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Sample records for glutamate dehydrogenase activity

  1. [Glutamate dehydrogenase activity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum in the presence of phytoregulators].

    PubMed

    Leonova, N O; Tytova, L V; Tantsiurenko, O V; Antypchuk, A F

    2006-01-01

    Influence of plant growth regulators ivin and emistim C, and flavonoids daidzein and quercetin on the glutamate dehydrogenase activity of soybean nodule bacteria, with contrasting symbiotic properties, were studied. It was shown that all used phytoregulators stimulated glutamate dehydrogenase activity of Bradyrhizobium japonicum 71t (the strain with highly efficient symbiotic properties) 1.2-4.9 times. Bradyrhizobium japonicum 21110 (the strain with inefficient symbiotic properties) diminished the enzyme activity in the presence of all phythoregulators except for ivin.

  2. Restricted feeding modulates the daily variations of liver glutamate dehydrogenase activity, expression, and histological location.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Martínez, Olivia; Méndez, Isabel; Turrubiate, Isaías; Valente-Godínez, Héctor; Pérez-Mendoza, Moisés; García-Tejada, Paola; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2017-05-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase is an important enzyme in the hepatic regulation of nitrogen and energy metabolism. It catalyzes one of the most relevant anaplerotic reactions. Although its relevance in liver homeostasis has been widely described, its daily pattern and responsiveness to restricted feeding protocols has not been studied. We explored the daily variations of liver glutamate dehydrogenase transcription, protein, activity, and histochemical and subcellular location in a protocol of daytime food synchronization in rats. Restricted feeding involved food access for 2 h each day for three weeks. Control groups included food ad libitum as well as acute fasting (21 h fasting) and refeeding (22 h fasting followed by 2 h of food access). Glutamate dehydrogenase mRNA, protein, activity, and histological location were measured every 3 h by qPCR, Western blot, spectrophotometry, and immunohistochemistry, respectively, to generate 24-h profiles. Restricted feeding promoted higher levels of mitochondrial glutamate dehydrogenase protein and activity, as well as a loss of 24-h rhythmicity, in comparison to ad libitum conditions. The rhythmicity of glutamate dehydrogenase activity detected in serum was changed. The data demonstrated that daytime restricted feeding enhanced glutamate dehydrogenase protein and activity levels in liver mitochondria, changed the rhythmicity of its mRNA and serum activity, but without effect in its expression in hepatocytes surrounding central and portal veins. These results could be related to the adaptation in nitrogen and energy metabolism that occurs in the liver during restricted feeding and the concomitant expression of the food entrainable oscillator. Impact statement For the first time, we are reporting the changes in daily rhythmicity of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) mRNA, protein and activity that occur in the liver during the expression of the food entrained oscillator (FEO). These results are part of the metabolic adaptations

  3. NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity is impaired in mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lack aconitase.

    PubMed

    González, A; Rodríguez, L; Olivera, H; Soberón, M

    1985-10-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking aconitase did not grow on minimal medium (MM) and had five- to tenfold less NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity than the wild-type, although its glutamine synthetase (GS) activity was still inducible. When this mutant was incubated with glutamate as the sole nitrogen source, the 2-oxoglutarate content rose, and the NADP+-dependent GDH activity increased. Furthermore, carbon-limited cultures showed a direct relation between NADP+-dependent GDH activity and the intracellular 2-oxoglutarate content. We propose that the low NADP+-dependent GDH activity found in the mutant was due to the lack of 2-oxoglutarate or some other intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

  4. Oxidation of Neurospora crassa NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase by activated oxygen species.

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, J; Rodríguez, R; Hansberg, W

    1989-01-01

    The glutamine synthetase and the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase activities of Neurospora crassa were lost in a culture without carbon source only when in the presence of air. Glutamine synthetase was previously reported to be liable to in vitro and in vivo inactivation by activated oxygen species. Here we report that NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase was remarkably stable in the presence of activated oxygen species but was rendered susceptible to oxidative inactivation when chelated iron was bound to the enzyme and either ascorbate or H2O2 reacted on the bound iron. This reaction gave rise to further modifications of the enzyme monomers by activated oxygen species, to partial dissociation of the oligomeric structure, and to precipitation and fragmentation of the enzyme. The in vitro oxidation reaction was affected by pH, temperature, and binding to the enzyme of NADPH. Heterogeneity in total charge was observed in the purified and immunoprecipitated enzymes, and the relative amounts of enzyme monomers with different isoelectric points changes with time of the oxidizing reaction. Images PMID:2530208

  5. Enzyme dynamics and activity: time-scale dependence of dynamical transitions in glutamate dehydrogenase solution.

    PubMed

    Daniel, R M; Finney, J L; Réat, V; Dunn, R; Ferrand, M; Smith, J C

    1999-10-01

    We have examined the temperature dependence of motions in a cryosolution of the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and compared these with activity. Dynamic neutron scattering was performed with two instruments of different energy resolution, permitting the separate determination of the average dynamical mean square displacements on the sub-approximately 100 ps and sub-approximately 5 ns time scales. The results demonstrate a marked dependence on the time scale of the temperature profile of the mean square displacement. The lowest temperature at which anharmonic motion is observed is heavily dependent on the time window of the instrument used to observe the dynamics. Several dynamical transitions (inflexions of the mean squared displacement) are observed in the slower dynamics. Comparison with the temperature profile of the activity of the enzyme in the same solvent reveals dynamical transitions that have no effect on GDH function.

  6. Estrogen modification of human glutamate dehydrogenases is linked to enzyme activation state.

    PubMed

    Borompokas, Nikolas; Papachatzaki, Maria-Martha; Kanavouras, Konstantinos; Mastorodemos, Vasileios; Zaganas, Ioannis; Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2010-10-08

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a housekeeping enzyme central to the metabolism of glutamate. Its activity is potently inhibited by GTP (IC(50) = 0.1-0.3 μM) and thought to be controlled by the need of the cell in ATP. Estrogens are also known to inhibit mammalian GDH, but at relatively high concentrations. Because, in addition to this housekeeping human (h) GDH1, humans have acquired via a duplication event an hGDH2 isoform expressed in human cortical astrocytes, we tested here the interaction of estrogens with the two human isoenzymes. The results showed that, under base-line conditions, diethylstilbestrol potently inhibited hGDH2 (IC(50) = 0.08 ± 0.01 μM) and with ∼18-fold lower affinity hGDH1 (IC(50) = 1.67 ± 0.06 μM; p < 0.001). Similarly, 17β-estradiol showed a ∼18-fold higher affinity for hGDH2 (IC(50) = 1.53 ± 0.24 μM) than for hGDH1 (IC(50) = 26.94 ± 1.07 μM; p < 0.001). Also, estriol and progesterone were more potent inhibitors of hGDH2 than hGDH1. Structure/function analyses revealed that the evolutionary R443S substitution, which confers low basal activity, was largely responsible for sensitivity of hGDH2 to estrogens. Inhibition of both human GDHs by estrogens was inversely related to their state of activation induced by ADP, with the slope of this correlation being steeper for hGDH2 than for hGDH1. Also, the study of hGDH1 and hGDH2 mutants displaying different states of activation revealed that the affinity of estrogen for these enzymes correlated inversely (R = 0.99; p = 0.0001) with basal catalytic activity. Because astrocytes are known to synthesize estrogens, these hormones, by interacting potently with hGDH2 in its closed state, may contribute to regulation of glutamate metabolism in brain.

  7. Determination of Glutamate Dehydrogenase Activity and Its Kinetics in Mouse Tissues using Metabolic Mapping (Quantitative Enzyme Histochemistry)

    PubMed Central

    Botman, Dennis; Tigchelaar, Wikky

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible conversion of glutamate into α-ketoglutarate with the concomitant reduction of NAD(P)+ to NAD(P)H or vice versa. GDH activity is subject to complex allosteric regulation including substrate inhibition. To determine GDH kinetics in situ, we assessed the effects of various glutamate concentrations in combination with either the coenzyme NAD+ or NADP+ on GDH activity in mouse liver cryostat sections using metabolic mapping. NAD+-dependent GDH Vmax was 2.5-fold higher than NADP+-dependent Vmax, whereas the Km was similar, 1.92 mM versus 1.66 mM, when NAD+ or NADP+ was used, respectively. With either coenzyme, Vmax was determined at 10 mM glutamate and substrate inhibition was observed at higher glutamate concentrations with a Ki of 12.2 and 3.95 for NAD+ and NADP+ used as coenzyme, respectively. NAD+- and NADP+-dependent GDH activities were examined in various mouse tissues. GDH activity was highest in liver and much lower in other tissues. In all tissues, the highest activity was found when NAD+ was used as a coenzyme. In conclusion, GDH activity in mice is highest in the liver with NAD+ as a coenzyme and highest GDH activity was determined at a glutamate concentration of 10 mM. PMID:25124006

  8. Further insights into the isoenzyme composition and activity of glutamate dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Bouton, Sophie; Pageau, Karine; Lea, Peter J.; Dubois, Frédéric; Hirel, Bertrand

    2013-01-01

    Following the discovery that in Arabidopsis, a third isoenzyme of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, we have re-examined the GDH isoenzyme composition. By analyzing the NADH-GDH isoenzyme composition of single, double and triple mutants deficient in the expression of the three genes encoding the enzyme, we have found that the α, β and γ polypeptides that comprise the enzyme can be assembled into a complex combination of heterohexamers in roots. Moreover, we observed that when one or two of the three root isoenzymes were missing from the mutants, the remaining isoenzymes compensated for this deficiency. The significance of such complexity is discussed in relation to the metabolic and signaling function of the NADH-GDH enzyme. Although it has been shown that a fourth gene encoding a NADPH-dependent enzyme is present in Arabidopsis, we were not able to detect corresponding enzyme activity, even in the triple mutant totally lacking NADH-GDH activity. PMID:23299333

  9. Inhibition by N'-nitrosonornicotine of the catalytic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase in alpha-ketoglutarate amination.

    PubMed

    Mao, You-An; Zhong, Ke-Jun; Wei, Wan-Zhi; Wei, Xin-Liang; Lu, Hong-Bing

    2005-02-01

    The effect of N'-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), one of the tobacco-specific nitrosamines, on the catalytic activity of glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) in the alpha-ketoglutarate amination, using reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as coenzyme, was studied by a chronoamperometric method. The maximum reaction rate of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction and the Michaelis-Menten constant, or the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant, were determined in the absence and presence of NNN. NNN remarkably inhibited the bio-catalysis activity of GLDH, and was a reversible competitive inhibitior with K(i), estimated as 199 micromol l(-1) at 25 degrees C and pH 8.0.

  10. Green Tea Polyphenols Control Dysregulated Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Transgenic Mice by Hijacking the ADP Activation Site

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changhong; Li, Ming; Chen, Pan; Narayan, Srinivas; Matschinsky, Franz M.; Bennett, Michael J.; Stanley, Charles A.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2012-05-09

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate and, in animals, is extensively regulated by a number of metabolites. Gain of function mutations in GDH that abrogate GTP inhibition cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HHS), resulting in increased pancreatic {beta}-cell responsiveness to leucine and susceptibility to hypoglycemia following high protein meals. We have previously shown that two of the polyphenols from green tea (epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate (ECG)) inhibit GDH in vitro and that EGCG blocks GDH-mediated insulin secretion in wild type rat islets. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that ECG binds to the same site as the allosteric regulator, ADP. Perifusion assays using pancreatic islets from transgenic mice expressing a human HHS form of GDH demonstrate that the hyperresponse to glutamine caused by dysregulated GDH is blocked by the addition of EGCG. As observed in HHS patients, these transgenic mice are hypersensitive to amino acid feeding, and this is abrogated by oral administration of EGCG prior to challenge. Finally, the low basal blood glucose level in the HHS mouse model is improved upon chronic administration of EGCG. These results suggest that this common natural product or some derivative thereof may prove useful in controlling this genetic disorder. Of broader clinical implication is that other groups have shown that restriction of glutamine catabolism via these GDH inhibitors can be useful in treating various tumors. This HHS transgenic mouse model offers a highly useful means to test these agents in vivo.

  11. Subunit assembly and active site location in the structure of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Baker, P J; Britton, K L; Engel, P C; Farrants, G W; Lilley, K S; Rice, D W; Stillman, T J

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional crystal structure of the NAD(+)-linked glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum has been solved to 1.96 A resolution by a combination of isomorphous replacement and molecular averaging and refined to a conventional crystallographic R factor of 0.227. Each subunit in this multimeric enzyme is organised into two domains separated by a deep cleft. One domain directs the self-assembly of the molecule into a hexameric oligomer with 32 symmetry. The other domain is structurally similar to the classical dinucleotide binding fold but with the direction of one of the strands reversed. Difference Fourier analysis on the binary complex of the enzyme with NAD+ shows that the dinucleotide is bound in an extended conformation with the nicotinamide moiety deep in the cleft between the two domains. Hydrogen bonds between the carboxyamide group of the nicotinamide ring and the side chains of T209 and N240, residues conserved in all hexameric GDH sequences, provide a positive selection for the syn conformer of this ring. This results in a molecular arrangement in which the A face of the nicotinamide ring is buried against the enzyme surface and the B face is exposed, adjacent to a striking cluster of conserved residues including K89, K113, and K125. Modeling studies, correlated with chemical modification data, have implicated this region as the glutamate/2-oxoglutarate binding site and provide an explanation at the molecular level for the B type stereospecificity of the hydride transfer of GDH during the catalytic cycle.

  12. Kinetic studies of dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Electricwala, A H; Dickinson, F M

    1979-01-01

    Initial-rate studies were made of the oxidation of L-glutamate by NAD+ and NADP+ catalysed by highly purified preparations of dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase. With NAD+ as coenzyme the kinetics show the same features of coenzyme activation as seen with the bovine liver enzyme [Engel & Dalziel (1969) Biochem. J. 115, 621--631]. With NADP+ as coenzyme, initial rates are much slower than with NAD+, and Lineweaver--Burk plots are linear over extended ranges of substrate and coenzyme concentration. Stopped-flow studies with NADP+ as coenzyme give no evidence for the accumulation of significant concentrations of NADPH-containing complexes with the enzyme in the steady state. Protection studies against inactivation by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate indicate that NAD+ and NADP+ give the same degree of protection in the presence of sodium glutarate. The results are used to deduce information about the mechanism of glutamate oxidation by the enzyme. Initial-rate studies of the reductive amination of 2-oxoglutarate by NADH and NADPH catalysed by dogfish liver glutamate dehydrogenase showed that the kinetic features of the reaction are very similar with both coenzymes, but reactions with NADH are much faster. The data show that a number of possible mechanisms for the reaction may be discarded, including the compulsory mechanism (previously proposed for the enzyme) in which the sequence of binding is NAD(P)H, NH4+ and 2-oxoglutarate. The kinetic data suggest either a rapid-equilibrium random mechanism or the compulsory mechanism with the binding sequence NH4+, NAD(P)H, 2-oxoglutarate. However, binding studies and protection studies indicate that coenzyme and 2-oxoglutarate do bind to the free enzyme. PMID:35153

  13. Mixed Disulfide Formation at Cys141 Leads to Apparent Unidirectional Attenuation of Aspergillus niger NADP-Glutamate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Walvekar, Adhish S.; Choudhury, Rajarshi; Punekar, Narayan S.

    2014-01-01

    NADP-Glutamate dehydrogenase from Aspergillus niger (AnGDH) exhibits sigmoid 2-oxoglutarate saturation. Incubation with 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide (2-HED, the disulfide of 2-mercaptoethanol) resulted in preferential attenuation of AnGDH reductive amination (forward) activity but with a negligible effect on oxidative deamination (reverse) activity, when monitored in the described standard assay. Such a disulfide modified AnGDH displaying less than 1.0% forward reaction rate could be isolated after 2-HED treatment. This unique forward inhibited GDH form (FIGDH), resembling a hypothetical ‘one-way’ active enzyme, was characterized. Kinetics of 2-HED mediated inhibition and protein thiol titrations suggested that a single thiol group is modified in FIGDH. Two site-directed cysteine mutants, C141S and C415S, were constructed to identify the relevant thiol in FIGDH. The forward activity of C141S alone was insensitive to 2-HED, implicating Cys141 in FIGDH formation. It was observed that FIGDH displayed maximal reaction rate only after a pre-incubation with 2-oxoglutarate and NADPH. In addition, compared to the native enzyme, FIGDH showed a four fold increase in K0.5 for 2-oxoglutarate and a two fold increase in the Michaelis constants for ammonium and NADPH. With no change in the GDH reaction equilibrium constant, the FIGDH catalyzed rate of approach to equilibrium from reductive amination side was sluggish. Altered kinetic properties of FIGDH at least partly account for the observed apparent loss of forward activity when monitored under defined assay conditions. In sum, although Cys141 is catalytically not essential, its covalent modification provides a striking example of converting the biosynthetic AnGDH into a catabolic enzyme. PMID:24987966

  14. Regional development of glutamate dehydrogenase in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Leong, S F; Clark, J B

    1984-07-01

    The development of glutamate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in rat brain regions has been followed from the late foetal stage to the adult and through to the aged (greater than 2 years) adult. In the adult brain the enzyme activity was greatest in the medulla oblongata and pons greater than midbrain = hypothalamus greater than cerebellum = striatum = cortex. In the aged adult brain, glutamate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in the medulla oblongata and pons when compared to the 90-day-old adult value, but not in other regions. The enzyme-specific activity of nonsynaptic (free) mitochondria purified from the medulla oblongata and pons of 90-day-old animals was about twice that of mitochondria purified from the striatum and the cortex. The specific activity of the enzyme in synaptic mitochondria purified from the above three brain regions, however, remained almost constant.

  15. Fate of glutamate carbon and nitrogen in isolated guinea-pig kidney-cortex tubules. Evidence for involvement of glutamate dehydrogenase in glutamine sythesis from glutamate.

    PubMed

    Baverel, G; Genoux, C; Forissier, M; Pellet, M

    1980-06-15

    1. The pathways and the fate of glutamate carbon and nitrogen were investigated in isolated guinea-pig kidney-cortex tubules. 2. At low glutamate concentration (1 mM), the glutamate carbon skeleton was either completely oxidized or converted into glutamine. At high glutamate concentration (5 mM), glucose, lactate and alanine were additional products of glutamate metabolism. 3. At neither concentration of glutamate was there accumulation of ammonia. 4. Nitrogen-balance calculations and the release of 14CO2 from L-[1-14C]glutamate (which gives an estimation of the flux of glutamate carbon skeleton through alpha-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase) clearly indicated that, despite the absence of ammonia accumulation, glutamate metabolism was initiated by the action of glutamate dehydrogenase and not by transamination reactions as suggested by Klahr, Schoolwerth & Bourgoignie [(1972) Am. J. Physiol. 222, 813-820] and Preuss [(1972) Am. J. Physiol. 222, 1395-1397]. Additional evidence for this was obtained by the use of (i) amino-oxyacetate, an inhibitor of transaminases, which did not decrease glutamate removal, or (ii) L-methionine DL-sulphoximine, an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, which caused an accumulation of ammonia from glutamate. 5. Addition of NH4Cl plus glutamate caused an increase in both glutamate removal and glutamine synthesis, demonstrating that the supply of ammonia via glutamate dehydrogenase is the rate-limiting step in glutamine formation from glutamate. NH4Cl also inhibited the flux of glutamate through glutamate dehydrogenase and the formation of glucose, alanine and lactate. 6. The activities of enzymes possibly involved in the glutamate conversion into pyruvate were measured in guinea-pig renal cortex. 7. Renal arteriovenous-difference measurements revealed that in vivo the guinea-pig kidney adds glutamine and alanine to the circulating blood.

  16. Spectra of glutamate dehydrogenase with diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Hillar, M

    1978-02-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase displays hyperchromicity at 256 nm and at 276 nm upon binding of diethylstilbestrol. Increase in absorbancy is linear at both regions up to 250 micrometer DES, and becomes parabolic at higher concentration of DES. ADP in the presence of DES causes decrease in absorbancy at 256 nm; absorbancy at 276 nm increased by DES is not affected by ADP. DES prevents spectral effects produced by GTP (decrease in absorbancy at 254 nm and at 276 nm). ADP still decreases absorbancy at 254 nm, leaving the 276 nm region unchanged. ADP enhances spectral effects produced by GTP. GTP, however, prevents changes produced by ADP.

  17. A mechanism of sulfite neurotoxicity: direct inhibition of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Vincent, Annette Shoba; Halliwell, Barry; Wong, Kim Ping

    2004-10-08

    Exposure of Neuro-2a and PC12 cells to micromolar concentrations of sulfite caused an increase in reactive oxygen species and a decrease in ATP. Likewise, the biosynthesis of ATP in intact rat brain mitochondria from the oxidation of glutamate was inhibited by micromolar sulfite. Glutamate-driven respiration increased the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), and this was abolished by sulfite but the MMP generated by oxidation of malate and succinate was not affected. The increased rate of production of NADH from exogenous NAD+ and glutamate added to rat brain mitochondrial extracts was inhibited by sulfite, and mitochondria preincubated with sulfite failed to reduce NAD+. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) in rat brain mitochondrial extract was inhibited dose-dependently by sulfite as was the activity of a purified enzyme. An increase in the Km (glutamate) and a decrease in Vmax resulting in an attenuation in Vmax/Km (glutamate) at 100 microm sulfite suggest a mixed type of inhibition. However, uncompetitive inhibition was noted with decreases in both Km (NAD+) and Vmax, whereas Vmax/Km (NAD+) remained relatively constant. We propose that GDH is one target of action of sulfite, leading to a decrease in alpha-ketoglutarate and a diminished flux through the tricarboxylic acid cycle accompanied by a decrease in NADH through the mitochondrial electron transport chain, a decreased MMP, and a decrease in ATP synthesis. Because glutamate is a major metabolite in the brain, inhibition of GDH by sulfite could contribute to the severe phenotype of sulfite oxidase deficiency in human infants.

  18. Glucose replaces glutamate as energy substrate to fuel glutamate uptake in glutamate dehydrogenase-deficient astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nissen, Jakob D; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-07-01

    Cultured astrocytes treated with siRNA to knock down glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were used to investigate whether this enzyme is important for the utilization of glutamate as an energy substrate. By incubation of these cells in media containing different concentrations of glutamate (range 100-500 µM) in the presence or in the absence of glucose, the metabolism of these substrates was studied by using tritiated glutamate or 2-deoxyglucose as tracers. In addition, the cellular contents of glutamate and ATP were determined. The astrocytes were able to maintain physiological levels of ATP regardless of the expression level of GDH and the incubation condition, indicating a high degree of flexibility with regard to regulatory mechanisms involved in maintaining an adequate energy level in the cells. Glutamate uptake was found to be increased in these cells when exposed to increasing levels of extracellular glutamate independently of the GDH expression level. Moreover, increased intracellular glutamate content was observed in the GDH-deficient cells after a 2-hr incubation in the presence of 100 µM glutamate. It is significant that GDH-deficient cells exhibited an increased utilization of glucose in the presence of 250 and 500 µM glutamate, monitored as an increase in the accumulation of tritiated 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate. These findings underscore the importance of the expression level of GDH for the ability to utilize glutamate as an energy source fueling its own energy-requiring uptake.

  19. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids.

  20. Role of NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S M; Magasanik, B

    1990-01-01

    We cloned GDH2, the gene that encodes the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, by purifying the enzyme, making polyclonal antibodies to it, and using the antibodies to screen a lambda gt11 yeast genomic library. A yeast strain with a deletion-disruption allele of GDH2 which replaced the wild-type gene grew very poorly with glutamate as a nitrogen source, but growth improved significantly when the strain was also provided with adenine or other nitrogenous compounds whose biosynthesis requires glutamine. Our results indicate that the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase catalyzes the major, but not sole, pathway for generation of ammonia from glutamate. We also isolated yeast mutants that lacked glutamate synthase activity and present evidence which shows that normally NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase is not involved in glutamate biosynthesis, but that if the enzyme is overexpressed, it may function reversibly in intact cells. PMID:1975578

  1. ¹³C-metabolic enrichment of glutamate in glutamate dehydrogenase mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yijin; Sieg, Alex; Trotter, Pamela J

    2011-10-20

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH) interconvert α-ketoglutarate and glutamate. In yeast, NADP-dependent enzymes, encoded by GDH1 and GDH3, are reported to synthesize glutamate from α-ketoglutarate, while an NAD-dependent enzyme, encoded by GDH2, catalyzes the reverse. Cells were grown in acetate/raffinose (YNAceRaf) to examine the role(s) of these enzymes during aerobic metabolism. In YNAceRaf the doubling time of wild type, gdh2Δ, and gdh3Δ cells was comparable at ∼4 h. NADP-dependent GDH activity (Gdh1p+Gdh3p) in wild type, gdh2Δ, and gdh3Δ was decreased ∼80% and NAD-dependent activity (Gdh2p) in wild type and gdh3Δ was increased ∼20-fold in YNAceRaf as compared to glucose. Cells carrying the gdh1Δ allele did not divide in YNAceRaf, yet both the NADP-dependent (Gdh3p) and NAD-dependent (Gdh2p) GDH activity was ∼3-fold higher than in glucose. Metabolism of [1,2-(13)C]-acetate and analysis of carbon NMR spectra were used to examine glutamate metabolism. Incorporation of (13)C into glutamate was nearly undetectable in gdh1Δ cells, reflecting a GDH activity at <15% of wild type. Analysis of (13)C-enrichment of glutamate carbons indicates a decreased rate of glutamate biosynthesis from acetate in gdh2Δ and gdh3Δ strains as compared to wild type. Further, the relative complexity of (13)C-isotopomers at early time points was noticeably greater in gdh3Δ as compared to wild type and gdh2Δ cells. These in vivo data show that Gdh1p is the primary GDH enzyme and Gdh2p and Gdh3p play evident roles during aerobic glutamate metabolism.

  2. Crystal structure of a chimaeric bacterial glutamate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Tânia; Sharkey, Michael A.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2016-05-23

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2–4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD(P)+as a cofactor. The bacterial enzymes are hexameric, arranged with 32 symmetry, and each polypeptide consists of an N-terminal substrate-binding segment (domain I) followed by a C-terminal cofactor-binding segment (domain II). The catalytic reaction takes place in the cleft formed at the junction of the two domains. Distinct signature sequences in the nucleotide-binding domain have been linked to the binding of NAD+versusNADP+, but they are not unambiguous predictors of cofactor preference. In the absence of substrate, the two domains move apart as rigid bodies, as shown by the apo structure of glutamate dehydrogenase fromClostridium symbiosum. Here, the crystal structure of a chimaeric clostridial/Escherichia colienzyme has been determined in the apo state. The enzyme is fully functional and reveals possible determinants of interdomain flexibility at a hinge region following the pivot helix. The enzyme retains the preference for NADP+cofactor from the parentE. colidomain II, although there are subtle differences in catalytic activity.

  3. Desensitization of glutamate dehydrogenase by reaction of tyrosne residues.

    PubMed

    Price, N C; Radda, G K

    1969-09-01

    1. The reaction of glutamate dehydrogenase with N-acetylimidazole and with tetranitromethane leads to modification of tyrosine residues. 2. Modification of 1 tyrosine residue/subunit does not affect the enzymic activity but decreases the response of the enzyme to the allosteric inhibitor, GTP. 3. The physical properties of the enzyme (sedimentation coefficient and optical rotatory dispersion) remain unaltered. 4. GTP partially protects against desensitization. 5. The diminished responses of the modified enzymes to GTP are also detected by using the fluorescence of 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate as a conformational probe. 6. Difficulties that generally arise in chemical modifications from inhomogeneous distributions of products are discussed.

  4. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in mammalian ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyzes the reversible inter-conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia. High levels of GDH activity is found in mammalian liver, kidney, brain, and pancreas. In the liver, GDH reaction appears to be close-to-equilibrium, providing the appropriate ratio of ammonia and amino acids for urea synthesis in periportal hepatocytes. In addition, GDH produces glutamate for glutamine synthesis in a small rim of pericentral hepatocytes. Hence, hepatic GDH can be either a source for ammonia or an ammonia scavenger. In the kidney, GDH function produces ammonia from glutamate to control acidosis. In the human, the presence of two differentially regulated isoforms (hGDH1 and hGDH2) suggests a complex role for GDH in ammonia homeostasis. Whereas hGDH1 is sensitive to GTP inhibition, hGDH2 has dissociated its function from GTP control. Furthermore, hGDH2 shows a lower optimal pH than hGDH1. The hGDH2 enzyme is selectively expressed in human astrocytes and Sertoli cells, probably facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential for their supportive role. Here, we report that hGDH2 is also expressed in the epithelial cells lining the convoluted tubules of the renal cortex. As hGDH2 functions more efficiently under acidotic conditions without the operation of the GTP energy switch, its presence in the kidney may increase the efficacy of the organ to maintain acid base equilibrium.

  5. Computational design of glutamate dehydrogenase in Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Li; Wang, Jia-Le; Hu, Yu; Qian, Bing-Jun; Yao, Xiao-Min; Wang, Jing-Fang; Zhang, Jian-Hua

    2013-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis natto is widely used in industry to produce natto, a traditional and popular Japanese soybean food. However, during its secondary fermentation, high amounts of ammonia are released to give a negative influence on the flavor of natto. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a key enzyme for the ammonia produced and released, because it catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate using NAD(+) or NADP(+) as co-factor during carbon and nitrogen metabolism processes. To solve this problem, we employed multiple computational methods model and re-design GDH from Bacillus subtilis natto. Firstly, a structure model of GDH with cofactor NADP(+) was constructed by threading and ab initio modeling. Then the substrate glutamate were flexibly docked into the structure model to form the substrate-binding mode. According to the structural analysis of the substrate-binding mode, Lys80, Lys116, Arg196, Thr200, and Ser351 in the active site were found could form a significant hydrogen bonding network with the substrate, which was thought to play a crucial role in the substrate recognition and position. Thus, these residues were then mutated into other amino acids, and the substrate binding affinities for each mutant were calculated. Finally, three single mutants (K80A, K116Q, and S351A) were found to have significant decrease in the substrate binding affinities, which was further supported by our biochemical experiments.

  6. Glutamate dehydrogenase activator BCH stimulating reductive amination prevents high fat/high fructose diet-induced steatohepatitis and hyperglycemia in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Jin; Choi, Sung-E; Yi, Sang-A; Jung, Jong Gab; Jung, Ik-Rak; Shin, Maureen; Kang, Seok; Oh, Hyunhee; Kim, Hae Jin; Kim, Dae Jung; Kwon, Ji Eun; Choi, Cheol Soo; Lee, Kwan Woo; Kang, Yup

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) induced by high calorie western diet are characterized by enhanced lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Stimulation of reductive amination may shift tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism for lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis toward glutamate synthesis with increase of NAD+/NADH ratio and thus, ameliorate high calorie diet-induced fatty liver and hyperglycemia. Stimulation of reductive amination through glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activator 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH) reduced both de novo lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis but increased the activities of sirtuins and AMP-activated kinase in primary hepatocytes. Long-term BCH treatment improved most metabolic alterations induced by high fat/high fructose (HF/HFr) diet in C57BL/6J mice. BCH prevented HF/HFr-induced fat accumulation and activation of stress/inflammation signals such as phospho-JNK, phospho-PERK, phospho-p38, and phospho-NFκB in liver tissues. Furthermore, BCH treatment reduced the expression levels of inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β in HF/HFr-fed mouse liver. BCH also reduced liver collagen and plasma levels of alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase. On the other hand, BCH significantly improved fasting hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance in HF/HFr-fed mice. In conclusion, stimulation of reductive amination through GDH activation can be used as a strategy to prevent high calorie western diet-induced NAFLD and T2D. PMID:27874078

  7. NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase activity in nonstarter lactic acid bacteria: effects of temperature, pH and NaCl on enzyme activity and expression.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, M; Calasso, M; Di Cagno, R; Siragusa, S; Minervini, F; Gobbetti, M

    2010-11-01

    To screen the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity of nonstarter lactic acid bacteria (NSLAB) and to determine the effects of temperature, pH and NaCl values used for cheese ripening on enzyme activity and expression of GDH gene. A subcellular fractionation protocol and specific enzyme assays were used. The effect of temperature, pH and NaCl on enzyme activity was evaluated. The expression of GDH gene was monitored by real-time PCR. One selected strain was also used as adjunct starter for cheese making to evaluate the catabolism of free amino acids and the production of volatile organic compounds (VOC) during cheese ripening. The cytoplasm fraction of all strains showed in vitro NADP-dependent GDH activity. NADP-GDH activity was markedly strain dependent and varied according to the interactions between temperature, pH and NaCl. Lactobacillus plantarum DPPMA49 showed the highest NADP-GDH activity under temperature, pH and NaCl values found during cheese ripening. RT-PCR analysis revealed that GDH expression of Lact. plantarum DPPMA49 was down-expressed by low temperature (<13°C) and over-expressed by NaCl (1·87-5·62%). According to NADP-GDH activity, the highest level of VOC (alcohols, aldehydes, miscellaneous and carboxylic acids) was found in cheeses made with DPPMA49. The results of this study may be considered as an example of the influence of temperature, pH and NaCl on enzyme activity and expression of functional genes, such as GDH, in cheese-related bacteria. It focuses on the phenotypic and molecular characterization of the NADP-GDH in lactobacilli under cheese-ripening conditions. The findings of this study contribute to the knowledge about enzymes involved in the catabolism of amino acids, to be used as an important selection trait for cheese strains. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Regulation of insulin release by factors that also modify glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Fahien, L A; MacDonald, M J; Kmiotek, E H; Mertz, R J; Fahien, C M

    1988-09-25

    Leucine and monomethyl succinate initiate insulin release, and glutamine potentiates leucine-induced insulin release. Alanine enhances and malate inhibits leucine plus glutamine-induced insulin release. The insulinotropic effect of leucine is at least in part secondary to its ability to activate glutamate oxidation by glutamate dehydrogenase (Sener, A., Malaisse-Lagae, F., and Malaisse, W. J. (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 78, 5460-5464). The effect of these other amino acids or Krebs cycle intermediates on insulin release also correlates with their effects on glutamate dehydrogenase and their ability to regulate inhibition of this enzyme by alpha-ketoglutarate. For example, glutamine enhances insulin release and islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity only in the presence of leucine. This could be because leucine, especially in the presence of alpha-ketoglutarate, increases the Km of glutamate and converts alpha-ketoglutarate from a noncompetitive to a competitive inhibitor of glutamate. Thus, in the presence of leucine, this enzyme is more responsive to high levels of glutamate and less responsive to inhibition by alpha-ketoglutarate. Malate could decrease and alanine could increase insulin release because malate increases the generation of alpha-ketoglutarate in islet mitochondria via the combined malate dehydrogenase-aspartate aminotransferase reaction, and alanine could decrease the level of alpha-ketoglutarate via the alanine transaminase reaction. Monomethyl succinate alone is as stimulatory of insulin release as leucine alone, and glutamine enhances the action of both. Succinyl coenzyme A, leucine, and GTP are all bound in the same region on glutamate dehydrogenase, where GTP is a potent inhibitor and succinyl coenzyme A and leucine are comparable activators. Thus, the insulinotropic properties of monomethyl succinate could result from it increasing the level of succinyl coenzyme A and decreasing the level of GTP via the succinate thiokinase reaction.

  9. Calcium regulates glutamate dehydrogenase and poly-γ-glutamic acid synthesis in Bacillus natto.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yonghong; Dong, Guiru; Zhang, Chen; Ren, Yuanyuan; Qu, Yuling; Chen, Weifeng

    2016-04-01

    To study the effect of Ca(2+) on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and its role in poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) synthesis in Bacillus natto HSF 1410. When the concentration of Ca(2+) varied from 0 to 0.1 g/l in the growth medium of B. natto HSF 1410, γ-PGA production increased from 6.8 to 9.7 g/l, while GDH specific activity and NH4Cl consumption improved from 183 to 295 U/mg and from 0.65 to 0.77 g/l, respectively. GDH with α-ketoglutarate as substrate primarily used NADPH as coenzyme with a K m of 0.08 mM. GDH was responsible for the synthesis of endogenous glutamate. The specific activity of GDH remained essentially unchanged in the presence of CaCl2 (0.05-0.2 g/l) in vitro. However, the specific activity of GDH and its expression was significantly increased by CaCl2 in vivo. Therefore, the regulation of GDH and PGA synthesis by Ca(2+) is an intracellular process. Calcium regulation may be an effective approach for producing γ-PGA on an industrial scale.

  10. Regulation of synthesis of glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase in micro-organisms

    PubMed Central

    Pateman, J. A.

    1969-01-01

    1. Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa and Escherichia coli were grown on media containing a range of concentrations of nitrate, or ammonia, or urea, or l-glutamate, or l-glutamine as the sole source of nitrogen and the glutamate dehydrogenate and glutamine synthetase of the cells measured. 2. Aspergillus, Neurospora and Escherichia coli cells, grown on l-glutamate or on high concentrations of ammonia or on high concentrations of urea, possessed low glutamate dehydrogenase activity compared with cells grown on other nitrogen sources. 3. Aspergillus, Neurospora and Escherichia coli cells grown on l-glutamate possessed high glutamine synthetase activity compared with cells grown on other nitrogen sources. 4. The hypothesis is proposed that in Aspergillus, Neurospora and Escherichia coli l-glutamate represses the synthesis of glutamate dehydrogenase and l-glutamine represses the synthesis of glutamine synthetase. 5. A comparison of the glutamine-synthesizing activity and the γ-glutamyltransferase activity of glutamine synthetase in Aspergillus and Neurospora gave no indication that these fungi produce different forms of glutamine synthetase when grown on ammonia or l-glutamate as nitrogen sources. PMID:4901826

  11. Regulation of synthesis of glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase in micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Pateman, J A

    1969-12-01

    1. Aspergillus nidulans, Neurospora crassa and Escherichia coli were grown on media containing a range of concentrations of nitrate, or ammonia, or urea, or l-glutamate, or l-glutamine as the sole source of nitrogen and the glutamate dehydrogenate and glutamine synthetase of the cells measured. 2. Aspergillus, Neurospora and Escherichia coli cells, grown on l-glutamate or on high concentrations of ammonia or on high concentrations of urea, possessed low glutamate dehydrogenase activity compared with cells grown on other nitrogen sources. 3. Aspergillus, Neurospora and Escherichia coli cells grown on l-glutamate possessed high glutamine synthetase activity compared with cells grown on other nitrogen sources. 4. The hypothesis is proposed that in Aspergillus, Neurospora and Escherichia colil-glutamate represses the synthesis of glutamate dehydrogenase and l-glutamine represses the synthesis of glutamine synthetase. 5. A comparison of the glutamine-synthesizing activity and the gamma-glutamyltransferase activity of glutamine synthetase in Aspergillus and Neurospora gave no indication that these fungi produce different forms of glutamine synthetase when grown on ammonia or l-glutamate as nitrogen sources.

  12. Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 and SIRT4 regulate glial development.

    PubMed

    Komlos, Daniel; Mann, Kara D; Zhuo, Yue; Ricupero, Christopher L; Hart, Ronald P; Liu, Alice Y-C; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2013-03-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HI/HA) syndrome is caused by an activation mutation of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1), a mitochondrial enzyme responsible for the reversible interconversion between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate. The syndrome presents clinically with hyperammonemia, significant episodic hypoglycemia, seizures, and frequent incidences of developmental and learning defects. Clinical research has implicated that although some of the developmental and neurological defects may be attributed to hypoglycemia, some characteristics cannot be ascribed to low glucose and as hyperammonemia is generally mild and asymptomatic, there exists the possibility that altered GDH1 activity within the brain leads to some clinical changes. GDH1 is allosterically regulated by many factors, and has been shown to be inhibited by the ADP-ribosyltransferase sirtuin 4 (SIRT4), a mitochondrially localized sirtuin. Here we show that SIRT4 is localized to mitochondria within the brain. SIRT4 is highly expressed in glial cells, specifically astrocytes, in the postnatal brain and in radial glia during embryogenesis. Furthermore, SIRT4 protein decreases in expression during development. We show that factors known to allosterically regulate GDH1 alter gliogenesis in CTX8 cells, a novel radial glial cell line. We find that SIRT4 and GDH1 overexpression play antagonistic roles in regulating gliogenesis and that a mutant variant of GDH1 found in HI/HA patients accelerates the development of glia from cultured radial glia cells.

  13. Biochemical and structural characterization of Plasmodium falciparum glutamate dehydrogenase 2.

    PubMed

    Zocher, Kathleen; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Kehr, Sebastian; Fischer, Marina; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja

    2012-05-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDHs) play key roles in cellular redox, amino acid, and energy metabolism, thus representing potential targets for pharmacological interventions. Here we studied the functional network provided by the three known glutamate dehydrogenases of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The recombinant production of the previously described PfGDH1 as hexahistidyl-tagged proteins was optimized. Additionally, PfGDH2 was cloned, recombinantly produced, and characterized. Like PfGDH1, PfGDH2 is an NADP(H)-dependent enzyme with a specific activity comparable to PfGDH1 but with slightly higher K(m) values for its substrates. The three-dimensional structure of hexameric PfGDH2 was solved to 3.1 Å resolution. The overall structure shows high similarity with PfGDH1 but with significant differences occurring at the subunit interface. As in mammalian GDH1, in PfGDH2 the subunit-subunit interactions are mainly assisted by hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions, whereas in PfGDH1 these contacts are mediated by networks of salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. In accordance with this, the known bovine GDH inhibitors hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol were more effective on PfGDH2 than on PfGDH1. Subcellular localization was determined for all three plasmodial GDHs by fusion with the green fluorescent protein. Based on our data, PfGDH1 and PfGDH3 are cytosolic proteins whereas PfGDH2 clearly localizes to the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle specific for apicomplexan parasites. This study provides new insights into the structure and function of GDH isoenzymes of P. falciparum, which represent potential targets for the development of novel antimalarial drugs.

  14. Asparaginyl deamidation in two glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    DeLuna, Alexander; Quezada, Héctor; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; González, Alicia

    2005-03-25

    The non-enzymatic deamidation of asparaginyl residues is a major source of spontaneous damage of several proteins under physiological conditions. In many cases, deamidation and isoaspartyl formation alters the biological activity or stability of the native polypeptide. Rates of deamidation of particular residues depend on many factors including protein structure and solvent exposure. Here, we investigated the spontaneous deamidation of the two NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which have different kinetic properties and are differentially expressed in this yeast. Our results show that Asn54, present in Gdh3p but missing in the GDH1-encoded homologue, is readily deamidated in vitro under alkaline conditions. Relative to the native enzyme, deamidated Gdh3p shows reduced protein stability. The different deamidation rates of the two isoenzymes could explain to some extent, the relative in vivo instability of the allosteric Gdh3p enzyme, compared to that of Gdh1p. It is thus possible that spontaneous asparaginyl modification could play a role in the metabolic regulation of ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis.

  15. Differential Role of Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Nitrogen Metabolism of Maize Tissues 1

    PubMed Central

    Loyola-Vargas, Victor Manuel; de Jimenez, Estela Sanchez

    1984-01-01

    Both calli and plantlets of maize (Zea mays L. var Tuxpeño 1) were exposed to specific nitrogen sources, and the aminative (NADH) and deaminative (NAD+) glutamate dehydrogenase activities were measured at various periods of time in homogenates of calli, roots, and leaves. A differential effect of the nitrogen sources on the tissues tested was observed. In callus tissue, glutamate, ammonium, and urea inhibited glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity. The amination and deamination reactions also showed different ratios of activity under different nitrogen sources. In roots, ammonium and glutamine produced an increase in GDH-NADH activity whereas the same metabolites were inhibitory of this activity in leaves. These data suggest the presence of isoenzymes or conformers of GDH, specific for each tissue, whose activities vary depending on the nutritional requirements of the tissue and the state of differentiation. PMID:16663876

  16. Stress-induced changes in glutamate dehydrogenase activity imply its role in adaptation to C and N metabolism in lupine embryos.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Teresa; Skrok, Albert; Dabert, Mirosława

    2010-01-01

    The modifying effect of sucrose on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity and isoenzyme pattern was investigated in isolated embryos of lupine (Lupinus luteus L.), cultured in vitro in a medium with sucrose (+S) or without sucrose (-S) and exposed to cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) stress. Sucrose starvation of lupine embryos led to a rapid increase in the specific activity of GDH, immunoreactive beta-polypeptide and it was accompanied by appearance of new cathodal isoforms of enzyme. This suggests that isoenzymes induced in lupine embryos by sucrose starvation combine into GDH hexamers with the predominance of beta-GDH subunits synthetized under GDH1 gene control. The addition of sucrose to the medium caused an opposite effect. Along with upregulation of catabolic activity of GDH by sucrose starvation, activity of proteolytic enzymes was also induced. These data can point to regulatory mechanism implying a sucrose dependent repression of the GDH1 gene according to the mechanism of catabolic repression. Treatment of embryos with Cd(2+) or Pb(2+) resulted in ammonium accumulation in the tissues, accompanied by an increase in anabolic activity of GDH and activity of anodal isoenzymes, in both (+S) and (-S) embryos without new de novo synthesis of alpha subunit proteins. Thus, GDH isoenzyme profiles may reflect the physiological function of GDH, which appears to be an important link of metabolic adaptation in cells, aimed at using carbon sources other than sugar during carbohydrate starvation (catabolic activity of GDH) and protecting plant tissues against ammonium accumulated because of heavy metal stress (anabolic activity of GDH).

  17. Structural relationship between the hexameric and tetrameric family of glutamate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Britton, K L; Baker, P J; Rice, D W; Stillman, T J

    1992-11-01

    The family of glutamate dehydrogenases include a group of hexameric oligomers with a subunit M(r) of around 50,000, which are closely related in amino acid sequence and a smaller group of tetrameric oligomers based on a much larger subunit with M(r) 115,000. Sequence comparisons have indicated a low level of similarity between the C-terminal portion of the tetrameric enzymes and a substantial region of the polypeptide chain for the more widespread hexameric glutamate dehydrogenases. In the light of the solution of the three-dimensional structure of the hexameric NAD(+)-linked glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium symbiosum, we have undertaken a detailed examination of the alignment of the sequence for the C-terminal domain of the tetrameric Neurospora crassa glutamate dehydrogenase against the sequence and the molecular structure of that from C. symbiosum. This analysis reveals that the residues conserved between these two families are clustered in the three-dimensional structure and points to a remarkably similar layout of the glutamate-binding site and the active-site pocket, though with some differences in the mode of recognition of the nucleotide cofactor.

  18. GDH3 encodes a glutamate dehydrogenase isozyme, a previously unrecognized route for glutamate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, A; Deluna, A; Olivera, H; Valenzuela, L; Gonzalez, A

    1997-09-01

    It has been considered that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, like many other microorganisms, synthesizes glutamate through the action of NADP+-glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+-GDH), encoded by GDH1, or through the combined action of glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase (GOGAT), encoded by GLN1 and GLT1, respectively. A double mutant of S. cerevisiae lacking NADP+-GDH and GOGAT activities was constructed. This strain was able to grow on ammonium as the sole nitrogen source and thus to synthesize glutamate through an alternative pathway. A computer search for similarities between the GDH1 nucleotide sequence and the complete yeast genome was carried out. In addition to identifying its cognate sequence at chromosome XIV, the search found that GDH1 showed high identity with a previously recognized open reading frame (GDH3) of chromosome I. Triple mutants impaired in GDH1, GLT1, and GDH3 were obtained. These were strict glutamate auxotrophs. Our results indicate that GDH3 plays a significant physiological role, providing glutamate when GDH1 and GLT1 are impaired. This is the first example of a microorganism possessing three pathways for glutamate biosynthesis.

  19. Regulation by ammonium of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bogonez, E; Satrústegui, J; Machado, A

    1985-06-01

    The activity of glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+) (EC 1.4.1.4; NADP-GDH) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is decreased under conditions in which intracellular ammonia concentrations increases. A high internal ammonia concentration can be obtained (a) by increasing the ammonium sulphate concentration in the culture medium, and (b) by growing the yeast either in acetate + ammonia media, where the pH of the medium rises during growth, or in heavily buffered glucose + ammonia media at pH 7.5. Under these conditions cellular oxoglutarate concentrations do not vary and changes in NADP-GDH activity appear to provide a constant rate of oxoglutarate utilization. The following results suggest that the decrease in NADP-GDH activity in ammonia-accumulating yeast cells is brought about by repression of synthesis: (i) after a shift to high ammonium sulphate concentrations, the number of units of activity per cell decreased as the inverse of cell doubling; and (ii) the rate of degradation of labelled NADP-GDH was essentially the same in ammonia-accumulating yeast cells and in controls, whereas the synthesis constant was much lower in the ammonia-accumulating cells than in the controls.

  20. Green tea polyphenols modulate insulin secretion by inhibiting glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhong; Allen, Aron; Kwagh, Jae; Doliba, Nicolai M; Qin, Wei; Najafi, Habiba; Collins, Heather W; Matschinsky, Franz M; Stanley, Charles A; Smith, Thomas J

    2006-04-14

    Insulin secretion by pancreatic beta-cells is stimulated by glucose, amino acids, and other metabolic fuels. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been shown to play a regulatory role in this process. The importance of GDH was underscored by features of hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia syndrome, where a dominant mutation causes the loss of inhibition by GTP and ATP. Here we report the effects of green tea polyphenols on GDH and insulin secretion. Of the four compounds tested, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) and epicatechin gallate were found to inhibit GDH with nanomolar ED(50) values and were therefore found to be as potent as the physiologically important inhibitor GTP. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that EGCG inhibits BCH-stimulated insulin secretion, a process that is mediated by GDH, under conditions where GDH is no longer inhibited by high energy metabolites. EGCG does not affect glucose-stimulated insulin secretion under high energy conditions where GDH is probably fully inhibited. We have further shown that these compounds act in an allosteric manner independent of their antioxidant activity and that the beta-cell stimulatory effects are directly correlated with glutamine oxidation. These results demonstrate that EGCG, much like the activator of GDH (BCH), can facilitate dissecting the complex regulation of insulin secretion by pharmacologically modulating the effects of GDH.

  1. Differential contribution of the proline and glutamine pathways to glutamate biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation in yeast lacking glutamate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sieg, Alex G.; Trotter, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymes play a pivotal role in glutamate biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation. It has been proposed that, in GDH-deficient yeast, either the proline utilization (PUT) or the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) pathway serves as the alternative pathway for glutamate production and nitrogen assimilation to the exclusion of the other. Using a gdh-null mutant (gdh1Δ2Δ3Δ), this ambiguity was addressed using a combination of growth studies and pathway-specific enzyme assays on a variety of nitrogen sources (ammonia, glutamine, proline and urea). The GDH-null mutant was viable on all nitrogen sources tested, confirming that alternate pathways for nitrogen assimilation exist in the gdh-null strain. Enzyme assays point to GS/GOGAT as the primary alternative pathway on the preferred nitrogen sources ammonia and glutamine, whereas growth on proline required both the PUT and GS/GOGAT pathways. In contrast, growth on glucose-urea media elicited a decrease in GOGAT activity along with an increase in activity of the PUT pathway specific enzyme Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH). Together, these results suggest the alternative pathway for nitrogen assimilation in strains lacking the preferred GDH-dependent route is nitrogen source dependent and that neither GS/GOGAT nor PUT serves as the sole compensatory pathway. PMID:24629525

  2. Differential contribution of the proline and glutamine pathways to glutamate biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation in yeast lacking glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Alex G; Trotter, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymes play a pivotal role in glutamate biosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation. It has been proposed that, in GDH-deficient yeast, either the proline utilization (PUT) or the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase (GS/GOGAT) pathway serves as the alternative pathway for glutamate production and nitrogen assimilation to the exclusion of the other. Using a gdh-null mutant (gdh1Δ2Δ3Δ), this ambiguity was addressed using a combination of growth studies and pathway-specific enzyme assays on a variety of nitrogen sources (ammonia, glutamine, proline and urea). The GDH-null mutant was viable on all nitrogen sources tested, confirming that alternate pathways for nitrogen assimilation exist in the gdh-null strain. Enzyme assays point to GS/GOGAT as the primary alternative pathway on the preferred nitrogen sources ammonia and glutamine, whereas growth on proline required both the PUT and GS/GOGAT pathways. In contrast, growth on glucose-urea media elicited a decrease in GOGAT activity along with an increase in activity of the PUT pathway specific enzyme Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH). Together, these results suggest the alternative pathway for nitrogen assimilation in strains lacking the preferred GDH-dependent route is nitrogen source dependent and that neither GS/GOGAT nor PUT serves as the sole compensatory pathway.

  3. Glutamate dehydrogenases: the why and how of coenzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Engel, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    NAD(+) and NADP(+), chemically similar and with almost identical standard oxidation-reduction potentials, nevertheless have distinct roles, NAD(+) serving catabolism and ATP generation whereas NADPH is the biosynthetic reductant. Separating these roles requires strict specificity for one or the other coenzyme for most dehydrogenases. In many organisms this holds also for glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH), NAD(+)-dependent for glutamate oxidation, NADP(+)-dependent for fixing ammonia. In higher animals, however, GDH has dual specificity. It has been suggested that GDH in mitochondria reacts only with NADP(H), the NAD(+) reaction being an in vitro artefact. However, contrary evidence suggests mitochondrial GDH not only reacts with NAD(+) but maintains equilibrium using the same pool as accessed by β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase. Another complication is the presence of an energy-linked dehydrogenase driving NADP(+) reduction by NADH, maintaining the coenzyme pools at different oxidation-reduction potentials. Its coexistence with GDH makes possible a futile cycle, control of which is not yet properly explained. Structural studies show NAD(+)-dependent, NADP(+)-dependent and dual-specificity GDHs are closely related and a few site-directed mutations can reverse specificity. Specificity for NAD(+) or for NADP(+) has probably emerged repeatedly during evolution, using different structural solutions on different occasions. In various GDHs the P7 position in the coenzyme-binding domain plays a key role. However, whereas in other dehydrogenases an acidic P7 residue usually hydrogen bonds to the 2'- and 3'-hydroxyls, dictating NAD(+) specificity, among GDHs, depending on detailed conformation of surrounding residues, an acidic P7 may permit binding of NAD(+) only, NADP(+) only, or in higher animals both.

  4. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  5. Regulation of the Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide- and Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Roon, Robert J.; Even, Harvey L.

    1973-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two distinct l-glutamate dehydrogenases. These enzymes are affected in a reciprocal fashion by growth on ammonia or dicarboxylic amino acids as the nitrogen source. The specific activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) (anabolic) enzyme is highest in ammonia-grown cells and is reduced in cells grown on glutamate or aspartate. Conversely, the specific activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) (catabolic) glutamate dehydrogenase is highest in cells grown on glutamate or aspartate and is much lower in cells grown on ammonia. The specific activity of both enzymes is very low in nitrogen-starved yeast. Addition of the ammonia analogue methylamine to the growth medium reduces the specific activity of the NAD-dependent enzyme and increases the specific activity of the NADP-dependent enzyme. PMID:4147647

  6. An NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase from cyanobacteria. Identification and properties.

    PubMed

    Chávez, S; Candau, P

    1991-07-08

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 presents a hexameric NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase with a molecular mass of 295 kDa. The enzyme differs from the NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase found in the same strain and is coded by a different gene. NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase shows a high coenzyme specificity, catalyzes preferentially glutamate formation and presents Km values for ammonium, NADH and 2-oxoglutarate of 4.5 mM, 50 microM and 1.8 mM respectively. An animating role for the enzyme is discussed.

  7. A NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of the petit-negative yeast Kluyveromyces lactis uses the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase pathway for glutamate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, L; Guzmán-León, S; Coria, R; Ramírez, J; Aranda, C; González, A

    1995-10-01

    The activities of the enzymes involved in ammonium assimilation and glutamate biosynthesis were determined in wild-type and NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) null mutant strains of Kluyveromyces lactis. The specific NADP-GDH activity from K. lactis was fivefold lower than that found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activities were similar to those reported in S. cerevisiae. The NADP-GDH null mutant was obtained by transforming the uraA strain MD2/1 with a linearized integrative yeast vector harbouring a 390 bp fragment of the NADP-GDH structural gene. This mutant grew as well as the parent strain on ammonium, but showed GS and GOGAT activities higher that those found in the wild-type strain, implying that the GS-GOGAT pathway could play a leading role in glutamate biosynthesis in K. lactis. Southern blotting analysis of K. lactis chromosomes separated by contour-clamped homogeneous electric field electrophoresis, indicated that the NADP-GDH structural gene is localized on chromosome VI.

  8. Denaturation studies by fluorescence and quenching of thermophilic protein NAD+-glutamate dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus HB8.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jose L; Ferrer, Juan; Pire, Carmen; Llorca, Francisco I; Bonete, Maria José

    2003-04-01

    Fluorescence techniques have been used to study the structural characteristics of many proteins. The thermophilic enzyme NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 is found to be a hexameric enzyme. Fluorescence spectra of native and denatured protein and effect of denaturants as urea and guanidine hydrochloride on enzyme activity of thermophilic glutamate dehydrogenase (t-GDH) have been analyzed. Native t-GDH presents the maximum emission at 338 nm. The denaturation process is accompanied by an exposure to the solvent of the tryptophan residues, as manifested by the red shift of the emission maximum. Fluorescence quenching by external quenchers, KI and acrylamide, has also been carried out.

  9. Identification of disulfide bond formation between MitoNEET and glutamate dehydrogenase 1.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Morgan E; Crail, Jacquelyn P; Laffoon, Megan M; Fernandez, William G; Menze, Michael A; Konkle, Mary E

    2013-12-17

    MitoNEET is a protein that was identified as a drug target for diabetes, but its cellular function as well as its role in diabetes remains elusive. Protein pull-down experiments identified glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) as a potential binding partner. GDH1 is a key metabolic enzyme with emerging roles in insulin regulation. MitoNEET forms a covalent complex with GDH1 through disulfide bond formation and acts as an activator. Proteomic analysis identified the specific cysteine residues that participate in the disulfide bond. This is the first report that effectively links mitoNEET to activation of the insulin regulator GDH1.

  10. Hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome: insights into the regulatory role of glutamate dehydrogenase in ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Charles A

    2004-04-01

    The second most common form of congenital hyperinsulinism, the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome (HI/HA), is associated with dominantly expressed missense mutations of the mitochondrial matrix enzyme, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). GDH catalyzes the oxidative deamination of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate plus ammonia, using NAD or NADP as co-factor. HI/HA mutations impair GDH sensitivity to its allosteric inhibitor, GTP, resulting in a gain of enzyme function and increased sensitivity to its allosteric activator, leucine. The phenotype is dominated by hypoglycemia with post-prandial hypoglycemia following protein meals, as well as fasting hypoglycemia. Plasma ammonia levels are increased 3-5 times normal due to expression of mutant GDH in liver, probably reflecting increased ammonia release from glutamate as well as impaired synthesis of NAG, due to reduction of hepatic glutamate pools. Ammonia levels are unaffected by feeding or fasting and appear to cause no symptoms, perhaps due to a protective effect of increased GDH activity in brain. The clinical consequences of the HI/HA mutations imply that GDH plays a central role in overall control of amino acid catabolism and ammonia metabolism integrating responses to changes in intracellular energy potential and amino acid levels.

  11. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria. PMID:27066186

  12. Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 signals through antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 1 to regulate redox homeostasis and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lingtao; Li, Dan; Alesi, Gina N; Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Lu, Zhou; Boggon, Titus J; Jin, Peng; Yi, Hong; Wright, Elizabeth R; Duong, Duc; Seyfried, Nicholas T; Egnatchik, Robert; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Magliocca, Kelly R; He, Chuan; Arellano, Martha L; Khoury, Hanna J; Shin, Dong M; Khuri, Fadlo R; Kang, Sumin

    2015-02-09

    How mitochondrial glutaminolysis contributes to redox homeostasis in cancer cells remains unclear. Here we report that the mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) is commonly upregulated in human cancers. GDH1 is important for redox homeostasis in cancer cells by controlling the intracellular levels of its product alpha-ketoglutarate and subsequent metabolite fumarate. Mechanistically, fumarate binds to and activates a reactive oxygen species scavenging enzyme glutathione peroxidase 1. Targeting GDH1 by shRNA or a small molecule inhibitor R162 resulted in imbalanced redox homeostasis, leading to attenuated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  13. Glutamate dehydrogenase 1 signals through antioxidant glutathione peroxidase 1 to regulate redox homeostasis and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lingtao; Li, Dan; Alesi, Gina N.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Hee-Bum; Lu, Zhou; Boggon, Titus J.; Jin, Peng; Yi, Hong; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Duong, Duc; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Egnatchik, Robert; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Magliocca, Kelly R.; He, Chuan; Arellano, Martha L.; Khoury, Hanna J.; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Kang, Sumin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY How mitochondrial glutaminolysis contributes to redox homeostasis in cancer cells remains unclear. Here we report that the mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) is commonly upregulated in human cancers. GDH1 is important for redox homeostasis in cancer cells by controlling the intracellular levels of its product alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and subsequent metabolite fumarate. Mechanistically, fumarate binds to and activates a ROS scavenging enzyme glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx1). Targeting GDH1 by shRNA or a small molecule inhibitor R162 resulted in imbalanced redox homeostasis, leading to attenuated cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. PMID:25670081

  14. Metabolic control of cell division in α-proteobacteria by a NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Beaufay, François; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2016-01-01

    Prior to initiate energy-consuming processes, such as DNA replication or cell division, cells need to evaluate their metabolic status. We have recently identified and characterized a new connection between metabolism and cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. We showed that an NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GdhZ) coordinates growth with cell division according to its enzymatic activity. Here we report the conserved role of GdhZ in controlling cell division in another α-proteobacterium, the facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus. We also discuss the importance of amino acids as a main carbon source for α-proteobacteria.

  15. Inhibitory properties of nerve-specific human glutamate dehydrogenase isozyme by chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Choi, Myung-Min; Kim, Eun-A; Choi, Soo Young; Kim, Tae Ue; Cho, Sung-Woo; Yang, Seung-Ju

    2007-11-30

    Human glutamate dehydrogenase exists in hGDH1 (housekeeping isozyme) and in hGDH2 (nerve-specific isozyme), which differ markedly in their allosteric regulation. In the nervous system, GDH is enriched in astrocytes and is important for recycling glutamate, a major excitatory neurotransmitter during neurotransmission. Chloroquine has been known to be a potent inhibitor of house-keeping GDH1 in permeabilized liver and kidney-cortex of rabbit. However, the effects of chloroquine on nerve-specific GDH2 have not been reported yet. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of chloroquine on hGDH2 at various conditions and showed that chloroquine could inhibit the activity of hGDH2 at dose-dependent manner. Studies of the chloroquine inhibition on enzyme activity revealed that hGDH2 was relatively less sensitive to chloroquine inhibition than house-keeping hGDH1. Incubation of hGDH2 was uncompetitive with respect of NADH and non-competitive with respect of 2-oxoglutarate. The inhibitory effect of chloroquine on hGDH2 was abolished, although in part, by the presence of ADP and L-leucine, whereas GTP did not change the sensitivity to chloroquine inhibition. Our results show a possibility that chloroquine may be used in regulating GDH activity and subsequently glutamate concentration in the central nervous system.

  16. Bacilli glutamate dehydrogenases diverged via coevolution of transcription and enzyme regulation.

    PubMed

    Noda-Garcia, Lianet; Romero Romero, Maria Luisa; Longo, Liam M; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Tawfik, Dan S

    2017-07-01

    The linkage between regulatory elements of transcription, such as promoters, and their protein products is central to gene function. Promoter-protein coevolution is therefore expected, but rarely observed, and the manner by which these two regulatory levels are linked remains largely unknown. We study glutamate dehydrogenase-a hub of carbon and nitrogen metabolism. In Bacillus subtilis, two paralogues exist: GudB is constitutively transcribed whereas RocG is tightly regulated. In their active, oligomeric states, both enzymes show similar enzymatic rates. However, swaps of enzymes and promoters cause severe fitness losses, thus indicating promoter-enzyme coevolution. Characterization of the proteins shows that, compared to RocG, GudB's enzymatic activity is highly dependent on glutamate and pH Promoter-enzyme swaps therefore result in excessive glutamate degradation when expressing a constitutive enzyme under a constitutive promoter, or insufficient activity when both the enzyme and its promoter are tightly regulated. Coevolution of transcriptional and enzymatic regulation therefore underlies paralogue-specific spatio-temporal control, especially under diverse growth conditions. © 2017 The Authors.

  17. Expression of the human isoform of glutamate dehydrogenase, hGDH2, augments TCA cycle capacity and oxidative metabolism of glutamate during glucose deprivation in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Jakob D; Lykke, Kasper; Bryk, Jaroslaw; Stridh, Malin H; Zaganas, Ioannis; Skytt, Dorte M; Schousboe, Arne; Bak, Lasse K; Enard, Wolfgang; Pääbo, Svante; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    A key enzyme in brain glutamate homeostasis is glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) which links carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism mediating glutamate degradation to CO2 and expanding tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle capacity with intermediates, i.e. anaplerosis. Humans express two GDH isoforms, GDH1 and 2, whereas most other mammals express only GDH1. hGDH1 is widely expressed in human brain while hGDH2 is confined to astrocytes. The two isoforms display different enzymatic properties and the nature of these supports that hGDH2 expression in astrocytes potentially increases glutamate oxidation and supports the TCA cycle during energy-demanding processes such as high intensity glutamatergic signaling. However, little is known about how expression of hGDH2 affects the handling of glutamate and TCA cycle metabolism in astrocytes. Therefore, we cultured astrocytes from cerebral cortical tissue of hGDH2-expressing transgenic mice. We measured glutamate uptake and metabolism using [(3) H]glutamate, while the effect on metabolic pathways of glutamate and glucose was evaluated by use of (13) C and (14) C substrates and analysis by mass spectrometry and determination of radioactively labeled metabolites including CO2 , respectively. We conclude that hGDH2 expression increases capacity for uptake and oxidative metabolism of glutamate, particularly during increased workload and aglycemia. Additionally, hGDH2 expression increased utilization of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) during aglycemia and caused a general decrease in oxidative glucose metabolism. We speculate, that expression of hGDH2 allows astrocytes to spare glucose and utilize BCAAs during substrate shortages. These findings support the proposed role of hGDH2 in astrocytes as an important fail-safe during situations of intense glutamatergic activity. GLIA 2017;65:474-488.

  18. Modular coenzyme specificity: a domain-swopped chimera of glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Michael A; Engel, Paul C

    2009-11-01

    Domain-swopped chimeras of the glutamate dehydrogenases from Clostridium symbiosum (CsGDH) (NAD(+)-specific) and Escherichia coli (EcGDH) (NADP(+)-specific) have been produced, with the aim of testing the localization of determinants of coenzyme specificity. An active chimera consisting of the substrate-binding domain (Domain I) of CsGDH and the coenzyme-binding domain (Domain II) of EcGDH has been purified to homogeneity, and a thorough kinetic analysis has been carried out. Results indicate that selectivity for the phosphorylated coenzyme does indeed reside solely in Domain II; the chimera utilizes NAD(+) at 0.8% of the rate observed with NADP(+), similar to the 0.5% ratio for EcGDH. Positive cooperativity toward L-glutamate, characteristic of CsGDH, has been retained with Domain I. An unforeseen feature of this chimera, however, is that, although glutamate cooperativity occurs only at higher pH values in the parent CsGDH, the chimeric protein shows it over the full pH range explored. Also surprising is that the chimera is capable of catalysing severalfold higher reaction rates (V(max)) in both directions than either of the parent enzymes from which it is constructed.

  19. Modulation of brain glutamate dehydrogenase as a tool for controlling seizures.

    PubMed

    Rasgado, Lourdes A Vega; Reyes, Guillermo Ceballos; Díaz, Fernando Vega

    2015-12-01

    Glutamate (Glu) is a major excitatory neurotransmitter involved in epilepsy. Glu is synthesized by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, E.C. 1.4.1.3) and dysfunction of the enzymatic activity of GDH is associated with brain pathologies. The main goal of this work is to establish the role of GDH in the effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) such as valproate (VALP), diazepam (DIAZ) and diphenylhydantoin (DPH) and its repercussions on oxygen consumption. Oxidative deamination of Glu and reductive amination of αketoglutarate (αK) in mice brain were investigated. Our results show that AEDs decrease GDH activity and oxygen consumption in vitro. In ex vivo experiments, AEDs increased GDH activity but decreased oxygen consumption during Glu oxidative deamination. VALP and DPH reversed the increase in reductive amination of αK caused by the chemoconvulsant pentylenetetrazol. These results suggest that AEDs act by modulating brain GDH activity, which in turn decreased oxygen consumption. GDH represents an important regulation point of neuronal excitability, and modulation of its activity represents a potential target for metabolic treatment of epilepsy and for the development of new AEDs.

  20. A NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase coordinates metabolism with cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Beaufay, François; Coppine, Jérôme; Mayard, Aurélie; Laloux, Géraldine; De Bolle, Xavier; Hallez, Régis

    2015-01-01

    Coupling cell cycle with nutrient availability is a crucial process for all living cells. But how bacteria control cell division according to metabolic supplies remains poorly understood. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism that coordinates central metabolism with cell division in the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus. This mechanism involves the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase GdhZ and the oxidoreductase-like KidO. While enzymatically active GdhZ directly interferes with FtsZ polymerization by stimulating its GTPase activity, KidO bound to NADH destabilizes lateral interactions between FtsZ protofilaments. Both GdhZ and KidO share the same regulatory network to concomitantly stimulate the rapid disassembly of the Z-ring, necessary for the subsequent release of progeny cells. Thus, this mechanism illustrates how proteins initially dedicated to metabolism coordinate cell cycle progression with nutrient availability. PMID:25953831

  1. Gene cloning, heterologous overexpression and optimized refolding of the NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase from Haloferax mediterranei.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Susana; Pérez-Pomares, Francisco; Pire, Carmen; Ferrer, Juan; Bonete, María-José

    2006-04-01

    The NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) gene from the halophilic archaeon Haloferax mediterranei has been cloned. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence revealed an open reading frame of 1323 bp that encodes a NAD-GDH. The amino acid sequence displayed high homology with those from other sources, especially the highly conserved residues involved in 2-oxoglutarate binding. The expression of this gene in Escherichia coli, the refolding and further characterization, yielded a fully active NAD-GDH with the same features than those found for the wild-type enzyme. This halophilic NAD-GDH showed a highly dependence on salts for both stability and activity, being essential for the refolding of the recombinant enzyme.

  2. Occurrence of cold-labile NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase in Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Jahns, T

    1992-09-15

    A nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GluDH; EC 1.4.1.3) inactivated by incubation at low temperatures was detected in several species of the genus Bacillus, including strains of B. cereus, B. laterosporus, B. lentus, B. panthotenicus, B. pasteurii, B. sphaericus, B. stearothermophilus, B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis. Incubation of cell-free extracts of these strains at 0 degrees C resulted in an 80-100% inactivation of NAD-GluDH activity within 120 min. The addition of 20% glycerol protected the enzyme from this inactivation in the cold. Strains of B. fastidiosus, B. licheniformis, B. macerans, B. megaterium and B. pumilus were found to lack NAD-GluDH activity.

  3. Structure of NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli: Reflections on the basis of coenzyme specificity in the family of glutamate dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Michael A.; Oliveira, Tânia F.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glutamate dehydrogenases (EC 1.4.1.2–4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate using NAD+ and/or NADP+ as a cofactor. Subunits of homo-hexameric bacterial enzymes comprise a substrate-binding Domain I followed by a nucleotide binding Domain II. The reaction occurs in a catalytic cleft between the two domains. Although conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domains of various dehydrogenases have been linked to cofactor preferences, the structural basis for specificity in the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) family remains poorly understood. Here, the refined crystal structure of Escherichia coli GDH in the absence of reactants is described at 2.5Å resolution. Modelling of NADP+ in Domain II reveals the potential contribution of positively charged residues from a neighbouring α-helical hairpin to phosphate recognition. In addition, a serine residue that follows the P7 aspartate is presumed to form a hydrogen bond to the 2’-phosphate. Mutagenesis and kinetic analysis confirms the importance of these residues in NADP+ recognition. Surprisingly, one of the positively charged residues is conserved in all sequences of NAD+ dependent enzymes, but the conformations adopted by the corresponding regions in proteins whose structure has been solved preclude their contribution toward the co-ordination of the 2’-ribose phosphate of NADP+. These studies clarify the sequence/structure relationships in bacterial glutamate dehydrogenases, revealing that identical residues may specify different coenzyme preferences, depending on the structural context. Primary sequence alone is therefore not a reliable guide for predicting coenzyme specificity. We also consider how it is possible for a single sequence to accommodate both coenzymes in the dual specificity GDHs of animals. PMID:23879525

  4. Characterization of the glutamate dehydrogenase gene and its regulation in a euryhaline copepod.

    PubMed

    Willett, Christopher S; Burton, Ronald S

    2003-08-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) plays a key role in the metabolism of free amino acids (FAA) in crustaceans and other metazoans. Glutamate synthesized by GDH via reductive amination is the amino group donor for alanine synthesis and the precursor required for proline synthesis. Since both proline and alanine are important intracellular osmolytes in many marine invertebrates, GDH has been widely implicated as playing a central role in response to hyperosmotic stress in these organisms. We have isolated the gene encoding a GDH homolog from the euryhaline copepod Tigriopus californicus and examined the regulation of GDH under salinity stress. The gene encodes a protein of 557 residues with 76% amino acid identity with Drosophila melanogaster GDH. The gene encodes an N-terminal mitochondrial signal sequence peptide. Only a single intron of 71 bp was found in the GDH gene in T. californicus when genomic sequences and cDNA sequences were compared. The levels of GDH mRNA do not increase during hyperosmotic stress in this copepod. The effects of salt and hyperosmotic stress on GDH enzyme activity were also investigated. GDH activities decrease with increasing NaCl concentrations in in vitro enzyme assays, while live animals exposed to hyperosmotic stress showed no change in GDH enzyme activities. Combined, these results indicate that GDH transcription and enzyme activity do not appear to function in the regulation of alanine and proline accumulation during hyperosmotic stress in T. californicus. The manner in which this important physiological process is regulated remains unknown.

  5. Glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in Bacillus licheniformis WX-02: Enzymatic properties and specific functions in glutamic acid synthesis for poly-γ-glutamic acid production.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guangming; Wang, Qin; Wei, Xuetuan; Ma, Xin; Chen, Shouwen

    2017-04-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA), a natural biopolymer, is widely used in cosmetics, medicine, food, water treatment, and agriculture owing to its features of moisture sequestration, cation chelation, non-toxicity and biodegradability. Intracellular glutamic acid, the substrate of γ-PGA, is a limiting factor for high yield in γ-PGA production. Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis are both important γ-PGA producing strains, and B. subtilis synthesizes glutamic acid in vivo using the unique GOGAT/GS pathway. However, little is known about the glutamate synthesis pathway in B. licheniformis. The aim of this work was to characterize the glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in glutamic acid synthesis from B. licheniformis with both in vivo and in vitro experiments. By re-directing the carbon flux distribution, the rocG gene deletion mutant WX-02ΔrocG produced intracellular glutamic acid with a concentration of 90ng/log(CFU), which was only 23.7% that of the wild-type WX-02 (380ng/log(CFU)). Furthermore, the γ-PGA yield of mutant WX-02ΔrocG was 5.37g/L, a decrease of 45.3% compared to the wild type (9.82g/L). In vitro enzymatic assays of RocG showed that RocG has higher affinity for 2-oxoglutarate than glutamate, and the glutamate synthesis rate was far above degradation. This is probably the first study to reveal the glutamic acid synthesis pathway and the specific functions of RocG in B. licheniformis. The results indicate that γ-PGA production can be enhanced through improving intracellular glutamic acid synthesis.

  6. The structure of apo human glutamate dehydrogenase details subunit communication and allostery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Thomas J; Schmidt, Timothy; Fang, Jie; Wu, Jane; Siuzdak, Gary; Stanley, Charles A

    2002-05-03

    The structure of human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been determined in the absence of active site and regulatory ligands. Compared to the structures of bovine GDH that were complexed with coenzyme and substrate, the NAD binding domain is rotated away from the glutamate-binding domain. The electron density of this domain is more disordered the further it is from the pivot helix. Mass spectrometry results suggest that this is likely due to the apo form being more dynamic than the closed form. The antenna undergoes significant conformational changes as the catalytic cleft opens. The ascending helix in the antenna moves in a clockwise manner and the helix in the descending strand contracts in a manner akin to the relaxation of an extended spring. A number of spontaneous mutations in this antenna region cause the hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia syndrome by decreasing GDH sensitivity to the inhibitor, GTP. Since these residues do not directly contact the bound GTP, the conformational changes in the antenna are apparently crucial to GTP inhibition. In the open conformation, the GTP binding site is distorted such that it can no longer bind GTP. In contrast, ADP binding benefits by the opening of the catalytic cleft since R463 on the pivot helix is pushed into contact distance with the beta-phosphate of ADP. These results support the previous proposal that purines regulate GDH activity by altering the dynamics of the NAD binding domain. Finally, a possible structural mechanism for negative cooperativity is presented.

  7. Interaction between glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-leucine catabolic enzymes: intersecting metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Susan M; Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Zaganas, Ioannis

    2011-09-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) catabolism follows sequential reactions and their metabolites intersect with other metabolic pathways. The initial enzymes in BCAA metabolism, the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm), which deaminates the BCAAs to branched-chain α-keto acids (BCKAs); and the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC), which oxidatively decarboxylates the BCKAs, are organized in a supramolecular complex termed metabolon. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1) is found in the metabolon in rat tissues. Bovine GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP)-form of human BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-BCATm in vitro. This protein interaction facilitates reamination of the α-ketoglutarate (αKG) product of the GDH1 oxidative deamination reaction. Human GDH1 appears to act like bovine GDH1 but human GDH2 does not show the same enhancement of BCKDC enzyme activities. Another metabolic enzyme is also found in the metabolon is pyruvate carboxylase (PC). Kinetic results suggest that PC binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC but does not effect BCAA catabolism. The protein interaction of BCATm and GDH1 promotes regeneration of PLP-BCATm which then binds to BCKDC resulting in channeling of the BCKA products from BCATm first half reaction to E1 and promoting BCAA oxidation and net nitrogen transfer from BCAAs. The cycling of nitrogen through glutamate via the actions of BCATm and GDH1 releases free ammonia. Formation of ammonia may be important for astrocyte glutamine synthesis in the central nervous system. In peripheral tissue association of BCATm and GDH1 would promote BCAA oxidation at physiologically relevant BCAA concentrations.

  8. Cloning of two glutamate dehydrogenase cDNAs from Asparagus officinalis: sequence analysis and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Pavesi, A; Ficarelli, A; Tassi, F; Restivo, F M

    2000-04-01

    Two different amplification products, termed c1 and c2, showing a high similarity to glutamate dehydrogenase sequences from plants, were obtained from Asparagus officinalis using two degenerated primers and RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction). The genes corresponding to these cDNA clones were designated aspGDHA and aspGDHB. Screening of a cDNA library resulted in the isolation of cDNA clones for aspGDHB only. Analysis of the deduced amino acid (aa) sequence from the full-length cDNA suggests that the gene product contains all regions associated with metabolic function of NAD glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH). A first phylogenetic analysis including only GDHs from plants suggested that the two GDH genes of A. officinalis arose by an ancient duplication event, pre-dating the divergence of monocots and dicots. Codon usage analysis showed a bias towards A/T ending codons. This tendency is likely due to the biased nucleotide composition of the asparagus genome, rather than to the translational selection for specific codons. Using principal coordinate analysis, the evolutionary relatedness of plant GDHs with homologous sequences from a large spectrum of organisms was investigated. The results showed a closer affinity of plant GDHs to GDHs of thermophilic archaebacterial and eubacterial species, when compared to those of unicellular eukaryotic fungi. Sequence analysis at specific amino acid signatures, known to affect the thermal stability of GDH, and assays of enzyme activity at non-physiological temperatures, showed a greater adaptation to heat-stress conditions for the asparagus and tobacco enzymes compared with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae enzyme.

  9. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) activates AMPK through the inhibition of glutamate dehydrogenase in muscle and pancreatic ß-cells: A potential beneficial effect in the pre-diabetic state?

    PubMed

    Pournourmohammadi, Shirin; Grimaldi, Mariagrazia; Stridh, Malin H; Lavallard, Vanessa; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Wollheim, Claes B; Maechler, Pierre

    2017-07-01

    Glucose homeostasis is determined by insulin secretion from the ß-cells in pancreatic islets and by glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and other insulin target tissues. While glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) senses mitochondrial energy supply and regulates insulin secretion, its role in the muscle has not been elucidated. Here we investigated the possible interplay between GDH and the cytosolic energy sensing enzyme 5'-AMP kinase (AMPK), in both isolated islets and myotubes from mice and humans. The green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) was used to inhibit GDH. Insulin secretion was reduced by EGCG upon glucose stimulation and blocked in response to glutamine combined with the allosteric GDH activator BCH (2-aminobicyclo-[2,2,1] heptane-2-carboxylic acid). Insulin secretion was similarly decreased in islets of mice with ß-cell-targeted deletion of GDH (ßGlud1(-/-)). EGCG did not further reduce insulin secretion in the mutant islets, validating its specificity. In human islets, EGCG attenuated both basal and nutrient-stimulated insulin secretion. Glutamine/BCH-induced lowering of AMPK phosphorylation did not operate in ßGlud1(-/-) islets and was similarly prevented by EGCG in control islets, while high glucose systematically inactivated AMPK. In mouse C2C12 myotubes, like in islets, the inhibition of AMPK following GDH activation with glutamine/BCH was reversed by EGCG. Stimulation of GDH in primary human myotubes caused lowering of insulin-induced 2-deoxy-glucose uptake, partially counteracted by EGCG. Thus, mitochondrial energy provision through anaplerotic input via GDH influences the activity of the cytosolic energy sensor AMPK. EGCG may be useful in obesity by resensitizing insulin-resistant muscle while blunting hypersecretion of insulin in hypermetabolic states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nucleotide sequence of yeast GDH1 encoding nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Moye, W S; Amuro, N; Rao, J K; Zalkin, H

    1985-07-15

    The yeast GDH1 gene encodes NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. This gene was isolated by complementation of an Escherichia coli glutamate auxotroph. NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was overproduced 6-10-fold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae bearing GDH1 on a multicopy plasmid. The nucleotide sequence of the 1362-base pair coding region and 5' and 3' flanking sequences were determined. Transcription start sites were located by S1 nuclease mapping. Regulation of GDH1 was not maintained when the gene was present on a multicopy plasmid. Protein secondary structure predictions identified a region with potential to form the dinucleotide-binding domain. The amino acid sequences of the yeast and Neurospora crassa enzymes are 63% conserved. Unlike the N. crassa gene, yeast GDH1 has no introns.

  11. NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Purification, kinetic properties, and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    DeLuna, A; Avendano, A; Riego, L; Gonzalez, A

    2001-11-23

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenases (NADP-GDHs) encoded by GDH1 and GDH3 catalyze the synthesis of glutamate from ammonium and alpha-ketoglutarate. The GDH2-encoded NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase degrades glutamate producing ammonium and alpha-ketoglutarate. Until very recently, it was considered that only one biosynthetic NADP-GDH was present in S. cerevisiae. This fact hindered understanding the physiological role of each isoenzyme and the mechanisms involved in alpha-ketoglutarate channeling for glutamate biosynthesis. In this study, we purified and characterized the GDH1- and GDH3-encoded NADP-GDHs; they showed different allosteric properties and rates of alpha-ketoglutarate utilization. Analysis of the relative levels of these proteins revealed that the expression of GDH1 and GDH3 is differentially regulated and depends on the nature of the carbon source. Moreover, the physiological study of mutants lacking or overexpressing GDH1 or GDH3 suggested that these genes play nonredundant physiological roles. Our results indicate that the coordinated regulation of GDH1-, GDH3-, and GDH2-encoded enzymes results in glutamate biosynthesis and balanced utilization of alpha-ketoglutarate under fermentative and respiratory conditions. The possible relevance of the duplicated NADP-GDH pathway in the adaptation to facultative metabolism is discussed.

  12. Human GLUD2 glutamate dehydrogenase is expressed in neural and testicular supporting cells.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Zaganas, Ioannis; Kleopa, Kleopas A; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2010-05-28

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is an allosterically regulated enzyme that is expressed widely. Its activity is potently inhibited by GTP and thought to be controlled by the need of the cell for ATP. In addition to this housekeeping human (h) GDH1, humans have acquired (via a duplication event) a highly homologous isoenzyme (hGDH2) that is resistant to GTP. Although transcripts of GLUD2, the gene encoding hGDH2, have been detected in human neural and testicular tissues, data on the endogenous protein are lacking. Here, we developed an antibody specific for hGDH2 and used it to study human tissues. Western blot analyses revealed, to our surprise, that endogenous hGDH2 is more densely expressed in testis than in brain. At the subcellular level, hGDH2 localized to mitochondria. Study of testicular tissue using immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence methods revealed that the Sertoli cells were strongly labeled by our anti-hGDH2 antibody. In human cerebral cortex, a robust labeling of astrocytes was detected, with neurons showing faint hGDH2 immunoreactivity. Astrocytes and Sertoli cells are known to support neurons and germ cells, respectively, providing them with lactate that largely derives from the tricarboxylic acid cycle via conversion of glutamate to alpha-ketoglutarate (GDH reaction). As hGDH2 is not subject to GTP control, the enzyme is able to metabolize glutamate even when the tricarboxylic acid cycle generates GTP amounts sufficient to inactivate the housekeeping hGDH1 protein. Hence, the selective expression of hGDH2 by astrocytes and Sertoli cells may provide a significant biological advantage by facilitating metabolic recycling processes essential to the supportive role of these cells.

  13. NAD+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase of the edible mushroom Agaricus bisporus: biochemical and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Kersten, M A; Müller, Y; Baars, J J; Op den Camp, H J; van der Drift, C; Van Griensven, L J; Visser, J; Schaap, P J

    1999-04-01

    The NAD+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) of Agaricus bisporus, a key enzyme in nitrogen metabolism, was purified to homogeneity. The apparent molecular mass of the native enzyme is 474 kDa comprising four subunits of 116 kDa. The isoelectric point of the enzyme is about 7.0. Km values for ammonium, 2-oxoglutarate, NADH, glutamate and NAD+ were 6.5, 3.5, 0.06, 37.1 and 0.046 mM, respectively. The enzyme is specific for NAD(H). The gene encoding this enzyme (gdhB) was isolated from an A. bisporus H39 recombinant lambda phage library. The deduced amino acid sequence specifies a 1029-amino acid protein with a deduced molecular mass of 115,463 Da, which displays a significant degree of similarity with NAD-GDH of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa. The ORF is interrupted by fifteen introns. Northern analysis combined with enzyme activity measurements suggest that NAD-GDH from A. bisporus is regulated by the nitrogen source. NAD-GDH levels in mycelium grown on glutamate were higher than NAD-GDH levels in mycelium grown on ammonium as a nitrogen source. Combined with the kinetic parameters, these results suggest a catabolic role for NAD-GDH. However, upon addition of ammonium to the culture transcription of the gene is not repressed as strongly as that of the gene encoding NADP-GDH (gdhA). To date, tetrameric NAD-GDHs with large subunits, and their corresponding genes, have only been isolated from a few species. This enzyme represents the first NAD-GDH of basidiomycete origin to be purified and is the first such enzyme from basidiomycetes whose sequence has been determined.

  14. Urease-glutamic dehydrogenase biosensor for screening heavy metals in water and soil samples.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Belen Bello; Bolbot, John A; Tothill, Ibtisam E

    2004-09-01

    A screen-printed three-electrode amperometric biosensor based on urease and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH)-glutamic dehydrogenase system was developed and applied to the screening of heavy metals in environmental samples. The development of an amperometric sensor for the monitoring of urease activity was feasible by coupling the urea breakdown reaction catalysed by urease to the reductive ammination of ketoglutarate catalysed by glutamic dehydrogenase (GLDH). The ammonia provided by the urea conversion is required for the conversion of ketoglutarate to glutamate with the concomitant oxidation of the NADH cofactor. NADH oxidation is monitored amperometrically at 0.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) after urease immobilization onto the screen-printed three-electrode configuration. Immobilization of urease on the surface of screen-printed electrodes was performed by entrapment in alginate gel and adsorption on the electrode in a nafion film. Low sensitivity to inactivation by metals was recorded after urease entrapment in alginate gel with detection limits of 2.9 and 29.8 mg L(-1) for Hg(II) and Cu(II), respectively. The use of the negatively charged nafion film created a more concentrated environment of cations in proximity to the enzyme, thus enhancing the urease inhibition when compared to gel entrapment. The calculated detection limits were 63.6 and 55.3 microg L(-1) for Hg(II) and Cu(II), respectively, and 4.3 mg L(-1) for Cd(II). A significant urease inactivation was recorded in the presence of trace amounts of metals (microg L(-1)) when the enzyme was used free in solution. Analysis of water and soil samples with the developed nafion-based sensor produced inhibition on urease activity according to their metal contents. The obtained results were in agreement with the standard methods employed for sample analysis. Nevertheless, the use of the amperometric assay (with free urease) proved more feasible for the screening of trace amounts of metals in polluted

  15. Differential levels of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GLUD1) in Balb/c and C57BL/6 mice and the effects of overexpression of the Glud1 gene on glutamate release in striatum

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, Kevin N; Bao, Xiaodong; Hascup, Erin R; Hui, Dongwei; Xu, Wenhao; Pomerleau, Francois; Huettl, Peter; Michaelis, Mary L; Michaelis, Elias K; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that overexpression of the Glud1 (glutamate dehydrogenase 1) gene in neurons of C57BL/6 mice results in increased depolarization-induced glutamate release that eventually leads to selective neuronal injury and cell loss by 12 months of age. However, it is known that isogenic lines of Tg (transgenic) mice produced through back-crossing with one strain may differ in their phenotypic characteristics from those produced using another inbred mouse strain. Therefore, we decided to introduce the Glud1 transgene into the Balb/c strain that has endogenously lower levels of GLUD1 (glutamate dehydrogenase 1) enzyme activity in the brain as compared with C57BL/6. Using an enzyme-based MEA (microelectrode array) that is selective for measuring glutamate in vivo, we measured depolarization-induced glutamate release. Within a discrete layer of the striatum, glutamate release was significantly increased in Balb/c Tg mice compared with wt (wild-type) littermates. Furthermore, Balb/c mice released approx. 50–60% of the amount of glutamate compared with C57BL/6 mice. This is similar to the lower levels of endogenous GLUD1 protein in Balb/c compared with C57BL/6 mice. The development of these Glud1-overexpressing mice may allow for the exploration of key molecular events produced by chronic exposure of neurons to moderate, transient increases in glutamate release, a process hypothesized to occur in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21446915

  16. Branched-chain amino acid metabolon: interaction of glutamate dehydrogenase with the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm).

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Mainul; Nautiyal, Manisha; Wynn, R Max; Mobley, James A; Chuang, David T; Hutson, Susan M

    2010-01-01

    The catabolic pathway for branched-chain amino acids includes deamination followed by oxidative decarboxylation of the deaminated product branched-chain alpha-keto acids, catalyzed by the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm) and branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (BCKDC). We found that BCATm binds to the E1 decarboxylase of BCKDC, forming a metabolon that allows channeling of branched-chain alpha-keto acids from BCATm to E1. The protein complex also contains glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH1), 4-nitrophenylphosphatase domain and non-neuronal SNAP25-like protein homolog 1, pyruvate carboxylase, and BCKDC kinase. GDH1 binds to the pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP) form of BCATm (PMP-BCATm) but not to the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-BCATm and other metabolon proteins. Leucine activates GDH1, and oxidative deamination of glutamate is increased further by addition of PMP-BCATm. Isoleucine and valine are not allosteric activators of GDH1, but in the presence of 5'-phosphate-BCATm, they convert BCATm to PMP-BCATm, stimulating GDH1 activity. Sensitivity to ADP activation of GDH1 was unaffected by PMP-BCATm; however, addition of a 3 or higher molar ratio of PMP-BCATm to GDH1 protected GDH1 from GTP inhibition by 50%. Kinetic results suggest that GDH1 facilitates regeneration of the form of BCATm that binds to E1 decarboxylase of the BCKDC, promotes metabolon formation, branched-chain amino acid oxidation, and cycling of nitrogen through glutamate.

  17. Importance of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) in Clostridium difficile Colonization In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Braun, Sterling; Sirigireddy, Apoorva Reddy; Lopez, Jose Espinola; Govind, Revathi

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Major metabolic requirements for colonization and expansion of C. difficile after microbiota disturbance have not been fully determined. In this study, we show that glutamate utilization is important for C. difficile to establish itself in the animal gut. When the gluD gene, which codes for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), was disrupted, the mutant C. difficile was unable to colonize and cause disease in a hamster model. Further, from the complementation experiment it appears that extracellular GDH may be playing a role in promoting C. difficile colonization and disease progression. Quantification of free amino acids in the hamster gut during C. difficile infection showed that glutamate is among preferred amino acids utilized by C. difficile during its expansion. This study provides evidence of the importance of glutamate metabolism for C. difficile pathogenesis. PMID:27467167

  18. Importance of Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH) in Clostridium difficile Colonization In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Girinathan, Brintha Parasumanna; Braun, Sterling; Sirigireddy, Apoorva Reddy; Lopez, Jose Espinola; Govind, Revathi

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Major metabolic requirements for colonization and expansion of C. difficile after microbiota disturbance have not been fully determined. In this study, we show that glutamate utilization is important for C. difficile to establish itself in the animal gut. When the gluD gene, which codes for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), was disrupted, the mutant C. difficile was unable to colonize and cause disease in a hamster model. Further, from the complementation experiment it appears that extracellular GDH may be playing a role in promoting C. difficile colonization and disease progression. Quantification of free amino acids in the hamster gut during C. difficile infection showed that glutamate is among preferred amino acids utilized by C. difficile during its expansion. This study provides evidence of the importance of glutamate metabolism for C. difficile pathogenesis.

  19. Amino-Acid Sequence of NADP-Specific Glutamate Dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, John C.; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Holder, Anthony A.; Baron, Andrew J.; Taylor, John G.; Fincham, John R. S.; Blumenthal, Kenneth M.; Moon, Kenneth; Smith, Emil L.

    1974-01-01

    A tentative primary structure of the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase [L-glutamate: NADP oxidoreductase (deaminating), EC 1.4.1.4] from Neurospora crassa has been determined. The proposed sequence contains 452 amino-acid residues in each of the identical subunits of the hexameric enzyme. Comparison of the sequence with that of the bovine liver enzyme reveals considerable homology in the amino-terminal portion of the chain, including the vicinity of the reactive lysine, with only shorter stretches of homology within the carboxyl-terminal regions. The significance of this distribution of homologous regions is discussed. PMID:4155068

  20. Optical characterization of glutamate dehydrogenase monolayers chemisorbed on SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompa, P. P.; Blasi, L.; Longo, L.; Cingolani, R.; Ciccarella, G.; Vasapollo, G.; Rinaldi, R.; Rizzello, A.; Storelli, C.; Maffia, M.

    2003-04-01

    This paper describes the formation of glutamate dehydrogenase monolayers on silicon dioxide, and their characterization by means of physical techniques, i.e., fluorescence spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Detailed investigations of the intrinsic stability of native proteins in solution were carried out to elucidate the occurrence of conformational changes induced by the immobilization procedure. The enzyme monolayers were deposited on SiO2 after preexposing silicon surfaces to 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and reacting the silylated surfaces with glutaric dialdehyde. The optical characterization demonstrates that the immobilization does not interfere with the fold pattern of the native enzyme. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal denaturation, and quenching studies performed on the enzyme in solution well describe the folding and unfolding properties of glutamate dehydrogenase. The photophysical studies reported here are relevant for nanobioelectronics applications requiring protein immobilization on a chip.

  1. Purification of Mitochondrial Glutamate Dehydrogenase from Dark-Grown Soybean Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Turano, F. J.; Dashner, R.; Upadhyaya, A.; Caldwell, C. R.

    1996-11-01

    Proteins in extracts from cotyledons, hypocotyls, and roots of 5-d-old, dark-grown soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. cv Williams) seedlings were separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Three isoforms of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were resolved and visualized in gels stained for GDH activity. Two isoforms with high electrophoretic mobility, GDH1 and GDH2, were in protein extracts from cotyledons and a third isoform with the lowest electrophoretic mobility, GDH3, was identified in protein extracts from root and hypocotyls. Subcellular fractionation of dark-grown soybean tissues demonstrated that GDH3 was associated with intact mitochondria. GDH3 was purified to homogeneity, as determined by native and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. The isoenzyme was composed of a single 42-kD subunit. The pH optima for the reductive amination and the oxidative deamination reactions were 8.0 and 9.3, respectively. At any given pH, GDH activity was 12- to 50-fold higher in the direction of reductive amination than in the direction of the oxidative deamination reaction. GDH3 had a cofactor preference for NAD(H) over NADP(H). The apparent Michaelis constant values for [alpha]-ketoglutarate, ammonium, and NADH at pH 8.0 were 3.6, 35.5, and 0.07 mM, respectively. The apparent Michaelis constant values for glutamate and NAD were 15.8 and 0.10 mM at pH 9.3, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first biochemical and physical characterization of a purified mitochondrial NAD(H)-dependent GDH isoenzyme from soybean.

  2. The amino acid sequence of Neurospora NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. The tryptic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, J C; Taylor, J G; Jackson, A A; Chambers, G K; Fincham, J R

    1975-01-01

    The NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa was digested with trypsin, and peptides accounting for 441 out of the 452 residues of the polypeptide chain were isolated and substantially sequenced. Additional experimental detail has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50052 (11 pages) with the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, W. Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained under the terms given in Biochem J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1000

  3. Ethylene-Regulated Glutamate Dehydrogenase Fine-Tunes Metabolism during Anoxia-Reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Kuen-Jin; Lin, Chih-Yu; Ting, Chen-Yun; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-11-01

    Ethylene is an essential hormone in plants that is involved in low-oxygen and reoxygenation responses. As a key transcription factor in ethylene signaling, ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE3 (EIN3) activates targets that trigger various responses. However, most of these targets are still poorly characterized. Through analyses of our microarray data and the published Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) EIN3 chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data set, we inferred the putative targets of EIN3 during anoxia-reoxygenation. Among them, GDH2, which encodes one subunit of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), was chosen for further studies for its role in tricarboxylic acid cycle replenishment. We demonstrated that both GDH1 and GDH2 are induced during anoxia and reoxygenation and that this induction is mediated via ethylene signaling. In addition, the results of enzymatic assays showed that the level of GDH during anoxia-reoxygenation decreased in the ethylene-insensitive mutants ein2-5 and ein3eil1 Global metabolite analysis indicated that the deamination activity of GDH might regenerate 2-oxoglutarate, which is a cosubstrate that facilitates the breakdown of alanine by alanine aminotransferase when reoxygenation occurs. Moreover, ineffective tricarboxylic acid cycle replenishment, disturbed carbohydrate metabolism, reduced phytosterol biosynthesis, and delayed energy regeneration were found in gdh1gdh2 and ethylene mutants during reoxygenation. Taken together, these data illustrate the essential role of EIN3-regulated GDH activity in metabolic adjustment during anoxia-reoxygenation.

  4. Gene transcript accumulation and in situ mRNA hybridization of two putative glutamate dehydrogenase genes in etiolated Glycine max seedlings.

    PubMed

    Dimou, M; Tsaniklidis, G; Aivalakis, G; Katinakis, P

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (EC 1.4.1.2) is a multimeric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible amination of α-ketoglutarate to form glutamate. We characterized cDNA clones of two Glycine max sequences, GmGDH1 and GmGDH2, that code for putative α- and β-subunits, respectively, of the NADH dependent enzyme. Temporal and spatial gene transcript accumulation studies using semiquantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization have shown an overlapping gene transcript accumulation pattern with differences in relative gene transcript accumulation in the organs examined. Detection of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity in situ using a histochemical method showed concordance with the spatial gene transcript accumulation patterns. Our findings suggest that although the two gene transcripts are co-localized in roots of etiolated soybean seedlings, the ratio of the two subunits of the active holoenzyme may vary among tissues.

  5. Mutants of Aspergillus nidulans lacking nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Kinghorn, J R; Pateman, J A

    1976-01-01

    Ten mutants of Aspergillus nidulans lacking nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) have been isolated, and their mutations (gdhB1 through gdhB10) have been shown to lie in the gdhB gene. In addition, a temperature-sensitive gdhB mutant (gdhB11) has been isolated. A revertant (designated R-5) of the mutant gdhB1 bears an additional lesion in the gdhB gene and has altered NAD-GDH activity with altered Km values for ammonia or ammonium ions and for alpha-ketoglutarate. These results suggest that gdhB specifies a structural component for NAD-GDH. The growth characteristics of gdhB mutants indicate the routes by which amino acids are utilized as nitrogen and carbon energy sources. The properties are described of the double mutants bearing the mutations gdhB1 and gdhA1 or tamA119, which have low NADP-GDH activity. PMID:173707

  6. The NADP+-linked glutamate dehydrogenase from Trypanosoma cruzi: sequence, genomic organization and expression.

    PubMed Central

    Barderi, P; Campetella, O; Frasch, A C; Santomé, J A; Hellman, U; Pettersson, U; Cazzulo, J J

    1998-01-01

    NADP-linked glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP+-GluDH, EC 1.4.1.4) has been purified to homogeneity from epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi by an improved procedure, and the amino acid sequences of 11 internal peptides obtained by digestion with trypsin, endopeptidase Lys-C, endopeptidase Arg-C or CNBr have been obtained. Using oligonucleotide primers synthesized according to the amino acid sequence of the N-terminus of the mature enzyme and to the nucleotide sequence of a clone corresponding to the C-terminus, obtained by immunological screening of an expression library, two complete open reading frames (TcGluDH1 and TcGluDH2) were isolated and sequenced. The sequences obtained are most similar to that of the NADP+-GluDH of Escherichia coli (70-72% identity), and less similar (50-56%) to those of lower eukaryotes. Using TcGluDH1 as a probe, evidence for the presence of several genes and developmental regulation of the expression of NADP+-GluDH in different parasite stages was obtained. TcGluDH1 encodes an enzymically active protein, since its expression in E. coli resulted in the production of a GluDH activity with kinetic parameters similar to those of the natural enzyme. PMID:9480915

  7. α-Ketoglutarate Dehydrogenase and Glutamate Dehydrogenase Work in Tandem To Modulate the Antioxidant α-Ketoglutarate during Oxidative Stress in Pseudomonas fluorescens▿

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Ryan J.; Singh, Ranji; Brewer, Guy; Auger, Christopher; Lemire, Joseph; Appanna, Vasu D.

    2009-01-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (KG) is a crucial metabolite in all living organisms, as it participates in a variety of biochemical processes. We have previously shown that this keto acid is an antioxidant and plays a key role in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In an effort to further confirm this intriguing phenomenon, Pseudomonas fluorescens was exposed to menadione-containing media, with various amino acids as the sources of nitrogen. Here, we demonstrate that KG dehydrogenase (KGDH) and NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) work in tandem to modulate KG homeostasis. While KGDH was sharply decreased in cells challenged with menadione, GDH was markedly increased in cultures containing arginine (Arg), glutamate (Glu), and proline (Pro). When ammonium (NH4) was utilized as the nitrogen source, both KGDH and GDH levels were diminished. These enzymatic profiles were reversed when control cells were incubated in menadione media. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and high-performance liquid chromatography studies revealed how KG was utilized to eliminate ROS with the concomitant formation of succinate. The accumulation of KG in the menadione-treated cells was dependent on the redox status of the lipoic acid residue in KGDH. Indeed, the treatment of cellular extracts from the menadione-exposed cells with dithiothreitol, a reducing agent, partially restored the activity of KGDH. Taken together, these data reveal that KG is pivotal to the antioxidative defense strategy of P. fluorescens and also point to the ROS-sensing role for KGDH. PMID:19376872

  8. Amino acid substitutions at glutamate-354 in dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli lower the sensitivity of pyruvate dehydrogenase to NADH.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhentao; Do, Phi Minh; Rhee, Mun Su; Govindasamy, Lakshmanan; Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2012-05-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) of Escherichia coli is inhibited by NADH. This inhibition is partially reversed by mutational alteration of the dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (LPD) component of the PDH complex (E354K or H322Y). Such a mutation in lpd led to a PDH complex that was functional in an anaerobic culture as seen by restoration of anaerobic growth of a pflB, ldhA double mutant of E. coli utilizing a PDH- and alcohol dehydrogenase-dependent homoethanol fermentation pathway. The glutamate at position 354 in LPD was systematically changed to all of the other natural amino acids to evaluate the physiological consequences. These amino acid replacements did not affect the PDH-dependent aerobic growth. With the exception of E354M, all changes also restored PDH-dependent anaerobic growth of and fermentation by an ldhA, pflB double mutant. The PDH complex with an LPD alteration E354G, E354P or E354W had an approximately 20-fold increase in the apparent K(i) for NADH compared with the native complex. The apparent K(m) for pyruvate or NAD(+) for the mutated forms of PDH was not significantly different from that of the native enzyme. A structural model of LPD suggests that the amino acid at position 354 could influence movement of NADH from its binding site to the surface. These results indicate that glutamate at position 354 plays a structural role in establishing the NADH sensitivity of LPD and the PDH complex by restricting movement of the product/substrate NADH, although this amino acid is not directly associated with NAD(H) binding.

  9. Purification and side chain selective chemical modifications of glutamate dehydrogenase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yinyun; Wang, Jiale; Qian, Bingjun; Song, Guangyan; Yao, Xiaomin; Zhang, Jian-hua

    2014-04-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) from Bacillus subtilis natto was purified to apparent homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, and hydroxyapatite (HA) affinity chromatography. The GDH was purified 34-fold, with a yield of 41 % of total activity and a specific activity of 34.29 U/mg proteins. The molecular weight (Mr) of was measured at 47 kDa with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and 264 kDa with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The optimum pH and temperature for the deammoniation reaction were measured to be 7.5 and 30 °C, respectively. The active-site amino acid residues of GDH were investigated by chemical modification. The compounds 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS), phenylglyoxal (PG), and phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) were used to modify lysine, arginine, and serine active site residues, respectively. After treatment with modifying reagents at concentrations of 1 mM, GDH activity fell to 10.7 % with TNBS, 83.3 % with PG, and 12.8 % with PMSF. However, with substrate protection, there was almost no loss in GDH activity following treatment with any modifying reagent. The kinetic parameters K m and V max were determined in each case. K m values for native GDH, 50 % TNBS-inactivated GDH, and 50 % PMSF-inactivated GDH were 0.037, 0.104, and 0.017 mM, respectively. V max values were 0.048, 0.022, and 0.031 mM/s, respectively. These results suggest that the active site contains one or more lysine residues that play a role in substrate binding and one or more serine residues that may maintain the enzyme conformation. However, arginine residues played less of a role in the activity of GDH.

  10. Expression of root glutamate dehydrogenase genes in tobacco plants subjected to boron deprivation.

    PubMed

    Beato, Víctor M; Teresa Navarro-Gochicoa, M; Rexach, Jesús; Begoña Herrera-Rodríguez, M; Camacho-Cristóbal, Juan J; Kempa, Stefan; Weckwerth, Wolfram; González-Fontes, Agustín

    2011-11-01

    Recently it has been reported that boron (B) deficiency increases the expression of Nicotiana tabacum asparagine synthetase (AS) gene in roots, and that AS might play a main role as a detoxifying mechanism to convert ammonium into asparagine. Interestingly, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) genes, Ntgdh-NAD;A1 and Ntgdh-NAD;B2, were up-regulated when tobacco roots were subjected to B deprivation for 8 and 24 h. In addition, aminating and deaminating GDH (EC 1.4.1.2) activities were higher in B-deficient than in B-sufficient plants after 24 h of B deficiency. Ammonium concentrations were kept sufficiently low and with similar values in B-deficient roots when compared to control. Glucose and fructose contents decreased after 24 h of B deprivation. This drop in hexoses, which was corroborated by metabolomic analysis, correlated with higher GDH gene expression. Furthermore, metabolomic profiling showed that concentrations of several organic acids, phenolics, and amino acids increased after 24 h of B deficiency. Our results suggest that GDH enzyme plays an important role in metabolic acclimation of tobacco roots to B deprivation. A putative model to explain these results is proposed and discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Selection and characterization of DNA aptamers for detection of glutamate dehydrogenase from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Yin, Qingxin; Brennan, John D; Li, Yingfu

    2017-09-04

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) is crucial for patient treatment, infection control and epidemiological monitoring. As an important antigen, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) has been proposed as a preliminary screening test target for CDI. However, current assays based on GDH activity or GDH immunoassays have suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Herein, we described the selection and characterization of single-stranded DNA aptamers that specifically targeted GDH. After 10 rounds of selection, high-throughput sequencing was used to identify enriched aptamer candidates. Of 10 candidates, three aptamers for GDH were identified. Gel shift assays showed that these aptamers exhibited low nanomolar affinities. One aptamer was optimized based on structural analysis and further engineered into a structure-switching fluorescence signaling aptamer, wherein desorption from reduced graphene oxide (RGO) upon binding of GDH led to an increase in fluorescence emission. This method allowed for quantitative detection of GDH with a detection limit of 1 nM, providing great potential for its further application in CDI diagnosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Expression, purification and characterization of human glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) allosteric regulatory mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jie; Hsu, Betty Y L; MacMullen, Courtney M; Poncz, Mortimer; Smith, Thomas J; Stanley, Charles A

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) catalyses the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate in the mitochondrial matrix. In mammals, this enzyme is highly regulated by allosteric effectors. The major allosteric activator and inhibitor are ADP and GTP, respectively; allosteric activation by leucine may play an important role in amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion. The physiological significance of this regulation has been highlighted by the identification of children with an unusual hyperinsulinism/hyperammonaemia syndrome associated with dominant mutations in GDH that cause a loss in GTP inhibition. In order to determine the effects of these mutations on the function of the human GDH homohexamer, we studied the expression, purification and characterization of two of these regulatory mutations (H454Y, which affects the putative GTP-binding site, and S448P, which affects the antenna region) and a mutation designed to alter the putative binding site for ADP (R463A). The sensitivity to GTP inhibition was impaired markedly in the purified H454Y (ED(50), 210 microM) and S448P (ED(50), 3.1 microM) human GDH mutants compared with the wild-type human GDH (ED(50), 42 nM) or GDH isolated from heterozygous patient cells (ED(50), 290 and 280 nM, respectively). Sensitivity to ADP or leucine stimulation was unaffected by these mutations, confirming that they interfere specifically with the inhibitory GTP-binding site. Conversely, the R463A mutation completely eliminated ADP activation of human GDH, but had little effect on either GTP inhibition or leucine activation. The effects of these three mutations on ATP regulation indicated that this nucleotide inhibits human GDH through binding of its triphosphate tail to the GTP site and, at higher concentrations, activates the enzyme through binding of the nucleotide to the ADP site. These data confirm the assignment of the GTP and ADP allosteric regulatory sites on GDH based on X-ray crystallography and provide

  13. Structure of NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli--reflections on the basis of coenzyme specificity in the family of glutamate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Michael A; Oliveira, Tânia F; Engel, Paul C; Khan, Amir R

    2013-09-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDHs; EC 1.4.1.2-4) catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, using NAD(+) and/or NADP(+) as a cofactor. Subunits of homo-hexameric bacterial enzymes comprise a substrate-binding domain I followed by a nucleotide-binding domain II. The reaction occurs in a catalytic cleft between the two domains. Although conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domains of various dehydrogenases have been linked to cofactor preferences, the structural basis for specificity in the GDH family remains poorly understood. Here, the refined crystal structure of Escherichia coli GDH in the absence of reactants is described at 2.5-Å resolution. Modelling of NADP(+) in domain II reveals the potential contribution of positively charged residues from a neighbouring α-helical hairpin to phosphate recognition. In addition, a serine that follows the P7 aspartate is presumed to form a hydrogen bond with the 2'-phosphate. Mutagenesis and kinetic analysis confirms the importance of these residues in NADP(+) recognition. Surprisingly, one of the positively charged residues is conserved in all sequences of NAD(+)-dependent enzymes, but the conformations adopted by the corresponding regions in proteins whose structure has been solved preclude their contribution to the coordination of the 2'-ribose phosphate of NADP(+). These studies clarify the sequence-structure relationships in bacterial GDHs, revealing that identical residues may specify different coenzyme preferences, depending on the structural context. Primary sequence alone is therefore not a reliable guide for predicting coenzyme specificity. We also consider how it is possible for a single sequence to accommodate both coenzymes in the dual-specificity GDHs of animals.

  14. Structure of NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Escherichia coli - reflections on the basis of coenzyme specificity in the family of glutamate dehydrogenases

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, Michael A.; Oliveira, Tânia F.; Engel, Paul C.; Khan, Amir R.

    2013-09-05

    Glutamate dehydrogenases catalyse the oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to α-ketoglutarate, using NAD+ and/or NADP+ as a cofactor. Subunits of homo-hexameric bacterial enzymes comprise a substrate-binding domain I followed by a nucleotide-binding domain II. The reaction occurs in a catalytic cleft between the two domains. Although conserved residues in the nucleotide-binding domains of various dehydrogenases have been linked to cofactor preferences, the structural basis for specificity in the GDH family remains poorly understood. Here, the refined crystal structure of Escherichia coli GDH in the absence of reactants is described at 2.5-Å resolution. Modelling of NADP+ in domain II reveals the potential contribution of positively charged residues from a neighbouring α-helical hairpin to phosphate recognition. In addition, a serine that follows the P7 aspartate is presumed to form a hydrogen bond with the 2'-phosphate. Mutagenesis and kinetic analysis confirms the importance of these residues in NADP+ recognition. Surprisingly, one of the positively charged residues is conserved in all sequences of NAD+-dependent enzymes, but the conformations adopted by the corresponding regions in proteins whose structure has been solved preclude their contribution to the coordination of the 2'-ribose phosphate of NADP+. These studies clarify the sequence–structure relationships in bacterial GDHs, revealing that identical residues may specify different coenzyme preferences, depending on the structural context. Primary sequence alone is therefore not a reliable guide for predicting coenzyme specificity. We also consider how it is possible for a single sequence to accommodate both coenzymes in the dual-specificity GDHs of animals.

  15. A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking catabolic NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. Growth characteristics of the mutant and regulation of enzyme synthesis in the wild-type strain.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, W J; van Eijk, J; van Renesse, R; Blijham, J M

    1978-01-01

    NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-B) was induced in a wild-type strain derived of alpha-sigma 1278b by alpha-amino acids, the nitrogen of which according to known degradative pathways is transferred to 2-oxoglutarate. A recessive mutant (gdhB) devoid of GDH-B activity grew more slowly than the wild type if one of these amino acids was the sole source of nitrogen. Addition of ammonium chloride, glutamine, asparagine or serine to growth media with inducing alpha-amino acids as the main nitrogen source increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant to the wild-type level and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the wild type. Arginine, urea and allantoin similarly increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the presence of glutamate, but not in the presence of aspartate, alanine or proline as the main nitrogen source. These observations are consistent with the view that GDH-B in vivo deaminates glutamate. Ammonium ions are required for the biosynthesis of glutamine, asparagine, arginine, histidine and purine and pyrimidine bases. Aspartate and alanine apparently are more potent inducers of GDH-B than glutamate. Anabolic NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-A) can not fulfil the function of GDH-B in the gdhB mutant. This is concluded from the equal growth rates in glutamate, aspartate and proline media as observed with a gdhB mutant and with a gdhA, gdhB double mutant in which both glutamate dehydrogenases area lacking. The double mutant showed an anomalous growth behaviour, growth rates on several nitrogen sources being unexpectedly low.

  16. NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase is essential for the survival of Arabidopsis thaliana during dark-induced carbon starvation.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Yo; Good, Allen G

    2008-01-01

    Interconversion between glutamate and 2-oxoglutarate, which can be catalysed by glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), is a key reaction in plant carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism. However, the physiological role of plant GDH has been a controversial issue for several decades. To elucidate the function of GDH, the expression of GDH in various tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana was studied. Results suggested that the expression of two Arabidopsis GDH genes was differently regulated depending on the organ/tissue types and cellular C availability. Moreover, Arabidopsis mutants defective in GDH genes were identified and characterized. The two isolated mutants, gdh1-2 and gdh2-1, were crossed to make a double knockout mutant, gdh1-2/gdh2-1, which contained negligible levels of NAD(H)-dependent GDH activity. Phenotypic analysis on these mutants revealed an increased susceptibility of gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants to C-deficient conditions. This conditional phenotype of the double knockout mutant supports the catabolic role of GDH and its role in fuelling the TCA cycle during C starvation. The reduced rate of glutamate catabolism in the gdh2-1 and gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants was also evident by the growth retardation of these mutants when glutamate was supplied as the alternative N source. Furthermore, amino acid profiles during prolonged dark conditions were significantly different between WT and the gdh mutant plants. For instance, glutamate levels increased in WT plants but decreased in gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants, and aberrant accumulation of several amino acids was detected in the gdh1-2/gdh2-1 plants. These results suggest that GDH plays a central role in amino acid breakdown under C-deficient conditions.

  17. Disruption of the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase affects the morphology of two industrial strains of Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Thykaer, Jette; Rueksomtawin, Kanchana; Noorman, Henk; Nielsen, Jens

    2009-02-23

    New morphological aspects of Penicillium chrysogenum were found during physiological characterisation of two NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase mutant strains. A morphological characterisation of the previously constructed strains, together with the two beta-lactam producing industrial recipient strains, was conducted. The reference strains showed a compact structure with highly branched hyphal elements whereas the morphology of the DeltagdhA strains consisting of long elongated hyphal elements with few branches. On solid medium, the hyphal growth unit (length) increased from an average of 47 microm tip(-1) in the reference strains to 117 microm tip(-1) in the DeltagdhA strains and in submerged cultures a decrease of 18% in branching frequency was measured due to the gdhA deletion. P. chrysogenum Wis 54-1255, the ancestor of most production strains was also characterised and this strain showed morphology similar to the industrial strains. Interestingly, the constructed strains showed morphology similar to wild type Aspergillus nidulans another species carrying the penicillin biosynthetic cluster. Thus, the results showed that elimination of glutamate dehydrogenase activity in high producing strains of P. chrysogenum has a radical impact on morphology.

  18. Reduced levels of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase decrease the glutamate content of ripe tomato fruit but have no effect on green fruit or leaves.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Gisela; D'Angelo, Matilde; Sulpice, Ronan; Stitt, Mark; Valle, Estela M

    2015-06-01

    Glutamate (Glu) is a taste enhancer that contributes to the characteristic flavour of foods. In fruit of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), the Glu content increases dramatically during the ripening process, becoming the most abundant free amino acid when the fruit become red. There is also a concomitant increase in NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) activity during the ripening transition. This enzyme is located in the mitochondria and catalyses the reversible amination of 2-oxoglutarate to Glu. To investigate the potential effect of GDH on Glu metabolism, the abundance of GDH was altered by artificial microRNA technology. Efficient silencing of all the endogenous SlGDH genes was achieved, leading to a dramatic decrease in total GDH activity. This decrease in GDH activity did not lead to any clear morphological or metabolic phenotype in leaves or green fruit. However, red fruit on the transgenic plants showed markedly reduced levels of Glu and a large increase in aspartate, glucose and fructose content in comparison to wild-type fruit. These results suggest that GDH is involved in the synthesis of Glu in tomato fruit during the ripening processes. This contrasts with the biological role ascribed to GDH in many other tissues and species. Overall, these findings suggest that GDH has a major effect on the control of metabolic composition during tomato fruit ripening, but not at other stages of development.

  19. Coimmobilization of urease and glutamate dehydrogenase in electrochemically prepared polypyrrole-polyvinyl sulfonate films.

    PubMed

    Gambhir, A; Gerard, M; Mulchandani, A K; Malhotra, B D

    2001-01-01

    Immobilization of urease and glutamate dehydrogenase enzymes in electrochemically prepared polypyrrole-polyvinyl sulfonate films (PPY-PVS) was carried out using physical adsorption and electrochemical entrapment techniques. Detailed studies on optimum pH, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and scanning electron microscopy of the enzymes in the immobilized state were conducted. The value of the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant was experimentally determined to be 2.5 and 2.7 for physically adsorbed and electrochemically entrapped urease in PPY-PVS films, respectively.

  20. Glutamate dehydrogenase requirement for apoptosis induced by aristolochic acid in renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Victor; Whyard, Terry; Bonala, Radha; Johnson, Francis; Grollman, Arthur

    2011-12-01

    Ingestion of aristolochic acids (AA) contained in herbal remedies results in a renal disease and, frequently, urothelial malignancy. The genotoxicity of AA in renal cells, including mutagenic DNA adduct formation, is well-documented. However, the mechanisms of AA-induced tubular atrophy and renal fibrosis are largely unknown. Epithelial cell death is a critical characteristic of these pathological conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms of AA-induced cytotoxicity, we explored AA-interacting proteins in tubular epithelial cells (TEC). We found that AA interacts with a mitochondrial enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and moderately inhibits its activity. We report that AA induces cell death in GDH-knockdown TEC preferentially via non-apoptotic means, whereas in GDH-positive cells, death was executed by both the non-apoptotic and apoptotic mechanisms. Apoptosis is an energy-reliant process and demands higher adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) consumption than does the non-apoptotic cell death. We found that, after AAI treatment, the ATP depletion is more pronounced in GDH-knockdown cells. When we reduced ATP in TEC cells by inhibition of glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration, cell death mode switched from apoptosis and necrosis to necrosis only. In addition, in cells incubated at low glucose and no glutamine conditions, oxaloacetate and pyruvate reduced AAI-induced apoptosis our data suggest that AAI-GDH interactions in TEC are critical for the induction of apoptosis by direct inhibition of GDH activity. AA binding may also induce changes in GDH conformation and promote interactions with other molecules or impair signaling by GDH metabolic products, leading to apoptosis.

  1. Control of carbon flux to glutamate excretion in Klebsiella pneumoniae: the role of the indigenous plasmid and its encoded isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    El-Mansi, Mansi; Trappey, Francois; Clark, Ewan; Campbell, Malcolm

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (NCTC, CL687/80) harbors a large indigenous plasmid (p(C3)), which in addition to encoding for citrate utilization, proline synthesis and glutamate excretion, it uniquely carries the structural gene (icd); encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH). Flux analysis revealed that ICDH, despite its role in the generation of NADPH required for glutamate dehydrogenase, is not rate-limiting (controlling) in central metabolism as evidenced by a negative flux control coefficient and an adverse effect of overexpression (14-fold) on glutamate excretion. More significantly, however, this paper presents, for the first time, clear evidence that the accumulation of glutamate and its subsequent excretion is associated with the C3 plasmid-encoded regulatory elements, which trigger a shift-down in the activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, both in the K. pneumoniae parental strain as well as in the E. coli exconjugants strains. This finding opens the door for the exploitation of regulatory elements as a tool for manipulating flux in microbial cell factories.

  2. Reconfiguration of N Metabolism upon Hypoxia Stress and Recovery: Roles of Alanine Aminotransferase (AlaAT) and Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH)

    PubMed Central

    Diab, Houssein; Limami, Anis M.

    2016-01-01

    In the context of climatic change, more heavy precipitation and more frequent flooding and waterlogging events threaten the productivity of arable farmland. Furthermore, crops were not selected to cope with flooding- and waterlogging-induced oxygen limitation. In general, low oxygen stress, unlike other abiotic stresses (e.g., cold, high temperature, drought and saline stress), received little interest from the scientific community and less financial support from stakeholders. Accordingly, breeding programs should be developed and agronomical practices should be adapted in order to save plants’ growth and yield—even under conditions of low oxygen availability (e.g., submergence and waterlogging). The prerequisite to the success of such breeding programs and changes in agronomical practices is a good knowledge of how plants adapt to low oxygen stress at the cellular and the whole plant level. In the present paper, we summarized the recent knowledge on metabolic adjustment in general under low oxygen stress and highlighted thereafter the major changes pertaining to the reconfiguration of amino acids syntheses. We propose a model showing (i) how pyruvate derived from active glycolysis upon hypoxia is competitively used by the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate synthase cycle, leading to alanine accumulation and NAD+ regeneration. Carbon is then saved in a nitrogen store instead of being lost through ethanol fermentative pathway. (ii) During the post-hypoxia recovery period, the alanine aminotransferase/glutamate dehydrogenase cycle mobilizes this carbon from alanine store. Pyruvate produced by the reverse reaction of alanine aminotransferase is funneled to the TCA cycle, while deaminating glutamate dehydrogenase regenerates, reducing equivalent (NADH) and 2-oxoglutarate to maintain the cycle function. PMID:27258319

  3. Characterization and dietary regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase in different ploidy fishes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Shaojun; Zhong, Huan; Zhang, Chun; kang, Xuewei; Liu, Yun

    2012-12-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) plays a crucial role in amino acid deamination and has been used as an inductor of nutrients metabolism. In this study, we cloned and analyzed the GDH cDNAs in diploids (red crucian carp), triploids and tetraploids and characterized their expression profiles upon dietary treatments. Results showed a high sequence similarity of GDH among the three kinds of ploidy fishes and other vertebrates. Expression analysis revealed that GDH exhibited a distinct spatial pattern of expression in different types of fishes. The triploids and tetraploids had higher levels of expression than diploids in heart, liver, gill, muscle, fore-gut and mid-gut. The GDH expression was also developmentally regulated with a stronger expression around blastula stage. The maternal GDH transcripts were first detected from eggs and their expression dropped down from the gastrula stage to heart beat stage. Adult triploids showed the highest levels of GDH expression in liver during breeding season which may contribute to the good appetite and fast growth. In addition, triploids exhibited high growth rates and excess GDH expression compared with other two types of fishes. The liver GDH enzyme activities were also higher in triploids than red crucian carp and tetraploids. Moreover, GDH expression is regulated by dietary protein levels. Fish fed with either high or low protein diets showed higher levels of GDH expression. In summary, our results demonstrated for the first time that the different ploidy fishes had different patterns of GDH mRNA expression during development, breeding and non-breeding seasons, and as well dietary effects from different protein levels in diet. These data indicate that abundant GDH expression may play an important role in growth rates in triploids.

  4. Characterization and expression of NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Turano, F J; Thakkar, S S; Fang, T; Weisemann, J M

    1997-04-01

    Two distinct cDNA clones encoding NAD(H)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD[H]-GDH) in Arabidopsis thaliana were identified and sequenced. The genes corresponding to these cDNA clones were designated GDH1 and GDH2. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences suggest that both gene products contain putative mitochondrial transit polypeptides and NAD(H)- and alpha-ketoglutarate-binding domains. Subcellular fractionation confirmed the mitochondrial location of the NAD(H)-GDH isoenzymes. In addition, a putative EF-hand loop, shown to be associated with Ca2+ binding, was identified in the GDH2 gene product but not in the GDH1 gene product. GDH1 encodes a 43.0-kD polypeptide, designated alpha, and GDH2 encodes a 42.5-kD polypeptide, designated beta. The two subunits combine in different ratios to form seven NAD(H)-GDH isoenzymes. The slowest-migrating isoenzyme in a native gel, GDH1, is a homohexamer composed of alpha subunits, and the fastest-migrating isoenzyme, GDH7, is a homohexamer composed of beta subunits. GDH isoenzymes 2 through 6 are heterohexamers composed of different ratios of alpha and beta subunits. NAD(H)-GDH isoenzyme patterns varied among different plant organs and in leaves of plants irrigated with different nitrogen sources or subjected to darkness for 4 d. Conversely, there were little or no measurable changes in isoenzyme patterns in roots of plants treated with different nitrogen sources. In most instances, changes in isoenzyme patterns were correlated with relative differences in the level of alpha and beta subunits. Likewise, the relative difference in the level of alpha or beta subunits was correlated with changes in the level of GDH1 or GDH2 transcript detected in each sample, suggesting that NAD(H)-GDH activity is controlled at least in part at the transcriptional level.

  5. Organ-specific expression of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) subunits in yellow lupine.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Teresa; Dabert, Mirosława; Nowak, Witold

    2011-07-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH, EC 1.4.2-4) is present in yellow lupine (Lupinus luteus cv. Juno) in many isoforms. The number and banding pattern of isoenzymes varies with respect to plant organ and developmental stage. To better understand the complex nature of GDH regulation in plants, the levels of GDH transcripts, enzyme activity and isoenzyme patterns in germinating seeds and roots of yellow lupine were examined. The analysis of GDH cDNA sequences in lupine revealed three mRNA types, of which two encoded the β-GDH subunit and one encoded the α-GDH subunit (corresponding to the GDH1(GDH3) and GDH2 genes, respectively). The relative expression of GDH1 and GDH2 genes was analyzed in various lupine organs by using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results indicate that different mRNA types were differently regulated depending on organ type. Although both genes appeared to be ubiquitously expressed in all lupine tissues, the GDH1 transcripts evidently predominated over those of GDH2. Immunochemical analyses confirmed that, during embryo development, varied expression of two GDH subunits takes place. The α-GDH subunit (43kDa) predominated in the early stages of germinating seeds, while the β-GDH subunit (44kDa) was the only GDH polypeptide present in lupine roots. These results firmly support the hypothesis that isoenzyme variability of GDH in yellow lupine is associated with the varied expression of α and β subunits into the complexes of hexameric GDH forms. The presence of several isogenes of GDH in yellow lupine may explain the high number (over 20) of its molecular forms in germinating lupine.

  6. Exacerbation of NMDA, AMPA, and L-glutamate excitotoxicity by the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate.

    PubMed

    Greene, J G; Greenamyre, J T

    1995-05-01

    We report that a subtoxic dose of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) inhibitor malonate greatly enhances the neurotoxicity of three different excitatory amino acid agonists: N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), S-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (S-AMPA), and L-glutamate. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, intrastriatal stereotaxic injection of malonate alone (0.6 mumol), NMDA alone (15 nmol), S-AMPA alone (1 nmol), or glutamate alone (0.6 mumol) produced negligible toxicity as assessed by measurement of lesion volume. Coinjection of subtoxic malonate with NMDA produced a large lesion (15.2 +/- 1.4 mm3), as did coinjection of malonate with S-AMPA (11.0 +/- 1.0 mm3) or glutamate (12.8 +/- 0.7 mm3). Administration of the noncompetitive NMDA antagonist MK-801 (5 mg/kg i.p.) completely blocked the toxicity of malonate plus NMDA (0.5 +/- 0.3 mm3). This dose of MK-801 had little effect on the lesion produced by malonate plus S-AMPA (9.0 +/- 0.7 mm3), but it attenuated the toxicity of malonate plus glutamate by approximately 40% (7.5 +/- 0.9 mm3). Coinjection of the AMPA antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo(f)-quinoxaline (NBQX; 2 nmol) had no effect on malonate plus NMDA or malonate plus glutamate toxicity (12.3 +/- 1.8 and 14.0 +/- 0.9 mm3, respectively) but greatly attenuated malonate plus S-AMPA toxicity (1.5 +/- 0.9 mm3). Combination of the two antagonists conferred no additional neuroprotection in any paradigm. These results indicate that metabolic inhibition exacerbates both NMDA receptor- and non-NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  8. Biochemical changes of the synovial liquid of corpses with regard to the cause of death. 2: Alkaline phosphatase, lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH), and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT).

    PubMed

    More, D S; Arroyo, M C

    1985-04-01

    We studied the activity of various enzymes in the synovial liquid of 100 corpses with regard to the cause of death finding that the alkaline phospatase and glutamic oxalacetic transaminase (GOT) are increased in cranioencephalic trauma, possibly as a result of the important cellular lysis which goes with them; and lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH) is increased in the pulmonary processes, almost certainly with relation to the great quantity of this enzyme in the lung.

  9. Physiological and genetic analysis of the carbon regulation of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Coschigano, P W; Miller, S M; Magasanik, B

    1991-09-01

    We found that cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have an elevated level of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH; encoded by the GDH2 gene) when grown with a nonfermentable carbon source or with limiting amounts of glucose, even in the presence of the repressing nitrogen source glutamine. This regulation was found to be transcriptional, and an upstream activation site (GDH2 UASc) sufficient for activation of transcription during respiratory growth conditions was identified. This UAS was found to be separable from a neighboring element which is necessary for the nitrogen source regulation of the gene, and strains deficient for the GLN3 gene product, required for expression of NAD-GDH during growth with the activating nitrogen source glutamate, were unaffected for the expression of NAD-GDH during growth with activating carbon sources. Two classes of mutations which prevented the normal activation of NAD-GDH in response to growth with nonfermentable carbon sources, but which did not affect the nitrogen-regulated expression of NAD-GDH, were found and characterized. Carbon regulation of GDH2 was found to be normal in hxk2, hap3, and hap4 strains and to be only slightly altered in a ssn6 strain; thus, in comparison with the regulation of previously identified glucose-repressed genes, a new pathway appears to be involved in the regulation of GDH2.

  10. Arabidopsis mutant analysis and gene regulation define a nonredundant role for glutamate dehydrogenase in nitrogen assimilation.

    PubMed

    Melo-Oliveira, R; Oliveira, I C; Coruzzi, G M

    1996-05-14

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is ubiquitous to all organisms, yet its role in higher plants remains enigmatic. To better understand the role of GDH in plant nitrogen metabolism, we have characterized an Arabidopsis mutant (gdh1-1) defective in one of two GDH gene products and have studied GDH1 gene expression. GDH1 mRNA accumulates to highest levels in dark-adapted or sucrose-starved plants, and light or sucrose treatment each repress GDH1 mRNA accumulation. These results suggest that the GDH1 gene product functions in the direction of glutamate catabolism under carbon-limiting conditions. Low levels of GDH1 mRNA present in leaves of light-grown plants can be induced by exogenously supplied ammonia. Under such conditions of carbon and ammonia excess, GDH1 may function in the direction of glutamate biosynthesis. The Arabidopsis gdh-deficient mutant allele gdh1-1 cosegregates with the GDH1 gene and behaves as a recessive mutation. The gdh1-1 mutant displays a conditional phenotype in that seedling growth is specifically retarded on media containing exogenously supplied inorganic nitrogen. These results suggest that GDH1 plays a nonredundant role in ammonia assimilation under conditions of inorganic nitrogen excess. This notion is further supported by the fact that the levels of mRNA for GDH1 and chloroplastic glutamine synthetase (GS2) are reciprocally regulated by light.

  11. The effect of pH and ADP on ammonia affinity for human glutamate dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Zaganas, Ioannis; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Wendel Nielsen, Camilla; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) uses ammonia to reversibly convert α-ketoglutarate to glutamate using NADP(H) and NAD(H) as cofactors. While GDH in most mammals is encoded by a single GLUD1 gene, humans and other primates have acquired a GLUD2 gene with distinct tissue expression profile. The two human isoenzymes (hGDH1 and hGDH2), though highly homologous, differ markedly in their regulatory properties. Here we obtained hGDH1 and hGDH2 in recombinant form and studied their Km for ammonia in the presence of 1.0 mM ADP. The analyses showed that lowering the pH of the buffer (from 8.0 to 7.0) increased the Km for ammonia substantially (hGDH1: from 12.8 ± 1.4 mM to 57.5 ± 1.6 mM; hGDH2: from 14.7 ± 1.6 mM to 62.2 ± 1.7 mM), thus essentially precluding reductive amination. Moreover, lowering the ADP concentration to 0.1 mM not only increased the K0.5 [NH4 (+)] of hGDH2, but also introduced a positive cooperative binding phenomenon in this isoenzyme. Hence, intra-mitochondrial acidification, as occurring in astrocytes during glutamatergic transmission should favor the oxidative deamination of glutamate. Similar considerations apply to the handling of glutamate by the proximal convoluted tubules of the kidney during systemic acidosis. The reverse could apply for conditions of local or systemic hyperammonemia or alkalosis.

  12. Glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzyme 3 (GDH3) of Arabidopsis thaliana is regulated by a combined effect of nitrogen and cytokinin.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Laura; Degola, Francesca; Polverini, Eugenia; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Dubois, Frédéric; Hirel, Bertrand; Restivo, Francesco Maria

    2013-12-01

    In higher plants, NAD(H)-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.4.1.2) is an abundant enzyme that exists in different isoenzymic forms. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three genes (Gdh1, Gdh2 and Gdh3) encode three different GDH subunits (β, α and γ) that randomly associate to form a complex array of homo- and heterohexamers. The modification of the GDH isoenzyme pattern and its regulation was studied during the development of A. thaliana in the gdh1, gdh2 single mutants and the gdh1-2 double mutant, with particular emphasis on GDH3. Investigations showed that the GDH3 isoenzyme could not be detected in closely related Arabidopsis species. The induction and regulation of GDH3 activity in the leaves and roots was investigated following nitrogen deprivation in the presence or absence of sucrose or kinetin. These experiments indicate that GDH3 is likely to play an important role during senescence and nutrient remobilization.

  13. Purification and Characterization of Glutamine Synthetase and NADP-Glutamate Dehydrogenase from the Ectomycorrhizal Fungus Laccaria laccata 1

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Annick; Chalot, Michel; Botton, Bernard; Martin, Francis

    1992-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) and NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) play a key role in nitrogen assimilation in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria laccata (Scop. ex Fr. Cke) strain S 238. The two enzymes were purified to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity by a three-step procedure involving diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Trisacryl and affinity chromatography, and DEAE-5PW fast protein liquid chromatography. This purification scheme resulted in a 23 and 62% recovery of the initial activity for GS and NADP-GDH, respectively. Purified GS had a specific activity of 713 nanomoles per second per milligram protein and a pH optimum of 7.2. Michaelis constants (millimolar) for the substrates were NH4+ (0.024), glutamate (3.2), glutamine (30), ATP (0.18), and ADP (0.002). The molecular weight (Mr) of native GS was approximately 380,000; it was composed of eight identical subunits of Mr 42,000. Purified NADP-GDH had a specific activity of 4130 nanomoles per second per milligram protein and a pH optimum of 7.2 (amination reaction). Michaelis constants (millimolar) for the substrates were NH4+ (5), 2-oxoglutarate (1), glutamate (26), NADPH (0.01), and NADP (0.03). Native NADP-GDH was a hexamer with a Mr of about 298,000 composed of identical subunits with Mr 47,000. Polyclonal antibodies were produced against purified GS and NADP-GDH. Immunoprecipitation tests and immunoblot analysis showed the high reactivity and specificity of the immune sera against the purified enzymes. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:16669022

  14. Purification and Characterization of Glutamine Synthetase and NADP-Glutamate Dehydrogenase from the Ectomycorrhizal Fungus Laccaria laccata.

    PubMed

    Brun, A; Chalot, M; Botton, B; Martin, F

    1992-07-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) and NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) play a key role in nitrogen assimilation in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria laccata (Scop. ex Fr. Cke) strain S 238. The two enzymes were purified to apparent electrophoretic homogeneity by a three-step procedure involving diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Trisacryl and affinity chromatography, and DEAE-5PW fast protein liquid chromatography. This purification scheme resulted in a 23 and 62% recovery of the initial activity for GS and NADP-GDH, respectively. Purified GS had a specific activity of 713 nanomoles per second per milligram protein and a pH optimum of 7.2. Michaelis constants (millimolar) for the substrates were NH(4) (+) (0.024), glutamate (3.2), glutamine (30), ATP (0.18), and ADP (0.002). The molecular weight (M(r)) of native GS was approximately 380,000; it was composed of eight identical subunits of M(r) 42,000. Purified NADP-GDH had a specific activity of 4130 nanomoles per second per milligram protein and a pH optimum of 7.2 (amination reaction). Michaelis constants (millimolar) for the substrates were NH(4) (+) (5), 2-oxoglutarate (1), glutamate (26), NADPH (0.01), and NADP (0.03). Native NADP-GDH was a hexamer with a M(r) of about 298,000 composed of identical subunits with M(r) 47,000. Polyclonal antibodies were produced against purified GS and NADP-GDH. Immunoprecipitation tests and immunoblot analysis showed the high reactivity and specificity of the immune sera against the purified enzymes.

  15. Abiotic Stress Generates ROS That Signal Expression of Anionic Glutamate Dehydrogenases to Form Glutamate for Proline Synthesis in Tobacco and Grapevine[W

    PubMed Central

    Skopelitis, Damianos S.; Paranychianakis, Nikolaos V.; Paschalidis, Konstantinos A.; Pliakonis, Eleni D.; Delis, Ioannis D.; Yakoumakis, Dimitris I.; Kouvarakis, Antonios; Papadakis, Anastasia K.; Stephanou, Euripides G.; Roubelakis-Angelakis, Kalliopi A.

    2006-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) may be a stress-responsive enzyme, as GDH exhibits considerable thermal stability, and de novo synthesis of the α-GDH subunit is induced by exogenous ammonium and senescence. NaCl treatment induces reactive oxygen species (ROS), intracellular ammonia, expression of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) gdh-NAD;A1 encoding the α-subunit of GDH, increase in immunoreactive α-polypeptide, assembly of the anionic isoenzymes, and in vitro GDH aminating activity in tissues from hypergeous plant organs. In vivo aminating GDH activity was confirmed by gas chromatorgraphy–mass spectrometry monitoring of 15N-Glu, 15N-Gln, and 15N-Pro in the presence of methionine sulfoximine and amino oxyacetic acid, inhibitors of Gln synthetase and transaminases, respectively. Along with upregulation of α-GDH by NaCl, isocitrate dehydrogenase genes, which provide 2-oxoglutarate, are also induced. Treatment with menadione also elicits a severalfold increase in ROS and immunoreactive α-polypeptide and GDH activity. This suggests that ROS participate in the signaling pathway for GDH expression and protease activation, which contribute to intracellular hyperammonia. Ammonium ions also mimic the effects of salinity in induction of gdh-NAD;A1 expression. These results, confirmed in tobacco and grape (Vitis vinifera cv Sultanina) tissues, support the hypothesis that the salinity-generated ROS signal induces α-GDH subunit expression, and the anionic iso-GDHs assimilate ammonia, acting as antistress enzymes in ammonia detoxification and production of Glu for Pro synthesis. PMID:17041150

  16. Evaluation of two novel chemiluminescence immunoassays for the detection of Clostridium difficile glutamate dehydrogenase and toxin A&B.

    PubMed

    Blaich, Annette; Frei, Reno; Castellano, Carine; Kiessling, Christine; Geschke, Angelika; Rentsch, Katharina M; Egli, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    A novel immunoassay for Clostridium difficile glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxin A&B (LIAISON, DiaSorin) was compared to another GDH assay (Alere), PCR and toxigenic culture. The GDH-DiaSorin is slightly more sensitive than the GDH-Alere. Sensitivity of the Toxin-Diasorin test is in accordance to the sensitivity of other immunoassays in literature.

  17. Quantitative determination of glycine in aqueous solution using glutamate dehydrogenase-immobilized glyoxal agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Semra Yilmazer; Keskin, Can Serkan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an enzymatic procedure for the determination of glycine (Gly) was developed by using a column containing immobilized glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) on glyoxal agarose beads. Ammonia is produced from the enzymatic reactions between Gly and GDH with NAD(+) in phosphate buffer medium. The indophenol blue method was used for ammonia detection based on the spectrophotometric measurements of blue-colored product absorbing at 640 nm. The calibration graph is linear in the range of 0.1-10 mM of Gly concentrations. The effect of pH, temperature, and time interval was studied to find column stability, and also the interference effects of other amino acids was investigated. The interaction between GDH and glyoxal agarose beads was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The morphology of the immobilized and non-immobilized agarose beads were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM).

  18. The Glutamate Dehydrogenase Pathway and Its Roles in Cell and Tissue Biology in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Plaitakis, Andreas; Kalef-Ezra, Ester; Kotzamani, Dimitra; Zaganas, Ioannis; Spanaki, Cleanthe

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia while reducing NAD(P)+ to NAD(P)H. It is found in all living organisms serving both catabolic and anabolic reactions. In mammalian tissues, oxidative deamination of glutamate via GDH generates α-ketoglutarate, which is metabolized by the Krebs cycle, leading to the synthesis of ATP. In addition, the GDH pathway is linked to diverse cellular processes, including ammonia metabolism, acid-base equilibrium, redox homeostasis (via formation of fumarate), lipid biosynthesis (via oxidative generation of citrate), and lactate production. While most mammals possess a single GDH1 protein (hGDH1 in the human) that is highly expressed in the liver, humans and other primates have acquired, via duplication, an hGDH2 isoenzyme with distinct functional properties and tissue expression profile. The novel hGDH2 underwent rapid evolutionary adaptation, acquiring unique properties that enable enhanced enzyme function under conditions inhibitory to its ancestor hGDH1. These are thought to provide a biological advantage to humans with hGDH2 evolution occurring concomitantly with human brain development. hGDH2 is co-expressed with hGDH1 in human brain, kidney, testis and steroidogenic organs, but not in the liver. In human cerebral cortex, hGDH1 and hGDH2 are expressed in astrocytes, the cells responsible for removing and metabolizing transmitter glutamate, and for supplying neurons with glutamine and lactate. In human testis, hGDH2 (but not hGDH1) is densely expressed in the Sertoli cells, known to provide the spermatids with lactate and other nutrients. In steroid producing cells, hGDH1/2 is thought to generate reducing equivalents (NADPH) in the mitochondria for the biosynthesis of steroidal hormones. Lastly, up-regulation of hGDH1/2 expression occurs in cancer, permitting neoplastic cells to utilize glutamine/glutamate for their growth. In

  19. The Glutamate Dehydrogenase Pathway and Its Roles in Cell and Tissue Biology in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Plaitakis, Andreas; Kalef-Ezra, Ester; Kotzamani, Dimitra; Zaganas, Ioannis; Spanaki, Cleanthe

    2017-02-08

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a hexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible conversion of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia while reducing NAD(P)⁺ to NAD(P)H. It is found in all living organisms serving both catabolic and anabolic reactions. In mammalian tissues, oxidative deamination of glutamate via GDH generates α-ketoglutarate, which is metabolized by the Krebs cycle, leading to the synthesis of ATP. In addition, the GDH pathway is linked to diverse cellular processes, including ammonia metabolism, acid-base equilibrium, redox homeostasis (via formation of fumarate), lipid biosynthesis (via oxidative generation of citrate), and lactate production. While most mammals possess a single GDH1 protein (hGDH1 in the human) that is highly expressed in the liver, humans and other primates have acquired, via duplication, an hGDH2 isoenzyme with distinct functional properties and tissue expression profile. The novel hGDH2 underwent rapid evolutionary adaptation, acquiring unique properties that enable enhanced enzyme function under conditions inhibitory to its ancestor hGDH1. These are thought to provide a biological advantage to humans with hGDH2 evolution occurring concomitantly with human brain development. hGDH2 is co-expressed with hGDH1 in human brain, kidney, testis and steroidogenic organs, but not in the liver. In human cerebral cortex, hGDH1 and hGDH2 are expressed in astrocytes, the cells responsible for removing and metabolizing transmitter glutamate, and for supplying neurons with glutamine and lactate. In human testis, hGDH2 (but not hGDH1) is densely expressed in the Sertoli cells, known to provide the spermatids with lactate and other nutrients. In steroid producing cells, hGDH1/2 is thought to generate reducing equivalents (NADPH) in the mitochondria for the biosynthesis of steroidal hormones. Lastly, up-regulation of hGDH1/2 expression occurs in cancer, permitting neoplastic cells to utilize glutamine/glutamate for their growth. In

  20. Transgenic Expression of Glud1 (Glutamate Dehydrogenase 1) in Neurons: In Vivo Model of Enhanced Glutamate Release, Altered Synaptic Plasticity, and Selective Neuronal Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Xiaodong; Pal, Ranu; Hascup, Kevin N.; Wang, Yongfu; Wang, Wen-Tung; Xu, Wenhao; Hui, Dongwei; Agbas, Abdulbaki; Wang, Xinkun; Michaelis, Mary L.; Choi, In-Young; Belousov, Andrei B.; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Michaelis, Elias K.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of lifelong, moderate excess release of glutamate (Glu) in the CNS have not been previously characterized. We created a transgenic (Tg) mouse model of lifelong excess synaptic Glu release in the CNS by introducing the gene for glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Glud1) under the control of the neuron-specific enolase promoter. Glud1 is, potentially, an important enzyme in the pathway of Glu synthesis in nerve terminals. Increased levels of GLUD protein and activity in CNS neurons of hemizygous Tg mice were associated with increases in the in vivo release of Glu after neuronal depolarization in striatum and in the frequency and amplitude of miniature EPSCs in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Despite overexpression of Glud1 in all neurons of the CNS, the Tg mice suffered neuronal losses in select brain regions (e.g., the CA1 but not the CA3 region). In vulnerable regions, Tg mice had decreases in MAP2A labeling of dendrites and in synaptophysin labeling of presynaptic terminals; the decreases in neuronal numbers and dendrite and presynaptic terminal labeling increased with advancing age. In addition, the Tg mice exhibited decreases in long-term potentiation of synaptic activity and in spine density in dendrites of CA1 neurons. Behaviorally, the Tg mice were significantly more resistant than wild-type mice to induction and duration of anesthesia produced by anesthetics that suppress Glu neurotransmission. The Glud1 mouse might be a useful model for the effects of lifelong excess synaptic Glu release on CNS neurons and for age-associated neurodegenerative processes. PMID:19890003

  1. Novel Inhibitors Complexed with Glutamate Dehydrogenase: ALLOSTERIC REGULATION BY CONTROL OF PROTEIN DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J.; Walker, Matthew T.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2009-12-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of L-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P){sup +} as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH.

  2. Novel inhibitors complexed with glutamate dehydrogenase: allosteric regulation by control of protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Smith, Christopher J; Walker, Matthew T; Smith, Thomas J

    2009-08-21

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a homohexameric enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of l-glutamate to 2-oxoglutarate using NAD(P)(+) as coenzyme. Unlike its counterparts from other animal kingdoms, mammalian GDH is regulated by a host of ligands. The recently discovered hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia disorder showed that the loss of allosteric inhibition of GDH by GTP causes excessive secretion of insulin. Subsequent studies demonstrated that wild-type and hyperinsulinemia/hyperammonemia forms of GDH are inhibited by the green tea polyphenols, epigallocatechin gallate and epicatechin gallate. This was followed by high throughput studies that identified more stable inhibitors, including hexachlorophene, GW5074, and bithionol. Shown here are the structures of GDH complexed with these three compounds. Hexachlorophene forms a ring around the internal cavity in GDH through aromatic stacking interactions between the drug and GDH as well as between the drug molecules themselves. In contrast, GW5074 and bithionol both bind as pairs of stacked compounds at hexameric 2-fold axes between the dimers of subunits. The internal core of GDH contracts when the catalytic cleft closes during enzymatic turnover. None of the drugs cause conformational changes in the contact residues, but all bind to key interfaces involved in this contraction process. Therefore, it seems likely that the drugs inhibit enzymatic turnover by inhibiting this transition. Indeed, this expansion/contraction process may play a major role in the inter-subunit communication and allosteric regulation observed in GDH.

  3. Clostridium difficile glutamate dehydrogenase is a secreted enzyme that confers resistance to H2O2.

    PubMed

    Girinathan, Brintha Prasummanna; Braun, Sterling E; Govind, Revathi

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile produces an NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), which converts l-glutamate into α-ketoglutarate through an irreversible reaction. The enzyme GDH is detected in the stool samples of patients with C. difficile-associated disease and serves as one of the diagnostic tools to detect C. difficile infection (CDI). We demonstrate here that supernatant fluids of C. difficile cultures contain GDH. To understand the role of GDH in the physiology of C. difficile, an isogenic insertional mutant of gluD was created in strain JIR8094. The mutant failed to produce and secrete GDH as shown by Western blot analysis. Various phenotypic assays were performed to understand the importance of GDH in C. difficile physiology. In TY (tryptose yeast extract) medium, the gluD mutant grew slower than the parent strain. Complementation of the gluD mutant with the functional gluD gene reversed the growth defect in TY medium. The presence of extracellular GDH may have a functional role in the pathogenesis of CDI. In support of this assumption we found higher sensitivity to H2O2 in the gluD mutant as compared to the parent strain. Complementation of the gluD mutant with the functional gluD gene reversed the H2O2 sensitivity.

  4. Clostridium difficile glutamate dehydrogenase is a secreted enzyme that confers resistance to H2O2

    PubMed Central

    Girinathan, Brintha Prasummanna; Braun, Sterling E.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile produces an NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), which converts l-glutamate into α-ketoglutarate through an irreversible reaction. The enzyme GDH is detected in the stool samples of patients with C. difficile-associated disease and serves as one of the diagnostic tools to detect C. difficile infection (CDI). We demonstrate here that supernatant fluids of C. difficile cultures contain GDH. To understand the role of GDH in the physiology of C. difficile, an isogenic insertional mutant of gluD was created in strain JIR8094. The mutant failed to produce and secrete GDH as shown by Western blot analysis. Various phenotypic assays were performed to understand the importance of GDH in C. difficile physiology. In TY (tryptose yeast extract) medium, the gluD mutant grew slower than the parent strain. Complementation of the gluD mutant with the functional gluD gene reversed the growth defect in TY medium. The presence of extracellular GDH may have a functional role in the pathogenesis of CDI. In support of this assumption we found higher sensitivity to H2O2 in the gluD mutant as compared to the parent strain. Complementation of the gluD mutant with the functional gluD gene reversed the H2O2 sensitivity. PMID:24145018

  5. A marriage full of surprises: forty-five years living with glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Engel, Paul C

    2011-09-01

    Detailed kinetic studies of bovine glutamate dehydrogenase [GDH] from the 1960s revealed complexities that remain to be fully explained. In the absence of heterotropic nucleotide regulators the enzyme follows a random pathway of substrate addition but saturation with ADP enforces a compulsory-order mechanism in which glutamate is the leading substrate. The rate dependence on NAD(P)(+) concentration is complex and is probably only partly explained by negative binding cooperativity. Bovine GDH eluded successful analysis by crystallographers for 30 years but the final structural solution presented in this symposium at last provides a comprehensible framework for much of the heterotropic regulation, focussing attention on an antenna region in the C-terminal tail, a structure that is missing in the slightly smaller hexameric GDHs of lower organisms. Nonetheless, our studies with one such smaller (clostridial) GDH reveal that even without the antenna the underlying core structure still mediates homotropic cooperativity, and the ability to generate a variety of mutants has made it possible to start to dissect this machinery. In addition, this short personal review discusses a number of unresolved issues such as the significance of phospholipid inhibition and of specific interaction with mRNA, and above all the question of why it is necessary to regulate an enzyme reputedly maintaining its reactants at equilibrium and whether this might be in some way related to its coexistence with an energy-linked transhydrogenase.

  6. Plasmodium falciparum glutamate dehydrogenase a is dispensable and not a drug target during erythrocytic development

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum contains three genes encoding potential glutamate dehydrogenases. The protein encoded by gdha has previously been biochemically and structurally characterized. It was suggested that it is important for the supply of reducing equivalents during intra-erythrocytic development of Plasmodium and, therefore, a suitable drug target. Methods The gene encoding the NADP(H)-dependent GDHa has been disrupted by reverse genetics in P. falciparum and the effect on the antioxidant and metabolic capacities of the resulting mutant parasites was investigated. Results No growth defect under low and elevated oxygen tension, no up- or down-regulation of a number of antioxidant and NADP(H)-generating proteins or mRNAs and no increased levels of GSH were detected in the D10Δgdha parasite lines. Further, the fate of the carbon skeleton of [13C] labelled glutamine was assessed by metabolomic studies, revealing no differences in the labelling of α-ketoglutarate and other TCA pathway intermediates between wild type and mutant parasites. Conclusions First, the data support the conclusion that D10Δgdha parasites are not experiencing enhanced oxidative stress and that GDHa function may not be the provision of NADP(H) for reductive reactions. Second, the results imply that the cytosolic, NADP(H)-dependent GDHa protein is not involved in the oxidative deamination of glutamate but that the protein may play a role in ammonia assimilation as has been described for other NADP(H)-dependent GDH from plants and fungi. The lack of an obvious phenotype in the absence of GDHa may point to a regulatory role of the protein providing glutamate (as nitrogen storage molecule) in situations where the parasites experience a limiting supply of carbon sources and, therefore, under in vitro conditions the enzyme is unlikely to be of significant importance. The data imply that the protein is not a suitable target for future drug development against intra-erythrocytic parasite

  7. Isolation and characterization of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant with impaired glutamate synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Folch, J L; Antaramián, A; Rodríguez, L; Bravo, A; Brunner, A; González, A

    1989-12-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lacks glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activity has been isolated. This mutant was obtained after chemical mutagenesis of a NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase-less mutant strain. The gdh gus mutant is a glutamate auxotroph. The genetic analysis of the gus mutant showed that the GOGAT-less phenotype is due to the presence of two loosely linked mutations. Evidence is presented which suggests the possibility that S. cerevisiae has two GOGAT activities, designated GOGAT A and GOGAT B. These activities can be distinguished by their pH optima and by their regulation by glutamate. Furthermore, one of the mutations responsible for the GOGAT-less phenotype affected GOGAT A activity, while the other mutation affected GOGAT B activity.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant with impaired glutamate synthase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Folch, J L; Antaramián, A; Rodríguez, L; Bravo, A; Brunner, A; González, A

    1989-01-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that lacks glutamate synthase (GOGAT) activity has been isolated. This mutant was obtained after chemical mutagenesis of a NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase-less mutant strain. The gdh gus mutant is a glutamate auxotroph. The genetic analysis of the gus mutant showed that the GOGAT-less phenotype is due to the presence of two loosely linked mutations. Evidence is presented which suggests the possibility that S. cerevisiae has two GOGAT activities, designated GOGAT A and GOGAT B. These activities can be distinguished by their pH optima and by their regulation by glutamate. Furthermore, one of the mutations responsible for the GOGAT-less phenotype affected GOGAT A activity, while the other mutation affected GOGAT B activity. PMID:2687252

  9. Kinetics of NH(4) Assimilation in Zea mays: Preliminary Studies with a Glutamate Dehydrogenase (GDH1) Null Mutant.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, J R; Ju, G C; Rich, P J; Rhodes, D

    1990-10-01

    In higher plants it is now generally considered that glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) plays only a small or negligible role in ammonia assimilation. To test this specific point, comparative studies of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation were undertaken with a GDH1-null mutant of Zea mays and a related (but not strictly isogenic) GDH1-positive wild type from which this mutant was derived. The kinetics of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation into free amino acids and total reduced nitrogen were monitored in both roots and shoots of 2-week-old seedlings supplied with 5 millimolar 99% ((15)NH(4))(2)SO(4) via the aerated root medium in hydroponic culture over a 24-h period. The GDH1-null mutant, with a 10- to 15-fold lower total root GDH activity in comparison to the wild type, was found to exhibit a 40 to 50% lower rate of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation into total reduced nitrogen. Observed rates of root ammonium assimilation were 5.9 and 3.1 micromoles per hour per gram fresh weight for the wild type and mutant, respectively. The lower rate of (15)NH(4) (+) assimilation in the mutant was associated with lower rates of labeling of several free amino acids (including glutamate, glutamine-amino N, aspartate, asparagine-amino N, and alanine) in both roots and shoots of the mutant in comparison to the wild type. Qualitatively, these labeling kinetics appear consistent with a reduced flux of (15)N via glutamate in the GDH1-null mutant. However, the responses of the two genotypes to the potent inhibitor of glutamine synthetase, methionine sulfoximine, and differences in morphology of the two genotypes (particularly a lower shoot:root ratio in the GDH1-null mutant) urge caution in concluding that GDH1 is solely responsible for these differences in ammonia assimilation rate.

  10. Characterization of a plant glutamate receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Teardo, Enrico; Segalla, Anna; Formentin, Elide; Zanetti, Manuela; Marin, Oriano; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Zoratti, Mario; Szabò, Ildikò

    2010-01-01

    Bioinformatic approaches have allowed the identification of twenty genes, grouped into three subfamilies, encoding for homologues of animal ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGLRs) in the Arabidopsis thaliana model plant. Indirect evidence suggests that plant iGLRs function as non-selective cation channels. In the present work we provide biochemical and electrophysiological evidences for the chloroplast localization of glutamate receptor(s) of family 3 (iGLR3) in spinach. A specific antibody, recognizing putative receptors of family 3 locates iGLR3 to the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. In planar lipid bilayer experiments, purified inner envelope vesicles from spinach display a cation-selective electrophysiological activity which is inhibited by DNQX (6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione), considered to act as an inhibitor on both animal and plant iGLRs. These results identify for the first time the intracellular localization of plant glutamate receptor(s) and a DNQX-sensitive, glutamate-gated activity at single channel level in native membrane with properties compatible with those predicted for plant glutamate receptors. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Use of a bioreactor consisting of sequentially aligned L-glutamate dehydrogenase and L-glutamate oxidase for the determination of ammonia by chemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Murachi, T; Tabata, M

    1987-08-01

    A chemiluminometric method for the automated flow injection analysis of ammonia is described. The essence of the invention is the use of a bioreactor consisting of both immobilized L-glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) and L-glutamate oxidase (GLXD), which are sequentially aligned in this order in a minicolumn measuring 2.0 X 20 mm. The unidirectional constant flow of liquid through the column reactor minimizes the reversed diffusion of the solutes so that the following sequence of reactions is ensured. Thus, ammonia to be determined is first transformed by GLDH into L-glutamate, which then produces hydrogen peroxide by GLXD. Hydrogen peroxide in the effluent from the column is then determined by its chemiluminescence upon admixing with luminol and potassium ferricyanide. The present method gives linearity of the standard curve for ammonia up to 1.0 mM. It is at least 100 times more sensitive than the conventional method for ammonia assay using ultraviolet absorption measurement.

  12. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  13. NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase in Penicillium chrysogenum is involved in regulation of beta-lactam production.

    PubMed

    Thykaer, Jette; Rueksomtawin, Kanchana; Noorman, Henk; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-04-01

    The interactions between the ammonium assimilatory pathways and beta-lactam production were investigated by disruption of the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase gene (gdhA) in two industrial beta-lactam-producing strains of Penicillium chrysogenum. The strains used were an adipoyl-7-ADCA- and a penicillin-producing strain. The gdhA gene disruption caused a decrease in maximum specific growth rate of 26 % and 35 % for the adipoyl-7-ADCA-producing strain and the penicillin-producing strain, respectively, compared to the corresponding reference strains. Interestingly, no beta-lactam production was detected in either of the DeltagdhA strains. Supplementation with glutamate restored growth but no beta-lactam production was detected for the constructed strains. Cultures with high ammonium concentrations (repressing conditions) and with proline as nitrogen source (de-repressed conditions) showed continued beta-lactam production for the reference strains whereas the DeltagdhA strains remained non-productive under all conditions. By overexpressing the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase, the specific growth rate could be restored, but still no beta-lactam production was detected. The results indicate that the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase may be directly or indirectly involved in the regulation of beta-lactam production in industrial strains of P. chrysogenum.

  14. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  15. Role of the complex upstream region of the GDH2 gene in nitrogen regulation of the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, S M; Magasanik, B

    1991-01-01

    We analyzed the upstream region of the GDH2 gene, which encodes the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for elements important for the regulation of the gene by the nitrogen source. The levels of this enzyme are high in cells grown with glutamate as the sole source of nitrogen and low in cells grown with glutamine or ammonium. We found that this regulation occurs at the level of transcription and that a total of six sites are required to cause a CYC1-lacZ fusion to the GDH2 gene to be regulated in the same manner as the NAD-linked glutamate dehydrogenase. Two sites behaved as upstream activation sites (UASs). The remaining four sites were found to block the effects of the two UASs in such a way that the GDH2-CYC1-lacZ fusion was not expressed unless the cells containing it were grown under conditions favorable for the activity of both UASs. This complex regulatory system appears to account for the fact that GDH2 expression is exquisitely sensitive to glutamine, whereas the expression of GLN1, coding for glutamine synthetase, is not nearly as sensitive. Images PMID:1682801

  16. Transfer nuclear Overhauser effect study of coenzyme binding to distinct sites in binary and ternary complexes in glutamate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, A.; Levy, H.R.; Levy, G.C.; LiMuti, C.; Goldstein, B.M.; Bell, J.E.

    1987-12-15

    The oxidized coenzyme NAD binds to two sites per subunit of bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase with equal affinity in the absence of dicarboxylic acid coligands. In the presence of glutarate or 2-oxoglutarate, the affinity to one site is unchanged, but the affinity to the other (presumed to be the active site) is considerably increased and now requires two dissociation constants to describe its saturation. A combination of transfer nuclear Overhauser effects (TRNOE) together with an examination of the slopes of TRNOE time dependence indicates that while NAD is bound in a syn conformation at both binding sites, NADP (which binds only to the active site) is bound in a syn-anti mixture. The existence of N6 to N3' and N6 and N2' and N1' to N3' NOE's with NAD suggest that the two coenzyme binding sites are located near enough to allow intermolecular NOE's. In the presence of 2-oxoglutarate where only binding to the active site is effectively observed, the conformation of either coenzyme is syn. Modeling studies using the distance estimates from the TRNOE results suggest that the nicotinamide ribose approximates a 3'-endo conformation. The absence of evidence for intermolecular NOE's under these conditions indicates that while the active and regulatory NAD sites per subunit are in close proximity, the six active sites per hexamer are located greater than 5 (A symbol) apart.

  17. Failure of glutamate dehydrogenase system to predict oxygenation state of human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Katz, A; Spencer, M K; Sahlin, K

    1990-07-01

    In a recent study, the total tissue contents of glutamate (Glu), ammonium (NH+4), and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) were used to estimate changes in the mitochondrial redox state ([NAD+]/[NADH]) of contracting skeletal muscle with intact circulation [Am. J. Physiol. 253 (Cell Physiol. 22): C263-C268, 1987]. These metabolites participate in the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) reaction, which, based on a number of assumptions, theoretically enables calculation of the mitochondrial redox state as follows (brackets indicate concentrations): [NAD+]/[NADH] = ([NH+4] [2-OG])/[( Glu]Kapp), where Kapp is the apparent equilibrium constant for GDH. The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the total tissue contents of Glu, NH+4, and 2-OG could be used to predict a reduction of the mitochondrial redox state in anoxic skeletal muscle. Anoxia was induced in the quadriceps femoris muscle by 10 min of circulatory occlusion (low metabolic rate) and isometric contraction to fatigue (high metabolic rate). The mean (+/- SE) value for the metabolite ratio ([NH+4][2-OG]/[Glu]) at rest was 6 +/- 3 mmol/kg dry wt (x 10(-4]. No significant change occurred after circulatory occlusion (4 +/- 2 x 10(-4); P greater than 0.05), whereas an almost 60-fold increase was observed after isometric contraction (P less than 0.05). Because the muscle was anoxic under both conditions, a significant decrease in the metabolite ratio should have occurred. These data demonstrate that changes in total tissue contents of Glu, NH+4, and 2-OG cannot be used to estimate changes in the redox and oxygenation state of mitochondria in intact human skeletal muscle.

  18. Purification and properties of three NAD(P)+ isozymes of L-glutamate dehydrogenase of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Moyano, E; Cárdenas, J; Muñoz-Blanco, J

    1992-02-13

    Three isozymes of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, induced under different trophic and stress conditions, have been purified about 800-1000-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity. They are hexamers of Mr 266,000-269,000 as deduced from gel filtration and sedimentation coefficient data. GDH1 consisted of six identical subunits of 44 kDa each, whereas both GDH2 and GDH3 consisted of six similar-sized monomers (4 of 44 kDa and 2 of 46 kDa). Optimum pH for the three activities with each pyridine nucleotide was identical (8.5 with NADH; 7.7 with NADPH; and 9.0 with NAD+). The isozymes exhibited similar high optimum temperature values (60-62 degrees C) and isoelectric points (7.9-8.1). Activity was enhanced in vitro by Ca2+ ions and strongly inhibited by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, KCN, o-phenanthroline and EDTA, and to a lesser extent by pHMB and methylacetimidate. In the aminating reaction the three isozymes were inhibited in a concentration-dependent process by both NADH and NADPH, with apparent Km values for NH4+ ranging from 13-53 mM; 0.36-1.85 mM for 2-oxoglutarate and 0.07-0.78 mM for NADH and NADPH. In the deaminating reaction apparent Km values ranged from 0.64-3.52 mM for L-glutamate and 0.20-0.32 for NAD+. In addition, the three isozymes exhibited a non-hyperbolic kinetics for NAD+ with negative cooperativity (n = 0.8).

  19. The role of chloroplast and cytoplasm in the NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase synthesis in Ankistrodesmus cells.

    PubMed

    Shatilov, V R; Sof'in, A V; Zabrodina, T M; Kretovich, W L

    1982-12-10

    The effects of transcription and translation inhibitors on NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase synthesis in nitrogen-starving Ankistrodesmus braunii cells have been studied. Considering the results obtained one can suggest that both enzymes are coded in the chloroplast genome and that during nitrogen starvation specific mRNA's are partly transferred from the chloroplast into the cytoplasm and can be translated there on 80S ribosomes.

  20. The role of chloroplast and cytoplasm in the NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase synthesis in Ankistrodesmus cells.

    PubMed

    Shatilov, V R; Sof'in, A V; Zabrodina, T M; Kretovich, W L

    1982-09-03

    The effects of transcription and translation inhibitors on NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase synthesis in nitrogen-starving Ankistrodesmus braunii cells have been studied. Considering the results obtained one can suggest that both enzymes are coded in a chloroplast genome and that during nitrogen starvation specific mRNA's are partly transferred from chloroplast into cytoplasm and can be translated there on 80S ribosomes.

  1. The role of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase in restoring growth on glucose of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae phosphoglucose isomerase mutant.

    PubMed

    Boles, E; Lehnert, W; Zimmermann, F K

    1993-10-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase pgi1-deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot grow on glucose as the sole carbon source and are even inhibited by glucose. These growth defects could be suppressed by an over-expression on a multi-copy plasmid of the structural gene GDH2 coding for the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. GDH2 codes for a protein with 1092 amino acids which is located on chromosome XII and shows high sequence similarity to the Neurospora crassa NAD-glutamate dehydrogenase. Suppression of the pgi1 deletion by over-expression of GDH2 was abolished in strains with a deletion of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene ZWF1 or gene GDH1 coding for the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase. Moreover, this suppression required functional mitochondria. It is proposed that the growth defect of pgi1 deletion mutants on glucose is due to a rapid depletion of NADP which is needed as a cofactor in the oxidative reactions of the pentose phosphate pathway. Over-expression of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase leads to a very efficient conversion of glutamate with NADH generation to 2-oxoglutarate which can be converted back to glutamate by the NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase with the consumption of NADPH. Consequently, over-expression of the NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase causes a substrate cycling between 2-oxoglutarate and glutamate which restores NADP from NADPH through the coupled conversion of NAD to NADH which can be oxidized in the mitochondria. Furthermore, the requirement for an increase in NADPH consumption for the suppression of the phosphoglucose isomerase defect could be met by addition of oxidizing agents which are known to reduce the level of NADPH.

  2. Surface Induced Dissociation Yields Quaternary Substructure of Refractory Noncovalent Phosphorylase B and Glutamate Dehydrogenase Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xin; Zhou, Mowei; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2014-03-01

    Ion mobility (IM) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) coupled with native MS are useful for studying noncovalent protein complexes. Collision induced dissociation (CID) is the most common MS/MS dissociation method. However, some protein complexes, including glycogen phosphorylase B kinase (PHB) and L-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) examined in this study, are resistant to dissociation by CID at the maximum collision energy available in the instrument. Surface induced dissociation (SID) was applied to dissociate the two refractory protein complexes. Different charge state precursor ions of the two complexes were examined by CID and SID. The PHB dimer was successfully dissociated to monomers and the GDH hexamer formed trimeric subcomplexes that are informative of its quaternary structure. The unfolding of the precursor and the percentages of the distinct products suggest that the dissociation pathways vary for different charge states. The precursors at lower charge states (+21 for PHB dimer and +27 for GDH hexamer) produce a higher percentage of folded fragments and dissociate more symmetrically than the precusors at higher charge states (+29 for PHB dimer and +39 for GDH hexamer). The precursors at lower charge state may be more native-like than the higher charge state because a higher percentage of folded fragments and a lower percentage of highly charged unfolded fragments are detected. The combination of SID and charge reduction is shown to be a powerful tool for quaternary structure analysis of refractory noncovalent protein complexes, as illustrated by the data for PHB dimer and GDH hexamer.

  3. Multiple Forms of Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Animals: Structural Determinants and Physiological Implications.

    PubMed

    Bunik, Victoria; Artiukhov, Artem; Aleshin, Vasily; Mkrtchyan, Garik

    2016-12-14

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) of animal cells is usually considered to be a mitochondrial enzyme. However, this enzyme has recently been reported to be also present in nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes. These extramitochondrial localizations are associated with moonlighting functions of GDH, which include acting as a serine protease or an ATP-dependent tubulin-binding protein. Here, we review the published data on kinetics and localization of multiple forms of animal GDH taking into account the splice variants, post-translational modifications and GDH isoenzymes, found in humans and apes. The kinetic properties of human GLUD1 and GLUD2 isoenzymes are shown to be similar to those published for GDH1 and GDH2 from bovine brain. Increased functional diversity and specific regulation of GDH isoforms due to alternative splicing and post-translational modifications are also considered. In particular, these structural differences may affect the well-known regulation of GDH by nucleotides which is related to recent identification of thiamine derivatives as novel GDH modulators. The thiamine-dependent regulation of GDH is in good agreement with the fact that the non-coenzyme forms of thiamine, i.e., thiamine triphosphate and its adenylated form are generated in response to amino acid and carbon starvation.

  4. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the Schwanniomyces occidentalis NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase gene.

    PubMed

    De Zoysa, P A; Connerton, I F; Watson, D C; Johnston, J R

    1991-08-01

    The cloned NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) genes of Aspergillus nidulans (gdhA) and Neurospora crassa (am) have been shown to hybridize under reduced stringency conditions to genomic sequences of the yeast Schwanniomyces occidentalis. Using 5' and 3' gene-specific probes, a unique 5.1 kb BclI restriction fragment that encompasses the entire Schwanniomyces sequence has been identified. A recombinant clone bearing the unique BclI fragment has been isolated from a pool of enriched clones in the yeast/E. coli shuttle vector pWH5 by colony hybridization. The identity of the plasmid clone was confirmed by functional complementation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gdh-1 mutation. The nucleotide sequence of the Schw. occidentalis GDH gene, which consists of 1380 nucleotides in a continuous reading frame of 459 amino acids, has been determined. The predicted amino acid sequence shows considerable homology with GDH proteins from other fungi and significant homology with all other available GDH sequences.

  5. Diagnostic test accuracy of glutamate dehydrogenase for Clostridium difficile: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Arimoto, Jun; Horita, Nobuyuki; Kato, Shingo; Fuyuki, Akiko; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Endo, Hiroki; Takashi, Nonaka; Kaneko, Takeshi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the diagnostic accuracy of detecting glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) based on the hierarchical model. Two investigators electrically searched four databases. Reference tests were stool cell cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) and stool toxigenic culture (TC). To assess the overall accuracy, we calculated the diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) using a DerSimonian-Laird random-model and area the under hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristics (AUC) using Holling’s proportional hazard models. The summary estimate of the sensitivity and the specificity were obtained using the bivariate model. According to 42 reports consisting of 3055 reference positive comparisons, and 26188 reference negative comparisons, the DOR was 115 (95%CI: 77–172, I2 = 12.0%) and the AUC was 0.970 (95%CI: 0.958–0.982). The summary estimate of sensitivity and specificity were 0.911 (95%CI: 0.871–0.940) and 0.912 (95%CI: 0.892–0.928). The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 10.4 (95%CI 8.4–12.7) and 0.098 (95%CI 0.066–0.142), respectively. Detecting GDH for the diagnosis of CDI had both high sensitivity and specificity. Considering its low cost and prevalence, it is appropriate for a screening test for CDI. PMID:27418431

  6. The discovery of four distinct glutamate dehydrogenase genes in a strain of Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Ingoldsby, Lorna M; Geoghegan, Kieran F; Hayden, Bronagh M; Engel, Paul C

    2005-04-11

    In earlier work, two glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) proteins were purified from a strain of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum (NRC-36014). One of these, an NAD+-specific enzyme, was matched to a cloned gene from H. salinarum (GenBank accession number: X63837 S75579) by sequencing peptide fragments. Analysis of enzymatic digests of the NADP+-GDH and database searching have now established that a gene encoding this protein exists in the full genomic sequence of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 as gdhA1, together with two other distinct gdh genes, gdhA2 and gdhB. From N-terminal sequence, it is clear that the genomic listing incorrectly assigns the start codon for gdhA1 and the corresponding protein is 43 amino acids longer than previously indicated. The three genes could be amplified by PCR either from NRC-1, as expected, or from NRC-36014 (GenBank accession numbers: YA840085-AY840087). A gene encoding the previously purified NAD+-GDH, is absent from the NRC-1 genome but can be successfully amplified from genomic DNA of NRC-36014 (GenBank accession number: AY840088). This establishes that NRC-36014 contains four gdh genes.

  7. Multiple Forms of Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Animals: Structural Determinants and Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Bunik, Victoria; Artiukhov, Artem; Aleshin, Vasily; Mkrtchyan, Garik

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) of animal cells is usually considered to be a mitochondrial enzyme. However, this enzyme has recently been reported to be also present in nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes. These extramitochondrial localizations are associated with moonlighting functions of GDH, which include acting as a serine protease or an ATP-dependent tubulin-binding protein. Here, we review the published data on kinetics and localization of multiple forms of animal GDH taking into account the splice variants, post-translational modifications and GDH isoenzymes, found in humans and apes. The kinetic properties of human GLUD1 and GLUD2 isoenzymes are shown to be similar to those published for GDH1 and GDH2 from bovine brain. Increased functional diversity and specific regulation of GDH isoforms due to alternative splicing and post-translational modifications are also considered. In particular, these structural differences may affect the well-known regulation of GDH by nucleotides which is related to recent identification of thiamine derivatives as novel GDH modulators. The thiamine-dependent regulation of GDH is in good agreement with the fact that the non-coenzyme forms of thiamine, i.e., thiamine triphosphate and its adenylated form are generated in response to amino acid and carbon starvation. PMID:27983623

  8. Activity of select dehydrogenases with Sepharose-immobilized N6-carboxymethyl-NAD

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N6-carboxymethyl-NAD (N6-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N6-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N6-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N6-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N6-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N6-amine group on NAD. PMID:25611453

  9. Activity of select dehydrogenases with sepharose-immobilized N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Justin; Vieille, Claire

    2015-01-01

    N(6)-carboxymethyl-NAD (N(6)-CM-NAD) can be used to immobilize NAD onto a substrate containing terminal primary amines. We previously immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD onto sepharose beads and showed that Thermotoga maritima glycerol dehydrogenase could use the immobilized cofactor with cofactor recycling. We now show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol dehydrogenase, rabbit muscle L-lactate dehydrogenase (type XI), bovine liver L-glutamic dehydrogenase (type III), Leuconostoc mesenteroides glucose-6-phosphate dehydro-genase, and Thermotoga maritima mannitol dehydrogenase are active with soluble N(6)-CM-NAD. The products of all enzymes but 6-phospho-D-glucono-1,5-lactone were formed when sepharose-immobilized N(6)-CM-NAD was recycled by T. maritima glycerol dehydrogenase, indicating that N(6)-immobilized NAD is suitable for use by a variety of different dehydrogenases. Observations of the enzyme active sites suggest that steric hindrance plays a greater role in limiting or allowing activity with the modified cofactor than do polarity and charge of the residues surrounding the N(6)-amine group on NAD.

  10. Glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzyme 3 (GDH3) of Arabidopsis thaliana is less thermostable than GDH1 and GDH2 isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Laura; Polverini, Eugenia; Degola, Francesca; Baruffini, Enrico; Restivo, Francesco Maria

    2014-10-01

    NAD(H)-glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.4.1.2) is an abundant and ubiquitous enzyme that may exist in different isoenzymic forms. Variation in the composition of the GDH isoenzyme pattern is observed during plant development and specific cell, tissue and organ localization of the different isoforms have been reported. However, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the isoenzymatic pattern are still obscure. Regulation may be exerted at several levels, i.e. at the level of transcription and translation of the relevant genes, but also when the enzyme is assembled to originate the catalytically active form of the protein. In Arabidopsis thaliana, three genes (GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3) encode three different GDH subunits (β, α and γ) that randomly associate to form a complex array of homo- and hetero-hexamers. In order to asses if the different Arabidopsis GDH isoforms may display different structural properties we have investigated their thermal stability. In particular the stability of GDH1 and GDH3 isoenzymes was studied using site-directed mutagenesis in a heterologous yeast expression system. It was established that the carboxyl terminus of the GDH subunit is involved in the stabilization of the oligomeric structure of the enzyme.

  11. Effects of deletion of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase genes on glycerol and ethanol metabolism in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Chin, Young-Wook; Park, Yong-Cheol; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Bioethanol is currently used as an alternative fuel for gasoline worldwide. For economic production of bioethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, formation of a main by-product, glycerol, should be prevented or minimized in order to reduce a separation cost of ethanol from fermentation broth. In this study, S. cerevisiae was engineered to investigate the effects of the sole and double disruption of NADH-dependent glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1 (GPD1) and NADPH-requiring glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GDH1) on the production of glycerol and ethanol from glucose. Even though sole deletion of GPD1 or GDH1 reduced glycerol production, double deletion of GPD1 and GDH1 resulted in the lowest glycerol concentration of 2.31 g/L, which was 46.4% lower than the wild-type strain. Interestingly, the recombinant S. cerevisiae ∆GPD1∆GDH1 strain showed a slight improvement in ethanol yield (0.414 g/g) compared with the wild-type strain (0.406 g/g). Genetic engineering of the glycerol and glutamate metabolic pathways modified NAD(P)H-requiring metabolic pathways and exerted a positive effect on glycerol reduction without affecting ethanol production.

  12. Identification of the molecular dysfunction caused by glutamate dehydrogenase S445L mutation responsible for hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Mariagrazia; Karaca, Melis; Latini, Livia; Brioudes, Estelle; Schalch, Thomas; Maechler, Pierre

    2017-09-15

    Congenital hyperinsulinism/hyperammonemia (HI/HA) syndrome gives rise to unregulated protein-induced insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells, fasting hypoglycemia and elevated plasma ammonia levels. Mutations associated with HI/HA were identified in the Glud1 gene, encoding for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH). We aimed at identifying the molecular causes of dysregulation in insulin secretion and ammonia production conferred by the most frequent HI/HA mutation Ser445Leu. Following transduction with adenoviruses carrying the human GDH-wild type or GDH-S445L-mutant gene, immunoblotting showed efficient expression of the transgenes in all the investigated cell types. Enzymatic activity tested in INS-1E beta-cells revealed that the mutant was much more sensitive to the allosteric activator ADP, rendering it highly responsive to substrates. INS-1E cells expressing either the wild type or mutant GDH responded similarly to glucose stimulation regarding mitochondrial activation and insulin secretion. However, at basal glucose glutamine stimulation increased mitochondrial activity and insulin release only in the mutant cells. In mouse and human islets, expression of mutant GDH resulted in robust elevation of insulin secretion upon glutamine stimulation, not observed in control islets. Hepatocytes expressing either the wild type or mutant GDH produced similar levels of ammonia when exposed to glutamine, although alanine response was strongly elevated with the mutant form. In conclusion, the GDH-S445L mutation confers hyperactivity to this enzyme due to higher sensitivity to ADP allosteric activation. This renders beta-cells responsive to amino acid stimulation, explaining protein-induced hypoglycemia secondary to non-physiological insulin release. Hepatocytes carrying mutant GDH produced more ammonia upon alanine exposure, which underscores hyperammonemia developed by the patients. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For

  13. The gdhB gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes an arginine-inducible NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase which is subject to allosteric regulation.

    PubMed

    Lu, C D; Abdelal, A T

    2001-01-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was purified, and its amino-terminal amino acid sequence was determined. This sequence information was used in identifying and cloning the encoding gdhB gene and its flanking regions. The molecular mass predicted from the derived sequence for the encoded NAD-GDH was 182.6 kDa, in close agreement with that determined from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified enzyme (180 kDa). Cross-linking studies established that the native NAD-GDH is a tetramer of equal subunits. Comparison of the derived amino acid sequence of NAD-GDH from P. aeruginosa with the GenBank database showed the highest homology with hypothetical polypeptides from Pseudomonas putida, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Rickettsia prowazakii, Legionella pneumophila, Vibrio cholerae, Shewanella putrefaciens, Sinorhizobium meliloti, and Caulobacter crescentus. A moderate degree of homology, primarily in the central domain, was observed with the smaller tetrameric NAD-GDH (protomeric mass of 110 kDa) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Neurospora crassa. Comparison with the yet smaller hexameric GDH (protomeric mass of 48 to 55 kDa) of other prokaryotes yielded a low degree of homology that was limited to residues important for binding of substrates and for catalytic function. NAD-GDH was induced 27-fold by exogenous arginine and only 3-fold by exogenous glutamate. Primer extension experiments established that transcription of gdhB is initiated from an arginine-inducible promoter and that this induction is dependent on the arginine regulatory protein, ArgR, a member of the AraC/XyIS family of regulatory proteins. NAD-GDH was purified to homogeneity from a recombinant strain of P. aeruginosa and characterized. The glutamate saturation curve was sigmoid, indicating positive cooperativity in the binding of glutamate. NAD-GDH activity was subject to allosteric control by arginine and citrate, which

  14. The Presence of Glutamate Dehydrogenase Is a Selective Advantage for the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 under Nonexponential Growth Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, S.; Lucena, J. M.; Reyes, J. C.; Florencio, F. J.; Candau, P.

    1999-01-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has two putative pathways for ammonium assimilation: the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase cycle, which is the main one and is finely regulated by the nitrogen source; and a high NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity (NADP-GDH) whose contribution to glutamate synthesis is uncertain. To investigate the role of the latter, we used two engineered mutants, one lacking and another overproducing NADP-GDH. No major disturbances in the regulation of nitrogen-assimilating enzymes or in amino acids pools were detected in the null mutant, but phycobiline content, a sensitive indicator of the nutritional state of cyanobacterial cells, was significantly reduced, indicating that NADP-GDH plays an auxiliary role in ammonium assimilation. This effect was already prominent in the initial phase of growth, although differences in growth rate between the wild type and the mutants were observed at this stage only at low light intensities. However, the null mutant was unable to sustain growth at the late stage of the culture at the point when the wild type showed the maximum NADP-GDH activity, and died faster in ammonium-containing medium. Overexpression of NADP-GDH improved culture proliferation under moderate ammonium concentrations. Competition experiments between the wild type and the null mutant confirmed that the presence of NADP-GDH confers a selective advantage to Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 in late stages of growth. PMID:9922243

  15. The presence of glutamate dehydrogenase is a selective advantage for the Cyanobacterium synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 under nonexponential growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Chávez, S; Lucena, J M; Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J; Candau, P

    1999-02-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has two putative pathways for ammonium assimilation: the glutamine synthetase-glutamate synthase cycle, which is the main one and is finely regulated by the nitrogen source; and a high NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activity (NADP-GDH) whose contribution to glutamate synthesis is uncertain. To investigate the role of the latter, we used two engineered mutants, one lacking and another overproducing NADP-GDH. No major disturbances in the regulation of nitrogen-assimilating enzymes or in amino acids pools were detected in the null mutant, but phycobiline content, a sensitive indicator of the nutritional state of cyanobacterial cells, was significantly reduced, indicating that NADP-GDH plays an auxiliary role in ammonium assimilation. This effect was already prominent in the initial phase of growth, although differences in growth rate between the wild type and the mutants were observed at this stage only at low light intensities. However, the null mutant was unable to sustain growth at the late stage of the culture at the point when the wild type showed the maximum NADP-GDH activity, and died faster in ammonium-containing medium. Overexpression of NADP-GDH improved culture proliferation under moderate ammonium concentrations. Competition experiments between the wild type and the null mutant confirmed that the presence of NADP-GDH confers a selective advantage to Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 in late stages of growth.

  16. Glutamate dehydrogenase isoforms with N-terminal (His)6- or FLAG-tag retain their kinetic properties and cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nielsen, Camilla Wendel; Hauge, Anne; Zaganas, Ioannis; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Plaitakis, Andreas; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a crucial enzyme on the crossroads of amino acid and energy metabolism and it is operating in all domains of life. According to current knowledge GDH is present only in one functional isoform in most animals, including mice. In addition to this housekeeping enzyme (hGDH1 in humans), humans and apes have acquired a second isoform (hGDH2) with a distinct tissue expression profile. In the current study we have cloned both mouse and human GDH constructs containing FLAG and (His)6 small genetically-encoded tags, respectively. The hGDH1 and hGDH2 constructs containing N-terminal (His)6 tags were successfully expressed in Sf9 cells and the recombinant proteins were isolated to ≥95 % purity in a two-step procedure involving ammonium sulfate precipitation and Ni(2+)-based immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. To explore whether the presence of the FLAG and (His)6 tags affects the cellular localization and functionality of the GDH isoforms, we studied the subcellular distribution of the expressed enzymes as well as their regulation by adenosine diphosphate monopotassium salt (ADP) and guanosine-5'-triphosphate sodium salt (GTP). Through immunoblot analysis of the mitochondrial and cytosolic fraction of the HEK cells expressing the recombinant proteins we found that neither FLAG nor (His)6 tag disturbs the mitochondrial localization of GDH. The addition of the small tags to the N-terminus of the mature mitochondrial mouse GDH1 or human hGDH1 and hGDH2 did not change the ADP activation or GTP inhibition pattern of the proteins as compared to their untagged counterparts. However, the addition of FLAG tag to the C-terminus of the mouse GDH left the recombinant protein fivefold less sensitive to ADP activation. This finding highlights the necessity of the functional characterization of recombinant proteins containing even the smallest available tags.

  17. Glutamate mediates platelet activation through the AMPA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Craig N.; Sun, Henry; Ikeda, Masahiro; Beique, Jean-Claude; Swaim, Anne Marie; Mason, Emily; Martin, Tanika V.; Thompson, Laura E.; Gozen, Oguz; Ampagoomian, David; Sprengel, Rolf; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Faraday, Nauder; Huganir, Richard; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter that binds to the kainate receptor, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor (AMPAR). Each receptor was first characterized and cloned in the central nervous system (CNS). Glutamate is also present in the periphery, and glutamate receptors have been identified in nonneuronal tissues, including bone, heart, kidney, pancreas, and platelets. Platelets play a central role in normal thrombosis and hemostasis, as well as contributing greatly to diseases such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Despite the presence of glutamate in platelet granules, the role of glutamate during hemostasis is unknown. We now show that activated platelets release glutamate, that platelets express AMPAR subunits, and that glutamate increases agonist-induced platelet activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that glutamate binding to the AMPAR increases intracellular sodium concentration and depolarizes platelets, which are important steps in platelet activation. In contrast, platelets treated with the AMPAR antagonist CNQX or platelets derived from GluR1 knockout mice are resistant to AMPA effects. Importantly, mice lacking GluR1 have a prolonged time to thrombosis in vivo. Our data identify glutamate as a regulator of platelet activation, and suggest that the AMPA receptor is a novel antithrombotic target. PMID:18283118

  18. An enzymatic bridge between carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism: regulation of glutamate dehydrogenase by reversible phosphorylation in a severe hypoxia-tolerant crayfish.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neal J; Storey, Kenneth B

    2012-04-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) (EC 1.4.1.3) is a crucial enzyme involved in bridging two metabolic pathways, gating the use of glutamate for either amino acid metabolism, or carbohydrate metabolism. The present study investigated GDH from tail muscle of the freshwater crayfish Orconectes virilis exploring changes to kinetic properties, phosphorylation levels and structural stability between two forms of the enzyme (aerobic control and 20-h severe hypoxic). Evidence indicated that GDH was converted to a high phosphate form under oxygen limitation. ProQ Diamond phosphoprotein staining showed a 42% higher bound phosphate content on GDH from muscle of severely hypoxic crayfish compared with the aerobic form, and treatment of this GDH with commercial phosphatase (alkaline phosphatase), and treatments that stimulated the activities of different endogenous protein phosphatases (stimulating PP1 + PP2A, PP2B, and PP2C) yielded significant increases in the fold activation by ADP of GDH from both control and severe hypoxic conditions. By contrast, stimulation of the activities of endogenous protein kinases (AMPK, PKA or CaMK) significantly reduced the ADP fold activation from control animals. The physiological consequence of severe hypoxia-induced GDH phosphorylation may be to suppress GDH activity under low oxygen, shutting off this critical bridge point between two metabolic pathways.

  19. Synthesis and biological activity of glutamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Receveur, J M; Guiramand, J; Récasens, M; Roumestant, M L; Viallefont, P; Martinez, J

    1998-01-20

    In order to develop new specific glutamate analogues at metabotropic glutamate receptors, Diels-Alder, 1-4 ionic and radical reactions were performed starting from (2S)-4-methyleneglutamic acid. Preliminary pharmacological evaluation by measuring IP accumulation using rat forebrain synaptoneurosomes has shown that (2S)-4-(2-phthalimidoethyl)glutamic acid (3a), (2S)-4-(4-phthalimidobutyl)glutamic acid (3b) and 1-[(S)-2-amino-2-carboxyethyl]-3,4-dimethylcyclohex-3-ene-1-carbox ylic acid (8) presented moderate antagonist activities.

  20. Neuronal Activity and Glutamate Uptake Decrease Mitochondrial Mobility in Astrocytes and Position Mitochondria Near Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua G.; O'Donnell, John C.; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Within neurons, mitochondria are nonuniformly distributed and are retained at sites of high activity and metabolic demand. Glutamate transport and the concomitant activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase represent a substantial energetic demand on astrocytes. We hypothesized that mitochondrial mobility within astrocytic processes might be regulated by neuronal activity and glutamate transport. We imaged organotypic hippocampal slice cultures of rat, in which astrocytes maintain their highly branched morphologies and express glutamate transporters. Using time-lapse confocal microscopy, the mobility of mitochondria within individual astrocytic processes and neuronal dendrites was tracked. Within neurons, a greater percentage of mitochondria were mobile than in astrocytes. Furthermore, they moved faster and farther than in astrocytes. Inhibiting neuronal activity with tetrodotoxin (TTX) increased the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Mitochondrial movement in astrocytes was inhibited by vinblastine and cytochalasin D, demonstrating that this mobility depends on both the microtubule and actin cytoskeletons. Inhibition of glutamate transport tripled the percentage of mobile mitochondria in astrocytes. Conversely, application of the transporter substrate d-aspartate reversed the TTX-induced increase in the percentage of mobile mitochondria. Inhibition of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange also increased the percentage of mitochondria that were mobile. Last, we demonstrated that neuronal activity increases the probability that mitochondria appose GLT-1 particles within astrocyte processes, without changing the proximity of GLT-1 particles to VGLUT1. These results imply that neuronal activity and the resulting clearance of glutamate by astrocytes regulate the movement of astrocytic mitochondria and suggest a mechanism by which glutamate transporters might retain mitochondria at sites of glutamate uptake. PMID:24478345

  1. Diversification of the kinetic properties of yeast NADP-glutamate-dehydrogenase isozymes proceeds independently of their evolutionary origin.

    PubMed

    Campero-Basaldua, Carlos; Quezada, Héctor; Riego-Ruíz, Lina; Márquez, Dariel; Rojas, Erendira; González, James; El-Hafidi, Mohammed; González, Alicia

    2016-11-19

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ScGDH1 and ScGDH3 encoded glutamate dehydrogenases (NADP-GDHs) catalyze the synthesis of glutamate from ammonium and α-ketoglutarate (α-KG). Previous kinetic characterization showed that these enzymes displayed different allosteric properties and respectively high or low rate of α-KG utilization. Accordingly, the coordinated action of ScGdh1 and ScGdh3, regulated balanced α-KG utilization for glutamate biosynthesis under either fermentative or respiratory conditions, safeguarding energy provision. Here, we have addressed the question of whether there is a correlation between the regulation and kinetic properties of the NADP-GDH isozymes present in S. cerevisiae (ScGdh1 and ScGdh3), Kluyveromyces lactis (KlGdh1), and Lachancea kluyveri (LkGdh1) and their evolutionary history. Our results show that the kinetic properties of K. lactis and L. kluyveri single NADP-GDHs are respectively similar to either ScGDH3 or ScGDH1, which arose from the whole genome duplication event of the S. cerevisiae lineage, although, KlGDH1 and LkGDH1 originated from a GDH clade, through an ancient interspecies hybridization event that preceded the divergence between the Saccharomyces clade and the one containing the genera Kluyveromyces, Lachancea, and Eremothecium. Thus, the kinetic properties which determine the NADP-GDHs capacity to utilize α-KG and synthesize glutamate do not correlate with their evolutionary origin.

  2. Resolving the role of plant glutamate dehydrogenase: II. Physiological characterization of plants overexpressing the two enzyme subunits individually or simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Bedu, Magali; Dargel-Grafin, Céline; Dubois, Frédéric; Gibon, Yves; Restivo, Francesco M; Hirel, Bertrand

    2013-10-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH; EC 1.4.1.2) is able to carry out the deamination of glutamate in higher plants. In order to obtain a better understanding of the physiological function of GDH in leaves, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) plants were constructed that overexpress two genes from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia (GDHA and GDHB under the control of the Cauliflower mosiac virus 35S promoter), which encode the α- and β-subunits of GDH individually or simultaneously. In the transgenic plants, the GDH protein accumulated in the mitochondria of mesophyll cells and in the mitochondria of the phloem companion cells (CCs), where the native enzyme is normally expressed. Such a shift in the cellular location of the GDH enzyme induced major changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolite accumulation and a reduction in growth. These changes were mainly characterized by a decrease in the amount of sucrose, starch and glutamine in the leaves, which was accompanied by an increase in the amount of nitrate and Chl. In addition, there was an increase in the content of asparagine and a decrease in proline. Such changes may explain the lower plant biomass determined in the GDH-overexpressing lines. Overexpressing the two genes GDHA and GDHB individually or simultaneously induced a differential accumulation of glutamate and glutamine and a modification of the glutamate to glutamine ratio. The impact of the metabolic changes occurring in the different types of GDH-overexpressing plants is discussed in relation to the possible physiological function of each subunit when present in the form of homohexamers or heterohexamers.

  3. Biomolecular Interaction Assays Identified Dual Inhibitors of Glutaminase and Glutamate Dehydrogenase That Disrupt Mitochondrial Function and Prevent Growth of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Fang, Jinzhang; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zheng; Xie, Jianhui; Yu, Yan; Ruan, Jennifer Jin; Chen, Zhao; Hou, Wei; Yang, Gensheng; Su, Weike; Ruan, Benfang Helen

    2017-02-07

    Glutaminase (KGA/isoenzyme GAC) is an emerging and important drug target for cancer. Traditional methods for assaying glutaminase activity are coupled with several other enzymes. Such coupled assays do not permit the direct and stringent characterization of specific glutaminase inhibitors. Ebselen was identified as a potent 9 nM KGA inhibitor in the KGA/glutamate oxidase (GO)/horse radish peroxidase (HRP) coupled assay but showed very weak activity in inhibiting the growth of glutamine-dependent cancer cells. For rigorous characterization, we developed a direct kinetic binding assay for KGA using bio-layer interferometry (BLI) as the detection method; Ebselen was identified as a GDH inhibitor but not a KGA inhibitor. Furthermore, we designed and synthesized several benzo[d][1,2]selenazol-3(2H)-one dimers which were subjected to SAR analysis by several glutaminolysis specific biochemical and cell based assays. Novel glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) or dual KGA/GDH inhibitors were discovered from the synthetic compounds; the dual inhibitors completely disrupt mitochondrial function and demonstrate potent anticancer activity with a minimum level of toxicity.

  4. Activation of Pedunculopontine Glutamate Neurons Is Reinforcing.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Zell, Vivien; Wu, Johnathan; Punta, Cindy; Ramajayam, Nivedita; Shen, Xinyi; Faget, Lauren; Lilascharoen, Varoth; Lim, Byung Kook; Hnasko, Thomas S

    2017-01-04

    Dopamine transmission from midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons underlies behavioral processes related to motivation and drug addiction. The pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) is a brainstem nucleus containing glutamate-, acetylcholine-, and GABA-releasing neurons with connections to basal ganglia and limbic brain regions. Here we investigated the role of PPTg glutamate neurons in reinforcement, with an emphasis on their projections to VTA dopamine neurons. We used cell-type-specific anterograde tracing and optogenetic methods to selectively label and manipulate glutamate projections from PPTg neurons in mice. We used anatomical, electrophysiological, and behavioral assays to determine their patterns of connectivity and ascribe functional roles in reinforcement. We found that photoactivation of PPTg glutamate cell bodies could serve as a direct positive reinforcer on intracranial self-photostimulation assays. Further, PPTg glutamate neurons directly innervate VTA; photostimulation of this pathway preferentially excites VTA dopamine neurons and is sufficient to induce behavioral reinforcement. These results demonstrate that ascending PPTg glutamate projections can drive motivated behavior, and PPTg to VTA synapses may represent an important target relevant to drug addiction and other mental health disorders.

  5. Ciprofloxacin triggered glutamate production by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Lubitz, Dorit; Wendisch, Volker F

    2016-10-07

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a well-studied bacterium which naturally overproduces glutamate when induced by an elicitor. Glutamate production is accompanied by decreased 2-oxoglutatate dehydrogenase activity. Elicitors of glutamate production by C. glutamicum analyzed to molecular detail target the cell envelope. Ciprofloxacin, an inhibitor of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, was shown to inhibit growth of C. glutamicum wild type with concomitant excretion of glutamate. Enzyme assays showed that 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity was decreased due to ciprofloxacin addition. Transcriptome analysis revealed that this inhibitor of DNA gyrase increased RNA levels of genes involved in DNA synthesis, repair and modification. Glutamate production triggered by ciprofloxacin led to glutamate titers of up to 37 ± 1 mM and a substrate specific glutamate yield of 0.13 g/g. Even in the absence of the putative glutamate exporter gene yggB, ciprofloxacin effectively triggered glutamate production. When C. glutamicum wild type was cultivated under nitrogen-limiting conditions, 2-oxoglutarate rather than glutamate was produced as consequence of exposure to ciprofloxacin. Recombinant C. glutamicum strains overproducing lysine, arginine, ornithine, and putrescine, respectively, secreted glutamate instead of the desired amino acid when exposed to ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin induced DNA synthesis and repair genes, reduced 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase activity and elicited glutamate production by C. glutamicum. Production of 2-oxoglutarate could be triggered by ciprofloxacin under nitrogen-limiting conditions.

  6. Nucleotide sequence of the GDH gene coding for the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nagasu, T; Hall, B D

    1985-01-01

    The isolation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene for NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) by cross hybridization to the Neurospora crassa am gene, known to encode for NADP-GDH is described. Two DNA fragments selected from a yeast genomic library in phage lambda gt11 were shown by restriction analysis to share 2.5 kb of common sequence. A yeast shuttle vector (CV13) carrying either to the cloned fragments complements the gdh- strain of S. cerevisiae and directs substantial overproduction of NADP-GDH. One of the cloned fragments was sequenced, and the deduced amino acid (aa) sequence of the yeast NADP-GDH is 64% homologous to N. crassa, 51% to Escherichia coli and 24% to bovine NADP-GDHs.

  7. A novel mutation in the glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1) of a patient with congenital hyperinsulinism-hyperammonemia (HI/HA).

    PubMed

    Fang, Chen; Ding, Xin; Huang, Yun; Huang, Jian; Zhao, Pengjun; Hu, Ji

    2016-03-01

    Hyperinsulinism-hyperammonemia (HI/HA) syndrome, often characterized by recurrent symptomatic hypoglycemia and persistent hyperammonemia, is the second most frequent cause of the congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI). Here, we reported a patient with normal birth weight, repeated seizures, untreatable hypoglycemia, and persistent, mild hyperammonemia. The genetic diagnosis revealed that the patient carried a heterozygous, de novo missense mutation (N410I, c.1401A>T) in the glutamate dehydrogenase 1 gene (GLUD1). The patient was treated with diazoxide, which significantly alleviated the hypoglycemia. CT and MRI brain scanning at different developmental stages revealed large-scale brain damage in the front lobe. Severe neurodevelopment deficits were identified in the follow-up.

  8. Radiochemical assay for a NADP+-specific gamma-glutamate semialdehyde dehydrogenase extracted from mitochondrial membrane of rat intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, J.J.; Gooding, R.C.; Jones, M.E.

    1988-02-01

    A radiochemical assay has been developed for a NADP+-specific gamma-glutamate semialdehyde dehydrogenase from rat intestinal epithelial cells. The spectrophotometric assay utilized to measure the enzyme in bacterial cell homogenates is not sensitive enough for homogenates from rat mitochondria, which require an assay that can measure as little as 0.5 nmol NADPH formed/min/ml extract. The assay described here is sensitive to 0.1 nmol product formed/min/ml of extract and employs the use of (/sup 3/H)pyrroline 5-carboxylate which is phosphorylated and oxidized by the enzyme to gamma-(/sup 3/H)glutamyl phosphate, a product that decomposes to (/sup 3/H)pyrrolidone 5-carboxylate. The latter product is separated from the substrate by ion-exchange chromatography. In order to correct for any product loss during separation by ion-exchange (/sup 14/C)pyrrolidone 5-carboxylate is added as an internal standard to the deproteinized assay mixture. Under the assay conditions described mammalian gamma-glutamate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity is linear with respect to time and protein concentration. Comparison between the kinetic parameters reported for the bacterial enzyme and those reported here for the mammalian enzyme indicate similarities in the pH optima as well as a requirement for phosphate. Kinetic studies on mammalian enzyme yield apparent Km values of 1.8 mM for pyrroline 5-carboxylate, 0.2 mM for NADP+, and 11.3 mM for phosphate.

  9. Morphine Induces Ubiquitin-Proteasome Activity and Glutamate Transporter Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liling; Wang, Shuxing; Sung, Backil; Lim, Grewo; Mao, Jianren

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate transporters play a crucial role in physiological glutamate homeostasis, neurotoxicity, and glutamatergic regulation of opioid tolerance. However, how the glutamate transporter turnover is regulated remains poorly understood. Here we show that chronic morphine exposure induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1 in C6 glioma cells with a concurrent decrease in glutamate uptake and increase in proteasome activity, which were blocked by the selective proteasome inhibitor MG-132 or lactacystin but not the lysosomal inhibitor chloroquin. At the cellular level, chronic morphine induced the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome Ten)-mediated up-regulation of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Nedd4 via cAMP/protein kinase A signaling, leading to EAAC1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Either Nedd4 or PTEN knockdown with small interfering RNA prevented the morphine-induced EAAC1 degradation and decreased glutamate uptake. These data indicate that cAMP/protein kinase A signaling serves as an intracellular regulator upstream to the activation of the PTEN/Nedd4-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome system activity that is critical for glutamate transporter turnover. Under an in vivo condition, chronic morphine exposure also induced posttranscriptional down-regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAC1, which was prevented by MG-132, and transcriptional up-regulation of PTEN and Nedd4 within the spinal cord dorsal horn. Thus, inhibition of the ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated glutamate transporter degradation may be an important mechanism for preventing glutamate overexcitation and may offer a new strategy for treating certain neurological disorders and improving opioid therapy in chronic pain management. PMID:18539596

  10. Effects of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Gan, Li-Qin; Li, Shu-Ke; Zheng, Jie-Cong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Various alcoholic beverages containing different concentrations of ethanol are widely consumed, and excessive alcohol consumption may result in serious health problems. The consumption of alcoholic beverages is often accompanied by non-alcoholic beverages, such as herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages to relieve drunk symptoms. The aim of this study was to supply new information on the effects of these beverages on alcohol metabolism for nutritionists and the general public, in order to reduce problems associated with excessive alcohol consumption. The effects of 57 kinds of herbal infusions, tea and carbonated beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity were evaluated. Generally, the effects of these beverages on alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity are very different. The results suggested that some beverages should not be drank after excessive alcohol consumption, and several beverages may be potential dietary supplements for the prevention and treatment of problems related to excessive alcohol consumption.

  11. Inhibitory effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Carper, W R; Dorey, R C; Beber, J H

    1987-10-01

    We investigated the effect of disulfiram (Antabuse) on the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) in vitro. We observed a time-dependent inhibition of this dehydrogenase by disulfiram and diethyldithiocarbamate similar to that obtained for aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3). These results suggest a possible explanation for various side effects observed in the clinical use of Antabuse.

  12. Herbicidal Activity of an Isopropylmalate Dehydrogenase Inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Wittenbach, V. A.; Teaney, P. W.; Hanna, W. S.; Rayner, D. R.; Schloss, J. V.

    1994-01-01

    Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) is the third enzyme specific to leucine biosynthesis. It catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of 3-isopropylmalate (3-IPM) to 2-ketoisocaproic acid. The partially purified enzyme from pea (Pisum sativum L.) shows a broad pH optimum of 7.8 to 9.1 and has Km values for 3-IPM and NAD of 18 and 40 [mu]M, respectively. O-Isobutenyl oxalylhydroxamate (O-IbOHA) has been discovered to be an excellent inhibitor of the pea IPMDH, with an apparent inhibitor constant of 5 nM. As an herbicide, O-IbOHA showed only moderate activity on a variety of broadleaf and grass species. We characterized the herbicidal activity of O-IbOHA on corn (Zea mays L.), a sensitive species; giant foxtail (Setaria faberi) and morning glory (Ipomoea purpurea [L.] Roth), moderately tolerant species; and soybean [Glycine max L. Merr.), a tolerant species. Differences in tolerance among the species were not due to differences in the sensitivity of IPMDH. Studies with [14C]O-IbOHA suggested that uptake and translocation were not major limitations for herbicidal activity, nor were they determinants of tolerance. Moreover, metabolism could not account for the difference in tolerance of corn, foxtail, and morning glory, although it might account for the tolerance of soybean. Herbicidal activity on all four species was correlated with the accumulation of 3-IPM in the plants. PMID:12232331

  13. Costimulation of AMPA and metabotropic glutamate receptors underlies phospholipase C activation by glutamate in hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Hyun; Lee, Kyu-Hee; Lee, Doyun; Han, Young-Eun; Lee, Suk-Ho; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Ho, Won-Kyung

    2015-04-22

    Glutamate, a major neurotransmitter in the brain, activates ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs, respectively). The two types of glutamate receptors interact with each other, as exemplified by the modulation of iGluRs by mGluRs. However, the other way of interaction (i.e., modulation of mGluRs by iGluRs) has not received much attention. In this study, we found that group I mGluR-specific agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) alone is not sufficient to activate phospholipase C (PLC) in rat hippocampus, while glutamate robustly activates PLC. These results suggested that additional mechanisms provided by iGluRs are involved in group I mGluR-mediated PLC activation. A series of experiments demonstrated that glutamate-induced PLC activation is mediated by mGluR5 and is facilitated by local Ca(2+) signals that are induced by AMPA-mediated depolarization and L-type Ca(2+) channel activation. Finally, we found that PLC and L-type Ca(2+) channels are involved in hippocampal mGluR-dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD) induced by paired-pulse low-frequency stimulation, but not in DHPG-induced chemical LTD. Together, we propose that AMPA receptors initiate Ca(2+) influx via the L-type Ca(2+) channels that facilitate mGluR5-PLC signaling cascades, which underlie mGluR-LTD in rat hippocampus.

  14. Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase Activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Lorite, María J.; Tachil, Jörg; Sanjuán, Juán; Meyer, Ortwin; Bedmar, Eulogio J.

    2000-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)2 subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein. PMID:10788353

  15. Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity in Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Lorite, M J; Tachil, J; Sanjuán, J; Meyer, O; Bedmar, E J

    2000-05-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain 110spc4 was capable of chemolithoautotrophic growth with carbon monoxide (CO) as a sole energy and carbon source under aerobic conditions. The enzyme carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CODH; EC 1.2.99.2) has been purified 21-fold, with a yield of 16% and a specific activity of 58 nmol of CO oxidized/min/mg of protein, by a procedure that involved differential ultracentrifugation, anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography, and gel filtration. The purified enzyme gave a single protein and activity band on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and had a molecular mass of 230,000 Da. The 230-kDa enzyme was composed of large (L; 75-kDa), medium (M; 28.4-kDa), and small (S; 17.2-kDa) subunits occurring in heterohexameric (LMS)(2) subunit composition. The 75-kDa polypeptide exhibited immunological cross-reactivity with the large subunit of the CODH of Oligotropha carboxidovorans. The B. japonicum enzyme contained, per mole, 2.29 atoms of Mo, 7.96 atoms of Fe, 7.60 atoms of labile S, and 1.99 mol of flavin. Treatment of the enzyme with iodoacetamide yielded di(carboxamidomethyl)molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide, identifying molybdopterin cytosine dinucleotide as the organic portion of the B. japonicum CODH molybdenum cofactor. The absorption spectrum of the purified enzyme was characteristic of a molybdenum-containing iron-sulfur flavoprotein.

  16. Characterization and Expression of Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Response to Acute Salinity Stress in the Chinese Mitten Crab, Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yueru; Li, Erchao; Yu, Na; Wang, Xiaodan; Cai, Chunfang; Tang, Boping; Chen, Liqiao; Van Wormhoudt, Alain

    2012-01-01

    Background Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) is a key enzyme for the synthesis and catabolism of glutamic acid, proline and alanine, which are important osmolytes in aquatic animals. However, the response of GDH gene expression to salinity alterations has not yet been determined in macro-crustacean species. Methodology/Principal Findings GDH cDNA was isolated from Eriocheir sinensis. Then, GDH gene expression was analyzed in different tissues from normal crabs and the muscle of crabs following transfer from freshwater (control) directly to water with salinities of 16‰ and 30‰, respectively. Full-length GDH cDNA is 2,349 bp, consisting of a 76 bp 5′- untranslated region, a 1,695 bp open reading frame encoding 564 amino acids and a 578 bp 3′- untranslated region. E. sinensis GDH showed 64–90% identity with protein sequences of mammalian and crustacean species. Muscle was the dominant expression source among all tissues tested. Compared with the control, GDH expression significantly increased at 6 h in crabs transferred to 16‰ and 30‰ salinity, and GDH expression peaked at 48 h and 12 h, respectively, with levels approximately 7.9 and 8.5 fold higher than the control. The free amino acid (FAA) changes in muscle, under acute salinity stress (16‰ and 30‰ salinities), correlated with GDH expression levels. Total FAA content in the muscle, which was based on specific changes in arginine, proline, glycine, alanine, taurine, serine and glutamic acid, tended to increase in crabs following transfer to salt water. Among these, arginine, proline and alanine increased significantly during salinity acclimation and accounted for the highest proportion of total FAA. Conclusions E. sinensis GDH is a conserved protein that serves important functions in controlling osmoregulation. We observed that higher GDH expression after ambient salinity increase led to higher FAA metabolism, especially the synthesis of glutamic acid, which increased the synthesis of proline and

  17. The significance of abrupt transitions in Lineweaver-Burk plots with particular reference to glutamate dehydrogenase. Negative and positive co-operativity in catalytic rate constants.

    PubMed

    Engel, P C; Ferdinand, W

    1973-01-01

    1. Lineweaver-Burk plots for glutamate dehydrogenase, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and several other enzymes show one or more abrupt transitions between apparently linear sections. These transitions correspond to abrupt increases in the apparent K(m) and V(max.) with increasing concentration of the varied substrate. 2. The generalized reciprocal initial-rate equation for a multi-site enzyme requires several restrictions to be put on it in order to generate such plots. These mathematical conditions are explored. 3. It is shown that the effective omission of a term in the denominator of the reciprocal initial-rate equation represents a minimal requirement for generation of abrupt transitions. This corresponds in physical terms to negative co-operativity followed by positive co-operativity affecting the catalytic rate constant for the reaction. 4. Previous models for glutamate dehydrogenase cannot adequately account for the results. On the other hand, the model based on both negative and positive co-operativity gives a good fit to the experimental points. 5. The conclusions are discussed in relation to current knowledge of the structure and mechanism of glutamate dehydrogenase.

  18. Desynchronization of glutamate release prolongs synchronous CA3 network activity.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jethro; Stubblefield, Elizabeth A; Benke, Timothy A; Staley, Kevin J

    2007-05-01

    Periodic bursts of activity in the disinhibited in vitro hippocampal CA3 network spread through the neural population by the glutamatergic recurrent collateral axons that link CA3 pyramidal cells. It was previously proposed that these bursts of activity are terminated by exhaustion of releasable glutamate at the recurrent collateral synapses so that the next periodic burst of network activity cannot occur until the supply of glutamate has been replenished. As a test of this hypothesis, the rate of glutamate release at CA3 axon terminals was reduced by substitution of extracellular Ca(2+) with Sr(2+). Reduction of the rate of glutamate release reduces the rate of depletion and should thereby prolong bursts. Here we demonstrate that Sr(2+) substitution prolongs spontaneous bursts in the disinhibited adult CA3 hippocampal slices to 37.2 +/- 7.6 (SE) times the duration in control conditions. Sr(2+) also decreased the probability of burst initiation and the rate of burst onset, consistent with reduced synchrony of glutamate release and a consequent reduced rate of spread of excitation through the slice. These findings support the supply of releasable glutamate as an important determinant of the probability and duration of synchronous CA3 network activity.

  19. RATES OF GDP-INDUCED AND GTP-INDUCED DEPOLYMERIZATION AND ISOMERIZATION OF THE BOVINE LIVER GLUTAMATE DEHYDROGENASE-COENZYME COMPLEX: A POSSIBLE CONTROLLING FACTOR IN METABOLIC REGULATION*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Charles Y.; Frieden, Carl

    1969-01-01

    The rate of the depolymerization of beef liver glutamate dehydrogenase induced by coenzyme and the purine nucleotides guanosine 5′-diphosphate and guanosine 5′-triphosphate, which are potent inhibitors of enzymatic activity, has been measured by rapid light scattering techniques and by absorbancy changes with stop flow. It is shown that the rate constant for this process may vary from several milliseconds to several seconds depending upon the nucleotides used. The widely varying rate constants for the nucleotide-induced depolymerization may serve a role in determining the nature of the regulation of enzyme activity by nucleotides. Depolymerization induced by guanosine 5′-diphosphate in the presence of diphosphopyridine nucleotide is slower than in the presence of triphosphopyridine nucleotide as coenzyme, and this difference is apparently due to the isomerization of the enzyme as a result of diphosphopyridine nucleotide binding to a second, nonactive site. This binding, as well as binding of the coenzyme to the active site, may be conveniently measured by a purine nucleotide-induced spectral shift in the coenzyme absorption spectrum. It is also shown that complete depolymerization of the enzyme in the presence of guanosine 5′-triphosphate is accomplished by about half saturation of the coenzyme active sites (6-8 active “monomer”). PMID:4312753

  20. Dehydrogenase and Oxoreductase Activities of Porcine Placental 11Beta-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    activity (p < .001). There were positive linear associations (p < . 01) between net dehydrogenase activity (dehydrogenase minus oxoreductase) and...Fragments ( ~ 3 grams ) of placentae from 7-8 fetuses from each of three gilts were removed and placed in ice cold sterile Eagle’s Minimum Essential...Females (n) Males Fetal weight ( grams ) 12 272.7 ± 20.7b 10 302.5 ± 12.8b Fetal length (mm) 12 185.9 ± 5.4 b 10 196.4± 4.8b Placental weight ( grams

  1. Overexpression in a non-native halophilic host and biotechnological potential of NAD+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from Halobacterium salinarum strain NRC-36014.

    PubMed

    Munawar, Nayla; Engel, Paul C

    2012-05-01

    Enzymes produced by halophilic archaea are generally heat resistant and organic solvent tolerant, and accordingly important for biocatalytic applications in 'green chemistry', frequently requiring a low-water environment. NAD(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase from an extremely halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum strain NRC-36014 was selected to explore the biotechnological potential of this enzyme and genetically engineered derivatives. Over-expression in a halophilic host Haloferax volcanii provided a soluble, active recombinant enzyme, not achievable in mesophilic Escherichia coli, and an efficient purification procedure was developed. pH and salt dependence, thermostability, organic solvent stability and kinetic parameters were explored. The enzyme is active up to 90 °C and fully stable up to 70 °C. It shows good tolerance of various miscible organic solvents. High concentrations of salt may be substituted with 30 % DMSO or betaine with good stability and activity. The robustness of this enzyme under a wide range of conditions offers a promising scaffold for protein engineering.

  2. Trehalose and sorbitol alter the kinetic pattern of inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase during drying in levitated microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Elke; Lee, Geoffrey

    2013-12-01

    A single-droplet acoustic levitator was used to determine the drying rate and the kinetics of inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of added trehalose or sorbitol. The solution was also spray dried under the same process condition of drying gas temperature on a bench-top machine. Both trehalose and sorbitol delay the point of onset of enzyme inactivation which lies after the critical point of drying. Both carbohydrates also reduce the apparent rate constant of inactivation calculated during the subsequent inactivation phase. The carbohydrates stabilise, therefore, the enzyme during droplet drying and particle formation mainly during the falling rate drying period. There is no difference between the stabilising effects of the two carbohydrates when examined as levitated single droplets. This suggests the importance of water replacement as a stabilising mechanism in the levitated droplets/particles. On spray drying, the trehalose stabilises the enzyme better than does the sorbitol at a drying gas (outlet) temperature of 60°C. This suggests glass formation with the trehalose but not the sorbitol during the very rapid drying process of small-atomised droplets in the spray dryer.

  3. The amino acid sequence of Neurospora NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. Peptic and chymotryptic peptides and the complete sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Holder, A A; Wootton, J C; Baron, A J; Chambers, G K; Fincham, J R

    1975-01-01

    Peptic and chymotryptic peptides were isolated form the NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase of Neurospora crassa and substantially sequenced. Out of 452 residues in the polypeptide chain, 265 were recovered in the peptic and 427 in the chymotryptic peptides. Together with the tryptic peptides [Wootton, J. C., Taylor, J. G., Jackson, A. A., Chambers, G. K. & Fincham, J. R. S. (1975) Biochem. J. 149, 749-755], these establish the complete sequence of the chain, including the acid and amide assignments, except for seven places where overlaps are inadequate. These remaining alignments are deduced from information on the CNBr fragments obtained in another laboratory [Blumenthal, K. M., Moon, K. & Smith, E. L. (1975), J. Biol. Chem. 250, 3644-3654]. Further information has been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50054 (17 pages) with the British Library (Lending Division), Boston Spa, Wetherby, W. Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies may be obtained under the terms given in Biochem. J. (1975) 145, 5. PMID:1002

  4. Prediction of the determinants of thermal stability by linear discriminant analysis: the case of the glutamate dehydrogenase protein family.

    PubMed

    Pavesi, Angelo

    2014-09-21

    Little is known about the determinants of thermal stability in individual protein families. Most of the knowledge on thermostability comes, in fact, from comparative analyses between large, and heterogeneous, sets of thermo- and mesophilic proteins. Here, we present a multivariate statistical approach aimed to detect signature sequences for thermostability in a single protein family. It was applied to the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) family, which is a good model for investigating this peculiar process. The structure of GDH consists of six subunits, each of them organized into two domains. Formation of ion-pair networks on the surface of the protein subunits, or increase in the inter-subunit hydrophobic interactions, have been suggested as important factors for explaining stability at high temperatures. However, identification of the amino acid changes that are involved in this process still remains elusive. Our approach consisted of a linear discriminant analysis on a set of GDH sequences from Archaea and Bacteria (33 thermo- and 36 mesophilic GDHs). It led to detection of 3 amino acid clusters as the putative determinants of thermal stability. They were localized at the subunit interface or in close proximity to the binding site of the NAD(P)(+) coenzyme. Analysis within the clusters led to prediction of 8 critical amino acid sites. This approach could have a wide utility, in the ligth of the notion that each protein family seems to adopt its own strategy for achieving thermostability.

  5. Characterization of a NADH-Dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase Mutant of Arabidopsis Demonstrates the Key Role of this Enzyme in Root Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism[W

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J.; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:23054470

  6. Characterization of a NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase mutant of Arabidopsis demonstrates the key role of this enzyme in root carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Jean-Xavier; Tercé-Laforgue, Thérèse; Armengaud, Patrick; Clément, Gilles; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Sandra; Catterou, Manuella; Azzopardi, Marianne; Gibon, Yves; Lea, Peter J; Hirel, Bertrand; Dubois, Frédéric

    2012-10-01

    The role of NADH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) was investigated by studying the physiological impact of a complete lack of enzyme activity in an Arabidopsis thaliana plant deficient in three genes encoding the enzyme. This study was conducted following the discovery that a third GDH gene is expressed in the mitochondria of the root companion cells, where all three active GDH enzyme proteins were shown to be present. A gdh1-2-3 triple mutant was constructed and exhibited major differences from the wild type in gene transcription and metabolite concentrations, and these differences appeared to originate in the roots. By placing the gdh triple mutant under continuous darkness for several days and comparing it to the wild type, the evidence strongly suggested that the main physiological function of NADH-GDH is to provide 2-oxoglutarate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The differences in key metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid cycle in the triple mutant versus the wild type indicated that, through metabolic processes operating mainly in roots, there was a strong impact on amino acid accumulation, in particular alanine, γ-aminobutyrate, and aspartate in both roots and leaves. These results are discussed in relation to the possible signaling and physiological functions of the enzyme at the interface of carbon and nitrogen metabolism.

  7. Different rates of synthesis and degradation of two chloroplastic ammonium-inducible NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes during induction and deinduction in Chlorella sorokiniana cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bascomb, N.F.; Prunkard, D.E.; Schmidt, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    The kinetics of accumulation (per milliliter of culture) of the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-subunits, associated with chloroplast-localized ammonium inducible nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) isoenzymes, were measured during a 3 hour induction of synchronized daughter cells of Chlorella sorokiniana in 29 millimolar ammonium medium under photoautotrophic conditions. The ..beta..-subunit holoenzyme(s) accumulated in a linear manner for 3 hours without an apparent induction lag. A 40 minute induction lag preceded the accumulation of the ..cap alpha..-subunit holoenzyme(s). After 120 minutes, the ..cap alpha..-subunit ceased accumulating and thereafter remained at a constant level. From pulse-chase experiments, using /sup 35/SO/sub 4/ and immunochemical procedures, the rate of synthesis of the ..cap alpha..-subunit was shown to be greater than the ..beta..-subunit during the first 80 minutes of induction. The ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-subunits had different rates of degradation during the induction period (t/sub 1/2/ = 50 versus 150 minutes, respectively) and during the deinduction period (t/sub 1/2/ = 5 versus 13.5 minutes) after removal of ammonium from the culture. During deinduction, total NADP-GDH activity decreased with a half-time of 9 minutes. Cycloheximide completely inhibited the synthesis and degradation of both subunits. A model for regulation of expression of the NADP-GDH gene was proposed.

  8. Evidence for Chloroplastic Localization of an Ammonium-Inducible Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Synthesis of Its Subunit from a Cytosolic Precursor-Protein in Chlorella sorokiniana1

    PubMed Central

    Prunkard, Donna E.; Bascomb, Newell F.; Robinson, Ralph W.; Schmidt, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    Chlorella sorokiniana cells, cultured for 12 hours in 30 millimolar ammonium medium, contained an ammonium inducible nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (NADP-GDH) isoenzyme with subunits having a molecular weight of 53,000. In vitro translation of total cellular poly(A)+ RNA, isolated from fully induced cells, resulted in synthesis of an NADP-GDH antigen with a molecular weight of 58,500. The 58,500 dalton antigen was processed in vitro, with a 100,000g supernatant prepared from broken fully induced Chlorella cells, to a protein with a molecular weight of 53,000. These data support the inference that the NADP-GDH subunit (Mr = 53,000) is initially synthesized as a larger precursor protein (Mr = 58,500). By use of a cytochemical staining procedure, dependent upon NADP-GDH catalytic activity, the holoenzyme was shown to be chloroplast-localized. An immunoelectron microscopy procedure, employing anti-NADP-GDH immunoglobulin G and Protein A-gold complex, showed that NADP-GDH antigen was absent from the nucleus but present in both the chloroplast and cytosol. Since synthesis of the enzyme can be inhibited by cycloheximide, the detection of NADP-GDH antigen in the cytosol was probably due to binding of the NADP-GDH antibody to nascent polypeptide chains of the precursor-protein being synthesized on cytosolic 80S ribosomes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:16664819

  9. Renal inner medullary choline dehydrogenase activity: characterization and modulation.

    PubMed

    Grossman, E B; Hebert, S C

    1989-01-01

    Betaine belongs to the trimethylamine class of osmolytes (osmotically active substances believed to play an important role in cell volume homeostasis) and has recently been identified in the inner medulla of the mammalian kidney. Trimethylamines accumulate in the renal inner medulla during hypertonic stress, and betaine content in the inner medulla has been shown recently to increase during hypernatremia, yet the mechanisms governing the modulation of trimethylamine content and, in particular, of betaine content are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate the presence of choline dehydrogenase activity in the renal inner medullas of three separate rat strains. Choline dehydrogenase is the enzyme that catalyzes the first of two successive oxidation steps in the biosynthetic conversion of choline to betaine. The presence of choline dehydrogenase activity in the inner medulla suggests that betaine accumulation in the inner medulla may result, at least in part, through in situ synthesis. The Km and Vmax of the reaction in the inner medullas of Long-Evans rats are 4.7 +/- 0.5 mM and 36.9 +/- 5.0 nmol.mg protein-1.min-1, respectively. These values are similar to the characteristics of choline dehydrogenase in mammalian liver. During hypernatremia, when betaine content of the inner medulla has been shown to increase 1.5-fold, choline dehydrogenase activity remains unchanged (or slightly increased), whereas enzyme activity in the cortex increases approximately 50%. Possible mechanisms of inner medullary betaine accumulation are discussed.

  10. Quantitative cytochemical measurement of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B

    1976-08-25

    A system has been developed for the quantitative measurment of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in tissue sections. An obstacle to the histochemical study of this enzyme has been the fact that the substrate, gylceraldehyde 3-phosphate, is very unstable. In the present system a stable compound, fructose 1, 6-diphosphate, is used as the primary substrate and the demonsatration of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity depends on the conversion of this compound into the specific substrate by the aldolase present in the tissue. The characteristics of the dehydrogenase activity resulting from the addition of fructose 1, 6-diphosphate, resemble closely the known properties of purified glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Use of polyvinyl alcohol in the reaction medium prevents release of enzymes from the sections, as occurs in aqueous media. Although in this study intrinsic aldolase activity was found to be adequate for the rapid conversion of fructose 1, 6-diphosphate into the specific substrate for the dehydrogenase, the use of exogenous aldolase may be of particular advantage in assessing the intergrity of the Embden-Meyerhof pathway.

  11. Characterization and nitrogen-source regulation at the transcriptional level of the gdhA gene of Aspergillus awamori encoding an NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, R E; Moralejo, F J; Gutiérrez, S; Casqueiro, J; Fierro, F; Martín, J F

    1998-07-01

    A 28.7-kb DNA region containing the gdhA gene of Aspergillus awamori was cloned from a genomic DNA library. A fragment of 2570 nucleotides was sequenced that contained ORF1, of 1380 bp, encoding a protein of 460 amino acids (Mr 49.4 kDa). The encoded protein showed high similarity to the NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenases of different organisms. The cloned gene was functional since it complemented two different Aspergillus nidulans gdhA mutants, restoring high levels of NADP-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase to the transformants. The A. awamori gdhA gene was located by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis in a 5.5-Mb band (corresponding to a doublet of chromosomes II and III), and was transcribed as a monocistronic transcript of 1.7 kb. Transcript levels of the gdhA gene were very high during the rapid growth phase and decreased drastically after 48 h of cultivation. Very high expression levels of the gdhA gene were observed in media with ammonium or asparagine as the nitrogen source, whereas glutamic acid repressed transcription of the gdhA gene. These results indicate that expression of the gdhA gene is subject to a strong nitrogen regulation at the transcriptional level.

  12. Dehydrogenase activity of forest soils depends on the assay used

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Januszek, Kazimierz; Długa, Joanna; Socha, Jarosław

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrogenases are exclusively intracellular enzymes, which play an important role in the initial stages of oxidation of soil organic matter. One of the most frequently used methods to estimate dehydrogenase activity in soil is based on the use of triphenyltetrazolium chloride as an artificial electron acceptor. The purpose of this study was to compare the activity of dehydrogenases of forest soils with varied physicochemical properties using different triphenyltetrazolium chloride assays. The determination was carried out using the original procedure by Casida et al., a modification of the procedure which involves the use of Ca(OH)2 instead of CaCO3, the Thalmann method, and the assay by Casida et al. without addition of buffer or any salt. Soil dehydrogenase activity depended on the assay used. Dehydrogenase determined by the Casida et al. method without addition of buffer or any salt correlated with the pH values of soils. The autoclaved strongly acidic samples of control soils showed high concentrations of triphenylformazan, probably due to chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride. There is, therefore, a need for a sterilization method other than autoclaving, ie a process that results in significant changes in soil properties, thus helping to increase the chemical reduction of triphenyltetrazolium chloride.

  13. Glutamate dehydrogenase and Na+-K+ ATPase expression and growth response of Litopenaeus vannamei to different salinities and dietary protein levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Erchao; Arena, Leticia; Lizama, Gabriel; Gaxiola, Gabriela; Cuzon, Gerard; Rosas, Carlos; Chen, Liqiao; van Wormhoudt, Alain

    2011-03-01

    Improvement in the osmoregulation capacity via nutritional supplies is vitally important in shrimp aquaculture. The effects of dietary protein levels on the osmoregulation capacity of the Pacific white shrimp ( L. vannamei) were investigated. This involved an examination of growth performance, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and Na+-K+ ATPase mRNA expression,, and GDH activity in muscles and gills. Three experimental diets were formulated, containing 25%, 40%, and 50% dietary protein, and fed to the shrimp at a salinity of 25. After 20 days, no significant difference was observed in weight gain, though GDH and Na+-K+ ATPase gene expression and GDH activity increased with higher dietary protein levels. Subsequently, shrimp fed diets with 25% and 50% dietary protein were transferred into tanks with salinities of 38 and 5, respectively, and sampled at weeks 1 and 2. Shrimp fed with 40% protein at 25 in salinity (optimal conditions) were used as a control. Regardless of the salinities, shrimp fed with 50% dietary protein had significantly higher growth performance than other diets; no significant differences were found in comparison with the control. Shrimp fed with 25% dietary protein and maintained at salinities of 38 and 5 had significantly lower weight gain values after 2 weeks. Ambient salinity change also stimulated the hepatosomatic index, which increased in the first week and then recovered to a relatively normal level, as in the control, after 2 weeks. These findings indicate that in white shrimp, the specific protein nutrient and energy demands related to ambient salinity change are associated with protein metabolism. Increased dietary protein level could improve the osmoregulation capacity of L. vannamei with more energy resources allocated to GDH activity and expression.

  14. Involvement of GDH3-encoded NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase in yeast cell resistance to stress-induced apoptosis in stationary phase cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Joo; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kang, Hong Yong; Kim, Hye-Rim; Maeng, Pil Jae

    2012-12-28

    Glutamate metabolism is linked to a number of fundamental metabolic pathways such as amino acid metabolism, the TCA cycle, and glutathione (GSH) synthesis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glutamate is synthesized from α-ketoglutarate by two NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenases (NADP-GDH) encoded by GDH1 and GDH3. Here, we report the relationship between the function of the NADP-GDH and stress-induced apoptosis. Gdh3-null cells showed accelerated chronological aging and hypersusceptibility to thermal and oxidative stress during stationary phase. Upon exposure to oxidative stress, Gdh3-null strains displayed a rapid loss in viability associated with typical apoptotic hallmarks, i.e. reactive oxygen species accumulation, nuclear fragmentation, DNA breakage, and phosphatidylserine translocation. In addition, Gdh3-null cells, but not Gdh1-null cells, had a higher tendency toward GSH depletion and subsequent reactive oxygen species accumulation than did WT cells. GSH depletion was rescued by exogenous GSH or glutamate. The hypersusceptibility of stationary phase Gdh3-null cells to stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed by deletion of GDH2. Promoter swapping and site-directed mutagenesis of GDH1 and GDH3 indicated that the necessity of GDH3 for the resistance to stress-induced apoptosis and chronological aging is due to the stationary phase-specific expression of GDH3 and concurrent degradation of Gdh1 in which the Lys-426 residue plays an essential role.

  15. Involvement of GDH3-encoded NADP+-dependent Glutamate Dehydrogenase in Yeast Cell Resistance to Stress-induced Apoptosis in Stationary Phase Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Joo; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kang, Hong Yong; Kim, Hye-Rim; Maeng, Pil Jae

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate metabolism is linked to a number of fundamental metabolic pathways such as amino acid metabolism, the TCA cycle, and glutathione (GSH) synthesis. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glutamate is synthesized from α-ketoglutarate by two NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenases (NADP-GDH) encoded by GDH1 and GDH3. Here, we report the relationship between the function of the NADP-GDH and stress-induced apoptosis. Gdh3-null cells showed accelerated chronological aging and hypersusceptibility to thermal and oxidative stress during stationary phase. Upon exposure to oxidative stress, Gdh3-null strains displayed a rapid loss in viability associated with typical apoptotic hallmarks, i.e. reactive oxygen species accumulation, nuclear fragmentation, DNA breakage, and phosphatidylserine translocation. In addition, Gdh3-null cells, but not Gdh1-null cells, had a higher tendency toward GSH depletion and subsequent reactive oxygen species accumulation than did WT cells. GSH depletion was rescued by exogenous GSH or glutamate. The hypersusceptibility of stationary phase Gdh3-null cells to stress-induced apoptosis was suppressed by deletion of GDH2. Promoter swapping and site-directed mutagenesis of GDH1 and GDH3 indicated that the necessity of GDH3 for the resistance to stress-induced apoptosis and chronological aging is due to the stationary phase-specific expression of GDH3 and concurrent degradation of Gdh1 in which the Lys-426 residue plays an essential role. PMID:23105103

  16. Integration between Glycolysis and Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle Flux May Explain Preferential Glycolytic Increase during Brain Activation, Requiring Glutamate.

    PubMed

    Hertz, Leif; Chen, Ye

    2017-01-01

    The 1988 observation by Fox et al. (1988) that brief intense brain activation increases glycolysis (pyruvate formation from glucose) much more than oxidative metabolism has been abundantly confirmed. Specifically glycolytic increase was unexpected because the amount of ATP it generates is much smaller than that formed by subsequent oxidative metabolism of pyruvate. The present article shows that preferential glycolysis can be explained by metabolic processes associated with activation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. The flux in this cycle, which is essential for production of transmitter glutamate and GABA, equals 75% of brain glucose utilization and each turn is associated with utilization of ~1 glucose molecule. About one half of the association between cycle flux and glucose metabolism occurs during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate in a process similar to the malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS) except that glutamate is supplied from glutamine, not formed from α-ketoglutarate (αKG) as during operation of conventional MAS. Regular MAS function is triggered by one oxidative process in the cytosol during glycolysis causing NAD(+) reduction to NADH. Since NADH cannot cross the mitochondrial membrane (MEM) for oxidation NAD(+) is re-generated by conversion of cytosolic oxaloacetate (OAA) to malate, which enters the mitochondria for oxidation and in a cyclic process regenerates cytosolic OAA. Therefore MAS as well as the "pseudo-MAS" necessary for neuronal glutamate formation can only operate together with cytosolic reduction of NAD(+) to NADH. The major process causing NAD(+) reduction is glycolysis which therefore also must occur during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate and may energize vesicular glutamate uptake which preferentially uses glycolytically derived energy. Another major contributor to the association between glutamate-glutamine cycle and glucose utilization is the need for astrocytic pyruvate to generate glutamate. Although some

  17. New insights from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy into the chemistry of covalent enzyme immobilization, with glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) on silicon dioxide as an example.

    PubMed

    Longo, Luigia; Vasapollo, Giuseppe; Guascito, Maria Rachele; Malitesta, Cosimino

    2006-05-01

    A three-step process for immobilization of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) on the surface of silicon dioxide has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The enzyme layer was deposited on the silicon dioxide surface after first exposing the surface to 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTS) and reacting the silylated surface with glutaraldehyde (GA). Fine XPS analysis, performed after each step of the chemical procedure, revealed unknown details of the step-by-step construction of the enzyme layer under different experimental conditions.

  18. The relationship between haematological indices, serum gamma-glutamyl transferase and glutamate dehydrogenase, visual hepatic damage and worm burden in cattle infected with Fasciola gigantica.

    PubMed

    Molina, E C; Lozano, S P; Barraca, A P

    2006-09-01

    The association between visual hepatic damage, burden of Fasciola gigantica, serum levels of gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) is described from an abattoir study of 70 cattle in the Philippines. In another abattoir study of 60 cattle, the relationship between burden of F. gigantica and haematological indices was investigated. The degree of visual hepatic damage and burden of F. gigantica were significantly positively related to levels of GGT and GLDH. Red blood cell counts and packed cell volume were significantly inversely related to worm burden, but animals compensated for reduced numbers of red blood cells by increasing red cell haemoglobin content.

  19. Ammonium assimilation by Candida albicans and other yeasts: evidence for activity of glutamate synthase.

    PubMed

    Holmes, A R; Collings, A; Farnden, K J; Shepherd, M G

    1989-06-01

    Activities and properties of the ammonium assimilation enzymes NADP+-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), glutamate synthase (GOGAT) and glutamine synthetase (GS) were determined in batch and continuous cultures of Candida albicans. NADP+-dependent GDH activity showed allosteric kinetics, with an S0.5 for 2-oxoglutarate of 7.5 mM and an apparent Km for ammonium of 5.0 mM. GOGAT activity was affected by the buffer used for extraction and assay, but in phosphate buffer, kinetics were hyperbolic, yielding Km values for glutamine of 750 microM and for 2-oxoglutarate of 65 microM. The enzymes GOGAT and NADP+-dependent GDH were also assayed in batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and three other pathogenic Candida spp.: Candida tropicalis, Candida pseudotropicalis and Candida parapsilosis. Evidence is presented that GS/GOGAT is a major pathway for ammonium assimilation in Candida albicans and that this pathway is also significant in other Candida species.

  20. Widening Spectrum of Cellular and Subcellular Expression of Human GLUD1 and GLUD2 Glutamate Dehydrogenases Suggests Novel Functions.

    PubMed

    Spanaki, Cleanthe; Kotzamani, Dimitra; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian glutamate dehydrogenase1 (GDH1) (E.C. 1.4.1.3) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes the reversible oxidative deamination of glutamate to α-ketoglutarate and ammonia while reducing NAD+ and/or NADP+ to NADH and/or NADPH. It links amino acid with carbohydrate metabolism, contributing to Krebs cycle anaplerosis, energy production, ammonia handling and redox homeostasis. Although GDH1 was one of the first major metabolic enzymes to be studied decades ago, its role in cell biology is still incompletely understood. There is however growing interest in a novel GDH2 isoenzyme that emerged via duplication in primates and underwent rapid evolutionary selection concomitant with prefrontal human cortex expansion. Also, the anaplerotic function of GDH1 and GDH2 is currently under sharp focus as this relates to the biology of glial tumors and other neoplasias. Here we used antibodies specific for human GDH1 (hGDH1) and human GDH2 (hGDH2) to study the expression of these isoenzymes in human tissues. Results revealed that both hGDH1 and hGDH2 are expressed in human brain, kidney, testis and steroidogenic organs. However, distinct hGDH1 and hGDH2 expression patterns emerged. Thus, while the Sertoli cells of human testis were strongly positive for hGDH2, they were negative for hGDH1. Conversely, hGDH1 showed very high levels of expression in human liver, but hepatocytes were virtually devoid of hGDH2. In human adrenals, both hGDHs were densely expressed in steroid-producing cells, with hGDH2 expression pattern matching that of the cholesterol side chain cleavage system involved in steroid synthesis. Similarly in human ovaries and placenta, both hGDH1 and hGDH2 were densely expressed in estrogen producing cells. In addition, hGDH1, being a housekeeping enzyme, was also expressed in cells that lack endocrine function. Regarding human brain, study of cortical sections using immunofluorescence (IF) with confocal microscopy revealed that hGDH1 and hGDH2 were both expressed

  1. Alpha helical structures in the leader sequence of human GLUD2 glutamate dehydrogenase responsible for mitochondrial import.

    PubMed

    Kotzamani, Dimitra; Plaitakis, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Human glutamate dehydrogenase (hGDH) exists in two highly homologous isoforms with a distinct regulatory and tissue expression profile: a housekeeping hGDH1 isoprotein encoded by the GLUD1 gene and an hGDH2 isoenzyme encoded by the GLUD2 gene. There is evidence that both isoenzymes are synthesized as pro-enzymes containing a 53 amino acid long N-terminal leader peptide that is cleaved upon translocation into the mitochondria. However, this GDH signal peptide is substantially larger than that of most nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial proteins, the leader sequence of which typically contains 17-35 amino acids and they often form a single amphipathic α-helix. To decode the structural elements that are essential for the mitochondrial targeting of human GDHs, we performed secondary structure analyses of their leader sequence. These analyses predicted, with 82% accuracy, that both leader peptides are positively charged and that they form two to three α-helices, separated by intermediate loops. The first α-helix of hGDH2 is strongly amphipathic, displaying both a positively charged surface and a hydrophobic plane. We then constructed GLUD2-EGFP deletion mutants and used them to transfect three mammalian cell lines (HEK293, COS 7 and SHSY-5Y). Confocal laser scanning microscopy, following co-transfection with pDsRed2-Mito mitochondrial targeting vector, revealed that deletion of the entire leader sequence prevented the enzyme from entering the mitochondria, resulting in its retention in the cytoplasm. Deletion of the first strongly amphipathic α-helix only was also sufficient to prevent the mitochondrial localization of the truncated protein. Moreover, truncated leader sequences, retaining the second and/or the third putative α-helix, failed to restore the mitochondrial import of hGDH2. As such, the first N-terminal alpha helical structure is crucial for the mitochondrial import of hGDH2 and these findings may have implications in understanding the evolutionary

  2. Integration between Glycolysis and Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle Flux May Explain Preferential Glycolytic Increase during Brain Activation, Requiring Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif; Chen, Ye

    2017-01-01

    The 1988 observation by Fox et al. (1988) that brief intense brain activation increases glycolysis (pyruvate formation from glucose) much more than oxidative metabolism has been abundantly confirmed. Specifically glycolytic increase was unexpected because the amount of ATP it generates is much smaller than that formed by subsequent oxidative metabolism of pyruvate. The present article shows that preferential glycolysis can be explained by metabolic processes associated with activation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle. The flux in this cycle, which is essential for production of transmitter glutamate and GABA, equals 75% of brain glucose utilization and each turn is associated with utilization of ~1 glucose molecule. About one half of the association between cycle flux and glucose metabolism occurs during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate in a process similar to the malate-aspartate shuttle (MAS) except that glutamate is supplied from glutamine, not formed from α-ketoglutarate (αKG) as during operation of conventional MAS. Regular MAS function is triggered by one oxidative process in the cytosol during glycolysis causing NAD+ reduction to NADH. Since NADH cannot cross the mitochondrial membrane (MEM) for oxidation NAD+ is re-generated by conversion of cytosolic oxaloacetate (OAA) to malate, which enters the mitochondria for oxidation and in a cyclic process regenerates cytosolic OAA. Therefore MAS as well as the “pseudo-MAS” necessary for neuronal glutamate formation can only operate together with cytosolic reduction of NAD+ to NADH. The major process causing NAD+ reduction is glycolysis which therefore also must occur during neuronal conversion of glutamine to glutamate and may energize vesicular glutamate uptake which preferentially uses glycolytically derived energy. Another major contributor to the association between glutamate-glutamine cycle and glucose utilization is the need for astrocytic pyruvate to generate glutamate. Although some

  3. Active NMDA glutamate receptors are expressed by mammalian osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Leon; Itzstein, Cécile; Cheynel, Hervé; Delmas, Pierre D; Chenu, Chantal

    1999-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor, widely distributed in the mammalian nervous system, has recently been identified in bone. In this study, we have investigated whether NMDA receptors expressed by osteoclasts have an electrophysiological activity. Using the patch clamp technique two agonists of the NMDA receptor, L-glutamate (Glu) and NMDA, were shown to activate whole-cell currents recorded in isolated rabbit osteoclasts. The current-voltage (I-V) relationships of the currents induced by Glu (IGlu) and NMDA (INMDA) were studied using Mg2+-free solutions. The agonist-induced currents had a linear I-V relationship with a reversal potential near 0 mV, as expected for a voltage independent and non-selective cationic current. IGlu and INMDA were sensitive to specific blockers of NMDA subtype glutamate receptors, such as magnesium ions, (5R, 10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a, d]cyclohepten -5,10-imine (MK-801) and 1-(1,2-diphenylethyl) piperidine (DEP). The block of IGlu and INMDA by these specific antagonists was voltage dependent, strong for negative potentials (inward current) and absent for positive potentials (outward current). These results demonstrate that NMDA receptors are functional in rabbit osteoclasts, and that their electrophysiological and pharmacological properties in these cells are similar to those documented for neuronal cells. Active NMDA receptors expressed by osteoclasts may represent a new target for regulating bone resorption. PMID:10373688

  4. Glutamate Clearance Is Locally Modulated by Presynaptic Neuronal Activity in the Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Moritz; Hanson, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are abundantly expressed by astrocytes, rapidly remove glutamate from the extracellular environment, and restrict the temporal and spatial extent of glutamate signaling. Studies probing EAAT function suggest that their capacity to remove glutamate is large and does not saturate, even with substantial glutamate challenges. In contrast, we report that neuronal activity rapidly and reversibly modulates EAAT-dependent glutamate transport. To date, no physiological manipulation has shown changes in functional glutamate uptake in a nonpathological state. Using iGluSnFr-based glutamate imaging and electrophysiology in the adult mouse cortex, we show that glutamate uptake is slowed up to threefold following bursts of neuronal activity. The slowing of glutamate uptake depends on the frequency and duration of presynaptic neuronal activity but is independent of the amount of glutamate released. The modulation of glutamate uptake is brief, returning to normal within 50 ms after stimulation ceases. Interestingly, the slowing of glutamate uptake is specific to activated synapses, even within the domain of an individual astrocyte. Activity-induced slowing of glutamate uptake, and the increased persistence of glutamate in the extracellular space, is reflected by increased decay times of neuronal NR2A-mediated NMDA currents. These results show that astrocytic clearance of extracellular glutamate is slowed in a temporally and spatially specific manner following bursts of neuronal activity ≥30 Hz and that these changes affect the neuronal response to released glutamate. This suggests a previously unreported form of neuron–astrocyte interaction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We report the first fast, physiological modulation of astrocyte glutamate clearance kinetics. We show that presynaptic activity in the cerebral cortex increases the persistence of glutamate in the extracellular space by slowing its clearance by astrocytes. Because of

  5. Spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity in forest soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błońska, Ewa; Lasota, Jarosław

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the spatial variability of the dehydrogenase activity (DH) in forest soils using geostatistics. We have studied variability soil dehydrogenase and their relationship with variability of some physic-chemical properties. Two study areas (A and B) were set up in southern Poland in the Zlotoryja Forest District. Study areas were covered by different types of vegetation (A- broadleaf forest with beech, ash and sycamore), B- coniferous forest with Norway spruce). The soils were classified as Dystric Cambisols (WRB 2006). The samples for laboratory testing were collected from 49 places on each areas. 15 cm of surface horizon of soil were taken (with previously removed litter). Dehydrogenase activity was marked with Lenhard's method according to the Casida procedure. Soil pH, nitrogen (N) and soil organic carbon (C) content (by LECO CNS 2000 carbon analyzer) was marked. C/N ratio was calculated. Particle size composition was determined using laser diffraction. Statistical analysis were performed using STATISTICA 10 software. Geostatistical analysis and mapping were done by application of GS 9+ (Gamma Design) and Surfer 11 (Golden Software). The activity of DH ranged between 5,02 and 71,20 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1 on the A area and between 0,94 and 16,47 mg TPP• kg-1 •24 h-1. Differences in spatial variability of the analised features were noted. The variability of dehydrogenase activity on the A study area was described by an exponential model, whereas on the B study area the spatial correlation has not been noted. The relationship of dehydrogenase activity with the remaining parameters of soil was noted only in the case of A study area. The variability of organic carbon content on the A and B study areas were described by an exponential model. The variability of nitrogen content on both areas were described by an spherical model.

  6. Fast Inhibition of Glutamate-Activated Currents by Caffeine

    PubMed Central

    Vyleta, Nicholas P.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Caffeine stimulates calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in many cell types. In neurons, caffeine stimulates CICR presynaptically and thus modulates neurotransmitter release. Methodology/Principal Findings Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique we found that caffeine (20 mM) reversibly increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in neocortical neurons. The increase in mEPSC frequency is consistent with a presynaptic mechanism. Caffeine also reduced exogenously applied glutamate-activated currents, confirming a separate postsynaptic action. This inhibition developed in tens of milliseconds, consistent with block of channel currents. Caffeine (20 mM) did not reduce currents activated by exogenous NMDA, indicating that caffeine block is specific to non-NMDA type glutamate receptors. Conclusions/Significance Caffeine-induced inhibition of mEPSC amplitude occurs through postsynaptic block of non-NMDA type ionotropic glutamate receptors. Caffeine thus has both pre and postsynaptic sites of action at excitatory synapses. PMID:18781199

  7. Slow motion picture of protein inactivation during single-droplet drying: a study of inactivation kinetics of L-glutamate dehydrogenase dried in an acoustic levitator.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, Elke; Lee, Geoffrey

    2012-06-01

    A novel technique is presented to allow measurement of the kinetics of protein inactivation during drying of an acoustically levitated single droplet. Droplets/particles are removed from the acoustic field after various times during drying, and the state of the protein within them is analyzed. The influence of drying air temperature, relative humidity, buffer concentration, and the presence of a substrate on the inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase is described. The kinetics of inactivation showed three distinct phases. The first phase of constant drying rate demonstrated little protein inactivation in the solution droplet. After the critical point of drying, a second phase was distinguishable when the surface temperature has risen sharply, but there is still only little inactivation of the protein in the solid particle. An onset point of rapid inactivation of the protein marked the start of the third phase that proceeded with approximately first-order rate kinetics. In the case of L-glutamate dehydrogenase, the evidence suggests that the residual moisture content of the solid and not the temperature alone determines the point of onset of protein inactivation.

  8. [The comparative investigation of antihypoxia activity of glutamic and N-acetylglutamic acids].

    PubMed

    Makarova, L M; Pogorelyĭ, V E

    2013-01-01

    Comparative study of antihypoxic activity of glutamic and N-acetylglutamic acid in doses of 1, 10, 50 and 100 mg/kg was realized. It was experimentally ascertained that the most apparent antihypoxic action of study objects occurs in conditions of hypobaric hypoxia of acetylated derivative of glutamic acid considerably exceeds glutamic acid.

  9. High-fat diet enhanced retinal dehydrogenase activity, but suppressed retinol dehydrogenase activity in liver of rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mian; Liu, Can; Hu, Meng-yue; Zhang, Ji; Xu, Ping; Li, Feng; Zhong, Ze-yu; Liu, Li; Liu, Xiao-dong

    2015-04-01

    Evidence has shown that hyperlipidemia is associated with retinoid dyshomeostasis. In liver, retinol is mainly oxidized to retinal by retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs) and alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs), further converted to retinoic acid by retinal dehydrogenases (RALDHs). The aim of this study was to investigate whether high-fat diet (HFD) induced hyperlipidemia affected activity and expression of hepatic ADHs/RDHs and RALDHs in rats. Results showed that retinol levels in liver, kidney and adipose tissue of HFD rats were significantly increased, while plasma retinol and hepatic retinal levels were markedly decreased. HFD rats exhibited significantly downregulated hepatic ADHs/RDHs activity and Adh1, Rdh10 and Dhrs9 expression. Oppositely, hepatic RALDHs activity and Raldh1 expression were upregulated in HFD rats. In HepG2 cells, treatment of HFD rat serum inhibited ADHs/RDHs activity and induced RALDHs activity. Among the tested abnormally altered components in HFD rat serum, cholesterol reduced ADHs/RDHs activity and RDH10 expression, while induced RALDHs activity and RALDH1 expression in HepG2 cells. Contrary to the effect of cholesterol, cholesterol-lowering agent pravastatin upregulated ADHs/RDHs activity and RDH10 expression, while suppressed RALDHs activity and RALDH1 expression. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia oppositely altered activity and expression of hepatic ADHs/RDHs and RALDHs, which is partially due to the elevated cholesterol levels. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nicotine decreases the activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hea-Jo; Lim, Young-Jin; Zuo, Zhiyi; Hur, Wonseok; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2014-02-10

    Nicotine, the main ingredient of tobacco, elicits seizures in animal models and cigarette smoking is regarded as a behavioral risk factor associated with epilepsy or seizures. In the hippocampus, the origin of nicotine-induced seizures, most glutamate uptake could be performed primarily by excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3). An association between temporal lobe epilepsy and EAAT3 downregulation has been reported. Therefore, we hypothesized that nicotine may elicit seizures through the attenuation of EAAT3 activity. We investigated chronic nicotine exposure (72 h) cause reduction of the activity of EAAT3 in a Xenopus oocyte expression system using a two-electrode voltage clamp. The roles of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) were also determined. Nicotine (0.001-1 μM) resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in EAAT3 activity with maximal inhibition at nicotine concentrations of 0.03 μM or higher and at an exposure time of 72 h. Vmax on the glutamate response was significantly reduced in the nicotine group (0.03 μM for 72 h), but the Km value of EAAT3 for glutamate was not altered. When nicotine-exposed oocytes (0.03 μM for 72 h) were pretreated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator), the nicotine-induced reduction in EAAT3 activity was abolished. PKC inhibitors (staurosporine, chelerythrine, and calphostin C) significantly reduced basal EAAT3 activity, but there were no significant differences among the PKC inhibitors, nicotine, and PKC inhibitors+nicotine groups. Similar response patterns were observed among PI3K inhibitors (wortmannin and LY294002), nicotine, and PI3K inhibitors+nicotine. In conclusion, this study suggests that nicotine decreases EAAT3 activity, and that this inhibition seems to be dependent on PKC and PI3K. Our results may provide an additional mechanism for nicotine-induced seizure.

  11. Peripartal changes in serum alkaline phosphatase activity and lactate dehydrogenase activity in dairy cows.

    PubMed Central

    Peter, A T; Bosu, W T; MacWilliams, P; Gallagher, S

    1987-01-01

    Peripartal serum alkaline phosphatase activity and lactate dehydrogenase activity were measured in 30 dairy cows in order to examine the association between retained fetal membranes and enzyme activity. Daily blood samples were obtained from pregnant cows, starting 15 days before the expected day of calving until eight days after parturition. Sera from 15 cows which retained fetal membranes longer than 24 hours and 15 cows which shed fetal membranes within six hours after parturition were analyzed for alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities. Mean alkaline phosphatase enzyme activities ranged from 15.93 to 32.6 U/L in retained and nonretained placenta cows. There was a trend towards higher serum alkaline phosphatase activities in retained placenta cows but the differences were not significant among the groups (P greater than 0.05). Mean lactate dehydrogenase activities ranged from 307.2 to 438.86 U/L in nonretained and retained placenta cows. Lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities in nonretained and retained placenta cows were similar (P greater than 0.05). The alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities peaked at the time of parturition in both groups. However, the differences in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase activities on different days within non-retained and retained placenta cows were significant (P less than 0.05). Results indicate that prepartal changes in alkaline phosphatase and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activities are not predictive of placental retention postpartum. PMID:3453274

  12. Aspartate and glutamate mimetic structures in biologically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Stefanic, Peter; Dolenc, Marija Sollner

    2004-04-01

    Glutamate and aspartate are frequently recognized as key structural elements for the biological activity of natural peptides and synthetic compounds. The acidic side-chain functionality of both the amino acids provides the basis for the ionic interaction and subsequent molecular recognition by specific receptor sites that results in the regulation of physiological or pathophysiological processes in the organism. In the development of new biologically active compounds that possess the ability to modulate these processes, compounds offering the same type of interactions are being designed. Thus, using a peptidomimetic design approach, glutamate and aspartate mimetics are incorporated into the structure of final biologically active compounds. This review covers different bioisosteric replacements of carboxylic acid alone, as well as mimetics of the whole amino acid structure. Amino acid analogs presented include those with different distances between anionic moieties, and analogs with additional functional groups that result in conformational restriction or alternative interaction sites. The article also provides an overview of different cyclic structures, including various cycloalkane, bicyclic and heterocyclic analogs, that lead to conformational restriction. Higher di- and tripeptide mimetics in which carboxylic acid functionality is incorporated into larger molecules are also reviewed. In addition to the mimetic structures presented, emphasis in this article is placed on their steric and electronic properties. These mimetics constitute a useful pool of fragments in the design of new biologically active compounds, particularly in the field of RGD mimetics and excitatory amino acid agonists and antagonists.

  13. Glutamate decarboxylase from Lactobacillus brevis: activation by ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Kazumi; Ueno, Yoshie; Oda, Kohei

    2008-05-01

    In this study, the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) gene from Lactobacillus brevis IFO12005 (Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem., 61, 1168-1171 (1997)), was cloned and expressed. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 99.6% and 53.1% identity with GAD of L. brevis ATCC367 and L. lactis respectively. The His-tagged recombinant GAD showed an optimum pH of 4.5-5.0, and 54 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The GAD activity and stability was significantly dependent on the ammonium sulfate concentration, as observed in authentic GAD. Gel filtration showed that the inactive form of the GAD was a dimer. In contrast, the ammonium sulfate-activated form was a tetramer. CD spectral analyses at pH 5.5 revealed that the structures of the tetramer and the dimer were similar. Treatment of the GAD with high concentrations of ammonium sulfate and subsequent dilution with sodium glutamate was essential for tetramer formation and its activation. Thus the biochemical properties of the GAD from L. brevis IFO12005 were significantly different from those from other sources.

  14. Methylphenidate Decreases ATP Levels and Impairs Glutamate Uptake and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity in Juvenile Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Felipe; Pierozan, Paula; Rodrigues, André F; Biasibetti, Helena; Grings, Mateus; Zanotto, Bruna; Coelho, Daniella M; Vargas, Carmen R; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Wyse, Angela T S

    2016-11-14

    The study of the long-term neurological consequences of early exposure with methylphenidate (MPH) is very important since this psychostimulant has been widely misused by children and adolescents who do not meet full diagnostic criteria for ADHD. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of early chronic exposure with MPH on amino acids profile, glutamatergic and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase homeostasis, as well as redox and energy status in the hippocampus of juvenile rats. Wistar male rats received intraperitoneal injections of MPH (2.0 mg/kg) or saline solution (controls), once a day, from the 15th to the 45th day of age. Results showed that MPH altered amino acid profile in the hippocampus, decreasing glutamine levels. Glutamate uptake and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity were decreased after chronic MPH exposure in the hippocampus of rats. No changes were observed in the immunocontents of glutamate transporters (GLAST and GLT-1), and catalytic subunits of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (α1, α2, and α3), as well as redox status. Moreover, MPH provoked a decrease in ATP levels in the hippocampus of chronically exposed rats, while citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase, respiratory chain complexes activities (II, II-III, and IV), as well as mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial membrane potential were not altered. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic MPH exposure at early age impairs glutamate uptake and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity probably by decreasing in ATP levels observed in rat hippocampus.

  15. Activity-Dependent Plasticity of Astroglial Potassium and Glutamate Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Giselle; Sibille, Jérémie; Zapata, Jonathan; Rouach, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that astrocytes play essential roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Nevertheless, how neuronal activity alters astroglial functional properties and whether such properties also display specific forms of plasticity still remain elusive. Here, we review research findings supporting this aspect of astrocytes, focusing on their roles in the clearance of extracellular potassium and glutamate, two neuroactive substances promptly released during excitatory synaptic transmission. Their subsequent removal, which is primarily carried out by glial potassium channels and glutamate transporters, is essential for proper functioning of the brain. Similar to neurons, different forms of short- and long-term plasticity in astroglial uptake have been reported. In addition, we also present novel findings showing robust potentiation of astrocytic inward currents in response to repetitive stimulations at mild frequencies, as low as 0.75 Hz, in acute hippocampal slices. Interestingly, neurotransmission was hardly affected at this frequency range, suggesting that astrocytes may be more sensitive to low frequency stimulation and may exhibit stronger plasticity than neurons to prevent hyperexcitability. Taken together, these important findings strongly indicate that astrocytes display both short- and long-term plasticity in their clearance of excess neuroactive substances from the extracellular space, thereby regulating neuronal activity and brain homeostasis. PMID:26346563

  16. [Effects of H2-blockers on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity].

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2008-12-01

    First-pass metabolism (FPM) of alcohol is demonstrated by lower blood alcohol concentrations after oral than intravenous administration of the same dose. FPM occurs predominantly in the stomach and has been attributed to class IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzyme localizated in the gastric mucosa. A number of factors that influence on gastric ADH activity and thereby modulate FPM have been identified. These include age, sex, ethnicity, concentrations and amounts of alcohol consumed and drugs. Several H2-receptor antagonists, including cimetidine and ranitidine, inhibit gastric ADH activity and reduce FPM, resulting in higher blood alcohol concentrations after H2-blockers administration.

  17. [Effect of hypobaric hypoxia on the dehydrogenase activities of respiration and photosynthetic metabolism in barley seedlings].

    PubMed

    Voytsekovskaya, S A; Astafurova, T P; Verkhoturova, G S; Postovalova, V M

    2015-01-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia effects on enzymes of photosynthesis and respiration metabolism were explored in 8-day old seedlings of barley Hordeum vulgare L. in the dark or light. 16-hour exposure in rarified atmosphere that causes reductions of partial pressure of air gases and, consequently, hypobaric hypoxia (P(air) = 8.3 κPa, pO2 = 1.7 κPa, pCO2 = 0.003 κPa) up-regulated the activities of piruvate kinase, alcohol dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADP x N-glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase both in the dark and light. NAD- and NAD-N-malate dehydrogenase activities were down-regulated. Levels of NAD- and NAD x H- malate dehydrogenases were decreased. Activation of the NADP-malic enzyme activity, invariably high activity of NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase and growth of NADP x N- glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase are considered as a mechanism of barley seedlings adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia.

  18. Redox engineering by ectopic expression of glutamate dehydrogenase genes links NADPH availability and NADH oxidation with cold growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Tomás, Lidia; Randez-Gil, Francisca; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Prieto, Jose Antonio

    2015-07-09

    Cold stress reduces microbial growth and metabolism being relevant in industrial processes like wine making and brewing. Knowledge on the cold transcriptional response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggests the need of a proper redox balance. Nevertheless, there are no direct evidence of the links between NAD(P) levels and cold growth and how engineering of enzymatic reactions requiring NAD(P) may be used to modify the performance of industrial strains at low temperature. Recombinant strains of S. cerevisiae modified for increased NADPH- and NADH-dependent Gdh1 and Gdh2 activity were tested for growth at low temperature. A high-copy number of the GDH2-encoded glutamate dehydrogenase gene stimulated growth at 15°C, while overexpression of GDH1 had detrimental effects, a difference likely caused by cofactor preferences. Indeed, neither the Trp(-) character of the tested strains, which could affect the synthesis of NAD(P), nor changes in oxidative stress susceptibility by overexpression of GDH1 and GDH2 account for the observed phenotypes. However, increased or reduced NADPH availability by knock-out or overexpression of GRE3, the NADPH-dependent aldose reductase gene, eliminated or exacerbated the cold-growth defect observed in YEpGDH1 cells. We also demonstrated that decreased capacity of glycerol production impairs growth at 15 but not at 30°C and that 15°C-grown baker's yeast cells display higher fermentative capacity than those cultivated at 30°C. Thus, increasing NADH oxidation by overexpression of GDH2 would help to avoid perturbations in the redox metabolism induced by a higher fermentative/oxidative balance at low temperature. Finally, it is shown that overexpression of GDH2 increases notably the cold growth in the wine yeast strain QA23 in both standard growth medium and synthetic grape must. Redox constraints limit the growth of S. cerevisiae at temperatures below the optimal. An adequate supply of NAD(P) precursors as well as a proper level of reducing

  19. Chemical activation of a high-affinity glutamate transporter in human erythrocytes and its implications for malaria-parasite-induced glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Winterberg, Markus; Rajendran, Esther; Baumeister, Stefan; Bietz, Sven; Kirk, Kiaran; Lingelbach, Klaus

    2012-04-12

    Human erythrocytes have a low basal permeability to L-glutamate and are not known to have a functional glutamate transporter. Here, treatment of human erythrocytes with arsenite was shown to induce the uptake of L-glutamate and D-aspartate, but not that of D-glutamate or L-alanine. The majority of the arsenite-induced L-glutamate influx was via a high-affinity, Na(+)-dependent system showing characteristics of members of the "excitatory amino acid transporter" (EAAT) family. Western blots and immunofluorescence assays revealed the presence of a member of this family, EAAT3, on the erythrocyte membrane. Erythrocytes infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum take up glutamate from the extracellular environment. Although the majority of uptake is via a low-affinity Na(+)-independent pathway there is, in addition, a high-affinity uptake component, raising the possibility that the parasite activates the host cell glutamate transporter.

  20. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis induces glutamate dehydrogenase-dependent ammonia fixation into alanine in co-cultures of astrocytes and neurons.

    PubMed

    Dadsetan, Sherry; Bak, Lasse K; Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Ott, Peter; Leke, Renata; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2011-09-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that ammonia exposure of neurons and astrocytes in co-culture leads to net synthesis not only of glutamine but also of alanine. The latter process involves the concerted action of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALAT). In the present study it was investigated if the glutamine synthetase (GS) inhibitor methionine sulfoximine (MSO) would enhance alanine synthesis by blocking the GS-dependent ammonia scavenging process. Hence, co-cultures of neurons and astrocytes were incubated for 2.5h with [U-(13)C]glucose to monitor de novo synthesis of alanine and glutamine in the absence and presence of 5.0 mM NH(4)Cl and 10 mM MSO. Ammonia exposure led to increased incorporation of label but not to a significant increase in the amount of these amino acids. However, in the presence of MSO, glutamine synthesis was blocked and synthesis of alanine increased leading to an elevated content intra- as well as extracellularly of this amino acid. Treatment with MSO led to a dramatic decrease in glutamine content and increased the intracellular contents of glutamate and aspartate. The large increase in alanine during exposure to MSO underlines the importance of the GDH and ALAT biosynthetic pathway for ammonia fixation, and it points to the use of a GS inhibitor to ameliorate the brain toxicity and edema induced by hyperammonemia, events likely related to glutamine synthesis.

  1. Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activity in Normal and Deficient Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Kwan-Fu Rex; Hu, Chii-Whei C.; Utter, Merton F.

    1981-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity in human skin fibroblasts appears to be regulated by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism, as is the case with other animal cells. The enzyme can be activated by pretreating the cells with dichloroacetate (DCA), an inhibitor of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, before they are disrupted for measurement of PDC activity. With such treatment, the activity reaches 5-6 nmol/min per mg of protein at 37°C with fibroblasts from infants. Such values represent an activation of about 5-20-fold over those observed with untreated cells. That this assay, based on [1-14C]pyruvate decarboxylation, represents a valid measurement of the overall PDC reaction is shown by the dependence of 14CO2 production on the presence of thiamin-PP, coenzyme A (CoA), Mg++, and NAD+. Also, it has been shown that acetyl-CoA and 14CO2 are formed in a 1:1 ratio. A similar degree of activation of PDC can also be achieved by adding purified pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase and high concentrations of Mg++ and Ca++, or in some cases by adding the metal ions alone to the cell homogenate after disruption. These results strongly suggest that activation is due to dephosphorylation. Addition of NaF, which inhibits dephosphorylation, leads to almost complete loss of PDC activity. Assays of completely activated PDC were performed on two cell lines originating from patients reported to be deficient in this enzyme (Blass, J. P., J. Avigan, and B. W. Ublendorf. 1970. J. Clin. Invest. 49: 423-432; Blass, J. P., J. D. Schuman, D. S. Young, and E. Ham. 1972. J. Clin. Invest. 51: 1545-1551). Even after activation with DCA, fibroblasts from the patients showed values of only 0.1 and 0.3 nmol/min per mg of protein. A familial study of one of these patients showed that both parents exhibited activity in fully activated cells about half that of normal values, whereas cells from a sibling appeared normal. These results demonstrate the inheritance nature of PDC deficiency

  2. Catalytically active monomers of E. coli glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Levashov, P A; Muronetz, V I; Klyachko, N L; Nagradova, N K

    1998-04-01

    Monomeric forms of E. coli glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase have been prepared using two different experimental approaches: (1) covalent immobilization of a tetramer on a solid support via a single subunit with subsequent dissociation of non-covalently bound subunits in the presence of urea, and (2) entrapment of monomeric species into reversed micelles of Aerosol OT in octane. Isolated monomers were shown to be catalytically active, exhibiting KM values close to the parameters characteristic of the tetrameric forms. Like tetramers, isolated monomers did not use NADP7 as a coenzyme.

  3. Methodological problems in the histochemical demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Bernocchi, G; Barni, S

    1983-12-01

    Methodological aspects of the histochemical technique for the demonstration of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity (EC 1.2.1.24) (indicative of the degradative step of gamma-aminobutyric acid catabolism) have been analysed in rat Purkinje neurons, where gamma-aminobutyric acid has been shown to be a neurotransmitter, and in hepatocytes, where it is metabolized. During a histochemical incubation for the enzyme, artefacts of succinate dehydrogenase activity and the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction are produced. Inhibition of these artefacts by the addition of two inhibitors, malonate and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, revealed specific reaction products. Formazan granules, which can be ascribed only to specific succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity, are obtained by adding malonate to the incubation medium in order to inhibit both succinate dehydrogenase activity and nothing dehydrogenase. The formation of these granules is completely inhibited by p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, an inhibitor of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity. Different levels of succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase activity were noted in Purkinje neurons. This activity was also found in hepatocytes, mostly in the portal area, but with a lesser degree of intensity and specificity. Indeed, non-specific formazan granules were still produced, because of the 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction, even in the presence of malonate. Thus, a malonate-insensitive 'nothing dehydrogenase' reaction seems to be present in neural and hepatic tissues.

  4. Potentiation of neurotransmitter release by activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors at developing neuromuscular synapses of Xenopus.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, W M; Liou, J C; Lee, Y H; Liou, H C

    1995-01-01

    1. Glutamate receptors play important roles in synaptic plasticity and neural development. Here we report that, at the developing neuromuscular synapses in Xenopus cultures, the activation of presynaptic glutamate receptors at motor nerve terminals potentiates spontaneous acetylcholine (ACh) release. 2. Co-cultures of spinal neurons and myotomal muscle cells were prepared from 1-day-old Xenopus embryos. Spontaneous synaptic currents (SSCs) were recorded from innervated myocytes using whole-cell recording. Bath application of glutamate (10 microM) markedly increased the frequency of SSCs, and the action of glutamate was reversible. 3. Pretreatment with 0.3 microM tetrodotoxin, which blocks Na+ channels and the conduction of action potentials, only slightly inhibited the potentiating action of glutamate on SSCs. Furthermore, the enhancement of ACh secretion was much more prominent when glutamate was applied locally to the synaptic region. 4. Three types of glutamate receptor agonists, kainate, quisqualate, AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid) and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate), were effective in inducing the potentiating effect. The ranking order was: glutamate > kainate > NMDA > AMPA > quisqualate. Glycine potentiated the effects induced by NMDA. Metabotropic receptors were not involved in the potentiating action of glutamate. 5. The potentiating effect of glutamate depended on the influx of Ca2+ through both L-type Ca2+ channels and NMDA-gated channels. 6. Since glutamate is known to be co-released with ACh at some cholinergic nerve terminals, the released glutamate may serve as a positive feedback regulation of ACh secretion at developing neuromuscular junctions via its action on presynaptic glutamate receptors. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8788945

  5. Neuronal activity regulates remyelination via glutamate signalling to oligodendrocyte progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Gautier, Hélène O. B.; Evans, Kimberley A.; Volbracht, Katrin; James, Rachel; Sitnikov, Sergey; Lundgaard, Iben; James, Fiona; Lao-Peregrin, Cristina; Reynolds, Richard; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur T

    2015-01-01

    Myelin regeneration can occur spontaneously in demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the underlying mechanisms and causes of its frequent failure remain incompletely understood. Here we show, using an in-vivo remyelination model, that demyelinated axons are electrically active and generate de novo synapses with recruited oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), which, early after lesion induction, sense neuronal activity by expressing AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid)/kainate receptors. Blocking neuronal activity, axonal vesicular release or AMPA receptors in demyelinated lesions results in reduced remyelination. In the absence of neuronal activity there is a ∼6-fold increase in OPC number within the lesions and a reduced proportion of differentiated oligodendrocytes. These findings reveal that neuronal activity and release of glutamate instruct OPCs to differentiate into new myelinating oligodendrocytes that recover lost function. Co-localization of OPCs with the presynaptic protein VGluT2 in MS lesions implies that this mechanism may provide novel targets to therapeutically enhance remyelination. PMID:26439639

  6. Mechanisms Associated with Activation of Intracellular Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor, mGluR5.

    PubMed

    Jong, Yuh-Jiin I; O'Malley, Karen L

    2017-01-01

    The group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGluR5, is found on the cell surface as well as on intracellular membranes where it can mediate both overlapping and unique signaling effects. Previously we have shown that glutamate activates intracellular mGluR5 by entry through sodium-dependent transporters and/or cystine glutamate exchangers. Calibrated antibody labelling suggests that the glutamate concentration within neurons is quite high (~10 mM) raising the question as to whether intracellular mGluR5 is maximally activated at all times or whether a different ligand might be responsible for receptor activation. To address this issue, we used cellular, optical and molecular techniques to show that intracellular glutamate is largely sequestered in mitochondria; that the glutamate concentration necessary to activate intracellular mGluR5 is about ten-fold higher than what is necessary to activate cell surface mGluR5; and uncaging caged glutamate within neurons can directly activate the receptor. Thus these studies further the concept that glutamate itself serves as the ligand for intracellular mGluR5.

  7. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  8. Microbial metabolic activity in soil as measured by dehydrogenase determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The dehydrogenase technique for measuring the metabolic activity of microorganisms in soil was modified to use a 6-h, 37 C incubation with either glucose or yeast extract as the electron-donating substrate. The rate of formazan production remained constant during this time interval, and cellular multiplication apparently did not occur. The technique was used to follow changes in the overall metabolic activities of microorganisms in soil undergoing incubation with a limiting concentration of added nutrient. The sequence of events was similar to that obtained by using the Warburg respirometer to measure O2 consumption. However, the major peaks of activity occurred earlier with the respirometer. This possibly is due to the lack of atmospheric CO2 during the O2 consumption measurements.

  9. Effect of ageing and ischemia on enzymatic activities linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacids metabolism of free and intrasynaptic mitochondria of cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Villa, Roberto Federico; Gorini, Antonella; Hoyer, Siegfried

    2009-12-01

    The effect of ageing and the relationships between the catalytic properties of enzymes linked to Krebs' cycle, electron transfer chain, glutamate and aminoacid metabolism of cerebral cortex, a functional area very sensitive to both age and ischemia, were studied on mitochondria of adult and aged rats, after complete ischemia of 15 minutes duration. The maximum rate (Vmax) of the following enzyme activities: citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase, succinate dehydrogenase for Krebs' cycle; NADH-cytochrome c reductase as total (integrated activity of Complex I-III), rotenone sensitive (Complex I) and cytochrome oxidase (Complex IV) for electron transfer chain; glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate-oxaloacetate-and glutamate-pyruvate transaminases for glutamate metabolism were assayed in non-synaptic, perikaryal mitochondria and in two populations of intra-synaptic mitochondria, i.e., the light and heavy mitochondrial fraction. The results indicate that in normal, steady-state cerebral cortex, the value of the same enzyme activity markedly differs according (a) to the different populations of mitochondria, i.e., non-synaptic or intra-synaptic light and heavy, (b) and respect to ageing. After 15 min of complete ischemia, the enzyme activities of mitochondria located near the nucleus (perikaryal mitochondria) and in synaptic structures (intra-synaptic mitochondria) of the cerebral tissue were substantially modified by ischemia. Non-synaptic mitochondria seem to be more affected by ischemia in adult and particularly in aged animals than the intra-synaptic light and heavy mitochondria. The observed modifications in enzyme activities reflect the metabolic state of the tissue at each specific experimental condition, as shown by comparative evaluation with respect to the content of energy-linked metabolites and substrates. The derangements in enzyme activities due to ischemia is greater in aged than in adult animals and especially the non-synaptic and the intra-synaptic light

  10. Inducible UDP-glucose dehydrogenase from French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) locates to vascular tissue and has alcohol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D; Smith, C; Bolwell, G P

    1996-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase is responsible for channelling UDP-glucose into the pool of UDP-sugars utilized in the synthesis of wall matrix polysaccharides and glycoproteins. It has been purified to homogeneity from suspension-cultured cells of French bean by a combination of hydrophobic-interaction chromatography, gel filtration and dye-ligand chromatography. The enzyme had a subunit of Mr 40,000. Km values were measured for UDP-glucose as 5.5 +/- 1.4 mM and for NAD+ as 20 +/- 3 microM. It was subject to inhibition by UDP-xylose. UDP-glucose dehydrogenase activity co-purified with alcohol dehydrogenase activity from suspension-cultured cells, elicitor-treated cells and elongating hypocotyls, even when many additional chromatographic steps were employed subsequently. The protein from each source was resolved into virtually identical patterns of isoforms on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/PAGE. However, a combination of peptide mapping and sequence analysis, gel analysis using activity staining and kinetic analysis suggests that both activities are a function of the same protein. An antibody was raised and used to immunolocalize UDP-glucose dehydrogenase to developing xylem and phloem of French bean hypocotyl. Together with data published previously, these results are consistent with an important role in the regulation of carbon flux into wall matrix polysaccharides.

  11. Xanthine dehydrogenase-1 silencing in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes promotes a blood feeding-induced adulticidal activity.

    PubMed

    Isoe, Jun; Petchampai, Natthida; Isoe, Yurika E; Co, Katrina; Mazzalupo, Stacy; Scaraffia, Patricia Y

    2017-02-08

    Aedesaegypti has 2 genes encoding xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). We analyzed XDH1 and XDH2 gene expression by real-time quantitative PCR in tissues from sugar- and blood-fed females. Differential XDH1 and XDH2 gene expression was observed in tissues dissected throughout a time course. We next exposed females to blood meals supplemented with allopurinol, a well-characterized XDH inhibitor. We also tested the effects of injecting double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against XDH1, XDH2, or both. Disruption of XDH by allopurinol or XDH1 by RNA interference significantly affected mosquito survival, causing a disruption in blood digestion, excretion, oviposition, and reproduction. XDH1-deficient mosquitoes showed a persistence of serine proteases in the midgut at 48 h after blood feeding and a reduction in the uptake of vitellogenin by the ovaries. Surprisingly, analysis of the fat body from dsRNA-XDH1-injected mosquitoes fell into 2 groups: one group was characterized by a reduction of the XDH1 transcript, whereas the other group was characterized by an up-regulation of several transcripts including XDH1, glutamine synthetase, alanine aminotransferase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate receptor, and ammonia transporter. Our data demonstrate that XDH1 plays an essential role and that XDH1 has the potential to be used as a metabolic target for Ae.aegypti vector control.-Isoe, J., Petchampai, N., Isoe, Y. E., Co, K., Mazzalupo, S., Scaraffia, P. Y. Xanthine dehydrogenase-1 silencing in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes promotes a blood feeding-induced adulticidal activity.

  12. Mutation of Arg-115 of human class III alcohol dehydrogenase: a binding site required for formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity and fatty acid activation.

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, K; Höög, J O; Holmquist, B; Estonius, M; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    The origin of the fatty acid activation and formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity that distinguishes human class III alcohol dehydrogenase (alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.1) from all other alcohol dehydrogenases has been examined by site-directed mutagenesis of its Arg-115 residue. The Ala- and Asp-115 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The activities of the recombinant native and mutant enzymes toward ethanol are essentially identical, but mutagenesis greatly decreases the kcat/Km values for glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation. The catalytic efficiency for the Asp variant is < 0.1% that of the unmutated enzyme, due to both a higher Km and a lower kcat value. As with the native enzyme, neither mutant can oxidize methanol, be saturated by ethanol, or be inhibited by 4-methylpyrazole; i.e., they retain these class III characteristics. In contrast, however, their activation by fatty acids, another characteristic unique to class III alcohol dehydrogenase, is markedly attenuated. The Ala mutant is activated only slightly, but the Asp mutant is not activated at all. The results strongly indicate that Arg-115 in class III alcohol dehydrogenase is a component of the binding site for activating fatty acids and is critical for the binding of S-hydroxymethylglutathione in glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. PMID:8460164

  13. 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Hernandez, G.; Lopez-Solache, I.; Rendon, J.L.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Diaz-Zagoya, J.C.

    1988-04-15

    The mitochondrial fraction of the dog pancreas showed NAD(H)-dependent enzyme activity of 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The enzyme catalyzes oxidoreduction between androstenedione and testosterone. The apparent Km value of the enzyme for androstenedione was 9.5 +/- 0.9 microM, the apparent Vmax was determined as 0.4 nmol mg-1 min-1, and the optimal pH was 6.5. In phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, maximal rate of androstenedione reduction was observed at 37 degrees C. The oxidation of testosterone by the enzyme proceeded at the same rate as the reduction of the androstenedione at a pH of 6.8-7.0. The apparent Km value and the optimal pH of the enzyme for testosterone were 3.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 7.5, respectively.

  14. [Effect Of Polyelectrolytes on Catalytic Activity of Alcohol Dehydrogenase].

    PubMed

    Dubrovsky, A V; Musina, E V; Kim, A L; Tikhonenko, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent and optical spectroscopy were used to study the interaction of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) with negatively charged polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) and dextran sulfate (DS), as well as positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium) (PDADMA). As found, DS and PDADMA did not affect the structural and catalytic enzyme properties. In contrast, PSS slightly decreased the protein self-fluorescence over 1 h of incubation, which is associated with partial destruction of its quaternary (globular) structure. Investigation of the ADH activity with and without PSS showed its dependency on the incubation time and the PSS presence. Sodium chloride (2.0 M and 0.2 M) or ammonium sulfate (0.1 M) added to the reaction mixture did not completely protect the enzyme quaternary structure from the PSS action. However ammonium sulfate or 0.2 M sodium chloride stabilized the enzyme and partially inhibited the negative PSS effect.

  15. Sirtuin 4 is a lipoamidase regulating pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Rommel A.; Greco, Todd M.; Oberstein, Adam; Budayeva, Hanna G.; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Rowland, Elizabeth A.; Kang, Yibin; Shenk, Thomas; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sirtuins (SIRTs) are critical enzymes that govern genome regulation, metabolism, and aging. Despite conserved deacetylase domains, mitochondrial SIRT4 and SIRT5 have little to no deacetylase activity, and a robust catalytic activity for SIRT4 has been elusive. Here, we establish SIRT4 as a cellular lipoamidase that regulates the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDH). Importantly, SIRT4 catalytic efficiency for lipoyl- and biotinyl-lysine modifications is superior to its deacetylation activity. PDH, which converts pyruvate to acetyl-CoA, has been known to be primarily regulated by phosphorylation of its E1 component. We determine that SIRT4 enzymatically hydrolyzes the lipoamide cofactors from the E2 component dihydrolipoyllysine acetyltransferase (DLAT), diminishing PDH activity. We demonstrate SIRT4-mediated regulation of DLAT lipoyl levels and PDH activity in cells and in vivo, in mouse liver. Furthermore, metabolic flux switching via glutamine stimulation induces SIRT4 lipoamidase activity to inhibit PDH, highlighting SIRT4 as a guardian of cellular metabolism. PMID:25525879

  16. A quantitative histochemical study of lactate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in the membrana granulosa of the ovulatory follicle of the rat.

    PubMed

    Zoller, L C; Enelow, R

    1983-11-01

    Using a microdensitometer, lactate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities were measured in the membrana granulosa of the rat ovulatory follicle. Ovaries were removed on each day of the oestrous cycle; oestrus, dioestrus-1, dioestrus-2, and proestrus; and enzyme activities measured in the membrana granulosa as a whole and in four regions within it: peripheral (PR), antral (AR), cumulus oophorus (CO) and corona radiata (CR). Throughout the cycle, lactate dehydrogenase activity was greatest in PR. On oestrus, lactate dehydrogenase activity was progressively less in AR, CO and CR. On dioestrus-1, activity was identical in AR and CO and less in CR. On dioestrus-2, activity was greater in AR than in CO or CR. By proestrus, activity was equal in AR, CO and CR. In the membrana granulosa as a whole, and in each region, lactate dehydrogenase activity declined as ovulation approached. In contrast, succinate dehydrogenase activity in the membrana granulosa as a whole and in PR was constant throughout the cycle. Activity fluctuated in the other regions. Succinate dehydrogenase activity on oestrus was greatest in PR, less in AR and CO and least in CR. On the remaining days, succinate dehydrogenase activity was greatest in PR and less but equal in the remainder of the membrana granulosa.

  17. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  18. CONTROL OF GLUTAMATE OXIDATION IN BRAIN AND LIVER MITOCHONDRIAL SYSTEMS.

    PubMed

    BALAZS, R

    1965-05-01

    1. Glutamate oxidation in brain and liver mitochondrial systems proceeds mainly through transamination with oxaloacetate followed by oxidation of the alpha-oxoglutarate formed. Both in the presence and absence of dinitrophenol in liver mitochondria this pathway accounted for almost 80% of the uptake of glutamate. In brain preparations the transamination pathway accounted for about 90% of the glutamate uptake. 2. The oxidation of [1-(14)C]- and [5-(14)C]-glutamate in brain preparations is compatible with utilization through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, either after the formation of alpha-oxoglutarate or after decarboxylation to form gamma-aminobutyrate. There is no indication of gamma-decarboxylation of glutamate. 3. The high respiratory control ratio obtained with glutamate as substrate in brain mitochondrial preparations is due to the low respiration rate in the absence of ADP: this results from the low rate of formation of oxaloacetate under these conditions. When oxaloacetate is made available by the addition of malate or of NAD(+), the respiration rate is increased to the level obtained with other substrates. 4. When the transamination pathway of glutamate oxidation was blocked with malonate, the uptake of glutamate was inhibited in the presence of ADP or ADP plus dinitrophenol by about 70 and 80% respectively in brain mitochondrial systems, whereas the inhibition was only about 50% in dinitrophenol-stimulated liver preparations. In unstimulated liver mitochondria in the presence of malonate there was a sixfold increase in the oxidation of glutamate by the glutamate-dehydrogenase pathway. Thus the operating activity of glutamate dehydrogenase is much less than the ;free' (non-latent) activity. 5. The following explanation is put forward for the control of glutamate metabolism in liver and brain mitochondrial preparations. The oxidation of glutamate by either pathway yields alpha-oxoglutarate, which is further metabolized. Since aspartate aminotransferase is

  19. Three human glutamate dehydrogenase genes (GLUD1, GLUDP2, and GLUDP3) are located on chromosome 10q, but are not closely physically linked

    SciTech Connect

    Deloukas, P.; Loon, A.P.G.M. van ); Dauwerse, J.G.; Ommen, G.J.B. van ); Moschonas, N.K. )

    1993-09-01

    Yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) of 340 and 370 kb that contain the functional human glutamate dehydrogenase gene (GLUD1) and the pseudogene GLUDP2, respectively, were isolated. These genes were not physically linked to each other nor to any other sequences homologous to the exons of GLUD1. No additional GLUD sequences were found within at least 70 kb of the 5[prime] and 175 kb of the 3[prime] end of GLUD1 or 150 kb of either end of GLUDP2. By in situ hybridization, GLUD1 was located at 10q23.3, GLUDP2 at 10q11.2, and another pseudogene of the GLUD gene family, GLUDP3, at 10q22.1. DNA fragments of these three genes showed cross-hybridization to the loci assigned to the other two genes, but not to any other chromosomal locus. Thus, these three genes are located at distinct positions on chromosome 10q. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The existence of a hexameric intermediate with molten-globule-like properties in the thermal denaturation of bovine-liver glutamate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Liu, Z; Fisher, H F

    1996-12-10

    We have studied the thermal denaturation of hexameric beef-liver glutamate dehydrogenase by itself and in the presence of ADP and guanidine-HCl by a variety of techniques. In differential scanning calorimetry studies, the observed melting temperature and total enthalpy of denaturation show no dependence on protein concentration, but do show significant dependence on the scan rate. This suggests that the overall denaturation process is irreversible and kinetically controlled. Isothermal unfolding kinetics from spectrophotometry confirm this result. The size of the protein, as shown by quasi-elastic light scattering measurements, does not change during the denaturation process. We interpret these results in terms of the following model: N6 reversible N'6-->6U(-->F) where N6 and N'6 are, respectively, the native hexamer and a hexameric, highly folded high-enthalpy species, U is the unfolded monomer and F is some final aggregated state. The kinetic intermediate, N'6, possesses the properties of one definition of a molten globule, having a very high enthalpy and a hexameric compact structured form. This "molten globule" is an obligatory intermediate in the unfolding pathway of the protein. The stabilization of the protein by ADP is due to the modulation of the high-enthalpy two-state predenaturational E reversible E' transition, resulting in the lowering of the energy of the native state of the protein.

  1. Variants of glycerol dehydrogenase having D-lactate dehydrogenase activity and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Qingzhao; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2017-08-29

    The present invention provides methods of designing and generating glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH) variants that have altered function as compared to a parent polypeptide. The present invention further provides nucleic acids encoding GlyDH polypeptide variants having altered function as compared to the parent polypeptide. Host cells comprising polynucleotides encoding GlyDH variants and methods of producing lactic acids are also provided in various aspects of the invention.

  2. Effects of denervation on the activities of some tricarboxylic acid-cycle-associated dehydrogenases and adenine-metabolizing enzymes in rat diaphragm muscle

    PubMed Central

    Turner, L. V.; Manchester, K. L.

    1972-01-01

    1. The activity of several tricarboxylic acid-cycle-associated dehydrogenases, adenine-metabolizing enzymes and glutathione reductase and the content of myoglobin were measured in rat diaphragm muscle after unilateral nerve section. 2. Consistent with morphological disintegration of the mitochondria there was a rapid diminution in activity of NAD- and NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase and glutamate dehydrogenase. 3. Creatine phosphokinase and adenylate kinase, by contrast, showed little change in activity; adenylate deaminase and glutathione reductase activities increased during the hypertrophic phase. The concentration of myoglobin at first declined, then increased again. 4. The distribution of enzymes between the left and right hemidiaphragms was found not to be uniform. 5. Activities of adenine-metabolizing enzymes in the diaphragm were as great as in white muscle. It is suggested that their reputedly lower activities in red muscle properly refer to muscle containing a high proportion of intermediate fibres, which is not the case with diaphragm. 6. The possible causes of the transient hypertrophy after nerve section are discussed. PMID:4404765

  3. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  4. Derivatives of cinnamic acid interact with the nucleotide binding site of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. Effects on the dehydrogenase reaction and stimulation of esterase activity by nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Poole, R C; Bowden, N J; Halestrap, A P

    1993-04-22

    A wide variety of cinnamic acid derivatives are inhibitors of the low Km mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase. Two of the most potent inhibitors are alpha-cyano-3,4-dihydroxythiocinnamamide (Ki0.6 microM) and alpha-cyano-3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamonitrile (Ki2.6 microM). With propionaldehyde as substrate the inhibition by these compounds was competitive with respect to NAD+. alpha-Fluorocinnamate was a much less effective inhibitor of the enzyme, with mixed behaviour towards NAD+, but with a major competitive component. These cinnamic acid derivatives were ineffective as inhibitors of the aldehyde dehydrogenase-catalysed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate, but inhibited the ability of NAD+ and NADH to activate this activity. Inhibition of the stimulation of esterase activity was competitive with respect to NAD+ and NADH, and the derived Ki values were the same as for inhibition of dehydrogenase activity. NAD+, but not acetaldehyde, could elute the low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase from alpha-cyanocinnamate-Sepharose, to which the enzyme binds specifically (Poole RC and Halestrap AP, Biochem J 259: 105-110, 1989). The cinnamic acid derivatives have little effect on lactate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase or a high Km aldehyde dehydrogenase present in rat liver mitochondria. It is concluded that some cinnamic acid derivatives are potent inhibitors of the low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase, by competing with NAD+/NADH for binding to the enzyme. They are much less effective as inhibitors of other NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases.

  5. Inhibitory effects of ionic liquids on the lactic dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xing; Fan, Yunchang; Zhang, Heng; Zhong, Yingying; Yang, Yang; Miao, Juan; Hua, Shaofeng

    2016-05-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) were widely used in scientific and industrial application and have been reported to possess potential toxicity to the environment and human health. The effects of six typical N-methylimidazolium-based ILs ([Cnmim]X, n=4, 6, 8; X=Br(-), Cl(-), BF4(-), CF3SO3(-)) on the lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and the molecular interaction mechanism of ILs and the LDH were investigated with the aid of spectroscopic techniques. Experimental results showed that the LDH activity was inhibited in the presence of ILs. For the ILs with the same anion but different cations, their inhibitory ability on the LDH activity increased with increasing the alkyl chain length on the IL cation. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were obtained by analyzing the fluorescence behavior of LDH with the addition of ILs. Both positive ΔH and ΔS suggested that hydrophobicity was the major driven force in the interaction process as expected.

  6. Mechanism of pyruvate dehydrogenase activation by increased cardiac work.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, K; Neely, J R

    1983-06-01

    The effects of increased cardiac work, pyruvate and insulin on the state of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activation and rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was studied in the isolated perfused rat heart. At low levels of cardiac work, 61% of PDH was present in the active form when glucose was the only substrate provided. The actual rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was only 5% of the available capacity calculated from the percent of active PDH. Under this condition, the rate of pyruvate decarboxylation was restricted by the slow rate of pyruvate production from glycolysis. Increasing cardiac work accelerated glycolysis, but production of pyruvate remained rate limiting for pyruvate oxidation and only 40% of the maximal active PDH capacity was used. Addition of insulin along with glucose reduced the percent of active PDH to 16% of the total at low cardiac work. This effect of insulin was associated with increased mitochondria NADH/NAD and acetyl CoA/CoA ratios. With both glucose and insulin the calculated maximum capacity of active PDH was about the same as measured rates of pyruvate oxidation indicating that pyruvate oxidation was limited by the activation state of PDH. In this case, raising the level of cardiac work increased the active PDH to 85% and although pyruvate oxidation was accelerated, measured flux through PDH was only 73% of the maximal activity of active PDH. With pyruvate as added exogenous substrate, PDH was 82% of active at low cardiac work probably due to pyruvate inhibition of PDH kinase. In this case, the measured rate of pyruvate oxidation was 64% of the capacity of active PDH. However, increased cardiac work still caused further activation of PDH to 96% active. Thus, actual rates of pyruvate oxidation in the intact tissue were determined by (1) the supply of pyruvate in hearts receiving glucose alone, (2) by the percent of active PDH in hearts receiving both glucose and insulin at low work and (3) by end-product inhibition in hearts receiving

  7. The activity of class I, II, III, and IV alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Orywal, Karolina; Jelski, Wojciech; Zdrodowski, Michał; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    The metabolism of cancerous cells is in many ways different than in healthy cells. In endometrial cancer, cells exhibit activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which participate in the metabolism of many biological substances. The aim of this study was to compare the metabolism of endometrial cancer cells and normal endometrial cells by measurement of ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activities in these tissues. The study material consists of cancerous endometrial tissues obtained from 34 patients. Total ADH activity was measured using the photometric method and ALDH activity using the fluorometric method. For the measurement of class I and II ADH isoenzyme activity, we employed the fluorometric method, with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. The activity of class III and IV ADH was measured using the photometric method. The activity of the class I ADH isoenzyme was significantly higher in the endometrial cancer tissues when compared with normal endometrial tissues. The other classes of ADH tested did not show significant differences between activity of cancerous cells and healthy endometrium. The activity of total ADH was also significantly higher in endometrial cancer. The increased activity of total ADH in endometrial cancer, especially the class I isoenzyme and normal activity of ALDH, may be the cause of disorders in metabolic pathways that use these isoenzymes and could increase the concentration of acetaldehyde, which is cancerogenic substance. J. Clin. Lab. Anal. 24:334-339, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. A ketogenic diet increases succinic dehydrogenase activity in aging cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Balietti, Marta; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Giorgetti, Belinda; Casoli, Tiziana; Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Solazzi, Moreno; Platano, Daniela; Aicardi, Giorgio; Bertoni-Freddari, Carlo

    2009-08-01

    Impairment of energy metabolism and an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production seem to play a major role in age-related apoptotic loss of cardiomyocytes. Succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) is an important marker of the mitochondrial capability to provide an adequate amount of ATP. Moreover, because of its unique redox properties, SDH activity contributes to maintain the reduced state of the ubiquinone pool. Recent reports have shown that ketone body intake improves cardiac metabolic efficiency and exerts a cardioprotective antioxidant action, we therefore performed a cytochemical investigation of SDH activity in cardiomyocytes of late-adult (19-month-old) rats fed for 8 weeks with a medium-chain triglycerides ketogenic diet (MCT-KD). Young, age-matched and old animals fed with a standard chow were used as controls. The overall area of the precipitates (PA) from SDH activity and the area of the SDH-positive mitochondria (MA) were measured. The percent ratios PA/MA and MA/total myocardial tissue area (MA/TA) were the parameters taken into account. We found that PA/MA was significantly higher in young control rats and in MCT-KD-fed rats versus late-adult and old control rats and in young control versus MCT-KD-fed rats. MA/TA of MCT-KD-fed rats was significantly higher versus age-matched and old control rats and tended to be higher versus young control rats; this parameter was significantly higher in young versus old control rats. Thus, MCT-KD intake partially recovers age-related decrease of SDH activity and increases the myocardial area occupied by metabolically active mitochondria. These effects might counteract metabolic alterations leading to apoptosis-induced myocardial atrophy and failure during aging.

  9. Recovery of network-driven glutamatergic activity in rat hippocampal neurons during chronic glutamate receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Eric; Belousov, Andrei B

    2009-01-28

    Previous studies indicated that a long-term decrease in the activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces cholinergic activity in rat and mouse hypothalamic neuronal cultures. Here we studied whether a prolonged inactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors also induces cholinergic activity in hippocampal neurons. Receptor activity was chronically suppressed in rat hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with two proportionally increasing sets of concentrations of NMDA plus non-NMDA receptor antagonists: 100 microM/10 microM AP5/CNQX (1X cultures) and 200 microM/20 microM AP5/CNQX (2X cultures). Using calcium imaging we demonstrate that cholinergic activity does not develop in these cultures. Instead, network-driven glutamate-dependent activity, that normally is detected in hyper-excitable conditions, reappears in each culture group in the presence of these antagonists and can be reversibly suppressed by higher concentrations of AP5/CNQX. This activity is mediated by non-NMDA receptors and is modulated by NMDA receptors. Further, non-NMDA receptors, the general level of glutamate receptor activity and CaMK-dependent signaling are critical for development of this network-driven glutamatergic activity in the presence of receptor antagonists. Using electrophysiology, western blotting and calcium imaging we show that some neuronal parameters are either reduced or not affected by chronic glutamate receptor blockade. However, other parameters (including neuronal excitability, mEPSC frequency, and expression of GluR1, NR1 and betaCaMKII) become up-regulated and, in some cases, proportionally between the non-treated, 1X and 2X cultures. Our data suggest recovery of the network-driven glutamatergic activity after chronic glutamate receptor blockade. This recovery may represent a form of neuronal plasticity that compensates for the prolonged suppression of the activity of glutamate receptors.

  10. Acute and chronic ethanol exposure differentially alters alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity in the zebrafish liver.

    PubMed

    Tran, Steven; Nowicki, Magda; Chatterjee, Diptendu; Gerlai, Robert

    2015-01-02

    Chronic ethanol exposure paradigms have been successfully used in the past to induce behavioral and central nervous system related changes in zebrafish. However, it is currently unknown whether chronic ethanol exposure alters ethanol metabolism in adult zebrafish. In the current study we examine the effect of acute ethanol exposure on adult zebrafish behavioral responses, as well as alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the liver. We then examine how two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms (continuous and repeated ethanol exposure) alter behavioral responses and liver enzyme activity during a subsequent acute ethanol challenge. Acute ethanol exposure increased locomotor activity in a dose-dependent manner. ADH activity was shown to exhibit an inverted U-shaped curve and ALDH activity was decreased by ethanol exposure at all doses. During the acute ethanol challenge, animals that were continuously housed in ethanol exhibited a significantly reduced locomotor response and increased ADH activity, however, ALDH activity did not change. Zebrafish that were repeatedly exposed to ethanol demonstrated a small but significant attenuation of the locomotor response during the acute ethanol challenge but ADH and ALDH activity was similar to controls. Overall, we identified two different chronic ethanol exposure paradigms that differentially alter behavioral and physiological responses in zebrafish. We speculate that these two paradigms may allow dissociation of central nervous system-related and liver enzyme-dependent ethanol induced changes in zebrafish.

  11. Acute Modulation of Cortical Glutamate and GABA Content by Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Maddock, Richard J; Casazza, Gretchen A; Fernandez, Dione H; Maddock, Michael I

    2016-02-24

    Converging evidence demonstrates that physical activity evokes a brain state characterized by distinctive changes in brain metabolism and cortical function. Human studies have shown that physical activity leads to a generalized increase in electroencephalography power across regions and frequencies, and a global increase in brain nonoxidative metabolism of carbohydrate substrates. This nonoxidative consumption of carbohydrate has been hypothesized to include increased de novo synthesis of amino acid neurotransmitters, especially glutamate and GABA. Here, we conducted a series of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in human volunteers before and after vigorous exercise (≥80% of predicted maximal heart rate). Results showed that the resonance signals of both glutamate and GABA increased significantly in the visual cortex following exercise. We further demonstrated a similar increase in glutamate following exercise in an executive region, the anterior cingulate cortex. The increase in glutamate was similar when using echo times of 30 and 144 ms, indicating that exercise-related T2 relaxation effects across this range of relaxation times did not account for the findings. In addition, we found preliminary evidence that more physical activity during the preceding week predicts higher resting glutamate levels. Overall, the results are consistent with an exercise-induced expansion of the cortical pools of glutamate and GABA, and add to a growing understanding of the distinctive brain state associated with physical activity. A more complete understanding of this brain state may reveal important insights into mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of physical exercise in neuropsychiatric disorders, neurorehabilitation, aging, and cognition.

  12. The amino acid sequence of ribitol dehydrogenase-F, a mutant enzyme with improved xylitol dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Homsi-Brandeburgo, M I; Toyama, M H; Marangoni, S; Ward, R J; Giglio, J R; Hartley, B S

    1999-05-01

    A mutant ribitol dehydrogenase (RDH-F) was purified from Klebsiella aerogenes strain F which evolved from the wild-type strain A under selective pressure to improve growth on xylitol, a poor substrate used as sole carbon source. The ratio of activities on xylitol (500 mM) and ribitol (50 mM) was 0.154 for RDH-F compared to 0.033 for the wild-type (RDH-A) enzyme. The complete amino acid sequence of RDH-F showed the mutations. Q60 for E60 and V215 for L215 in the single polypeptide chain of 249 amino acid residues. Structural modeling based on homologies with two other microbial dehydrogenases suggests that E60 --> Q60 is a neutral mutation, since it lies in a region far from the catalytic site and should not cause structural perturbations. In contrast, L215 --> V215 lies in variable region II and would shift a loop that interacts with the NADH cofactor. Another improved ribitol dehydrogenase, RDH-D, contains an A196 --> P196 mutation that would disrupt a surface alpha-helix in region II. Hence conformational changes in this region appear to be responsible for the improved xylitol specificity.

  13. Diagnosing Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea using enzyme immunoassay: the clinical significance of toxin negativity in glutamate dehydrogenase-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Yuhashi, Kazuhito; Yagihara, Yuka; Misawa, Yoshiki; Sato, Tomoaki; Saito, Ryoichi; Okugawa, Shu; Moriya, Kyoji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The enzyme immunoassay (EIA) has lower sensitivity for Clostridium difficile toxins A and B than the polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). Furthermore, toxin positivity with EIA performed on C. difficile isolates from stool cultures may be observed even in patients with EIA glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH)-positive and toxin-negative stool specimens. It is unclear whether such patients should be treated as having CDAD. Methods The present study retrospectively compared patient characteristics, treatment, and diarrhea duration among three groups of patients who underwent stool EIA testing for CDAD diagnosis: a toxin-positive stool group (positive stool group; n=39); a toxin-negative stool/toxin-positive isolate group (discrepant negative/positive group, n=14); and a dual toxin-negative stool and isolate group (dual negative group, n=15). All cases included were confirmed to be GDH positive on EIA test. Results Patients’ backgrounds and comorbidities were not significantly different among three groups. No difference was observed among the three groups with regard to antimicrobial drug use before diarrhea onset. Treatment was received by 82.1% of the positive stool group compared to 7.1% of the discrepant positive/negative group and 0% of the dual negative group, while mean diarrhea duration was 10.6 days compared to 7.9 days (P=0.6006) and 3.4 days (P=0.0312), respectively. Conclusion Even without treatment, patients with toxin-negative stool specimens had shorter diarrhea duration than those with toxin-positive stool specimens even with toxin-positive isolates. These findings may suggest a limited need for CDAD treatment for GDH-positive patients and toxin-negative stool specimens. PMID:27313472

  14. [Utility of a Simultaneous Detection Kit for Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Toxin A/B with Toxigenic Culture in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Akio; Suzuki, Hiroko; Shishido, Hiroko; Abe, Satomi; Nakajima, Mikako; Maeda, Junko; Tamura, Isao; Shiroishi, Mitsuru; Usui, Mariko

    2015-06-01

    We examined how doctors evaluate the results of C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE (COMPLETE) in the diagnosis and treatment of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). A total of 887 stool samples submitted from 2012 to 2013 were examined with COMPLETE. Requested specimens among samples with discrepant results were inoculated onto CCMA plates and incubated under anaerobic conditions for 48 h, then retested by COMPLETE if positive culture results were obtained. Of the 887 specimens, 198 (22.3%) were glutamate dehydrogenase-positive and 73(8.3%) were toxin-positive. Of the 125 specimens yielding discrepant results, 106 specimens were cultured and retested, with 46 (43.4%, 46/106) proving toxin-positive. As a result, the total number of toxin-positive results increased from 73 (8.3%, 73/887) to 119 (13.4%, 119/887). This change was significant (p<0.01). We analyzed the relationship between doctor's decision-making and timing of receiving CD test results in 81 specimens among the discrepant results. Twenty-four patients started treatment just after obtaining the first test result (29.6%, 24/81) and the toxin-positive ratio of the second test was 62.5% (15/24). The decision to start treatment was made after obtaining results of the second test in 48 patients, of whom 13 (16.0%, 13/81) started treatment, and the toxin-positive ratio was 37.5% (18/48). The difference in toxin ratio was significant (p < 0.05). The increase in toxin-positive ratio in the final report facilitates diagnosis in patients with CDL Many doctors, however, started treatment before obtaining results from the second test, suggesting that the 3-day delay in report results represents a drawback for this system.

  15. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity from pig kidney cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Pawelczyk, T; Olson, M S

    1992-01-01

    The activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase in the purified PDH complex from pig kidney is sensitive to changes in ionic strength. The enzyme has optimum activity within a small range of ionic strength (0.03-0.05 M). An increase in ionic strength from 0.04 M to 0.2 M lowers the activity of PDH kinase by 32% and decreases the Km for ATP from 25 microM to 10 microM. At constant ionic strength (0.15 M) the enzyme has optimum activity over a broad pH range (7.2-8.0). The PDH kinase is stimulated 2.2-fold by 20 mM-K+, whereas Na+ even at high concentration (80 mM) has no effect on the enzyme activity. The stimulation of PDH kinase by K+ is not dependent on pH and ionic strength. PDH kinase is inhibited by HPO4(2-) in the presence of K+, whereas HPO4(2-) has no effect on the activity of this enzyme in the absence of K+. HPO4(2-) at concentrations of 2 and 10 mM inhibits PDH kinase by 28% and 55% respectively. The magnitude of this inhibition is not dependent on the ATP/ADP ratio. Inhibition by HPO4(2-) in the concentration range 0-10 mM is non-competitive with respect to ATP, and becomes mixed-type at concentrations over 10 mM. The Ki for HPO4(2-) is 10 mM. When HPO4(2-) is replaced by SO4(2-), the same effects on the activity of PDH kinase are observed. PDH kinase is also inhibited by Cl-. In the presence of 80 mM-Cl- the PDH kinase is inhibited by 40%. The inhibition by Cl- is not dependent on K+. In conclusion, we postulate that changes in phosphate concentrations may play a significant role in the regulation of PDH kinase activity in vivo. PMID:1463442

  16. Effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor activation in auditory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Tennigkeit, F; Schwarz, D W; Puil, E

    1999-08-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are expressed predominantly in dendritic regions of neurons of auditory thalamus. We studied the effects of mGluR activation in neurons of the ventral partition of medial geniculate body (MGBv) using whole cell current- and voltage-clamp recordings in brain slices. Bath application of the mGluR-agonist, 1S,3R-1-aminocyclopentan-1,3-dicarboxylic acid or 1S,3R-ACPD (5-100 microM), depolarized MGBv neurons (n = 67), changing evoked response patterns from bursts to tonic firing as well as frequency responses from resonance ( approximately 1 Hz) to low-pass filter characteristics. The depolarization was resistant to Na(+)-channel blockade with tetrodotoxin (TTX; 300 nM) and Ca(2+)-channel blockade with Cd(2+) (0.1 mM). The application of 1S, 3R-ACPD did not change input conductance and produced an inward current (I(ACPD)) with an average amplitude of 84.2 +/- 5.3 pA (at -70 mV, n = 22). The application of the mGluR antagonist, (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (0.5 mM), reversibly blocked the depolarization or I(ACPD). During intracellular application of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) from the recording electrode, bath application of 1S,3R-ACPD irreversibly activated a large amplitude I(ACPD). During intracellular application of guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate), application of 1S, 3R-ACPD evoked only a small I(ACPD). These results implicate G proteins in mediation of the 1S,3R-ACPD response. A reduction of external [Na(+)] from 150 to 26 mM decreased I(ACPD) to 32.8 +/- 10. 3% of control. Internal applications of a Ca(2+) chelator, 1, 2-bis-(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA; 10 mM), suppressed I(ACPD), implying a contribution of a Ca(2+) signal or Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. However, partial replacement of Na(+) with Li(+) (50 mM) did not significantly change I(ACPD). Therefore it seemed less likely that a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange current was a major participant in the response. A reduction of

  17. Telmisartan ameliorates glutamate-induced neurotoxicity: roles of AT1 receptor blockade and PPARγ activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Pang, Tao; Hafko, Roman; Benicky, Julius; Sanchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Sartans (Angiotensin II AT1 Receptor Blockers, ARBs) are powerful neuroprotective agents in vivo and protect against IL-1β neurotoxicity in vitro. The purpose of this research was to determine the extent of sartan neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity, a common cause of neuronal injury and apoptosis. The results show that sartans are neuroprotective, significantly reducing glutamate-induced neuronal injury and apoptosis in cultured rat primary cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). Telmisartan was the most potent sartan studied, with an order of potency telmisartan > candesartan > losartan > valsartan. Mechanisms involved reduction of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 activation, protection of the survival PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway, and prevention of glutamate-induced ERK1/2 activation. NMDA receptor stimulation was essential for glutamate-induced cell injury and apoptosis. Participation of AT1A receptor was supported by glutamate-induced upregulation of AT1A gene expression and AT1 receptor binding. Conversely, AT1B or AT2 receptor played no role. Glutamate-induced neuronal injury and the neuroprotective effect of telmisartan were decreased, but not abolished, in CGCs obtained from AT1A knock-out mice. This indicates that although AT1 receptors are necessary for glutamate to exert its full neurotoxic potential, part of the neuroprotective effect of telmisartan is independent of AT1 receptor blockade. PPARγ activation was also involved in the neuroprotective effects of telmisartan, as telmisartan enhanced PPARγ nuclear translocation, and the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 partially reversed the neuroprotective effects of telmisartan. The present results substantiate the therapeutic use of sartans, in particular telmisartan, in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain disorders where glutamate neurotoxicity plays a significant role. PMID:24316465

  18. Telmisartan ameliorates glutamate-induced neurotoxicity: roles of AT(1) receptor blockade and PPARγ activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Pang, Tao; Hafko, Roman; Benicky, Julius; Sanchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M

    2014-04-01

    Sartans (Angiotensin II AT(1) Receptor Blockers, ARBs) are powerful neuroprotective agents in vivo and protect against IL-1β neurotoxicity in vitro. The purpose of this research was to determine the extent of sartan neuroprotection against glutamate excitotoxicity, a common cause of neuronal injury and apoptosis. The results show that sartans are neuroprotective, significantly reducing glutamate-induced neuronal injury and apoptosis in cultured rat primary cerebellar granule cells (CGCs). Telmisartan was the most potent sartan studied, with an order of potency telmisartan > candesartan > losartan > valsartan. Mechanisms involved reduction of pro-apoptotic caspase-3 activation, protection of the survival PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway and prevention of glutamate-induced ERK1/2 activation. NMDA receptor stimulation was essential for glutamate-induced cell injury and apoptosis. Participation of AT(1A) receptor was supported by glutamate-induced upregulation of AT(1A) gene expression and AT(1) receptor binding. Conversely, AT(1B) or AT(2) receptors played no role. Glutamate-induced neuronal injury and the neuroprotective effect of telmisartan were decreased, but not abolished, in CGCs obtained from AT(1A) knock-out mice. This indicates that although AT(1) receptors are necessary for glutamate to exert its full neurotoxic potential, part of the neuroprotective effect of telmisartan is independent of AT(1) receptor blockade. PPARγ activation was also involved in the neuroprotective effects of telmisartan, as telmisartan enhanced PPARγ nuclear translocation and the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 partially reversed the neuroprotective effects of telmisartan. The present results substantiate the therapeutic use of sartans, in particular telmisartan, in neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic brain disorders where glutamate neurotoxicity plays a significant role. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Extrasynaptic Glutamate Receptor Activation as Cellular Bases for Dynamic Range Compression in Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Short, Shaina M.; Rich, Matthew T.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive synaptic stimulation overcomes the ability of astrocytic processes to clear glutamate from the extracellular space, allowing some dendritic segments to become submerged in a pool of glutamate, for a brief period of time. This dynamic arrangement activates extrasynaptic NMDA receptors located on dendritic shafts. We used voltage-sensitive and calcium-sensitive dyes to probe dendritic function in this glutamate-rich location. An excess of glutamate in the extrasynaptic space was achieved either by repetitive synaptic stimulation or by glutamate iontophoresis onto the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Two successive activations of synaptic inputs produced a typical NMDA spike, whereas five successive synaptic inputs produced characteristic plateau potentials, reminiscent of cortical UP states. While NMDA spikes were coupled with brief calcium transients highly restricted to the glutamate input site, the dendritic plateau potentials were accompanied by calcium influx along the entire dendritic branch. Once initiated, the glutamate-mediated dendritic plateau potentials could not be interrupted by negative voltage pulses. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cellular compartments void of spines is sufficient to initiate and support plateau potentials. The only requirement for sustained depolarizing events is a surplus of free glutamate near a group of extrasynaptic receptors. Highly non-linear dendritic spikes (plateau potentials) are summed in a highly sublinear fashion at the soma, revealing the cellular bases of signal compression in cortical circuits. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors provide pyramidal neurons with a function analogous to a dynamic range compression in audio engineering. They limit or reduce the volume of “loud sounds” (i.e., strong glutamatergic inputs) and amplify “quiet sounds” (i.e., glutamatergic inputs that barely cross the dendritic threshold for local spike initiation). Our data also explain why consecutive cortical UP

  20. Blending foundry sands with soil: Effect on dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Robert S; Kukier, Urzsula; Lee, Brad

    2006-03-15

    Each year U.S. foundries landfill several million tons of sand that can no longer be used to make metalcasting molds and cores. A possible use for these materials is as an ingredient in manufactured soils; however, potentially harmful metals and resin binders (used to make cores) may adversely impact the soil microbial community. In this study, the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of soil amended with molding sand (clay-coated sand known as "green sand") or core sands at 10%, 30%, and 50% (dry wt.) was determined. The green sands were obtained from iron, aluminum, and brass foundries; the core sands were made with phenol-formaldehyde or furfuryl alcohol based resins. Overall, incremental additions of these sands resulted in a decrease in the DHA which lasted throughout the 12-week experimental period. A brass green sand, which contained high concentrations of Cu, Pb, and Zn, severely impacted the DHA. By week 12 no DHA was detected in the 30% and 50% treatments. In contrast, the DHA in soil amended with an aluminum green sand was 2.1 times higher (all blending ratios), on average, at week 4 and 1.4 times greater (30% and 50% treatments only) than the controls by week 12. In core sand-amended soil, the DHA results were similar to soils amended with aluminum and iron green sands. Increased activity in some treatments may be a result of the soil microorganisms utilizing the core resins as a carbon source. The DHA assay is a sensitive indicator of environmental stress caused by foundry sand constituents and may be useful to assess which foundry sands are suitable for beneficial use in the environment.

  1. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O.; Shanmugam, K. T.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(−)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L-1 of optically pure D(−)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min-1 (mg protein)-1. By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(−) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates. PMID:22065761

  2. Evolution of D-lactate dehydrogenase activity from glycerol dehydrogenase and its utility for D-lactate production from lignocellulose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingzhao; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-11-22

    Lactic acid, an attractive, renewable chemical for production of biobased plastics (polylactic acid, PLA), is currently commercially produced from food-based sources of sugar. Pure optical isomers of lactate needed for PLA are typically produced by microbial fermentation of sugars at temperatures below 40 °C. Bacillus coagulans produces L(+)-lactate as a primary fermentation product and grows optimally at 50 °C and pH 5, conditions that are optimal for activity of commercial fungal cellulases. This strain was engineered to produce D(-)-lactate by deleting the native ldh (L-lactate dehydrogenase) and alsS (acetolactate synthase) genes to impede anaerobic growth, followed by growth-based selection to isolate suppressor mutants that restored growth. One of these, strain QZ19, produced about 90 g L(-1) of optically pure D(-)-lactic acid from glucose in < 48 h. The new source of D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-LDH) activity was identified as a mutated form of glycerol dehydrogenase (GlyDH; D121N and F245S) that was produced at high levels as a result of a third mutation (insertion sequence). Although the native GlyDH had no detectable activity with pyruvate, the mutated GlyDH had a D-LDH specific activity of 0.8 μmoles min(-1) (mg protein)(-1). By using QZ19 for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to D-lactate (50 °C and pH 5.0), the cellulase usage could be reduced to 1/3 that required for equivalent fermentations by mesophilic lactic acid bacteria. Together, the native B. coagulans and the QZ19 derivative can be used to produce either L(+) or D(-) optical isomers of lactic acid (respectively) at high titers and yields from nonfood carbohydrates.

  3. Human gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity: effect of age, sex, and alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, H K; Egerer, G; Simanowski, U A; Waldherr, R; Eckey, R; Agarwal, D P; Goedde, H W; von Wartburg, J P

    1993-01-01

    As various isoenzymes of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase exist and as the effect of sex and age on these enzymes is unknown, this study measured the activity of gastric alcohol dehydrogenase at high and low ethanol concentrations in endoscopic biopsy specimens from a total of 290 patients of various ages and from 10 patients with chronic alcoholism. Gastric alcohol dehydrogenase was also detected by immunohistological tests in biopsy specimens from 40 patients by the use of a polyclonal rabbit antibody against class I alcohol dehydrogenase. A significant correlation was found between the immunohistological reaction assessed by the intensity of the colour reaction in the biopsy specimen and the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase measured at 580 mM ethanol. While alcohol dehydrogenase activity measured at 16 mM ethanol was not significantly affected by age and sex, both factors influenced alcohol dehydrogenase activity measured at 580 mM ethanol. Young women below 50 years of age had significantly lower alcohol dehydrogenase activities in the gastric corpus and antrum when compared with age matched controls (SEM) (6.4 (0.7) v 8.8 (0.6) nmol/min/mg protein; p < 0.001 and 6.0 (1.3) v 9.5 (1.3) nmol/min/mg protein; p < 0.001). Over 50 years of age this sex difference was no longer detectable, as high Km gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity decreases with age only in men and not in women. In addition, extremely low alcohol dehydrogenase activities have been found in gastric biopsy specimens from young male alcoholics (2.2 (0.5) nmol/min/mg protein), which returned to normal after two to three weeks of abstinence. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase in the human stomach measured at 580 mM ethanol is decreased in young women, in elderly men, and in the subject with alcoholism. This decrease in alcohol dehydrogenase activity may contribute to the reduced first pass metabolism of ethanol associated with raised ethanol blood concentrations seen in these people. Images Figure

  4. Gene Cloning and mRNA Expression of Glutamate Dehydrogenase in the Liver, Brain, and Intestine of the Swamp Eel, Monopterus albus (Zuiew), Exposed to Freshwater, Terrestrial Conditions, Environmental Ammonia, or Salinity Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tok, Chia Y.; Chew, Shit F.; Ip, Yuen K.

    2011-01-01

    The swamp eel, Monopterus albus, is an obligatory air-breathing teleost which can undergo long period of emersion, has high environmental and tissue ammonia tolerance, and can survive in brackish water. We obtained a cDNA sequence of glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh), which consisted of a 133-bp 5′ UTR, a complete coding sequence region spanning 1629 bp and a 3′ UTR of approximately 717 bp, from the liver, intestine, and brain of M. albus. The translated Gdh amino acid sequence had 542 residues, and it formed a monophyletic clade with Bostrychus sinensis Gdh1a, Tetraodon nigroviridis Gdh1a, Chaenocephalus aceratus Gdh1a, Salmo salar Gdh1a1 and Gdh1a2, and O. mykiss Gdh1a. One day of exposure to terrestrial conditions or 75 mmol l−1 NH4Cl, but not to water at salinity 20, resulted in a significant increase in mRNA expression of gdh1a and Gdh amination activity in the liver of M. albus. However, exposure to brackish water, but not to terrestrial conditions or 75 mmol l−1 NH4Cl, led to a significant increase in the mRNA expression of gdh1a and Gdh amination activity in the intestine. By contrast, all the three experimental conditions had no significant effects on the mRNA expression of gdh1a in the brain of M. albus, despite a significant decrease in the Gdh amination activity in the brain of fish exposed to 75 mmol l−1 NH4Cl for 6 days. Our results indicate for the first time that the mRNA expression of gdh1a was differentially up-regulated in the liver and intestine of M. albus in response to ammonia toxicity and salinity stress, respectively. The increases in mRNA expression of gdh1a and Gdh amination activity would probably lead to an increase in glutamate production in support of increased glutamine synthesis for the purpose of ammonia detoxification or cell volume regulation under these two different environmental conditions. PMID:22319499

  5. Lactate dehydrogenase activity is inhibited by methylmalonate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saad, Laura O; Mirandola, Sandra R; Maciel, Evelise N; Castilho, Roger F

    2006-04-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMAemia) is an inherited metabolic disorder of branched amino acid and odd-chain fatty acid metabolism, involving a defect in the conversion of methylmalonyl-coenzyme A to succinyl-coenzyme A. Systemic and neurological manifestations in this disease are thought to be associated with the accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA) in tissues and biological fluids with consequent impairment of energy metabolism and oxidative stress. In the present work we studied the effect of MMA and two other inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II (malonate and 3-nitropropionate) on the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in tissue homogenates from adult rats. MMA potently inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in liver and brain homogenates as well as in a purified bovine heart LDH preparation. LDH was about one order of magnitude less sensitive to inhibition by MMA when catalyzing the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of brain LDH indicated that MMA inhibits this enzyme competitively with lactate as a substrate (K (i)=3.02+/-0.59 mM). Malonate and 3-nitropropionate also strongly inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in brain homogenates, while no inhibition was observed by succinate or propionate, when present in concentrations of up to 25 mM. We propose that inhibition of the lactate/pyruvate conversion by MMA contributes to lactate accumulation in blood, metabolic acidemia and inhibition of gluconeogenesis observed in patients with MMAemia. Moreover, the inhibition of LDH in the central nervous system may also impair the lactate shuttle between astrocytes and neurons, compromising neuronal energy metabolism.

  6. Allosteric activation of membrane-bound glutamate receptors using coordination chemistry within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Kubota, Ryou; Michibata, Yukiko; Sakakura, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Hideo; Numata, Tomohiro; Inoue, Ryuji; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Hamachi, Itaru

    2016-10-01

    The controlled activation of proteins in living cells is an important goal in protein-design research, but to introduce an artificial activation switch into membrane proteins through rational design is a significant challenge because of the structural and functional complexity of such proteins. Here we report the allosteric activation of two types of membrane-bound neurotransmitter receptors, the ion-channel type and the G-protein-coupled glutamate receptors, using coordination chemistry in living cells. The high programmability of coordination chemistry enabled two His mutations, which act as an artificial allosteric site, to be semirationally incorporated in the vicinity of the ligand-binding pockets. Binding of Pd(2,2‧-bipyridine) at the allosteric site enabled the active conformations of the glutamate receptors to be stabilized. Using this approach, we were able to activate selectively a mutant glutamate receptor in live neurons, which initiated a subsequent signal-transduction pathway.

  7. Detection of amount and activity of living algae in fresh water by dehydrogenase activity (DHA).

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Hu, Wenrong; Pei, Haiyan; Dun, Mina; Qi, Feng

    2008-11-01

    A study was performed to determine the amount and activity of living algae in fresh water by measuring the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of algae in order to provide a method to assess the effect of algicide treatment. The conditions of measurement were researched with respect to incubating temperature and duration, and selection of extractants. The comparison between this method and an alternative method, chlorophyll a, shows that this method is simple and easy to practice, and can determine the effect of algicide treatment.

  8. Enhanced excitatory synaptic network activity following transient group I metabotropic glutamate activation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y-Z; Rutecki, P A

    2014-09-05

    Prolonged activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) using the agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) produces long-lasting changes in the CA3 region of the hippocampal slice. Changes in CA3 pyramidal neuron excitability that follow DHPG exposure result in abnormal network activity manifest by epileptiform activity that consists of interictal and longer lasting ictal epileptiform discharges. In this study we evaluated changes in synaptic activity of CA3 neurons in rat hippocampal slices that occurred after exposure to DHPG. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings were made from visually identified CA3 neurons in control artificial cerebrospinal fluid at times greater than 1h after DHPG exposure. Compared to control slices, neurons from slices exposed to DHPG showed enhanced amplitude and frequency of spontaneously occurring excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) without a concurrent change in inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) amplitude or frequency. Miniature EPSCs were not affected by DHPG exposure but mIPSCs occurred less frequently and were of reduced amplitude. IPSCs recorded in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor blockade occurred less frequently in neurons that had been exposed to DHPG. Monosynaptic-evoked IPSPs were also reduced in amplitude in neurons that had been exposed to DHPG. Taken together, these findings demonstrated an enhanced network excitability of the CA3 region and failure of compensatory synaptic inhibition. We propose that prolonged activation of group I mGluR that may occur under conditions of pathological glutamate release results in long-lasting changes in CA3 synaptic network activity and epileptiform activity driven by excessive synaptic excitation.

  9. A specific radiochemical assay for pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Small, C; Jones, M E

    1987-03-01

    Previous studies of pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase have been conducted using a spectrophotometric method to monitor substrate-dependent NAD(P)H production. For the assay of the mammalian enzyme, the spectrophotometric assay was found to be unacceptable for kinetic studies as the production of NAD(P)H was nonlinear with time and protein concentration. An assay which measures radiolabeled glutamate production by this enzyme in the presence of NAD+ from radiolabeled pyrroline-5-carboxylate has been developed. Separation of substrate from product is achieved by column chromatography using Dowex 50 cation-exchange resin. The product isolated by this procedure was identified as glutamate. This new assay is linear with time and protein concentration and gives reproducible results. The assay is not influenced by competing enzyme activities, such as glutamate dehydrogenase, in a liver homogenate so that quantitative conversion of pyrroline-5-carboxylate to glutamate is observed.

  10. Hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity in alcoholic subjects with and without liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, F; Perez, J; Morancho, J; Pinto, B; Richart, C

    1990-01-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was measured in samples of liver tissue from a group of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects to determine whether decreased liver alcohol dehydrogenase activity is a consequence of ethanol consumption or liver damage. The alcoholic patients were classified further into the following groups: control subjects with no liver disease (group 1), subjects with non-cirrhotic liver disease (group 2), and subjects with cirrhotic liver disease (group 3). The non-alcoholic subjects were also divided, using the same criteria, into groups 4, 5, and 6, respectively. The analysis of the results showed no significant differences when mean alcohol dehydrogenase activities of alcoholic and non-alcoholic patients with similar degrees of liver pathology were compared (groups 1 v 4, 2 v 5, and 3 v 6. Alcohol dehydrogenase activity was, however, severely reduced in patients with liver disease compared with control subjects. Our findings suggest that alcohol consumption does not modify hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase activity. The reduction in specific alcohol dehydrogenase activity in alcoholic liver disease is a consequence of liver damage. PMID:2379876

  11. Ebselen induces reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cytotoxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with inhibition of glutamate dehydrogenase being a target☆

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Singh, Vikash; Mandal, Papita; Singh, Prabhat; Golla, Upendarrao; Baranwal, Shivani; Chauhan, Sakshi; Tomar, Raghuvir S.

    2014-01-01

    Ebselen is a synthetic, lipid-soluble seleno-organic compound. The high electrophilicity of ebselen enables it to react with multiple cysteine residues of various proteins. Despite extensive research on ebselen, its target molecules and mechanism of action remains less understood. We performed biochemical as well as in vivo experiments employing budding yeast as a model organism to understand the mode of action of ebselen. The growth curve analysis and FACS (florescence activated cell sorting) assays revealed that ebselen exerts growth inhibitory effects on yeast cells by causing a delay in cell cycle progression. We observed that ebselen exposure causes an increase in intracellular ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential, and that these effects were reversed by addition of antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH) or N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Interestingly, a significant increase in ROS levels was noticed in gdh3-deleted cells compared to wild-type cells. Furthermore, we showed that ebselen inhibits GDH function by interacting with its cysteine residues, leading to the formation of inactive hexameric GDH. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed protein targets of ebselen including CPR1, the yeast homolog of Cyclophilin A. Additionally, ebselen treatment leads to the inhibition of yeast sporulation. These results indicate a novel direct connection between ebselen and redox homeostasis. PMID:24490132

  12. Ebselen induces reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cytotoxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with inhibition of glutamate dehydrogenase being a target.

    PubMed

    Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Singh, Vikash; Mandal, Papita; Singh, Prabhat; Golla, Upendarrao; Baranwal, Shivani; Chauhan, Sakshi; Tomar, Raghuvir S

    2014-01-01

    Ebselen is a synthetic, lipid-soluble seleno-organic compound. The high electrophilicity of ebselen enables it to react with multiple cysteine residues of various proteins. Despite extensive research on ebselen, its target molecules and mechanism of action remains less understood. We performed biochemical as well as in vivo experiments employing budding yeast as a model organism to understand the mode of action of ebselen. The growth curve analysis and FACS (florescence activated cell sorting) assays revealed that ebselen exerts growth inhibitory effects on yeast cells by causing a delay in cell cycle progression. We observed that ebselen exposure causes an increase in intracellular ROS levels and mitochondrial membrane potential, and that these effects were reversed by addition of antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH) or N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC). Interestingly, a significant increase in ROS levels was noticed in gdh3-deleted cells compared to wild-type cells. Furthermore, we showed that ebselen inhibits GDH function by interacting with its cysteine residues, leading to the formation of inactive hexameric GDH. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed protein targets of ebselen including CPR1, the yeast homolog of Cyclophilin A. Additionally, ebselen treatment leads to the inhibition of yeast sporulation. These results indicate a novel direct connection between ebselen and redox homeostasis.

  13. Woodward's reagent K inactivation of Escherichia coli L-threonine dehydrogenase: increased absorbance at 340-350 nm is due to modification of cysteine and histidine residues, not aspartate or glutamate carboxyl groups.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, A. R.; Dekker, E. E.

    1996-01-01

    L-Threonine dehydrogenase (TDH) from Escherichia coli is rapidly inactivated and develops a new absorbance peak at 347 nm when incubated with N-ethyl-5-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate (Woodward's reagent K, WRK). The cofactors, NAD+ or NADH (1.5 mM), provide complete protection against inactivation; L-threonine (60 mM) is approximately 50% as effective. Tryptic digestion of WRK-modified TDH followed by HPLC fractionation (pH 6.2) yields four 340-nm-absorbing peptides, two of which are absent from enzyme incubated with WRK and NAD+. Peptide I has the sequence TAICGTDVH (TDH residues 35-43), whereas peptide II is TAICGTDVHIY (residues 35-45). Peptides not protected are TMLDTMNHGGR (III, residues 248-258) and NCRGGRTHLCR (IV, residues 98-108). Absorbance spectra of these WRK-peptides were compared with WRK adducts of imidazole, 2-hydroxyethanethiolate, and acetate. Peptides III and IV have pH-dependent lambda max values (340-350 nm), consistent with histidine modification. Peptide I has pH-independent lambda max (350 nm) indicating that a thiol is modified. WRK, therefore, does not react specifically with carboxyl groups in this enzyme, but rather modifies Cys-38 in the active site of TDH; modification of His-105 and His-255 does not affect enzyme activity. These results are the first definitive proof of WRK modifying cysteine and histidine residues of a protein and show that enzyme inactivation by WRK associated with the appearance of new absorptivity at 340-350 nm does not establish modification of aspartate or glutamate residues, as has been assumed in numerous earlier reports. PMID:8745417

  14. Control of glycolytic flux in Zymomonas mobilis by glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Snoep, J.L. |; Arfman, N.; Yomano, L.P.; Ingram, L.O.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Conway, T.

    1996-07-20

    Alycolytic genes in Zymomonas mobilis are highly expressed and constitute half of the cytoplasmic protein. The first four genes (glf, zwf, edd, glk) in this pathway form an operon encoding a glucose permease, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6-P dehydrogenase), 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase, and glucokinase, respectively. Each gene was overexpressed from a tac promoter to investigate the control of glycolysis during the early stages of batch fermentation when flux (qCO{sub 2}) is highest. Almost half of flux control appears to reside with G6-P dehydrogenase (C{sub G6-P dehydrogenase}{sup J} = 0.4). Although Z. mobilis exhibits one of the highest rates of glycolysis known, recombinants with elevated G6-P dehydrogenase had a 10% to 13% higher glycolytic flux than the native organism. A small increase in flux was also observed for recombinants expressing glf. Results obtained did not allow a critical evaluation of glucokinase and this enzyme may also represent an important control point. 6-Phosphogluconate dehydratase appears to be saturating at native levels. With constructs containing the full operon, growth rate and flux were both reduced, complicating interpretations. However, results obtained were also consistent with G6-P dehydrogenase as a primary site of control. Flux was 17% higher in operon constructs which exhibited a 17% increase in G6-P dehydrogenase specific activity, relative to the average of other operon constructs which contain a frameshift mutation in zwf.

  15. Mechanism of activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase by dichloroacetate and other halogenated carboxylic acids

    PubMed Central

    Whitehouse, Sue; Cooper, Ronald H.; Randle, Philip J.

    1974-01-01

    1. Monochloroacetate, dichloroacetate, trichloroacetate, difluoroacetate, 2-chloropropionate, 2,2′-dichloropropionate and 3-chloropropionate were inhibitors of pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. Dichloroacetate was also shown to inhibit rat heart pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase. The inhibition was mainly non-competitive with respect to ATP. The concentration required for 50% inhibition was approx. 100μm for the three chloroacetates, difluoroacetate and 2-chloropropionate and 2,2′-dichloropropionate. Dichloroacetamide was not inhibitory. 2. Dichloroacetate had no significant effect on the activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphate phosphatase when this was maximally activated by Ca2+ and Mg2+. 3. Dichloroacetate did not increase the catalytic activity of purified pig heart pyruvate dehydrogenase. 4. Dichloroacetate, difluoroacetate, 2-chloropropionate and 2,2′-dichloropropionate increased the proportion of the active (dephosphorylated) form of pyruvate dehydrogenase in rat heart mitochondria with 2-oxoglutarate and malate as respiratory substrates. Similar effects of dichloroacetate were shown with kidney and fat-cell mitochondria. Glyoxylate, monochloroacetate and dichloroacetamide were inactive. 5. Dichloroacetate increased the proportion of active pyruvate dehydrogenase in the perfused rat heart, isolated rat diaphragm and rat epididymal fat-pads. Difluoroacetate and dichloroacetamide were also active in the perfused heart, but glyoxylate, monochloroacetate and trichloroacetate were inactive. 6. Injection of dichloroacetate into rats starved overnight led within 60 min to activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase in extracts from heart, psoas muscle, adipose tissue, kidney and liver. The blood concentration of lactate fell within 15 min to reach a minimum after 60 min. The blood concentration of glucose fell after 90 min and reached a minimum after 120 min. There was no significant change in plasma glycerol concentration. 7. In epididymal fatpads

  16. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activation and coevolution of its εPKC-mediated phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Nene, Aishwarya; Chen, Che-Hong; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Cruz, Leslie; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2017-01-05

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a key enzyme for the metabolism of many toxic aldehydes such as acetaldehyde, derived from alcohol drinking, and 4HNE, an oxidative stress-derived lipid peroxidation aldehyde. Post-translational enhancement of ALDH2 activity can be achieved by serine/threonine phosphorylation by epsilon protein kinase C (εPKC). Elevated ALDH2 is beneficial in reducing injury following myocardial infarction, stroke and other oxidative stress and aldehyde toxicity-related diseases. We have previously identified three εPKC phosphorylation sites, threonine 185 (T185), serine 279 (S279) and threonine 412 (T412), on ALDH2. Here we further characterized the role and contribution of each phosphorylation site to the enhancement of enzymatic activity by εPKC. Each individual phosphorylation site was mutated to a negatively charged amino acid, glutamate, to mimic a phosphorylation, or to a non-phosphorylatable amino acid, alanine. ALDH2 enzyme activities and protection against 4HNE inactivation were measured in the presence or absence of εPKC phosphorylation in vitro. Coevolution of ALDH2 and its εPKC phosphorylation sites was delineated by multiple sequence alignments among a diverse range of species and within the ALDH multigene family. We identified S279 as a critical εPKC phosphorylation site in the activation of ALDH2. The critical catalytic site, cysteine 302 (C302) of ALDH2 is susceptible to adduct formation by reactive aldehyde, 4HNE, which readily renders the enzyme inactive. We show that phosphomimetic mutations of T185E, S279E and T412E confer protection of ALDH2 against 4HNE-induced inactivation, indicating that phosphorylation on these three sites by εPKC likely also protects the enzyme against reactive aldehydes. Finally, we demonstrate that the three ALDH2 phosphorylation sites co-evolved with εPKC over a wide range of species. Alignment of 18 human ALDH isozymes, indicates that T185 and S279 are unique ALDH2, ε

  17. Astrocytic glutamate uptake is slow and does not limit neuronal NMDA receptor activation in the neonatal neocortex.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Elizabeth; Armbruster, Moritz; Cantu, David; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor, Amaro; Danbolt, Niels Christian; Dulla, Chris G

    2015-10-01

    Glutamate uptake by astrocytes controls the time course of glutamate in the extracellular space and affects neurotransmission, synaptogenesis, and circuit development. Astrocytic glutamate uptake has been shown to undergo post-natal maturation in the hippocampus, but has been largely unexplored in other brain regions. Notably, glutamate uptake has never been examined in the developing neocortex. In these studies, we investigated the development of astrocytic glutamate transport, intrinsic membrane properties, and control of neuronal NMDA receptor activation in the developing neocortex. Using astrocytic and neuronal electrophysiology, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis we show that: (1) glutamate uptake in the neonatal neocortex is slow relative to neonatal hippocampus; (2) astrocytes in the neonatal neocortex undergo a significant maturation of intrinsic membrane properties; (3) slow glutamate uptake is accompanied by lower expression of both GLT-1 and GLAST; (4) glutamate uptake is less dependent on GLT-1 in neonatal neocortex than in neonatal hippocampus; and (5) the slow glutamate uptake we report in the neonatal neocortex corresponds to minimal astrocytic control of neuronal NMDA receptor activation. Taken together, our results clearly show fundamental differences between astrocytic maturation in the developing neocortex and hippocampus, and corresponding changes in how astrocytes control glutamate signaling.

  18. Resveratrol Prevents Retinal Dysfunction by Regulating Glutamate Transporters, Glutamine Synthetase Expression and Activity in Diabetic Retina.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Kaihong; Yang, Na; Wang, Duozi; Li, Suping; Ming, Jian; Wang, Jing; Yu, Xuemei; Song, Yi; Zhou, Xue; Yang, Yongtao

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of resveratrol (RSV) on retinal functions, glutamate transporters (GLAST) and glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in diabetic rats retina, and on glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression in high glucose-cultured Müller cells. The electroretinogram was used to evaluate retinal functions. Müller cells cultures were prepared from 5- to 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats. The expression of GLAST and GS was examined by qRT-PCR, ELISA and western-blotting. Glutamate uptake was measured as (3)H-glutamate contents of the lysates. GS activity was assessed by a spectrophotometric assay. 1- to 7-month RSV administrations (5 and 10 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated hyperglycemia and weight loss in diabetic rats. RSV administrations also significantly attenuated diabetes-induced decreases in amplitude of a-wave in rod response, decreases in amplitude of a-, and b-wave in cone and rod response and decreases in amplitude of OP2 in oscillatory potentials. 1- to 7-month RSV treatments also significantly inhibited diabetes-induced delay in OP2 implicit times in scotopic 3.0 OPS test. The down-regulated mRNA and protein expression of GLAST and GS in diabetic rats retina was prevented by RSV administrations. In high glucose-treated cultures, Müller cells' glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression were decreased significantly compared with normal control cultures. RSV (10, 20, and 30 mmol/l) significantly inhibited the HG-induced decreases in glutamate uptake, GS activity, GLAST and GS expression (at least P < 0.05). These beneficial results suggest that RSV may be considered as a therapeutic option to prevent from diabetic retinopathy.

  19. Re-engineering the discrimination between the oxidized coenzymes NAD+ and NADP+ in clostridial glutamate dehydrogenase and a thorough reappraisal of the coenzyme specificity of the wild-type enzyme.

    PubMed

    Capone, Marina; Scanlon, David; Griffin, Joanna; Engel, Paul C

    2011-07-01

    Clostridial glutamate dehydrogenase mutants, designed to accommodate the 2'-phosphate of disfavoured NADPH, showed the expected large specificity shifts with NAD(P)H. Puzzlingly, similar assays with oxidized cofactors initially revealed little improvement with NADP(+) , although rates with NAD(+) were markedly diminished. This article reveals that the enzyme's discrimination in favour of NAD(+) and against NADP(+) had been greatly underestimated and has indeed been abated by a factor of > 16,000 by the mutagenesis. Initially, stopped-flow studies of the wild-type enzyme showed a burst increase of A(340) with NADP(+) but not NAD(+), with amplitude depending on the concentration of the coenzyme, rather than enzyme. Amplitude also varied with the commercial source of the NADP(+). FPLC, HPLC and mass spectrometry identified NAD(+) contamination ranging from 0.04 to 0.37% in different commercial samples. It is now clear that apparent rates of NADP(+) utilization mainly reflected the reduction of contaminating NAD(+), creating an entirely false view of the initial coenzyme specificity and also of the effects of mutagenesis. Purification of the NADP(+) eliminated the burst. With freshly purified NADP(+), the NAD(+) : NADP(+) activity ratio under standard conditions, previously estimated as 300 : 1, is 11,000. The catalytic efficiency ratio is even higher at 80,000. Retested with pure cofactor, mutants showed marked specificity shifts in the expected direction, for example, 16 200 fold change in catalytic efficiency ratio for the mutant F238S/P262S, confirming that the key structural determinants of specificity have been successfully identified. Of wider significance, these results underline that, without purification, even the best commercial coenzyme preparations are inadequate for such studies.

  20. PAR1 activation induces rapid changes in glutamate uptake and astrocyte morphology

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Amanda M.; Fleming, Kelsey E.; McCauley, John P.; Rodriguez, Marvin F.; Martin, Elliot T.; Sousa, Alioscka A.; Leapman, Richard D.; Scimemi, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    The G-protein coupled, protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a membrane protein expressed in astrocytes. Fine astrocytic processes are in tight contact with neurons and blood vessels and shape excitatory synaptic transmission due to their abundant expression of glutamate transporters. PAR1 is proteolytically-activated by bloodstream serine proteases also involved in the formation of blood clots. PAR1 activation has been suggested to play a key role in pathological states like thrombosis, hemostasis and inflammation. What remains unclear is whether PAR1 activation also regulates glutamate uptake in astrocytes and how this shapes excitatory synaptic transmission among neurons. Here we show that, in the mouse hippocampus, PAR1 activation induces a rapid structural re-organization of the neuropil surrounding glutamatergic synapses, which is associated with faster clearance of synaptically-released glutamate from the extracellular space. This effect can be recapitulated using realistic 3D Monte Carlo reaction-diffusion simulations, based on axial scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography reconstructions of excitatory synapses. The faster glutamate clearance induced by PAR1 activation leads to short- and long-term changes in excitatory synaptic transmission. Together, these findings identify PAR1 as an important regulator of glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus and a possible target molecule to limit brain damage during hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:28256580

  1. Biorhythms of activities of liver and blood dehydrogenases and changes in body weight of the rats feeding normal diet or excess of sugar substitutes.

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Yu A; Volozhin, A I; Zubtsov, V A; Kichenko, S M

    2007-12-01

    Biorhythms with higher levels of activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase in blood plasma, specific activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase in the liver, and body weight of rats were more pronounced in the spring-summer period than in the autumn-winter period. These specific features were revealed in animals feeding a normal diet or food with 54 and 27% sugar substitute sorbitol. However, specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the liver was higher in the autumn-winter period. Activity of sorbitol dehydrogenase in blood plasma increased by tens of times due to induction of sorbitol synthesis (substrate) in the liver. Sugar substitute xylitol is structurally similar to sorbitol, but is not the substrate for sorbitol dehydrogenase. However, the effect of xylitol on activities of lactate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the spring-summer period was similar to that of sorbitol.

  2. Enhancement of CA3 hippocampal network activity by activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Ster, Jeanne; Mateos, José María; Grewe, Benjamin Friedrich; Coiret, Guyllaume; Corti, Corrado; Corsi, Mauro; Helmchen, Fritjof; Gerber, Urs

    2011-06-14

    Impaired function or expression of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRIIs) is observed in brain disorders such as schizophrenia. This class of receptor is thought to modulate activity of neuronal circuits primarily by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. Here, we characterize a postsynaptic excitatory response mediated by somato-dendritic mGluRIIs in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells and in stratum oriens interneurons. The specific mGluRII agonists DCG-IV or LCCG-1 induced an inward current blocked by the mGluRII antagonist LY341495. Experiments with transgenic mice revealed a significant reduction of the inward current in mGluR3(-/-) but not in mGluR2(-/-) mice. The excitatory response was associated with periods of synchronized activity at theta frequency. Furthermore, cholinergically induced network oscillations exhibited decreased frequency when mGluRIIs were blocked. Thus, our data indicate that hippocampal responses are modulated not only by presynaptic mGluRIIs that reduce glutamate release but also by postsynaptic mGluRIIs that depolarize neurons and enhance CA3 network activity.

  3. Endogenous activation of kainate receptors regulates glutamate release and network activity in the developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lauri, Sari E; Segerstråle, Mikael; Vesikansa, Aino; Maingret, Francois; Mulle, Christophe; Collingridge, Graham L; Isaac, John T R; Taira, Tomi

    2005-05-04

    Kainate receptors (KARs) are highly expressed throughout the neonatal brain, but their function during development is unclear. Here, we show that the maturation of the hippocampus is associated with a switch in the functional role of presynaptic KARs. In a developmental period restricted to the first postnatal week, endogenous L-glutamate tonically activates KARs at CA3 glutamatergic synapses to regulate release in an action potential-independent manner. At synapses onto pyramidal cells, KARs inhibit glutamate release via a G-protein and PKC-dependent mechanism. In contrast, at glutamatergic terminals onto CA3 interneurons, presynaptic KARs can facilitate release in a G-protein-independent mechanism. In both cell types, however, KAR activation strongly upregulates inhibitory transmission. We show that, through the interplay of these novel diverse mechanisms, KARs strongly regulate the characteristic synchronous network activity observed in the neonatal hippocampus. By virtue of this, KARs are likely to play a central role in the development of hippocampal synaptic circuits.

  4. Α-amino-β-fluorocyclopropanecarboxylic acids as a new tool for drug development: synthesis of glutamic acid analogs and agonist activity towards metabotropic glutamate receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Lemonnier, Gérald; Lion, Cédric; Quirion, Jean-Charles; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Goudet, Cyril; Jubault, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Herein we describe the diastereoselective synthesis of glutamic acid analogs and the evaluation of their agonist activity towards metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 4 (mGluR4). These analogs are based on a monofluorinated cyclopropane core substituted with an α-aminoacid function. The potential of this new building block as a tool for the development of a novel class of drugs is demonstrated with racemic analog 11a that displayed the best agonist activity with an EC50 of 340 nM. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Activation of β-adrenoceptor facilitates active avoidance learning through enhancement of glutamate levels in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Feng, Hao; Chen, Ling; Wang, Wei-Yao; Yue, Xue-Ling; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2017-10-18

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is widely accepted as the best studied model for neurophysiological mechanisms that could underlie learning and memory formation. Despite a number of studies indicating that β-adrenoceptors in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) is involved in the modulation of learning and memory as well as LTP, few studies have used glutamate release as a visual indicator in awake animals to explore the role of β-adrenoceptors in learning-dependent LTP. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of propranolol (an antagonist of β-adrenoceptor) and isoproterenol (an agonist of β-adrenoceptor) on extracellular concentrations of glutamate and amplitudes of field excitatory postsynaptic potential were measured in the DG region during active avoidance learning in freely moving conscious rats. In the control group, the glutamate level in the DG was significantly increased during the acquisition of active avoidance behavior and returned to basal level following extinction training. In propranolol group, antagonism of β-adrenoceptors in the DG significantly reduced the change in glutamate level, and the acquisition of the active avoidance behavior was significantly inhibited. In contrast, the change in glutamate level was significantly enhanced by isoproterenol, and the acquisition of the active avoidance behavior was significantly accelerated. Furthermore, in all groups, the changes in glutamate level were accompanied by corresponding changes in field excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude and active avoidance behavior. Our results suggest that activation of β-adrenoceptors in the hippocampal DG facilitates active avoidance learning by modulations of glutamate level and synaptic efficiency in rats.

  6. Exposure to high glutamate concentration activates aerobic glycolysis but inhibits ATP-linked respiration in cultured cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yao; Tian, Yueyang; Shi, Xiaojie; Yang, Jianbo; Ouyang, Li; Gao, Jieqiong; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes play a key role in removing the synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space and maintaining the glutamate below neurotoxic level in the brain. However, high concentration of glutamate leads to toxicity in astrocytes, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether energy metabolism disorder, especially impairment of mitochondrial respiration, is involved in the glutamate-induced gliotoxicity. Exposure to 10-mM glutamate for 48 h stimulated glycolysis and respiration in astrocytes. However, the increased oxygen consumption was used for proton leak and non-mitochondrial respiration, but not for oxidative phosphorylation and ATP generation. When the exposure time extended to 72 h, glycolysis was still activated for ATP generation, but the mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration of astrocytes was reduced. The glutamate-induced astrocyte damage can be mimicked by the non-metabolized substrate d-aspartate but reversed by the non-selective glutamate transporter inhibitor TBOA. In addition, the glutamate toxicity can be partially reversed by vitamin E. These findings demonstrate that changes of bioenergetic profile occur in cultured cortical astrocytes exposed to high concentration of glutamate and highlight the role of mitochondria respiration in glutamate-induced gliotoxicity in cortical astrocytes.

  7. Caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in primary hippocampal neurons following glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Brecht, S; Gelderblom, M; Srinivasan, A; Mielke, K; Dityateva, G; Herdegen, T

    2001-10-19

    Excitotoxic glutamate CNS stimulation can result in neuronal cell death. Contributing mechanisms and markers of cell death are the activation of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation. It remains to be resolved to which extent both cellular reactions overlap and/or indicate different processes of neurodegeneration. In this study, mixed neuronal cultures from newborn mice pubs (0-24 h) were stimulated with glutamate, and the co-localization of active caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation was investigated by immunocytochemistry and the TUNEL nick-end labelling. In untreated cultures, 8% scattered neurons (marked by MAP-2) displayed activated caspase-3 at different morphological stages of degeneration. TUNEL staining was detected in 5% of cell nuclei including GFAP-positive astrocytes. However, co-localization of active caspase-3 with TUNEL was less than 2%. After glutamate stimulation (125 microM), the majority of neurons was dying between 12 and 24 h. The absolute number of active caspase-3 neurons increased only moderately but in relation of surviving neurons after 24 h from 8 to 36% (125 microM), to 53% (250 microM) or to 32% (500 microM). TUNEL staining also increased after 24 h following glutamate treatment to 37% but the co-localization with active caspase-3 remained at the basal low level of 2%. In our system, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity effects the DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 activation. Co-localization of both parameters, however, is very poor. Active caspase-3 in the absence of TUNEL indicates a dynamic degenerative process, whereas TUNEL marks the end stage of severe irreversible cell damage regardless to the origin of the cell.

  8. Glutamate and capsaicin effects on trigeminal nociception I: Activation and peripheral sensitization of deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed

    Lam, David K; Sessle, Barry J; Hu, James W

    2009-01-28

    We have examined the effect of the peripheral application of glutamate and capsaicin to deep craniofacial tissues in influencing the activation and peripheral sensitization of deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents. The activity of single trigeminal nociceptive afferents with receptive fields in deep craniofacial tissues were recorded extracellularly in 55 halothane-anesthetized rats. The mechanical activation threshold (MAT) of each afferent was assessed before and after injection of 0.5 M glutamate (or vehicle) and 1% capsaicin (or vehicle) into the receptive field. A total of 68 afferents that could be activated by blunt noxious mechanical stimulation of the deep craniofacial tissues (23 masseter, 5 temporalis, 40 temporomandibular joint) were studied. When injected alone, glutamate and capsaicin activated and induced peripheral sensitization reflected as MAT reduction in many afferents. Following glutamate injection, capsaicin-evoked activity was greater than that evoked by capsaicin alone, whereas following capsaicin injection, glutamate-evoked responses were similar to glutamate alone. These findings indicate that peripheral application of glutamate or capsaicin may activate or induce peripheral sensitization in a subpopulation of trigeminal nociceptive afferents innervating deep craniofacial tissues, as reflected in changes in MAT and other afferent response properties. The data further suggest that peripheral glutamate and capsaicin receptor mechanisms may interact to modulate the activation and peripheral sensitization in some deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents.

  9. Tandem orientation of duplicated xanthine dehydrogenase genes from Arabidopsis thaliana: differential gene expression and enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Hesberg, Christine; Hänsch, Robert; Mendel, Ralf R; Bittner, Florian

    2004-04-02

    Xanthine dehydrogenase from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed on molecular and biochemical levels. Whereas most other organisms appear to own only one gene for xanthine dehydrogenase A. thaliana possesses two genes in tandem orientation spaced by 704 base pairs. The cDNAs as well as the proteins AtXDH1 and AtXDH2 share an overall identity of 93% and show high homologies to xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms. Whereas AtXDH2 mRNA is expressed constitutively, alterations of AtXDH1 transcript levels were observed at various stresses like drought, salinity, cold, and natural senescence, but also after abscisic acid treatment. Transcript alteration did not mandatorily result in changes of xanthine dehydrogenase activities. Whereas salt treatment had no effect on xanthine dehydrogenase activities, cold stress caused a decrease, but desiccation and senescence caused a strong increase of activities in leaves. Because AtXDH1 presumably is the more important isoenzyme in A. thaliana it was expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and used for biochemical studies. AtXDH1 protein is a homodimer of about 300 kDa consisting of identical subunits of 150 kDa. Like xanthine dehydrogenases from other organisms AtXDH1 uses hypoxanthine and xanthine as main substrates and is strongly inhibited by allopurinol. AtXDH1 could be activated by the purified molybdenum cofactor sulfurase ABA3 that converts inactive desulfo-into active sulfoenzymes. Finally it was found that AtXDH1 is a strict dehydrogenase and not an oxidase, but is able to produce superoxide radicals indicating that besides purine catabolism it might also be involved in response to various stresses that require reactive oxygen species.

  10. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase activity helps support glycolysis in actively proliferating cells and cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanse, E A; Ruan, C; Kachman, M; Wang, D; Lowman, X H; Kelekar, A

    2017-03-06

    Increased glucose consumption is a hallmark of cancer cells. The increased consumption and subsequent metabolism of glucose during proliferation creates the need for a constant supply of NAD, a co-factor in glycolysis. Regeneration of the NAD required to support enhanced glycolysis has been attributed to the terminal glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). However, loss of glucose carbons to biosynthetic pathways early in glycolysis reduces the carbon supply to LDH. Thus, alternative routes for NAD regeneration must exist to support the increased glycolytic rate while allowing for the diversion of glucose to generate biomass and support proliferation. Here we demonstrate, using a variety of cancer cell lines as well as activated primary T cells, that cytosolic malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1) is an alternative to LDH as a supplier of NAD. Moreover, our results indicate that MDH1 generates malate with carbons derived from glutamine, thus enabling utilization of glucose carbons for glycolysis and for biomass. Amplification of MDH1 occurs at an impressive frequency in human tumors and correlates with poor prognosis. Together, our findings suggest that proliferating cells rely on both MDH1 and LDH to replenish cytosolic NAD, and that therapies designed at targeting glycolysis must consider both dehydrogenases.Oncogene advance online publication, 6 March 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.36.

  11. Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase activity helps support glycolysis in actively proliferating cells and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hanse, Eric A; Ruan, Chunhai; Kachman, Maureen; Wang, Dongyu; Lowman, Xazmin H; Kelekar, Ameeta

    2017-01-01

    Increased glucose consumption is a hallmark of cancer cells. The increased consumption and subsequent metabolism of glucose during proliferation creates the need for a constant supply of NAD, a co-factor in glycolysis. Regeneration of the NAD required to support enhanced glycolysis has been attributed to the terminal glycolytic enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). However, loss of glucose carbons to biosynthetic pathways early in glycolysis reduces the carbon supply to LDH. Thus, alternative routes for NAD regeneration must exist to support the increased glycolytic rate while allowing for the diversion of glucose to generate biomass and support proliferation. Here we demonstrate, using a variety of cancer cell lines as well as activated primary T cells, that cytosolic malate dehydrogenase 1 (MDH1) is an alternative to LDH as a supplier of NAD. Moreover, our results indicate that MDH1 generates malate with carbons derived from glutamine, thus enabling utilization of glucose carbons for glycolysis and for biomass. Amplification of MDH1 occurs at an impressive frequency in human tumors and correlates with poor prognosis. Together, our findings suggest proliferating cells rely on both MDH1 and LDH to replenish cytosolic NAD and therapies designed at targeting glycolysis must consider both dehydrogenases. PMID:28263970

  12. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Kristan, Katja; Deluca, Dominga; Adamski, Jerzy; Stojan, Jure; Rižner, Tea Lanišnik

    2005-01-01

    Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl) is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor. PMID:16359545

  13. Carbamazepine enhances the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gwanwoo; Huang, Yueming; Washington, Jacqueline M; Briggs, Nicole W; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate transporters (also called excitatory amino acid transporters, EAAT) participate in maintaining extracellular homeostasis of glutamate, a major excitatory neurotransmitter, and regulating glutamate neurotransmission. EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT, may also regulate gamma-aminobutyric acid-mediated inhibitory neurotransmission. Dysfunction of EAAT3 has been shown to induce seizure in rats. We hypothesize that carbamazepine, a commonly used antiepileptic agent, enhances EAAT3 activity. We tested this hypothesis using oocytes artificially expressing EAAT3 and C6 rat glioma cells expressing endogenous EAAT3. In oocytes, carbamazepine dose-dependently enhanced EAAT3 activity. The EC50 of this carbamazepine effect was 12.2muM. The concentrations of carbamazepine to significantly enhance EAAT3 activity were within the therapeutic serum levels (17-51muM) of carbamazepine for the antiepileptic effect. Carbamazepine decreased the Km but did not change the maximal response of EAAT3 to glutamate. Carbamazepine-increased EAAT3 activity was inhibited by wortmannin or LY-294002, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors, but was not affected by staurosporine, chelerythrine or calphostin C, protein kinase C inhibitors. In C6 cells, carbamazepine also enhanced the endogenous EAAT3 activity. However, carbamazepine did not affect the activity of EAAT4 expressed in Cos7 cells. These results suggest that carbamazepine at clinically relevant concentrations specifically enhances the affinity of EAAT3 for glutamate to increase EAAT3 activity via a PI3K-dependent pathway. EAAT3 may be a therapeutic target for carbamazepine in the central nervous system.

  14. Effects of glutamate receptor activation on NG2-glia in the rat optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Nicola; Hubbard, Paul S; Butt, Arthur M

    2009-01-01

    NG2-glia are a substantial population of cells in the central nervous system (CNS) that can be identified by their specific expression of the NG2 chondroitin sulphate (CSPG). NG2-glia can generate oligodendrocytes, but it is unlikely this is their only function; indeed, they may be multipotent neural stem cells. Moreover, NG2-glia are a highly reactive cell type and a major function is to help form the axon growth inhibitory glial scar in response to CNS injury. The factors that regulate these diverse behaviours of NG2-glia are not fully resolved, but NG2-glia express receptors to the neurotransmitter glutamate, which has known potent effects on other glia. Here, we have examined the actions of glutamate receptor activation on NG2-glia in the rat optic nerve, a typical CNS white matter tract that does not contain neuronal cell bodies. Glutamate induces an increase in [Ca2+]i in immuno-identified NG2-glia in situ and in vitro. In addition, we examined the effects of glutamate receptor activation in vivo by focal injection of the glutamate receptor agonist kainate into the optic nerve; saline was injected in controls. Changes in glial and axonal function were determined at 7 days post injection (dpi), by immunohistochemistry and electrophysiological measurement of the compound action potential (CAP). Injection of kainate resulted in a highly localized ‘injury response’ in NG2-glia, marked by dense labelling for NG2 at the lesion site, as compared to astrocytes, which displayed a more extensive reactive astrogliosis. Furthermore, injection of kainate resulted in an axonal conduction block. These glial and axonal changes were not observed following injection of saline vehicle. In addition, we provide evidence that endogenous glutamate induces calcium-dependent phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), which may provide a potential mechanism by which glutamate-mediated changes in raised intracellular calcium could regulate the observed

  15. Expression and activity of alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases in melanoma cells and in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Amann, Philipp M; Hofmann, Claudia; Freudenberger, Muriel; Holland-Cunz, Stefan; Eichmüller, Stefan B; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2012-03-01

    Disturbances in vitamin A metabolism are an important attribute of some cancer cells. Most evidence point that these disturbances lead to decreasing of the retinoic acid concentration in tumor cells. Up to now, in benign and malignant skin cells the features of vitamin A metabolism with its participating enzymes are not entirely understood. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are involved in the retinol metabolism, oxidizing retinol, and retinal in retinoic acid or reducing retinal in retinol. In this work we investigated the expression and enzymatic activity of alcohol and ALDH in melanoma cells compared to their benign counterparts. We demonstrated that melanoma cell lines and melanocytes despite similar pattern of the enzyme expression, show different general ALDH activity. Retinal, the substrate of ALDH, could stimulate the ALDH activity through up-regulation of retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase 6. Furthermore, we found that retinoids regulate alcohol dehydrogenase activity, probably via effects on alcohol dehydrogenase expression at the post-transcriptional level. We suggest that melanoma cells in contrast to melanocytes should favor the retinal reduction over its oxidation. The decreasing cellular amount of the precursor molecules of retinoic acid could result in a changed gene regulation in melanoma cells. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. INFLUENCE OF MODERATE TEMPERATURE ON GROWTH AND MALIC DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY OF A MARINE PSYCHROPHILE.

    PubMed

    MORITA, R Y; BURTON, S D

    1963-11-01

    Morita, Richard Y. (Oregon State University, Corvallis), and Sheril D. Burton. Influence of moderate temperature on growth and malic dehydrogenase activity of a marine psychrophile. J. Bacteriol. 86:1025-1029. 1963.-The maximal and optimal growth temperatures for a marine psychrophilic vibrio (PS 207) were determined to be 30 and 24.5 C, respectively. Malic dehydrogenase was found to be functioning in whole cells at about 1/20 of its observed maximum. Incubation of the cells, prior to or during the assay, at temperatures above the maximal growth temperature permitted the malic dehydrogenase to operate nearer its maximum, but this also inactivated the intracellular enzyme. The heating of whole cells gave an apparent effect of increasing malic dehydrogenase activity. Lysis of the cells permitted the enzyme to function at its full potential but rendered the enzyme more sensitive to heat denaturation. Lysis of the cells also caused the enzyme to lose approximately one-half of its malic dehydrogenase activity with each 10 C drop in temperature, whereas whole cells only lose approximately 1/5 of their enzyme activity at low temperatures with each 10 C drop.

  17. [Isolation PQQ biosynthesis gene cluster from Gluconobacter oxydans based on sorbose-dehydrogenase activity].

    PubMed

    Gao, Shuying; Xiong, Xionghua; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Weicai

    2010-08-01

    To isolate PQQ biosynthesis gene cluster from Gluconobacter oxydans H24 based on sorbose-dehydrogenase activity. A library of Gluconobacter oxydans H24 genomic DNA was constructed with host strains Escherichia coli JM109s, which was integrated of sdh gene at the ptsG site on the chromosome of JM109. By detecting sorbose-dehydrogenase activity, clone of PQQ biosynthesis was isolated and subcloned. A positive clone was isolated from Gluconobacter oxydans H24 genomic DNA library. Within the 5,400-base-pair DNA fragment five reading frames are presented, corresponding to five of the pqq genes (pqqABCDE). The nucleotide and amino acid sequence showed highly homology to pqq genes of other bacteria. The pqqABCDE gene cluster was successfully isolated from Gluconobacter oxydans H24 by sorbose dehydrogenase activity.

  18. Glucose metabolism and regulation of glycolysis in Lactococcus lactis strains with decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Garrigues, C; Goupil-Feuillerat, N; Cocaign-Bousquet, M; Renault, P; Lindley, N D; Loubiere, P

    2001-07-01

    The distribution of carbon flux at the pyruvate node was investigated in Lactococcus lactis under anaerobic conditions with mutant strains having decreased lactate dehydrogenase activity. Strains previously selected by random mutagenesis by H. Boumerdassi, C. Monnet, M. Desmazeaud, and G. Corrieu (Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63, 2293-2299, 1997) were found to have single punctual mutations in the ldh gene and presented a high degree of instability. The strain L. lactis JIM 5711 in which lactate dehydrogenase activity was diminished to less than 30% of the wild type maintained homolactic metabolism. This was due to an increase in the intracellular pyruvate concentration, which ensures the maintained flux through the lactate dehydrogenase. Pyruvate metabolism was linked to the flux limitation at the level of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as previously postulated for the parent strain (C. Garrigues, P. Loubière, N. D. Lindley, and M. Cocaign-Bousquet (1997) J. Bacteriol. 179, 5282-5287, 1997). However, a strain (L. lactis JIM 5954) in which the ldh gene was interrupted reoriented pyruvate metabolism toward mixed metabolism (production of formate, acetate, and ethanol), though the glycolytic flux was not strongly diminished. Only limited production of acetoin occurred despite significant overflow of pyruvate. Intracellular metabolite profiles indicated that the in vivo glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was no longer flux limiting in the Deltaldh strain. The shift toward mixed acid fermentation was correlated with the lower intracellular trioses phosphate concentration and diminished allosteric inhibition of pyruvate formate lyase. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Effects of zinc deficiency on ethanol metabolism and alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities.

    PubMed

    Das, I; Burch, R E; Hahn, H K

    1984-10-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase, low Km and high Km mitochondrial and microsomal aldehyde dehydrogenase, and in vivo ethanol elimination rates were determined in five groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats given liquid diets, as follows: control (C), control plus 5% ethanol (CE), pair-fed control and zinc-deficient (PC-ZnD), zinc-deficient (ZnD), and zinc-deficient plus 5% ethanol (ZnDE). Rats fed CE had decreased liver and serum zinc content. The animals given ZnD diets had an even more dramatic decrease in their tissue zinc concentrations and displayed marked growth retardation. The in vivo blood ethanol elimination rate was increased in animals fed ethanol, and this increase was accompanied by increased alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities. There was a significant decrease in the ethanol elimination rate in rats given ZnD and ZnDE diets. Alcohol dehydrogenase activities in rats with deficient zinc levels also were decreased, and there were no changes in acetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. Our results suggest that the metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde is impaired in zinc deficiency, but acetaldehyde to acetate conversion appears normal.

  20. Central GPR109A Activation Mediates Glutamate-Dependent Pressor Response in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rezq, Samar

    2016-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A) activation by its ligand nicotinic acid (NA) in immune cells increases Ca2+ levels, and Ca2+ induces glutamate release and oxidative stress in central blood pressure (BP)-regulating nuclei, for example, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), leading to sympathoexcitation. Despite NA’s ability to reach the brain, the expression and function of its receptor GPR109A in the RVLM remain unknown. We hypothesized that NA activation of RVLM GPR109A causes Ca2+-dependent l-glutamate release and subsequently increases neuronal oxidative stress, sympathetic activity, and BP. To test this hypothesis, we adopted a multilevel approach, which included pharmacologic in vivo studies along with ex vivo and in vitro molecular studies in rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) cells (which exhibit neuronal phenotype). We present the first evidence for GPR109A expression in the RVLM and in PC12 cells. Next, we showed that RVLM GPR109A activation (NA) caused pressor and bradycardic responses in conscious rats. The resemblance of these responses to those caused by intra-RVLM glutamate and their attenuation by NMDA receptor (NMDAR) blockade (2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid) and enhancement by l-glutamate uptake inhibition (l-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid, PDC) supported our hypothesis. NA increased Ca2+, glutamate, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in PC12 cells and increased RVLM ROS levels. The inactive NA analog isonicotinic acid failed to replicate the cardiovascular and biochemical effects of NA. Further, GPR109A knockdown (siRNA) abrogated the biochemical effects of NA in PC12 cells. These novel findings yield new insight into the role of RVLM GPR109A in central BP control. PMID:26621144

  1. Spike-independent release of ATP from Xenopus spinal neurons evoked by activation of glutamate receptors

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Paul; Dale, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    As the release of ATP from neurons has only been directly studied in a few cases, we have used patch sniffing to examine ATP release from Xenopus spinal neurons. ATP release was detected following intracellular current injection to evoke spikes. However, spiking was not essential as both glutamate and NMDA could evoke release of ATP in the presence of TTX. Neither acetylcholine nor high K+ was effective at inducing ATP release in the presence of TTX. Although Cd2+ blocked glutamate-evoked release of ATP suggesting a dependence on Ca2+ entry, neither ω-conotoxin-GVIA nor nifedipine prevented ATP release. N-type and L-type channels are thus not essential for glutamate-evoked ATP release. That glutamate receptors can elicit release in the absence of spiking suggests a close physical relationship between these receptors, the Ca2+ channels and release sites. As the dependence of ATP release on the influx of Ca2+ through Ca2+ channel subtypes differs from that of synaptic transmitter release, ATP may be released from sites that are distinct from those of the principal transmitter. In addition to its role as a fast transmitter, ATP may thus be released as a consequence of the activation of excitatory glutamatergic synapses and act to signal information about activity patterns in the nervous system. PMID:11986374

  2. Relationship of lactate dehydrogenase activity with body measeurements of Angus x Charolais cows and calves

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Angus x Charolais cows (n = 87) and their Angus-sired, spring-born calves (n = 86) were utilized to examine relationships between lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and body measurements of beef cows; and the relationship between maternal LDH activity in late gestation and subsequent calf birth we...

  3. Convergence of dopamine and glutamate signaling onto striatal ERK activation in response to drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Emma; Salery, Marine; Vanhoutte, Peter; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    Despite their distinct targets, all addictive drugs commonly abused by humans evoke increases in dopamine (DA) concentration within the striatum. The main DA Guanine nucleotide binding protein couple receptors (GPCRs) expressed by medium-sized spiny neurons of the striatum are the D1R and D2R, which are positively and negatively coupled to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, respectively. These two DA GPCRs are largely segregated into distinct neuronal populations, where they are co-expressed with glutamate receptors in dendritic spines. Direct and indirect interactions between DA GPCRs and glutamate receptors are the molecular basis by which DA modulates glutamate transmission and controls striatal plasticity and behavior induced by drugs of abuse. A major downstream target of striatal D1R is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase pathway. ERK activation by drugs of abuse behaves as a key integrator of D1R and glutamate NMDAR signaling. Once activated, ERK can trigger chromatin remodeling and induce gene expression that permits long-term cellular alterations and drug-induced morphological and behavioral changes. Besides the classical cAMP/PKA pathway, downstream of D1R, recent evidence implicates a cAMP-independent crosstalk mechanism by which the D1R potentiates NMDAR-mediated calcium influx and ERK activation. The mounting evidence of reciprocal modulation of DA and glutamate receptors adds further intricacy to striatal synaptic signaling and is liable to prove relevant for addictive drug-induced signaling, plasticity, and behavior. Herein, we review the evidence that built our understanding of the consequences of this synergistic signaling for the actions of drugs of abuse. PMID:24409148

  4. Gabapentin inhibits the activity of the rat excitatory glutamate transporter 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gil, Yang Sook; Kim, Jong Hak; Kim, Chi Hyo; Han, Jong In; Zuo, Zhiyi; Baik, Hee Jung

    2015-09-05

    Gabapentin, a derivative of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is used to treat epilepsy and neuropathic pain. The pharmacological mechanisms for gabapentin effects are not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of gabapentin on the activity of excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) that can regulate extracellular glutamate concentrations. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Membrane currents were recorded after application of l-glutamate in the presence or absence of different concentrations of gabapentin (1-300μM) by using a two-electrode voltage clamp. To determine the effect of gabapentin on Vmax and Km of EAAT3 for l-glutamate, l-glutamate at 3-300μM was used. To study the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) on gabapentin-induced changes in EAAT3 activity, oocytes were incubated with the PKC activator (Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA), the PKC inhibitors (chelerythrine or staurosporine), and the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Gabapentin decreased EAAT3 activity in a concentration-dependent manner and EAAT3 activity was significantly inhibited by 10-300μM gabapentin. Gabapentin significantly decreased Vmax without affecting Km. PMA increased EAAT3 activity; however, gabapentin attenuated the PMA-induced increase in EAAT3 activity. Pre-incubation of oocytes with chelerythrine, staurosporine, or wortmannin decreased basal EAAT3 activity, which was further reduced by gabapentin. We conclude that gabapentin decreases EAAT3 activity at clinically relevant and higher concentrations, in which PKC and PI3K may not be involved. The results suggest that EAAT3 might not be a target for the anticonvulsant action of gabapentin.

  5. Spatiotemporal Imaging of Glutamate-Induced Biophotonic Activities and Transmission in Neural Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Rendong; Dai, Jiapei

    2014-01-01

    The processing of neural information in neural circuits plays key roles in neural functions. Biophotons, also called ultra-weak photon emissions (UPE), may play potential roles in neural signal transmission, contributing to the understanding of the high functions of nervous system such as vision, learning and memory, cognition and consciousness. However, the experimental analysis of biophotonic activities (emissions) in neural circuits has been hampered due to technical limitations. Here by developing and optimizing an in vitro biophoton imaging method, we characterize the spatiotemporal biophotonic activities and transmission in mouse brain slices. We show that the long-lasting application of glutamate to coronal brain slices produces a gradual and significant increase of biophotonic activities and achieves the maximal effect within approximately 90 min, which then lasts for a relatively long time (>200 min). The initiation and/or maintenance of biophotonic activities by glutamate can be significantly blocked by oxygen and glucose deprivation, together with the application of a cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor (sodium azide), but only partly by an action potential inhibitor (TTX), an anesthetic (procaine), or the removal of intracellular and extracellular Ca2+. We also show that the detected biophotonic activities in the corpus callosum and thalamus in sagittal brain slices mostly originate from axons or axonal terminals of cortical projection neurons, and that the hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau leads to a significant decrease of biophotonic activities in these two areas. Furthermore, the application of glutamate in the hippocampal dentate gyrus results in increased biophotonic activities in its intrahippocampal projection areas. These results suggest that the glutamate-induced biophotonic activities reflect biophotonic transmission along the axons and in neural circuits, which may be a new mechanism for the processing of neural

  6. Spatiotemporal imaging of glutamate-induced biophotonic activities and transmission in neural circuits.

    PubMed

    Tang, Rendong; Dai, Jiapei

    2014-01-01

    The processing of neural information in neural circuits plays key roles in neural functions. Biophotons, also called ultra-weak photon emissions (UPE), may play potential roles in neural signal transmission, contributing to the understanding of the high functions of nervous system such as vision, learning and memory, cognition and consciousness. However, the experimental analysis of biophotonic activities (emissions) in neural circuits has been hampered due to technical limitations. Here by developing and optimizing an in vitro biophoton imaging method, we characterize the spatiotemporal biophotonic activities and transmission in mouse brain slices. We show that the long-lasting application of glutamate to coronal brain slices produces a gradual and significant increase of biophotonic activities and achieves the maximal effect within approximately 90 min, which then lasts for a relatively long time (>200 min). The initiation and/or maintenance of biophotonic activities by glutamate can be significantly blocked by oxygen and glucose deprivation, together with the application of a cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor (sodium azide), but only partly by an action potential inhibitor (TTX), an anesthetic (procaine), or the removal of intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+). We also show that the detected biophotonic activities in the corpus callosum and thalamus in sagittal brain slices mostly originate from axons or axonal terminals of cortical projection neurons, and that the hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau leads to a significant decrease of biophotonic activities in these two areas. Furthermore, the application of glutamate in the hippocampal dentate gyrus results in increased biophotonic activities in its intrahippocampal projection areas. These results suggest that the glutamate-induced biophotonic activities reflect biophotonic transmission along the axons and in neural circuits, which may be a new mechanism for the processing of neural

  7. Caffeine-induced inhibition of the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun-Jung; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Kim, Sang-Tae; Zuo, Zhiyi; Do, Sang-Hwan

    2013-02-27

    Caffeine has been known to trigger seizures, however, the precise mechanism about the proconvulsive effect of caffeine remains unclear. Glutamate transporters play an important role to maintain the homeostasis of glutamate concentration in the brain tissue. Especially, dysfunction of excitatory amino acid transporter type 3 (EAAT3) can lead to seizures. We investigated the effects of caffeine on the activity of EAAT3 and the involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Rat EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting EAAT3 mRNA. l-Glutamate (30μM)-induced inward currents were recorded via the two-electrode voltage clamp method. Caffeine decreased EAAT3 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Caffeine (30μM for 3min) significantly reduced V(max), but did not alter K(m) value of EAAT3 for glutamate. When preincubated oocytes with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator) were exposed to caffeine, PMA-induced increase in EAAT3 activity was abolished. Two PKC inhibitors (chelerythrine and staurosporine) significantly reduced basal EAAT3 activity. Whereas, there were no significant differences among the PKC inhibitors, caffeine, and PKC inhibitors+caffeine groups. In similarly fashion, wortmannin (a PI3K inhibitor) significantly decreased EAAT3 activity, however no statistical differences were observed among the wortmannin, caffeine, and wortmannin+caffeine groups. Our results demonstrate that caffeine attenuates EAAT3 activity and this reducing effect of caffeine seems to be mediated by PKC and PI3K.

  8. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M.; Park, Jin-Byung

    2016-01-01

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass. PMID:27681369

  9. Activation of the Glutamic Acid-Dependent Acid Resistance System in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Leads to Increase of the Fatty Acid Biotransformation Activity.

    PubMed

    Woo, Ji-Min; Kim, Ji-Won; Song, Ji-Won; Blank, Lars M; Park, Jin-Byung

    The biosynthesis of carboxylic acids including fatty acids from biomass is central in envisaged biorefinery concepts. The productivities are often, however, low due to product toxicity that hamper whole-cell biocatalyst performance. Here, we have investigated factors that influence the tolerance of Escherichia coli to medium chain carboxylic acid (i.e., n-heptanoic acid)-induced stress. The metabolic and genomic responses of E. coli BL21(DE3) and MG1655 grown in the presence of n-heptanoic acid indicated that the GadA/B-based glutamic acid-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system might be critical for cellular tolerance. The GDAR system, which is responsible for scavenging intracellular protons by catalyzing decarboxylation of glutamic acid, was inactive in E. coli BL21(DE3). Activation of the GDAR system in this strain by overexpressing the rcsB and dsrA genes, of which the gene products are involved in the activation of GadE and RpoS, respectively, resulted in acid tolerance not only to HCl but also to n-heptanoic acid. Furthermore, activation of the GDAR system allowed the recombinant E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing the alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus and the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida to reach 60% greater product concentration in the biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (i.e., 12-hydroxyoctadec-9-enoic acid (1)) into n-heptanoic acid (5) and 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (4). This study may contribute to engineering E. coli-based biocatalysts for the production of carboxylic acids from renewable biomass.

  10. High-level exogenous glutamic acid-independent production of poly-(γ-glutamic acid) with organic acid addition in a new isolated Bacillus subtilis C10.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huili; Zhu, Jianzhong; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Cai, Jin; Zhang, Anyi; Hong, Yizhi; Huang, Jin; Huang, Lei; Xu, Zhinan

    2012-07-01

    A new exogenous glutamic acid-independent γ-PGA producing strain was isolated and characterized as Bacillus subtilis C10. The factors influencing the endogenous glutamic acid supply and the biosynthesis of γ-PGA in this strain were investigated. The results indicated that citric acid and oxalic acid showed the significant capability to support the overproduction of γ-PGA. This stimulated increase of γ-PGA biosynthesis by citric acid or oxalic acid was further proved in the 10 L fermentor. To understand the possible mechanism contributing to the improved γ-PGA production, the activities of four key intracellular enzymes were measured, and the possible carbon fluxes were proposed. The result indicated that the enhanced level of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity caused by oxalic acid was important for glutamic acid synthesized de novo from glucose. Moreover, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were the positive regulators of glutamic acid biosynthesis, while 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC) was the negative one. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Lipid peroxidation processes and activity of brain succinate dehydrogenase in experimental craniocerebral trauma].

    PubMed

    Demchuk, M L; Medvedev, A E; Promyslov, M Sh; Gorkin, V Z

    1993-01-01

    A statistically significant decrease in the activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) was found in the rabbit brain after craniocerebral injury. The decrease in the activity of brain SDH was not shown to result from "competitive inhibition" by malonate accumulated after activation of lipid peroxidation. The activity of brain SDH was normalized by directed modification of the function of the central nervous system via administration of phenamine (amphetamine) into the injured animals.

  12. Small-molecule activator of glutamate transporter EAAT2 translation provides neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qiongman; Chang, Ling-Chu; Takahashi, Kou; Liu, Qibing; Schulte, Delanie A; Lai, Liching; Ibabao, Brian; Lin, Yuchen; Stouffer, Nathan; Das Mukhopadhyay, Chitra; Xing, Xuechao; Seyb, Kathleen I; Cuny, Gregory D; Glicksman, Marcie A; Lin, Chien-Liang Glenn

    2014-03-01

    Glial glutamate transporter EAAT2 plays a major role in glutamate clearance in synaptic clefts. Several lines of evidence indicate that strategies designed to increase EAAT2 expression have potential for preventing excitotoxicity, which contributes to neuronal injury and death in neurodegenerative diseases. We previously discovered several classes of compounds that can increase EAAT2 expression through translational activation. Here, we present efficacy studies of the compound LDN/OSU-0212320, which is a pyridazine derivative from one of our lead series. In a murine model, LDN/OSU-0212320 had good potency, adequate pharmacokinetic properties, no observed toxicity at the doses examined, and low side effect/toxicity potential. Additionally, LDN/OSU-0212320 protected cultured neurons from glutamate-mediated excitotoxic injury and death via EAAT2 activation. Importantly, LDN/OSU-0212320 markedly delayed motor function decline and extended lifespan in an animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We also found that LDN/OSU-0212320 substantially reduced mortality, neuronal death, and spontaneous recurrent seizures in a pilocarpine-induced temporal lobe epilepsy model. Moreover, our study demonstrated that LDN/OSU-0212320 treatment results in activation of PKC and subsequent Y-box-binding protein 1 (YB-1) activation, which regulates activation of EAAT2 translation. Our data indicate that the use of small molecules to enhance EAAT2 translation may be a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Origins of the High Catalytic Activity of Human Alcohol Dehydrogenase 4 Studied with Horse Liver A317C Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Plapp, Bryce V.

    2011-01-01

    The turnover numbers and other kinetic constants for human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) 4 (“stomach” isoenzyme) are substantially larger (10–100-fold) than those for human class I and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenases. Comparison of the primary amino acid sequences (69% identity) and tertiary structures of these enzymes led to the suggestion that residue 317, which makes a hydrogen bond with the nicotinamide amide nitrogen of the coenzyme, may account for these differences. Ala-317 in the class I enzymes is substituted with Cys in human ADH4, and locally different conformations of the peptide backbones could affect coenzyme binding. This hypothesis was tested by making the A317C substitution in horse liver ADH1E and comparisons to the wild-type ADH1E. The steady-state kinetic constants for the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and the reduction of benzaldehyde catalyzed by the A317C enzyme were very similar (up to about 2-fold differences) to those for the wild-type enzyme. Transient kinetics showed that the rate constants for binding of NAD+ and NADH were also similar. Transient reaction data were fitted to the full ordered bi bi mechanism and showed that the rate constants for hydride transfer decreased by about 2.8-fold with the A317C substitution. The structure of A317C ADH1E complexed with NAD+ and 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl alcohol at 1.2 Ǻ resolution is essentially identical to the structure of the wild-type enzyme, except near residue 317 where the additional sulfhydryl group displaces a water molecule that is present in the wild-type enzyme. ADH is adaptable and can tolerate internal substitutions, but the protein dynamics apparently are affected, as reflected in rates of hydride transfer. The A317C substitution is not solely responsible for the larger kinetic constants in human ADH4; thus, the differences in catalytic activity must arise from one or more of the other hundred substitutions in the enzyme. PMID:21184752

  14. INT-dehydrogenase activity test for assessing anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Hongwei, Yang; Zhanpeng, Jiang; Shaoqi, Shi; Tang, W Z

    2002-11-01

    This study assessed anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds from microorganism activity. Dehydrogenase activity can be a good parameter characterizing the microorganism activity. A modified method of 2-(p-iodophenyl-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-pheny tetrazolium chloride-dehydrogenase activity determination was proposed in anaerobic biodegradability assessment. Cubic spline curves were adopted to link the data points. This curve was integrated twice to calculate areas. The microorganism activity index in anaerobic biodegradability assessment was calculated by standardizing the integral. According to the results of the activity index, 14 kinds of organic compounds were classified into readily, partially, and poorly biodegradable under anaerobic conditions, respectively. As a result, some conclusions for anaerobic biodegradability of organic compounds were reached, based on the activity index value.

  15. Activation of NOX2 by the stimulation of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors contributes to glutamate neurotoxicity in vivo through the production of reactive oxygen species and calpain activation.

    PubMed

    Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Estrada-Sánchez, Ana María; Montiel, Teresa; Páramo, Blanca; Massieu, Lourdes; Morán, Julio

    2011-11-01

    Prolonged activation of glutamate receptors leads to excitotoxicity. Several processes such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and activation of the calcium-dependent protease, calpain, contribute to glutamate-induced damage. It has been suggested that the ROS-producing enzyme, NADPH oxidase (NOX), plays a role in excitotoxicity. Studies have reported NOX activation after NMDA receptor stimulation during excitotoxic damage, but the role of non-NMDA and metabotropic receptors is unknown. We evaluated the roles of different glutamate receptor subtypes on NOX activation and neuronal death induced by the intrastriatal administration of glutamate in mice. In wild-type mice, NOX2 immunoreactivity in neurons and microglia was stimulated by glutamate administration, and it progressively increased as microglia became activated; calpain activity was also induced. By contrast, mice lacking NOX2 were less vulnerable to excitotoxicity, and there was reduced ROS production and protein nitrosylation, microglial reactivity, and calpain activation. These results suggest that NOX2 is stimulated by glutamate in neurons and reactive microglia through the activation of ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Neuronal damage involves ROS production by NOX2, which, in turn, contributes to calpain activation.

  16. The action of progesterone and diethylstilboestrol on the dehydrogenase and esterase activities of a purified aldehyde dehydrogenase from rabbit liver.

    PubMed Central

    Julian, R; Duncan, S

    1977-01-01

    A steroid-sensitive aldehyde dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.3) was purified from rabbit liver and is homogeneous by the criterion of electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels with or without sodium dodecyl sulphate. The enzyme is tetrameric, of subunit mo.wt. 48 300, and contains no tightly bound zinc. The fluorescence of the protein is decreased in the presence of progesterone, which is inhibitory to the reactions catalysed by the enzyme. When NADH is bound to the enzyme, the fluorescence of the coenzyme is augmented to an extent independent of the presence of steroids or acetaldehyde. The purified enzyme catalyses the oxidation of acetaldehyde and glucuronolactone, and the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl acetate. Each of these reactions is inhibited by progesterone in such a manner as to suggest the formation of a catalytically active enzyme-hormone complex. Diethylstilboestrol inhibits the hydrolysis of esters by this enzyme, but stimulates the oxidation of aldehydes, except at low aldehyde concentrations; the ligand is then inhibitory. NADH inhibits the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenyl acetate by the enzyme in a partially competitive fashion. PMID:192192

  17. ACTIVITY AND ISOZYME CONTENT OF LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE UNDER LONG-TERM ORAL TAURINE ADMINISTRATION TO RATS.

    PubMed

    Ostapiv, R D; Humenyuk, S L; Manko, V V

    2015-01-01

    The effect of long-term oral taurine administration to rats on activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), its isozyme content and activity in the whole blood, liver, thigh muscle, brain and testes tissues were studied in the present work. For this purpose male Wistar rats with body weight 190-220 g were randomly divided into three groups, they were orally administered drinking water (control group) or taurine solution 40 and 100 mg per kg of body weight ( groups I and II, respectively). The total lactate dehydrogenase activity was measured spectrophotometrically, the percentage content of isozymes was determined by electrophoresis in 7.5% poliacrylamide gel withfurther staining according to J. Garbus. It was found that the total lactate dehydrogenase activity increased in all studied tissues. In testes of animals of both groups and in brain of group I animals, the total percentage contents of isozymes that are responsible for lactate production (LDH4+LDH5) increased. In liver of animals of both groups and in whole blood of group II animals, the total percentage content of isozymes that produce pyruvate (LDH1+LDH2) increased. In thigh muscle of both groups and in brain of group II animals the balance between LDH1+LDH2 and LDH4+LDH5 content did not differ from control values, though total lactate dehydrogenase activity was significantly higher, than that in the control group. Thus, the increase in the lactate dehydrogenase activity under long-term oral taurine administration in different rat tissues was found to be tissue- and dose-dependent and was caused by the increase in the content of different isozymes. Such increase in group I animals might be explained by adaptive mechanisms to hypoxia caused by high doses of taurine. For group II animals high doses of taurine were toxic and directly affected metabolic processes in the animal bodies.

  18. Nanomolar vitamin E alpha-tocotrienol inhibits glutamate-induced activation of phospholipase A2 and causes neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Savita; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Kotha, Sainath R; Roy, Sashwati; Rink, Cameron; Bibus, Douglas; Sen, Chandan K

    2010-03-01

    Our previous works have elucidated that the 12-lipoxygenase pathway is directly implicated in glutamate-induced neural cell death, and that such that toxicity is prevented by nM concentrations of the natural vitamin E alpha-tocotrienol (TCT). In the current study we tested the hypothesis that phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) activity is sensitive to glutamate and mobilizes arachidonic acid (AA), a substrate for 12-lipoxygenase. Furthermore, we examined whether TCT regulates glutamate-inducible PLA(2) activity in neural cells. Glutamate challenge induced the release of [(3)H]AA from HT4 neural cells. Such response was attenuated by calcium chelators (EGTA and BAPTA), cytosolic PLA(2) (cPLA(2))-specific inhibitor (AACOCF(3)) as well as TCT at 250 nM. Glutamate also caused the elevation of free polyunsaturated fatty acid (AA and docosahexaenoic acid) levels and disappearance of phospholipid-esterified AA in neural cells. Furthermore, glutamate induced a time-dependent translocation and enhanced serine phosphorylation of cPLA(2) in the cells. These effects of glutamate on fatty acid levels and on cPLA(2) were significantly attenuated by nM TCT. The observations that AACOCF(3), transient knock-down of cPLA(2) as well as TCT significantly protected against the glutamate-induced death of neural cells implicate cPLA(2) as a TCT-sensitive mediator of glutamate induced neural cell death. This work presents first evidence recognizing glutamate-induced changes in cPLA(2) as a novel mechanism responsible for neuroprotection observed in response to nanomolar concentrations of TCT.

  19. Evidence for glutamate-mediated activation of hippocampal neurons by glial calcium waves.

    PubMed

    Hassinger, T D; Atkinson, P B; Strecker, G J; Whalen, L R; Dudek, F E; Kossel, A H; Kater, S B

    1995-10-01

    Communication from astrocytes to neurons has recently been reported by two laboratories, but different mechanisms were though to underlie glial calcium wave activation of associated neurons. Neuronal calcium elevation by glia observed in the present report is similar to that reported previously, where an increase in neuronal calcium was demonstrated in response to glial stimulation. In the present study hippocampal neurons plated on a confluent glial monolayer displayed a transient increase in intracellular calcium following a short delay after the passage of a wave of increased calcium in underlying glia. Activated cells displayed action potentials in response to glial waves and showed antineurofilament immunoreactivity. Finally, the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid and the non-NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione significantly reduced the responsiveness of neurons to glial calcium waves. Our results indicate that hippocampal neurons growing on hippocampal or cortical astrocytes respond to glial calcium waves with elevations in calcium and increased electrical activity. Furthermore, we show that in most cases this communication appears to be mediated by ionotropic glutamate receptor channels.

  20. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of glutamic acid-based dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Silveira-Dorta, Gastón; Martín, Víctor S; Padrón, José M

    2015-08-01

    A small and focused library of 22 dipeptides derived from N,N-dibenzylglutamic acid α- and γ-benzyl esters was prepared in a straightforward manner. The evaluation of the antiproliferative activity in the human solid tumor cell lines HBL-100 (breast), HeLa (cervix), SW1573 (non-small cell lung), T-47D (breast), and WiDr (colon) provided γ-glutamyl methionine (GI50 = 6.0-41 μM) and α-glutamyl proline (GI50 = 7.5-18 μM) as lead compounds. In particular, glutamyl serine and glutamyl proline dipeptides were more active in the resistant cancer cell line WiDr than the conventional anticancer drugs cisplatin and etoposide. Glutamyl tryptophan dipeptides did not affect cell growth of HBL-100, while in T-47D cells, proliferation was inhibited. This result might be attributed to the inhibition of the ATB(0,+) transporter.

  1. Corticothalamic Activation Modulates Thalamic Firing Through Glutamate "Metabotropic" Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, David A.; von Krosigk, Marcus

    1992-04-01

    The mammalian thalamus forms an obligatory relay for nearly all sensory information that reaches the cerebral cortex. The transmission of sensory information by the thalamus varies in a state-dependent manner, such that during slow wave sleep or drowsiness thalamic responsiveness is markedly reduced, whereas during the waking, attentive state transmission is enhanced. Although activation of brainstem inputs to thalamic neurons has long been assumed to underlie this gating of sensory transfer through the thalamus, numerically the largest input to thalamic relay neurons derives from layer VI cells of the cerebral cortex. Here we report that activation of corticothalamic fibers causes a prolonged excitatory postsynaptic potential in guinea pig dorsal lateral geniculate relay neurons resulting from the reduction of a potassium conductance, consistent with the activation of glutamatergic "metabotropic" receptors. This slow depolarization can switch firing of thalamic neurons from the burst firing mode, which is prevalent during slow wave sleep, to the single spike mode, which is prevalent during waking, thereby facilitating transmission of sensory information through the thalamus. This prolonged enhancement of thalamic transfer may allow the cerebral cortex to gate or control selective fields of sensory inputs in a manner that facilitates arousal, attention, and cognition.

  2. Modulation of pineal melatonin synthesis by glutamate involves paracrine interactions between pinealocytes and astrocytes through NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Villela, Darine; Atherino, Victoria Fairbanks; Lima, Larissa de Sá; Moutinho, Anderson Augusto; do Amaral, Fernanda Gaspar; Peres, Rafael; Martins de Lima, Thais; Torrão, Andréa da Silva; Cipolla-Neto, José; Scavone, Cristóforo; Afeche, Solange Castro

    2013-01-01

    The glutamatergic modulation of melatonin synthesis is well known, along with the importance of astrocytes in mediating glutamatergic signaling in the central nervous system. Pinealocytes and astrocytes are the main cell types in the pineal gland. The objective of this work was to investigate the interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes as a part of the glutamate inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis. Rat pinealocytes isolated or in coculture with astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence of norepinephrine, and the melatonin content, was quantified. The expression of glutamate receptors, the intracellular calcium content and the NF- κ B activation were analyzed in astrocytes and pinealocytes. TNF- α 's possible mediation of the effect of glutamate was also investigated. The results showed that glutamate's inhibitory effect on melatonin synthesis involves interactions between astrocytes and pinealocytes, possibly through the release of TNF- α . Moreover, the activation of the astrocytic NF- κ B seems to be a necessary step. In astrocytes and pinealocytes, AMPA, NMDA, and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors were observed, as well as the intracellular calcium elevation. In conclusion, there is evidence that the modulation of melatonin synthesis by glutamate involves paracrine interactions between pinealocytes and astrocytes through the activation of the astrocytic NF- κ B transcription factor and possibly by subsequent TNF- α release.

  3. The Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor mGlu7 Activates Phospholipase C, Translocates Munc-13-1 Protein, and Potentiates Glutamate Release at Cerebrocortical Nerve Terminals*

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Ricardo; Durroux, Thierry; Ciruela, Francisco; Torres, Magdalena; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2010-01-01

    At synaptic boutons, metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGlu7 receptor) serves as an autoreceptor, inhibiting glutamate release. In this response, mGlu7 receptor triggers pertussis toxin-sensitive G protein activation, reducing presynaptic Ca2+ influx and the subsequent depolarization evoked release. Here we report that receptor coupling to signaling pathways that potentiate release can be seen following prolonged exposure of nerve terminals to the agonist l-(+)-phosphonobutyrate, l-AP4. This novel mGlu7 receptor response involves an increase in the release induced by the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin, suggesting a mechanism that is independent of Ca2+ channel activity, but dependent on the downstream exocytotic release machinery. The mGlu7 receptor-mediated potentiation resists exposure to pertussis toxin, but is dependent on phospholipase C, and increased phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate hydrolysis. Furthermore, the potentiation of release does not depend on protein kinase C, although it is blocked by the diacylglycerol-binding site antagonist calphostin C. We also found that activation of mGlu7 receptors translocate the active zone protein essential for synaptic vesicle priming, munc13-1, from soluble to particulate fractions. We propose that the mGlu7 receptor can facilitate or inhibit glutamate release through multiple pathways, thereby exerting homeostatic control of presynaptic function. PMID:20375012

  4. Glutamate protects against Ca(2+) paradox-induced injury and inhibits calpain activity in isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Ying; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lai, Dong; Jin, Zhen-Xiao; Gu, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Jing-Jun

    2016-10-01

    This study determined the effects of glutamate on the Ca(2+) paradoxical heart, which is a model for Ca(2+) overload-induced injury during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion, and evaluated its effect on a known mediator of injury, calpain. An isolated rat heart was retrogradely perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. Ca(2+) paradox was elicited via perfusion with a Ca(2+) -free Krebs-Henseleit (KH) solution for 3 minutes followed by Ca(2+) -containing normal KH solution for 30 minutes. The Ca(2+) paradoxical heart exhibited almost no viable tissue on triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and markedly increased LDH release, caspase-3 activity, cytosolic cytochrome c content, and apoptotic index. These hearts also displayed significantly increased LVEDP and a disappearance of LVDP. Glutamate (5 and 20 mmol/L) significantly alleviated Ca(2+) paradox-induced injury. In contrast, 20 mmol/L mannitol had no effect on Ca(2+) paradox. Ca(2+) paradox significantly increased the extent of the translocation of μ-calpain to the sarcolemmal membrane and the proteolysis of α-fodrin, which suggests calpain activation. Glutamate also blocked these effects. A non-selective inhibitor of glutamate transporters, dl-TBOA (10 μmol/L), had no effect on control hearts, but it reversed glutamate-induced cardioprotection and reduction in calpain activity. Glutamate treatment significantly increased intracellular glutamate content in the Ca(2+) paradoxical heart, which was also blocked by dl-TBOA. We conclude that glutamate protects the heart against Ca(2+) overload-induced injury via glutamate transporters, and the inhibition of calpain activity is involved in this process. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Genetically Epilepsy-Prone Rats Have Increased Brain Regional Activity of an Enzyme Which Liberates Glutamate from N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    genetically epilepsy -prone iats "was 11-26% greater than control in brain regions, including the amygdala, hippocarrpus and cerebellum, as well as the...9 -0 3 Genetically epilepsy -prone rats have increased brain regional activity of an enzyme which liberates glutamate from N-acetyl-aspartyl...in genctically epilepsy -prone rats was 11-~261; greater than control in brain regions. including the amygdala. hippocampus and cerebellum, as well as

  6. Depression of alcohol dehydrogenase activity in rat hepatocyte culture by dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Mezey, E; Potter, J J; Diehl, A M

    1986-01-15

    Hepatocytes harvested from castrated rats retained a higher alcohol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.1) activity than hepatocytes harvested from normal rats during 7 days of culture. Dihydrotestosterone (1 microM) decreased the enzyme activity, after 2 and 5 days of culture, in hepatocytes from castrated and control animals respectively. Dihydrotestosterone decreased the enzyme activity to similar values in both groups of hepatocytes by the end of 7 days of culture. Testosterone (1 microM) had no effect on the enzyme activity in normal hepatocytes and only a transitory effect in decreasing the enzyme activity in hepatocytes from castrated animals. The increases in alcohol dehydrogenase activity after castration and their suppression by dihydrotestosterone were associated with parallel changes in the rate of ethanol elimination. Additions of substrates of the malate-aspartate shuttle or dinitrophenol did not modify ethanol elimination. These observations indicate that dihydrotestosterone has a direct suppressant effect on hepatocyte alcohol dehydrogenase and that the enzyme activity is a major determinant of the rate of ethanol elimination.

  7. Nicotinamide Cofactors Suppress Active-Site Labeling of Aldehyde Dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Stiti, Naim; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Strubl, Laura; Mohammed, Shabaz; Bartels, Dorothea; van der Hoorn, Renier A L

    2016-06-17

    Active site labeling by (re)activity-based probes is a powerful chemical proteomic tool to globally map active sites in native proteomes without using substrates. Active site labeling is usually taken as a readout for the active state of the enzyme because labeling reflects the availability and reactivity of active sites, which are hallmarks for enzyme activities. Here, we show that this relationship holds tightly, but we also reveal an important exception to this rule. Labeling of Arabidopsis ALDH3H1 with a chloroacetamide probe occurs at the catalytic Cys, and labeling is suppressed upon nitrosylation and oxidation, and upon treatment with other Cys modifiers. These experiments display a consistent and strong correlation between active site labeling and enzymatic activity. Surprisingly, however, labeling is suppressed by the cofactor NAD(+), and this property is shared with other members of the ALDH superfamily and also detected for unrelated GAPDH enzymes with an unrelated hydantoin-based probe in crude extracts of plant cell cultures. Suppression requires cofactor binding to its binding pocket. Labeling is also suppressed by ALDH modulators that bind at the substrate entrance tunnel, confirming that labeling occurs through the substrate-binding cavity. Our data indicate that cofactor binding adjusts the catalytic Cys into a conformation that reduces the reactivity toward chloroacetamide probes.

  8. Glutamate transporter type 3 attenuates the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhiyi; Fang, Hongyu

    2005-06-01

    We studied the regulation of N-methy-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) current/activation by glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3), a neuronal EAAT in vivo, in the restricted extracellular space of a biological model. This model involved co-expressing EAAT3 and NMDAR (composed of NMDAR1-1a and NMDAR2A) in Xenopus oocytes. The NMDAR current was reduced in the co-expression oocytes but not in oocytes expressing NMDAR only when the flow of glutamate-containing superfusate was stopped. The degree of this current reduction was glutamate concentration-dependent. No reduction of NMDAR current was observed in Na+-free solution or when NMDA, a non-substrate for EAATs, was used as the agonist for NMDAR. In the continuous flow experiments, the dose-response curve of glutamate-induced current was shifted to the right-hand side in co-expression oocytes compared with oocytes expressing NMDAR alone. The degree of this shift depended on the abundance of EAAT3 in the co-expression oocytes. Thus, the glutamate concentrations sensed by NMDAR locally were lower than those in the superfusates. These results suggest that EAAT3 regulates the amplitude of NMDAR currents at pre-saturated concentrations of glutamate to EAAT3. Thus, EAATs, by rapidly regulating glutamate concentrations near NMDAR, modulate NMDAR current/activation.

  9. Geldanamycin Prevents Hemorrhage-Induced ATP Loss by Overexpressing Inducible HSP70 and Activating Pyruvate Dehydrogenase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-24

    levels were determined using the ATP Bioluminescence Assay Kit HS II (Roche; Mannheim, Germany). Luminescence was measured with a TD-20/20...Geldanamycin prevents hemorrhage-induced ATP loss by overexpressing inducible HSP70 and activating pyruvate dehydrogenase Juliann G. Kiang,1,2,3...Geldanamycin prevents hemorrhage-induced ATP loss by overexpressing inducible HSP70 and activating pyruvate dehy- drogenase. Am J Physiol Gastrointest

  10. Disrupting Glutamate Co-transmission Does Not Affect Acquisition of Conditioned Behavior Reinforced by Dopamine Neuron Activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong V; Viereckel, Thomas; Zell, Vivien; Konradsson-Geuken, Åsa; Broker, Carl J; Talishinsky, Aleksandr; Yoo, Ji Hoon; Galinato, Melissa H; Arvidsson, Emma; Kesner, Andrew J; Hnasko, Thomas S; Wallén-Mackenzie, Åsa; Ikemoto, Satoshi

    2017-03-14

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) were previously found to express vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) and to co-transmit glutamate in the ventral striatum (VStr). This capacity may play an important role in reinforcement learning. Although it is known that activation of the VTA-VStr dopamine system readily reinforces behavior, little is known about the role of glutamate co-transmission in such reinforcement. By combining electrode recording and optogenetics, we found that stimulation of VTA dopamine neurons in vivo evoked fast excitatory responses in many VStr neurons of adult mice. Whereas conditional knockout of the gene encoding VGLUT2 in dopamine neurons largely eliminated fast excitatory responses, it had little effect on the acquisition of conditioned responses reinforced by dopamine neuron activation. Therefore, glutamate co-transmission appears dispensable for acquisition of conditioned responding reinforced by DA neuron activation.

  11. Oligomers of Amyloid β Prevent Physiological Activation of the Cellular Prion Protein-Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Complex by Glutamate in Alzheimer Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Laura T.

    2016-01-01

    The dysfunction and loss of synapses in Alzheimer disease are central to dementia symptoms. We have recently demonstrated that pathological Amyloid β oligomer (Aβo) regulates the association between intracellular protein mediators and the synaptic receptor complex composed of cellular prion protein (PrPC) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Here we sought to determine whether Aβo alters the physiological signaling of the PrPC-mGluR5 complex upon glutamate activation. We provide evidence that acute exposure to Aβo as well as chronic expression of familial Alzheimer disease mutant transgenes in model mice prevents protein-protein interaction changes of the complex induced by the glutamate analog 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine. We further show that 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine triggers the phosphorylation and activation of protein-tyrosine kinase 2-β (PTK2B, also referred to as Pyk2) and of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in wild-type brain slices but not in Alzheimer disease transgenic brain slices or wild-type slices incubated with Aβo. This study further distinguishes two separate Aβo-dependent signaling cascades, one dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and Fyn kinase activation and the other dependent on the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Thus, Aβo triggers multiple distinct PrPC-mGluR5-dependent events implicated in neurodegeneration and dementia. We propose that targeting the PrPC-mGluR5 complex will reverse aberrant Aβo-triggered states of the complex to allow physiological fluctuations of glutamate signaling. PMID:27325698

  12. Oligomers of Amyloid β Prevent Physiological Activation of the Cellular Prion Protein-Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Complex by Glutamate in Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Haas, Laura T; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2016-08-12

    The dysfunction and loss of synapses in Alzheimer disease are central to dementia symptoms. We have recently demonstrated that pathological Amyloid β oligomer (Aβo) regulates the association between intracellular protein mediators and the synaptic receptor complex composed of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Here we sought to determine whether Aβo alters the physiological signaling of the PrP(C)-mGluR5 complex upon glutamate activation. We provide evidence that acute exposure to Aβo as well as chronic expression of familial Alzheimer disease mutant transgenes in model mice prevents protein-protein interaction changes of the complex induced by the glutamate analog 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine. We further show that 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine triggers the phosphorylation and activation of protein-tyrosine kinase 2-β (PTK2B, also referred to as Pyk2) and of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in wild-type brain slices but not in Alzheimer disease transgenic brain slices or wild-type slices incubated with Aβo. This study further distinguishes two separate Aβo-dependent signaling cascades, one dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) and Fyn kinase activation and the other dependent on the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores. Thus, Aβo triggers multiple distinct PrP(C)-mGluR5-dependent events implicated in neurodegeneration and dementia. We propose that targeting the PrP(C)-mGluR5 complex will reverse aberrant Aβo-triggered states of the complex to allow physiological fluctuations of glutamate signaling.

  13. Rapid phosphorylation of histone H2A.X following ionotropic glutamate receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Samantha L; Movsesyan, Vilen A; Jorgensen, Timothy J; Kondratyev, Alexei

    2006-05-01

    Excessive activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors increases oxidative stress, contributing to the neuronal death observed following neurological insults such as ischemia and seizures. Post-translational histone modifications may be key mediators in the detection and repair of damage resulting from oxidative stress, including DNA damage, and may thus affect neuronal survival in the aftermath of insults characterized by excessive glutamate release. In non-neuronal cells, phosphorylation of histone variant H2A.X (termed gamma-H2AX) occurs rapidly following DNA double-strand breaks. We investigated gamma-H2AX formation in rat cortical neurons (days in vitro 14) following activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate glutamate receptors using fluorescent immunohistochemical techniques. Moreover, we evaluated the co-localization of gamma-H2AX 'foci' with Mre11, a double-strand break repair protein, to provide further evidence for the activation of this DNA damage response pathway. Here we show that minimally cytotoxic stimulation of ionotropic glutamate receptors was sufficient to evoke gamma-H2AX in neurons, and that NMDA-induced gamma-H2AX foci formation was attenuated by pretreatment with the antioxidant, Vitamin E, and the intracellular calcium chelator, BAPTA-AM. Moreover, a subset of gamma-H2AX foci co-localized with Mre11, indicating that at least a portion of gamma-H2AX foci is damage dependent. The extent of gamma-H2AX induction following glutamate receptor activation corresponded to the increases we observed following conventional DNA damaging agents [i.e. non-lethal doses of gamma-radiation (1 Gy) and hydrogen peroxide (10 microm)]. These data suggest that insults not necessarily resulting in neuronal death induce the DNA damage-evoked chromatin modification, gamma-H2AX, and implicate a role for histone alterations in determining neuronal vulnerability following neurological insults.

  14. Multichannel Simultaneous Determination of Activities of Lactate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lianjia

    2000-09-12

    It is very important to find the best conditions for some enzymes to do the best catalysis in current pharmaceutical industries. Based on the results above, we could say that this set-up could be widely used in finding the optimal condition for best enzyme activity of a certain enzyme. Instead of looking for the best condition for enzyme activity by doing many similar reactions repeatedly, we can complete this assignment with just one run if we could apply enough conditions.

  15. Enhancement of the activity of enzyme immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles by rational orientation of formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Ni, Kefeng; Zhao, Chengcheng; Ren, Yuhong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-10-20

    Immobilization of enzymes onto nanoparticles and retention of their structure and activity, which may be related to the orientation of enzymes on nanoparticles, remain a challenge. Here, we developed a novel enzyme-orientation strategy to enhance the activity of formate dehydrogenase immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles via site-directed mutation. Seven mutants were constructed based on homology modeling of formate dehydrogenase and immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles to investigate the influence of these mutations on immobilization. The immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C demonstrated the highest immobilization yield and retained 90% of its initial activity, which was about 3-fold higher than that of wild-type formate dehydrogenase. Moreover, co-immobilization of formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase was performed for the synthesis of l-tert-leucine. The catalytic efficiency of the co-immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C and leucine dehydrogenase increased by more than 4-fold compared to that of co-immobilized wild-type formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrafine carbon black induces glutamate and ATP release by activating connexin and pannexin hemichannels in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongying; Deng, Furong; Chen, Yiyong; Qin, Yu; Hao, Yu; Guo, Xinbiao

    2014-09-02

    Ultrafine particles could enter central nervous system and were associated with brain damage. The underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Glutamate and ATP are important signaling molecules in brain physiology and pathology. We investigated whether ultrafine carbon black (ufCB) could regulate the release of glutamate and ATP from cultured cortical astrocytes and the involvement of hemichannels in the release mechanism. Our results showed that ufCB dose-dependently increased glutamate and ATP release and activated hemichannels in astrocytes. ufCB-activated hemichannels were attributed to the activation of both connexin 43 (Cx43) and pannexin1 (Panx1) hemichannels, which was based on the finding of increased protein expression and distribution on cell surface of Cx43 and Panx1, and the inhibiting effects of hemichannel inhibitor carbenoxolone, Cx43 hemichannel inhibitor (43)Gap27 and Panx1 hemichannel inhibitor (10)Panx1 on hemichannel activation. Furthermore, ufCB-induced glutamate and ATP release were dependent on Cx43 and Panx1 hemichannels, because carbenoxolone and (43)Gap27 inhibited ufCB-induced glutamate and ATP release, and (10)Panx1 inhibited ufCB-induced ATP release. Taken together, we demonstrated, for the first time, that ufCB could induce glutamate and ATP release by activating Cx43 and Panx1 hemchannels in astrocytes. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for neurotoxicity caused by ultrafine particles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduced mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase activity has a strong effect on photorespiratory metabolism as revealed by 13C labelling

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, Pernilla; Keech, Olivier; Stenlund, Hans; Gardeström, Per; Moritz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase (mMDH) catalyses the interconversion of malate and oxaloacetate (OAA) in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Its activity is important for redox control of the mitochondrial matrix, through which it may participate in regulation of TCA cycle turnover. In Arabidopsis, there are two isoforms of mMDH. Here, we investigated to which extent the lack of the major isoform, mMDH1 accounting for about 60% of the activity, affected leaf metabolism. In air, rosettes of mmdh1 plants were only slightly smaller than wild type plants although the fresh weight was decreased by about 50%. In low CO2 the difference was much bigger, with mutant plants accumulating only 14% of fresh weight as compared to wild type. To investigate the metabolic background to the differences in growth, we developed a 13CO2 labelling method, using a custom-built chamber that enabled simultaneous treatment of sets of plants under controlled conditions. The metabolic profiles were analysed by gas- and liquid- chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry to investigate the metabolic adjustments between wild type and mmdh1. The genotypes responded similarly to high CO2 treatment both with respect to metabolite pools and 13C incorporation during a 2-h treatment. However, under low CO2 several metabolites differed between the two genotypes and, interestingly most of these were closely associated with photorespiration. We found that while the glycine/serine ratio increased, a concomitant altered glutamine/glutamate/α-ketoglutarate relation occurred. Taken together, our results indicate that adequate mMDH activity is essential to shuttle reductants out from the mitochondria to support the photorespiratory flux, and strengthen the idea that photorespiration is tightly intertwined with peripheral metabolic reactions. PMID:26889011

  18. Progesterone increases the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Son, Ilsoon; Shin, Hyun-Jung; Ryu, Jung-Hee; Kim, Hae-Kyoung; Do, Sang-Hwan; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-09-05

    Progesterone is an important sex hormone for pregnancy and also has neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects. It is well-known that full-term parturients become more susceptible to volatile anesthetics. Glutamate transporters are important for preventing neurotoxicity and anesthetic action in the central nervous system. We investigated the effects of progesterone on the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 (EAAT3), the major neuronal EAAT. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes by injecting its mRNA. Oocytes were incubated with diluted progesterone for 72 h. Two-electrode voltage clamping was used to measure membrane currents before, during, and after applying 30 μML-glutamate. Progesterone (1-100 nM) significantly increased EAAT3 activity in a dose-dependent manner. Our kinetic study showed that the Vmax was increased in the progesterone group compared with that in the control group (2.7 ± 0.2 vs. 3.6 ± 0.2μC for control group vs. progesterone group; n=18-23; P<0.05), however, Km was unaltered (46.7 ± 10.2μM vs. 55.9 ± 10.5μM for control group vs. progesterone group; n=18-23; P>0.05). Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, did not change progesterone-enhanced EAAT3 activity. Inhibitors of PKC or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) abolished the progesterone-induced increases in EAAT3 activity. Our results suggest that progesterone enhances EAAT3 activity and that PKC and PI3K are involved in mediating these effects. These effects of progesterone may contribute to its anticonvulsant and anesthesia-related properties.

  19. Postsynaptic actin regulates active zone spacing and glutamate receptor apposition at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Blunk, Aline D; Akbergenova, Yulia; Cho, Richard W; Lee, Jihye; Walldorf, Uwe; Xu, Ke; Zhong, Guisheng; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Littleton, J Troy

    2014-07-01

    Synaptic communication requires precise alignment of presynaptic active zones with postsynaptic receptors to enable rapid and efficient neurotransmitter release. How transsynaptic signaling between connected partners organizes this synaptic apparatus is poorly understood. To further define the mechanisms that mediate synapse assembly, we carried out a chemical mutagenesis screen in Drosophila to identify mutants defective in the alignment of active zones with postsynaptic glutamate receptor fields at the larval neuromuscular junction. From this screen we identified a mutation in Actin 57B that disrupted synaptic morphology and presynaptic active zone organization. Actin 57B, one of six actin genes in Drosophila, is expressed within the postsynaptic bodywall musculature. The isolated allele, act(E84K), harbors a point mutation in a highly conserved glutamate residue in subdomain 1 that binds members of the Calponin Homology protein family, including spectrin. Homozygous act(E84K) mutants show impaired alignment and spacing of presynaptic active zones, as well as defects in apposition of active zones to postsynaptic glutamate receptor fields. act(E84K) mutants have disrupted postsynaptic actin networks surrounding presynaptic boutons, with the formation of aberrant actin swirls previously observed following disruption of postsynaptic spectrin. Consistent with a disruption of the postsynaptic actin cytoskeleton, spectrin, adducin and the PSD-95 homolog Discs-Large are all mislocalized in act(E84K) mutants. Genetic interactions between act(E84K) and neurexin mutants suggest that the postsynaptic actin cytoskeleton may function together with the Neurexin-Neuroligin transsynaptic signaling complex to mediate normal synapse development and presynaptic active zone organization.

  20. Postsynaptic actin regulates active zone spacing and glutamate receptor apposition at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Blunk, Aline D.; Akbergenova, Yulia; Cho, Richard W.; Lee, Jihye; Walldorf, Uwe; Xu, Ke; Zhong, Guisheng; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Littleton, J. Troy

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic communication requires precise alignment of presynaptic active zones with postsynaptic receptors to enable rapid and efficient neurotransmitter release. How transsynaptic signaling between connected partners organizes this synaptic apparatus is poorly understood. To further define the mechanisms that mediate synapse assembly, we carried out a chemical mutagenesis screen in Drosophila to identify mutants defective in the alignment of active zones with postsynaptic glutamate receptor fields at the larval neuromuscular junction. From this screen we identified a mutation in actin 57B that disrupted synaptic morphology and presynaptic active zone organization. Actin 57B, one of six actin genes in Drosophila, is expressed within the postsynaptic bodywall musculature. The isolated allele, actE84K, harbors a point mutation in a highly conserved glutamate residue in subdomain 1 that binds members of the Calponin Homology protein family, including spectrin. Homozygous actE84K mutants show impaired alignment and spacing of presynaptic active zones, as well as defects in apposition of active zones to postsynaptic glutamate receptor fields. actE84K mutants have disrupted postsynaptic actin networks surrounding presynaptic boutons, with the formation of aberrant actin swirls previously observed following disruption of postsynaptic spectrin. Consistent with a disruption of the postsynaptic actin cytoskeleton, spectrin, adducin and the PSD-95 homolog Disc-Large are all mislocalized in actE84K mutants. Genetic interactions between actE84K and neurexin mutants suggest that the postsynaptic actin cytoskeleton may function together with the Neurexin-Neuroligin transsynaptic signaling complex to mediate normal synapse development and presynaptic active zone organization. PMID:25066865

  1. The Markers of Glutamate Metabolism in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Neurological Complications in Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosius, Wojciech; Gazdulska, Joanna; Gołda-Gocka, Iwona; Kozubski, Wojciech; Ramlau, Rodryg

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the involvement of glutamate metabolism in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the development of neurological complications in lung cancer and during chemotherapy. Methods. The prospective study included 221 lung cancer patients treated with chemotherapeutics. Neurological status and cognitive functions were evaluated at baseline and after 6-month follow-up. Glutamate level, the activities of glutaminase- (GLS-) glutamate synthetizing enzyme, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), and glutamate decarboxylase catalyzing glutamate degradation were analyzed in PBMC and in sera of lung cancer patients by means of spectrophotometric and colorimetric methods. Results. Chemotherapy of lung neoplasms induced increase of glutamate content in PBMC and its concentration in serum increased the activity of GDH in PBMC and decreased activity of glutaminase in PBMC. The changes in glutamate metabolism markers were associated with initial manifestation of neurological deficit in lung cancer patients and with new symptoms, which appear as a complication of chemotherapy. Moreover, the analyzed parameters of glutamate control correlated with a spectrum of cognitive functions measures in lung cancer patients. Conclusion. We have demonstrated dysregulation in glutamate and glutamate metabolism controlling enzymes as promising indicators of risk for chemotherapy-induced neurological complications in lung cancer patients with particular emphasis on cognitive impairment. PMID:28044066

  2. Structure-activity relationship of daptomycin analogues with substitution at (2S, 3R) 3-methyl glutamic acid position.

    PubMed

    Lin, Du'an; Lam, Hiu Yung; Han, Wenbo; Cotroneo, Nicole; Pandya, Bhaumik A; Li, Xuechen

    2017-02-01

    Daptomycin is a highly effective lipopeptide antibiotic against Gram-positive pathogens. The presence of (2S, 3R) 3-methyl glutamic acid (mGlu) in daptomycin has been found to be important to the antibacterial activity. However the role of (2S, 3R) mGlu is yet to be revealed. Herein, we reported the syntheses of three daptomycin analogues with (2S, 3R) mGlu substituted by (2S, 3R) methyl glutamine (mGln), dimethyl glutamic acid and (2S, 3R) ethyl glutamic acid (eGlu), respectively, and their antibacterial activities. The detailed synthesis of dimethyl glutamic acid was also reported. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of motoneurons innervating different portions of the rat tibialis anterior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution, soma size and oxidative enzyme activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating muscle fibres in the deep (away from the surface of the muscle) and superficial (close to the surface of the muscle) portions of the tibialis anterior in normal rats were determined. The deep portion had a higher percentage of high oxidative fibres than the superficial portion of the muscle. Motoneurons were labelled by retrograde neuronal transport of fluorescent tracers: Fast Blue and Nuclear Yellow were injected into the deep portion and Nuclear Yellow into the superficial portion of the muscle. Therefore, motoneurons innervating the deep portion were identified by both a blue fluorescent cytoplasm and a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus, while motoneurons innervating the superficial portion were identified by only a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus. After staining for succinate dehydrogenase activity on the same section used for the identification of the motoneurons, soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of the motoneurons were measured. The gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions were located primarily at L4 and were intermingled within the same region of the dorsolateral portion of the ventral horn in the spinal cord. Mean soma size was similar for either gamma or alpha motoneurons in the two portions of the muscle. The alpha motoneurons innervating the superficial portion had a lower mean succinate dehydrogenase activity than those innervating the deep portion of the muscle. An inverse relationship between soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of alpha, but not gamma, motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions was observed. Based on three-dimensional reconstructions within the spinal cord, there were no apparent differences in the spatial distribution of the motoneurons, either gamma or alpha, associated with the deep and superficial compartments of the muscle. The data

  4. Succinate dehydrogenase activity and soma size of motoneurons innervating different portions of the rat tibialis anterior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishihara, A.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution, soma size and oxidative enzyme activity of gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating muscle fibres in the deep (away from the surface of the muscle) and superficial (close to the surface of the muscle) portions of the tibialis anterior in normal rats were determined. The deep portion had a higher percentage of high oxidative fibres than the superficial portion of the muscle. Motoneurons were labelled by retrograde neuronal transport of fluorescent tracers: Fast Blue and Nuclear Yellow were injected into the deep portion and Nuclear Yellow into the superficial portion of the muscle. Therefore, motoneurons innervating the deep portion were identified by both a blue fluorescent cytoplasm and a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus, while motoneurons innervating the superficial portion were identified by only a golden-yellow fluorescent nucleus. After staining for succinate dehydrogenase activity on the same section used for the identification of the motoneurons, soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of the motoneurons were measured. The gamma and alpha motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions were located primarily at L4 and were intermingled within the same region of the dorsolateral portion of the ventral horn in the spinal cord. Mean soma size was similar for either gamma or alpha motoneurons in the two portions of the muscle. The alpha motoneurons innervating the superficial portion had a lower mean succinate dehydrogenase activity than those innervating the deep portion of the muscle. An inverse relationship between soma size and succinate dehydrogenase activity of alpha, but not gamma, motoneurons innervating both the deep and superficial portions was observed. Based on three-dimensional reconstructions within the spinal cord, there were no apparent differences in the spatial distribution of the motoneurons, either gamma or alpha, associated with the deep and superficial compartments of the muscle. The data

  5. Effect of phenylephrine on glutamate and glutamine metabolism in isolated perfused rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Häussinger, D; Sies, H

    1984-01-01

    Addition of phenylephrine to isolated perfused rat liver is followed by an increased 14CO2 production from [1-14C]glutamate, [1-14C]glutamine, [U-14C]proline and [3-14C]pyruvate, but by a decreased 14CO2 production from [1-14C]pyruvate. Simultaneously, there is a considerable decrease in tissue content of 2-oxoglutarate, glutamate and citrate. Stimulation of 14CO2 production from [1-14C]glutamate is also observed in the presence of amino-oxyacetate, suggesting a stimulation of glutamate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase fluxes by phenylephrine. Inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase flux by phenylephrine is due to an increased 2-oxoglutarate dehydroxygenase flux. Phenylephrine stimulates glutaminase flux and inhibits glutamine synthetase flux to a similar extent, resulting in an increased hepatic glutamine uptake. Whereas the effects of NH4+ ions and phenylephrine on glutaminase flux were additive, activation of glutaminase by glucagon was considerably diminished in the presence of phenylephrine. The reported effects are largely overcome by prazosin, indicating the involvement of alpha-adrenergic receptors in the action of phenylephrine. It is concluded that stimulation of gluconeogenesis from various amino acids by phenylephrine is due to an increased flux through glutamate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle. PMID:6148074

  6. Enzyme activities in fish spermatozoa with focus on lactate dehydrogenase isoenzymes from herring Clupea harengus.

    PubMed

    Gronczewska, Jadwiga; Zietara, Marek S; Biegniewska, Anna; Skorkowski, Edward F

    2003-03-01

    The activities of NAD- and NADP-dependent dehydrogenases and creatine kinase were compared in extracts of spermatozoa from herring (Clupea harengus), carp (Cyprinus carpio) and catfish (Clarias gariepinus). The activity of malic enzyme in herring spermatozoa was approximately 5 and 36 times higher than in carp and catfish spermatozoa. In contrast, lactate dehydrogenase activity in herring spermatozoa was very low. Herring spermatozoa possess two isoenzymes of lactate dehydrogenase: LDH-A(2)B(2) and LDH-B(4). Both herring spermatozoa isozymes were separated, partly purified and characterized by kinetic and physico-chemical properties. The pH optima and K(m) values for pyruvate reduction were 7.1, 7.25, 7.6 and 0.22, 0.07, 0.09 mM for LDH-A(4), LDH-A(2)B(2) and LDH-B(4), respectively. The isoenzymes also have different thermostabilities. High activity of malic enzyme in herring spermatozoa suggests adaptation to metabolism at high oxygen tension.

  7. Expanding the active pH range of Escherichia coli glutamate decarboxylase by breaking the cooperativeness.

    PubMed

    Thu Ho, Ngoc Anh; Hou, Chen Yuan; Kim, Woo Hyun; Kang, Taek Jin

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) transforms glutamate into γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) with the consumption of a proton. The enzyme is active under acidic environments only and sharply loses its activity as pH approaches neutrality with concomitant structural deformation. In an attempt to understand better the role of this cooperative loss of activity upon pH shifts, we prepared and studied a series of GAD site-specific mutants. In this report, we show that the cooperativeness was kept intact by at least two residues, Glu89 and His465, of which Glu89 is newly identified to be involved in the cooperativity system of GAD. Double mutation on these residues not only broke the cooperativity in the activity change but also yielded a mutant GAD that retained the activity at neutral pH. The resulting mutant GAD that was active at neutral pH inhibited the cell growth in a glycerol medium by converting intracellular Glu into GABA in an uncontrolled manner, which explains in part why the cooperativeness of GAD has to be kept by several layers of safety keepers. This unexpected result might be utilized to convert a low-valued by-product of biodiesel production, glycerol, into value-added product, GABA. Copyright © 2012 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of Dehydrogenase Activities Involved in D-Glucose Oxidation in Gluconobacter and Acetobacter Strains

    PubMed Central

    Sainz, Florencia; Jesús Torija, María; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Mas, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are known for rapid and incomplete oxidation of an extensively variety of alcohols and carbohydrates, resulting in the accumulation of organic acids as the final products. These oxidative fermentations in AAB are catalyzed by PQQ- or FAD- dependent membrane-bound dehydrogenases. In the present study, the enzyme activity of the membrane-bound dehydrogenases [membrane-bound PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase (mGDH), D-gluconate dehydrogenase (GADH) and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH)] involved in the oxidation of D-glucose and D-gluconic acid (GA) was determined in six strains of three different species of AAB (three natural and three type strains). Moreover, the effect of these activities on the production of related metabolites [GA, 2-keto-D-gluconic acid (2KGA) and 5-keto-D-gluconic acid (5KGA)] was analyzed. The natural strains belonging to Gluconobacter showed a high mGDH activity and low activity in GADH and GLDH, whereas the Acetobacter malorum strain presented low activity in the three enzymes. Nevertheless, no correlation was observed between the activity of these enzymes and the concentration of the corresponding metabolites. In fact, all the tested strains were able to oxidize D-glucose to GA, being maximal at the late exponential phase of the AAB growth (24 h), which coincided with D-glucose exhaustion and the maximum mGDH activity. Instead, only some of the tested strains were capable of producing 2KGA and/or 5KGA. In the case of Gluconobacter oxydans strains, no 2KGA production was detected which is related to the absence of GADH activity after 24 h, while in the remaining strains, detection of GADH activity after 24 h resulted in a high accumulation of 2KGA. Therefore, it is possible to choose the best strain depending on the desired product composition. Moreover, the sequences of these genes were used to construct phylogenetic trees. According to the sequence of gcd, gene coding for mGDH, Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter

  9. Activation of glutamate transport evokes rapid glutamine release from perisynaptic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Uwechue, Nneka M; Marx, Mari-Carmen; Chevy, Quentin; Billups, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of astrocytes by neuronal activity and the subsequent release of neuromodulators is thought to be an important regulator of synaptic communication. In this study we show that astrocytes juxtaposed to the glutamatergic calyx of Held synapse in the rat medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) are stimulated by the activation of glutamate transporters and consequently release glutamine on a very rapid timescale. MNTB principal neurones express electrogenic system A glutamine transporters, and were exploited as glutamine sensors in this study. By simultaneous whole-cell voltage clamping astrocytes and neighbouring MNTB neurones in brainstem slices, we show that application of the excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) substrate d-aspartate stimulates astrocytes to rapidly release glutamine, which is detected by nearby MNTB neurones. This release is significantly reduced by the toxins l-methionine sulfoximine and fluoroacetate, which reduce glutamine concentrations specifically in glial cells. Similarly, glutamine release was also inhibited by localised inactivation of EAATs in individual astrocytes, using internal dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) or dissipating the driving force by modifying the patch-pipette solution. These results demonstrate that astrocytes adjacent to glutamatergic synapses can release glutamine in a temporally precise, controlled manner in response to glial glutamate transporter activation. Since glutamine can be used by neurones as a precursor for glutamate and GABA synthesis, this represents a potential feedback mechanism by which astrocytes can respond to synaptic activation and react in a way that sustains or enhances further communication. This would therefore represent an additional manifestation of the tripartite relationship between synapses and astrocytes. PMID:22411007

  10. Cell Active Hydroxylactam Inhibitors of Human Lactate Dehydrogenase with Oral Bioavailability in Mice.

    PubMed

    Purkey, Hans E; Robarge, Kirk; Chen, Jinhua; Chen, Zhongguo; Corson, Laura B; Ding, Charles Z; DiPasquale, Antonio G; Dragovich, Peter S; Eigenbrot, Charles; Evangelista, Marie; Fauber, Benjamin P; Gao, Zhenting; Ge, Hongxiu; Hitz, Anna; Ho, Qunh; Labadie, Sharada S; Lai, Kwong Wah; Liu, Wenfeng; Liu, Yajing; Li, Chiho; Ma, Shuguang; Malek, Shiva; O'Brien, Thomas; Pang, Jodie; Peterson, David; Salphati, Laurent; Sideris, Steve; Ultsch, Mark; Wei, BinQing; Yen, Ivana; Yue, Qin; Zhang, Huihui; Zhou, Aihe

    2016-10-13

    A series of trisubstituted hydroxylactams was identified as potent enzymatic and cellular inhibitors of human lactate dehydrogenase A. Utilizing structure-based design and physical property optimization, multiple inhibitors were discovered with <10 μM lactate IC50 in a MiaPaca2 cell line. Optimization of the series led to 29, a potent cell active molecule (MiaPaca2 IC50 = 0.67 μM) that also possessed good exposure when dosed orally to mice.

  11. Protease activated receptor 1-induced glutamate release in cultured astrocytes is mediated by Bestrophin-1 channel but not by vesicular exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Glutamate is the major transmitter that mediates the principal form of excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain. It has been well established that glutamate is released via Ca2+-dependent exocytosis of glutamate-containing vesicles in neurons. However, whether astrocytes exocytose to release glutamate under physiological condition is still unclear. Findings We report a novel form of glutamate release in astrocytes via the recently characterized Ca2+-activated anion channel, Bestrophin-1 (Best1) by Ca2+ dependent mechanism through the channel pore. We demonstrate that upon activation of protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1), an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration leads to an opening of Best1 channels and subsequent release of glutamate in cultured astrocytes. Conclusions These results provide strong molecular evidence for potential astrocyte-neuron interaction via Best1-mediated glutamate release. PMID:23062602

  12. Changes in cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activities from sugarcane cultivars inoculated with Sporisorium scitamineum sporidia.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Rocío; Alarcón, Borja; de Armas, Roberto; Vicente, Carlos; Legaz, María Estrella

    2012-06-01

    This study describes a method for determining cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity in sugarcane stems using reverse phase (RP) high-performance liquid chromatography to elucidate their possible lignin origin. Activity is assayed using the reverse mode, the oxidation of hydroxycinnamyl alcohols into hydroxycinnamyl aldehydes. Appearance of the reaction products, coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde is determined by measuring absorbance at 340 and 345 nm, respectively. Disappearance of substrates, coniferyl alcohol and sinapyl alcohol is measured at 263 and 273 nm, respectively. Isocratic elution with acetonitrile:acetic acid through an RP Mediterranea sea C18 column is performed. As case examples, we have examined two different cultivars of sugarcane; My 5514 is resistant to smut, whereas B 42231 is susceptible to the pathogen. Inoculation of sugarcane stems elicits lignification and produces significant increases of coniferyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD). Production of lignin increases about 29% in the resistant cultivar and only 13% in the susceptible cultivar after inoculation compared to uninoculated plants. Our results show that the resistance of My 5514 to smut is likely derived, at least in part, to a marked increase of lignin concentration by the activation of CAD and SAD.

  13. Cytophotometric analysis of reaction rates of succinate and lactate dehydrogenase activity in rat liver, heart muscle and tracheal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Van Noorden, C J; Vogels, I M

    1989-01-01

    Reaction rates of succinate and lactate dehydrogenase activity in cryostat sections of rat liver, tracheal epithelium and heart muscle were monitored by continuous measurement of formazan formation by cytophotometry at room temperature. Incubation media contained polyvinyl alcohol as tissue protectant and Tetranitro BT as final electron acceptor. Control media lacked either substrate or substrate and coenzyme. Controls were also performed by adding malonate (a competitive inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase), pyruvate (a non-competitive inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase), oxalate (a competitive inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase) or N-ethylmaleimide (a blocker of SH groups). A specific malonate-sensitive linear test minus control response for succinate dehydrogenase activity was obtained in liver (1.6 mumol H2cm-3 min-1) and tracheal epithelium (0.8 mumol H2cm-3 min-1) but not in heart muscle. All variations in the incubation conditions tested did not result in a linear test minus control response in the latter tissue. Because the reaction was sensitive to malonate, it was concluded that the initial reaction rate was the specific rate of succinate dehydrogenase activity in heart muscle (9.1 mumol H2 cm-3 min-1). Test minus control reactions for lactate dehydrogenase activity were distinctly non-linear for all tissues tested. This appeared to be due to product inhibition by pyruvate generated during the reaction and therefore it was concluded that the appropriate control reaction was the test reaction in the presence of 20 mM pyruvate. The initial rate of the test minus this control was the true rate of lactate dehydrogenase activity. The lactate dehydrogenase activity thus found in liver parenchyma was 5.0 mumol of H2 generated per cm3 liver tissue per min.

  14. The specific requirement for sodium chloride for the active uptake of l-glutamate by Halobacterium salinarium

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, J.

    1966-01-01

    1. Uptake of l-glutamate by Halobacterium salinarium is dependent on high concentrations of sodium chloride in the environment. When the sodium chloride is replaced by isomolar concentrations of potassium chloride, sodium acetate or potassium acetate, only negligible uptake occurs. 2. Most of the glutamate taken up can be shown to be in the cells in the free state and at a concentration of at least 50 times that in the medium. Sodium chloride is therefore required for an active transport of the glutamate into the cells. 3. The question whether sodium chloride is essential for the actual migration of glutamate across the cell envelope or for the mechanism supplying energy for this migration is discussed on the basis of experiments on endogenous respiration and with inhibitors. PMID:5947144

  15. Serotonin activates catecholamine neurons in the solitary tract nucleus by increasing spontaneous glutamate inputs.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ran Ji; Roberts, Brandon L; Zhao, Huan; Zhu, Mingyan; Appleyard, Suzanne M

    2012-11-14

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a critical neurotransmitter in the control of autonomic functions. 5-HT(3) receptors participate in vagal afferent feedback to decrease food intake and regulate cardiovascular reflexes; however, the phenotype of the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) neurons involved is not known. A(2)/C(2) catecholamine (CA) neurons in the NTS are directly activated by visceral afferents and are important for the control of food intake and cardiovascular function, making them good candidates to respond to and mediate the effects of serotonin at the level of the NTS. This study examines serotonin's effects on NTS-CA neurons using patch-clamp techniques and transgenic mice expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein driven by the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter (TH-EGFP) to identify catecholamine neurons. Serotonin increased the frequency of spontaneous glutamate excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in >90% of NTS-TH-EGFP neurons, an effect blocked by the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist ondansetron and mimicked by the 5-HT(3) receptor agonists SR5227 and mCPBG. In contrast, 5-HT(3) receptor agonists increased sEPSCs on a minority (<30%) of non-TH neurons. 5-HT(3) receptor agonists increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of mini-EPSCs, suggesting that their actions are presynaptic. 5-HT(3) receptor agonists increased the firing rate of TH-EGFP neurons, an effect dependent on the increased spontaneous glutamate inputs as it was blocked by the ionotropic glutamate antagonist NBQX, but independent of visceral afferent activation. These results demonstrate a cellular mechanism by which serotonin activates NTS-TH neurons and suggest a pathway by which it can increase catecholamine release in target regions to modulate food intake, motivation, stress, and cardiovascular function.

  16. Serotonin Activates Catecholamine Neurons in the Solitary Tract Nucleus by Increasing Spontaneous Glutamate Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ran Ji; Roberts, Brandon L.; Zhao, Huan; Zhu, Mingyan

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a critical neurotransmitter in the control of autonomic functions. 5-HT3 receptors participate in vagal afferent feedback to decrease food intake and regulate cardiovascular reflexes; however, the phenotype of the solitary tract nucleus (NTS) neurons involved is not known. A2/C2 catecholamine (CA) neurons in the NTS are directly activated by visceral afferents and are important for the control of food intake and cardiovascular function, making them good candidates to respond to and mediate the effects of serotonin at the level of the NTS. This study examines serotonin's effects on NTS-CA neurons using patch-clamp techniques and transgenic mice expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein driven by the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter (TH-EGFP) to identify catecholamine neurons. Serotonin increased the frequency of spontaneous glutamate excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) in >90% of NTS-TH-EGFP neurons, an effect blocked by the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist ondansetron and mimicked by the 5-HT3 receptor agonists SR5227 and mCPBG. In contrast, 5-HT3 receptor agonists increased sEPSCs on a minority (<30%) of non-TH neurons. 5-HT3 receptor agonists increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of mini-EPSCs, suggesting that their actions are presynaptic. 5-HT3 receptor agonists increased the firing rate of TH-EGFP neurons, an effect dependent on the increased spontaneous glutamate inputs as it was blocked by the ionotropic glutamate antagonist NBQX, but independent of visceral afferent activation. These results demonstrate a cellular mechanism by which serotonin activates NTS-TH neurons and suggest a pathway by which it can increase catecholamine release in target regions to modulate food intake, motivation, stress, and cardiovascular function. PMID:23152635

  17. [Enhancing glutamate decarboxylase activity by site-directed mutagenesis: an insight from Ramachandran plot].

    PubMed

    Ke, Piyu; Huang, Jun; Hu, Sheng; Zhao, Weirui; Lü, Changjiang; Yu, Kai; Lei, Yinlin; Wang, Jinbo; Mei, Lehe

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can catalyze the decarboxylation of glutamate into γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) and is the only enzyme of GABA biosynthesis. Improving GAD activity and thermostability will be helpful for the highly efficient biosynthesis of GABA. According to the Ramachandran plot information of GAD 1407 three-dimensional structure from Lactobacillus brevis CGMCC No. 1306, we identified the unstable site K413 as the mutation target, constructed the mutant GAD by site-directed mutagenesis and measured the thermostability and activity of the wide type and mutant GAD. Mutant K413A led to a remarkably slower inactivation rate, and its half-life at 50 °C reached 105 min which was 2.1-fold higher than the wild type GAD1407. Moreover, mutant K413I exhibited 1.6-fold higher activity in comparison with the wide type GAD1407, although it had little improvement in thermostability of GAD. Ramachandran plot can be considered as a potential approach to increase GAD thermostability and activity.

  18. Activation of the glutamate receptor GRM1 enhances angiogenic signaling to drive melanoma progression.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yu; Li, Jiadong; Koo, Jasmine; Shin, Seung-Shick; Lin, Yong; Jeong, Byeong-Seon; Mehnert, Janice M; Chen, Suzie; Cohen-Sola, Karine A; Goydos, James S

    2014-05-01

    Glutamate-triggered signal transduction is thought to contribute widely to cancer pathogenesis. In melanoma, overexpression of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (GRM)-1 occurs frequently and its ectopic expression in melanocytes is sufficient for neoplastic transformation. Clinical evaluation of the GRM1 signaling inhibitor riluzole in patients with advanced melanoma has demonstrated tumor regressions that are associated with a suppression of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) pathways. Together, these results prompted us to investigate the downstream consequences of GRM1 signaling and its disruption in more detail. We found that melanoma cells with enhanced GRM1 expression generated larger tumors in vivo marked by more abundant blood vessels. Media conditioned by these cells in vitro contained relatively higher concentrations of interleukin-8 and VEGF due to GRM1-mediated activation of the AKT-mTOR-HIF1 pathway. In clinical specimens from patients receiving riluzole, we confirmed an inhibition of MAPK and PI3K/AKT activation in posttreatment as compared with pretreatment tumor specimens, which exhibited a decreased density of blood vessels. Together, our results demonstrate that GRM1 activation triggers proangiogenic signaling in melanoma, offering a mechanistic rationale to design treatment strategies for the most suitable combinatorial use of GRM1 inhibitors in patients. ©2014 AACR.

  19. SDR-type human hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases involved in steroid hormone activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqiu; Lukacik, Petra; Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Oppermann, Udo

    2007-02-01

    Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases catalyze the NAD(P)(H)-dependent oxidoreduction of hydroxyl and oxo-functions at distinct positions of steroid hormones. This reversible reaction constitutes an important pre-receptor control mechanism for nuclear receptor ligands of the androgen, estrogen and glucocorticoid classes, since the conversion "switches" between receptor ligands and their inactive metabolites. The major reversible activities found in mammals acting on steroid hormones comprise 3alpha-, 11beta- and 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases, and for each group several distinct isozymes have been described. The enzymes differ in their expression pattern, nucleotide cofactor preference, steroid substrate specificity and subcellular localization, and thus constitute a complex system ensuring cell-specific adaptation and regulation of steroid hormone levels. Several isoforms constitute promising drug targets, of particular importance in cancer, metabolic diseases, neurodegeneration and immunity.

  20. Kinetic equivalence of the active sites of alcohol dehydrogenase from horse liver.

    PubMed

    Hadorn, M; John, V A; Meier, F K; Dutler, H

    1975-05-01

    The reduction, catalysed by liver alcohol dehydrogenase, of benzaldehyde in the presence and absence of pyrazole, and the oxidation of benzyl alcohol and cyclohexanol in the presence of isobutyramide, has been measured by the stopped-flow technique. In performing these experiments particular care was taken to purify the enzyme, coenzymes, substrates and inhibitors, and to minimise as much as possible the effects of a blank substrate reaction. The calculation of the amount of substrate converted to product during the various phases of the transient process was based on the absorption coefficients for the enzyme-coenzyme and enzyme-coenzyme-inhibitor complexes determined in the absence of substrate. The results show that the two active sites of liver alcohol dehydrogenase are kinetically equivalent and that the enzyme does not exhibit half-of-the-sites reactivity.

  1. Expression in Escherichia coli of active human alcohol dehydrogenase lacking N-terminal acetylation.

    PubMed

    Höög, J O; Weis, M; Zeppezauer, M; Jörnvall, H; von Bahr-Lindström, H

    1987-12-01

    Human alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, beta beta isozyme of class I) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and characterized regarding N-terminal processing. The expression system was obtained by ligation of a cDNA fragment corresponding to the beta-subunit of human liver alcohol dehydrogenase into the vector pKK 223-3 containing the tac promoter. The enzyme, detected by Western-blot analysis and ethanol oxidizing activity, constituted up to 3% of the total amount of protein. Recombinant ADH was separated from E. coli ADH by ion-exchange chromatography and the isolated enzyme was essentially pure as judged by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. The N-terminal sequence was identical to that of the authentic beta-subunit except that the N-terminus was non-acetylated, indicating a correct removal of the initiator methionine, but lack of further processing.

  2. Alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase activity in sex-linked muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Johnston, H A; Wilkinson, J H; Withycombe, W A; Raymond, S

    1966-05-01

    In two families with severe sex-linked muscular dystrophy, high levels of alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (HBD), lactate dehydrogenase (LD), aspartate transaminase (AspT), aldolase, and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) were found in the sera of three young affected males. In both families the mother had a raised level of HBD activity. Four sisters of the three affected boys had raised serum enzyme levels, and they are regarded as presumptive carriers of the disease. Biopsy specimens of dystrophic muscle had LD and HBD contents which were significantly lower than those of control specimens, while the HBD/LD ratios were markedly greater. Muscle from two unaffected members of the same family also exhibited high ratios, indicating the presence of the electrophoretically fast LD isoenzymes, and this was confirmed by acrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  3. Histochemical modification of the active site of succinate dehydrogenase with N-acetylimidazole.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Y; Shono, M

    1986-04-01

    The kinetics of acetylation of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase [EC 1.3.99.1] in the two fibre types (A and C) of rat gastrocnemius with N-acetylimidazole was studied by a newly modified histochemical technique. Acetylimidazole partially inactivated the enzyme, but subsequent deacetylation with hydroxylamine restored the enzyme activity completely. Inactivation of the enzyme by acetylimidazole was prevented by malonate, which is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The value of the inhibition constant (Ki = 34 microM) for malonate, obtained from the dependence of the pseudo-first order rate constant of acetylation of the enzyme with acetylimidazole on the malonate concentration, was in good agreement with the Ki value (33 microM) obtained by a different method, the dependence of the initial velocity of succinate oxidation by the dehydrogenase on the substrate concentration in the presence of malonate. These findings suggest that a tyrosyl residue is located in the malonate binding site (the active site) of succinate dehydrogenase in the gastrocnemius and plays a role in substrate binding, but is not a catalytic group.

  4. [Effects of lemon peel extracts on lactate dehydrogenase and sucrase activity of Streptococcus mutans].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-yu; Yu, Zhi-fen; Wang, Da-zhao; Liu, Ying; Guo, Mao-ding

    2010-12-01

    To investigate the effect of lemon peel extracts (LPE) on the activity of lactate dehydrogenase and sucrase of Streptococcus mutans (Sm). After serial dilution with trypticase soy broth (TSB) medium containing 2% glucose, LPE was used as the experimental group, and TSB without LPE as the control group. Sm was added to each group, which was then cultured for 6, 18, 24 and 48 hours in the anaerobic tank. The activity of lactate dehydrogenase(LDH) was measured with the method of oxidation of reduction coenzymeIand the pH value of the culture solution was also detected. The activity of the sucrose was determined with the method of coloration of 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. The activity of LDH, sucrase and the changes of solution pH were decreased with the increase of the concentration of LPE (P < 0.01). The activity of LDH were declined from (0.8025 ± 0.0913) × 10(3) U/L to (0.2099 ± 0.0283) × 10(3) U/L; the activity of sucrase were declined from (-0.0107 ± 0.0003) × 10(3) U/L to (-0.0078 ± 0.0002) × 10(3) U/L; the ΔpH were declined from (2.8067 ± 0.0404) to (2.5033 ± 0.0416) (24 h results). The differences were significant between experimental groups and the control group (P < 0.01), and there were also significant differences among experimental groups with different LPE concentration (P < 0.01). The inhibitory effect of acid generation and lactate dehydrogenas' activity of Sm were positively correlated (P < 0.01). LPE can inhibit the activity of lactate dehydrogenase, sucrase and the acid production capacity of the Sm in a dose dependent manner. The inhibitory effects in logarithmic phase is stronger than that in other phases of growth cycle.

  5. Potentiation of acid-sensing ion channel activity by peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gan, Xiong; Wu, Jing; Ren, Cuixia; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Li, Yan-Kun; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2016-05-01

    Glutamate activates peripheral group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and contributes to inflammatory pain. However, it is still not clear the mechanisms are involved in group I mGluR-mediated peripheral sensitization. Herein, we report that group I mGluRs signaling sensitizes acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and contributes to acidosis-evoked pain. DHPG, a selective group I mGluR agonist, can potentiate the functional activity of ASICs, which mediated the proton-induced events. DHPG concentration-dependently increased proton-gated currents in DRG neurons. It shifted the proton concentration-response curve upwards, with a 47.3±7.0% increase of the maximal current response to proton. Group I mGluRs, especially mGluR5, mediated the potentiation of DHPG via an intracellular cascade. DHPG potentiation of proton-gated currents disappeared after inhibition of intracellular Gq/11 proteins, PLCβ, PKC or PICK1 signaling. Moreover, DHPG enhanced proton-evoked membrane excitability of rat DRG neurons and increased the amplitude of the depolarization and the number of spikes induced by acid stimuli. Finally, peripherally administration of DHPG dose-dependently exacerbated nociceptive responses to intraplantar injection of acetic acid in rats. Potentiation of ASIC activity by group I mGluR signaling in rat DRG neurons revealed a novel peripheral mechanism underlying group I mGluRs involvement in hyperalgesia.

  6. Mechanisms of photoswitch conjugation and light activation of an ionotropic glutamate receptor.

    PubMed

    Gorostiza, Pau; Volgraf, Matthew; Numano, Rika; Szobota, Stephanie; Trauner, Dirk; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2007-06-26

    The analysis of cell signaling requires the rapid and selective manipulation of protein function. We have synthesized photoswitches that covalently modify target proteins and reversibly present and withdraw a ligand from its binding site due to photoisomerization of an azobenzene linker. We describe here the properties of a glutamate photoswitch that controls an ion channel in cells. Affinity labeling and geometric constraints ensure that the photoswitch controls only the targeted channel, and enables spatial patterns of light to favor labeling in one location over another. Photoswitching to the activating state places a tethered glutamate at a high (millimolar) effective local concentration near the binding site. The fraction of active channels can be set in an analog manner by altering the photostationary state with different wavelengths. The bistable photoswitch can be turned on with millisecond-long pulses at one wavelength, remain on in the dark for minutes, and turned off with millisecond long pulses at the other wavelength, yielding sustained activation with minimal irradiation. The system provides rapid, reversible remote control of protein function that is selective without orthogonal chemistry.

  7. Influence of cooling rate on activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors in brain slices at hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Mokrushin, Anatoly A; Pavlinova, Larisa I; Borovikov, Sergey E

    2014-08-01

    Hypothermia is a known approach in the treatment of neurological pathologies. Mild hypothermia enhances the therapeutic window for application of medicines, while deep hypothermia is often accompanied by complications, including problems in the recovery of brain functions. The purpose of present study was to investigate the functioning of glutamate ionotropic receptors in brain slices cooled with different rates during mild, moderate and deep hypothermia. Using a system of gradual cooling combined with electrophysiological recordings in slices, we have shown that synaptic activity mediated by the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in rat olfactory cortex was strongly dependent on the rate of lowering the temperature. High cooling rate caused a progressive decrease in glutamate receptor activity in brain slices during gradual cooling from mild to deep hypothermia. On the contrary, low cooling rate slightly changed the synaptic responses in deep hypothermia. The short-term potentiation may be induced in slices by electric tetanization at 16 °C in this case. Hence, low cooling rate promoted preservation of neuronal activity and plasticity in the brain tissue.

  8. Activation of the Glutamate Receptor GRM1 Enhances Angiogenic Signaling to Drive Melanoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yu; Li, Jiadong; Koo, Jasmine; Shin, Seung-Shick; Lin, Yong; Jeong, Byeong-Seon; Mehnert, Janice; Chen, Suzie; Cohen-Solal, Karine; Goydos, James S

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate-triggered signal transduction is thought to contribute widely to cancer pathogenesis. In melanoma, over-expression of the metabotropic glutamate receptor GRM1 occurs frequently and its ectopic expression in melanocytes is sufficient for neoplastic transformation. Clinical evaluation of the GRM1 signaling inhibitor riluzole in patients with advanced melanoma has demonstrated tumor regressions that are associated with a suppression of the MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways. Together, these results prompted us to investigate the downstream consequences of GRM1 signaling and its disruption in more detail. We found that melanoma cells with enhanced GRM1 expression generated larger tumors in vivo marked by more abundant blood vessels. Media conditioned by these cells in vitro contained relatively higher concentrations of IL-8 and VEGF, due to GRM1-mediated activation of the AKT-mTOR-HIF1 pathway. In clinical specimens from patients receiving riluzole, we confirmed an inhibition of MAPK and PI3K/AKT activation in post-treatment as compared to pre-treatment tumor specimens, which exhibited a decreased density of blood vessels. Together, our results demonstrate that GRM1 activation triggers pro-angiogenic signaling in melanoma, offering a mechanistic rationale to design treatment strategies for the most suitable combinatorial use of GRM1 inhibitors in patients. PMID:24491800

  9. A high-throughput colorimetric assay to measure the activity of glutamate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Hu, Sheng; Huang, Jun; Mei, Le-He

    2011-08-10

    A pH-sensitive colorimetric assay has been established to quantitatively measure glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) activity in bacterial cell extracts using a microplate format. GAD catalyzes the irreversible α-decarboxylation of L-glutamate to γ-aminobutyrate. The assay is based on the color change of bromocresol green due to an increase in pH as protons are consumed during the enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Bromocresol green was chosen as the indicator because it has a similar pK(a) to the acetate buffer used. The corresponding absorbance change at 620 nm was recorded with a microplate reader as the reaction proceeded. A difference in the enzyme preparation pH and optimal pH for GAD activity of 2.5 did not prevent this method from successfully allowing the determination of reaction kinetic parameters and the detection of improvements in enzymatic activity with a low coefficient of variance. Our assay is simple, rapid, requires minimal sample concentration and can be carried out in robotic high-throughput devices used as standard in directed evolution experiments. In addition, it is also applicable to other reactions that involve a change in pH.

  10. Determinants of substrate specificity in the superfamily of amino acid dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Baker, P J; Waugh, M L; Wang, X G; Stillman, T J; Turnbull, A P; Engel, P C; Rice, D W

    1997-12-23

    The subunit of the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase comprises two domains separated by a cleft harboring the active site. One domain is responsible for dinucleotide binding and the other carries the majority of residues which bind the substrate. During the catalytic cycle a large movement between the two domains occurs, closing the cleft and bringing the C4 of the nicotinamide ring and the Calpha of the substrate into the correct positioning for hydride transfer. In the active site, two residues, K89 and S380, make interactions with the gamma-carboxyl group of the glutamate substrate. In leucine dehydrogenase, an enzyme belonging to the same superfamily, the equivalent residues are L40 and V294, which create a more hydrophobic specificity pocket and provide an explanation for their differential substrate specificity. In an attempt to change the substrate specificity of glutamate dehydrogenase toward that of leucine dehydrogenase, a double mutant, K89L,S380V, of glutamate dehydrogenase has been constructed. Far from having a high specificity for leucine, this mutant appears to be devoid of any catalytic activity over a wide range of substrates tested. Determination of the three-dimensional structure of the mutant enzyme has shown that the loss of function is related to a disordering of residues linking the enzyme's two domains, probably arising from a steric clash between the valine side chain, introduced at position 380 in the mutant, and a conserved threonine residue, T193. In leucine dehydrogenase the steric clash between the equivalent valine and threonine side chains (V294, T134) does not occur owing to shifts of the main chain to which these side chains are attached. Thus, the differential substrate specificity seen in the amino acid dehydrogenase superfamily arises from both the introduction of simple point mutations and the fine tuning of the active site pocket defined by small but significant main chain rearrangements.

  11. Effect of dehydrogenase, phosphatase and urease activity in cotton soil after applying thiamethoxam as seed treatment.

    PubMed

    Jyot, Gagan; Mandal, Kousik; Singh, Balwinder

    2015-05-01

    Soil enzymes are indicators of microbial activities in soil and are often considered as an indicator of soil health and fertility. They are very sensitive to the agricultural practices, pH of the soil, nutrients, inhibitors and weather conditions. To understand the effect of an insecticide, thiamethoxam, on different soil enzyme activities, the experiments were conducted at cotton experimental fields of Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana. The results here were presented to understand the impact of thiamethoxam on soil enzyme activities. Thiamethoxam was applied as seed treatment to control the pest. Soil from three localities, i.e. soil in which seed was treated with recommended dose at 2.1 g a.i. kg(-1), soil in which seed was treated with four times recommended dose at 8.4 g a.i. kg(-1) and from the control field, were tested for different enzyme activities. Phosphatase and dehydrogenase activities were high in control soil in comparison to control soil while no effect of this insecticide on urease activity. Thiamethoxam had inhibitory effects on dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities. Therefore, it can be attributed that agricultural practices, weather conditions and use of thiamethoxam might be responsible for the different level of enzyme activities in soil.

  12. A sensitive radioisotopic method for the measurement of NAD(P)H: Its application to the assay of metabolites and enzymatic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sener, A.; Malaisse, W.J. )

    1990-05-01

    A radioisotopic method for the assay of NADH or NADPH is presented, which is based on the conversion of 2-(U-{sup 14}C)ketoglutarate to {sup 14}C-labeled glutamate in the reaction catalyzed by glutamate dehydrogenase. The efficiency of the method is close to 75%, its precision (coefficient of variation) close to 5%, and its sensitivity close to 0.1 pmol/sample. This simple and rapid method can be applied to the measurement of several metabolites and enzymatic activities. In the present study, its application to the assay of sorbitol, 3-hydroxybutyrate, glutamate dehydrogenase, 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is documented.

  13. Mechanistic insights into ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase catalysis involving the conserved glutamate in the active site.

    PubMed

    Dumit, Verónica I; Essigke, Timm; Cortez, Néstor; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2010-04-02

    Plant-type ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductases (FNRs) are flavoenzymes harboring one molecule of noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide that catalyze reversible reactions between obligatory one-electron carriers and obligatory two-electron carriers. A glutamate next to the C-terminus is strictly conserved in FNR and has been proposed to function as proton donor/acceptor during catalysis. However, experimental studies of this proposed function led to contradicting conclusions about the role of this glutamate in the catalytic mechanism. In the present work, we study the titration behavior of the glutamate in the active site of FNR using theoretical methods. Protonation probabilities for maize FNR were computed for the reaction intermediates of the catalytic cycle by Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations and Metropolis Monte Carlo titration. The titration behavior of the highly conserved glutamate was found to vary depending on the bound substrates NADP(H) and ferredoxin and also on the redox states of these substrates and the flavin adenine dinucleotide. Our results support the involvement of the glutamate in the FNR catalytic mechanism not only as a proton donor but also as a key residue for stabilizing and destabilizing reaction intermediates. On the basis of our findings, we propose a model rationalizing the function of the glutamate in the reaction cycle, which allows reinterpretation of previous experimental results. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The retinaldehyde reductase activity of DHRS3 is reciprocally activated by retinol dehydrogenase 10 to control retinoid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mark K; Belyaeva, Olga V; Wu, Lizhi; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2014-05-23

    The retinoic acid-inducible dehydrogenase reductase 3 (DHRS3) is thought to function as a retinaldehyde reductase that controls the levels of all-trans-retinaldehyde, the immediate precursor for bioactive all-trans-retinoic acid. However, the weak catalytic activity of DHRS3 and the lack of changes in retinaldehyde conversion to retinol and retinoic acid in the cells overexpressing DHRS3 undermine its role as a physiologically important all-trans-retinaldehyde reductase. This study demonstrates that DHRS3 requires the presence of retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) to display its full catalytic activity. The RDH10-activated DHRS3 acts as a robust high affinity all-trans-retinaldehyde-specific reductase that effectively converts retinaldehyde back to retinol, decreasing the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis. In turn, the retinol dehydrogenase activity of RDH10 is reciprocally activated by DHRS3. At E13.5, DHRS3-null embryos have ∼4-fold lower levels of retinol and retinyl esters, but only slightly elevated levels of retinoic acid. The membrane-associated retinaldehyde reductase and retinol dehydrogenase activities are decreased by ∼4- and ∼2-fold, respectively, in Dhrs3(-/-) embryos, and Dhrs3(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit reduced metabolism of both retinaldehyde and retinol. Neither RDH10 nor DHRS3 has to be itself catalytically active to activate each other. The transcripts encoding DHRS3 and RDH10 are co-localized at least in some tissues during development. The mutually activating interaction between the two related proteins may represent a highly sensitive and conserved mechanism for precise control over the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis.

  15. The Retinaldehyde Reductase Activity of DHRS3 Is Reciprocally Activated by Retinol Dehydrogenase 10 to Control Retinoid Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Mark K.; Belyaeva, Olga V.; Wu, Lizhi; Kedishvili, Natalia Y.

    2014-01-01

    The retinoic acid-inducible dehydrogenase reductase 3 (DHRS3) is thought to function as a retinaldehyde reductase that controls the levels of all-trans-retinaldehyde, the immediate precursor for bioactive all-trans-retinoic acid. However, the weak catalytic activity of DHRS3 and the lack of changes in retinaldehyde conversion to retinol and retinoic acid in the cells overexpressing DHRS3 undermine its role as a physiologically important all-trans-retinaldehyde reductase. This study demonstrates that DHRS3 requires the presence of retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10) to display its full catalytic activity. The RDH10-activated DHRS3 acts as a robust high affinity all-trans-retinaldehyde-specific reductase that effectively converts retinaldehyde back to retinol, decreasing the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis. In turn, the retinol dehydrogenase activity of RDH10 is reciprocally activated by DHRS3. At E13.5, DHRS3-null embryos have ∼4-fold lower levels of retinol and retinyl esters, but only slightly elevated levels of retinoic acid. The membrane-associated retinaldehyde reductase and retinol dehydrogenase activities are decreased by ∼4- and ∼2-fold, respectively, in Dhrs3−/− embryos, and Dhrs3−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibit reduced metabolism of both retinaldehyde and retinol. Neither RDH10 nor DHRS3 has to be itself catalytically active to activate each other. The transcripts encoding DHRS3 and RDH10 are co-localized at least in some tissues during development. The mutually activating interaction between the two related proteins may represent a highly sensitive and conserved mechanism for precise control over the rate of retinoic acid biosynthesis. PMID:24733397

  16. A bifunctional enzyme from Rhodococcus erythropolis exhibiting secondary alcohol dehydrogenase-catalase activities.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Rojas, Enriqueta; Kurt, Tutku; Schmidt, Udo; Meyer, Vera; Garbe, Leif-Alexander

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases have long been recognized as potential biocatalyst for production of chiral fine and bulk chemicals. They are relevant for industry in enantiospecific production of chiral compounds. In this study, we identified and purified a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-dependent secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SdcA) from Rhodococcus erythropolis oxidizing γ-lactols into γ-lactones. SdcA showed broad substrate specificity on γ-lactols; secondary aliphatic alcohols with 8 and 10 carbon atoms were also substrates and oxidized with (2S)-stereospecificity. The enzyme exhibited moderate stability with a half-life of 5 h at 40 °C and 20 days at 4 °C. Mass spectrometric identification revealed high sequence coverage of SdcA amino acid sequence to a highly conserved catalase from R. erythropolis. The corresponding encoding gene was isolated from genomic DNA and subsequently overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21 DE3 cells. In addition, the recombinant SdcA was purified and characterized in order to confirm that the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase and catalase activity correspond to the same enzyme.

  17. [Imbalance of system of glutamin - glutamic acid in the placenta and amniotic fluid at placental insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Pogorelova, T N; Gunko, V O; Linde, V A

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamine and glutamic acid has been investigated in the placenta and amniotic fluid under conditions of placental insufficiency. The development of placental insufficiency is characterized by the increased content of glutamic acid and a decrease of glutamine in both placenta and amniotic fluid. These changes changes were accompanied by changes in the activity of enzymes involved in the metabolism of these amino acids. There was a decrease in glutamate dehydrogenase activity and an increase in glutaminase activity with the simultaneous decrease of glutamine synthetase activity. The compensatory decrease in the activity of glutamine keto acid aminotransferase did not prevent a decrease in the glutamine level. The impairments in the system glutamic acid-glutamine were more pronounced during the development of premature labor.

  18. Asymmetry of the Active Site Loop Conformation between Subunits of Glutamate-1-semialdehyde Aminomutase in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Campanini, Barbara; di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Mozzarelli, Andrea; Contestabile, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminomutase (GSAM) is a dimeric, pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP)- dependent enzyme catalysing in plants and some bacteria the isomerization of L-glutamate-1-semialdehyde to 5-aminolevulinate, a common precursor of chlorophyll, haem, coenzyme B12, and other tetrapyrrolic compounds. During the catalytic cycle, the coenzyme undergoes conversion from pyridoxamine 5′-phosphate (PMP) to PLP. The entrance of the catalytic site is protected by a loop that is believed to switch from an open to a closed conformation during catalysis. Crystallographic studies indicated that the structure of the mobile loop is related to the form of the cofactor bound to the active site, allowing for asymmetry within the dimer. Since no information on structural and functional asymmetry of the enzyme in solution is available in the literature, we investigated the active site accessibility by determining the cofactor fluorescence quenching of PMP- and PLP-GSAM forms. PLP-GSAM is partially quenched by potassium iodide, suggesting that at least one catalytic site is accessible to the anionic quencher and therefore confirming the asymmetry observed in the crystal structure. Iodide induces release of the cofactor from PMP-GSAM, apparently from only one catalytic site, therefore suggesting an asymmetry also in this form of the enzyme in solution, in contrast with the crystallographic data. PMID:23984351

  19. Increasing thermal stability and catalytic activity of glutamate decarboxylase in E. coli: An in silico study.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Yasaman; Esmaeili, Abolghasem; Saber, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is an enzyme that converts l-glutamate to gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) that is a widely used drug to treat mental disorders like Alzheimer's disease. In this study for the first time point mutation was performed virtually in the active site of the E. coli GAD in order to increase thermal stability and catalytic activity of the enzyme. Energy minimization and addition of water box were performed using GROMACS 5.4.6 package. PoPMuSiC 2.1 web server was used to predict potential spots for point mutation and Modeller software was used to perform point mutation on three dimensional model. Molegro virtual docker software was used for cavity detection and stimulated docking study. Results indicate that performing mutation separately at positions 164, 302, 304, 393, 396, 398 and 410 increase binding affinity to substrate. The enzyme is predicted to be more thermo- stable in all 7 mutants based on ΔΔG value.

  20. Genistein inhibits activities of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and lactate dehydrogenase, enzymes which use NADH as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Michał; Banecki, Bogdan; Kadziński, Leszek; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Kaźmierkiewicz, Rajmund; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Banecka-Majkutewicz, Zyta

    2015-09-25

    Genistein (5, 7-dihydroxy-3- (4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) is a natural isoflavone revealing many biological activities. Thus, it is considered as a therapeutic compound in as various disorders as cancer, infections and genetic diseases. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that genistein inhibits activities of bacterial methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Both enzymes use NADH as a substrate, and results of biochemical as well as molecular modeling studies with MetF suggest that genistein may interfere with binding of this dinucleotide to the enzyme. These results have implications for our understanding of biological functions of genistein and its effects on cellular metabolism.

  1. The separate roles of PQQ and apo-enzyme syntheses in the regulation of glucose dehydrogenase activity in Klebsiella pneumoniae NCTC 418.

    PubMed

    Hommes, R W; Herman, P T; Postma, P W; Tempest, D W; Neijssel, O M

    1989-01-01

    No holoenzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-dependent glucose dehydrogenase and only very low apoenzyme levels could be detected in cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae, growing anaerobically, or carrying out a fumarate or nitrate respiration. Low glucose dehydrogenase activity in some aerobic glucose-excess cultures of K. pneumoniae (ammonia or sulphate limitation) was increased significantly by addition of PQQ, whereas in cells already possessing a high glucose dehydrogenase activity (phosphate or potassium limitation) extra PQQ had almost no effect. These observations indicate that the glucose dehydrogenase activity in K. pneumoniae is modulated by both PQQ synthesis and synthesis of the glucose dehydrogenase apo-enzyme.

  2. Activation of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Potentiates Heteromeric Kainate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wetherington, Jonathon; Shaw, Renee; Serrano, Geidy; Swanger, Sharon; Dingledine, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Kainate receptors (KARs), a family of ionotropic glutamate receptors, are widely expressed in the central nervous system and are critically involved in synaptic transmission. KAR activation is influenced by metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGlu) signaling, but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. We undertook studies to examine how mGlu modulation affects activation of KARs. Confocal immunohistochemistry of rat hippocampus and cultured rat cortex revealed colocalization of the high-affinity KAR subunits with group I mGlu receptors. In hippocampal and cortical cultures, the calcium signal caused by activation of native KARs was potentiated by activation of group I mGlu receptors. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, activation of group I mGlu receptors potentiated heteromeric but not homomeric KAR-mediated currents, with no change in agonist potency. The potentiation of heteromeric KARs by mGlu1 activation was attenuated by GDPβS, blocked by an inhibitor of phospholipase C or the calcium chelator 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), prolonged by the phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, but unaffected by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor lavendustin A. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition reduced the potentiation by mGlu1 of GluK2/GluK5, and conversely, direct activation of PKC by phorbol 12-myristate,13-acetate potentiated GluK2/GluK5. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified three serines (Ser833, Ser836, and Ser840) within the membrane proximal region of the GluK5 C-terminal domain that, in combination, are required for mGlu1-mediated potentiation of KARs. Together, these data suggest that phosphorylation of key residues in the C-terminal domain changes the overall charge of this domain, resulting in potentiated agonist responses. PMID:23066089

  3. Down-regulation of Na+-coupled glutamate transporter EAAT3 and EAAT4 by AMP-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Sopjani, Mentor; Alesutan, Ioana; Dërmaku-Sopjani, Miribane; Fraser, Scott; Kemp, Bruce E; Föller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2010-06-01

    The glutamate transporters EAAT3 and EAAT4 are expressed in neurons. They contribute to the cellular uptake of glutamate and aspartate and thus to the clearance of the excitatory transmitters from the extracellular space. During ischemia, extracellular accumulation of glutamate may trigger excitotoxicity. Energy depletion leads to activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a kinase enhancing energy production and limiting energy expenditure. The present study thus explored the possibility that AMPK regulates EAAT3 and/or EAAT4. To this end, EAAT3 or EAAT4 were expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without AMPK and electrogenic glutamate transport determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. In EAAT3- and in EAAT4-expressing oocytes glutamate generated a current (I(g)), which was half maximal (K(M)) at 74 microM (EAAT3) or at 4 microM (EAAT4) glutamate. Co-expression of constitutively active (gammaR70Q)AMPK or of wild type AMPK did not affect K(M) but significantly decreased the maximal I(g) in both EAAT3- (by 34%) and EAAT4- (by 49%) expressing oocytes. Co-expression of the inactive mutant (alphaK45R)AMPK [alpha1(K45R)beta1gamma1] did not appreciably affect I(g). According to confocal microscopy and chemiluminescence co-expression of (gammaR70Q)AMPK or of wild type AMPK reduced the membrane abundance of EAAT3 and EAAT4. The observations show that AMPK down-regulates Na(+)-coupled glutamate transport.

  4. Nutrient deprivation induces the Warburg effect through ROS/AMPK-dependent activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-An; Chao, Yee; Shiah, Shine-Gwo; Lin, Wan-Wan

    2013-05-01

    The Warburg effect is known to be crucial for cancer cells to acquire energy. Nutrient deficiencies are an important phenomenon in solid tumors, but the effect on cancer cell metabolism is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrate that starvation of HeLa cells by incubation with Hank's buffered salt solution (HBSS) induced cell apoptosis, which was accompanied by the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation. Notably, HBSS starvation increased lactate production, cytoplasmic pyruvate content and decreased oxygen consumption, but failed to change the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity or the glucose uptake. We found that HBSS starvation rapidly induced pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) activation and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) phosphorylation, both of which were inhibited by compound C (an AMPK inhibitor), NAC (a ROS scavenger), and the dominant negative mutant of AMPK. Our data further revealed the involvement of ROS production in AMPK activation. Moreover, DCA (a PDK inhibitor), NAC, and compound C all significantly decreased HBSS starvation-induced lactate production accompanied by enhancement of HBSS starvation-induced cell apoptosis. Not only in HeLa cells, HBSS-induced lactate production and PDH phosphorylation were also observed in CL1.5, A431 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, we for the first time demonstrated that a low-nutrient condition drives cancer cells to utilize glycolysis to produce ATP, and this increases the Warburg effect through a novel mechanism involving ROS/AMPK-dependent activation of PDK. Such an event contributes to protecting cells from apoptosis upon nutrient deprivation.

  5. Physiological and fermentation properties of Bacillus coagulans and a mutant lacking fermentative lactate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Yue; Rhee, Mun Su; Ingram, Lonnie O; Shanmugam, K T

    2011-03-01

    Bacillus coagulans, a sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, grows optimally at 50-55 °C and produces lactic acid as the primary fermentation product from both hexoses and pentoses. The amount of fungal cellulases required for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 55 °C was previously reported to be three to four times lower than for SSF at the optimum growth temperature for Saccharomyces cerevisiae of 35 °C. An ethanologenic B. coagulans is expected to lower the cellulase loading and production cost of cellulosic ethanol due to SSF at 55 °C. As a first step towards developing B. coagulans as an ethanologenic microbial biocatalyst, activity of the primary fermentation enzyme L-lactate dehydrogenase was removed by mutation (strain Suy27). Strain Suy27 produced ethanol as the main fermentation product from glucose during growth at pH 7.0 (0.33 g ethanol per g glucose fermented). Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) acting in series contributed to about 55% of the ethanol produced by this mutant while pyruvate formate lyase and ADH were responsible for the remainder. Due to the absence of PDH activity in B. coagulans during fermentative growth at pH 5.0, the l-ldh mutant failed to grow anaerobically at pH 5.0. Strain Suy27-13, a derivative of the l-ldh mutant strain Suy27, that produced PDH activity during anaerobic growth at pH 5.0 grew at this pH and also produced ethanol as the fermentation product (0.39 g per g glucose). These results show that construction of an ethanologenic B. coagulans requires optimal expression of PDH activity in addition to the removal of the LDH activity to support growth and ethanol production.

  6. Naphthazarin protects against glutamate-induced neuronal death via activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Tae Gen; Kawamoto, Elisa M.; Yu, Qian-Sheng; Greig, Nigel H.; Mattson, Mark P.; Camandola, Simonetta

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Naphthazarin activates the Nrf2/ARE pathway. •Naphthazarin induces Nrf2-driven genes in neurons and astrocytes. •Naphthazarin protects neurons against excitotoxicity. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway is an important cellular stress response pathway involved in neuroprotection. We previously screened several natural phytochemicals and identified plumbagin as a novel activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway that can protect neurons against ischemic injury. Here we extended our studies to natural and synthetic derivatives of plumbagin. We found that 5,8-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (naphthazarin) is a potent activator of the Nrf2/ARE pathway, up-regulates the expression of Nrf2-driven genes in primary neuronal and glial cultures, and protects neurons against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity.

  7. Nitric oxide facilitates active avoidance learning via enhancement of glutamate levels in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi; Pan, De-Xi; Wang, Dan; Wan, Peng; Qiu, De-Lai; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2014-09-01

    The hippocampus is a key structure for learning and memory in mammals, and long-term potentiation (LTP) is an important cellular mechanism responsible for learning and memory. Despite a number of studies indicating that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the formation and maintenance of LTP as a retrograde messenger, few studies have used neurotransmitter release as a visual indicator in awake animals to explore the role of NO in learning-dependent long-term enhancement of synaptic efficiency. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of l-NMMA (a NO synthase inhibitor) and SNP (a NO donor) on extracellular glutamate (Glu) concentrations and amplitudes of field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP) were measured in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) region during the acquisition and extinction of active-avoidance behavior in freely-moving conscious rats. In the control group, the extracellular concentration of Glu in the DG was significantly increased during the acquisition of active-avoidance behavior and gradually returned to baseline levels following extinction training. In the experimental group, the change in Glu concentration was significantly reduced by local microinjection of l-NMMA, as was the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior. In contrast, the change in Glu concentration was significantly enhanced by SNP, and the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior was significantly accelerated. Furthermore, in all groups, the changes in extracellular Glu were accompanied by corresponding changes in fEPSP amplitude and active-avoidance behavior. Our results suggest that NO in the hippocampal DG facilitates active avoidance learning via enhancements of glutamate levels and synaptic efficiency in rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Visualization of glutamate as a volume transmitter.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Yohei; Iino, Masamitsu

    2011-02-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. Although glutamate mediates synaptically confined point-to-point transmission, it has been suggested that under certain conditions glutamate may escape from the synaptic cleft (glutamate spillover), accumulate in the extrasynaptic space, and mediate volume transmission to regulate important brain functions. However, the inability to directly measure glutamate dynamics around active synapses has limited our understanding of glutamatergic volume transmission. The recent development of a family of fluorescent glutamate indicators has enabled the visualization of extrasynaptic glutamate dynamics in brain tissues. In this topical review, we examine glutamate as a volume transmitter based on novel results of glutamate imaging in the brain.

  9. The activity of class I, II, III and IV alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase in ovarian cancer and ovarian cysts.

    PubMed

    Orywal, K; Jelski, W; Zdrodowski, M; Szmitkowski, M

    2013-01-01

    The metabolism of cancerous cells is in many ways different than in healthy cells. In ovarian cancer, cells exhibit activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which participate in metabolism of many biological substances. The aim of this study was to compare the metabolism of ovarian cancer cells, ovarian cysts and normal ovarian cells by measurement of ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activities. The study material consisted of 36 cancerous ovarian tissues. Class III, IV of ADH and total ADH activity was measured by the photometric method and class I, II ADH and ALDH activity by the fluorometric method with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. The activity of the class I ADH isoenzyme and the total ADH was significantly higher in ovarian cancer as compared to ovarian cysts and healthy tissues but there are no significant differences between ovarian cysts and healthy cells. The other classes of ADH tested, did not show significant differences between activity of cancerous cells and healthy ovary. The increased activity of total ADH in ovarian cancer, especially the class I isoenzyme and normal activity of ALDH, may be the factor for the disturbances in important biological substances metabolism and could increase the concentration of highly carcinogenic acetaldehyde.

  10. [Blocking action of Nephila clavata spider toxin on ionic currents activated by glutamate and its agonists in isolated hippocampal neurons].

    PubMed

    Kiskin, N I; Kliuchko, E M; Kryshtal', O A; Tsyndrenko, A Ia; Akaike, N

    1989-01-01

    The blocking action of the Nephila clavata spider neurotoxin was studied using the concentration clamp method in isolated neurons of the rat hippocampus. Crude venom JSTX blocked L-glutamate-, quisqualate- and kainate-activated ionic currents mediated by activation of the non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (non-NMDA) membrane receptors. Ionic currents elicited by all agonists were depressed by crude JSTX venom to 34-35% of its initial amplitude with no recovery during prolonged washing. An active fraction of JSTX venom blocked ionic currents almost completely, but its action was partially reversible. The concentration dependences of blocking kinetics allowed determining the rate constants of JSTX interaction with glutamate receptors. It is supposed that JSTX blocks the non-NMDA ionic channels in some of their open states and may be one of useful tools in further biochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the glutamate-mediated synaptic transmission.

  11. Neuronal activity mediated regulation of glutamate transporter GLT‐1 surface diffusion in rat astrocytes in dissociated and slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Al Awabdh, Sana; Gupta‐Agarwal, Swati; Sheehan, David F.; Muir, James; Norkett, Rosalind; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Griffin, Lewis D.

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic GLT‐1 (or EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter for clearing synaptic glutamate. While the diffusion dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors at the neuronal surface are well understood, far less is known regarding the surface trafficking of transporters in subcellular domains of the astrocyte membrane. Here, we have used live‐cell imaging to study the mechanisms regulating GLT‐1 surface diffusion in astrocytes in dissociated and brain slice cultures. Using GFP‐time lapse imaging, we show that GLT‐1 forms stable clusters that are dispersed rapidly and reversibly upon glutamate treatment in a transporter activity‐dependent manner. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single particle tracking using quantum dots revealed that clustered GLT‐1 is more stable than diffuse GLT‐1 and that glutamate increases GLT‐1 surface diffusion in the astrocyte membrane. Interestingly, the two main GLT‐1 isoforms expressed in the brain, GLT‐1a and GLT‐1b, are both found to be stabilized opposed to synapses under basal conditions, with GLT‐1b more so. GLT‐1 surface mobility is increased in proximity to activated synapses and alterations of neuronal activity can bidirectionally modulate the dynamics of both GLT‐1 isoforms. Altogether, these data reveal that astrocytic GLT‐1 surface mobility, via its transport activity, is modulated during neuronal firing, which may be a key process for shaping glutamate clearance and glutamatergic synaptic transmission. GLIA 2016;64:1252–1264 PMID:27189737

  12. Activation and inactivation of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase with pyridoxal compounds.

    PubMed

    Sogin, D C; Plapp, B V

    1975-01-10

    Pyridoxal compounds can either activate or inactivate horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase in differential labeling experiments. Amino groups outside of the active sites were modified with ethyl acetimidate, while the amino groups in the active sites were protected by the formation of the complex with NAD-plus and pyrazole. After removal of the NAD-plus and pyranzole, the partially acetimidylated enzyme was reductively alkylated with pyridoxal and NaBH4, with the incorporation of one pyridoxal group per subunit of the enzyme. The turnover numbers for the reaction of NAD-plus and ethanol increased by 15-fold, and for NADH and acetaldehyde by 32-fold. The Michaelis and inhibition constants increased 80-fold or more. Pyridoxal phosphate and NaBH4 also modified one group per subunit, but the turnover numbers decreased by 10-fold and the kinetic constants were intermediate between those obtained for pyridoxyl alcohol dehydrogenase and the partially acetimidylated enzyme. With native enzyme, the rates of dissociation of the enzyme-coenzyme complexes are rate-limiting in the catalytic reactions. The pyridoxyl enzyme is activated because the rates of dissociation of the enzyme-coenzyme complexes are increased. The rates of binding of coenzyme to phosphopyridoxyl enzyme have decreased due to the introduction of the negatively charged phosphate. The size of the group is not responsible for this decrease since these rates are not greatly decreased by the incorporation of pyridoxal. For both pyrodoxal and phosphopyridoxyl alcohol dehydrogenases, the interconversion of the ternary complex is at least partially rate-limiting. Chymotryptic-tryptic digestion of pryidoxyl enzyme produced a major peptide corresponding to residues 219 to 229, in which Lys 228 had reacted with pyridoxal. The same lysine residue reacted with pyridoxal phosphate.

  13. Cost-effectiveness of a modified two-step algorithm using a combined glutamate dehydrogenase/toxin enzyme immunoassay and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Vasoo, Shawn; Stevens, Jane; Portillo, Lena; Barza, Ruby; Schejbal, Debra; Wu, May May; Chancey, Christina; Singh, Kamaljit

    2014-02-01

    The analytical performance and cost-effectiveness of the Wampole Toxin A/B EIA, the C. Diff. Quik Chek Complete (CdQCC) (a combined glutamate dehydrogenase antigen/toxin enzyme immunoassay), two RT-PCR assays (Progastro Cd and BD GeneOhm) and a modified two-step algorithm using the CdQCC reflexed to RT-PCR for indeterminate results were compared. The sensitivity of the Wampole Toxin A/B EIA, CdQCC (GDH antigen), BD GeneOhm and Progastro Cd RT-PCR were 85.4%, 95.8%, 100% and 93.8%, respectively. The algorithm provided rapid results for 86% of specimens and the remaining indeterminate results were resolved by RT-PCR, offering the best balance of sensitivity and cost savings per test (algorithm ∼US$13.50/test versus upfront RT-PCR ∼US$26.00/test). Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Clostridium difficile testing algorithms using glutamate dehydrogenase antigen and C. difficile toxin enzyme immunoassays with C. difficile nucleic acid amplification testing increase diagnostic yield in a tertiary pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Ota, Kaede V; McGowan, Karin L

    2012-04-01

    We evaluated the performance of the rapid C. diff Quik Chek Complete's glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (GDH) and toxin A/B (CDT) tests in two algorithmic approaches for a tertiary pediatric population: algorithm 1 entailed initial testing with GDH/CDT followed by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP), and algorithm 2 entailed GDH/CDT followed by cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA) for adjudication of discrepant GDH-positive/CDT-negative results. A true positive (TP) was defined as positivity by CCNA or positivity by LAMP plus another test (GDH, CDT, or the Premier C. difficile toxin A and B enzyme immunoassay [P-EIA]). A total of 141 specimens from 141 patients yielded 27 TPs and 19% prevalence. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 56%, 100%, 100%, and 90% for P-EIA and 81%, 100%, 100%, and 96% for both algorithm 1 and algorithm 2. In summary, GDH-based algorithms detected C. difficile infections with superior sensitivity compared to P-EIA. The algorithms allowed immediate reporting of half of all TPs, but LAMP or CCNA was required to confirm the presence or absence of toxigenic C. difficile in GDH-positive/CDT-negative specimens.

  15. Evaluation of the C.Diff Quik Chek Complete Assay, a new glutamate dehydrogenase and A/B toxin combination lateral flow assay for use in rapid, simple diagnosis of clostridium difficile disease.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Susan E; Ruden, Lila O; Pohl, Julie C; Hatcher, Patricia A; Jayne, Linda M; Ivie, W Michael

    2010-06-01

    The diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection continues to be a challenge for many clinical microbiology laboratories. A new lateral flow assay, the C.Diff Quik Chek Complete assay, which tests for the presence of both glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and C. difficile toxins A and B, was evaluated for its ability to diagnose C. difficile disease. The results of this assay were compared to those of both PCR and toxigenic culture. The results showed that this assay allows 88% of specimens to be accurately screened as either positive (both tests positive) or negative (both tests negative) for the presence of toxigenic C. difficile in less than 30 min and with minimal hands-on time. Use of a random-access PCR for the analysis of specimens with discrepant results (one test positive and the other negative) allows the easy, rapid, and highly sensitive (100%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 89.6 to 100%) and specific (99.6%; 95% CI, 97.3 to 99.9%) diagnosis of C. difficile disease. The use of this algorithm would save institutional costs, curtail unnecessary isolation days, reduce the nosocomial transmission of disease, and increase the quality of care for patients.

  16. Effect of L-glutamate on 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed Central

    Shigeoka, S; Hanaoka, T; Kishi, N; Nakano, Y

    1992-01-01

    The effect of tricarboxylic acid-cycle intermediates and related compounds on 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase activity was investigated. The addition of L-glutamate to Euglena cells grown on glucose/(NH4)2SO4 medium resulted in an increase in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase activity, which was abolished by the simultaneous addition of cycloheximide. Immunochemical titration, immunoblot analysis and labelling in vivo with antibody raised against 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase showed that the increase in 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase activity was due to synthesis of new protein and not to activation of pre-existing protein. The experimental results reported here demonstrate that L-glutamate is assimilated by the pathway, via 2-oxoglutarate, that consists of L-glutamate-oxaloacetate aminotransferase, 2-oxoglutarate decarboxylase and succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase, rather than by the gamma-aminobutyrate shunt, consisting of L-glutamate decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyrate aminotransferase. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1347680

  17. Human placental glucose dehydrogenase: IEF polymorphism in two Italian populations and enzyme activity in the six common phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Scacchi, R; Corbo, R M; Calzolari, E; Laconi, G; Palmarino, R; Lucarelli, P

    1985-01-01

    Glucose dehydrogenase (hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) has been assayed qualitatively and quantitatively in more than 600 human placentae collected in two Italian populations. The gene frequencies for GDH1, GDH2 and GDH3 were, respectively, 0.66, 0.21 and 0.12 in Continental Italy and 0.65, 0.23 and 0.12 in Sardinia. Among the six common phenotypes there was no difference in catalytic activity.

  18. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors regulates ribosomes of cochlear nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Carzoli, Kathryn L; Hyson, Richard L

    2014-01-01

    The brain stem auditory system of the chick is an advantageous model for examining changes that occur as a result of deafness. Elimination of acoustic input through cochlear ablation results in the eventual death of approximately 30% of neurons in the chick cochlear nucleus, nucleus magnocellularis (NM). One early change following deafness is an alteration in NM ribosomes, evidenced both by a decrease in protein synthesis and reduction in antigenicity for Y10B, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a ribosomal epitope. Previous studies have shown that mGluR activation is necessary to maintain Y10B antigenicity and NM viability. What is still unclear, however, is whether or not mGluR activation is sufficient to prevent deafness-induced changes in these neurons, or if other activity-dependent factors are also necessary. The current study investigated the ability of mGluR activation to regulate cochlear nucleus ribosomes in the absence of auditory nerve input. In vitro methods were employed to periodically pressure eject glutamate or mGluR agonists over neurons on one side of a slice preparation leaving the opposite side of the same slice untreated. Immunohistochemistry was then performed using Y10B in order to assess ribosomal changes. Application of glutamate and both group I and II selective mGluR agonists effectively rescued ribosomal antigenicity on the treated side of the slice in comparison to ribosomes on the untreated side. These findings suggest that administration of mGluR agonists is sufficient to reduce the early interruption of normal ribosomal integrity that is typically seen following loss of auditory nerve activity.

  19. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase

    SciTech Connect

    Piao, L.-H.; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, C.-Y.; Liu Tao; Yue, H.-Y.; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2009-02-20

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na{sup +}-channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  20. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase.

    PubMed

    Piao, Lian-Hua; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, Chang-Yu; Liu, Tao; Yue, Hai-Yuan; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2009-02-20

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na(+)-channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  1. Gene expression profiles of prostate cancer stem cells isolated by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity assay.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Sachiyo; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Akari; Masumori, Naoya; Tsukamoto, Taiji; Sato, Noriyuki

    2012-07-01

    Prostate cancer cells include a small population of cancer stem-like/cancer initiating cells, which have roles in cancer initiation and progression. Recently aldehyde dehydrogenase activity was used to isolate stem cells of various cancer and normal cells. We evaluated the aldehyde dehydrogenase activity of the human prostate cancer cell line 22Rv1 (ATCC®) with the ALDEFLUOR® assay and determined its potency as prostate cancer stem-like/cancer initiating cells. The human prostate cancer cell line 22Rv1 was labeled with ALDEFLUOR reagent and analyzed by flow cytometry. ALDH1(high) and ALDH1(low) cells were isolated and tumorigenicity was evaluated by xenograft transplantation into NOD/SCID mice. Tumor sphere forming ability was evaluated by culturing in a floating condition. Invasion capability was evaluated by the Matrigel™ invasion assay. Gene expression profiling was assessed by microarrays and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. ALDH1(high) cells were detected in 6.8% of 22Rv1 cells, which showed significantly higher tumorigenicity than ALDH1(low) cells in NOD/SCID mice (p < 0.05). Gene expression profiling revealed higher expression of the stem cell related genes PROM1 and NKX3-1 in ALDH1(high) cells than in ALDH1(low) cells. ALDH1(high) cells also showed higher invasive capability and sphere forming capability than ALDH1(low) cells. Results indicate that cancer stem-like/cancer initiating cells are enriched in the ALDH1(high) population of the prostate cancer cell line 22Rv1. This approach may provide a breakthrough to further clarify prostate cancer stem-like/cancer initiating cells. To our knowledge this is the first report of cancer stem-like/cancer initiating cells of 22Rv1 using the aldehyde dehydrogenase activity assay. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Glutamatergic inputs and glutamate-releasing immature inhibitory inputs activate a shared postsynaptic receptor population in lateral superior olive

    PubMed Central

    Alamilla, Javier; Gillespie, Deda C

    2013-01-01

    Principal cells of the lateral superior olive (LSO) compute interaural intensity differences by comparing converging excitatory and inhibitory inputs. The excitatory input carries information from the ipsilateral ear and the inhibitory input carries information from the contralateral ear. Throughout life, the excitatory input pathway releases glutamate. In adulthood, the inhibitory input pathway releases glycine. During a period of major developmental refinement in the LSO, however, synaptic terminals of the immature inhibitory input pathway release not only glycine, but also GABA and glutamate. To determine whether glutamate released by terminals in either pathway could spill over to activate postsynaptic NMDA receptors under the other pathway, we made whole-cell recordings from LSO principal cells in acute slices of neonatal rat brainstem bathed in the use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801, and stimulated in the two opposing pathways. We found that during the first postnatal week glutamate spillover occurs bidirectionally from both immature excitatory terminals and immature inhibitory terminals. We further found that a population of postsynaptic NMDA receptors is shared: glutamate released from either pathway can diffuse to and activate these receptors. We suggest that these shared receptors contain the GluN2B subunit and are located extrasynaptically. PMID:21907763

  3. The murI gene of Escherichia coli is an essential gene that encodes a glutamate racemase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Doublet, P; van Heijenoort, J; Bohin, J P; Mengin-Lecreulx, D

    1993-01-01

    The murI gene of Escherichia coli was recently identified on the basis of its ability to complement the only mutant requiring D-glutamic acid for growth that had been described to date: strain WM335 of E. coli B/r (P. Doublet, J. van Heijenoort, and D. Mengin-Lecreulx, J. Bacteriol. 174:5772-5779, 1992). We report experiments of insertional mutagenesis of the murI gene which demonstrate that this gene is essential for the biosynthesis of D-glutamic acid, one of the specific components of cell wall peptidoglycan. A special strategy was used for the construction of strains with a disrupted copy of murI, because of a limited capability of E. coli strains grown in rich medium to internalize D-glutamic acid. The murI gene product was overproduced and identified as a glutamate racemase activity. UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine (UDP-MurNAc-L-Ala), which is the nucleotide substrate of the D-glutamic-acid-adding enzyme (the murD gene product) catalyzing the subsequent step in the pathway for peptidoglycan synthesis, appears to be an effector of the racemase activity. Images PMID:8098327

  4. Novel biohybrids of layered double hydroxide and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Hidouri, Slah; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem

    2016-02-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biomolecule such as enzyme to produce bioinorganic system. Lactate dehydrogenase (Lac Deh) has been chosen as a model enzyme, being immobilized onto MgAl and ZnAl LDH materials via direct ion-exchange (adsorption) and co-precipitation methods. The immobilization efficiency was largely dependent upon the immobilization methods. A comparative study shows that the co-precipitation method favors the immobilization of great and tunable amount of enzyme. The structural behavior, chemical bonding composition and morphology of the resulting biohybrids were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The free and immobilized enzyme activity and kinetic parameters were also reported using UV-Visible spectroscopy. However, the modified LDH materials showed a decrease in crystallinity as compared to the unmodified LDH. The change in activity of the immobilized lactate dehydrogenase was considered to be due, to the reduced accessibility of substrate molecules to the active sites of the enzyme and the partial conformational change of the Lac Deh molecules as a result of the immobilization way. Finally, it was proven that there is a correlation between structure/microstructure and enzyme activity dependent on the immobilization process.

  5. Xanthine Dehydrogenase (XDH) cross-reacting material in mutants of Drosophila melanogaster deficient in XDH activity.

    PubMed

    Browder, L W; Tucker, L; Wilkes, J

    1982-02-01

    Rocket immunoelectrophoresis was used to estimate xanthine dehydrogenase cross-reacting material (XDH-CRM) in strains containing the cin and cin mutant genes, which are deficient in XDH enzymatic activity. CRM levels were determined as percentages of CRM in the Oregon-R wild-type strain. The mutant strains contain 72 and 76% of Oregon-R CRM, respectively. CRM levels in strains containing the XDH-deficient mutant genes lxd and mal are 93 and 105%, respectively. The high levels of CRM in these four mutant strains indicate that the primary effects of the mutant genes are on the function of XDH protein rather than its accumulation.

  6. Designing a highly active soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase for efficient glucose biosensors and biofuel cells.

    PubMed

    Durand, Fabien; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Flexer, Victoria; André, Isabelle; Mano, Nicolas

    2010-11-26

    We report for the first time a soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase that is twice more active than the wild type for glucose oxidation and was obtained by combining site directed mutagenesis, modelling and steady-state kinetics. The observed enhancement is attributed to a better interaction between the cofactor and the enzyme leading to a better electron transfer. Electrochemical experiments also demonstrate the superiority of the new mutant for glucose oxidation and make it a promising enzyme for the development of high-performance glucose biosensors and biofuel cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Al(III) and Nano-Al13 Species on Malate Dehydrogenase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al13 can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al13 concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al13 on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules. PMID:22163924

  8. Effects of Al(III) and nano-Al13 species on malate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaodi; Cai, Ling; Peng, Yu; Li, Huihui; Chen, Rong Fu; Shen, Ren Fang

    2011-01-01

    The effects of different aluminum species on malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activity were investigated by monitoring amperometric i-t curves for the oxidation of NADH at low overpotential using a functionalized multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). The results showed that Al(III) and Al(13) can activate the enzymatic activity of MDH, and the activation reaches maximum levels as the Al(III) and Al(13) concentration increase. Our study also found that the effects of Al(III) and Al(13) on the activity of MDH depended on the pH value and aluminum speciation. Electrochemical and circular dichroism spectra methods were applied to study the effects of nano-sized aluminum compounds on biomolecules.

  9. Glutamate Stimulates Local Protein Synthesis in the Axons of Rat Cortical Neurons by Activating α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptors and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Chung, Hui-Wen; Wu, Chih-Yueh; Wu, Huei-Ing; Lee, Yu-Tao; Chen, En-Chan; Fang, Weilun; Chang, Yen-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. By analyzing the metabolic incorporation of azidohomoalanine, a methionine analogue, in newly synthesized proteins, we find that glutamate treatments up-regulate protein translation not only in intact rat cortical neurons in culture but also in the axons emitting from cortical neurons before making synapses with target cells. The process by which glutamate stimulates local translation in axons begins with the binding of glutamate to the ionotropic AMPA receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 and members of group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptors on the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and the rise in Ca2+, resulting from Ca2+ influxes through calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, and transient receptor potential canonical channels, in axons stimulate the local translation machinery. For comparison, the enhancement effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the local protein synthesis in cortical axons were also studied. The results indicate that Ca2+ influxes via transient receptor potential canonical channels and activated the mTOR pathway in axons also mediate BDNF stimulation to local protein synthesis. However, glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of translation in axons exhibit different kinetics. Moreover, Ca2+ and mTOR signaling appear to play roles carrying different weights, respectively, in transducing glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of axonal translation. Thus, our results indicate that exposure to transient increases of glutamate and more lasting increases of BDNF would stimulate local protein synthesis in migrating axons en route to their targets in the developing brain. PMID:26134564

  10. [Effects of Light Near-Infrared Radiation on Rats Assessed by Succinate Dehydrogenase Activity in Lymphocytes on Blood Smears].

    PubMed

    Khunderyakova, N V; Zakharchenko, A V; Zakharchenko, M V; Muller, H; Fedotcheva, I; Kondrashova, M N

    2015-01-01

    Biological effects of light near infrared radiation (850 nm), with modulation acoustic frequency of 101 Hz, was studied. The study was conducted on rats, the effect was recorded by succinate dehydrogenase activity in lymphocytes on the blood smear after administration of the activating dose of adrenaline, which simulates the state of the organism in the early stages of the pathogenic effects (stress). A pronounced regulating effect of infrared radiation on the activity of succinate dehydrogenase in animals activated by adrenaline was shown. Infrared radiation has a normalizing effect reducing the degree of inhibition or activation of the enzyme induced by adrenaline and had no effect on the control animals. Thus, by modulating the activity of succinate dehydrogenase infrared radiation regulates energy production in the mitochondria supported by the most powerful oxidation substrate--succinic acid, which is especially pronounced under stress.

  11. [Activity of liver mitochondrial NAD+-dependent dehydrogenases of the krebs cycle in rats with acetaminophen-induced hepatitis developed under conditions of alimentary protein deficiency].

    PubMed

    Voloshchuk, O N; Kopylchuk, G P

    2016-01-01

    Activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and the NAD(+)/NADН ratio were studied in the liver mitochondrial fraction of rats with toxic hepatitis induced by acetaminophen under conditions of alimentary protein deprivation. Acetaminophen-induced hepatitis was characterized by a decrease of isocitrate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase activities, while the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio remained at the control level. Modeling of acetaminophen-induced hepatitis in rats with alimentary protein caused a more pronounced decrease in the activity of NAD(+)-dependent dehydrogenases studied and a 2.2-fold increase of the mitochondrial NAD(+)/NADН ratio. This suggests that alimentary protein deprivation potentiated drug-induced liver damage.

  12. Regulation of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase in Rhodospirillum rubrum: effects of CO and oxygen on synthesis and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bonam, D; Lehman, L; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1989-01-01

    Exposure of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum to carbon monoxide led to increased carbon monoxide dehydrogenase and hydrogenase activities due to de novo protein synthesis of both enzymes. Two-dimensional gels of [35S]methionine-pulse-labeled cells showed that induction of CO dehydrogenase synthesis was rapidly initiated (less than 5 min upon exposure to CO) and was inhibited by oxygen. Both CO dehydrogenase and the CO-induced hydrogenase were inactivated by oxygen in vivo and in vitro. In contrast to CO dehydrogenase, the CO-induced hydrogenase was 95% inactivated by heating at 70 degrees C for 5 min. Unlike other hydrogenases, this CO-induced hydrogenase was inhibited only 60% by a 100% CO gas phase. Images PMID:2498285

  13. Enhancing poly-γ-glutamic acid production in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by introducing the glutamate synthesis features from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Quan, Yufen; Gu, Yanyan; Liu, Fenghong; Huang, Xiaozhong; Shen, Haosheng; Dang, Yulei; Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Weixia; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yi; Song, Cunjiang; Wang, Shufang

    2017-05-22

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a valuable polymer with glutamate as its sole precursor. Enhancement of the intracellular glutamate synthesis is a very important strategy for the improvement of γ-PGA production, especially for those glutamate-independent γ-PGA producing strains. Corynebacterium glutamicum has long been used for industrial glutamate production and it exhibits some unique features for glutamate synthesis; therefore introduction of these metabolic characters into the γ-PGA producing strain might lead to increased intracellular glutamate availability, and thus ultimate γ-PGA production. In this study, the unique glutamate synthesis features from C. glutamicum was introduced into the glutamate-independent γ-PGA producing Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NK-1 strain. After introducing the energy-saving NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADPH-GDH) pathway, the NK-1 (pHT315-gdh) strain showed slightly increase (by 9.1%) in γ-PGA production. Moreover, an optimized metabolic toggle switch for controlling the expression of ɑ-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC) was introduced into the NK-1 strain, because it was previously shown that the ODHC in C. glutamicum was completely inhibited when glutamate was actively produced. The obtained NK-PO1 (pHT01-xylR) strain showed 66.2% higher γ-PGA production than the NK-1 strain. However, the further combination of these two strategies (introducing both NADPH-GDH pathway and the metabolic toggle switch) did not lead to further increase of γ-PGA production but rather the resultant γ-PGA production was even lower than that in the NK-1 strain. We proposed new metabolic engineering strategies to improve the γ-PGA production in B. amyloliquefaciens. The NK-1 (pHT315-gdh) strain with the introduction of NADPH-GDH pathway showed 9.1% improvement in γ-PGA production. The NK-PO1 (pHT01-xylR) strain with the introduction of a metabolic toggle switch for controlling the expression of ODHC showed 66.2% higher

  14. Ceftriaxone modulates uptake activity of glial glutamate transporter-1 against global brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu-Yan; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Min; Wang, Dan; Li, Li; Li, Wen-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Ceftriaxone(Cef) selectively increases the expression of glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), which was thought to be neuroprotective in some circumstances. However, the effect of Cef on glutamate uptake of GLT-1 was mostly assayed using in vitro studies such as primary neuron/astrocyte cultures or brain slices. In addition, the effect of Cef on neurons in different ischemic models was still discrepant. Therefore, this study was undertaken to observe the effect of Cef on neurons in global brain ischemia in rats, and especially to provide direct evidence of the up-regulation of GLT-1 uptake for glutamate contributing to the neuronal protection of Cef against brain ischemia. Neuropathological evaluation indicated that administration of Cef, especially pre-treatment protocols, significantly prevented delayed neuronal death in hippocampal CA1 subregion normally induced by global brain ischemia. Simultaneously, pre-administration of Cef significantly up-regulated the expression of GLT-1. Particularly, GLT-1 uptake assay with (3) H-glutamate in living cells from adult rats showed that up-regulation in glutamate uptake accompanied up-regulated GLT-1 expression. Inhibition of GLT-1 by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides or dihydrokainate significantly inhibited the Cef-induced up-regulation in GLT-1 uptake and the neuroprotective effect against global ischemia. Thus, we may conclude that Cef protects neurons against global brain ischemia via up-regulation of the expression and glutamate uptake of GLT-1. Glutamate uptake by glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) is the principal way to regulate extracellular glutamate homeostasis in central nervous system. Over-accumulation of glutamate results in excitotoxicity and injures neurons after cerebral ischemia. Ceftriaxone up-regulates GLT-1 expression and uptake of glutamate, diminishes the excitotoxicity of glutamate and then protects neurons against global brain ischemia. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  15. Hypericin, the active component of St. John's wort, inhibits glutamate release in the rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes via a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi; Wang, Su-Jane

    2010-05-25

    Changes in central glutamate neurotransmission are involved in the pathophysiology of depression and in the mechanism of antidepressants. In this study, the effect of hypericin, a major active constituent of St. John's wort that is widely used in the treatment of depression, on the release of glutamate from nerve terminals purified from rat cerebral cortex was examined. Result showed that hypericin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by 4-aminopyridine in a concentration-dependent manner. Further experiments revealed that hypericin-mediated inhibition of glutamate release (i) results from a reduction of vesicular exocytosis, not from an inhibition of Ca2+-independent efflux via glutamate transporter; (ii) is not due to an alternation of nerve terminal excitability; (iii) is associated with a decrease in presynaptic N- and P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel activity; and (iv) appears to involve the suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. These results are the first to suggest that, in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals, hypericin suppresses voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity and in so doing inhibits evoked glutamate release. This finding may provide important information regarding the beneficial effects of St. John's wort in the brain.

  16. 17β-Estradiol attenuates the activity of the glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyo-Seok; Park, Hee-Pyeong; Kim, Chong-Sung; Do, Sang-Hwan; Zuo, Zhiyi; Kim, Chong-Soo

    2012-02-15

    Estrogen, a neuroactive sex hormone in the brain, enhances neuronal excitability and increases seizures. Glutamate transporters help in limiting the excitatory neurotransmission by uptaking glutamate from the synapses. We investigated the effects of 17β-estradiol on the activity of a glutamate transporter, excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3), in Xenopus oocytes. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injection of rat EAAT3 mRNA. l-Glutamate (30 μM)-induced membrane currents mediated by EAAT3 were measured using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. 17β-Estradiol reduced EAAT3 activity in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. 17β-Estradiol (10nM for 72h) significantly decreased V(max) but had no effect on K(m) of EAAT3 for glutamate. When 17β-estradiol treated oocytes were incubated with phorbol-12-myrisate-13-acetate, a protein kinase C (PKC) activator, 17β-estradiol-induced decrease in EAAT3 activity was abolished. Furthermore, in pretreatment of oocytes with chelerythrine or staurosporine, two PKC inhibitors, EAAT3 activity was significantly decreased. However, there was no statistical difference among the 17β-estradiol, PKC inhibitor, or 17β-estradiol plus PKC inhibitor groups. Likewise, wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, significantly reduced basal EAAT3 activity, but the activity did not differ among the 17β-estradiol, wortmannin, or 17β-estradiol plus wortmannin groups. Estradiol receptor inhibitor, fulvestrant, did not change the reduced EAAT3 activity by 17β-estradiol. Our results suggest that 17β-estradiol decreases EAAT3 activity. PKC and PI3K seem to be involved in this effect, possibly not via estradiol receptors.

  17. An Activator of Mutant and Wildtype Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Reduces Ischemic Damage to the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Che-Hong; Budas, Grant R.; Churchill, Eric N.; Disatnik, Marie-Helene; Hurley, Thomas D.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2009-01-01

    There is substantial interest in the development of drugs that limit the extent of ischemia-induced cardiac damage caused by myocardial infarction or by certain surgical procedures. Here an unbiased proteomic search identified mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) as an enzyme whose activation correlates with reduced ischemic heart damage in rodent models. A high-throughput screen yielded a small-molecule activator of ALDH2 (Alda-1) that, when administered to rats prior to an ischemic event, reduced infarct size by 60%, most likely through its inhibitory effect on the formation of cytotoxic aldehydes. In vitro, Alda-1 was a particularly effective activator of ALDH2*2, an inactive mutant form of the enzyme that is found in 40% of East Asian populations. Thus, pharmacologic enhancement of ALDH2 activity may be useful for patients with wildtype or mutant ALDH2 subjected to cardiac ischemia, such as during coronary bypass surgery. (140/140 words) PMID:18787169

  18. Glutathion peroxidase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities in bovine blood and liver.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mahmoud Rushdi; Niishimori, Kazuhiro; Goryo, Masanobu; Okada, Keiji; Yasuda, Jun

    2004-10-01

    A total of 46 cattle, including 25 as control, 16 with glycogen degeneration and 5 with severe fatty degeneration were studied. Whole blood and liver tissue specimens were used to measure glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) activities. The present study determined the value of these parameters in diagnosing glycogen and fatty degeneration in cattle from the point of the status of antioxidation and lipid peroxidation. The results showed a significant decrease in hepatic GSH-Px activity and a significant increase in hepatic G6PD activity in cases of fatty degeneration. On the other hand, there were no significant changes in erythrocytic and hepatic GSH-Px and G6PD activities in cases of glycogen degeneration. The results indicated lipoperoxidation process in the liver tissues increased in cases of fatty degeneration. Therefore, supplying animals suffering from fatty liver with sufficient quantities of nutrient antioxidants may be valuable when treatment is considered.

  19. SLC1 Glutamate Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Grewer, Christof; Gameiro, Armanda; Rauen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane transporters for the neurotransmitter glutamate belong to the solute carrier 1 (SLC1) family. They are secondary active transporters, taking up glutamate into the cell against a substantial concentration gradient. The driving force for concentrative uptake is provided by the cotransport of Na+ ions and the countertransport of one K+ in a step independent of the glutamate translocation step. Due to eletrogenicity of transport, the transmembrane potential can also act as a driving force. Glutamate transporters are expressed in many tissues, but are of particular importance in the brain, where they contribute to the termination of excitatory neurotransmission. Glutamate transporters can also run in reverse, resulting in glutamate release from cells. Due to these important physiological functions, glutamate transporter expression and, therefore, the transport rate, are tightly regulated. This review summarizes recent literature on the functional and biophysical properties, structure-function relationships, regulation, physiological significance, and pharmacology of glutamate transporters. Particular emphasis is on the insight from rapid kinetic and electrophysiological studies, transcriptional regulation of transporter expression, and reverse transport and its importance for pathophysiological glutamate release under ischemic conditions. PMID:24240778

  20. Structural characterization of the mechanism through which human glutamic acid decarboxylase auto-activates

    PubMed Central

    Langendorf, Christopher G.; Tuck, Kellie L.; Key, Trevor L. G.; Fenalti, Gustavo; Pike, Robert N.; Rosado, Carlos J.; Wong, Anders S. M.; Buckle, Ashley M.; Law, Ruby H. P.; Whisstock, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Imbalances in GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid) homoeostasis underlie psychiatric and movement disorders. The ability of the 65 kDa isoform of GAD (glutamic acid decarboxylase), GAD65, to control synaptic GABA levels is influenced through its capacity to auto-inactivate. In contrast, the GAD67 isoform is constitutively active. Previous structural insights suggest that flexibility in the GAD65 catalytic loop drives enzyme inactivation. To test this idea, we constructed a panel of GAD65/67 chimaeras and compared the ability of these molecules to auto-inactivate. Together, our data reveal the important finding that the C-terminal domain of GAD plays a key role in controlling GAD65 auto-inactivation. In support of these findings, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of a GAD65/67 chimaera that reveals that the conformation of the catalytic loop is intimately linked to the C-terminal domain. PMID:23126365

  1. Synchronized oscillations in interneuron networks driven by metabotropic glutamate receptor activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittington, Miles A.; Traub, Roger D.; Jefferys, John G. R.

    1995-02-01

    PARTIALLY synchronous 40-Hz oscillations of cortical neurons have been implicated in cognitive function. Specifically, coherence of these oscillations between different parts of the cortex may provide conjunctive properties1,2 to solve the 'binding problem' associating features detected by the cortex into unified perceived objects. Here we report an emergent 40-Hz oscillation in networks of inhibitory neurons connected by synapses using GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid) receptors in slices of rat hippocampus and neocortex. These network inhibitory postsynaptic potential oscillations occur in response to the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. The oscillations can entrain pyramidal cell discharges. The oscillation frequency is determined both by the net excitation of interneurons and by the kinetics of the inhibitory postsynaptic potentials between them. We propose that interneuron network oscillations, in conjunction with intrinsic membrane resonances and long-loop (such as thalamocortical) interactions, contribute to 40-Hz rhythms in vivo.

  2. Maternal immune activation alters glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 expression in the brains of adult rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Cassella, Sarah N.; Hemmerle, Ann M.; Lundgren, Kerstin H.; Kyser, Tara L.; Ahlbrand, Rebecca; Bronson, Stefanie L.; Richtand, Neil M.; Seroogy, Kim B.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the maternal innate immune system, termed “maternal immune activation” (MIA), represents a common environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. Whereas evidence suggests dysregulation of GABA systems may underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, a role for MIA in alteration of GABAergic systems is less clear. Here, pregnant rats received either the viral mimetic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid or vehicle injection on gestational day 14. Glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67) mRNA expression was examined in male offspring at postnatal day (P)14, P30 and P60. At P60, GAD67 mRNA was elevated in hippocampus and thalamus and decreased in prefrontal cortex of MIA offspring. MIA-induced alterations in GAD expression could contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:26830319

  3. Induction of an Olfactory Memory by the Activation of a Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaba, Hideto; Hayashi, Yasunori; Higuchi, Takashi; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    1994-07-01

    Female mice form an olfactory memory of male pheromones at mating; exposure to the pheromones of a strange male after that mating will block pregnancy. The formation of this memory is mediated by the accessory olfactory system, in which an increase in norepinephrine after mating reduces inhibitory transmission of γ-aminobutyric acid from the granule cells to the mitral cells. This study shows that the activation of mGluR2, a metabotropic glutamate receptor that suppresses the γ-aminobutyric acid inhibition of the mitral cells, permits the formation of a specific olfactory memory without the occurrence of mating by infusion of mGluR2 agonists into the female's accessory olfactory bulb. This memory faithfully reflects the memory formed at mating.

  4. Brain regional development of the activity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex in the rat.

    PubMed

    Buerstatte, C R; Behar, K L; Novotny, E J; Lai, J C

    2000-12-29

    This study was initiated to test the hypothesis that the development of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) activity, like that of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, is one of the late developers of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes. The postnatal development of KGDHC in rat brain exhibits four distinct region-specific patterns. The age-dependent increases in olfactory bulb (OB) and hypothalamus (HYP) form one pattern: low in postnatal days (P) 2 and 4, KGDHC activity rose linearly to attain adult level at P30. The increases in mid-brain (MB) and striatum (ST) constitute a second pattern: being <40% of adult level at P2 and P4, KGDHC activity rose steeply between P10 and P17 and attained adult level by P30. The increases in cerebellum (CB), cerebral cortex (CC), and hippocampus (HIP) form a third pattern: being 25-30% of adult level at P2 and P4, KGDHC activity doubled between P10 and P17 and rose to adult level by P30. KGDHC activity development is unique in pons and medulla (PM): being >60% of the adult level at P2, it rose rapidly to adult level by P10. Thus, KGDHC activity develops earlier in phylogenetically older regions (PM) than in phylogenetically younger regions (CB, CC, HIP). Being lowest in activity among all TCA cycle enzymes, KGDHC activity in any region at any age will exert a limit on the maximum TCA cycle flux therein. The results may have functional and pathophysiological implications in control of brain glucose oxidative metabolism, energy metabolism, and neurotransmitter syntheses.

  5. Network effects of glutamate on neuronal activity in the medial septum/diagonal band complex in vitro.

    PubMed

    Popova, I Yu; Karavaev, E N; Kitchigina, V F

    2011-01-01

    Inter-neuronal interactions within the medial septum/diagonal band complex (MSDB) are of great interest as this region is believed to be the hippocampal theta rhythm pacemaker. However, the role of glutamatergic system in functioning of the septal cells is yet unclear. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the effects of glutamate in physiological concentration (1 microM) on the MSDB neuronal spontaneous and evoked activities in vitro. These effects (activation of 70% and inhibition of 30% of responsive neurons) differed in pacemaker and non-pacemaker cells. Pacemaker cells were always activated under glutamate, whereas non-pacemaker neurons could be either activated or inhibited. Indeed, in the burst pacemakers, glutamate increased the frequency of rhythmic activity. In a total MSDB neuron population, in 30% of neurons glutamate applications modified responses to the electrical stimulation by unifying the temporal parameters of neuron responses. Along with the increase in the theta-burst frequency, this indicates that the glutamatergic system is involved in the process ofintraseptal synchronization. Obtained data shed light on the role ofglutamatergic system in septal neuron interactions and broaden our understanding of theta oscillation mechanisms in the septo-hippocampal system.

  6. Cytoplasm-to-myonucleus ratios and succinate dehydrogenase activities in adult rat slow and fast muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, B. S.; Kasper, C. E.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between myonuclear number, cellular size, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and myosin type was examined in single fiber segments (n = 54; 9 +/- 3 mm long) mechanically dissected from soleus and plantaris muscles of adult rats. One end of each fiber segment was stained for DNA before quantitative photometric analysis of succinate dehydrogenase activity; the other end was double immunolabeled with fast and slow myosin heavy chain monoclonal antibodies. Mean +/- S.D. cytoplasmic volume/myonucleus ratio was higher in fast and slow plantaris fibers (112 +/- 69 vs. 34 +/- 21 x 10(3) microns3) than fast and slow soleus fibers (40 +/- 20 vs. 30 +/- 14 x 10(3) microns3), respectively. Slow fibers always had small volumes/myonucleus, regardless of fiber diameter, succinate dehydrogenase activity, or muscle of origin. In contrast, smaller diameter (< 70 microns) fast soleus and plantaris fibers with high succinate dehydrogenase activity appeared to have low volumes/myonucleus while larger diameter (> 70 microns) fast fibers with low succinate dehydrogenase activity always had large volume/myonucleus. Slow soleus fibers had significantly greater numbers of myonuclei/mm than did either fast soleus or fast plantaris fibers (116 +/- 51 vs. 55 +/- 22 and 44 +/- 23), respectively. These data suggest that the myonuclear domain is more limited in slow than fast fibers and in the fibers with a high, compared to a low, oxidative metabolic capability.

  7. SIRT3 DEACETYLATES AND INCREASES PYRUVATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Brett A.; Song, Ha Yong; Zhu, Yueming; Vassilopoulos, Athanassios; Jung, Barbara; Buettner, Garry R.; Gius, David

    2015-01-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 alpha (PDHE1α or PDHA1) is the first component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) that transforms pyruvate, via pyruvate decarboxylation, into acetyl-CoA that is subsequently used by both the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. As such, PDH links glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in normal as well as cancer cells. Herein we report that SIRT3 interacts with PDHA1 and directs its enzymatic activity via changes in protein acetylation. SIRT3 deacetylates PDHA1 lysine 321 (K321) and a PDHA1 mutant, mimicking a deacetylated lysine (PDHA1K321R) increases in PDH activity, as compared to the K321 acetylation mimic (PDHA1K321Q) or wild-type PDHA1. Finally, PDHA1K321Q exhibited a more transformed in vitro cellular phenotype as compared to PDHA1K321R. These results suggest that the acetylation of PDHA1 provides another layer of enzymatic regulation, in addition to phosphorylation, involving a reversible acetyl-lysine suggesting that the acetylome, as well as the kinome, links glycolysis to respiration. PMID:25152236

  8. SIRT3 deacetylates and increases pyruvate dehydrogenase activity in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Ozkan; Park, Seong-Hoon; Wagner, Brett A; Yong Song, Ha; Zhu, Yueming; Vassilopoulos, Athanassios; Jung, Barbara; Buettner, Garry R; Gius, David

    2014-11-01

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α (PDHA1) is the first component enzyme of the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex that transforms pyruvate, via pyruvate decarboxylation, into acetyl-CoA that is subsequently used by both the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation to generate ATP. As such, PDH links glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in normal as well as cancer cells. Herein we report that SIRT3 interacts with PDHA1 and directs its enzymatic activity via changes in protein acetylation. SIRT3 deacetylates PDHA1 lysine 321 (K321), and a PDHA1 mutant mimicking a deacetylated lysine (PDHA1(K321R)) increases PDH activity, compared to the K321 acetylation mimic (PDHA1(K321Q)) or wild-type PDHA1. Finally, PDHA1(K321Q) exhibited a more transformed in vitro cellular phenotype compared to PDHA1(K321R). These results suggest that the acetylation of PDHA1 provides another layer of enzymatic regulation, in addition to phosphorylation, involving a reversible acetyllysine, suggesting that the acetylome, as well as the kinome, links glycolysis to respiration.

  9. E4F1 controls a transcriptional program essential for pyruvate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Rodier, Geneviève; Kirsh, Olivier; Houles, Thibault; Delpech, Hélène; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Casas, Francois; Pessemesse, Laurence; Heuillet, Maud; Bellvert, Floriant; Portais, Jean-Charles; Berthet, Charlene; Bernex, Florence; Brivet, Michele; Boutron, Audrey; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2016-09-27

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) acts as a central metabolic node that mediates pyruvate oxidation and fuels the tricarboxylic acid cycle to meet energy demand. Here, we reveal another level of regulation of the pyruvate oxidation pathway in mammals implicating the E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1). E4F1 controls a set of four genes [dihydrolipoamide acetlytransferase (Dlat), dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld), mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (Mpc1), and solute carrier family 25 member 19 (Slc25a19)] involved in pyruvate oxidation and reported to be individually mutated in human metabolic syndromes. E4F1 dysfunction results in 80% decrease of PDH activity and alterations of pyruvate metabolism. Genetic inactivation of murine E4f1 in striated muscles results in viable animals that show low muscle PDH activity, severe endurance defects, and chronic lactic acidemia, recapitulating some clinical symptoms described in PDC-deficient patients. These phenotypes were attenuated by pharmacological stimulation of PDH or by a ketogenic diet, two treatments used for PDH deficiencies. Taken together, these data identify E4F1 as a master regulator of the PDC.

  10. E4F1 controls a transcriptional program essential for pyruvate dehydrogenase activity

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Matthieu; Rodier, Geneviève; Houles, Thibault; Delpech, Hélène; Seyran, Berfin; Gayte, Laurie; Casas, Francois; Pessemesse, Laurence; Heuillet, Maud; Bellvert, Floriant; Portais, Jean-Charles; Berthet, Charlene; Brivet, Michele; Boutron, Audrey; Le Cam, Laurent; Sardet, Claude

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex (PDC) acts as a central metabolic node that mediates pyruvate oxidation and fuels the tricarboxylic acid cycle to meet energy demand. Here, we reveal another level of regulation of the pyruvate oxidation pathway in mammals implicating the E4 transcription factor 1 (E4F1). E4F1 controls a set of four genes [dihydrolipoamide acetlytransferase (Dlat), dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld), mitochondrial pyruvate carrier 1 (Mpc1), and solute carrier family 25 member 19 (Slc25a19)] involved in pyruvate oxidation and reported to be individually mutated in human metabolic syndromes. E4F1 dysfunction results in 80% decrease of PDH activity and alterations of pyruvate metabolism. Genetic inactivation of murine E4f1 in striated muscles results in viable animals that show low muscle PDH activity, severe endurance defects, and chronic lactic acidemia, recapitulating some clinical symptoms described in PDC-deficient patients. These phenotypes were attenuated by pharmacological stimulation of PDH or by a ketogenic diet, two treatments used for PDH deficiencies. Taken together, these data identify E4F1 as a master regulator of the PDC. PMID:27621446

  11. Distribution of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Complex Activities between Chloroplasts and Mitochondria from Leaves of Different Species.

    PubMed Central

    Lernmark, U.; Gardestrom, P.

    1994-01-01

    Protoplasts from barley (Hordeum vulgare), pea (Pisum sativum), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves were fractionated into chloroplast- and mitochondrion-enriched fractions. Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex capacities in mitochondria (mtPDC) and chloroplasts (cpPDC) were measured in appropriate fractions under conditions optimal for each isozyme. The total cellular capacity of PDC was similar in barley and pea but about 50% lower in wheat and spinach. In pea a distribution of 87% mtPDC and 13% cpPDC was found on a cellular basis. In barley, wheat, and spinach the subcellular distribution was the opposite, with about 15% mtPDC and 85% cpPDC. cpPDC activity was constant at about 0.1 nmol cell-1 h-1 in cells from different regions along the developing barley leaf and showed no correlation with developmental patterns of photosynthetic parameters, such as increasing Chl and NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity. Similarly, the capacity of the mitochondrial isoform did not change during barley leaf development and had a developmental pattern similar to that of citrate synthase and fumarase. Differences in subcellular distribution of PDCs in barley and pea are proposed to be due to differences in regulation, not to changes in isozyme proportions during leaf development or to species-specific differences in phosphorylation state of mtPDC after organelle separation. PMID:12232437

  12. The conversion of glutamate by glutamine synthase in neocortical astrocytes from juvenile rat is important to limit glutamate spillover and peri/extrasynaptic activation of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Yosra; Amri, Mohamed; Becq, Hélène; Molinari, Florence; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    Glutamate transporters (EAATs) are important to maintain spatial and temporal specificity of synaptic transmission. Their efficiency to uptake and transport glutamate into the intracellular space depends on several parameters including the intracellular concentrations of Na(+) and glutamate, the elevations of which may slow down the cycling rate of EAATs. In astrocytes, glutamate is maintained at low concentration due to the presence of specific enzymes such as glutamine synthase (GS). GS inhibition results in cytosolic accumulation of glutamate suggesting that the conversion of glutamate by GS is important for EAATs operation. Here we recorded astrocytes from juvenile rat neocortical slices and analyzed the consequences of elevated intracellular glutamate concentrations and of GS inhibition on the time course of synaptically evoked transporter current (STC). In slices from rats treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSO), a GS inhibitor, STC evoked by short burst of high frequency stimulation (HFS; 100 Hz for 100 ms) but not by low frequency stimulation (LFS; 0.1 Hz) was twice slower than STC evoked from saline injected rats. Same results were obtained for astrocytes recorded with pipette containing 3-10 mM glutamate and compared with cells recorded with 0 or1 mM glutamate in the patch pipette. We also showed that HFS elicited significantly larger NMDAR-excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with a stronger peri/extrasynaptic component in pyramidal cells from MSO-treated compared with saline treated rats. Taken together our data demonstrate that the conversion of glutamate by GS is fundamental to ensure an efficient clearance of glutamate by EAATs and to prevent glutamate spillover. GLIA 2017;65:401-415.

  13. Characterization and evolution of an activator-independent methanol dehydrogenase from Cupriavidus necator N-1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tung-Yun; Chen, Chang-Ting; Liu, Jessica Tse-Jin; Bogorad, Igor W; Damoiseaux, Robert; Liao, James C

    2016-06-01

    Methanol utilization by methylotrophic or non-methylotrophic organisms is the first step toward methanol bioconversion to higher carbon-chain chemicals. Methanol oxidation using NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh) is of particular interest because it uses NAD(+) as the electron carrier. To our knowledge, only a limited number of NAD-dependent Mdhs have been reported. The most studied is the Bacillus methanolicus Mdh, which exhibits low enzyme specificity to methanol and is dependent on an endogenous activator protein (ACT). In this work, we characterized and engineered a group III NAD-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (Mdh2) from Cupriavidus necator N-1 (previously designated as Ralstonia eutropha). This enzyme is the first NAD-dependent Mdh characterized from a Gram-negative, mesophilic, non-methylotrophic organism with a significant activity towards methanol. Interestingly, unlike previously reported Mdhs, Mdh2 does not require activation by known activators such as B. methanolicus ACT and Escherichia coli Nudix hydrolase NudF, or putative native C. necator activators in the Nudix family under mesophilic conditions. This enzyme exhibited higher or comparable activity and affinity toward methanol relative to the B. methanolicus Mdh with or without ACT in a wide range of temperatures. Furthermore, using directed molecular evolution, we engineered a variant (CT4-1) of Mdh2 that showed a 6-fold higher K cat/K m for methanol and 10-fold lower K cat/K m for n-butanol. Thus, CT4-1 represents an NAD-dependent Mdh with much improved catalytic efficiency and specificity toward methanol compared with the existing NAD-dependent Mdhs with or without ACT activation.

  14. The activity of class I, II, III and IV alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase in the sera of bladder cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Orywal, Karolina; Jelski, Wojciech; Werel, Tadeusz; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    Studies on alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in the sera of patients with malignant neoplasms show that cancer cells in many organs may release ADH isoenzymes into the blood. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in the activity of ADH isoenzymes and ALDH in the sera of patients with bladder cancer (BCa), and with different grades of the disease. Blood samples were taken from 39 patients with BCa (15 patients with low-grade and 24 with high-grade BCa) and from 60 healthy subjects. Class III and IV of ADH and total ADH activity were measured using the photometric method, while class I and II ADH and ALDH activity using the fluorometric method with class-specific fluorogenic substrates. The activity of the class I ADH isoenzyme and total ADH was significantly higher in the sera of BCa patients as compared to control group. Analysis of ALDH activity did not show statistically significant differences between the tested groups. Significantly higher total activity of ADH in comparison to control was found in both, low-grade and high-grade BCa group. The activity of ADH class I was also significantly higher in high-grade BCa group when compared to low-grade patients and controls. The increase of total ADH activity in the sera of BCa patients seems to be caused by isoenzymes released from cancerous cells. The higher activity of ADH I probably resulted from metastatic tumors as significant increase was detected only in the sera of high-grade bladder cancer patients.

  15. Effects of introducing theanine or glutamic acid core to tralopyril on systemicity and insecticidal activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Chen, Yao; Zhang, Ying; Gao, Xiu-Bing; Zhou, Yu-Feng

    2017-09-01

    Tralopyril was the active agent of a pro-insecticide chlorfenapyr. To simultaneously solve the problems of the phytotoxicity and non-systemic insecticidal activity of tralopyril, four new tralopyril conjugates containing theanine or glutamic acid moieties were designed and synthesized. Their phytotoxicity to tea shoot, phloem systemicity, and insecticidal activity were evaluated. Phytotoxic symptoms were not observed after the tea shoots were exposed to the four conjugates at concentrations of 2mM. The phloem mobility test on Ricinus communis L. seedlings confirmed that all four conjugates were mobile in the sieve tubes. Results of insecticidal activity against the third-instar larvae of Plutella xylostella showed that only conjugate 20 exhibited activity with an LC50 value of 0.5882±0.0504mM. After root application to tea seedlings, conjugate 20 showed obviously systemic insecticidal activity against Dendrothrips minowai Priesner, while chlorfenapyr showed no attribute of that. A new conjugate as potential phloem mobile pro-insecticide candidate was provided and so a novel strategy of pro-insecticide for improved phloem systemicity was proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thinking outside the cleft to understand synaptic activity: contribution of the cystine-glutamate antiporter (System xc-) to normal and pathological glutamatergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Richard; Lutgen, Victoria; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A

    2012-07-01

    System x(c)(-) represents an intriguing target in attempts to understand the pathological states of the central nervous system. Also called a cystine-glutamate antiporter, system x(c)(-) typically functions by exchanging one molecule of extracellular cystine for one molecule of intracellular glutamate. Nonvesicular glutamate released during cystine-glutamate exchange activates extrasynaptic glutamate receptors in a manner that shapes synaptic activity and plasticity. These findings contribute to the intriguing possibility that extracellular glutamate is regulated by a complex network of release and reuptake mechanisms, many of which are unique to glutamate and rarely depicted in models of excitatory signaling. Because system x(c)(-) is often expressed on non-neuronal cells, the study of cystine-glutamate exchange may advance the emerging viewpoint that glia are active contributors to information processing in the brain. It is noteworthy that system x(c)(-) is at the interface between excitatory signaling and oxidative stress, because the uptake of cystine that results from cystine-glutamate exchange is critical in maintaining the levels of glutathione, a critical antioxidant. As a result of these dual functions, system x(c)(-) has been implicated in a wide array of central nervous system diseases ranging from addiction to neurodegenerative disorders to schizophrenia. In the current review, we briefly discuss the major cellular components that regulate glutamate homeostasis, including glutamate release by system x(c)(-). This is followed by an in-depth discussion of system x(c)(-) as it relates to glutamate release, cystine transport, and glutathione synthesis. Finally, the role of system x(c)(-) is surveyed across a number of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Plasma lactic dehydrogenase activities in men during bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake and the activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH-T) and its five isoenzymes were measured by spectrophotometer in seven men before, during, and after bed rest and exercise training. Exercise training consisted of isometric leg exercises of 250 kcal/hr for a period of one hour per day. It is found that LDH-T was reduced by 0.05 percent in all three regimens by day 10 of bed rest, and that the decrease occurred at different rates. The earliest reduction in LDH-T activity in the no-exercise regimen was associated with a decrease in peak oxygen uptake of 12.3 percent. It is concluded that isometric (aerobic) muscular strength training appear to maintain skeletal muscle integrity better during bed rest than isotonic exercise training. Reduced hydrostatic pressure during bed rest, however, ultimately counteracts the effects of both moderate isometric and isotonic exercise training, and may result in decreased LDH-T activity.

  18. Plasma lactic dehydrogenase activities in men during bed rest with exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake and the activity of lactic dehydrogenase (LDH-T) and its five isoenzymes were measured by spectrophotometer in seven men before, during, and after bed rest and exercise training. Exercise training consisted of isometric leg exercises of 250 kcal/hr for a period of one hour per day. It is found that LDH-T was reduced by 0.05 percent in all three regimens by day 10 of bed rest, and that the decrease occurred at different rates. The earliest reduction in LDH-T activity in the no-exercise regimen was associated with a decrease in peak oxygen uptake of 12.3 percent. It is concluded that isometric (aerobic) muscular strength training appear to maintain skeletal muscle integrity better during bed rest than isotonic exercise training. Reduced hydrostatic pressure during bed rest, however, ultimately counteracts the effects of both moderate isometric and isotonic exercise training, and may result in decreased LDH-T activity.

  19. A nucleotide-controlled conformational switch modulates the activity of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases.

    PubMed

    Buey, Rubén M; Fernández-Justel, David; Marcos-Alcalde, Íñigo; Winter, Graeme; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; de Pereda, José María; Luis Revuelta, José

    2017-06-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is an essential enzyme for nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Despite IMPDH is the target of drugs with antiviral, immunosuppressive and antitumor activities, its physiological mechanisms of regulation remain largely unknown. Using the enzyme from the industrial fungus Ashbya gossypii, we demonstrate that the binding of adenine and guanine nucleotides to the canonical nucleotide binding sites of the regulatory Bateman domain induces different enzyme conformations with significantly distinct catalytic activities. Thereby, the comparison of their high-resolution structures defines the mechanistic and structural details of a nucleotide-controlled conformational switch that allosterically modulates the catalytic activity of eukaryotic IMPDHs. Remarkably, retinopathy-associated mutations lie within the mechanical hinges of the conformational change, highlighting its physiological relevance. Our results expand the mechanistic repertoire of Bateman domains and pave the road to new approaches targeting IMPDHs.

  20. Designing a highly active soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase for efficient glucose biosensors and biofuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, Fabien; Stines-Chaumeil, Claire; Flexer, Victoria; Andre, Isabelle; Mano, Nicolas

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} A new mutant of PQQ-GDH designed for glucose biosensors application. {yields} First mutant of PQQ-GDH with higher activity for D-glucose than the Wild type. {yields} Position N428 is a key point to increase the enzyme activity. {yields} Molecular modeling shows that the N428 C mutant displays a better interaction for PQQ than the WT. -- Abstract: We report for the first time a soluble PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase that is twice more active than the wild type for glucose oxidation and was obtained by combining site directed mutagenesis, modelling and steady-state kinetics. The observed enhancement is attributed to a better interaction between the cofactor and the enzyme leading to a better electron transfer. Electrochemical experiments also demonstrate the superiority of the new mutant for glucose oxidation and make it a promising enzyme for the development of high-performance glucose biosensors and biofuel cells.

  1. Critical role of s465 in protein kinase C-increased rat glutamate transporter type 3 activity.

    PubMed

    Baik, Hee Jung; Huang, Yueming; Washington, Jacqueline M; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate transporters, also called excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), uptake extracellular glutamate and regulate neurotransmission. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) increases the activity of EAAT type 3 (EAAT3), the major neuronal EAAT. We designed this study to determine which amino acid residue(s) in EAAT3 may be involved in this PKC effect. Selective potential PKC phosphorylation sites were mutated. These EAAT3 mutants were expressed in the Xenopus oocytes. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a PKC activator, significantly increased wild-type EAAT3 activity. Mutation of serine 465 to alanine or aspartic acid, but not the mutation of threonine 5 to alanine, abolished PKC-increased EAAT3 activity. Our results suggest a critical role of serine 465 in the increased EAAT3 activity by PKC activation.

  2. Activation of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Induces Depotentiation in Amygdala Slices and Reduces Fear-Potentiated Startle in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Ho; Lee, Chia-Ching; Huang, Ya-Chun; Wang, Su-Jane; Gean, Po-Wu

    2005-01-01

    There is a close correlation between long-term potentiation (LTP) in the synapses of lateral amygdala (LA) and fear conditioning in animals. We predict that reversal of LTP (depotentiation) in this area of the brain may ameliorate conditioned fear. Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) with DCG-IV induces…

  3. Activation of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Induces Depotentiation in Amygdala Slices and Reduces Fear-Potentiated Startle in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Ho; Lee, Chia-Ching; Huang, Ya-Chun; Wang, Su-Jane; Gean, Po-Wu

    2005-01-01

    There is a close correlation between long-term potentiation (LTP) in the synapses of lateral amygdala (LA) and fear conditioning in animals. We predict that reversal of LTP (depotentiation) in this area of the brain may ameliorate conditioned fear. Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) with DCG-IV induces…

  4. Luteolytic action of RU486: modulation of luteal 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activities in late pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Tellería, C M; Stocco, C O; Deis, R P

    1995-06-01

    The effect of the synthetic antiprogestin RU486 on luteal function in late pregnant rats was studied by evaluating the activities of the enzymes 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD) and 20 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20 alpha-HSD). RU486 (2 mg/kg) administered to rats on day 18 of pregnancy at 10.00 h induced preterm delivery 26.4 +/- 0.35 h (n = 8) after treatment. Luteal 3 beta-HSD activity increased 24 and 34 h after RU486 injection, but a significant and progressive decrease started at 48 h with the maximal reduction 72 h after RU486 treatment, when compared with controls. Serum progesterone concentration decreased at the time of 3 beta-HSD activity reduction. Interestingly, 20 alpha-HSD activity started to increase 58 h after RU486 injection. The administration of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, diclofenac (1.3 mg/kg), on days 17-19 of pregnancy to RU486-treated rats, delayed abortion and the duration of delivery, and prevented the decrease in 3 beta-HSD and the increase in 20 alpha-HSD activities observed 58 h after antiprogesterone treatment. RU486 administered intrabursally (1 microgram per ovary) on day 20 (14.00-15.00 h) increased 3 beta-HSD and decreased 20 alpha-HSD luteal activities at 18.00 h on day 21 of pregnancy, without modifying serum progesterone concentration, when compared with normal pregnant rats. In conclusion, the luteolytic process after preterm delivery i