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Sample records for glutamate msg-obese rats

  1. Reproductive alterations in hyperinsulinemic but normoandrogenic MSG obese female rats.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Renato Simões; Benevides, Renata Ohana Alves; Fontelles, João Lucas de Lima; Vale, Caroline Castro; França, Lucas Martins; Barros, Paulo de Tarso Silva; Paes, Antonio Marcus de Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are the common causes of reproductive and fertility disorders in women. In particular, polycystic ovary syndrome, which is clinically characterized by hyperandrogenism, oligo/anovulation, and polycystic ovarian morphology, has been increasingly associated with metabolic disorders. However, given the broad interplay between metabolic and reproductive functions, this remains a field of intense research. In this study, we investigated the effect of monosodium l-glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity on reproductive biology of female rats. Newborn female rats were subcutaneously injected with MSG (4g/kg/day) or equiosmolar saline (CTR) each 2 days up to postnatal day (pnd) 10. On pnd 60, estrous cycle was evaluated using vaginal smears twice a day for 15 days, which showed MSG rats to be oligocyclic. Thereafter, animals were killed on estrous phase for blood and tissue collection. MSG rats had increased body mass, accumulation of retroperitoneal and visceral fat pads, and visceral adipocyte hypertrophy compared with CTR rats. MSG rats were also dyslipidemic and hyperinsulinemic but were normoglycemic and normoandrogenic. Ovarian morphology analysis showed that MSG rats had a two-fold decrease in oocyte count but a six-fold increase on ovarian follicular cysts, along with a higher number of total primordial and atretic follicles. Moreover, MSG rats had a four-fold increase in anti-Müllerian hormone immunohistochemical staining on antral follicles. Taken together, data presented here characterize MSG obesity as a unique model to study the metabolic pathways underlying reproductive disorders in the absence of overactivated hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  2. Effects of fibre-enriched diets on tissue lipid profiles of MSG obese rats.

    PubMed

    Rotimi, O A; Olayiwola, I O; Ademuyiwa, O; Balogun, E A

    2012-11-01

    In order to investigate the influence of some fibre-enriched diets on tissue lipids in an animal model of obesity induced by the administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG), obese rats were fed diets containing 30% of Acha, Cassava, Maize and Plantain for five weeks and weight gain, feed intake and lee index were recorded. The lipid profiles of plasma, erythrocytes, kidney, heart and liver as well as hepatic 3-hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase activity were measured. The diets significantly (p<0.05) reduced weight gain and lee index in the obese rats. Obesity-induced increase in plasma and erythrocytes lipid levels was significantly (p<0.05) reduced by these diets. MSG-induced obesity also resulted in a significant increase (p<0.05) in hepatic cholesterol level which was reduced by the diets. MSG-obesity was characterised by a significant (p<0.05) increase in cholesterol, triacylglycerol and phospholipids in kidney and this was reversed by the diets except Maize which did not reverse the increased cholesterol level. Only Acha reversed the obesity-induced increase in heart cholesterol and phospholipids. The increased activity of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase associated with obesity was also significantly (p<0.05) reduced by the diets. In conclusion, dyslipidemia associated with MSG-induced obesity could be attenuated by consumption of fibre-enriched diets.

  3. Vagotomy ameliorates islet morphofunction and body metabolic homeostasis in MSG-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Lubaczeuski, C; Balbo, S L; Ribeiro, R A; Vettorazzi, J F; Santos-Silva, J C; Carneiro, E M; Bonfleur, M L

    2015-05-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system is important for β-cell secretion and mass regulation. Here, we characterized involvement of the vagus nerve in pancreatic β-cell morphofunctional regulation and body nutrient homeostasis in 90-day-old monosodium glutamate (MSG)-obese rats. Male newborn Wistar rats received MSG (4 g/kg body weight) or saline [control (CTL) group] during the first 5 days of life. At 30 days of age, both groups of rats were submitted to sham-surgery (CTL and MSG groups) or subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (Cvag and Mvag groups). The 90-day-old MSG rats presented obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and hypertriglyceridemia. Their pancreatic islets hypersecreted insulin in response to glucose but did not increase insulin release upon carbachol (Cch) stimulus, despite a higher intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. Furthermore, while the pancreas weight was 34% lower in MSG rats, no alteration in islet and β-cell mass was observed. However, in the MSG pancreas, increases of 51% and 55% were observed in the total islet and β-cell area/pancreas section, respectively. Also, the β-cell number per β-cell area was 19% higher in MSG rat pancreas than in CTL pancreas. Vagotomy prevented obesity, reducing 25% of body fat stores and ameliorated glucose homeostasis in Mvag rats. Mvag islets demonstrated partially reduced insulin secretion in response to 11.1 mM glucose and presented normalization of Cch-induced Ca(2+) mobilization and insulin release. All morphometric parameters were similar among Mvag and CTL rat pancreases. Therefore, the higher insulin release in MSG rats was associated with greater β-cell/islet numbers and not due to hypertrophy. Vagotomy improved whole body nutrient homeostasis and endocrine pancreatic morphofunction in Mvag rats.

  4. Vagotomy ameliorates islet morphofunction and body metabolic homeostasis in MSG-obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Lubaczeuski, C.; Balbo, S.L.; Ribeiro, R.A.; Vettorazzi, J.F.; Santos-Silva, J.C.; Carneiro, E.M.; Bonfleur, M.L.

    2015-01-01

    The parasympathetic nervous system is important for β-cell secretion and mass regulation. Here, we characterized involvement of the vagus nerve in pancreatic β-cell morphofunctional regulation and body nutrient homeostasis in 90-day-old monosodium glutamate (MSG)-obese rats. Male newborn Wistar rats received MSG (4 g/kg body weight) or saline [control (CTL) group] during the first 5 days of life. At 30 days of age, both groups of rats were submitted to sham-surgery (CTL and MSG groups) or subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (Cvag and Mvag groups). The 90-day-old MSG rats presented obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and hypertriglyceridemia. Their pancreatic islets hypersecreted insulin in response to glucose but did not increase insulin release upon carbachol (Cch) stimulus, despite a higher intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Furthermore, while the pancreas weight was 34% lower in MSG rats, no alteration in islet and β-cell mass was observed. However, in the MSG pancreas, increases of 51% and 55% were observed in the total islet and β-cell area/pancreas section, respectively. Also, the β-cell number per β-cell area was 19% higher in MSG rat pancreas than in CTL pancreas. Vagotomy prevented obesity, reducing 25% of body fat stores and ameliorated glucose homeostasis in Mvag rats. Mvag islets demonstrated partially reduced insulin secretion in response to 11.1 mM glucose and presented normalization of Cch-induced Ca2+ mobilization and insulin release. All morphometric parameters were similar among Mvag and CTL rat pancreases. Therefore, the higher insulin release in MSG rats was associated with greater β-cell/islet numbers and not due to hypertrophy. Vagotomy improved whole body nutrient homeostasis and endocrine pancreatic morphofunction in Mvag rats. PMID:25714886

  5. Sex differences in brain cholinergic activity in MSG-obese rats submitted to exercise.

    PubMed

    Sagae, Sara Cristina; Grassiolli, Sabrina; Raineki, Charlis; Balbo, Sandra Lucinei; Marques da Silva, Ana Carla

    2011-11-01

    Obesity is an epidemic disease most commonly caused by a combination of increased energy intake and lack of physical activity. The cholinergic system has been shown to be involved in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure. Moreover, physical exercise promotes a reduction of fat pads and body mass by increasing energy expenditure, but also influences the cholinergic system. The aim of this study is to evaluate the interaction between physical exercise (swimming) and central cholinergic activity in rats treated with monosodium glutamate (MSG, a model for obesity) during infancy. Our results show that MSG treatment is able to induce obesity in male and female rats. Specifically, MSG-treated rats presented a reduced body mass and nasoanal length, and increased perigonadal and retroperitoneal fat pads in relation to the body mass. Physical exercise was able to reduce body mass in both male and female rats, but did not change the fat pads in MSG-treated rats. Increased food intake was only seen in MSG-treated females submitted to exercise. Cholinergic activity was increased in the cortex of MSG-treated females and physical exercise was able to reduce this activity. Thalamic cholinergic activity was higher in sedentary MSG-treated females and exercised MSG-treated males. Hypothalamic cholinergic activity was higher in male and female MSG-treated rats, and was not reduced by exercise in the 2 sexes. Taken together, these results show that MSG treatment and physical exercise have different effects in the cholinergic activity of males and females.

  6. Decreased TNF-α gene expression in periodontal ligature in MSG-obese rats: a possible protective effect of hypothalamic obesity against periodontal disease?

    PubMed

    Brandelero, Sávio; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Ribeiro, Rosane Aparecida; Vanzela, Emerielle Cristine; Nassar, Carlos Augusto; Nassar, Patrícia Oehlmeyer; Balbo, Sandra Lucinei

    2012-03-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing globally. There is evidence that the uncontrolled energetic metabolism in obese patients can accelerate periodontal disease. Therefore, the aim of this study was evaluate the possible relationship between hypothalamic obesity induced by neonatal treatment with MSG and experimental periodontal disease. Newborn male Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections in the cervical region, of 4g/Kg/day of body weight (BW) of MSG (MSG group) or hypertonic saline solution, 1.25/kg/day BW (control group, CTL). At 70 days of life periodontal disease was induced in these animals. After they were sacrificed, radiographic analyses of alveolar bone resorption and Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα) gene expression in gingival tissue were performed. The neonatal treatment with MSG did not affect the concentration of plasma glucose and cholesterol (CHOL). However, plasma insulin, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and triglycerides (TG) leves were higher in MSG compared with CTL group. The alveolar bone resorption was 44% lower in MSG-obese rats compared with CTL rats. In the presence of periodontal ligature, there was an increase in this parameter in all groups. The TNFα gene expression, an inflammatory marker, in periodontal tissue was similar in obese and CTL rats. The presence of ligature increased TNFα gene expression in both groups, but in a lower extension in MSG-obese rats. In conclusion these results suggested that hypothalamic obesity may produce a protective effect against periodontal disease, however further research is needed to understand the mechanisms involved in this process.

  7. Physical exercise introduced after weaning enhances pancreatic islet responsiveness to glucose and potentiating agents in adult MSG-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, R A; Bonfleur, M L; Vanzela, E C; Zotti, A I; Scomparin, D X; Boschero, A C; Balbo, S L

    2014-08-01

    Physical exercise represents an alternative way to prevent and/or ameliorate chronic metabolic diseases. Disruption of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity contributes to adiposity in obese subjects. Here, we verified the preventive effect of swimming training upon adiposity, adrenal catecholamine storage, and pancreatic islet function in obese monosodium glutamate (MSG)-treated rats. Male neonatal Wistar rats received MSG (4 mg/g body weight) during the first 5 days of life and, at weaning, half of the rats were submitted to swimming training, 30 min/day, 3 days a week, until 90 days of age (exercised rats: MSGex). Half of the rats were used as controls (sedentary group, MSGsd). Exercise training (ET) decreased insulinemia and fat deposition in MSGex, and increased adrenal catecholamine content, compared with MSGsd rats. Insulinemia during the ivGTT was lower in MSGex rats, despite a lack of difference in glycemia. Swimming training enhanced insulin release in islets challenged by 2.8-8.3 mmol/l glucose, whereas, at supraphysiological glucose concentrations (11.1-16.7 mmol/l), MSGex islets secreted less insulin than MSGsd. No differences in insulin secretion were observed following l-arginine (Arg) or K(+) stimuli. In contrast, islets from MSGex rats secreted more insulin when exposed to carbachol (100 μmol/l), forskolin (10 μmol/l), or IBMX (1 mmol/l) at 8.3 mmol/l glucose. Additionally, MSGex islets presented a better epinephrine inhibition upon insulin release. These results demonstrate that ET prevented the onset of obesity in MSG rats, probably by enhancing adrenal catecholamine levels. ET ameliorates islet responsiveness to several compounds, as well as insulin peripheral action.

  8. Impaired muscarinic type 3 (M3) receptor/PKC and PKA pathways in islets from MSG-obese rats.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Rosane Aparecida; Balbo, Sandra Lucinei; Roma, Letícia Prates; Camargo, Rafael Ludemann; Barella, Luiz Felipe; Vanzela, Emerielle Cristine; de Freitas Mathias, Paulo Cesar; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães; Boschero, Antonio Carlos; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia

    2013-07-01

    Monosodium glutamate-obese rats are glucose intolerant and insulin resistant. Their pancreatic islets secrete more insulin at increasing glucose concentrations, despite the possible imbalance in the autonomic nervous system of these rats. Here, we investigate the involvement of the cholinergic/protein kinase (PK)-C and PKA pathways in MSG β-cell function. Male newborn Wistar rats received a subcutaneous injection of MSG (4 g/kg body weight (BW)) or hyperosmotic saline solution during the first 5 days of life. At 90 days of life, plasma parameters, islet static insulin secretion and protein expression were analyzed. Monosodium glutamate rats presented lower body weight and decreased nasoanal length, but had higher body fat depots, glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia and hypertrigliceridemia. Their pancreatic islets secreted more insulin in the presence of increasing glucose concentrations with no modifications in the islet-protein content of the glucose-sensing proteins: the glucose transporter (GLUT)-2 and glycokinase. However, MSG islets presented a lower secretory capacity at 40 mM K(+) (P < 0.05). The MSG group also released less insulin in response to 100 μM carbachol, 10 μM forskolin and 1 mM 3-isobutyl-1-methyl-xantine (P < 0.05, P < 0.0001 and P < 0.01). These effects may be associated with a the decrease of 46 % in the acetylcholine muscarinic type 3 (M3) receptor, and a reduction of 64 % in PKCα and 36 % in PKAα protein expressions in MSG islets. Our data suggest that MSG islets, whilst showing a compensatory increase in glucose-induced insulin release, demonstrate decreased islet M3/PKC and adenylate cyclase/PKA activation, possibly predisposing these prediabetic rodents to the early development of β-cell dysfunction.

  9. Taurine supplementation regulates Iκ-Bα protein expression in adipose tissue and serum IL-4 and TNF-α concentrations in MSG obesity.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Luiz Carlos; Bonfleur, Maria Lúcia; Ribeiro, Rosane Aparecida; Nardelli, Tarlliza Romanna; Lubaczeuski, Camila; do Nascimento da Silva, Juliana; Carneiro, Everardo Magalhães; Balbo, Sandra Lucinei

    2017-03-01

    Obesity is usually associated with low-grade inflammation, which impairs insulin action. The amino acid, taurine (TAU), regulates glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism and presents anti-inflammatory actions. Here, we evaluated whether inflammatory markers are altered in the serum and retroperitoneal adipose tissue of monosodium glutamate (MSG) obese rats, supplemented or not with TAU. Male Wistar rats received subcutaneous injections of MSG (4 mg/kg body weight/day, MSG group) or hypertonic saline (CTL) during the first 5 days of life. From 21 to 120 days of age, half of each of the MSG and CTL groups received 2.5 % TAU in their drinking water (CTAU and MTAU). At 120 days of age, MSG rats were obese and hyperinsulinemic. TAU supplementation reduced fat deposition without affecting insulinemia in MTAU rats. MSG rats presented increased pIκ-Bα/Iκ-Bα protein expression in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue. TAU supplementation decreased the ratio of pIκ-Bα/Iκ-Bα protein, possibly contributing to the increased Iκ-Bα content in MTAU adipose tissue. Furthermore, MSG obesity or supplementation did not alter TNF-α, IL-1β or IL-6 content in adipose tissue. In contrast, MSG rats presented lower serum TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-10 concentrations, and these alterations were prevented by TAU treatment. MSG obesity in rats was not associated with alterations in pro-inflammatory markers in retroperitoneal fat stores; however, reductions in the serum concentrations of anti-inflammatory cytokines and of TNF-α were observed. TAU treatment decreased adiposity, and this effect was associated with the normalization of circulating TNF-α and IL-4 concentrations in MTAU rats.

  10. Anorexigenic effect of cholecystokinin is lost but that of CART (Cocaine and Amphetamine Regulated Transcript) peptide is preserved in monosodium glutamate obese mice.

    PubMed

    Zelezná, B; Maixnerová, J; Matysková, R; Haugvicová, R; Blokesová, D; Maletínská, L

    2009-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) treatment of neonatal mice results in a selective damage to the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and development of obesity with increased adiposity at sustained body weight in the adulthood. Feeding pattern of the MSG obese mice is unusual. Our previous results showed that after 24-h fasting, MSG mice consumed negligible amount of food in several hours and therefore, it was impossible to register the effect of peptides attenuating food intake such as cholecystokinin (CCK) or cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide. To overcome this problem, two findings were used: firstly, orexigenic effect of neuropeptide Y (NPY) was attenuated both by CCK or CART peptide in lean fed mice and secondly, orexigenic effect of NPY was preserved in fed rats with MSG obesity. In this study, short-term food intake in fed lean and MSG obese C57BL/6 male mice was measured after simultaneous central administration of orexigenic NPY with either CART peptide or peripherally administered CCK. Anorexigenic action of exogenous CART peptide was preserved in MSG obese mice. On the other hand, satiety effect of exogenous CCK was completely lost in MSG obese mice. In conclusion, effective leptin signaling in ARC is necessary for satiety effect of CCK.

  11. Splenectomy attenuates obesity and decreases insulin hypersecretion in hypothalamic obese rats.

    PubMed

    Leite, Nayara de Carvalho; Montes, Elisangela Gueiber; Fisher, Stefani Valéria; Cancian, Cláudia Regina Capriglioni; de Oliveira, Júlio Cezar; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso; Kanunfre, Carla Cristine; Souza, Kleber Luiz Araujo; Grassiolli, Sabrina

    2015-09-01

    Obesity-induced abnormalities, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension, are frequently correlated with low-grade inflammation, a process that may depend on normal spleen function. This study investigated the role of the spleen in the obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) treatment. MSG-obese and lean control (CON) rats were subjected to splenectomy (SPL) or non-operated (NO). MSG-NO rats presented a high adipose tissue content, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and islet hypersecretion, accompanied by hypertrophy of both pancreatic islets and adipocytes when compared with CON-NO rats. In addition, changes in nitric oxide response were found in islets from the MSG-NO group without associated alterations in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) or IL1β expression. MSG-NO also presented increased leukocyte counts and augmented LPS-induced nitric oxide production in macrophages. Splenectomy of MSG-obese animals decreased insulin hypersecretion, normalized the nitric oxide response in the pancreatic islets, improved insulin sensitivity and reduced hypertrophy of both adipocytes and islets, when compared with MSG-NO rats. Results show that splenectomy attenuates the progression of the obesity modulating pancreas functions in MSG-obese rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanisms underlying hypertriglyceridemia in rats with monosodium L-glutamate-induced obesity: evidence of XBP-1/PDI/MTP axis activation.

    PubMed

    França, Lucas Martins; Freitas, Larissa Nara Costa; Chagas, Vinicyus Teles; Coêlho, Caio Fernando Ferreira; Barroso, Wermerson Assunção; Costa, Graciomar Conceição; Silva, Lucilene Amorim; Debbas, Victor; Laurindo, Francisco Rafael Martins; Paes, Antonio Marcus de Andrade

    2014-01-10

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is intimately associated with insulin resistance and hypertriglyceridemia, whereas many of the mechanisms underlying this association are still poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) and markers of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the liver of rats subjected to neonatal monosodium L-glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity. At age 120 days old, the MSG-obese animals exhibited hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and liver steatosis, while the control (CTR) group did not. Analysis using fast protein liquid chromatography of the serum lipoproteins revealed that the triacylglycerol content of the very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles was twice as high in the MSG animals compared with the CTR animals. The expression of ER stress markers, GRP76 and GRP94, was increased in the MSG rats, promoting a higher expression of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP-1), protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and MTP. As the XBP-1/PDI/MTP axis has been suggested to represent a significant lipogenic mechanism in the liver response to ER stress, our data indicate that hypertriglyceridemia and liver steatosis occurring in the MSG rats are associated with increased MTP expression.

  13. Glutamate formation via the leucine-to-glutamate pathway of rat pancreas.

    PubMed

    Schachter, David; Buteau, Jean

    2014-06-01

    The leucine-to-glutamate (Leu→Glu) pathway, which metabolizes the carbon atoms of l-leucine to form l-glutamate, was studied by incubation of rat tissue segments with l-[U-(14)C]leucine and estimation of the [(14)C]glutamate formed. Metabolism of the leucine carbon chain occurs in most rat tissues, but maximal activity of the Leu→Glu pathway for glutamate formation is limited to the thoracic aorta and pancreas. In rat aorta, the Leu→Glu pathway functions to relax the underlying smooth muscle; its functions in the pancreas are unknown. This report characterizes the Leu→Glu pathway of rat pancreas and develops methods to examine its functions. Pancreatic segments effect net formation of glutamate on incubation with l-leucine, l-glutamine, or a mix of 18 other plasma amino acids at their concentrations in normal rat plasma. Glutamate formed from leucine remains mainly in the tissue, whereas that from glutamine enters the medium. The pancreatic Leu→Glu pathway uses the leucine carbons for net glutamate formation; the α-amino group is not used; the stoichiometry is as follows: 1 mol of leucine yields 2 mol of glutamate (2 leucine carbons per glutamate) plus 2 mol of CO2. Comparison of the Leu→Glu pathway in preparations of whole pancreatic segments, isolated acini, and islets of Langerhans localizes it in the acini; relatively high activity is found in cultures of the AR42J cell line and very little in the INS-1 832/13 cell line. Pancreatic tissue glutamate concentration is homeostatically regulated in the range of ∼1-3 μmol/g wet wt. l-Valine and leucine ethyl, benzyl, and tert-butyl esters inhibit the Leu→Glu pathway without decreasing tissue total glutamate.

  14. Regulation of Glutamate Transport in Developing Rat Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    DeSilva, Tara M.; Kabakov, Anatoli Y.; Goldhoff, Patricia E.; Volpe, Joseph J.; Rosenberg, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate released from synaptic vesicles mediates excitatory neurotransmission by stimulating glutamate receptors. Glutamate transporters maintain low synaptic glutamate levels critical for this process, a role primarily attributed to astrocytes. Recently, vesicular release of glutamate from unmyelinated axons in the rat corpus callosum has been shown to elicit AMPA receptor-mediated currents in glial progenitor cells. Glutamate transporters are the only mechanism of glutamate clearance, yet very little is known about the role of glutamate transporters in normal development of oligodendrocytes (OLs) or in excitotoxic injury to OLs. We found that OLs in culture are capable of sodium-dependent glutamate uptake with a Km of 10 ± 2 μm and a Vmax of 2.6, 5.0, and 3.8 nmol · min−1 · mg−1 for preoligodendrocytes, immature, and mature OLs, respectively. Surprisingly, EAAC1, thought to be exclusively a neuronal transporter, contributes more to [3H]l-glutamate uptake in OLs than GLT1 or GLAST. These data suggest that glutamate transporters on oligodendrocytes may serve a critical role in maintaining glutamate homeostasis at a time when unmyelinated callosal axons are engaging in glutamatergic signaling with glial progenitors. Furthermore, GLT1 was significantly increased in cultured mature OLs contrary to in vivo data in which we have shown that, although GLT1 is present on developing OLs when unmyelinated axons are prevalent in the developing rat corpus callosum, after myelination, GLT1 is not expressed on mature OLs. The absence of GLT1 in mature OLs in the rat corpus callosum and its presence in mature rat cultured OLs may indicate that a signaling process in vivo is not activated in vitro. PMID:19535601

  15. Palmitoylethanolamide inhibits glutamate release in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wu, Chia-Chan; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2015-03-11

    The effect of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), an endogenous fatty acid amide displaying neuroprotective actions, on glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals (synaptosomes) was investigated. PEA inhibited the Ca²⁺-dependent release of glutamate, which was triggered by exposing synaptosomes to the potassium channel blocker 4-aminopyridine. This release inhibition was concentration dependent, associated with a reduction in cytosolic Ca²⁺ concentration, and not due to a change in synaptosomal membrane potential. The glutamate release-inhibiting effect of PEA was prevented by the Ca(v)2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVA or the protein kinase A inhibitor H89, not affected by the intracellular Ca²⁺ release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157, and partially antagonized by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM281. Based on these results, we suggest that PEA exerts its presynaptic inhibition, likely through a reduction in the Ca²⁺ influx mediated by Ca(v)2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, thereby inhibiting the release of glutamate from rat cortical nerve terminals. This release inhibition might be linked to the activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the suppression of the protein kinase A pathway.

  16. Sex differences in the glutamate signaling pathway in juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Suwailem, Etidal; Abdi, Saba; El-Ansary, Afaf

    2017-09-01

    Females have been found to be at lower risk for the development of neurodevelopmental disorders than males. The greater neuroprotection in females is mostly due to female sex hormones. Estrogen is hypothesized to provide neuroprotection by suppressing the neuro-excitotoxicity induced by glutamate (Glu). This study was conducted to understand the effect of sex in modulating Glu signaling in juvenile rats. Brain tissue homogenate of 15 Wistar albino rats (9 males, 6 females) weighing 60 to 80 g and aged approximately 28 days was used. Biochemical parameters related to Glu signaling, such as the absolute and relative concentrations of Glu, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glutamine, as well as glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1), glutamine synthetase (GS), glutaminase (GLN), and glutamate decarboxylase-67 (GAD-67), were measured by ELISA. The data obtained demonstrated that compared with the levels in males, female rats exhibited significantly lower levels of Glu (p = .001) and GLN/GS (p = .021). The Glu/GABA and Glu/GLT1 ratios as well as the levels of GAD-67 were also lower in female rats, although the difference was not significant. The GLN/GAD-67 ratio (p = .027) and levels of GS (p = .019) were significantly higher in female rats than in males. Multiple regression analysis confirmed the role of GLN/GS, together with the much higher affinity of GLT1 to Glu, in avoiding excitotoxicity in females. In conclusion, there was a significant difference in Glu signaling between female and male rats. The females exhibited a lower susceptibility to develop Glu-induced excitotoxicity, an etiological mechanism for multiple neurodevelopmental disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Regional development of glutamate dehydrogenase in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Leong, S F; Clark, J B

    1984-07-01

    The development of glutamate dehydrogenase enzyme activity in rat brain regions has been followed from the late foetal stage to the adult and through to the aged (greater than 2 years) adult. In the adult brain the enzyme activity was greatest in the medulla oblongata and pons greater than midbrain = hypothalamus greater than cerebellum = striatum = cortex. In the aged adult brain, glutamate dehydrogenase activity was significantly lower in the medulla oblongata and pons when compared to the 90-day-old adult value, but not in other regions. The enzyme-specific activity of nonsynaptic (free) mitochondria purified from the medulla oblongata and pons of 90-day-old animals was about twice that of mitochondria purified from the striatum and the cortex. The specific activity of the enzyme in synaptic mitochondria purified from the above three brain regions, however, remained almost constant.

  18. The role of hypothermia in the regulation of blood glutamate levels in naive rats.

    PubMed

    Boyko, Matthew; Kuts, Ruslan; Gruenbaum, Benjamin F; Melamed, Israel; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Klein, Moti; Shapira, Yoram; Zlotnik, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    The exact mechanism of hypothermia-induced neuroprotection has not been determined yet; however, we hypothesized that it may be mediated by a blood glutamate-scavenging effect. Here, we examine the effect of hypothermic conditions (mild, moderate, and deep) on blood glutamate levels in naive rats. To identify the mechanism of hypothermia-induced glutamate reduction, we also measured concentrations of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), the primary regulators of glutamate concentration in blood. Rats were anesthetized with isoflurane, and their rectal temperature was maintained for 6 hours at 36 to 37°C, 33 to 36°C, 30 to 32°C, 18 to 22°C, or was not maintained artificially. At 6 hours, active cooling was discontinued and rats were allowed to rewarm. There were 12 rats in each group for a total of 60 rats. Blood samples were drawn at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours for the determination of blood glutamate, GOT, and GPT levels. A strong correlation between body temperature and blood glutamate levels was observed (P<0.001). Mild (33 to 36°C) and moderate (30 to 32°C) hypothermia led to reduced blood glutamate levels (P<0.001). Deep hypothermia (18 to 22°C) was associated with significant elevations in blood glutamate levels (P<0.001). Hypothermia, irrespective of the degree, led to elevations in GOT in plasma (P<0.001). Mild and moderate hypothermia led to a reduction in blood glutamate levels in rats, whereas deep hypothermia was associated with a significant elevation in blood glutamate levels. We further demonstrated an elevation of GOT and GPT levels, supporting their involvement in reducing blood glutamate by the conversion of glutamate to 2-ketoglutarate. We suggest that the neuroprotective properties of hypothermia may be partially because of a blood glutamate-scavenging mechanism.

  19. Nerve injury enhances rat neuronal glutamate transporter expression: identification by differential display PCR.

    PubMed

    Kiryu, S; Yao, G L; Morita, N; Kato, H; Kiyama, H

    1995-12-01

    An increase in neuronal glutamate transporter expression after nerve injury was demonstrated by means of differential display PCR (DD-PCR) coupled with in situ hybridization. DD-PCR was carried out to compare differences in expression of mRNAs between axotomized and normal hypoglossal motoneurons in the rat. The expression of several gene fragments were found to be increased following nerve injury; the full length cDNA corresponding to one fragment was cloned by subsequent rat cDNA library screening. The close homology of glutamate transporters with our rat cDNA led us to conclude that this clone corresponds to the rat neuronal glutamate transporter (rat EAAC1). We speculate that the upregulation of this glutamate uptake system may increase the resistance of these cells against neurotoxic glutamate accumulation during the process of nerve regeneration.

  20. Rapid Microelectrode Measurements and the Origin and Regulation of Extracellular Glutamate in Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hascup, E.R.; Hascup, K.N.; Stephens, M.; Pomerleau, F.; Huettl, P.; Gratton, A.; Gerhardt, G.A.

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays a significant role in several mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, addiction and anxiety. Previous studies on PFC glutamate-mediated function have used techniques that raise questions on the neuronal vs. astrocytic origin of glutamate. The present studies used enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEAs) to monitor second-by-second resting glutamate levels in the PFC of awake rats. Locally-applied drugs were employed in an attempt to discriminate between the neuronal or glial components of the resting glutamate signal. Local application of tetrodotoxin (TTX; sodium channel blocker), produced a significant (~40%) decline in resting glutamate levels. In addition significant reductions in extracellular glutamate were seen with locally-applied ω-conotoxin (MVIIC; ~50%; calcium channel blocker), and the mGluR⅔ agonist, LY379268 (~20%), and a significant increase with the mGluR⅔ antagonist LY341495 (~40%), effects all consistent with a large neuronal contribution to the resting glutamate levels. Local administration of D,L-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA; glutamate transporter inhibitor) produced an ~120% increase in extracellular glutamate levels, supporting that excitatory amino acid transporters, which are largely located on glia, modulate clearance of extracellular glutamate. Interestingly, local application of (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (CPG; cystine/glutamate antiporter inhibitor), produced small, non-significant bi-phasic changes in extracellular glutamate versus vehicle control. Finally, pre-administration of TTX completely blocked the glutamate response to tail pinch stress. Taken together, these results support that PFC resting glutamate levels in rats as measured by the MEA technology are at least 40-50% derived from neurons. Furthermore, these data support that the impulse flow-dependent glutamate release from a physiologically-evoked event is entirely neuronally derived. PMID:20969570

  1. Rat meningeal and brain microvasculature pericytes co-express the vesicular glutamate transporters 2 and 3.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Brian N; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2008-04-18

    Pericytes are small cells that are apposed to brain and meningeal microvasculature and control capillary contraction, thereby regulating local cerebral perfusion. Pericytes respond to exogenously applied glutamate in vitro and express metabotropic glutamate receptors. However, it is unclear if pericytes have the capacity to release glutamate. We therefore determined whether pericytes express vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs), which are considered to be unambiguous markers of cells that use glutamate as an intercellular signaling molecule. Leptomeningeal and brain microvasculature-associated pericytes of the adult rat, as defined by the presence of NG2 proteoglycan, expressed both VGLUT2- and VGLUT3-immunoreactivity, but did not express VGLUT1. Consistent with the hypothesis that pericytes release glutamate, VGLUT2- and VGLUT3-immunoreactivities appeared to be localized to secretory vesicles. These results suggest that glutamate is released from pericytes of the leptomeninges and brain microvasculature, and demonstrate for the first time the co-localization of VGLUT2 and VGLUT3.

  2. Effects of ammonia on high affinity glutamate uptake and glutamate transporter EAAT3 expression in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Chan, Helen; Zwingmann, Claudia; Pannunzio, Marc; Butterworth, Roger F

    2003-07-01

    Increased levels of extracellular glutamate are a consistent feature of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) associated with liver failure and other hyperammonemic pathologies. Reduction of glutamate uptake has been described in ammonia-exposed cultured astrocytes, synaptosomes, and in animal models of hyperammonemia. In the present study, we examine the effects of pathophysiological concentrations of ammonia on D-aspartate (a non-metabolizable analog of glutamate) uptake by cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Exposure of these cells to ammonia resulted in time-dependent (24% reduction at 24h and 60% reduction at 5 days, P<0.001) and dose-dependent (21, 37, and 57% reduction at 1, 2.5, and 5mM for 5 days, P<0.01) suppression of D-aspartate uptake. Kinetic analyses revealed significant decreases in the velocity of uptake (V(max)) (37% decrease at 2.5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.05 and 52% decrease at 5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.001) as well as significant reductions in K(m) values (25% reduction at 2.5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.05 and 45% reduction at 5mM NH(4)Cl, P<0.001). Western blotting, on the other hand, showed no significant changes in the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1/EAAT3 protein, the only glutamate transporter currently known to be expressed by these cells. In addition, 1H combined with 13C-NMR spectroscopy studies using the stable isotope [1-13C]-glucose demonstrated a significant increase in intracellular glutamate levels derived from the oxidative metabolism of glucose, rather than from the deamidation of exogenous glutamine in cultured granule neurons exposed to ammonia. The present study provides evidence that the effects of ammonia on glutamate uptake are not solely an astrocytic phenomenon and that unlike the astrocytic glutamate transporter counterpart, EAAT3 protein expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells is not down-regulated when exposed to ammonia. Decrease of glutamate uptake in these cellular preparations may afford an additional regulatory mechanism aimed at

  3. Agmatine Prevents Adaptation of the Hippocampal Glutamate System in Chronic Morphine-Treated Rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Tai-Yun; Su, Rui-Bin; Wu, Ning; Li, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Chronic exposure to opioids induces adaptation of glutamate neurotransmission, which plays a crucial role in addiction. Our previous studies revealed that agmatine attenuates opioid addiction and prevents the adaptation of glutamate neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens of chronic morphine-treated rats. The hippocampus is important for drug addiction; however, whether adaptation of glutamate neurotransmission is modulated by agmatine in the hippocampus remains unknown. Here, we found that continuous pretreatment of rats with ascending doses of morphine for 5 days resulted in an increase in the hippocampal extracellular glutamate level induced by naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) precipitation. Agmatine (20 mg/kg, s.c.) administered concurrently with morphine for 5 days attenuated the elevation of extracellular glutamate levels induced by naloxone precipitation. Furthermore, in the hippocampal synaptosome model, agmatine decreased the release and increased the uptake of glutamate in synaptosomes from chronic morphine-treated rats, which might contribute to the reduced elevation of glutamate levels induced by agmatine. We also found that expression of the hippocampal NR2B subunit, rather than the NR1 subunit, of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) was down-regulated after chronic morphine treatment, and agmatine inhibited this reduction. Taken together, agmatine prevented the adaptation of the hippocampal glutamate system caused by chronic exposure to morphine, including modulating extracellular glutamate concentration and NMDAR expression, which might be one of the mechanisms underlying the attenuation of opioid addiction by agmatine.

  4. Faster flux of neurotransmitter glutamate during seizure - Evidence from 13C-enrichment of extracellular glutamate in kainate rat model.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Keiko

    2017-01-01

    The objective is to examine how the flux of neurotransmitter glutamate from neurons to the extracellular fluid, as measured by the rate of 13C enrichment of extracellular glutamate (GLUECF), changes in response to seizures in the kainate-induced rat model of temporal-lobe epilepsy. Following unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainate, GLUECF was collected by microdialysis from the CA1/CA3 region of awake rats, in combination with EEG recording of chronic-phase recurrent seizures and intravenous infusion of [2,5-13C]glucose. The 13C enrichment of GLUECF C5 at ~ 10 picomol level was measured by gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry. The rate of 13C enrichment, expressed as the increase of the fractional enrichment/min, was 0.0029 ± 0.0001/min in frequently seizing rats (n = 4); this was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than in the control (0.00167 ± 0.0001/min; n = 6) or in rats with infrequent seizures (0.00172 ± 0.0001/min; n = 6). This result strongly suggests that the flux of the excitatory neurotransmitter from neurons to the extracellular fluid is significantly increased by frequent seizures. The extracellular [12C + 13C]glutamate concentration increased progressively in frequently seizing rats. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the observed seizure-induced high flux of glutamate overstimulated glutamate receptors, which triggered a chain reaction of excitation in the CA3 recurrent glutamatergic networks. The rate of 13C enrichment of extracellular glutamine (GLNECF) at C5 was 0.00299 ± 0.00027/min in frequently seizing rats, which was higher (p < 0.05) than in controls (0.00227 ± 0.00008/min). For the first time in vivo, this study examined the effects of epileptic seizures on fluxes of the neurotransmitter glutamate and its precursor glutamine in the extracellular fluid of the hippocampus. The advantages, limitations and the potential for improvement of this approach for pre-clinical and clinical studies of temporal-lobe epilepsy

  5. Pressor effects of L-glutamate injected into the diagonal band of Broca of unanesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Rodrigo Fiacadori; de Aguiar Corrêa, Fernando Morgan

    2003-01-10

    The diagonal band of Broca (dbB) is involved in central cardiovascular control. In the present study we compared the effects of microinjections of L-glutamate into the dbB of unanesthetized rats with those observed after the injection of L-glutamate into the same area in urethane-anesthetized rats. The microinjection of L-glutamate (10, 30, 100 or 200 nmol/200 nl) into the dbB of urethane-anesthetized rats caused dose-related short-lasting depressor responses The depressor responses to L-glutamate were accompanied by dose-related heart rate reduction. The cardiovascular response to the injection of L-glutamate (10, 30 or 100 nmol/200 nl) into the dbB of unanesthetized rats was characterized as a long-lasting pressor response without consistent heart rate changes. The pressor response was dose-related and presented an ED(50) of approximately 30 nmol/200 nl. The fact that the chemical stimulation of the dbB with L-glutamate caused only dose-related pressor responses in unanesthetized rats suggests that under normal conditions the dbB is predominantly a pressor area. After the characterization of the pressor response to L-glutamate microinjected into the dbB of unanesthetized rats we studied the mechanisms involved in the mediation of these responses. The pressor response to L-glutamate (30 nmol/200 nl) into the dbB was blocked by intravenous pretreatment with the vasopressin antagonist dTyr(CH(2))(5)(Me)AVP (50 microg/kg), suggesting the involvement of circulating vasopressin in this response. Further evidence of the involvement of the endocrine vasopressin system in the pressor response to L-glutamate injected into the dbB was provided by hypophysectomy since L-glutamate (30 nmol/200 nl) microinjection into the dbB of hypophysectomized rats caused only depressor responses. We presently report that chemical stimulation of the dbB with L-glutamate caused only pressor responses in unanesthetized rats that were mediated by vasopressin release into the systemic

  6. Glutamic Acid as Enhancer of Protein Synthesis Kinetics in Hepatocytes from Old Rats.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, V Y; Malchenko, L A; Butorina, N N; Lazarev Konchenko, D S; Zvezdina, N D; Dubovaya, T K

    2017-08-01

    Dense cultures of hepatocytes from old rats (~2 years old, body weight 530-610 g) are different from similar cultures of hepatocytes from young rats by the low amplitude of protein synthesis rhythm. Addition of glutamic acid (0.2, 0.4, or 0.6 mg/ml) into the culture medium with hepatocytes of old rats resulted in increase in the oscillation amplitudes of the protein synthesis rhythm to the level of young rats. A similar action of glutamic acid on the protein synthesis kinetics was observed in vivo after feeding old rats with glutamic acid. Inhibition of metabotropic receptors of glutamic acid with α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (0.01 mg/ml) abolished the effect of glutamic acid. The amplitude of oscillation of the protein synthesis rhythm in a cell population characterizes synchronization of individual oscillations caused by direct cell-cell communications. Hence, glutamic acid, acting as a receptor-dependent transmitter, enhanced direct cell-cell communications of hepatocytes that were decreased with aging. As differentiated from other known membrane signaling factors (gangliosides, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine), glutamic acid can penetrate into the brain and thus influence the communications and protein synthesis kinetics that are disturbed with aging not only in hepatocytes, but also in neurons.

  7. Local glutamate release in the rat ventral lateral thalamus evoked by high-frequency stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Blaha, Charles D.; Lin, Jessica; Lee, Kendall H.

    2010-04-01

    Thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) is proven therapy for essential tremor, Parkinson's disease and Tourette's syndrome. We tested the hypothesis that high-frequency electrical stimulation results in local thalamic glutamate release. Enzyme-linked glutamate amperometric biosensors were implanted in anesthetized rat thalamus adjacent to the stimulating electrode. Electrical stimulation was delivered to investigate the effect of frequency, pulse width, voltage-controlled or current-controlled stimulation, and charge balancing. Monophasic electrical stimulation-induced glutamate release was linearly dependent on stimulation frequency, intensity and pulse width. Prolonged stimulation evoked glutamate release to a plateau that subsequently decayed back to baseline after stimulation. Glutamate release was less pronounced with voltage-controlled stimulation and not present with charge balanced current-controlled stimulation. Using fixed potential amperometry in combination with a glutamate bioprobe and adjacent microstimulating electrode, the present study has shown that monophasic current-controlled stimulation of the thalamus in the anesthetized rat evoked linear increases in local extracellular glutamate concentrations that were dependent on stimulation duration, frequency, intensity and pulse width. However, the efficacy of monophasic voltage-controlled stimulation, in terms of evoking glutamate release in the thalamus, was substantially lower compared to monophasic current-controlled stimulation and entirely absent with biphasic (charge balanced) current-controlled stimulation. It remains to be determined whether similar glutamate release occurs with human DBS electrodes and similar charge balanced stimulation. As such, the present results indicate the importance of evaluating local neurotransmitter dynamics in studying the mechanism of action of DBS.

  8. Biochemical and immunological changes on oral glutamate feeding in male albino rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D.; Bansal, Anju; Thomas, Pauline; Sairam, M.; Sharma, S. K.; Mongia, S. S.; Singh, R.; Selvamurthy, W.

    High altitude stress leads to lipid peroxidation and free radical formation which results in cell membrane damage in organs and tissues, and associated mountain diseases. This paper discusses the changes in biochemical parameters and antibody response on feeding glutamate to male albino Sprague Dawley rats under hypoxic stress. Exposure of rats to simulated hypoxia at 7576 m, for 6 h daily for 5 consecutive days, in an animal decompression chamber at 32+/-2° C resulted in an increase in plasma malondialdehyde level with a concomitant decrease in blood glutathione (reduced) level. Supplementation of glutamate orally at an optimal dose (27 mg/kg body weight) in male albino rats under hypoxia enhanced glutathione level and decreased malondialdehyde concentration significantly. Glutamate feeding improved total plasma protein and glucose levels under hypoxia. The activities of serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) and the urea level remained elevated on glutamate supplementation under hypoxia. Glutamate supplementation increased the humoral response against sheep red blood cells (antibody titre). These results indicate a possible utility of glutamate in the amelioration of hypoxia-induced oxidative stress.

  9. The effect of chronic ethanol on glutamate binding in human and rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Cummins, J.T.; Sack, M.; von Hungen, K. Univ. of California School of Medicine, Los Angeles )

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiographic techniques demonstrate that chronic alcohol administration causes a decrease in ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding to hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. A 14% decrease in ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding in the hippocampal CA{sub 1} region is seen both in the rat after five days of ethanol administration and in postmortem hippocampal tissues from alcoholics. In the rat, 24 hr ethanol withdrawal values are intermediate between control and alcohol binding levels. There was no significant effect of ethanol on ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding in the cortex or caudate.

  10. Effects of stimulation of glutamate receptors in medial septum on some immune responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Goutam; Raj Goswami, Ananda; Ghosh, Tusharkanti

    2013-11-13

    The immunomodulatory role of medial septum (MS) has been explored so far only in MS lesioned rats. But in MS lesioned rats, all the nerve cells and fibres of the lesioned area are damaged and the specific role of the neural circuits of MS on immunomodulation cannot be assessed from the lesion of MS. Considering the presence of a large number of glutamate receptors in MS, the specific role of glutamate receptors stimulation on some immune responses has been investigated in the present study. Hyperreactive behaviour, TC and DC of WBC, phagocytic activity of peripheral leukocytes, adhesibility and cytotoxicity of splenic mononuclear cells (MNC), delayed type of hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and the serum corticosterone (CORT) were measured after microinfusion of glutamate into MS of rats. To ascertain the specific role of those glutamate receptors, the parameters were also measured after microinfusion of glutamate receptor blocker 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione (DNQX). The hyperreactive behaviour, TC and DC of WBC remained unaltered after stimulation or blocking of glutamate receptors. The phagocytic activity, adhesibility and cytotoxicity of splenic MNC, and DTH responses were increased after infusion of 0.25 and 0.5µM glutamate. But after infusion of higher dose of glutamate (1µM), the phagocytic activity and the adhesibility of splenic MNC were decreased and other parameters remained unaltered in that condition. After infusion of 4 and 8mM DNQX all the observed immunological parameters were decreased. The CORT concentration was decreased after infusion of 0.25 and 0.5µM of glutamate but it was increased after infusion of 1µM glutamate or 4 and 8mM DNQX. Results indicate that the medial septal glutamate receptors play an important role in the modulation of some immune responses.

  11. Ceftriaxone modulates uptake activity of glial glutamate transporter-1 against global brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yu-Yan; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Min; Wang, Dan; Li, Li; Li, Wen-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Ceftriaxone(Cef) selectively increases the expression of glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), which was thought to be neuroprotective in some circumstances. However, the effect of Cef on glutamate uptake of GLT-1 was mostly assayed using in vitro studies such as primary neuron/astrocyte cultures or brain slices. In addition, the effect of Cef on neurons in different ischemic models was still discrepant. Therefore, this study was undertaken to observe the effect of Cef on neurons in global brain ischemia in rats, and especially to provide direct evidence of the up-regulation of GLT-1 uptake for glutamate contributing to the neuronal protection of Cef against brain ischemia. Neuropathological evaluation indicated that administration of Cef, especially pre-treatment protocols, significantly prevented delayed neuronal death in hippocampal CA1 subregion normally induced by global brain ischemia. Simultaneously, pre-administration of Cef significantly up-regulated the expression of GLT-1. Particularly, GLT-1 uptake assay with (3) H-glutamate in living cells from adult rats showed that up-regulation in glutamate uptake accompanied up-regulated GLT-1 expression. Inhibition of GLT-1 by antisense oligodeoxynucleotides or dihydrokainate significantly inhibited the Cef-induced up-regulation in GLT-1 uptake and the neuroprotective effect against global ischemia. Thus, we may conclude that Cef protects neurons against global brain ischemia via up-regulation of the expression and glutamate uptake of GLT-1. Glutamate uptake by glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) is the principal way to regulate extracellular glutamate homeostasis in central nervous system. Over-accumulation of glutamate results in excitotoxicity and injures neurons after cerebral ischemia. Ceftriaxone up-regulates GLT-1 expression and uptake of glutamate, diminishes the excitotoxicity of glutamate and then protects neurons against global brain ischemia. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. The conversion of glutamate by glutamine synthase in neocortical astrocytes from juvenile rat is important to limit glutamate spillover and peri/extrasynaptic activation of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Yosra; Amri, Mohamed; Becq, Hélène; Molinari, Florence; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2017-02-01

    Glutamate transporters (EAATs) are important to maintain spatial and temporal specificity of synaptic transmission. Their efficiency to uptake and transport glutamate into the intracellular space depends on several parameters including the intracellular concentrations of Na(+) and glutamate, the elevations of which may slow down the cycling rate of EAATs. In astrocytes, glutamate is maintained at low concentration due to the presence of specific enzymes such as glutamine synthase (GS). GS inhibition results in cytosolic accumulation of glutamate suggesting that the conversion of glutamate by GS is important for EAATs operation. Here we recorded astrocytes from juvenile rat neocortical slices and analyzed the consequences of elevated intracellular glutamate concentrations and of GS inhibition on the time course of synaptically evoked transporter current (STC). In slices from rats treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSO), a GS inhibitor, STC evoked by short burst of high frequency stimulation (HFS; 100 Hz for 100 ms) but not by low frequency stimulation (LFS; 0.1 Hz) was twice slower than STC evoked from saline injected rats. Same results were obtained for astrocytes recorded with pipette containing 3-10 mM glutamate and compared with cells recorded with 0 or1 mM glutamate in the patch pipette. We also showed that HFS elicited significantly larger NMDAR-excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) with a stronger peri/extrasynaptic component in pyramidal cells from MSO-treated compared with saline treated rats. Taken together our data demonstrate that the conversion of glutamate by GS is fundamental to ensure an efficient clearance of glutamate by EAATs and to prevent glutamate spillover. GLIA 2017;65:401-415.

  13. The efficacy of probiotics for monosodium glutamate-induced obesity: dietology concerns and opportunities for prevention

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Obesity becomes endemic today. Monosodium glutamate was proved as obesogenic food additive. Probiotics are discussed to impact on obesity development. Aims and objectives The aim was to study the effects of probiotics on the development of monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity in rats. Material and methods We included 45 Wistar male rats and divided into three groups (n = 15). Newborn rats of group 1 (control) received subcutaneously 8 μl/g saline. Group 2 received 3 to 4 mg/g MSG subcutaneously on the second, fourth, sixth, eighth and tenth day of life. Within 4 months after birth, rats were on a standard diet. Group 3 received an aqueous solution of probiotics mixture (2:1:1 Lactobacillus casei IMVB-7280, Bifidobacterium animalis VKL, B. animalis VKB) at the dose of 5 × 109 CFU/kg (50 mg/kg) intragastrically. Administration of probiotics was started at the age of 4 weeks just after weaning and continued for 3 months during 2-week courses. Group 2 received intragastrically 2.5 ml/kg water. Organometric and biochemical parameters in all groups of rats were analyzed over 4 months. The concentration of adiponectin was determined in serum, and leptin - in adipose tissue. Results Administration of MSG led to the development of obesity in rats; body weight had increased by 7.9% vs controls (p < 0.05); body length had increased by 5.4% (p < 0.05). Body mass index and Lee index and visceral fat mass had increased (p < 0.001). Under the neonatal injection of MSG, the concentration of total cholesterol, triglycerides, VLDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol significantly increased (p < 0.001), in comparison with controls. Adipose-derived hormones changed in MSG obesity rats: adiponectin decreased by 58.8% (p < 0.01), and leptin concentration in adipose tissue had increased by 74.7% (p < 0.01). The probiotic therapy of rats from group 3 prevented obesity development. Parameters of rats treated with probiotic mixture did not differ from that in

  14. The efficacy of probiotics for monosodium glutamate-induced obesity: dietology concerns and opportunities for prevention.

    PubMed

    Savcheniuk, Oleksandr A; Virchenko, Oleksandr V; Falalyeyeva, Tetyana M; Beregova, Tetyana V; Babenko, Lidia P; Lazarenko, Liudmyla M; Demchenko, Olga M; Bubnov, Rostyslav V; Spivak, Mykola Ya

    2014-01-13

    Obesity becomes endemic today. Monosodium glutamate was proved as obesogenic food additive. Probiotics are discussed to impact on obesity development. The aim was to study the effects of probiotics on the development of monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity in rats. We included 45 Wistar male rats and divided into three groups (n = 15). Newborn rats of group 1 (control) received subcutaneously 8 μl/g saline. Group 2 received 3 to 4 mg/g MSG subcutaneously on the second, fourth, sixth, eighth and tenth day of life. Within 4 months after birth, rats were on a standard diet. Group 3 received an aqueous solution of probiotics mixture (2:1:1 Lactobacillus casei IMVB-7280, Bifidobacterium animalis VKL, B. animalis VKB) at the dose of 5 × 109 CFU/kg (50 mg/kg) intragastrically. Administration of probiotics was started at the age of 4 weeks just after weaning and continued for 3 months during 2-week courses. Group 2 received intragastrically 2.5 ml/kg water. Organometric and biochemical parameters in all groups of rats were analyzed over 4 months. The concentration of adiponectin was determined in serum, and leptin - in adipose tissue. Administration of MSG led to the development of obesity in rats; body weight had increased by 7.9% vs controls (p < 0.05); body length had increased by 5.4% (p < 0.05). Body mass index and Lee index and visceral fat mass had increased (p < 0.001). Under the neonatal injection of MSG, the concentration of total cholesterol, triglycerides, VLDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol significantly increased (p < 0.001), in comparison with controls. Adipose-derived hormones changed in MSG obesity rats: adiponectin decreased by 58.8% (p < 0.01), and leptin concentration in adipose tissue had increased by 74.7% (p < 0.01). The probiotic therapy of rats from group 3 prevented obesity development. Parameters of rats treated with probiotic mixture did not differ from that in the control. The introduction of MSG to newborn rats caused the

  15. Glutamate release in the ventromedial hypothalamus of the female rat during copulation: modulation by estradiol.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, M; Afonso, V M; Graham, M D; Pfaus, J G

    2014-02-01

    Binding of glutamate or its ionotropic receptor agonists in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) of female rats inhibits both appetitive and consummatory aspects of sexual behavior. Because vaginocervical stimulation activates glutamate neurons in the VMH, and administration of estradiol benzoate (EB) and progesterone (P) delays this effect, the present study examined the effects of hormonal priming on glutamate release within the VMH of female rats paired with sexually vigorous males. Ovariectomized, sexually experienced rats were implanted with guide cannula aimed at the ventrolateral VMH, through which microdialysis probes were inserted prior to testing. Females were assigned randomly to one of three hormone treatment conditions: EB+P, EB alone, or the oil vehicle. Testing was conducted over 5h, including a 120-min period of habituation to the testing chamber, a 60-min period of baseline sample collection, and a 120-min period during which a sexually vigorous male was introduced into the testing chamber. Dialysates were collected every 20min during the test and were analyzed for glutamate using HPLC. Females primed with oil had large and significant increases in glutamate release from baseline once the male was introduced to the chamber. Treatment with EB alone decreased glutamate release in response to male cues. Although treatment with EB+P did not differ significantly from EB alone, the degree of reduced glutamate release was less than with EB alone. These results indicate that priming with EB reduces glutamate transmission in the VMH in response to male cues. Taken together with our previous findings, estradiol blunts the activation of glutamate neurons in the VMH thus allowing female rats to copulate.

  16. Vitamin B2 inhibits glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Su-Jane; Wu, Wen-Mein; Yang, Feili-Lo; Hsu, Guoo-Shyng Wang; Huang, Chia-Yu

    2008-08-27

    We examined the effect of riboflavin, vitamin B2, on the release of endogenous glutamate from nerve terminals purified from rat cerebral cortex. The release of glutamate evoked by 4-aminopyridine was inhibited by riboflavin. Further experiments indicated that riboflavin-mediated inhibition of glutamate release (i) results from a reduction of vesicular exocytosis, not from an inhibition of nonvesicular release; (ii) is associated with a decrease in presynaptic N-type and P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca channel activity. These findings are the first to suggest that, in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals, riboflavin suppresses voltage-dependent Ca channel activity and in so doing inhibits evoked glutamate release. This finding may explain the neuroprotective effects of vitamin B2 against neurotoxicity.

  17. Chronic exercise dampens hippocampal glutamate overflow induced by kainic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip V; Reiss, Jenny I; Murray, Patrick S; Dishman, Rod K; Spradley, Jessica M

    2015-05-01

    Our laboratory has previously reported that chronic, voluntary exercise diminishes seizure-related behaviors induced by convulsant doses of kainic acid. The present experiments tested the hypothesis that exercise exerts this protective effect through a mechanism involving suppression of glutamate release in the hippocampal formation. Following three weeks of voluntary wheel running or sedentary conditions, rats were injected with 10 mg/kg of kainic acid, and hippocampal glutamate was measured in real time using a telemetric, in vivo voltammetry system. A separate experiment measured electroencephalographic (EEG) activity following kainic acid treatment. Results of the voltammetry experiment revealed that the rise in hippocampal glutamate induced by kainic acid is attenuated in exercising rats compared to sedentary controls, indicating that the exercise-induced protection against seizures involves regulation of hippocampal glutamate release. The findings reveal the potential benefit of regular exercise in the treatment and prevention of seizure disorders and suggest a possible neurobiological mechanism underlying this effect.

  18. [Ammonia, glutamine and glutamic acid content of rat tissues during and after hyperoxia].

    PubMed

    Gabibov, M M

    1975-01-01

    The content of ammonia, glutamine, glutamic acid was measured in the brain, liver, heart, spleen, kidneys, skeletal muscles and blood rats exposed to a 4 atm oxygen atmosphere and during aftereffects. The hyperoxic atmosphere resulted in an increase of ammonia and glutamic acid and in a decrease of glutamine in the tissues. The return to the norm of the compounds occurred slowly and nonuniformly, lasting for 40 to 60 posthyperoxic days.

  19. Regulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA expression in rat brain after sertraline treatment.

    PubMed

    Giardino, L; Zanni, M; Bettelli, C; Savina, M A; Calzà, L

    1996-09-26

    We now investigated the effect of chronic treatment with sertraline on glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA expression in different rat brain areas by means of in situ hybridization. We found a reduced glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex, accumbens nucleus, olfactory tubercle and reticular nucleus of the thalamus. The involvement of presynaptic modulation of gamma-amino-butyric acid transmission in the anxiolytic effect of sertraline is discussed.

  20. Response of regional brain glutamate transaminases of rat to aluminum in protein malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Prasunpriya; Chatterjee, Ajay K

    2002-08-28

    The mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity is not clear. The involvement of glutamate in the aluminium-induced neurocomplications has been suggested. Brain glutamate levels also found to be altered in protein malnutrition. Alterations in glutamate levels as well as glutamate-alpha-decarboxylase in different regions of rat brain has been reported in response to aluminum exposure. Thus the study of glutamate metabolising enzymes in different brain regions of rats maintained on either normal or restricted protein diet may be of importance for understanding the neurotoxicity properties of aluminium. Dietary protein restrictions does not have an significant impact on regional aluminum content of the brain. The interaction of aluminum intoxication and protein restriction is significant in the thalamic area and the midbrain-hippocampal region in cases of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase. In the case of glutamate pyruvate transaminase, this interaction is significant only in thalamic area. The metabolism of amino acids, as indicated by activities of specific transaminases, of brain is altered in response to aluminum exposure. These alterations are region specific and are dependent on dietary protein intake or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis.

  1. Tianeptine modulates amygdalar glutamate neurochemistry and synaptic proteins in rats subjected to repeated stress.

    PubMed

    Piroli, Gerardo G; Reznikov, Leah R; Grillo, Claudia A; Hagar, Janel M; Fadel, Jim R; Reagan, Lawrence P

    2013-03-01

    Stress is a common environmental factor associated with depressive illness and the amygdala is thought to be integral for this association. For example, repeated stress impairs amygdalar neuroplasticity in rodents and these defects parallel amygdalar deficits in depressive illness patients. Because the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate is important in neuroplasticity, we hypothesized that alterations in amygdalar glutamatergic systems may serve as key players in depressive illness. Moreover, restoration of amygdalar glutamatergic systems may serve as important therapeutic targets in the successful management of multiple stress-related mood disorders. To address these hypotheses, we measured glutamate efflux in the basolateral and central amygdalar complexes via in vivo microdialysis, as well as the expression of synaptic proteins that regulate vesicular glutamate packaging and release, in rats subjected to repeated stress and treated daily with saline or the antidepressant tianeptine. Glutamate efflux was significantly reduced in the central amygdalar complex of animals subjected to repeated stress. In addition, repeated stress nearly eliminated amygdalar vGLUT2 expression, thereby proving a potential mechanism through which repeated stress impairs amygdalar glutamate neurochemistry. These stress-induced changes in glutamate efflux and vGLUT2 expression were inhibited by daily tianeptine administration. Moreover, tianeptine administration increased the vesicular localization of SNAP-25, which could account for the ability of tianeptine to modify glutamatergic tone in non-stressed control rats. Collectively, these results demonstrate that repeated stress differentially affects amygdalar glutamate systems and further supports our previous studies indicating that tianeptine's antidepressant efficacy may involve targeting amygdalar glutatamatergic systems.

  2. Glutamate Impairs Mitochondria Aerobic Respiration Capacity and Enhances Glycolysis in Cultured Rat Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xu; Shi, Zhong Fang; Xu, Li Xin; Li, Jia Xin; Wu, Min; Wang, Xiao Xuan; Jia, Mei; Dong, Li Ping; Yang, Shao Hua; Yuan, Fang

    2017-01-01

    To study the effect of glutamate on metabolism, shifts in glycolysis and lactate release in rat astrocytes. After 10 days, secondary cultured astrocytes were treated with 1 mmol/L glutamate for 1 h, and the oxygen consumption rates (OCR) and extra cellular acidification rate (ECAR) was analyzed using a Seahorse XF 24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer. Cell viability was then evaluated by MTT assay. Moreover, changes in extracellular lactate concentration induced by glutamate were tested with a lactate detection kit. Compared with the control group, treatment with 1 mmol/L glutamate decreased the astrocytes' maximal respiration and spare respiratory capacity but increased their glycolytic capacity and glycolytic reserve. Further analysis found that 1-h treatment with different concentrations of glutamate (0.1-1 mmol/L) increased lactate release from astrocytes, however the cell viability was not affected by the glutamate treatment. The current study provided direct evidence that exogenous glutamate treatment impaired the mitochondrial respiration capacity of astrocytes and enhanced aerobic glycolysis, which could be involved in glutamate injury or protection mechanisms in response to neurological disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of Ceftriaxone on Glial Glutamate Transporters in Wistar Rats Administered Sequential Ethanol and Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Alshehri, Fahad S.; Almalki, Atiah H.; Sari, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is one of the psychostimulants that is co-abused with ethanol. Repeated exposure to high dose of METH has been shown to cause increases in extracellular glutamate concentration. We have recently reported that ethanol exposure can also increase the extracellular glutamate concentration and downregulate the expression of glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1). GLT-1 is a glial transporter that regulates the majority of extracellular glutamate. A Wistar rat model of METH and ethanol co-abuse was used to examine the expression of GLT-1 as well as other glutamate transporters such as cystine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST). We also examined the body temperature in rats administered METH, ethanol or both drugs. We further investigated the effects of ceftriaxone (CEF), a β-lactam antibiotic known to upregulate GLT-1, in this METH/ethanol co-abuse rat model. After 7 days of either ethanol (6 g/kg) or water oral gavage, Wistar rats received either saline or METH (10 mg/kg i.p. every 2 h × 4), followed by either saline or CEF (200 mg/kg) posttreatment. METH administered alone decreased GLT-1 expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and increased body temperature, but did not reduce either xCT or GLAST expression in ethanol and water-pretreated rats. Interestingly, ethanol and METH were found to have an additive effect on the downregulation of GLT-1 expression in the NAc but not in the PFC. Moreover, ethanol alone caused GLT-1 downregulation in the NAc and elevated body temperature compared to control. Finally, CEF posttreatment significantly reversed METH-induced hyperthermia, restored GLT-1 expression, and increased xCT expression. These findings suggest the potential therapeutic role of CEF against METH- or ethanol/METH-induced hyperglutamatergic state and hyperthermia. PMID:27713684

  4. Effects of poly-gamma-glutamic acid on serum and brain concentrations of glutamate and GABA in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyesung; Chang, Moon-Jeong; Kim, Sun-Hee

    2010-02-01

    Poly-gamma-glutamic acid (gamma-PGA) is a mucilaginous and biodegradable compound produced by Bacillus subtilis from fermented soybeans, and is found in the traditional Korean soy product, cheongkukjang. This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of gamma-PGA from a food source on the concentration of the neurotransmitter GABA and its metabolic precursor glutamate in diet-induced obese rats. Eight-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=60) were used. The rats were divided into two groups and obesity was induced by providing either a 10% control fat or 45% high fat diet for 5 weeks. The rats were then blocked into 6 groups and supplemented with a 0.1% gamma-PGA diet for 4 weeks. After sacrifice, brain and serum GABA and glutamate concentrations were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection. The rats fed the high fat diet had significantly increased body weights. gamma-PGA supplementation significantly increased serum concentrations of glutamate and GABA in the control fat diet groups while this effect was not found in the high fat groups. In the brain, glutamate concentrations were significantly higher in the gamma-PGA supplemented groups both in rats fed the normal and high fat diets than in the no gamma-PGA controls. GABA concentrations showed the same tendency. The results indicated that gamma-PGA intake increased GABA concentrations in the serum and brain. However, the effects were not shown in obese rats.

  5. Effects of poly-γ-glutamic acid on serum and brain concentrations of glutamate and GABA in diet-induced obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyesung; Chang, Moon-Jeong

    2010-01-01

    Poly-gamma-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a mucilaginous and biodegradable compound produced by Bacillus subtilis from fermented soybeans, and is found in the traditional Korean soy product, cheongkukjang. This study was carried out to evaluate the effects of γ-PGA from a food source on the concentration of the neurotransmitter GABA and its metabolic precursor glutamate in diet-induced obese rats. Eight-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=60) were used. The rats were divided into two groups and obesity was induced by providing either a 10% control fat or 45% high fat diet for 5 weeks. The rats were then blocked into 6 groups and supplemented with a 0.1% γ-PGA diet for 4 weeks. After sacrifice, brain and serum GABA and glutamate concentrations were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection. The rats fed the high fat diet had significantly increased body weights. γ-PGA supplementation significantly increased serum concentrations of glutamate and GABA in the control fat diet groups while this effect was not found in the high fat groups. In the brain, glutamate concentrations were significantly higher in the γ-PGA supplemented groups both in rats fed the normal and high fat diets than in the no γ-PGA controls. GABA concentrations showed the same tendency. The results indicated that γ-PGA intake increased GABA concentrations in the serum and brain. However, the effects were not shown in obese rats. PMID:20198205

  6. Functional and morphological characterization of glutamate transporters in the rat locus coeruleus

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, M C; Gerrikagoitia, I; Martínez-Millán, L; Mendiguren, A; Pineda, J

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) in the CNS contribute to the clearance of glutamate released during neurotransmission. The aim of this study was to explore the role of EAATs in the regulation of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons by glutamate. Experimental Approach We measured the effect of different EAAT subtype inhibitors/enhancers on glutamate- and KCl-induced activation of LC neurons in rat slices. EAAT2–3 expression in the LC was also characterized by immunohistochemistry. Key Results The EAAT2–5 inhibitor DL-threo-β-benzyloxaspartic acid (100 μM), but not the EAAT2, 4, 5 inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (100 μM) or the EAAT2 inhibitor dihydrokainic acid (DHK; 100 μM), enhanced the glutamate- and KCl-induced activation of the firing rate of LC neurons. These effects were blocked by ionotropic, but not metabotrobic, glutamate receptor antagonists. DHK (100 μM) was the only EAAT inhibitor that increased the spontaneous firing rate of LC cells, an effect that was due to inhibition of EAAT2 and subsequent AMPA receptor activation. Chronic treatment with ceftriaxone (200 mg·kg−1 i.p., once daily, 7 days), an EAAT2 expression enhancer, increased the actions of glutamate and DHK, suggesting a functional impact of EAAT2 up-regulation on the glutamatergic system. Immuhistochemical data revealed the presence of EAAT2 and EAAT3 surrounding noradrenergic neurons and EAAT2 on glial cells in the LC. Conclusions and Implications These results remark the importance of EAAT2 and EAAT3 in the regulation of rat LC by glutamate. Neuronal EAAT3 would be responsible for terminating the action of synaptically released glutamate, whereas glial EAAT2 would regulate tonic glutamate concentrations in this nucleus. PMID:23638698

  7. Alcohol consumption increases basal extracellular glutamate in the nucleus accumbens core of Sprague-Dawley rats without increasing spontaneous glutamate release.

    PubMed

    Pati, Dipanwita; Kelly, Kyle; Stennett, Bethany; Frazier, Charles J; Knackstedt, Lori A

    2016-07-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens core (NAc) mediates ethanol consumption. Previous studies using non-contingent and voluntary alcohol administration in inbred rodents have reported increased basal extracellular glutamate levels in the NAc. Here, we assessed basal glutamate levels in the NAc following intermittent alcohol consumption in male Sprague-Dawley rats that had access to ethanol for 7 weeks on alternating days. We found increased basal NAc glutamate at 24 h withdrawal from ethanol and thus sought to identify the source of this glutamate. To do so, we employed a combination of microdialysis, slice electrophysiology and western blotting. Reverse dialysis of the voltage-gated sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin did not affect glutamate levels in either group. Electrophysiological recordings in slices made after 24 h withdrawal revealed a decrease in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) frequency relative to controls, with no change in sEPSC amplitude. No change in metabotropic glutamate receptor 2/3 (mGlu2/3) function was detected as bath application of the mGlu2/3 agonist LY379268 decreased spontaneous and miniature EPSC frequency in slices from both control and ethanol-consuming rats. The increase in basal glutamate was not associated with changes in the surface expression of GLT-1, however, a decrease in slope of the no-net-flux dialysis function was observed following ethanol consumption, indicating a potential decrease in glutamate reuptake. Taken together, these findings indicate that the increase in basal extracellular glutamate occurring after chronic ethanol consumption is not mediated by an increase in action potential-dependent glutamate release or a failure of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors to regulate such release. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Response of regional brain glutamate transaminases of rat to aluminum in protein malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Prasunpriya; Chatterjee, Ajay K

    2002-01-01

    Background The mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity is not clear. The involvement of glutamate in the aluminium-induced neurocomplications has been suggested. Brain glutamate levels also found to be altered in protein malnutrition. Alterations in glutamate levels as well as glutamate-α-decarboxylase in different regions of rat brain has been reported in response to aluminum exposure. Thus the study of glutamate metabolising enzymes in different brain regions of rats maintained on either normal or restricted protein diet may be of importance for understanding the neurotoxicity properties of aluminium. Results Dietary protein restrictions does not have an significant impact on regional aluminum content of the brain. The interaction of aluminum intoxication and protein restriction is significant in the thalamic area and the midbrain-hippocampal region in cases of glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase. In the case of gluatmate pyruvate transaminase, this interaction is significant only in thalamic area. Conclusion The metabolism of amino acids, as indicated by activities of specific transaminases, of brain is altered in response to aluminum exposure. These alterations are region specific and are dependent on dietary protein intake or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis. PMID:12197946

  9. [Comparative analysis of metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate striatal receptors blockade influence on rats locomotor behaviour].

    PubMed

    Iakimovskiĭ, A F; Kerko, T V

    2013-02-01

    The influence of NMDA and metabotropic neostriatal glutamate receptors blockade to avoidance conditioning (in shuttle box) and free locomotor behavior (in open field) in chronic experiments in rats were investigated. The glutamate receptor antagonists were injected bilateral into striatum separately and with the GABA-A receptor antagonist picrotoxin (2 microg), that produced in rats the impairment of avoidance conditioning and choreo-myoklonic hyperkinesis. The most effective in preventing of negative picrotoxin influence on behavior was 5-type metabotropic glutamate receptors antagonist MTEP (3 microg). Separately injected MTEP did not influence on avoidance conditioning and free locomotor behavior. Unlike that, 1-type metabotropic glutamate receptors antagonist EMQMCM (3 microg) impaired normal locomotor behavior and did not prevent the picrotoxin effects. The NMDA glutamate receptors MK 801 (disocilpin--1 and 5 microg) impaired the picrotoxin-induced hyperkinesis, but did not to prevent the negative effects on avoidance conditioning; separately injected MK 801 reduced free locomotor activity. Based on location of investigated receptor types in neostriatal neurons membranes, we proposed that the most effective influence on 5-type metabotropic glutamate receptors is associated with their involvement in "indirect" efferent pathway, suffered in hyperkinetic extrapyramidal motor dysfunction--Huntington's chorea in human.

  10. Apigenin, a natural flavonoid, inhibits glutamate release in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia Ying; Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Wang, Chia Chuan; Wang, Ying Chou; Chou, Shang Shing Peter; Wang, Su Jane

    2015-09-05

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect and mechanism of apigenin, a natural flavonoid, on glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), apigenin inhibited glutamate release and the elevation of the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration evoked by 4-aminopyridine, whereas it had no effect on 4-aminopyridine-mediated depolarization and Na(+) influx. The apigenin-mediated inhibition of evoked glutamate release was prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca(2+) ions and blocking Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel activity. Furthermore, we determined that gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors are present in the hippocampal nerve terminals because they are colocalized with the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. However, the effect of apigenin on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release from synaptosomes was unaffected by the GABAA receptor antagonists SR95531 and bicuculline. Furthermore, in slice preparations, whole-cell patch-clamp experiments showed that apigenin reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude, suggesting a presynaptic mechanism. On the basis of these results, we suggested that apigenin exerts its presynaptic inhibition probably by reducing Ca(2+) entry mediated by the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, thereby inhibiting glutamate release from the rat hippocampal nerve terminals.

  11. Effect of glutamate and blood glutamate scavengers oxaloacetate and pyruvate on neurological outcome and pathohistology of the hippocampus after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zlotnik, Alexander; Sinelnikov, Igor; Gruenbaum, Benjamin F; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Dubilet, Michael; Dubilet, Elena; Leibowitz, Akiva; Ohayon, Sharon; Regev, Adi; Boyko, Matthew; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian I

    2012-01-01

    Decreasing blood glutamate concentrations after traumatic brain injury accelerates brain-to-blood glutamate efflux, leading to improved neurologic outcomes. The authors hypothesize that treatment with blood glutamate scavengers should reduce neuronal cell loss, whereas administration of glutamate should worsen outcomes. The authors performed histologic studies of neuronal survival in the rat hippocampus after traumatic brain injury and treatment with blood glutamate scavengers. Traumatic brain injury was induced on anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats by a standardized weight drop. Intravenous treatment groups included saline (control), oxaloacetate, pyruvate, and glutamate. Neurologic outcome was assessed using a Neurological Severity Score at 1 h, and 1, 2, 7, 14, 21, 28 days. Blood glutamate was determined at baseline and 90 min. Four weeks after traumatic brain injury, a histologic analysis of surviving neurons was performed. Oxaloacetate and pyruvate treatment groups demonstrated increased neuronal survival (oxaloacetate 2,200 ± 37, pyruvate 2,108 ± 137 vs. control 1,978 ± 46, P < 0.001, mean ± SD). Glutamate treatment revealed decreased neuronal survival (1,715 ± 48, P < 0.001). Treatment groups demonstrated favorable neurologic outcomes at 24 and 48 h (Neurological Severity Score at 24 and 48 h: 5.5 (1-8.25), 5 (1.75-7.25), P = 0.02 and 3(1-6.5), 4 (1.75-4.5), P = 0.027, median ± corresponding interquartile range). Blood glutamate concentrations were decreased in the oxaloacetate and pyruvate treatment groups. Administration of oxaloacetate and pyruvate was not shown to have any adverse effects. The authors demonstrate that the blood glutamate scavengers oxaloacetate and pyruvate provide neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury, expressed both by reduced neuronal loss in the hippocampus and improved neurologic outcomes. The findings of this study may bring about new therapeutic possibilities in a variety of clinical settings.

  12. Chronic postnatal stress induces voluntary alcohol intake and modifies glutamate transporters in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Odeon, María Mercedes; Andreu, Marcela; Yamauchi, Laura; Grosman, Mauricio; Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal stress alters stress responses for life, with serious consequences on the central nervous system (CNS), involving glutamatergic neurotransmission and development of voluntary alcohol intake. Several drugs of abuse, including alcohol and cocaine, alter glutamate transport (GluT). Here, we evaluated effects of chronic postnatal stress (CPS) on alcohol intake and brain glutamate uptake and transporters in male adolescent Wistar rats. For CPS from postnatal day (PD) 7, pups were separated from their mothers and exposed to cold stress (4 °C) for 1 h daily for 20 days; controls remained with their mothers. Then they were exposed to either voluntary ethanol (6%) or dextrose (1%) intake for 7 days (5-7 rats per group), then killed. CPS: (1) increased voluntary ethanol intake, (2) did not affect body weight gain or produce signs of toxicity with alcohol exposure, (3) increased glutamate uptake by hippocampal synaptosomes in vitro and (4) reduced protein levels (Western measurements) in hippocampus and frontal cortex of glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and excitatory amino-acid transporter-3 (EAAT-3) but increased glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) levels. We propose that CPS-induced decrements in GLT-1 and EAAT-3 expression levels are opposed by activation of a compensatory mechanism to prevent excitotoxicity. A greater role for GLAST in total glutamate uptake to prevent enlarged extracellular glutamate levels is inferred. Although CPS strongly increased intake of ethanol, this had little impact on effects of CPS on brain glutamate uptake or transporters. However, the impact of early life adverse events on glutamatergic neurotransmission may underlie increased alcohol consumption in adulthood.

  13. Effects of Administered Ethanol and Methamphetamine on Glial Glutamate Transporters in Rat Striatum and Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Fahad S; Althobaiti, Yusuf S; Sari, Youssef

    2017-03-01

    Exposure to ethanol (EtOH) or methamphetamine (MA) can lead to increase in extracellular glutamate concentration in the brain. Although studies from ours showed the effects of EtOH exposure on key glial glutamate transporters, little is known about the effects of sequential exposure to EtOH and MA or MA alone on certain glial glutamate transporters. In this study, we investigated the effects of sequential exposure to EtOH and MA on the expression of the major glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1), as well as cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in striatum and hippocampus. We also tested the effects of ceftriaxone (CEF), known to upregulate GLT-1, in animals administered EtOH and MA. Wistar rats were orally gavaged with EtOH (6 g/kg) or water for 7 days. On the following day (day 8), the rats received four intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of MA (10 mg/kg) or saline (vehicle) occurring every 2 h. The rats were then treated with CEF (200 mg/kg/day, i.p.) or saline on days 8, 9, and 10. EtOH or MA exposure caused a significant downregulation of GLT-1 expression as compared to control groups in striatum and hippocampus. Furthermore, sequential exposure of EtOH and MA caused a significant downregulation of GLT-1 expression as compared to either drug administered alone in both brain regions. Importantly, GLT-1 expression was restored following CEF treatment. There were no significant differences on xCT and GLAST expression in striatum and hippocampus between all groups. These findings demonstrated that sequential exposure to EtOH and MA has additive effect in downregulation of GLT-1 and this effect can be attenuated by CEF treatment.

  14. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Su-Jane

    2012-09-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat

  15. [Effect of cholinomimetics on L-glutamic acid release and uptake in the neostriatum of rats].

    PubMed

    Godukhin, O V; Budantsev, A Iu; Selifonova, O V; Agapova, V N

    1983-12-01

    The effects of cholinomimetics on release and uptake of exogenic glutamic acid in the rat brain neostriatum in vivo and in vitro were studied. Carbocholine and nicotin were shown to inhibit the release, carbocholine acting directly on the presynaptic receptors whereas nicotin acting indirectly through the interneurons of neostriatum.

  16. Effects of MS-153 on glutamate transporter 1 and cysteine/glutamate exchanger as well as ethanol drinking behavior in male P rats

    PubMed Central

    Aal-Aaboda, Munaf; Alhaddad, Hasan; Osowik, Francis; Nauli, Surya M.; Sari, Youssef

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is largely associated with alterations in the extracellular glutamate concentrations in several brain reward regions. We have recently found that glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) is downregulated following chronic exposure to ethanol for five weeks in alcohol-preferring rats, and upregulation of the GLT-1 levels in nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex resulted, in part, in attenuating ethanol consumption. Cysteine glutamate antiporter (xCT) was also found to be downregulated after chronic ethanol exposure in P rats, and its upregulation could be valuable in attenuating ethanol drinking. In this study, we examined the effect of a synthetic compound, (R)-(−)-5-methyl-1-nicotinoyl-2-pyrazoline (MS-153), on ethanol drinking and expression of GLT-1 and xCT in the amygdala and hippocampus of P rats. P rats were exposed to continuous free-choice access to water, 15% and 30% ethanol, and food for five weeks, and then after which they received treatments of MS-153 or vehicle for five days. The results showed that MS-153 treatment significantly reduced ethanol consumption in P rats. It was revealed that GLT-1 and xCT expressions were downregulated in both the amygdala and hippocampus of ethanol-vehicle treated rats (ethanol vehicle group) as compared to water control animals. Importantly, MS-153 treatment upregulated GLT-1 and xCT expression in these brain regions. These findings provide important role of MS-153 on these glutamate transporters for the attenuation of ethanol drinking behavior. PMID:25601490

  17. The effects of thioperamide on extracellular levels of glutamate and GABA in the rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Welty, Natalie; Shoblock, James R

    2009-12-01

    Histamine H3 receptors (H3R) are presynaptic heteroreceptors that negatively modulate the release of histamine and other neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine. Blocking H3 receptors with antagonists/inverse agonists has been shown to be procognitive and this effect has often been associated with increases in acetylcholine transmission. H3 receptors are abundantly expressed in the prefrontal cortex, an area associated with cognitive performance. While the procognitive effects of H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists may depend on alterations to acetylcholine or histamine release, other transmitters involved in cognitive processing such as glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) may also be involved. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of thioperamide, an H3 receptor antagonist, on extracellular levels of glutamate and GABA in the prefrontal cortex. By means of in vivo microdialysis on freely moving Sprague Dawley rats, samples were collected and assayed via high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection. Replacement of calcium with magnesium revealed that the release of GABA, but not glutamate, was calcium-dependent. Thioperamide (10-20 mg/kg) did not affect basal glutamate or GABA release. Perfusion with a high concentration of potassium (100 mM) increased GABA, but not glutamate, release and thioperamide (20 mg/kg) attenuated the effects of high potassium on GABA release. These data indicate that H3 receptors in the prefrontal cortex can enhance stimulated GABA release, but do not regulate basal levels of glutamate or GABA.

  18. Effects of aluminium exposure on brain glutamate and GABA systems: an experimental study in rats.

    PubMed

    Nayak, P; Chatterjee, A K

    2001-12-01

    It has been postulated that the neurotoxic effects of aluminium could be mediated through glutamate, an excitatory amino acid. Hence the effects of aluminium administration (at a dose of 4.2mg/kg body weight daily as aluminium chloride, hexahydrate, intraperitoneally, for 4 weeks) on glutamate and gamma-amino butyrate (GABA), an inhibitory amino acid, and related enzyme activities in different regions of the brain were studied in albino rats. The glutamate level increased significantly in the cerebrum, thalamic area, midbrain-hippocampal region and cerebellum in response to in vivo aluminium exposure. The aluminium insult also caused significant increases in glutamate alpha-decarboxylase activity in all the brain regions. However, on aluminium insult, the GABA content was not significantly changed except in the thalamic area, where it was elevated. On the contrary, the GABA-T activities of all the regions were reduced significantly in all regions except the midbrain-hippocampal region. However, the succinic semi-aldehyde content of all brain regions increased, often significantly. The aluminium-induced modification of the enzyme activities may be either due to the direct impact of aluminium or due to aluminium-induced changes in the cellular environment. The aluminium-induced differential regional accumulation of glutamate or other alterations in enzymes of the glutamate-GABA system may be one of the causes of aluminium-induced neurotoxicity.

  19. Insulin and glucagon share the same mechanism of neuroprotection in diabetic rats: role of glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Fanne, Rami Abu; Nassar, Taher; Heyman, Samuel N.; Hijazi, Nuha

    2011-01-01

    In patients with acute ischemic stroke, diabetes and hyperglycemia are associated with increased infarct size, more profound neurologic deficits and higher mortality. Notwithstanding extensive clinical and experimental data, treatment of stroke-associated hyperglycemia with insulin is controversial. In addition to hyperglycemia, diabetes and even early prediabetic insulin resistance are associated with increased levels of amino acids, including the neurotoxic glutamate, in the circulation. The pleiotropic metabolic effects of insulin include a reduction in the concentration of amino acids in the circulation. In this article, we show that in diabetic rats exposed to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, a decrease of plasma glutamate by insulin or glucagon reduces CSF glutamate, improves brain histology, and preserves neurologic function. The neuroprotective effect of insulin and glucagon was similar, notwithstanding their opposite effects on blood glucose. The therapeutic window of both hormones overlapped with the short duration (∼30 min) of elevated brain glutamate following brain trauma in rodents. Similar neuroprotective effects were found after administration of the glutamate scavenger oxaloacetate, which does not affect glucose metabolism. These data indicate that insulin and glucagon exert a neuroprotective effect within a very brief therapeutic window that correlates with their capacity to reduce glutamate, rather than by modifying glucose levels. PMID:21677268

  20. Effect of free malonate on the utilization of glutamate by rat brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Koeppen, A H; Riley, K M

    1987-05-01

    Malonate is an effective inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase in preparations from brain and other organs. This property was reexamined in isolated rat brain mitochondria during incubation with L-glutamate. The biosynthesis of aspartate was determined by a standard spectrofluorometric method and a radiometric technique. The latter was suitable for aspartate assay after very brief incubations of mitochondria with glutamate. At a concentration of 1 mM or higher, malonate totally inhibited aspartate biosynthesis. At 0.2 mM, the inhibitory effect was still present. It is thus possible that the natural concentration of free malonate in adult rat brain of 192 nmol/g wet weight exerts an effect on citric acid cycle reactions in vivo. The inhibition of glutamate utilization by malonate was readily overcome by the addition of malate which provided oxaloacetate for the transamination of glutamate. The reaction was accompanied by the accumulation of 2-oxoglutarate. The metabolism of glutamate was also blocked by inclusion of arsenite and gamma-vinyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid but again added malate allowed transamination to resume. When arsenite and gamma-vinyl-gamma-aminobutyric acid were present, the role of malonate as an inhibitor of malate entry into the mitochondrial interior could be determined without considering the inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase. The apparent Km and Vmax values for uninhibited malate entry were 0.01 mM and 100 nmol/mg protein/min, respectively. Malonate was a competitive inhibitor of malate transport (Ki = 0.75 mM).

  1. Xanthohumol-induced presynaptic reduction of glutamate release in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi; Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Huang, Shu Kuei; Wang, Ying Chou; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether xanthohumol, a hop-derived prenylated flavonoid present in beer, affects glutamate release in the rat hippocampus. In the rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes), xanthohumol inhibited the release of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked glutamate and the elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, whereas it had no effect on 4-AP-mediated depolarization. The inhibitory effect of xanthohumol on the evoked glutamate release was prevented by removing extracellular Ca(2+), using the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-CgTX MVIIC, the calmodulin antagonists W7 and calmidazolium, and the protein kinase A inhibitor H89; however, no such effect was observed when the G-protein inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide was used. In addition, immunocytochemical data demonstrated that GABAA receptors are present in the hippocampal synaptosomes and that the xanthohumol effect on evoked glutamate release was antagonized by the GABAA receptor antagonist SR95531. Furthermore, in slice preparations, xanthohumol reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude. We conclude that xanthohumol acts at GABAA receptors present in the hippocampal nerve terminals to decrease the Ca(2+) influx through N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, which subsequently suppresses the Ca(2+)-calmodulin/PKA cascade to decrease the evoked glutamate release.

  2. Benzodiazepine receptor inverse agonist-induced kindling of rats alters learning and glutamate binding.

    PubMed

    Rössler, A S; Schröder, H; Dodd, R H; Chapouthier, G; Grecksch, G

    2000-09-01

    Kindling, recognized as a model of epilepsy, can be obtained by applications of repeated nonconvulsive stimulations that finally lead to generalized seizures. Epileptics often show cognitive impairments. The present work analyzed the learning performance of male Wistar rats kindled with a convulsant inverse agonist of the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex, methyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta-CCM). This compound is also known to have an action on learning processes. It was thus interesting to verify if beta-CCM kindling had the same impairing action on learning as other kindling agents, such as pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). A two-way active-avoidance shuttle-box learning task was chosen, because a deficit was found after PTZ kindling in this learning model. On the other hand, hippocampal glutamate binding, has previously been shown to be modified by both seizures and learning. Thus, the level of glutamate binding was also measured in the present study. Results showed that fully kindled rats had poorer learning performance after the third day of test than controls or not fully kindled animals. L-[3H] glutamate binding to hippocampal membrane fractions of the fully kindled animals was significantly higher when compared with controls, whereas L-[3H] glutamate binding of not fully kindled subjects did not differ from that of controls. Neuronal plasticity changes are a possible explanation for the correlation between kindling, learning deficits, and increased glutamate binding.

  3. Recovery of network-driven glutamatergic activity in rat hippocampal neurons during chronic glutamate receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Eric; Belousov, Andrei B

    2009-01-28

    Previous studies indicated that a long-term decrease in the activity of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces cholinergic activity in rat and mouse hypothalamic neuronal cultures. Here we studied whether a prolonged inactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors also induces cholinergic activity in hippocampal neurons. Receptor activity was chronically suppressed in rat hippocampal primary neuronal cultures with two proportionally increasing sets of concentrations of NMDA plus non-NMDA receptor antagonists: 100 microM/10 microM AP5/CNQX (1X cultures) and 200 microM/20 microM AP5/CNQX (2X cultures). Using calcium imaging we demonstrate that cholinergic activity does not develop in these cultures. Instead, network-driven glutamate-dependent activity, that normally is detected in hyper-excitable conditions, reappears in each culture group in the presence of these antagonists and can be reversibly suppressed by higher concentrations of AP5/CNQX. This activity is mediated by non-NMDA receptors and is modulated by NMDA receptors. Further, non-NMDA receptors, the general level of glutamate receptor activity and CaMK-dependent signaling are critical for development of this network-driven glutamatergic activity in the presence of receptor antagonists. Using electrophysiology, western blotting and calcium imaging we show that some neuronal parameters are either reduced or not affected by chronic glutamate receptor blockade. However, other parameters (including neuronal excitability, mEPSC frequency, and expression of GluR1, NR1 and betaCaMKII) become up-regulated and, in some cases, proportionally between the non-treated, 1X and 2X cultures. Our data suggest recovery of the network-driven glutamatergic activity after chronic glutamate receptor blockade. This recovery may represent a form of neuronal plasticity that compensates for the prolonged suppression of the activity of glutamate receptors.

  4. Glutamate and CO2 production from glutamine in incubated enterocytes of adult and very old rats.

    PubMed

    Meynial-Denis, Dominique; Bielicki, Guy; Beaufrère, Anne-Marie; Mignon, Michelle; Mirand, Philippe Patureau; Renou, Jean-Pierre

    2013-04-01

    Glutamine is the major fuel for enterocytes and promotes the growth of intestinal mucosa. Although oral glutamine exerts a positive effect on intestinal villus height in very old rats, how glutamine is used by enterocytes is unclear. Adult (8 months) and very old (27 months) female rats were exposed to intermittent glutamine supplementation for 50% of their age lifetime. Treated rats received glutamine added to their drinking water, and control rats received water alone. Jejunal epithelial cells (~300×10(6) cells) were incubated in oxygenated Krebs-Henseleit buffer for 30 min containing [1-(13)C] glutamine (~17 M) for analysis of glutamine metabolites by (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR). An aliquot fraction was incubated in the presence of [U-(14)C] glutamine to measure produced CO2. Glutamine pretreatment increased glutamate production and decreased CO2 production in very old rats. The ratio CO2/glutamate, which was very high in control very old rats, was similar at both ages after glutamine pretreatment, as if enterocytes from very old rats recovered the metabolic abilities of enterocytes from adult rats. Our results suggest that long-term treatment with glutamine started before advanced age (a) prevented the loss of rat body weight without limiting sarcopenia and (b) had a beneficial effect on enterocytes from very old rats probably by favoring the role of glutamate as a precursor for glutathione, arginine and proline biosynthesis, which was not detected in (13)C NMR spectra in our experimental conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased glutamate synaptic transmission in the nucleus raphe magnus neurons from morphine-tolerant rats

    PubMed Central

    Bie, Bihua; Pan, Zhizhong Z

    2005-01-01

    Currently, opioid-based drugs are the most effective pain relievers that are widely used in the treatment of pain. However, the analgesic efficacy of opioids is significantly limited by the development of tolerance after repeated opioid administration. Glutamate receptors have been reported to critically participate in the development and maintenance of opioid tolerance, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in brainstem slices, the present study investigated chronic morphine-induced adaptations in glutamatergic synaptic transmission in neurons of the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), a key supraspinal relay for pain modulation and opioid analgesia. Chronic morphine significantly increased glutamate synaptic transmission exclusively in one class of NRM cells that contains μ-opioid receptors in a morphine-tolerant state. The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and the cAMP analog 8-bromo-cAMP mimicked the chronic morphine effect in control neurons and their potency in enhancing the glutamate synaptic current was significantly increased in neurons from morphine-tolerant rats. MDL12330a, an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, and H89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, reversed the increase in glutamate synaptic transmission induced by chronic morphine. In addition, PMA, a phorbol ester activator of protein kinase C (PKC), also showed an increased potency in enhancing the glutamate synaptic current in these morphine-tolerant cells. The PKC inhibitor GF109203X attenuated the chronic morphine effect. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic morphine increases presynaptic glutamate release in μ receptor-containing NRM neurons in a morphine-tolerant state, and that the increased glutamate synaptic transmission appears to involve an upregulation of both the cAMP/PKA pathway and the PKC pathway. This glutamate-mediated activation of these NRM neurons that are thought to facilitate spinal pain transmission may contribute to

  6. Increased glutamate synaptic transmission in the nucleus raphe magnus neurons from morphine-tolerant rats.

    PubMed

    Bie, Bihua; Pan, Zhizhong Z

    2005-02-09

    Currently, opioid-based drugs are the most effective pain relievers that are widely used in the treatment of pain. However, the analgesic efficacy of opioids is significantly limited by the development of tolerance after repeated opioid administration. Glutamate receptors have been reported to critically participate in the development and maintenance of opioid tolerance, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in brainstem slices, the present study investigated chronic morphine-induced adaptations in glutamatergic synaptic transmission in neurons of the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), a key supraspinal relay for pain modulation and opioid analgesia. Chronic morphine significantly increased glutamate synaptic transmission exclusively in one class of NRM cells that contains mu-opioid receptors in a morphine-tolerant state. The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and the cAMP analog 8-bromo-cAMP mimicked the chronic morphine effect in control neurons and their potency in enhancing the glutamate synaptic current was significantly increased in neurons from morphine-tolerant rats. MDL12330a, an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, and H89, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, reversed the increase in glutamate synaptic transmission induced by chronic morphine. In addition, PMA, a phorbol ester activator of protein kinase C (PKC), also showed an increased potency in enhancing the glutamate synaptic current in these morphine-tolerant cells. The PKC inhibitor GF109203X attenuated the chronic morphine effect. Taken together, these results suggest that chronic morphine increases presynaptic glutamate release in mu receptor-containing NRM neurons in a morphine-tolerant state, and that the increased glutamate synaptic transmission appears to involve an upregulation of both the cAMP/PKA pathway and the PKC pathway. This glutamate-mediated activation of these NRM neurons that are thought to facilitate spinal pain transmission may contribute to

  7. Effects of Amoxicillin and Augmentin on Cystine-Glutamate Exchanger and Glutamate Transporter 1 Isoforms as well as Ethanol Intake in Alcohol-Preferring Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hakami, Alqassem Y.; Hammad, Alaa M.; Sari, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is associated with alteration of glutamate transport and glutamate neurotransmission. Glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) is a major transporter that regulates the majority of extracellular glutamate concentration, which is also regulated by cystine-glutamate exchanger (xCT). Importantly, we recently reported that amoxicillin and Augmentin (amoxicillin/clavulanate) upreglulated GLT-1 expression in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) as well as reduced ethanol consumption in male P rats. In this study, we examined the effects of amoxicillin and Augmentin on GLT-1 isoforms (GLT-1a and GLT-1b), xCT, and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) expression in NAc and PFC as well as ethanol intake in male P rats. We found that both compounds significantly reduced ethanol intake, and increased GLT-1a, GLT-1b, and xCT expression in NAc. However, only Augmentin increased GLT-1a, GLT-1b, and xCT expression in PFC. There were no effects of these compounds on GLAST expression in NAc and PFC. These findings demonstrated that Augmentin and amoxicillin have the potential to upregulate GLT-1 isoforms and xCT expression, and consequently attenuate ethanol dependence. PMID:27199635

  8. Downregulation of postsynaptic density-95-interacting regulator of spine morphogenesis reduces glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by differentially regulating glutamate receptors in rat cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Luo, Peng; Yang, Yuefan; Liu, Wei; Rao, Wei; Bian, Huan; Li, Xin; Chen, Tao; Liu, Mengdong; Zhao, Yongbo; Dai, Shuhui; Yan, Xu; Fei, Zhou

    2013-12-01

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity is involved in many neurological diseases. Preso, a novel postsynaptic scaffold protein, mediates excitatory synaptic transmission and various synaptic functions. In this study, we investigated the role of Preso in the regulation of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in rat cortical neurons. Knockdown of Preso with small interfering RNA improved neuronal viability and attenuated the elevation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release after glutamate treatment. Downregulation of Preso also inhibited an increase in the BAX/Bcl-2 ratio and cleavage of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Although the expression and distribution of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1/5, NR1, NR2A and NR2B were not changed by knockdown of Preso, downregulation of Preso protected neurons from glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by inhibiting mGluR and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function. However, downregulation of Preso neither affected the expression of GluR1 and GluR2 nor influenced the function of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate receptor after glutamate treatment. Furthermore, intracellular Ca(2+) was an important downstream effector of Preso in the regulation of excitotoxicity. These results suggest that expression of Preso promotes the induction of excitotoxicity by facilitating different glutamate receptor signaling pathways. Therefore, Preso might be a potential pharmacological target for preventing and treating neurological diseases.

  9. Effects of ampicillin on cystine/glutamate exchanger transporter and glutamate transporter 1 isoforms as well as ethanol drinking in male P rats

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Abuhamdah, Sawsan; Sari, Youssef

    2015-01-01

    Evidence demonstrated that glial cells, mainly astrocytes, regulate glutamate uptake, which is regulated by several glutamate transporters. Among these glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1; its human homolog is excitatory amino acid transporter-2) is responsible for the majority of glutamate uptake by glial cells. Cystine-glutamate antiporter (xCT) is another glial protein critical in regulating glutamate transmission. Several studies from our laboratory demonstrated that attenuation of ethanol intkae was associated in part with upregulation of xCT and GLT suggesting the important role of these transporters in the treatment of ethanol dependence. We found recently that β-lactam antibiotic, ampicillin, upregulated GLT-1 expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) and consequently reduced ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring (P) rats. In this study, we investigated the effects of ampicillin on the expressions of xCT and GLT-1 isoforms (GLT-1a and GLT-1b) as well as on GLAST expression. We found that ampicillin reduced ethanol intake as compared to the saline (control)-treated group. In addition, we found that ampicillin induced upregulation of xCT, GLT-1a, and GLT-1b expressions in both the PFC and NAc, but had no effect on GLAST expression. Our findings provide significant role of ampicillin on upregulating xCT and GLT-1 isoforms expressions, might be suggested as possible tragets for the attenuation of ethanol consumption. PMID:26071905

  10. Effects of ampicillin on cystine/glutamate antiporter and glutamate transporter 1 isoforms as well as ethanol drinking in male P rats.

    PubMed

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Abuhamdah, Sawsan; Sari, Youssef

    2015-07-23

    Evidence demonstrated that glial cells, mainly astrocytes, regulate glutamate uptake through several glutamate transporters. Among these glutamate transporters, glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1; its human homolog is excitatory amino acid transporter-2) is responsible for the majority of glutamate uptake. Cystine-glutamate antiporter (xCT) is another glial protein critical in regulating glutamate transmission. Several studies from our laboratory demonstrated that attenuation of ethanol intkae was associated in part with upregulation of xCT and GLT-1 expression suggesting the important role of these transporters in the treatment of ethanol dependence. We found recently that β-lactam antibiotic, ampicillin, upregulated GLT-1 expression in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) and consequently reduced ethanol intake in alcohol-preferring (P) rats. In this study, we investigated the effects of ampicillin on the expression of xCT and GLT-1 isoforms (GLT-1a and GLT-1b) as well as on GLAST expression. We found that ampicillin reduced ethanol intake as compared to the saline (control)-treated group. In addition, we found that ampicillin induced upregulation of xCT, GLT-1a, and GLT-1b expression in both the PFC and NAc, but had no effect on GLAST expression. Our findings provide significant role of ampicillin on upregulating xCT and GLT-1 isoforms expression, might be suggested as possible targets for the attenuation of ethanol consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [The effect of probiotic therapy on development of experimental obesity in rats caused by monosodium glutamate].

    PubMed

    Savcheniuk, O A; Virchenko, O V; Falalieieva, T M; Beregova, T V; Babenko, L P; Lazarenko, L M; Spivak, M Ia

    2014-01-01

    The effect of a mixture of probiotic strains (2:1:1 Lactobacillus casei IMVB-7280, Bifidobacterium animalis VKL, Bifidobacterium animalis VKB) on the development of experimental obesity in rats induced by neonatal administration of monosodium glutamate has been studied. It was shown that in rats of 4 months age, the injection of monosodium glutamate (4 mg/g) at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 days after birth elicited abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome. An intermittent administration of a probiotic mixture to rats treated with monosodium prevented the development of obesity. In the group of rats treated with probiotics, anthropometric parameters (weight and body length, Lee index, body mass index) did not differ from the level of intact rats. Visceral fat mass was decreased by probiotics by 38.5% (P < 0.05) compared to rats treated with water. Probiotics improved lipid metabolism: reduced the level of VLDL by 32.2% (P < 0,05), the level of LDL by 30.6% (P < 0.05), increased HDL by 25.7% (P <0,05) compared to obese control rats. Probiotic strains restored the secretion of adipocytes hormones (leptin and adiponectin) to the normal level of intact animals. The results show the effectiveness of probiotics for the prevention of obesity.

  12. Repeated phencyclidine administration alters glutamate release and decreases GABA markers in the prefrontal cortex of rats

    PubMed Central

    Amitai, Nurith; Kuczenski, Ronald; Behrens, M. Margarita; Markou, Athina

    2011-01-01

    Repeated phencyclidine (PCP) administration induces cognitive disruptions resembling those seen in schizophrenia. Alterations in glutamate transmission and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) have been implicated in these PCP-induced deficits, as well as in cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. PCP-induced cognitive deficits are reversed by chronic treatment with the atypical antipsychotic clozapine in rats. We investigated the effects of a single injection vs. repeated administration of PCP on glutamate levels in the PFC using in vivo microdialysis. Furthermore, we examined how these PCP regimens affect GABA neuronal markers in the PFC. Finally, we investigated the effects of clozapine on disruptions in glutamate levels and GABA neuronal markers induced by repeated PCP administration. Acute PCP administration (2 mg/kg) increased extracellular PFC glutamate; this increase appeared blunted, but was not eliminated, after repeated PCP pretreatment. PCP administration also strongly decreased levels of parvalbumin and glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (two markers of GABA function) in the PFC, an effect that was maintained after a 10 day drug-free washout period and unaltered by the resumption of repeated PCP injections. All of the observed PCP effects were attenuated by chronic treatment with clozapine, an atypical antipsychotic that has partial effectiveness on cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. These findings suggest that abnormal cortical glutamate transmission, possibly driven by pathological changes in GABA function in parvalbumin-positive fast-spiking interneurons, may underlie some of the cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. A better understanding of glutamate and GABA dysregulation in schizophrenia may uncover new treatment targets for schizophrenia-related cognitive dysfunction. PMID:21238466

  13. Effect of 8-bromo-cAMP and dexamethasone on glutamate metabolism in rat astrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zielke, H.R.; Tildon, J.T.; Landry, M.E.; Max, S.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in cultured rat astrocytes was measured in extracts and compared to the intracellular rate of glutamine synthesis by intact control astrocytes or astrocytes exposed to 1 mM 8-bromo-cAMP (8Br-cAMP) + 1 microM dexamethasone (DEX) for 4 days. GS activity in extracts of astrocytes treated with 8Br-cAMP + DEX was 7.5 times greater than the activity in extracts of control astrocytes. In contrast, the intracellular rate of glutamine synthesis by intact cells increased only 2-fold, suggesting that additional intracellular effectors regulate the expression of GS activity inside the intact cell. The rate of glutamine synthesis by astrocytes was 4.3 times greater in MEM than in HEPES buffered Hank's salts. Synthesis of glutamine by intact astrocytes cultured in MEM was independent of the external glutamine or ammonia concentrations but was increased by higher extracellular glutamate concentrations. In studies with intact astrocytes 80% of the original (U-{sup 14}C)glutamate was recovered in the medium as radioactive glutamine, 2-3% as aspartate, and 7% as glutamate after 2 hours for both control and treated astrocytes. The results suggest: (1) astrocytes are highly efficient in the conversion of glutamate to glutamine; (2) induction of GS activity increases the rate of glutamate conversion to glutamine by astrocytes and the rate of glutamine release into the medium; (3) endogenous intracellular regulators of GS activity control the flux of glutamate through this enzymatic reaction; and (4) the composition of the medium alters the rate of glutamine synthesis from external glutamate.

  14. Perinatal thiamine restriction affects central GABA and glutamate concentrations and motor behavior of adult rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Vieira, Talita Hélen; de Freitas-Silva, Danielle Marra; Ribeiro, Andrea Frozino; Pereira, Sílvia Rejane Castanheira; Ribeiro, Ângela Maria

    2016-03-23

    The purposes of the present study were to investigate the effects of perinatal thiamine deficiency, from the 11th day of gestation until the 5th day of lactation, on motor behavior and neurochemical parameters in adult rat offspring, using 3-month-old, adult, male Wistar rats. All rats were submitted to motor tests, using the rotarod and paw print tasks. After behavioral tests, their thalamus, cerebellum and spinal cord were dissected for glutamate and GABA quantifications by high performance liquid chromatography. The thiamine-restricted mothers (RM) group showed a significant reduction of time spent on the rotarod at 25 rpm and an increase in hind-base width. A significant decrease of glutamate concentration in the cerebellum and an increase of GABA concentrations in the thalamus were also observed. For the offspring from control mothers (CM) group there were significant correlations between thalamic GABA concentrations and both rotarod performance and average hind-base width. In addition, for rats from the RM group a significant correlation between stride length and cerebellar GABA concentration was found. These results show that the deficiency of thiamine during an early developmental period affects certain motor behavior parameters and GABA and glutamate levels in specific brain areas. Hence, a thiamine deficiency episode during an early developmental period can induce motor impairments and excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter changes that are persistent and detectable in later periods of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Retinal glutamate transporter changes in experimental glaucoma and after optic nerve transection in the rat.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R G; Levkovitch-Verbin, Hana; Valenta, Danielle; Baumrind, Lisa; Pease, Mary Ellen; Quigley, Harry A

    2002-07-01

    High levels of glutamate can be toxic to retinal ganglion cells. Effective buffering of extracellular glutamate by retinal glutamate transporters is therefore important. This study was conducted to investigate whether glutamate transporter changes occur with two models of optic nerve injury in the rat. Glaucoma was induced in one eye of 35 adult Wistar rats by translimbal diode laser treatment to the trabecular meshwork. Twenty-five more rats underwent unilateral optic nerve transection. Two glutamate transporters, GLAST (EAAT-1) and GLT-1 (EAAT-2), were studied by immunohistochemistry and quantitative Western blot analysis. Treated and control eyes were compared 3 days and 1, 4, and 6 weeks after injury. Optic nerve damage was assessed semiquantitatively in epoxy-embedded optic nerve cross sections. Trabecular laser treatment resulted in moderate intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation in all animals. After 1 to 6 weeks of experimental glaucoma, all treated eyes had significant optic nerve damage. Glutamate transporter changes were not detected by immunohistochemistry. Western blot analysis demonstrated significantly reduced GLT-1 in glaucomatous eyes compared with control eyes at 3 days (29.3% +/- 6.7%, P = 0.01), 1 week (55.5% +/- 13.6%, P = 0.02), 4 weeks (27.2% +/- 10.1%, P = 0.05), and 6 weeks (38.1% +/- 7.9%, P = 0.01; mean reduction +/- SEM, paired t-tests, n = 5 animals per group, four duplicate Western blot analyses per eye). The magnitude of the reduction in GLT-1 correlated significantly with mean IOP in the glaucomatous eye (r(2) = 0.31, P = 0.01, linear regression). GLAST was significantly reduced (33.8% +/- 8.1%, mean +/- SEM) after 4 weeks of elevated IOP (P = 0.01, paired t-test, n = 5 animals per group). In contrast to glaucoma, optic nerve transection resulted in an increase in GLT-1 compared with the control eye (P = 0.01, paired t-test, n = 15 animals). There was no significant change in GLAST after transection. GLT-1 and GLAST were significantly

  16. Epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by glutamate decarboxylase inhibitors in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Patricia; Tapia, Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme responsible for GABA synthesis, requires pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. Thiosemicarbazide (TSC) and γ-glutamyl-hydrazone (PLPGH) inhibit the free PLP-dependent isoform (GAD65) activity after systemic administration, leading to epilepsy in mice and in young, but not in adult rats. However, the competitive GAD inhibitor 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) induces convulsions in both immature and adult rats. In the present study we tested comparatively the epileptogenic and neurotoxic effects of PLPGH, TSC and MPA, administered by microdialysis in the hippocampus of adult awake rats. Cortical EEG and motor behavior were analyzed during the next 2h, and aspartate, glutamate and GABA were measured by HPLC in the microdialysis-collected fractions. Twenty-four hours after drug administration rats were fixed for histological analysis of the hippocampus. PLPGH or TSC did not affect the motor behavior, EEG or cellular morphology, although the extracellular concentration of GABA was decreased. In contrast, MPA produced intense wet-dog shakes, EEG epileptiform discharges, a >75% reduction of extracellular GABA levels and remarkable neurodegeneration of the CA1 region, with >80% neuronal loss. The systemic administration of the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist MK-801 30 min before MPA did not prevent the MPA-induced epilepsy but significantly protected against its neurotoxic effect, reducing neuronal loss to <30%. We conclude that in adult awake rats, drugs acting on PLP availability have only a weak effect on GABA neurotransmission, whereas direct GAD inhibition produced by MPA induces hyperexcitation leading to epilepsy and hippocampal neurodegeneration. Because this degeneration was prevented by the blockade of NMDA receptors, we conclude that it is due to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity consequent to disinhibition of the hippocampal excitatory circuits.

  17. Sleep Duration Varies as a Function of Glutamate and GABA in Rat Pontine Reticular Formation

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Christopher J.; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A.

    2011-01-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) is a component of the ascending reticular activating system and plays a role in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. The PnO receives glutamatergic and GABAergic projections from many brain regions that regulate behavioral state. Indirect, pharmacological evidence has suggested that glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling within the PnO alters traits that characterize wakefulness and sleep. No previous studies have simultaneously measured endogenous glutamate and GABA from rat PnO in relation to sleep and wakefulness. The present study utilized in vivo microdialysis coupled on-line to capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence to test the hypothesis that concentrations of glutamate and GABA in the PnO vary across the sleep/wake cycle. Concentrations of glutamate and GABA were significantly higher during wakefulness than during NREM sleep and REM sleep. Regression analysis revealed that decreases in glutamate and GABA accounted for a significant portion of the variance in the duration of NREM sleep and REM sleep episodes. These data provide novel support for the hypothesis that endogenous glutamate and GABA in the PnO contribute to the regulation of sleep duration. PMID:21679185

  18. Sleep duration varies as a function of glutamate and GABA in rat pontine reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christopher J; Lydic, Ralph; Baghdoyan, Helen A

    2011-08-01

    The oral part of the pontine reticular formation (PnO) is a component of the ascending reticular activating system and plays a role in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. The PnO receives glutamatergic and GABAergic projections from many brain regions that regulate behavioral state. Indirect, pharmacological evidence has suggested that glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling within the PnO alters traits that characterize wakefulness and sleep. No previous studies have simultaneously measured endogenous glutamate and GABA from rat PnO in relation to sleep and wakefulness. The present study utilized in vivo microdialysis coupled on-line to capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence to test the hypothesis that concentrations of glutamate and GABA in the PnO vary across the sleep/wake cycle. Concentrations of glutamate and GABA were significantly higher during wakefulness than during non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep. Regression analysis revealed that decreases in glutamate and GABA accounted for a significant portion of the variance in the duration of non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep episodes. These data provide novel support for the hypothesis that endogenous glutamate and GABA in the PnO contribute to the regulation of sleep duration.

  19. Effect of phenylephrine on glutamate and glutamine metabolism in isolated perfused rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Häussinger, D; Sies, H

    1984-01-01

    Addition of phenylephrine to isolated perfused rat liver is followed by an increased 14CO2 production from [1-14C]glutamate, [1-14C]glutamine, [U-14C]proline and [3-14C]pyruvate, but by a decreased 14CO2 production from [1-14C]pyruvate. Simultaneously, there is a considerable decrease in tissue content of 2-oxoglutarate, glutamate and citrate. Stimulation of 14CO2 production from [1-14C]glutamate is also observed in the presence of amino-oxyacetate, suggesting a stimulation of glutamate dehydrogenase and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase fluxes by phenylephrine. Inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase flux by phenylephrine is due to an increased 2-oxoglutarate dehydroxygenase flux. Phenylephrine stimulates glutaminase flux and inhibits glutamine synthetase flux to a similar extent, resulting in an increased hepatic glutamine uptake. Whereas the effects of NH4+ ions and phenylephrine on glutaminase flux were additive, activation of glutaminase by glucagon was considerably diminished in the presence of phenylephrine. The reported effects are largely overcome by prazosin, indicating the involvement of alpha-adrenergic receptors in the action of phenylephrine. It is concluded that stimulation of gluconeogenesis from various amino acids by phenylephrine is due to an increased flux through glutamate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle. PMID:6148074

  20. Genetically Epilepsy-Prone Rats Have Increased Brain Regional Activity of an Enzyme Which Liberates Glutamate from N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    genetically epilepsy -prone iats "was 11-26% greater than control in brain regions, including the amygdala, hippocarrpus and cerebellum, as well as the...9 -0 3 Genetically epilepsy -prone rats have increased brain regional activity of an enzyme which liberates glutamate from N-acetyl-aspartyl...in genctically epilepsy -prone rats was 11-~261; greater than control in brain regions. including the amygdala. hippocampus and cerebellum, as well as

  1. Immunohistochemical localization of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the rat red nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Minbay, Zehra; Kocoglu, Sema Serter; Yurtseven, Duygu Gok; Eyigor, Ozhan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the presence as well as the diverse distribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA glutamate receptor subunits in the rat red nucleus. Using adult Sprague-Dawley rats as the experimental animals, immunohistochemistry was performed on 30 µm thick coronal brain sections with antibodies against α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (GluA1-4), kainate (GluK1, GluK2/3, and GluK5), and NMDA (GluN1 and GluN2A) receptor subunits. The results showed that all ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits are expressed in the red nucleus. Specific staining was localized in the neuron bodies and processes. However, the pattern of immunoreactivity and the number of labeled neurons changed depending on the type of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and the localization of neurons in the red nucleus. The neurons localized in the magnocellular part of the red nucleus were particularly immunopositive for GluA2, GluA4, GluK2/3, GluK5, GluN1, and GluN2A receptor proteins. In the parvocellular part of the red nucleus, ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit immunoreactivity of variable intensity (lightly to moderately stained) was detected in the neurons. These results suggest that red nucleus neurons in rat heterogeneously express ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits to form functional receptor channels. In addition, the likelihood of the coexpression of different subunits in the same subgroup of neurons suggests the formation of receptor channels with diverse structure by way of different subunit combination, and the possibility of various neuronal functions through these channels in the red nucleus. PMID:28027456

  2. Immunohistochemical localization of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the rat red nucleus.

    PubMed

    Minbay, Zehra; Serter Kocoglu, Sema; Gok Yurtseven, Duygu; Eyigor, Ozhan

    2017-02-21

    In this study, we aimed to determine the presence as well as the diverse distribution of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA glutamate receptor subunits in the rat red nucleus. Using adult Sprague-Dawley rats as the experimental animals, immunohistochemistry was performed on 30 µm thick coronal brain sections with antibodies against α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (GluA1-4), kainate (GluK1, GluK2/3, and GluK5), and NMDA (GluN1 and GluN2A) receptor subunits. The results showed that all ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits are expressed in the red nucleus. Specific staining was localized in the neuron bodies and processes. However, the pattern of immunoreactivity and the number of labeled neurons changed depending on the type of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and the localization of neurons in the red nucleus. The neurons localized in the magnocellular part of the red nucleus were particularly immunopositive for GluA2, GluA4, GluK2/3, GluK5, GluN1, and GluN2A receptor proteins. In the parvocellular part of the red nucleus, ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit immunoreactivity of variable intensity (lightly to moderately stained) was detected in the neurons. These results suggest that red nucleus neurons in rat heterogeneously express ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits to form functional receptor channels. In addition, the likelihood of the coexpression of different subunits in the same subgroup of neurons suggests the formation of receptor channels with diverse structure by way of different subunit combination, and the possibility of various neuronal functions through these channels in the red nucleus.

  3. The role of different glutamate receptors in the mediation of glutamate-evoked excitation of red nucleus neurons after simulated microgravity in rat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Chang; Fan, Xiao-Li; Song, Xin-Ai; Li, Qiang

    2008-12-31

    The present study investigates changes in red nucleus (RN) neuronal activity and the role of glutamate receptors (GluRs) after simulated microgravity (tail-suspension) in the rat using single-unit recording and microinjection. The results showed that tail-suspension for 3, 7, and 14 days could induce a significant decrease in spontaneous firing rate of RN neurons in a time-dependent manner. Unilateral microinjection of glutamate into the RN significantly increased the firing rate of RN neurons, but the increased firing rate was significantly reduced following tail-suspension time. Microinjection of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 or the non-NMDA receptor antagonist DNQX into the RN blocked this excitatory effect induced by glutamate. However, microinjection of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist (+/-)-MCPG into the RN had no effect. These results suggest that simulated microgravity can reduce excitability of RN neurons following a functional impairment of glutamate receptors. NMDA and non-NMDA receptors, but not mGluRs, are involved in the mediation of glutamate-evoked excitation of RN neurons. The decrease in excitability of RN neurons may be involved in simulated microgravity-induced muscle atrophy.

  4. Dendritic and somatic glutamate receptor channels in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed Central

    Häusser, M; Roth, A

    1997-01-01

    1. The properties of glutamate receptor (GluR) channels in outside-out patches from the dendrites and somata of rat cerebellar Purkinje cells in brain slice were studied using fast agonist application techniques. Dendritic patches were isolated 40-130 micronm from the soma. 2. Outside-out patches from both dendrites and somata of Purkinje cells responded to application of glutamate with a current which desensitized rapidly and nearly completely. Currents evoked by glutamate application were blocked by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), were mimicked by L-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA), and were modulated by cyclothiazide. Kainate produced small, non-desensitizing currents. No currents were observed in response to aspartate application. Responses characteristic of NMDA receptor activation were not observed. These findings indicate that glutamate-activated currents were mediated by the AMPA subtype of GluR. 3. Deactivation of the GluR channels following 1 ms pulses of glutamate occurred with a time constant of 1.23 +/- 0.07 ms in dendritic and 1.12 +/- 0.04 ms in somatic patches. Desensitization occurred with a time constant of 5.37 +/- 0.26 ms in dendritic and 5.29 +/- 0.29 ms in somatic patches. The time constant of recovery from desensitization caused by a 1 ms application of 1 mM glutamate was 36 ms in dendritic patches and 33 ms in somatic patches. 4. Half-maximal activation of the GluR channels was achieved at a glutamate concentration of 432 microM. Deactivation kinetics were not dependent on the glutamate concentration, while desensitization became slower at lower glutamate concentrations. 5. Pre-equilibration of patches with low concentrations of glutamate reduced the peak current activated by 1 mM glutamate. The IC50 for this effect was 8.7 microM. Equilibrium desensitization did not affect the kinetics of the current activated by 1 mM glutamate. 6. The current-voltage relationship of the peak current was linear in

  5. Changes in the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3 in rat brain after exposure to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Kerdsan, Walailuk; Thanoi, Samur; Nudmamud-Thanoi, Sutisa

    2012-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an addictive psychostimulant, can induce glutamate release in several brain areas such as cerebral cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Excess glutamate is ordinarily removed from the synaptic cleft by glutamate transporters for maintaining homoeostasis. EAAT3, a subtype of glutamate transporter expressed mainly by neurons, is a major glutamate transporter in the hippocampus and cortex. Therefore, this study examined the effects of acute and sub-acute METH administration on the expression of the EAAT3 in the hippocampal formation, striatum and frontal cortex. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received vehicle injections (i.p.) for 13 days followed by one injection of METH (8 mg/kg, i.p.) on day 14 in acute group. Animals received METH (4 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle for 14 days in sub-acute and control groups, respectively. EAAT3 immunoreactivity was determined by western blotting followed by measurement of the integrated optical density. A significant increase in EAAT3 was found in the hippocampal formation after sub-acute, but not acute, METH administration. Conversely, a significant decrease in EAAT3 in striatum was observed in both acute and sub-acute groups. A trend towards a decrease in EAAT3 was also found in frontal cortex in the sub-acute group. Our results of decreased EAAT3 in striatum and frontal cortex suggest deficits of cortico-striatal glutamatergic synapses after METH exposure. Increased EAAT3 expression in the hippocampus may be a compensatory response to possible deficits of glutamatergic neurotransmission induced by METH. Moreover, our findings provide further support for glutamatergic dysfunction with abnormalities involving a transporter important in the regulation of neuronal glutamate.

  6. Interactions between VTA orexin and glutamate in cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Stephen V.; Smith, Rachel J.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Glutamate and orexin/hypocretin systems are involved in Pavlovian cue-triggered drug seeking. Objectives Here, we asked whether orexin and glutamate interact within ventral tegmental area (VTA) to promote reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking in a rat self-administration paradigm. Methods/results We first found that bilateral VTA micro-injections of the orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) antagonist SB-334867 (SB) or a cocktail of the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists CNQX/AP-5 reduced reinstatement of cocaine seeking elicited by cues. In contrast, neither of these microinjections nor systemic SB reduced cocaine-primed reinstatement. Additionally, unilateral VTA OX1R blockade combined with contralateral VTA glutamate blockade attenuated cue-induced reinstatement, indicating that VTA orexin and glutamate are simultaneously necessary for cue-induced reinstatement. We further probed the receptor specificity of glutamate actions in VTA, finding that CNQX, but not AP-5, dose-dependently attenuated cue-induced reinstatement, indicating that AMPA but not NMDA receptor transmission is required for this type of cocaine seeking. Given the necessary roles of both OX1 and AMPA receptors in VTA for cue-induced cocaine seeking, we hypothesized that these signaling pathways interact during this behavior. We found that PEPA, a positive allosteric modulator of AMPA receptors, completely reversed the SB-induced attenuation of reinstatement behavior. Intra-VTA PEPA alone did not alter cue-induced reinstatement, indicating that potentiating AMPA activity with this drug specifically compensates for OX1R blockade, rather than simply inducing or enhancing reinstatement itself. Conclusions These findings show that cue-induced, but not cocaine-primed, reinstatement of cocaine seeking is dependent upon orexin and AMPA receptor interactions in VTA. PMID:22411428

  7. Interactions between VTA orexin and glutamate in cue-induced reinstatement of cocaine seeking in rats.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Stephen V; Smith, Rachel J; Aston-Jones, Gary

    2013-04-01

    Glutamate and orexin/hypocretin systems are involved in Pavlovian cue-triggered drug seeking. Here, we asked whether orexin and glutamate interact within ventral tegmental area (VTA) to promote reinstatement of extinguished cocaine seeking in a rat self-administration paradigm. We first found that bilateral VTA microinjections of the orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) antagonist SB-334867 (SB) or a cocktail of the AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists CNQX/AP-5 reduced reinstatement of cocaine seeking elicited by cues. In contrast, neither of these microinjections nor systemic SB reduced cocaine-primed reinstatement. Additionally, unilateral VTA OX1R blockade combined with contralateral VTA glutamate blockade attenuated cue-induced reinstatement, indicating that VTA orexin and glutamate are simultaneously necessary for cue-induced reinstatement. We further probed the receptor specificity of glutamate actions in VTA, finding that CNQX, but not AP-5, dose-dependently attenuated cue-induced reinstatement, indicating that AMPA but not NMDA receptor transmission is required for this type of cocaine seeking. Given the necessary roles of both OX1 and AMPA receptors in VTA for cue-induced cocaine seeking, we hypothesized that these signaling pathways interact during this behavior. We found that PEPA, a positive allosteric modulator of AMPA receptors, completely reversed the SB-induced attenuation of reinstatement behavior. Intra-VTA PEPA alone did not alter cue-induced reinstatement, indicating that potentiating AMPA activity with this drug specifically compensates for OX1R blockade, rather than simply inducing or enhancing reinstatement itself. These findings show that cue-induced, but not cocaine-primed, reinstatement of cocaine seeking is dependent upon orexin and AMPA receptor interactions in VTA.

  8. Central GPR109A Activation Mediates Glutamate-Dependent Pressor Response in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rezq, Samar

    2016-01-01

    G protein–coupled receptor 109A (GPR109A) activation by its ligand nicotinic acid (NA) in immune cells increases Ca2+ levels, and Ca2+ induces glutamate release and oxidative stress in central blood pressure (BP)-regulating nuclei, for example, the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), leading to sympathoexcitation. Despite NA’s ability to reach the brain, the expression and function of its receptor GPR109A in the RVLM remain unknown. We hypothesized that NA activation of RVLM GPR109A causes Ca2+-dependent l-glutamate release and subsequently increases neuronal oxidative stress, sympathetic activity, and BP. To test this hypothesis, we adopted a multilevel approach, which included pharmacologic in vivo studies along with ex vivo and in vitro molecular studies in rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) cells (which exhibit neuronal phenotype). We present the first evidence for GPR109A expression in the RVLM and in PC12 cells. Next, we showed that RVLM GPR109A activation (NA) caused pressor and bradycardic responses in conscious rats. The resemblance of these responses to those caused by intra-RVLM glutamate and their attenuation by NMDA receptor (NMDAR) blockade (2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid) and enhancement by l-glutamate uptake inhibition (l-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid, PDC) supported our hypothesis. NA increased Ca2+, glutamate, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in PC12 cells and increased RVLM ROS levels. The inactive NA analog isonicotinic acid failed to replicate the cardiovascular and biochemical effects of NA. Further, GPR109A knockdown (siRNA) abrogated the biochemical effects of NA in PC12 cells. These novel findings yield new insight into the role of RVLM GPR109A in central BP control. PMID:26621144

  9. A ketogenic diet modifies glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid and agmatine levels in the hippocampus of rats: A microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Calderón, Naima; Betancourt, Luis; Hernández, Luis; Rada, Pedro

    2017-03-06

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is acknowledged as an unconventional option in the treatment of epilepsy. Several lines of investigation point to a possible role of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as main contributors in this protective effect. Other biomolecules could also be involved in the beneficial consequence of the KD, for example, the diamine agmatine has been suggested to block imidazole and glutamate NMDA receptor and serves as an endogenous anticonvulsant in different animal models of epilepsy. In the present report, we have used microdialysis coupled to capillary electrophoresis to monitor microdialysate levels of GABA, glutamate and agmatine in the hippocampus of rats submitted to a KD for 15days compared to rats on a normal rat chow diet. A significant increase in GABA and agmatine levels while no change in glutamate levels was observed. These results support the notion that the KD modifies different transmitters favoring inhibitory over excitatory neurotransmitters.

  10. Methodology for Rapid Measures of Glutamate Release in Rat Brain Slices Using Ceramic-Based Microelectrode Arrays: Basic Characterization and Drug Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Jorge E.; Pomerleau, François; Huettl, Peter; Johnson, Kirk W.; Offord, James; Gerhardt, Greg A.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive excitability or hyperexcitability of glutamate-containing neurons in the brain has been proposed as a possible explanation for anxiety, stress-induced disorders, epilepsy, and some neurodegenerative diseases. However, direct measurement of glutamate on a rapid time scale has proven to be difficult. Here we adapted enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEA) capable of detecting glutamate in vivo, to assess the effectiveness of hyperexcitability modulators on glutamate release in brain slices of the rat neocortex. Using glutamate oxidase coated ceramic MEAs coupled with constant voltage amperometry, we measured resting glutamate levels and synaptic overflow of glutamate after K+ stimulation in brain slices. MEAs reproducibly detected glutamate on a second-by-second time scale in the brain slice preparation after depolarization with high K+ to evoke glutamate release. This stimulus-evoked glutamate release was robust, reproducible, and calcium dependent. The K+-evoked glutamate release was modulated by ligands to the a2δ subunit of voltage sensitive calcium channels (PD-0332334 and PD-0200390). Meanwhile, agonists to Group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors (LY379268 and LY354740), which are known to alter hyperexcitability of glutamate neurons, attenuated K+-evoked glutamate release but did not alter resting glutamate levels. This new MEA technology provides a means of directly measuring the chemical messengers involved in glutamate neurotransmission and thereby helping to reveal the role multiple glutamatergic system components have on glutamate signaling. PMID:21664606

  11. Rate of utilization of glucose and `compartmentation' of α-oxoglutarate and glutamate in rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Gaitonde, M. K.

    1965-01-01

    1. The rate of incorporation of 14C into pyruvate, α-oxoglutarate, lactate and glucose of rat tissues was measured after the subcutaneous injection of uniformly labelled glucose. 2. In rat brain the specific radioactivities of lactate and glucose were similar to that of alanine. In liver the specific radioactivity of glucose was considerably higher than that of lactate or alanine. 3. The specific radioactivities of α-oxo acids of rat brain were lower than those of corresponding amino acids, alanine and glutamate. These findings have been explained in relation to metabolic compartments in vivo. 4. The approximate estimated rate of glucose utilization in rat brain in vivo is 0·96μmole/g. of brain/min. PMID:14342519

  12. Glutamate receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarius contribute to ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in rat.

    PubMed

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Carr, J Austin; Go, Ariel; Fu, Zhenxing; Reid, Stephen G; Powell, Frank L

    2014-04-15

    When exposed to a hypoxic environment the body's first response is a reflex increase in ventilation, termed the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR). With chronic sustained hypoxia (CSH), such as during acclimatization to high altitude, an additional time-dependent increase in ventilation occurs, which increases the HVR. This secondary increase persists after exposure to CSH and involves plasticity within the circuits in the central nervous system that control breathing. Currently these mechanisms of HVR plasticity are unknown and we hypothesized that they involve glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), where afferent endings from arterial chemoreceptors terminate. To test this, we treated rats held in normoxia (CON) or 10% O2 (CSH) for 7 days and measured ventilation in conscious, unrestrained animals before and after microinjecting glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists into the NTS. In normoxia, AMPA increased ventilation 25% and 50% in CON and CSH, respectively, while NMDA doubled ventilation in both groups (P < 0.05). Specific AMPA and NMDA receptor antagonists (NBQX and MK801, respectively) abolished these effects. MK801 significantly decreased the HVR in CON rats, and completely blocked the acute HVR in CSH rats but had no effect on ventilation in normoxia. NBQX decreased ventilation whenever it was increased relative to normoxic controls; i.e. acute hypoxia in CON and CSH, and normoxia in CSH. These results support our hypothesis that glutamate receptors in the NTS contribute to plasticity in the HVR with CSH. The mechanism underlying this synaptic plasticity is probably glutamate receptor modification, as in CSH rats the expression of phosphorylated NR1 and GluR1 proteins in the NTS increased 35% and 70%, respectively, relative to that in CON rats.

  13. Glutamate receptors in the nucleus tractus solitarius contribute to ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in rat

    PubMed Central

    Pamenter, Matthew E; Carr, J Austin; Go, Ariel; Fu, Zhenxing; Reid, Stephen G; Powell, Frank L

    2014-01-01

    When exposed to a hypoxic environment the body's first response is a reflex increase in ventilation, termed the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR). With chronic sustained hypoxia (CSH), such as during acclimatization to high altitude, an additional time-dependent increase in ventilation occurs, which increases the HVR. This secondary increase persists after exposure to CSH and involves plasticity within the circuits in the central nervous system that control breathing. Currently these mechanisms of HVR plasticity are unknown and we hypothesized that they involve glutamatergic synapses in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), where afferent endings from arterial chemoreceptors terminate. To test this, we treated rats held in normoxia (CON) or 10% O2 (CSH) for 7 days and measured ventilation in conscious, unrestrained animals before and after microinjecting glutamate receptor agonists and antagonists into the NTS. In normoxia, AMPA increased ventilation 25% and 50% in CON and CSH, respectively, while NMDA doubled ventilation in both groups (P < 0.05). Specific AMPA and NMDA receptor antagonists (NBQX and MK801, respectively) abolished these effects. MK801 significantly decreased the HVR in CON rats, and completely blocked the acute HVR in CSH rats but had no effect on ventilation in normoxia. NBQX decreased ventilation whenever it was increased relative to normoxic controls; i.e. acute hypoxia in CON and CSH, and normoxia in CSH. These results support our hypothesis that glutamate receptors in the NTS contribute to plasticity in the HVR with CSH. The mechanism underlying this synaptic plasticity is probably glutamate receptor modification, as in CSH rats the expression of phosphorylated NR1 and GluR1 proteins in the NTS increased 35% and 70%, respectively, relative to that in CON rats. PMID:24492841

  14. Effects of depressive-like behavior of rats on brain glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Roberto Farina; Thomazi, Ana Paula; Godinho, Graça Fabiana; Saute, Jonas Alex Morales; Wofchuk, Susana Tchernin; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Ganzella, Marcelo

    2010-08-01

    Learned helplessness paradigm is a widely accepted animal model of depressive-like behavior based on stress. Glutamatergic system is closely involved with the stress-neurotoxicity in the brain and recently it is pointed to have a relevant role in the pathophysiology of depression disorder. Glutamate uptake is the main mechanism to terminate the glutamatergic physiological activity and to neuroprotection against excitotoxicity. We investigated the profile of glutamate uptake in female rats submitted to the learned helplessness paradigm and to different classes of stress related to the paradigm, in slices of brain cortex, striatum and hippocampus. Glutamate uptake in slices of hippocampus differ between learned helplessness (LH) and non-learned helplessness (NLH) animals immediately persisting up to 21 days after the paradigm. In addition, there were a decrease of glutamate uptake in the three brain structures analyzed at 21 days after the paradigm for LH animals. These results may contribute to better understand the role of the glutamatergic system on the depressive-like behavior.

  15. Striatal Glutamate and GABA after High Frequency Subthalamic Stimulation in Parkinsonian Rat

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Jin; Shim, Insop; Sung, Jae Hoon; Hong, Jae Taek; Kim, Il sup; Cho, Chul Bum

    2017-01-01

    Objective High frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is recognized as an effective treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. However, the neurochemical basis of its effects remains unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of STN HFS in intact and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian rat model on changes of principal neurotransmitters, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the striatum. Methods The authors examined extracellular glutamate and GABA change in the striatum on sham group, 6-OHDA group, and 6-OHDA plus deep brain stimulation (DBS) group using microdialysis methods. Results High-pressure liquid chromatography was used to quantify glutamate and GABA. The results show that HFS-STN induces a significant increase of extracellular glutamate and GABA in the striatum of 6-OHDA plus DBS group compared with sham and 6-OHDA group. Conclusion Therefore, the clinical results of STN-HFS are not restricted to the direct STN targets but involve widespread adaptive changes within the basal ganglia. PMID:28264233

  16. Rat gustatory neurons in the geniculate ganglion express glutamate receptor subunits.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, Alejandro; Zucchi, Benedetta; Pereira, Elizabeth; Roper, Stephen D

    2004-07-01

    Taste receptor cells are innervated by primary gustatory neurons that relay sensory information to the central nervous system. The transmitter(s) at synapses between taste receptor cells and primary afferent fibers is (are) not yet known. By analogy with other sensory organs, glutamate might a transmitter in taste buds. We examined the presence of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits in rat gustatory primary neurons in the ganglion that innervates the anterior tongue (geniculate ganglion). AMPA and NMDA type subunits were immunohistochemically detected with antibodies against GluR1, GluR2, GluR2/3, GluR4 and NR1 subunits. Gustatory neurons were specifically identified by retrograde tracing with fluorogold from injections made into the anterior portion of the tongue. Most gustatory neurons in the geniculate ganglion were strongly immunoreactive for GluR2/3 (68%), GluR4 (78%) or NR1 (71%). GluR1 was seen in few cells (16%). We further examined if glutamate receptors were present in the peripheral terminals of primary gustatory neurons in taste buds. Many axonal varicosities in fungiform and vallate taste buds were immunoreactive for GluR2/3 but not for NR1. We conclude that gustatory neurons express glutamate receptors and that glutamate receptors of the AMPA type are likely targeted to synapses within taste buds.

  17. Effects of glutamate receptor activation on NG2-glia in the rat optic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Nicola; Hubbard, Paul S; Butt, Arthur M

    2009-01-01

    NG2-glia are a substantial population of cells in the central nervous system (CNS) that can be identified by their specific expression of the NG2 chondroitin sulphate (CSPG). NG2-glia can generate oligodendrocytes, but it is unlikely this is their only function; indeed, they may be multipotent neural stem cells. Moreover, NG2-glia are a highly reactive cell type and a major function is to help form the axon growth inhibitory glial scar in response to CNS injury. The factors that regulate these diverse behaviours of NG2-glia are not fully resolved, but NG2-glia express receptors to the neurotransmitter glutamate, which has known potent effects on other glia. Here, we have examined the actions of glutamate receptor activation on NG2-glia in the rat optic nerve, a typical CNS white matter tract that does not contain neuronal cell bodies. Glutamate induces an increase in [Ca2+]i in immuno-identified NG2-glia in situ and in vitro. In addition, we examined the effects of glutamate receptor activation in vivo by focal injection of the glutamate receptor agonist kainate into the optic nerve; saline was injected in controls. Changes in glial and axonal function were determined at 7 days post injection (dpi), by immunohistochemistry and electrophysiological measurement of the compound action potential (CAP). Injection of kainate resulted in a highly localized ‘injury response’ in NG2-glia, marked by dense labelling for NG2 at the lesion site, as compared to astrocytes, which displayed a more extensive reactive astrogliosis. Furthermore, injection of kainate resulted in an axonal conduction block. These glial and axonal changes were not observed following injection of saline vehicle. In addition, we provide evidence that endogenous glutamate induces calcium-dependent phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), which may provide a potential mechanism by which glutamate-mediated changes in raised intracellular calcium could regulate the observed

  18. Faster flux of neurotransmitter glutamate during seizure — Evidence from 13C-enrichment of extracellular glutamate in kainate rat model

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The objective is to examine how the flux of neurotransmitter glutamate from neurons to the extracellular fluid, as measured by the rate of 13C enrichment of extracellular glutamate (GLUECF), changes in response to seizures in the kainate-induced rat model of temporal-lobe epilepsy. Following unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainate, GLUECF was collected by microdialysis from the CA1/CA3 region of awake rats, in combination with EEG recording of chronic-phase recurrent seizures and intravenous infusion of [2,5-13C]glucose. The 13C enrichment of GLUECF C5 at ~ 10 picomol level was measured by gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry. The rate of 13C enrichment, expressed as the increase of the fractional enrichment/min, was 0.0029 ± 0.0001/min in frequently seizing rats (n = 4); this was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than in the control (0.00167 ± 0.0001/min; n = 6) or in rats with infrequent seizures (0.00172 ± 0.0001/min; n = 6). This result strongly suggests that the flux of the excitatory neurotransmitter from neurons to the extracellular fluid is significantly increased by frequent seizures. The extracellular [12C + 13C]glutamate concentration increased progressively in frequently seizing rats. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the observed seizure-induced high flux of glutamate overstimulated glutamate receptors, which triggered a chain reaction of excitation in the CA3 recurrent glutamatergic networks. The rate of 13C enrichment of extracellular glutamine (GLNECF) at C5 was 0.00299 ± 0.00027/min in frequently seizing rats, which was higher (p < 0.05) than in controls (0.00227 ± 0.00008/min). For the first time in vivo, this study examined the effects of epileptic seizures on fluxes of the neurotransmitter glutamate and its precursor glutamine in the extracellular fluid of the hippocampus. The advantages, limitations and the potential for improvement of this approach for pre-clinical and clinical studies of temporal-lobe epilepsy

  19. Hippocampal glutamate level and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) are up-regulated in senior rat associated with isoflurane-induced spatial learning/memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiangdong; Xu, Chengshi; Wang, Hui; Xu, Jie; Liu, Weiran; Wang, Yun; Jia, Xingyuan; Xie, Zhongcong; Xu, Zhipeng; Ji, Chao; Wu, Anshi; Yue, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive decline is a clinical concern especially for senior patients. It is generally recognized that glutamatergic system plays a crucial role in the physiopathologic process of neurocognitive deterioration. However, alterations of glutamatergic system in prolonged isoflurane-induced learning/memory decline are still unclear. This study investigates the question whether glutamate concentration and corresponding transporters or receptors display any alternations in aged rat suffering from isoflurane-induced learning/memory impairment. 111 male Sprague-Dawley rats (>18 months) were randomly divided into two main groups: hippocampal microdialysis group (n = 38) and western blotting group (n = 73). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups including (1) control subgroup (n = 6 and 10, receiving no behavioral trial, anesthesia or air exposure); (2) air-exposed subgroup (n = 7 and 15, receiving behavioral trial and air exposure but not anesthesia); (3) isoflurane anesthesia subgroup (n = 25 and 48, receiving both behavioral trial and anesthesia). The isoflurane-exposed rats were further divided into a learning/memory-impaired subgroup and a non-learning/memory-impaired subgroup according to their behavioral performance, which was measured using Morris water maze. Hippocampal glutamate concentrations in microdialysates were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Expression levels of GLAST, GLT-1, NMDAR1, NMDAR2A/B, AMPAR and tau in hippocampus were assessed via quantitative Western blotting. The incidences of learning/memory impairment of isoflurane-exposed rats in hippocampal microdialysis group and western blotting group were 12.0 (3/25) and 10.4 % (5/48) respectively. The intra-anesthesia hippocampal glutamate levels were significantly lower than those of non-anesthesized rats. The learning/memory-impaired rats showed a long-lasting increased glutamate level from 24 h after isoflurane exposure to the end of the study, but the other

  20. High Resolution Mapping of Modafinil Induced Changes in Glutamate Level in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Haris, Mohammad; Singh, Anup; Cai, Kejia; Nath, Kavindra; Verma, Gaurav; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Hariharan, Hari; Detre, John A.; Epperson, Neill; Reddy, Ravinder

    2014-01-01

    Modafinil is marketed in the United States for the treatment of narcolepsy and daytime somnolence due to shift-work or sleep apnea. Investigations of this drug in the treatment of cocaine and nicotine dependence in addition to disorders of executive function are also underway. Modafinil has been known to increase glutamate levels in rat brain models. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS) has been commonly used to detect the glutamate (Glu) changes in vivo. In this study, we used a recently described glutamate chemical exchange saturation transfer (GluCEST) imaging technique to measure Modafinil induced regional Glu changes in rat brain and compared the results with Glu concentration measured by single voxel 1HMRS. No increases in either GluCEST maps or 1HMRS were observed after Modafinil injection over a period of 5 hours. However, a significant increase in GluCEST (19±4.4%) was observed 24 hours post Modafinil administration, which is consistent with results from previous biochemical studies. This change was not consistently seen with 1HMRS. GluCEST mapping allows regional cerebral Glu changes to be measured and may provide a useful clinical biomarker of Modafinil effects for the management of patients with sleep disorders and addiction. PMID:25068408

  1. High resolution mapping of modafinil induced changes in glutamate level in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Haris, Mohammad; Singh, Anup; Cai, Kejia; Nath, Kavindra; Verma, Gaurav; Nanga, Ravi Prakash Reddy; Hariharan, Hari; Detre, John A; Epperson, Neill; Reddy, Ravinder

    2014-01-01

    Modafinil is marketed in the United States for the treatment of narcolepsy and daytime somnolence due to shift-work or sleep apnea. Investigations of this drug in the treatment of cocaine and nicotine dependence in addition to disorders of executive function are also underway. Modafinil has been known to increase glutamate levels in rat brain models. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1HMRS) has been commonly used to detect the glutamate (Glu) changes in vivo. In this study, we used a recently described glutamate chemical exchange saturation transfer (GluCEST) imaging technique to measure Modafinil induced regional Glu changes in rat brain and compared the results with Glu concentration measured by single voxel 1HMRS. No increases in either GluCEST maps or 1HMRS were observed after Modafinil injection over a period of 5 hours. However, a significant increase in GluCEST (19 ± 4.4%) was observed 24 hours post Modafinil administration, which is consistent with results from previous biochemical studies. This change was not consistently seen with 1HMRS. GluCEST mapping allows regional cerebral Glu changes to be measured and may provide a useful clinical biomarker of Modafinil effects for the management of patients with sleep disorders and addiction.

  2. Alteration of glutamate/GABA balance during acute alcohol intoxication in rats: effect of Xingnaojing injection.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingjing; Yao, Limei; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Shi, Si; Cai, Qingyan; Chen, Dingsheng; Li, Weirong; Wang, Qi

    2015-05-26

    Xingnaojing Injection (XNJI) is a modern Chinese formula came from famous Chinese medicine An Gong Niu Huang Pill. XNJI has been used for treatment of cerebral diseases and stroke in China, and is approved by the State Food and Drug Administration of China for the treatment of acute alcohol intoxication (AAI). XNJI belongs to the ethnopharmacological family of medicines. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of the XNJI effect on AAI. To investigate the effects of XNJI on glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and related receptor in lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) of AAI rat. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with microdialysis probes in LHA. Rats were randomly divided into control, model, 1.36mg/kg XNJI, 0.68mg/kg XNJI and 0.34mg/kg XNJI groups. During microdialysis, baseline samples were collected from 1h to 2.5h; thereafter, the rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of 52% ethanol, 5.2g/kg, or saline for control group. Twenty minutes later, three doses of XNJI was given by unilateral injection respectively, while saline for control and model groups, and samples were collected for the next 4h. The extracellular glutamate and GABA levels were measured in the LHA by a high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detector (HPLC-FLU). The expression levels of related receptors N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NR) subunit NR2A, NR2B and GABAA were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Ethanol (5.2g/kg) significantly decreased the extracellular levels of glutamate and increased extracellular GABA in LHA. On the other hand ethanol significantly decreased NR2A and NR2B mRNAs expression, and increase GABAA mRNA expression. XNJI could increase the extracellular level of glutamate and decrease that of GABA; moreover, induced an increase in NR2A and NR2B mRNA expression, and a decrease in GABAA mRNA expression in LHA. The current changes in glutamate, GABA and mRNA expressions of related

  3. Nitrogen in dietary glutamate is utilized exclusively for the synthesis of amino acids in the rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Torii, Kunio; Sakai, Ryosei

    2013-01-01

    Although previous studies have shown that virtually the entire carbon skeleton of dietary glutamate (glutamate-C) is metabolized in the gut for energy production and amino acid synthesis, little is known regarding the fate of dietary glutamate nitrogen (glutamate-N). In this study, we hypothesized that dietary glutamate-N is an effective nitrogen source for amino acid synthesis and investigated the fate of dietary glutamate-N using [(15)N]glutamate. Fischer male rats were given hourly meals containing [U-(13)C]- or [(15)N]glutamate. The concentration and isotopic enrichment of several amino acids were measured after 0-9 h of feeding, and the net release of each amino acid into the portal vein was calculated. Most of the dietary glutamate-C was metabolized into CO(2), lactate, or alanine (56, 13, and 12% of the dietary input, respectively) in the portal drained viscera (PDV). Most of the glutamate-N was utilized for the synthesis of other amino acids such as alanine and citrulline (75 and 3% of dietary input, respectively) in the PDV, and only minor amounts were released into the portal vein in the form of ammonia and glutamate (2 and 3% of the dietary input, respectively). Substantial incorporation of (15)N into systemic amino acids such as alanine, glutamine, and proline, amino acids of the urea cycle, and branched-chain amino acids was also evident. These results provide quantitative evidence that dietary glutamate-N distributes extensively to amino acids synthesized in the PDV and, consequently, to circulating amino acids.

  4. Differing effects of transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by nerve terminals before and after exposure of rats to artificial gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Subsequent to its release from glutamatergic neurons and activation of receptors, it is removed from extracellular space by high affinity Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters, which utilize the Na^+/K^+ electrochemical gradient as a driving force and located in nerve terminals and astrocytes. The glutamate transporters may modify the time course of synaptic events. Like glutamate itself, glutamate transporters are somehow involved in almost all aspects of normal and abnormal brain activity (e.g. cerebral ischemia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and schizophrenia). The present study assessed transporter inhibitor for the ability to inhibit glutamate uptake by synaptosomes at the normal and hypergravity conditions (rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period). DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA) is a newly developed competitive inhibitor of the high-affinity, Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters. As a potent, non- transported inhibitor of glutamate transporters, DL-TBOA promises to be a valuable new compound for the study of glutamatergic mechanisms. We demonstrated that DL-TBOA inhibited glutamate uptake ( 100 μM glutamate, 30 sec incubation period) in dose-dependent manner as in control as in hypergravity. The effect of this transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by control synaptosomes and synaptosomes prepared of animals exposed to hypergravity was different. IC50 values calculated on the basis of curves of non-linear regression kinetic analysis was 18±2 μM and 11±2 μM ((P≤0,05) before and after exposure to artificial gravity, respectively. Inhibition caused by 10 μM DL-TBOA was significantly increased from 38,0±3,8 % in control group to 51,0±4,1 % in animals, exposed to hypergravity (P≤0,05). Thus, DL-TBOA had complex effect on glutamate uptake process and perhaps, became more potent under

  5. The effects of development of a food-related operant reflex on the receptor binding of glutamate in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Karpova, I V

    1999-01-01

    Receptor binding of glutamate was studied in the striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex of rats with different abilities to acquire an operant food-related reflex in a Skinner box. The striatum of rapidly-learning rats and rats unable to learn showed significantly higher levels of glutamate binding than controls were not trained in the Skinner box (p < 0.05). Striatal receptor binding of glutamate in slow-learning rats was lower than that in rapidly-learning rats and rats which were unable to learn (p < 0.05). In the hippocampus, all groups of rats (rapidly-learning, slow-learning, and those unable to learn) showed increased receptor binding of glutamate as compared with controls (p < 0.05), in the cerebral cortex, there was a significant decrease in glutamate binding as compared with controls in all groups of animals subjected to training (p < 0.05).

  6. Evaluation of glutamate concentration transient in the synaptic cleft of the rat calyx of Held

    PubMed Central

    Budisantoso, Timotheus; Harada, Harumi; Kamasawa, Naomi; Fukazawa, Yugo; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Matsui, Ko

    2013-01-01

    Establishing the spatiotemporal concentration profile of neurotransmitter following synaptic vesicular release is essential for our understanding of inter-neuronal communication. Such profile is a determinant of synaptic strength, short-term plasticity and inter-synaptic crosstalk. Synaptically released glutamate has been suggested to reach a few millimolar in concentration and last for <1 ms. The synaptic cleft is often conceived as a single concentration compartment, whereas a huge gradient likely exists. Modelling studies have attempted to describe this gradient, but two key parameters, the number of glutamate in a vesicle (NGlu) and its diffusion coefficient (DGlu) in the extracellular space, remained unresolved. To determine this profile, the rat calyx of Held synapse at postnatal day 12–16 was studied where diffusion of glutamate occurs two-dimensionally and where quantification of AMPA receptor distribution on individual postsynaptic specialization on medial nucleus of the trapezoid body principal cells is possible using SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labelling. To assess the performance of these receptors as glutamate sensors, a kinetic model of the receptors was constructed from outside-out patch recordings. From here, we simulated synaptic responses and compared them with the EPSC recordings. Combinations of NGlu and DGlu with an optimum of 7000 and 0.3 μm2 ms−1 reproduced the data, suggesting slow diffusion. Further simulations showed that a single vesicle does not saturate the synaptic receptors, and that glutamate spillover does not affect the conductance amplitude at this synapse. Using the estimated profile, we also evaluated how the number of multiple vesicle releases at individual active zones affects the amplitude of postsynaptic signals. PMID:23070699

  7. The effects of the stress caused by experimental procedures on alanine aspartate, glutamate and glutamine in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Heath, D. F.; George, D. R.; Rose, J. G.

    1971-01-01

    Rats were stressed by intravenous injection, tail-warming or moderate restraint for 30s, i.e. by stresses imposed by normal handling during experiment. Liver glutamate concentrations were greatly affected. The results were substantially the same in two varieties of rat (Wistar and Sprague–Dawley), in two laboratories, in experiments carried out by two sets of workers, and after all three stresses. The following detailed results refer to Wistar rats. 1. In starved rats at 20°C and 30°C and in post-absorptive rats at 20°C stress by injection raised liver glutamate concentrations from 1.54, 1.57 and 1.88μmol/g wet wt. 30s after injection to 3.4, 2.7 and 3.6μmol/g wet wt. respectively a few minutes later. In starved rats at 20°C the concentration then fell slowly to 2.3μmol/g wet wt., in starved rats at 30°C it remained steady, and in post-absorptive rats at 20°C it rose slowly to about 4.3μmol/g wet wt. The final values seemed fairly steady and corresponded to an `alert' state. 2. In starved rats at 20°C anaesthesia, with or without injection or cannulation during it, raised glutamate concentrations to the `alert' values, which were maintained for 2–3h. 3. Liver alanine concentration in post-absorptive rats initially fell from 1.5 to 0.8μmol/g, and then stayed fairly constant. 4. Aspartate and glutamine concentrations altered only in starved rats, and proportionately much less than those of glutamate. 5. The necessity for knowing the time-dependence of glutamate concentrations after experimental handling is emphasized. 6. There is no wholly satisfactory explanation of the observations. PMID:5145894

  8. Caffeine alters glutamate-aspartate transporter function and expression in rat retina.

    PubMed

    de Freitas, Adriana Pinto; Ferreira, Danielle Dias Pinto; Fernandes, Arlete; Martins, Robertta Silva; Borges-Martins, Vladimir Pedro Peralva; Sathler, Matheus Figueiredo; Dos-Santos-Pereira, Maurício; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto; Giestal-de-Araujo, Elizabeth; de Melo Reis, Ricardo Augusto; Kubrusly, Regina Celia Cussa

    2016-11-19

    l-Glutamate and l-aspartate are the main excitatory amino acids (EAAs) in the Central Nervous System (CNS) and their uptake regulation is critical for the maintenance of the excitatory balance. Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs) are widely distributed among central neurons and glial cells. GLAST and GLT1 are expressed in glial cells, whereas excitatory amino acid transporter 3/excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAT3/EAAC1) is neuronal. Different signaling pathways regulate glutamate uptake by modifying the activity and expression of EAATs. In the present work we show that immature postnatal day 3 (PN3) rat retinas challenged by l-glutamate release [(3)H]-d-Aspartate linked to the reverse transport, with participation of NMDA, but not of non-NMDA receptors. The amount of [(3)H]-d-Aspartate released by l-glutamate is reduced during retinal development. Moreover, immature retinae at PN3 and PN7, but not PN14, exposed to a single dose of 200 or 500μM caffeine or the selective A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist 100nM ZM241385 decreased [(3)H]-d-Aspartate uptake. Caffeine also selectively increased total expression of EAAT3 at PN7 and its expression in membrane fractions. However, both EAAT1 and EAAT2 were reduced after caffeine treatment in P2 fraction. Addition of 100nM DPCPX, an A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist, had no effect on the [(3)H]-d-Aspartate uptake. [(3)H]-d-Aspartate release was dependent on both extracellular sodium and Dl-TBOA, but not calcium, implying a transporter-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that in the developing rat retina caffeine modulates [(3)H]-d-Aspartate uptake by blocking adenosine A2AR.

  9. Generation of slow network oscillations in the developing rat hippocampus after blockade of glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Cattani, Adriano Augusto; Bonfardin, Valérie Delphine; Represa, Alfonso; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Aniksztejn, Laurent

    2007-10-01

    Cell-surface glutamate transporters are essential for the proper function of early cortical networks because their dysfunction induces seizures in the newborn rat in vivo. We have now analyzed the consequences of their inhibition by DL-TBOA on the activity of the developing CA1 rat hippocampal network in vitro. DL-TBOA generated a pattern of recurrent depolarization with an onset and decay of several seconds' duration in interneurons and pyramidal cells. These slow network oscillations (SNOs) were mostly mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in pyramidal cells and by GABA and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in interneurons. However, in both cell types SNOs were blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists, suggesting that their generation requires a glutamatergic drive. Moreover, in interneurons, SNOs were still generated after the blockade of NMDA-mediated synaptic currents with MK-801, suggesting that SNOs are expressed by the activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors. Long-lasting bath application of glutamate or NMDA failed to induce SNOs, indicating that they are generated by periodic but not sustained activation of NMDA receptors. In addition, SNOs were observed in interneurons recorded in slices with or without the strata pyramidale and oriens, suggesting that the glutamatergic drive may originate from the radiatum and pyramidale strata. We propose that in the absence of an efficient transport of glutamate, the transmitter diffuses in the extracellular space to activate extrasynaptic NMDA receptors preferentially present on interneurons that in turn activate other interneurons and pyramidal cells. This periodic neuronal coactivation may contribute to the generation of seizures when glutamate transport dysfunction is present.

  10. Activation of spinal group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in rats evokes local glutamate release and spontaneous nociceptive behaviors: effects of 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Lorrain, Daniel S; Correa, Lucia; Anderson, Jeffery; Varney, Mark

    2002-07-26

    Intrathecal (i.t.) administration of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine ((RS)-3,5-DHPG) to rats produces an immediate display of spontaneous nociceptive behaviors (SNBs) persisting for up to 10 h after injection (NeuroReport 7 (1996) 2743). The mechanisms underlying these behavioral effects are not entirely understood but may include enhanced release of glutamate within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. The current experiments used microdialysis in awake moving animals to test: (1), whether i.t. (S)-3,5-DHPG increases the local release of glutamate at doses that also induce SNBs; and (2), whether the effects on glutamate release (as well as SNBs) can be blocked by pretreatment with the mGluR5 selective antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with a microdialysis probe inserted into the i.t. space of the spinal cord (J. Neurosci. Methods 62 (1995) 43) and then tested under i.t. drug conditions (0.01, 0.1 and 1 mM (S)-3,5-DHPG) following a 2-3 day recovery period. As predicted, local application of (S)-3,5-DHPG via the microdialysis probe increased the release of glutamate in a dose-dependent manner. Significant SNBs were also noted in the 0.1 and 1 mM groups in a manner paralleling the onset and duration of the glutamate response. Pretreatment with MPEP (55 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) blocked glutamate release to the 0.1 mM dose of (S)-3,5-DHPG, and also decreased the proportion of animals displaying SNBs in this dose group. No effects of MPEP were seen against the higher dose of (S)-3,5-DHPG (1 mM). These results suggest that stimulation of spinal mGluR5 leads to glutamate release within the spinal cord, a response that may in part account for the nociceptive behaviors evoked by i.t. (S)-3,5-DHPG.

  11. The neurotoxic effect of monosodium glutamate (MSG) on the retinal ganglion cells of the albino rat.

    PubMed

    van Rijn, C M; Marani, E; Rietveld, W J

    1986-07-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) administered postnatally to the albino rat causes extensive destruction of the retina. This MSG effect does not result in complete blindness. Ganglion cells surviving the MSG treatment are healthy and functional. Using retrogradely transported HRP and Nissl staining in whole mounted retinas, it was found that the ganglion cells left after MSG treatment are not smaller than those in controls, that these cells do not belong to one cell size group, and that no cells size group is selectively missed. The results explain why photic entrainment of MSG treated animals is still possible.

  12. The impact of serotonergic stimulation on reelin and glutamate decarboxylase gene expression in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Lakatosova, S; Celec, P; Schmidtova, E; Kubranska, A; Durdiakova, J; Ostatnikova, D

    2011-01-01

    Reelin plays an important role in the regulation of synaptic plasticity in adulthood. Administration of 5-metoxytryptamine (5MT), an agonist of serotonin receptors, during natal and neonatal periods results in decreased reelin expression. In adulthood, reelin is expressed by GABAergic neurons. The purpose of this study was to reveal the effect of elevated serotonergic stimulation on the expression of reelin and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD1) in adulthood as well as on depressive behavior and spatial cognitive abilities in adult female rats. Rats were injected with 5MT. A forced swimming test was used for evaluation of the depressive behavior and Morris water maze test was used for evaluation of spatial cognition. Brains were used for measuring the expression of reelin and GAD1. We found a significant decrease in reelin expression in the cerebellum and prefrontal cortex of 5MT-treated rats. GAD1 expression was decreased in the cerebellum of 5MT-treated rats. 5MT-treated rats reached a lower immobility score in the forced swimming test. The Morris water maze test did not reveal any significant differences. We have shown that administration of serotonin receptor agonist resulted in a decreased RELN and GAD1 expression in the cerebellum of adult female rats. We propose that this phenomenon might be relevant in the pathogenesis of autism (Fig. 3, Ref. 38). Full Text in free PDF www.bmj.sk.

  13. Alternate splicing and expression of the glutamate transporter EAAT5 in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Lee, Aven; Anderson, Ashley R; Barnett, Nigel L; Stevens, Melissa G; Pow, David V

    2012-09-15

    Excitatory amino acid transporter 5 (EAAT5) is an unusual glutamate transporter that is expressed in the retina, where it is localised to two populations of glutamatergic neurons, namely the bipolar neurons and photoreceptors. EAAT5 exhibits two distinct properties, acting both as a slow glutamate transporter and as a glutamate-gated inhibitory receptor. The latter property is attributable to a co-associated chloride conductance. EAAT5 has previously been thought to exist only as a full-length form. We now demonstrate by PCR cloning and sequencing, the presence of five novel splice variant forms of EAAT5 which skip either partial or complete exons in the rat retina. Furthermore, we demonstrate that each of these variants is expressed at the protein level as assessed by Western blotting using splice-specific antibodies that we have generated. We conclude that EAAT5 exists in multiple spliced forms, and propose, based upon retention or absence of key structural features, that these variant forms may potentially exhibit distinct properties relative to the originally described form of EAAT5. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hyperammonemia compromises glutamate metabolism and reduces BDNF in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Galland, Fabiana; Negri, Elisa; Da Ré, Carollina; Fróes, Fernanda; Strapazzon, Liliane; Guerra, Maria Cristina; Tortorelli, Lucas Silva; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Leite, Marina Concli

    2017-09-01

    Ammonia is putatively the major toxin associated with hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a neuropsychiatric manifestation that results in cognitive impairment, poor concentration and psychomotor alterations. The hippocampus, a brain region involved in cognitive impairment and depressive behavior, has been studied less than neocortical regions. Herein, we investigated hippocampal astrocyte parameters in a hyperammonemic model without hepatic lesion and in acute hippocampal slices exposed to ammonia. We also measured hippocampal BDNF, a neurotrophin commonly related to synaptic plasticity and cognitive deficit, and peripheral S100B protein, used as a marker for brain damage. Hyperammonemia directly impaired astrocyte function, inducing a decrease in glutamate uptake and in the activity of glutamine synthetase, in turn altering the glutamine-glutamate cycle, glutamatergic neurotransmission and ammonia detoxification itself. Hippocampal BDNF was reduced in hyperammonemic rats via a mechanism that may involve astrocyte production, since the same effect was observed in astrocyte cultures exposed to ammonia. Ammonia induced a significant increase in S100B secretion in cultured astrocytes; however, no significant changes were observed in the serum or in cerebrospinal fluid. Data demonstrating hippocampal vulnerability to ammonia toxicity, particularly due to reduced glutamate uptake activity and BDNF content, contribute to our understanding of the neuropsychiatric alterations in HE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic inactivation of glutamate neurons in the rat sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus recapitulates REM sleep behaviour disorder.

    PubMed

    Valencia Garcia, Sara; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Lazarus, Michael; Grassi, Daniela; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2017-02-01

    SEE SCHENCK AND MAHOWALD DOI101093/AWW329 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by the enactment of violent dreams during paradoxical (REM) sleep in the absence of normal muscle atonia. Accumulating clinical and experimental data suggest that REM sleep behaviour disorder might be due to the neurodegeneration of glutamate neurons involved in paradoxical sleep and located within the pontine sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus. The purpose of the present work was thus to functionally determine first, the role of glutamate sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons in paradoxical sleep and second, whether their genetic inactivation is sufficient for recapitulating REM sleep behaviour disorder in rats. For this goal, we first injected two retrograde tracers in the intralaminar thalamus and ventral medulla to disentangle neuronal circuits in which sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus is involved; second we infused bilaterally in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus adeno-associated viruses carrying short hairpin RNAs targeting Slc17a6 mRNA [which encodes vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2)] to chronically impair glutamate synaptic transmission in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons. At the neuroanatomical level, sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons specifically activated during paradoxical sleep hypersomnia send descending efferents to glycine/GABA neurons within the ventral medulla, but not ascending projections to the intralaminar thalamus. These data suggest a crucial role of sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons rather in muscle atonia than in paradoxical sleep generation. In line with this hypothesis, 30 days after adeno-associated virus injections into sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus rats display a decrease of 30% of paradoxical sleep daily quantities, and a significant increase of muscle tone during paradoxical sleep concomitant to a tremendous increase of abnormal motor dream

  16. L-glutamate microinjection in the preoptic area increases brain and body temperature in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Trina; Jaryal, Ashok K; Kumar, Velayudhan M; Mallick, Hruda N

    2014-01-08

    The role of the preoptic area (POA) in thermoregulation is well documented. Microinjection of various neurotransmitters into the POA in rats has been shown to influence body temperature. Alhough there are reports showing changes in temperature on administration of L-glutamate into the POA, the role of this excitatory amino acid in thermoregulation has not been studied in unanaesthetized rats. In the present study, brain and body temperatures were recorded in freely moving adult male Wistar rats with K-type thermocouple implanted near the hypothalamus and temperature transmitter implanted inside the peritoneum. Recordings were performed 2 h preinjection and 4 h postinjection. L-glutamate (0.14 nM) microinjection into the POA induced long-lasting hyperthermia and reduced locomotor activity. The rats remained curled up and showed piloerection. L-glutamate-induced hyperthermia was attenuated by previous injection of the ionotropic L-glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenate (0.11 nM). We propose that L-glutamate in the POA participates not only in heat production and conservation but also plays a role in interlinking sleep and thermoregulation.

  17. Pyridoxine inhibits depolarization-evoked glutamate release in nerve terminals from rat cerebral cortex: a possible neuroprotective mechanism?

    PubMed

    Yang, Tsung-Tair; Wang, Su-Jane

    2009-10-01

    Pyridoxine (vitamin B(6)) protects neurons against neurotoxicity. An excessive release of glutamate is widely considered to be one of the molecular mechanisms of neuronal damage in several neurological diseases. We investigated whether pyridoxine affected glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Pyridoxine inhibited the release of glutamate that was evoked by exposing synaptosomes to the K(+) channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), and this phenomenon was concentration-dependent. Inhibition of glutamate release by pyridoxine was prevented by the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1, or by chelating intraterminal Ca(2+), but was insensitive to DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate, a glutamate transporter inhibitor. Pyridoxine did not alter the resting synaptosomal membrane potential or 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Examination of the effect of pyridoxine on cytosolic [Ca(2+)] revealed that diminution of glutamate release could be attributed to a reduction in voltage-dependent Ca(2+) influx. Consistent with this, the pyridoxine-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was completely prevented by blocking the N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, but not by blocking intracellular Ca(2+) release or Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. Furthermore, the pyridoxine effect on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was abolished by the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors bisindolylmaleimide I (GF109203X) or bisindolylmaleimide IX (Ro318220), and pyridoxine significantly decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of PKC, PKCalpha, and myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate. Together, these results suggest that pyridoxine inhibits glutamate release from rat cortical synaptosomes, through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca(2+) entry and PKC activity.

  18. Acute Stress Increases Depolarization-Evoked Glutamate Release in the Rat Prefrontal/Frontal Cortex: The Dampening Action of Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Farisello, Pasqualina; Zappettini, Simona; Tardito, Daniela; Barbiero, Valentina S.; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Mallei, Alessandra; Baldelli, Pietro; Racagni, Giorgio; Raiteri, Maurizio; Benfenati, Fabio; Bonanno, Giambattista; Popoli, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Background Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release. Methodology/Findings Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine) and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated), and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486). On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats). Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability. Conclusions/Significance Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes. This novel effect of

  19. Acute stress increases depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the rat prefrontal/frontal cortex: the dampening action of antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Musazzi, Laura; Milanese, Marco; Farisello, Pasqualina; Zappettini, Simona; Tardito, Daniela; Barbiero, Valentina S; Bonifacino, Tiziana; Mallei, Alessandra; Baldelli, Pietro; Racagni, Giorgio; Raiteri, Maurizio; Benfenati, Fabio; Bonanno, Giambattista; Popoli, Maurizio

    2010-01-05

    Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release. Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine) and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated), and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486). On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats). Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability. Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes. This novel effect of antidepressants on the response to stress, shown here for

  20. Ionotropic glutamate receptors in the ventral tegmental area regulate cocaine-seeking behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenlin; Akins, Chana K; Mattingly, Anne E; Rebec, George V

    2005-11-01

    Drug addiction is characterized by compulsive drug-seeking and drug-taking behavior and by a high rate of relapse even after long periods of abstinence. Although the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) pathway is thought to play a critical role in drug craving and relapse, recent evidence also implicates glutamate, an amino acid known to activate DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) via ionotropic receptors. To assess whether increased glutamate transmission in the VTA is involved in cocaine-primed drug-seeking behavior, we tested rats in a between-session reinstatement model. They were trained to press a lever for cocaine infusions (0.25 mg/infusion) accompanied by compound stimuli (light and tone) under a modified fixed-ratio 5 reinforcement schedule. Cocaine-primed reinstatement was conducted after lever pressing was extinguished in the absence of the conditioned stimuli. Blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors in the VTA by local application of kynurenate (0.0, 1.0, 3.2, and 5.6 microg/side) dose-dependently decreased cocaine-primed reinstatement, whereas sucrose-primed reinstatement of sucrose-seeking behavior was unaffected. In addition, the minimum effective dose for decreasing cocaine-primed reinstatement was ineffective in the substantia nigra. Together, these data indicate that glutamatergic activation of the VTA is critical for cocaine-primed reinstatement. Because such activation can increase impulse flow in DA neurons and thus DA release in mesocorticolimbic targets, this glutamate-DA interaction in the VTA may underlie cocaine-primed relapse to cocaine-seeking behavior.

  1. GPR30 regulates glutamate transporter GLT-1 expression in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wêgrzynowicz, Marta; Wang, Ning; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Lee, Kyuwon; Aschner, Michael

    2012-08-03

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPR30 contributes to the neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol (E2); however, the mechanisms associated with this protection have yet to be elucidated. Given that E2 increases astrocytic expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), which would prevent excitotoxic-induced neuronal death, we proposed that GPR30 mediates E2 action on GLT-1 expression. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the effects of G1, a selective agonist of GPR30, and GPR30 siRNA on astrocytic GLT-1 expression, as well as glutamate uptake in rat primary astrocytes, and explored potential signaling pathways linking GPR30 to GLT-1. G1 increased GLT-1 protein and mRNA levels, subject to regulation by both MAPK and PI3K signaling. Inhibition of TGF-α receptor suppressed the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Silencing GPR30 reduced the expression of both GLT-1 and TGF-α and abrogated the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Moreover, the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 protein expression was abolished by a protein kinase A inhibitor and an NF-κB inhibitor. G1 also enhanced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), as well as both NF-κB p50 and NF-κB p65 binding to the GLT-1 promoter. Finally, to model dysfunction of glutamate transporters, manganese was used, and G1 was found to attenuate manganese-induced impairment in GLT-1 protein expression and glutamate uptake. Taken together, the present data demonstrate that activation of GPR30 increases GLT-1 expression via multiple pathways, suggesting that GPR30 is worthwhile as a potential target to be explored for developing therapeutics of excitotoxic neuronal injury.

  2. GPR30 Regulates Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 Expression in Rat Primary Astrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wêgrzynowicz, Marta; Wang, Ning; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Lee, Kyuwon; Aschner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The G protein-coupled estrogen receptor GPR30 contributes to the neuroprotective effects of 17β-estradiol (E2); however, the mechanisms associated with this protection have yet to be elucidated. Given that E2 increases astrocytic expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1), which would prevent excitotoxic-induced neuronal death, we proposed that GPR30 mediates E2 action on GLT-1 expression. To investigate this hypothesis, we examined the effects of G1, a selective agonist of GPR30, and GPR30 siRNA on astrocytic GLT-1 expression, as well as glutamate uptake in rat primary astrocytes, and explored potential signaling pathways linking GPR30 to GLT-1. G1 increased GLT-1 protein and mRNA levels, subject to regulation by both MAPK and PI3K signaling. Inhibition of TGF-α receptor suppressed the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Silencing GPR30 reduced the expression of both GLT-1 and TGF-α and abrogated the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 expression. Moreover, the G1-induced increase in GLT-1 protein expression was abolished by a protein kinase A inhibitor and an NF-κB inhibitor. G1 also enhanced cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), as well as both NF-κB p50 and NF-κB p65 binding to the GLT-1 promoter. Finally, to model dysfunction of glutamate transporters, manganese was used, and G1 was found to attenuate manganese-induced impairment in GLT-1 protein expression and glutamate uptake. Taken together, the present data demonstrate that activation of GPR30 increases GLT-1 expression via multiple pathways, suggesting that GPR30 is worthwhile as a potential target to be explored for developing therapeutics of excitotoxic neuronal injury. PMID:22645130

  3. Interactions between adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors in the rat hippocampal slice

    PubMed Central

    Shahraki, Ali; Stone, Trevor W

    2003-01-01

    We have examined excitatory postsynaptic potentials and paired-pulse interactions in rat hippocampal slices to obtain more information about the site and mechanism of interactions between metabotropic glutamate receptors and adenosine receptors. The results show that the suppression of adenosine sensitivity is explained by a selectively reduced responsiveness to A1 receptor stimulation, and does not involve any facilitation of A2A adenosine receptors, since it can be obtained in the absence of endogenous adenosine and is not prevented by the A2A receptor blocker ZM241385. The glutamate receptors involved are of the group I class since the suppression of adenosine sensitivity is produced by ACPD and the group I selective compound DHPG. Furthermore, the effects of DHPG could be prevented by LY367385, a selective antagonist at the mGlu1a subtype of group I receptors. The selective antagonist at mGlu5 receptors, SIB1893, did not prevent the suppression of adenosine sensitivity by DHPG. Blockade of the DHPG/adenosine interaction was also obtained by superfusion with the protein kinasae C inhibitor chelerythrine. Since the suppression of adenosine responses by metabotropic receptor agonists was seen in the paired-pulse paradigm, we conclude that the observed interactions occur at the level of the presynaptic terminals. The interaction with adenosine receptors is not specific, but applies also to a suppression of responses mediated by the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen. We conclude that activation of the mGlu1a subtype of receptor can suppress responses mediated via adenosine A1 receptors, probably by activating protein kinase C. Since the changes induced by metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists last for at least 60 min, the data also imply that these interactions could play an important role in changes of synaptic function long after even transient increases of glutamate release in the CNS. PMID:12684261

  4. Glutamate-dependent ectodomain shedding of neuregulin-1 type II precursors in rat forebrain neurons

    PubMed Central

    Iwakura, Yuriko; Wang, Ran; Inamura, Naoko; Araki, Kazuaki; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The neurotrophic factor neuregulin 1 (NRG1) regulates neuronal development, glial differentiation, and excitatory synapse maturation. NRG1 is synthesized as a membrane-anchored precursor and is then liberated by proteolytic processing or exocytosis. Mature NRG1 then binds to its receptors expressed by neighboring neurons or glial cells. However, the molecular mechanisms that govern this process in the nervous system are not defined in detail. Here we prepared neuron-enriched and glia-enriched cultures from embryonic rat neocortex to investigate the role of neurotransmitters that regulate the liberation/release of NRG1 from the membrane of neurons or glial cells. Using a two-site enzyme immunoassay to detect soluble NRG1, we show that, of various neurotransmitters, glutamate was the most potent inducer of NRG1 release in neuron-enriched cultures. NRG1 release in glia-enriched cultures was relatively limited. Furthermore, among glutamate receptor agonists, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) and kainate (KA), but not AMPA or tACPD, mimicked the effects of glutamate. Similar findings were acquired from analysis of the hippocampus of rats with KA-induced seizures. To evaluate the contribution of members of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) families to NRG1 release, we transfected primary cultures of neurons with cDNA vectors encoding NRG1 types I, II, or III precursors, each tagged with the alkaline phosphatase reporter. Analysis of alkaline phosphatase activity revealed that the NRG1 type II precursor was subjected to tumor necrosis factor-α-converting enzyme (TACE) / a Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) -dependent ectodomain shedding in a protein kinase C-dependent manner. These results suggest that glutamatergic neurotransmission positively regulates the ectodomain shedding of NRG1 type II precursors and liberates the active NRG1 domain in an activity-dependent manner. PMID:28350885

  5. Pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthesis from glutamate by rat intestinal mucosa. Subcellular localization and temperature stability.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Y; Henslee, J G; Jones, M E

    1983-03-25

    The demonstration of the ornithine biosynthesis from glutamate in cell-free homogenates of rat intestinal mucosa by Ross, G., Dunn, D., and Jones, M.E. (1978) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 85, 140-147 suggested that this tissue might have the capacity to convert glutamate to pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C). We have shown in the preceding paper (Wakabayashi, Y., and Jones, M.E. (1983) J. Biol. Chem. 258, 3865-3872) that this is the case. The intracellular distribution of the P5C-synthesizing activity was investigated utilizing a newly developed procedure for subcellular fractionation of the rat intestinal mucosa. We found that the activity resided in the mitochondrial fraction as characterized by marker enzymes and an electron micrograph. The mitochondrial membrane fraction, freed of the soluble matrix and intermembrane space enzymes, retained all of the P5C-synthesizing activity. Addition of the soluble fraction to the membrane fraction did not affect the activity. P5C synthase, the name we have chosen for the protein(s) that catalyzes P5C synthesis from glutamate when ATP and NADPH are present, is susceptible to thermal inactivation in the presence of detergent. By lowering the incubation temperature to or below 20 degrees C, one can obtain a linear production of P5C with respect to time and protein concentration. Lower incubation temperatures are recommended for routine assay of this enzyme(s). Addition of 30% glycerol to the incubation mixture resulted in a linear formation of P5C with time at 30 degrees C; this and other data suggest that polyhydroxylic compounds may protect this protein against denaturation. Preliminary experiments suggest that P5C synthase can be extracted from a mitochondrial membrane in the presence of detergent, a high salt concentration, and glycerol. The possibility that the enzyme(s) is located in the inner mitochondrial membrane is discussed.

  6. Monosodium glutamate and sweet taste: generalization of conditioned taste aversion between glutamate and sweet stimuli in rats.

    PubMed

    Heyer, B R; Taylor-Burds, C C; Tran, L H; Delay, E R

    2003-09-01

    Even though monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a prototypical umami substance, previous studies reported that a conditioned taste aversion (CTA) to MSG, mixed with amiloride to block the taste of sodium, generalizes to sucrose. These findings suggest that the taste of glutamate mimics the taste of sucrose and raise the question of whether glutamate has a broadly tuned sweet taste component. To test this hypothesis, CTA experiments were conducted to test for generalization between MSG and several sweet stimuli: sucrose, glucose, maltose, saccharin and SC-45647. Strong bidirectional generalization was seen between MSG mixed with amiloride and sucrose, glucose, saccharin and SC-45647. Weak generalization was seen between MSG and maltose, and sucrose and maltose. None of the CTAs generalized to NMDA. These findings support the hypothesis that the taste of MSG has broadly tuned, sweet-like characteristics, possibly due to the convergence of afferent signals for MSG, natural sugars and artificial sweeteners.

  7. Voluntary wheel running modulates glutamate receptor subunit gene expression and stress hormone release in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Makatsori, A; Duncko, R; Schwendt, M; Moncek, F; Johansson, B B; Jezova, D

    2003-07-01

    Lewis rats that are known to be addiction-prone, develop compulsive running if they have access to running wheels. The present experiments were aimed 1) to evaluate the activation of stress systems following chronic and acute voluntary wheel running in Lewis rats by measurement of hormone release and gene expression of neuropeptides related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity and 2) to test the hypothesis that wheel running as a combined model of addictive behavior and stress exposure is associated with modulation of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits in the ventral tegmental area. Voluntary running for three weeks but not for one night resulted in a rise in plasma corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels (p<0.05) compared to those in control rats. Principal component analysis revealed the relation between POMC gene expression in the intermediate pituitary and running rate. Acute exposure of animals to voluntary wheel running induced a significant decrease in alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit mRNA levels (p<0.01), while repeated voluntary physical activity increased levels of GluR1 mRNA in the ventral tegmentum (p<0.05). Neither acute nor chronic wheel running influenced N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR1 mRNA levels in the ventral tegmental area. Thus, the present study revealed changes in AMPA receptor subunit gene expression in a reward-related brain structure as well as an activation of HPA axis in response to compulsive wheel running in Lewis rats. It may be suggested that hormones of HPA axis and glutamate receptors belong to the factors that substantiate higher vulnerability to addictive behavior.

  8. Correlation between extracellular glutamate release and neuronal cell death in an eleven vessel occlusion model in rat.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunkuk; Lee, Gi Ja; Choi, Samjin; Choi, Seok Keun; Chae, Su Jin; Kang, Sung Wook; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2010-06-25

    The aim of this study was to define the effects of glutamate release on cell death in an eleven vessel rat occlusion model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-350g) were used for the 11 vessel occlusion ischemic model, which was induced by a 5- and 10-min transient occlusion. During the surgical procedure, the extracellular glutamate concentration was measured in real-time using a microdialysis amperometirc biosensor with cerebral blood flow. In order to confirm neuronal cell death, brains were removed 72h after ischemia for the detection of the neuron-specific nuclear protein and cleaved caspase-3 levels, using double-immunofluorescence. A significant decrease in % cerebral blood flow was observed in both the 5- and 10-min 11 vessel occlusion models, while an increase in glutamate release was detected after the onset of ischemia that continued to rise during the ischemic period. However, a significantly higher level of glutamate release was observed in the 10-min ischemia group compared to the 5-min group. Unlike the small amount of brain damage in the 5-min group, the increased glutamate levels in the 10-min group resulted in ischemic cell death in the hippocampal region with the activation of cleaved caspase-3 and the inhibition of neuron-specific nuclear protein expression. This study suggests that the increased level of glutamate release induces apoptotic cell death in the 11 vessel occlusion ischemic model.

  9. Modulation of ( sup 3 H)-glutamate binding by serotonin in the rat hippocampus: An autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Mennini, T.; Miari, A. )

    1991-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) added in vitro increased ({sup 3}H)-glutamate specific binding in the rat hippocampus, reaching statistical significance in layers rich in N-Methyl-D-Aspartate sensitive glutamate receptors. This effect was explained by a significant increase in the apparent affinity of ({sup 3}H)-glutamate when 5-HT is added in vitro. Two days after lesion of serotonergic afferents to the hippocampus with 5,7- Dihydroxytryptamine ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding was significantly decreased in the CA3 region and stratum lacunosum moleculare of the hippocampus, this reduction being reversed by in vitro addition of 10 {mu}M 5-HT. The decrease observed is due to a significant reduction of quisqualate-insensitive (radiatum CA3) and kainate receptors (strata oriens, radiatum, pyramidal of CA3). Five days after lesion ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding increased significantly in the CA3 region of the hippocampus but was not different from sham animals in the other hippocampal layers. Two weeks after lesion ({sup 3}H)-glutamate binding to quisqualate-insensitive receptors was increased in all the hippocampal layers, while kainate and quisqualate-sensitive receptors were not affected. These data are consistent with the possibility that 5-HT is a direct positive modulator of glutamate receptor subtypes.

  10. Valproate is neuroprotective against malonate toxicity in rat striatum: an association with augmentation of high-affinity glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Morland, Cecilie; Boldingh, Karen Astrid; Iversen, Evy Grini; Hassel, Bjørnar

    2004-11-01

    The antiepileptic drug valproate (VPA) may be neuroprotective. We treated rats with VPA for 14 days (300 mg/kg twice daily) before intrastriatal injection of 1.5 micromol (1 M) of the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate. VPA-treated animals developed smaller lesions than control animals: 10 +/- 2 mm(3) versus 26 +/- 8 mm(3) (means +/- SD; P = 10(-4). Injection of NaCl that was equiosmolar with 1 M malonate caused lesions of only 1.2 +/- 0.4 mm(3) in control animals, whereas physiologic saline produced no lesion. VPA pretreatment reduced the malonate-induced extracellular accumulation of glutamate. This effect paralleled an increase in the striatal level of the glutamate transporter GLT, which augmented high-affinity glutamate uptake by 25%, as determined from the uptake of [(3)H] glutamate into striatal proteoliposomes. Malonate caused a 76% reduction in striatal adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, but the glial, ATP-dependent formation of glutamine from radiolabeled glucose or glutamate was intact, indicating that glial ATP production supported uptake of glutamate. Striatal levels of HSP-70 and fos were reduced, and the levels of bcl-2 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase remained unaffected, but histone acetylation was increased by VPA treatment. The results suggest that augmentation of glutamate uptake may contribute importantly to VPA-mediated neuroprotection in striatum.

  11. Effect of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon on the glutamate release from rat brain nerve terminals under altered gravity conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.

    L-glutamate acts within the mammalian central nervous system as the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter and as a potent neurotoxin The balance between these physiological and pathological actions of glutamate is thought to be kept in check by the rapid removal of the neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft The majority of uptake is mediated by the high-affinity Na -dependent glutamate transporters Depolarization leads to stimulation of glutamate efflux mediated by reversal of the high-affinity glutamate transporters The effects of the protonophore carbonyl cyanide-p-trifluoromethoxyphenyl-hydrazon FCCP on the glutamate release from isolated nerve terminals rat brain synaptosomes were investigated in control and after centrifuge-induced hypergravity rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period The treatment of synaptosomes with 1 mu M FCCP during 11 min resulted in the increase in L- 14 C glutamate release by 23 0 pm 2 3 of total accumulated synaptosomal label in control animals and 24 0 pm 2 3 animals subjected to hypergravity FCCP evoked release of L- 14 C glutamate from synaptosomes was not altered in animals exposed to hypergravity as compared to control Glutamate transport is of electrogenic nature and thus depends on the membrane potential The high-KCl stimulated L- 14 C glutamate release in Ca 2 -free media occurred due to reversal of the glutamate transporters Carrier --mediated release of L- 14 C glutamate 6 min slightly increased as a result of

  12. Extracellular glutamate in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord in the freely moving rat during hindlimb stepping.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, W M; Ta-Haung, J; Ackerson, L; Maidment, N T; Edgerton, V R

    1999-08-01

    The capacity to reestablish locomotor function after complete spinal cord transection in the adult mammal is now well documented. Further studies have shown different neurotransmitters to be involved in the initiation and maintenance of these locomotor patterns. However, there has been no in vivo evidence of the changes in glutamate or any other neurotransmitter in the extracellular space of the dorsal horn during an alternating motor pattern such as hindlimb stepping. This study describes an in vivo microdialysis technique to measure extracellular glutamate in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord in the fully awake intact rat. A concentric microdialysis probe was placed in the dorsal horn at L5, and 18 h later dialysate samples were collected at 20-min intervals before, during, and after 20 min of hindlimb stepping. During stepping, extracellular glutamate rose 150% above resting levels and returned to resting levels 40 min later. This increase may have occurred either as a result of primary afferent depolarization or modulation by the descending and ascending supraspinal pathways. In another series of experiments extracellular glutamate was, therefore, measured in the dorsal horn of the chronic spinally transected rat during 20 min of hindlimb stepping. Although the spinal group did not take as many steps as the intact group, those taking more than 40 steps showed a significant rise in extracellular glutamate, and the number of steps taken by the individual spinal rats correlated positively with the individual values of extracellular glutamate (r2 = 0.63). These results are consistent with glutamate being an important neurotransmitter in the spinal cord in normal locomotion.

  13. Glutamate protects against Ca(2+) paradox-induced injury and inhibits calpain activity in isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Ying; Kong, Ling-Heng; Lai, Dong; Jin, Zhen-Xiao; Gu, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Jing-Jun

    2016-10-01

    This study determined the effects of glutamate on the Ca(2+) paradoxical heart, which is a model for Ca(2+) overload-induced injury during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion, and evaluated its effect on a known mediator of injury, calpain. An isolated rat heart was retrogradely perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. Ca(2+) paradox was elicited via perfusion with a Ca(2+) -free Krebs-Henseleit (KH) solution for 3 minutes followed by Ca(2+) -containing normal KH solution for 30 minutes. The Ca(2+) paradoxical heart exhibited almost no viable tissue on triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and markedly increased LDH release, caspase-3 activity, cytosolic cytochrome c content, and apoptotic index. These hearts also displayed significantly increased LVEDP and a disappearance of LVDP. Glutamate (5 and 20 mmol/L) significantly alleviated Ca(2+) paradox-induced injury. In contrast, 20 mmol/L mannitol had no effect on Ca(2+) paradox. Ca(2+) paradox significantly increased the extent of the translocation of μ-calpain to the sarcolemmal membrane and the proteolysis of α-fodrin, which suggests calpain activation. Glutamate also blocked these effects. A non-selective inhibitor of glutamate transporters, dl-TBOA (10 μmol/L), had no effect on control hearts, but it reversed glutamate-induced cardioprotection and reduction in calpain activity. Glutamate treatment significantly increased intracellular glutamate content in the Ca(2+) paradoxical heart, which was also blocked by dl-TBOA. We conclude that glutamate protects the heart against Ca(2+) overload-induced injury via glutamate transporters, and the inhibition of calpain activity is involved in this process. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  14. Developmental increase of asynchronic glutamate release from hippocampal synapses in mutant taiep rat.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida, Marco; Aliaga, Esteban; Olivares, Virginia; Roncagliolo, Manuel; Bonansco, Christian

    2009-06-01

    During development, regulation of the strength of synaptic transmission plays a central role in the formation of mammalian brain circuitries. In taiep rat, a neurological mutant with severe reactive astrogliosis and demyelination, we have described alterations in the synaptic transmission in central neurons, characterized by asynchronous excitatory postsynaptic currents ((ASYN)EPSCs), because of delayed neurotransmitter release. This hippocampal synaptic dysfunction has been described in juvenile mutants, concomitantly with the appearance of their main glial alterations. However, it is unknown whether this abnormal synaptic activity is correlated with some alterations of synaptic maturation during the postnatal development. Using intracellular electrophysiological recordings and immunohistochemistry assays, we studied the maturation of CA3-CA1 synapses in taiep rats. In taiep, the number of (ASYN)EPSCs evoked by conventional stimulation of Schaffer collaterals increases with age (P7-P30) and can be evoked by stimulation of single fiber. The amplitude and frequency of spontaneous EPSC (sEPSC) increased during the postnatal development in both control and taiep rats. However, in taiep, the increase of sEPSC frequency was significantly higher than in the control rats. The frequency of miniature EPSC (mEPSC) increased over the studied age range, without differences between taiep and control rats. In both control and taiep groups, the synaptophysin immunostaining (SYP-IR) in the stratum radiatum of CA1 region was significantly lower in the juvenile (P30) than in the neonatal (P10) rats, suggesting that synaptic pruning is normally occurring in taiep, even when SYP-IR was higher in taiep than control in both ages studied. These results suggest that, in taiep mutants, the asynchronic transmission is due to a dysfunction in the glutamate release mechanisms that progressively increases during development, which is not attributable to the existence of aberrant synaptic

  15. Alcohol drinking and deprivation alter basal extracellular glutamate concentrations and clearance in the mesolimbic system of alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zheng-Ming; Rodd, Zachary A; Engleman, Eric A; Bailey, Jason A; Lahiri, Debomoy K; McBride, William J

    2013-03-01

    The present study determined the effects of voluntary ethanol drinking and deprivation on basal extracellular glutamate concentrations and clearance in the mesolimbic system and tested the hypothesis that chronic ethanol drinking would persistently increase basal glutamate neurotransmission. Three groups of alcohol-preferring (P) rats were used: 'water group (WG),' 'ethanol maintenance group (MG; 24-hour free choice water versus 15% ethanol)' and 'ethanol deprivation group (DG; 2 weeks of deprivation).' Quantitative microdialysis and Western blots were conducted to measure basal extracellular glutamate concentrations, clearance and proteins associated with glutamate clearance. Chronic alcohol drinking produced a 70-100% increase of basal extracellular glutamate concentrations in the posterior ventral tegmental area (4.0 versus 7.0 μM) and nucleus accumbens shell (3.0 versus 6.0 μM). Glutamate clearances were reduced by 30-40% in both regions of MG rats compared with WG rats. In addition, Western blots revealed a 40-45% decrease of excitatory amino transporter 1 (EAAT1) protein, but no significant changes in the levels of EAAT2 or cystine-glutamate antiporter in these regions of MG versus WG rats. The enhanced glutamate concentrations returned to control levels, accompanied by a recovery of glutamate clearance following deprivation. These results indicated that chronic alcohol drinking enhanced extracellular glutamate concentrations in the mesolimbic system, as a result, in part, of reduced clearance, suggesting that enhanced glutamate neurotransmission may contribute to the maintenance of alcohol drinking. However, because the increased glutamate levels returned to normal after deprivation, elevated glutamate neurotransmission may not contribute to the initiation of relapse drinking.

  16. [Studying specific effects of nootropic drugs on glutamate receptors in the rat brain].

    PubMed

    Firstova, Iu Iu; Vasil'eva, E V; Kovalev, G I

    2011-01-01

    The influence of nootropic drugs of different groups (piracetam, phenotropil, nooglutil, noopept, semax, meclofenoxate, pantocalcine, and dimebon) on the binding of the corresponding ligands to AMPA, NMDA, and mGlu receptors of rat brain has been studied by the method of radio-ligand binding in vitro. It is established that nooglutil exhibits pharmacologically significant competition with a selective agonist of AMPA receptors ([G-3H]Ro 48-8587) for the receptor binding sites (with IC50 = 6.4 +/- 0.2 microM), while the competition of noopept for these receptor binding sites was lower by an order of magnitude (IC50 = 80 +/- 5.6 microM). The heptapeptide drug semax was moderately competitive with [G-3H]LY 354740 for mGlu receptor sites (IC50 = 33 +/- 2.4 microM). Dimebon moderately influenced the specific binding of the ligand of NMDA receptor channel ([G-3H]MK-801) at IC50 = 59 +/- 3.6 microM. Nootropic drugs of the pyrrolidone group (piracetam, phenotropil) as well as meclofenoxate, pantocalcine (pantogam) in a broad rage of concentrations (10(-4)-10(-10) M) did not affect the binding of the corresponding ligands to glutamate receptors (IC50 100 pM). Thus, the direct neurochemical investigation was used for the first time to qualitatively characterize the specific binding sites for nooglutil and (to a lower extent) noopept on AMPA receptors, for semax on metabotropic glutamate receptors, and for dimebon on the channel region of NMDA receptors. The results are indicative of a selective action of some nootropes on the glutamate family.

  17. Effects of cefazolin and cefoperazone on glutamate transporter 1 isoforms and cystine/glutamate exchanger as well as alcohol drinking behavior in male alcohol-preferring rats

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Rao, P.S.S.; Sari, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that cefazolin and cefoperazone treatments attenuated ethanol consumption, at least in part, through upregulation of GLT-1 expression in male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. In this study, we determined the effects of these compounds on the expression of GLT-1 isoforms (GLT-1a and GLT-1b), cysteine/glutamate exchanger (xCT), which is another glial glutamate transporter co-localized with GLT-1, and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). We found that cefazolin and cefoperazone treatments decreased ethanol intake and upregulated both GLT-1 isoforms, GLT-1a and GLT-1b, in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) compared to saline treated group. In addition, cefazolin increased the expression of xCT in NAc and PFC, while cefoperazone upregulated xCT expression only in NAc. However, we did not find any significant differences in GLAST expression between the treated and control groups. Overall, our findings suggest that cefazolin and cefoperazone may be considered as potential compounds for the treatment of ethanol dependence. PMID:26790351

  18. Effects of cefazolin and cefoperazone on glutamate transporter 1 isoforms and cystine/glutamate exchanger as well as alcohol drinking behavior in male alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Rao, P S S; Sari, Youssef

    2016-03-01

    Previously, we have reported that cefazolin and cefoperazone treatments attenuated ethanol consumption, at least in part, through upregulation of GLT-1 expression in male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. In this study, we determined the effects of these compounds on the expression of GLT-1 isoforms (GLT-1a and GLT-1b), cysteine/glutamate exchanger (xCT), which is another glial glutamate transporter co-localized with GLT-1, and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). We found that cefazolin and cefoperazone treatments decreased ethanol intake and upregulated both GLT-1 isoforms, GLT-1a and GLT-1b, in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) compared to saline treated group. In addition, cefazolin increased the expression of xCT in NAc and PFC, while cefoperazone upregulated xCT expression only in NAc. However, we did not find any significant differences in GLAST expression between the treated and control groups. Overall, our findings suggest that cefazolin and cefoperazone may be considered as potential compounds for the treatment of ethanol dependence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Regional development of carbachol-, glutamate-, norepinephrine-, and serotonin-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Balduini, W; Candura, S M; Costa, L G

    1991-09-19

    Phosphoinositide metabolism stimulated by activation of cholinergic muscarinic, glutamatergic, alpha-adrenergic and serotoninergic receptors was measured in brain regions of the developing rats. Accumulation of [3H]inositol phosphates ([3H]InsPs) in [3H]inositol-prelabeled slices from cerebral cortex, hippocampus, brainstem and cerebellum was measured as an index of phosphoinositide metabolism. Large age-, neurotransmitter receptor-, and brain region-dependent differences were found. Carbachol-stimulated [3H]InsPs accumulation peaked on postnatal day 7 in cerebral cortex and hippocampus while in cerebellum and brainstem the effect of muscarinic stimulation was maximal at birth and then declined to adulthood. The effect of glutamate also showed a peak on day 7 in hippocampus and brainstem and a developmentally related decrease in cerebral cortex. In the cerebellum, on the other hand, the response to glutamate remained sustained through adulthood. Stimulation of phosphoinositide metabolism by norepinephrine increased with age in hippocampus and cerebral cortex, but decreased in the cerebellum, while the effect of serotonin did not change significantly with age except in cerebellum. These changes in receptor-stimulated phosphoinositide metabolism do not parallel, for the most part, the ontogeny of receptor recognition sites. Activation of the phosphoinositide metabolism pathway leads to an increase in intracellular calcium levels and to stimulation of protein kinase C, which are believed to play significant roles in cellular proliferation and differentiation. Thus, the differential ability of neurotransmitters to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis might play a role in the development of brain regions.

  20. Pattern of expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase mRNA in the developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bond, R W; Jansen, K R; Gottlieb, D I

    1988-05-01

    The time and pattern of appearance of glutamic acid decarboxylase (glutamate decarboxylase; EC 4.1.1.15) (GAD) mRNA during the development of the rat brain were analyzed. RNA transfer blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from whole brain shows that a 3.7-kilobase transcript is the most abundant form of the message from embryonic day 15 (E15) through adulthood. By E15 this form is present at about 50% of its adult abundance relative to other poly(A)+ mRNA species. At birth the abundance is approximately the same as in the adult. In contrast, the enzyme activity level is only 8% of the adult level at birth and takes 3 weeks to reach adult levels. There are qualitative changes in GAD mRNA during development. Several large (7-9 kilobases) transcripts with strong homology to GAD are enriched in early developmental stages but are barely detectable in the adult. A nuclease protection assay shows a developmentally regulated heterogeneity in a coding portion of the mRNA.

  1. Transient receptor potential-like channels mediate metabotropic glutamate receptor EPSCs in rat dopamine neurones

    PubMed Central

    Bengtson, C Peter; Tozzi, Alessandro; Bernardi, Giorgio; Mercuri, Nicola B

    2004-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels form cationic channels activated by diverse factors including mechanical stimuli, changes in osmolarity, pH and temperature, as well as the exogenous irritant, capsaicin. Metabotropic glutamate receptors have also recently been linked to TRP channel activation in neurones of the substantia nigra, hippocampus and cerebellum, suggesting a novel role for such channels in synaptic communication via endogenous neurotransmitters. We tested this for dopamine neurones in rat brain slices by characterizing the current–voltage relationship and pharmacology of EPSCs mediated by group I metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1). Slow inward currents (273 ± 35 pA peak amplitude, 381 ± 25 ms latency, holding potential (Vh) =−73 mV) representing evoked mGluR1 EPSCs were isolated in the presence of antagonists of AMPA, NMDA, GABAA, GABAB, muscarinic and glycine receptors. CPCCOEt (100 μm), an mGluR1 antagonist, blocked the residual EPSC in all recordings. mGluR1-activated EPSCs reversed polarity near −10 mV, consistent with the involvement of a cationic channel. Extracellular application of the non-selective TRP channel blockers SKF 96365, flufenamic acid and ruthenium red caused reversible inhibition of mGluR1-activated EPSCs. These characteristics parallel those of mGluR1 activation with an agonist and indicate the involvement of a TRP-like channel in mGluR1-mediated EPSCs. PMID:14724196

  2. Factors influencing pyrroline 5-carboxylate synthesis from glutamate by rat intestinal mucosa mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Henslee, J.G.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Small, C.; Jones, M.E.

    1983-10-15

    Factors influencing pyrroline 5-carboxylate (P5C) synthesis from glutamate by a subcellular fraction enriched in mitochondria of rat small intestinal mucosa have been studied. P5C synthesis decreased rapidly if this subcellular fraction was preincubated at 20 degrees C in the absence of substrates; this effect suggests that the enzyme(s) catalyzing P5C synthesis from glutamate (P5C synthase) is unstable in the absence of substrates. In the presence of substrates P5C synthesis increased linearly for the first 30 min of incubation, suggesting that the substrates promote enzyme stability. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate is an effective inhibitor of P5C synthase whereas pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate and pyridoxal are not inhibitory. Potassium phosphate, KCl, and KBr each inhibited P5C synthase but potassium-Hepes (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid) did not. Potassium phosphate was the most potent inhibitor followed by KBr, and then KCl. These results suggest P5C synthase is sensitive to anion inhibition. Both L-ornithine and D-ornithine inhibited P5C synthase; L-proline did not inhibit. Several analogs of ornithine and proline were also tested and none was found to inhibit P5C synthase; the inhibition by ornithine is, therefore, rather specific and it may prove to contribute to the regulation of metabolism of these amino acids.

  3. The hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) increases cortical extracellular glutamate levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Scruggs, Jennifer L; Schmidt, Dennis; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2003-08-07

    Activation of the cerebral cortex is seen during hallucinations. The 5-HT(2A/C) agonist 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) is a potent hallucinogen that has been proposed to act by targeting 5-HT(2A) heteroceptors on thalamocortical neurons and eliciting release of glutamate from these cells, which in turn drives cortical neurons. We used in vivo microdialysis to determine if DOI increases extracellular glutamate levels. Systemic administration of DOI significantly increased extracellular glutamate levels in the somatosensory cortex of the freely-moving rat. Similarly, intracortical administration of DOI by reverse dialysis increased cortical extracellular glutamate levels. No consistent changes in either extracellular GABA or glycine levels were observed in response to DOI. The increase in glutamate levels elicited by intracortical DOI was blocked by treatment with the selective 5-HT(2A) antagonist MDL 100,907. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that 5-HT(2A) receptor-mediated regulation of glutamate release is the mechanism through which hallucinogens activate the cerebral cortex.

  4. Evidence for involvement of nitric oxide and GABAB receptors in MK-801- stimulated release of glutamate in rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Roenker, Nicole L.; Gudelsky, Gary A.; Ahlbrand, Rebecca; Horn, Paul S.; Richtand, Neil M.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic administration of NMDA receptor antagonists elevates extracellular glutamate within prefrontal cortex. The cognitive and behavioral effects of NMDA receptor blockade have direct relevance to symptoms of schizophrenia, and recent studies demonstrate an important role for nitric oxide and GABAB receptors in mediating the effects of NMDA receptor blockade on these behaviors. We sought to extend those observations by directly measuring the effects of nitric oxide and GABAB receptor mechanisms on MK-801-induced glutamate release in the prefrontal cortex. Systemic MK-801 injection (0.3 mg/kg) to male Sprague-Dawley rats significantly increased extracellular glutamate levels in prefrontal cortex, as determined by microdialysis. This effect was blocked by pretreatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME (60 mg/kg). Reverse dialysis of the nitric oxide donor SNAP (0.5 – 5 mM) directly into prefrontal cortex mimicked the effect of systemic MK-801, dose-dependently elevating cortical extracellular glutamate. The effect of MK-801 was also blocked by systemic treatment with the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen (5 mg/kg). In combination, these data suggest increased nitric oxide formation is necessary for NMDA antagonist-induced elevations of extracellular glutamate in the prefrontal cortex. Additionally, the data suggest GABAB receptor activation can modulate the NMDA antagonist-induced increase in cortical glutamate release. PMID:22579658

  5. Effects of lead exposure on hippocampal metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 3 and 7 in developmental rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Yan, Huai C; Yang, Bo; Tong, Lu S; Zou, Yu X; Tian, Ying

    2009-01-01

    Background A complete explanation of the mechanisms by which Pb2+ exerts toxic effects on developmental central nervous system remains unknown. Glutamate is critical to the developing brain through various subtypes of ionotropic or metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs). Ionotropic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors have been considered as a principal target in lead-induced neurotoxicity. The relationship between mGluR3/mGluR7 and synaptic plasticity had been verified by many recent studies. The present study aimed to examine the role of mGluR3/mGluR7 in lead-induced neurotoxicity. Methods Twenty-four adult and female rats were randomly selected and placed on control or 0.2% lead acetate during gestation and lactation. Blood lead and hippocampal lead levels of pups were analyzed at weaning to evaluate the actual lead content at the end of the exposure. Impairments of short -term memory and long-term memory of pups were assessed by tests using Morris water maze and by detection of hippocampal ultrastructural alterations on electron microscopy. The impact of lead exposure on mGluR3 and mGluR7 mRNA expression in hippocampal tissue of pups were investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and its potential role in lead neurotoxicity were discussed. Results Lead levels of blood and hippocampi in the lead-exposed rats were significantly higher than those in the controls (P < 0.001). In tests using Morris Water Maze, the overall decrease in goal latency and swimming distance was taken to indicate that controls had shorter latencies and distance than lead-exposed rats (P = 0.001 and P < 0.001 by repeated-measures analysis of variance). On transmission electron microscopy neuronal ultrastructural alterations were observed and the results of real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that exposure to 0.2% lead acetate did not substantially change gene expression of mGluR3 and mGluR7 mRNA compared with controls. Conclusion Exposure to lead before and after

  6. Accumbal and pallidal dopamine, glutamate and GABA overflow during cocaine self-administration and its extinction in rats.

    PubMed

    Wydra, Karolina; Golembiowska, Krystyna; Zaniewska, Magdalena; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Ferraro, Luca; Fuxe, Kjell; Filip, Małgorzata

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the changes in dopamine (DA), glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during cocaine self-administration in rats implanted with guide cannulae into the nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum. After stabilized cocaine self-administration, separate groups of rats underwent extinction (10 days) procedure in which cocaine infusion was replaced by saline injections. With using a 'yoked' procedure, the effects of cocaine or its withdrawal on the level of neurotransmitters were evaluated by dual-probe microdialysis. Repeated cocaine administration reduced basal glutamate levels in the nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum, whereas it did not affect basal accumbal DA levels. Only rats that self-administered cocaine had increased basal GABA overflow in both examined brain structures. Active or passive cocaine administration elevated extracellular accumbal DA, however, the extent of cocaine-evoked DA level was significantly higher in rats that self-administered cocaine while both groups of animals showed also an attenuation of GABA level in the nucleus accumbens. On day 10 of extinction training, rats previously given cocaine revealed decreases in the basal accumbal concentration of glutamate while the basal GABA levels were significantly enhanced as compared with baseline of saline-yoked controls. Potassium depolarization delayed the reduction of the accumbal and pallidal extracellular glutamate levels in the active and passive cocaine groups. The present data indicate that changes in DA and GABA neurotransmission during maintenance phase mirror the motivational aspects of cocaine intake. Depending on acute (24 hours) or late (10 days) cocaine withdrawal, different neurotransmitter systems (i.e. glutamate or GABA) seem to be involved.

  7. Melatonin nocturnal surge modulates nicotinic receptors and nicotine-induced [3H]glutamate release in rat cerebellum slices.

    PubMed

    Markus, Regina P; Santos, Jussara M; Zago, Wagner; Reno, Livia A C

    2003-05-01

    In mammals, the most important synchronizer for endogenous rhythms is the environmental light/dark cycle. In this report we have explored the ability of light/dark cycle and melatonin, the pineal hormone released during the night, to modulate cerebellar cholinergic input by interfering with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors' (nAChRs) availability. Through the analysis of the response to selective cholinergic agonists and antagonists, we observed that nAChRs containing the alpha7 gene product mediate the release of [(3)H]glutamate from rat cerebellum slices. The [(3)H]glutamate overflow induced by alpha7 nAChR activation was higher during the dark phase, although the number of alpha-[(125)I]bungarotoxin binding sites, but not the [(3)H]nicotine binding sites (B(max)), was reduced. On the other hand, glutamate-evoked [(3)H]glutamate release was not modified by the hour of the day. Finally, we show that the nocturnal increase in nicotine-evoked [(3)H]glutamate release is imposed by a nocturnal surge of melatonin, as it is abolished when pineal melatonin production is inhibited by either maintaining the animals in constant light for 48 h or by injecting propranolol just before lights off for 2 days. The difference between light and dark [(3)H]glutamate-evoked release is restored in propranolol-treated animals that received melatonin during the dark period. In conclusion, we show that nicotine-evoked [(3)H]glutamate release in rat cerebellum presents a diurnal variation, driven by nocturnal pineal melatonin surge.

  8. Maternal immune activation alters glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 expression in the brains of adult rat offspring

    PubMed Central

    Cassella, Sarah N.; Hemmerle, Ann M.; Lundgren, Kerstin H.; Kyser, Tara L.; Ahlbrand, Rebecca; Bronson, Stefanie L.; Richtand, Neil M.; Seroogy, Kim B.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the maternal innate immune system, termed “maternal immune activation” (MIA), represents a common environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. Whereas evidence suggests dysregulation of GABA systems may underlie the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, a role for MIA in alteration of GABAergic systems is less clear. Here, pregnant rats received either the viral mimetic polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid or vehicle injection on gestational day 14. Glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 (GAD67) mRNA expression was examined in male offspring at postnatal day (P)14, P30 and P60. At P60, GAD67 mRNA was elevated in hippocampus and thalamus and decreased in prefrontal cortex of MIA offspring. MIA-induced alterations in GAD expression could contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. PMID:26830319

  9. Glutamate microinjection in the medial septum of rats decreases paradoxical sleep and increases slow wave sleep.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Didhiti; Kaushik, Mahesh K; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan; Mallick, Hruda Nanda

    2012-05-09

    The role of the medial septum in suppressing paradoxical sleep and promoting slow wave sleep was suggested on the basis of neurotoxic lesion studies. However, these conclusions need to be substantiated with further experiments, including chemical stimulation studies. In this report, the medial septum was stimulated in adult male rats by microinjection of L-glutamate. Sleep-wakefulness was electrophysiologically recorded, through chronically implanted electrodes, for 2 h before the injection and 4 h after the injection. There was a decrease in paradoxical sleep during the first hour and an increase in slow wave sleep during the second hour after the injection. The present findings not only supported the lesion studies but also showed that the major role of the medial septum is to suppress paradoxical sleep.

  10. Effect of ascorbic acid on the monosodium glutamate-induced neurobehavioral changes in periadolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Sareesh Naduvil; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Paval, Jaijesh; Nayak, Satheesha

    2010-01-01

    In the current study we evaluated adverse effects of monosodium glutamate (MSG) on memory formation and its retrieval as well as the role of ascorbic acid (Vitamin-C) in prevention of MSG-induced alteration of neurobehavioral performance in periadolescent rats. Healthy male albino Wistar rats (4-6 weeks old), were randomly allotted in four groups. Group I: normal control, who remained in their homecage throughout the experimental period. Group II: vehicle control, who were orally administered with normal saline for three weeks. Group III: MSG, who were orally administered with aqueous solution of MSG (2 mg/g b.w/day), for three weeks. Group IV: MSG+AA, who were administered with aqueous solution of MSG, and subsequently by ascorbic acid (100 mg/kg b.w/day) orally for three weeks. After the experimental period, all animals from all groups were first tested for anxiety followed by passive avoidance behavior. MSG significantly altered the neurobehavioral performance in rats. The alteration manifested as less time spent on the open arm during the EPM test and shorter entrance latency to the dark compartment during the passive avoidance task. All behavioral changes were significantly prevented by simultaneous administration of ascorbic acid with MSG. The present data point to the neuroprotective role of ascorbic acid. The ascorbic acid can be used as a therapeutic agent in various cognitive deficits (Fig. 5, Ref. 25). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk.

  11. Liver-targeting of primaquine-(poly-γ-glutamic acid) and its degradation in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tomiya, Noboru; Jardim, Juliette G; Hou, Jennifer; Pastrana-Mena, Rebecca; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Lee, Yuan C

    2013-09-01

    We have synthesized poly-γ-glutamic acid (PGA) modified with a synthetic trivalent glyco-ligand (TriGalNAc) for the hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R). We investigated in vivo distribution of unmodified PGA and TriGalNAc-modified PGA (TriGalNAc-PGA) in mice after intravenous injection. Most of unmodified PGA administered was transported to the bladder over 20-80min, suggesting a rapid excretion of unmodified PGA into urine. In contrast, TriGalNAc-PGA was found exclusively in the liver over the same period of time. We further synthesized TriGalNAc-PGA-primaquine conjugate (TriGalNAc-PGA-PQ), and investigated binding, uptake, and catabolism of the conjugate by rat hepatocytes. Our studies indicated that approximately 250ng per million cells of the conjugate bound to one million rat hepatocytes at 0°C, and approximately 2μg per million cells of the conjugate was taken up over 7h incubation at 37°C. Furthermore, our results suggested that TriGalNAc-PGA-PQ was almost completely degraded over 24h, and small degradation products were secreted into cell culture medium. The results described in this report suggest that the TriGalNAc ligand can serve as an excellent targeting device for delivery of PGA-conjugates to the liver hepatocytes, and rat hepatocytes possess sufficient capacity to digest PGA even modified with other substituents. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Endogenous dopamine increases extracellular concentrations of glutamate and GABA in striatum of the freely moving rat: involvement of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Expósito, I; Del Arco, A; Segovia, G; Mora, F

    1999-07-01

    Interactions between endogenous dopamine, glutamate, GABA, and taurine were investigated in striatum of the freely moving rat by using microdialysis. Intrastriatal infusions of the selective dopamine uptake inhibitor nomifensine (NMF) were used to increase the endogenous extracellular dopamine. NMF produced a dose-related increase in extracellular dopamine and also increased extracellular concentrations of glutamate, GABA, and taurine. Extracellular increases of dopamine were significantly correlated with extracellular increases of glutamate and GABA, but not taurine. To investigate whether the increased extracellular dopamine produced by NMF was responsible for the concomitant increase of glutamate and GABA, D1, and D2 receptor antagonists were used. Dopamine receptor antagonists D1 (SCH23390) and D2 (sulpiride) significantly attenuated the increases of glutamate and GABA produced by NMF. These data suggest that endogenous dopamine, through both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors, plays a role in releasing glutamate and GABA in striatum of the freely moving rat.

  13. Cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor celecoxib inhibits glutamate release by attenuating the PGE2/EP2 pathway in rat cerebral cortex endings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Huang, Shu Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2014-10-01

    The excitotoxicity caused by excessive glutamate is a critical element in the neuropathology of acute and chronic brain disorders. Therefore, inhibition of glutamate release is a potentially valuable therapeutic strategy for treating these diseases. In this study, we investigated the effect of celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor that reduces the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), on endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Celecoxib substantially inhibited the release of glutamate induced by the K(+) channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), and this phenomenon was prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca(2+) ions and by the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. Celecoxib inhibited a 4-AP-induced increase in cytosolic-free Ca(2+) concentration, and the celecoxib-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was prevented by the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC. However, celecoxib did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization and Na(+) influx. In addition, this glutamate release-inhibiting effect of celecoxib was mediated through the PGE2 subtype 2 receptor (EP2) because it was not observed in the presence of butaprost (an EP2 agonist) or PF04418948 [1-(4-fluorobenzoyl)-3-[[6-methoxy-2-naphthalenyl)methyl]-3-azetidinecarboxylic acid; an EP2 antagonist]. The celecoxib effect on 4-AP-induced glutamate release was prevented by the inhibition or activation of protein kinase A (PKA), and celecoxib decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of PKA. We also determined that COX-2 and the EP2 receptor are present in presynaptic terminals because they are colocalized with synaptophysin, a presynaptic marker. These results collectively indicate that celecoxib inhibits glutamate release from nerve terminals by reducing voltage-dependent Ca(2+) entry through a signaling cascade involving EP2 and PKA.

  14. The ontogenic expressions of multiple vesicular glutamate transporters during postnatal development of rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Ina, A; Konno, J; Wu, T; Shutoh, F; Nogami, H; Hisano, S

    2008-03-18

    The pineal gland expresses vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2), which are thought to transport glutamate into synaptic-like microvesicles in the pinealocytes. Recently, we reported that the rat pineal gland also expresses VGLUT1v which is a novel variant of VGLUT1 during the perinatal period. To explore the biological significance of these VGLUT expressions in pineal development, we studied the ontogeny of VGLUT in this gland by in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using rats. Histological analysis revealed that intensities of VGLUT1 hybridization signal and immunostaining drastically increase by postnatal day (P) 7, whereas VGLUT2 expression exhibits high levels of mRNA and protein at birth and decreases gradually from P7 onward. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis supported these histological observations, showing that expressions of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 exhibit opposite patterns to each other. Coinciding with VGLUT1-upregulation, RT-PCR data showed that expressions of dynamin 1 and endophilin 1, which are factors predictably involved in the endocytotic recovery of VGLUT1-associated vesicle, are also increased by P7. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of VGLUT1v demonstrated that its mRNA expression is upregulated by P7, kept at the same level until P14, and apparently decreased at P21, suggesting its functional property required for a certain developmental event. Moreover, a comparison of mRNA expressions at daytime and nighttime revealed that neither VGLUT1 nor VGLUT1v shows any difference in both P7 and P21 glands, whereas VGLUT2 is significantly lower at daytime than at nighttime at P21 but not P7, the time point at which the melatonin rhythm is not yet generated. The present study shows that expressions of these VGLUT types are differentially regulated during postnatal pineal development, each presumably participating in physiologically distinct glutamatergic functions.

  15. Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on rat dural artery diameter in an intravital microscopy model

    PubMed Central

    Chan, KY; Gupta, S; de Vries, R; Danser, AHJ; Villalón, CM; Muñoz-Islas, E; Maassen Van Den Brink, A

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: During migraine, trigeminal nerves may release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inducing cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition or blockade of craniovascular CGRP receptors may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. Several preclinical studies have shown that glutamate receptor antagonists affect the pathophysiology of migraine. This study investigated whether antagonists of NMDA (ketamine and MK801), AMPA (GYKI52466) and kainate (LY466195) glutamate receptors affected dural vasodilatation induced by α-CGRP, capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation in rats, using intravital microscopy. Experimental approach: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized and the overlying bone was thinned to visualize the dural artery. Then, vasodilator responses to exogenous (i.v. α-CGRP) and endogenous (released by i.v. capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation) CGRP were elicited in the absence or presence of the above antagonists. Key results: α-CGRP, capsaicin and periarterial electrical stimulation increased dural artery diameter. Ketamine and MK801 inhibited the vasodilator responses to capsaicin and electrical stimulation, while only ketamine attenuated those to α-CGRP. In contrast, GYKI52466 only attenuated the vasodilatation to exogenous α-CGRP, while LY466195 did not affect the vasodilator responses to endogenous or exogenous CGRP. Conclusions and implications: Although GYKI52466 has not been tested clinically, our data suggest that it would not inhibit migraine via vascular mechanisms. Similarly, the antimigraine efficacy of LY466195 seems unrelated to vascular CGRP-mediated pathways and/or receptors. In contrast, the cranial vascular effects of ketamine and MK801 may represent a therapeutic mechanism, although the same mechanism might contribute, peripherally, to cardiovascular side effects. PMID:20590623

  16. Disruptions in the Regulation of Extracellular Glutamate by Neurons and Glia in the Rat Striatum Two Days after Diffuse Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hinzman, Jason M.; Thomas, Theresa Currier; Quintero, Jorge E.; Gerhardt, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Disrupted regulation of extracellular glutamate in the central nervous system contributes to and can exacerbate the acute pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Previously, we reported increased extracellular glutamate in the striatum of anesthetized rats 2 days after diffuse brain injury. To determine the mechanism(s) responsible for increased extracellular glutamate, we used enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEAs) coupled with specific pharmacological agents targeted at in vivo neuronal and glial regulation of extracellular glutamate. After TBI, extracellular glutamate was significantly increased in the striatum by (∼90%) averaging 4.1±0.6 μM compared with sham 2.2±0.4 μM. Calcium-dependent neuronal glutamate release, investigated by local application of an N-type calcium channel blocker, was no longer a significant source of extracellular glutamate after TBI, compared with sham. In brain-injured animals, inhibition of glutamate uptake with local application of an excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor produced significantly greater increase in glutamate spillover (∼ 65%) from the synapses compared with sham. Furthermore, glutamate clearance measured by locally applying glutamate into the extracellular space revealed significant reductions in glutamate clearance parameters in brain-injured animals compared with sham. Taken together, these data indicate that disruptions in calcium-mediated glutamate release and glial regulation of extracellular glutamate contribute to increased extracellular glutamate in the striatum 2 days after diffuse brain injury. Overall, these data suggest that therapeutic strategies used to regulate glutamate release and uptake may improve excitatory circuit function and, possibly, outcomes following TBI. PMID:22233432

  17. Methylphenidate Decreases ATP Levels and Impairs Glutamate Uptake and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase Activity in Juvenile Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Felipe; Pierozan, Paula; Rodrigues, André F; Biasibetti, Helena; Grings, Mateus; Zanotto, Bruna; Coelho, Daniella M; Vargas, Carmen R; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Wyse, Angela T S

    2016-11-14

    The study of the long-term neurological consequences of early exposure with methylphenidate (MPH) is very important since this psychostimulant has been widely misused by children and adolescents who do not meet full diagnostic criteria for ADHD. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of early chronic exposure with MPH on amino acids profile, glutamatergic and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase homeostasis, as well as redox and energy status in the hippocampus of juvenile rats. Wistar male rats received intraperitoneal injections of MPH (2.0 mg/kg) or saline solution (controls), once a day, from the 15th to the 45th day of age. Results showed that MPH altered amino acid profile in the hippocampus, decreasing glutamine levels. Glutamate uptake and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity were decreased after chronic MPH exposure in the hippocampus of rats. No changes were observed in the immunocontents of glutamate transporters (GLAST and GLT-1), and catalytic subunits of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (α1, α2, and α3), as well as redox status. Moreover, MPH provoked a decrease in ATP levels in the hippocampus of chronically exposed rats, while citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase, respiratory chain complexes activities (II, II-III, and IV), as well as mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial membrane potential were not altered. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic MPH exposure at early age impairs glutamate uptake and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity probably by decreasing in ATP levels observed in rat hippocampus.

  18. Brain glutathione content and glutamate uptake are reduced in rats exposed to pre- and postnatal protein malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Feoli, Ana Maria; Siqueira, Ionara; Almeida, Lucia Maria V; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Battu, Cíntia; Wofchuk, Susana T; Gottfried, Carmem; Perry, Marcos Luiz; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2006-09-01

    The brain is particularly susceptible to oxidative insults and its antioxidant defense is dependent on its glutathione content. Protein malnutrition (PMN) is an important and very common insult during development and compromises antioxidant defenses in the body, particularly glutathione levels. We investigated whether brain glutathione content and related metabolic pathways, predominantly regulated by astrocytes (particularly glutamate uptake and glutamine synthesis), are altered by pre- and postnatal PMN in rats. Thus, we measured the glutathione content, glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and glutamate uptake activity in the cerebral cortex (Cx) and hippocampus of rats subjected to pre- and postnatal PMN and in nourished controls. Although malnourished rats exhibited an ontogenetic profile of glutathione levels in both brain regions similar to that of controls, they had lower levels on postnatal d 2 (P2); in Cx this decrease persisted until postnatal d 15. In addition, we found other changes, such as reduced total antioxidant reactivity and glutathione peroxidase activity on P2, and these were not accompanied by alterations in free radical levels or lipoperoxidation in either brain region. Moreover, malnourished rats had elevated GS and reduced glutamate uptake. Taken together, these alterations indicate specific changes in astrocyte metabolism, possibly responsible for the higher vulnerability to excitotoxic/oxidative damage in malnourished rats. The lower antioxidant defense appears to be the main alteration that causes oxidative imbalance, rather than an increase in reactive oxygen species. Moreover, a recovery of altered metabolic variables may occur during adulthood, despite persistent PMN.

  19. Swimming Training Modulates Nitric Oxide-Glutamate Interaction in the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla in Normotensive Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Raquel, Hiviny de A.; Masson, Gustavo S.; Barna, Barbara Falquetto; Zanluqui, Nágela G.; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Michelini, Lisete C.; Martins-Pinge, Marli C.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of swimming training on nitric oxide (NO) modulation to glutamate microinjection within the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in conscious freely moving rats. Male Wistar rats were submitted to exercise training (Tr) by swimming or kept sedentary (Sed) for 4 weeks. After the last training session, RVLM guide cannulas and arterial/venous catheters were chronically implanted. Arterial pressure (AP), heart rate (HR), and baroreflex control of HR (loading/unloading of baroreceptors) were recorded in conscious rats at rest. Pressor response to L-glutamate in the RVLM was compared before and after blockade of local nitric oxide (NO) production. In other Tr and Sed groups, brain was harvested for gene (qRT-PCR) and protein (immunohistochemistry) expression of NO synthase (NOS) isoforms and measurement of NO content (nitrite assay) within the RVLM. Trained rats exhibited resting bradycardia (average reduction of 9%), increased baroreflex gain (Tr: −4.41 ± 0.5 vs. Sed: −2.42 ± 0.31 b/min/mmHg), and unchanged resting MAP. The pressor response to glutamate was smaller in the Tr group (32 ± 4 vs. 53 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05); this difference disappeared after RVLM pretreatment with carboxy-PTIO (NO scavenger), Nw-Propyl-L-Arginine and L-NAME (NOS inhibitors). eNOS immunoreactivity observed mainly in RVLM capillaries was higher in Tr, but eNOS gene expression was reduced. nNOS gene and protein expression was slightly reduced (−29 and −9%, respectively, P > 0.05). Also, RVLM NO levels were significantly reduced in Tr (−63% vs. Sed). After microinjection of a NO-donor, the attenuated pressor response of L-glutamate in Tr group was restored. Data indicate that swimming training by decreasing RVLM NO availability and glutamatergic neurotransmission to locally administered glutamate may contribute to decreased sympathetic activity in trained subjects. PMID:27378935

  20. Mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity induced by glyphosate-based herbicide in immature rat hippocampus: involvement of glutamate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cattani, Daiane; de Liz Oliveira Cavalli, Vera Lúcia; Heinz Rieg, Carla Elise; Domingues, Juliana Tonietto; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Tasca, Carla Inês; Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina; Zamoner, Ariane

    2014-06-05

    Previous studies demonstrate that glyphosate exposure is associated with oxidative damage and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the mechanism of glyphosate-induced neurotoxic effects needs to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Roundup(®) (a glyphosate-based herbicide) leads to neurotoxicity in hippocampus of immature rats following acute (30min) and chronic (pregnancy and lactation) pesticide exposure. Maternal exposure to pesticide was undertaken by treating dams orally with 1% Roundup(®) (0.38% glyphosate) during pregnancy and lactation (till 15-day-old). Hippocampal slices from 15 day old rats were acutely exposed to Roundup(®) (0.00005-0.1%) during 30min and experiments were carried out to determine whether glyphosate affects (45)Ca(2+) influx and cell viability. Moreover, we investigated the pesticide effects on oxidative stress parameters, (14)C-α-methyl-amino-isobutyric acid ((14)C-MeAIB) accumulation, as well as glutamate uptake, release and metabolism. Results showed that acute exposure to Roundup(®) (30min) increases (45)Ca(2+) influx by activating NMDA receptors and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, leading to oxidative stress and neural cell death. The mechanisms underlying Roundup(®)-induced neurotoxicity also involve the activation of CaMKII and ERK. Moreover, acute exposure to Roundup(®) increased (3)H-glutamate released into the synaptic cleft, decreased GSH content and increased the lipoperoxidation, characterizing excitotoxicity and oxidative damage. We also observed that both acute and chronic exposure to Roundup(®) decreased (3)H-glutamate uptake and metabolism, while induced (45)Ca(2+) uptake and (14)C-MeAIB accumulation in immature rat hippocampus. Taken together, these results demonstrated that Roundup(®) might lead to excessive extracellular glutamate levels and consequently to glutamate excitotoxicity and oxidative stress in rat hippocampus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Up-regulation of DRP-3 long isoform during the induction of neural progenitor cells by glutamate treatment in the ex vivo rat retina

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Byron, Baron; Kitagawa, Takao; Tokuda, Nobuko; Kobayashi, Daiki; Nagayama, Megumi; Araki, Norie; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2015-08-07

    Glutamate has been shown to induce neural progenitor cells in the adult vertebrate retina. However, protein dynamics during progenitor cell induction by glutamate are not fully understood. To identify specific proteins involved in the process, we employed two-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics on glutamate untreated and treated retinal ex vivo sections. Rat retinal tissues were incubated with 1 mM glutamate for 1 h, followed by incubation in glutamate-free media for a total of 24 h. Consistent with prior reports, it was found that mitotic cells appeared in the outer nuclear layer without any histological damage. Immunohistological evaluations and immunoblotting confirmed the emergence of neuronal progenitor cells in the mature retina treated with glutamate. Proteomic analysis revealed the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 3 (DRP-3), DRP-2 and stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1 (STIP1) during neural progenitor cell induction by glutamate. Moreover, mRNA expression of DRP-3, especially, its long isoform, robustly increased in the treated retina compared to that in the untreated retina. These results may indicate that glutamate induces neural progenitor cells in the mature rat retina by up-regulating the proteins which mediate cell mitosis and neurite growth. - Highlights: • Glutamate induced neuronal progenitor cells in the mature rat retina. • Proteomic analysis revealed the up-regulation of DRP-3, DRP-2 and STIP1. • mRNA expression of DRP-3, especially, its long isoform, robustly increased.

  2. Effect of monocular deprivation on uptake and binding of [3H]glutamate in the visual system of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Schliebs, R; Kunert, E; Bigl, V

    1984-11-01

    [3H]Glutamate uptake and binding studies were performed in the visual cortices, lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN), and superior colliculi of 3-month-old rats with one eyelid surgically closed from postnatal day 10 (monocular deprivation). Uptake and binding were highest in the lateral geniculate nucleus followed by the visual cortex (69% and 15%, respectively compared to LGN values) and the superior colliculus (32% and 59% of LGN values). Monocular deprivation did not affect [3H]glutamate uptake in any of the visual regions examined. However, a 46% decrease in [3H]glutamate binding in the lateral geniculate nucleus ipsilateral to the sutured eye was detected. Binding levels in other regions were not affected.

  3. The physiologically induced release of ascorbate in rat brain is dependent on impulse traffic, calcium influx and glutamate uptake.

    PubMed

    Miele, M; Boutelle, M G; Fillenz, M

    1994-09-01

    Extracellular brain ascorbate fluctuates with neuronal activity. There is previous evidence that the release of ascorbate is triggered by the re-uptake of neuronally released glutamate. This hypothesis predicts that drugs which block the release and re-uptake of glutamate will also block the release of ascorbate. In the present experiments we have used a novel dialysis electrode which allows continuous monitoring of physiologically induced ascorbate release from the striatum in freely moving rats. An infusion of the enzyme ascorbic acid oxidase abolished the increase in oxidation current in response to tail-pinch, which identified it as an ascorbate current. Perfusion with tetrodotoxin reduced the response to 25% and with CdCl2 to 4% of control. Perfusion with the uptake blocker L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-di-carboxylate reduced the response to 24% of control. A neuroprotective function for this coupling of ascorbate and glutamate release is discussed.

  4. Dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans from Schisandra chinensis protect primary cultures of rat cortical cells from glutamate-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Ra; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Koo, Kyung Ah; Kim, Seung Hyun; Sung, Sang Hyun; Lee, Na Gyong; Markelonis, George J; Oh, Tae H; Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Young Choong

    2004-05-01

    A methanolic extract of dried Schisandra fruit (Schisandra chinensis Baill.; Schisandraceae) significantly attenuated the neurotoxicity induced by L-glutamate in primary cultures of rat cortical cells. Five dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans (deoxyschisandrin, gomisin N, gomisin A, schisandrin, and wuweizisu C) were isolated from the methanolic extract; their protective effects against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity were then evaluated. Among the five lignans, deoxyschisandrin, gomisin N, and wuweizisu C significantly attenuated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity as measured by 1). an inhibition in the increase of intracellular [Ca(2+)]; 2). an improvement in the glutathione defense system, the level of glutathione, and the activity of glutathione peroxidase; and 3). an inhibition in the formation of cellular peroxide. These results suggest that dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans from Schisandra chinensis may possess therapeutic potential against oxidative neuronal damage induced by excitotoxin.

  5. Acamprosate {monocalcium bis(3-acetamidopropane-1-sulfonate)} reduces ethanol-drinking behavior in rats and glutamate-induced toxicity in ethanol-exposed primary rat cortical neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Oka, Michiko; Hirouchi, Masaaki; Tamura, Masaru; Sugahara, Seishi; Oyama, Tatsuya

    2013-10-15

    Acamprosate, the calcium salt of bis(3-acetamidopropane-1-sulfonate), contributes to the maintenance of abstinence in alcohol-dependent patients, but its mechanism of action in the central nervous system is unclear. Here, we report the effect of acamprosate on ethanol-drinking behavior in standard laboratory Wistar rats, including voluntary ethanol consumption and the ethanol-deprivation effect. After forced ethanol consumption arranged by the provision of only one drinking bottle containing 10% ethanol, the rats were given a choice between two drinking bottles, one containing water and the other containing 10% ethanol. In rats selected for high ethanol preference, repeated oral administration of acamprosate diminished voluntary ethanol drinking. After three months of continuous access to two bottles, rats were deprived of ethanol for three days and then presented with two bottles again. After ethanol deprivation, ethanol preference was increased, and the increase was largely abolished by acamprosate. After exposure of primary neuronal cultures of rat cerebral cortex to ethanol for four days, neurotoxicity, as measured by the extracellular leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), was induced by incubation with glutamate for 1h followed by incubation in the absence of ethanol for 24h. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker 5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]-cyclohepten-5,10-imine, the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 antagonist 6-methyl-2-(phenylethynyl)pyridine and the voltage-gated calcium-channel blocker nifedipine all inhibited glutamate-induced LDH leakage from ethanol-exposed neurons. Acamprosate inhibited the glutamate-induced LDH leakage from ethanol-exposed neurons more strongly than that from intact neurons. In conclusion, acamprosate showed effective reduction of drinking behavior in rats and protected ethanol-exposed neurons by multiple blocking of glutamate signaling. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence for a glutamate receptor of the AMPA subtype which mediates insulin release from rat perfused pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, G.; Gross, R.; Puech, R.; Loubatières-Mariani, M. M.; Bockaert, J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effect of L-glutamate has been studied on insulin secretion by the isolated perfused pancreas of the rat. The glutamate receptor subtype involved has been characterized. 2. In the presence of a slightly stimulating glucose concentration (8.3 mM), L-glutamate (5 x 10(-5)-4 x 10(-3) M) induced an immediate, transient and concentration-dependent insulin response. On the other hand, in the presence of a non stimulating glucose concentration (2.8 mM), L-glutamate (10(-3) M) did not modify the basal insulin secretion. 3. The three non-NMDA receptor agonists, kainate (10(-4)-10(-3) M), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA, 5 x 10(-5)-10(-4) M) and quisqualate (5 x 10(-6)-5 x 10(-5) M) all provoked a transient and concentration-dependent insulin response from pancreas perfused with 8.3 mM glucose. Compared with glutamate, kainate exhibited a similar efficacy, whereas AMPA and quisqualate elicited only a 3 fold lower maximal insulin response. In contrast, NMDA (10(-4)-10(-3) M) was ineffective. 4. An antagonist of non-NMDA receptors, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX; 5 x 10(-5) M) totally prevented the stimulatory effect of L-glutamate (4 x 10(-4) M) and kainate (2 x 10(-4) M). In contrast, the NMDA receptor antagonist, (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine ((+) MK801) was without effect. 5. The insulin secretory effect of glutamate (4 x 10(-4) M) was not affected by atropine (3 x 10(-7) M) or tetrodotoxin (3 x 10(-6) M). 6. Quisqualate at a high maximally effective concentration (4 x 10(-4) M) inhibited glutamate (10(-3) M) or kainate (4 x 10(-4) M)-induced insulin release. 7. This study shows that L-glutamate stimulates insulin secretion in rat pancreas, by acting on an excitatory amino acid receptor of the AMPA subtype. PMID:1382779

  7. Binge Toluene Exposure Alters Glutamate, Glutamine and GABA in the Adolescent Rat Brain as Measured by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Perrine, Shane A.; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K.; Galloway, Matthew P.; Hannigan, John H.; Bowen, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of toluene abuse in adolescents, little is known regarding the effect of binge exposure on neurochemical profiles during this developmental stage. In the current study, the effects of binge toluene exposure during adolescence on neurotransmitter levels were determined using high-resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ex vivo at 11.7 T. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to toluene (0, 8,000 , or 12,000 ppm) for 15 min twice daily from postnatal day 28 (P28) through P34 and then euthanized either one or seven days later (on P35 or P42) to assess glutamate, glutamine, and GABA levels in intact tissue punches from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), anterior striatum and hippocampus. In the mPFC, toluene reduced glutamate one day after exposure, with no effect on GABA, while after seven days, glutamate was no longer affected but there was an increase in GABA levels. In the hippocampus, neither GABA nor glutamate was altered one day after exposure, whereas seven days after exposure, increases were observed in GABA and glutamate. Striatal glutamate and GABA levels measured after either one or seven days were not altered after toluene exposure. These findings show that one week of binge toluene inhalation selectively alters these neurotransmitters in the mPFC and hippocampus in adolescent rats, and that some of these effects endure at least one week after the exposure. The results suggest that age-dependent, differential neurochemical responses to toluene may contribute to the unique behavioral patterns associated with drug abuse among older children and young teens. PMID:21126832

  8. Pulsed radiofrequency attenuates diabetic neuropathic pain and suppresses formalin-evoked spinal glutamate release in rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Hsin; Hou, Shao-Yun; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Chung-Ren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) has been used to treat chronic pain for years, but its effectiveness and mechanism in treating diabetic neuropathic pain are still unexplored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the modulation of diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin and the release of spinal excitatory amino acids by PRF. METHODS: Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. Pulsed radiofrequency was applied to L5 and L6 dorsal roots at 42 °C for 2 min. The responses of all of the groups to thermal, mechanical and cold stimuli were measured for a period of 6 d after this process. Seven days after PRF treatment, intrathecal microdialysis was used to examine the effect of pulsed radiofrequency on the formalin-evoked spinal release of excitatory amino acids and concurrent behaviour responses from diabetic rats. RESULTS: Three weeks after intraperitoneal streptozotocin treatment and before PRF application, mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity occurred. Application of PRF significantly alleviated hyperglycaemia-induced mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity and also attenuated the increase in formalin-evoked CSF glutamate concentration, compared with sham treated diabetic rats. CONCLUSION: It may be concluded that PRF has an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain by suppressing the nociception-induced release of excitatory neurotransmitters. PRF may provide a novel promising therapeutic approach for managing diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:27994505

  9. A rhythmic change of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 2 expression in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Sachine; Hira, Yoshiki; Ehara, Ayuka; Mimura-Yamamoto, Yuka; Kawano, Michihiro; Shutoh, Fumihiro; Nogami, Haruo; Hisano, Setsuji

    2012-01-01

    The pineal gland secretes melatonin under circadian control via nocturnal noradrenergic stimulation, and expresses vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 1, VGLUT2 and a VGLUT1 splice variant (VGLUT1v). Although we previously reported that VGLUT2 mRNA level of rat pineal gland at postnatal day 21 is higher in the nighttime than in daytime, questions remained as to the time of postnatal onset of this phenomenon and a 24-h change in the mRNA or protein level at postnatal days. The day-night difference in VGLUT2 mRNA level was evident 14 days after birth. In the adult, VGLUT2 mRNA and protein levels increased in the dark phase, with the protein level showing a 6-h delay. The nocturnal elevation in VGLUT2 mRNA level diminished under the constant light condition but persisted under the constant dark condition. The present data suggest that VGLUT2 in the rat pineal gland is involved in some nocturnal glutamatergic function.

  10. Pulsed radiofrequency attenuates diabetic neuropathic pain and suppresses formalin-evoked spinal glutamate release in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Hsin; Hou, Shao-Yun; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Chung-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) has been used to treat chronic pain for years, but its effectiveness and mechanism in treating diabetic neuropathic pain are still unexplored. The aim of this study was to elucidate the modulation of diabetic neuropathic pain induced by streptozotocin and the release of spinal excitatory amino acids by PRF. Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal administration of streptozotocin. Pulsed radiofrequency was applied to L5 and L6 dorsal roots at 42 °C for 2 min. The responses of all of the groups to thermal, mechanical and cold stimuli were measured for a period of 6 d after this process. Seven days after PRF treatment, intrathecal microdialysis was used to examine the effect of pulsed radiofrequency on the formalin-evoked spinal release of excitatory amino acids and concurrent behaviour responses from diabetic rats. Three weeks after intraperitoneal streptozotocin treatment and before PRF application, mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity occurred. Application of PRF significantly alleviated hyperglycaemia-induced mechanical, thermal and cold hypersensitivity and also attenuated the increase in formalin-evoked CSF glutamate concentration, compared with sham treated diabetic rats. It may be concluded that PRF has an analgesic effect on neuropathic pain by suppressing the nociception-induced release of excitatory neurotransmitters. PRF may provide a novel promising therapeutic approach for managing diabetic neuropathic pain.

  11. Dietary protein restriction causes modification in aluminum-induced alteration in glutamate and GABA system of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Prasunpriya; Chatterjee, Ajay K

    2003-02-25

    Alteration of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyrate system have been reported to be associated with neurodegenerative disorders and have been postulated to be involved in aluminum-induced neurotoxicity as well. Aluminum, an well known and commonly exposed neurotoxin, was found to alter glutamate and gamma-aminobutyrate levels as well as activities of associated enzymes with regional specificity. Protein malnutrition also reported to alter glutamate level and some of its metabolic enzymes. Thus the region-wise study of levels of brain glutamate and gamma-aminobutyrate system in protein adequacy and inadequacy may be worthwhile to understand the mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity. Protein restriction does not have any significant impact on regional aluminum and gamma-aminobutyrate contents of rat brain. Significant interaction of dietary protein restriction and aluminum intoxication to alter regional brain glutamate level was observed in the tested brain regions except cerebellum. Alteration in glutamate alpha-decarboxylase and gamma-aminobutyrate transaminase activities were found to be significantly influenced by interaction of aluminum intoxication and dietary protein restriction in all the tested brain regions. In case of regional brain succinic semialdehyde content, this interaction was significant only in cerebrum and thalamic area. The alterations of regional brain glutamate and gamma-aminobutyrate levels by aluminum are region specific as well as dependent on dietary protein intake. The impact of aluminum exposure on the metabolism of these amino acid neurotransmitters are also influenced by dietary protein level. Thus, modification of dietary protein level or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis by any other means may be an useful tool to find out a path to restrict amino acid neurotransmitter alterations in aluminum-associated neurodisorders.

  12. Dietary protein restriction causes modification in aluminum-induced alteration in glutamate and GABA system of rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Prasunpriya; Chatterjee, Ajay K

    2003-01-01

    Background Alteration of glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system have been reported to be associated with neurodegenerative disorders and have been postulated to be involved in aluminum-induced neurotoxicity as well. Aluminum, an well known and commonly exposed neurotoxin, was found to alter glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels as well as activities of associated enzymes with regional specificity. Protein malnutrition also reported to alter glutamate level and some of its metabolic enzymes. Thus the region-wise study of levels of brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate system in protein adequacy and inadequacy may be worthwhile to understand the mechanism of aluminum-induced neurotoxicity. Results Protein restriction does not have any significant impact on regional aluminum and γ-aminobutyrate contents of rat brain. Significant interaction of dietary protein restriction and aluminum intoxication to alter regional brain glutamate level was observed in the tested brain regions except cerebellum. Alteration in glutamate α-decarboxylase and γ-aminobutyrate transaminase activities were found to be significantly influenced by interaction of aluminum intoxication and dietary protein restriction in all the tested brain regions. In case of regional brain succinic semialdehyde content, this interaction was significant only in cerebrum and thalamic area. Conclusion The alterations of regional brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyrate levels by aluminum are region specific as well as dependent on dietary protein intake. The impact of aluminum exposure on the metabolism of these amino acid neurotransmitters are also influenced by dietary protein level. Thus, modification of dietary protein level or manipulation of the brain amino acid homeostasis by any other means may be an useful tool to find out a path to restrict amino acid neurotransmitter alterations in aluminum-associated neurodisorders. PMID:12657166

  13. K+ depolarization evokes ATP, adenosine and glutamate release from glia in rat hippocampus: a microelectrode biosensor study

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, A; Andó, RD; Túri, G; Rózsa, B; Sperlágh, B

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE This study was undertaken to characterize the ATP, adenosine and glutamate outflow evoked by depolarization with high K+ concentrations, in slices of rat hippocampus. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We utilized the microelectrode biosensor technique and extracellular electrophysiological recording for the real-time monitoring of the efflux of ATP, adenosine and glutamate. KEY RESULTS ATP, adenosine and glutamate sensors exhibited transient and reversible current during depolarization with 25 mM K+, with distinct kinetics. The ecto-ATPase inhibitor ARL67156 enhanced the extracellular level of ATP and inhibited the prolonged adenosine efflux, suggesting that generation of adenosine may derive from the extracellular breakdown of ATP. Stimulation-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux was inhibited by tetrodotoxin, while exposure to Ca2+-free medium abolished ATP and adenosine efflux from hippocampal slices. Extracellular elevation of ATP and adenosine were decreased in the presence of NMDA receptor antagonists, D-AP-5 and ifenprodil, whereas non-NMDA receptor blockade by CNQX inhibited glutamate but not ATP and adenosine efflux. The gliotoxin fluoroacetate and P2X7 receptor antagonists inhibited the K+-evoked ATP, adenosine and glutamate efflux, while carbenoxolone in low concentration and probenecid decreased only the adenosine efflux. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results demonstrated activity-dependent gliotransmitter release in the hippocampus in response to ongoing neuronal activity. ATP and glutamate were released by P2X7 receptor activation into extracellular space. Although the increased extracellular levels of adenosine did derive from released ATP, adenosine might also be released directly via pannexin hemichannels. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Sershen, pp. 1000–1002 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2012.02072.x PMID:22394324

  14. Activation of presynaptic oxytocin receptors enhances glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus of prenatally restraint stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Mairesse, Jérôme; Gatta, Eleonora; Reynaert, Marie-Line; Marrocco, Jordan; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Soichot, Marion; Deruyter, Lucie; Camp, Gilles Van; Bouwalerh, Hammou; Fagioli, Francesca; Pittaluga, Anna; Allorge, Delphine; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Maccari, Stefania

    2015-12-01

    Oxytocin receptors are known to modulate synaptic transmission and network activity in the hippocampus, but their precise function has been only partially elucidated. Here, we have found that activation of presynaptic oxytocin receptor with the potent agonist, carbetocin, enhanced depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus with no effect on GABA release. This evidence paved the way for examining the effect of carbetocin treatment in "prenatally restraint stressed" (PRS) rats, i.e., the offspring of dams exposed to repeated episodes of restraint stress during pregnancy. Adult PRS rats exhibit an anxious/depressive-like phenotype associated with an abnormal glucocorticoid feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and, remarkably, with a reduced depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus. Chronic systemic treatment with carbetocin (1mg/kg, i.p., once a day for 2-3 weeks) in PRS rats corrected the defect in glutamate release, anxiety- and depressive-like behavior, and abnormalities in social behavior, in the HPA response to stress, and in the expression of stress-related genes in the hippocampus and amygdala. Of note, carbetocin treatment had no effect on these behavioral and neuroendocrine parameters in prenatally unstressed (control) rats, with the exception of a reduced expression of the oxytocin receptor gene in the amygdala. These findings disclose a novel function of oxytocin receptors in the hippocampus, and encourage the use of oxytocin receptor agonists in the treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders in adult life.

  15. Morphine sensitization increases the extracellular level of glutamate in CA1 of rat hippocampus via μ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Farahmandfar, Maryam; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Kadivar, Mehdi; Afrouzi, Hossein; Naghdi, Nasser

    2011-04-25

    Repeated administration of abuse drugs such as morphine elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect plastic changes requiring regulation of glutamatergic system in the brain. In this study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on extracellular glutamate concentration in the hippocampus, a brain region rich in glutamatergic neurons. Sensitization was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of morphine, once daily for 3 days followed by 5 days free of the opioid treatment. The results showed that extracellular glutamate concentration in the CA1 was decreased following administration of morphine in non-sensitized rats. However, morphine-induced behavioral sensitization significantly increased the extracellular glutamate concentration in this area. The enhancement of glutamate in morphine sensitized rats was prevented by administration of naloxone 30 min before each of three daily doses of morphine. These results suggest an adaptation of the glutamatergic neuronal transmission in the hippocampus after morphine sensitization and it is postulated that opioid receptors may play an important role in this effect.

  16. AMPA/kainate receptors in the ventromedial hypothalamus mediate the effects of glutamate on estrus termination in the rat.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Michaela; Cyr, Dave; Pfaus, James G

    2012-07-01

    Infusions of glutamate or its selective receptor agonists to the VMH of ovariectomized (OVX) female rats primed with estradiol benzoate (EB) and progesterone (P) inhibit both appetitive and consummatory aspects of sexual behavior whereas selective glutamate receptor antagonists facilitate these measures in females primed with EB alone. Because vaginocervical stimulation (VCS) activates glutamate neurons in the VMH, and induces a faster termination of estros behavior, the present study examined the effects of the AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist DNQX on the induction of estrus termination by manual VCS. Ovx, sexually-experienced rats were primed with EB and P and subsequently received either 1 or 50 distributed VCSs, over the course of an hour, 12 h before a test with sexually vigorous males. Half of the females in each stimulus group received bilateral infusions of 1 μl/side of either DNQX (19.8 mmol/μl) or saline aimed at the VMH immediately prior to VCS or sham stimulation. Saline-infused females given VCS had lower lordosis quotients compared to females given sham stimulation. In contrast, females infused with DNQX prior to VCS displayed more appetitive behaviors and higher lordosis quotients and magnitudes compared to females infused with saline. These data indicate that activation of AMPA/kainate receptors in the VMH by increased glutamate transmission induced by VCS mediates estrus termination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Glutamate co-transmission from developing medial nucleus of the trapezoid body--lateral superior olive synapses is cochlear dependent in kanamycin-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Ho; Pradhan, Jonu; Maskey, Dhiraj; Park, Ki Sup; Hong, Sung Hwa; Suh, Myung-Whan; Kim, Myeung Ju; Ahn, Seung Cheol

    2011-02-11

    Cochlear dependency of glutamate co-transmission at the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB)--the lateral superior olive (LSO) synapses was investigated using developing rats treated with high dose kanamycin. Rats were treated with kanamycin from postnatal day (P) 3 to P8. A scanning electron microscopic study on P9 demonstrated partial cochlear hair cell damage. A whole cell voltage clamp experiment demonstrated the increased glutamatergic portion of postsynaptic currents (PSCs) elicited by MNTB stimulation in P9-P11 kanamycin-treated rats. The enhanced VGLUT3 immunoreactivities (IRs) in kanamycin-treated rats and asymmetric VGLUT3 IRs in the LSO of unilaterally cochlear ablated rats supported the electrophysiologic data. Taken together, it is concluded that glutamate co-transmission is cochlear-dependent and enhanced glutamate co-transmission in kanamycin-treated rats is induced by partial cochlear damage.

  18. Brain Rewarding Stimulation Reduces Extracellular Glutamate Through Glial Modulation in Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Rats.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Gen; Nakamura, Masato; Takita, Masatoshi; Ishida, Yasushi; Ueki, Takatoshi; Nakahara, Daiichiro

    2015-11-01

    Growing evidence implicates a critical involvement of prefrontal glial modulation of extracellular glutamate (GLU) in aversive behaviors. However, nothing is known about whether prefrontal glial cells modulate GLU levels in rewarding behaviors. To address this question, we measured GLU efflux in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC) of rats associated with rewarding behaviors. We used intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) as the rewarding behavior. GLU was indirectly measured using microdialysis combined with on-line fluorometric detection of NADH resulting from the reaction of GLU and NAD(+) catalyzed by GLU dehydrogenase with a time resolution of 1 min. ICSS caused a minute-by-minute change of extracellular GLU in the medial PFC, with a slight decrease during the stimulation, followed by an increase afterward. This bidirectional change was tetrodotoxin insensitive and abolished by the gliotoxin fluorocitrate. To confirm and extend the previous studies of aversion-induced increase of extracellular GLU in the medial PFC, we also measured prefrontal GLU efflux associated with an aversive stimulation, immobilization stress. The temporal change in extracellular GLU caused by this stress was markedly different from that observed during ICSS. A rapid increase in GLU was detected during the aversive stimulation, followed by a large increase afterward. This bimodal change was tetrodotoxin insensitive, similar to that detected for ICSS. These findings indicate a bidirectional regulation of extracellular GLU by prefrontal glial cells associated with rat ICSS behavior, and reveal that glial modulation of GLU neurochemistry in the medial PFC contributes to rewarding as well as aversive behaviors in rats.

  19. The group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, LY379268, decreases methamphetamine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jordan T; Roberts, David C S; Beveridge, Thomas J R

    2013-10-01

    Given the problems associated with the escalation in methamphetamine (METH) use, the identification of more effective treatment strategies is essential. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) have been suggested to be a novel therapeutic target for psychostimulant addiction. We sought to test the ability of the selective group II mGluR agonist LY379268 to reduce METH self-administration in rats. Rats were trained to self-administer METH on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule. Animals were then switched to fixed ratio responding and given daily extended access (6 h/day) to METH self-administration for 14 days. Rats were then re-tested on the PR schedule. The effect of LY379268 on METH-reinforced PR responding was determined before and after 14 days of extended access. To test for non-specific effects, a separate group of animals received LY379268 prior to a sucrose pellet-reinforced PR schedule. Animals escalated their daily intake of METH during extended access. PR responding did not change as a function of extended access. LY379268 significantly attenuated METH reinforced responding, both before and after extended access. The degree of attenuation did not change as a function of extended access. LY379268 had no effect on sucrose pellet-reinforced responding at any dose. LY379268 selectively reduced the motivation to self-administer METH. In contrast to data with other compounds, the sensitivity to the effects of LY379268 did not change following extended access to METH self-administration. Group II mGluR agonists, therefore, may represent a relatively new class of compounds for the development of pharmacotherapies for METH addiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ceftriaxone attenuates ethanol drinking and restores extracellular glutamate concentration through normalization of GLT-1 in nucleus accumbens of male alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujan C; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Hristov, Alexandar M; Sari, Youssef

    2015-10-01

    Alteration of glutamatergic-neurotransmission is a hallmark of alcohol dependence. We have previously reported that chronic ethanol-drinking downregulated glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) in nucleus accumbens (NAc) in male P rats in a manner that was reversed by ceftriaxone treatment. However, the effect of ceftriaxone on extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc after chronic ethanol-drinking has not yet been studied. In the present study, male P rats were treated with ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for five consecutive days following five-weeks of free choice ethanol (15% and 30%) drinking. In vivo microdialysis was performed to measure the extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc and the effect of blockade of GLT-1 with dihydrokainic acid (DHK) on extracellular glutamate in NAc of ceftriaxone-treated rats was determined. Ceftriaxone treatment attenuated ethanol intake as well as ethanol preference. Extracellular glutamate was significantly higher in NAc after five-weeks of ethanol drinking in saline-treated compared to water control rats. Ceftriaxone treatment blocked the increase extracellular glutamate produced by ethanol intake. Blockade of GLT-1 by DHK reversed the effects of ceftriaxone on glutamate and implicated the role of GLT-1 in the normalization of extracellular glutamate by ceftriaxone. In addition, GLT-1 protein was decreased in ethanol exposed animals and ceftriaxone treatment reversed this deficit. Ceftriaxone treatment also increased glutamine synthetase activity in NAc but not in PFC as compared to ethanol drinking saline-treated rats. Our present study demonstrates that ceftriaxone treatment prevents ethanol drinking in part through normalization of extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc of male P rats via GLT-1.

  1. Effect of chitosan glutamate, carbomer 974P, and EDTA on the in vitro Caco-2 permeability and oral pharmacokinetic profile of acyclovir in rats.

    PubMed

    Merzlikine, Alexei; Rotter, Charles; Rago, Brian; Poe, Julie; Christoffersen, Curt; Thomas, V Hayden; Troutman, Matthew; El-Kattan, Ayman

    2009-09-01

    Chitosan glutamate and polyacrylic acid (e.g., carbomer 974P) are known to modulate the tight junctions in the intestinal wall and increase permeability and blood exposure of drugs absorbed orally by the paracellular route. To assess the impact of chitosan glutamate and carbomer 974P on the absorption of paracellularly absorbed model drug, acyclovir, in vitro and in rat in vivo. The influence of chitosan glutamate and carbomer 974P (alone and in combination with EDTA-Na2) on the in vitro Caco-2 permeability and oral pharmacokinetic profile in the rat of acyclovir was investigated. In the presence of chitosan glutamate, the apparent permeability of acyclovir across Caco2 monolayer increased 4.1 times relative to control. This increase was accompanied by a significant ( approximately 60%) decrease in transepithelial electrical resistance values indicating opening of the tight junctions in the cell monolayer. In rat, chitosan glutamate doubled oral bioavailability of acyclovir and tripled the amount of acyclovir excreted unchanged into urine. In contrast, the effect of carbomer 974P was not statistically significant at 5% level. In conclusion, chitosan glutamate (1-3%) and chitosan glutamate (1%)/EDTA-Na2 (0.01%) are effective excipients to increase permeability of acyclovir across Caco-2 cell monolayers and the oral absorption in the rat in vivo.

  2. Cultures of rat astrocytes challenged with a steady supply of glutamate: new model to study flux distribution in the glutamate-glutamine cycle.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Luís L; Monteiro, Miguel A R; Alves, Paula M; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Santos, Helena

    2005-09-01

    Glutamate metabolism in astrocytes was studied using an experimental setup that simulates the role of neurons (glutamate producers and glutamine consumers) by the addition of glutaminase to the culture medium. Thereby, a steady supply of glutamate was imposed at the expense of glutamine, and the stress intensity was manipulated by changing the glutaminase concentration. Glutamate supply rates in the range 8-23 nmol/min/mg protein were examined for periods of up to 48 h. When the glutamate supply rate exceeded the uptake rate of this amino acid, a transient increase in the extracellular concentration of glutamate was observed. In response to this stress, the fluxes through the glutamate transporter and glutamine synthetase were increased considerably, and the extracellular concentration of glutamate was eventually restored to a low level. The increased levels of glutamine synthetase were demonstrated by immunoblotting analysis. The effect on glutamate metabolism of the transaminase inhibitor, aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA), and of NH4Cl was also investigated. The supply of glutamate caused a concomitant reduction in the levels of phosphocreatine, phosphoethanolamine, and phosphocholine without affecting the ATP pool. Glutamine synthetase was shown to be is a key element in the control of glutamate metabolism in astrocytic cultures. The metabolic fate of glutamate depends greatly on the time of endurance to the challenge: in naive cells, glutamate was primarily metabolized through the transaminase pathway, while in well-adapted cells glutamate was converted almost exclusively through glutamine synthetase.

  3. Pharmacological Blockade of Serotonin 5-HT7 Receptor Reverses Working Memory Deficits in Rats by Normalizing Cortical Glutamate Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Aluisio, Leah; Shoblock, James; Boggs, Jamin D.; Fraser, Ian C.; Lord, Brian; Lovenberg, Timothy W.; Galici, Ruggero

    2011-01-01

    The role of 5-HT7 receptor has been demonstrated in various animal models of mood disorders; however its function in cognition remains largely speculative. This study evaluates the effects of SB-269970, a selective 5-HT7 antagonist, in a translational model of working memory deficit and investigates whether it modulates cortical glutamate and/or dopamine neurotransmission in rats. The effect of SB-269970 was evaluated in the delayed non-matching to position task alone or in combination with MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, and, in separate experiments, with scopolamine, a non-selective muscarinic antagonist. SB-269970 (10 mg/kg) significantly reversed the deficits induced by MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) but augmented the deficit induced by scopolamine (0.06 mg/kg). The ability of SB-269970 to modulate MK-801-induced glutamate and dopamine extracellular levels was separately evaluated using biosensor technology and microdialysis in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats. SB-269970 normalized MK-801 -induced glutamate but not dopamine extracellular levels in the prefrontal cortex. Rat plasma and brain concentrations of MK-801 were not affected by co-administration of SB-269970, arguing for a pharmacodynamic rather than a pharmacokinetic mechanism. These results indicate that 5-HT7 receptor antagonists might reverse cognitive deficits associated with NMDA receptor hypofunction by selectively normalizing glutamatergic neurotransmission. PMID:21701689

  4. Transforming growth factor-α mediates estrogen-induced upregulation of glutamate transporter GLT-1 in rat primary astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Węgrzynowicz, Marta; Yin, Zhaobao; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Aschner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) plays a central role in preventing excitotoxicity by removing excess glutamate from the synaptic clefts. 17β-estradiol (E2) and tamoxifen (TX), a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), afford neuroprotection in a range of experimental models. However, the mechanisms that mediate E2 and TX neuroprotection have yet to be elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that E2 and TX enhance GLT-1 function by increasing transforming growth factor (TGF)-α expression and thus, attenuate manganese (Mn)-induced impairment in astrocytic GLT-1 expression and glutamate uptake in rat neonatal primary astrocytes. The results showed that E2 (10 nM) and TX (1 μM) increased GLT-1 expression and reversed the Mn-induced reduction in GLT-1, both at the mRNA and protein levels. E2/TX also concomitantly reversed the Mn-induced inhibition of astrocytic glutamate uptake. E2/TX activated the GLT-1 promoter and attenuated the Mn-induced repression of the GLT-1 promoter in astrocytes. TGF-α knock-down (siRNA) abolished the E2/TX effect on GLT-1 expression, and inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (TGF-α receptor) suppressed the effect of E2/TX on GLT-1 expression and GLT-1 promoter activity. E2/TX also increased TGF-α mRNA and protein levels with a concomitant increase in astrocytic glutamate uptake. All estrogen receptors (ERs: ER-α ER-β and GPR30) were involved in mediating E2 effects on the regulation of TGF-α, GLT-1, and glutamate uptake. These results indicate that E2/TX increase GLT-1 expression in astrocytes via TGF-α signaling, thus offering an important putative target for the development of novel therapeutics for neurological disorders. PMID:22488924

  5. Transforming growth factor-α mediates estrogen-induced upregulation of glutamate transporter GLT-1 in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Yin, Zhaobao; Webb, Anton; Son, Deok-Soo; Aschner, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) plays a central role in preventing excitotoxicity by removing excess glutamate from the synaptic clefts. 17β-Estradiol (E2) and tamoxifen (TX), a selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulator, afford neuroprotection in a range of experimental models. However, the mechanisms that mediate E2 and TX neuroprotection have yet to be elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that E2 and TX enhance GLT-1 function by increasing transforming growth factor (TGF)-α expression and, thus, attenuate manganese (Mn)-induced impairment in astrocytic GLT-1 expression and glutamate uptake in rat neonatal primary astrocytes. The results showed that E2 (10 nM) and TX (1 μM) increased GLT-1 expression and reversed the Mn-induced reduction in GLT-1, both at the mRNA and protein levels. E2/TX also concomitantly reversed the Mn-induced inhibition of astrocytic glutamate uptake. E2/TX activated the GLT-1 promoter and attenuated the Mn-induced repression of the GLT-1 promoter in astrocytes. TGF-α knockdown (siRNA) abolished the E2/TX effect on GLT-1 expression, and inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (TGF-α receptor) suppressed the effect of E2/TX on GLT-1 expression and GLT-1 promoter activity. E2/TX also increased TGF-α mRNA and protein levels with a concomitant increase in astrocytic glutamate uptake. All ERs (ER-α, ER-β, and G protein-coupled receptor 30) were involved in mediating E2 effects on the regulation of TGF-α, GLT-1, and glutamate uptake. These results indicate that E2/TX increases GLT-1 expression in astrocytes via TGF-α signaling, thus offering an important putative target for the development of novel therapeutics for neurological disorders.

  6. Ciproxifan, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist and inverse agonist, presynaptically inhibits glutamate release in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chang, Chia-Ying; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2017-03-15

    Ciproxifan is an H3 receptor antagonist and inverse agonist with antipsychotic effects in several preclinical models; its effect on glutamate release has been investigated in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, ciproxifan reduced 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked Ca(2+)-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration elevation but did not affect the membrane potential. The inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was prevented by the Gi/Go-protein inhibitor pertussis toxin and Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, but was not affected by the intracellular Ca(2+)-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157. Furthermore, the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitor OBAA, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), PGE2 subtype 2 (EP2) receptor antagonist PF04418948, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor FR180204 eliminated the inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on glutamate release. Ciproxifan reduced the 4-AP-evoked phosphorylation of ERK and synapsin I, a presynaptic target of ERK. The ciproxifan-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was prevented in synaptosomes from synapsin I-deficient mice. Moreover, ciproxifan reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that ciproxifan, acting through the blockade of Gi/Go protein-coupled H3 receptors present on hippocampal nerve terminals, reduces voltage-dependent Ca(2+) entry by diminishing PLA2/PGE2/EP2 receptor pathway, which subsequently suppresses the ERK/synapsin I cascade to decrease the evoked glutamate release.

  7. Lack of effect of antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs on glutamate receptor mRNA levels in rat brains.

    PubMed

    Oretti, R G; Spurlock, G; Buckland, P R; McGuffin, P

    1994-08-15

    By employing multiprobe oligonucleotide solution hybridisation (MOSH) we have measured the levels of mRNA encoding the NMDA receptor subtypes (R1, R2A, R2B and R2C) and the non-NMDA glutamate receptor subtypes (GluR1, 2, 3, and 4) within rat brain following, 1-32 days of antipsychotic or antidepressant drug administration. The results suggest that the drugs studied do not significantly alter rat glutamatergic system mRNA levels when compared to controls.

  8. Glutamate co-transmission from developing medial nucleus of the trapezoid body - Lateral superior olive synapses is cochlear dependent in kanamycin-treated rats

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae Ho; Pradhan, Jonu; Maskey, Dhiraj; Park, Ki Sup; Hong, Sung Hwa; Suh, Myung-Whan; Kim, Myeung Ju; Ahn, Seung Cheol

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Glutamate co-transmission is enhanced in kanamycin-treated rats. {yields} VGLUT3 expression is increased in kanamycin-treated rats. {yields} GlyR expression is decreased in kanamycin-treated rats. {yields} GlyR, VGLUT3 expression patterns are asymmetric in unilaterally cochlear ablated rat. -- Abstract: Cochlear dependency of glutamate co-transmission at the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) - the lateral superior olive (LSO) synapses was investigated using developing rats treated with high dose kanamycin. Rats were treated with kanamycin from postnatal day (P) 3 to P8. A scanning electron microscopic study on P9 demonstrated partial cochlear hair cell damage. A whole cell voltage clamp experiment demonstrated the increased glutamatergic portion of postsynaptic currents (PSCs) elicited by MNTB stimulation in P9-P11 kanamycin-treated rats. The enhanced VGLUT3 immunoreactivities (IRs) in kanamycin-treated rats and asymmetric VGLUT3 IRs in the LSO of unilaterally cochlear ablated rats supported the electrophysiologic data. Taken together, it is concluded that glutamate co-transmission is cochlear-dependent and enhanced glutamate co-transmission in kanamycin-treated rats is induced by partial cochlear damage.

  9. Pharmacological characterization of metabotropic glutamate receptors coupled to phospholipase D in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini-Giampietro, D. E.; Torregrossa, S. A.; Moroni, F.

    1996-01-01

    1. Phospholipase D (PLD) is the key enzyme in a signal transduction pathway leading to the formation of the second messengers phosphatidic acid and diacylglycerol. In order to define the pharmacological profile of PLD-coupled metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), PLD activity was measured in slices of adult rat brain in the presence of mGluR agonists or antagonists. Activation of the phospholipase C (PLC) pathway by the same agents was also examined. 2. The mGluR-selective agonist (1S,3R)-l-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid [(1S,3R)-ACPD] induced a concentration-dependent (10-300 microM) activation of PLD in the hippocampus, neocortex, and striatum, but not in the cerebellum. The effect was particularly evident in hippocampal slices, which were thus used for all subsequent experiments. 3. The rank order of potencies for agonists stimulating the PLD response was: quisqualate > ibotenate > (2S,3S,4S)-alpha-(carboxycyclopropyl)-glycine > (1S,3R)-ACPD > L-cysteine sulphinic acid > L-aspartate > L-glutamate. L-(+)-2-Amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid and the ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists N-methyl-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and kainate failed to activate PLD. (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (100300 microM), an agonist of mGluRs of the first group, stimulated PLC but inhibited the PLD response elicited by 100 microM (1S,3R)-ACPD. 4. (+)-alpha-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (0.1-1 mM), a competitive antagonist of mGluRs of the first and second group, elicited a significant PLD response. L-(+)-2-Amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (1 mM), an antagonist of mGluRs of the first group, inhibited the 100 microM (1S,3R)-ACPD-induced PLC response but produced a robust stimulation of PLD. 5. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetic acid and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), activators of protein kinase C, at 1 microM had a stimulatory effect on mGluRs linked to PLD but depressed (1S,3R)-ACPD-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The

  10. Effects of (R)-(-)-5-methyl-1-nicotinoyl-2-pyrazoline on glutamate transporter 1 and cysteine/glutamate exchanger as well as ethanol drinking behavior in male, alcohol-preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Aal-Aaboda, Munaf; Alhaddad, Hasan; Osowik, Francis; Nauli, Surya M; Sari, Youssef

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is largely associated with alterations in the extracellular glutamate concentrations in several brain reward regions. We recently showed that glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) is downregulated following chronic exposure to ethanol for 5 weeks in alcohol-preferring (P) rats and that upregulation of the GLT-1 levels in nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex results, in part, in attenuating ethanol consumption. Cystine glutamate antiporter (xCT) is also downregulated after chronic ethanol exposure in P rats, and its upregulation could be valuable in attenuating ethanol drinking. This study examines the effect of a synthetic compound, (R)-(-)-5-methyl-1-nicotinoyl-2-pyrazoline (MS-153), on ethanol drinking and expressions of GLT-1 and xCT in the amygdala and the hippocampus of P rats. P rats were exposed to continuous free-choice access to water, 15% and 30% ethanol, and food for 5 weeks, after which they received treatments of MS-153 or vehicle for 5 days. The results show that MS-153 treatment significantly reduces ethanol consumption. It was revealed that GLT-1 and xCT expressions were downregulated in both the amygdala and the hippocampus of ethanol-vehicle-treated rats (ethanol-vehicle group) compared with water-control animals. MS-153 treatment upregulated GLT-1 and xCT expressions in these brain regions. These findings demonstrate an important role for MS-153 in these glutamate transporters for the attenuation of ethanol-drinking behavior.

  11. Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate induces morphological alterations in suprachiasmatic nucleus of adult rat.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Castañeda, Julio César; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Chávez-Saldaña, Margarita; Rojas, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Pérez, Oscar; Rojas, Carolina; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal exposure to monosodium glutamate (MSG) induces circadian disorders in several physiological and behavioural processes regulated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of neonatal exposure to MSG on locomotor activity, and on morphology, cellular density and expression of proteins, as evaluated by optical density (OD), of vasopressin (VP)-, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-immunoreactive cells in the SCN. Male Wistar rats were used: the MSG group was subcutaneously treated from 3 to 10 days of age with 3.5 mg/g/day. Locomotor activity was evaluated at 90 days of age using 'open-field' test, and the brains were processed for immunohistochemical studies. MSG exposure induced a significant decrease in locomotor activity. VP- and VIP-immunoreactive neuronal densities showed a significant decrease, while the somatic OD showed an increase. Major axes and somatic area were significantly increased in VIP neurons. The cellular and optical densities of GFAP-immunoreactive sections of SCN were significantly increased. These results demonstrated that newborn exposure to MSG induced morphological alterations in SCN cells, an alteration that could be the basis for behavioural disorders observed in the animals.

  12. Exercise-induced plasticity of AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Real, Caroline C; Ferreira, Ana F B; Hernandes, Marina S; Britto, Luiz R G; Pires, Raquel S

    2010-12-02

    The aim of this study was to analyze the plastic effects of moderate exercise upon the motor cortex (M1 and M2 areas), cerebellum (Cb), and striatum (CPu) of the rat brain. This assessment was made by verifying the expression of AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunits (GluR1 and GluR2/3). We used adult Wistar rats, divided into 5 groups based on duration of exercise training, namely 3 days (EX3), 7 days (EX7), 15 days (EX15), 30 days (EX30), and sedentary (S). The exercised animals were subjected to a treadmill exercise protocol at the speed of the 10 meters/min for 40 min. After exercise, the brains were subjected to immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting to analyze changes of GluR1 and GluR2/3, and plasma corticosterone was measured by ELISA in order to verify potential stress induced by physical training. Overall, the results of immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting were similar and revealed that GluR subunits show distinct responses over the exercise periods and for the different structures analyzed. In general, there was increased expression of GluR subunits after longer exercise periods (such as EX30), although some opposite effects were seen after short periods of exercise (EX3). In a few cases, biphasic patterns with decreases and subsequent increases of GluR expression were seen and may represent the outcome of exercise-dependent, complex regulatory processes. The data show that the protocol used was able to promote plastic GluR changes during exercise, suggesting a specific involvement of these receptors in exercise-induced plasticity processes in the brain areas tested. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Vesicular glutamate transporter 1 immunoreactivity in extrinsic and intrinsic innervation of the rat esophagus.

    PubMed

    Ewald, P; Neuhuber, W L; Raab, M

    2006-04-01

    Encouraged by the recent finding of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) immunoreactivity (-ir) in intraganglionic laminar endings (IGLEs) of the rat esophagus, we investigated also the distribution and co-localization patterns of VGLUT1. Confocal imaging revealed substantial co-localization of VGLUT1-ir with selective markers of IGLEs, i.e., calretinin and VGLUT2, indicating that IGLEs contain both VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 within their synaptic vesicles. Besides IGLEs, we found VGLUT1-ir in both cholinergic and nitrergic myenteric neuronal cell bodies, in fibers of the muscularis mucosae, and in esophageal motor endplates. Skeletal neuromuscular junctions, in contrast, showed no VGLUT1-ir. We also tested for probable co-localization of VGLUT1-ir with markers of extrinsic and intrinsic esophageal innervation and glia. Within the myenteric neuropil we found, besides co-localization of VGLUT1 and substance P, no further co-localization of VGLUT1-ir with any of these markers. In the muscularis mucosae some VGLUT1-ir fibers were shown to contain neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-ir. VGLUT1-ir in esophageal motor endplates was partly co-localized with vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)/choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-ir, but VGLUT1-ir was also demonstrated in separately terminating fibers at motor endplates co-localized neither with ChAT/VAChT-ir nor with nNOS-ir, suggesting a hitherto unknown glutamatergic enteric co-innervation. Thus, VGLUT1-ir was found in extrinsic as well as intrinsic innervation of the rat esophagus.

  14. Guanine derivatives modulate L-glutamate uptake into rat brain synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Carla I; Santos, Tiago G; Tavares, Rejane G; Battastini, Ana M O; Rocha, João B T; Souza, Diogo O

    2004-05-01

    Glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles is driven by a proton electrochemical gradient generated by a vacuolar H(+)-ATPase and stimulated by physiological concentrations of chloride. This uptake plays an important role in glutamatergic transmission. We show here that vesicular glutamate uptake is selectively inhibited by guanine derivatives, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Guanosine, GMP, GDP, guanosine-5'-O-2-thiodiphosphate, GTP, or 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp) inhibited glutamate uptake in 1.5 and 3 min incubations, however, when incubating for 10 min, only GTP or GppNHp displayed such inhibition. By increasing ATP concentrations, the inhibitory effect of GTP was no longer observed, but GppNHp still inhibited glutamate uptake. In the absence of ATP, vesicular ATPase can hydrolyze GTP in order to drive glutamate uptake. However, 5mM GppNHp inhibited ATP hydrolysis by synaptic vesicle preparations. GTP or GppNHp decreased the proton electrochemical gradient, whereas the other guanine derivatives did not. Glutamate saturation curves were assayed in order to evaluate the specificity of inhibition of the vesicular glutamate carrier by the guanine derivatives. The maximum velocity of the initial rate of glutamate uptake was decreased by all guanine derivatives. These results indicate that, although GppNHp can inhibit ATPase activity, guanine derivatives are more likely to be acting through interaction with vesicular glutamate carrier.

  15. Glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1) activator ceftriaxone attenuates amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and behavioral sensitization in rats

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Bruce; Unterwald, Ellen M.; Rawls, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The β-lactam antibiotic and glutamate transporter subtype 1 (GLT-1) activator ceftriaxone prevents relapse to cocaine-seeking and inhibits morphine-induced physical dependence and tolerance in rats, but its efficacy against amphetamine-induced behaviors is unknown. METHODS Here, we tested the hypothesis that ceftriaxone (200 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibits hyperactivity produced by acute amphetamine administration (2 mg/kg, i.p.) and sensitization of hyperactivity induced by repeated amphetamine exposure (2 mg/kg, i.p.). For acute experiments, rats treated with ceftriaxone for 5 days were injected with amphetamine or saline on day 6. RESULTS Amphetamine elicited less ambulatory and stereotypical activity in ceftriaxone-treated rats than in ceftriaxone-naïve rats. For chronic experiments, rats injected with ceftriaxone or saline for 8 days were also injected with amphetamine or saline on days 6–8 and then challenged with amphetamine 5 days later. Amphetamine produced greater ambulatory and stereotypical activity in amphetamine-pretreated rats than in rats previously naïve to amphetamine. Amphetamine challenge produced less ambulatory and stereotypical activity in rats pretreated with a combination of ceftriaxone (200 mg/kg) and amphetamine than in rats pretreated with only amphetamine. CONCLUSION The present demonstration that ceftriaxone attenuates amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and behavioral sensitization suggests its documented efficacy against adverse cocaine and morphine effects extends to amphetamine. PMID:21524862

  16. Distribution of radiolabeled L-glutamate and D-aspartate from blood into peripheral tissues in naive rats: Significance for brain neuroprotection

    SciTech Connect

    Klin, Yael; Zlotnik, Alexander; Boyko, Matthew; Ohayon, Sharon; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian I.

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Blood glutamate has a half-life time of 2-3 min. {yields} Blood glutamate is submitted to rapid decarboxylation. {yields} Blood glutamate and its metabolites are mainly absorbed in skeletal muscle and liver. {yields} The skeletal muscle and liver are now targets for potential drugs affording brain neuroprotection. -- Abstract: Excess L-glutamate (glutamate) levels in brain interstitial and cerebrospinal fluids (ISF and CSF, respectively) are the hallmark of several neurodegenerative conditions such as stroke, traumatic brain injury or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Its removal could prevent the glutamate excitotoxicity that causes long-lasting neurological deficits. As in previous studies, we have established the role of blood glutamate levels in brain neuroprotection, we have now investigated the contribution of the peripheral organs to the homeostasis of glutamate in blood. We have administered naive rats with intravenous injections of either L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glutamic acid (L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu), L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glutamic acid (L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glu) or D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Aspartic acid (D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp), a non-metabolized analog of glutamate, and have followed their distribution into peripheral organs. We have observed that the decay of the radioactivity associated with L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu and L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glu was faster than that associated with glutamate non-metabolized analog, D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp. L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu was subjected in blood to a rapid decarboxylation with the loss of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. The three major sequestrating organs, serving as depots for the eliminated glutamate and/or its metabolites were skeletal muscle, liver and gut, contributing together 92% or 87% of total L-[U-{sup 14}C] Glu or D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp radioactivity capture. L-[U-{sup 14}C] Glu and D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp showed a different organ sequestration pattern. We conclude that glutamate is rapidly eliminated from the blood into peripheral tissues

  17. Malnutrition affects the pressor response to microinjection of L-glutamate into the RVLM of awake rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Chianca-Jr, Deoclecio Alves; Gonçalves Fernandes, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Post-weaning protein malnutrition is often related to the development of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in humans, as well to changed content of neurotransmitters in the central nervous system under experimental conditions. The rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) is a bulbar region that contains sympathetic premotor neurons; the excitatory amino acid L-glutamate seems to be the main neurotransmitter at this level. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible change in the L-glutamate sensitivity of the RVLM neurons of malnourished animals. Male Fischer rats were divided into two groups: control (n = 15) and malnourished (n = 19). Four days before the experiments, guide cannulas were implanted bilaterally in direction of the RVLM for microinjection of L-glutamate. Twenty-four hours before the experiments, the femoral artery was cannulated for cardiovascular recordings. The results showed that the baseline heart rate increased in malnourished compared to control animals (412.18 ± 16.03 bpm vs. 370.74 ± 9.59 bpm, respectively). Malnourished animals presented a dissimilar concentration-dependent pressor response curve to L-glutamate and an attenuated baroreflex gain. Our results suggest that post-weaning protein restriction affects glutamatergic neurotransmission of the baroreflex at the RVLM level.

  18. Expression of Vesicular Glutamate Transporters VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the Rat Dental Pulp and Trigeminal Ganglion following Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jae Hyun; Kim, Yun Sook; Choi, So Young; Kim, Tae Heon; Cho, Yi Sul; Bae, Yong Chul

    2014-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that peripheral glutamate signaling mechanism is involved in the nociceptive transmission during pathological conditions. However, little is known about the glutamate signaling mechanism and related specific type of vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) in the dental pulp following inflammation. To address this issue, we investigated expression and protein levels of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in the dental pulp and trigeminal ganglion (TG) following complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) application to the rat dental pulp by light microscopic immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Results The density of VGLUT2− immunopositive (+) axons in the dental pulp and the number of VGLUT2+ soma in the TG increased significantly in the CFA-treated group, compared to control group. The protein levels of VGLUT2 in the dental pulp and TG were also significantly higher in the CFA-treated group than control group by Western blot analysis. The density of VGLUT1+ axons in the dental pulp and soma in the TG remained unchanged in the CFA-treated group. Conclusions These findings suggest that glutamate signaling that is mediated by VGLUT2 in the pulpal axons may be enhanced in the inflamed dental pulp, which may contribute to pulpal axon sensitization leading to hyperalgesia following inflammation. PMID:25290694

  19. Up-regulation of DRP-3 long isoform during the induction of neural progenitor cells by glutamate treatment in the ex vivo rat retina.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Byron, Baron; Kitagawa, Takao; Tokuda, Nobuko; Kobayashi, Daiki; Nagayama, Megumi; Araki, Norie; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2015-08-07

    Glutamate has been shown to induce neural progenitor cells in the adult vertebrate retina. However, protein dynamics during progenitor cell induction by glutamate are not fully understood. To identify specific proteins involved in the process, we employed two-dimensional electrophoresis-based proteomics on glutamate untreated and treated retinal ex vivo sections. Rat retinal tissues were incubated with 1 mM glutamate for 1 h, followed by incubation in glutamate-free media for a total of 24 h. Consistent with prior reports, it was found that mitotic cells appeared in the outer nuclear layer without any histological damage. Immunohistological evaluations and immunoblotting confirmed the emergence of neuronal progenitor cells in the mature retina treated with glutamate. Proteomic analysis revealed the up-regulation of dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 3 (DRP-3), DRP-2 and stress-induced-phosphoprotein 1 (STIP1) during neural progenitor cell induction by glutamate. Moreover, mRNA expression of DRP-3, especially, its long isoform, robustly increased in the treated retina compared to that in the untreated retina. These results may indicate that glutamate induces neural progenitor cells in the mature rat retina by up-regulating the proteins which mediate cell mitosis and neurite growth.

  20. Ceftriaxone attenuates glutamate-mediated neuro-inflammation and restores BDNF in MPTP model of Parkinson's disease in rats.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Baninder; Prakash, Atish

    2017-06-01

    The present study is designed to investigate the role of glutamate transporter in neuroprotection of ceftriaxone against MPTP induced PD animal model. Young male Wistar rats were subjected to intra-nigral administration of MPTP for the induction of Parkinson's disease. Glutamate modulators like ceftriaxone (CFX), Memantine (MEM) and Dihydrokainate (DHK) were administered to MPTP-lesioned rats. Different behavioral alterations were assessed in between the study period. Animals were sacrificed immediately after behavioral session, and different biochemical parameters were measured. Intranigral administration of MPTP showed significant impairment of motor behavior and marked increase in inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress parameters in rats. In addition, MPTP also produced significant decrease in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in striatum of rats. However, chronic administration of ceftriaxone (200mg/kg) has shown significant improvement in motor behavioral deficits and oxidative damage. In addition, Ceftriaxone also attenuated the marked increase of NFκB, TNF-α and IL-1β in MPTP treated rats thus, conferring its neuro-inflammatory property. Further, Ceftriaxone significantly restored the decreased activity of BDNF in striatum of MPTP treated rats. Moreover, pre-treatment of memantine (20mg/kg) with sub-therapeutic dose of ceftriaxone (100mg/kg) potentiated the protective effect of ceftriaxone. Furthermore, intra-nigral injection of DHK (200 nmol) with lower dose of ceftriaxone (100mg/kg) reversed the protective effect of ceftriaxone in MPTP treated rats. The present study concluded that ceftriaxone produce beneficial effect against MPTP induced PD like symptoms rats through glutamatergic pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of levetiracetam on molecular regulation of hippocampal glutamate and GABA transporters in rats with chronic seizures induced by amygdalar FeCl3 injection.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Yuto; Doi, Taku; Nagatomo, Keiko; Tokumaru, Jun; Takaki, Mayuko; Willmore, L James

    2007-06-02

    Enhancement of the glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission efficacy in the FeCl3 induced epilepsy model is associated with changes in the levels of glutamate and GABA transporter proteins. This study examined the effect of levetiracetam (LEV) on glutamate overflow and glutamate/GABA transporters expression in rats with epileptogenesis induced by the amygdalar injection of 1.0 microl of 100 mM FeCl3 (epileptic rat) and in control rats receiving amygdalar acidic saline injection (non-epileptic rat). In amygdalar acidic saline injected rats, 40 mM KCl-evoked glutamate overflow was significantly suppressed by both 32 and 100 microM LEV co-perfusion. In unilateral amygdalar FeCl3 injected rats, 32 microM LEV was ineffective, but the 100 microM LEV statistically suppressed glutamate overflow. Western blotting was employed to determine the hippocampal expression of glutamate/GABA transporters in epileptic or non-epileptic rats. The rats were treated for 14 days with 54 mg/kg LEV or vehicle intraperitoneally injection. Following 14 days of treatment, the ipsilateral hippocampus was removed for a Western blot analysis. In non-epileptic rats, the expression increased for all of the glutamate and GABA transporters (GLAST, GLT-1, EAAC-1, GAT-1 and GAT-3) while the glutamate transporter regulating protein (GTRAP3-18) decreased in comparison to those of normal rats that were treated with the vehicle. In epileptic rats receiving LEV, the EAAC-1 and GAT-3 levels increased while GTRAP3-18 (89%) decreased in comparison to those of the epileptic rats treated with the vehicle. GTRAP3-18 inhibitor regulates glutamate-binding affinity to EAAC-1. The anti-epileptic action of LEV may be partially due to a reduction of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and an enhancement of the GABAergic inhibition as observed with the inhibitory effect on the 40 mM KCl-evoked glutamate overflow. These conclusions are supported by the increase in the expression of glial glutamate transporters (GLAST

  2. Glutamate Stimulates Local Protein Synthesis in the Axons of Rat Cortical Neurons by Activating α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptors and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wei-Lun; Chung, Hui-Wen; Wu, Chih-Yueh; Wu, Huei-Ing; Lee, Yu-Tao; Chen, En-Chan; Fang, Weilun; Chang, Yen-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. By analyzing the metabolic incorporation of azidohomoalanine, a methionine analogue, in newly synthesized proteins, we find that glutamate treatments up-regulate protein translation not only in intact rat cortical neurons in culture but also in the axons emitting from cortical neurons before making synapses with target cells. The process by which glutamate stimulates local translation in axons begins with the binding of glutamate to the ionotropic AMPA receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 and members of group 2 metabotropic glutamate receptors on the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and the rise in Ca2+, resulting from Ca2+ influxes through calcium-permeable AMPA receptors, voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, and transient receptor potential canonical channels, in axons stimulate the local translation machinery. For comparison, the enhancement effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on the local protein synthesis in cortical axons were also studied. The results indicate that Ca2+ influxes via transient receptor potential canonical channels and activated the mTOR pathway in axons also mediate BDNF stimulation to local protein synthesis. However, glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of translation in axons exhibit different kinetics. Moreover, Ca2+ and mTOR signaling appear to play roles carrying different weights, respectively, in transducing glutamate- and BDNF-induced enhancements of axonal translation. Thus, our results indicate that exposure to transient increases of glutamate and more lasting increases of BDNF would stimulate local protein synthesis in migrating axons en route to their targets in the developing brain. PMID:26134564

  3. Cue-conditioned alcohol seeking in rats following abstinence: involvement of metabotropic glutamate 5 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Adams, CL; Short, JL; Lawrence, AJ

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: The current study was designed to: (i) examine whether functional interactions occur between receptors known to regulate alcohol self-administration; and (ii) characterize relapse to alcohol seeking following abstinence. Experimental approach: The selective cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (0.03–1.0 mg·kg−1 i.p.) resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in ethanol self-administration in ethanol-preferring Indiana-preferring rats. SR141716A was then co-administered with either the selective glutamate metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor antagonist 3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine (MTEP) or the selective adenosine A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261. Key results: When administered at individually sub-threshold doses, a combination of SR141716A (0.1 mg·kg−1) and SCH58261 (0.5 mg·kg−1 i.p.) produced a reduction (28%) in ethanol self-administration. Combinations of threshold doses of SR141716A (0.3 mg·kg−1) and SCH58261 (2.0 mg·kg−1, i.p.) caused an essentially additive reduction (68%) in alcohol self-administration. A combination of individually sub-threshold doses of CB1 and mGlu5 receptor antagonists did not affect alcohol self-administration; however, combined threshold doses of SR141716A (0.3 mg·kg−1) and MTEP (1.0 mg·kg−1 i.p.) did reduce ethanol self-administration markedly (80%). Cue-conditioned alcohol seeking was attenuated by pretreatment with MTEP (1.0 mg·kg−1) co-administered with SR141716A (0.3 mg·kg−1 i.p.). In contrast, SCH58261 (2.0 mg·kg−1) co-administered with SR141716A (0.3 mg·kg−1 i.p.) did not reduce cue-conditioned alcohol seeking. Conclusions and implications: Adenosine A2A and cannabinoid CB1 receptors regulated alcohol self-administration additively, but combined low-dose antagonism of these receptors did not prevent cue-conditioned alcohol seeking after abstinence. In contrast, combined low-dose antagonism of mGlu5 and CB1 receptors did prevent relapse

  4. Presynaptic modulation by L-glutamate and GABA of sympathetic co-transmission in rat isolated vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Y W; Ngan, M P; Tsang, K Y; Lee, H M; Chu, L A

    1996-06-01

    1. The modulatory effects of L-glutamate and its structural analogues, and of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), on sympathetic co-transmission were studied in the rat isolated vas deferens exposed to electrical field stimulation (EFS). 2. Application of exogenous L-glutamate caused a concentration-dependent (1 microM-3 mM) inhibition of the rapid twitch component of the biphasic EFS contraction. However, L-glutamate (1 microM-3 mM) had a minimal effect on the phasic contraction induced by exogenous adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP, 150 microM) and noradrenaline (50 microM). Unlike L-glutamate, D-glutamate had no effect on the EFS contraction. 3. The L-glutamate-induced inhibition of the EFS contractions was significantly attenuated by the glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) inhibitor 3-mercapto-propionic acid (150 microM) and was abolished in the presence of the GABA transaminase (GABA-T) inhibitor, 2-aminoethyl hydrogen sulphate (500 microM). 4. The L-glutamate-induced inhibition of the electrically evoked contraction was not affected by the adenosine A1-receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX)(30 nM), reactive blue 2 (30 microM) or the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (50 microM). However, the GABAB receptor antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen (50 microM) significantly inhibited the L-glutamate effect. 5. Similar to L-glutamate, GABA also caused a concentration-dependent (0.1-100 microM) inhibition of the EFS contractions. This GABA-induced inhibition was not affected by either the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (50 microM) or reactive blue 2 (30 microM). However, a significant attenuation of the GABA-mediated effect was recorded with the GABAB receptor antagonist 2-hydroxysaclofen (50 microM). Contractions of the vas deferens induced by exogenous ATP and noradrenaline were not affected by GABA (0.1-100 microM). 6. The L-glutamate analogues, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) (1 microM-1 mM) and quisqualate (Quis 0.1 microM-0.3 mM) had no effect

  5. Changes in metabolic proteins in ex vivo rat retina during glutamate-induced neural progenitor cell induction.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Kazuhiro; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Baron, Byron; Kitagawa, Takao; Tokuda, Nobuko; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Kimura, Kazuhiro; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2016-08-01

    Understanding how energy metabolism and related proteins influence neural progenitor cells in adult tissues is critical for developing new strategies in clinical tissue regeneration therapy. We have recently reported that a subtoxic concentration of glutamate-induced neural progenitor cells in the mature ex vivo rat retina. We herein explore changes in the metabolic pathways during the process. We firstly observed an increase in lactate and lactate dehydrogenase concentration in the glutamate-treated retina. We then investigated the levels of glycolytic enzymes and confirmed significant upregulation of pyruvate kinase M type (PKM), especially PKM2, enolase, phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1), and inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH1) in the glutamate-treated retina compared to the untreated retina. An analysis of the subcellular localization of PKM2 revealed nuclear translocation in the treated retina, which has been reported to regulate cell cycle proliferation and glycolytic enzymes. Our findings indicate that the mature rat retina undergoes an increase in aerobic glycolysis. PKM2, both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, may thus play an important role during neural progenitor cell induction, as it does in other proliferating cells.

  6. The influence of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands on anxiety-like effect of amphetamine withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Koltunowska, D; Gibula-Bruzda, E; Kotlinska, J H

    2013-08-01

    Chronic amphetamine use results in anxiety-like states after drug cessation. The aim of the study was to determine a role of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor ligands in amphetamine-evoked withdrawal anxiety in the elevated plus-maze test in rats. In our study memantine (8 and 12 mg/kg), a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist did not reduce amphetamine withdrawal anxiety. Acamprosate (NMDA and metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor (mGluR5) antagonist) at the dose 200 and 400mg/kg showed anxiolytic-like effect, thus increasing the percent of time spent in open arms and a number of open arm entries. mGluR5 selective antagonist, MTEP (3-[(2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]pyridine hydrochloride) and mGluR2/3 agonist, LY354740 (1S,2S,5R,6S)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid), caused effects similar to acamprosate at doses 1.25-5mg/kg and 2.5-5mg/kg, respectively. None of the glutamate ligands influenced locomotor activity of rats when given to the saline-treated group. Taking into account the positive correlation between amphetamine withdrawal-induced anxiety and relapse to amphetamine taking, our results suggest that modulation of mGluRs may prevent relapse to amphetamine and might pose a new direction in amphetamine abuse therapy.

  7. Dietary taurine supplementation ameliorates diabetic retinopathy via anti-excitotoxicity of glutamate in streptozotocin-induced Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoping; Xu, Zhaoxia; Mi, Mantian; Xu, Hongxia; Zhu, Jundong; Wei, Na; Chen, Ka; Zhang, Qianyong; Zeng, Kaihong; Wang, Jian; Chen, Fang; Tang, Yong

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether taurine ameliorate the diabetic retinopathy, and to further explore the underlying mechanisms. The Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with streptozotocin to establish experimental diabetic model, then fed without or with 1.2% taurine for additional 4-12 weeks. After that, the protective effects of dietary taurine supplementation on diabetic retinopathy were estimated. Our results showed that chronic taurine supplement effectively improved diabetic retinopathy as changes of histopathology and ultrastructure. The supplementation could not lower plasma glucose concentration (P > 0.05), but caused an elevation in taurine content and a decline in levels of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in diabetic retina (P < 0.05). Moreover, chronic taurine supplementation increased glutamate transporter (GLAST) expression (P < 0.05), decreased intermediate filament glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor subunit 1 (NR1) expression in diabetic retina (P < 0.05). These results demonstrated that chronic taurine supplementation ameliorates diabetic retinopathy via anti-excitotoxicity of glutamate in rats.

  8. On-line derivatization for continuous and automatic monitoring of brain extracellular glutamate levels in anesthetized rats: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Yang, C S; Tsai, P J; Chen, W Y; Tsai, W J; Kuo, J S

    1999-10-29

    Glutamate is an important excitatory amino acid in central nervous system. We developed a method for in vivo, continuous and automatic monitoring of brain extracellular glutamate, as well as other amino acids in anesthetized rat. This method involves the use of microdialysis perfusion technique and a high-performance liquid chromatography system equipped with a fluorescence detector. The microdialysate (perfused at a flow-rate of 1 microl/min) was on-line derivatized with o-phthaldehyde (perfused at 2 microl/min) through a mixing tee prior to the injection onto the HPLC column. The efficiency of this on-line derivatization was equivalent to that performed with an off-line manner. The effect of cerebral ischemia (2 h) and reperfusion (2 h) in brain cortex of anesthetized rats was monitored using this method. In addition to glutamate, extracellular concentrations of other amino acids, such as aspartate, glutamine, glycine, taurine and gamma-aminobutyric acid, were also simultaneously monitored with this on-line method. Since monitoring of extracellular amino acids by microdialysis perfusion is intensively used in neuroscience investigations, this simple and convenient method would be useful in the future applications.

  9. Intra-amygdala microinjection of TNF-α impairs the auditory fear conditioning of rats via glutamate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jing, He; Hao, Yongxin; Bi, Qiang; Zhang, Jiaozhen; Yang, Pingting

    2015-02-01

    During an inflammatory or infectious process, innate immune cells produce large amount of pro-inflammatory cytokines that act on the brain to cause cognitive dysfunctions. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is one of the main pro-inflammatory cytokines. Thus, it is important to study how the excessive TNF-α affects the cognitive functions of central nervous system and possible antagonists to its effects. In the present study, we conducted behavioral experiments of rats to determine whether murine TNF-α administered directly into the brain would elicit behavioral effects related to learning and memory impairments. Rats subjected to single-dose intra-amygdala TNF-α infusion showed a significant delay in the acquisition and extinction of auditory fear conditioning. Accordingly, the glutamate level of the tissue samples from amygdala was elevated after the TNF-α treatment. Furthermore, pharmacological blockade of NMDAR before the TNF-α treatment reversed the TNF-α induced impairments in fear learning. Our findings suggest that TNF-α can impair the learning and memory functions through glutamate-NMDAR neurotoxicity, and present the possibility to develop therapeutic modalities directing at glutamate transmission for the treatment of neuro-inflammative dysfunctions.

  10. The Effects of Monosodium Glutamate and Tannic Acid on Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ugur Calis, Ibrahim; Turgut Cosan, Didem; Saydam, Faruk; Kerem Kolac, Umut; Soyocak, Ahu; Kurt, Hulyam; Veysi Gunes, Hasan; Sahinturk, Varol; Sahin Mutlu, Fezan; Ozdemir Koroglu, Zeynep; Degirmenci, Irfan

    2016-01-01

    Background Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a widely-used flavor enhancer and stabilizer in ready-made or packaged foods. The excessive use of MSG has been shown to increase oxidative stress in different organ systems and causes glucose metabolism disorders, obesity, and coronary diseases. Objectives In this study, the antioxidant activity of tannic acid was investigated experimentally with respect to its protective effects against overdosed MSG-induced oxidative stress in rats. The study took place in Turkey in August 2013. Methods Four groups (n = 7) of three- to four-month-old Sprague-Dawley female rats were used in this study. The first group was the control, who were administered saline. The second group received tannic acid (50 mg/kg, 3 days) intraperitoneally (i.p.). The third group received MSG (2 g/kg, 7 days) i.p., and the fourth group received both tannic acid (50 mg/kg, 3 days, pretreatment) and MSG (2 g/kg, 7 days) i.p. The animals were euthanized ten days later. Blood was collected for determining the hematological values and blood glucose levels. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined in the brain, liver, and kidney homogenates, and in the erythrocyte hemolysate. Histopathological examination of the brain, liver, and kidneys was conducted through hematoxylin-eosin staining. Results The data showed that the tannic acid treatment statistically decreased the MDA levels in the brain tissues of the group administered MSG and tannic acid (P < 0.001) when compared to the corresponding values of the control group. The SOD activities in the blood hemolysates of the MSG and tannic acid group increased when compared to the corresponding values for the MSG group (P < 0.01). Additionally, we found that pretreatment with tannic acid reduced blood glucose levels in comparison to the levels of the MSG group (P = 0.029). The results of our study show that tannic acid pretreatment in adult rats decreased blood glucose levels and

  11. Estrogen attenuates manganese-induced glutamate transporter impairment in rat primary astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, Joao B T; Aschner, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The astrocytic glutamate transporters (GLT-1, GLAST) are critical for removing excess glutamate from synaptic sites, thereby maintaining glutamate homeostasis within the brain. 17β-Estradiol (E2) is one of the most active estrogen hormones possessing neuroprotective effects both in in vivo and in vitro models, and it has been shown to enhance astrocytic glutamate transporter function (Liang et al. in J Neurochem 80:807-814, 2002; Pawlak et al. in Brain Res Mol Brain Res 138:1-7, 2005). However, E2 is not clinically optimal for neuroprotection given its peripheral feminizing and proliferative effects; therefore, brain selective estrogen receptor modulators (neuro SERMs) (Zhao et al. in Neuroscience 132:299-311, 2005) that specifically target estrogenic mechanisms, but lack the systemic estrogen side effects offer more promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of conditions associated with excessive synaptic glutamate levels. This review highlights recent studies from our laboratory showing that E2 and SERMs effectively reverse glutamate transport inhibition in a manganese (Mn)-induced model of glutamatergic deregulation. Specifically, we discuss mechanisms by which E2 restores the expression and activity of glutamate uptake. We advance the hypothesis that E2 and related compounds, such as tamoxifen may offer a potential therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by altered glutamate homeostasis.

  12. Comparison of fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in myocytes from rats treated with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate and histidine-tryptophan cetoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcos Aurélio Barboza; Brandi, Antônio Carlos; dos Santos, Carlos Alberto; Botelho, Paulo Henrique Husseni; Cortez, José Luís Lasso; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes; Braile, Domingo Marcolino

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Solutions that cause elective cardiac arrest are constantly evolving, but the ideal compound has not yet been found. The authors compare a new cardioplegic solution with histidine-tryptophan-glutamate (Group 2) and other one with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate (Group 1) in a model of isolated rat heart. Objective To quantify the fractal dimension and Shannon entropy in rat myocytes subjected to cardioplegia solution using histidine-tryptophan with glutamate in an experimental model, considering the caspase markers, IL-8 and KI-67. Methods Twenty male Wistar rats were anesthetized and heparinized. The chest was opened, the heart was withdrawn and 40 ml/kg of cardioplegia (with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate or histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution) was infused. The hearts were kept for 2 hours at 4ºC in the same solution, and thereafter placed in the Langendorff apparatus for 30 min with Ringer-Locke solution. Analyzes were performed for immunohistochemical caspase, IL-8 and KI-67. Results The fractal dimension and Shannon entropy were not different between groups histidine-tryptophan-glutamate and histidine-tryptophan-acetoglutarate. Conclusion The amount of information measured by Shannon entropy and the distribution thereof (given by fractal dimension) of the slices treated with histidine-tryptophan-cetoglutarate and histidine-tryptophan-glutamate were not different, showing that the histidine-tryptophan-glutamate solution is as good as histidine-tryptophan-acetoglutarate to preserve myocytes in isolated rat heart. PMID:25140464

  13. Impaired expression and function of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in pilocarpine-treated chronically epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R; Otalora, Luis F Pacheco; Arshadmansab, Massoud F; Herrera, Berenice; Francisco, Sebastian; Ermolinsky, Boris S

    2008-11-13

    Group II metabotropic (mGlu II) receptor subtypes mGlu2 and mGlu3 are important modulators of synaptic plasticity and glutamate release in the brain. Accordingly, several pharmacological ligands have been designed to target these receptors for the treatment of neurological disorders characterized by anomalous glutamate regulation including epilepsy. In this study, we examine whether the expression level and function of mGlu2 and mGlu3 are altered in experimental epilepsy by using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, RT-PCR and extracellular recordings. A down-regulation of mGlu2/3 protein expression at the mossy fiber pathway was associated with a significant reduction in mGlu2/3 protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex of chronically epileptic rats. Moreover, a reduction in mGlu2 and mGlu3 transcripts levels was noticed as early as 24 h after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) and persisted during subsequent "latent" and chronic periods. In addition, a significant impairment of mGlu II-mediated depression of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses was detected in chronically epileptic rats. Application of mGlu II agonists (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) induced a significant reduction of the fEPSP amplitude in control rats, but not in chronic epileptic rats. These data indicate a long-lasting impairment of mGlu2/3 expression that may contribute to abnormal presynaptic plasticity, exaggerate glutamate release and hyperexcitability in temporal lobe epilepsy.

  14. Impaired expression and function of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors in pilocarpine-treated chronically epileptic rats

    PubMed Central

    Garrido-Sanabria, Emilio R.; Otalora, Luis F. Pacheco; Arshadmansab, Massoud F.; Herrera, Berenice; Francisco, Sebastian; Ermolinsky, Boris

    2008-01-01

    Group II metabotropic (mGlu II) receptor subtypes mGlu2 and mGlu3 are important modulators of synaptic plasticity and glutamate release in the brain. Accordingly, several pharmacological ligands have been designed to target these receptors for the treatment of neurological disorders characterized by anomalous glutamate regulation including epilepsy. In this study, we examine whether the expression level and function of mGlu2 and mGlu3 are altered in experimental epilepsy by using immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, RT-PCR and extracellular recordings. A down-regulation of mGlu2/3 protein expression at the mossy fiber pathway was associated with a significant reduction in mGlu2/3 protein expression in the hippocampus and cortex of chronically epileptic rats. Moreover, a reduction in mGlu2 and mGlu3 transcripts levels was noticed as early as 24h after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) and persisted during subsequent “latent” and chronic periods. In addition, a significant impairment of mGlu II-mediated depression of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses was detected in chronically epileptic rats. Application of mGlu II agonists (2S,2'R,3'R)-2-(2',3'-dicarboxycyclopropyl)glycine (DCG-IV) induced a significant reduction of the fEPSP amplitude in control rats, but not in chronic epileptic rats. These data indicate a long-lasting impairment of mGlu2/3 expression that may contribute to abnormal presynaptic plasticity, exaggerate glutamate release and hyperexcitability in temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:18804094

  15. Glutamate receptor antagonism in inferior colliculus attenuates elevated startle response of high anxiety diazepam-withdrawn rats.

    PubMed

    Cabral, A; De Ross, J; Castilho, V M; Brandão, M L; Nobre, M J

    2009-07-07

    Rats segregated according to low (LA) or high (HA) anxiety levels have been used as an important tool in the study of fear and anxiety. Since the efficacy of an anxiolytic compound is a function of the animal's basal anxiety level, it is possible that chronic treatment with a benzodiazepine (Bzp) affects LA and HA animals differently. Based on these assumptions, this study aimed to provide some additional information on the influence of acute, chronic (18 days) and withdrawal effects (48 h) from diazepam (10 mg/kg), in rats with LA or HA levels, on startle response amplitude. For this purpose, the elevated plus-maze (EPM) test was used. In addition, the role of glutamate receptors of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (cIC), the most important mesencephalic tectum integrative structure of the auditory pathways and a brain region that is linked to the processing of auditory information of aversive nature, was also evaluated. Our results showed that, contrary to the results obtained in LA rats, long-term treatment with diazepam promoted anxiolytic and aversive effects in HA animals that were tested under chronic effects or withdrawal from this drug, respectively. In addition, since Bzp withdrawal may function as an unconditioned stressor, the negative affective states observed in HA rats could be a by-product of GABA-glutamate imbalance in brain systems that modulate unconditioned fear and anxiety behaviors, since the blockade of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors in the cIC clearly reduced the aversion promoted by diazepam withdrawal.

  16. Proinflammatory cytokines and apoptosis following glutamate-induced excitotoxicity mediated by p38 MAPK in the hippocampus of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Chaparro-Huerta, V; Rivera-Cervantes, M C; Flores-Soto, M E; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Beas-Zárate, C

    2005-08-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 rise during neuronal damage and activate the apoptotic mitogen-activated protein kinase p38. We studied apoptosis, the levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6, and the cell type producing TNF-alpha in rats at 8, 10, and 14 days of age after neonatal exposure to glutamate, which induces neuronal damage. TNF-alpha production was significantly increased by glutamate, but inhibited by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 mRNA levels increased, but SB203580 did not modify their expression. Thus, the p38 signaling pathway influences the expression of inflammatory genes and its inhibition may offer anti-inflammatory therapy.

  17. Effect of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate, GABA, glutamine and alanine in the rat striatum and hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Molchanova, Svetlana M; Oja, Simos S; Saransaari, Pirjo

    2007-01-01

    Taurine, a non-protein amino acid, acts as an osmoregulator and inhibitory neuromodulator in the brain. Here we studied the effects of intraperitoneal injections of taurine on the concentrations of glutamate and GABA, and their precursors, glutamine and alanine, in the rat striatum and hippocampus. Injections of 0.25, 0.5 and 1 g/kg taurine led to a gradual increase in taurine tissue concentrations in both hippocampus and striatum. Glutamate and GABA also increased in the hippocampus, but not in the striatum. Glutamine increased and alanine decreased markedly in both brain structures. The results corroborate the neuromodulatory role of taurine in the brain. Taurine administration results in an imbalance in inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission in the glutamatergic (hippocampus) and GABAergic (striatum) brain structures, affecting more markedly the neurotransmitter precursors.

  18. The Function of the Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway in Brain in Vivo and Learning Ability Decrease in Parallel in Mature Compared with Young Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piedrafita, Blanca; Cauli, Omar; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2007-01-01

    Aging is associated with cognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We have recently reported that the ability of rats to learn a Y-maze conditional discrimination task depends on the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in brain. The aims of the present work were to assess whether the ability of rats to…

  19. ESP-102, a combined extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis and Schizandra chinensis, protects against glutamate-induced toxicity in primary cultures of rat cortical cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Choong Je; Kim, Seung Hyun; Lee, Ki Yong; Oh, Taehwan; Kim, Sun Yeou; Sung, Sang Hyun; Kim, Young Choong

    2009-11-01

    It was reported previously that ESP-102, a combined extract of Angelica gigas, Saururus chinensis and Schizandra chinensis, significantly improved scopolamine-induced memory impairment in mice and protected primary cultured rat cortical cells against glutamate-induced toxicity. To corroborate this effect, the action patterns of ESP-102 were elucidated using the same in vitro system. ESP-102 decreased the cellular calcium concentration increased by glutamate, and inhibited the subsequent overproduction of cellular nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species to the level of control cells. It also preserved cellular activities of antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase reduced in the glutamate-injured neuronal cells. While a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was observed in glutamate treated cells, the mitochondrial membrane potential was maintained by ESP-102. These results support that the actual mechanism of neuroprotective activity of ESP-102 against glutamate-induced oxidative stress might be its antioxidative activity.

  20. Transiently increased glutamate cycling in rat PFC is associated with rapid onset of antidepressant-like effects

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Golam M. I.; Zhang, Jie; Thomas, Monique; Banasr, Mounira; Ma, Xiaoxian; Pittman, Brian; Bristow, Linda; Schaeffer, Eric; Duman, Ronald; Rothman, Douglas; Behar, Kevin; Sanacora, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Several drugs have recently been reported to induce rapid antidepressant effects in clinical trials and rodent models. Although the cellular mechanisms involved remain unclear, reports suggest that increased glutamate transmission contributes to these effects. Here, we demonstrate that the antidepressant-like efficacy of three unique drugs, with reported rapid onset antidepressant properties, is coupled with a rapid transient rise in glutamate cycling in medial prefronal cortex (mPFC) of awake rats as measured by ex vivo 1H-[13C]-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Rats were acutely pre-treated by intraperitoneal injection with a single dose of ketamine (1,3,10,30,80mg/kg), Ro 25-6981 (1,3,10mg/kg), scopolamine (5,25,100μg/kg) or vehicle (controls). At fixed times after drug injection animals received an intravenous infusion of [1,6-13C2]glucose for 8 min to enrich brain amino acid pools with 13C, followed by rapid euthanasia. The mPFC was dissected, extracted with ethanol and metabolite 13C enrichments measured. We found a clear dose dependent effect of ketamine and Ro 25-6981 on behavior and the percent of 13C-enrichment of glutamate, glutamine and GABA. Further, we also found an effect of scopolamine on both cycling and behavior. These studies demonstrate that three pharmacologically distinct classes of drugs, clinically related through their reported rapid antidepressant actions, share the common ability to rapidly stimulate glutamate cycling at doses pertinent for their antidepressant-like efficacy. We conclude that increased cycling precedes the antidepressant action at behaviorally effective doses and suggests the rapid change in cycling could be used to predict efficacy of novel agents or identify doses with antidepressant activity. PMID:27067013

  1. Glutamate controls the induction of GABA-mediated giant depolarizing potentials through AMPA receptors in neonatal rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Bolea, S; Avignone, E; Berretta, N; Sanchez-Andres, J V; Cherubini, E

    1999-05-01

    Glutamate controls the induction of GABA-mediated giant depolarizing potentials through AMPA receptors in neonatal rat hippocampal slices. Giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) are generated by the interplay of the depolarizing action of GABA and glutamate. In this study, single and dual whole cell recordings (in current-clamp configuration) were performed from CA3 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slices obtained from postnatal (P) days P1- to P6-old rats to evaluate the role of ionotropic glutamate receptors in GDP generation. Superfusion of 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) (10-40 microM) completely blocked GDPs. However, in the presence of CNQX, it was still possible to re-induce the appearance of GDPs with GABA (20 microM) or (RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxadepropionate (AMPA) (5 microM). This effect was prevented by the more potent and selective AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 53655 (50-100 microM). In the presence of GYKI 53655, both kainic or domoic acid (0.1-1 microM) were unable to induce GDPs. In contrast, bath application of D-(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (50 microM) or (+)-3-(2carboxy-piperazin-4-yl)-propyl-L-phosphonic acid (20 microM) produced only a 37 +/- 9% (SE) and 36 +/- 11% reduction in GDPs frequency, respectively. Cyclothiazide, a selective blocker of AMPA receptor desensitization, increased GDP frequency by 76 +/- 14%. Experiments were also performed with an intracellular solution containing KF to block GABAA receptor-mediated responses. In these conditions, a glutamatergic component of GDP was revealed. GDPs could still be recorded synchronous with those detected simultaneously with KCl-filled electrodes, although their amplitude was smaller. Similar results were found in pair recordings obtained from minislices containing only a small portion of the CA3 area. These data suggest that GDP generation requires activation of AMPA receptors by local release of glutamate from recurrent collaterals.

  2. Developmental effects of wheel running on hippocampal glutamate receptor expression in young and mature adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Miranda C.; Somkuwar, Sucharita S.; Mandyam, Chitra D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the behavioral benefits associated with voluntary wheel running in rodents may be due to modulation of glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in learning and memory. However, the expression of the n-Methyl-d-Aspartate glutamate receptor subunits (GluNs) in the hippocampus in response to chronic sustained voluntary wheel running has not yet been investigated. Further, the developmental effects during young and mature adulthood on wheel running output and GluN expression in hippocampal subregions has not been determined, and therefore is the main focus of this investigation. Eight-week-old and sixteen-week-old male Wistar rats were housed in home cages with free access to running wheels and running output was monitored for four weeks. Wheel access was terminated and tissue from the dorsal and ventral hippocampi were processed for Western blot analysis of GluN subunit expression. Young adult runners demonstrated an escalation in running output but this behavior was not evident in mature adult runners. In parallel, young adult runners demonstrated a significant increase in total GluN (1 and 2A) subunit expression in the dorsal hippocampus, and an opposing effect in the ventral hippocampus compared to age-matched sedentary controls; these changes in total protein expression were not associated with significant alterations in the phosphorylation of the GluN subunits. In contrast, mature adult runners demonstrated a reduction in total GluN2A expression in the dorsal hippocampus, without producing alterations in the ventral hippocampus compared to age-matched sedentary controls. In conclusion, differential running activity-mediated modulation of GluN subunit expression in the hippocampal subregions was revealed to be associated with developmental effects on running activity, which may contribute to altered hippocampal synaptic activity and behavioral outcomes in young and mature adult subjects. PMID:26220171

  3. CB1 cannabinoid receptor inhibits synaptic release of glutamate in rat dorsolateral striatum.

    PubMed

    Gerdeman, G; Lovinger, D M

    2001-01-01

    CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the neostriatum mediate profound motor deficits induced when cannabinoid drugs are administered to rodents. Because the CB1 receptor has been shown to inhibit neurotransmitter release in various brain areas, we investigated the effects of CB1 activation on glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the dorsolateral striatum of the rat where the CB1 receptor is highly expressed. We performed whole cell voltage-clamp experiments in striatal brain slices and applied the CB1 agonists HU-210 or WIN 55,212-2 during measurement of synaptic transmission. Excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), evoked by electrical stimulation of afferent fibers, were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by CB1 agonist application. EPSC inhibition was accompanied by an increase in two separate indices of presynaptic release, the paired-pulse response ratio and the coefficient of variation, suggesting a decrease in neurotransmitter release. These effects were prevented by application of the CB1 antagonist SR141716A. When Sr(2+) was substituted for Ca(2+) in the extracellular solution, application of HU-210 (1 microM) significantly reduced the frequency, but not amplitude, of evoked, asynchronous quantal release events. Spontaneous release events were similarly decreased in frequency with no change in amplitude. These findings further support the interpretation that CB1 activation leads to a decrease of glutamate release from afferent terminals in the striatum. These results reveal a novel potential role for cannabinoids in regulating striatal function and thus basal ganglia output and may suggest CB1-targeted drugs as potential therapeutic agents in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and other basal ganglia disorders.

  4. Estrogen attenuates Manganese-induced glutamate transporter impairment in rat primary astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunsook; Sidoryk-Wegrzynowicz, Marta; Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, Joao BT; Aschner, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The astrocytic glutamate transporters (GLT-1, GLAST) are critical for removing excess glutamate from synaptic sites, thereby maintaining glutamate homeostasis within the brain. 17 -Estradiol (E2) is one of the most active estrogen hormones possessing neuroprotective effects both in in vivo and in vitro models, and it has been shown to enhance astrocytic glutamate transporter function (Liang et al. 2002; Pawlak et al. 2005). However, E2 is not clinically optimal for neuroprotection given its peripheral feminizing and proliferative effects; therefore, brain selective estrogen receptor modulators (neuroSERMs) (Zhao et al. 2005) that specifically target estrogenic mechanisms, but lack the systemic estrogen side effects offer more promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of conditions associated with excessive synaptic glutamate levels. This review highlights recent studies from our laboratory showing that E2 and SERMs effectively reverse glutamate transport inhibition in a manganese (Mn)-induced model of glutamatergic deregulation. Specifically, we discuss mechanisms by which E2 restores the expression and activity of glutamatergic neurotransmission. We advance the hypothesis that E2 and related compounds, such as tamoxifen (TX) may offer a potential therapeutic modality in neurodegenerative disorders, which are characterized by altered glutamate homeostasis. PMID:22878846

  5. Increases in Brain (1)H-MR Glutamine and Glutamate Signals Following Acute Exhaustive Endurance Exercise in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Świątkiewicz, Maciej; Fiedorowicz, Michał; Orzeł, Jarosław; Wełniak-Kamińska, Marlena; Bogorodzki, Piotr; Langfort, Józef; Grieb, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) in ultra-high magnetic field can be used for non-invasive quantitative assessment of brain glutamate (Glu) and glutamine (Gln) in vivo. Glu, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, is efficiently recycled between synapses and presynaptic terminals through Glu-Gln cycle which involves glutamine synthase confined to astrocytes, and uses 60-80% of energy in the resting human and rat brain. During voluntary or involuntary exercise many brain areas are significantly activated, which certainly intensifies Glu-Gln cycle. However, studies on the effects of exercise on (1)H-MRS Glu and/or Gln signals from the brain provided divergent results. The present study on rats was performed to determine changes in (1)H-MRS signals from three brain regions engaged in motor activity consequential to forced acute exercise to exhaustion. Method: After habituation to treadmill running, rats were subjected to acute treadmill exercise continued to exhaustion. Each animal participating in the study was subject to two identical imaging sessions performed under light isoflurane anesthesia, prior to, and following the exercise bout. In control experiments, two imaging sessions separated by the period of rest instead of exercise were performed. (1)H-NMR spectra were recorded from the cerebellum, striatum, and hippocampus using a 7T small animal MR scanner. Results: Following exhaustive exercise statistically significant increases in the Gln and Glx signals were found in all three locations, whereas increases in the Glu signal were found in the cerebellum and hippocampus. In control experiments, no changes in (1)H-MRS signals were found. Conclusion: Increase in glutamine signals from the brain areas engaged in motor activity may reflect a disequilibrium caused by increased turnover in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and a delay in the return of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons. Increased turnover of Glu

  6. Increases in Brain 1H-MR Glutamine and Glutamate Signals Following Acute Exhaustive Endurance Exercise in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Świątkiewicz, Maciej; Fiedorowicz, Michał; Orzeł, Jarosław; Wełniak-Kamińska, Marlena; Bogorodzki, Piotr; Langfort, Józef; Grieb, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in ultra-high magnetic field can be used for non-invasive quantitative assessment of brain glutamate (Glu) and glutamine (Gln) in vivo. Glu, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, is efficiently recycled between synapses and presynaptic terminals through Glu-Gln cycle which involves glutamine synthase confined to astrocytes, and uses 60–80% of energy in the resting human and rat brain. During voluntary or involuntary exercise many brain areas are significantly activated, which certainly intensifies Glu-Gln cycle. However, studies on the effects of exercise on 1H-MRS Glu and/or Gln signals from the brain provided divergent results. The present study on rats was performed to determine changes in 1H-MRS signals from three brain regions engaged in motor activity consequential to forced acute exercise to exhaustion. Method: After habituation to treadmill running, rats were subjected to acute treadmill exercise continued to exhaustion. Each animal participating in the study was subject to two identical imaging sessions performed under light isoflurane anesthesia, prior to, and following the exercise bout. In control experiments, two imaging sessions separated by the period of rest instead of exercise were performed. 1H-NMR spectra were recorded from the cerebellum, striatum, and hippocampus using a 7T small animal MR scanner. Results: Following exhaustive exercise statistically significant increases in the Gln and Glx signals were found in all three locations, whereas increases in the Glu signal were found in the cerebellum and hippocampus. In control experiments, no changes in 1H-MRS signals were found. Conclusion: Increase in glutamine signals from the brain areas engaged in motor activity may reflect a disequilibrium caused by increased turnover in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and a delay in the return of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons. Increased turnover of Glu-Gln cycle

  7. Glutamate stimulation of retinal ganglion cells in normal and s334ter-4 rat retinas: a candidate for a neurotransmitter-based retinal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Finlayson, Paul G; Iezzi, Raymond

    2010-07-01

    PURPOSE. To investigate the suitability of glutamate as a potential agent for a neurotransmitter-based retinal prosthesis. METHODS. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from P35-70 albino Sprague-Dawley (normal) and P60-254 S334ter-4 (photoreceptor degeneration) rats were recorded extracellularly in flattened eye cup preparations, to assess their responses to glutamate, applied locally via micropipettes. RESULTS. Brief local application of glutamate effectively excited RGCs in both normal and degenerated retinas. Epiretinal surface application of glutamate was less likely to excite RGCs than was subsurface application (20 microm below the epiretinal surface). Glutamate evoked RGC firing rates, and the response patterns were similar for epiretinal surface and subsurface applications. Subsurface application of 2 mM glutamate effectively excited cells within 130 microm of the ejection sites. Response latencies averaged 281 ms and were significantly longer for OFF RGCs than for ON RGCs in normal retinas (P = 0.025). Suppression of activity was observed at shorter latencies ( approximately 100 ms) after glutamate application in most of the spontaneously active RGCs. Responses to each glutamate application were similar, and the duration of activity was directly dependent on the duration of application. RGC responses varied from recurrent high-frequency bursts to sustained firing at rates above 40 spikes/s, in normal and degenerated retinas. Paired, sequential applications of glutamate evoked two distinguishable responses, with interstimulus intervals as low as 200 ms. Overall, RGC response sensitivity to glutamate was similar in normal and degenerated retinas. CONCLUSIONS. Glutamate is an excellent candidate for a neurotransmitter-based retinal prosthesis, as its local application effectively stimulates RGCs with high spatial and temporal resolution.

  8. Metabolism and disposition of a potent group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, in rats, dogs, and monkeys.

    PubMed

    James, Joyce K; Nakamura, Masato; Nakazato, Atsuro; Zhang, Kanyin E; Cramer, Merryl; Brunner, Janice; Cook, Jacquelynn; Chen, Weichao G

    2005-09-01

    Metabolism and disposition of MGS0028 [(1R,2S,5S,6S)-2-amino-6-fluoro-4-oxobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid monohydrate], a potent group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, were examined in three preclinical species (Sprague-Dawley rats, beagle dogs, and rhesus monkeys). In rats, MGS0028 was widely distributed and primarily excreted in urine as parent and as a single reductive metabolite, identified as the 4R-isomer MGS0034 [(1R,2S,4R,5S,6S)-2-amino-6-fluoro-4-hydroxybicyclo[3.1.0]-hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid]. MGS0028 had a low brain to plasma ratio at efficacious doses in rats and was eliminated more slowly in rat brain than in plasma. Exposure increased proportionally (1--10 mg/kg p.o.) in rats, with bioavailability>60% at all doses. However, bioavailability was only approximately 20% in monkeys, and MGS0034 was found in relatively high abundance in plasma. In dogs, oral bioavailability was >60%, and the metabolite was not detected. In vitro metabolism was examined in liver subcellular fractions (microsomes and cytosol) from rat, dog, monkey, and human. Reductive metabolism was observed in rat, monkey, and human liver cytosol incubations, but not in dog liver cytosol incubations. No metabolism of MGS0028 was detected in incubations with liver microsomes from any species. Similar to in vivo results, MGS0028 was reduced in cytosol stereospecifically to MGS0034. The rank order of in vitro metabolite formation (monkey > rat approximately human > dog) was in agreement with in vivo observations in rats, dogs, and monkeys. Based on the observation of species difference in reductive metabolism, rat and monkey were recommended to be the preclinical species for further characterization prior to testing in humans. Finally, allometric scaling predicts that human pharmacokinetic parameters would be acceptable for further development.

  9. Metabotropic glutamate receptors, transmitter output and fatty acids: studies in rat brain slices.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, G.; Leonardi, P.; Moroni, F.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD), a non-selective agonist of the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), have been studied in rat cortical and striatal slices by measuring the depolarization-induced output of D-[3H]-aspartate (D-[3H]-Asp) and of [3H]-glutamate ([3H]-Glu), neosynthesized from [3H]-glutamine. 2. In cortical slices, 1S,3R-ACPD potentiated the depolarization-induced (KCl, 30 mM) output of both D-[3H]-Asp and [3H]-Glu. The potentiation, obtained at 300 microM 1S,3R-ACPD was 65 +/- 6% for D-[3H]-Asp and 56 +/- 10% for [3H]-Glu. Conversely, in striatal slices, 1S,3R-ACPD reduced the depolarization-induced transmitter output. The reduction, obtained at 300 microM of the agonist, was 60 +/- 8% for D-[3H]-Asp and 50 +/- 5% for neosynthesized [3H]-Glu. 3. Bovine serum albumin (BSA, 15 microM), which is able to bind locally produced fatty acids, completely eliminated the potentiating effect 1S,3R-ACPD had on D-[3H]-Asp output from cortical slices. Low concentrations of arachidonic acid (1-10 microM) or of oleic acid (1-10 microM) added to BSA-containing perfusion medium, restored this potentiating effect. BSA, however, had no effect on the inhibitory action of 1S,3R-ACPD in striatal slices. 4. Bromophenacyl bromide (100 microM), an inhibitor of phospholipase A2, and RG80267 (100 microM), an inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipase, have been shown to inhibit fatty acid production. These compounds prevented the potentiating effect of 1S,3R-ACPD on D-[3H]-Asp-output in cortical slices. 5. Indomethacin (100 microM), an inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenases, plus nordihydroguaiaretic acid (100 microM), an inhibitor of lipoxygenases, increased D-[3H]-Asp output in cortical slices perfused with BSA-containing medium. 6. These experiments suggest that the mGluR-mediated potentiation of transmitter output requires the availability of unsaturated fatty acids, such as arachidonic or oleic acids, in cortical slices. In contrast, the m

  10. Metabotropic glutamate response in acutely dissociated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Shirasaki, T; Harata, N; Akaike, N

    1994-01-01

    1. The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) response was investigated in dissociated rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones using conventional and nystatin-perforated whole-cell modes of the patch recording configuration. 2. In the perforated patch recording configuration, the application of glutamate (Glu), quisqualate (QA), aspartate (Asp) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) induced a slow outward current superimposed on a fast ionotropic inward current, whereas alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and kainate (KA) induced only an ionotropic inward current at a holding potential (VH) of -20 mV. A specific agonist of the mGlu receptor (mGluR), trans-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylate (tACPD), induced an outward current in approximately 80% of the neurones tested. Asp- and NMDA-induced outward currents were antagonized by D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-AP5) whereas Glu-, QA- and tACPD-induced outward currents were not antagonized by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and D-AP5, indicating that the mGlu response is an outward current component. 3. L-2-Amino-3-phosphonopropionate (L-AP3) and DL-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (AP4) did not block the mGlu response. 4. The relative potencies of mGlu agonists were QA > Glu > tACPD. The threshold and EC50 values of metabotropic outward currents were 10-100 times lower than those of the ionotropic inward current (iGlu response). 5. The reversal potential of the mGlu response (EmGlu) was close to EK (K+ equilibrium potential), and it shifted 59.5 mV for a tenfold change in extracellular K+ concentration. 6. In Ca(2+)-free external solution, the mGlu response was elicited by an initial application of Glu, but subsequent applications failed to induce the response. There was also an increase in the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) during the application of Glu and QA but not of AMPA, indicating Ca2+ release from an intracellular Ca2+ store. 7

  11. Vesicular Glutamate Transporter 2 Expression in the Rat Pineal Gland: Detailed Analysis of Expression Pattern and Regulatory Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Sachine; Hisano, Setsuji

    Melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, is closely related physiologically to circadian rhythm, sleep and reproduction, and also psychiatrically to mood disorders in humans. Under circadian control, melatonin secretion is modulated via nocturnal autonomic (adrenergic) stimulation to the gland, which expresses vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) 1, VGLUT2 and a VGLUT1 splice variant (VGLUT1v), glutamatergic markers. Expression of VGLUT2 gene and protein in the intact gland has been reported to exhibit a rhythmic change during a day. To study VGLUT2 expression is under adrenergic control, we here performed an in vitro experiment using dispersed pineal cells of rats. Stimulation of either β-adrenergic receptor or cAMP production to the pineal cells was shown to increase mRNA level of VGLUT2, but not VGLUT1 and VGLUT1v. Because an ability of glutamate to inhibit melatonin production was previously reported in the cultured gland, it is likely that pineal VGLUT2 transports glutamate engaged in the inhibition of melatonin production.

  12. Riluzole is a potent drug to protect neonatal rat hypoglossal motoneurons in vitro from excitotoxicity due to glutamate uptake block.

    PubMed

    Cifra, Alessandra; Nani, Francesca; Nistri, Andrea

    2011-03-01

    Excitotoxic damage to motoneurons is thought to be an important contribution to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a slowly developing degeneration of motoneurons that, in most cases of sporadic occurrence, is associated with impaired glial glutamate uptake. Riluzole is the only drug licensed for symptomatic ALS treatment and is proposed to delay disease progression. As riluzole is administered only after full ALS manifestation, it is unclear if its early use might actually prevent motoneuron damage. We explored this issue by using, as a simple in vitro model, hypoglossal motoneurons (a primary target of ALS) of the neonatal rat brainstem slice preparation exposed to excitotoxic stress due to glutamate uptake block by DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA). TBOA evoked sustained network bursting, early (1 h) enhancement of the S100B immunostaining of gray matter astrocytes, and activated the motoneuronal stress ATF-3 transcription factor; 4 h later, loss (30%) of motoneuron staining ensued and pyknosis appeared. Riluzole (5 μM; applied 15 min after TBOA) inhibited bursting, decreased the frequency of spontaneous glutamatergic events, reversed changes in S100B immunostaining and prevented late loss of motoneuron staining. These results show that excitotoxicity induced by glutamate uptake block developed slowly, and was sensed by glia and motoneurons with delayed cell death. Our data provide novel evidence for the neuroprotective action of riluzole on motoneurons and glia when applied early after an excitotoxic stimulus. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Glutamate binding is altered in hippocampus and cortex of Wistar rats after pilocarpine-induced Status Epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Alexandra Olimpio Siqueira; Mortari, Márcia Renata; Carolino, Ruither Oliveira Gomes; Coutinho-Netto, Joaquim; Dos Santos, Wagner Ferreira

    2007-08-31

    Several evidences have pointed to biochemical alterations in some brain structures after experimental Status Epilepticus (SE). Thus, the effects of pilocarpine-induced SE on the glutamate binding in the hippocampus and cortex of Wistar rats were evaluated. Groups of animals were submitted to a 3h SE induced by intrahippocampal microinjection of pilocarpine, which was interrupted by the administration of sodium thiopental. Two weeks later the animals were sacrificed and had their cerebral cortices and hippocampi removed in order to perform the binding experiments. The results show that the pilocarpine-induced SE provoked an increase in 2.5-fold in the B(max) values for glutamate binding in the cortex, but not in the hippocampus. Moreover, we observed a 4-fold increase for the Kd values in the hippocampus and a 2-fold increase in the cortex. These findings might indicate that the epileptogenesis involves alterations in the glutamate receptors that are not restricted to the limbic system. Moreover, changes in these receptors are not exclusively of number, but rather involve the affinity for their ligands.

  14. Melatonin protects against oxygen and glucose deprivation by decreasing extracellular glutamate and Nox-derived ROS in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Paloma; Parada, Esther; Farré-Alins, Victor; Molz, Simone; Cacabelos, Ramón; Marco-Contelles, José; López, Manuela G; Tasca, Carla I; Ramos, Eva; Romero, Alejandro; Egea, Javier

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic interventions on pathological processes involved in the ischemic cascade, such as oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and/or apoptosis, are of urgent need for stroke treatment. Melatonin regulates a large number of physiological actions and its beneficial properties have been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate whether melatonin mediates neuroprotection in rat hippocampal slices subjected to oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) and glutamate excitotoxicity. Thus, we describe here that melatonin significantly reduced the amount of lactate dehydrogenase released in the OGD-treated slices, reverted neuronal injury caused by OGD-reoxygenation in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions, restored the reduction of GSH content of the hippocampal slices induced by OGD, and diminished the oxidative stress produced in the reoxygenation period. Furthermore, melatonin afforded maximum protection against glutamate-induced toxicity and reversed the glutamate released almost basal levels, at 10 and 30μM concentration, respectively. Consequently, we propose that melatonin might strongly and positively influence the outcome of brain ischemia/reperfusion.

  15. Tl+ induces the permeability transition pore in Ca2+-loaded rat liver mitochondria energized by glutamate and malate.

    PubMed

    Korotkov, Sergey M; Emelyanova, Larisa V; Konovalova, Svetlana A; Brailovskaya, Irina V

    2015-08-01

    It is known that Ca2+ and heavy metals more actively induce MPTP opening in mitochondria, energized by the I complex substrates. Thus, a rise in a Tl+-induced MPTP was proposed in experiments on isolated rat liver mitochondria energized by the complex I substrate (glutamate and malate). Expose of the mitochondria to Ca2+ into a medium containing TlNO3, glutamate, and malate as well as sucrose or KNO3 resulted in a decrease in state 3, state 4, or DNP-stimulated respiration as well as an increase of both mitochondrial swelling and ΔΨmito dissipation. The MPTP inhibitors, CsA and ADP, almost completely eliminated the effect of Ca2+, which was more pronounced in the presence of the complex I substrates than the complex II substrate (succinate) and rotenone (Korotkov and Saris, 2011). The present study concludes that Tl+-induced MPTP opening is more appreciable in mitochondria energized by glutamate and malate but not succinate in the presence of rotenone. We assume that the Tl+-induced MPTP opening along with followed swelling and possible structural deformations of the complex I in Ca2+-loaded mitochondria may be a part of the thallium toxicity mechanism on mitochondria in living organisms. At the same time, oxidation of Tl+ to Tl3+ by mitochondrial oxygen reactive species is proposed for the mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ethanol and acetaldehyde induce similar changes in extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine and GABA in rat anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Gong Cheng; Yang, Jing Yu; Hao, Yue; Dong, Ying Xu; Wu, Chun Fu

    2007-03-30

    It is controversial regarding to the roles of acetaldehyde and ethanol in the central nervous system. In the present study, the effects of acetaldehyde and ethanol on extracellular levels of glutamate, taurine and GABA in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of freely moving rats were investigated by using the microdialysis technique coupled to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescent detection. The result showed that glutamate levels were significantly decreased after acute administration of acetaldehyde (AcH, 20 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.), while taurine levels were significantly increased after the higher dose of acetaldehyde (100 mg/kg, i.p.). GABA levels had no changes at any doses of acetaldehyde tested. Interestingly, similar changes of these amino acids were induced by ethanol (EtOH, 3 g/kg, i.p.) when sodium azide (NaN3, 10 mg/kg, i.p.), a catalase inhibitor that can reduce brain ethanol metabolism, was used simultaneously. These findings suggest that acetaldehyde and ethanol have the similar effects on the extracellular output of glutamate, taurine and GABA in the ACC.

  17. Pharmacological characterization of metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated high-affinity GTPase activity in rat cerebral cortical membranes

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Nobuyuki; Odagaki, Yuji; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2000-01-01

    Activation of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) functionally coupled to metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) was assessed by agonist-induced high-affinity GTPase (EC3.6.1.-) activity in rat cerebral cortical membranes. L-Glutamate (1 mM) stimulated high-affinity GTPase activity to the same extent throughout the incubation period up to 20 min, in a Mg2+-dependent manner. The addition of 1 mM L-glutamate augmented Vmax of the enzyme activity (1670 to 3850 pmol mg−1 protein 15 min−1) with slight increase in KM value (0.26 to 0.63 μM). The high-affinity GTPase activity was stimulated by the following compounds with a rank order of potency of (2S,2′R,3′R)-2-(2′,3′-dicarboxycyclopropyl) glycine (DCG-IV) >  (2S,1′S,2′S)-2-(carboxycyclopyropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I) > L-glutamate ≥ 2R,4R-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate [(2R,4R)-APDC] > 1S,3R-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylate [(1S,3R)-ACPD] > (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine [(S)-4C3HPG] > (S)-3-carboxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycine [(S)-3C4HPG] > ibotenate, but not by L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4), (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine [(RS)-3,5-DHPG], quisqualate, or L-serine-O-phosphate (L-SOP), indicative of involvement of group II mGluRs, in particular mGluR2. (2S)-α-Ethylglutamate (EGLU), a presumably selective antagonist against group II mGluRs, inhibited DCG-IV-stimulated high-affinity GTPase activity in a competitive manner with an apparent KB of 220 μM. L-Glutamate-stimulated activity was eliminated by pretreatment of the membranes with sulfhydryl alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) at 30–50 μM, indicating that G-proteins of the Gi family are involved. These results indicate that mGluR agonist-induced high-affinity GTPase activity in rat cerebral cortical membranes may be used to detect the functional interaction between group II mGluRs, in particular mGluR2, and NEM-sensitive Gi proteins. PMID:10928972

  18. A study of glutamate levels, NR1, NR2A, NR2B receptors and oxidative stress in rat model of Japanese encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Prashant Singh; Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee

    2017-03-15

    There is paucity of studies on the role of glutamate excitotoxicity in cell damage in Japanese encephalitis. In this study the glutamate levels and its NMDA receptors, and oxidative stress markers in different brain regions have been evaluated and correlated with neurobehavioral changes at different time points. Twelve day old Wistar rats were inoculated with 3×10(6)pfu/ml intracerebrally. The neurobehavioral effects were evaluated by spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA), grip strength and rota rod test on 10, 33 and 48days post inoculation (dpi). Glutamate level was evaluated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, mRNA gene expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor 1, 2A and 2B (NR1, NR2A and NR2B) were evaluated by real time PCR. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) levels were measured by spectrophotometer in different brain regions of JEV infected rats on 10, 33 and 48dpi. There was significant increase in motor deficit, grip strength and decreased locomotor activity on 10 and 33dpi. Glutamate levels were increased in thalamus, midbrain, frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum on 10 and 33dpi and were followed by a recovery on 48dpi. Glutamate NMDR receptors NR1, NR2A and NR2B were reduced in thalamus, midbrain, frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum on 10dpi which was followed by recovery after 33dpi. A significant increase in MDA level in thalamus, midbrain, frontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum was noted on 10 and 33dpi. The antioxidant GSH and GPx were significantly reduced in these brain regions on 10 and 33dpi. Glutamate, MDA, GSH and GPx correlated in different brain regions as the disease progress. Increased Glutamate level may be related to oxidative stress and may be responsible for behavioral alterations in rat model of Japanese encephalitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cyanocobalamin, vitamin B12, depresses glutamate release through inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals (synaptosomes).

    PubMed

    Hung, Kun-Long; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Huang, Chia-Yu; Wang, Su-Jane

    2009-01-14

    The effect of cyanocobalamin, vitamin B12, on glutamate release in isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) prepared from rat prefrontal cortex was examined. Cyanocobalamin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by 4-aminopyridine in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of cyanocobalamin was blocked by the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1, not by the glutamate transporter inhibitor L-transpyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid or the nontransportable glutamate inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate, indicating that this release inhibition results from a reduction of vesicular exocytosis and not from an inhibition of Ca(2+)-independent efflux via glutamate transporter. Examination of the effect of cyanocobalamin on cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration revealed that the inhibition of glutamate release could be attributed to a reduction in voltage-dependent Ca(2+) influx. Consistent with this, the N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel blocker omega-conotoxin MVIIC, largely attenuated the inhibitory effect of cyanocobalamin on 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release, but the Ca(2+) release inhibitor dantrolene had no effect. Cyanocobalamin did not alter the resting synaptosomal membrane potential or 4-aminopyridine-mediated depolarization; thus, the inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca(2+) influx and glutamate release produced by cyanocobalamin was not due to its decreasing synaptosomal excitability. In addition, cyanocobalamin-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked Ca(2+) influx and glutamate release was significantly attenuated by protein kinase C inhibitors GF109203X and Ro318220. Furthermore, 4-aminopyridine-induced phosphorylation of protein kinase C was significantly reduced by cyanocobalamin. These results suggest that cyanocobalamin effects a decrease in protein kinase C activation, which subsequently reduces the Ca(2+) entry through voltage-dependent N- and P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels to cause a decrease in evoked glutamate

  20. Effect of glutamate stimulation of the cuneiform nucleus on cardiovascular regulation in anesthetized rats: role of the pontine Kolliker-Fuse nucleus.

    PubMed

    Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Nasimi, Ali

    2011-04-18

    Cuneiform nucleus (CnF) is a reticular nucleus of the midbrain involved in cardiovascular function and stress. There is no report on the cardiovascular effects of the glutamatergic system in the CnF. In the present study, we investigated the cardiovascular effects of glutamate and its NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors in the CnF. In addition, the possible mediation of Kolliker-Fuse (KF) nucleus in the cardiovascular effects of the CnF was explored. l-glutamate, AP5 (an NMDA receptor antagonist), and CNQX (an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) (50-100 nl) were microinjected into the CnF of anesthetized rats. Also, the KF was blocked by cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) then l-glutamate was microinjected into the CnF. The maximum changes of blood pressure and heart rate were compared with the pre-injection (paired t-test) and control (independent t-test) values. Microinjection of glutamate (25 nmol/100 nl) into the CnF produced either a short pressor and bradycardic or a long pressor and tachycardic responses. Microinjection of AP5 or CNQX alone did not affect the basal arterial pressure and heart rate. However, co-injection of glutamate with AP5 strongly attenuated the short and moderately attenuated the long cardiovascular responses elicited by glutamate. Co-injection of glutamate with CNQX did not attenuate the short and weakly attenuated the long cardiovascular responses elicited by glutamate. These data suggest that the responses are mediated mainly through NMDA receptors. Blockade of the KF nucleus strongly attenuated the short response and weakly attenuated the long response to glutamate microinjection, suggesting that the cardiovascular effects of glutamate in the CnF, especially the short responses, were mediated by the KF nucleus. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Reduction by gabapentin of K+-evoked release of [3H]-glutamate from the caudal trigeminal nucleus of the streptozotocin-treated rat

    PubMed Central

    Maneuf, Y P; Blake, R; Andrews, N A; McKnight, A T

    2004-01-01

    Recently, we showed that gabapentin can inhibit a facilitatory effect of substance P (SP) on K+-evoked glutamate release in rat trigeminal slices (Maneuf et al., 2001), and we have now examined the effect of gabapentin on glutamate release in the trigeminal slice from the streptozotocin (STZ)-treated rat. At 4 weeks following STZ treatment (50 mg kg−1 i.p.), blood glucose was increased in the majority of cases, compared to the control level. All the treated animals showed a significant degree (P<0.001) of tactile allodynia (assessed using von Frey filaments) that did not appear to correlate with blood glucose levels.In this study, we demonstrated that, after STZ treatment, 30 μM gabapentin reduced K+-evoked release of [3H]-glutamate in either normal (11 mM) or high (30 mM) glucose conditions by 24 and 22%, respectively. In the normal rat, gabapentin (up to 100 μM) is ordinarily unable to affect release of glutamate from the trigeminal slice.The uptake of glutamate in Sp5C punches from streptozotocin-treated rats was reduced under normal glucose conditions (41.7% of control), whereas high glucose restored uptake to normal (84.7% of control).The addition of 1 μM substance P potentiated the evoked release of glutamate in both normal (40% increase) and high glucose (28%), and this was blocked by gabapentin (30 μM) in both conditions. It is interesting to speculate that this ability of gabapentin to reduce the release of glutamate in the trigeminal nucleus after streptozotocin treatment may be of relevance to the antihyperalgesic-allodynic actions of the drug. PMID:14744819

  2. Involvement of glutamate in gastrointestinal vago-vagal reflexes initiated by gastrointestinal distention in the rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueguo; Fogel, Ronald

    2003-01-31

    Vago-vagal reflexes play an integral role in the regulation of gastrointestinal function. Although there have been a number of reports describing the effects of various stimuli on the firing rates of vagal afferent fibers and vagal motor neurons, little is known regarding the neurotransmitters that mediate the vago-vagal reflexes. In the present work, we investigated the role of glutamate in the vago-vagal reflex induced by gastrointestinal distention. Using single-cell recording techniques, we determined the effects of gastric and duodenal distention on the firing rates of gut-related neurons in the dorsal vagal complex, in the absence and presence of glutamate antagonists. Kynurenic acid, a competitive glutamate receptor antagonist, injected into the dorsal vagal complex, blocked the neuronal response of neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and the nucleus of the solitary tract to gastrointestinal distention. Injection of glutamate into the nucleus of the solitary tract produced inhibition of dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus neurons that were also inhibited by gastric and/or duodenal distention. Thus, the distention-induced inhibition of dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus neurons may be mediated by glutamate-induced excitation of gut-related nucleus of the solitary tract neurons. To investigate the role of the various glutamate receptor subtypes in the distention-induced events, we studied the effects of 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), a selective non-NMDA receptor antagonist, and DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (DL-AP5), a selective NMDA receptor antagonist. CNQX injected into the dorsal vagal complex either blocked or attenuated the inhibitory response of the neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and nucleus of the solitary tract neurons to gastric and duodenal distention. In contrast, DL-AP5 had less effect, especially in the vago-vagal reflex elicited by gastric distention. The results suggest (1) distention activates

  3. Subcellular fractionation on Percoll gradient of mossy fiber synaptosomes: evoked release of glutamate, GABA, aspartate and glutamate decarboxylase activity in control and degranulated rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Taupin, P; Ben-Ari, Y; Roisin, M P

    1994-05-02

    Using discontinuous density gradient centrifugation in isotonic Percoll sucrose, we have characterized two subcellular fractions (PII and PIII) enriched in mossy fiber synaptosomes and two others (SII and SIII) enriched in small synaptosomes. These synaptosomal fractions were compared with those obtained from adult hippocampus irradiated at neonatal stage to destroy granule cells and their mossy fibers. Synaptosomes were viable as judged by their ability to release aspartate, glutamate and GABA upon K+ depolarization. After irradiation, compared to the control values, the release of glutamate and GABA was decreased by 57 and 74% in the PIII fraction, but not in the other fractions and the content of glutamate, aspartate and GABA was also decreased in PIII fraction by 62, 44 and 52% respectively. These results suggest that mossy fiber (MF) synaptosomes contain and release glutamate and GABA. Measurement of the GABA synthesizing enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase, exhibited no significant difference after irradiation, suggesting that GABA is not synthesized by this enzyme in mossy fibers.

  4. Role of glutamate receptors in the ventromedial hypothalamus in the regulation of female rat sexual behaviors. II. Behavioral effects of selective glutamate receptor antagonists AP-5, CNQX, and DNQX.

    PubMed

    Georgescu, Michaela; Pfaus, James G

    2006-02-01

    Bilateral infusions of glutamate or its selective ionotrophic receptor agonists to the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) produce a rapid inhibition of both appetitive and consummatory sexual behavior in hormone-primed female rats. The present study examined whether infusion of selective ionotrophic glutamate receptor antagonists to the VMH can facilitate female sexual behavior in females treated with estradiol benzoate (EB) and progesterone (P), or EB alone. Ovariectomized, sexually experienced female rats were implanted bilaterally with guide cannulae aimed at the ventrolateral VMH. After recovery from surgery, females were primed either with EB+P or EB alone, and infused with saline, or one of two doses each of AP-5 (to target NMDA receptors), CNQX, or DNQX (to target AMPA/kainate receptors), immediately before tests with sexually vigorous male rats in bilevel chambers. In general, the drug infusions had a more powerful effect in females primed with EB alone compared to females primed with EB+P. AP-5 increased lordosis in females primed with EB alone. CNQX had a similar facilitative effect on lordosis, and also increased solicitations. DNQX increased solicitations in both hormone-priming conditions, increased lordosis quotients and magnitudes, and decreased pacing and defensive responses in the EB-alone condition. These results indicate that antagonism of glutamate receptors in the VMH resembles the effect of P, and that the addition of P to an EB baseline eliminates most of the effects of glutamate receptor antagonists. These data support the notion that glutamate receptors in the VMH contribute a strong inhibitory influence in the control of female sexual behavior.

  5. Antinociceptive action of diphenyl diselenide in the nociception induced by neonatal administration of monosodium glutamate in rats.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Suzan G; Quines, Caroline B; da Rocha, Juliana T; Bortolatto, Cristiani F; Duarte, Thiago; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2015-07-05

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a neuroexcitatory amino acid commonly used as flavoring of foods. MSG neonatal administration to animals leads to behavioral and physiological disorders in adulthood, including increased pain sensitivity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2, an organoselenium compound with pharmacological properties already documented, on nociception induced by MSG. Newborn Wistar rats received 10 subcutaneous injections of MSG at a dose of 4.0g/kg or saline (once daily). At the 60th day of life, the rats were daily treated with (PhSe)2 (1mg/kg) or vehicle (canola oil) by the intragastric route for 7 days. The behavioral tests (locomotor activity, hot plate, tail-immersion and mechanical allodynia) were carried out. Ex vivo assays were performed in samples of hippocampus to determine Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities, cytokine levels and [(3)H]glutamate uptake. The results demonstrated that MSG increased nociception in the hot plate test and in the mechanical allodynia stimulated by Von-Frey hair but did not alter the tail immersion test. (PhSe)2 reversed all nociceptive behaviors altered by MSG. MSG caused an increase in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities and in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and a decrease in the anti-inflammatory cytokine and in the [(3)H]glutamate uptake. (PhSe)2 was effective in reversing all alterations caused by MSG. The results indicate that (PhSe)2 had a potential antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory action in the MSG model.

  6. β-Lactamase inhibitor, clavulanic acid, attenuates ethanol intake and increases glial glutamate transporters expression in alcohol preferring rats.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Alqassem Y; Sari, Youssef

    2017-09-14

    Studies from our laboratory showed that upregulation of glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and cystine-glutamate exchanger (xCT) expression with ceftriaxone, β-lactam antibiotic, in the brain was associated with attenuation of ethanol consumption. In this study, we tested clavulanic acid, which is another β-lactam compound with negligible antimicrobial activity, on ethanol consumption and expression of GLT-1, xCT and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. Clavulanic acid has the central β-lactam pharmacophore that is critical for the upregulation of GLT-1 and xCT expression. We found that clavulanic acid, at 5mg/kg (i.p.) dose, significantly attenuated ethanol consumption and ethanol preference in P rats as compared to vehicle-treated group. This effect was associated with a significant increase in water intake in clavulanic acid treated group. Importantly, we found that clavulanic acid increased the expression of GLT-1 and xCT in nucleus accumbens. However, there was no effect of clavulanic acid on GLAST expression in the nucleus accumbens. Clavulanic acid treatment did not upregulate the expression of GLT-1, xCT and GLAST in prefrontal cortex. These findings revealed that clavulanic acid at 20-40 fold lower dose than ceftriaxone can attenuate ethanol consumption, in part through upregulation of GLT-1 and xCT expression in the nucleus accumbens. Thus, we suggest that clavulanic acid might be used as an alternative option to ceftriaxone to attenuate ethanol drinking behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The neonatal neurotoxicity of monosodium L-glutamate on the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area in rats.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y L; Hsu, C; Lue, S I; Hsu, H K; Peng, M T

    1997-01-01

    The neurotoxic effect of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) on the morphologies in the darkly stained sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) and the lighter-staining surrounding area (non-SDN-POA) within the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) was evaluated. Male and female Long-Evans rats were used. MSG (4 mg/g of body weight) was administered subcutaneously to pups on days 1 and 3 postnatally. Normal saline was used as the vehicle. At the age of 6 months, the rats were sacrificed and the brain tissues were fixed for histological examination. The morphological changes, i.e., total volume, density, total neuron number, neuronal nuclear volume (NNV) and ratio of pyknosis, of the SDN-POA and non-SDN-POA within the MPN, were estimated using the AMS VIDS III semiautomatic image-analytic system. The results indicate that neonatal MSG treatment caused significant neuronal loss and decreases in total volume of the SDN-POA and non-SDN-POA of male and female rats. However, only the SDN-POA of MSG-treated male rats showed a significant increase of pyknosis and decrease of neuronal density. A significant enlargement of NNV in the SDN-POA and non-SDN-POA was observed in the MSG-treated male rats. These results indicate that the MPN shows sex-specific and area-specific changes after neonatal neurotoxicity due to MSG.

  8. Effect of local infusion of glutamate analogues into the nucleus accumbens of rats: an electrochemical and behavioural study.

    PubMed

    Svensson, L; Zhang, J; Johannessen, K; Engel, J A

    1994-04-18

    In vivo voltammetry at electrochemically pretreated carbon fibre electrodes was used to investigate the effect of local infusion of glutamate analogues on dopamine (DA) release in rat nucleus accumbens. Infusion of a low dose of NMDA or AMPA (1 mM/0.2 microliter), but not L-glutamate or kainate, was followed a few minutes later by a large but short-lived increase in the extracellular concentration of DA. The involvement of spreading depression was indicated since this response could be repeated only after a short refractory period, and the response magnitude did not seem to be dependent on the dose infused. Furthermore, the increase in DA release was accompanied by a marked negative shift in brain field potential and a similar increase in release could be induced by local infusion of K+. The infusion of NMDA, AMPA or kainate was followed by behavioural activation of the animals but not convulsions. The behavioural response induced by NMDA was dose-dependently reduced by haloperidol, which suggests the involvement of a DA-dependent mechanism in this effect. Co-infusion of the DA transport inhibitors, nomifensine or GBR 12909, failed to alter the DA response to NMDA, while this response was completely blocked by co-infusion of tetrodotoxin or pretreatment with reserpine. It is evident from this study that local infusion of NMDA or AMPA may induce spreading depression in rat nucleus accumbens and that this condition is associated with a vast release of DA and behavioural activation.

  9. Hypericin, the active component of St. John's wort, inhibits glutamate release in the rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes via a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi; Wang, Su-Jane

    2010-05-25

    Changes in central glutamate neurotransmission are involved in the pathophysiology of depression and in the mechanism of antidepressants. In this study, the effect of hypericin, a major active constituent of St. John's wort that is widely used in the treatment of depression, on the release of glutamate from nerve terminals purified from rat cerebral cortex was examined. Result showed that hypericin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by 4-aminopyridine in a concentration-dependent manner. Further experiments revealed that hypericin-mediated inhibition of glutamate release (i) results from a reduction of vesicular exocytosis, not from an inhibition of Ca2+-independent efflux via glutamate transporter; (ii) is not due to an alternation of nerve terminal excitability; (iii) is associated with a decrease in presynaptic N- and P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel activity; and (iv) appears to involve the suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. These results are the first to suggest that, in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals, hypericin suppresses voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity and in so doing inhibits evoked glutamate release. This finding may provide important information regarding the beneficial effects of St. John's wort in the brain.

  10. Glutamate Synaptic Inputs to Ventral Tegmental Area Neurons in the Rat Derive Primarily from Subcortical Sources

    PubMed Central

    Omelchenko, Natalia; Sesack, Susan R.

    2007-01-01

    Dopamine and GABA neurons in the ventral tegmental area project to the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex and modulate locomotor and reward behaviors as well as cognitive and affective processes. Both midbrain cell types receive synapses from glutamate afferents that provide an essential control of behaviorally-linked activity patterns, although the sources of glutamate inputs have not yet been completely characterized. We used antibodies against the vesicular glutamate transporters VGlut1 and VGlut2 to investigate the morphology and synaptic organization of axons containing these proteins as putative markers of glutamate afferents from cortical versus subcortical sites, respectively. We also characterized the ventral tegmental area cell populations receiving VGlut1+ or VGlut2+ synapses according to their transmitter phenotype (dopamine or GABA) and major projection target (nucleus accumbens or prefrontal cortex). By light and electron microscopic examination, VGlut2+ as opposed to VGlut1+ axon terminals were more numerous, had a larger average size, synapsed more proximally, and were more likely to form convergent synapses onto the same target. Both axon types formed predominantly asymmetric synapses, although VGlut2+ terminals more often formed synapses with symmetric morphology. No absolute selectivity was observed for VGlut1+ or VGlut2+ axons to target any particular cell population. However, the synapses onto mesoaccumbens neurons more often involved VGlut2+ terminals, whereas mesoprefrontal neurons received relatively equal synaptic inputs from VGlut1+ and VGlut2+ profiles. The distinct morphological features of VGlut1 and VGlut2 positive axons suggest that glutamate inputs from presumed cortical and subcortical sources, respectively, differ in the nature and intensity of their physiological actions on midbrain neurons. More specifically, our findings imply that subcortical glutamate inputs to the ventral tegmental area expressing VGlut2 predominate over

  11. [The blocade of glutamate metabotropic 5-th tipe receptors prevents the locomotor behavior changes produced by intrastriatal picrotoxin microinjections in rats].

    PubMed

    Iakimovskiĭ, A F; Red'ka, Iu A; Iakubenko, A L

    2010-01-01

    It was demonstrated in chronic experiments in Wistar rats that only the first of daily multiple microinjections of glutamate metabotropic 5-th type receptor antagonist MTEP into the rostral region of neostriatum impaired the avoidance conditioning in a shuttle box. Within the next two weeks, MTEP was ineffective but being injected into the neostriatum simultaneously with picrotoxin prevented the impairment of avoidance conditioning in a shuttle-box and decreased the hyperactivity (open-field locomotor hyperactivity and choreic hyperkinesis) produced by this GABA-A receptor antagonist. The results do not suggest the involvement of striatal glutamate metabotropic 5-th type receptors in avoidance conditioning control but demonstrate that glutamate metabotropic system is involved in behavioral disorders mediated by inhibition of GABA-A receptors. In principle, it might be possible to treat the human hyperkinetic basal ganglia dysfunction (Huntington's horea), athetosis and similar disorders with glutamate metabotropic receptor antagonists.

  12. Neuroprotective effects of a sesquiterpene lactone and flavanones from Paulownia tomentosa Steud. against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat cortical cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Ki; Cho, Sang-Buem; Moon, Hyung-In

    2010-12-01

    The neuroprotective effects of Paulownia tomentosa against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity were studied in primary cultured rat cortical cells. It was found that the aqueous extract of this medicinal plant significantly attenuated glutamate-induced toxicity. In order to clarify the mechanism(s) underlying this neuroprotective effect, the active fractions and components were isolated and identified. Five compounds were isolated as the methanol extracts from air-dried flowers of P. tomentosa. Isoatriplicolide tiglate exhibited significant neuroprotective activity against glutamate-induced toxicity at concentrations ranging from 1 μM to 10 μM, and exhibited cell viability of approximately 43-78%. Therefore, the neuroprotective effect of P. tomentosa might be due to the inhibition of glutamate-induced toxicity by the sesquiterpene lactone derivative it contains.

  13. Decreased glutamate receptor binding and NMDA R1 gene expression in hippocampus of pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats: neuroprotective role of Bacopa monnieri extract.

    PubMed

    Khan, Reas; Krishnakumar, Amee; Paulose, C S

    2008-01-01

    The potential for antiepileptic drugs to negatively impact cognitive abilities has generated renewed interest in herbal drugs and formulations in the treatment of epilepsy. Bacopa monnieri is one such widely used revitalizing herb that purportedly strengthens nervous function and also possesses memory-enhancing, antioxidative, antiepileptic, and anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the neuroprotective role of B. monnieri extract in alteration of glutamate receptor binding and gene expression of NMDA R1 in hippocampus of temporal lobe epileptic rats. In association with pilocarpine-induced epilepsy, there was significant downregulation of NMDA R1 gene expression and glutamate receptor binding without any change in its affinity. B. monnieri treatment of epileptic rats significantly reversed the expression of NMDA R1 and glutamate receptor binding alterations to near-control levels. Also, in the epileptic rats, we measured a significant increase in the activity of glutamate dehydrogenase, which neared the control level after B. monnieri treatment. The therapeutic effect of B. monnieri was also observed in the Morris water maze experiment. These data together indicate the neuroprotective role of B. monnieri extract in glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity during seizures and cognitive damage occurring in association with pilocarpine-induced epilepsy.

  14. Possible role of glutamate, aspartate, glutamine, GABA or taurine on cadmium toxicity on the hypothalamic pituitary axis activity in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Esquifino, A I

    2002-06-01

    This work was designed to evaluate the possible changes in glutamate, aspartate, glutamine, GABA and taurine within various hypothalamic areas the striatum and prefrontal cortex after oral cadmium exposure in adult male rats, and if these changes are related to pituitary hormone secretion. The contents of glutamine, glutamate, aspartate, GABA and taurine in the median eminence, anterior, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus, and in prefrontal cortex in adult male rats exposed to 272.7 micromol l(-1) of cadmium chloride (CdCl2) in the drinking water for one month. Cadmium diminished the content of glutamine, glutamate and aspartate in anterior hypothalamus as compared to the values found in the untreated group. Besides, there is a decrease in the content of glutamate, aspartate and taurine in the prefrontal cortex. The amino acids studied did not change in median eminence, mediobasal and posterior hypothalamus or the striatum by cadmium treatment. Plasma prolactin and LH levels decreased in rats exposed to the metal. These results suggest that (1) cadmium differentially affects amino acid content within the brain region studied and (2) the inhibitory effect of cadmium on prolactin and LH secretion may be partially explained by a decrease in the content of both glutamate and aspartate in anterior hypothalamus, but not through changes in GABA and taurine.

  15. Immunohistochemical localization of the neuron-specific glutamate transporter EAAC1 (EAAT3) in rat brain and spinal cord revealed by a novel monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Shashidharan, P; Huntley, G W; Murray, J M; Buku, A; Moran, T; Walsh, M J; Morrison, J H; Plaitakis, A

    1997-10-31

    Neuronal regulation of glutamate homeostasis is mediated by high-affinity sodium-dependent and highly hydrophobic plasma membrane glycoproteins which maintain low levels of glutamate at central synapses. To further elucidate the molecular mechanisms that regulate glutamate metabolism and glutamate flux at central synapses, a monoclonal antibody was produced to a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 161-177 of the deduced sequence of the human neuron-specific glutamate transporter III (EAAC1). Immunoblot analysis of human and rat brain total homogenates and isolated synaptosomes from frontal cortex revealed that the antibody immunoreacted with a protein band of apparent Mr approximately 70 kDa. Deglycosylation of immunoprecipitates obtained using the monoclonal antibody yielded a protein with a lower apparent Mr (approximately 65 kDa). These results are consistent with the molecular size of the human EAAC1 predicted from the cloned cDNA. Analysis of the transfected COS-1 cells by immunocytochemistry confirmed that the monoclonal antibody is specific for the neuron-specific glutamate transporter. Immunocytochemical studies of rat cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, substantia nigra and spinal cord revealed intense labeling of neuronal somata, dendrites, fine-caliber fibers and puncta. Double-label immunofluorescence using antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein as a marker for astrocytes demonstrated that astrocytes were not co-labeled for EAAC1. The localization of EAAC1 immunoreactivity in dendrites and particularly in cell somata suggests that this transporter may function in the regulation of other aspects of glutamate metabolism in addition to terminating the action of synaptically released glutamate at central synapses.

  16. Effects of ethanol on the accumbal output of dopamine, GABA and glutamate in alcohol-tolerant and alcohol-nontolerant rats.

    PubMed

    Piepponen, T Petteri; Kiianmaa, Kalervo; Ahtee, Liisa

    2002-12-01

    Effects of ethanol on the accumbal extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as of the amino acid transmitters gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA), glutamate and taurine, were studied in the alcohol-insensitive (alcohol-tolerant, AT) and alcohol-sensitive (alcohol-nontolerant, ANT) rats selected for low and high sensitivity to ethanol-induced motor impairment. Ethanol (2 or 3 g/kg ip) enhanced the output of dopamine and its metabolites in freely moving rats of both lines as measured by in vivo microdialysis. The effect of ethanol on the metabolites of dopamine tended to be stronger in the ANT rats. The smaller dose of ethanol decreased the output of GABA only in the AT rats, whereas the larger dose of ethanol decreased the output of GABA in rats of both lines to a similar degree. Ethanol at the dose of 2 g/kg slightly, but statistically, significantly decreased the output of glutamate in rats of both lines, but the larger dose of ethanol decreased the output of glutamate only in the AT rats. Ethanol at the dose of 2 g/kg induced a small transient increase in the output of taurine within 2 h after its administration in rats of both lines, but the larger dose of ethanol was without significant effect. These results confirm the previous findings that ethanol suppresses the release of GABA more in the AT than ANT rats. Thus, among the neurotransmitter systems we studied, the effects of ethanol might be the most relevant on GABAergic transmission regarding the sensitivity towards ethanol. However, our findings suggest that glutamate is also involved in this respect.

  17. High dosage of monosodium glutamate causes deficits of the motor coordination and the number of cerebellar Purkinje cells of rats.

    PubMed

    Prastiwi, D; Djunaidi, A; Partadiredja, G

    2015-11-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) has been widely used throughout the world as a flavoring agent of food. However, MSG at certain dosages is also thought to cause damage to many organs, including cerebellum. This study aimed at investigating the effects of different doses of MSG on the motor coordination and the number of Purkinje cells of the cerebellum of Wistar rats. A total of 24 male rats aged 4 to 5 weeks were divided into four groups, namely, control (C), T2.5, T3, and T3.5 groups, which received intraperitoneal injection of 0.9% sodium chloride solution, 2.5 mg/g body weight (bw) of MSG, 3.0 mg/g bw of MSG, and 3.5 mg/g bw of MSG, respectively, for 10 consecutive days. The motor coordination of the rats was examined prior and subsequent to the treatment. The number of cerebellar Purkinje cells was estimated using physical fractionator method. It has been found that the administration of MSG at a dosage of 3.5 mg/g bw, but not at lower dosages, caused a significant decrease of motor coordination and the estimated total number of Purkinje cells of rats. There was also a significant correlation between motor coordination and the total number of Purkinje cells.

  18. Local synaptic release of glutamate from neurons in the rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Belousov, A B; van den Pol, A N

    1997-01-01

    1. The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) contains neuroendocrine neurons that regulate endocrine secretions by releasing substances which control anterior pituitary hormonal release into the portal blood stream. Many neuroactive substances have been identified in the ARC, but the existence of excitatory neurons in the ARC and the identity of an excitatory transmitter have not been investigated physiologically. 2. In the present experiments using whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp recording of neurons from cultures and slices of the ARC, we demonstrate for the first time that some of the neurons in the ARC secrete glutamate as their transmitter. 3. Using microdrop stimulation of presynaptic neurons in ARC slices, we found that local axons from these glutamatergic neurons make local synaptic contact with other neurons in the ARC and that all evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials could be blocked by the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX; 10 microM) and D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5; 100 microM). To determine the identity of ARC neurons postsynaptic to local glutamatergic neurons, we used antidromic stimulation to reveal that many of these cells were neuroendocrine neurons by virtue of their maintaining axon terminals in the median eminence. 4. In ARC cultures, postsynaptic potentials, both excitatory and inhibitory, were virtually eliminated by the glutamate receptor antagonists AP5 and CNQX, underlining the functional importance of glutamate within this part of the neuroendocrine brain. 5. GABA was secreted by a subset of ARC neurons from local axons. The GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline released glutamatergic neurons from chronic inhibition mediated by synaptically released GABA, resulting in further depolarization and an increase in the amplitude and frequency of glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Images Figure 1 PMID:9130170

  19. Effects of cannabinoid and glutamate receptor antagonists and their interactions on learning and memory in male rats.

    PubMed

    Barzegar, Somayeh; Komaki, Alireza; Shahidi, Siamak; Sarihi, Abdolrahman; Mirazi, Naser; Salehi, Iraj

    2015-04-01

    Despite previous findings on the effects of cannabinoid and glutamatergic systems on learning and memory, the effects of the combined stimulation or the simultaneous inactivation of these two systems on learning and memory have not been studied. In addition, it is not clear whether the effects of the cannabinoid system on learning and memory occur through the modulation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission. Hence, in this study, we examined the effects of the simultaneous inactivation of the cannabinoid and glutamatergic systems on learning and memory using a passive avoidance (PA) test in rats. On the test day, AM251, which is a CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist; MK-801, which is a glutamate receptor antagonist; or both substances were injected intraperitoneally into male Wistar rats 30min before placing the animal in a shuttle box. A learning test (acquisition) was then performed, and a retrieval test was performed the following day. Learning and memory in the PA test were significantly different among the groups. The CB1 receptor antagonist improved the scores on the PA acquisition and retention tests. However, the glutamatergic receptor antagonist decreased the acquisition and retrieval scores on the PA task. The CB1 receptor antagonist partly decreased the glutamatergic receptor antagonist effects on PA learning and memory. These results indicated that the acute administration of a CB1 antagonist improved cognitive performance on a PA task in normal rats and that a glutamate-related mechanism may underlie the antagonism of cannabinoid by AM251 in learning and memory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nefiracetam attenuates post-ischemic nonconvulsive seizures in rats and protects neuronal cell death induced by veratridine and glutamate.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xi-Chun May; Dave, Jitendra R; Chen, Zhiyong; Cao, Ying; Liao, Zhilin; Tortella, Frank C

    2013-06-13

    Stroke patients are at a high risk of developing post-ischemic seizures and cognitive impairment. Nefiracetam (NEF), a pyrrolidone derivative, has been shown to possess both anti-epileptic and cognitive-enhancing properties. In this study the anti-seizure effects of NEF were evaluated in a rat model of post-ischemic nonconvulsive seizures (NCSs). Its potential mechanisms were investigated in neuronal cell culture assays of neurotoxicity associated with ischemic brain injury and epileptogenesis. In the in vivo study, rats received 24h permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. NEF was administered intravenously either at 15 min post-injury but prior to the first NCS event (30 mg/kg, pre-NCS treatment) or immediately after the first NCS occurred (30 or 60 mg/kg, post-NCS treatment). In the in vitro study, neuronal cell cultures were exposed to veratridine or glutamate and treated with NEF (1-500 nM). The NEF pre-NCS treatment significantly reduced the NCS frequency and duration, whereas the higher NEF dose (60 mg/kg) was required to achieve similar effects when given after NCS occurred. The NEF treatment also dose-dependently (5-500 nM) protected against neuronal cell death induced by veratridine as measured by MTT cell viability assay, but higher doses (250-500 nM) were required against glutamate toxicity. The anti-seizure property of NEF was demonstrated in a clinically relevant rat model of post-ischemic NCS. The preferential effects of NEF against in vitro veratridine toxicity suggest the involvement of its modulation of sodium channel malfunction. Future studies are warranted to study the mechanisms of NEF against ischemic brain injury and post-ischemic seizures. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Reduced dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens of quinpirole-sensitized rats hints at inhibitory D2 autoreceptor function.

    PubMed

    Escobar, Angélica P; Cornejo, Francisca A; Olivares-Costa, Montserrat; González, Marcela; Fuentealba, José A; Gysling, Katia; España, Rodrigo A; Andrés, María E

    2015-09-01

    Dopamine from the ventral tegmental area and glutamate from several brain nuclei converge in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) to drive motivated behaviors. Repeated activation of D2 receptors with quinpirole (QNP) induces locomotor sensitization and compulsive behaviors, but the mechanisms are unknown. In this study, in vivo microdialysis and fast scan cyclic voltammetry in adult anesthetized rats were used to investigate the effect of repeated QNP on dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission within the NAc. Following eight injections of QNP, a significant decrease in phasic and tonic dopamine release was observed in rats that displayed locomotor sensitization. Either a systemic injection or the infusion of QNP into the NAc decreased dopamine release, and the extent of this effect was similar in QNP-sensitized and control rats, indicating that inhibitory D2 autoreceptor function is maintained despite repeated activation of D2 receptors and decreased dopamine extracellular levels. Basal extracellular levels of glutamate in the NAc were also significantly lower in QNP-treated rats than in controls. Moreover, the increase in NAc glutamate release induced by direct stimulation of medial prefrontal cortex was significantly lower in QNP-sensitized rats. Together, these results indicate that repeated activation of D2 receptors disconnects NAc from medial prefrontal cortex and ventral tegmental area. Repeated administration of the dopamine D2 receptor agonist quinpirole (QNP) induces locomotor sensitization. We found that the NAc of QNP-sensitized rats has reduced glutamate levels coming from prefrontal cortex together with a decreased phasic and tonic dopamine neurotransmission but a conserved presynaptic D2 receptor function. We suggest that locomotor sensitization is because of increased affinity state of D2 post-synaptic receptors. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Stress-sensitive organs and blood corticosterone after immobilization of active and passive rats immunized with glutamate-bovine serum albumin conjugate.

    PubMed

    Umryukhin, A E; Sotnikov, S V; Chekmareva, N Yu; Vetrile, L A; Zakharova, I A

    2014-12-01

    We studied stress-induced organ and hormonal responses in behaviorally active and passive rats against the background of immunization with glutamate-BSA conjugate. The relative weight of the adrenal glands after immobilization was lower in rats immunized with the conjugate in comparison with non-immunized animals. The weight of the adrenal glands in behaviorally active rats decreased in parallel with the decrease in blood corticosterone. In behaviorally active and passive rats immunized with the conjugate, ulcer formation in the stomach was slightly intensified after immobilization. It was hypothesized that immunization with glutamate-BSA conjugate suppresses activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal feedback mechanism underlying the production of glucocorticoid hormones, which is manifested in slightly increased ulceration due to attenuation of the gastroprotective action of corticosterone under stress.

  3. Postmortem elevation in extracellular glutamate in the rat hippocampus when brain temperature is maintained at physiological levels: implications for the use of human brain autopsy tissues.

    PubMed

    Geddes, J W; Chang, N G; Ackley, D C; Soultanian, N S; McGillis, J P; Yokel, R A

    1999-06-12

    Postmortem alterations in the neuronal cytoskeleton resemble some aspects of the cytoskeletal disruption associated with neurodegenerative disorders, and are also similar to those observed following ischemia and produced by excitotoxins in vivo and in vitro. This suggests the involvement of excitotoxic mechanisms during the postmortem interval. The purpose of this study was to determine if extracellular levels of glutamate are elevated postmortem. Extracellular levels of GABA and taurine were also monitored using in vivo microdialysis. These three amino acids were analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography. When postmortem rat brain temperature cooled rapidly to near room temperature, dialysate concentrations of glutamate were not increased in the hippocampal CA1 region during a 2-h postmortem interval, although increased extracellular levels of GABA and taurine were observed. In contrast, maintenance of brain temperature at 37 degrees C resulted in a 12-to-40 fold elevation in extracellular glutamate levels 20-120 min postmortem. In addition, the elevation in dialysate taurine concentration was greater than that observed in rats in which postmortem brain temperature was not maintained. Excitatory amino acid antagonists, NBQX (2, 3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(F)quinoxaline) and MK-801 (dizocilpine, (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cylohepten-5, 10-imine hydrogen maleate blocked the additional elevation in taurine associated with maintaining brain at 37 degrees C, but had less robust effects against glutamate and GABA release. The results indicate that extracellular concentrations of glutamate, taurine and GABA increase in postmortem rat brain when physiologic temperatures are maintained, but that these increases are blunted when brain temperature decreases. After death, the human brain cools much more slowly than does the rat brain. Therefore, extracellular glutamate levels are likely to increase in the postmortem human brain and may

  4. Ca2+-permeable non-NMDA glutamate receptors in rat magnocellular basal forebrain neurones

    PubMed Central

    Waters, D Jack; Allen, Timothy G J

    1998-01-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptor-mediated responses were recorded from rat magnocellular basal forebrain neurones under voltage clamp from a somatically located patch-clamp pipette. Currents were recorded from both acutely dissociated neurones and neurones maintained in culture for up to 6 weeks. Non-NMDA and NMDA receptor-mediated events could be distinguished pharmacologically using the selective agonists (S)-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), kainate and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), and antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5). Responses to rapid application of AMPA displayed pronounced and rapid desensitization. Responses to kainate showed no desensitization. Steady-state EC50 values for AMPA and kainate were 2.7 ± 0.4 μm (n = 5) and 138 ± 25 μm (n = 10), respectively. Cyclothiazide markedly increased current amplitude of responses to both agonists, whereas concanavalin A had no clear effect on either response. The selective AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 53655 inhibited responses to kainate with an IC50 of 1.2 ± 0.08 μm (n = 5) at -70 mV. These data strongly suggest that AMPA receptors are the predominant non-NMDA receptors expressed by basal forebrain neurones. At -70 mV, approximately 6% of control current amplitude remained, at a maximally effective concentration of GYKI 53655. This residual response displayed desensitization, was insensitive to cyclothiazide and was potentiated by concanavalin A, suggesting that it was mediated by a kainate receptor. Current-voltage relationships for non-NMDA receptor-mediated currents were obtained from both nucleated patches pulled from neurones in culture and from acutely dissociated neurones. With 30 μm spermine in the recording pipette, currents frequently displayed double-rectification characteristic of non-NMDA receptors with high Ca2+ permeabilities. Ca2+ permeability, relative to Na+ and Cs+, was investigated using constant

  5. (p-ClPhSe)2 Reduces Hepatotoxicity Induced by Monosodium Glutamate by Improving Mitochondrial Function in Rats.

    PubMed

    Quines, Caroline B; Chagas, Pietro M; Hartmann, Diane; Carvalho, Nélson R; Soares, Félix A; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2017-09-01

    It is has been demonstrated that mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and chronic inflammatory process are associated with progress of morbid obesity in human patients. For this reason, the searching for safe and effective antiobesity drugs has been the subject of intense research. In this context, the organic selenium compounds have attracted much attention due to their pharmacological properties, such as antihyperglycemic, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory. The aim of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective action of p-chloro-diphenyl diselenide (p-ClPhSe)2 , an organic selenium compound, in a model of obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) administration in rats. Wistar rats were treated during the first ten postnatal days with MSG (4 g/kg by subcutaneous injections) and received (p-ClPhSe)2 (10 mg/kg, intragastrically) from 90th to 97th postnatal day. Mitochondrial function, purine content and the levels of proteins involved in apoptotic (poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase [PARP]) and inflammatory processes (inducible nitric oxide synthases [iNOS] and p38) were determined in the liver of rats. The present study, demonstrated that postnatal administration of MSG to male rats induced a mitochondrial dysfunction, accompanied by oxidative stress and an increase in the ADP levels, without altering the efficiency of phosphorylation in the liver of adult rats. Furthermore, the MSG administration also induces hepatotoxicity, through an increase in PARP, iNOS, and p38 levels. (p-ClPhSe)2 treatment had beneficial effects against mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and modulated protein markers of apoptosis and inflammation in the liver of MSG-treated rats. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 2877-2886, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Activation of amygdalar metabotropic glutamate receptors modulates anxiety, and risk assessment behaviors in ovariectomized estradiol-treated female rats

    PubMed Central

    De Jesús-Burgos, María; Torres-Llenza, Vanessa; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L.

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are more prevalent in females than males. The underlying reasons for this gender difference are unknown. Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) have been linked to anxiety and it has been shown that interaction between estrogen receptors and mGluRs modulate sexual receptivity in rats. We investigated the role of mGluRs in anxiety-related behaviors in ovariectomized (OVX) female rats with (OVX+EB) or without (OVX) estradiol implants. We centrally infused (s)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), a group I mGluR agonist, into the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of OVX+EB and OVX rats at 0.1 and 1.0 μM. Male rats that normally have low estradiol levels were used to compare with OVX rats. Generalized anxiety, explorative activity and detection and analysis of threat were analyzed in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and risk assessment behaviors (RABs). DHPG (1.0 μM) increased the percentage of time spent in- and entries into- the open arms in OVX+EB, but not in OVX females or male rats. Flat-back approaches and stretch-attend postures, two RABs, were significantly reduced by DHPG (0.1 and 1.0 μM) in OVX+EB female rats only. DHPG did not modulate rearing- and freezing, behaviors related to exploration and fear-like behavior, respectively. However, DHPG (1.0 μM) increased head dipping and decreased grooming behaviors in OVX female rats, suggesting a weak explorative modulation. The effects of DHPG observed in OVX+EB, were blocked by 50 μM of (RS)-1-Aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA), a mGluR1 antagonist. AIDA and/or estradiol did not modulate anxiety and or RABs. Our results show that intra-BLA infusion of DHPG exerts an anxiolytic-like effect in OVX+EB, but not in OVX or male rats. This effect seems to depend upon mGluR1 subtype activation. Our findings led us to suggest that the effects observed in OVX+EB rats might be due to an interaction at the membrane level of estrogen receptors with mGlu1 within the BLA. PMID:22326382

  7. Synaptic plasticity in the medial vestibular nuclei: role of glutamate receptors and retrograde messengers in rat brainstem slices.

    PubMed

    Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E

    2001-08-01

    The analysis of cellular-molecular events mediating synaptic plasticity within vestibular nuclei is an attempt to explain the mechanisms underlying vestibular plasticity phenomena. The present review is meant to illustrate the main results, obtained in vitro, on the mechanisms underlying long-term changes in synaptic strength within the medial vestibular nuclei. The synaptic plasticity phenomena taking place at the level of vestibular nuclei could be useful for adapting and consolidating the efficacy of vestibular neuron responsiveness to environmental requirements, as during visuo-vestibular recalibration and vestibular compensation. Following a general introduction on the most salient features of vestibular compensation and visuo-vestibular adaptation, which are two plastic events involving neuronal circuitry within the medial vestibular nuclei, the second and third sections describe the results from rat brainstem slice studies, demonstrating the possibility to induce long-term potentiation and depression in the medial vestibular nuclei, following high frequency stimulation of the primary vestibular afferents. In particular the mechanisms sustaining the induction and expression of vestibular long-term potentiation and depression, such as the role of various glutamate receptors and retrograde messengers have been described. The relevant role of the interaction between the platelet-activating factor, acting as a retrograde messenger, and the presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors, in determining the full expression of vestibular long-term potentiation is also underlined. In addition, the mechanisms involved in vestibular long-term potentiation have been compared with those leading to long-term potentiation in the hippocampus to emphasize the most significant differences emerging from vestibular studies. The fourth part, describes recent results demonstrating the essential role of nitric oxide, another retrograde messenger, in the induction of vestibular

  8. Hippocampal interneurons expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase and calcium-binding proteins decrease with aging in Fischer 344 rats.

    PubMed

    Shetty, A K; Turner, D A

    1998-05-04

    Aging leads to alterations in the function and plasticity of hippocampal circuitry in addition to behavioral changes. To identify critical alterations in the substrate for inhibitory circuitry as a function of aging, we evaluated the numbers of hippocampal interneurons that were positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase and those that expressed calcium-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin) in young adult (4-5 months old) and aged (23-25 months old) male Fischer 344 rats. Both the overall interneuron population and specific subpopulations of interneurons demonstrated a commensurate decline in numbers throughout the hippocampus with aging. Interneurons positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase were significantly depleted in the stratum radiatum of CA1, the strata oriens, radiatum and pyramidale of CA3, the dentate molecular layer, and the dentate hilus. Parvalbumin interneurons showed significant reductions in the strata oriens and pyramidale of CA1, the stratum pyramidale of CA3, and the dentate hilus. The reductions in calbindin interneurons were more pronounced than other calcium-binding protein-positive interneurons and were highly significant in the strata oriens and radiatum of both CA1 and CA3 subfields and in the dentate hilus. Calretinin interneurons were decreased significantly in the strata oriens and radiatum of CA3, in the dentate granule cell and molecular layers, and in the dentate hilus. However, the relative ratio of parvalbumin-, calbindin-, and calretinin-positive interneurons compared with glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive interneurons remained constant with aging, suggesting actual loss of interneurons expressing calcium-binding proteins with age. This loss contrasts with the reported preservation of pyramidal neurons with aging in the hippocampus. Functional decreases in inhibitory drive throughout the hippocampus may occur due to this loss, particularly alterations in the processing of feed-forward information through the

  9. Meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid and licarin A of Machilus thunbergii protect against glutamate-induced toxicity in primary cultures of a rat cortical cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Choong Je; Kim, So Ra; Kim, Jinwoong; Kim, Young Choong

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported that four lignans isolated from the bark of Machilus thunbergii Sieb. et Zucc. (Lauraceae) protected primary cultures of rat cortical neurons from neurotoxicity induced by glutamate. Among the lignans, meso-dihydroguaiarectic acid (MDGA) and licarin A significantly attenuated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity when added prior to or right after the excitotoxic glutamate challenge. The neuroprotective activities of two lignans appeared to be more effective in protecting neurons against neurotoxicity induced by NMDA than that induced by kainic acid. MDGA and licarin A diminished the calcium influx that routinely accompanies with the glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, and inhibited the subsequent overproduction of cellular nitric oxide and peroxide to the level of control cells. They also preserved cellular activities of antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase reduced in the glutamate-injured neuronal cells. Thus, our results suggest that MDGA and licarin A significantly protect primary cultured neuronal cells against glutamate-induced oxidative stress, via antioxidative activities. PMID:16151440

  10. Ca2+ entry via AMPA-type glutamate receptors triggers Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release from ryanodine receptors in rat spiral ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Morton-Jones, Rachel T; Cannell, Mark B; Housley, Gary D

    2008-04-01

    Ryanodine receptor (RyR)-gated Ca2+ stores have recently been identified in cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) and likely contribute to Ca2+ signalling associated with auditory neurotransmission. Here, we identify an ionotropic glutamate receptor signal transduction pathway which invokes RyR-gated Ca2+ stores in SGN via Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). Ca2+ levels were recorded in SGN in situ within rat cochlear slices (postnatal day 0-17) using the Ca2+ indicator fluo-4. RyR-gated Ca2+ stores were confirmed by caffeine-induced increases in intracellular Ca2+ which were blocked by ryanodine (100 microM) and were independent of external Ca2+. Glutamate evoked comparable increases in intracellular Ca2+, but required the presence of external Ca2+. Ca2+ influx via the glutamate receptor was found to elicit CICR via RyR-gated Ca2+ stores, as shown by the inhibition of the response by prior depletion of the Ca2+ stores with caffeine, the SERCA inhibitor thapsigargin, or ryanodine. The glutamate analogue AMPA (alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid) elicited Ca2+ responses that could be inhibited by caffeine. Glutamate- and AMPA-mediated Ca2+ responses were eliminated with the AMPA/Kainate receptor antagonist DNQX (6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione). These data demonstrate functional coupling between somatic AMPA-type glutamate receptors and intracellular Ca(2+) stores via RyR-dependent CICR in primary auditory neurons.

  11. AMPA receptor activation, but not the accumulation of endogenous extracellular glutamate, induces paralysis and motor neuron death in rat spinal cord in vivo.

    PubMed

    Corona, Juan Carlos; Tapia, Ricardo

    2004-05-01

    The mechanisms of motor neuron (MN) degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are unknown, but glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity may be involved. To examine directly this idea in vivo, we have used microdialysis in the rat lumbar spinal cord and showed that four- to fivefold increases in the concentration of endogenous extracellular glutamate during at least 1 h, by perfusion with the glutamate transport inhibitor L-2,4-trans-pyrrolidine-dicarboxylate, elicited no motor alterations or MN damage. Stimulation of glutamate release with 4-aminopyridine induced transitory ipsilateral hindlimb muscular twitches but no MN damage. In contrast, perfusion of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) did not modify glutamate levels but produced intense muscular spasms, followed by ipsilateral permanent hindlimb paralysis and a remarkable loss of MNs. These effects of AMPA were prevented by co-perfusion with the AMPA receptor antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(F)quinoxaline. Perfusion with NMDA or kainate produced no motor effects or MN damage. Thus, the elevation of endogenous extracellular glutamate in vivo due to blockade of its transport is innocuous for spinal MNs. Because this resistance is observed under the same experimental conditions in which MNs are highly vulnerable to AMPA, these results indicate that excitotoxicity due to this mechanism might not be an important factor in the pathogenesis of ALS.

  12. Gabapentin inhibits the activity of the rat excitatory glutamate transporter 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gil, Yang Sook; Kim, Jong Hak; Kim, Chi Hyo; Han, Jong In; Zuo, Zhiyi; Baik, Hee Jung

    2015-09-05

    Gabapentin, a derivative of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), is used to treat epilepsy and neuropathic pain. The pharmacological mechanisms for gabapentin effects are not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of gabapentin on the activity of excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) that can regulate extracellular glutamate concentrations. EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Membrane currents were recorded after application of l-glutamate in the presence or absence of different concentrations of gabapentin (1-300μM) by using a two-electrode voltage clamp. To determine the effect of gabapentin on Vmax and Km of EAAT3 for l-glutamate, l-glutamate at 3-300μM was used. To study the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) on gabapentin-induced changes in EAAT3 activity, oocytes were incubated with the PKC activator (Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA), the PKC inhibitors (chelerythrine or staurosporine), and the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Gabapentin decreased EAAT3 activity in a concentration-dependent manner and EAAT3 activity was significantly inhibited by 10-300μM gabapentin. Gabapentin significantly decreased Vmax without affecting Km. PMA increased EAAT3 activity; however, gabapentin attenuated the PMA-induced increase in EAAT3 activity. Pre-incubation of oocytes with chelerythrine, staurosporine, or wortmannin decreased basal EAAT3 activity, which was further reduced by gabapentin. We conclude that gabapentin decreases EAAT3 activity at clinically relevant and higher concentrations, in which PKC and PI3K may not be involved. The results suggest that EAAT3 might not be a target for the anticonvulsant action of gabapentin.

  13. Pre-synaptic GABA receptors inhibit glutamate release through GIRK channels in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ladera, Carolina; del Carmen Godino, María; José Cabañero, María; Torres, Magdalena; Watanabe, Masahiko; Luján, Rafael; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2008-12-01

    Neuronal G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels mediate the slow inhibitory effects of many neurotransmitters post-synaptically. However, no evidence exists that supports that GIRK channels play any role in the inhibition of glutamate release by GABA(B) receptors. In this study, we show for the first time that GABA(B) receptors operate through two mechanisms in nerve terminals from the cerebral cortex. As shown previously, GABA(B) receptors reduces glutamate release and the Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-type Ca(2+) channels in a mode insensitive to the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q and consistent with direct inhibition of this voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. However, by means of weak stimulation protocols, we reveal that GABA(B) receptors also reduce glutamate release mediated by P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, and that these responses are reversed by the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q. Consistent with the functional interaction between GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels at nerve terminals we demonstrate by immunogold electron immunohistochemistry that pre-synaptic boutons of asymmetric synapses co-express GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels, thus suggesting that the functional interaction of these two proteins, found at the post-synaptic level, also occurs at glutamatergic nerve terminals.

  14. Cadmium effects on 24h changes in glutamate, aspartate, glutamine, GABA and taurine content of rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pérez, B; Caride, A; Cabaleiro, T; Lafuente, A

    2010-07-01

    This work evaluates the possible changes in 24 h variations of striatal aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and taurine content after oral cadmium treatment. Male rats were submitted to cadmium exposure at two doses (25 and 50 mg/L of cadmium chloride (CdCl(2))) in the drinking water for 30 days. Control rats received cadmium-free water. After the treatment, rats were killed at six different time intervals throughout a 24 h cycle. Differential effects of cadmium on 24 h amino acid fluctuations were observed. Metal exposure modified the daily pattern of the amino acids concentration found in control animals, except for GABA and taurine with the lowest dose used. Exposure to 25 mg/L of CdCl(2) decreased mean content of aspartate, as well as GABA concentration. These results suggest that cadmium exposure affects 24 h changes of the studied amino acids concentration in the striatum, and those changes may be related to alterations in striatal function.

  15. Nicotinic receptor activation contrasts pathophysiological bursting and neurodegeneration evoked by glutamate uptake block on rat hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Corsini, Silvia; Tortora, Maria; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-11-15

    Impaired uptake of glutamate builds up the extracellular level of this excitatory transmitter to trigger rhythmic neuronal bursting and delayed cell death in the brainstem motor nucleus hypoglossus. This process is the expression of the excitotoxicity that underlies motoneuron degeneration in diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis affecting bulbar motoneurons. In a model of motoneuron excitotoxicity produced by pharmacological block of glutamate uptake in vitro, rhythmic bursting is suppressed by activation of neuronal nicotinic receptors with their conventional agonist nicotine. Emergence of bursting is facilitated by nicotinic receptor antagonists. Following excitotoxicity, nicotinic receptor activity decreases mitochondrial energy dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress and production of toxic radicals. Globally, these phenomena synergize to provide motoneuron protection. Nicotinic receptors may represent a novel target to contrast pathological overactivity of brainstem motoneurons and therefore to prevent their metabolic distress and death. Excitotoxicity is thought to be one of the early processes in the onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) because high levels of glutamate have been detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of such patients due to dysfunctional uptake of this transmitter that gradually damages brainstem and spinal motoneurons. To explore potential mechanisms to arrest ALS onset, we used an established in vitro model of rat brainstem slice preparation in which excitotoxicity is induced by the glutamate uptake blocker dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA). Because certain brain neurons may be neuroprotected via activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) by nicotine, we investigated if nicotine could arrest excitotoxic damage to highly ALS-vulnerable hypoglossal motoneurons (HMs). On 50% of patch-clamped HMs, TBOA induced intense network bursts that were inhibited by 1-10 μm nicotine, whereas nAChR antagonists

  16. Effects of glutamate and {alpha}2-noradrenergic receptor antagonists on the development of neurotoxicity produced by chronic rotenone in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Mesbah Danysz, Wojciech; Schmidt, Werner Juergen; Dekundy, Andrzej

    2009-10-15

    Systemic inhibition of complex I by rotenone in rats represents a model of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to elucidate whether neramexane (NMDA, nicotinic {alpha}9/{alpha}10 and 5-HT{sub 3} receptor antagonist), idazoxan ({alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor antagonist) or 2-methyl-6-(phenyl-ethyl)-pyrimidine (MPEP, metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 antagonist) prevents rotenone-induced parkinsonian-like behaviours and neurochemical changes in rats. Rotenone (2.5 mg/kg i.p. daily) was administered over 60 days together with saline, neramexane (5 mg/kg i.p., b.i.d.), idazoxan (2.5 mg/kg i.p., b.i.d.) or MPEP (2.5 mg/kg i.p., b.i.d.). The same doses of neramexane, idazoxan and MPEP were administered to rats treated with vehicle instead of rotenone. Treatment-related effects on parkinsonian-like behaviours, such as hypokinesia/rigidity and locomotor activity, were evaluated. Moreover, concentrations of dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites were measured in rats from each experimental group. Over the 60-day treatment period, the rotenone + saline treated animals developed hypokinesia, expressed as an increase in the bar and grid descent latencies in the catalepsy test, and a decrease in locomotor activity. Neramexane and idazoxan partially prevented the development of catalepsy in rotenone-treated rats. Co-administration of MPEP with rotenone resulted only in a decrease in descent latency in the grid test on day 60. Chronic rotenone treatment reduced concentrations of dopamine and serotonin in the anterior striatum, which was blocked by co-treatment with neramexane or idazoxan but not with MPEP. Only neramexane treatment blocked the rotenone-induced decrease in dopamine levels in the substantia nigra pars compacta. In conclusion, neramexane and idazoxan counteracted to some extent the development of parkinsonian symptoms and neurochemical alterations in the rotenone model of Parkinson's disease.

  17. Effect of chronic glutamate administration to pregnant rats during gestation on metabotropic glutamate receptors from mothers and full-term fetuses brain.

    PubMed

    León Navarro, D; Albasanz, J L; Iglesias, I; Ruiz, M A; Martín, M

    2005-03-01

    Chronic glutamate treatment during gestational period caused a significant decrease in total metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) number. Similar results were observed on the steady-state level of mGlu(1) receptor detected by immunoblotting assays, suggesting that this is the main receptor subtype modulated by agonist exposure. Furthermore, no variations on mRNA coding mGlu(1) receptor were found, suggesting post-transcriptional modulation as a possible mechanism of the lost of receptor detected at the membrane surface. On the other hand, western-blotting to determine level of G(q/11) protein and phospholipase C beta(1) revealed a significant decrease of both proteins in mothers brain. This decrease was associated with significant variation in glutamate and DHPG-stimulated phospholipase C activity. No significant differences on mGluR transduction pathway components were observed in fetuses brain. These results suggest that glutamate intake during pregnancy causes a down-regulation of different proteins involved in glutamate response mediated by mGluR only in mothers brain without significantly affecting fetuses brain.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of a standardized extract of Diospyros kaki leaves on MCAO transient focal cerebral ischemic rats and cultured neurons injured by glutamate or hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Bei, Weijian; Peng, Wenlie; Zang, Linquan; Xie, Zhiyong; Hu, Dehui; Xu, Anlong

    2007-06-01

    Naoxinqing (NXQ, a standardized extract of Diospyros kaki leaves) is a patented and approved drug of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) used for the treatment of apoplexy syndrome for years in China, but its underlying mechanism remains to be further elucidated. The present study investigates the effects of NXQ against focal ischemia/reperfusion injury induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats and against glutamate-induced cell injury of hippocampal neurons as well as against hypoxia injury of cortical neurons. Oral administrations of NXQ at 20, 40, 80 mg/kg/day for 7 days (3 days before MCAO and 4 days after MCAO) significantly reduced the lesion of the insulted brain hemisphere and improved the neurological behavior of the rats. In primary rat hippocampal neuron cultures, treatment with NXQ at 5 - 20 microg mL concentration protects the neurons against glutamate-induced excitotoxic death in a dose-dependent manner. In primary rat cerebral cortical neuron cultures, pretreatment with 5 - 100 microg/mL NXQ also attenuates hypoxia-reoxygen induced neuron death and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that NXQ significantly protects the rats from MCAO ischemic injury in vivo and the hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced excitotoxic injury as well as cortical neurons from hypoxia injury in vitro by synergistic mechanisms involving its antioxidative effects. NXQ:Naoxinqing CNS:central nervous system MCAO:middle cerebral artery occlusion I/R:ischemia and reperfusion.

  19. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2 allosteric potentiators prevent sodium lactate-induced panic-like response in panic-vulnerable rats

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip L; Fitz, Stephanie D; Engleman, Eric A; Svensson, Kjell A; Schkeryantz, Jeffrey M; Shekhar, Anantha

    2015-01-01

    Rats with chronic inhibition of GABA synthesis by infusion of l-allyglycine, a glutamic acid decarboxylase inhibitor, into their dorsomedial/perifornical hypothalamus are anxious and exhibit panic-like cardio-respiratory responses to treatment with intravenous (i.v.) sodium lactate (NaLac) infusions, in a manner similar to what occurs in patients with panic disorder. We previously showed that either NMDA receptor antagonists or metabotropic glutamate receptor type 2/3 receptor agonists can block such a NaLac response, suggesting that a glutamate mechanism is contributing to this panic-like state. Using this animal model of panic, we tested the efficacy of CBiPES and THIIC, which are selective group II metabotropic glutamate type 2 receptor allosteric potentiators (at 10–30mg/kg i.p.), in preventing NaLac-induced panic-like behavioral and cardiovascular responses. The positive control was alprazolam (3mg/kg i.p.), a clinically effective anti-panic benzodiazepine. As predicted, panic-prone rats given a NaLac challenge displayed NaLac-induced panic-like cardiovascular (i.e. tachycardia and hypertensive) responses and “anxiety” (i.e. decreased social interaction time) and “flight” (i.e. increased locomotion) -associated behaviors; however, systemic injection of the panic-prone rats with CBiPES, THIIC or alprazolam prior to the NaLac dose blocked all NaLac-induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses. These data suggested that in a rat animal model, selective group II metabotropic glutamate type 2 receptor allosteric potentiators show an anti-panic efficacy similar to alprazolam. PMID:22914798

  20. Effect of adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists and L-DOPA on hydroxyl radical, glutamate and dopamine in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Dziubina, Anna

    2012-02-01

    A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists have been proposed as a new therapy of PD. Since oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of PD, we studied the effect of the selective A(2A) adenosine receptor antagonists 8-(-3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC) and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385) on hydroxyl radical generation, and glutamate (GLU) and dopamine (DA) extracellular level using a microdialysis in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats. CSC (1 mg/kg) and ZM 241385 (3 mg/kg) given repeatedly for 14 days decreased the production of hydroxyl radical and extracellular GLU level, both enhanced by prior 6-OHDA treatment in dialysates from the rat striatum. CSC and ZM 241385 did not affect DA and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) extracellular levels in the striatum of 6-OHDA-treated rats. L-DOPA (6 mg/kg) given twice daily for two weeks in the presence of benserazide (3 mg/kg) decreased striatal hydroxyl radical and glutamate extracellular level in 6-OHDA-treated rats. At the same time, L-DOPA slightly but significantly increased the extracellular levels of DOPAC and HVA. A combined repeated administration of L-DOPA and CSC or ZM 241385 did not change the effect of L-DOPA on hydroxyl radical production and glutamate extracellular level in spite of an enhancement of extracellular DA level by CSC and elevation of extracellular level of DOPAC and HVA by ZM 241385. The data suggest that the 6-OHDA-induced damage of nigrostriatal DA-terminals is related to oxidative stress and excessive release of glutamate. Administration of L-DOPA in combination with CSC or ZM 241385, by restoring striatal DA-glutamate balance, suppressed 6-OHDA-induced overproduction of hydroxyl radical.

  1. Convulsant and Subconvulsant Doses of Norfloxacin in the Presence and Absence of Biphenylacetic Acid Alter Extracellular Hippocampal Glutamate but Not Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Levels in Conscious Rats

    PubMed Central

    Smolders, I.; Gousseau, C.; Marchand, S.; Couet, W.; Ebinger, G.; Michotte, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics with central excitatory side effects. These adverse effects presumably result from inhibition of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAA receptors. This GABA antagonistic effect is greatly potentiated by the active metabolite of fenbufen, biphenylacetic acid (BPAA). Nevertheless, it remains questionable whether GABA receptor antagonism alone can explain the convulsant activity potentials of these antimicrobial agents. The present study was undertaken to investigate the possible effects of norfloxacin, both in the absence and in the presence of BPAA, on the extracellular hippocampal levels of GABA and glutamate, the main central inhibitory and excitatory amino acid neurotransmitters, respectively. This in vivo microdialysis approach with conscious rats allows monitoring of behavioral alterations and concomitant transmitter modulation in the hippocampus. Peroral administration of 100 mg of BPAA per kg of body weight had no effect on behavior and did not significantly alter extracellular GABA or glutamate concentrations. Intravenous perfusion of 300 mg of norfloxacin per kg did not change the rat's behavior or the concomitant neurotransmitter levels in about half of the experiments, while the remaining animals exhibited severe seizures. These norfloxacin-induced convulsions did not affect extracellular hippocampal GABA levels but were accompanied by enhanced glutamate concentrations. Half of the rats receiving both 100 mg of BPAA per kg and 50 mg of norfloxacin per kg displayed lethal seizures, while the remaining animals showed no seizure-related behavior. In the latter subgroup, again no significant alterations in extracellular GABA levels were observed, but glutamate overflow remained significantly elevated for at least 3 h. In conclusion, norfloxacin exerts convulsant activity in rats, accompanied by elevations of extracellular hippocampal glutamate levels but not GABA levels, even in the presence of BPAA. PMID:11796360

  2. Glutamate microinjected in the posterodorsal medial amygdala induces subtle increase in the consumption of a three-choice macronutrient self-selection diet in male rats.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Carolina Böettge; Goularte, Jéferson F; Trindade, Nathália A; De Oliveira, Alexandre P; Rasia-Filho, Alberto A

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have involved the "posterodorsal" amygdaloid area with the control of food intake and the development of obesity in rats. Within this wide region, the posterodorsal medial amygdala (MePD) has connections with specific hypothalamic nuclei that increase feeding behavior and modulate energy balance. Glutamate is the major brain excitatory neurotransmitter, remarkably enhances centrally mediated food consumption, and is abundantly found in the MePD. Here, it was studied the effects of saline (0.3 μL) and glutamate (45 nM or 45 mM/0.3 μL) directly microinjected in the MePD of adult male rats on the consumption of a three-choice (high-carbohydrate, high-protein, or high-lipid) macronutrient selective diet. The rat adaptation to the experimental procedures and its body weight gain were continuously evaluated. Control data for all groups and results following microinjections were obtained after a fasting protocol. Feeding behavior was evaluated during the subsequent 2-hr period of free access to the selective diets. Both doses of glutamate microinjected in the MePD did not lead to a higher percentage of animals consuming any of the different diets (P > 0.05), although glutamate 45 mM induced a higher consumption of the high-carbohydrate diet when compared with presurgery control values (P < 0.01). Interestingly, present data indicate that glutamate in the male MePD induces only a subtle modification in the feeding behavior and suggest that large electrolytic lesions of the "posterodorsal" amygdaloid region might have affected other regions to alter drastically meal size consumption in rats. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Pharmacology of postsynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones.

    PubMed

    Davies, C H; Clarke, V R; Jane, D E; Collingridge, G L

    1995-09-01

    1. Activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones leads to a depolarization, an increase in input resistance and a reduction in spike frequency adaptation (or accommodation). At least eight subtypes of mGluR have been identified which have been divided into three groups based on their biochemical, structural and pharmacological properties. It is unclear to which group the mGluRs which mediate these excitatory effects in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones belong. We have attempted to address this question by using intracellular recording to test the effects of a range of mGluR agonists and antagonists, that exhibit different profiles of subtype specificity, on the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurones in rat hippocampal slices. 2. (2S, 1'S,2'S)-2-(2'-carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG1) caused a reduction in spike frequency adaptation and a depolarization (1-10 mV) associated with an increase in input resistance (10-30%) at concentrations (> or = 50 microM) that have been shown to activate mGluRs in groups I, II and III. Similar effects were observed with concentrations (50-100 microM) of (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD) and (1S,3S)-ACPD that exhibit little or no activity at group III mGluRs but which activate groups I and II mGluRs. 3. Inhibition of the release of endogenous neurotransmitters through activation of GABAB receptors, by use of 200 microM (+/-)-baclofen, did not alter the effects of (1S,3R)-ACPD (50-100 microM), (1S,3S)-ACPD (100 microM) or L-CCG1 (100 microM). This suggests that mGluR agonists directly activate CA1 pyramidal neurones. 4. Like these broad spectrum mGluR agonists, the racemic mixture ((SR)-) or resolved (S)-isomer of the selective group I mGluR agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine ((SR)-DHPG (50-100 microM) or (S)-DHPG (20-50 microM)) caused a reduction in spike frequency adaptation concomitant with postsynaptic depolarization and an increase in input

  4. Neuropeptide Cycloprolylglycine Exhibits Neuroprotective Activity after Systemic Administration to Rats with Modeled Incomplete Global Ischemia and in In Vitro Modeled Glutamate Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Povarnina, P Yu; Kolyasnikova, K N; Nikolaev, S V; Antipova, T A; Gudasheva, T A

    2016-03-01

    We studied cerebroprotective properties of neuropeptide cycloprolylglycine (1 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally to rats with modeled incomplete global ischemia rats and neuroprotective properties for HT-22 cells under conditions of glutamate toxicity. It was shown that the neuropeptide administered during the postischemic period restored the neurological status of rats by preventing sensorimotor impairments in the limb-placing test and suppression of locomotor activity in the open field test. In in vitro experiments, cycloprolylglycine in concentrations of 10(-5)-10(-8) M exhibited pronounced dose-dependent neuroprotective activity. The results attest to high cerebro- and neuroprotective potential of endogenous peptide cycloprolylglycine.

  5. Contribution of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors to in vivo glutamate-induced calpain activation in the rat striatum. Relation to neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Del Río, Perla; Montiel, Teresa; Massieu, Lourdes

    2008-08-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, can cause the death of neurons by a mechanism known as excitotoxicity. This is a calcium-dependent process and activation of the NMDA receptor subtype contributes mainly to neuronal damage, due to its high permeability to calcium. Activation of calpain, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease, has been implicated in necrotic excitotoxic neuronal death. We have investigated the contribution of NMDA and non-NMDA ionotropic receptors to calpain activation and neuronal death induced by the acute administration of glutamate into the rat striatum. Calpain activity was assessed by the cleavage of the cytoskeletal protein, alpha-spectrin. Caspase-3 activity was also studied because glutamate can also lead to apoptosis. Results show no caspase-3 activity, but a strong calpain activation involving both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors. Although neuronal damage is mediated mainly by the NMDA receptor subtype, it can not be attributed solely to calpain activity.

  6. Administration of thimerosal to infant rats increases overflow of glutamate and aspartate in the prefrontal cortex: protective role of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate.

    PubMed

    Duszczyk-Budhathoki, Michalina; Olczak, Mieszko; Lehner, Malgorzata; Majewska, Maria Dorota

    2012-02-01

    Thimerosal, a mercury-containing vaccine preservative, is a suspected factor in the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders. We previously showed that its administration to infant rats causes behavioral, neurochemical and neuropathological abnormalities similar to those present in autism. Here we examined, using microdialysis, the effect of thimerosal on extracellular levels of neuroactive amino acids in the rat prefrontal cortex (PFC). Thimerosal administration (4 injections, i.m., 240 μg Hg/kg on postnatal days 7, 9, 11, 15) induced lasting changes in amino acid overflow: an increase of glutamate and aspartate accompanied by a decrease of glycine and alanine; measured 10-14 weeks after the injections. Four injections of thimerosal at a dose of 12.5 μg Hg/kg did not alter glutamate and aspartate concentrations at microdialysis time (but based on thimerosal pharmacokinetics, could have been effective soon after its injection). Application of thimerosal to the PFC in perfusion fluid evoked a rapid increase of glutamate overflow. Coadministration of the neurosteroid, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS; 80 mg/kg; i.p.) prevented the thimerosal effect on glutamate and aspartate; the steroid alone had no influence on these amino acids. Coapplication of DHEAS with thimerosal in perfusion fluid also blocked the acute action of thimerosal on glutamate. In contrast, DHEAS alone reduced overflow of glycine and alanine, somewhat potentiating the thimerosal effect on these amino acids. Since excessive accumulation of extracellular glutamate is linked with excitotoxicity, our data imply that neonatal exposure to thimerosal-containing vaccines might induce excitotoxic brain injuries, leading to neurodevelopmental disorders. DHEAS may partially protect against mercurials-induced neurotoxicity.

  7. Imaging for metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 in rat and monkey brains using PET with [18F]FITM.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Tomoteru; Fujinaga, Masayuki; Maeda, Jun; Kawamura, Kazunori; Yui, Joji; Hatori, Akiko; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Nagai, Yuji; Tokunaga, Masaki; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Zhang, Ming-Rong

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we evaluate the utility of 4-[(18)F]fluoro-N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino)pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-N-methylbenzamide ([(18)F]FITM) as a positron emission tomography (PET) ligand for imaging of the metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1) in rat and monkey brains. In vivo distribution of [(18)F]FITM in brains was evaluated by PET scans with or without the mGluR1-selective antagonist (JNJ16259685). Kinetic parameters of monkey PET data were obtained using the two-tissue compartment model with arterial blood sampling. In PET studies in rat and monkey brains, the highest uptake of radioactivity was in the cerebellum, followed by moderate uptake in the thalamus, hippocampus and striatum. The lowest uptake of radioactivity was detected in the pons. These uptakes in all brain regions were dramatically decreased by pre-administration of JNJ16259685. In kinetic analysis of monkey PET, the highest volume of distribution (V(T)) was detected in the cerebellum (V(T) = 11.5). [(18)F]FITM has an excellent profile as a PET ligand for mGluR1 imaging. PET with [(18)F]FITM may prove useful for determining the regional distribution and density of mGluR1 and the mGluR1 occupancy of drugs in human brains.

  8. Plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein and mitochondrial glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase of rat liver are related

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, P.D.; Potter, B.J.; Sorrentino, D.; Zhou, S.L.; Isola, L.M.; Stump, D.; Kiang, C.L.; Thung, S. ); Wada, H.; Horio, Y. )

    1990-05-01

    The hepatic plasma membrane fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP{sub PM}) and the mitochondrial isoenzyme of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (mGOT) of rat liver have similar amino acid compositions and identical amino acid sequences for residues 3-24. Both proteins migrate with an apparent molecular mass of 43 kDa on SDS/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, have a similar pattern of basic charge isomers on isoelectric focusing, are eluted similarly from four different high-performance liquid chromatographic columns, have absorption maxima at 435 nm under acid conditions and 354 nm at pH 8.3, and bind oleate. Sinusoidally enriched liver plasma membranes and purified h-FABP{sub PM} have GOT enzymatic activity. Monospecific rabbit antiserum against h-FABP{sub PM} reacts on Western blotting with mGOT, and vice versa. Antisera against both proteins produce plasma membrane immunofluorescence in rat hepatocytes and selectively inhibit the hepatocellular uptake of ({sup 3}H)oleate but not that of ({sup 35}S)sulfobromophthalein or ({sup 14}C)taurocholate. The inhibition of oleate uptake produced by anti-h-FABP{sub PM} can be eliminated by preincubation of the antiserum with mGOT; similarly, the plasma membrane immunofluorescence produced by either antiserum can be eliminated by preincubation with the other antigen. These data suggest that h-FABP{sub PM} and mGOT are closely related.

  9. Pegylation of poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) nanoparticles is efficient for avoiding mononuclear phagocyte system capture in rats

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, İpek; Segura-Sánchez, Freimar; Bouchemal, Kawthar; Sezak, Murat; Özer, Özgen; Güneri, Tamer; Ponchel, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Poly(γ-benzyl-L-glutamate) (PBLG) derivatives are synthetic polypeptides for preparing nanoparticles with well controlled surface properties. The aim of this paper was to investigate the biodistribution of pegylated PBLG in rats. For this purpose, nanoparticles were prepared by a nanoprecipitation method using mixtures of different PBLG derivates, including a pegylated derivate to avoid mononuclear phagocyte system uptake. The morphology, size distribution, and surface charge of the nanoparticles were investigated as a function of the amount of polymer employed for the preparation. Moderately polydispersed nanoparticles (polydispersity index less than 0.2) were obtained. Their size increased with polymer concentration. The zeta potential values were negative whatever the formulations. The availability of polyethylene glycol chains on the nanoparticles’ surface was confirmed by measuring the decrease in bovine serum albumin adsorption. For in vivo distribution studies, pegylated and nonpegylated nanoparticles were prepared with polymer mixtures containing PBLG-fluorescein isothiocyanate and imaged by fluorescence microscopy to measure their accumulation in liver and spleen tissues of rats after intravenous administration. Injection of stealth formulations resulted in negligible fluorescence in liver and spleen compared with nonpegylated formulations, which suggests that these nanoparticles are promising candidates as a stealth-type long-circulating drug carrier system and could be useful for active targeting of drugs while reducing systemic side effects. PMID:21270961

  10. Leucine-nitrogen metabolism in the brain of conscious rats: its role as a nitrogen carrier in glutamate synthesis in glial and neuronal metabolic compartments.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Ryosei; Cohen, David M; Henry, Joseph F; Burrin, Douglas G; Reeds, Peter J

    2004-02-01

    The source of nitrogen (N) for the de novo synthesis of brain glutamate, glutamine and GABA remains controversial. Because leucine is readily transported into the brain and the brain contains high activities of branched-chain aminotransferase (BCAT), we hypothesized that leucine is the predominant N-precursor for brain glutamate synthesis. Conscious and unstressed rats administered with [U-13C] and/or [15N]leucine as additions to the diet were killed at 0-9 h of continuous feeding. Plasma and brain leucine equilibrated rapidly and the brain leucine-N turnover was more than 100%/min. The isotopic dilution of [U-13C]leucine (brain/plasma ratio 0.61 +/- 0.06) and [15N]leucine (0.23 +/- 0.06) differed markedly, suggesting that 15% of cerebral leucine-N turnover derived from proteolysis and 62% from leucine synthesis via reverse transamination. The rate of glutamate synthesis from leucine was 5 micro mol/g/h and at least 50% of glutamate-N originally derived from leucine. The enrichment of [5-15N]glutamine was higher than [15N]ammonia in the brain, indicating glial ammonia generation from leucine via glutamate. The enrichment of [15N]GABA, [15N]aspartate, [15N]glutamate greater than [2-15N]glutamine suggests direct incorporation of leucine-N into both glial and neuronal glutamate. These findings provide a new insight for the role of leucine as N-carrier from the plasma pool and within the cerebral compartments.

  11. Induction of Fos expression in the rat forebrain after intragastric administration of monosodium L-glutamate, glucose and NaCl.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, H; Kondoh, T; Shibata, M; Torii, K; Ueta, Y

    2011-11-24

    l-glutamate, an umami taste substance, is a key molecule coupled to a food intake signaling pathway. Furthermore, recent studies have unveiled new roles for dietary glutamate on gut-brain axis communication via activation of gut glutamate receptors and subsequent vagus nerve. In the present study, we mapped activation sites of the rat forebrain after intragastric load of 60 mM monosodium l-glutamate (MSG) by measurement of Fos protein, a functional marker of neuronal activation. The same concentration of d-glucose (sweet) and NaCl (salty) was used as controls. MSG administration exclusively produced enhanced Fos expression in four hypothalamic regions (the medial preoptic area, lateral hypothalamic area, dorsomedial nucleus, and arcuate nucleus). On the other hand, glucose administration exclusively enhanced Fos induction in the nucleus accumbens. Both MSG and glucose enhanced Fos induction in three brain regions (the habenular nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, and central nucleus of the amygdala). However, MSG induced Fos inductions were more potent than those of glucose in the habenular nucleus and paraventricular nucleus. Importantly, the present study identified for the first time two brain areas (the paraventricular and arcuate hypothalamic nuclei) that are more potently activated by intragastric MSG loads compared with glucose and NaCl. Overall, our results suggest significant activation of a neural network comprising the habenular nucleus, amygdala, and the hypothalamic subnuclei following intragastric load with glutamate.

  12. MDMA increases glutamate release and reduces parvalbumin-positive GABAergic cells in the dorsal hippocampus of the rat: role of cyclooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Anneken, John H; Cunningham, Jacobi I; Collins, Stuart A; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2013-03-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) is a popular drug of abuse with well-documented acute effects on serotonergic, dopaminergic, and cholinergic transmitter systems, as well as evidence of long-term disruption of serotoninergic systems in the rat brain. Recently, it was demonstrated that MDMA evokes a delayed and sustained increase in glutamate release in the hippocampus. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of inflammatory mediators in the MDMA-induced increase in glutamate release, as well as the contribution of inflammatory pathways in the persistent neurochemical toxicity associated with repeated MDMA treatment. Treatment with the non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor ketoprofen and the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide attenuated the increase in extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus evoked by repeated MDMA exposure (10 mg/kg, i.p., every 2 h); no attenuation was observed in rats treated with the COX-1 selective inhibitor piroxicam. Reverse dialysis of a major product of COX activity, prostaglandin E2, also resulted in a significant increase in extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus . Repeated exposure to MDMA diminished the number of parvalbumin-positive GABA interneurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, an effect that was attenuated by ketoprofen treatment. However, COX inhibition with ketoprofen did not prevent the long-term depletion of 5-HT in the hippocampus evoked by MDMA treatment. These data are supportive of the view that cyclooxygenase activity contributes to the mechanism underlying both the increased release of glutamate and decreased number of GABA interneurons in the rat hippocampus produced by repeated MDMA exposure.

  13. Ceftriaxone Treatment after Traumatic Brain Injury Restores Expression of the Glutamate Transporter, GLT-1, Reduces Regional Gliosis, and Reduces Post-Traumatic Seizures in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, Grant S.; Kabakov, Anatoli Y.; Hameed, Mustafa Q.; Dhamne, Sameer C.; Rosenberg, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Excessive extracellular glutamate after traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to excitotoxic cell death and likely to post-traumatic epilepsy. Glutamate transport is the only known mechanism of extracellular glutamate clearance, and glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) is the major glutamate transporter of the mammalian brain. We tested, by immunoblot, in the rat lateral fluid percussion injury TBI model whether GLT-1 expression is depressed in the cortex after TBI, and whether GLT-1 expression after TBI is restored after treatment with ceftriaxone, a well-tolerated β-lactam antibiotic previously shown to enhance GLT-1 expression in noninjured animals. We then tested whether treatment with ceftriaxone mitigates the associated regional astrogliosis, as reflected by glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) expression, and also whether ceftriaxone treatment mitigates the severity of post-traumatic epilepsy. We found that 7 days after TBI, GLT-1 expression in the ipsilesional cortex was reduced by 29% (n=7/group; p<0.01), relative to the contralesional cortex. However, the loss of GLT-1 expression was reversed by treatment with ceftriaxone (200 mg/kg, daily, intraperitoneally). We found that ceftriaxone treatment also decreased the level of regional GFAP expression by 43% in the lesioned cortex, relative to control treatment with saline (n=7 per group; p<0.05), and, 12 weeks after injury, reduced cumulative post-traumatic seizure duration (n=6 rats in the ceftriaxone treatment group and n=5 rats in the saline control group; p<0.001). We cautiously conclude that our data suggest a potential role for ceftriaxone in treatment of epileptogenic TBI. PMID:23510201

  14. Decreasing nicotinic receptor activity and the spatial learning impairment caused by the NMDA glutamate antagonist dizocilpine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Dennis A.; Heshmati, Pooneh; Kholdebarin, Ehsan; Levin, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic systems have been shown by a variety of studies to be involved in cognitive function. Nicotinic receptors have an inherent property to become desensitized after activation. The relative role of nicotinic receptor activation vs. net receptor inactivation by desensitization in the cognitive effects of nicotinic drugs remains to be fully understood. In these studies, we tested the effects of the α7 nicotinic receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA), the α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE), the nonspecific nicotinic channel blocker mecamylamine and the α4β2 nicotinic receptor desensitizing agent sazetidine-A on learning in a repeated acquisition test. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on a repeated acquisition learning procedure in an 8-arm radial maze. MLA (1–4 mg/kg), DHβE (1–4 mg/kg), mecamylamine (0.125–0.5 mg/kg) or sazetidine-A (1 and 3 mg/kg) were administered in four different studies either alone or together with the NMDA glutamate antagonist dizocilpine (0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg). MLA significantly counteracted the learning impairment caused by dizocilpine. The overall choice accuracy impairment caused by dizocilpine was significantly attenuated by co-administration of DHβE. Low doses of the non-specific nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine also reduced dizocilpine-induced repeated acquisition impairment. Sazetidine-A reversed the accuracy impairment caused by dizocilpine. These studies provide evidence that a net decrease in nicotinic receptor activity can improve learning by attenuating learning impairment induced by NMDA glutamate blockade. This adds to evidence in cognitive tests that nicotinic antagonists can improve cognitive function. Further research characterizing the efficacy and mechanisms underlying nicotinic antagonist and desensitization induced cognitive improvement is warranted. PMID:25064338

  15. Propofol differentially inhibits the release of glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid and glycine in the spinal dorsal horn of rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Wei; Yong, Zheng; Mi, Weidong; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Propofol (2, 6-diisopropylphenol) is an intravenous anesthetic that is commonly used for the general anesthesia. It is well known that the spinal cord is one of the working targets of general anesthesia including propofol. However, there is a lack of investigation of the effects of propofol on spinal dorsal horn which is important for the sensory transmission of nociceptive signals. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing dosage of propofol on the release of glutamate (Glu), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine (Gly) in the spinal dorsal horn. Materials and Methods: The efflux of Glu, GABA or Gly in the spinal dorsal horn of rats was detected using transverse spinal microdialysis under an awake condition and various depths of propofol anesthesia. The infusion rates of propofol were, in order, 400 µg/(kg·min), 600 µg/(kg·min) and 800 µg/(kg·min), with a 20 min infusion period being maintained at each infusion rate. Results: Propofol decreased the glutamate efflux within spinal dorsal horn in a dose-dependent manner, and the maximum decrease was 56.8 ± 6.0% at high-dose propofol infusion producing immobility. The inhibitory GABA and Gly efflux was also decreased about 15–20% at low-dose propofol infusion only producing sedation, but did not continue to drop with higher doses of propofol. Conclusion: Propofol decreased both excitatory and inhibitory amino acids efflux in spinal dorsal horn, and the preferential suppression of the excitatory amino acid might be associated with the analgesic effect of propofol. PMID:26557972

  16. Riluzole-Triggered GSH Synthesis via Activation of Glutamate Transporters to Antagonize Methylmercury-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yu; Xu, Zhao-Fa; Liu, Wei; Xu, Bin; Yang, Hai-Bo; Wei, Yan-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This study was to evaluate the effect of riluzole on methylmercury- (MeHg-) induced oxidative stress, through promotion of glutathione (GSH) synthesis by activating of glutamate transporters (GluTs) in rat cerebral cortex. Methods. Eighty rats were randomly assigned to four groups, control group, riluzole alone group, MeHg alone group, and riluzole + MeHg group. The neurotoxicity of MeHg was observed by measuring mercury (Hg) absorption, pathological changes, and cell apoptosis of cortex. Oxidative stress was evaluated via determining reactive oxygen species (ROS), 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), malondialdehyde (MDAs), carbonyl, sulfydryl, and GSH in cortex. Glutamate (Glu) transport was studied by measuring Glu, glutamine (Gln), mRNA, and protein of glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) and glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1). Result. (1) MeHg induced Hg accumulation, pathological injury, and apoptosis of cortex; (2) MeHg increased ROS, 8-OHdG, MDA, and carbonyl, and inhibited sulfydryl and GSH; (3) MeHg elevated Glu, decreased Gln, and downregulated GLAST and GLT-1 mRNA expression and protein levels; (4) riluzole antagonized MeHg-induced downregulation of GLAST and GLT-1 function and expression, GSH depletion, oxidative stress, pathological injury, and apoptosis obviously. Conclusion. Data indicate that MeHg administration induced oxidative stress in cortex and that riluzole could antagonize this situation through elevation of GSH synthesis by activating of GluTs. PMID:22966415

  17. The effect of polychlorinated biphenyls on the high affinity uptake of the neurotransmitters, dopamine, serotonin, glutamate and GABA, into rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Mariussen, E; Fonnum, F

    2001-02-21

    Studies have shown that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) may affect cognitive functions both in human and also in experimental animals. We have investigated whether this effect could be caused by an inhibition of the uptake of selected neurotransmitters into rat brain synaptosomes. Ortho-chlorinated biphenyls were found to inhibit transmitter transport into synaptosomes from rat brain. In contrast, several nonortho-chlorinated biphenyls did not inhibit uptake. The uptake of dopamine, glutamate, GABA and serotonin was inhibited by the PCB mixtures, Aroclor 1242 and 1254. Under identical condition, the uptake of dopamine was inhibited more efficient than that of glutamate. The inhibition of neurotransmitter uptake was found to be dependent on the chlorination patterns of the PCB congeners, (i) ortho-chlorinated PCBs with four to five chlorine substituents (with the exception of 2,2',6,6'-TeCB) were the most effective inhibitors; (ii) hexa- or heptachlorinated PCBs were poor inhibitors or partial inhibitors (e.g. 2,2',4,4',5,5'-HCB) of glutamate and GABA uptake. Kinetic studies indicated that Aroclor 1242 inhibited dopamine uptake mainly competitively. The uptake of glutamate and GABA was inhibited in either a mixed competitive or in a non-competitive way, respectively. The neurotoxic consequences of the effect of different PCBs on neurotransmitter uptake on the uptake into synaptosomes are discussed.

  18. Fear extinction in 17 day old rats is dependent on metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Ganella, Despina E; Thangaraju, Pushbalela; Lawrence, Andrew J; Kim, Jee Hyun

    2016-02-01

    We used pharmacological modulation of the mGlu5 receptor to investigate its role in the extinction of conditioned fear throughout development. In postnatal day (P) 17 rats, the positive allosteric modulator CDPPB facilitated, while the negative allosteric modulator MTEP impaired extinction. These drugs had no such effects on P24 or adult rats. These results establish a changing importance of mGlu5 in extinction of conditioned fear at distinct stages of development.

  19. Mechanisms of glutamate-stimulated Mg2+ influx and subsequent Mg2+ efflux in rat forebrain neurones in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Stout, A K; Li-Smerin, Y; Johnson, J W; Reynolds, I J

    1996-01-01

    1. Mag-fura-2 fluorescence microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were used to measure glutamate-induced changes in the intracellular free Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]i) and Mg2+ currents, respectively, in cultured forebrain neurones from fetal rats in the absence of extracellular Na+ (Nao+) and Ca2+ (Cao2+). 2. Increasing the extracellular Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]o) from 9 to 70 mM significantly enhanced the maximum [Mg2+]i induced by a 5 min 100 microM glutamate plus 1 microM glycine stimulation ([Mg2+]i,5 min) from 2.04 +/- 0.07 to 2.98 +/- 0.20 mM. Increasing [Mg2+]o from 9 to 70 mM also significantly enhanced the initial rate of rise in [Mg2+]i upon glutamate stimulation from 0.41 +/- 0.02 to 0.81 +/- 0.08 mM min-1. 3. The glutamate-stimulated increase in [Mg2+]i was not altered by prior depletion of intracellular free Na+ (Nai+). For paired stimulations in single neurones, the mean [Mg2+]i,5 min was 1.95 +/- 0.17 mM under Na(+)-depleted conditions and 1.94 +/- 0.16 mM under control conditions. 4. The glutamate-stimulated increase in [Mg2+]i was significantly reduced when NMDA channel-permeant Cs+ or K+ ions were used as the Na+ substitute instead of the presumably NMDA channel-impermeant ions N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG), Tris or sucrose. The mean [Mg2+]i,5 min was 0.56 +/- 0.06 and 0.74 +/- 0.08 mM in the presence of Cs+ or K+, respectively, compared with 2.13 +/- 0.10, 1.93 +/- 0.11 and 2.07 +/- 0.22 mM in the presence of NMDG, Tris or sucrose, respectively. 5. In whole-cell recordings performed with Cs+ as the primary intracellular cation, application of 100 microM NMDA plus 10 microM glycine induced inward currents that reversed around -55 mV in an extracellular solution containing 70 mM Mg2+ and 31 mM NMDG as the only cations. The currents were reversibly inhibited by DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV). In an extracellular solution containing 2 mM Mg2+ and 140 mM NMDG, NMDA plus glycine activated outward currents at potentials more

  20. Glutamate and Opioid Antagonists Modulate Dopamine Levels Evoked by Innately Attractive Male Chemosignals in the Nucleus Accumbens of Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Catalán, María-José; Orrico, Alejandro; Hipólito, Lucía; Zornoza, Teodoro; Polache, Ana; Lanuza, Enrique; Martínez-García, Fernando; Granero, Luis; Agustín-Pavón, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Sexual chemosignals detected by vomeronasal and olfactory systems mediate intersexual attraction in rodents, and act as a natural reinforcer to them. The mesolimbic pathway processes natural rewards, and the nucleus accumbens receives olfactory information via glutamatergic projections from the amygdala. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the mesolimbic pathway in the attraction toward sexual chemosignals. Our data show that female rats with no previous experience with males or their chemosignals display an innate preference for male-soiled bedding. Focal administration of the opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine into the posterior ventral tegmental area does not affect preference for male chemosignals. Nevertheless, exposure to male-soiled bedding elicits an increase in dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens shell and core, measured by microdialysis. Infusion of the opioid antagonist naltrexone in the accumbens core does not significantly affect dopamine efflux during exposure to male chemosignals, although it enhances dopamine levels 40 min after withdrawal of the stimuli. By contrast, infusion of the glutamate antagonist kynurenic acid in the accumbens shell inhibits the release of dopamine and reduces the time that females spend investigating male-soiled bedding. These data are in agreement with previous reports in male rats showing that exposure to opposite-sex odors elicits dopamine release in the accumbens, and with data in female mice showing that the behavioral preference for male chemosignals is not affected by opioidergic antagonists. We hypothesize that glutamatergic projections from the amygdala into the accumbens might be important to modulate the neurochemical and behavioral responses elicited by sexual chemosignals in rats.

  1. Glutamate and Opioid Antagonists Modulate Dopamine Levels Evoked by Innately Attractive Male Chemosignals in the Nucleus Accumbens of Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Catalán, María-José; Orrico, Alejandro; Hipólito, Lucía; Zornoza, Teodoro; Polache, Ana; Lanuza, Enrique; Martínez-García, Fernando; Granero, Luis; Agustín-Pavón, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Sexual chemosignals detected by vomeronasal and olfactory systems mediate intersexual attraction in rodents, and act as a natural reinforcer to them. The mesolimbic pathway processes natural rewards, and the nucleus accumbens receives olfactory information via glutamatergic projections from the amygdala. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the mesolimbic pathway in the attraction toward sexual chemosignals. Our data show that female rats with no previous experience with males or their chemosignals display an innate preference for male-soiled bedding. Focal administration of the opioid antagonist β-funaltrexamine into the posterior ventral tegmental area does not affect preference for male chemosignals. Nevertheless, exposure to male-soiled bedding elicits an increase in dopamine efflux in the nucleus accumbens shell and core, measured by microdialysis. Infusion of the opioid antagonist naltrexone in the accumbens core does not significantly affect dopamine efflux during exposure to male chemosignals, although it enhances dopamine levels 40 min after withdrawal of the stimuli. By contrast, infusion of the glutamate antagonist kynurenic acid in the accumbens shell inhibits the release of dopamine and reduces the time that females spend investigating male-soiled bedding. These data are in agreement with previous reports in male rats showing that exposure to opposite-sex odors elicits dopamine release in the accumbens, and with data in female mice showing that the behavioral preference for male chemosignals is not affected by opioidergic antagonists. We hypothesize that glutamatergic projections from the amygdala into the accumbens might be important to modulate the neurochemical and behavioral responses elicited by sexual chemosignals in rats. PMID:28280461

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to 65kDa glutamate decarboxylase induce epitope specific effects on motor and cognitive functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Hampe, Christiane S; Petrosini, Laura; De Bartolo, Paola; Caporali, Paola; Cutuli, Debora; Laricchiuta, Daniela; Foti, Francesca; Radtke, Jared R; Vidova, Veronika; Honnorat, Jérôme; Manto, Mario

    2013-06-05

    Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune movement disorder characterized by the presence of autoantibodies specific to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65). A pathological role of these antibodies has been suggested by their capacity to inhibit GAD65 enzyme activity and by the observation that rats receiving cerebellar injections of GAD65Ab showed cerebellar motor hyperexcitability. To assess the effect of epitope-specific GAD65Ab on cognitive and motor functions, we conducted behavioral experiments in rats that received cerebellar injections with two distinct monoclonal GAD65Ab (b96.11 and b78). Rats received three injections of GAD65Ab b96.11 (5 or 7 μg), GAD65Ab b78 (5 or 7 μg), or saline at the level of three cerebellar nuclei. Animals were submitted to neurological evaluation and Morris Water Maze (MWM) test. Cellular internalization of GAD65Ab was analyzed by Flow Cytometry, Fluorescence and Bright Field microscopy. Monoclonal GAD65Ab induced dose-dependent and epitope-specific effects on motor and cognitive functions. Injections of the higher dose altered motor and spatial procedural behaviors, while the lower dose induced only modest cerebellar motor symptoms and did not affect MWM performances. While b96.11 provoked immediate severe effects, which rapidly decreased, b78 induced moderate but prolonged effects. Both GAD65Ab were taken up by live cells in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings support the hypothesis that epitope-specific GAD65Ab induce cerebellar dysfunction impairing motor and procedural abilities. This is the first demonstration of a critical role of cerebellar nuclei GAD65 enzyme in procedural spatial functions.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to 65kDa glutamate decarboxylase induce epitope specific effects on motor and cognitive functions in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune movement disorder characterized by the presence of autoantibodies specific to the smaller isoform of glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65). A pathological role of these antibodies has been suggested by their capacity to inhibit GAD65 enzyme activity and by the observation that rats receiving cerebellar injections of GAD65Ab showed cerebellar motor hyperexcitability. To assess the effect of epitope-specific GAD65Ab on cognitive and motor functions, we conducted behavioral experiments in rats that received cerebellar injections with two distinct monoclonal GAD65Ab (b96.11 and b78). Methods Rats received three injections of GAD65Ab b96.11 (5 or 7 μg), GAD65Ab b78 (5 or 7 μg), or saline at the level of three cerebellar nuclei. Animals were submitted to neurological evaluation and Morris Water Maze (MWM) test. Cellular internalization of GAD65Ab was analyzed by Flow Cytometry, Fluorescence and Bright Field microscopy. Results Monoclonal GAD65Ab induced dose-dependent and epitope-specific effects on motor and cognitive functions. Injections of the higher dose altered motor and spatial procedural behaviors, while the lower dose induced only modest cerebellar motor symptoms and did not affect MWM performances. While b96.11 provoked immediate severe effects, which rapidly decreased, b78 induced moderate but prolonged effects. Both GAD65Ab were taken up by live cells in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions Our findings support the hypothesis that epitope-specific GAD65Ab induce cerebellar dysfunction impairing motor and procedural abilities. This is the first demonstration of a critical role of cerebellar nuclei GAD65 enzyme in procedural spatial functions. PMID:23738610

  4. The glutamate transporter EAAT4 in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells: a glutamate-gated chloride channel concentrated near the synapse in parts of the dendritic membrane facing astroglia.

    PubMed

    Dehnes, Y; Chaudhry, F A; Ullensvang, K; Lehre, K P; Storm-Mathisen, J; Danbolt, N C

    1998-05-15

    Antibodies to an excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT4) label a glycoprotein of approximately 65 kDa strongly in the cerebellum and weakly in the forebrain. Cross-linking of cerebellar proteins with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate before solubilization causes dimer bands of EAAT4 and both dimer and trimer bands of the other glutamate transporters GLAST (EAAT1) and GLT (EAAT2) to appear on immunoblots. In contrast to GLAST, GLT, and EAAC (EAAT3), EAAT4 is unevenly distributed in the cerebellar molecular layer, being strongly expressed in parasagittal zones. It is located in cerebellar Purkinje cells, and the highest concentrations are seen in ones expressing high levels of zebrin II (aldolase C). The labeling of Purkinje cell spines and thin dendrites is stronger than that of large diameter dendrites and cell bodies. EAAT4 is present at low concentrations in the synaptic membrane, but is highly enriched in the parts of the dendritic and spine membranes facing astrocytes (which express GLAST and GLT) compared with parts facing neuronal membranes, suggesting a functional relationship with glial glutamate transporters. The presence of EAAT4 in intracellular cisterns and multivesicular organelles may reflect turnover of transporter in the plasma membrane. The total Purkinje cell spine surface and the EAAT4 concentration were found to be 1.1 m2/cm3 and 0.2 mg/cm3, respectively, in the molecular layer, corresponding to 1800 molecules/microm2. The juxtasynaptic location of EAAT4 may explain electrophysiological observations predicting the presence of a neuronal glutamate transporter near the release site at a Purkinje cell spine synapse. EAAT4 may function as a combined transporter and inhibitory glutamate receptor.

  5. Commiphora molmol Modulates Glutamate-Nitric Oxide-cGMP and Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 Pathways and Attenuates Oxidative Stress and Hematological Alterations in Hyperammonemic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Sultan; Othman, Sarah I.; Germoush, Mousa O.; Hussein, Omnia E.; Al-Basher, Gadh; Khim, Jong Seong; Al-Qaraawi, Maha A.; Al-Harbi, Hanan M.; Fadel, Abdulmannan; Allam, Ahmed A.

    2017-01-01

    Hyperammonemia is a serious complication of liver disease and may lead to encephalopathy and death. This study investigated the effects of Commiphora molmol resin on oxidative stress, inflammation, and hematological alterations in ammonium chloride- (NH4Cl-) induced hyperammonemic rats, with an emphasis on the glutamate-NO-cGMP and Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 signaling pathways. Rats received NH4Cl and C. molmol for 8 weeks. NH4Cl-induced rats showed significant increase in blood ammonia, liver function markers, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Concurrent supplementation of C. molmol significantly decreased circulating ammonia, liver function markers, and TNF-α in hyperammonemic rats. C. molmol suppressed lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide and enhanced the antioxidant defenses in the liver, kidney, and cerebrum of hyperammonemic rats. C. molmol significantly upregulated Nrf2 and HO-1 and decreased glutamine and nitric oxide synthase, soluble guanylate cyclase, and Na+/K+-ATPase expression in the cerebrum of NH4Cl-induced hyperammonemic rats. Hyperammonemia was also associated with hematological and coagulation system alterations. These alterations were reversed by C. molmol. Our findings demonstrated that C. molmol attenuates ammonia-induced liver injury, oxidative stress, inflammation, and hematological alterations. This study points to the modulatory effect of C. molmol on glutamate-NO-cGMP and Nrf2/ARE/HO-1 pathways in hyperammonemia. Therefore, C. molmol might be a promising protective agent against hyperammonemia. PMID:28744340

  6. Enhanced Extracellular Glutamate and Dopamine in the Ventral Pallidum of Alcohol-Preferring AA and Alcohol-Avoiding ANA Rats after Morphine.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, Heidi; Nurmi, Harri; Raivio, Noora; Kiianmaa, Kalervo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of ventral pallidal opioidergic mechanisms in the control of ethanol intake by studying the effects of acute administration of morphine on the levels of GABA, glutamate, and dopamine in the ventral pallidum. The study was conducted using the alcohol-preferring Alko Alcohol (AA) and alcohol-avoiding Alko Non-Alcohol (ANA) rat lines that have well-documented differences in their voluntary ethanol intake and brain opioidergic systems. Therefore, examination of neurobiological differences between the lines is supposed to help to identify the neuronal mechanisms underlying ethanol intake, since selection pressure is assumed gradually to lead to enrichment of alleles promoting high or low ethanol intake, respectively. The effects of an acute dose of morphine (1 or 10 mg/kg s.c.) on the extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate in the ventral pallidum were monitored with in vivo microdialysis. The concentrations of GABA and glutamate in the dialyzates were determined with a high performance liquid chromatography system using fluorescent detection, while electrochemical detection was used for dopamine. The levels of glutamate in the rats injected with morphine 1 mg/kg were significantly above the levels found in the controls and in the rats receiving morphine 10 mg/kg. Morphine 10 mg/kg also increased the levels of dopamine. Morphine could not, however, modify the levels of GABA. The rat lines did not differ in any of the effects of morphine. The data suggest that the glutamatergic and dopaminergic systems in the ventral pallidum may mediate some effects of morphine. Since there were no differences between the AA and ANA lines, the basic hypothesis underlying the use of the genetic animal model suggests that the effects of morphine detected probably do not underlie the different intake of ethanol by the lines and contribute to the control of ethanol intake in these animals.

  7. Effects of ceftriaxone on ethanol intake: a possible role for xCT and GLT-1 isoforms modulation of glutamate levels in P rats.

    PubMed

    Alhaddad, Hasan; Das, Sujan C; Sari, Youssef

    2014-10-01

    Evidence suggests that glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and cystine/glutamate exchanger transporter (xCT) are critical in maintaining glutamate homeostasis. We have recently demonstrated that ceftriaxone treatment induced upregulation of GLT1 levels and attenuated ethanol intake; however, less is known about the involvement of xCT on ethanol intake. In this study, we investigated the effects of ceftriaxone on the levels of xCT in both continuous and relapse-like ethanol drinking, as well as GLT-1 isoforms, and glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) in relapse-like ethanol intake. P rats received free choice of 15 and 30 % ethanol and water for 5 weeks and then deprived of ethanol for 2 weeks. Rats were treated with ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline during the last 5 days of the 2-week deprivation period. After deprivation period, P rats were re-exposed to free choice of 15 and 30 % ethanol and water for nine consecutive days. A second group of P rats was given continuous ethanol access for 5 weeks, then ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline throughout the week 6. Ceftriaxone significantly attenuated relapse-like ethanol intake. Importantly, this effect of ceftriaxone was associated in part with upregulation of the levels of GLT-1a and GLT-1b isoforms and xCT in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc). There were no significant differences in GLAST expression among all groups. We also found that ceftriaxone treatment increased xCT levels in both PFC and NAc in continuous ethanol intake. These findings suggest that xCT and GLT-1 isoforms might be target proteins for the treatment of alcohol dependence.

  8. Resistance imparted by traditional Chinese medicines to the acute change of glutamic pyruvic transaminase, alkaline phosphatase and creatine kinase activities in rat blood caused by noise.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bei-Wei; Sun, Yu-Mei; Yun, Xia; Han, Song; Piao, Mei-Lan; Murata, Yoshiyuki; Tada, Mikiro

    2004-05-01

    The activities of serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and creatine kinase (CK) in rats injected or not with the Chinese medicines, Astragali, Rhodiolae and Ligusticum, were determined after noise exposure. Noise at 95 and 105 dB significantly increased the activities of GPT, ALP and CK, and showed a dependence on the exposure time. The injection of each medicine significantly suppressed the increased enzyme activities by 95 and 105 dB noise.

  9. Kinetic characterization of l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake inhibition and increase oxidative damage induced by glutaric acid in striatal synaptosomes of rats.

    PubMed

    Magni, Danieli Valnes; Furian, Ana Flávia; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider; Souza, Mauren Assis; Lunardi, Fabiane; Ferreira, Juliano; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Fighera, Michele Rechia

    2009-02-01

    Glutaric acidemia type I (GA-I) is an inherited metabolic disease characterized by accumulation of glutaric acid (GA) and striatal degeneration. Although growing evidence suggests that excitotoxicity and oxidative stress play central role in the neuropathogenesis of this disease, mechanism underlying striatal damage in this disorder is not well established. Thus, we decided to investigate the in vitro effects of GA 10nM (a low concentration that can be present initial development this disorder) on l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in synaptosomes from striatum of rats. GA reduced l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake in synaptosomes from 1 up to 30min after its addition. Furthermore, we also provided some evidence that GA competes with the glutamate transporter inhibitor l-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (PDC), suggesting a possible interaction of GA with glutamate transporters on synaptosomes. Moreover, GA produced a significant decrease in the V(MAX) of l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake, but did not affect the K(D) value. Although the GA did not show oxidant activity per se, it increased the ROS generation in striatal synaptosomes. To evaluate the involvement of reactive species generation in the GA-induced l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake inhibition, trolox (0.3, 0.6 and 6muM) was added on the incubation medium. Statistical analysis showed that trolox did not decrease inhibition of GA-induced l-[(3)H]glutamate uptake, but decreased GA-induced reactive species formation in striatal synaptosomes (1, 3, 5, 10, 15 and 30min), suggesting that ROS generation appears to occur secondarily to glutamatergic overstimulation in this model of organic acidemia. Since GA induced DCFH oxidation increase, we evaluate the involvement of glutamate receptor antagonists in oxidative stress, showing that CNQX, but not MK-801, decreased the DCFH oxidation increase in striatal synaptosomes. Furthermore, the results presented in this report suggest that excitotoxicity elicited

  10. Modafinil restores methamphetamine induced object-in-place memory deficits in rats independent of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Reichel, Carmela M; Gilstrap, Meghin G; Ramsey, Lauren A; See, Ronald E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic methamphetamine (meth) abuse in humans can lead to various cognitive deficits, including memory loss. We previously showed that chronic meth self-administration impairs memory for objects relative to their location and surrounding objects. Here, we demonstrate that the cognitive enhancer, modafinil, reversed this cognitive impairment independent of glutamate N-methyl-d-aspartate (GluN) receptor expression Male, Long-Evans rats underwent a noncontingent (Experiment 1) or contingent (Experiment 2) meth regimen. After one week of abstinence, rats were tested for object-in-place recognition memory. Half the rats received either vehicle or modafinil (100mg/kg) immediately after object familiarization. Rats (Experiment 2) were sacrificed immediately after the test and brain areas that comprise the key circuitry for object in place performance were manually dissected. Subsequently, glutamate receptor expression was measured from a crude membrane fraction using Western blot procedures. Saline-treated rats spent more time interacting with the objects in changed locations, while meth-treated rats distributed their time equally among all objects. Meth-treated rats that received modafinil showed a reversal in the deficit, whereby they spent more time exploring the objects in the new locations. GluN2B receptor subtype was decreased in the perirhinal cortex, yet remained unaffected in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of meth rats. This meth-induced down regulation occurred whether or not meth experienced rats received vehicle or modafinil. These data support the use of modafinil for memory impairment in meth addiction. Further studies are needed to elucidate the neural mechanisms of modafinil reversal of cognitive impairments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adenosine triphosphate depletion reverses sodium-dependent, neuronal uptake of glutamate in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Madl, J E; Burgesser, K

    1993-10-01

    Extracellular accumulations of excitatory amino acids (EAAs) may mediate ischemic neuronal damage. Metabolic insults can decrease Na+ and K+ plasma membrane gradients, thereby reducing the driving force for uptake of EAAs into cells by Na(+)-dependent EAA cotransporters. EAA accumulations could result from decreased uptake and increased release due to reversal of these cotransporters. ATP depletion, uptake, and release of EAAs were measured by HPLC in slices treated with metabolic inhibitors. Inhibition and reversal of cotransporters were determined by uptake or release of D,L-threo-beta-hydroxyaspartate (OH-Asp), an EAA analog with high affinity for cotransporters. Moderate ATP depletion (7 > ATP nmol/mg protein > 3) reduced uptake by cotransporters without increasing release of EAAs. When ATP was severely depleted (ATP < 2 nmol/mg protein), increased release of EAAs and preloaded OH-Asp occurred, consistent with reversal of cotransporters. Release of glutamine and asparagine was not increased, confirming that release was not primarily due to nonselective increased membrane permeability. ATP depletion and ouabain acted synergistically to produce EAA release, strongly suggesting release was largely mediated by inhibition of Na/K-ATPases. Severe ATP depletion decreased glutamate-like immunoreactivity primarily in axonal terminal-like structures, suggesting release occurred primarily from terminals. Moderate ATP depletion may increase extracellular EAAs by decreasing uptake. Severe ATP depletion may further increase EAAs by reversing uptake, thereby releasing cytosolic neuronal pools of EAAs.

  12. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors 7 within the Nucleus Accumbens are Involved in Relief Learning in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Evelyn; Fendt, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Relief learning is an appetitive association of a formally neutral cue with relief induced by the offset of an aversive stimulus. Since the nucleus accumbens mediates relief learning and accumbal metabotropic glutamate receptors 7 (mGluR7) modulate appetitive-like processes, we hypothesized that accumbal mGluR7 may be involved in the modulation of relief learning. Therefore, we injected the allosteric mGluR7 agonist AMN082 into the nucleus accumbens and tested the effects of these injections on acquisition and expression of relief memory, as well as on the reactivity to electric stimuli. AMN082 injections blocked acquisition but not expression of relief memory. In addition, accumbal AMN082 injections strongly reduced the locomotor reactivity to electric stimuli indicating antinociceptive effects. These antinociceptive effects might be causal for the blockade of relief learning after AMN082 injections. Taken together, the present study indicates that functional activation of accumbal mGluR7 has antinociceptive effects that interfere with relief learning.

  13. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors 7 within the Nucleus Accumbens are Involved in Relief Learning in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Evelyn; Fendt, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Relief learning is an appetitive association of a formally neutral cue with relief induced by the offset of an aversive stimulus. Since the nucleus accumbens mediates relief learning and accumbal metabotropic glutamate receptors 7 (mGluR7) modulate appetitive-like processes, we hypothesized that accumbal mGluR7 may be involved in the modulation of relief learning. Therefore, we injected the allosteric mGluR7 agonist AMN082 into the nucleus accumbens and tested the effects of these injections on acquisition and expression of relief memory, as well as on the reactivity to electric stimuli. AMN082 injections blocked acquisition but not expression of relief memory. In addition, accumbal AMN082 injections strongly reduced the locomotor reactivity to electric stimuli indicating antinociceptive effects. These antinociceptive effects might be causal for the blockade of relief learning after AMN082 injections. Taken together, the present study indicates that functional activation of accumbal mGluR7 has antinociceptive effects that interfere with relief learning. PMID:27296637

  14. MRS studies of neuroenergetics and glutamate/glutamine exchange in rats: Extensions to hyperammonemic models.

    PubMed

    Lanz, Bernard; Rackayova, Veronika; Braissant, Olivier; Cudalbu, Cristina

    2016-12-23

    In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy is a useful tool to characterize brain biochemistry as well as its alteration in a large number of major central nervous system diseases. The present review will focus on the study of the glutamate-glutamine cycle, an important biochemical pathway in excitatory neurotransmission, analyzed using in vivo MRS of different accessible nuclei: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N and (31)P. The different methodological aspects of data acquisition, processing and absolute quantification of the MRS data for each nucleus will be presented, as well as the description of the mathematical modeling approach to interpret the MRS measurements in terms of biochemical kinetics. The unique advantages of MRS, especially its non-invasive nature enabling longitudinal monitoring of brain disease progression and/or effect of treatment is illustrated in the particular context of hyperammonemic disorders with a specific focus on animal models. We review the current possibilities given by in vivo MRS to investigate some of the molecular mechanisms involved in hyperammonemic disorders and to give a better understanding of the process of development of hepatic encephalopathy, a severe neuropsychiatric disorder that frequently accompanies liver disease.

  15. Metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors modulate fear-conditioning induced enhancement of prepulse inhibition in rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dan; Huang, Juan; Wu, Xihong; Li, Liang

    2007-02-01

    Non-startling acoustic events presented shortly before an intense startling sound can inhibit the acoustic startle reflex. This phenomenon is called prepulse inhibition (PPI), and is widely used as a model of sensorimotor gating. The present study investigated whether PPI can be modulated by fear conditioning, whose acquisition can be blocked by the specific antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptors subtype 5 (mGluR5), 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP). The results show that a gap embedded in otherwise continuous noise sounds, which were delivered by two spatially separated loudspeakers, could inhibit the startle reflex induced by an intense sound that was presented 50 ms after the gap. The inhibitory effect depended on the duration of the gap, and was enhanced by fear conditioning that was introduced by temporally pairing the gap with footshock. Intraperitoneal injection of MPEP (0.5 or 5mg/kg) 30 min before fear conditioning blocked the enhancing effect of fear conditioning on PPI, but did not affect either the baseline startle magnitude or PPI if no fear conditioning was introduced. These results indicate that PPI is enhanced when the prepulse signifies an aversive event after fear conditioning. Also, mGlu5Rs play a role in preserving the fear-conditioning-induced enhancement of PPI.

  16. Glutamate and glycine modulation of 3H-MK801 binding to the NMDA receptor-ion channel complex in the vitamin B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Guilarte, T.R. )

    1990-02-26

    The authors have previously shown that the concentrations of the neuroactive amino acids glutamate (GLU) and glycine (GLY) are significantly altered in the seizure-prone vitamin B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain. Recently, it has been shown that GLU and GLY modulate the binding of {sup 3}H-MK801 to the ion channel associated with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-glutamate receptor subtype. The present investigation was undertaken to determine if GLU or GLY modulation of {sup 3}H-MK801 binding was altered in B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain. Preparation of cortical membranes from control and deficient 14 day old rats and {sup 3}H-MK801 binding assay were done as described by Ransom and Stec. The results show a significant reduction in the potency and efficacy of GLU modulation of {sup 3}H-MK801 binding, as well as a reduction in the efficacy of GLY, in membrane preparations from deficient rats compared to controls. These results indicate a reduced ability of GLU and GLY to potentiate the binding of {sup 3}H-MK801 to the NMDA receptor-ion channel in the B-6 deficient neonatal rat brain.

  17. Rapid changes in glutamate levels in the posterior hypothalamus across sleep-wake states in freely behaving rats.

    PubMed

    John, Joshi; Ramanathan, Lalini; Siegel, Jerome M

    2008-12-01

    The histamine-containing posterior hypothalamic region (PH-TMN) plays a key role in sleep-wake regulation. We investigated rapid changes in glutamate release in the PH-TMN across the sleep-wake cycle with a glutamate biosensor that allows the measurement of glutamate levels at 1- to 4-s resolution. In the PH-TMN, glutamate levels increased in active waking (AW) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep compared with quiet waking and nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. There was a rapid (0.6 +/- 1.8 s) and progressive increase in glutamate levels at REM sleep onset. A reduction in glutamate levels consistently preceded the offset of REM sleep by 8 +/- 3 s. Short-duration sleep deprivation resulted in a progressive increase in glutamate levels in the PH-TMN, perifornical-lateral hypothalamus (PF-LH), and cortex. We found that in the PF-LH, glutamate levels took a longer time to return to basal values compared with the time it took for glutamate levels to increase to peak values during AW onset. This is in contrast to other regions we studied in which the return to baseline values after AW was quicker than their rise with waking onset. In summary, we demonstrated an increase in glutamate levels in the PH-TMN with REM/AW onset and a drop in glutamate levels before the offset of REM. High temporal resolution measurement of glutamate levels reveals dynamic changes in release linked to the initiation and termination of REM sleep.

  18. Enhancement of Glutamate Release by l-Fucose Changes Effects of Glutamate Receptor Antagonists on Long-Term Potentiation in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Matthies, Henry; Schroeder, Helmut; Smalla, Karl-Heinz; Krug, Manfred

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies l-fucose has been shown to facilitate long-term memory formation and to enhance and prolong long-term potentiation (LTP). To search for possible presynaptic or postsynaptic mechanisms that are affected by l-fucose, we examined the effect of l-fucose on (1) inhibition of LTP induction via glutamate receptors by antagonists, (2) paired-pulse facilitation, and (3) presynaptic transmitter release. Coapplication of 0.2 mm l-fucose with the competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, d-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5), or coapplication of 0.2 mml-fucose in the presence of an inhibitor for class I/II metabotropic glutamate receptors, (S)-α-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG), reversed LTP blockade in the CA1-region of hippocampal slices. In contrast, l-fucose had no effect on the LTP blockade by the noncompetitive NMDA ion-channel blocker (5R,10S)-(+)-5-Methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5, 10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801). Paired-pulse facilitation, which is a primarily presynaptic phenomenon of short-term plasticity, was decreased in the presence of 0.2 mm l-fucose. Furthermore, l-fucose enhanced the K+-stimulated release of [3H]-d-aspartate from preloaded hippocampal slices in a concentration-dependent manner. These observations demonstrate an influence of l-fucose on transmitter release that in turn can increase transmitter availability at postsynaptic glutamate receptors. This effect of l-fucose may contribute to the LTP facilitation seen in vitro and in vivo as well as to improvement in memory formation. PMID:10940323

  19. Glutamate excitotoxicity activates the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway and induces the survival of rat hippocampal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel; González, Raúl Montes; Verdaguer, Ester; Huerta, Verónica Chaparro; Torres-Mendoza, Blanca M; Lemus, Lourdes; Rivera-Cervantes, Martha Catalina; Camins, A; Zárate, C Beas

    2014-03-01

    Current knowledge concerning the molecular mechanisms of the cellular response to excitotoxic insults in neurodegenerative diseases is insufficient. Although glutamate (Glu) has been widely studied as the main excitatory neurotransmitter and principal excitotoxic agent, the neuroprotective response enacted by neurons is not yet completely understood. Some of the molecular participants have been revealed, but the signaling pathways involved in this protective response are just beginning to be identified. Here, we demonstrate in vivo that, in response to the cell damage and death induced by Glu excitotoxicity, neurons orchestrate a survival response through the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway by increasing ERK expression in the rat hippocampal (CA1) region, allowing increased neuronal survival. In addition, this protective response is specifically reversed by U0126, an ERK inhibitor, which promotes cell death only when it is administered together with Glu. Our findings demonstrate that the ERK signaling pathway has a neuroprotective role in the response to Glu-induced excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons. Therefore, the ERK signaling pathway may be activated as a cellular response to excitotoxic injury to prevent damage and neural loss, representing a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Histone hyperacetylation modulates spinal type II metabotropic glutamate receptor alleviating stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dong-Yuan; Bai, Guang; Ji, Yaping; Karpowicz, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Stress is often a trigger to exacerbate chronic pain including visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome, a female predominant functional bowel disorder. Epigenetic mechanisms that mediate stress responses are a potential target to interfere with visceral pain. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, on visceral hypersensitivity induced by a subchronic stressor in female rats and to investigate the involvement of spinal glutamate receptors. Three daily sessions of forced swim induced visceral hypersensitivity. Intrathecal suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid prevented or reversed the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity, increased spinal histone 3 acetylation and increased mGluR2 and mGluR3 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis revealed enrichment of H3K9Ac and H3K18Ac at several promoter Grm2 and Grm3 regions. The mGluR2/3 antagonist LY341495 reversed the inhibitory effect of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid on the stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In surprising contrast, stress and/or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid had no effect on spinal NMDA receptor expression or function. These data reveal histone modification modulates mGluR2/3 expression in the spinal cord to attenuate stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. HDAC inhibitors may provide a potential approach to relieve visceral hypersensitivity associated with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:27385724

  1. The effects of combined application of inorganic Martian dust simulant and carbon dots on glutamate transport rat brain nerve terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Borysov, Arseniy; Pastukhov, Artem; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Dudarenko, Marina

    2016-07-01

    During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and can be transported to the central nervous system (Oberdorster et al., 2004). Recently, the research team of this study found the minor fractions of nanoparticles with the size ~ 50 -60 nm in Lunar and Martian dust stimulants (JSC-1a and JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin), whereas the average size of the simulants was 1 mm and 4mm, respectively (Krisanova et al., 2013). Also, the research team of this study discovered new phenomenon - the neuromodulating and neurotoxic effect of carbon nano-sized particles - Carbon dots (C-dots), originated from ash of burned carbon-containing product (Borisova et al, 2015). The aims of this study was to analyse acute effects of upgraded stimulant of inorganic Martian dust derived from volcanic ash (JSC-1a/JSC, ORBITEC Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, Wisconsin) by the addition of carbon components, that is, carbon dots, on the key characteristic of synaptic neurotransmission. Acute administration of carbon-containing Martian dust analogue resulted in a significant decrease in transporter-mediated uptake of L-[14C]glutamate (the major excitatory neurotransmitter) by isolated rat brain nerve terminals. The ambient level of the neurotransmitter in the preparation of nerve terminals increased in the presence of carbon dot-contained Martian dust analogue. These effects were associated with action of carbon component of the upgraded Martian dust stimulant but not with its inorganic constituent.

  2. Glutamate requires NMDA receptors to modulate alpha2 adrenoceptor in medulla oblongata cultured cells of newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Marinho da Silva, Sergio; Carrettiero, Daniel C; Chadi, Débora R F

    2014-04-03

    α2 Adrenoceptors (α2-ARs) are important in regulating the central control of blood pressure in medulla oblongata. However, it is unclear how this receptor is modulated by different receptors, especially the glutamatergic. In the present study, we studied the influence of ionotropic glutamatergic receptors over the α2-ARs in cultured cells of the medulla oblongata of newborn rats. For this purpose, the protein level of the α2-ARs was assessed after administration to the cultured cells of glutamate (glu), the agonists NMDA and kainate (KA), the NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 and the KA receptor antagonist DNQX. Results indicate that the α2-AR protein levels were increased after the treatments with glu and NMDA, and the addition of MK801 to this treatment thwarted this increase. Notwithstanding the fact that KA did not alter the receptor protein level, the combined treatment of DNQX with glu prevented the α2-AR protein modulation. In conclusion, the present study suggests that ionotropic glutamatergic receptors could be related to the α2-AR protein regulation in the medulla oblongata.

  3. Dopamine and glutamate release in the dorsolateral caudate putamen following withdrawal from cocaine self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Gabriele, Amanda; Pacchioni, Alejandra M; See, Ronald E

    2012-12-01

    Evidence suggests that cocaine addiction may involve progressive neuroadaptive changes in the dorsolateral caudate putamen (dlCPu). While cocaine seeking following abstinence from chronic self-administration requires intact dlCPu function, in vivo neurotransmitter release in the dlCPu has not been investigated. The current study measured dlCPu dopamine (DA) and glutamate (GLU) release during drug seeking following limited or extended abstinence, as well as in response to a cocaine priming injection alone. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered cocaine (0.2mg/50μl infusion, i.v.) for 10days (2h/day). In vivo microdialysis occurred in the self-administration chamber after 1 and 14days of abstinence (Experiment 1). A separate set of animals that completed self-administration as well as drug naïve controls received a cocaine priming injection (20mg/kg) during concurrent microdialysis (Experiment 2). DA release increased during drug seeking in the self-administration context at both 1 and 14days post abstinence. In contrast, GLU release only increased after 1day of abstinence. Furthermore, animals with a cocaine self-administration history showed enhanced DA and GLU release following cocaine challenge as compared to drug naïve controls. These results indicate that chronic cocaine self-administration enhances dlCPu DA and GLU under both drug-paired context and drug-primed conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dopamine and glutamate release in the dorsolateral caudate putamen following withdrawal from cocaine self-administration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Amanda; Pacchioni, Alejandra M.; See, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cocaine addiction may involve progressive neuroadaptive changes in the dorsolateral caudate putamen (dlCPu). While cocaine seeking following abstinence from chronic self-administration requires intact dlCPu function, in vivo neurotransmitter release in the dlCPu has not been investigated. The current study measured dlCPu dopamine (DA) and glutamate (GLU) release during drug seeking following limited or extended abstinence, as well as in response to a cocaine priming injection alone. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered cocaine (0.2 mg/50 µl infusion, i.v.) for 10 days (2-h/day). In vivo microdialysis occurred in the self-administration chamber after 1 and 14 days of abstinence (experiment 1). A separate set of animals that completed self-administration as well as drug naïve controls received a cocaine priming injection (20 mg/kg) during concurrent microdialysis (experiment 2). DA release increased during drug seeking in the self-administration context at both 1 and 14 days post abstinence. In contrast, GLU release only increased after 1 day of abstinence. Furthermore, animals with a cocaine self-administration history showed enhanced DA and GLU release following cocaine challenge as compared to drug naïve controls. These results indicate that chronic cocaine self-administration enhances dlCPu DA and GLU under both drug-paired context and drug-primed conditions. PMID:23026056

  5. Forebrain Projections of Arcuate Neurokinin B Neurons Demonstrated by Anterograde Tract-Tracing and Monosodium Glutamate Lesions in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, Sally J.; Burke, Michelle C.; Anderson, Miranda J.; McMullen, Nathaniel T.; Rance, Naomi E.

    2010-01-01

    Neurokinin B (NKB) and kisspeptin receptor signaling are essential components of the reproductive axis. A population of neurons resides within the arcuate nucleus of the rat that expresses NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and estrogen receptor α. Here we investigate the projections of these neurons using NKB-immunocytochemistry as a marker. First, the loss of NKB-immunoreactive (ir) somata and fibers was characterized after ablation of the arcuate nucleus by neonatal injections of monosodium glutamate. Second, biotinylated dextran amine was injected into the arcuate nucleus and anterogradely labeled NKB-ir fibers were identified using dual-labeled immunofluorescence. Four major projection pathways are described: 1) Local projections within the arcuate nucleus bilaterally, 2) Projections to the median eminence including the lateral palisade zone, 3) Projections to a periventricular pathway extending rostrally to multiple hypothalamic nuclei, the septal region and BNST and dorsally to the dorsomedial nucleus and 4) Projections to a ventral hypothalamic tract to the lateral hypothalamus and medial forebrain bundle. The diverse projections provide evidence that NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons could integrate the reproductive axis with multiple homeostatic, behavioral and neuroendocrine processes. Interestingly, anterograde tract-tracing revealed NKB-ir axons originating from arcuate neurons terminating on other NKB-ir somata within the arcuate nucleus. Combined with previous studies, these experiments reveal a bilateral interconnected network of sex-steroid responsive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the rat that express NKB, kisspeptin, dynorphin, NK3 receptors and ERα and project to GnRH terminals in the median eminence. This circuitry provides a mechanism for bilateral synchronization of arcuate NKB/kisspeptin/dynorphin neurons to modulate the pulsatile secretion of GnRH. PMID:20038444

  6. Cardiovascular and single-unit responses to L-glutamate injection into the posterior insular cortex in rat.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, A; Hatam, M; Nasimi, A

    2015-10-15

    The insular cortex in rat is a longitudinal strip that runs along the rostral half of the rhinal fissure. The previous studies showed connections between the posterior insular cortex (PIC) and some major cardiovascular centers. Based on the stimulation site, electrical or chemical stimulation of the PIC induced an increase or a decrease in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR). There is no report of simultaneous cardiovascular and single-unit recording microinjection of Glut in the PIC. In this study, L-glutamate was microinjected into the PIC of urethane anesthetized rats and arterial pressure, HR and single-unit responses were recorded simultaneously. Also the response of the neurons to baroreceptor activation was explored. Glut produced five types of long oscillatory, pressor, depressor, bradycardic and tachycardic cardiovascular responses, with no association between pressure and HR responses. We also observed five single-unit responses, consisting of short excitatory, long oscillatory, excitatory, inhibitory and mixed responses. There was an association between oscillation in BP and in single-unit response. There were some differences between the two sides especially for single-unit responses. In conclusion, there were five types of cardiovascular and five types of single-unit responses, to Glut microinjection into PIC, from which three types were correlated. The left side of the PIC is involved more in the cardiovascular functions. These data along with the fact that most recorded neurons responded to baroreceptor activation, might imply the presence of feedback systems in the PIC, producing irregularity in BP and HR. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Herpes simplex virus vector-mediated gene delivery of glutamic acid decarboxylase reduces detrusor overactivity in spinal cord injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Miyazato, Minoru; Sugaya, Kimio; Goins, William F.; Goss, James R.; Chancellor, Michael B.; de Groat, William C.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors encoding the 67 Kd form of the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) gene product, the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis enzyme, can suppress detrusor overactivity (DO) in spinal cord injury (SCI) rats. One week after spinalization, HSV vectors expressing GAD and green fluorescent protein (GFP) (HSV-GAD) were injected into the bladder wall. SCI rats without HSV injection (HSV-untreated) and those injected with lacZ-encoding reporter gene HSV vectors (HSV-LacZ) were used as controls. Three weeks after viral injection, continuous cystometry was performed under awake conditions in all three groups. In the HSV-GAD group, the number and amplitude of non-voiding contractions (NVCs) were significantly decreased (40–45% and 38–40%, respectively) along with an increase in voiding efficiency, compared with HSV-untreated and HSV-LacZ groups, but micturition pressure was not different among the three groups. Intrathecal application of bicuculline partly reversed the decreased number and amplitude of NVCs, and decreased voiding efficiency in the HSV-GAD group. In the HSV-GAD group, GAD67 mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased in L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) compared with the HSV-LacZ group while 57% of DRG cells were GFP-positive, and these neurons showed increased GAD67-like immunoreactivity compared with the HSV-LacZ group. These results indicate that GAD gene therapy effectively suppresses DO following SCI predominantly via activation of spinal GABAA receptors. Thus, HSV-based GAD gene transfer to bladder afferent pathways may represent a novel approach for the treatment of neurogenic DO. PMID:19225548

  8. The effect of adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists on hydroxyl radical, dopamine, and glutamate in the striatum of rats with altered function of VMAT2.

    PubMed

    Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Dziubina, Anna

    2012-08-01

    It has been shown that a decreased vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) function and the disruption of dopamine (DA) storage is an early contributor to oxidative damage of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). In our previous study, we demonstrated that adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists suppressed oxidative stress in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats suggesting that this effect may account for neuroprotective properties of drugs. In the present study, rats were injected with reserpine (10 mg/kg sc) and 18 h later the effect of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists 8-(3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC) and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385) on extracellular DA, glutamate and hydroxyl radical formation was studied in the rat striatum using in vivo microdialysis. By disrupting VMAT2 function, reserpine depleted DA stores, and increased glutamate and hydroxyl radical levels in the rat striatum. CSC (1 mg/kg) but not ZM 241385 (3 mg/kg) increased extracellular DA level and production of hydroxyl radical in reserpinised rats. Both antagonists decreased the reserpine-induced increase in extracellular glutamate. L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) (25 mg/kg) significantly enhanced extracellular DA, had no effect on reserpine-induced hydroxyl radical production and decreased extracellular glutamate concentration. CSC but not ZM 241385 given jointly with L-DOPA increased the effect of L-DOPA on extracellular DA and augmented the reserpine-induced hydroxyl radical production. CSC and ZM 241385 did not influence extracellular glutamate level, which was decreased by L-DOPA. It seems that by decreasing the MAO-dependent DA metabolism rate, CSC raised cytosolic DA and by DA autoxidation, it induced hydroxyl radical overproduction. Thus, the methylxanthine A(2A) receptor antagonists bearing properties of MAO-B inhibitor, like CSC, may cause a risk of oxidative stress resulting from dysfunctional DA storage

  9. The Role of Primary Motor Cortex (M1) Glutamate and GABA Signaling in l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia in Parkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Melissa M.; Ostock, Corinne Y.; George, Jessica A.; Goldenberg, Adam A.; Melikhov-Sosin, Mitchell; Nuss, Emily E.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term treatment of Parkinson's disease with l-DOPA almost always leads to the development of involuntary movements termed l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Whereas hyperdopaminergic signaling in the basal ganglia is thought to cause dyskinesia, alterations in primary motor cortex (M1) activity are also prominent during dyskinesia, suggesting that the cortex may represent a therapeutic target. The present study used the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model of Parkinson's disease to characterize in vivo changes in GABA and glutamate neurotransmission within M1 and determine their contribution to behavioral output. 6-Hydroxydopamine lesion led to parkinsonian motor impairment that was partially reversed by l-DOPA. Among sham-lesioned rats, l-DOPA did not change glutamate or GABA efflux. Likewise, 6-hydroxydopamine lesion did not impact GABA or glutamate among rats chronically treated with saline. However, we observed an interaction of lesion and treatment whereby, among lesioned rats, l-DOPA given acutely (1 d) or chronically (14–16 d) reduced glutamate efflux and enhanced GABA efflux. Site-specific microinjections into M1 demonstrated that l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia was reduced by M1 infusion of a D1 antagonist, an AMPA antagonist, or a GABAA agonist. Overall, the present study demonstrates that l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is associated with increased M1 inhibition and that exogenously enhancing M1 inhibition may attenuate dyskinesia, findings that are in agreement with functional imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies in human Parkinson's disease patients. Together, our study suggests that increasing M1 inhibitory tone is an endogenous compensatory response designed to limit dyskinesia severity and that potentiating this response is a viable therapeutic strategy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Most Parkinson's disease patients will receive l-DOPA and eventually develop hyperkinetic involuntary movements termed dyskinesia. Such symptoms can be as

  10. The effects of verapamil and its combinations with glutamate and glycine on cardiodynamics, coronary flow and oxidative stress in isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Stojic, Isidora; Srejovic, Ivan; Zivkovic, Vladimir; Jeremic, Nevena; Djuric, Marko; Stevanovic, Ana; Milanovic, Tamara; Djuric, Dragan; Jakovljevic, Vladimir

    2017-02-01

    The role of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) in heart is still unclear. For these ionotropic glutamate receptors is characteristic the necessity of both co-agonists, glutamate and glycine, for their activation, which primarily allows influx of calcium. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of verapamil, as a calcium channel blocker, alone and its combination with glycine and/or glutamate on cardiac function, coronary flow, and oxidative stress in isolated rat heart or to examine the effects of potential activation of NMDA-R in isolated rat heart. The hearts of male Wistar albino rats were excised and perfused according to Langendorff technique, and cardiodynamic parameters and coronary flow were determined during the administration of verapamil and its combinations with glutamate and/or glycine. The oxidative stress biomarkers, including thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, nitrites, superoxide anion radical, and hydrogen peroxide, were each determined spectrophotometrically from coronary venous effluent. The greatest decline in parameters of cardiac contractility and systolic pressure was in the group that was treated with verapamil only, while minimal changes were observed in group treated with all three tested substances. Also, the largest changes in coronary flow were in the group treated only with verapamil, and at least in the group that received all three tested substances, as well as the largest increase in oxidative stress parameters. Based on the obtained results, it can be concluded that NMDA-R activation allows sufficient influx of calcium to increase myocardial contractility and systolic pressure, as well as short-term increase of oxidative stress.

  11. Chronic Treatment with a Clinically Relevant Dose of Methylphenidate Increases Glutamate Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid and Impairs Glutamatergic Homeostasis in Prefrontal Cortex of Juvenile Rats.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Felipe; Pierozan, Paula; Rodrigues, André F; Biasibetti, Helena; Coelho, Daniella M; Mussulini, Ben Hur; Pereira, Mery S L; Parisi, Mariana M; Barbé-Tuana, Florencia; de Oliveira, Diogo L; Vargas, Carmen R; Wyse, Angela T S

    2016-05-01

    The understanding of the consequences of chronic treatment with methylphenidate is very important since this psychostimulant is extensively prescribed to preschool age children, and little is known about the mechanisms underlying the persistent changes in behavior and neuronal function related with the use of methylphenidate. In this study, we initially investigate the effect of early chronic treatment with methylphenidate on amino acids profile in cerebrospinal fluid and prefrontal cortex of juvenile rats, as well as on glutamatergic homeostasis, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase function, and balance redox in prefrontal cortex of rats. Wistar rats at early age received intraperitoneal injections of methylphenidate (2.0 mg/kg) or an equivalent volume of 0.9% saline solution (controls), once a day, from the 15th to the 45th day of age. Twenty-four hours after the last injection, the animals were decapitated and the cerebrospinal fluid and prefrontal cortex were obtained. Results showed that methylphenidate altered amino acid profile in cerebrospinal fluid, increasing the levels of glutamate. Glutamate uptake was decreased by methylphenidate administration, but GLAST and GLT-1 were not altered by this treatment. In addition, the astrocyte marker GFAP was not altered by MPH. The activity and immunocontent of catalytic subunits (α1, α2, and α3) of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were decreased in prefrontal cortex of rats subjected to methylphenidate treatment, as well as changes in α1 and α2 gene expression of catalytic α subunits of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were also observed. CAT activity was increased and SOD/CAT ratio and sulfhydryl content were decreased in rat prefrontal cortex. Taken together, our results suggest that chronic treatment with methylphenidate at early age induces excitotoxicity, at least in part, due to inhibition of glutamate uptake probably caused by disturbances in the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase function and/or in protein damage observed in the prefrontal cortex.

  12. Effects of NMDA and non-NMDA ionotropic glutamate receptors in the medial preoptic area on body temperature in awake rats.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Trina; Jaryal, Ashok Kumar; Mallick, Hruda Nanda

    2016-10-01

    Glutamate when microinjected at the medial preoptic area (mPOA) influences brain temperature (Tbr) and body temperature (Tb) in rats. Glutamate and its various receptors are present at the mPOA. The aim of this study was to identify the contribution of each of the ionotropic glutamatergic receptors at the mPOA on changes in Tbr and Tb in freely moving rats. Adult male Wistar rats (n=40) were implanted with bilateral guide cannula with indwelling styli above the mPOA. A telemetric transmitter was implanted at the peritoneum to record Tb and locomotor activity (LMA). A precalibrated thermocouple wire implanted near the hypothalamus was used to assess Tbr. Specific agonist for each ionotropic glutamate receptor was microinjected into the mPOA and its effects on temperature and LMA were measured in the rats. The rats were also microinjected with the respective ionotropic receptor antagonists, 15min prior to the microinjection of each agonist. Amongst amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA), N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and kainic acid, AMPA increased Tb and LMA when injected at the mPOA. Specific antagonists for AMPA receptors was able to attenuate this increase (p<0.005). Pharmacological blockade of NMDA was able to lower Tbr only. Microinjection of kainic acid and its antagonist had no effect on the variables. The finding of the study suggests that activation of the AMPA receptors at the mPOA, leads to the rise in body temperature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Periaqueductal grey CB1 cannabinoid and metabotropic glutamate subtype 5 receptors modulate changes in rostral ventromedial medulla neuronal activities induced by subcutaneous formalin in the rat.

    PubMed

    de Novellis, V; Mariani, L; Palazzo, E; Vita, D; Marabese, I; Scafuro, M; Rossi, F; Maione, S

    2005-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze the involvement of periaqueductal gray (PAG) cannabinoid or group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in the formalin-induced changes on the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) ON- and OFF-cells activities. S.c. injection of formalin into the hind paw produced a transient decrease (4-6 min) followed by a longer increase (25-35 min) in tail flick latencies. Formalin also increased basal activity in RVM ON-cells (42+/-7%) and decreased it in OFF-cells (35+/-4%). Intra-PAG microinjection of (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl) pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone mesylate (WIN 55,212-2) (2 nmol/rat), a cannabinoid receptor agonist, prevented the formalin-induced changes in RVM cell activities. Higher dosages of WIN 55,212-2 (4-8 nmol/rat) increased the tail flick latencies, delayed the tail flick-related onset to ON-cell burst, and decreased the duration of OFF-cell pause. Furthermore, WIN 55,212-2 at a dosage of 8 nmol/rat decreased RVM ON-cell (57+/-7%) and increased OFF-cell ongoing activities (26+/-4%). These effects were prevented by N-piperidino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-3-pyrazolecarboxamide SR141716A, (1 pmol/rat), a CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, or by 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP 20 nmol/rat), a selective mGlu5 glutamate receptor antagonist. T7-(hydroxyimino) cyclopropa[b]chromen-1alpha-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCOOE/50 nmol/rat) and (S)-(+)-alpha-amino-4-carboxy-2-methylbenzeneacetic acid (LY367385, 20 nmol/rat), selective mGlu1 glutamate receptor antagonists, were ineffective in preventing the WIN-induced effects. This study suggests that s.c. injection of formalin modifies RVM neuronal activities and this effect is prevented by PAG cannabinoid receptor stimulation. Moreover, the physiological stimulation of PAG mGlu5, but not mGlu1 glutamate receptors, seems to be required for the cannabinoid-mediated effect.

  14. Effects of propofol on the activity of rat glutamate transporter type 3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes: the role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Do, Sang-Hwan; Ham, Byung-Moon; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2003-06-05

    We investigated the effects of propofol on one type of glutamate transporter, excitatory amino acid transporter 3 (EAAT3) and the role of protein kinase C (PKC) in mediating these effects. Rat EAAT3 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes. L-glutamate (30 microM)-induced membrane currents were measured. Propofol increased glutamate-induced inward currents significantly at two tested concentrations (30 and 100 microM) but not at other concentrations. Propofol (30 microM) significantly increased V(max), but not K(m) of EAAT3 for glutamate. The combination of phorbol-12-myrisate-13-acetate (PMA, a PKC activator) and propofol did not increase the responses further compared with PMA or propofol alone. Three PKC inhibitors (staurosporine, calphostin C, and chelerythrine) did not affect basal EAAT3 activity but significantly inhibited the propofol-enhanced EAAT3 activity. Our results suggest that propofol enhances EAAT3 activity at clinically relevant concentrations and PKC may mediate these effects.

  15. Cyclic AMP-dependent modulation of giant depolarizing potentials by metabotropic glutamate receptors in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Strata, F; Sciancalepore, M; Cherubini, E

    1995-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were used to study the role of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in modulating GABA-mediated giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) in immature rat hippocampal CA3 neurones. 2. The mGluR antagonist (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, 1 mM) reduced the frequency of GDPs. The broad-spectrum ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (1 mM) blocked GDPs. 3. In the presence of kynurenic acid, both tetanic stimulation of the hilus or bath application of quisqualic acid (1 microM) and trans-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (t-ACPD, 20 microM) induced the appearance of GDPs. These effects were antagonized by MCPG (1 mM) or L(+)-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (L-AP3) and blocked by bicuculline (10 microM). 4. 8-Bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP, 0.3 mM), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, 200 microM) or forskolin (30 microM) mimicked the effects of mGluR agonists on GDPs. The forskolin analogue 1,9-dideoxyforskolin (30 microM), which does not activate adenylate cyclase, was ineffective. 5. Incubation of slices in the presence of the protein kinase A inhibitor Rp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate triethylamine (Rp-cAMPS) (500 microM) or superfusion of Rp-cAMPS (20 microM) prevented the effects of forskolin or t-ACPD on GDPs. In the presence of kynurenic acid, the protein kinase C activator, phorbol 12,13-diacetate (2 microM) induced the appearance of GDPs. This effect was prevented by staurosporine (1 microM). However, staurosporine (1-3 microM) did not modify the effects of t-ACPD on GDPs. 6. It is suggested that, during development, mGluRs enhance the synchronous release of GABA, responsible for GDPs, through cAMP-dependent protein kinase. PMID:8583396

  16. Activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors by L-glutamate in cells dissociated from adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, A J; Colquhoun, D

    1992-01-01

    1. Single channel recording techniques were used to study the ion channel openings resulting from activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by the agonist glutamate. Patches were from cells acutely dissociated from adult rat hippocampus (CA1). Channel activity was studied at low glutamate concentrations (20-100 nM) with 1 microM-glycine, in the absence of extracellular divalent cations. 2. Channel openings were to two main conductance levels corresponding to 50 pS and 40 pS openings in extracellular solution with 1 mM-Ca2+. Around 80% of openings were to the large conductance level. The single channel conductances increased as extracellular Ca2+ was reduced. 3. Distributions of channel open times were described by three exponential components of 87 microseconds, 0.91 ms and 4.72 ms (relative areas of 51, 31 and 18%). Most long openings were to the large conductance level. 4. The channel closed time distribution was complex, requiring five exponential components to describe it adequately. Of these five components, at least three, with time constants of 68 microseconds, 0.72 ms and 7.6 ms (relative areas of 38, 12 and 17%) represent gaps within single activations of the receptor. The presence of a component with a mean of 7.6 ms is notable because gaps of this length have not previously been identified as being within single NMDA receptor channel activations. 5. Channel activations were identified as including gaps underlying at least the first three closed time components. Activations consisted of clusters of channel openings. Distributions of the length of these clusters had mean time constants of 88 microseconds, 3.4 ms and 32 ms (relative areas of 45, 25 and 30%). Long clusters contained short, intermediate and long duration openings as well as subconductance openings. The open probability within clusters averaged 0.62. Three components were evident in distributions of the number of openings per cluster. These had mean values of 1.22, 3.2 and 11

  17. Central mineralocorticoid receptors and the role of angiotensin II and glutamate in the paraventricular nucleus of rats with angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gabor, Alexander; Leenen, Frans H H

    2013-05-01

    A chronic increase in circulating angiotensin II (Ang II) activates an aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor-ouabain neuromodulatory pathway in the brain that increases neuronal activation in hypothalamic nuclei, such as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and causes progressive hypertension. Several models of chronic sympathetic hyperactivity are associated with an increase in AT1 and glutamate receptor activation in the PVN. The current study evaluated whether increased angiotensin type 1 (AT1) and glutamate receptor-dependent signaling in the PVN contributes to the maintenance of blood pressure (BP) in Ang II-hypertensive Wistar rats, and the role of aldosterone-mineralocorticoid receptor pathway in this enhanced signaling. After subcutaneous infusion of Ang II for 2 weeks, in conscious rats BP and heart rate were recorded after (1) 10-minute bilateral infusions of candesartan and kynurenate in the PVN; (2) 1 hour intracerebroventricular infusion of eplerenone, and (3) candesartan and kynurenate after eplerenone. Candesartan or kynurenate in the PVN fully reversed the increase in BP from circulating Ang II. Kynurenate after candesartan or candesartan after kynurenate did not further lower BP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of eplerenone at 16 hours after its infusion fully reversed the increase in BP from circulating Ang II. After eplerenone, candesartan and kynurenate in the PVN did not further decrease BP. These findings suggest that increased mineralocorticoid receptor activation in the brain activates a slow neuromodulatory pathway that maintains enhanced AT1 and glutamate receptor-dependent signaling in the PVN, and thereby the hypertension from a chronic increase in circulating Ang II.

  18. Renal targeting potential of a polymeric drug carrier, poly-l-glutamic acid, in normal and diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Hann-Juang; Kiew, Lik-Voon; Chin, Yunni; Norazit, Anwar; Mohd Noor, Suzita; Lo, Yoke-Lin; Looi, Chung-Yeng; Lau, Yeh-Siang; Lim, Tuck-Meng; Wong, Won-Fen; Abdullah, Nor Azizan; Abdul Sattar, Munavvar Zubaid; Johns, Edward J; Chik, Zamri; Chung, Lip-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Poly-l-glutamic acid (PG) has been used widely as a carrier to deliver anticancer chemotherapeutics. This study evaluates PG as a selective renal drug carrier. Experimental approach 3H-deoxycytidine-labeled PGs (17 or 41 kDa) and 3H-deoxycytidine were administered intravenously to normal rats and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The biodistribution of these compounds was determined over 24 h. Accumulation of PG in normal kidneys was also tracked using 5-(aminoacetamido) fluorescein (fluoresceinyl glycine amide)-labeled PG (PG-AF). To evaluate the potential of PGs in ferrying renal protective anti-oxidative stress compounds, the model drug 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF) was conjugated to 41 kDa PG to form PG-AEBSF. PG-AEBSF was then characterized and evaluated for intracellular anti-oxidative stress efficacy (relative to free AEBSF). Results In the normal rat kidneys, 17 kDa radiolabeled PG (PG-Tr) presents a 7-fold higher, while 41 kDa PG-Tr shows a 15-fold higher renal accumulation than the free radiolabel after 24 h post injection. The accumulation of PG-AF was primarily found in the renal tubular tissues at 2 and 6 h after an intravenous administration. In the diabetic (oxidative stress-induced) kidneys, 41 kDa PG-Tr showed the greatest renal accumulation of 8-fold higher than the free compound 24 h post dose. Meanwhile, the synthesized PG-AEBSF was found to inhibit intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (a reactive oxygen species generator) at an efficiency that is comparable to that of free AEBSF. This indicates the preservation of the anti-oxidative stress properties of AEBSF in the conjugated state. Conclusion/Implications The favorable accumulation property of 41 kDa PG in normal and oxidative stress-induced kidneys, along with its capabilities in conserving the pharmacological properties of the conjugated renal protective drugs, supports its role as a potential renal

  19. Comparison of Glutamate Turnover in Nerve Terminals and Brain Tissue During [1,6-(13)C2]Glucose Metabolism in Anesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anant B; Lai, James C K; Chowdhury, Golam I M; Rothman, Douglas L; Behar, Kevin L

    2017-01-01

    The (13)C turnover of neurotransmitter amino acids (glutamate, GABA and aspartate) were determined from extracts of forebrain nerve terminals and brain homogenate, and fronto-parietal cortex from anesthetized rats undergoing timed infusions of [1,6-(13)C2]glucose or [2-(13)C]acetate. Nerve terminal (13)C fractional labeling of glutamate and aspartate was lower than those in whole cortical tissue at all times measured (up to 120 min), suggesting either the presence of a constant dilution flux from an unlabeled substrate or an unlabeled (effectively non-communicating on the measurement timescale) glutamate pool in the nerve terminals. Half times of (13)C labeling from [1,6-(13)C2]glucose, as estimated by least squares exponential fitting to the time course data, were longer for nerve terminals (GluC4, 21.8 min; GABAC2 21.0 min) compared to cortical tissue (GluC4, 12.4 min; GABAC2, 14.5 min), except for AspC3, which was similar (26.5 vs. 27.0 min). The slower turnover of glutamate in the nerve terminals (but not GABA) compared to the cortex may reflect selective effects of anesthesia on activity-dependent glucose use, which might be more pronounced in the terminals. The (13)C labeling ratio for glutamate-C4 from [2-(13)C]acetate over that of (13)C-glucose was twice as large in nerve terminals compared to cortex, suggesting that astroglial glutamine under the (13)C glucose infusion was the likely source of much of the nerve terminal dilution. The net replenishment of most of the nerve terminal amino acid pools occurs directly via trafficking of astroglial glutamine.

  20. COMPARISON OF THE ONTOGENY OF THE VESICULAR GLUTAMATE TRANSPORTER 3 (VGLUT3) WITH VGLUT1 AND VGLUT2 IN THE RAT RETINA

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Salvatore L.; Li, Stefanie; Sabatini, Andrea; Vila, Alejandro; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina, and most glutamatergic neurons express one of the three known vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1, 2, or 3). However, the expression profiles of these transporters vary greatly in the retina. VGLUT1 is expressed by photoreceptor and bipolar cell terminals, and VGLUT2 appears to be predominately expressed by ganglion cells, and perhaps Müller cells, cone photoreceptor terminals, and horizontal cells in some species. The discovery of a third vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT3, has brought about speculation concerning its role and function based on its expression in amacrine cells. To address this we studied the postnatal development of VGLUT3 from day 0 through adult in the rat retina, and compared this with the expression patterns of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2. VGLUT3 expression was restricted to a population of amacrine cells. Expression of VGLUT3 was first observed at postnatal day 10 (P10) in the soma and some processes, which extensively arborized in both the ON and OFF sublamina of the IPL by P15. In contrast, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 expression appeared earlier than VGLUT3; with VGLUT1 initially detected at P5 in photoreceptor terminals and P6 in bipolar terminals, and VGLUT2 immunoreactivity initially detected at P0 in ganglion cell bodies, and remained prominent throughout all stages of development. Interestingly, VGLUT3 has extensive somatic expression throughout development, which could be involved in non-synaptic modulation by glutamate in developing retina, and could influence trophic and extra-synaptic neuronal signaling by glutamate in the inner retina. PMID:18482716

  1. Desire and dread from the nucleus accumbens: cortical glutamate and subcortical GABA differentially generate motivation and hedonic impact in the rat.

    PubMed

    Faure, Alexis; Richard, Jocelyn M; Berridge, Kent C

    2010-06-18

    GABAergic signals to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell arise from predominantly subcortical sources whereas glutamatergic signals arise mainly from cortical-related sources. Here we contrasted GABAergic and glutamatergic generation of hedonics versus motivation processes, as a proxy for comparing subcortical and cortical controls of emotion. Local disruptions of either signals in medial shell of NAc generate intense motivated behaviors corresponding to desire and/or dread, along a rostrocaudal gradient. GABA or glutamate disruptions in rostral shell generate appetitive motivation whereas disruptions in caudal shell elicit fearful motivation. However, GABA and glutamate signals in NAc differ in important ways, despite the similarity of their rostrocaudal motivation gradients. Microinjections of a GABA(A) agonist (muscimol), or of a glutamate AMPA antagonist (DNQX) in medial shell of rats were assessed for generation of hedonic "liking" or "disliking" by measuring orofacial affective reactions to sucrose-quinine taste. Motivation generation was independently assessed measuring effects on eating versus natural defensive behaviors. For GABAergic microinjections, we found that the desire-dread motivation gradient was mirrored by an equivalent hedonic gradient that amplified affective taste "liking" (at rostral sites) versus "disliking" (at caudal sites). However, manipulation of glutamatergic signals completely failed to alter pleasure-displeasure reactions to sensory hedonic impact, despite producing a strong rostrocaudal gradient of motivation. We conclude that the nucleus accumbens contains two functional affective keyboards for amino-acid signals: a motivation-generating keyboard and a hedonic-generating keyboard. Corticolimbic glutamate signals and subcortical GABA signals equivalently engage the motivation keyboard to generate desire and-or dread. Only subcortical GABA signals additionally engage the hedonic keyboard to amplify affective "liking" and "disliking

  2. Occlusion of carotid artery and hypergravity loading of animals caused similar effects on L-[14C]glutamate uptake in rat brain nerve terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Sivko, Roman; Krisanova, Natalia

    Changes in sodium-dependent L-[14C]glutamate uptake in rat brain nerve terminals was com-paratively analysed after hypergravity loading of animals (centrifugation of rats in special con-tainers at 10 G for 1 hour) and unilateral occlusion of carotid artery (20 min). The initial velocity of L-[14C]glutamate uptake was decreased from 2.5 ± 0.2 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins to 2.05 ± 0.1 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins after hypergravity and after occlusion -up to 2.25 ± 0.1 nmol x min-1 x mg-1 of proteins. Recently, we have shown that a decrease in L-[14C]glutamate uptake was at least partially caused by the redaction in the membrane potential of nerve terminals and the proton gradient of synaptic vesicles. These parameters were analysed after unilateral occlusion of carotid artery, where one brain hemisphere was used as a control, whereas the second one as subjected to ischemic/hypoxic conditions. Similarly with hypergravity, we revealed a decrease in the membrane potential of nerve terminals by ˜ 10 % and a reduction of the proton gradient of synaptic vesicles by ˜ 5 % after occlusion of carotid artery. Thus, a decrease in the activity of glutamate transporters after hypergrav-ity and unilateral occlusion of carotid artery was at least partially caused by changes in the membrane potential of nerve terminals and the proton gradient of synaptic vesicles. This fact may be considered in support of the suggestion that ischemia/hypoxia was a main unspecific stressor, which caused the alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission under conditions of hypergravity.

  3. Binge ethanol withdrawal: Effects on post-withdrawal ethanol intake, glutamate-glutamine cycle and monoamine tissue content in P rat model

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sujan C.; Althobaiti, Yusuf S.; Alshehri, Fahad S.; Sari, Youssef

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a medical emergency situation which appears after abrupt cessation of ethanol intake. Decreased GABA-A function and increased glutamate function are known to exist in the AWS. However, the involvement of glutamate transporters in the context of AWS requires further investigation. In this study, we used a model of ethanol withdrawal involving abrupt cessation of binge ethanol administration (4 g/kg/gavage three times a day for three days) using male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. After 48 hours of withdrawal, P rats were re-exposed to voluntary ethanol intake. The amount of ethanol consumed was measured during post-withdrawal phase. In addition, the expression of GLT-1, GLAST and xCT were determined in both medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). We also measured glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and the tissue content of glutamate, glutamine, dopamine and serotonin in both mPFC and NAc. We found that binge ethanol withdrawal escalated post-withdrawal ethanol intake, which was associated with downregulation of GLT-1 expression in both mPFC and NAc. The expression of GLAST and xCT were unchanged in the ethanol-withdrawal (EW) group compared to control group. Tissue content of glutamate was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of glutamine was higher in mPFC but unchanged in NAc in the EW group compared to control group. The GS activity was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. The tissue content of DA was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of serotonin was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. These findings provide important information of the critical role of GLT-1 in context of AWS. PMID:26821293

  4. Binge ethanol withdrawal: Effects on post-withdrawal ethanol intake, glutamate-glutamine cycle and monoamine tissue content in P rat model.

    PubMed

    Das, Sujan C; Althobaiti, Yusuf S; Alshehri, Fahad S; Sari, Youssef

    2016-04-15

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a medical emergency situation which appears after abrupt cessation of ethanol intake. Decreased GABA-A function and increased glutamate function are known to exist in the AWS. However, the involvement of glutamate transporters in the context of AWS requires further investigation. In this study, we used a model of ethanol withdrawal involving abrupt cessation of binge ethanol administration (4 g/kg/gavage three times a day for three days) using male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. After 48 h of withdrawal, P rats were re-exposed to voluntary ethanol intake. The amount of ethanol consumed was measured during post-withdrawal phase. In addition, the expression of GLT-1, GLAST and xCT were determined in both medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). We also measured glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and the tissue content of glutamate, glutamine, dopamine and serotonin in both mPFC and NAc. We found that binge ethanol withdrawal escalated post-withdrawal ethanol intake, which was associated with downregulation of GLT-1 expression in both mPFC and NAc. The expression of GLAST and xCT were unchanged in the ethanol-withdrawal (EW) group compared to control group. Tissue content of glutamate was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of glutamine was higher in mPFC but unchanged in NAc in the EW group compared to control group. The GS activity was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. The tissue content of DA was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of serotonin was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. These findings provide important information of the critical role of GLT-1 in context of AWS.

  5. Neurotoxic potential of lunar and martian dust: influence on em, proton gradient, active transport, and binding of glutamate in rat brain nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Krisanova, Natalia; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Sivko, Roman; Borysov, Arseniy; Nazarova, Anastasiya; Slenzka, Klaus; Borisova, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    The harmful effects of lunar dust (LD) on directly exposed tissues are documented in the literature, whereas researchers are only recently beginning to consider its effects on indirectly exposed tissues. During inhalation, nano-/microsized particles are efficiently deposited in nasal, tracheobronchial, and alveolar regions and transported to the central nervous system. The neurotoxic potential of LD and martian dust (MD) has not yet been assessed. Glutamate is the main excitatory neurotransmitter involved in most aspects of normal brain function, whereas disturbances in glutamate homeostasis contribute to the pathogenesis of major neurological disorders. The research was focused on the analysis of the effects of LD/MD simulants (JSC-1a/JSC, derived from volcanic ash) on the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission. The average size of LD and MD particles (even minor fractions) before and after sonication was determined by dynamic light scattering. With the use of radiolabeled l-[(14)C]glutamate, it was shown that there is an increase in l-[(14)C]glutamate binding to isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) in low [Na(+)] media and at low temperature in the presence of LD. MD caused significantly lesser changes under the same conditions, whereas nanoparticles of magnetite had no effect at all. Fluorimetric experiments with potential-sensitive dye rhodamine 6G and pH-sensitive dye acridine orange showed that the potential of the plasma membrane of the nerve terminals and acidification of synaptic vesicles were not altered by LD/MD (and nanoparticles of magnetite). Thus, the unique effect of LD to increase glutamate binding to the nerve terminals was shown. This can have deleterious effects on extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the central nervous system and cause alterations in the ambient level of glutamate, which is extremely important for proper synaptic transmission. During a long-term mission, a combination of constant irritation due

  6. High glutamate attenuates S100B and LDH outputs from rat cortical slices enhanced by either oxygen-glucose deprivation or menadione.

    PubMed

    Demircan, Celaleddin; Gül, Zülfiye; Büyükuysal, R Levent

    2014-07-01

    One hour incubation of rat cortical slices in a medium without oxygen and glucose (oxygen-glucose deprivation, OGD) increased S100B release to 6.53 ± 0.3 ng/ml/mg protein from its control value of 3.61 ± 0.2 ng/ml/mg protein. When these slices were then transferred to a medium containing oxygen and glucose (reoxygenation, REO), S100B release rose to 344 % of its control value. REO also caused 192 % increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. Glutamate added at millimolar concentration into the medium decreased OGD or REO-induced S100B release and REO-induced LDH leakage. Alpha-ketoglutarate, a metabolic product of glutamate, was found to be as effective as glutamate in decreasing the S100B and LDH outputs. Similarly lactate, 2-ketobutyrate and ethyl pyruvate, a lipophilic derivative of pyruvate, also exerted a glutamate-like effect on S100B and LDH outputs. Preincubation with menadione, which produces H2O2 intracellularly, significantly increased S100B and LDH levels in normoxic medium. All drugs tested in the present study, with the exception of pyruvate, showed a complete protection against menadione preincubation. Additionally, each OGD-REO, menadione or H2O2-induced mitochondrial energy impairments determined by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and OGD-REO or menadione-induced increases in reactive oxygen substances (ROS) determined by 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) were also recovered by glutamate. Interestingly, H2O2-induced increase in fluorescence intensity derived from DCFH-DA in a slice-free physiological medium was attenuated significantly by glutamate and alpha-keto acids. All these drug actions support the conclusion that high glutamate, such as alpha-ketoglutarate and other keto acids, protects the slices against OGD- and REO-induced S100B and LDH outputs probably by scavenging ROS in addition to its energy substrate metabolite property.

  7. Electrogenic uptake contributes a major component of the depolarizing action of L-glutamate in rat hippocampal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Frenguelli, B. G.; Blake, J. F.; Brown, M. W.; Collingridge, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    1. A grease-gap technique has been used to measure d.c. potentials, in response to the application of excitatory amino acids and electrical stimulation of the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway, in the CA1 region of rat hippocampal slices. The actions of L-glutamate (L-Glu) have been quantified and compared to those of structurally related compounds. 2. Perfusion of L-Glu (90s applications) depolarized the tissue with a threshold of approximately 50 microM and a maximum response in excess of 10 mM. L-Aspartate (L-Asp) produced a similar dose-response relationship. By comparison N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) were more potent excitants, producing dose-dependent depolarizations over the range 2-50 microM. 3. Application of the agonists depressed the amplitude of electrically-evoked synaptic responses; an effect that presumably reflects depolarization of neuronal tissue. However, for a given agonist-induced d.c. potential. L-Glu or L-Asp caused smaller depressions of synaptic responses than did either NMDA or AMPA. 4. The combined application of 50 microM D-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (AP5) and 10 microM 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) substantially depressed synaptic responses and antagonized responses to NMDA and AMPA producing mean (+/- s.e.) dose-ratios of 12.2 +/- 1.2 and 7.0 +/- 0.8, respectively. However, these compounds produced minimal antagonism of responses to L-Glu and L-Asp (dose-ratios of 1.5 +/- 0.1 and 1.5 +/- 0.2, respectively). 5. Responses to the stereoisomers of homocysteate (HCA) were compared over the range 50 microM to 10 mM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1673070

  8. Effect of neurotrophin-3 precursor on glutamate-induced calcium homeostasis deregulation in rat cerebellum granule cells.

    PubMed

    Safina, Dina R; Surin, Alexander M; Pinelis, Vsevolod G; Kostrov, Sergey V

    2015-12-01

    Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) belongs to the family of highly conserved dimeric growth factors that controls the differentiation and activity of various neuronal populations. Mammals contain both the mature (NT-3) and the precursor (pro-NT-3) forms of neurotrophin. Members of the neurotrophin family are involved in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in neurons; however, the role of NT-3 and pro-NT-3 in this process remains unclear. The current study explores the effects of NT-3 and pro-NT-3 on disturbed calcium homeostasis and decline of mitochondrial potential induced by a neurotoxic concentration of glutamate (Glu; 100 µM) in the primary culture of rat cerebellar granule cells. In this Glu excitotoxicity model, mature NT-3 had no effect on the induced changes in Ca²⁺ homeostasis. In contrast, pro-NT-3 decreased the period of delayed calcium deregulation (DCD) and concurrent strong mitochondrial depolarization. According to the amplitude of the increase in the intracellular free Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]i ) and Fura-2 fluorescence quenching by Mn²⁺ within the first 20 sec of exposure to Glu, pro-NT-3 had no effect on the initial rate of Ca²⁺ entry into neurons. During the lag period preceding DCD, the mean amplitude of [Ca²⁺]i rise was 1.2-fold greater in the presence of pro-NT-3 than in the presence of Glu alone (1.67 ±  0.07 and 1.39 ± 0.04, respectively, P < 0.05). The Glu-induced changes in Са²⁺ homeostasis in the presence of pro-NT-3 likely are due to the decreased rate of Са²⁺ removal from the cytosol during the DCD latency period.

  9. Discriminative stimulus effects of NMDA, AMPA and mGluR5 glutamate receptor ligands in methamphetamine-trained rats

    PubMed Central

    Wooters, Thomas E.; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate contributes to the reinforcing and stimulant effects of methamphetamine, yet its potential role in the interoceptive stimulus properties of methamphetamine is unknown. In the current study, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate methamphetamine (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) from saline in a standard operant discrimination task. The effects of methamphetamine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg, i.p.), the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channel blockers MK-801 (0.03-0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) and ketamine (1.0-10.0 mg/kg, i.p.), the low-affinity NMDA antagonist memantine (1.0-10 mg/kg, i.p.), the polyamine site NMDA receptor antagonist ifenprodil (1-10 mg/kg), the α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX; 1-10 mg/kg, i.p.), and the metabotropic 5 (mGluR5) receptor antagonist 6-methyl-2-(phenylethynyl)pyridine (MPEP; 1-10 mg/kg) given alone were determined in substitution tests. The effects of MK-801 (0.03 and 0.1 mg/kg), ketamine (1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg), ifenprodil (5.6 mg/kg), CNQX (5.6 mg/kg) and MPEP (5.6 mg/kg) were also tested in combination with methamphetamine to assess for alterations in the methamphetamine cue. In substitution tests, none of the test drugs generalized to the methamphetamine cue. However, ketamine and ifenprodil produced significant leftward shifts in the methamphetamine dose-response curve; pretreatment with 3 mg/kg of ketamine, for example, decreased the ED50 value for methamphetamine by half. These results suggest that blockade of the NMDA receptor augments the interoceptive stimulus properties of methamphetamine. PMID:21836462

  10. Development of γ-aminobutyric acid-, glycine-, and glutamate-immunopositive boutons on rat jaw-opening motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Paik, Sang Kyoo; Kwak, Woo Kyung; Bae, Jin Young; Na, Yeon Kyung; Park, Soo Young; Yi, Hyun Won; Ahn, Dong Kuk; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Yoshida, Atsushi; Bae, Yong Chul

    2012-04-15

    Inhibitory and excitatory synaptic inputs onto trigeminal motoneurons play an important role in coordinating jaw movements. Previously, we reported that the phenotype of the inhibitory boutons apposing the somata of jaw-closing (JC) motoneurons changes from γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-positive (GABA+) to predominantly glycine-positive (Gly+) during development. In the present study, we investigated the development of inhibitory and excitatory boutons apposing antagonistic jaw-opening (JO) motoneurons (anterior digastric motoneurons) at postnatal day 2 (P2), P11, and P31 in the rat. JO motoneurons were retrogradely labeled with horseradish peroxidase. Postembedding immunogold staining with antisera against GABA, Gly, and glutamate (Glut) was performed and followed by quantitative ultrastructural analysis. The size of both small and large JO motoneurons increased during development. The number of excitatory (Glut+) and inhibitory (GABA+, Gly+, and GABA+/Gly+) boutons per JO motoneuron increased significantly from P2 to P11 and then remained unchanged until P31. The time course of inhibitory synapse formation differed between JO and JC motoneurons, whereas that of excitatory synapse formation was similar between the two neuronal populations. The fraction of GABA+ boutons decreased by 86% and the fraction of GABA+/Gly+ boutons increased by 200% from P11 to P31, suggesting a switch from GABA+ to GABA+/Gly+ phenotype. The fraction of Gly+ boutons remained unchanged. These results indicate that inhibitory synapses onto somata of JO motoneurons exhibit a developmental pattern distinct from that of synapses onto JC motoneurons, which may reflect distinctive maturation of oral motor system.

  11. Antimutagenic Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. Aqueous Extract on Rats Treated with Monosodium Glutamate.

    PubMed

    Gheller, Ana Carla Guidini Valentini; Kerkhoff, Jacqueline; Vieira Júnior, Gerardo Magela; de Campos, Kleber Eduardo; Sugui, Marina Mariko

    2017-01-01

    Hibiscus sabdariffa L. is a plant of the Malvaceae family, commonly known as roselle. H. sabdariffa is known to contain antioxidant, cholesterol-lowering, antiobesity, insulin resistance reduction, antihypertensive, and skin cancer chemopreventive properties. This study evaluated the effects of H. sabdariffa aqueous extract against cyclophosphamide (CPA, 25 mg/Kg) induced damage to DNA in male Wistar rats by micronucleus test. Samples of H. sabdariffa calyx were obtained in the municipality of Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The aqueous extract was prepared by infusion and each animal received a daily dose of 400 mg/Kg by gavage for 15 consecutive days of treatment. The presence of anthocyanins was confirmed by ferric chloride test and phenolic compounds using high-performance liquid chromatography, with emphasis on the identification of rutin. The animals were sacrificed by deepening of anaesthesia to obtain bone marrow and determination of the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes. The group treated with the aqueous extract of H. sabdariffa revealed a 91% reduction in micronucleus frequency when compared with the positive control group. Under the conditions tested, H. sabdariffa L. presented a protective effect to CPA-induced damage to DNA of the treated animals, and it is a potential candidate as a chemopreventive agent against carcinogenesis.

  12. Antimutagenic Effect of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. Aqueous Extract on Rats Treated with Monosodium Glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhoff, Jacqueline; Vieira Júnior, Gerardo Magela; de Campos, Kleber Eduardo; Sugui, Marina Mariko

    2017-01-01

    Hibiscus sabdariffa L. is a plant of the Malvaceae family, commonly known as roselle. H. sabdariffa is known to contain antioxidant, cholesterol-lowering, antiobesity, insulin resistance reduction, antihypertensive, and skin cancer chemopreventive properties. This study evaluated the effects of H. sabdariffa aqueous extract against cyclophosphamide (CPA, 25 mg/Kg) induced damage to DNA in male Wistar rats by micronucleus test. Samples of H. sabdariffa calyx were obtained in the municipality of Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso, Brazil. The aqueous extract was prepared by infusion and each animal received a daily dose of 400 mg/Kg by gavage for 15 consecutive days of treatment. The presence of anthocyanins was confirmed by ferric chloride test and phenolic compounds using high-performance liquid chromatography, with emphasis on the identification of rutin. The animals were sacrificed by deepening of anaesthesia to obtain bone marrow and determination of the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes. The group treated with the aqueous extract of H. sabdariffa revealed a 91% reduction in micronucleus frequency when compared with the positive control group. Under the conditions tested, H. sabdariffa L. presented a protective effect to CPA-induced damage to DNA of the treated animals, and it is a potential candidate as a chemopreventive agent against carcinogenesis. PMID:28197528

  13. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 modulates the rewarding effects of cocaine in rats: involvement of a ventral pallidal GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Li, Jie; Peng, Xiao-Qing; Spiller, Krista; Gardner, Eliot L; Xi, Zheng-Xiong

    2009-06-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 (mGluR7) has received much attention as a potential target for the treatment of epilepsy, major depression, and anxiety. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of mGluR7 in cocaine reward in animal models of drug addiction. Pretreatment with the selective mGluR7 allosteric agonist N,N'-dibenzyhydryl-ethane-1,2-diamine dihydrochloride (AMN082; 1-20 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently inhibited cocaine-induced enhancement of electrical brain-stimulation reward and intravenous cocaine self-administration under both fixed-ratio and progressive-ratio reinforcement conditions, but failed to alter either basal or cocaine-enhanced locomotion or oral sucrose self-administration, suggesting a specific inhibition of cocaine reward. Microinjections of AMN082 (1-5 microg/microl per side) into the nucleus accumbens (NAc) or ventral pallidum (VP), but not dorsal striatum, also inhibited cocaine self-administration in a dose-dependent manner. Intra-NAc or intra-VP co-administration of 6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-pyridin-4-ylisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one (MMPIP, 5 microg/microl per side), a selective mGluR7 allosteric antagonist, significantly blocked AMN082's action, suggesting an effect mediated by mGluR7 in these brain regions. In vivo microdialysis demonstrated that cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) priming significantly elevated extracellular DA in the NAc or VP, while decreasing extracellular GABA in VP (but not in NAc). AMN082 pretreatment selectively blocked cocaine-induced changes in extracellular GABA, but not in DA, in both naive rats and cocaine self-administration rats. These data suggest: (1) mGluR7 is critically involved in cocaine's acute reinforcement; (2) GABA-, but not DA-, dependent mechanisms in the ventral striatopallidal pathway appear to underlie AMN082's actions; and (3) AMN082 or other mGluR7-selective agonists may be useful in the treatment of cocaine addiction.

  14. Developmental effects of wheel running on hippocampal glutamate receptor expression in young and mature adult rats.

    PubMed

    Staples, M C; Somkuwar, S S; Mandyam, C D

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the behavioral benefits associated with voluntary wheel running in rodents may be due to modulation of glutamatergic transmission in the hippocampus, a brain region implicated in learning and memory. However, the expression of the glutamatergic ionotropic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (GluN) in the hippocampus in response to chronic sustained voluntary wheel running has not yet been investigated. Further, the developmental effects during young and mature adulthood on wheel running output and GluN expression in hippocampal subregions has not been determined, and therefore is the main focus of this investigation. Eight-week-old and 16-week-old male Wistar rats were housed in home cages with free access to running wheels and running output was monitored for 4weeks. Wheel access was terminated and tissues from the dorsal and ventral hippocampi were processed for Western blot analysis of GluN subunit expression. Young adult runners demonstrated an escalation in running output but this behavior was not evident in mature adult runners. In parallel, young adult runners demonstrated a significant increase in total GluN (1 and 2A) subunit expression in the dorsal hippocampus (DH), and an opposing effect in the ventral hippocampus (VH) compared to age-matched sedentary controls; these changes in total protein expression were not associated with significant alterations in the phosphorylation of the GluN subunits. In contrast, mature adult runners demonstrated a reduction in total GluN2A expression in the DH, without producing alterations in the VH compared to age-matched sedentary controls. In conclusion, differential running activity-mediated modulation of GluN subunit expression in the hippocampal subregions was revealed to be associated with developmental effects on running activity, which may contribute to altered hippocampal synaptic activity and behavioral outcomes in young and mature adult subjects.

  15. L-theanine administration results in neuroprotection and prevents glutamate receptor agonist-mediated injury in the rat model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Zukhurova, Mavdzhuda; Prosvirnina, Maria; Daineko, Anastasia; Simanenkova, Anna; Petrishchev, Nikolay; Sonin, Dmitry; Galagudza, Michael; Shamtsyan, Mark; Juneja, Lekh R; Vlasov, Timur

    2013-09-01

    While the neuroprotective effect of green tea (Camellia sinensis) might be explained by the presence of amino acid L-theanine in the tea leaves, it is not known whether postischemic administration of L-theanine could also provide neuroprotection. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of L-theanine (1 and 4 mg/kg) administered at 3, 12, and 24 h after reperfusion in the rat model of stroke. We also studied the effect of L-theanine on brain injury caused by exogenous administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionate/kainate receptor agonists during reperfusion. Rats were subjected to 30-min middle cerebral artery occlusion followed by 48-h reperfusion. Neurological deficit and infarct size were determined at the end of reperfusion. At 3 and 12 h, but not at 24 h of reperfusion, L-theanine substantially reduced the size of brain infarct. Neurological status was improved when L-theanine was administered 3, 12, and 24 h after reperfusion. Repeated intrastriatal injections of L-theanine at a total dose of 800 µg/kg during reperfusion prevented brain injury caused by glutamate receptor agonists. In conclusion, L-theanine at reperfusion exerts neuroprotective effect in the in vivo rat model of stroke. Local treatment with L-theanine at reperfusion prevents glutamate receptor agonist-mediated brain injury.

  16. Paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats causes a selective reduction in the expression of type-2 metabotropic glutamate receptors in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Panaccione, Isabella; Iacovelli, Luisa; di Nuzzo, Luigi; Nardecchia, Francesca; Mauro, Gianluca; Janiri, Delfina; De Blasi, Antonio; Sani, Gabriele; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Orlando, Rosamaria

    2017-03-01

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation in rats is considered as an experimental animal model of mania endowed with face, construct, and pharmacological validity. We induced paradoxical sleep deprivation by placing rats onto a small platform surrounded by water. This procedure caused the animal to fall in the water at the onset of REM phase of sleep. Control rats were either placed onto a larger platform (which allowed them to sleep) or maintained in their home cage. Sleep deprived rats showed a substantial reduction in type-2 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu2) receptors mRNA and protein levels in the hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex or corpus striatum, as compared to both groups of control rats. No changes in the expression of mGlu3 receptor mRNA levels or mGlu1α and mGlu5 receptor protein levels were found with exception of an increase in mGlu1α receptor levels in the striatum of SD rats. Moving from these findings we treated SD and control rats with the selective mGlu2 receptor enhancer, BINA (30mg/kg, i.p.). SD rats were also treated with sodium valproate (300mg/kg, i.p.) as an active comparator. Both BINA and sodium valproate were effective in reversing the manic-like phenotype evaluated in an open field arena in SD rats. BINA treatment had no effect on motor activity in control rats, suggesting that our findings were not biased by a non-specific motor-lowering activity of BINA. These findings suggest that changes in the expression of mGlu2 receptors may be associated with the enhanced motor activity observed with mania.

  17. Effects of troxerutin on cognitive deficits and glutamate cysteine ligase subunits in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songyun; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Lihui; Li, Jie; Wang, Ruiying; Wang, Mian

    2017-02-15

    Increasing evidence demonstrates an association between diabetes and hippocampal neuron damage. This study aimed to determine the effects of troxerutin on cognitive deficits and glutamate cysteine ligase subunits (GCLM and GCLC) in the hippocampus of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) rats. At 12weeks after streptozotocin injection, T1DM rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=15 each group) to receive no treatment (T1DM), saline (T1DM+saline), alpha-lipoic acid (T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid), and troxerutin (T1DM+troxerutin), respectively, for 6weeks. Meanwhile, 10 control animals (NC group) were assessed in parallel. Learning performance was evaluated by the Morris water maze. After treatment, hippocampi were collected for pathological examination by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Next, hippocampal superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels were assessed. Finally, glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic (GCLC) and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier (GCLM) subunit mRNA and protein levels were quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. Compared with T1DM and T1DM+saline groups, escape latency was overtly reduced in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. Significantly increased GCLM and GCLC mRNA levels, GCLC protein amounts, SOD activity, and GSH levels, and reduced MDA amounts were observed in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. In T1DM and T1DM+saline groups, H&E staining showed less pyramidal cells in the hippocampus, with disorganized layers, karyopyknosis, decreased endochylema, and cavitation, effects relieved in T1DM+alpha-lipoic acid and T1DM+troxerutin groups. Troxerutin alleviates oxidative stress and promotes learning in streptozotocin-induced T1DM rats, a process involving GCLC expression.

  18. Influence of Volatile Anesthesia on the Release of Glutamate and other Amino Acids in the Nucleus Accumbens in a Rat Model of Alcohol Withdrawal: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Seidemann, Thomas; Spies, Claudia; Morgenstern, Rudolf; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Netzhammer, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    Background Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is a potentially life-threatening condition, which can occur when patients with alcohol use disorders undergo general anesthesia. Excitatory amino acids, such as glutamate, act as neurotransmitters and are known to play a key role in alcohol withdrawal syndrome. To understand this process better, we investigated the influence of isoflurane, sevoflurane, and desflurane anesthesia on the profile of excitatory and inhibitory amino acids in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of alcohol-withdrawn rats (AWR). Methods Eighty Wistar rats were randomized into two groups of 40, pair-fed with alcoholic or non-alcoholic nutrition. Nutrition was withdrawn and microdialysis was performed to measure the activity of amino acids in the NAcc. The onset time of the withdrawal syndrome was first determined in an experiment with 20 rats. Sixty rats then received isoflurane, sevoflurane, or desflurane anesthesia for three hours during the withdrawal period, followed by one hour of elimination. Amino acid concentrations were measured using chromatography and results were compared to baseline levels measured prior to induction of anesthesia. Results Glutamate release increased in the alcohol group at five hours after the last alcohol intake (p = 0.002). After 140 min, desflurane anesthesia led to a lower release of glutamate (p < 0.001) and aspartate (p = 0.0007) in AWR compared to controls. GABA release under and after desflurane anesthesia was also significantly lower in AWR than controls (p = 0.023). Over the course of isoflurane anesthesia, arginine release decreased in AWR compared to controls (p < 0.001), and aspartate release increased after induction relative to controls (p20min = 0.015 and p40min = 0.006). However, amino acid levels did not differ between the groups as a result of sevoflurane anesthesia. Conclusions Each of three volatile anesthetics we studied showed different effects on excitatory and inhibitory amino acid concentrations. Under

  19. Lysergic acid diethylamide and [-]-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine increase extracellular glutamate in rat prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Muschamp, John W; Regina, Meredith J; Hull, Elaine M; Winter, Jerrold C; Rabin, Richard A

    2004-10-08

    The ability of hallucinogens to increase extracellular glutamate in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was assessed by in vivo microdialysis. The hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD; 0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a time-dependent increase in PFC glutamate that was blocked by the 5-HT(2A) antagonist M100907 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p.). Similarly, the 5-HT(2A/C) agonist [-]-2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (DOM; 0.6 mg/kg, i.p.), which is a phenethylamine hallucinogen, increased glutamate to 206% above saline-treated controls. When LSD (10 microM) was directly applied to the PFC by reverse dialysis, a rapid increase in PFC glutamate levels was observed. Glutamate levels in the PFC remained elevated after the drug infusion was discontinued. These data provide direct evidence in vivo for the hypothesis that an enhanced release of glutamate is a common mechanism in the action of hallucinogens.

  20. Simultaneous assay of glucose, lactate, L-glutamate and hypoxanthine levels in a rat striatum using enzyme electrodes based on neutral red-doped silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fen-Fen; Wan, Qiao; Li, Chen-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Zi-Qiang; Xian, Yue-Zhong; Jin, Li-Tong; Yamamoto, Katsunobu

    2004-10-01

    An electrochemical method suitable for the simultaneous measurement of cerebral glucose, lactate, L-glutamate and hypoxanthine concentrations from in vivo microdialysis sampling has been successfully performed for the first time using a neutral red-doped silica (NRDS) nanoparticle-derived enzyme sensor system. These uniform NRDS nanoparticles (about 50 +/- 3 nm) were prepared by a water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion method, and characterized by a TEM technique. The neutral red-doped interior maintained its high electron-activity, while the exterior nano-silica surface prevented the mediator from leaching out into the aqueous solution, and showed high biocompability. These nanoparticles were then mixing with the glucose oxidase (GOD), lactate oxidase (LOD), L-glutamate oxidase (L-GLOD) or xanthine oxidase (XOD), and immobilized on four glassy carbon electrodes, respectively. A thin Nafion film was coated on the enzyme layer to prevent interference from molecules such as ascorbic acid and uric acid in the dialysate. The high sensitivity of the NRDS modified enzyme electrode system enables the simultaneous monitoring of trace levels of glucose, L-glutamate, lactate and hypoxanthine in diluted dialysate samples from a rat striatum.

  1. Sequential expression of cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor in rat hippocampal neurons after fluid percussion injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqiang; Shu, Qingming; Li, Lingzhi; Ge, Maolin; Zhang, Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes gene expression changes in different brain regions. Occurrence and development of traumatic brain injury are closely related, involving expression of three factors, namely cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor. However, little is known about the correlation of these three factors and brain neuronal injury. In this study, primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons were subjected to fluid percussion injury according to Scott's method, with some modifications. RT-PCR and semi-quantitative immunocytochemical staining was used to measure the expression levels of cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor. Our results found that cyclooxygenase-2 expression were firstly increased post-injury, and then decreased. Both mRNA and protein expression levels reached peaks at 8 and 12 hours post-injury, respectively. Similar sequential changes in glutamate receptor 2 were observed, with highest levels mRNA and protein expression at 8 and 12 hours post-injury respectively. On the contrary, the expressions of platelet activating factor receptor were firstly decreased post-injury, and then increased. Both mRNA and protein expression levels reached the lowest levels at 8 and 12 hours post-injury, respectively. Totally, our findings suggest that these three factors are involved in occurrence and development of hippocampal neuronal injury. PMID:25206921

  2. Short- and long-term consequences of prenatal exposure to the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 on rat glutamate transmission and cognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Luca; Tomasini, M C; Beggiato, S; Gaetani, S; Cassano, T; Cuomo, V; Amoroso, S; Tanganelli, S; Antonelli, T

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize integrated neurochemical, morphological and neurobehavioral evidence, in particular from our laboratory, which emphasize the short- and long-term consequences of prenatal exposure to the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 on rat glutamate transmission and cognitive functions. The results obtained provide evidence that maternal exposure to WIN55,212-2 induces an impairment of cognitive capacities in the offspring. This impairment is associated with alterations of cortical and hippocampal glutamate outflow, cortical neuron morphology and hippocampal long-term potentiation. These findings are in line with clinical data showing that the consumption of marijuana by women during pregnancy has negative consequences on the cognitive functions of their children. Thus, although it is difficult and sometimes misleading to extrapolate findings obtained from animal models to humans, the possibility that an alteration of glutamate transmission might underlie, at least in part, some of the cognitive deficits affecting the offspring of marijuana users, is supported.

  3. [The role of non-NMDA glutamate receptors in the EEG effects of chronic administration of noopept GVS-111 in awake rats].

    PubMed

    Kovalev, G I; Vorob'ev, V V

    2002-01-01

    Participation of the non-NMDA glutamate receptor subtype in the formation of the EEG frequency spectrum was studied in wakeful rats upon a long-term (10 x 0.2 mg/kg, s.c.) administration of the nootropic dipeptide GVS-111 (noopept or N-phenylacetyl-L-prolyglycine ethylate). The EEGs were measured with electrodes implanted into somatosensor cortex regions, hippocampus, and a cannula in the lateral ventricle. The acute reactions (characteristic of nootropes) in the alpha and beta ranges of EEG exhibited inversion after the 6th injection of noopept and almost completely vanished after the 9th injection. Preliminary introduction of the non-NMDA antagonist GDEE (glutamic acid diethyl ester) in a dose of 1 mumole into the lateral ventricle restored the EEG pattern observed upon the 6th dose of GVS-111. The role of glutamate receptors in the course of a prolonged administration of nootropes, as well as the possible mechanisms accounting for a difference in the action of GVS-111 and piracetam are discussed.

  4. γ-Aminobutyric acid-, glycine-, and glutamate-immunopositive boutons on mesencephalic trigeminal neurons that innervate jaw-closing muscle spindles in the rat: ultrastructure and development.

    PubMed

    Paik, Sang Kyoo; Kwak, Myung Kyw; Bae, Jin Young; Yi, Hyun Won; Yoshida, Atsushi; Ahn, Dong Kuk; Bae, Yong Chul

    2012-10-15

    Unlike other primary sensory neurons, the neurons in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Vmes) receive most of their synaptic input onto their somata. Detailed description of the synaptic boutons onto Vmes neurons is crucial for understanding the synaptic input onto these neurons and their role in the motor control of masticatory muscles. For this, we investigated the distribution of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-, glycine-, and glutamate-immunopositive (+) boutons on Vmes neurons and their ultrastructural parameters that relate to transmitter release: Vmes neurons that innervate masseteric muscle spindles were identified by labeling with horseradish peroxidase injected into the muscle, and immunogold staining and quantitative ultrastructural analysis of synapses onto these neurons were performed in adult rats and during postnatal development. The bouton volume, mitochondrial volume, and active zone area of the boutons contacting labeled somata (axosomatic synapses) were similar to those of boutons forming axoaxonic synapses with Vmes neurons but smaller than those of boutons forming axodendritic or axosomatic synapses with most other neurons. GABA+ , glycine+ , and glutamate+ boutons constituted a large majority (83%) of all boutons on labeled somata. A considerable fraction of boutons (28%) was glycine(+) , and all glycine+ boutons were also GABA+ . Bouton size remained unchanged during postnatal development. These findings suggest that the excitability of Vmes neurons is determined to a great extent by GABA, glycine, and glutamate and that the relatively lower synaptic strength of axosomatic synapses may reflect the role of the Vmes neurons in modulating orofacial motor function.

  5. P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity GABA and glutamate transport into rat brain cortex synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Barros-Barbosa, A R; Lobo, M G; Ferreirinha, F; Correia-de-Sá, P; Cordeiro, J M

    2015-10-15

    Sodium-dependent high-affinity amino-acid transporters play crucial roles in terminating synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS). However, there is lack of information about the mechanisms underlying the regulation of amino-acid transport by fast-acting neuromodulators, like ATP. Here, we investigated whether activation of the ATP-sensitive P2X7 receptor modulates Na(+)-dependent high-affinity γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate uptake into nerve terminals (synaptosomes) of the rat cerebral cortex. Radiolabeled neurotransmitter accumulation was evaluated by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The cell-permeant sodium-selective fluorescent indicator, SBFI-AM, was used to estimate Na(+) influx across plasma membrane. 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)ATP (BzATP, 3-300 μM), a prototypic P2X7 receptor agonist, concentration-dependently decreased [(3)H]GABA (14%) and [(14)C]glutamate (24%) uptake; BzATP decreased transport maximum velocity (Vmax) without affecting the Michaelis constant (Km) values. The selective P2X7 receptor antagonist, A-438079 (3 μM), prevented inhibition of [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake by BzATP (100 μM). The inhibitory effect of BzATP coincided with its ability to increase intracellular Na(+) and was mimicked by Na(+) ionophores, like gramicidin and monensin. Increases in intracellular Na(+) (with veratridine or ouabain) or substitution of extracellular Na(+) by N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG)(+) all decreased [(3)H]GABA and [(14)C]glutamate uptake and attenuated BzATP effects. Uptake inhibition by BzATP (100 μM) was also attenuated by calmidazolium, which selectively inhibits Na(+) currents through the P2X7 receptor pore. In conclusion, disruption of the Na(+) gradient by P2X7 receptor activation downmodulates high-affinity GABA and glutamate uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes. Interference with amino-acid transport efficacy may constitute a novel target for therapeutic management of cortical excitability.

  6. Polyphenol-Rich Extract of Syzygium cumini Leaf Dually Improves Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity and Pancreatic Islet Function in Monosodium L-Glutamate-Induced Obese Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Jonas R.; França, Lucas M.; Chagas, Vinicyus T.; Gaspar, Renato S.; dos Santos, Kayque A.; Gonçalves, Luciana M.; Sloboda, Deborah M.; Holloway, Alison C.; Dutra, Richard P.; Carneiro, Everardo M.; Cappelli, Ana Paula G.; Paes, Antonio Marcus de A.

    2016-01-01

    Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (Myrtaceae) has been traditionally used to treat a number of illnesses. Ethnopharmacological studies have particularly addressed antidiabetic and metabolic-related effects of extracts prepared from its different parts, especially seed, and pulp-fruit, however. there is a lack of studies on phytochemical profile and biological properties of its leaf. As there is considerable interest in bioactive compounds to treat metabolic syndrome and its clustered risk factors, we sought to characterize the metabolic effects of hydroethanolic extract of S. cumini leaf (HESc) on lean and monosodium L-glutamate (MSG)-induced obese rats. HPLC-MS/MS characterization of the HESc polyphenolic profile, at 254 nm, identified 15 compounds pertaining to hydrolysable tannin and flavanol subclasses. At 60 days of age, both groups were randomly assigned to receive HESc (500 mg/kg) or vehicle for 30 days. At the end of treatment, obese+HESc exhibited significantly lower body weight gain, body mass index, and white adipose tissue mass, compared to obese rats receiving vehicle. Obese rats treated with HESc showed a twofold increase in lipolytic activity in the periepididymal fat pad, as well as, brought triglyceride levels in serum, liver and skeletal muscle back to levels close those found in lean animals. Furthermore, HESc also improved hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in obese+HESc rats, which resulted in partial reversal of glucose intolerance, as compared to obese rats. HESc had no effect in lean rats. Assessment of ex vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion showed HESc potentiated pancreatic function in islets isolated from both lean and obese rats treated with HESc. In addition, HESc (10–1000 μg/mL) increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion from both isolated rat islets and INS-1E β-cells. These data demonstrate that S. cumini leaf improved peripheral insulin sensitivity via stimulating/modulating β-cell insulin release, which was associated

  7. Polyphenol-Rich Extract of Syzygium cumini Leaf Dually Improves Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity and Pancreatic Islet Function in Monosodium L-Glutamate-Induced Obese Rats.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Jonas R; França, Lucas M; Chagas, Vinicyus T; Gaspar, Renato S; Dos Santos, Kayque A; Gonçalves, Luciana M; Sloboda, Deborah M; Holloway, Alison C; Dutra, Richard P; Carneiro, Everardo M; Cappelli, Ana Paula G; Paes, Antonio Marcus de A

    2016-01-01

    Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels (Myrtaceae) has been traditionally used to treat a number of illnesses. Ethnopharmacological studies have particularly addressed antidiabetic and metabolic-related effects of extracts prepared from its different parts, especially seed, and pulp-fruit, however. there is a lack of studies on phytochemical profile and biological properties of its leaf. As there is considerable interest in bioactive compounds to treat metabolic syndrome and its clustered risk factors, we sought to characterize the metabolic effects of hydroethanolic extract of S. cumini leaf (HESc) on lean and monosodium L-glutamate (MSG)-induced obese rats. HPLC-MS/MS characterization of the HESc polyphenolic profile, at 254 nm, identified 15 compounds pertaining to hydrolysable tannin and flavanol subclasses. At 60 days of age, both groups were randomly assigned to receive HESc (500 mg/kg) or vehicle for 30 days. At the end of treatment, obese+HESc exhibited significantly lower body weight gain, body mass index, and white adipose tissue mass, compared to obese rats receiving vehicle. Obese rats treated with HESc showed a twofold increase in lipolytic activity in the periepididymal fat pad, as well as, brought triglyceride levels in serum, liver and skeletal muscle back to levels close those found in lean animals. Furthermore, HESc also improved hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in obese+HESc rats, which resulted in partial reversal of glucose intolerance, as compared to obese rats. HESc had no effect in lean rats. Assessment of ex vivo glucose-stimulated insulin secretion showed HESc potentiated pancreatic function in islets isolated from both lean and obese rats treated with HESc. In addition, HESc (10-1000 μg/mL) increased glucose stimulated insulin secretion from both isolated rat islets and INS-1E β-cells. These data demonstrate that S. cumini leaf improved peripheral insulin sensitivity via stimulating/modulating β-cell insulin release, which was associated

  8. Glutamate-induced depression of EPSP-spike coupling in rat hippocampal CA1 neurons and modulation by adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alexandra L; Stone, Trevor W

    2010-04-01

    The presence of high concentrations of glutamate in the extracellular fluid following brain trauma or ischaemia may contribute substantially to subsequent impairments of neuronal function. In this study, glutamate was applied to hippocampal slices for several minutes, producing over-depolarization, which was reflected in an initial loss of evoked population potential size in the CA1 region. Orthodromic population spikes recovered only partially over the following 60 min, whereas antidromic spikes and excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) showed greater recovery, implying a change in EPSP-spike coupling (E-S coupling), which was confirmed by intracellular recording from CA1 pyramidal cells. The recovery of EPSPs was enhanced further by dizocilpine, suggesting that the long-lasting glutamate-induced change in E-S coupling involves NMDA receptors. This was supported by experiments showing that when isolated NMDA-receptor-mediated EPSPs were studied in isolation, there was only partial recovery following glutamate, unlike the composite EPSPs. The recovery of orthodromic population spikes and NMDA-receptor-mediated EPSPs following glutamate was enhanced by the adenosine A1 receptor blocker DPCPX, the A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 or adenosine deaminase, associated with a loss of restoration to normal of the glutamate-induced E-S depression. The results indicate that the long-lasting depression of neuronal excitability following recovery from glutamate is associated with a depression of E-S coupling. This effect is partly dependent on activation of NMDA receptors, which modify adenosine release or the sensitivity of adenosine receptors. The results may have implications for the use of A1 and A2A receptor ligands as cognitive enhancers or neuroprotectants.

  9. Nicotinic receptors modulate the onset of reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction evoked by glutamate uptake block in the rat hypoglossal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Tortora, Maria; Corsini, Silvia; Nistri, Andrea

    2017-02-03

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity is considered to be a major process to initiate cell degeneration. Indeed, subsequent to excessive glutamate receptor stimulation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial dysfunction are regarded as two major gateways leading to neuron death. These processes are mimicked in an in vitro model of rat brainstem slice when excitotoxicity is induced by DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate (TBOA), a specific glutamate-uptake blocker that increases extracellular glutamate. Our recent study has demonstrated that brainstem hypoglossal motoneurons, which are very vulnerable to this damage, were neuroprotected from excitotoxicity with nicotine application through the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and subsequent inhibition of ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study examined if endogenous cholinergic activity exerted any protective effect in this pathophysiological model and how ROS production (estimated with rhodamine fluorescence) and mitochondrial dysfunction (measured as methyltetrazolium reduction) were time-related during the early phase of excitotoxicity (0-4h). nAChR antagonists did not modify TBOA-evoked ROS production (that was nearly doubled over control) or mitochondrial impairment (25% decline), suggesting that intrinsic nAChR activity was insufficient to contrast excitotoxicity and needed further stimulation with nicotine to become effective. ROS production always preceded mitochondrial dysfunction by about 2h. Nicotine prevented both ROS production and mitochondrial metabolic depression with a delayed action that alluded to a complex chain of events targeting these two lesional processes. The present data indicate a relatively wide time frame during which strong nAChR activation can arrest a runaway neurotoxic process leading to cell death.

  10. Synaptotagmins I and II in the developing rat auditory brainstem: Synaptotagmin I is transiently expressed in glutamate-releasing immature inhibitory terminals.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Alan P; Gillespie, Deda C

    2011-08-15

    The lateral superior olive (LSO), a nucleus in the auditory brainstem, computes interaural intensity differences for sound localization by comparing converging excitatory and inhibitory inputs that carry tonotopically matched information from the two ears. Tonotopic refinement in the inhibitory projection pathway from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) is known to be established during the first postnatal week in rats. During this period, immature MNTB terminals in the LSO contain vesicular transporters for both inhibitory and excitatory amino acids and release glutamate. The primary Ca(2+) sensors for vesicular release in the CNS are understood to be synaptotagmins, and in adult auditory brainstem synaptotagmin 2 is the predominant synaptotagmin. We asked here whether a different Ca(2+) sensor might be expressed in the immature auditory brainstem. We have found that synaptotagmin 1 is indeed expressed transiently in the immature auditory brainstem, most highly in those areas that receive glutamate-releasing immature inhibitory inputs from the MNTB, and that during the first postnatal week synaptotagmin 1 co-localizes with the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT3, a marker of glutamate-releasing immature inhibitory terminals from the MNTB. We suggest that immature MNTB terminals may contain two populations of synaptic vesicles, one expressing the vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter together with synaptotagmin 2 and another expressing VGLUT3 together with synaptotagmin 1. Because Ca(2+) sensing is an important determinant of release properties for the presynaptic terminal, differential expression of the synaptotagmins might allow the differential release of excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in response to differing patterns of neural activity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Pharmacological characterization of the metabotropic glutamate receptor inhibiting D-[3H]-aspartate output in rat striatum.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, G.; Alesiani, M.; Leonardi, P.; Cherici, G.; Pellicciari, R.; Moroni, F.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of several agonists of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) were studied in adult rat striatal slices by measuring (i) KCl (30 mM)-induced output of previously taken up D-[3H]-aspartate (Asp), (ii) forskolin (30 microM)-induced adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) accumulation and (iii) phophoinositide (PI) hydrolysis. 2. K(+)-induced efflux of D-[3H]-Asp was inhibited by the following mGluR agonists: (1S,3S,4S)-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I), (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD) and quisqualic acid (Quis). 2-Amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) was inactive up to 300 microM. The maximal inhibition of D-[3H]-Asp output was 60 +/- 8%. The EC50s of mGluR agonists were: 0.5 microM for L-CCG-I, 100 microM for 1S,3R-ACPD and 100 microM for Quis. 3. Forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation was also inhibited by mGluR agonists. The maximal inhibition was 50 +/- 4% and was obtained at a concentration of 10 microM for L-CCG-I and 100 microM for 1S,3R-ACPD. The EC50s for this inhibition were: 0.9 microM for L-CCG-I and 20 microM for 1S,3R-ACPD. Quis (300 microM) inhibited cyclic AMP accumulation by approximately 20%. L-AP4 slightly potentiated cyclic AMP accumulation. 4. PI hydrolysis was stimulated by mGluR agonists. The most potent compound was Quis (100 microM), which increased inositol phosphate formation up to 2.2 fold over control values. Its EC50 was 15 microM. L-CCG-I and 1S,3R-ACPD increased inositol phosphate formation by approximately 1.8 fold and their EC50 values were 30 and 25 microM, respectively. L-AP4 did not affect PI hydrolysis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8306080

  12. Neuronal activity mediated regulation of glutamate transporter GLT‐1 surface diffusion in rat astrocytes in dissociated and slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Al Awabdh, Sana; Gupta‐Agarwal, Swati; Sheehan, David F.; Muir, James; Norkett, Rosalind; Twelvetrees, Alison E.; Griffin, Lewis D.

    2016-01-01

    The astrocytic GLT‐1 (or EAAT2) is the major glutamate transporter for clearing synaptic glutamate. While the diffusion dynamics of neurotransmitter receptors at the neuronal surface are well understood, far less is known regarding the surface trafficking of transporters in subcellular domains of the astrocyte membrane. Here, we have used live‐cell imaging to study the mechanisms regulating GLT‐1 surface diffusion in astrocytes in dissociated and brain slice cultures. Using GFP‐time lapse imaging, we show that GLT‐1 forms stable clusters that are dispersed rapidly and reversibly upon glutamate treatment in a transporter activity‐dependent manner. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and single particle tracking using quantum dots revealed that clustered GLT‐1 is more stable than diffuse GLT‐1 and that glutamate increases GLT‐1 surface diffusion in the astrocyte membrane. Interestingly, the two main GLT‐1 isoforms expressed in the brain, GLT‐1a and GLT‐1b, are both found to be stabilized opposed to synapses under basal conditions, with GLT‐1b more so. GLT‐1 surface mobility is increased in proximity to activated synapses and alterations of neuronal activity can bidirectionally modulate the dynamics of both GLT‐1 isoforms. Altogether, these data reveal that astrocytic GLT‐1 surface mobility, via its transport activity, is modulated during neuronal firing, which may be a key process for shaping glutamate clearance and glutamatergic synaptic transmission. GLIA 2016;64:1252–1264 PMID:27189737

  13. Acute stress-mediated increases in extracellular glutamate levels in the rat amygdala: differential effects of antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Reznikov, Leah R; Grillo, Claudia A; Piroli, Gerardo G; Pasumarthi, Ravi K; Reagan, Lawrence P; Fadel, Jim

    2007-05-01

    Depressive illness is associated with changes in amygdalar volume, and stressful life events are known to precipitate depressive episodes in this patient population. Stress affects amygdalar synaptic plasticity and several neurotransmitter systems have been implicated in stress-mediated changes in the brain, including the glutamatergic system. However, the role of the glutamatergic system in stress-mediated plasticity in the amygdala remains to be determined. Accordingly the current study examined the stress modulation of extracellular glutamate levels in the basolateral nucleus (BLA) and the central nucleus (CeA) of the amygdala by in vivo microdialysis. Acute stress increased extracellular glutamate levels in the BLA and CeA, although the dynamics of these stress-mediated changes were dramatically different in these amygdalar nuclei. Tetrodotoxin administration reduced basal, and completely eliminated stress-mediated increases in glutamate efflux in the amygdala, demonstrating that stress effects are dependent on local axonal depolarization. Moreover, stress-mediated increases in glutamate efflux in the BLA were inhibited by the antidepressant tianeptine but not by the selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine. Collectively, these data demonstrate that stress-induced modulation of glutamate neurochemistry reflects a fundamental pathological change that may contribute to the aetiology and progression of depressive illness, and suggest that some antidepressants such as tianeptine may elicit their clinical effects by modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  14. In vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI): [3,4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate/glutamine tomography in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hyder, F; Renken, R; Rothman, D L

    1999-12-01

    A method for in vivo carbon-edited detection with proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (ICED PEPSI) is described. This method is composed of an echo-planar based acquisition implemented with (13)C-(1)H J editing spectroscopy and is intended for high temporal and spatial resolution in vivo spectroscopic imaging of (13)C turnover, from D-[1,6-(13)C]glucose to glutamate and glutamine, in the brain. At a static magnetic field strength of 7 T, both in vitro and in vivo chemical shift imaging data are presented with a spatial resolution of 8 microL (i.e., 1.25 x 1.25 x 5.00 mm(3)) and a maximum spectral bandwidth of 5.2 ppm in (1)H. Chemical shift imaging data acquired every 11 minutes allowed detection of regional [4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate turnover in rat brain. The [4-(13)CH(2)]glutamate turnover curves, which can be converted to tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes, showed that the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux (V(TCA)) in pure gray and white matter can range from 1.2 +/- 0.2 to 0.5 +/- 0.1 micromol/g/min, respectively, for morphine-anesthetized rats. The mean cortical V(TCA) from 32 voxels of 1.0 +/- 0.3 micromol/g/min (N = 3) is in excellent agreement with previous localized measurements that have demonstrated that V(TCA) can range from 0.9-1.1 micromol/g/min under identical anesthetized conditions. Magn Reson Med 42:997-1003, 1999.

  15. Homeostatic effect of p-chloro-diphenyl diselenide on glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function alterations induced by monosodium glutamate administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Chagas, Pietro M; da Rocha, Juliana T; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Carvalho, Nélson R; Soares, Félix A; da Luz, Sônia C Almeida; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a group of metabolic alterations considered a worldwide public health problem. Organic selenium compounds have been reported to have many different pharmacological actions, such as anti-hypercholesterolemic and anti-hyperglycemic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of p-chloro-diphenyl diselenide (p-ClPhSe)2, an organic selenium compound, in a model of obesity induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) administration in rats. The rats were treated during the first ten postnatal days with MSG and received (p-ClPhSe)2 (10 mg/kg, intragastrically) from 45th to 51 th postnatal day. Glucose, lipid and lactate levels were determined in plasma of rats. Glycogen levels and activities of tyrosine aminotransferase, hexokinase, citrate synthase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase) were determined in livers of rats. Renal G-6-Pase activity was also determined. The purine content [Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate] and mitochondrial functionality in the liver were also investigated. p-(ClPhSe)2 did not alter the reduction in growth performance and in the body weight caused by MSG but reduced epididymal fat deposition of rats. p-(ClPhSe)2 restored glycemia, triglycerides, cholesterol and lactate levels as well as the glucose metabolism altered in rats treated with MSG. p-(ClPhSe)2 restored hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction and the decrease in citrate synthase activity and ATP and ADP levels caused by MSG in rats. In summary, (p-ClPhSe)2 had homeostatic effects on glucose metabolism and mitochondrial function alterations induced by MSG administration to rats.

  16. Different effect of handle region peptide on β-cell function in different sexes of rats neonatally treated with sodium L-glutamate.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-xi; Sun, Ru-qiong; Yin, Guo-shu; Xu, Dong-chuan; Wang, Ping; Lin, Kun; Lin, Chu-jia; Lin, Shao-da

    2015-03-17

    BACKGROUND The (pro)renin receptor ((P)RR) was reported to be expressed in various tissues including the pancreas, and handle region peptide (HRP) is believed to block the function of (P)RR. This study aimed to investigate the effect of HRP on the glucose tolerance status and β-cell function of female rats, neonatally treated with sodium L-glutamate (MSG) and to compare with the previously reported HRP effect on male rats. MATERIAL AND METHODS Female MSG rats aged 8 weeks were divided into MSG control group and HRP treated group and the normal SD rats served as control. The MSG rats were treated with HRP by osmotic minipumps with dose of 1 mg/kg per day for total 28 days. Glucose tolerance status was evaluated at the end of the study. Islets α-cell and β-cell were marked with insulin antibody and glucagon antibody respectively. The proliferation of islet cells and expression of subunit of NADPH oxidase P22phox were marked by PCNA and P22phox antibody. Picrosirius red staining was performed for evaluating fibrosis of islets. RESULTS HRP improved the glucose status tolerance with decreasing α-cell mass, islets PCNA-positive cells, expression of P22phox and picrosirius red stained areas, and increasing β-cell mass in female MSG rats. The indexes with obviously interacted effect of sexes and HRP for the MSG rats were the AUC of blood glucose concentration (P<0.01), α-cell mass (P<0.05), proliferation of islet cells (P<0.01) and area of picrosirius red staining (P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS HRP improved the glucose tolerance status in the females although it was previously reported to worsen the glucose tolerance in male MSG rats. Different levels of sex hormones may partly account for the disparate effects observed for HRP in different sexes.

  17. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5)-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis and NMDA-potentiating effects are blunted in the striatum of aged rats: a possible additional mechanism in striatal senescence.

    PubMed

    Domenici, Maria Rosaria; Pintor, Annita; Potenza, Rosa Luisa; Gaudi, Simona; Grò, Maria Cristina; Passarelli, Francesca; Reggio, Rosaria; Galluzzo, Mariangela; Massotti, Marino; Popoli, Patrizia

    2003-05-01

    The aim of the present work was to verify whether an impairment of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated neurotransmission did occur in the aged striatum. To this end, the ability of the subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist, RS-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine, to stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis and to potentiate N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced effects in striatal slices from young (3 months) and aged (24 months) rats was compared. The ability of RS-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine to induce maximal phosphoinositide turnover and to potentiate N-methyl-d-aspartate effects was significantly reduced in slices from old vs. young rats. These changes were associated with a significant reduction in the expression of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptor protein (-28.8%) and phospholipase C-beta1 (-55.8%) in old striata, while receptor messenger ribonucleic acid expression was unchanged. These results show that the signalling associated with subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors undergoes significant age-related changes and that a reduced expression of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors and, more importantly, phospholipase C-beta1 may account for the functional decline of subtype 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  18. Glutamine and glutamic acid enhance thyroid-stimulating hormone β subunit mRNA expression in the rat pars tuberalis.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Sayaka; Sakai, Takafumi; Sakata, Ichiro

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-producing cells of the pars tuberalis (PT) display distinct characteristics that differ from those of the pars distalis (PD). The mRNA expression of TSHβ and αGSU in PT has a circadian rhythm and is inhibited by melatonin via melatonin receptor type 1; however, the detailed regulatory mechanism for TSHβ expression in the PT remains unclear. To identify the factors that affect PT, a microarray analysis was performed on laser-captured PT tissue to screen for genes coding for receptors that are abundantly expressed in the PT. In the PT, we found high expression of the KA2, which is an ionotropic glutamic acid receptor (iGluR). In addition, the amino acid transporter A2 (ATA2), also known as the glutamine transporter, and glutaminase (GLS), as well as GLS2, were highly expressed in the PT compared to the PD. We examined the effects of glutamine and glutamic acid on TSHβ expression and αGSU expression in PT slice cultures. l-Glutamine and l-glutamic acid significantly stimulated TSHβ expression in PT slices after 2- and 4-h treatments, and the effect of l-glutamic acid was stronger than that of l-glutamine. In contrast, treatment with glutamine and glutamic acid did not affect αGSU expression in the PT or the expression of TSHβ or αGSU in the PD. These results strongly suggest that glutamine is taken up by PT cells through ATA2 and that glutamic acid locally converted from glutamine by Gls induces TSHβ expression via the KA2 in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner in the PT.

  19. Desire and Dread from the Nucleus Accumbens: Cortical Glutamate and Subcortical GABA Differentially Generate Motivation and Hedonic Impact in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Alexis; Richard, Jocelyn M.; Berridge, Kent C.

    2010-01-01

    Background GABAergic signals to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell arise from predominantly subcortical sources whereas glutamatergic signals arise mainly from cortical-related sources. Here we contrasted GABAergic and glutamatergic generation of hedonics versus motivation processes, as a proxy for comparing subcortical and cortical controls of emotion. Local disruptions of either signals in medial shell of NAc generate intense motivated behaviors corresponding to desire and/or dread, along a rostrocaudal gradient. GABA or glutamate disruptions in rostral shell generate appetitive motivation whereas disruptions in caudal shell elicit fearful motivation. However, GABA and glutamate signals in NAc differ in important ways, despite the similarity of their rostrocaudal motivation gradients. Methodology/Principal Findings Microinjections of a GABAA agonist (muscimol), or of a glutamate AMPA antagonist (DNQX) in medial shell of rats were assessed for generation of hedonic “liking” or “disliking” by measuring orofacial affective reactions to sucrose-quinine taste. Motivation generation was independently assessed measuring effects on eating versus natural defensive behaviors. For GABAergic microinjections, we found that the desire-dread motivation gradient was mirrored by an equivalent hedonic gradient that amplified affective taste “liking” (at rostral sites) versus “disliking” (at caudal sites). However, manipulation of glutamatergic signals completely failed to alter pleasure-displeasure reactions to sensory hedonic impact, despite producing a strong rostrocaudal gradient of motivation. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that the nucleus accumbens contains two functional affective keyboards for amino-acid signals: a motivation-generating keyboard and a hedonic-generating keyboard. Corticolimbic glutamate signals and subcortical GABA signals equivalently engage the motivation keyboard to generate desire and-or dread. Only subcortical GABA signals

  20. The negative effects of alcohol hangover on high-anxiety phenotype rats are influenced by the glutamate receptors of the dorsal midbrain.

    PubMed

    Ezequiel Leite, L; Nobre, M J

    2012-06-28

    Alcoholism is a chronic disorder characterized by the appearance of a withdrawal syndrome following the abrupt cessation of alcohol intake that includes symptoms of physical and emotional disturbances, anxiety being the most prevalent symptom. In humans, it was shown that anxiety may increase the probability of relapse. In laboratory animals, however, the use of anxiety to predict alcohol preference has remained difficult. Excitatory amino acids as glutamate have been implicated in alcohol hangover and may be responsible for the seizures and anxiety observed during withdrawal. The dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG) is a midbrain region critical for the modulation/expression of anxiety- and fear-related behaviors and the propagation of seizures induced by alcohol withdrawal, the glutamate neurotransmission being one of the most affected. The present study was designed to evaluate whether low- (LA) and high-anxiety rats (HA), tested during the alcohol hangover phase, in which anxiety is the most prevalent symptom, are more sensitive to the reinforcing effects of alcohol when tested in a voluntary alcohol drinking procedure. Additionally, we were interested in investigating the main effects of reducing the excitatory tonus of the dorsal midbrain, after the blockade of the ionotropic glutamate receptors into the DPAG, on the voluntary alcohol intake of HA and LA motivated rats that were made previously experienced with the free operant response of alcohol drinking. For this purpose, we used local infusions of the N-metil D-Aspartato (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-kainate receptors antagonist DL-2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid - DL-AP7 (10 nmol/0.2 μl) and l-glutamic acid diethyl ester - GDEE (160 nmol/0.2 μl), respectively. Alcohol intoxication was produced by 10 daily bolus intraperitonial (IP) injections of alcohol (2.0 g/kg). Peak-blood alcohol levels were determined by gas-chromatography analysis in order to assess blood

  1. [The influence of calcium N-(5-hydroxynicotinoyl)-L-glutamate on reproductive function, prenatal and postnatal development of rats].

    PubMed

    Kiselev, A V; Stovbun, S V; Sergienko, V I

    2012-01-01

    The safety of a new nootrope and neuroprotector--calcium N-(5-hydroxynicotinoyl)-L-glutamate (ampasse)--has been evaluated. It is shown that ampasse at a dose of 6.7 mg/kg (10 times the maximum therapeutic dose for humans) did not affect the reproductive function in experimental animals and did not produced any embryotoxic and teratogenic effects.

  2. Activation of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Induces Depotentiation in Amygdala Slices and Reduces Fear-Potentiated Startle in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Ho; Lee, Chia-Ching; Huang, Ya-Chun; Wang, Su-Jane; Gean, Po-Wu

    2005-01-01

    There is a close correlation between long-term potentiation (LTP) in the synapses of lateral amygdala (LA) and fear conditioning in animals. We predict that reversal of LTP (depotentiation) in this area of the brain may ameliorate conditioned fear. Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) with DCG-IV induces…

  3. Activation of Group II Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Induces Depotentiation in Amygdala Slices and Reduces Fear-Potentiated Startle in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Ho; Lee, Chia-Ching; Huang, Ya-Chun; Wang, Su-Jane; Gean, Po-Wu

    2005-01-01

    There is a close correlation between long-term potentiation (LTP) in the synapses of lateral amygdala (LA) and fear conditioning in animals. We predict that reversal of LTP (depotentiation) in this area of the brain may ameliorate conditioned fear. Activation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR II) with DCG-IV induces…

  4. Synaptic glutamate spillover due to impaired glutamate uptake mediates heroin relapse.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao-wei; Scofield, Michael D; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W

    2014-04-16

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration.

  5. Synaptic Glutamate Spillover Due to Impaired Glutamate Uptake Mediates Heroin Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Scofield, Michael D.; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration. PMID:24741055

  6. Glutamate ameliorates experimental vincristine neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Boyle, F M; Wheeler, H R; Shenfield, G M

    1996-10-01

    The dose-limiting toxicity of the chemotherapeutic agent vincristine is peripheral neuropathy, for which there is no established therapy. The amino acid glutamate has been proposed as a neuroprotectant for vincristine, but a full preclinical evaluation of its efficacy, safety and mechanism of action has been hampered by a lack of suitable animal models. We report the development of a Dark Agouti rat model of sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, to investigate the neurotoxicity of cytotoxic drugs. Neuropathy was manifested as gait disturbance in 100% of vincristine-treated animals (n = 12), significant elevation of the tail-flick threshold (5.1 +/- 2 sec) and significantly impaired mean Rotarod times (55 +/- 41 sec) developing after administration of 1.5 mg/kg vincristine over 2 weeks. Among vincristine-treated animals supplemented p.o. with sodium glutamate (500 mg/kg/day in drinking water) from 24 hr before vincristine treatment, only one (8%, P = .01) developed gait disturbance, the tall-flick threshold was not significantly different from controls and the mean Rotarod score was 188 +/- 18 sec (P = .004). Glutamate thus significantly protected against both sensory and motor neuropathy. We observed no intrinsic neurotoxicity with glutamate and no interference with the cytotoxic efficacy of vincristine against a transplantable rat mammary adenocarcinoma grown s.c. in Dark Agouti rats. Our findings suggest that glutamate is likely to be a safe and effective neuroprotectant for patients receiving vincristine, and it warrants further clinical evaluation. The mechanism of this selective neuroprotection by glutamate remains to be elucidated. Our rat model may be of use in determining whether glutamate offers protection from other neurotoxic drugs.

  7. The Neuroprotective Effect of Dark Chocolate in Monosodium Glutamate-Induced Nontransgenic Alzheimer Disease Model Rats: Biochemical, Behavioral, and Histological Studies.

    PubMed

    Madhavadas, Sowmya; Kapgal, Vijaya Kumar; Kutty, Bindu M; Subramanian, Sarada

    2016-01-01

    The vulnerability to oxidative stress and cognitive decline continue to increase during both normal and pathological aging. Dietary changes and sedentary life style resulting in mid-life obesity and type 2 diabetes, if left uncorrected, further add to the risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer disease (AD) in the later stages of life. Certain antioxidant agents such as dietary polyphenols, taken in adequate quantities, have been suggested to improve the cognitive processes. In this study, we examined the effect of oral administration of dark chocolate (DC) containing 70% cocoa solids and 4% total polyphenol content for three months at a dose of 500 mg/Kg body weight per day to 17-month-old monosodium glutamate treated obese Sprague-Dawley rats, earlier characterized as a nontransgenic AD (NTAD) rat model after reversal of obesity, diabetes, and consequent cognitive impairments. The results demonstrated that DC reduced the hyperglycemia, inhibited the cholinesterase activity in the hippocampal tissue homogenates, and improved the cognitive performance in spatial memory related Barnes maze task. Histological studies revealed an increase in cell volume in the DC treated rats in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. These findings demonstrated the benefits of DC in enhancing cognitive function and cholinergic activity in the hippocampus of the aged NTAD rats while correcting their metabolic disturbances.

  8. Effects of chronic dietary exposure to monosodium glutamate on feeding behavior, adiposity, gastrointestinal motility, and cardiovascular function in healthy adult rats.

    PubMed

    López-Miranda, V; Soto-Montenegro, M L; Uranga-Ocio, J A; Vera, G; Herradón, E; González, C; Blas, C; Martínez-Villaluenga, M; López-Pérez, A E; Desco, M; Abalo, R

    2015-11-01

    Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is a flavor-enhancer widely used as a food additive. However, its safe dietary concentration and its toxicity, including its possible implication in the recent metabolic syndrome pandemia, is still a controversial issue. Therefore, a deep knowledge of its effects upon regular dietary use is needed. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of chronic exposure to MSG on feeding behavior, abdominal fat, gastrointestinal motility, and cardiovascular function in rats. Two groups of adult male Wistar rats were used: control and treated with MSG (4 g/L in drinking water) for 6 weeks. Different functional parameters were determined and the histological structure was analyzed in tissues of interest. Compared to control animals, chronic MSG increased water intake but did not modify food ingestion or body weight gain. Neither the abdominal fat volume nor the fat fraction, measured by magnetic resonance imaging, was modified by MSG. Monosodium glutamate did not alter general gastrointestinal motility, but significantly increased the colonic response to mechanical stimulation. It slightly reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation in aorta, without significantly modifying any other cardiovascular parameters. No significant histological alterations were detected in salivary glands, intestinal wall, aorta, heart, and kidney. Chronic treatment with MSG in the adult rat increased water intake. This supports its potential to improve acceptance of low-fat regimens and to increase hydration in the elderly and sportspeople, often at risk of dehydration. Changes in colonic contractility and cardiovascular function could have some long-term repercussions warranting further research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effects of ceftriaxone on chronic ethanol consumption: a potential role for xCT and GLT1 modulation of glutamate levels in male P rats.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S S; Sari, Youssef

    2014-09-01

    Alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission have been suggested to affect many aspects of neuroplasticity associated with alcohol/drug addiction. We have previously shown that ceftriaxone, a β-lactam antibiotic known to upregulate glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1), reduced ethanol intake after 5 weeks of free choice ethanol drinking paradigm in male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. Evidence suggests that differential effects involving alterations of glutamatergic neurotransmission occur after long-term ethanol consumption. In this study, we tested whether the efficacy of administration of ceftriaxone persists after 14 weeks of free access to 15 and 30 % ethanol in male P rats. After 14 weeks of ethanol consumption, male P rats were administered ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) or saline vehicle for 5 days. We found that ceftriaxone treatment resulted in a significant reduction in ethanol intake starting from day 2 (48 h after the first i.p. injections of ceftriaxone) through day 14, 10 days after final injection. Western blot analysis of brain samples from animals euthanized 24 h after treatment with the last dose of ceftriaxone revealed a significant upregulation of cystine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) and GLT1 levels in prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala as compared to saline vehicle-treated group. These findings demonstrated the effectiveness of ceftriaxone in attenuating ethanol intake in a chronic consumption paradigm. These might be due in part through the upregulation of both xCT and GLT1 levels in brain reward regions. Thus, the drug has a potential therapeutic action for the treatment of alcohol dependence.

  10. Effects of ceftriaxone on chronic ethanol consumption: a potential role for xCT and GLT1 modulation of glutamate levels in male P rats

    PubMed Central

    Rao, P.S.S.; Sari, Youssef

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission have been suggested to affect many aspects of neuroplasticity associated with alcohol/drug addiction. We have previously shown that ceftriaxone, a β-lactam antibiotic known to upregulate glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1), reduced ethanol intake after five weeks of free-choice ethanol drinking paradigm in male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. Evidence suggests that differential effects involving alterations of glutamatergic neurotransmission occur after long term ethanol consumption. In this study, we tested whether the efficacy of administration of ceftriaxone persists after 14 weeks of free access to 15% and 30 % ethanol in male P rats. After 14 weeks of ethanol consumption, male P rats were administered ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline vehicle for five days. We found that ceftriaxone treatment resulted in a significant reduction in ethanol intake starting from Day 2 (48 hours after the first i.p. injections of ceftriaxone) through Day 14, 10 days after final injection. Western blot analysis of brain samples from animals euthanized 24 h after treatment with the last dose of ceftriaxone revealed a significant upregulation of cystine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) and GLT1 levels in prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens and amygdala as compared to saline vehicle-treated group. These findings demonstrated the effectiveness of ceftriaxone in attenuating ethanol intake in a chronic consumption paradigm. These might be due in part through upregulation of both xCT and GLT1 levels in brain reward regions. Thus, the drug has a potential therapeutic action for the treatment of alcohol dependence. PMID:24535561

  11. Changes in the expression level of MAPK pathway components induced by monosodium glutamate-administration produce neuronal death in the hippocampus from neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Martha Catalina Rivera; Basulto, José Jaime Jarero; Velasco, Alfredo Ignacio Feria; Zárate, Carlos Beas; Meza, Mónica Navarro; López, Mariana Berenice González; Cabrera, Graciela Gudiño; Rodríguez, Julio Cesar García

    2017-09-24

    Excessive Glutamate (Glu) release may trigger excitotoxic cellular death by the activation of intracellular signaling pathways that transduce extracellular signals to the cell nucleus, which determines the onset of a death program. One such signaling pathway is the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), which is involved in both survival and cell death. Experimental evidences from the use of specific inhibitors supports the participation of some MAPK pathway components in the excitotoxicity mechanism, but the complete process of this activation, which terminates in cell damage and death, is not clearly understood. In the present work, we investigated the changes in the expression level of some MAPK-pathway components in hippocampal excitotoxic cell death in the neonatal rats using an experimental model of subcutaneous monosodium glutamate (MSG) administration on postnatal days (PD) 1, 3, 5 and 7. Data were collected at different ages through PD 14. Cell viability was evaluated using fluorescein diacetate mixed with propidium iodide (FDA-PI), and the Nissl-staining technique was used to evaluate histological damage. Transcriptional changes were also investigated in 98 components of the MAPK pathway that are associated with cell damage. These results are an evidence of that repetitive use of MSG, in neonatal rats, induces cell damage-associated transcriptional changes of MAPK components, that might reflect a differential stage of both biochemical and molecular brain maturation. This work also suggests that some of the proteins evaluated such as phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb) protein, which was up-regulated, could regulate the response to excitotoxic through modulation of the process of re-entry into the cell cycle in the hippocampus of rats treated with MSG. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prenatal chronic mild stress induces depression-like behavior and sex-specific changes in regional glutamate receptor expression patterns in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Ma, Y; Hu, J; Cheng, W; Jiang, H; Zhang, X; Li, M; Ren, J; Li, X

    2015-08-20

    Chronic stress during critical periods of human fetal brain development is associated with cognitive, behavioral, and mood disorders in later life. Altered glutamate receptor (GluR) expression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of stress-dependent disorders. To test whether prenatal chronic mild stress (PCMS) enhances offspring's vulnerability to stress-induced behavioral and neurobiological abnormalities and if this enhanced vulnerability is sex-dependent, we measured depression-like behavior in the forced swimming test (FST) and regional changes in GluR subunit expression in PCMS-exposed adult male and female rats. Both male and female PCMS-exposed rats exhibited stronger depression-like behavior than controls. Males and females exhibited unique regional changes in GluR expression in response to PCMS alone, FST alone (CON-FST), and PCMS with FST (PCMS-FST). In females, PCMS alone did not alter N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) or metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) expression, while in PCMS males, higher mGluR2/3, mGluR5, and NR1 expression levels were observed in the prefrontal cortex. In addition, PCMS altered the change in GluR expression induced by acute stress (the FST test), and this too was sex-specific. Male PCMS-FST rats expressed significantly lower mGluR5 levels in the hippocampus, lower mGluR5, NR1, postsynaptic density protein (PSD)95, and higher mGluR2/3 in the prefrontal cortex, and higher mGluR5 and PSD95 in the amygdala than male CON-FST rats. Female PCMS-FST rats expressed lower NR1 in the hippocampus, lower NR2B and PSD95 in the prefrontal cortex, lower mGluR2/3 in the amygdala, and higher PSD95 in the amygdala than female CON-FST rats. PCMS may increase the offspring's vulnerability to depression by altering sex-specific stress-induced changes in glutamatergic signaling.

  13. Endogenous interleukin-1β in neuropathic rats enhances glutamate release from the primary afferents in the spinal dorsal horn through coupling with presynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xisheng; Weng, Han-Rong

    2013-10-18

    Excessive activation of glutamate receptors and overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the spinal dorsal horn, are key mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which endogenous IL-1β alters glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with neuropathic pain induced by ligation of the L5 spinal nerve. We demonstrated that endogenous IL-1β in neuropathic rats enhances glutamate release from the primary afferent terminals and non-NMDA glutamate receptor activities in postsynaptic neurons in the spinal dorsal horn. Myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) is a mediator used by IL-1β to enhance non-NMDA glutamate receptor activities in postsynaptic neurons in the spinal dorsal horn. Presynaptic NMDA receptors are effector receptors used by the endogenous IL-1β to enhance glutamate release from the primary afferents in neuropathic rats. This is further supported by the fact that NMDA currents recorded from small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion of normal rats are potentiated by exogenous IL-1β. Furthermore, we provided evidence that functional coupling between IL-1β receptors and presynaptic NMDA receptors at the primary afferent terminals is mediated by the neutral sphingomyelinase/ceramide signaling pathway. Hence, functional coupling between IL-1β receptors and presynaptic NMDA receptors at the primary afferent terminals is a crucial mechanism leading to enhanced glutamate release and activation of non-NMDA receptors in the spinal dorsal horn neurons in neuropathic pain conditions. Interruption of such functional coupling could be an effective approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  14. Endogenous Interleukin-1β in Neuropathic Rats Enhances Glutamate Release from the Primary Afferents in the Spinal Dorsal Horn through Coupling with Presynaptic N-Methyl-d-aspartic Acid Receptors*♦

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xisheng; Weng, Han-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Excessive activation of glutamate receptors and overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the spinal dorsal horn, are key mechanisms underlying the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which endogenous IL-1β alters glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the spinal dorsal horn in rats with neuropathic pain induced by ligation of the L5 spinal nerve. We demonstrated that endogenous IL-1β in neuropathic rats enhances glutamate release from the primary afferent terminals and non-NMDA glutamate receptor activities in postsynaptic neurons in the spinal dorsal horn. Myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) is a mediator used by IL-1β to enhance non-NMDA glutamate receptor activities in postsynaptic neurons in the spinal dorsal horn. Presynaptic NMDA receptors are effector receptors used by the endogenous IL-1β to enhance glutamate release from the primary afferents in neuropathic rats. This is further supported by the fact that NMDA currents recorded from small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion of normal rats are potentiated by exogenous IL-1β. Furthermore, we provided evidence that functional coupling between IL-1β receptors and presynaptic NMDA receptors at the primary afferent terminals is mediated by the neutral sphingomyelinase/ceramide signaling pathway. Hence, functional coupling between IL-1β receptors and presynaptic NMDA receptors at the primary afferent terminals is a crucial mechanism leading to enhanced glutamate release and activation of non-NMDA receptors in the spinal dorsal horn neurons in neuropathic pain conditions. Interruption of such functional coupling could be an effective approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:24003233

  15. Permeation and block of rat GluR6 glutamate receptor channels by internal and external polyamines.

    PubMed Central

    Bähring, R; Bowie, D; Benveniste, M; Mayer, M L

    1997-01-01

    1. Polyamine block of rat GluR6(Q) glutamate receptor channels was studied in outside-out patches from transiently transfected HEK 293 cells. With symmetrical 150 mM Na+ and 30 microM internal spermine there was biphasic voltage dependence with 95% block at +40 mV but only 20% block at +140 mV. Dose-inhibition analysis for external spermine also revealed biphasic block; the Kd at +40 mV (54 microM) was lower than at +80 (167 microM) and -80 mV (78 microM). 2. For internal polyamines relief from block was most pronounced for spermine, weaker for N-(4-hydroxyphenylpropanoyl)-spermine (PPS), and virtually absent for philanthotoxin 343 (PhTX 343), suggesting that permeation of polyamines varies with cross-sectional width (spermine, 0.44 nm; PPS, 0.70 nm; PhTX 343, 0.75 nm). 3. With putrescine, spermidine, or spermine as sole external cations, inward currents at -120 mV confirmed permeation of polyamines. For bi-ionic conditions with 90 mM polyamine and 150 mM Na+i, reversal potentials were -12.4 mV for putrescine (permeability ratio relative to Na+, PPut/PNa = 0.42) and -32.7 mV for spermidine (PSpd/PNa = 0.07). Currents carried by spermine were too small to analyse accurately in the majority of patches. 4. Increasing [Na+]i from 44 to 330 mM had no effect on the potential for 50% block (V1/2) by 30 microM internal spermine; however, relief from block at positive membrane potentials increased with [Na+]i. In contrast, raising [Na+]o from 44 to 330 mM resulted in a depolarizing shift in V1/2, indicating a strong interaction between internal polyamines and external permeant ions. 5. The Woodhull infinite barrier model of ion channel block adequately described the action of spermine at membrane potentials insufficient to produce relief from block. For 30 microM internal spermine such analysis gave Kd(O) = 2.5 microM, z theta = 1.97; block by 30 microM external spermine was weaker and less voltage dependent (Kd(O) = 37.8 microM and z delta = 0.55); delta and theta are

  16. Knockdown of spinal metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) alleviates pain and restores opioid efficacy after nerve injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fundytus, Marian E; Yashpal, Kiran; Chabot, Jean-Guy; Osborne, Michael G; Lefebvre, Celeste D; Dray, Andy; Henry, James L; Coderre, Terence J

    2001-01-01

    Nerve injury often produces long-lasting spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia that are refractory to treatment, being only partially relieved by clinical analgesics, and often insensitive to morphine. With the aim of assessing its therapeutic potential, we examined the effect of antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of spinal metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) in neuropathic rats. We chronically infused rats intrathecally with either vehicle, or 50 μg day−1 antisense or missense oligonucleotides beginning either 3 days prior to or 5 days after nerve injury. Cold, heat and mechanical sensitivity was assessed prior to any treatment and again every few days after nerve injury. Here we show that knockdown of mGluR1 significantly reduces cold hyperalgesia, heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in the ipsilateral (injured) hindpaw of neuropathic rats. Moreover, we show that morphine analgesia is reduced in neuropathic rats, but not in sham-operated rats, and that knockdown of mGluR1 restores the analgesic efficacy of morphine. We also show that neuropathic rats are more sensitive to the excitatory effects of intrathecally injected N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), and have elevated protein kinase C (PKC) activity in the spinal cord dorsal horn, two effects that are reversed by knockdown of mGluR1. These results suggest that activity at mGluR1 contributes to neuropathic pain through interactions with spinal NMDA receptors and PKC, and that knockdown of mGluR1 may be a useful therapy for neuropathic pain in humans, both to alleviate pain directly, and as an adjunct to opioid analgesic treatment. PMID:11156596

  17. Extrasynaptic glutamate release through cystine/glutamate antiporter contributes to ischemic damage

    PubMed Central

    Soria, Federico N.; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Martin, Abraham; Gona, Kiran Babu; Llop, Jordi; Szczupak, Boguslaw; Chara, Juan Carlos; Matute, Carlos; Domercq, María

    2014-01-01

    During brain ischemia, an excessive release of glutamate triggers neuronal death through the overactivation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs); however, the underlying pathways that alter glutamate homeostasis and whether synaptic or extrasynaptic sites are responsible for excess glutamate remain controversial. Here, we monitored ischemia-gated currents in pyramidal cortical neurons in brain slices from rodents in response to oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) as a real-time glutamate sensor to identify the source of glutamate release and determined the extent of neuronal damage. Blockade of excitatory amino acid transporters or vesicular glutamate release did not inhibit ischemia-gated currents or neuronal damage after OGD. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of the cystine/glutamate antiporter dramatically attenuated ischemia-gated currents and cell death after OGD. Compared with control animals, mice lacking a functional cystine/glutamate antiporter exhibited reduced anoxic depolarization and neuronal death in response to OGD. Furthermore, glutamate released by the cystine/glutamate antiporter activated extrasynaptic, but not synaptic, NMDARs, and blockade of extrasynaptic NMDARs reduced ischemia-gated currents and cell damage after OGD. Finally, PET imaging showed increased cystine/glutamate antiporter function in ischemic rats. Altogether, these data suggest that cystine/glutamate antiporter function is increased in ischemia, contributing to elevated extracellular glutamate concentration, overactivation of extrasynaptic NMDARs, and ischemic neuronal death. PMID:25036707

  18. Stimulation of dopamine D4 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of male rats induces hyperphagia: involvement of glutamate.

    PubMed

    Tejas-Juárez, Juan Gabriel; Cruz-Martínez, Ana María; López-Alonso, Verónica Elsa; García-Iglesias, Brenda; Mancilla-Díaz, Juan Manuel; Florán-Garduño, Benjamín; Escartín-Pérez, Rodrigo Erick

    2014-06-22

    Obesity is a serious worldwide health problem, affecting 20-40% of the population in several countries. According to animal models, obesity is related to changes in the expression of proteins that control energy homeostasis and in neurotransmission associated to regulation of food intake. For example, it has been reported that diet-induced obesity produces overexpression of dopamine D4 receptor (D4R) mRNA in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) of mice. Neurons in the VMH send dense glutamatergic projections to other hypothalamic regions as the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), where multiple signals are integrated to finely regulate energy homeostasis and food intake. Although it is well established that dopaminergic transmission in the hypothalamus plays a key role in modulating feeding, the specific mechanisms involved in the activation of D4R in the PVN and its modulatory action on glutamate release and feeding behavior have remained unexplored. To fill this gap, we characterize the behavioral and neurochemical role of D4R in the PVN. In behavioral experiments, we examined the effects of activation of dopamine D4 receptors in the PVN on food intake and on the behavioral satiety sequence in rats exposed to a food-restricted feeding program. In vitro experiments were conducted to study the effects of activation of dopamine D4 receptors on [(3)H]glutamate release and on plasma corticosterone in explants of the PVN. We found that activation of D4R in the PVN induced inhibition of glutamate release and stimulated food intake by inhibiting satiety. Furthermore, activation of D4R in the PVN decreased plasma levels of corticosterone, and this effect was reverted by NMDA. According to our findings, D4R in the PVN may be a target for the pharmacotherapy for obesity as well as eating disorder patients who show restrictive patterns and overweight. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Contrasting changes in extracellular dopamine and glutamate along the rostrocaudal axis of the anterior cingulate cortex of the rat following an acute d-amphetamine or dopamine challenge

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Elizabeth S.; Heal, David J.; Clare Stanford, S.

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence for functional specificity of subregions along the rostrocaudal axis of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The subregion-specific distribution of dopaminergic afferents and glutamatergic efferents along the ACC make these obvious candidates for coding such regional responses. We investigated this possibility using microdialysis in freely-moving rats to compare changes in extracellular dopamine and glutamate in the rostral (‘rACC': Cg1 and Cg3 (prelimbic area)) and caudal (‘cACC’: Cg1 and Cg2) ACC induced by systemic or local administration of d-amphetamine. Systemic administration of d-amphetamine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a transient increase in extracellular dopamine in the rACC, but an apparent increase in the cACC of the same animals was less clearly defined. Local infusion of d-amphetamine increased dopamine efflux in the rACC, only. Glutamate efflux in the rACC was increased by local infusion of dopamine (5–50 μM), which had negligible effect in the cACC, but only systemic administration of d-amphetamine increased glutamate efflux and only in the cACC. The asymmetry in the neurochemical responses within the rACC and cACC, to the same experimental challenges, could help explain why different subregions are recruited in the response to specific environmental and somatosensory stimuli and should be taken into account when studying the regulation of neurotransmission in the ACC. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled ‘CNS Stimulants’. PMID:24747182

  20. SDF-1α/CXCL12 enhances GABA and glutamate synaptic activity at serotonin neurons in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Heinisch, Silke; Kirby, Lynn G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) system has a well-characterized role in depression. Recent reports describe comorbidities of mood-immune disorders, suggesting an immunological component may contribute to the pathogenesis of depression as well. Chemokines, immune proteins which mediate leukocyte trafficking, and their receptors are widely distributed in the brain, mediate neuronal patterning, and modulate various neuropathologies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neuroanatomical relationship and functional impact of the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1α/CXCL12 and its receptor, CXCR4, on the serotonin dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) system in the rat using anatomical and electrophysiological techniques. Immunohistochemical analysis indicates that over 70% of 5-HT neurons colocalize with CXCL12 and CXCR4. At a subcellular level, CXCL12 localizes throughout the cytoplasm whereas CXCR4 concentrates to the outer membrane and processes of 5-HT neurons. CXCL12 and CXCR4 also colocalize on individual DRN cells. Furthermore, electrophysiological studies demonstrate CXCL12 depolarization of 5-HT neurons indirectly via glutamate synaptic inputs. CXCL12 also enhances the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory and excitatory postsynaptic currents (sIPSC and sEPSC). CXCL12 concentration-dependently increases evoked IPSC amplitude and decreases evoked IPSC paired-pulse ratio selectively in 5-HT neurons, effects blocked by the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. These data indicate presynaptic enhancement of GABA and glutamate release at 5-HT DRN neurons by CXCL12. Immunohistochemical analysis further shows CXCR4 localization to DRN GABA neurons, providing an anatomical basis for CXCL12 effects on GABA release. Thus, CXCL12 indirectly modulates 5-HT neurotransmission via GABA and glutamate synaptic afferents. Future therapies targeting CXCL12 and other chemokines may treat serotonin related mood disorders, particularly depression experienced by immune

  1. Topical dura mater application of CFA induces enhanced expression of c-fos and glutamate in rat trigeminal nucleus caudalis: attenuated by KYNA derivate (SZR72).

    PubMed

    Lukács, M; Warfvinge, K; Tajti, J; Fülöp, F; Toldi, J; Vécsei, L; Edvinsson, L

    2017-12-01

    Migraine is a debilitating neurological disorder where trigeminovascular activation plays a key role. We have previously reported that local application of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) onto the dura mater caused activation in rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) which was abolished by a systemic administration of kynurenic acid (KYNA) derivate (SZR72). Here, we hypothesize that this activation may extend to the trigeminal complex in the brainstem and is attenuated by treatment with SZR72. Activation in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) and the trigeminal tract (Sp5) was achieved by application of CFA onto the dural parietal surface. SZR72 was given intraperitoneally (i.p.), one dose prior CFA deposition and