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Sample records for glutathione s-conjugate hydrolysis1woa

  1. Biliary transport of glutathione S-conjugate by rat liver canalicular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Inoue, M; Akerboom, T P; Sies, H; Kinne, R; Thao, T; Arias, I M

    1984-04-25

    Transport of S-dinitrophenyl glutathione, a model compound of glutathione S-conjugates, was studied in isolated rat liver canalicular membrane vesicles by a rapid filtration technique. The membrane vesicles exhibited time-dependent uptake of [2-3H]glycine-glutathione conjugate into an osmotically sensitive intravesicular space. Inactivation of vesicle-associated gamma-glutamyltransferase by affinity labeling with L-(alpha-S,5S)-alpha-amino-3-chloro-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazole-acetic acid had no effect on the initial rate of transport. Chemical analysis revealed that the intact glutathione conjugate accounted for most vesicle-associated radioactivity, reflecting the low transferase activity in the liver and membrane vesicles. The initial rate of transport followed saturation kinetics with respect to conjugate concentrations; an apparent Km of 1.0 mM and Vmax of 1.7 nmol/mg of protein X 20 s were calculated. These results indicate that transport of the glutathione S-conjugate across the canalicular membranes is a carrier-mediated process. Sodium chloride in the transport medium could be replaced by KCl, LiCl, or choline chloride without any changes in transport activity. The rate of conjugate transport was enhanced by a valinomycin-induced K+ diffusion potential (vesicle-inside-positive). The rate of conjugate uptake was enhanced by replacing KCl in the transport medium with K gluconate, providing a less permeant anion, and was reduced by replacing KCl with KSCN, providing a more permeant anion. These data indicate that conjugate transport is electrogenic and involves the transfer of negative charge. Transport of S-dinitrophenyl glutathione was inhibited by S-benzyl glutathione, oxidized glutathione, or reduced glutathione. This transport system in canalicular membranes may function in biliary secretion of glutathione S-conjugates of xenobiotics whose synthesis in hepatocytes requires glutathione S-transferases.

  2. Glutathione S-conjugates as prodrugs to target drug-resistant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Emma E.; Dilda, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Living organisms are continuously exposed to xenobiotics. The major phase of enzymatic detoxification in many species is the conjugation of activated xenobiotics to reduced glutathione (GSH) catalyzed by the glutathione-S-transferase (GST). It has been reported that some compounds, once transformed into glutathione S-conjugates, enter the mercapturic acid pathway whose end products are highly reactive and toxic for the cell responsible for their production. The cytotoxicity of these GSH conjugates depends essentially on GST and gamma-glutamyl transferases (γGT), the enzymes which initiate the mercapturic acid synthesis pathway. Numerous studies support the view that the expression of GST and γGT in cancer cells represents an important factor in the appearance of a more aggressive and resistant phenotype. High levels of tumor GST and γGT expression were employed to selectively target tumor with GST- or γGT-activated drugs. This strategy, explored over the last two decades, has recently been successful using GST-activated nitrogen mustard (TLK286) and γGT-activated arsenic-based (GSAO and Darinaparsin) prodrugs confirming the potential of GSH-conjugates as anticancer drugs. PMID:25157234

  3. Overexpression of the Gene Encoding the Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein Results in Increased ATP-Dependent Glutathione S-Conjugate Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Michael; Meijer, Coby; Zaman, Guido J. R.; Borst, Piet; Scheper, Rik J.; Mulder, Nanno H.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Jansen, Peter L. M.

    1994-12-01

    The multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) is a 180- to 195-kDa glycoprotein associated with multidrug resistance of human tumor cells. MRP is mainly located in the plasma membrane and it confers resistance by exporting natural product drugs out of the cell. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of the MRP gene in human cancer cells increases the ATP-dependent glutathione S-conjugate carrier activity in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from these cells. The glutathione S-conjugate export carrier is known to mediate excretion of bivalent anionic conjugates from mammalian cells and is thought to play a role in the elimination of conjugated xenobiotics. Our results suggest that MRP can cause multidrug resistance by promoting the export of drug modification products from cells and they shed light on the reported link between drug resistance and cellular glutathione and glutathione S-transferase levels.

  4. Glutathione-S-conjugate transport in plants

    DOEpatents

    Rea, Philip A.; Lu, Yu-Ping; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    The invention includes an isolated DNA encoding a plant GS-X pump polypeptide and an isolated preparation of a plant GS-X pump polypeptide. Also included is an isolated preparation of a nucleic acid which is antisense in orientation to a portion or all of a plant GS-X pump gene. The invention also includes a cells, vectors and transgenic plants having an isolated DNA encoding a plant GS-X pump and methods of use thereof. In addition, the invention relates to plant GS-X pump promoter sequences and the uses thereof.

  5. Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Noctor, Graham; Queval, Guillaume; Mhamdi, Amna; Chaouch, Sejir; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione is a simple sulfur compound composed of three amino acids and the major non-protein thiol in many organisms, including plants. The functions of glutathione are manifold but notably include redox-homeostatic buffering. Glutathione status is modulated by oxidants as well as by nutritional and other factors, and can influence protein structure and activity through changes in thiol-disulfide balance. For these reasons, glutathione is a transducer that integrates environmental information into the cellular network. While the mechanistic details of this function remain to be fully elucidated, accumulating evidence points to important roles for glutathione and glutathione-dependent proteins in phytohormone signaling and in defense against biotic stress. Work in Arabidopsis is beginning to identify the processes that govern glutathione status and that link it to signaling pathways. As well as providing an overview of the components that regulate glutathione homeostasis (synthesis, degradation, transport, and redox turnover), the present discussion considers the roles of this metabolite in physiological processes such as light signaling, cell death, and defense against microbial pathogen and herbivores. PMID:22303267

  6. The photochemical thiol–ene reaction as a versatile method for the synthesis of glutathione S-conjugates targeting the bacterial potassium efflux system Kef† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Further experimental details and NMR spectra. See DOI: 10.1039/c5qo00436e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Tim; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    The thiol–ene coupling reaction is emerging as an important conjugation reaction that is suitable for use in a biological setting. Here, we explore the utility of this reaction for the synthesis of glutathione-S-conjugates (GSX) and present a general, operationally simple, protocol with a wide substrate scope. The GSX afforded are an important class of compounds and provide invaluable molecular tools to study glutathione-binding proteins. In this study we apply the diverse library of GSX synthesised to further our understanding of the structural requirements for binding to the glutathione-binding protein, Kef, a bacterial K+ efflux system, found in many bacterial pathogens. This system is vital to the survival of bacteria upon exposure to electrophiles, and plays an essential role in the maintenance of intracellular pH and K+ homeostasis. Consequently, Kef is an appealing target for the development of novel antibacterial drugs. PMID:27110363

  7. GLUTATHIONE SYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shelly C.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glutathione (GSH) is present in all mammalian tissues as the most abundant non-protein thiol that defends against oxidative stress. GSH is also a key determinant of redox signaling, vital in detoxification of xenobiotics, regulates cell proliferation, apoptosis, immune function, and fibrogenesis. Biosynthesis of GSH occurs in the cytosol in a tightly regulated manner. Key determinants of GSH synthesis are the availability of the sulfur amino acid precursor, cysteine, and the activity of the rate-limiting enzyme, glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which is composed of a catalytic (GCLC) and a modifier (GCLM) subunit. The second enzyme of GSH synthesis is GSH synthetase (GS). SCOPE OF REVIEW This review summarizes key functions of GSH and focuses on factors that regulate the biosynthesis of GSH, including pathological conditions where GSH synthesis is dysregulated. MAJOR CONCLUSIONS GCL subunits and GS are regulated at multiple levels and often in a coordinated manner. Key transcription factors that regulate the expression of these genes include NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) via the antioxidant response element (ARE), AP-1, and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). There is increasing evidence that dysregulation of GSH synthesis contributes to the pathogenesis of many pathological conditions. These include diabetes mellitus, pulmonary and liver fibrosis, alcoholic liver disease, cholestatic liver injury, endotoxemia and drug-resistant tumor cells. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE GSH is a key antioxidant that also modulates diverse cellular processes. A better understanding of how its synthesis is regulated and dysregulated in disease states may lead to improvement in the treatment of these disorders. PMID:22995213

  8. The yliA, -B, -C, and -D genes of Escherichia coli K-12 encode a novel glutathione importer with an ATP-binding cassette.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hideyuki; Koyanagi, Takashi; Izuka, Shunsuke; Onishi, Akiko; Kumagai, Hidehiko

    2005-09-01

    Glutathione protects cells and organisms from oxygen species and peroxides and is indispensable for aerobically living organisms. Moreover, it acts against xenobiotics and drugs by the formation and excretion of glutathione S conjugates. In this study, we show that the yliA, -B, -C, and -D genes of Escherichia coli K-12 encode a glutathione transporter with the ATP-binding cassette. The transporter imports extracellular glutathione into the cytoplasm in an ATP-dependent manner. This transporter, along with gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, has an important role in E. coli growth with glutathione as a sole sulfur source.

  9. Glutathione Production in Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachhawat, Anand K.; Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Kaur, Jaspreet; Kasturia, Neha; Thakur, Anil; Kaur, Hardeep; Kumar, Akhilesh; Yadav, Amit

    Glutathione, γ -glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine, is the most abundant non-protein thiol found in almost all eukaryotic cells (and in some prokaryotes). The tripeptide, which is synthesized non-ribosomally by the consecutive action of two soluble enzymes, is needed for carrying out numerous functions in the cell, most important of which is the maintenance of the redox buffer. The cycle of glutathione biosynthesis and degradation forms part of the γ -glutamyl cycle in most organisms although the latter half of the pathway has not been demonstrated in yeasts. Our current understanding of how glutathione levels are controlled at different levels in the cell is described. Several different routes and processes have been attempted to increase commercial production of glutathione using both yeast and bacteria. In this article we discuss the history of glutathione production in yeast. The current bottlenecks for increased glutathione production are presented based on our current understanding of the regulation of glutathione homeostasis, and possible strategies for overcoming these limitations for further enhancing and improving glutathione production are discussed

  10. Glutathione in cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bermudes, D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of light and O2 on glutathione production were determined. Results of light and dark studies under normal and reduced oxygen tensions were compared to determine the effect of reduction in oxygen tension on glutathione levels. The growth rate of Anacystis nidulans and concurrent production of glutathione is presented. The generation of time of Anacystis nidulans was approximately 12 hours. Results of light and dark incubation of Aphanothece halophytica dominated planktonic microbial community from Pond 4 and Anacystis nidulans under high and low oxygen tension is also presented. It appears that light grown Anacystis nidulans cells have equal amounts of glutathione while dark grown cells produce more glutathione in the presence of increased O2.

  11. Mutagenicity of the cysteine S-conjugate sulfoxides of trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene in the Ames test.

    PubMed

    Irving, Roy M; Elfarra, Adnan A

    2013-04-01

    The nephrotoxicity and nephrocarcinogenicity of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) are believed to be mediated primarily through the cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase-dependent bioactivation of the corresponding cysteine S-conjugate metabolites S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (DCVC) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (TCVC), respectively. DCVC and TCVC have previously been demonstrated to be mutagenic by the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity assay, and reduction in mutagenicity was observed upon treatment with the β-lyase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA). Because DCVC and TCVC can also be bioactivated through sulfoxidation to yield the potent nephrotoxicants S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine sulfoxide (DCVCS) and S-(1,2,2-trichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine sulfoxide (TCVCS), respectively, the mutagenic potential of these two sulfoxides was investigated using the Ames Salmonella typhimurium TA100 mutagenicity assay. The results show both DCVCS and TCVCS were mutagenic, and TCVCS exhibited 3-fold higher mutagenicity than DCVCS. However, DCVCS and TCVCS mutagenic activity was approximately 700-fold and 30-fold lower than DCVC and TCVC, respectively. DCVC and DCVCS appeared to induce toxicity in TA100, as evidenced by increased microcolony formation and decreased mutant frequency above threshold concentrations. TCVC and TCVCS were not toxic in TA100. The toxic effects of DCVC limited the sensitivity of TA100 to DCVC mutagenic effects and rendered it difficult to investigate the effects of AOAA on DCVC mutagenic activity. Collectively, these results suggest that DCVCS and TCVCS exerted a definite but weak mutagenicity in the TA100 strain. Therefore, despite their potent nephrotoxicity, DCVCS and TCVCS are not likely to play a major role in DCVC or TCVC mutagenicity in this strain.

  12. New cysteine-S-conjugate precursors of volatile sulfur compounds in bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L. cultivar).

    PubMed

    Starkenmann, Christian; Niclass, Yvan

    2011-04-13

    The objective of this study was to verify whether the volatile organic sulfur compounds recently discovered in bell pepper (Capsicum annuum, L. cultivars), such as the mercapto-ketones: 4-sulfanyl-2-heptanone and 2-sulfanyl-4-heptanone, the mercapto-alcohols: 4-sulfanyl-2-heptanol and 2-sulfanyl-4-heptanol, and heptane-2,4-dithiol, originate from their corresponding cysteine-S-conjugates. Analysis of aqueous extracts of red and green bell pepper by ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization in the positive mode (UPLC-MS ESI(+)) displayed masses corresponding to the expected cysteine-S-conjugates. To confirm this observation, four cysteine-S-conjugates were prepared as authentic samples: S-(3-hydroxy-1-methylhexyl)-L-cysteine, S-(3-hydroxy-1-propylbutyl)-L-cysteine, S-(3-oxo-1-propylbutyl)-L-cysteine, and (2R,2'R)-3,3'-(4-hydroxyheptane-2,6-diyl)bis(sulfanediyl) bis(2-aminopropanoic acid). By comparison with the fragmentation patterns and retention times of synthetic mixtures of cysteine-S-conjugate diastereoisomers, the natural occurrence of cysteine conjugates was confirmed in bell peppers. In addition, the cysteine-S-conjugates from red and green bell pepper extracts were concentrated by ion exchange chromatography and the fractions incubated with a β-lyase (apotryptophanase). The liberated thiols were concentrated by affinity chromatography, and their occurrence, detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, confirmed our predictions. Moreover, 3-sulfanyl-1-hexanol was also detected and the occurrence of S-(1(2-hydroxyethyl)butyl)-L-cysteine confirmed. A quantitative estimation based on external calibration curves, established by UPLC-MS ESI(+) in selected reaction monitoring mode, showed that cysteine-S-conjugates were present at concentrations in the range of 1 to 100 μg/kg (±20%).

  13. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by β-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by β -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively.

  14. Possible role of cysteine-S-conjugate β-lyase in species differences in cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Rieko; Nagata, Saori; Iida, Hiroko; Yamagishi, Norio; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2011-09-01

    To better understand species differences in cisplatin nephrotoxicity, we focused on renal cysteine-S-conjugate β-lyase (C-S lyase), which may play a crucial role in the metabolism of platinum (Pt)-cysteine conjugates. Aminooxyacetic acid hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor of C-S lyase, reduced renal injuries due to cisplatin in rats, suggesting involvement of C-S lyase. On day 5 following a bolus cisplatin injection, three species showed in vivo nephrotoxic potentials in the order of rats>mice=rabbits (the highest to lowest), based on body surface. The levels of renal Pt residue at the nephrotoxic dose were in order of rabbits>rats>mice. Meanwhile, the activity of endogenous (basal) mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (AST), one of the C-S lyases, in the renal cortex of naive animals was rats>mice=rabbits. In a qualitative Western blot analysis, expression of mitochondrial C-S lyase in the kidney was observed at approximately 37kDa in all five species used. In in vitro studies, the cytotoxicity of cisplatin was dependent on the expression level of C-S lyase mRNA in the respective renal cells. These results demonstrate that species differences in cisplatin nephrotoxicity are attributable to an interaction of renal Pt transition with C-S lyase activity.

  15. Characterization of Enzymes Catalyzing Transformations of Cysteine S-Conjugated Intermediates in the Lincosamide Biosynthetic Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ushimaru, Richiro; Lin, Chia-I; Sasaki, Eita; Liu, Hung-Wen

    2016-09-01

    Lincosamides such as lincomycin A, celesticetin, and Bu-2545, constitute an important group of antibiotics. These natural products are characterized by a thiooctose linked to a l-proline residue, but they differ with regards to modifications of the thioacetal moiety, the pyrrolidine ring, and the octose core. Here we report that the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzyme CcbF (celesticetin biosynthetic pathway) is a decarboxylating deaminase that converts a cysteine S-conjugated intermediate into an aldehyde. In contrast, the homologous enzyme LmbF (lincomycin biosynthetic pathway) catalyzes C-S bond cleavage of the same intermediate to afford a thioglycoside. We show that Ccb4 and LmbG (downstream methyltransferases) convert the aldehyde and thiol intermediates into a variety of methylated lincosamide compounds including Bu-2545. The substrates used in these studies are the β-anomers of the natural substrates. The findings not only provide insight into how the biosynthetic pathway of lincosamide antibiotics can bifurcate to generate different lincosamides, but also reveal the promiscuity of the enzymes involved. PMID:27431934

  16. Formation of cysteine-S-conjugates in the Maillard reaction of cysteine and xylose.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Christoph; Guntz-Dubini, Renée

    2013-11-15

    Cysteine-S-conjugates (CS-conjugates) occur in foods derived from plant sources like grape, passion fruit, onion, garlic, bell pepper and hops. During eating CS-conjugates are degraded into aroma-active thiols by β-lyases that originate from oral microflora. The present study provides evidence for the formation of the CS-conjugates S-furfuryl-l-cysteine (FFT-S-Cys) and S-(2-methyl-3-furyl)-l-cysteine (MFT-S-Cys) in the Maillard reaction of xylose with cysteine at 100°C for 2h. The CS-conjugates were isolated using cationic exchange and reversed-phase chromatography and identified by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and LC-MS(2). Spectra and LC retention times matched those of authentic standards. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that CS-conjugates are described as Maillard reaction products. Furfuryl alcohol (FFA) is proposed as an intermediate which undergoes a nucleophilic substitution with cysteine. Both FFT-S-Cys and MFT-S-Cys are odourless but produce strong aroma when tasted in aqueous solutions, supposedly induced by β -lyases from the oral microflora. The perceived aromas resemble those of the corresponding aroma-active thiols 2-furfurylthiol (FFT) and 2-methyl-3-furanthiol (MFT) which smell coffee-like and meaty, respectively. PMID:23790889

  17. Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases: Important roles in the metabolism of naturally occurring sulfur and selenium-containing compounds, xenobiotics and anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Arthur J. L.; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Niatsetskaya, Zoya V.; Pinto, John T.; Callery, Patrick S.; Villar, Maria T.; Artigues, Antonio; Bruschi, Sam A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-containing enzymes that catalyze β-elimination reactions with cysteine S-conjugates that possess a good leaving group in the β-position. The end products are aminoacrylate and a sulfur-containing fragment. The aminoacrylate tautomerizes and hydrolyzes to pyruvate and ammonia. The mammalian cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases thus far identified are enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism that catalyze β-lyase reactions as non-physiological side reactions. Most are aminotransferases. In some cases the lyase is inactivated by reaction products. The cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are of much interest to toxicologists because they play an important key role in the bioactivation (toxication) of halogenated alkenes, some of which are produced on an industrial scale and are environmental contaminants. The cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases have been reviewed in this journal previously [Cooper and Pinto, 2006]. Here we focus on more recent findings regarding: 1) the identification of enzymes associated with high-Mr cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of rat liver and kidney; 2) the mechanism of syncatalytic inactivation of rat liver mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase by the nephrotoxic β-lyase substrate S-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine (the cysteine S-conjugate of tetrafluoroethylene); 3) toxicant channeling of reactive fragments from the active site of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase to susceptible proteins in the mitochondria; 4) the involvement of cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the metabolism/bioactivation of drugs and natural products; and 5) the role of cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the metabolism of selenocysteine Se-conjugates. This review emphasizes the fact that the cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are biologically more important than hitherto appreciated. PMID:20306345

  18. Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases: important roles in the metabolism of naturally occurring sulfur and selenium-containing compounds, xenobiotics and anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Arthur J L; Krasnikov, Boris F; Niatsetskaya, Zoya V; Pinto, John T; Callery, Patrick S; Villar, Maria T; Artigues, Antonio; Bruschi, Sam A

    2011-06-01

    Cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-containing enzymes that catalyze β-elimination reactions with cysteine S-conjugates that possess a good leaving group in the β-position. The end products are aminoacrylate and a sulfur-containing fragment. The aminoacrylate tautomerizes and hydrolyzes to pyruvate and ammonia. The mammalian cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases thus far identified are enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism that catalyze β-lyase reactions as non-physiological side reactions. Most are aminotransferases. In some cases the lyase is inactivated by reaction products. The cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are of much interest to toxicologists because they play an important key role in the bioactivation (toxication) of halogenated alkenes, some of which are produced on an industrial scale and are environmental contaminants. The cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases have been reviewed in this journal previously (Cooper and Pinto in Amino Acids 30:1-15, 2006). Here, we focus on more recent findings regarding: (1) the identification of enzymes associated with high-M(r) cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions of rat liver and kidney; (2) the mechanism of syncatalytic inactivation of rat liver mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase by the nephrotoxic β-lyase substrate S-(1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethyl)-L-cysteine (the cysteine S-conjugate of tetrafluoroethylene); (3) toxicant channeling of reactive fragments from the active site of mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase to susceptible proteins in the mitochondria; (4) the involvement of cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the metabolism/bioactivation of drugs and natural products; and (5) the role of cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases in the metabolism of selenocysteine Se-conjugates. This review emphasizes the fact that the cysteine S-conjugate β-lyases are biologically more important than hitherto appreciated.

  19. A Mitochondria-Targeted Nitroxide/Hemigramicidin S Conjugate Protects Mouse Embryonic Cells Against Gamma Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Jianfei; Belikova, Natalia A.; Hoye, Adam T.; Zhao Qing; Epperly, Michael W.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Wipf, Peter; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the in vitro radioprotective effect of the mitochondria-targeted hemigramicidin S-conjugated 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (hemi-GS-TEMPO) 5-125 in {gamma}-irradiated mouse embryonic cells and adenovirus-12 SV40 hybrid virus transformed human bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B and explore the mechanisms involved in its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Cells were incubated with 5-125 before (10 minutes) or after (1 hour) {gamma}-irradiation. Superoxide generation was determined by using dihydroethidium assay, and lipid oxidation was quantitated by using a fluorescence high-performance liquid chromatography-based Amplex Red assay. Apoptosis was characterized by evaluating the accumulation of cytochrome c in the cytosol and externalization of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface. Cell survival was measured by means of a clonogenic assay. Results: Treatment (before and after irradiation) of cells with 5-125 at low concentrations (5, 10, and 20 {mu}M) effectively suppressed {gamma}-irradiation-induced superoxide generation, cardiolipin oxidation, and delayed irradiation-induced apoptosis, evaluated by using cytochrome c release and phosphatidylserine externalization. Importantly, treatment with 5-125 increased the clonogenic survival rate of {gamma}-irradiated cells. In addition, 5-125 enhanced and prolonged {gamma}-irradiation-induced G{sub 2}/M phase arrest. Conclusions: Radioprotection/mitigation by hemi-GS-TEMPO likely is caused by its ability to act as an electron scavenger and prevent superoxide generation, attenuate cardiolipin oxidation in mitochondria, and hence prevent the release of proapoptotic factors from mitochondria. Other mechanisms, including cell-cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M phase, may contribute to the protection.

  20. Cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase activity and pyridoxal phosphate binding site of onion alliin lyase.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, N; Shimomura, N; Iseki, J; Honma, M; Chiba, S; Tahara, S; Mizutani, J

    1997-08-01

    Purification of onion alliin lyase gave two fractions by cation exchange chromatography. Both fractions showed the comparable high catalytic activity of cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase with that of alliin lyase using S-(2-chloro-6-nitrophenyl)-L-cysteine and alliin, S-allyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide as substrates. All the active substrates tested with onion alliin lyase were also active to the cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase of Mucor javanicus, but the catalytic activity of the Mucor enzyme was lower for all the substrates. The pyridoxal phosphate binding site of the onion alliin lyase was identified as Lys 285 in the amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA which has been reported. This lysine was conserved in all the sequences from the alliin lyase cDNAs, while similarity was not found between the sequences around pyridoxal phosphate binding sites of both the onion alliin lyase and the Mucor cysteine-S-conjugate beta-lyase. PMID:9301115

  1. Glutathione transferases and neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Fiorile, Maria Carmela; Primavera, Alessandra; Lo Bello, Mario

    2015-03-01

    There is substantial agreement that the unbalance between oxidant and antioxidant species may affect the onset and/or the course of a number of common diseases including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Many studies suggest a crucial role for oxidative stress in the first phase of aging, or in the pathogenesis of various diseases including neurological ones. Particularly, the role exerted by glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes (Glutathione Transferases) in the nervous system appears more relevant, this latter tissue being much more vulnerable to toxins and oxidative stress than other tissues such as liver, kidney or muscle. The present review addresses the question by focusing on the results obtained by specimens from patients or by in vitro studies using cells or animal models related to Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. In general, there is an association between glutathione depletion and Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. In addition, a significant decrease of glutathione transferase activity in selected areas of brain and in ventricular cerebrospinal fluid was found. For some glutathione transferase genes there is also a correlation between polymorphisms and onset/outcome of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, there is a general agreement about the protective effect exerted by glutathione and glutathione transferases but no clear answer about the mechanisms underlying this crucial role in the insurgence of neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Comparison of inhibitory effects between acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione in human glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Nýdlová, Erika; Vrbová, Martina; Cesla, Petr; Jankovičová, Barbora; Ventura, Karel; Roušar, Tomáš

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen overdose is the most frequent cause of acute liver injury. The main mechanism of acetaminophen toxicity has been attributed to oxidation of acetaminophen. The oxidation product is very reactive and reacts with glutathione generating acetaminophen-glutathione conjugate (APAP-SG). Although this conjugate has been recognized to be generally nontoxic, we have found recently that APAP-SG could produce a toxic effect. Therefore, the aim of our study was to estimate the toxicity of purified APAP-SG by characterizing the inhibitory effect in human glutathione reductase (GR) and comparing that to the inhibitory effect of the natural inhibitor reduced glutathione. We used two types of human GR: recombinant and freshly purified from red blood cells. Our results show that GR was significantly inhibited in the presence of both APAP-SG and reduced glutathione. For example, the enzyme activity of recombinant and purified GR was reduced in the presence of 4 mm APAP-SG (with 0.5 mm glutathione disulfide) by 28% and 22%, respectively. The type of enzyme inhibition was observed to be competitive in the cases of both APAP-SG and glutathione. As glutathione inhibits GR activity in cells under physiological conditions, the rate of enzyme inhibition ought to be weaker in the case of glutathione depletion that is typical of acetaminophen overdose. Notably, however, enzyme activity likely remains inhibited due to the presence of APAP-SG, which might enhance the pro-oxidative status in the cell. We conclude that our finding could reflect some other pathological mechanism that may contribute to the toxicity of acetaminophen.

  3. Glutathione analogue sorbents selectively bind glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Castro, V M; Kelley, M K; Engqvist-Goldstein, A; Kauvar, L M

    1993-06-01

    Novel affinity sorbents for glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were created by binding glutathione (GSH) analogues to Sepharose 6B. The GSH molecule was modified at the glycine moiety and at the group attached to the sulphur of cysteine. When tested by affinity chromatography in a flow-through microplate format, several of these sorbents selectively bound GST isoenzymes. gamma E-C(Hx)-phi G (glutathione with a hexyl moiety bound to cysteine and phenylglycine substituted for glycine) specifically bound rat GST 7-7, the Pi-class isoenzyme, from liver, kidney and small intestine. gamma E-C(Bz)-beta A (benzyl bound to cysteine and beta-alanine substituted for glycine) was highly selective for rat subunits 3 and 4, which are Mu-class isoenzymes. By allowing purification of the isoenzymes under mild conditions that preserve activity, the novel sorbents should be useful in characterizing the biological roles of GSTs in both normal animal and cancer tissues.

  4. Measurement of malondialdehyde, glutathione, and glutathione peroxidase in SLE patients.

    PubMed

    Gheita, Tamer A; Kenawy, Sanaa A

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to chronic inflammation of tissues and plays a central role in immunomodulation, which may lead to autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome. Markers of oxidative damage include malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidant scavengers as glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH Px), which all correlate well with SLE disease activity. Amelioration of some clinical manifestations of SLE may be expected by targeting lipid peroxidation with dietary or pharmacological antioxidants. Here, we describe the detection of the key players of oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in SLE.

  5. Glutathione transferases: a structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Aaron

    2011-05-01

    The glutathione transferases (GSTs) are one of the most important families of detoxifying enzymes in nature. The classic activity of the GSTs is conjugation of compounds with electrophilic centers to the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), but many other activities are now associated with GSTs, including steroid and leukotriene biosynthesis, peroxide degradation, double-bond cis-trans isomerization, dehydroascorbate reduction, Michael addition, and noncatalytic "ligandin" activity (ligand binding and transport). Since the first GST structure was determined in 1991, there has been an explosion in structural data across GSTs of all three families: the cytosolic GSTs, the mitochondrial GSTs, and the membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG family). In this review, the major insights into GST structure and function will be discussed.

  6. The sequential action of a dipeptidase and a beta-lyase is required for the release of the human body odorant 3-methyl-3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol from a secreted Cys-Gly-(S) conjugate by Corynebacteria.

    PubMed

    Emter, Roger; Natsch, Andreas

    2008-07-25

    Human axillary odor is formed by the action of Corynebacteria on odorless axilla secretions. Sulfanylalkanols, 3-methyl-3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol in particular, form one key class of the odoriferous compounds. A conjugate with the dipeptide Cys-Gly has been reported as the secreted precursor for 3-methyl-3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol. Here, we confirm the Cys-Gly-(S) conjugate as the major precursor of this odorant, with lower levels of the Cys-(S) conjugate being present in axilla secretions. The enzymatic release of 3-methyl-3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol from the Cys-Gly-(S) conjugate by the axilla isolate Corynebacterium Ax20 was thus investigated. Cellular extracts of Ax20 released 3-methyl-3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol from the Cys-Gly-(S) conjugate and from the Cys-(S) conjugate, whereas the previously isolated C-S lyase of this bacterial strain was only able to cleave the Cys-(S) conjugate. o-Phenanthroline blocked the release from the Cys-Gly-(S) conjugate but did not affect cleavage of the Cys-(S) conjugate, indicating that in a first step, a metal-dependent dipeptidase hydrolyzes the Cys-Gly bond. This enzyme was purified by four chromatographic steps and gel electrophoresis, and the partial amino acid sequence was determined. The corresponding gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. It codes for a novel dipeptidase with a high affinity toward the Cys-Gly-(S) conjugate of 3-methyl-3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol. Co-incubating either the synthetic Cys-Gly-(S) conjugate or fresh axilla secretions with both the C-S lyase and the novel dipeptidase did release 3-methyl-3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, proving that the sequential action of these two enzymes from the skin bacterium Corynebacterium Ax20 does release the odorant from the key secreted precursor.

  7. Glutathione production by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing bifunctional glutathione synthetase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dezheng; Wang, Cheng; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important bioactive substance applied widely in pharmaceutical and food industries. Due to the strong product inhibition in the GSH biosynthetic pathway, high levels of intracellular content, yield and productivity of GSH are difficult to achieve. Recently, a novel bifunctional GSH synthetase was identified to be less sensitive to GSH. A recombinant Escherichia coli strain expressing gshF encoding the bifunctional glutathione synthetase of Streptococcus thermophilus was constructed for GSH production. In this study, efficient GSH production using this engineered strain was investigated. The cultivation process was optimized by controlling dissolved oxygen (DO), amino acid addition and glucose feeding. 36.8 mM (11.3 g/L) GSH were formed at a productivity of 2.06 mM/h when the amino acid precursors (75 mM each) were added and glucose was supplied as the sole carbon and energy source. PMID:26586402

  8. Dysregulation of Glutathione Homeostasis in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, William M.; Wilson-Delfosse, Amy L.; Mieyal, John. J.

    2012-01-01

    Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are increasingly implicated in the induction and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Friedreich’s ataxia. In this review background is provided on the steady-state synthesis, regulation, and transport of glutathione, with primary focus on the brain. A brief overview is presented on the distinct but vital roles of glutathione in cellular maintenance and survival, and on the functions of key glutathione-dependent enzymes. Major contributors to initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases are considered, including oxidative stress, protein misfolding, and protein aggregation. In each case examples of key regulatory mechanisms are identified that are sensitive to changes in glutathione redox status and/or in the activities of glutathione-dependent enzymes. Mechanisms of dysregulation of glutathione and/or glutathione-dependent enzymes are discussed that are implicated in pathogenesis of each neurodegenerative disease. Limitations in information or interpretation are identified, and possible avenues for further research are described with an aim to elucidating novel targets for therapeutic interventions. The pros and cons of administration of N-acetylcysteine or glutathione as therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases, as well as the potential utility of serum glutathione as a biomarker, are critically evaluated. PMID:23201762

  9. Kynurenine aminotransferase III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes that have cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity and can transaminate L-selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Pinto, John T; Krasnikov, Boris F; Alcutt, Steven; Jones, Melanie E; Dorai, Thambi; Villar, Maria T; Artigues, Antonio; Li, Jianyong; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2014-11-01

    Three of the four kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT I, II, and IV) that synthesize kynurenic acid, a neuromodulator, are identical to glutamine transaminase K (GTK), α-aminoadipate aminotransferase, and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, respectively. GTK/KAT I and aspartate aminotransferase/KAT IV possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. The gene for the former enzyme, GTK/KAT I, is listed in mammalian genome data banks as CCBL1 (cysteine conjugate beta-lyase 1). Also listed, despite the fact that no β-lyase activity has been assigned to the encoded protein in the genome data bank, is a CCBL2 (synonym KAT III). We show that human KAT III/CCBL2 possesses cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity, as does mouse KAT II. Thus, depending on the nature of the substrate, all four KATs possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. These present studies show that KAT III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes. This report also shows that KAT I, II, and III differ in their ability to transaminate methyl-L-selenocysteine (MSC) and L-selenomethionine (SM) to β-methylselenopyruvate (MSP) and α-ketomethylselenobutyrate, respectively. Previous studies have identified these seleno-α-keto acids as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors. Methylselenol (CH3SeH), also purported to have chemopreventive properties, is the γ-elimination product of SM and the β-elimination product of MSC catalyzed by cystathionine γ-lyase (γ-cystathionase). KAT I, II, and III, in part, can catalyze β-elimination reactions with MSC generating CH3SeH. Thus, the anticancer efficacy of MSC and SM will depend, in part, on the endogenous expression of various KAT enzymes and cystathionine γ-lyase present in target tissue coupled with the ability of cells to synthesize in situ either CH3SeH and/or seleno-keto acid metabolites. PMID:25231977

  10. Kynurenine Aminotransferase III and Glutamine Transaminase L Are Identical Enzymes that have Cysteine S-Conjugate β-Lyase Activity and Can Transaminate l-Selenomethionine*

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, John T.; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Alcutt, Steven; Jones, Melanie E.; Dorai, Thambi; Villar, Maria T.; Artigues, Antonio; Li, Jianyong; Cooper, Arthur J. L.

    2014-01-01

    Three of the four kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT I, II, and IV) that synthesize kynurenic acid, a neuromodulator, are identical to glutamine transaminase K (GTK), α-aminoadipate aminotransferase, and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, respectively. GTK/KAT I and aspartate aminotransferase/KAT IV possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. The gene for the former enzyme, GTK/KAT I, is listed in mammalian genome data banks as CCBL1 (cysteine conjugate beta-lyase 1). Also listed, despite the fact that no β-lyase activity has been assigned to the encoded protein in the genome data bank, is a CCBL2 (synonym KAT III). We show that human KAT III/CCBL2 possesses cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity, as does mouse KAT II. Thus, depending on the nature of the substrate, all four KATs possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. These present studies show that KAT III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes. This report also shows that KAT I, II, and III differ in their ability to transaminate methyl-l-selenocysteine (MSC) and l-selenomethionine (SM) to β-methylselenopyruvate (MSP) and α-ketomethylselenobutyrate, respectively. Previous studies have identified these seleno-α-keto acids as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors. Methylselenol (CH3SeH), also purported to have chemopreventive properties, is the γ-elimination product of SM and the β-elimination product of MSC catalyzed by cystathionine γ-lyase (γ-cystathionase). KAT I, II, and III, in part, can catalyze β-elimination reactions with MSC generating CH3SeH. Thus, the anticancer efficacy of MSC and SM will depend, in part, on the endogenous expression of various KAT enzymes and cystathionine γ-lyase present in target tissue coupled with the ability of cells to synthesize in situ either CH3SeH and/or seleno-keto acid metabolites. PMID:25231977

  11. Kynurenine aminotransferase III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes that have cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity and can transaminate L-selenomethionine.

    PubMed

    Pinto, John T; Krasnikov, Boris F; Alcutt, Steven; Jones, Melanie E; Dorai, Thambi; Villar, Maria T; Artigues, Antonio; Li, Jianyong; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2014-11-01

    Three of the four kynurenine aminotransferases (KAT I, II, and IV) that synthesize kynurenic acid, a neuromodulator, are identical to glutamine transaminase K (GTK), α-aminoadipate aminotransferase, and mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, respectively. GTK/KAT I and aspartate aminotransferase/KAT IV possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. The gene for the former enzyme, GTK/KAT I, is listed in mammalian genome data banks as CCBL1 (cysteine conjugate beta-lyase 1). Also listed, despite the fact that no β-lyase activity has been assigned to the encoded protein in the genome data bank, is a CCBL2 (synonym KAT III). We show that human KAT III/CCBL2 possesses cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity, as does mouse KAT II. Thus, depending on the nature of the substrate, all four KATs possess cysteine S-conjugate β-lyase activity. These present studies show that KAT III and glutamine transaminase L are identical enzymes. This report also shows that KAT I, II, and III differ in their ability to transaminate methyl-L-selenocysteine (MSC) and L-selenomethionine (SM) to β-methylselenopyruvate (MSP) and α-ketomethylselenobutyrate, respectively. Previous studies have identified these seleno-α-keto acids as potent histone deacetylase inhibitors. Methylselenol (CH3SeH), also purported to have chemopreventive properties, is the γ-elimination product of SM and the β-elimination product of MSC catalyzed by cystathionine γ-lyase (γ-cystathionase). KAT I, II, and III, in part, can catalyze β-elimination reactions with MSC generating CH3SeH. Thus, the anticancer efficacy of MSC and SM will depend, in part, on the endogenous expression of various KAT enzymes and cystathionine γ-lyase present in target tissue coupled with the ability of cells to synthesize in situ either CH3SeH and/or seleno-keto acid metabolites.

  12. Expression of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase pi in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutathione (GSH) is one of the most important agents of the antioxidant defense system of the cell because, in conjunction with the enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione S transferase pi (GSTpi), it plays a central role in the detoxification and biotransformation of chemotherapeutic drugs. This study evaluated the expression of GSH and the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes by immunohistochemistry in 30 canine mammary tumors, relating the clinicopathological parameters, clinical outcome and survival of the bitches. In an in vitro study, the expression of the genes glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC) and glutathione synthetase (GSS) that synthesize GSH and GSH-Px gene were verified by qPCR and subjected to treatment with doxorubicin, to check the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Results The immunohistochemical expression of GSH, GSH-Px and GSTpi was compared with the clinical and pathological characteristics and the clinical outcome in the bitches, including metastasis and death. The results showed that high immunoexpression of GSH was correlated to the absence of tumor ulceration and was present in dogs without metastasis (P < 0.05). There was significant correlation of survival with the increase of GSH (P < 0.05). The expression of the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes showed no statistically significant correlation with the analyzed variables (p > 0.05). The analysis of the relative expression of genes responsible for the synthesis of GSH (GCLC and GSS) and GSH-Px by quantitative PCR was done with cultured cells of 10 tumor fragments from dogs with mammary tumors. The culture cells showed a decrease in GCLC and GSS expression when compared with no treated cells (P < 0.05). High GSH immunoexpression was associated with better clinical outcomes. Conclusion Therefore, high expression of the GSH seems to play an important role in the clinical outcome of patients with mammary tumors and suggest its use as prognostic marker. The in

  13. Unusual production of glutathione in Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Todd; Newton, Gerald; Fahey, R.C.; Rawat, Mamta

    2008-01-01

    Most Actinobacteria produce mycothiol as the major thiol. In addition to mycothiol Rhodococcus AD45 generates a substantial level of glutathione possibly using genes acquired in a lateral transfer. Instead of mycothiol, Rubrobacter radiotolerans and Rubrobacter xylanophilus produce glutathione, whose synthesis appears to involve enzymes substantially different from those in other organisms. PMID:18719892

  14. Genetics Home Reference: glutathione synthetase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... PubMed Njålsson R. Glutathione synthetase deficiency. Cell Mol Life Sci. 2005 Sep;62(17):1938-45. Review. Citation on PubMed Ristoff E, Larsson A. Inborn errors in the metabolism of glutathione. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2007 Mar 30;2:16. Review. Citation on PubMed or ...

  15. Glutathione, glutathione-related enzymes, and oxidative stress in individuals with subacute occupational exposure to lead.

    PubMed

    Dobrakowski, Michał; Pawlas, Natalia; Hudziec, Edyta; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Agnieszka; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of subacute exposure to lead on the glutathione-related antioxidant defense and oxidative stress parameters in 36 males occupationally exposed to lead for 40±3.2days. Blood lead level in the examined population increased significantly by 359% due to lead exposure. Simultaneously, erythrocyte glutathione level decreased by 16%, whereas the activity of glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and leukocytes decreased by 28% and 10%, respectively. Similarly, the activity of glutathione-S-transferase in erythrocytes decreased by 45%. However, the activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes and leukocytes increased by 26% and 6%, respectively, whereas the total oxidant status value in leukocytes increased by 37%. Subacute exposure to lead results in glutathione pool depletion and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products; however, it does not cause DNA damage. Besides, subacute exposure to lead modifies the activity of glutathione-related enzymes. PMID:27331344

  16. Selenium, glutathione peroxidase and other selenoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    Selenium, as essential trace element, has long been associated with protein. The essentiality of selenium is partially understood as glutathione peroxidase contains an essential selenocysteine. Glutathione peroxidase has been purified from many tissues including rat liver. An estimated molecular weight of 105,000 was obtained for glutathione peroxidase by comparison to standards. A subunit size of 26,000 was obtained by SDS-gel electrophoresis. Glutathione peroxidase is not the only selenoprotein in the rat. In seven rat tissues examined, there were many different subunit sizes and change groups representing between 9 and 23 selenoproteins. Selenocysteine in glutathione peroxidase accounts for ca. 36% of the selenium in the rat. The mode of synthesis of glutathione peroxidase and the other selenoproteins is not understood. Glutathione peroxidase is strongly and reversibly inhibited by mercaptocarboxylic acids and other mercaptans, including some used as slow-acting drugs for the symtomatic treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism and chemistry of this inhibition is discussed. This inhibition may provide a link between selenium and arthritis.

  17. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Angel L.; Mena, Salvador; Estrela, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy. PMID:24212662

  18. The biological functions of glutathione revisited in arabidopsis transgenic plants with altered glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Xiang, C; Werner, B L; Christensen, E M; Oliver, D J

    2001-06-01

    A functional analysis of the role of glutathione in protecting plants from environmental stress was undertaken by studying Arabidopsis that had been genetically modified to have altered glutathione levels. The steady-state glutathione concentration in Arabidopsis plants was modified by expressing the cDNA for gamma-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase (GSH1) in both the sense and antisense orientation. The resulting plants had glutathione levels that ranged between 3% and 200% of the level in wild-type plants. Arabidopsis plants with low glutathione levels were hypersensitive to Cd due to the limited capacity of these plants to make phytochelatins. Plants with the lowest levels of reduced glutathione (10% of wild type) were sensitive to as little as 5 microM Cd, whereas those with 50% wild-type levels required higher Cd concentrations to inhibit growth. Elevating glutathione levels did not increase metal resistance. It is interesting that the plants with low glutathione levels were also less able to accumulate anthocyanins supporting a role for glutathione S-transferases for anthocyanin formation or for the vacuolar localization and therefore accumulation of these compounds. Plants with less than 5% of wild-type glutathione levels were smaller and more sensitive to environmental stress but otherwise grew normally. PMID:11402187

  19. Antioxidant action of glutathione and the ascorbic acid/glutathione pair in a model white wine.

    PubMed

    Sonni, Francesca; Clark, Andrew C; Prenzler, Paul D; Riponi, Claudio; Scollary, Geoffrey R

    2011-04-27

    Glutathione was assessed individually, and in combination with ascorbic acid, for its ability to act as an antioxidant with respect to color development in an oxidizing model white wine system. Glutathione was utilized at concentrations normally found in wine (30 mg/L), as well as at concentrations 20-fold higher (860 mg/L), the latter to afford ascorbic acid (500 mg/L) to glutathione ratios of 1:1. The model wine systems were stored at 45 °C without sulfur dioxide and at saturated oxygen levels, thereby in conditions highly conducive to oxidation. Under these conditions the results demonstrated the higher concentration of glutathione could initially provide protection against oxidative coloration, but eventually induced color formation. In the period during which glutathione offered a protective effect, the production of xanthylium cation pigment precursors and o-quinone-derived phenolic compounds was limited. When glutathione induced coloration, polymeric pigments were formed, but these were different from those found in model wine solutions without glutathione. In the presence of ascorbic acid, high concentrations of glutathione were able to delay the decay in ascorbic acid and inhibit the reaction of ascorbic acid degradation products with the wine flavanol compound (+)-catechin. However, on depletion, the glutathione again induced the production of a range of different polymeric pigments. These results highlight new mechanisms through which glutathione can offer both protection and spoilage during the oxidative coloration of a model wine. PMID:21384873

  20. Antioxidant action of glutathione and the ascorbic acid/glutathione pair in a model white wine.

    PubMed

    Sonni, Francesca; Clark, Andrew C; Prenzler, Paul D; Riponi, Claudio; Scollary, Geoffrey R

    2011-04-27

    Glutathione was assessed individually, and in combination with ascorbic acid, for its ability to act as an antioxidant with respect to color development in an oxidizing model white wine system. Glutathione was utilized at concentrations normally found in wine (30 mg/L), as well as at concentrations 20-fold higher (860 mg/L), the latter to afford ascorbic acid (500 mg/L) to glutathione ratios of 1:1. The model wine systems were stored at 45 °C without sulfur dioxide and at saturated oxygen levels, thereby in conditions highly conducive to oxidation. Under these conditions the results demonstrated the higher concentration of glutathione could initially provide protection against oxidative coloration, but eventually induced color formation. In the period during which glutathione offered a protective effect, the production of xanthylium cation pigment precursors and o-quinone-derived phenolic compounds was limited. When glutathione induced coloration, polymeric pigments were formed, but these were different from those found in model wine solutions without glutathione. In the presence of ascorbic acid, high concentrations of glutathione were able to delay the decay in ascorbic acid and inhibit the reaction of ascorbic acid degradation products with the wine flavanol compound (+)-catechin. However, on depletion, the glutathione again induced the production of a range of different polymeric pigments. These results highlight new mechanisms through which glutathione can offer both protection and spoilage during the oxidative coloration of a model wine.

  1. The antioxidant master glutathione and periodontal health

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vivek Kumar; Bains, Rhythm

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, considered to be the master antioxidant (AO), is the most-important redox regulator that controls inflammatory processes, and thus damage to the periodontium. Periodontitis patients have reduced total AO capacity in whole saliva, and lower concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) in serum and gingival crevicular fluid, and periodontal therapy restores the redox balance. Therapeutic considerations for the adjunctive use of glutathione in management of periodontitis, in limiting the tissue damage associated with oxidative stress, and enhancing wound healing cannot be underestimated, but need to be evaluated further through multi-centered randomized controlled trials. PMID:26604952

  2. New insights into the metabolism of organomercury compounds: Mercury-containing cysteine S-conjugates are substrates of human glutamine transaminase K and potent inactivators of cystathionine γ-lyase

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Christy C.; Krasnikov, Boris F.; Joshee, Lucy; Pinto, John T.; Hallen, André; Li, Jianyong; Zalups, Rudolfs K.; Cooper, Arthur J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic practices and recycling in the environment through natural processes result in release of potentially harmful levels of mercury into the biosphere. Mercury, especially organic forms, accumulates in the food chain. Mercury reacts readily with sulfur-containing compounds and often exists as a thiol S-conjugate, such as the L-cysteine (Cys)-S-conjugate of methylmercury (CH3Hg-S-Cys) or inorganic mercury (Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys). These S-conjugates are structurally similar to L-methionine and L-cystine/L-cystathionine, respectively. Bovine and rat glutamine transaminase K (GTK) catalyze transamination of sulfur-containing amino acids. Recombinant human GTK (rhGTK) has a relatively open catalytic active site, and we report here that this enzyme, like the rat and bovine enzymes, can also utilize sulfur-containing L-amino acids, including L-methionine, L-cystine, and L-cystathionine as substrates. The current study extends this list to include mercuric S-conjugates, and shows that CH3Hg-S-Cys and Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys are substrates and reversible inhibitors of rhGTK. The homocysteine S-conjugates, Hcy-S-Hg-S-Hcy and CH3Hg-S-Hcy, are also inhibitors. Finally, we show that HgCl2, CH3Hg-S-Cys and Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys are potent irreversible inhibitors of rat cystathionine γ-lyase. The present study broadens our knowledge of the biochemistry of mercury compounds by showing that Cys S-conjugates of mercury interact with enzymes that catalyze transformations of biologically important sulfur-containing amino acids. PMID:22093698

  3. New insights into the metabolism of organomercury compounds: mercury-containing cysteine S-conjugates are substrates of human glutamine transaminase K and potent inactivators of cystathionine γ-lyase.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Christy C; Krasnikov, Boris F; Joshee, Lucy; Pinto, John T; Hallen, André; Li, Jianyong; Zalups, Rudolfs K; Cooper, Arthur J L

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic practices and recycling in the environment through natural processes result in release of potentially harmful levels of mercury into the biosphere. Mercury, especially organic forms, accumulates in the food chain. Mercury reacts readily with sulfur-containing compounds and often exists as a thiol S-conjugate, such as the l-cysteine (Cys)-S-conjugate of methylmercury (CH(3)Hg-S-Cys) or inorganic mercury (Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys). These S-conjugates are structurally similar to l-methionine and l-cystine/l-cystathionine, respectively. Bovine and rat glutamine transaminase K (GTK) catalyze transamination of sulfur-containing amino acids. Recombinant human GTK (rhGTK) has a relatively open catalytic active site, and we report here that this enzyme, like the rat and bovine enzymes, can also utilize sulfur-containing l-amino acids, including l-methionine, l-cystine, and l-cystathionine as substrates. The current study extends this list to include mercuric S-conjugates, and shows that CH(3)Hg-S-Cys and Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys are substrates and reversible inhibitors of rhGTK. The homocysteine S-conjugates, Hcy-S-Hg-S-Hcy and CH(3)Hg-S-Hcy, are also inhibitors. Finally, we show that HgCl(2), CH(3)Hg-S-Cys and Cys-S-Hg-S-Cys are potent irreversible inhibitors of rat cystathionine γ-lyase. The present study broadens our knowledge of the biochemistry of mercury compounds by showing that Cys S-conjugates of mercury interact with enzymes that catalyze transformations of biologically important sulfur-containing amino acids.

  4. Glutathione Metabolism and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Smeyne, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    It has been established that oxidative stress, defined as the condition when the sum of free radicals in a cell exceeds the antioxidant capacity of the cell, contributes to the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease. Glutathione is a ubiquitous thiol tripeptide that acts alone, or in concert with enzymes within cells to reduce superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals and peroxynitrites. In this review, we examine the synthesis, metabolism and functional interactions of glutathione, and discuss how this relates to protection of dopaminergic neurons from oxidative damage and its therapeutic potential in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23665395

  5. Binding properties of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates as inhibitors and sensors for glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Téllez-Sanz, Ramiro; Mesa-Valle, Concepción; Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; García-Maroto, Federico; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; García-Fuentes, Luís

    2012-02-01

    The binding properties of two electroactive glutathione-ferrocene conjugates that consist in glutathione attached to one or both of the cyclopentadienyl rings of ferrocene (GSFc and GSFcSG), to Schistosoma japonica glutathione S-transferase (SjGST) were studied by spectroscopy fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Such ferrocene conjugates resulted to be competitive inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase with an increased binding affinity relative to the natural substrate glutathione (GSH). We found that the conjugate having two glutathione units (GSFcSG) exhibits an affinity for SjGST approximately two orders of magnitude higher than GSH. Furthermore, it shows negative cooperativity with the affinity for the second binding site two orders of magnitude lower than that for the first one. We propose that the reason for such negative cooperativity is steric since, i) the obtained thermodynamic parameters do not indicate profound conformational changes upon GSFcSG binding and ii) docking studies have shown that, when bound, part of the first bound ligand invades the second site due to its large size. In addition, voltammetric measurements show a strong decrease of the peak current upon binding of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates to SjGST and provide very similar K values than those obtained by ITC. Moreover, the sensing ability, expressed by the sensitivity parameter shows that GSFcSG is much more sensitive than GSFc, for the detection of SjGST.

  6. Role of glutathione metabolism and glutathione-related antioxidant defense systems in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robaczewska, J; Kedziora-Kornatowska, K; Kozakiewicz, M; Zary-Sikorska, E; Pawluk, H; Pawliszak, W; Kedziora, J

    2016-06-01

    The risk of developing chronic hypertension increases with age. Among others factors, increased oxidative stress is a well-recognized etiological factor for the development of hypertension. The co-occurrence of oxidative stress and hypertension may occur as a consequence of a decrease in antioxidant defense system activity or elevated reactive oxygen species generation. Glutathione is a major intracellular thiol-disulfide redox buffer that serves as a cofactor for many antioxidant enzymes. Glutathione-related parameters are altered in hypertension, suggesting that there is an association between the glutathione-related redox system and hypertension. In this review, we provide mechanistic explanations for how glutathione maintains blood pressure. More specifically, we discuss glutathione's role in combating oxidative stress and maintaining nitric oxide bioavailability via the formation of nitrosothiols and nitrosohemoglobin. Although impaired vasodilator responses are observed in S-nitrosothiol-deficient red blood cells, this potential hypertensive mechanism is currently overlooked in the literature. Here we fill in this gap by discussing the role of glutathione in nitric oxide metabolism and controlling blood pressure. We conclude that disturbances in glutathione metabolism might explain age-dependent increases in blood pressure. PMID:27511994

  7. Role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in regulation of redox-dependent processes.

    PubMed

    Kalinina, E V; Chernov, N N; Novichkova, M D

    2014-12-01

    Over the last decade fundamentally new features have been revealed for the participation of glutathione and glutathione-dependent enzymes (glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin) in cell proliferation, apoptosis, protein folding, and cell signaling. Reduced glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining cellular redox status by participating in thiol-disulfide exchange, which regulates a number of cell functions including gene expression and the activity of individual enzymes and enzyme systems. Maintaining optimum GSH/GSSG ratio is essential to cell viability. Decrease in the ratio can serve as an indicator of damage to the cell redox status and of changes in redox-dependent gene regulation. Disturbance of intracellular GSH balance is observed in a number of pathologies including cancer. Consequences of inappropriate GSH/GSSG ratio include significant changes in the mechanism of cellular redox-dependent signaling controlled both nonenzymatically and enzymatically with the participation of isoforms of glutathione transferase and glutaredoxin. This review summarizes recent data on the role of glutathione, glutathione transferase, and glutaredoxin in the regulation of cellular redox-dependent processes.

  8. Glutathione-binding site of a bombyx mori theta-class glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M D Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily plays key roles in the detoxification of various xenobiotics. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a silkworm protein belonging to a previously reported theta-class GST family. The enzyme (bmGSTT) catalyzes the reaction of glutathione with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, 1,2-epoxy-3-(4-nitrophenoxy)-propane, and 4-nitrophenethyl bromide. Mutagenesis of highly conserved residues in the catalytic site revealed that Glu66 and Ser67 are important for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTT and into the metabolism of exogenous chemical agents.

  9. Five decades with glutathione and the GSTome.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt

    2012-02-24

    Uncle Folke inspired me to become a biochemist by demonstrating electrophoresis experiments on butterfly hemolymph in his kitchen. Glutathione became the subject for my undergraduate project in 1964 and has remained a focal point in my research owing to its multifarious roles in the cell. Since the 1960s, the multiple forms of glutathione transferase (GST), the GSTome, were isolated and characterized, some of which were discovered in our laboratory. Products of oxidative processes were found to be natural GST substrates. Examples of toxic compounds against which particular GSTs provide protection include 4-hydroxynonenal and ortho-quinones, with possible links to the etiology of Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and other degenerative conditions. The role of thioltransferase and glutathione reductase in the cellular reduction of disulfides and other oxidized forms of thiols was clarified. Glyoxalase I catalyzes still another glutathione-dependent detoxication reaction. The unusual steady-state kinetics of this zinc-containing enzyme initiated model discrimination by regression analysis. Functional properties of the enzymes have been altered by stochastic mutations based on DNA shuffling and rationally tailored by structure-based redesign. We found it useful to represent promiscuous enzymes by vectors or points in multidimensional substrate-activity space and visualize them by multivariate analysis. Adopting the concept "molecular quasi-species," we describe clusters of functionally related enzyme variants that may emerge in natural as well as directed evolution.

  10. Glutathione system in young spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, S K; Arunkumar, Sundaram; Sirajudeen, K N S; Singh, H J

    2010-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) forms a part of the antioxidant system that plays a vital role in preventing oxidative stress, and an imbalance in the oxidant/antioxidant system has been linked to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The aim of this study was to investigate the status of the GSH system in the kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Components of the GSH system, including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and total GSH content, were measured in the kidneys of 4, 6, 8, 12, and 16 weeks old SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Systolic blood pressure of SHR was significantly higher from the age of 6 weeks onwards compared with age-matched WKY rats. GPx activity in the SHR was significantly lower from the age of 8 weeks onwards when compared to that in age-matched WKY rats. No significant differences were evident in the GPx-1 protein abundance, and its relative mRNA levels, GR, GST activity, and total GSH content between SHR and age-matched WKY rats. The lower GPx activity suggests of an impairment of the GSH system in the SHR, which might be due to an abnormality in its protein rather than non-availability of a cofactor. Its role in the development of hypertension in SHR however remains unclear.

  11. [Structure and functions of glutathione transferases].

    PubMed

    Fedets, O M

    2014-01-01

    Data about classification, nomenclature, structure, substrate specificity and role of many glutathione transferase's isoenzymes in cell functions have been summarised. The enzyme has been discovered more than 50 years ago. This family of proteins is updated continuously. It has very different composition and will have demand for system analysis for many years.

  12. Enzyme-catalysed conjugations of glutathione with unsaturated compounds

    PubMed Central

    Boyland, E.; Chasseaud, L. F.

    1967-01-01

    1. Rat-liver supernatant catalyses the reaction of diethyl maleate with glutathione. 2. Evidence is presented that the enzyme involved is different from the known glutathione-conjugating enzymes, glutathione S-alkyltransferase, S-aryltransferase and S-epoxidetransferase. 3. Rat-liver supernatant catalyses the reaction of a number of other αβ-unsaturated compounds, including aldehydes, ketones, lactones, nitriles and nitro compounds, with glutathione: separate enzymes may be responsible for these reactions. PMID:6035529

  13. Conjugate products of pyocyanin-glutathione reactions.

    PubMed

    Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Eri, Rajaraman

    2015-08-01

    This "Letter to the Editor" is a "gentle but purposeful rejoinder" to specific comments made in pages 36-37 of your Muller and Merrett (2015) publication regarding the data presented in our Cheluvappa et al. (2008) paper. Our rebuttal topics include the effect of oxygen on the pyocyanin-glutathione reaction, relevance of reaction-duration to pathophysiology, rationale of experiments, veracity of statements germane to molecular-structure construction, and correction of hyperbole. PMID:26079058

  14. Effect of glutathione depletion on Ifosfamide nephrotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Garimella-Krovi, Sudha; Springate, James E

    2008-09-01

    Kidney injury is an important side effect of the chemotherapeutic agent ifosfamide in humans. Previous studies have shown that treatment with ifosfamide reduces kidney glutathione and that the toxicity of ifosfamide is enhanced in glutathione-depleted renal tubule cells in vitro. In this study, we examined the effect of glutathione depletion on ifosfamide nephrotoxicity in vivo using rats treated with the glutathione-depleting agent buthionine sulfoximine. Animals received 80 mg/kg ifosfamide intraperitoneally daily for three days with or without buthionine sulfoximine in drinking water. Buthionine sulfoximine produced a significant fall in renal glutathione content but did not affect kidney function. Ifosfamide-treated rats developed low-grade glucosuria, phosphaturia and proteinuria that worsened with concomitant buthionine sulfoximine therapy. These findings indicate that glutathione depletion exacerbates ifosfamide nephrotoxicity in rats and suggest that pharmacological methods for replenishing intracellular glutathione may be effective in ameliorating ifosfamide-induced renal injury.

  15. Efflux of glutathione and glutathione complexes from human erythrocytes in response to inorganic arsenic exposure.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Deniz; Cakir, Yeliz

    2012-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate if arsenic exposure results in glutathione efflux from human erythrocytes. Arsenite significantly depleted intracellular nonprotein thiol level in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The intracellular nonprotein thiol level was decreased to 0.767 ± 0.0017 μmol/ml erythrocyte following exposure to 10 mM of arsenite for 4 h. Extracellular nonprotein thiol level was increased concomitantly with the intracellular decrease and reached to 0.481 ± 0.0005 μmol/ml erythrocyte in 4 h. In parallel with the change in extracellular nonprotein thiol levels, significant increases in extracellular glutathione levels were detected. Extracellular glutathione levels reached to 0.122 ± 0.0013, 0.226 ± 0.003, and 0.274 ± 0.004 μmol/ml erythrocyte with 1, 5, and 10 mM of arsenite, respectively. Dimercaptosuccinic acid treatment of supernatants significantly increased the glutathione levels measured in the extracellular media. Utilization of MK571 and verapamil, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 and Pgp inhibitors, decreased the rate of glutathione efflux from erythrocytes suggesting a role for these membrane transporters in the process. The results of the present study indicate that human erythrocytes efflux glutathione in reduced free form and in conjugated form or forms that can be recovered with dimercaptosuccinic acid when exposed to arsenite. PMID:22890881

  16. Deficient Glutathione in the Pathophysiology of Mycotoxin-Related Illness

    PubMed Central

    Guilford, Frederick T.; Hope, Janette

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of mycotoxin-related illness is increasing. The glutathione antioxidant and detoxification systems play a major role in the antioxidant function of cells. Exposure to mycotoxins in humans requires the production of glutathione on an “as needed” basis. Research suggests that mycotoxins can decrease the formation of glutathione due to decreased gene expression of the enzymes needed to form glutathione. Mycotoxin-related compromise of glutathione production can result in an excess of oxidative stress that leads to tissue damage and systemic illness. The review discusses the mechanisms by which mycotoxin-related deficiency of glutathione may lead to both acute and chronic illnesses. PMID:24517907

  17. Diallyl disulphide depletes glutathione in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Lemar, Katey M.; Aon, Miguel A.; Cortassa, Sonia; O’Rourke, Brian; T. Müller, Carsten; Lloyd, David

    2008-01-01

    Using two-photon scanning laser microscopy, we investigated the effect of an Allium sativum (garlic) constituent, diallyl disulphide (DADS), on key physiological functions of the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans. A short 30 min exposure to 0.5 mm DADS followed by removal induced 70% cell death (50% necrotic, 20% apoptotic) within 2 h, increasing to 75% after 4 h. The early intracellular events associated with DADS-induced cell death were monitored with two-photon fluorescence microscopy to track mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and NADH or reduced glutathione (GSH) under aerobic conditions. DADS treatment decreased intracellular GSH and elevated intracellular ROS levels. Additionally, DADS induced a marked decrease of ΔΨm and lowered respiration in cell suspensions and isolated mitochondria. In vitro kinetic experiments in cell-free extracts suggest that glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is one of the intracellular targets of DADS. Additional targets were also identified, including inhibition of a site or sites between complexes II-IV in the electron transport chain, as well as the mitochondrial ATP-synthase. The results indicate that DADS is an effective antifungal agent able to trigger cell death in Candida, most probably by eliciting oxidative stress as a consequence of thiol depletion and impaired mitochondrial function. PMID:17534841

  18. Ageing of glutathione reductase in the lens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W Z; Augusteyn, R C

    1994-07-01

    The distribution of glutathione reductase activity in concentric layers from the lens has been determined as a function of age for 16 species. Primate lenses have almost ten times the level of glutathione reductase found in other species. Comparison with the activity of hexokinase revealed that this is not due to a higher overall rate of metabolism in these lenses. By contrast, the higher activity found in bird and fish lenses reflects a higher metabolic activity in these tissues. In all species, a gradient of activity was observed with the highest specific activity in the outermost cortical fibres, decreasing to virtually no activity in the inner parts of the tissue. No alterations were found in this gradient with increasing age, other than an increase in the amount of nuclear tissue essentially devoid of activity. The maximum activity in the outer cortical fibres was the same, regardless of the age of the lens. The time taken, in different species, for the specific activity to decrease by half, was estimated from the rate of protein accumulation. This time was found to vary from a few days to several years, indicating that the decrease in activity is not due to ageing but rather, it is related to the maturation of fibre cells. These observations are discussed in terms of current concepts of lens ageing and cataract formation. PMID:7835401

  19. Manipulation of glutathione metabolism in transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Creissen, G; Broadbent, P; Stevens, R; Wellburn, A R; Mullineaux, P

    1996-05-01

    There is clear potential for the genetic manipulation of key enzymes involved in stress metabolism in transgenic plants. However, the data emerging so far from such experiments are equivocal. The detailed analysis of stress responses in progeny of primary transgenics, coupled with comparisons with control transgenic plants that do not contain the GR transgene, allows us to take into account the possible variation in response to stress associated with regeneration of plants from tissue culture. The picture that is now beginning to emerge with respect to the role of GR in stress protection is that, although there are clearly benefits to be had from overexpression of the enzymes, there is no direct correlation between enzyme levels and stress tolerance. It may be that overexpression of the cytosolic isoform (gor2) will prove to be of greater benefit. Furthermore, the types of stresses to which transgenic plants have been exposed in order to assess the consequences of oxidative stress tolerance cannot reproduce those that will experienced in field conditions. Only when plants with higher GR levels and increased glutathione synthesis capacity are grown in field trials will it be possible to make a full assessment of the benefits of engineering plants with altered glutathione metabolism. PMID:8736785

  20. Nomenclature for mammalian soluble glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt; Board, Philip G; Hayes, John D; Listowsky, Irving; Pearson, William R

    2005-01-01

    The nomenclature for human soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs) is extended to include new members of the GST superfamily that have been discovered, sequenced, and shown to be expressed. The GST nomenclature is based on primary structure similarities and the division of GSTs into classes of more closely related sequences. The classes are designated by the names of the Greek letters: Alpha, Mu, Pi, etc., abbreviated in Roman capitals: A, M, P, and so on. (The Greek characters should not be used.) Class members are distinguished by Arabic numerals and the native dimeric protein structures are named according to their subunit composition (e.g., GST A1-2 is the enzyme composed of subunits 1 and 2 in the Alpha class). Soluble GSTs from other mammalian species can be classified in the same manner as the human enzymes, and this chapter presents the application of the nomenclature to the rat and mouse GSTs. PMID:16399376

  1. Quantification of Glutathione in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel W.; Aschner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant intracellular thiol with diverse functions from redox signaling, xenobiotic detoxification, and apoptosis. The quantification of GSH is an important measure for redox capacity and oxidative stress. This protocol quantifies total GSH from Caenorhabditis elegans, an emerging model organism for toxicology studies. GSH is measured using the 5,5′-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) cycling method originally created for cell and tissue samples but optimized for whole worm extracts. DTNB reacts with GSH to from a 5′-thio-2-nitrobenzoic acid (TNB) chromophore with maximum absorbance of 412 nm. This method is both rapid and sensitive, making it ideal for studies involving a large number of transgenic nematode strains. PMID:26309452

  2. Maintenance of glutathione content is isolated hepatocyctes.

    PubMed Central

    Nińa, J; Hems, R; Krebs, H A

    1978-01-01

    1. During the standard procedure for the preparation of rat hepatocytes, about half of the cellular GSH (reduced glutathione) is lost. 2. This loss is prevented by the addition of 0.1 mM-EGTA (but no EDTA) to the perfusion medium. 3. On incubation with and without EGTA, isolated hepatocytes prepared in the presence of EGTA lose GSH. This loss is prevented by near-physiological concentrations of methionine or homocysteine, but not of cysteine. 4. Cysteine, at concentrations above 0.2 mM, causes a loss of GSH probably by non-enzymic formation of a mixed disulphide. 5. Serine together with methionine or homocystein increases GSH above the value in cells from starved rats in vivo. This is taken to suggest that cystathionine may be a cysteine donor in the synthesis of gamma-glutamylcysteine, the precursor of GSH. PMID:646804

  3. Nomenclature for mammalian soluble glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt; Board, Philip G; Hayes, John D; Listowsky, Irving; Pearson, William R

    2005-01-01

    The nomenclature for human soluble glutathione transferases (GSTs) is extended to include new members of the GST superfamily that have been discovered, sequenced, and shown to be expressed. The GST nomenclature is based on primary structure similarities and the division of GSTs into classes of more closely related sequences. The classes are designated by the names of the Greek letters: Alpha, Mu, Pi, etc., abbreviated in Roman capitals: A, M, P, and so on. (The Greek characters should not be used.) Class members are distinguished by Arabic numerals and the native dimeric protein structures are named according to their subunit composition (e.g., GST A1-2 is the enzyme composed of subunits 1 and 2 in the Alpha class). Soluble GSTs from other mammalian species can be classified in the same manner as the human enzymes, and this chapter presents the application of the nomenclature to the rat and mouse GSTs.

  4. Glutathione transferases in the bioactivation of azathioprine.

    PubMed

    Modén, Olof; Mannervik, Bengt

    2014-01-01

    The prodrug azathioprine is primarily used for maintaining remission in inflammatory bowel disease, but approximately 30% of the patients suffer adverse side effects. The prodrug is activated by glutathione conjugation and release of 6-mercaptopurine, a reaction most efficiently catalyzed by glutathione transferase (GST) A2-2. Among five genotypes of GST A2-2, the variant A2*E has threefold-fourfold higher catalytic efficiency with azathioprine, suggesting that the expression of A2*E could boost 6-mercaptopurine release and adverse side effects in treated patients. Structure-activity studies of the GST A2-2 variants and homologous alpha class GSTs were made to delineate the determinants of high catalytic efficiency compared to other alpha class GSTs. Engineered chimeras identified GST peptide segments of importance, and replacing the corresponding regions in low-activity GSTs by these short segments produced chimeras with higher azathioprine activity. By contrast, H-site mutagenesis led to decreased azathioprine activity when active-site positions 208 and 213 in these favored segments were mutagenized. Alternative substitutions indicated that hydrophobic residues were favored. A pertinent question is whether variant A2*E represents the highest azathioprine activity achievable within the GST structural framework. This issue was addressed by mutagenesis of H-site residues assumed to interact with the substrate based on molecular modeling. The mutants with notably enhanced activities had small or polar residues in the mutated positions. The most active mutant L107G/L108D/F222H displayed a 70-fold enhanced catalytic efficiency with azathioprine. The determination of its structure by X-ray crystallography showed an expanded H-site, suggesting improved accommodation of the transition state for catalysis.

  5. Glutathione peroxidase and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase in tissues of Balb/C mice

    SciTech Connect

    Spallholz, J.E.; Roveri, A.; Yan, L.; Boylan, L.M.; Kang, C.R.; Ursini, F. Univ. of Padua )

    1991-03-11

    The two selenium (Se) enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxide (PHGPx) were assayed in tissues and organ homogenates of female Balb/C mice fed torula yeast diets containing 0.008, 0.2 and 1.0 ug/g Se as selenite for nine months. GPx activity was detected in all tissues and organs whereas PHGPx activity was not detectable in lung, large intestine, eye or thymus tissue. GPx activity nearly always exceeded PHGPx activity when tissues or organs contained both enzymes irrespective of dietary Se treatment. GPx activity in tissues was generally more susceptible to the dietary Se deficiency than was PHGPx activity when expressed as a percentage of the activity found in tissues and organs of mice fed supplemented Se diets. This limited study suggests that dietary Se may be more valued in supporting PHGPx activity than GPx activity in the course of a protracted dietary Se deficiency.

  6. Substrate profiling of glutathione S-transferase with engineered enzymes and matched glutathione analogues.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shan; Zhang, Lei; Adilijiang, Gulishana; Liu, Jieyuan; Luo, Minkui; Deng, Haiteng

    2014-07-01

    The identification of specific substrates of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is important for understanding drug metabolism. A method termed bioorthogonal identification of GST substrates (BIGS) was developed, in which a reduced glutathione (GSH) analogue was developed for recognition by a rationally engineered GST to label the substrates of the corresponding native GST. A K44G-W40A-R41A mutant (GST-KWR) of the mu-class glutathione S-transferases GSTM1 was shown to be active with a clickable GSH analogue (GSH-R1) as the cosubstrate. The GSH-R1 conjugation products can react with an azido-based biotin probe for ready enrichment and MS identification. Proof-of-principle studies were carried to detect the products of GSH-R1 conjugation to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and dopamine quinone. The BIGS technology was then used to identify GSTM1 substrates in the Chinese herbal medicine Ganmaocongji.

  7. Glutathione peroxidase and catalase modulate the genotoxicity of arsenite.

    PubMed

    Wang, T S; Shu, Y F; Liu, Y C; Jan, K Y; Huang, H

    1997-09-01

    The X-ray hypersensitive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, xrs-5, are also more sensitive to sodium arsenite in terms of cell growth and micronucleus induction than CHO-K1 cells. Since reactive oxygen species are suggested to be involved in arsenic toxicity, we have measured antioxidant mechanisms in xrs-5 as well as CHO-K1 cells. There were no apparent differences in the activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase, glutathione reductase, and the levels of glutathione between xrs-5 and CHO-K1 cells. However, the activities of glutathione peroxidase and catalase were 5.4- and 5.8-fold lower, respectively, in xrs-5 cells. The addition of catalase or glutathione peroxidase to cultures reduced the arsenite-induced micronuclei in xrs-5 cells. Whereas, simultaneous treatment with mercaptosuccinate, an inhibitor of glutathione peroxidase, and 3-aminotriazole, an inhibitor of catalase, synergistically increased the arsenite-induced micronuclei. These results suggest that both catalase and glutathione peroxidase are involved in defense against arsenite genotoxicity. The xrs-6 cells, another line of x-ray hypersensitive CHO cells, which had 1.6-fold higher catalase activity and 2.5-fold higher glutathione peroxidase activity than xrs-5 cells, were also more sensitive than CHO-K1 cells but were less sensitive than xrs-5 cells to cell growth inhibition of arsenite. Moreover, a 1.6-fold increase of glutathione peroxidase activity by selenite adaptation effectively removed the arsenite-induced micronuclei in CHO-K1 cells. These results suggest that glutathione peroxidase is more important than catalase in defending against arsenite toxicity. Our results also suggest that increasing the intracellular antioxidant level may have preventive or therapeutic effects in arsenic poisoning.

  8. Quantitation of protein S-glutathionylation by liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometry: Correction for contaminating glutathione and glutathione disulfide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a posttranslational modification that links oxidative stimuli to reversible changes in cellular function. Protein-glutathione mixed disulfides (PSSG) are commonly quantified by the reduction of the disulfide and detection of the resultant glutathione species. This met...

  9. Glutathione transferase gene family from the housefly Musca domestica.

    PubMed

    Syvanen, M; Zhou, Z H; Wang, J Y

    1994-10-17

    Three new glutathione transferase (GST) genes from the housefly Musca domestica are described. These genes, identified as MdGST-2, -3, and -4, were from cDNA clones obtained from a cDNA bank in phage lambda. The bank was prepared using poly(A)+ RNA from a housefly that is highly resistant to organophosphate insecticides because of enhanced expression of multiple members of the glutathione transferase gene family. The DNA sequence of each is reported and has a complete open reading frame that specified an amino acid sequence similar to other dipteran glutathione transferases. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we can conclude that the insect glutathione transferase gene family falls into two groups, each of which evolves at a different rate, presumably due to differences in functional constraints. We show that MdGST-1 (and their homologues from Drosophila and Lucilia) evolve at a significantly slower rate than the other members of the gene family. Each housefly GST cDNA was inserted into a bacterial plasmid expression system and a glutathione transferase activity was expressed in Escherichia coli. The transcription pattern of each of these glutathione transferases was examined in a variety of different housefly strains that are known to differ in their resistance to organophosphate insecticides due to different patterns of glutathione transferase expression. We found that the level of transcription for two of our clones was positively correlated with the level of organophosphate resistance.

  10. Glutathione-dependent peroxidative metabolism in the alveolar macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Molly T.; Thomas, Catherine; Vassallo, Charles L.; Basford, R. E.; Gee, J. Bernard L.

    1971-01-01

    Phagocytosis by rabbit alveolar macrophages (AM) is accompanied by increases in O2 consumption, glucose oxidation, and H2O2 formation. Two aspects of the interrelations between these metabolic features of phagocytosis have been studied. First, the following evidence indicates that glutathione, glutathione reductase, and peroxidase serve as a cytoplasmic shuttle between H2O2 and NADPH-dependent glucose oxidation: (a) AM contain 5.9 mμmoles of reduced glutathione per 106 cells and exhibit glutathione peroxidase and NADPH-specific glutathione reductase activity; (b) oxidized glutathione potentiates NADP stimulation of glucose oxidation; (c) an artificial H2O2-generating system stimulates glucose oxidation; (d) the cell penetrating thiol inhibitor, N-ethylmaleimide diminishes glucose oxidation. This effect largely depends on inhibition of the glutathione system rather than on inhibition of either H2O2 formation or enzymes directly subserving glucose oxidation. Second, three potential H2O2-generating oxidases have been sought. No cyanide-insensitive NADH or NADPH oxidase activity could be detected. D-amino acid oxidase activity was 0.48 ±0.07 U/106 cells with D-alanine as substrate. PMID:4395562

  11. Glutamine attenuates post-traumatic glutathione depletion in human muscle.

    PubMed

    Fläring, U B; Rooyackers, O E; Wernerman, J; Hammarqvist, F

    2003-03-01

    Glutathione is quantitatively the most important endogenous scavenger system. Glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle is pronounced following major trauma and sepsis in intensive care unit patients. Also, following elective surgery, glutathione depletion occurs in parallel with a progressive decline in muscle glutamine concentration. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that glutamine supplementation may counteract glutathione depletion in a human trauma model. A homogeneous group of patients (n = 17) undergoing a standardized surgical procedure were prospectively randomly allocated to receive glutamine (0.56 g x day(-1) x kg(-1)) or placebo as part of isonitrogenous and isocaloric nutrition. Percutaneous muscle biopsies and blood samples were taken pre-operatively and at 24 and 72 h after surgery. The concentrations of muscle glutathione and related amino acids were determined in muscle tissue and plasma. In the control (unsupplemented) subjects, total muscle glutathione had decreased by 47+/-8% and 37+/-11% and reduced glutathione had decreased by 53+/-10% and 45+/-16% respectively at 24 and 72 h after surgery (P < 0.05). In contrast, in the glutamine-supplemented group, no significant post-operative decreases in total or reduced glutathione were seen following surgery. Muscle free glutamine had decreased at 72 h after surgery in both groups, by 41.4+/-14.8% (P < 0.05) in the glutamine-supplemented group and by 46.0+/-14.3% (P < 0.05) in the control group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that intravenous glutamine supplementation attenuates glutathione depletion in skeletal muscle in humans following standardized surgical trauma.

  12. The Genetic Architecture of Murine Glutathione Transferases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Houseal, M. Trevor; Mulligan, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes play a protective role against oxidative stress and may influence disease risk and drug pharmacokinetics. In this study, massive multiscalar trait profiling across a large population of mice derived from a cross between C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA2/J (D2)—the BXD family—was combined with linkage and bioinformatic analyses to characterize mechanisms controlling GST expression and to identify downstream consequences of this variation. Similar to humans, mice show a wide range in expression of GST family members. Variation in the expression of Gsta4, Gstt2, Gstz1, Gsto1, and Mgst3 is modulated by local expression QTLs (eQTLs) in several tissues. Higher expression of Gsto1 in brain and liver of BXD strains is strongly associated (P < 0.01) with inheritance of the B6 parental allele whereas higher expression of Gsta4 and Mgst3 in brain and liver, and Gstt2 and Gstz1 in brain is strongly associated with inheritance of the D2 parental allele. Allele-specific assays confirmed that expression of Gsto1, Gsta4, and Mgst3 are modulated by sequence variants within or near each gene locus. We exploited this endogenous variation to identify coexpression networks and downstream targets in mouse and human. Through a combined systems genetics approach, we provide new insight into the biological role of naturally occurring variants in GST genes. PMID:26829228

  13. Fluorescein-labeled glutathione to study protein S-glutathionylation.

    PubMed

    Landino, Lisa M; Brown, Carolyn M; Edson, Carolyn A; Gilbert, Laura J; Grega-Larson, Nathan; Wirth, Anna Jean; Lane, Kelly C

    2010-07-01

    Numerous studies of S-glutathionylation of cysteine thiols indicate that this protein modification plays a key role in redox regulation of proteins. To facilitate the study of protein S-glutathionylation, we developed a synthesis and purification to produce milligram quantities of fluorescein-labeled glutathione. The amino terminus of the glutathione tripeptide reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate readily in ammonium bicarbonate. Purification by solid phase extraction on C8 and C18 columns separated excess reactants from desired products. Both oxidized and reduced fluorescein-labeled glutathione reacted with a variety of thiol-containing proteins to yield fluorescent proteins. PMID:20156418

  14. Fluorescein-labeled glutathione to study protein S-glutathionylation.

    PubMed

    Landino, Lisa M; Brown, Carolyn M; Edson, Carolyn A; Gilbert, Laura J; Grega-Larson, Nathan; Wirth, Anna Jean; Lane, Kelly C

    2010-07-01

    Numerous studies of S-glutathionylation of cysteine thiols indicate that this protein modification plays a key role in redox regulation of proteins. To facilitate the study of protein S-glutathionylation, we developed a synthesis and purification to produce milligram quantities of fluorescein-labeled glutathione. The amino terminus of the glutathione tripeptide reacted with fluorescein isothiocyanate readily in ammonium bicarbonate. Purification by solid phase extraction on C8 and C18 columns separated excess reactants from desired products. Both oxidized and reduced fluorescein-labeled glutathione reacted with a variety of thiol-containing proteins to yield fluorescent proteins.

  15. Glutathione redox dynamics and expression of glutathione-related genes in the developing embryo

    PubMed Central

    Timme-Laragy, Alicia R.; Goldstone, Jared V.; Imhoff, Barry R.; Stegeman, John J.; Hahn, Mark E.; Hansen, Jason M.

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic development involves dramatic changes in cell proliferation and differentiation that must be highly coordinated and tightly regulated. Cellular redox balance is critical for cell fate decisions, but it is susceptible to disruption by endogenous and exogenous sources of oxidative stress. The most abundant endogenous non-protein antioxidant defense molecule is the tri-peptide glutathione (γ-glutamyl-cysteinylglycine, GSH), but the ontogeny of GSH concentration and redox state during early life stages is poorly understood. Here, we describe the GSH redox dynamics during embryonic and early larval development (0–5 days post-fertilization) in the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a model vertebrate embryo. We measured reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH, GSSG) using HPLC, and calculated the whole embryo total glutathione (GSHT) concentrations and redox potentials (Eh) over 0–120 hours of zebrafish development (including mature oocytes, fertilization, mid-blastula transition, gastrulation, somitogenesis, pharyngula, pre-hatch embryos, and hatched eleutheroembryos). GSHT concentration doubled between 12 hours post fertilization (hpf) and hatching. The GSH Eh increased, becoming more oxidizing during the first 12 h, and then oscillated around −190 mV through organogenesis, followed by a rapid change, associated with hatching, to a more negative (more reducing) Eh (−220 mV). After hatching, Eh stabilized and remained steady through 120 hpf. The dynamic changes in GSH redox status and concentration defined discrete windows of development: primary organogenesis, organ differentiation, and larval growth. We identified the set of zebrafish genes involved in the synthesis, utilization, and recycling of GSH, including several novel paralogs, and measured how expression of these genes changes during development. Ontogenic changes in the expression of GSH-related genes support the hypothesis that GSH redox state is tightly regulated early in development. This study

  16. Quantitation of protein S-glutathionylation by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: correction for contaminating glutathione and glutathione disulfide.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Michael R; Bucklin, Christopher; Picklo, Matthew J

    2015-01-15

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a posttranslational modification that links oxidative stimuli to reversible changes in cellular function. Protein-glutathione mixed disulfide (PSSG) is commonly quantified by reduction of the disulfide and detection of the resultant glutathione species. This methodology is susceptible to contamination by free unreacted cellular glutathione (GSH) species, which are present in 1000-fold greater concentration. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based method was developed for quantification of glutathione and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), which was used for the determination of PSSG in biological samples. Analysis of rat liver samples demonstrated that GSH and GSSG coprecipitated with proteins similar to the range for PSSG in the sample. The use of [(13)C2,(5)N]GSH and [(13)C4,(5)N2]GSSG validated these results and demonstrated that the release of GSH from PSSG did not occur during sample preparation and analysis. These data demonstrate that GSH and GSSG contamination must be accounted for when determining PSSG content in cellular/tissue preparations. A protocol for rinsing samples to remove the adventitious glutathione species is demonstrated. The fragmentation patterns for glutathione were determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry, and candidate ions for detection of PSSG on protein and protein fragments were identified.

  17. The content of glutathione and glutathione S-transferases and the glutathione peroxidase activity in rat liver nuclei determined by a non-aqueous technique of cell fractionation.

    PubMed Central

    Soboll, S; Gründel, S; Harris, J; Kolb-Bachofen, V; Ketterer, B; Sies, H

    1995-01-01

    Hepatocellular nuclei require glutathione, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx) for intranuclear protection against damage from electrophiles or products of active oxygen. Data so far available from the literature on nuclei isolated in aqueous systems range from glutathione, GSTs and GPx either being absent altogether to being present in quantities in excess of those in the cytoplasm. This paper describes a small-scale preparation of a nuclear fraction from rat liver by a non-aqueous technique, designed to retain nuclear water-soluble molecules in situ, since low-molecular-mass compounds can diffuse freely into other compartments during aqueous separation. This non-aqueous procedure shows the nucleus to contain glutathione at 8.4 mM and soluble GSTs at 38 micrograms/mg of protein, the enrichment over the homogenate being 1.2-1.4-fold. Se-dependent GPx activity was also present in the nucleus (56 m-units/mg), although with slightly lower activity than in the homogenate (0.7-fold). Images Figure 1 PMID:7487946

  18. Effect of glutathione during bottle storage of sparkling wine.

    PubMed

    Webber, Vanessa; Dutra, Sandra Valduga; Spinelli, Fernanda Rodrigues; Carnieli, Gilberto João; Cardozo, Alejandro; Vanderlinde, Regina

    2017-02-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) is an efficient antioxidant on limiting browning, losing varietal aromas and off-flavor formation. Therefore, this study aims to evaluate the effect of GSH addition (10, 20 and 30mgL(-1)) after the disgorging of the sparkling wine during storage. The sparkling wines were analyzed at 1, 6, 12 and 18months of storage according to the color index, concentration of the free SO2, phenolic compounds, catechin, epicatechin, caffeic acid, coumaric acid, acetaldehyde, total and reduced glutathione. The results show that GSH concentration decreased to the level of the control sparkling wine during the first 6months, and the total glutathione gradually declined up to 12months. The GSH reduces browning and acetaldehyde formation for up to 12months. However, the presence of glutathione had low or no influence on the concentration of free SO2, total phenolics, catechin, epicatechin, caffeic and coumaric acids. PMID:27596417

  19. Intracellular glutathione and cytotoxicity of platinum complexes.

    PubMed

    Pendyala, L; Creaven, P J; Perez, R; Zdanowicz, J R; Raghavan, D

    1995-01-01

    Although there have been a number of reports correlating cellular GSH levels with cytotoxicity of platinum agents, none has examined the relationship between GSH concentrations and cytotoxicity. In this study, using a highly specific HPLC method for measuring GSH and expressing GSH as concentration and also per cell number, we evaluated the correlation between GSH levels and the cytotoxicity to five agents in ten human tumor cell lines. The five platinum agents included the platinum(II) complexes cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin and platinum(IV) complexes iproplatin and tetraplatin. The correlation between intracellular GSH concentration and cytotoxicity was highly significant only for iproplatin (P = 0.002) followed by tetraplatin, which demonstrated a trend toward statistical significance (P = 0.06). Cytotoxicity of the other platinum complexes showed no relation to GSH concentration, cisplatin itself showing a P-value of 0.09. In contrast, the GSH levels normalized to cell number showed a statistically significant correlation with the cytotoxicity of four of the five platinum agents, the exception being carboplatin; the strongest correlation observed was that for iproplatin and tetraplatin. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity in these cell lines showed no correlation with cytotoxicity of any of the platinum complexes. Our results, from the analyses of both GSH concentration as well as GSH per cell number, suggest a significantly higher interaction between GSH and iproplatin compared with the other platinum agents. Moreover, our data suggest that relationships between cytotoxicity and GSH levels on a per-cell basis may not persist when differences in cell volume are taken into account.

  20. Effect of glutathione on oxymyoglobin oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiali; Faustman, Cameron; Lee, Seok; Hoagland, Thomas A

    2003-03-12

    The oxidation of oxymyoglobin (OxyMb) to metmyoglobin (MetMb) is responsible for fresh meat discoloration. Glutathione (GSH) is an important tripeptide reductant that can protect lipid and protein from oxidation. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of GSH on MetMb formation in vitro and in bovine skeletal muscle cytosol. Equine MetMb formation was greater in the presence of GSH than controls at pH 5.6 or 7.2 and 25 or 37 degrees C (p < 0.05); GSH addition to purified bovine OxyMb solution also resulted in more MetMb formation at pH 7.2 and 25 or 37 degrees C (p < 0.05). This effect on MetMb formation was partly or completely inhibited by EDTA or catalase in the GSH-equine OxyMb system (p < 0.05). The addition of GSH to bovine muscle cytosol inhibited MetMb formation at pH 5.6 or 7.2 and 4 or 25 degrees C (p < 0.05); the effect was concentration-dependent. The inhibitory effect was observed in a high molecular weight (HMW) but not low molecular weight fraction of cytosol at pH 7.2 and 25 degrees C (p < 0.05); there was no effect when HMW was heated at 90 degrees C for 15 min. These results suggest the antioxidant effect of GSH on bovine OxyMb is dependent on heat-sensitive HMW cytosolic component(s).

  1. Nanofiltration concentration of extracellular glutathione produced by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kengo; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Sazuka, Takashi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to optimize extracellular glutathione production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered strain and to concentrate the extracellular glutathione by membrane separation processes, including ultrafiltration (UF) and nanofiltration (NF). Synthetic defined (SD) medium containing 20 g L(-1) glucose was fermented for 48 h; the fermentation liquid was passed through an UF membrane to remove macromolecules. Glutathione in this permeate was concentrated for 48 h to 545.1 ± 33.6 mg L(-1) using the NF membrane; this was a significantly higher concentration than that obtained with yeast extract peptone dextrose (YPD) medium following 96 h NF concentration (217.9 ± 57.4 mg L(-1)). This higher glutathione concentration results from lower cellular growth in SD medium (final OD600 = 6.9 ± 0.1) than in YPD medium (final OD600 = 11.0 ± 0.6) and thus higher production of extracellular glutathione (16.0 ± 1.3 compared to 9.2 ± 2.1 mg L(-1) in YPD medium, respectively). Similar fermentation and membrane processing of sweet sorghum juice containing 20 g L(-1) total sugars provided 240.3 ± 60.6 mg L(-1) glutathione. Increased extracellular production of glutathione by this engineered strain in SD medium and subsequent UF permeation and NF concentration in shortend time may help realize industrial recovery of extracellular glutathione.

  2. Amodiaquine failure associated with erythrocytic glutathione in Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    Zuluaga, Lina; Pabón, Adriana; López, Carlos; Ochoa, Aleida; Blair, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Objective To establish the relationship between production of glutathione and the therapeutic response to amodiaquine (AQ) monotherapy in Plasmodium falciparum non-complicated malaria patients. Methodology Therapeutic response to AQ was evaluated in 32 patients with falciparum malaria in two townships of Antioquia, Colombia, and followed-up for 28 days. For every patient, total glutathione and enzymatic activity (glutathione reductase, GR, and γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, γ-GCS) were determined in parasitized erythrocytes, non-infected erythrocytes and free parasites, on the starting day (day zero, before ingestion of AQ) and on the day of failure (in case of occurrence). Results There was found an AQ failure of 31.25%. Independent of the therapeutic response, on the starting day and on the day of failure, lower total glutathione concentration and higher GR activities in parasitized erythrocytes were found, compared with non-infected erythrocytes (p < 0.003). In addition, only on the day of failure, γ-GCS activity of parasitized erythrocytes was higher, compared with that of healthy erythrocytes (p = 0.01). Parasitized and non-parasitized erythrocytes in therapeutic failure patients (TF) had higher total glutathione on the starting day compared with those of adequate clinical response (ACR) (p < 0.02). Parasitized erythrocytes of TF patients showed lower total glutathione on the failure day, compared with starting day (p = 0.017). No differences was seen in the GR and γ-GCS activities by compartment, neither between the two therapeutic response groups nor between the two treatment days. Conclusion This study is a first approach to explaining P. falciparum therapeutic failure in humans through differences in glutathione metabolism in TF and ACR patients. These results suggest a role for glutathione in the therapeutic failure to antimalarials. PMID:17451604

  3. Allyl isothiocyanate depletes glutathione and upregulates expression of glutathione S-transferases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Øverby, Anders; Stokland, Ragni A.; Åsberg, Signe E.; Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Bones, Atle M.

    2015-01-01

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) is a phytochemical associated with plant defense in plants from the Brassicaceae family. AITC has long been recognized as a countermeasure against external threats, but recent reports suggest that AITC is also involved in the onset of defense-related mechanisms such as the regulation of stomatal aperture. However, the underlying cellular modes of action in plants remain scarcely investigated. Here we report evidence of an AITC-induced depletion of glutathione (GSH) and the effect on gene expression of the detoxification enzyme family glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Treatment of A. thaliana wild-type with AITC resulted in a time- and dose-dependent depletion of cellular GSH. AITC-exposure of mutant lines vtc1 and pad2-1 with elevated and reduced GSH-levels, displayed enhanced and decreased AITC-tolerance, respectively. AITC-exposure also led to increased ROS-levels in the roots and loss of chlorophyll which are symptoms of oxidative stress. Following exposure to AITC, we found that GSH rapidly recovered to the same level as in the control plant, suggesting an effective route for replenishment of GSH or a rapid detoxification of AITC. Transcriptional analysis of genes encoding GSTs showed an upregulation in response to AITC. These findings demonstrate cellular effects by AITC involving a reversible depletion of the GSH-pool, induced oxidative stress, and elevated expression of GST-encoding genes. PMID:25954298

  4. Functional mimicry of the active site of glutathione peroxidase by glutathione imprinted selenium-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Mao, Shi-zhong; Liu, Xiao-man; Huang, Xin; Xu, Jia-yun; Liu, Jun-qiu; Luo, Gui-min; Shen, Jia-cong

    2008-01-01

    For imitating the active site of antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx), an artificial enzyme selenosubtilisin was employed as a scaffold for reconstructing substrate glutathione (GSH) specific binding sites by a bioimprinting strategy. GSH was first covalently linked to selenosubtilisin to form a covalent complex GSH-selenosubtilisin through a Se-S bond, then the GSH molecule was used as a template to cast a complementary binding site for substrate GSH recognition. The bioimprinting procedure consists of unfolding the conformation of selenosubtilisin and fixing the new conformation of the complex GSH-selenosubtilisin. Thus a new specificity for naturally occurring GPx substrate GSH was obtained. This bioimprinting procedure facilitates the catalytic selenium moiety of the imprinted selenosubtilisin to match the reactive thiol group of GSH in the GSH binding site, which contributes to acceleration of the intramolecular catalysis. These imprinted selenium-containing proteins exhibited remarkable rate enhancement for the reduction of H2O2 by GSH. The average GPx activity was found to be 462 U/micromol, and it was approximately 100 times that for unimprinted selenosubtilisin. Compared with ebselen, a well-known GPx mimic, an activity enhancement of 500-fold was observed. Detailed steady-state kinetic studies demonstrated that the novel selenoenzyme followed a ping-pong mechanism similar to the naturally occurring GPx. PMID:18163571

  5. Glutathione and glutathione peroxidase activities in blood of patients in early stages following kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronislaw A; Wlodarczyk, Zbigniew; Andruszkiewicz, Jacek; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on glutathione (GSH) level in red blood cells, as well as on glutathione peroxidases (GSH-Px) activities in red blood cells and in plasma of chronic renal failure (CRF) patients following renal transplantation. We want to focus our main attention on plasma GSH-Px, the selenoenzyme that is synthesized primarily in the kidney. In CRF patients, activity of this enzyme is significantly reduced, and the reduction decreases with the progress of the disease, reaching in the end-stage 20% to 30% of the activity of healthy patients. We have shown that following renal transplantation the activity of plasma GSH-Px is restored very rapidly, and 2 weeks after surgery it reached the value of the control group. Red blood cell GSH level is significantly higher in CRF patients, and following transplantation, no significant changes were observed. Red blood cell GSH-Px activity before transplantation was the same as in healthy patients and did not change significantly after surgery. PMID:16350829

  6. Identification of Small-Molecule Frequent Hitters of Glutathione S-Transferase-Glutathione Interaction.

    PubMed

    Brenke, Jara K; Salmina, Elena S; Ringelstetter, Larissa; Dornauer, Scarlett; Kuzikov, Maria; Rothenaigner, Ina; Schorpp, Kenji; Giehler, Fabian; Gopalakrishnan, Jay; Kieser, Arnd; Gul, Sheraz; Tetko, Igor V; Hadian, Kamyar

    2016-07-01

    In high-throughput screening (HTS) campaigns, the binding of glutathione S-transferase (GST) to glutathione (GSH) is used for detection of GST-tagged proteins in protein-protein interactions or enzyme assays. However, many false-positives, so-called frequent hitters (FH), arise that either prevent GST/GSH interaction or interfere with assay signal generation or detection. To identify GST-FH compounds, we analyzed the data of five independent AlphaScreen-based screening campaigns to classify compounds that inhibit the GST/GSH interaction. We identified 53 compounds affecting GST/GSH binding but not influencing His-tag/Ni(2+)-NTA interaction and general AlphaScreen signals. The structures of these 53 experimentally identified GST-FHs were analyzed in chemoinformatic studies to categorize substructural features that promote interference with GST/GSH binding. Here, we confirmed several existing chemoinformatic filters and more importantly extended them as well as added novel filters that specify compounds with anti-GST/GSH activity. Selected compounds were also tested using different antibody-based GST detection technologies and exhibited no interference clearly demonstrating specificity toward their GST/GSH interaction. Thus, these newly described GST-FH will further contribute to the identification of FH compounds containing promiscuous substructures. The developed filters were uploaded to the OCHEM website (http://ochem.eu) and are publicly accessible for analysis of future HTS results. PMID:27044684

  7. Melatonin and nitric oxide modulate glutathione content and glutathione reductase activity in sunflower seedling cotyledons accompanying salt stress.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Harmeet; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-09-30

    The present findings demonstrate significant modulation of total glutathione content, reduced glutathione (GSH) content, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) content, GSH/GSSG ratio and glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) activity in dark-grown seedling cotyledons in response to salt-stress (120 mM NaCl) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings. A differential spatial distribution of GR activity (monitored by confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging) is also evident. Melatonin and nitric oxide (NO) differentially ameliorate salt stress effect by modulating GR activity and GSH content in seedling cotyledons. Total glutathione content (GSH + GSSG) exhibit a seedling age-dependent increase in the cotyledons, more so in salt-stressed conditions and when subjected to melatonin treatment. Seedlings raised in presence of 15 μM of melatonin exhibit significant increase in GR activity in cotyledon homogenates (10,000 g supernatant) coinciding with significant increase in GSH content. GSSG content and GSH/GSSG ratio also increased due to melatonin treatment. A correlation is thus evident in NaCl-sensitized modulation of GSH content and GR activity by melatonin. GSH content is down regulated by NO provided as 250 μM of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) although total glutathione content remained in similar range. A reversal of response (enhanced total glutathione accumulation) by NO scavenger (cPTIO) highlights the critical role of NO in modulating glutathione homeostasis. SNP lowers the activity of hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT) - a regulatory enzyme in melatonin biosynthesis in control seedlings whereas its activity is upregulated in salt-stressed seedling cotyledons. Melatonin content of seedling cotyledons is also modulated by NO. NO and melatonin thus seem to modulate GR activity and GSH content during seedling growth under salt stress. PMID:27432590

  8. Changes in biosynthesis and metabolism of glutathione upon ochratoxin A stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhao, Weiwei; Hao, Junran; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Wu, Weihong; Yang, Zhuojun; Liang, Zhihong; Huang, Kunlun

    2014-06-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is one of the most toxic mycotoxins, which is toxic to plants and simulates oxidative stress. Glutathione is an important antioxidant in plants and is closely associated with detoxification in cells. We have previously shown that OTA exposure induces obvious expression differences in genes associated with glutathione metabolism. To characterize glutathione metabolism and understand its role in OTA phytotoxicity, we observed the accumulation of GSH in the detached leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana under OTA treatment. OTA stimulated a defense response through enhancing glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase activities, and the transcript levels of these enzymes were increased to maintain the total glutathione content. Moreover, the level of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) was increased and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle fluctuated in response to OTA. The depletion of glutathione using buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, inhibitor of glutamate-cysteine ligase) had no profound effect on OTA toxicity, as glutathione was regenerated through the ascorbate-glutathione cycle to maintain the total glutathione content. The ROS, MDA and GSH accumulation was significantly affected in the mutant gsh1, gr1 and gpx2 after treatment with OTA, which indicated that glutathione metabolism is directly involved in the oxidative stress response of Arabidopsis thaliana subjected to OTA. In conclusion, date demonstrate that glutathione-associated metabolism is closely related with OTA stress and glutathione play a role in resistance of Arabidopsis subjected to OTA.

  9. The mitochondrial dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers do not transport glutathione.

    PubMed

    Booty, Lee M; King, Martin S; Thangaratnarajah, Chancievan; Majd, Homa; James, Andrew M; Kunji, Edmund R S; Murphy, Michael P

    2015-02-27

    Glutathione carries out vital protective roles within mitochondria, but is synthesised in the cytosol. Previous studies have suggested that the mitochondrial dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers were responsible for glutathione uptake. We set out to characterise the putative glutathione transport by using fused membrane vesicles of Lactococcus lactis overexpressing the dicarboxylate and 2-oxoglutarate carriers. Although transport of the canonical substrates could be measured readily, an excess of glutathione did not compete for substrate uptake nor could transport of glutathione be measured directly. Thus these mitochondrial carriers do not transport glutathione and the identity of the mitochondrial glutathione transporter remains unknown.

  10. Hepatic glutathione and glutathione S-transferase in selenium deficiency and toxicity in the chick

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. S.

    1989-01-01

    First, the hepatic activity of GSH-T{sub CDNB} was increased only under conditions of severe oxidative stress produced by combined Se- and vitamin E (VE)-deficiency, indicating that VE also affects GSH metabolism. Second, the incorporation of {sup 35}S-methionine into GSH and protein was about 4- and 2-fold higher, respectively, in Se- and VE-deficient chick hepatocytes as compared to controls. Third, chicks injected with the glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHpx) inhibitor, aurothioglucose (AuTG), showed increase hepatic GSH-T{sub CDNB} activity and plasma GSH concentration regardless of their Se status. Fourth, the effect of ascorbic acid (AA), on GSH metabolism was studied. Chicks fed 1000 ppm AA showed decreased hepatic GSH concentration compared to chicks fed no AA in a Se- and VE-deficient diet. Fifth, chicks fed excess Se showed increase hepatic activity of GSH-T{sub CDNB} and GSH concentration regardless of VE status.

  11. Glutathione is required for efficient production of infectious picornavirus virions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Allen D. . E-mail: smitha@ba.ars.usda.gov; Dawson, Harry . E-mail: dawsonh@ba.ars.usda.gov

    2006-09-30

    Glutathione is an intracellular reducing agent that helps maintain the redox potential of the cell and is important for immune function. The drug L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) selectively inhibits glutathione synthesis. Glutathione has been reported to block replication of HIV, HSV-1, and influenza virus, whereas cells treated with BSO exhibit increased replication of Sendai virus. Pre-treatment of HeLa cell monolayers with BSO inhibited replication of CVB3, CVB4, and HRV14 with viral titers reduced by approximately 6, 5, and 3 log{sub 1}, respectively. The addition of glutathione ethyl ester, but not dithiothreitol or 2-mercaptoethanol, to the culture medium reversed the inhibitory effect of BSO. Viral RNA and protein synthesis were not inhibited by BSO treatment. Fractionation of lysates from CVB3-infected BSO-treated cells on cesium chloride and sucrose gradients revealed that empty capsids but not mature virions were being produced. The levels of the 5S and 14S assembly intermediates, however, were not affected by BSO treatment. These results demonstrate that glutathione is important for production of mature infectious picornavirus virions.

  12. Genetic study of glutathione accumulation during cold hardening in wheat.

    PubMed

    Kocsy, G; Szalai, G; Vágújfalvi, A; Stéhli, L; Orosz, G; Galiba, G

    2000-01-01

    The effect of cold hardening on the accumulation of glutathione (GSH) and its precursors was studied in the shoots and roots of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cv. Cheyenne (Ch, frost-tolerant) and cv. Chinese Spring (CS, moderately frost-sensitive), in a T. spelta L. accession (Tsp, frost-sensitive) and in chromosome substitution lines CS (Ch 5A) and CS (Tsp 5A). The fast induction of total glutathione accumulation was detected during the first 3 d of hardening in the shoots, especially in the frost-tolerant Ch and CS (Ch 5A). This observation was corroborated by the study of de novo GSH synthesis using [(35)S]sulfate. In Ch and CS (Ch 5A) the total cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine (precursors of GSH), hydroxymethylglutathione and GSH contents were greater during the 51-d treatment than in the sensitive genotypes. After 35 d hardening, when the maximum frost tolerance was observed, greater ratios of reduced to oxidised hydroxymethylglutathione and glutathione were detected in Ch and CS (Ch 5A) compared to the sensitive genotypes. A correspondingly greater glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity was also found in Ch and CS (Ch 5A). It can be assumed that chromosome 5A of wheat has an influence on GSH accumulation and on the ratio of reduced to oxidised glutathione as part of a complex regulatory function during hardening. Consequently, GSH may contribute to the enhancement of frost tolerance in wheat. PMID:10664136

  13. Hemolytic anemia and metabolic acidosis: think about glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ben Ameur, Salma; Aloulou, Hajer; Nasrallah, Fehmi; Kamoun, Thouraya; Kaabachi, Naziha; Hachicha, Mongia

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency (GSSD) is a rare disorder of glutathione metabolism with varying clinical severity. Patients may present with hemolytic anemia alone or together with acidosis and central nervous system impairment. Diagnosis is made by clinical presentation and detection of elevated concentrations of 5-oxoproline in urine and low glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes or cultured skin fibroblasts. The prognosis seems to depend on early diagnosis and treatment. We report a 4 months old Tunisian male infant who presented with severe metabolic acidosis with high anion gap and hemolytic anemia. High level of 5-oxoproline was detected in her urine and diagnosis of GSSD was made. Treatment consists of the correction of acidosis, blood transfusion, and supplementation with antioxidants. He died of severe metabolic acidosis and sepsis at the age of 15 months.

  14. Glutathione Homeostasis and Functions: Potential Targets for Medical Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I.

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide, which has many biological roles including protection against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The primary goal of this paper is to characterize the principal mechanisms of the protective role of GSH against reactive species and electrophiles. The ancillary goals are to provide up-to-date knowledge of GSH biosynthesis, hydrolysis, and utilization; intracellular compartmentalization and interorgan transfer; elimination of endogenously produced toxicants; involvement in metal homeostasis; glutathione-related enzymes and their regulation; glutathionylation of sulfhydryls. Individual sections are devoted to the relationships between GSH homeostasis and pathologies as well as to developed research tools and pharmacological approaches to manipulating GSH levels. Special attention is paid to compounds mainly of a natural origin (phytochemicals) which affect GSH-related processes. The paper provides starting points for development of novel tools and provides a hypothesis for investigation of the physiology and biochemistry of glutathione with a focus on human and animal health. PMID:22500213

  15. Thioltransferase activity of bovine lens glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed Central

    Dal Monte, M; Cecconi, I; Buono, F; Vilardo, P G; Del Corso, A; Mura, U

    1998-01-01

    A Mu-class glutathione S-transferase purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens displayed thioltransferase activity, catalysing the transthiolation reaction between GSH and hydroxyethyldisulphide. The thiol-transfer reaction is composed of two steps, the formation of GSSG occurring through the generation of an intermediate mixed disulphide between GSH and the target disulphide. Unlike glutaredoxin, which is only able to catalyse the second step of the transthiolation process, glutathioneS-transferase catalyses both steps of the reaction. Data are presented showing that bovine lens glutathione S-transferase and rat liver glutaredoxin, which was used as a thioltransferase enzyme model, can operate in synergy to catalyse the GSH-dependent reduction of hydroxyethyldisulphide. PMID:9693102

  16. Recurrent Isolated Neonatal Hemolytic Anemia: Think About Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Signolet, Isabelle; Chenouard, Rachel; Oca, Florine; Barth, Magalie; Reynier, Pascal; Denis, Marie-Christine; Simard, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia (HA) of the newborn should be considered in cases of rapidly developing, severe, or persistent hyperbilirubinemia. Several causes of corpuscular hemolysis have been described, among which red blood cell enzyme defects are of particular concern. We report a rare case of red blood cell enzyme defect in a male infant, who presented during his first months of life with recurrent and isolated neonatal hemolysis. All main causes were ruled out. At 6.5 months of age, the patient presented with gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization; fortuitously, urine organic acid chromatography revealed a large peak of 5-oxoproline. Before the association between HA and 5-oxoprolinuria was noted, glutathione synthetase deficiency was suspected and confirmed by a low glutathione synthetase concentration and a collapse of glutathione synthetase activity in erythrocytes. Moreover, molecular diagnosis revealed 2 mutations in the glutathione synthetase gene: a previously reported missense mutation (c.[656A>G]; p.[Asp219Gly]) and a mutation not yet described in the binding site of the enzyme (c.[902T>C]; p.[Leu301Pro]). However, 15 days later, a control sample revealed no signs of 5-oxoprolinuria and the clinical history discovered administration of acetaminophen in the 48 hours before hospitalization. Thus, in this patient, acetaminophen exposure allowed the diagnosis of a mild form of glutathione synthetase deficiency, characterized by isolated HA. Early diagnosis is important because treatment with bicarbonate, vitamins C and E, and elimination of trigger factors are recommended to improve long-term outcomes. Glutathione synthetase deficiency should be screened for in cases of unexplained newborn HA. PMID:27581854

  17. Characterization of recombinant glutathione reductase from the psychrophilic Antarctic bacterium Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mikyoung; Barnwell, Callie V; Grunden, Amy M

    2015-07-01

    Glutathione reductases catalyze the reduction of oxidized glutathione (glutathione disulfide, GSSG) using NADPH as the substrate to produce reduced glutathione (GSH), which is an important antioxidant molecule that helps maintain the proper reducing environment of the cell. A recombinant form of glutathione reductase from Colwellia psychrerythraea, a marine psychrophilic bacterium, has been biochemically characterized to determine its molecular and enzymatic properties. C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was shown to be a homodimer with a molecular weight of 48.7 kDa using SDS-PAGE, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and gel filtration. The C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase sequence shows significant homology to that of Escherichia coli glutathione reductase (66 % identity), and it possesses the FAD and NADPH binding motifs, as well as absorption spectrum features which are characteristic of flavoenzymes such as glutathione reductase. The psychrophilic C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase exhibits higher k cat and k cat/K m at lower temperatures (4 °C) compared to mesophilic Baker's yeast glutathione reductase. However, C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase was able to complement an E. coli glutathione reductase deletion strain in oxidative stress growth assays, demonstrating the functionality of C. psychrerythraea glutathione reductase over a broad temperature range, which suggests its potential utility as an antioxidant enzyme in heterologous systems. PMID:26101017

  18. Role of glutathione in cancer progression and chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Traverso, Nicola; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Nitti, Mariapaola; Marengo, Barbara; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Domenicotti, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in a multitude of cellular processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and disturbances in GSH homeostasis are involved in the etiology and progression of many human diseases including cancer. While GSH deficiency, or a decrease in the GSH/glutathione disulphide (GSSG) ratio, leads to an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress implicated in the progression of cancer, elevated GSH levels increase the antioxidant capacity and the resistance to oxidative stress as observed in many cancer cells. The present review highlights the role of GSH and related cytoprotective effects in the susceptibility to carcinogenesis and in the sensitivity of tumors to the cytotoxic effects of anticancer agents.

  19. Glutathione peroxidase and iron-thiol dependent lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Punekar, N S; Lardy, H A

    1989-12-01

    Role of glutathione peroxidase in iron-thiol-mediated lipid peroxidation was examined. The enzyme was unable to prevent peroxidation of extracted rat liver microsomal lipids. In contrast, when arachidonic acid was the substrate, glutathione peroxidase did decrease the formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive material. Superoxide dismutase produced a consistent but partial inhibition of peroxidation and catalase was without effect. Our results suggest that iron-thiol-dependent lipid peroxidation cannot be completely blocked by protective enzymes that are effective in other systems. PMID:2635868

  20. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  4. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375...

  5. Gender differences in glutathione metabolism in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Honglei; Harrell, Lindy E; Shenvi, Swapna; Hagen, Tory; Liu, Rui-Ming

    2005-03-15

    The mechanism underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD), an age-related neurodegenerative disease, is still an area of significant controversy. Oxidative damage of macromolecules has been suggested to play an important role in the development of AD; however, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we showed that the concentration of glutathione (GSH), the most abundant intracellular free thiol and an important antioxidant, was decreased in red blood cells from male AD patients compared with age- and gender-matched controls. However, there was no difference in blood GSH concentration between the female patients and female controls. The decrease in GSH content in red blood cells from male AD patients was associated with reduced activities of glutamate cysteine ligase and glutathione synthase, the two enzymes involved in de novo GSH synthesis, with no change in the amount of oxidized glutathione or the activity of glutathione reductase, suggesting that a decreased de novo GSH synthetic capacity is responsible for the decline in GSH content in AD. These results showed for the first time that GSH metabolism was regulated differently in male and female AD patients. PMID:15693022

  6. Rational design of an organometallic glutathione transferase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Ang, W.H.; Parker, L.J.; De Luca, A.; Juillerat-Jeanneret, L.; Morton, C.J.; LoBello, M.; Parker, M.W.; Dyson, P.J.

    2010-08-17

    A hybrid organic-inorganic (organometallic) inhibitor was designed to target glutathione transferases. The metal center is used to direct protein binding, while the organic moiety acts as the active-site inhibitor. The mechanism of inhibition was studied using a range of biophysical and biochemical methods.

  7. Methods for the determination of plasma or tissue glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Tipple, Trent E; Rogers, Lynette K

    2012-01-01

    We present two different methods for determining levels of glutathione in complex biological samples and plasma. The DTNB/GR enzyme recycling method is sensitive and requires no specialized equipment. The HPLC method is particularly useful for situations in which sample amounts are limited. Detailed instructions for performing each method as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed in this chapter.

  8. REACTION OF BENZENE OXIDE WITH THIOLS INCLUDING GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study accounts for the observations that the metabolism of benzene is dominated by the formation of phenol. As demonstrated here, the pathway leading to S-phenylmercapturic acid is necessarily minor on account of the low efficiency of benzene oxide capture by glutathione at ...

  9. Balneotherapy and platelet glutathione metabolism in type II diabetic patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Agishi, Yuko

    1996-09-01

    Effects of balneotherapy on platelet glutathione metabolism were investigated in 12 type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetic patients. Levels of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) on admission were well correlated with those of fasting plasma glucose (FPG; r=0.692, P<0.02). After 4 weeks of balneotherapy, the mean level of GSH showed no changes; however, in well-controlled patients (FPG <150 mg/dl), the level increased ( P<0.01) and in poorly controlled patients (FPG >150 mg/dl), the value decreased ( P<0.05). There was a negative correlation between glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activities and the levels of FPG ( r=-0.430, P<0.05). After balneotherapy, the activity increased in 5 patients, decreased in 3 patients and showed no changes (alteration within ±3%) in all the other patients. From these findings in diabetic patients we concluded: (1) platelet GSH synthesis appeared to be induced in response to oxidative stress; (2) lowered GPX activities indicated that the antioxidative defense system was impaired; and (3) platelet glutathione metabolism was partially improved by 4 weeks balneotherapy, an effect thought to be dependent on the control status of plasma glucose levels. It is suggested that balneotherapy is beneficial for patients whose platelet antioxidative defense system is damaged, such as those with diabetes mellitus and coronary heart disease.

  10. Electrochemical evaluation of glutathione S-transferase kinetic parameters.

    PubMed

    Enache, Teodor Adrian; Oliveira-Brett, Ana Maria

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), are a family of enzymes belonging to the phase II metabolism that catalyse the formation of thioether conjugates between the endogenous tripeptide glutathione and xenobiotic compounds. The voltammetric behaviour of glutathione (GSH), 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), as well as the catalytic conjugation reaction of GSH to CDNB by GST was investigated at room temperature, T=298.15K (25°C), at pH6.5, for low concentration of substrates and enzyme, using differential pulse (DP) voltammetry at a glassy carbon electrode. Only GSH can be oxidized; a sensitivity of 0.14nA/μM and a LOD of 6.4μM were obtained. The GST kinetic parameter electrochemical evaluation, in relation to its substrates, GSH and CDNB, using reciprocal Michaelis-Menten and Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots, was determined. A value of KM~100μM was obtained for either GSH or CDNB, and Vmax varied between 40 and 60μmol/min per mg of GST.

  11. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Glutathione test system. 862.1365 Section 862.1365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  12. 21 CFR 862.1365 - Glutathione test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Glutathione test system. 862.1365 Section 862.1365 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  13. Mechanism-based biomarker gene sets for glutathione depletion-related hepatotoxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Weihua; Mizukawa, Yumiko; Nakatsu, Noriyuki; Minowa, Yosuke; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ohno, Yasuo; Urushidani, Tetsuro

    2010-09-15

    Chemical-induced glutathione depletion is thought to be caused by two types of toxicological mechanisms: PHO-type glutathione depletion [glutathione conjugated with chemicals such as phorone (PHO) or diethyl maleate (DEM)], and BSO-type glutathione depletion [i.e., glutathione synthesis inhibited by chemicals such as L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO)]. In order to identify mechanism-based biomarker gene sets for glutathione depletion in rat liver, male SD rats were treated with various chemicals including PHO (40, 120 and 400 mg/kg), DEM (80, 240 and 800 mg/kg), BSO (150, 450 and 1500 mg/kg), and bromobenzene (BBZ, 10, 100 and 300 mg/kg). Liver samples were taken 3, 6, 9 and 24 h after administration and examined for hepatic glutathione content, physiological and pathological changes, and gene expression changes using Affymetrix GeneChip Arrays. To identify differentially expressed probe sets in response to glutathione depletion, we focused on the following two courses of events for the two types of mechanisms of glutathione depletion: a) gene expression changes occurring simultaneously in response to glutathione depletion, and b) gene expression changes after glutathione was depleted. The gene expression profiles of the identified probe sets for the two types of glutathione depletion differed markedly at times during and after glutathione depletion, whereas Srxn1 was markedly increased for both types as glutathione was depleted, suggesting that Srxn1 is a key molecule in oxidative stress related to glutathione. The extracted probe sets were refined and verified using various compounds including 13 additional positive or negative compounds, and they established two useful marker sets. One contained three probe sets (Akr7a3, Trib3 and Gstp1) that could detect conjugation-type glutathione depletors any time within 24 h after dosing, and the other contained 14 probe sets that could detect glutathione depletors by any mechanism. These two sets, with appropriate scoring

  14. Glutathione level after long-term occupational elemental mercury exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Kobal, Alfred Bogomir Prezelj, Marija; Horvat, Milena; Krsnik, Mladen; Gibicar, Darija; Osredkar, Josko

    2008-05-15

    Many in vitro and in vivo studies have elucidated the interaction of inorganic mercury (Hg) and glutathione. However, human studies are limited. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of remote long-term intermittent occupational elemental Hg vapour (Hg{sup o}) exposure on erythrocyte glutathione levels and some antioxidative enzyme activities in ex-mercury miners in the period after exposure. The study included 49 ex-mercury miners divided into subgroups of 28 still active, Hg{sup o}-not-exposed miners and 21 elderly retired miners, and 41 controls, age-matched to the miners subgroup. The control workers were taken from 'mercury-free works'. Reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized disulphide glutathione (GSSG) concentrations in haemolysed erythrocytes were determined by capillary electrophoresis, while total glutathione (total GSH) and the GSH/GSSG ratio were calculated from the determined values. Catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR) activities in erythrocytes were measured using commercially available reagent kits, while urine Hg (U-Hg) concentrations were determined by cold vapour atomic absorption (CVAAS). No correlation of present U-Hg levels, GSH, GSSG, and antioxidative enzymes with remote occupational biological exposure indices were found. The mean CAT activity in miners and retired miners was significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the controls. No differences in mean GPx activity among the three groups were found, whereas the mean GR activity was significantly higher (p<0.05) in miners than in retired miners. The mean concentrations of GSH (mmol/g Hb) in miners (13.03{+-}3.71) were significantly higher (p<0.05) than in the control group (11.68{+-}2.66). No differences in mean total GSH, GSSG levels, and GSH/GSSG ratio between miners and controls were found. A positive correlation between GSSG and present U-Hg excretion (r=0.41, p=0.001) in the whole group of ex-mercury miners was observed. The

  15. [Optimization of a spectrophotometry assay of total and oxidized blood glutathione: comparison with a fluorimetric method].

    PubMed

    Coutelle, C; Iron, A; Higueret, D; Cassaigne, A

    1992-01-01

    We developed a method for the enzymatic assay of glutathione which is easy to practice, rapid, specific, based on the reaction of the thiol group of glutathione with dithiobis-nitrobenzoic acid after the action of glutathione reductase in the presence of NADPH. This spectrophotometric technique allowed, on the one hand, the determination of total glutathione and on the other hand, that of oxidized glutathione (disulfide), after the blockage of reduced glutathione by 2-vinyl-pyridine. The improvements of the assay of blood glutathione concerned the sample preparation, the reaction sensitivity, thanks to a better definition of the optimal pH and a reduction ot the blockage time by 2-vinyl-pyridine in well defined operating conditions. We compared the performances of our technique with a fluorimetric method. We used our method for the determination of total and oxidized blood glutathione in a control population.

  16. Effects of glutathione modulation on oxidative stress and enzymatic antioxidant defence in yeast Pachysolen tannophilus.

    PubMed

    Saharan, Rajesh K; Sharma, Sukesh C

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the relationship of intracellular glutathione with various oxidative stress markers and the stress protectant marker trehalose. In the first group of yeast cells, diethyl maleate was used for depletion of glutathione. A second group of yeast cells were incubated with amino acids constituting glutathione (GIu, Cys, Gly) to increase glutathione level. Increased level of oxidative stress marker like ROS, protein carbonyl formation and lipid peroxidation and decreased viability in glutathione-depleted cells were observed in the present study. The increased activity of antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT in the glutathione depleted group suggests the interaction of different antioxidant defence system in Pachysolen tannophilus. Furthermore, the increased levels of trehalose in glutathione-depleted group shows that trehalose acts as a stress reducer in glutathione depleted Pachysolen tannophilus.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF DANSYLATED CYSTEINE, CYSTINE, GLUTATHIONE, AND GLUTATHIONE DISULFIDE BY NARROW BORE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY - ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method using reversed phase high performance liquid chromtography/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (RP-LC/ESI-MS) has been developed to confirm the dientity of dansylated derivatives of cysteine (C) and glutathione (GSH), and their respective dimers, cystine (CSSC) and...

  18. Apd1(+), a Gene Required for Red Pigment Formation in Ade6 Mutants of Schizosaccharomyces Pombe, Encodes an Enzyme Required for Glutathione Biosynthesis: A Role for Glutathione and a Glutathione-Conjugate Pump

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, B.; Ingavale, S.; Bachhawat, A. K.

    1997-01-01

    Mutants in the adenine biosynthetic pathway of yeasts (ade1 and ade2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ade6 and ade7 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe) accumulate an intense red pigment in their vacuoles when grown under adenine-limiting conditions. The precise events that determine the formation of the pigment are however, still unknown. We have begun a genetic investigation into the nature and cause of pigmentation of ade6 mutants of S. pombe and have discovered that one of these pigmentation defective mutants, apd1 (adenine pigmentation defective), is a strict glutathione auxotroph. The gene apd1(+) was found to encode the first enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase, gcs1(+). This gene when expressed in the mutant could confer both glutathione prototrophy and the characteristic red pigmentation, and disruption of the gene led to a loss in both phenotypes. Supplementation of glutathione in the medium, however, could only restore growth but not the pigmentation because the cells were unable to achieve sufficient intracellular levels of glutathione. Disruption of the second enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis, glutathione synthetase, gsh2(+), also led to glutathione auxotrophy, but only a partial defect in pigment formation. A reevaluation of the major amino acids previously reported to be present in the pigment indicated that the pigment is probably a glutathione conjugate. The ability of vanadate to inhibit pigment formation indicated that the conjugate was transported into the vacuole through a glutathione-conjugate pump. This was further confirmed using strains of S. cerevisiae bearing disruptions in the recently identified glutathione-conjugate pump, YCF1, where a significant reduction in pigment formation was observed. The pump of S. pombe is distinct from the previously identified vacuolar pump, hmt1p, for transporting cadystin peptides into vacuoles of S. pombe. PMID:9017391

  19. Glutathione Utilization by Candida albicans Requires a Functional Glutathione Degradation (DUG) Pathway and OPT7, an Unusual Member of the Oligopeptide Transporter Family

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Prashant Ramesh; Thakur, Anil; Ganguli, Dwaipayan; Paul, Sanjoy; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Bachhawat, Anand K.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans lacks the ability to survive within its mammalian host in the absence of endogenous glutathione biosynthesis. To examine the ability of this yeast to utilize exogenous glutathione, we exploited the organic sulfur auxotrophy of C. albicans met15Δ strains. We observed that glutathione is utilized efficiently by the alternative pathway of glutathione degradation (DUG pathway). The major oligopeptide transporters OPT1–OPT5 of C. albicans that were most similar to the known yeast glutathione transporters were not found to contribute to glutathione transport to any significant extent. A genomic library approach to identify the glutathione transporter of C. albicans yielded OPT7 as the primary glutathione transporter. Biochemical studies on OPT7 using radiolabeled GSH uptake revealed a Km of 205 μm, indicating that it was a high affinity glutathione transporter. OPT7 is unusual in several aspects. It is the most remote member to known yeast glutathione transporters, lacks the two highly conserved cysteines in the family that are known to be crucial in trafficking, and also has the ability to take up tripeptides. The transporter was regulated by sulfur sources in the medium. OPT7 orthologues were prevalent among many pathogenic yeasts and fungi and formed a distinct cluster quite remote from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HGT1 glutathione transporter cluster. In vivo experiments using a systemic model of candidiasis failed to detect expression of OPT7 in vivo, and strains disrupted either in the degradation (dug3Δ) or transport (opt7Δ) of glutathione failed to show a defect in virulence. PMID:21994941

  20. Association between glutathione, haemoglobin and transferrin in finnsheep.

    PubMed

    Atroshi, F; Osterberg, S; Lindström, U B

    1980-04-01

    Haemoglobin (Hb) and transferrin (Tf) types were determined in 760 Finnsheep and correlated with the reduced glutathione (GSH) levels of packed erythrocytes. The gene frequencies of the two haemoglobin alleles A and B were: HbA = 0.748 and HbB = 0.252. Five transferrin alleles were found: A, B, C, D and E, with gene frequencies of 0.056, 0.226, 0.620, 0.075 and 0.023, respectively. The Hb B group had significantly higher GSH levels and lower haematocrit values than heterozygotes (Hb AB) and homozygote (Hb AA). There was no significant difference in GSH concentration among the haemoglobin types in lambs. Erythrocyte glutathione levels of Tf BC ewes were significantly higher than the levels in sheep with other transferrin types, whereas young lambs of Tf AB types had the highest GSH levels. The significance of these findings is discussed.

  1. Pleiotropic Functions of Glutathione S-Transferase P

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Grek, Christina; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Manevich, Yefim; Tew, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Danyelle M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP) is one member of the GST superfamily that is prevalently expressed in mammals. Known to possess catalytic activity through deprotonating glutathione allowing formation of thioether bonds with electrophilic substrates, more recent discoveries have broadened our understanding of the biological roles of this protein. In addition to catalytic detoxification, other properties so far ascribed to GSTP include chaperone functions, regulation of nitric oxide pathways, regulation of a variety of kinase signaling pathways, and participation in the forward reaction of protein S-glutathionylation. The expression of GSTP has been linked with cancer and other human pathologies and more recently even with drug addiction. With respect to human health, polymorphic variants of GSTP may determine individual susceptibility to oxidative stress and/or be critical in the design and development of drugs that have used redox pathways as a discovery platform. PMID:24974181

  2. Role of Glutathione in Cancer Progression and Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Traverso, Nicola; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Nitti, Mariapaola; Marengo, Barbara; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Domenicotti, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in a multitude of cellular processes, including cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis, and disturbances in GSH homeostasis are involved in the etiology and progression of many human diseases including cancer. While GSH deficiency, or a decrease in the GSH/glutathione disulphide (GSSG) ratio, leads to an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress implicated in the progression of cancer, elevated GSH levels increase the antioxidant capacity and the resistance to oxidative stress as observed in many cancer cells. The present review highlights the role of GSH and related cytoprotective effects in the susceptibility to carcinogenesis and in the sensitivity of tumors to the cytotoxic effects of anticancer agents. PMID:23766865

  3. Glutathione S-transferase class {pi} polymorphism in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Aivaliotis, M.J.; Cantu, T.; Gilligan, R.

    1995-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) comprises a family of isozymes with broad substrate specificities. One or more GST isozymes are present in most animal tissues and function in several detoxification pathways through the conjugation of reduced glutathione with various electrophiles, thereby reducing their potential toxicity. Four soluble GST isozymes encoded by genes on different chromosomes have been identified in humans. The acidic class pi GST, GSTP (previously designated GST-3), is widely distributed in adult tissues and appears to be the only GST isozyme present in leukocytes and placenta. Previously reported electrophoretic analyses of erythrocyte and leukocyte extracts revealed single bands of activity, which differed slightly in mobility between the two cell types, or under other conditions, a two-banded pattern. To our knowledge, no genetically determined polymorphisms have previously been reported in GSTP from any species. We now report a polymorphism of GSTP in baboon leukocytes, and present family data that verifies autosomal codominant inheritance. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Pleiotropic functions of glutathione S-transferase P.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Grek, Christina; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Manevich, Yefim; Tew, Kenneth D; Townsend, Danyelle M

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP) is one member of the GST superfamily that is prevalently expressed in mammals. Known to possess catalytic activity through deprotonating glutathione allowing formation of thioether bonds with electrophilic substrates, more recent discoveries have broadened our understanding of the biological roles of this protein. In addition to catalytic detoxification, other properties so far ascribed to GSTP include chaperone functions, regulation of nitric oxide pathways, regulation of a variety of kinase signaling pathways, and participation in the forward reaction of protein S-glutathionylation. The expression of GSTP has been linked with cancer and other human pathologies and more recently even with drug addiction. With respect to human health, polymorphic variants of GSTP may determine individual susceptibility to oxidative stress and/or be critical in the design and development of drugs that have used redox pathways as a discovery platform.

  5. Glutathione and plant response to the biotic environment.

    PubMed

    Frendo, Pierre; Baldacci-Cresp, Fabien; Benyamina, Sofiane M; Puppo, Alain

    2013-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is a major antioxidant molecule in plants. It is involved in regulating plant development and responses to the abiotic and biotic environment. In recent years, numerous reports have clarified the molecular processes involving GSH in plant-microbe interactions. In this review, we summarize recent studies, highlighting the roles of GSH in interactions between plants and microbes, whether pathogenic or beneficial to plants.

  6. Proton mobilities in crambin and glutathione S-transferase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanderlingh, U. N.; Corsaro, C.; Hayward, R. L.; Bée, M.; Middendorf, H. D.

    2003-08-01

    Using a neutron backscattering spectrometer, the temperature dependence of mean-square atomic displacements derived from window-integrated quasielastic spectra was measured for two D 2O-hydrated proteins: crambin and glutathione S-transferase. Analyses show that the anharmonic dynamics observed around and above 200 K is consistent with a description in terms of proton/deuteron jumps within asymmetric double-minimum potentials. Also determined were activation energies along with estimates of effective masses and average oscillator energies.

  7. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level. PMID:26091838

  8. Newly identified protein Imi1 affects mitochondrial integrity and glutathione homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kowalec, Piotr; Grynberg, Marcin; Pająk, Beata; Socha, Anna; Winiarska, Katarzyna; Fronk, Jan; Kurlandzka, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione homeostasis is crucial for cell functioning. We describe a novel Imi1 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affecting mitochondrial integrity and involved in controlling glutathione level. Imi1 is cytoplasmic and, except for its N-terminal Flo11 domain, has a distinct solenoid structure. A lack of Imi1 leads to mitochondrial lesions comprising aberrant morphology of cristae and multifarious mtDNA rearrangements and impaired respiration. The mitochondrial malfunctioning is coupled to significantly decrease the level of intracellular reduced glutathione without affecting oxidized glutathione, which decreases the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. These defects are accompanied by decreased cadmium sensitivity and increased phytochelatin-2 level.

  9. Glutamine: a precursor of glutathione and its effect on liver

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jian-Chun; Jiang, Zhu-Ming; Li, De-Min

    1999-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between alanyl-glutamine (ALA-GLN) and glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis in hepatic protection. METHODS Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: one receiving standard parenteral nutrition (STD) and the other supplemented with or without ALA-GLN for 7 days. The blood and liver tissue samples were examined after 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was injected peritoneally. RESULTS The concentration measurements were significantly highe r in ALA-GLN group than in STD group in serum GLN (687 μmol/ L ± 50 μmol/L vs 505 μmol/L ± 39 μmol/L,P < 0.05), serum GSH (14 μmol/L ± 5 μmol/L vs 7 μmol/L ± 3 μmol/L, P < 0.01) and in liver GSH content (6.9 μmol/g ± 2.5 μmol/g vs 4.4 μmol/ g ± 1.6 μmol/g liver tissue, P < 0.05). Rats in ALA-GLN group had lesser elevations in hepatic enzymes after 5-FU administration. CONCLUSION The supplemented nutrition ALA-GLN can protect the liver function through increasing the glutathione biosynthesis and pre-serving the glutathione stores in hepatic tissue. PMID:11819414

  10. Benzene oxide is a substrate for glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Zarth, Adam T; Murphy, Sharon E; Hecht, Stephen S

    2015-12-01

    Benzene is a known human carcinogen which must be activated to benzene oxide (BO) to exert its carcinogenic potential. BO can be detoxified in vivo by reaction with glutathione and excretion in the urine as S-phenylmercapturic acid. This process may be catalyzed by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), but kinetic data for this reaction have not been published. Therefore, we incubated GSTA1, GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 with glutathione and BO and quantified the formation of S-phenylglutathione. Kinetic parameters were determined for GSTT1 and GSTP1. At 37 °C, the putative Km and Vmax values for GSTT1 were 420 μM and 450 fmol/s, respectively, while those for GSTP1 were 3600 μM and 3100 fmol/s. GSTA1 and GSTM1 did not exhibit sufficient activity for determination of kinetic parameters. We conclude that GSTT1 is a critical enzyme in the detoxification of BO and that GSTP1 may also play an important role, while GSTA1 and GSTM1 seem to be less important.

  11. Maintaining good hearing: calorie restriction, Sirt3, and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Han, Chul; Someya, Shinichi

    2013-10-01

    Reducing calorie intake extends the lifespan of a variety of experimental models and delays progression of age-related hearing loss (AHL). AHL is a common feature of aging and is characterized by age-related decline of hearing associated with loss of sensory hair cells, spiral ganglion neurons, and/or stria vascularis degeneration in the cochlea. Sirtuins are a family of NAD(+)-dependent enzymes that regulate lifespan in lower organisms and have emerged as broad regulators of cellular fate. Our recent study indicated that mitochondrial Sirt3, a member of the sirtuin family, mediates the anti-aging effects of calorie restriction (CR) on AHL in mice. Interestingly, we also found that weight loss alone may not be sufficient for maintaining normal hearing. How does CR slow the progression of AHL through regulation of Sirt3? Here we review the evidence that during CR, Sirt3 slows the progression of AHL by promoting the glutathione-mediated mitochondrial antioxidant defense system in mice. A significant reduction in food consumption in one's daily life may not be a desirable and realistic option for most people. Therefore, identification/discovery of compounds that induce the activation of SIRT3 or glutathione reductase, or that increase mitochondrial glutathione levels has potential for maintaining good hearing through mimicking the anti-aging effects of CR in human inner ear cells. PMID:23454634

  12. The role of glutathione reductase and related enzymes on cellular redox homoeostasis network.

    PubMed

    Couto, Narciso; Wood, Jennifer; Barber, Jill

    2016-06-01

    In this review article we examine the role of glutathione reductase in the regulation, modulation and maintenance of cellular redox homoeostasis. Glutathione reductase is responsible for maintaining the supply of reduced glutathione; one of the most abundant reducing thiols in the majority of cells. In its reduced form, glutathione plays key roles in the cellular control of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species act as intracellular and extracellular signalling molecules and complex cross talk between levels of reactive oxygen species, levels of oxidised and reduced glutathione and other thiols, and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase determine the most suitable conditions for redox control within a cell or for activation of programmed cell death. Additionally, we discuss the translation and expression of glutathione reductase in a number of organisms including yeast and humans. In yeast and human cells, a single gene expresses more than one form of glutathione reductase, destined for residence in the cytoplasm or for translocation to different organelles; in plants, however, two genes encoding this protein have been described. In general, insects and kinetoplastids (a group of protozoa, including Plasmodia and Trypanosoma) do not express glutathione reductase or glutathione biosynthetic enzymes. Instead, they express either the thioredoxin system or the trypanothione system. The thioredoxin system is also present in organisms that have the glutathione system and there may be overlapping functions with cross-talk between the two systems. Finally we evaluate therapeutic targets to overcome oxidative stress associated cellular disorders.

  13. Delayed cardiomyopathy in dystrophin deficient mdx mice relies on intrinsic glutathione resource.

    PubMed

    Khouzami, Lara; Bourin, Marie-Claude; Christov, Christo; Damy, Thibaud; Escoubet, Brigitte; Caramelle, Philippe; Perier, Magali; Wahbi, Karim; Meune, Christophe; Pavoine, Catherine; Pecker, Françoise

    2010-09-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although they have been a model for DMD, mdx mice exhibit slowly developing cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that disease process was delayed owing to the development of an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress, involving glutathione synthesis. At 15 to 20 weeks of age, mdx mice displayed a 33% increase in blood glutathione levels compared with age-matched C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, cardiac glutathione content was similar in mdx and C57BL/6 mice as a result of the balanced increased expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits ensuring glutathione synthesis in the mdx mouse heart, as well as increased glutathione peroxidase-1 using glutathione. Oral administration from 10 weeks of age of the glutamate cysteine ligase inhibitor, l-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO, 5 mmol/L), led to a 33% and 50% drop in blood and cardiac glutathione, respectively, in 15- to 20-week-old mdx mice. Moreover, 20-week-old BSO-treated mdx mice displayed left ventricular hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction, discontinuities in beta-dystroglycan expression, micronecrosis and microangiopathic injuries. Examination of the glutathione status in four DMD patients showed that three displayed systemic glutathione deficiency as well. In conclusion, low glutathione resource hastens the onset of cardiomyopathy linked to a defect in dystrophin in mdx mice. This is relevant to the glutathione deficiency that DMD patients may suffer.

  14. Delayed Cardiomyopathy in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mice Relies on Intrinsic Glutathione Resource

    PubMed Central

    Khouzami, Lara; Bourin, Marie-Claude; Christov, Christo; Damy, Thibaud; Escoubet, Brigitte; Caramelle, Philippe; Perier, Magali; Wahbi, Karim; Meune, Christophe; Pavoine, Catherine; Pecker, Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although they have been a model for DMD, mdx mice exhibit slowly developing cardiomyopathy. We hypothesized that disease process was delayed owing to the development of an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress, involving glutathione synthesis. At 15 to 20 weeks of age, mdx mice displayed a 33% increase in blood glutathione levels compared with age-matched C57BL/6 mice. In contrast, cardiac glutathione content was similar in mdx and C57BL/6 mice as a result of the balanced increased expression of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic and regulatory subunits ensuring glutathione synthesis in the mdx mouse heart, as well as increased glutathione peroxidase-1 using glutathione. Oral administration from 10 weeks of age of the glutamate cysteine ligase inhibitor, l-buthionine(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO, 5 mmol/L), led to a 33% and 50% drop in blood and cardiac glutathione, respectively, in 15- to 20-week-old mdx mice. Moreover, 20-week-old BSO-treated mdx mice displayed left ventricular hypertrophy associated with diastolic dysfunction, discontinuities in β-dystroglycan expression, micronecrosis and microangiopathic injuries. Examination of the glutathione status in four DMD patients showed that three displayed systemic glutathione deficiency as well. In conclusion, low glutathione resource hastens the onset of cardiomyopathy linked to a defect in dystrophin in mdx mice. This is relevant to the glutathione deficiency that DMD patients may suffer. PMID:20696779

  15. Effect of glutathione on phytochelatin synthesis in tomato cells. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Mendum, M.L.; Gupta, S.C.; Goldsbrough, P.B. )

    1990-06-01

    Growth of cell suspension cultures of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv VFNT-Cherry, in the presence of cadmium is inhibited by buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis. Cell growth and phytochelatin synthesis are restored to cells treated with buthionine sulfoximine by the addition of glutathione to the medium. Glutathione stimulates the accumulation of phytochelatins in cadmium treated cells, indicating that availability of glutathione can limit synthesis of these peptides. Exogenous glutathione causes a disproportionate increase in the level of smaller phytochelatins, notably ({gamma}-Glu-Cys){sub 2}-Gly. In the presence of buthionine sulfoximine and glutathione, phytochelatins that are produced upon exposure to cadmium incorporate little ({sup 35}S)cysteine, indicating that these peptides are probably not synthesized by sequential addition of cysteine and glutamate to glutathione.

  16. Effect of ovariectomy and sex hormone replacement on glutathione and glutathione-related enzymes in rat hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hambali, Z; Ngah, W Z; Wahid, S A; Kadir, K A

    1995-01-01

    The effects of ovariectomy and hormone replacement in control and carcinogen treated female rats were investigated by measuring whole blood and liver glutathione (WGSH, HGSH), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GRx) and histological evaluation. Hepatocarcinogenesis was induced by diethylnitrosamine and 2-acetylaminofluorene. In control rats not receiving carcinogen, ovariectomy significantly increased the GST and GRx activities. Replacement with either estrogen or progesterone reduced the GST activities to below intact female values whereas replacement of both hormones together brought the GST activities to that of intact females. GRx activities were brought to intact female values by replacement with estrogen or progesterone, either singly or in combination. Neither ovariectomy nor sex hormone/s replacement influenced the levels of WGSH, HGSH and GPx activities. Carcinogen administration to intact rats increased all the parameters measured. Ovariectomized rats treated with carcinogen showed lower GPx and GRx activities at 2 mths. However, replacement with either progesterone or combined estrogen and progesterone increased GPx and GRx activities to original values. On the other hand GST and GPx activities in ovariectomized rats which had carcinogen treatment were lower than intact rats after 5 mths. Replacement with hormones either singly or both brought GST and GPx activities up to intact rat levels receiving carcinogen. The levels of WGSH, HGSH and GRx activities (5 mths) in carcinogen treated rats were not influenced by ovariectomy and/or hormone/s replacement. The results from this study suggested that ovariectomy reduced the severity of hepatocarcinogenesis which was restored by sex hormone/s replacement.

  17. Plastid-Localized Glutathione Reductase2–Regulated Glutathione Redox Status Is Essential for Arabidopsis Root Apical Meristem Maintenance[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin; Pasternak, Taras; Eiblmeier, Monika; Ditengou, Franck; Kochersperger, Philip; Sun, Jiaqiang; Wang, Hui; Rennenberg, Heinz; Teale, William; Paponov, Ivan; Zhou, Wenkun; Li, Chuanyou; Li, Xugang; Palme, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione is involved in thiol redox signaling and acts as a major redox buffer against reactive oxygen species, helping to maintain a reducing environment in vivo. Glutathione reductase (GR) catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) into reduced glutathione (GSH). The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes two GRs: GR1 and GR2. Whereas the cytosolic/peroxisomal GR1 is not crucial for plant development, we show here that the plastid-localized GR2 is essential for root growth and root apical meristem (RAM) maintenance. We identify a GR2 mutant, miao, that displays strong inhibition of root growth and severe defects in the RAM, with GR activity being reduced to ∼50%. miao accumulates high levels of GSSG and exhibits increased glutathione oxidation. The exogenous application of GSH or the thiol-reducing agent DTT can rescue the root phenotype of miao, demonstrating that the RAM defects in miao are triggered by glutathione oxidation. Our in silico analysis of public microarray data shows that auxin and glutathione redox signaling generally act independently at the transcriptional level. We propose that glutathione redox status is essential for RAM maintenance through both auxin/PLETHORA (PLT)-dependent and auxin/PLT-independent redox signaling pathways. PMID:24249834

  18. Crystal structure of Glycine max glutathione transferase in complex with glutathione: investigation of the mechanism operating by the Tau class glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Axarli, Irene; Dhavala, Prathusha; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2009-08-13

    Cytosolic GSTs (glutathione transferases) are a multifunctional group of enzymes widely distributed in Nature and involved in cellular detoxification processes. The three-dimensional structure of GmGSTU4-4 (Glycine max GST Tau 4-4) complexed with GSH was determined by the molecular replacement method at 2.7 A (1 A=0.1 nm) resolution. The bound GSH is located in a region formed by the beginning of alpha-helices H1, H2 and H3 in the N-terminal domain of the enzyme. Significant differences in the G-site (GSH-binding site) as compared with the structure determined in complex with Nb-GSH [S-(p-nitrobenzyl)-glutathione] were found. These differences were identified in the hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interaction pattern and, consequently, GSH was found bound in two different conformations. In one subunit, the enzyme forms a complex with the ionized form of GSH, whereas in the other subunit it can form a complex with the non-ionized form. However, only the ionized form of GSH may form a productive and catalytically competent complex. Furthermore, a comparison of the GSH-bound structure with the Nb-GSH-bound structure shows a significant movement of the upper part of alpha-helix H4 and the C-terminal. This indicates an intrasubunit modulation between the G-site and the H-site (electrophile-binding site), suggesting that the enzyme recognizes the xenobiotic substrates by an induced-fit mechanism. The reorganization of Arg111 and Tyr107 upon xenobiotic substrate binding appears to govern the intrasubunit structural communication between the G- and H-site and the binding of GSH. The structural observations were further verified by steady-state kinetic analysis and site-directed mutagenesis studies.

  19. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  20. Exposure to cadmium changes the content of glutathione in maize seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Rauser, W.E.

    1987-04-01

    Glutathione may be involved in the biosynthesis of Cd-binding peptides known as phytochelatins. Five-day old maize seedlings in hydroponic culture were exposed to 3 ..mu..M CdSO/sub 4/ for 2, 6 and 12 hours and 1, 2 and 3 days. Total glutathione (glutathione + glutathione disulfide) in roots and shoots was measured enzymatically. Exposure to Cd for 12 hours or longer reduced root elongation growth. Shoots contained more glutathione than did roots. Within 2 hours of exposure to Cd the glutathione content declined by 47% of control and stayed low for a day. Shoot glutathione decreased gradually and less markedly (by 34% in 24 hours). Following the decline in the first day the glutathione per seedling increased with time in the presence of Cd. Cadmium-binding peptide in roots increased during the recovery phase. If glutathione is a substrate for Cd-binding peptide synthesis, such a use accounts for only part of the decline in root glutathione observed during the first day.

  1. Glutathione Reductase Is Essential for Host Defense against Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing; Ralston, Melissa M.; Meng, Xiaomei; Bongiovanni, Kathleen D.; Jones, Amanda L.; Benndorf, Rainer; Nelin, Leif D.; Frazier, W. Joshua; Rogers, Lynette K.; Smith, Charles V.; Liu, Yusen

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione reductase (Gsr)1 catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide to glutathione, a major cellular antioxidant. We have recently shown that Gsr is essential for host defense against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli in a mouse model of sepsis. While we have demonstrated that Gsr is required for sustaining the oxidative burst and the development of neutrophil extracellular traps, the role of Gsr in other phagocytic functions remains unclear. It is also unclear whether Gsr-deficient mice exhibit host defense defects against Gram-positive bacteria. In the present study, we characterized the effects of Gsr deficiency on the innate immune responses to a Gram-positive bacterium, group B Streptococcus, and to the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that like, E. coli, group B Streptococcus resulted in a substantially more robust cytokine response and a markedly higher morbidity and mortality in Gsr-deficient mice than in wildtype mice. The increased morbidity and mortality were associated with greater bacterial burden in the Gsr-deficient mice. Interestingly, Gsr-deficient mice did not exhibit a greater sensitivity to LPS than did wildtype mice. Analysis of the neutrophils of Gsr-deficient mice revealed impaired phagocytosis. In response to thioglycollate stimulation, Gsr-deficient mice mobilized far fewer phagocytes, including neutrophils, macrophages, and eosinophils, into their peritoneal cavities than did wildtype mice. The defective phagocyte mobilization is associated with profound oxidation and aggregation of ascitic proteins, particularly albumin. Our results indicate that the oxidative defense mechanism mediated by Gsr is required for an effective innate immune response against bacteria, likely by preventing phagocyte dysfunction due to oxidative damage. PMID:23623936

  2. The Roles of Glutathione Peroxidases during Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Ufer, Christoph; Wang, Chi Chiu

    2011-01-01

    Embryo development relies on the complex interplay of the basic cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptotic cell death. Precise regulation of these events is the basis for the establishment of embryonic structures and the organ development. Beginning with fertilization of the oocyte until delivery the developing embryo encounters changing environmental conditions such as varying levels of oxygen, which can give rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS). These challenges are met by the embryo with metabolic adaptations and by an array of anti-oxidative mechanisms. ROS can be deleterious by modifying biological molecules including lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids and may induce abnormal development or even embryonic lethality. On the other hand ROS are vital players of various signaling cascades that affect the balance between cell growth, differentiation, and death. An imbalance or dysregulation of these biological processes may generate cells with abnormal growth and is therefore potentially teratogenic and tumorigenic. Thus, a precise balance between processes generating ROS and those decomposing ROS is critical for normal embryo development. One tier of the cellular protective system against ROS constitutes the family of selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidases (GPx). These enzymes reduce hydroperoxides to the corresponding alcohols at the expense of reduced glutathione. Of special interest within this protein family is the moonlighting enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4). This enzyme is a scavenger of lipophilic hydroperoxides on one hand, but on the other hand can be transformed into an enzymatically inactive cellular structural component. GPx4 deficiency - in contrast to all other GPx family members - leads to abnormal embryo development and finally produces a lethal phenotype in mice. This review is aimed at summarizing the current knowledge on GPx isoforms during embryo development and tumor development with an emphasis on

  3. The comprehensive acid-base characterization of glutathione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzahosseini, Arash; Somlyay, Máté; Noszál, Béla

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione in its thiol (GSH) and disulfide (GSSG) forms, and 4 related compounds were studied by 1H NMR-pH titrations and a case-tailored evaluation method. The resulting acid-base properties are quantified in terms of 128 microscopic protonation constants; the first complete set of such parameters for this vitally important pair of compounds. The concomitant 12 interactivity parameters were also determined. Since biological redox systems are regularly compared to the GSH-GSSG pair, the eight microscopic thiolate basicities determined this way are exclusive means for assessing subtle redox parameters in a wide pH range.

  4. Chemical reactions of As complexation by glutathione: an XAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, M. W.; Vasconcelos, I. F.; Modolo, L. V.; Barbosa, F. A. R.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the chemical reactions between As(III) and As(V) with glutathione, which is a target compound in As biochemistry due to its primordial role in As immobilization and intracellular reduction, in various molar ratios were investigated using As K-edge XAFS spectroscopy. Results showed a gradual substitution of As-O bonds in the coordination of aqueous As(III) and As(V) for three As-S bonds in the As+GSH complex. Moreover, the data showed reduction of As(V) to As(III) prior or concomitant to the As+GSH complex formation.

  5. Formation of an adduct between fosfomycin and glutathione: a new mechanism of antibiotic resistance in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Arca, P; Rico, M; Braña, A F; Villar, C J; Hardisson, C; Suárez, J E

    1988-01-01

    Plasmid-borne resistance to fosfomycin in bacteria is due to modification of the antibiotic molecule by a glutathione S-transferase that catalyzes the formation of a covalent bond between the sulfhydryl residue of the cysteine in glutathione and the C-1 of fosfomycin. This reaction results in opening of the epoxide ring of the antibiotic to form an inactive adduct, the structure of which was confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance. Dialyzed extracts prepared from resistant Escherichia coli strains were unable to modify fosfomycin unless exogenous glutathione was added to the reaction mixtures. Similarly, mutants defective in glutathione biosynthesis were susceptible to fosfomycin, despite harboring a resistance plasmid. Extracts of resistant but not susceptible strains could join glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, confirming the nature of the enzymatic activity. Adduct formation appeared to be specific for glutathione: none of the other thiols tested (cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, and dithiothreitol) could modify fosfomycin. PMID:3056239

  6. Three-dimensional structure of a Bombyx mori Omega-class glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Suzuki, Mamoru; Higashiura, Akifumi; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2013-09-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major phase II detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here we report the crystal structure of an Omega-class glutathione transferase of Bombyx mori, bmGSTO, to gain insight into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of bmGSTO complexed with glutathione determined at a resolution of 2.5Å reveals that it exists as a dimer and is structurally similar to Omega-class GSTs with respect to its secondary and tertiary structures. Analysis of a complex between bmGSTO and glutathione showed that bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site (G-site). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTO mutants indicated that amino acid residues Leu62, Lys65, Lys77, Val78, Glu91 and Ser92 in the G-site contribute to catalytic activity.

  7. Atypical features of a Ure2p glutathione transferase from Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Thuillier, Anne; Roret, Thomas; Favier, Frédérique; Gelhaye, Eric; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Didierjean, Claude; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie

    2013-07-11

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are known to transfer glutathione onto small hydrophobic molecules in detoxification reactions. The GST Ure2pB1 from Phanerochaete chrysosporium exhibits atypical features, i.e. the presence of two glutathione binding sites and a high affinity towards oxidized glutathione. Moreover, PcUre2pB1 is able to efficiently deglutathionylate GS-phenacylacetophenone. Catalysis is not mediated by the cysteines of the protein but rather by the one of glutathione and an asparagine residue plays a key role in glutathione stabilization. Interestingly PcUre2pB1 interacts in vitro with a GST of the omega class. These properties are discussed in the physiological context of wood degrading fungi.

  8. Structural characterization of the catalytic site of a Nilaparvata lugens delta-class glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Higashiura, Akifumi; Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamada, Naotaka; Shiotsuki, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a major class of detoxification enzymes that play a central role in the defense against environmental toxicants and oxidative stress. Here, we studied the crystal structure of a delta-class glutathione transferase from Nilaparvata lugens, nlGSTD, to gain insights into its catalytic mechanism. The structure of nlGSTD in complex with glutathione, determined at a resolution of 1.7Å, revealed that it exists as a dimer and its secondary and tertiary structures are similar to those of other delta-class GSTs. Analysis of a complex between nlGSTD and glutathione showed that the bound glutathione was localized to the glutathione-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of nlGSTD mutants indicated that amino acid residues Ser11, His52, Glu66, and Phe119 contribute to catalytic activity.

  9. S-(4-bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)glutathione: A new affinity label for the 4-4 isoenzyme of rat liver glutathione S-transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Katusz, R.M.; Colman, R.F. )

    1991-11-26

    S-(4-Bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)glutathione (S-BDB-G), a reactive analogue of glutathione, has been synthesized and characterized by UV spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography, as well as by bromide and primary amine analysis. Incubation of S-BDB-G (200 {mu}M) with the 4-4 isoenzyme of rat liver glutathione S-transferase at pH 6.5 and 25C results in a time-dependent inactivation of the enzyme. The k{sub obs} exhibits a nonlinear dependence on S-BDB-G concentration from 50 to 1000 {mu}M. Modified enzyme, prepared by incubating glutathione S-transferase with ({sup 3}H)S-BDB-G in the absence or in the presence of S-hexylglutathione, was reduced with NaBH{sub 4}, carboxymethylated, and digested with trypsin. The tryptic digest was fractionated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Two radioactive peptides were identified. These results suggest that S-BDB-G functions as an affinity label at or near the active site of glutathione S-transferase and that modification of one site per enzyme subunit causes inactivation. It is proposed that the new compound, S-(4-bromo-2,3-dioxobutyl)glutathione, may have general applicability as an affinity label of other enzymes with glutathione binding sites.

  10. Reactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin with reduced glutathione.

    PubMed

    Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Shimmon, Ronald; Dawson, Michael; Hilmer, Sarah N; Le Couteur, David G

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common cause of chronic and recurrent lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) whose sputa contain copious quantities of P. aeruginosa toxin, pyocyanin. Pyocyanin triggers tissue damage mainly by its redox cycling and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The reactions between reduced glutathione (GSH) and pyocyanin were observed using absorption spectra from spectrophotometry and the reaction products analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Pyocyanin reacted with GSH non-enzymatically at 37 degrees C resulting in the production of red-brown products, spectophotometrically visible as a 480 nm maximum absorption peak after 24 h of incubation. The reaction was concentration-dependent on reduced glutathione but not on pyocyanin. Minimizing the accessibility of oxygen to the reaction decreased its rate. The anti-oxidant enzyme catalase circumvented the reaction. Proton-NMR analysis demonstrated the persistence of the original aromatic ring and the methyl-group of pyocyanin in the red-brown products. Anti-oxidant agents having thiol groups produced similar spectophotometrically visible peaks. The presence of a previously unidentified non-enzymatic GSH-dependent metabolic pathway for pyocyanin has thus been identified. The reaction between pyocyanin and GSH is concentration-, time-, and O(2)-dependent. The formation of H(2)O(2) as an intermediate and the thiol group in GSH seem to be important in this reaction. PMID:18797520

  11. Fasciola gigantica thioredoxin glutathione reductase: Biochemical properties and structural modeling.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankita; Kesherwani, Manish; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Tripathi, Timir

    2016-08-01

    Platyhelminth thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR) is a multifunctional enzyme that crosstalk between the conventional thioredoxin (Trx) and glutathione (GSH) system. It has been validated as a potential drug target in blood flukes. In the present study, we have performed a biochemical study on Fasciola gigantica TGR with substrates DTNB and GSSG. The Michaelis constant (Km) with DTNB was found to be 4.34±0.12μM while it was 61.15±1.50μM with GSSG. The kinetic results were compared with the TGR activities of other helminths. FgTGR showed typical hysteretic behavior with GSSG as other TGRs. We also described a homology-based structure of FgTGR. The cofactors (NADPH and FAD) and substrates (GSSG and DTNB) were docked, and two possible binding sites for substrates were identified in a single chain. The substrates were found to bind more favorably in the second site of TrxR domains. We also presented the first report on binding interaction of DTNB with a TGR. DTNB forms H-bond with His204 and Arg450 of chain A, Sec597, and Gly598 from chain B, salt-bridge with Lys124, and numerous other hydrophobic interactions. Helminth TGR represents an important enzyme in the redox and antioxidant system; hence, its inhibition can be used as an effective strategy against liver flukes. PMID:27112978

  12. Protective role of glutathione in buck semen cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Noei Razliqi, R; Zhandi, M; Shakeri, M; Towhidi, A; Sharafi, M; Emamverdi, M; Khodaei Motlagh, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of low levels of glutathione on post-thawed buck sperm quality. In this experiment, different concentrations of glutathione [0 (LG-0), 0.5 (LG-0.5), 1 (LG-1), 1.5 (LG-1.5), and 2 (LG-2) mM] were added in a soybean lecithin-based extender. A total of 16 ejaculates from four bucks were collected and pooled. Each pooled sample was divided into five equal parts and each part was diluted by one of the above mentioned groups. After freeze-thawing process, motility and velocity, plasma membrane integrity and functionality, and apoptosis features of spermatozoa were evaluated. The results of this experiment showed that total motility (50.75 ± 2.33), plasma membrane integrity (55.75 ± 3.01) and functionality (46.75 ± 2.79) were higher in LG-1 extender compared to other extenders (P<0.05). The percentage of live spermatozoa (53.23 ± 3.26) was higher in LG-1 extender compared to other extenders, with the exception of LG-1.5 extender (P<0.05). Also, the percentage of late apoptotic spermatozoa (21.33 ± 1.63) was lower in LG-1 extender compared to other extenders (P<0.05). In conclusion, our results showed that GL-1 extender resulted in higher post-thawed buck sperm quality compared to other extenders.

  13. Dinitrosyl iron complexes with glutathione suppress experimental endometriosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Burgova, Evgeniya N; Tkachev, Nikolai А; Adamyan, Leila V; Mikoyan, Vasak D; Paklina, Oksana V; Stepanyan, Asiya A; Vanin, Anatoly F

    2014-03-15

    Dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with glutathione exert a cytotoxic effect on endometrioid tumours in rats with surgically induced experimental endometriosis. Intraperitoneal treatment of rats (Group 1) with DNIC (12.5μmoles/kg, daily, for 12 days), beginning with day 4 after the surgical operation (implantation of two 2mm-thick uterine fragments onto the abdominal wall) followed by 14-day keeping of animals on a standard feeding schedule (without medication) resulted in complete inhibition of the growth of endometrioid implants (EMI) in the majority of experimental animals. The ratio of mean EMI volumes in control and experimental rats of Group 1 was 14:1. In Group 2 rats, the use of a similar treatment protocol 4 weeks after surgery changed this ratio to 1.4:1. Noteworthy, the decrease of this ratio was irrelevant to deceleration of EMI growth at later periods after surgery. The histopathological analysis of EMI samples from experimental rats of Group 2 demonstrated complete disappearance of endometrial cysts suggesting a cytotoxic effect of DNIC on the tumours. The data obtained demonstrate that DNIC with glutathione and, probably, with other thiol-containing ligands hold considerable promise in the design of drugs for treating endometriosis in female patients. PMID:24491840

  14. Interaction between glutathione and Apoptosis in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dilip; Sah, Sangita; Nath, Swapan K.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by imbalance redox state and increased apoptosis. The activation, proliferation and cell death of lymphocytes are dependent on intracellular levels of glutathione and controlled production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Changes in the intracellular redox environment of cells, through oxygen-derived free radical production known as oxidative stress, have been reported to be critical for cellular immune dysfunction, activation of apoptotic enzymes and apoptosis. The shift in the cellular GSH-to-GSSG redox balance in favor of the oxidized species, GSSG, constitutes an important signal that can decide the fate of the abnormal apoptosis in the disease. The current review will focus on four main areas: (1) general description of oxidative stress markers in SLE, (2) alteration of redox state and complication of disease (3) role of redox mechanisms in the initiation and execution phases of apoptosis, and (4) intracellular glutathione and its checkpoints with lymphocyte apoptosis represent novel targets for pharmacological intervention in SLE. PMID:23279845

  15. Glutathione depletion due to copper-induced phytochelatin synthesis causes oxidative stress in Silene cucubalus

    SciTech Connect

    Ric De Vos, C.H.; Vonk, M.J.; Vooijs, R.; Schat, H. )

    1992-03-01

    The relation between loss of glutathione due to metal-induced phytochelatin synthesis and oxidative stress was studied in the roots of copper-sensitive and tolerant Silene cucubalus (L.) Wib., resistant to 1 and 40 micromolar Cu, respectively. The amount of nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds other then glutathione was taken as a measure of phytochelatins. At a supply of 20 micromolar Cu, which is toxic for sensitive plants only, phytochelatin synthesis and loss of total glutathione were observed only in sensitive plants within 6 h of exposure. When the plants were exposed to a range of copper concentrations for 3 d, a marked production of phytochelatins in sensitive plants was already observed at 0.5 micromolar Cu, whereas the production in tolerant plants was negligible at 40 micromolar or lower. The highest production in tolerant plants was only 40% of that in sensitive plants. In both varieties, the synthesis of phytochelatins was coupled to a loss of glutathione. Copper at toxic concentrations caused oxidative stress, as was evidenced by both the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and a shift in the glutathione redox couple to a more oxidized state. Depletion of glutathione by pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine significantly increased the oxidative damage by copper. At a comparably low glutathione level, cadmium had no effect on either lipid peroxidation or the glutathione redox couple in buthionine sulfoximine-treated plants. These results indicate that copper may specifically cause oxidative stress by depletion of the antioxidant glutathione due to phytochelatin synthesis.

  16. Interaction of glutathione with bovine serum albumin: Spectroscopy and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Jahanban-Esfahlan, Ali; Panahi-Azar, Vahid

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to investigate the interaction between glutathione and bovine serum albumin (BSA) using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption, fluorescence spectroscopies under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.4) and molecular docking methods. The results of fluorescence spectroscopy indicated that the fluorescence intensity of BSA was decreased considerably upon the addition of glutathione through a static quenching mechanism. The fluorescence quenching obtained was related to the formation of BSA-glutathione complex. The values of KSV, Ka and Kb for the glutathione and BSA interaction were in the order of 10(5). The thermodynamic parameters including enthalpy change (ΔH), entropy change (ΔS) and also Gibb's free energy (ΔG) were determined using Van't Hoff equation. These values showed that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces were the main interactions in the binding of glutathione to BSA and the stabilization of the complex. Also, the interaction of glutathione and BSA was spontaneous. The effects of glutathione on the BSA conformation were determined using UV-vis spectroscopy. Moreover, glutathione was docked in BSA using ArgusLab as a molecular docking program. It was recognized that glutathione binds within the sub-domain IIA pocket in domain II of BSA. PMID:26920314

  17. Effects of heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Pb, Zn) on fish glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Eroglu, A; Dogan, Z; Kanak, E G; Atli, G; Canli, M

    2015-03-01

    The glutathione metabolism contains crucial antioxidant molecules to defend the organisms against oxidants. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the response of the glutathione metabolism in the liver of freshwater fish Oreochromis niloticus exposed to metals (Cu, Cd, Cr, Pb, Zn) in different periods. Fish were exposed to metals (as 1 μg/mL) individually for 1, 7, and 14 days and subsequently antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, GPX; glutathione reductase, GR and glutathione S-transferase, GST) and glutathione levels (total glutathione, tGSH; reduced glutathione, rGSH; oxidized glutathione, GSSG and GSH/GSSG ratios) in the liver were measured. There was no fish mortality during the experiments, except Cu exposure. The antioxidant enzymes responded differently to metal exposures depending on metal types and exposure durations. GPX activity increased only after Cd exposure, while GST activity increased following 7 days of all metal exposures. However, GR activity did not alter in most cases. Total GSH and GSH/GSSG levels generally decreased, especially after 7 days. Data showed that metal exposures significantly altered the response of antioxidant system parameters, particularly at day 7 and some recovery occurred after 14 days. This study suggests that the response of antioxidant system could help to predict metal toxicity in the aquatic environments and be useful as an "early warning tool" in natural monitoring studies.

  18. Intrinsic electrophilicity of the 4-methylsulfonyl-2-pyridone scaffold in glucokinase activators: role of glutathione-S-transferases and in vivo quantitation of a glutathione conjugate in rats.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, John; Sharma, Raman; Atkinson, Karen; Filipski, Kevin J; Wright, Stephen W; Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Tan, Beijing; Kosa, Rachel E; Stevens, Benjamin; Tu, Meihua; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2010-11-01

    Previous studies on the in vitro metabolism of 4-alkylsulfonyl-2-pyridone-based glucokinase activators revealed a facile, non-enzymatic displacement of the 4-alkylsulfonyl group by glutathione. In the present studies, a role for glutathione-S-transferases (GST) as catalysts in the desulfonylation reaction was demonstrated using a combination of human liver microsomes, human liver cytosol and human GSTs. The identification of a glutathione conjugate in circulation following intravenous administration of a candidate 4-methylsulfonyl-2-pyridone to rats confirmed the relevance of the in vitro findings.

  19. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site.

    PubMed

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-10-20

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme.

  20. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  1. Surface display of a bifunctional glutathione synthetase on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for converting chicken feather hydrolysate into glutathione.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiqi; Tan, Hongming; Zhou, Shining; Cao, Lixiang

    2014-08-01

    The low economic profits of feather recycling lead that the large amount of feathers is currently discarded in China. To convert feather hydrolysates into GSH with high values, surface display of the bifunctional glutathione synthetase encoded by gcsgs from Streptococcus thermophilus on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the potential in glutathione (GSH) production from feather hydrolysates were studied. The surface-displayed GCSGS could be used to convert feather hydrolysates into GSH. Results showed that 10 g/l of feather was converted into 321.8 mg/l GSH by the Trichoderma atroviride F6 and surface-displayed GCSGS in the study. Compared with production of intracellular GSH by S. cerevisiae from amino acids or feather hydrolysate, the concentration of GSH in the study was higher, and purification of GSH was more feasible. Due to the glycolytic pathway, the S. cerevisiae was used to generate ATP and cheap feather hydrolysate as precursors, the process for GSH production based on surface-displayed GCSGS is cheap and feasible. The process showed the potential to convert feather hydrolysates into GSH on an industrial scale.

  2. Naegleria fowleri: a free-living highly pathogenic amoeba contains trypanothione/trypanothione reductase and glutathione/glutathione reductase systems.

    PubMed

    Ondarza, Raúl N; Hurtado, Gerardo; Tamayo, Elsa; Iturbe, Angélica; Hernández, Eva

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents definitive data showing that the thiol-bimane compound isolated and purified by HPLC from Naegleria fowleri trophozoites unequivocally corresponds by matrix assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS, to the characteristic monoprotonated ion of trypanothione-(bimane)(2) [M(+)H(+)] of m/z 1104.57 and to the trypanothione-(bimane) of m/z 914.46. The trypanothione disulfide T(S)(2) was also found to have a molecular ion of m/z 723.37. Additionally HPLC demonstrated that thiol-bimane compounds corresponding to cysteine and glutathione were present in Naegleria. The ion patterns of the thiol-bimane compounds prepared from commercial trypanothione standard, Entamoeba histolytica and Crithidia luciliae are identical to the Naegleria thiol-bimane compound. Partially purified extracts from N. fowleri showed the coexistence of glutathione and trypanothione reductases activities. There is not doubt that the thiol compound trypanothione, which was previously thought to occur only in Kinetoplastida, is also present in the human pathogens E. histolytica and N. fowleri, as well as in the non-pathogenic euglenozoan E. gracilis. The presence of the trypanothione/trypanothione reductase system in N. fowleri creates the possibility of using this enzyme as a new "drug target" for rationally designed drugs to eliminate the parasite, without affecting the human host.

  3. Improvement of oxidized glutathione fermentation by thiol redox metabolism engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Aoki, Naoko; Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Nishida, Keiji; Araki, Michihiro; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tripeptide widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. In industrial fermentation, glutathione is currently produced primarily using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Intracellular glutathione exists in two forms; the majority is present as reduced glutathione (GSH) and a small amount is present as oxidized glutathione (GSSG). However, GSSG is more stable than GSH and is a more attractive form for the storage of glutathione extracted from yeast cells after fermentation. In this study, intracellular GSSG content was improved by engineering thiol oxidization metabolism in yeast. An engineered strain producing high amounts of glutathione from over-expression of glutathione synthases and lacking glutathione reductase was used as a platform strain. Additional over-expression of thiol oxidase (1.8.3.2) genes ERV1 or ERO1 increased the GSSG content by 2.9-fold and 2.0-fold, respectively, compared with the platform strain, without decreasing cell growth. However, over-expression of thiol oxidase gene ERV2 showed almost no effect on the GSSG content. Interestingly, ERO1 over-expression did not decrease the GSH content, raising the total glutathione content of the cell, but ERV1 over-expression decreased the GSH content, balancing the increase in the GSSG content. Furthermore, the increase in the GSSG content due to ERO1 over-expression was enhanced by additional over-expression of the gene encoding Pdi1, whose reduced form activates Ero1 in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results indicate that engineering the thiol redox metabolism of S. cerevisiae improves GSSG and is critical to increasing the total productivity and stability of glutathione.

  4. [35S]-LABELING OF THE SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM GLUTATHIONE POOL TO ASSESS GLUTATHIONE-MEDIATED DNA BINDING BY 1,2-DIBROMOETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotransformation of drugs and environmental chemicals to reactive intermediates is often studied with the use of radiolabeled compounds that are synthesized by expensive and technically difficult procedures. In general, glutathione (GSH) conjugation serves as a detoxification m...

  5. Consequences of abrupt glutathione depletion in murine Clara cells: ultrastructural and biochemical investigations into the role of glutathione loss in naphthalene cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Phimister, Andrew J; Williams, Kurt J; Van Winkle, Laura S; Plopper, Charles G

    2005-08-01

    Glutathione plays many critical roles within the cell, including offering protection from reactive chemicals. The bioactivated toxicant naphthalene forms chemically reactive intermediates that can deplete glutathione and covalently bind to cellular proteins. Naphthalene selectively injures the nonciliated epithelial cells of the intrapulmonary airways (i.e., Clara cells). This study attempted to define what role glutathione loss plays in naphthalene cytotoxicity by comparing Swiss-Webster mice treated with naphthalene with those treated with the glutathione depletor diethylmaleate. High-resolution imaging techniques were used to evaluate acute changes in Clara cell ultrastructure, membrane permeability, and cytoskeleton structure. A single dose of either diethylmaleate (1000 mg/kg) or naphthalene (200 mg/kg) caused similar glutathione losses in intrapulmonary airways (< 20% of control). Diethylmaleate did not increase membrane permeability, disrupt mitochondria, or lead to cell death--hallmark features of naphthalene cytotoxicity. However, diethylmaleate treatment did cause Clara cell swelling, plasma membrane blebs, and actin cytoskeleton disruptions similar to naphthalene treatment. Structural changes in mitochondria and Golgi bodies also were noted. Changes in ATP levels were measured as an indication of overall cell function, in isolated airway explants incubated with diethylmaleate, naphthalene, or naphthalene metabolites in vitro. Only the reactive metabolites of naphthalene caused significant ATP losses. Unlike the lethal injury caused by naphthalene, the disruptive cellular changes associated with glutathione loss from diethylmaleate seemed to be reversible after recovery of glutathione levels. This suggests that glutathione depletion may be responsible for some aspects of naphthalene cytotoxicity, but it is not sufficient to cause cell death without further stresses.

  6. Role of glutathione in cancer pathophysiology and therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Singh, Simendra; Khan, Amir R; Gupta, Alok K

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important intracellular antioxidant that instills several vital roles within a cell including maintenance of the redox state, drug detoxification, and cellular protection from damage by free radicals, peroxides and toxins. Molecular alterations in the components of the GSH system in various tumors can lead to increased survival and enhanced tumor drug resistance. Early identification of the importance of intracellular GSH to detoxification reactions has now led to investigating the potential importance that GSH chemistry has on signal transduction, molecular regulation of cellular physiology and regulation of apoptosis pathway. Several therapeutic agents that target this system have been developed and used experimentally and clinically in an attempt to improve cancer chemotherapy. This review highlights different roles played by GSH that finally regulate tumor growth and advances in the use of GSH-based drugs to specifically target this detoxifying system in cancer treatment as a means to increase therapeutic response and decrease chemotherapeutic drug resistance.

  7. Insights into the catalytic mechanism of synthetic glutathione peroxidase mimetics.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Debasish; Mugesh, Govindasamy

    2015-11-01

    Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx) is a key selenoenzyme that protects biomolecules from oxidative damage. Extensive research has been carried out to design and synthesize small organoselenium compounds as functional mimics of GPx. While the catalytic mechanism of the native enzyme itself is poorly understood, the synthetic mimics follow different catalytic pathways depending upon the structures and reactivities of various intermediates formed in the catalytic cycle. The steric as well as electronic environments around the selenium atom not only modulate the reactivity of these synthetic mimics towards peroxides and thiols, but also the catalytic mechanisms. The catalytic cycle of small GPx mimics is also dependent on the nature of peroxides and thiols used in the study. In this review, we discuss how the catalytic mechanism varies with the substituents attached to the selenium atom.

  8. Oxidative stress and glutathione in TGF-β-mediated fibrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, R-M.; Gaston Pravia, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is the most potent and ubiquitous profibrogenic cytokine and its expression is increased in almost all the fibrotic diseases and in experimental fibrosis models. TGF-β increases ROS production and decreases the concentration of glutathione (GSH), the most abundant intracellular free thiol and an important antioxidant, in various types of cells, which mediates many of TGF-β’s fibrogenic effects. A decreased GSH concentration is also observed in human fibrotic diseases and in experimental fibrosis models. Although the biological significance of GSH depletion in the development of fibrosis remains obscure, GSH and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of GSH, have been used in clinics for the treatment of fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes recent findings in the field to address the potential mechanism whereby oxidative stress mediates TGF-β’s fibrogenesis and the potential therapeutic values of antioxidant treatment in fibrotic diseases. PMID:19800967

  9. Glutathione peroxidase 4 prevents necroptosis in mouse erythroid precursors

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Özge; Alankuş, Yasemin B.; Grootjans, Sasker; Vegi, Naidu; Hültner, Lothar; Hoppe, Philipp S.; Schroeder, Timm; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining cellular redox balance is vital for cell survival and tissue homoeostasis because imbalanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to oxidative stress and cell death. The antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a key regulator of oxidative stress–induced cell death. We show that mice with deletion of Gpx4 in hematopoietic cells develop anemia and that Gpx4 is essential for preventing receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis in erythroid precursor cells. Absence of Gpx4 leads to functional inactivation of caspase 8 by glutathionylation, resulting in necroptosis, which occurs independently of tumor necrosis factor α activation. Although genetic ablation of Rip3 normalizes reticulocyte maturation and prevents anemia, ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation in Gpx4-deficient cells remain high. Our results demonstrate that ROS and lipid hydroperoxides function as not-yet-recognized unconventional upstream signaling activators of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. PMID:26463424

  10. Glutathione transferase classes alpha, pi, and mu: GSH activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Daniel F A R; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2010-10-14

    Since the early 1960s, glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been described as detoxification enzymes. In fact, GSTs are the most important enzymes involved in the metabolism of electrophilic xenobiotic/endobiotic compounds. These enzymes are able to catalyze the nucleophilic addition of glutathione (GSH) sulfur thiolate to a wide range of electrophilic substrates, building up a less toxic and more soluble compound. Cytosolic classes alpha, pi, and mu are the most extensively studied GSTs. However, many of the catalytic events are still poorly understood. In the present work, we have resorted to density functional theory (DFT) and to potential of mean force (PMF) calculations to determine the GSH activation mechanism of GSTP1-1 and GSTM1-1 isoenzymes. For the GSTP1-1 enzyme, we have demonstrated that a water molecule, after an initial conformational rearrangement of GSH, can assist a proton transfer between the GSH cysteine thiol (GSH-SH) and the GSH glutamate alpha carboxylate (GSH-COO(-)) groups. The energy barrier associated with the proton transfer is 11.36 kcal·mol(-1). The GSTM1-1 enzyme shows a completely different behavior from the previous isoenzyme. In this case, two water molecules, positioned between the GSH-SH and the ξ N atom of His107, working like a bridge, are able to promote the proton transfer between these two active groups with an energy barrier of 7.98 kcal·mol(-1). All our results are consistent with all the enzymes kinetics and mutagenesis experimental studies.

  11. Chronic depletion of glutathione (GSH) and minimal modification of LDL in vivo: its prevention by glutathione mono ester (GME) therapy.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Namakkal Soorappan; Sathyanarayanan, Srinivasan; Devaraj, Niranjali S; Devaraj, Halagowder

    2005-06-30

    A decline in reduced glutathione (GSH) level is associated with aging and free radical mediated diseases. The objective of this study was to determine whether the chronic depletion of extra cellular GSH causes oxidative damage to the circulating macromolecules such as lipoproteins. Decreased concentrations of plasma glutathione, vitamin E and ascorbic acid were recorded in the rats treated with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), a selective GSH inhibitor. In LDL isolated from BSO-treated animals, the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) and conjugated dienes were significantly increased (P<0.01), whereas the levels of vitamin E were decreased (P<0.01). The analysis of total and LDL cholesterol revealed significant changes between the control and experimental groups. Of interest, altered concentrations of lyso-phosphatidyl choline (Lyso-PC) and phosphatidyl choline (PC) were recorded from the BSO mediated minimally modified LDL. A negative correlation between LDL-BDC/MDA and its antioxidant capacity was noted. Upon in vitro oxidation with CuSO(4), the electrophoretic behavior of purified LDL-apoprotein-B on agarose gel showed an increased mobility in BSO-treated rats, indicative of in vivo modification of LDL to become susceptible for in vitro oxidation. The increased mobility of LDL (after in vitro oxidation) isolated from the BSO-treated animals correlates with a decrease in its amino groups, as determined by the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) reactants. However, the mobility of LDL molecule was not altered due to BSO treatment in vivo. Interestingly, the minimal modification on LDL does not lead to any vascular damage in the dorsal aorta of the rats injected with BSO. The administration of glutathione monoester (GME), at a dose of 5 mmol/kg body weight, twice a day, for 30 days, to animals treated with l-buthionine-SR-sulfoximine (BSO, 4 mmol/kg body weight, twice a day, for 30 days) normalized the antioxidant status and prevented the minimal modifications on

  12. Enhancement of Combined Umami and Salty Taste by Glutathione in the Human Tongue and Brain.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tazuko K; Yeung, Andy Wai Kan; Tanabe, Hiroki C; Ito, Yuki; Jung, Han-Sung; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2016-09-01

    Glutathione, a natural substance, acts on calcium receptors on the tongue and is known to enhance basic taste sensations. However, the effects of glutathione on brain activity associated with taste sensation on the tongue have not been determined under standardized taste delivery conditions. In this study, we investigated the sensory effect of glutathione on taste with no effect of the smell when glutathione added to a combined umami and salty taste stimulus. Twenty-six volunteers (12 women and 14 men; age 19-27 years) performed a sensory evaluation of taste of a solution of monosodium L-glutamate and sodium chloride, with and without glutathione. The addition of glutathione changed taste qualities and significantly increased taste intensity ratings under standardized taste delivery conditions (P < 0.001). Functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that glutathione itself elicited significant activation in the left ventral insula. These results are the first to demonstrate the enhancing effect of glutathione as reflected by brain data while tasting an umami and salty mixture. PMID:27353260

  13. A Hg(II)-mediated "signal-on" electrochemical glutathione sensor.

    PubMed

    Lotfi Zadeh Zhad, Hamid R; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2014-08-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a DNA-based electrochemical sensor for detection of glutathione. Sensor signaling relies on glutathione's ability to chelate mercury Hg(II), displacing it from the thymine-Hg(II)-thymine complex formed between the surface-immobilized DNA probes. Our results show that this sensor is sensitive and selective enough to be employed in saliva.

  14. METABOLISM OF 1,1- AND 1,3- DICHLOROPROPENE: A MECHANISM OF BIOACTIVATION BY GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glutathione transferases (GST) catalyze the reaction of glutathione (GSH) with haloalkenes via a nucleophilic vinylic substitution mechanism (SNV reaction). The source water contaminants 1,1-dichloropropene and 1,3-dichloropropene, which are under scrutiny by the U.S.EPA, were...

  15. Glutathione metabolic genes coordinately respond to heavy metals and jasmonic acid in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, C; Oliver, D J

    1998-01-01

    Glutathione plays a pivotal role in protecting plants from environmental stresses, oxidative stress, xenobiotics, and some heavy metals. Arabidopsis plants treated with cadmium or copper responded by increasing transcription of the genes for glutathione synthesis, gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase and glutathione synthetase, as well as glutathione reductase. The response was specific for those metals whose toxicity is thought to be mitigated through phytochelatins, and other toxic and nontoxic metals did not alter mRNA levels. Feeding experiments suggested that neither oxidative stress, as results from exposure to H2O2, nor oxidized or reduced glutathione levels were responsible for activating transcription of these genes. Jasmonic acid also activated the same suite of genes, which suggests that it might be involved in the signal transduction pathway for copper and cadmium. Jasmonic acid treatment increased mRNA levels and the capacity for glutathione synthesis but did not alter the glutathione content in unstressed plants, which supports the idea that the glutathione concentration is controlled at multiple levels. PMID:9724699

  16. Glutathione suppresses the enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning in grape juice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shengjun

    2014-10-01

    Browning tends to occur in grape juice during processing and storage and decreases the commercial value of it. Thus, browning inhibition is an important objective for manufacturers. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of glutathione as a browning inhibitor for use on grape juice. Grape juice browning treated with glutathione was monitored during processing and accelerated browning. 0.04% of glutathione inhibited 99.4% of the polyphenoloxidase activity in the grape juice. Consequently, during processing at room temperature and accelerated browning at 80 °C, the browning in the grape juice treated with glutathione was significantly lower than that in the control (p<0.05). The results indicate that glutathione is a promising browning inhibitor used in grape juice.

  17. Improvements in the bread-making quality of gluten-free rice batter by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Yano, Hiroyuki

    2010-07-14

    The wide prevalence of celiac disease and wheat allergy has led to a growing demand for gluten-free foods. Rice proteins do not possess the viscoelastic properties typically found in gluten, thus making rice flour unsuitable for the production of yeast-leavened products. In the present study, we found that the addition of glutathione to rice batter improves its gas-retaining properties. Glutathione was found to prevent the formation of the disulfide-linked macromolecular protein barrier, which is reported to confer resistance to the deformation of rice batter in the baking process. Also, glutathione appeared to gelatinize rice starch at lower temperatures. Microstructure analyses of glutathione-added rice bread revealed it to have a perforated structure like wheat bread but with a smoother-looking surface. These data collectively suggest that glutathione facilitates the deformation of rice batter, thus increasing its elasticity in the early stages of bread baking and the volume of the resulting bread.

  18. Effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Hirota, Y.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of methylmercury on the activity of glutathione peroxidase in rat liver was studied in vivo. A daily dose of 10mg methylmercuric chloride/kg body weight was administered subcutaneously to 15 male Wistar rats for 10 days, and the glutathione peroxidase activity in the liver was measured to compare with the control activity. A marked decrease was observed in the glutathione peroxidase activity in the experimental animals, which measured as low as 40% in comparison to that in the control animals. It can be speculated that the inhibition of glutathione peroxidase activity plays a significant role in the development of mercury toxicity and that the protective effect of selenium and vitamin E on the mercury intoxication might be partly due to preserving the glutathione peroxidase activity in the antioxidative defense mechanisms.

  19. Competition between glutathione and protein thiols for disulphide-bond formation.

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, J W; Kaiser, C A

    1999-07-01

    It has long been assumed that the oxidized form of glutathione, the tripeptide glutamate-cysteine-glycine, is a source of oxidizing equivalents needed for the formation of disulphide bonds in proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), although the in vivo function of glutathione in the ER has never been studied directly. Here we show that the major pathway for oxidation in the yeast ER, defined by the protein Ero1, is responsible for the oxidation of both glutathione and protein thiols. However, mutation and overexpression studies show that glutathione competes with protein thiols for the oxidizing machinery. Thus, contrary to expectation, cellular glutathione contributes net reducing equivalents to the ER; these reducing equivalents can buffer the ER against transient hyperoxidizing conditions. PMID:10559898

  20. Storage of Heparinised Canine Whole Blood for the Measurement of Glutathione Peroxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    van Zelst, Mariëlle; Hesta, Myriam; Gray, Kerry; Janssens, Geert P J

    2016-08-01

    Glutathione peroxidase activity is used as a biomarker of selenium status in dogs. Freshly collected blood samples are usually measured, due to the lack of knowledge on the effect of storing the samples. This study investigated if the analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity in whole blood collected from dogs was affected by storage of between 5 and 164 days. Results indicated that glutathione peroxidase activity was more variable in the freshly analysed samples compared to the stored samples. Although the mean differences between fresh and stored samples were not always equal to zero, this is thought to be caused by the variability of reagent preparation rather than by storage, as no consistent increase or decrease in glutathione peroxidase activity was found. Therefore, it can be concluded that heparinised dog blood samples can be successfully stored up to 164 days before analysis of glutathione peroxidase activity. PMID:26701335

  1. Effect of aluminium metal on glutathione (GSH) level in plasma and cytosolic fraction of human blood.

    PubMed

    Khan, Haroon; Khan, M Farid; Jan, Syed Umer; Ullah, Naseem

    2011-01-01

    Aluminium is being used in the medicines in the form of antacids. The Aluminium metal can be leached from our utensils and can harm the body for its side effects, if become available to the systemic circulation. So it is important to check the effect of Aluminum on the Glutathione in vivo condition. Ellman method was used to determine the effect of Aluminum on GSH level in whole blood spectrophotometerically. 5,5-Dithiobis, 2-Nitrobenzoic Acid, Glutathione, Aluminium sulphate, phosphate buffer, HCl (Hydrochloric acid) and other laboratory instruments were used to conduct the research work. Time dependent effect of Aluminum on Glutathione level in whole blood was also checked and decrease was observed. This study also shows the effect of Aluminum as helping agent for the Glutathione to enhance the antioxidant system of the body or a cause for depletion of reduced Glutathione.

  2. Glutathione suppresses the enzymatic and non-enzymatic browning in grape juice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shengjun

    2014-10-01

    Browning tends to occur in grape juice during processing and storage and decreases the commercial value of it. Thus, browning inhibition is an important objective for manufacturers. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of glutathione as a browning inhibitor for use on grape juice. Grape juice browning treated with glutathione was monitored during processing and accelerated browning. 0.04% of glutathione inhibited 99.4% of the polyphenoloxidase activity in the grape juice. Consequently, during processing at room temperature and accelerated browning at 80 °C, the browning in the grape juice treated with glutathione was significantly lower than that in the control (p<0.05). The results indicate that glutathione is a promising browning inhibitor used in grape juice. PMID:24799201

  3. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  4. Glutathione determination by the Tietze enzymatic recycling assay and its relationship to cellular radiation response.

    PubMed Central

    Eady, J. J.; Orta, T.; Dennis, M. F.; Stratford, M. R.; Peacock, J. H.

    1995-01-01

    Large fluctuations in glutathione content were observed on a daily basis using the Tietze enzyme recycling assay in a panel of six human cell lines of varying radiosensitivity. Glutathione content tended to increase to a maximum during exponential cell proliferation, and then decreased at different rates as the cells approached plateau phase. By reference to high-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry of the fluorescent bimane derivative we were able to verify that these changes were real. However, the Tietze assay was occasionally unable to detect glutathione in two of our cell lines (MGH-U1 and AT5BIVA), although the other methods indicated its presence. The existence of an inhibitory activity responsible for these anomalies was confirmed through spiking our samples with known amounts of glutathione. We were unable to detect a direct relationship between cellular glutathione concentration and aerobic radiosensitivity in our panel of cell lines. PMID:7577452

  5. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  6. Characterization of bifunctional L-glutathione synthetases from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Actinobacillus succinogenes for efficient glutathione biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianhua; Li, Wei; Wang, Dezheng; Wu, Hui; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2016-07-01

    Glutathione (GSH), an important bioactive substance, is widely applied in pharmaceutical and food industries. In this work, two bifunctional L-glutathione synthetases (GshF) from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae (GshFAp) and Actinobacillus succinogenes (GshFAs) were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3). Similar to the GshF from Streptococcus thermophilus (GshFSt), GshFAp and GshFAs can be applied for high titer GSH production because they are less sensitive to end-product inhibition (Ki values 33 and 43 mM, respectively). The active catalytic forms of GshFAs and GshFAp are dimers, consistent with those of GshFPm (GshF from Pasteurella multocida) and GshFSa (GshF from Streptococcus agalactiae), but are different from GshFSt (GshF from S. thermophilus) which is an active monomer. The analysis of the protein sequences and three dimensional structures of GshFs suggested that the binding sites of GshFs for substrates, L-cysteine, L-glutamate, γ-glutamylcysteine, adenosine-triphosphate, and glycine are highly conserved with only very few differences. With sufficient supply of the precursors, the recombinant strains BL-21(DE3)/pET28a-gshFas and BL-21(DE3)/pET28a-gshFap were able to produce 36.6 and 34.1 mM GSH, with the molar yield of 0.92 and 0.85 mol/mol, respectively, based on the added L-cysteine. The results showed that GshFAp and GshFAs are potentially good candidates for industrial GSH production. PMID:26996628

  7. Dynamics of glutathione regulation in Schistosoma mansoni: correlations with the acute effects of oltipraz

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, D.D.

    1984-01-01

    Glutathione is present in adult Schistosoma mansoni (0.336 +/- 0.012 nmol/mg protein) at significantly lower levels than uninfected host tissues (1.051 +/- 0.013 nmol/mg protein, liver; 0.627 +/- 0.013 nmol/mg protein, kidney). Host hepatic glutathione levels decline significantly during the course of infection, while renal cortical glutathione levels are unaffected. Of the enzymes regulating glutathione utilization, glutathione reductase in the male parasite exhibits a specific activity of 10.3 +/- 4.2 nmol/mg protein, 15% of hepatic values. The apparent glutathione S-transferase activity was 26 +/- 7 ..mu..mol conjugate formed/min/mg protein with p-nitrobenzyl chloride as substrate (13% of hepatic values) and 526 +/- 18 ..mu..mol conjugate formed/min/mg protein with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrate (43% of hepatic values). Male schistosomes exhibited negligible glutathione peroxidase activity. Oltipraz, an antischistosomal compound, effected a significant depletion of parasite and host glutathione levels within 1 h of exposure in vivo and in vitro (at 250 mg/kg and 10 ..mu..M, respectively). Host tissue glutathionine levels returned to, or above, control levels by 6 h after oltipraz administration, while parasite glutathione levels remained significantly depressed. Uptake of (/sup 35/S) cysteine or (/sup 35/S) cystine by schistosomes was inhibited by oltipraz. However, the drug did not alter the relative distribution of label once incorporated into the parasite, indicating that the enzymes of glutathione synthesis were not directly inhibited.

  8. Protective role of glutathione reductase in paraquat induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Djukic, Mirjana M; Jovanovic, Marina D; Ninkovic, Milica; Stevanovic, Ivana; Ilic, Katarina; Curcic, Marijana; Vekic, Jelena

    2012-08-30

    Paraquat (PQ), a widely used herbicide is a well-known free radical producing agent. The mechanistic pathways of PQ neurotoxicity were examined by assessing oxidative/nitrosative stress markers. Focus was on the role of glutathione (GSH) cycle and to examine whether the pre-treatment with enzyme glutathione reductase (GR) could protect the vulnerable brain regions (VBRs) against harmful oxidative effect of PQ. The study was conducted on Wistar rats, randomly divided in five groups: intact-control group, (n = 8) and four experimental groups (n = 24). All tested compounds were administered intrastriatally (i.s.) in one single dose. The following parameters of oxidative status were measured in the striatum, hippocampus and cortex, at 30 min, 24 h and 7 days post treatment: superoxide anion radical (O₂·⁻), nitrate (NO₃⁻), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total GSH (tGSH) and its oxidized, disulfide form (GSSG) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Results obtained from the intact and the sham operated groups were not statistically different, confirming that invasive i.s. route of administration would not influence the reliability of results. Also, similar pattern of changes were observed between ipsi- and contra- lateral side of examined VBRs, indicating rapid spatial spreading of oxidative stress. Mortality of the animals (10%), within 24h, along with symptoms of Parkinsonism, after awakening from anesthesia for 2-3 h, were observed in the PQ group, only. Increased levels of O₂·⁻, NO₃⁻ and MDA, increased ratio of GSSG/GSH and considerably high activity of GPx were measured at 30 min after the treatment. Cytotoxic effect of PQ was documented by drastic drop of all measured parameters and extremely high peak of the ratio GSSG/GSH at 24th hrs after the PQ i.s. injection. In the GR+PQ group, markedly low activity of GPx and low content of NO₃⁻ (in striatum and cortex) were measured during whole experiment, while increase value was

  9. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Hercules R; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T; Chiarini, Luciana B; do Nascimento, José Luiz M; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G B; Kubrusly, Regina C; Faria, Robson X; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Reis, Ricardo A de Melo

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1-10 mM) showed that 5-10 mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50 mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100 nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70 μM and MK-801 20 μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5 mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit. PMID:27078878

  10. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Hercules R.; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C.; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; do Nascimento, José Luiz M.; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H.; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G. B.; Kubrusly, Regina C.; Faria, Robson X.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1–10mM) showed that 5–10mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70μM and MK-801 20μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit. PMID:27078878

  11. Purification and Biochemical Characterization of Glutathione S-Transferase from Down Syndrome and Normal Children Erythrocytes: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Ragaa R.; Maharem, Tahany M.; Abdel-Meguid, Nagwa; Sabry, Gilane M.; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem; Guneidy, Rasha A.

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the phenotypic manifestation of trisomy 21. Our study was concerned with the characterization and purification of glutathione S-transferase enzyme (GST) from normal and Down syndrome (DS) erythrocytes to illustrate the difference in the role of this enzyme in the cell. Glutathione S-transferase and glutathione (GSH) was…

  12. Unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways suggests potential involvement in plant defense against the gall midge mayetiola destructor in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutathione, a thiol tripeptide of '-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. In this study, we found that the abundance of total glutathion...

  13. Endurance Training and Glutathione-Dependent Antioxidant Defense Mechanism in Heart of the Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gül, Mustafa; Atalay, Mustafa; Hänninen, Osmo

    2003-01-01

    Regular physical exercise beneficially influences cardiac antioxidant defenses in normal rats. The aim of this study was to test whether endurance training can strengthen glutathione-dependent antioxidant defense mechanism and decrease lipid peroxidation in heart of the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Redox status of glutathione in blood of diabetic rats in response to training and acute exercise was also examined. Eight weeks of treadmill training increased the endurance in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. It did not affect glutathione level in heart tissue at rest and also after exercise. On the other hand, endurance training decreased glutathione peroxidase activity in heart, while glutathione reductase and glutathione S-transferase activities were not affected either by acute exhaustive exercise or endurance training. Reduced and oxidized glutathione levels in blood were not affected by either training or acute exercise. Conjugated dienes levels in heart tissue were increased by acute exhaustive exercise and also 8 weeks treadmill training. Longer duration of exhaustion in trained group may have contributed to the increased conjugated dienes levels in heart after acute exercise. Our results suggest that endurance type exercise may make heart more susceptible to oxidative stress. Therefore it may be wise to combine aerobic exercise with insulin treatment to prevent its adverse effects on antioxidant defense in heart in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:24616611

  14. Enzymes of glutathione synthesis in dog skeletal muscles and their response to training.

    PubMed

    Marin, E; Kretzschmar, M; Arokoski, J; Hänninen, O; Klinger, W

    1993-04-01

    The glutathione synthesizing enzymes, gamma-glutamyl cysteinyl synthetase and glutathione synthetase, were found in all skeletal muscles studied in dogs. Both occurred also in the liver, but only the former in the lung. The influence of physical training on these enzyme activities was also investigated. For 30 weeks the dogs ran 5 days week-1 on a treadmill at a 15 degrees uphill grade. A 1.5- to 2-fold increase in the gamma-glutamyl cysteinyl synthetase and 3-fold increase in the glutathione synthetase activities was observed in muscles affected by the training procedure (m. triceps, m. extensor carpi radialis and m. gastrocnemius). No training effect could be observed in the splenius and longissimus dorsi muscles or in the liver. The training increased total glutathione levels in the lung and gastrocnemius muscle as well as in the plasma. Glutathione disulfide levels were not altered. Acute physical exercise significantly decreased the plasma total glutathione concentrations in the trained dogs. The results indicate a training responsive adaptation of glutathione system in skeletal muscle.

  15. Effect of fish oil on glutathione redox system in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sorto-Gomez, Tania E; Ortiz, Genaro G; Pacheco-Moises, Fermín P; Torres-Sanchez, Erandis D; Ramirez-Ramirez, Viridiana; Macias-Islas, Miguel A; de la Rosa, Alfredo Celis; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory and autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Dysregulation of glutathione homeostasis and alterations in glutathione-dependent enzyme activities are implicated in the induction and progression of MS. Evidence suggests that Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of fish oil on the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), content of reduced and oxidized glutathione, and GSH/GSSG ratio in MS. 50 patients with relapsing-remitting MS were enrolled. The experimental group received orally 4 g/day of fish oil for 12 months. Fish oil supplementation resulted in a significant increase in n-3 fatty acids and a decrease n-6 fatty acids. No differences in glutathione reductase activity, content of reduced and oxidized glutathione, and GSH/GSSG ratio were found. Conclusion: Glutathione reductase activity was not significantly different between the groups; however, fish oil supplementation resulted in smaller increase in GR compared with control group, suggesting a possible effect on antioxidant defence mechanisms. PMID:27335704

  16. Increased fructosamine in non-diabetic rheumatoid arthritis patients: role of lipid peroxides and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Babu, Narsimhan Prakash; Bobby, Zachariah; Selvaraj, Nambiar; Harish, Belgode N

    2006-01-01

    Modification of proteins by non-enzymatic glycation is one of the underlying factors known to play a major role in the pathogenesis of many clinical disorders. Glycation of plasma proteins is enhanced by elevated glucose concentrations. However, increased fructosamine has been documented in rheumatoid arthritis patients without any history of diabetes. Collective evidence reveals that malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione can modulate the glycation process. This study was undertaken to unravel the possible association of malondialdehyde and glutathione with fructosamine in rheumatoid arthritis patients. A case-control study was performed on 15 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 15 control subjects. Whole blood glutathione, plasma malondialdehyde, fructosamine and fasting glucose were analyzed in both groups. Partial correlation analysis was performed to predict the independent association of malondialdehyde, glutathione and fasting glucose on fructosamine. In rheumatoid arthritis patients, while fructosamine and malondialdehyde levels were significantly increased, glutathione levels were significantly decreased compared with controls. With partial correlation analysis, fructosamine was found to have a significant positive correlation with malondialdehyde and a negative correlation with glutathione. These data suggest that plasma fructosamine levels are closely associated with malondialdehyde and glutathione in rheumatoid arthritis patients, warranting extra precaution in interpreting fructosamine as a measure of glycemic control in these patients. PMID:16776632

  17. 1-3-A Resolution Structure of Human Glutathione S-Transferase With S-Hexyl Glutathione Bound Reveals Possible Extended Ligandin Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Trong, I.Le; Stenkamp, R.E.; Ibarra, C.; Atkins, W.M.; Adman, E.T.

    2005-08-22

    Cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a critical role in xenobiotic binding and metabolism, as well as in modulation of oxidative stress. Here, the high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of homodimeric human GSTA1-1 in the apo form and in complex with S-hexyl glutathione (two data sets) are reported at 1.8, 1.5, and 1.3A respectively. At this level of resolution, distinct conformations of the alkyl chain of S-hexyl glutathione are observed, reflecting the nonspecific nature of the hydrophobic substrate binding site (H-site). Also, an extensive network of ordered water, including 75 discrete solvent molecules, traverses the open subunit-subunit interface and connects the glutathione binding sites in each subunit. In the highest-resolution structure, three glycerol moieties lie within this network and directly connect the amino termini of the glutathione molecules. A search for ligand binding sites with the docking program Molecular Operating Environment identified the ordered water network binding site, lined mainly with hydrophobic residues, suggesting an extended ligand binding surface for nonsubstrate ligands, the so-called ligandin site. Finally, detailed comparison of the structures reported here with previously published X-ray structures reveal a possible reaction coordinate for ligand-dependent conformational changes in the active site and the C-terminus.

  18. Effects of glutathione on the in vivo metabolism and oxidative stress of arsenic in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da; Lin, Lin; Li, Xin; Sun, Gui-Fan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of exogenous glutathione and buthionine sulfoximine on arsenic methylation and antioxidant capacity in mice exposed to arsenic via drinking water. Thirty-six female albino mice were randomly divided into six groups. All groups were given free access to drinking water that contained arsenic continuously except the control group. After ten days, mice were treated with different levels of glutathione or buthionine sulfoximine. The levels of the metabolites of arsenic were determined in the liver and urine. The levels of glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were determined in the whole blood and liver. Our results showed that the increase of arsenic species in the liver as well as the decrease of blood and hepatic glutathione and total antioxidant capacity, were all relieved by exogenous glutathione consistently. We also observed the involvement of glutathione in promoting arsenic methylation and urinary elimination in vivo. Increase of total arsenic in the urine was mainly due to the increase of dimethylated arsenic. Furthermore, administration of glutathione increased the first methylation ratio and secondary methylation ratio in the liver and urine, which resulted in the consequent increase of dimethylated arsenic percent and decrease of inorganic arsenic percent in the urine. Opposite effects appeared with the administration of buthionine sulfoximine, a scavenger of glutathione. Our study indicated that exogenous glutathione not only accelerated the methylation and the excretion of arsenic, but also relieve the arsenic-induced oxidative stress. This provides a potential useful chemopreventive dietary component for human populations being at risk of arsenic exposure.

  19. Effects of glutathione on the in vivo metabolism and oxidative stress of arsenic in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da; Lin, Lin; Li, Xin; Sun, Gui-Fan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of exogenous glutathione and buthionine sulfoximine on arsenic methylation and antioxidant capacity in mice exposed to arsenic via drinking water. Thirty-six female albino mice were randomly divided into six groups. All groups were given free access to drinking water that contained arsenic continuously except the control group. After ten days, mice were treated with different levels of glutathione or buthionine sulfoximine. The levels of the metabolites of arsenic were determined in the liver and urine. The levels of glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were determined in the whole blood and liver. Our results showed that the increase of arsenic species in the liver as well as the decrease of blood and hepatic glutathione and total antioxidant capacity, were all relieved by exogenous glutathione consistently. We also observed the involvement of glutathione in promoting arsenic methylation and urinary elimination in vivo. Increase of total arsenic in the urine was mainly due to the increase of dimethylated arsenic. Furthermore, administration of glutathione increased the first methylation ratio and secondary methylation ratio in the liver and urine, which resulted in the consequent increase of dimethylated arsenic percent and decrease of inorganic arsenic percent in the urine. Opposite effects appeared with the administration of buthionine sulfoximine, a scavenger of glutathione. Our study indicated that exogenous glutathione not only accelerated the methylation and the excretion of arsenic, but also relieve the arsenic-induced oxidative stress. This provides a potential useful chemopreventive dietary component for human populations being at risk of arsenic exposure. PMID:26354374

  20. Tissue glutathione levels in mice treated with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Husain, S; Ahmed, K M

    1991-11-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is widely distributed among living cells and is involved in many biological functions. It provides the sulfhydryl groups for conjugation of toxic metabolites of several xenobiotica. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) toxicity is a classical example of this property. For this purpose, we studied the effects of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on tissue levels of GSH in the mice. Groups of male Swiss Webster mice weighing 25 +/- 5 g were treated with 50 mg/kg, PO THC at 1300 h. Control mice were given equal volume of sesame oil (5 ml/kg, PO) which was the vehicle for THC. Ninety minutes following THC administration, mice were sacrificed, their plasma, brain, heart, liver, kidney and testis were collected. All tissues were homogenized in 5% TCA/EDTA solution and supernatant solutions of these homogenates were diluted. In these diluted samples, levels of GSH were determined by a modified spectrophotometric procedure and the GSH levels were expressed as micromoles of GSH/g tissue. In this study, THC caused no effects on GSH levels in brain, heart, testis and plasma. However, GSH levels in liver and kidney were decreased by 14% and 7% respectively. Although the decrease in kidney GSH levels were insignificant, these changes in liver and kidney could be indicative of a possible metabolic and/or dispositional interaction between THC and different commonly available drugs such as acetaminophen. PMID:1666916

  1. Measuring glutathione-induced feeding response in hydra.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ram; Galande, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01

    Hydra is among the most primitive organisms possessing a nervous system and chemosensation for detecting reduced glutathione (GSH) for capturing the prey. The movement of prey organisms causes mechanosensory discharge of the stinging cells called nematocysts from hydra, which are inserted into the prey. The feeding response in hydra, which includes curling of the tentacles to bring the prey towards the mouth, opening of the mouth and consequent engulfing of the prey, is triggered by GSH present in the fluid released from the injured prey. To be able to identify the molecular mechanism of the feeding response in hydra which is unknown to date, it is necessary to establish an assay to measure the feeding response. Here, we describe a simple method for the quantitation of the feeding response in which the distance between the apical end of the tentacle and mouth of hydra is measured and the ratio of such distance before and after the addition of GSH is determined. The ratio, called the relative tentacle spread, was found to give a measure of the feeding response. This assay was validated using a starvation model in which starved hydra show an enhanced feeding response in comparison with daily fed hydra. PMID:25490534

  2. Hepatic mitochondrial glutathione: transport and role in disease and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Checa, Jose C. . E-mail: checa229@yahoo.com; Kaplowitz, Neil . E-mail: kaplowitz@hsc.usc.edu

    2005-05-01

    Synthesized in the cytosol of cells, a fraction of cytosolic glutathione (GSH) is then transported into the mitochondrial matrix where it reaches a high concentration and plays a critical role in defending mitochondria against oxidants and electrophiles. Evidence mainly from kidney and liver mitochondria indicated that the dicarboxylate and the 2-oxoglutarate carriers contribute to the transport of GSH across the mitochondrial inner membrane. However, differential features between kidney and liver mitochondrial GSH (mGSH) transport seem to suggest the existence of additional carriers the identity of which remains to be established. One of the characteristic features of the hepatic mitochondrial transport of GSH is its regulation by membrane fluidity. Conditions leading to increased cholesterol deposition in the mitochondrial inner membrane such as in alcohol-induced liver injury decrease membrane fluidity and impair the mitochondrial transport of GSH. Depletion of mitochondrial GSH by alcohol is believed to contribute to the sensitization of the liver to alcohol-induced injury through tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-mediated hepatocellular death. Through control of mitochondrial electron transport chain-generated oxidants, mitochondrial GSH modulates cell death and hence its regulation may be a key target to influence disease progression and drug-induced cell death.

  3. Inactivation of Anopheles gambiae Glutathione Transferase ε2 by Epiphyllocoumarin

    PubMed Central

    Marimo, Patience; Hayeshi, Rose; Mukanganyama, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are part of a major family of detoxifying enzymes that can catalyze the reductive dehydrochlorination of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). The delta and epsilon classes of insect GSTs have been implicated in conferring resistance to this insecticide. In this study, the inactivation of Anopheles gambiae GSTε2 by epiphyllocoumarin (Tral 1) was investigated. Recombinant AgGSTε2 was expressed in Escherichia coli cells containing a pET3a-AGSTε2 plasmid and purified by affinity chromatography. Tral 1 was shown to inactivate GSTε2 both in a time-dependent manner and in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-life of GSTε2 in the presence of 25 μM ethacrynic acid (ETA) was 22 minutes and with Tral 1 was 30 minutes, indicating that Tral 1 was not as efficient as ETA as an inactivator. The inactivation parameters kinact and KI were found to be 0.020 ± 0.001 min−1 and 7.5 ± 2.1 μM, respectively, after 90 minutes of incubation. Inactivation of GSTε2 by Tral 1 implies that Tral 1 covalently binds to this enzyme in vitro and would be expected to exhibit time-dependent effects on the enzyme in vivo. Tral 1, therefore, would produce irreversible effects when used together with dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in malaria control programmes where resistance is mediated by GSTs. PMID:26925266

  4. The evolution of glutathione metabolism in phototrophic microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, Robert C.; Buschbacher, Ralph M.; Newton, Gerald L.

    1988-01-01

    The low molecular weight thiol composition of a variety of phototropic microorganisms is examined in order to ascertain how evolution of glutathione (GSH) production is related to the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cells were extracted in the presence of monobromobimane (mBBr) to convert thiols (RSH) to fluorescent derivatives (RSmB) which were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Significant levels of GSH were not found in green sulfur bacteria. Substantial levels were present in purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and eukaryotic algae. Other thiols measured included cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine, thiosulfate, coenzyme A, and sulfide. Many of the organisms also exhibited a marked ability to reduce mBBr to syn-(methyl,methyl)bimane, an ability which was quenched by treatment with 2-pyridyl disulfide or 5,5 prime-bisdithio - (2-nitrobenzoic acid) prior to reaction with mBBr. These observations indicate the presence of a reducing system capable of electron transfer to mBBr and reduction of reactive disulfides. The distribution of GSH in phototropic eubacteria indicates that GSH synthesis evolved at or around the time that oxygenic photosynthesis evolved.

  5. Serine incorporation into the selenocysteine moiety of glutathione peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Sunde, R.A.; Evenson, J.K.

    1987-01-15

    The selenium in mammalian glutathione peroxidase is present as a selenocysteine ((Se)Cys) moiety incorporated into the peptide backbone 41-47 residues from the N-terminal end. To study the origin of the skeleton of the (Se)Cys moiety, we perfused isolated rat liver with /sup 14/C- or /sup 3/H-labeled amino acids for 4 h, purified the GSH peroxidase, derivatized the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase to carboxymethylselenocysteine ((Se)Cys(Cm)), and determined the amino acid specific activity. Perfusion with (/sup 14/C)cystine resulted in (/sup 14/C)cystine incorporation into GSH peroxidase without labeling (Se)Cys(Cm), indicating that cysteine is not a direct precursor for (Se)Cys. (/sup 14/C)Serine perfusion labeled serine, glycine (the serine hydroxymethyltransferase product), and (Se)Cys(Cm) in purified GSH peroxidase, whereas (3-3H)serine perfusion only labeled serine and (Se)Cys(Cm), thus demonstrating that the (Se)Cys in GSH peroxidase is derived from serine. The similar specific activities of serine and (Se)Cys(Cm) strongly suggest that the precursor pool of serine used for (Se) Cys synthesis is the same or similar to the serine pool used for acylation of seryl-tRNAs.

  6. Glutathione peroxidase mimics as novel antioxidants from vegetables.

    PubMed

    Terao, Junji; Hiwada, Mio; Taguchi, Keiko; Takahara, Keigo; Mohri, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Vegetables are generally recognized as rich sources of dietary antioxidants for inhibiting lipid peroxidation. Here we investigated lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH)-reducing activity of several vegetables to estimate their role on the prevention of lipid peroxidation in food and the digestive tract. By using HPLC analysis, we screened vegetables possessing the ability to convert 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) to its reduced derivative, 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HODE). Welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.) was found to be highly active in the reduction of 13-HPODE among tested vegetables. There was no relationship between 13-HPODE reducing activity and GSH peroxidase (GPX) activity in the tested vegetables. 13-HPODE-reducing activity of welsh onion was enhanced by the addition of sulfhydryl compounds including glutathione (GSH). Neither GPX inhibitor nor heat treatment suppressed 13-HPODE-reducing activity effectively. These results suggest that welsh onion and other vegetables contain GPX mimics responsible for the reduction of LOOH. GPX mimics may be helpful in the attenuation of harmful effect of LOOH from food. PMID:15817993

  7. MITOCHONDRIAL GLUTATHIONE: FEATURES, REGULATION AND ROLE IN DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Marí, Montserrat; Morales, Albert; Colell, Anna; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Kaplowitz, Neil; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mitochondria are the powerhouse of mammalian cells and the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with oxygen consumption. In addition, they also play a strategic role in controlling the fate of cells through regulation of death pathways. Mitochondrial ROS production fulfills a signaling role through regulation of redox pathways, but also contributes to mitochondrial damage in a number of pathological states. SCOPE OF REVIEW Mitochondria are exposed to the constant generation of oxidant species, and yet the organelle remains functional due to the existence of an armamentarium of antioxidant defense systems aimed to repair oxidative damage, of which mitochondrial glutathione (mGSH) is of particular relevance. Thus, the aim of the review is to cover the regulation of mGSH and its role in disease. MAJOR CONCLUSIONS Cumulating evidence over recent years has demonstrated the essential role for mGSH in mitochondrial physiology and disease. Despite its high concentration in the mitochondrial matrix, mitochondria lack the enzymes to synthesize GSH de novo, so that mGSH originates from cytosolic GSH via transport through specific mitochondrial carriers, which exhibit sensitivity to membrane dynamics. Depletion of mGSH sensitizes cells to stimuli leading to oxidative stress such as TNF, hypoxia or amyloid β-peptide, thereby contributing to disease pathogenesis. GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE Understanding the regulation of mGSH may provide novel insights to disease pathogenesis and toxicity and the opportunity to design therapeutic targets of intervention in cell death susceptibility and disease. PMID:23123815

  8. Demonstration of nuclear compartmentalization of glutathione in hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bellomo, G; Vairetti, M; Stivala, L; Mirabelli, F; Richelmi, P; Orrenius, S

    1992-01-01

    The intracellular distribution of glutathione (GSH) in cultured hepatocytes has been investigated by using the compound monochlorobimane (BmCl), which interacts specifically with GSH to form a highly fluorescent adduct. Image analysis of BmCl-labeled hepatocytes predominantly localized the fluorescence in the nucleus; the nuclear/cytoplasmic concentration gradient was approximately three. This concentration gradient was collapsed by treatment of the cells with ATP-depleting agents. The uneven distribution of BmCl fluorescence was not attributable to (i) nonspecific interaction of BmCl with protein sulfhydryl groups, (ii) any selective nuclear localization of the GSH transferase(s) catalyzing formation of the GSH-BmCl conjugate, or (iii) any apparent alterations in cell morphology from culture conditions, suggesting that this distribution did, indeed, reflect a nuclear compartmentalization of GSH. That the nuclear pool of GSH was found more resistant to depletion by several agents than the cytoplasmic pool supports the assumption that GSH is essential in protecting DNA and other nuclear structures from chemical injury. Images PMID:1584774

  9. Oral glutathione supplementation drastically reduces Helicobacter-induced gastric pathologies

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyne, Ellen; Ducatelle, Richard; Foss, Dennis; Sanchez, Margaret; Joosten, Myrthe; Zhang, Guangzhi; Smet, Annemieke; Pasmans, Frank; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter (H.) suis causes gastric pathologies in both pigs and humans. Very little is known on the metabolism of this bacterium and its impact on the host. In this study, we have revealed the importance of the glutamate-generating metabolism, as shown by a complete depletion of glutamine (Gln) in the medium during H. suis culture. Besides Gln, H. suis can also convert glutathione (GSH) to glutamate, and both reactions are catalyzed by the H. suis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT). Both for H. pylori and H. suis, it has been hypothesized that the degradation of Gln and GSH may lead to a deficiency for the host, possibly initiating or promoting several pathologies. Therefore the in vivo effect of oral supplementation with Gln and GSH was assessed. Oral supplementation with Gln was shown to temper H. suis induced gastritis and epithelial (hyper)proliferation in Mongolian gerbils. Astonishingly, supplementation of the feed with GSH, another GGT substrate, resulted in inflammation and epithelial proliferation levels returning to baseline levels of uninfected controls. This indicates that Gln and GSH supplementation may help reducing tissue damage caused by Helicobacter infection in both humans and pigs, highlighting their potential as a supportive therapy during and after Helicobacter eradication therapy. PMID:26833404

  10. Psychomotor effects of dopamine infusion under decreased glutathione conditions.

    PubMed

    Shukitt-Hale, B; Denisova, N A; Strain, J G; Joseph, J A

    1997-01-01

    Administration of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) selectively inhibits glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis, thereby inducing a GSH deficiency. Because GSH plays a critical role in intracellular antioxidant defense, decreased GSH levels in the brain may result in less oxidative stress (OS) protection. Thus, the pro-oxidant effects of dopamine (DA), which rapidly oxidizes to form reactive oxygen species, may increase. In this study, the behavioral consequences of reduced OS protection were examined by administering BSO (3.2 mg in 30 microl Ringer's solution, intracerebroventricularly) every other day for 12 d to male Fischer 344 rats. In addition, DA (15 microl of 500 microM) was administered every day; when given on the same day as BSO, it was either 1 h after BSO (BSO + DA group) or 1 h before BSO (DA + BSO group). Tests of psychomotor behavior--rod walking, wire suspension, and plank walking--were performed five times during the experiment. BSO + DA administration, but not DA + BSO, impaired performance by decreasing latency to fall in the rod and plank walk tests compared to a vehicle only (Ringer's) group. Therefore, depletion of GSH with BSO, followed by DA treatment, produced deficits in psychomotor behavior. These deficits are similar to those seen in aged rats, suggesting that the oxidation of DA coupled with a reduced capacity to respond to OS may be responsible for the induction of age-related motor behavioral deficits. PMID:9214577

  11. Cheminformatics Models for Inhibitors of Schistosoma mansoni Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Gaba, Sonam; Jamal, Salma; Open Source Drug Discovery Consortium

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by a parasite Schistosoma mansoni and affects over 200 million annually. There is an urgent need to discover novel therapeutic options to control the disease with the recent emergence of drug resistance. The multifunctional protein, thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), an essential enzyme for the survival of the pathogen in the redox environment has been actively explored as a potential drug target. The recent availability of small-molecule screening datasets against this target provides a unique opportunity to learn molecular properties and apply computational models for discovery of activities in large molecular libraries. Such a prioritisation approach could have the potential to reduce the cost of failures in lead discovery. A supervised learning approach was employed to develop a cost sensitive classification model to evaluate the biological activity of the molecules. Random forest was identified to be the best classifier among all the classifiers with an accuracy of around 80 percent. Independent analysis using a maximally occurring substructure analysis revealed 10 highly enriched scaffolds in the actives dataset and their docking against was also performed. We show that a combined approach of machine learning and other cheminformatics approaches such as substructure comparison and molecular docking is efficient to prioritise molecules from large molecular datasets. PMID:25629082

  12. Glutathione S-transferase, incense burning and asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-J; Tsai, C-H; Chen, C-H; Tung, K-Y; Lee, Y L

    2011-06-01

    Incense burning is a popular practice in many family homes and temples. However, little is known about the effects of indoor incense burning and genetic polymorphisms on asthma. This study evaluated the effects of indoor incense burning and glutathione S-transferase (GST) genetic polymorphisms on asthma and wheeze. In 2007, 3,764 seventh-grade schoolchildren (mean±sd age 12.42±0.65 yrs) were evaluated using a standard questionnaire for information about respiratory symptoms and environmental exposures. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to assess the association between GST polymorphisms and incense burning frequency on asthma and wheeze, after adjusting for potential confounders. The frequency of incense burning at home was associated with increased risk of current asthma (p=0.05), medication use (p=0.03) and exercise wheeze (p=0.001). GST1 (GSTT1) null genotypes were associated with current asthma (OR 1.43, 95% CI 1.00-2.04) and medication use (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.01-2.22). GSTT1 showed a significant interactive effect with incense burning on current asthma, current wheeze and nocturnal wheeze. The frequency of incense burning was associated with increased risk of current asthma, medication use, lifetime wheeze, nocturnal wheeze and exercise wheeze in an exposure-response manner among children with GSTT1 null genotype (p<0.05). Incense burning is a risk factor for asthma and wheezing, especially in GSTT1 genetically susceptible children.

  13. New role for leucyl aminopeptidase in glutathione turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Cappiello, Mario; Lazzarotti, Alessandra; Buono, Francesca; Scaloni, Andrea; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Amodeo, Pietro; Méndez, Blanca L; Pelosi, Paolo; Del Corso, Antonella; Mura, Umberto

    2004-01-01

    A manganese-dependent cysteinyl-glycine hydrolysing activity has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from bovine lens. The characterization of the purified enzyme (molecular mass of the native protein, molecular mass of the subunit and extensive primary structure analysis) allowed the unequivocal attribution of the cysteinyl-glycine hydrolysing activity, which is usually associated with alanyl aminopeptidase (EC 3.4.11.2) or membrane-bound dipeptidase (EC 3.4.13.19), to LAP (leucyl aminopeptidase; EC 3.4.11.1). Analysis of the pH dependence of Cys-Gly hydrolysis catalysed by LAP, supported by a molecular modelling approach to the enzyme-substrate conformation, gave insights into the ability of the enzyme to recognize Cys-Gly as a substrate. Due to the effectiveness of LAP in hydrolysing Cys-Gly (K(m)=0.57 mM, kcat=6.0x10(3) min(-1) at pH 7.4 and 25 degrees C) with respect to other dipeptide substrates, a new role for this enzyme in glutathione turnover is proposed. PMID:14583094

  14. Effect of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid on activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione level in selected organs of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Szaroma, Waldemar; Dziubek, K; Kapusta, E

    2014-09-01

    One of the major classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors is the class of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Receptor activation recruits, via calcium signal transduction mechanisms which play important roles in oxidative metabolism, mitochondrial free radical production and occurrence of other mitochondrial factors which potentially contribute to excitotoxicity and neuronal death. In the present study, the effects of stimulation of NMDARs by applying N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) in the brain, liver, kidneys and pancreas on change of the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and in the amount of reduced glutathione (GSH) in blood, brain, liver and kidneys has been investigated. Statistically significant decrease of the activity of SOD, CAT and GSHPx and in the amount of reduced glutathione (GSH) was found in the examined organs after administration of NMDA, an agonist of NMDA receptors, demonstrating that NMDA administration compromises the antioxidant status in the investigated organs of the mouse.

  15. A novel glutathione-S transferase immunosensor based on horseradish peroxidase and double-layer gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dingqiang; Lu, Fuping; Pang, Guangchang

    2016-06-01

    GSTs, a biotransformation enzyme group, can perform metabolism, drug transfer and detoxification functions. Rapid detection of the GSTs with more sensitive approaches is of great importance. In the current study, a novel double-layer gold nanoparticles-electrochemical immunosensor electrode (DGN-EIE) immobilized with Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) antibody derived from Balb/c mice was developed. To increase the fixed quantity of antibodies and electrochemical signal, an electrochemical biosensing signal amplification system was utilized with gold nanoparticles-thionine-chitosan absorbing horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In addition, transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to characterize the nanogold solution. To evaluate the quality of DGN-EIE, the amperometric I-t curve method was applied to determine the GST in PBS. The results showed that the response current had a good linear correlation with the GST concentration ranged from 0.1-10(4) pg/mL. The lowest detection limit was found at 0.03 pg/mL(S/N = 3). The linear equation was deduced as △I/% = 7.386lgC + 22.36 (R(2) = 0.998). Moreover, it was validated with high sensitivity and reproducibility. Apparently, DGN-EIE may be a very useful tool for monitoring the GST. PMID:27220630

  16. Efficacy of free glutathione and niosomal glutathione in the treatment of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in cats.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, L A Denzoin; Confalonieri, O; Franci, R; Tapia, M O; Soraci, A L

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) administration results in hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats. The response to three different treatments against APAP poisoning was evaluated. Free glutathione (GSH) (200mg/kg), niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) and free amino acids (180 mg/kg of N-acetylcysteine and 280 mg/kg of methionine) were administered to cats that were intoxicated with APAP (a single dose of 150 mg/kg, p.o.). Serum concentration of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) along with serum, liver and erythrocyte concentration of GSH and methemoglobin percentage were measured before and 4, 24 and 72 hours after APAP administration. Free GSH (200 mg/kg) and niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) were effective in reducing hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats intoxicated with a dose of 150 mg/kg APAP. We conclude that both types of treatments can protect the liver and haemoglobin against oxidative stress in APAP intoxicated cats. Furthermore, our results showed that treatment with niosomal GSH represents an effective therapeutic approach for APAP poisoning. PMID:26623313

  17. Efficacy of free glutathione and niosomal glutathione in the treatment of acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in cats

    PubMed Central

    Vulcano, L.A. Denzoin; Confalonieri, O.; Franci, R.; Tapia, M.O.; Soraci, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) administration results in hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats. The response to three different treatments against APAP poisoning was evaluated. Free glutathione (GSH) (200mg/kg), niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) and free amino acids (180 mg/kg of N-acetylcysteine and 280 mg/kg of methionine) were administered to cats that were intoxicated with APAP (a single dose of 150 mg/kg, p.o.). Serum concentration of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) along with serum, liver and erythrocyte concentration of GSH and methemoglobin percentage were measured before and 4, 24 and 72 hours after APAP administration. Free GSH (200 mg/kg) and niosomal GSH (14 mg/kg) were effective in reducing hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity in cats intoxicated with a dose of 150 mg/kg APAP. We conclude that both types of treatments can protect the liver and haemoglobin against oxidative stress in APAP intoxicated cats. Furthermore, our results showed that treatment with niosomal GSH represents an effective therapeutic approach for APAP poisoning. PMID:26623313

  18. Unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways suggests potential involvement in plant defense against the gall midge Mayetiola destructor in wheat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuming; Zhang, Shize; Whitworth, R Jeff; Stuart, Jeffrey J; Chen, Ming-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteinylglycine, exists abundantly in nearly all organisms. Glutathione participates in various physiological processes involved in redox reactions by serving as an electron donor/acceptor. We found that the abundance of total glutathione increased up to 60% in resistant wheat plants within 72 hours following attack by the gall midge Mayetiola destructor, the Hessian fly. The increase in total glutathione abundance, however, is coupled with an unbalanced activation of glutathione metabolic pathways. The activity and transcript abundance of glutathione peroxidases, which convert reduced glutathione (GSH) to oxidized glutathione (GSSG), increased in infested resistant plants. However, the enzymatic activity and transcript abundance of glutathione reductases, which convert GSSG back to GSH, did not change. This unbalanced regulation of the glutathione oxidation/reduction cycle indicates the existence of an alternative pathway to regenerate GSH from GSSG to maintain a stable GSSG/GSH ratio. Our data suggest the possibility that GSSG is transported from cytosol to apoplast to serve as an oxidant for class III peroxidases to generate reactive oxygen species for plant defense against Hessian fly larvae. Our results provide a foundation for elucidating the molecular processes involved in glutathione-mediated plant resistance to Hessian fly and potentially other pests as well. PMID:25627558

  19. Nineteen-year follow-up of a patient with severe glutathione synthetase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Paldeep S; Medina, Casey R; Burrage, Lindsay C; Sutton, V Reid

    2016-07-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting in low levels of glutathione and an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. Patients with glutathione synthetase deficiency typically present in the neonatal period with hemolytic anemia, metabolic acidosis and neurological impairment. Lifelong treatment with antioxidants has been recommended in an attempt to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with the disorder. Here, we present a 19-year-old female who was diagnosed with glutathione synthetase deficiency shortly after birth and who has been closely followed in our metabolic clinic. Despite an initial severe presentation, she has had normal intellectual development and few complications of her disorder with a treatment regimen that includes polycitra (citric acid, potassium citrate and sodium citrate), vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium.

  20. High performance liquid chromatographic assay for the quantitation of total glutathione in plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abukhalaf, Imad K.; Silvestrov, Natalia A.; Menter, Julian M.; von Deutsch, Daniel A.; Bayorh, Mohamed A.; Socci, Robin R.; Ganafa, Agaba A.

    2002-01-01

    A simple and widely used homocysteine HPLC procedure was applied for the HPLC identification and quantitation of glutathione in plasma. The method, which utilizes SBDF as a derivatizing agent utilizes only 50 microl of sample volume. Linear quantitative response curve was generated for glutathione over a concentration range of 0.3125-62.50 micromol/l. Linear regression analysis of the standard curve exhibited correlation coefficient of 0.999. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) values were 5.0 and 15 pmol, respectively. Glutathione recovery using this method was nearly complete (above 96%). Intra-assay and inter-assay precision studies reflected a high level of reliability and reproducibility of the method. The applicability of the method for the quantitation of glutathione was demonstrated successfully using human and rat plasma samples.

  1. Magnetically separable nanoferrite-anchored glutathione: Aqueous homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation

    EPA Science Inventory

    A highly active, stable and magnetically separable glutathione based organocatalyst provided good to excellent yields to symmetric biaryls in the homocoupling of arylboronic acids under microwave irradiation. Symmetrical biaryl motifs are present in a wide range of natural p...

  2. Measuring protein-bound glutathioine (PSSG): Critical correction for cytosolic glutathione species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Protein glutathionylation is gaining recognition as an important posttranslational protein modification. The common first step in measuring protein glutathionylation is the denaturation and precipitation of protein away from soluble, millimolar quantities of glutathione (GSH) and glut...

  3. Activation of glutathione peroxidase via Nrf1 mediates genistein's protection against oxidative endothelial cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Montes, Eva; Pollard, Susan E.; Vauzour, David; Jofre-Montseny, Laia; Rota, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Weinberg, Peter D.; Spencer, Jeremy P.E. . E-mail: j.p.e.spencer@reading.ac.uk

    2006-08-04

    Cellular actions of isoflavones may mediate the beneficial health effects associated with high soy consumption. We have investigated protection by genistein and daidzein against oxidative stress-induced endothelial injury. Genistein but not daidzein protected endothelial cells from damage induced by oxidative stress. This protection was accompanied by decreases in intracellular glutathione levels that could be explained by the generation of glutathionyl conjugates of the oxidised genistein metabolite, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone. Both isoflavones evoked increased protein expression of {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase-heavy subunit ({gamma}-GCS-HS) and increased cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. However, only genistein led to increases in the cytosolic accumulation and nuclear translocation of Nrf1 and the increased expression of and activity of glutathione peroxidase. These results suggest that genistein-induced protective effects depend primarily on the activation of glutathione peroxidase mediated by Nrf1 activation, and not on Nrf2 activation or increases in glutathione synthesis.

  4. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for the discrimination of cystein from homocystein and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-02-14

    We report a turn-on fluorescent sensor based on nitrothiophenolate boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives for the discrimination of cystein (Cys) from homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH). The sensor was applied for detection of Cys in living cells. PMID:23295243

  5. 19-Year Follow-up of A Patient With Severe Glutathione Synthetase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Atwal, Paldeep S.; Medina, Casey R.; Burrage, Lindsay C.; Sutton, V. Reid

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione synthetase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting in low levels of glutathione and an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress. Patients with glutathione synthetase deficiency typically present in the neonatal period with hemolytic anemia, metabolic acidosis and neurological impairment. Lifelong treatment with antioxidants has been recommended in an attempt to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with the disorder. Here we present a 19-year-old female who was diagnosed with glutathione synthetase deficiency shortly after birth and who has been closely followed in our metabolic clinic. Despite an initial severe presentation, she has had normal intellectual development and few complications of her disorder with a treatment regimen that includes polycitra (citric acid, potassium citrate and sodium citrate), vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium. PMID:26984560

  6. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for the discrimination of cystein from homocystein and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Niu, Li-Ya; Guan, Ying-Shi; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2013-02-14

    We report a turn-on fluorescent sensor based on nitrothiophenolate boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) derivatives for the discrimination of cystein (Cys) from homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH). The sensor was applied for detection of Cys in living cells.

  7. Selection of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides against glutathione S-transferase Mu.

    PubMed Central

    't Hoen, Peter A C; Out, Ruud; Commandeur, Jan N M; Vermeulen, Nico P E; van Batenburg, F H D; Manoharan, Muthiah; van Berkel, Theo J C; Biessen, Erik A L; Bijsterbosch, Martin K

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify functional antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) against the rat glutathione S-transferase Mu (GSTM) isoforms, GSTM1 and GSTM2. These antisense ODNs would enable the study of the physiological consequences of GSTM deficiency. Because it has been suggested that the effectiveness of antisense ODNs is dependent on the secondary mRNA structures of their target sites, we made mRNA secondary structure predictions with two software packages, Mfold and STAR. The two programs produced only marginally similar structures, which can probably be attributed to differences in the algorithms used. The effectiveness of a set of 18 antisense ODNs was evaluated with a cell-free transcription/translation assay, and their activity was correlated with the predicted secondary RNA structures. Four phosphodiester ODNs specific for GSTM1, two ODNs specific for GSTM2, and four ODNs targeted at both GSTM isoforms were found to be potent, sequence-specific, and RNase H-dependent inhibitors of protein expression. The IC50 value of the most potent ODN was approximately 100 nM. Antisense ODNs targeted against regions that were predicted by STAR to be predominantly single stranded were more potent than antisense ODNs against double-stranded regions. Such a correlation was not found for the Mfold prediction. Our data suggest that simulation of the local folding of RNA facilitates the discovery of potent antisense sequences. In conclusion, we selected several promising antisense sequences, which, when synthesized as biologically stable oligonucleotides, can be applied for study of the physiological impact of reduced GSTM expression. PMID:12515389

  8. Evaluation of Glutathione Peroxidase 4 role in Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xinguo; Lin, Yan; Li, Jinling; Liu, Mengchun; Wang, Jingli; Li, Xueying; Liu, Jingjing; Jia, Xuewen; Jing, Zhongcui; Huang, Zuzhou; Chu, Kaiqiu; Liu, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome that may be lifethreatening to pregnancies and fetus. Glutathione Peroxidase 4 (GPx4) is a powerful antioxidant enzyme that can provide protection from oxidative stress damage which plays a pivotal role in the pathology of PE. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the association between Gpx4 polymorphisms and the susceptibility to PE in Chinese Han women. TaqMan allelic discrimination real-time PCR was used to perform the genotyping of rs713041 and rs4807542 in 1008 PE patients and 1386 normotensive pregnancies. Obviously statistical difference of genotypic and allelic frequencies were found of rs713041 in GPx4 between PE patients and controls and the C allele has the higher risk for pathogenesis of PE (χ(2) = 12.292, P = 0.002 by genotype; χ(2) = 11.035, P = 0.001, OR = 1.216, 95% CI 1.084-1.365 by allele). Additionally, when subdividing these samples into CC + CT and TT groups, we found a significant difference between the two groups (χ(2) = 11.241, P = 0.001, OR = 1.417, 95% CI 1.155-1.738). Furthermore, the genotype of rs713041 was found to be associated with the mild, severe and early-onset PE. Our results suggest that rs713041 in GPx4 may play a key role in the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:27641822

  9. A supramolecular microgel glutathione peroxidase mimic with temperature responsive activity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yanzhen; Jiao, Shufei; Lang, Chao; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-05-21

    Glutathione peroxidase (GPx) protects cells from oxidative damage by scavenging surplus reactive oxygen species (ROS). Commonly, an appropriate amount of ROS acts as a signal molecule in the metabolism. A smart artificial GPx exhibits adjustable catalytic activity, which can potentially reduce the amount of ROS to an appropriate degree and maintain its important physiological functions in metabolism. To construct an optimum and excellent smart artificial GPx, a novel supramolecular microgel artificial GPx (SM-Te) was prepared based on the supramolecular host-guest interaction employing the tellurium-containing guest molecule (ADA-Te-ADA) and the cyclodextrin-containing host block copolymer (poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-[polyacrylamides-co-poly(6-o-(triethylene glycol monoacrylate ether)-β-cyclodextrin)], PPAM-CD) as building blocks. Subsequently, based on these building blocks, SM-Te was constructed and the formation of its self-assembled structure was confirmed by dynamic light scattering, NMR, SEM, TEM, etc. Typically, benefitting from the temperature responsive properties of the PNIPAM scaffold, SM-Te also exhibited similar temperature responsive behaviour. Importantly, the GPx catalytic rates of SM-Te displayed a noticeable temperature responsive characteristic. Moreover, SM-Te exhibited the typical saturation kinetics behaviour of a real enzyme catalyst. It was proved that the changes of the hydrophobic microenvironment and the pore size in the supramolecular microgel network of SM-Te played significant roles in altering the temperature responsive catalytic behaviour. The successful construction of SM-Te not only overcomes the insurmountable disadvantages existing in previous covalent bond crosslinked microgel artificial GPx but also bodes well for the development of novel intelligent antioxidant drugs. PMID:24652520

  10. The evolution of glutathione metabolism in phototrophic microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, R. C.; Buschbacher, R. M.; Newton, G. L.

    1987-01-01

    Of the many roles ascribed to glutathione (GSH) the one most clearly established is its role in the protection of higher eucaryotes against oxygen toxicity through destruction of thiol-reactive oxygen byproducts. If this is the primary function of GSH then GSH metabolism should have evolved during or after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. That many bacteria do not produce GSH is consistent with this view. In the present study we have examined the low-molecular-weight thiol composition of a variety of phototrophic microorganisms to ascertain how evolution of GSH production is related to evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cells were extracted in the presence of monobromobimane (mBBr) to convert thiols to fluorescent derivatives, which were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Significant levels of GSH were not found in the green bacteria (Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus). Substantial levels of GSH were present in the purple bacteria (Chromatium vinosum, Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and Rhodocyclus gelatinosa), the cyanobacteria [Anacystis nidulans, Microcoleus chthonoplastes S.G., Nostoc muscorum, Oscillatoria amphigranulata, Oscillatoria limnetica, Oscillatoria sp. (Stinky Spring, Utah), Oscillatoria terebriformis, Plectonema boryanum, and Synechococcus lividus], and eucaryotic algae (Chlorella pyrenoidsa, Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena gracilis, Scenedesmus obliquus, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). Other thiols measured included cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine, thiosulfate, coenzyme A, and sulfide; several unidentified thiols were also detected. Many of the organisms examined also exhibited a marked ability to reduce mBBr to syn-(methyl,methyl)bimane, an ability that was quenched by treatment with 2-pyridyl disulfide or 5,5'-bisdithio-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) prior to reaction with mBBr. These observations indicate the presence of a reducing system capable of electron transfer to mBBr and reduction of

  11. Function of glutathione peroxidases in legume root nodules

    PubMed Central

    Matamoros, Manuel A.; Saiz, Ana; Peñuelas, Maria; Bustos-Sanmamed, Pilar; Mulet, Jose M.; Barja, Maria V.; Rouhier, Nicolas; Moore, Marten; James, Euan K.; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Becana, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (Gpxs) are antioxidant enzymes not studied so far in legume nodules, despite the fact that reactive oxygen species are produced at different steps of the symbiosis. The function of two Gpxs that are highly expressed in nodules of the model legume Lotus japonicus was examined. Gene expression analysis, enzymatic and nitrosylation assays, yeast cell complementation, in situ mRNA hybridization, immunoelectron microscopy, and LjGpx-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions were used to characterize the enzymes and to localize each transcript and isoform in nodules. The LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 genes encode thioredoxin-dependent phospholipid hydroperoxidases and are differentially regulated in response to nitric oxide (NO) and hormones. LjGpx1 and LjGpx3 are nitrosylated in vitro or in plants treated with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Consistent with the modification of the peroxidatic cysteine of LjGpx3, in vitro assays demonstrated that this modification results in enzyme inhibition. The enzymes are highly expressed in the infected zone, but the LjGpx3 mRNA is also detected in the cortex and vascular bundles. LjGpx1 is localized to the plastids and nuclei, and LjGpx3 to the cytosol and endoplasmic reticulum. Based on yeast complementation experiments, both enzymes protect against oxidative stress, salt stress, and membrane damage. It is concluded that both LjGpxs perform major antioxidative functions in nodules, preventing lipid peroxidation and other oxidative processes at different subcellular sites of vascular and infected cells. The enzymes are probably involved in hormone and NO signalling, and may be regulated through nitrosylation of the peroxidatic cysteine essential for catalytic function. PMID:25740929

  12. Kinetic study on the reactions of platinum drugs with glutathione.

    PubMed

    Hagrman, Douglas; Goodisman, Jerry; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2004-02-01

    The binding of platinum (Pt) drugs (oxaliplatin, carboplatin, and cisplatin) to glutathione (GSH, 6.75 mM) was investigated at 37 degrees C in Hepes (100 mM, pH approximately 7.4) or Tris-NO(3) (60 mM, pH 7.4) buffer and NaCl (4.62, 6.63, or 7.82 mM). The conditions were chosen to mimic passage of clinical concentrations of the drugs (135 microM) through the cytosol. The reactions were monitored by UV-absorption spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The initial rates, detected by UV absorbance, were similar for oxaliplatin and cisplatin reacting with GSH and were more than 5-fold faster than for carboplatin reacting with GSH. The Pt contents in HPLC eluates corresponding to unbound drug decreased exponentially with time, confirming that the reactions were first order in [Pt drug] and allowing determination of the pseudo first-order rate constants (k(1)). The second-order rate constants (k(2)) were calculated as k(1) divided by [GSH]. The k(2) value for oxaliplatin reacting with GSH was approximately 3.8 x 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1), for cisplatin reacting with GSH approximately 2.7 x 10(-2) M(-1) s(-1), and for carboplatin reacting with GSH approximately 1.2 x 10(-3) M(-1) s(-1) (approximately 32-fold slower than that of oxaliplatin and approximately 23-fold slower than that of cisplatin). These results demonstrate an influence of ligands surrounding the Pt coordination sphere on the reactivity of Pt(2+) with GSH.

  13. Altered glutathione metabolism in oxaliplatin resistant ovarian carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    el-akawi, Z; Abu-hadid, M; Perez, R; Glavy, J; Zdanowicz, J; Creaven, P J; Pendyala, L

    1996-07-19

    Elevation of glutathione (GSH) is commonly observed in cellular resistance to a number of anticancer agents. Most frequently reported change in GSH metabolism that is associated with the elevated GSH levels is increased mRNA expression and activity of gamma-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (gamma GCS), the first enzyme of the GSH biosynthetic pathway. We have isolated sublines of the A2780 ovarian carcinoma cell line (C10 and C25) that are 8- and 12-fold resistant to oxaliplatin by repeatedly exposing the cells to increasing concentrations of the platinum agent. The GSH levels in C10 and C25 cell sublines are 3.1- and 3.8-fold higher than the parent A2780 cell line. The mRNA levels and activities for gamma GCS and that for gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (gamma GT), the GSH salvage pathway enzyme, were measured in these cells. The mRNA for gamma GT and gamma GCS were measured by RT-PCR, with quantitation of the PCR product by HPLC; mRNA levels are expressed as ratios to beta-actin mRNA, used as an endogenous standard. GSH and gamma GCS activity were measured by HPLC assays and gamma GT activity by a colorimetric assay. The increase in GSH in C10 and C25 was associated with an elevation in gamma GT mRNA (2.5- and 8-fold) and gamma GT activity (2.7- and 2.8-fold). No changes were observed in gamma GCS mRNA levels or activity. The data indicate that alterations in GSH metabolism leading to elevations in cellular GSH in A2780 ovarian carcinoma cells selected for low levels of resistance to oxaliplatin are mediated by gamma GT, the "salvage' pathway, rather than an increase in GSH biosynthesis.

  14. Beta-amyloidolysis and glutathione in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lasierra-Cirujeda, J; Coronel, P; Aza, MJ; Gimeno, M

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we hypothesized the importance of the interaction between the brain glutathione (GSH) system, the proteolytic tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)/plasminogen/ plasmin system, regulated by plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), and neuroserpin in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease. The histopathological characteristic hallmark that gives personality to the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease is the accumulation of neurofibroid tangles located intracellularly in the brain, such as the protein tau and extracellular senile plaques made primarily of amyloidal substance. These formations of complex etiology are intimately related to GSH, brain protective antioxidants, and the proteolytic system, in which t-PA plays a key role. There is scientific evidence that suggests a relationship between aging, a number of neurodegenerative disorders, and the excessive production of reactive oxygen species and accompanying decreased brain proteolysis. The plasminogen system in the brain is an essential proteolytic mechanism that effectively degrades amyloid peptides (“beta-amyloidolysis”) through action of the plasmin, and this physiologic process may be considered to be a means of prevention of neurodegenerative disorders. In parallel to the decrease in GSH levels seen in aging, there is also a decrease in plasmin brain activity and a progressive decrease of t-PA activity, caused by a decrease in the expression of the t-PA together with an increase of the PAI-1 levels, which rise to an increment in the production of amyloid peptides and a lesser clearance of them. Better knowledge of the GSH mechanism and cerebral proteolysis will allow us to hypothesize about therapeutic practices. PMID:23650462

  15. Glutathione and cellular redox control in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibañez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Seco-Cervera, Marta; Pallardó, Federico V

    2014-10-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the mitotically/meiotically heritable changes in gene expression that are not due to changes in the primary DNA sequence. Over recent years, growing evidence has suggested a link between redox metabolism and the control of epigenetic mechanisms. The effect of the redox control, oxidative stress, and glutathione (GSH) on the epigenetic mechanisms occur at different levels affecting DNA methylation, miRNAs expression, and histone post-translational modifications (PTMs). Furthermore, a number of redox PTMs are being described, so enriching the histone code. Pioneer works showed how oxidized GSH inhibits the activity of S-adenosyl methionine synthetase, MAT1A, a key enzyme involved in the synthesis of S-adenosyl methionine (SAM), which is used by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone methyltransferases (HMTs). Alteration in NAD /NADH ratio affects the activity of class III histone deacetylases (HDACs) and poly-ADP ribosyltransferases (PARPs). Furthermore, the iron redox state of the catalytic center of key enzymes influences the activity of HDACs and the activity of Tet methylcytosine dioxygenases (DNA demetylases) and JmjC histone demethylases. In this communication, we will show the intricate mechanisms that participate in the redox control of the epigenetic mechanisms. We specially focus our work in the characterization of new PTMs in histones, such as histone carbonylation and glutathionylation. Demonstrating how GSH influences the epigenetic mechanisms beyond a mere regulation of SAM levels. The mechanisms described in this communication place GSH and redox control in the landscape of the epigenetic regulation. The results shown underscore the relevant role that oxidative stress and GSH play as key factors in epigenetics, opening a new window for understating the underlying mechanisms that control cell differentiation, proliferation, development, and disease. PMID:26461333

  16. Evaluation of Glutathione Peroxidase 4 role in Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinguo; Lin, Yan; Li, Jinling; Liu, Mengchun; Wang, Jingli; Li, Xueying; Liu, Jingjing; Jia, Xuewen; Jing, Zhongcui; Huang, Zuzhou; Chu, Kaiqiu; Liu, Shiguo

    2016-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a pregnancy-specific syndrome that may be lifethreatening to pregnancies and fetus. Glutathione Peroxidase 4 (GPx4) is a powerful antioxidant enzyme that can provide protection from oxidative stress damage which plays a pivotal role in the pathology of PE. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the association between Gpx4 polymorphisms and the susceptibility to PE in Chinese Han women. TaqMan allelic discrimination real-time PCR was used to perform the genotyping of rs713041 and rs4807542 in 1008 PE patients and 1386 normotensive pregnancies. Obviously statistical difference of genotypic and allelic frequencies were found of rs713041 in GPx4 between PE patients and controls and the C allele has the higher risk for pathogenesis of PE (χ2 = 12.292, P = 0.002 by genotype; χ2 = 11.035, P = 0.001, OR = 1.216, 95% CI 1.084–1.365 by allele). Additionally, when subdividing these samples into CC + CT and TT groups, we found a significant difference between the two groups (χ2 = 11.241, P = 0.001, OR = 1.417, 95% CI 1.155–1.738). Furthermore, the genotype of rs713041 was found to be associated with the mild, severe and early-onset PE. Our results suggest that rs713041 in GPx4 may play a key role in the pathogenesis of PE. PMID:27641822

  17. Pharmacokinetics of tetraplatin administered intraperitoneally with reduced glutathione in mice.

    PubMed

    Kido, Y; Khokhar, A R; Yoshida, M; Thai, G W; Siddik, Z H

    1994-01-01

    Tetraplatin (Ormaplatin) has been developed as a second generation platinum complex because of its good antitumor activity against some cisplatin-resistant tumor cell lines. It is currently in clinical trials. Its reduction to diaminocyclohexane (DACH)-dichloroplatinum(II) [DACH-Pt(II)Cl2] or closely similar species is essential for binding to DNA to produce the desired antitumor effects. We have studied the pharmacokinetics of tetraplatin in mice after intraperitoneal administration with the reducing agent glutathione (GSH). The systemic absorption of tetraplatin (5 mg/kg) with GSH (31 mg/kg) was faster than of tetraplatin alone. Peak plasma platinum (Pt) levels of 0.89 and 1.44 micrograms Pt/ml were observed at 15 min and 2 hr after administration of tetraplatin with and without GSH, respectively, and the Pt then decayed biphasically when administered with GSH and monophasically when administered alone. The plasma Pt level was 4-fold lower (0.17 vs. 0.71 micrograms Pt/ml) by 24 hr when tetraplatin was administered with GSH compared with its administration alone. DACH-Pt(II)Cl2 (4.21 mg/kg, ip) gave similar plasma Pt kinetics to that seen with the combination of tetraplatin and GSH. Pt levels in kidney 24 hr after administration of tetraplatin+GSH or of DACH-Pt(II)Cl2 were lower (1.6-fold) than after tetraplatin alone. Plasma and ascitic fluid from tumor-bearing mice demonstrated equivalent abilities to reduce tetraplatin rapidly. However, tetraplatin treatment of intraperitoneal-inoculated L1210/0 (parent) or L1210/DDP (cisplatin-resistant) tumor cells was unaffected by GSH. As GSH lowered systemic tetraplatin exposure in vivo without compromising antitumor activity against peritoneal tumor models, the combination of thiol and tetraplatin may be clinically useful in the treatment of intraperitoneal disseminated cancers. PMID:8013287

  18. The evolution of glutathione metabolism in phototrophic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Fahey, R C; Buschbacher, R M; Newton, G L

    1987-01-01

    Of the many roles ascribed to glutathione (GSH) the one most clearly established is its role in the protection of higher eucaryotes against oxygen toxicity through destruction of thiol-reactive oxygen byproducts. If this is the primary function of GSH then GSH metabolism should have evolved during or after the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. That many bacteria do not produce GSH is consistent with this view. In the present study we have examined the low-molecular-weight thiol composition of a variety of phototrophic microorganisms to ascertain how evolution of GSH production is related to evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis. Cells were extracted in the presence of monobromobimane (mBBr) to convert thiols to fluorescent derivatives, which were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Significant levels of GSH were not found in the green bacteria (Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus). Substantial levels of GSH were present in the purple bacteria (Chromatium vinosum, Rhodospirillum rubrum, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, and Rhodocyclus gelatinosa), the cyanobacteria [Anacystis nidulans, Microcoleus chthonoplastes S.G., Nostoc muscorum, Oscillatoria amphigranulata, Oscillatoria limnetica, Oscillatoria sp. (Stinky Spring, Utah), Oscillatoria terebriformis, Plectonema boryanum, and Synechococcus lividus], and eucaryotic algae (Chlorella pyrenoidsa, Chlorella vulgaris, Euglena gracilis, Scenedesmus obliquus, and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii). Other thiols measured included cysteine, gamma-glutamylcysteine, thiosulfate, coenzyme A, and sulfide; several unidentified thiols were also detected. Many of the organisms examined also exhibited a marked ability to reduce mBBr to syn-(methyl,methyl)bimane, an ability that was quenched by treatment with 2-pyridyl disulfide or 5,5'-bisdithio-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) prior to reaction with mBBr. These observations indicate the presence of a reducing system capable of electron transfer to mBBr and reduction of

  19. Measuring glutathione redox potential of HIV-1-infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Ashima; Munshi, MohamedHusen; Khan, Sohrab Zafar; Fatima, Sadaf; Arya, Rahul; Jameel, Shahid; Singh, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Redox signaling plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). The majority of HIV redox research relies on measuring redox stress using invasive technologies, which are unreliable and do not provide information about the contributions of subcellular compartments. A major technological leap emerges from the development of genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFPs), which provide sensitive and compartment-specific insights into redox homeostasis. Here, we exploited a roGFP-based specific bioprobe of glutathione redox potential (E(GSH); Grx1-roGFP2) and measured subcellular changes in E(GSH) during various phases of HIV-1 infection using U1 monocytic cells (latently infected U937 cells with HIV-1). We show that although U937 and U1 cells demonstrate significantly reduced cytosolic and mitochondrial E(GSH) (approximately -310 mV), active viral replication induces substantial oxidative stress (E(GSH) more than -240 mV). Furthermore, exposure to a physiologically relevant oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), induces significant deviations in subcellular E(GSH) between U937 and U1, which distinctly modulates susceptibility to apoptosis. Using Grx1-roGFP2, we demonstrate that a marginal increase of about ∼25 mV in E(GSH) is sufficient to switch HIV-1 from latency to reactivation, raising the possibility of purging HIV-1 by redox modulators without triggering detrimental changes in cellular physiology. Importantly, we show that bioactive lipids synthesized by clinical drug-resistant isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reactivate HIV-1 through modulation of intracellular E(GSH). Finally, the expression analysis of U1 and patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells demonstrated a major recalibration of cellular redox homeostatic pathways during persistence and active replication of HIV.

  20. Role of glutathione in neuroprotective effects of mood stabilizing drugs lithium and valproate.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Shao, L; Young, L T; Wang, J-F

    2007-02-23

    Mood stabilizing drugs lithium and valproate are the most commonly used treatments for bipolar disorder. Previous studies in our laboratory indicate that chronic treatment with lithium and valproate inhibits oxidative damage in primary cultured rat cerebral cortical cells. Glutathione, as the major antioxidant in the brain, plays a key role in defending against oxidative damage. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of glutathione in the neuroprotective effects of lithium and valproate against oxidative damage. We found that chronic treatment with lithium and valproate inhibited reactive oxygen metabolite H(2)O(2)-induced cell death in primary cultured rat cerebral cortical cells, while buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione rate-limiting synthesis enzyme glutamate-cysteine ligase, reduced the neuroprotective effect of lithium and valproate against H(2)O(2)-induced cell death. Further, we found that chronic treatment with lithium and valproate increased glutathione levels in primary cultured rat cerebral cortical cells and that the effects of lithium and valproate on glutathione levels were dose-dependent in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Chronic treatment with lithium and valproate also increased the expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase in both rat cerebral cortical cells and SH-SY5Y cells. In addition, chronic treatment with other mood stabilizing drugs lamotrigine and carbamazepine, but not antidepressants desipramine and fluoxetine, increased both glutathione levels and the expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase in SH-SY5Y cells. These results suggest that glutathione plays an important role in the neuroprotective effects of lithium and valproate, and that glutathione may be a common target for mood stabilizing drugs.

  1. Structural insight into the active site of a Bombyx mori unclassified glutathione transferase.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamamoto, Kohji

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are major detoxification enzymes that play central roles in the defense against various environmental toxicants as well as oxidative stress. Here, we identify amino acid residues of an unclassified GST from Bombyx mori, bmGSTu-interacting glutathione (GSH). Site-directed mutagenesis of bmGSTu mutants indicated that amino acid residues Asp103, Ser162, and Ser166 contribute to catalytic activity.

  2. The effect of tilmicosin on cardiac superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities.

    PubMed

    Yazar, E; Altunok, V; Elmas, M; Traş, B; Baş, A L; Ozdemir, V

    2002-05-01

    In this study, the effect of tilmicosin on cardiac superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities was investigated. Forty male BALB/c mice were used as material. Ten mice served as a control group, and 30 mice were injected with tilmicosin (25 mg/kg body weight, subcutaneously, with a single injection). After drug administration, they were monitored for 3 days. Tilmicosin caused decreases in cardiac superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities.

  3. Cadmium induced changes in subcellular glutathione contents within glandular trichomes of Cucurbita pepo L.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Dagmar; Müller, Maria; Zellnig, Günther; Zechmann, Bernd

    2010-07-01

    Plants cope with cadmium (Cd) stress by complexation with phytochelatins (Pc), metallothioneins and glutathione and sequestration within vacuoles. Especially glutathione was found to play a major role in Cd detoxification as Cd shows a high binding affinity towards thiols and as glutathione is a precursor for Pc synthesis. In the present study, we have used an immunohistochemical approach combined with computer-supported transmission electron microscopy in order to measure changes in the subcellular distribution of glutathione during Cd-stress in mesophyll cells and cells of different glandular trichomes (long and short stalked) of Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca GREB: . Even though no ultrastructural alterations were observed in leaf and glandular trichome cells after the treatment of plants with 50 microM cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)) for 48 h, all cells showed a large decrease in glutathione contents. The strongest decrease was found in nuclei and the cytosol (up to 76%) in glandular trichomes which are considered as a major side of Cd accumulation in leaves. The ratio of glutathione between the cytosol and nuclei and the other cell compartments was strongly decreased only in glandular trichomes (more than 50%) indicating that glutathione in these two cell compartments is especially important for the detoxification of Cd in glandular trichomes. Additionally, these data indicate that large amounts of Cd are withdrawn from nuclei during Cd exposure. The present study gives a detailed insight into the compartment-specific importance of glutathione during Cd exposure in mesophyll cells and glandular trichomes of C. pepo L. plants.

  4. A Glutathione-Nrf2-Thioredoxin Cross-Talk Ensures Keratinocyte Survival and Efficient Wound Repair

    PubMed Central

    Telorack, Michèle; Meyer, Michael; Ingold, Irina; Conrad, Marcus; Bloch, Wilhelm; Werner, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is the most abundant cellular antioxidant with high medical relevance, and it is also required as a co-factor for various enzymes involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and toxic compounds. However, its cell-type specific functions and its interaction with other cytoprotective molecules are largely unknown. Using a combination of mouse genetics, functional cell biology and pharmacology, we unraveled the function of glutathione in keratinocytes and its cross-talk with other antioxidant defense systems. Mice with keratinocyte-specific deficiency in glutamate cysteine ligase, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glutathione biosynthesis, showed a strong reduction in keratinocyte viability in vitro and in the skin in vivo. The cells died predominantly by apoptosis, but also showed features of ferroptosis and necroptosis. The increased cell death was associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which caused DNA and mitochondrial damage. However, epidermal architecture, and even healing of excisional skin wounds were only mildly affected in the mutant mice. The cytoprotective transcription factor Nrf2 was strongly activated in glutathione-deficient keratinocytes, but additional loss of Nrf2 did not aggravate the phenotype, demonstrating that the cytoprotective effect of Nrf2 is glutathione dependent. However, we show that deficiency in glutathione biosynthesis is efficiently compensated in keratinocytes by the cysteine/cystine and thioredoxin systems. Therefore, our study highlights a remarkable antioxidant capacity of the epidermis that ensures skin integrity and efficient wound healing. PMID:26808544

  5. A Glutathione-Nrf2-Thioredoxin Cross-Talk Ensures Keratinocyte Survival and Efficient Wound Repair.

    PubMed

    Telorack, Michèle; Meyer, Michael; Ingold, Irina; Conrad, Marcus; Bloch, Wilhelm; Werner, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is the most abundant cellular antioxidant with high medical relevance, and it is also required as a co-factor for various enzymes involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and toxic compounds. However, its cell-type specific functions and its interaction with other cytoprotective molecules are largely unknown. Using a combination of mouse genetics, functional cell biology and pharmacology, we unraveled the function of glutathione in keratinocytes and its cross-talk with other antioxidant defense systems. Mice with keratinocyte-specific deficiency in glutamate cysteine ligase, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in glutathione biosynthesis, showed a strong reduction in keratinocyte viability in vitro and in the skin in vivo. The cells died predominantly by apoptosis, but also showed features of ferroptosis and necroptosis. The increased cell death was associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which caused DNA and mitochondrial damage. However, epidermal architecture, and even healing of excisional skin wounds were only mildly affected in the mutant mice. The cytoprotective transcription factor Nrf2 was strongly activated in glutathione-deficient keratinocytes, but additional loss of Nrf2 did not aggravate the phenotype, demonstrating that the cytoprotective effect of Nrf2 is glutathione dependent. However, we show that deficiency in glutathione biosynthesis is efficiently compensated in keratinocytes by the cysteine/cystine and thioredoxin systems. Therefore, our study highlights a remarkable antioxidant capacity of the epidermis that ensures skin integrity and efficient wound healing. PMID:26808544

  6. Impaired synthesis contributes to diabetes-induced decrease in liver glutathione.

    PubMed

    Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Nitti, Mariapaola; Marengo, Barbara; Domenicotti, Cinzia; Cottalasso, Damiano; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Traverso, Nicola

    2012-05-01

    Diabetes-induced glutathione (GSH) decrease is usually ascribed to GSH oxidation. Here we investigate, in streptozotocin-treated rats, if impairment of GSH synthesis contributes to GSH decrease in diabetic liver, and if antioxidant treatments can provide protection. Diabetic rats were divided into 3 groups: untreated diabetic rats (UD); N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC)-treated diabetic rats; taurine (TAU)-treated diabetic rats; a group of non-streptozotocin-treated rats was used as control (CTR). All rats were sacrificed at 40 weeks of age. Diabetes induced hepatic glutathione decrease, but oxidized glutathione (GSSG) did not increase significantly. Accumulations of cysteine and cysteinyl-glycine in UD suggest respectively decreased glutathione synthesis and increased loss through the plasma membrane with subsequent degradation. Decreased expression of γ-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase in UD is consistent with repressed GSH synthesis. Moreover, diabetes caused increase of GSSG/GSH ratio and induction of heme oxygenase-1, both signs of oxidative stress. Supplementation with NAC or TAU resulted in amelioration of glutathione levels, probably depending on antioxidant activity, more efficient glutathione synthesis and decreased GSH loss and degradation. In conclusion, impaired synthesis and increased loss and degradation of GSH appear to contribute to a decrease in GSH levels in diabetic liver. NAC and TAU are able to partially protect from oxidative stress and GSH decrease, while enhancing GSH synthesis and restricting GSH loss.

  7. Extracellular glutathione promotes migration of hydrogen peroxide-stressed cultured chick embryonic skin cells.

    PubMed

    Denunzio, Mia; Gomez, George

    2014-04-01

    The ability of glutathione to affect melanocyte survival has fostered its use in a variety of applications related to epithelial cells. Our study focused on fibroblast migration and the effects of oxidative stress. We used scratch assays to measure cell migration: fibroblasts were harvested from embryonic chicks, grown to confluence in a monolayer, and the layer was scratched to initiate migration. Migration rates were measured over 8 h using photomicrographs, and vinculin expression as an indicator focal adhesion formation was measured using immunofluorescence. Addition of 200 μM glutathione to the culture media in which the cells grew resulted in a significantly increased rate of scratch closure. When the scratch assays were performed in the presence of 100 μM H2O2 (to simulate oxidative stress), the cells ceased to migrate. Addition of 200 μM glutathione to the H2O2-treated scratched layers resulted in a restoration of the scratch closure capabilities. At the subcellular level, addition of extracellular glutathione resulted in a redistribution of vinculin into fewer but larger aggregates. In cells at the edge of scratched monolayers that were treated with H2O2, vinculin particles were distributed throughout the cell in smaller aggregates; addition of glutathione resulted in vinculin aggregates that were larger and closer to the edges of the cell, indicating that these cells were more migratory. Our results suggest that glutathione promotes fibroblast migration, possibly via a mechanism that promotes the formation of focal adhesions.

  8. Study of Linkage between Glutathione Pathway and the Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli from Patients’ Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Kominkova, Marketa; Michalek, Petr; Cihalova, Kristyna; Guran, Roman; Cernei, Natalia; Nejdl, Lukas; Smerkova, Kristyna; Dostalova, Simona; Chudobova, Dagmar; Heger, Zbynek; Vesely, Radek; Gumulec, Jaromir; Kynicky, Jindrich; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we focused on the differences between bacterial cultures of E. coli obtained from swabs of infectious wounds of patients compared to laboratory E. coli. In addition, blocking of the protein responsible for the synthesis of glutathione (γ-glutamylcysteine synthase—GCL) using 10 mM buthionine sulfoximine was investigated. Each E. coli showed significant differences in resistance to antibiotics. According to the determined resistance, E. coli were divided into experimental groups based on a statistical evaluation of their properties as more resistant and more sensitive. These groups were also used for finding the differences in a dependence of the glutathione pathway on resistance to antibiotics. More sensitive E. coli showed the same kinetics of glutathione synthesis while blocking GCL (Km 0.1 µM), as compared to non-blocking. In addition, the most frequent mutations in genes of glutathione synthetase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase were observed in this group compared to laboratory E.coli. The group of “more resistant” E. coli exhibited differences in Km between 0.3 and 0.8 µM. The number of mutations compared to the laboratory E. coli was substantially lower compared to the other group. PMID:25837469

  9. Blood selenium concentrations and enzyme activities related to glutathione metabolism in wild emperor geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Schmutz, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, we collected blood samples from 63 emperor geese (Chen canagica) on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, USA. We studied the relationship between selenium concentrations in whole blood and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that plasma activities of these enzymes are useful biomarkers of selenium-induced oxidative stress, but little information is available on their relationship to selenium in the blood of wild birds. Adult female emperor geese incubating their eggs in mid-June had a higher mean concentration of selenium in their blood and a greater activity of glutathione peroxidase in their plasma than adult geese or goslings that were sampled during the adult flight feathera??molting period in late July and early August. Glutathione peroxidase activity was positively correlated with the concentration of selenium in the blood of emperor geese, and the rate of increase relative to selenium was greater in goslings than in adults. The activity of glutathione reductase was greatest in the plasma of goslings and was greater in molting adults than incubating females but was not significantly correlated with selenium in the blood of adults or goslings. Incubating female emperor geese had high selenium concentrations in their blood, accompanied by increased glutathione peroxidase activity consistent with early oxidative stress. These findings indicate that further study of the effects of selenium exposure, particularly on reproductive success, is warranted in this species.

  10. Blood selenium concentrations and enzyme activities related to glutathione metabolism in wild emperor geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Hoffman, D.J.; Schmutz, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 1998, we collected blood samples from 63 emperor geese (Chen canagica) on their breeding grounds on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska, USA. We studied the relationship between selenium concentrations in whole blood and the activities of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in plasma. Experimental studies have shown that plasma activities of these enzymes are useful biomarkers of selenium-induced oxidative stress, but little information is available on their relationship to selenium in the blood of wild birds. Adult female emperor geese incubating their eggs in mid-June had a higher mean concentration of selenium in their blood and a greater activity of glutathione peroxidase in their plasma than adult geese or goslings that were sampled during the adult flight feathermolting period in late July and early August. Glutathione peroxidase activity was positively correlated with the concentration of selenium in the blood of emperor geese, and the rate of increase relative to selenium was greater in goslings than in adults. The activity of glutathione reductase was greatest in the plasma of goslings and was greater in molting adults than incubating females but was not significantly correlated with selenium in the blood of adults or goslings. Incubating female emperor geese had high selenium concentrations in their blood, accompanied by increased glutathione peroxidase activity consistent with early oxidative stress. These findings indicate that further study of the effects of selenium exposure, particularly on reproductive success, is warranted in this species.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of glutathione- and PEG-glutathione-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for nitric oxide delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M. C.; Seabra, A. B.; Pelegrino, M. T.; Haddad, P. S.

    2016-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), with appropriate surface coatings, are commonly used for biomedical applications, such as drug delivery. For the successful application of SPIONs, it is necessary that the nanoparticles have well-defined morphological, structural and magnetic characteristics, in addition to high stability and biocompatibility in biological environments. The present work is focused on the synthesis and characterization of SPIONs, which were prepared using the co-precipitation method and have great potential for drug delivery. The surfaces of the SPIONs were functionalized with the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to form GSH-SPIONs and PEG-GSH-SPIONs. The structural, morphological, magnetic properties and the cytotoxicity of the obtained nanoparticles were characterized using different techniques. The results showed that the nanoparticles have a mean diameter of 10 nm in the solid state and are superparamagnetic at room temperature. No cytotoxicity was observed for either nanoparticle (up to 500 μg L-1) on mouse normal fibroblasts (3T3 cell line) or acute T cell leukemia (Jurkat cell line) after 24 h of incubation. Free thiol groups (SH) on the surfaces of GSH-SPIONs and PEG-GSH-SPIONs were nitrosated, leading to the formation of S-nitrosated SPIONs, which act as a nitric oxide (NO) donor. The amounts of NO released from GSNO-SPIONs and PEG-GSNO-SPIONs were (124.0 ± 1.0) μmol and (33.2 ± 5.1) μmol of NO per gram, respectively. This study highlights the successful capping of the SPION surfaces with antioxidant GSH and biocompatible PEG, which improved the dispersion and biocompatibility of the NPs in aqueous/biological environments, thereby enhancing the potential uses of SPIONs as drug delivery systems, such as a NO donor vehicle, in biomedical applications.

  12. E6* oncoprotein expression of human papillomavirus type-16 determines different ultraviolet sensitivity related to glutathione and glutathione peroxidase antioxidant defence.

    PubMed

    Mouret, Stéphane; Sauvaigo, Sylvie; Peinnequin, André; Favier, Alain; Beani, Jean-Claude; Leccia, Marie-Thérèse

    2005-06-01

    Clinical observations of non-melanoma skin cancer in immunocompromised patients, such as organ transplant recipients, suggest co-operative effects of human papillomavirus (HPV) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The aim of the present study is to evaluate UV sensitivity and DNA damage formation according to antioxidant status in HPV16-infected keratinocytes. We used SKv cell lines, infected with HPV16 and well characterized for their proliferative and tumorigenic capacities. We showed that SKv cell lines presented various E6* (a truncated form of E6) RNA levels. We demonstrated that the higher oncoprotein RNA expression level was associated with a higher resistance to solar-simulated radiation, more specifically to UVB radiation and to hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, this high resistance was associated with a low oxidative DNA damage formation after UV radiation and was related to high glutathione content and glutathione peroxidase activities. Therefore, the results of our study suggest that E6* levels could modulate the glutathione/glutathione peroxidase pathway providing a mechanism to protect HPV-infected keratinocytes against an environmental oxidative stress, such as UV radiation.

  13. Structure of glutathione S-transferase 1 from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus (Na-GST-1) in complex with glutathione.

    PubMed

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Ceccarelli, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase 1 from Necator americanus (Na-GST-1) is a vaccine candidate for hookworm infection that has a high affinity for heme and metal porphyrins. As part of attempts to clarify the mechanism of heme detoxification by hookworm GSTs, co-crystallization and soaking studies of Na-GST-1 with the heme-like molecules protoporphyrin IX disodium salt, hematin and zinc protoporphyrin were undertaken. While these studies did not yield the structure of the complex of Na-GST-1 with any of these molecules, co-crystallization experiments resulted in the first structures of the complex of Na-GST-1 with the substrate glutathione. The structures of the complex of Na-GST-1 with glutathione were solved from pathological crystalline aggregates comprising more than one crystal form. These first structures of the complex of Na-GST-1 with the substrate glutathione were solved by molecular replacement from data collected with a sealed-tube home source using the previously reported apo structure as the search model.

  14. The three-dimensional structure of class pi glutathione S-transferase in complex with glutathione sulfonate at 2.3 A resolution.

    PubMed Central

    Reinemer, P; Dirr, H W; Ladenstein, R; Schäffer, J; Gallay, O; Huber, R

    1991-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of class pi glutathione S-transferase from pig lung, a homodimeric enzyme, has been solved by multiple isomorphous replacement at 3 A resolution and preliminarily refined at 2.3 A resolution (R = 0.24). Each subunit (207 residues) is folded into two domains of different structure. Domain I (residues 1-74) consists of a central four-stranded beta-sheet flanked on one side by two alpha-helices and on the other side, facing the solvent, by a bent, irregular helix structure. The topological pattern resembles the bacteriophage T4 thioredoxin fold, in spite of their dissimilar sequences. Domain II (residues 81-207) contains five alpha-helices. The dimeric molecule is globular with dimensions of about 55 A x 52 A x 45 A. Between the subunits and along the local diad, is a large cavity which could possibly be involved in the transport of nonsubstrate ligands. The binding site of the competitive inhibitor, glutathione sulfonate, is located on domain I, and is part of a cleft formed between intrasubunit domains. Glutathione sulfonate is bound in an extended conformation through multiple interactions. Only three contact residues, namely Tyr7, Gln62 and Asp96 are conserved within the family of cytosolic glutathione S-transferases. The exact location of the binding site(s) of the electrophilic substrate is not clear. Catalytic models are discussed on the basis of the molecular structure. Images PMID:2065650

  15. Carcinogen treatment increases glutathione hydrolysis by gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase.

    PubMed

    Conway, J G; Neptun, D A; Garvey, L K; Popp, J A

    1987-07-01

    The effect of carcinogen treatment on gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-mediated hydrolysis of GSH to glutamate and cysteinylglycine in the blood and bile compartments was investigated in livers perfused in situ. Treatment of rats with 40 p.p.m. diethylnitrosamine (DEN) in the drinking water or 0.02% 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) in the diet for 50-60 days increased GGT activity in liver homogenates by 100 and 800% respectively. Bile flow and the sum of glutamate and glutathione (GSH) efflux into the bile of perfused livers was not affected by carcinogen treatment. However, the ratio of GSH to glutamate in bile was 2.1, 1.1 and 0.2 in livers from control, DEN- and AAF-treated rats respectively. Pretreatment with L-(alpha S,5S)-alpha-amino-3-chloro-4,5-dihydro-5-isoxazoleacetic acid (AT125) decreased GGT activity in liver homogenates by about 85% and elevated the ratio of GSH to glutamate in the bile to 3.2 in all groups. Thus, the hydrolysis of GSH to glutamate in the bile of perfused livers correlated with the degree of induction of GGT by DEN and AAF treatments. Exogenous GSH (10 microM) infused into the portal vein of perfused livers from control, DEN- and AAF-treated rats was recovered completely in the effluent perfusate. Pretreatment with AT125 had no effect on the recovery of exogenous GSH in the effluent perfusate. Thus, metabolism of GSH in the blood space was not detected after short-term carcinogen treatment. To increase the possible hydrolysis of GSH in the perfusate, rats were treated for 130-180 days with DEN and GSH (60 microM) was infused into the hepatic artery of livers perfused simultaneously via the hepatic artery and portal vein. Only 50% of the infused GSH was recovered in the effluent perfusate of perfused livers from DEN-treated rats. In contrast, significantly more GSH (80-90%) was recovered from livers from control rats or DEN-treated rats that had received AT125 pretreatment. In addition AT125 pretreatment increased the basal rates of GSH

  16. Characterization of glutathione-S-transferases in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Glisic, Branka; Mihaljevic, Ivan; Popovic, Marta; Zaja, Roko; Loncar, Jovica; Fent, Karl; Kovacevic, Radmila; Smital, Tvrtko

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are one of the key enzymes that mediate phase II of cellular detoxification. The aim of our study was a comprehensive characterization of GSTs in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an important vertebrate model species frequently used in environmental research. A detailed phylogenetic analysis of GST superfamily revealed 27 zebrafish gst genes. Further insights into the orthology relationships between human and zebrafish GSTs/Gsts were obtained by the conserved synteny analysis. Expression of gst genes in six tissues (liver, kidney, gills, intestine, brain and gonads) of adult male and female zebrafish was determined using qRT-PCR. Functional characterization was performed on 9 cytosolic Gst enzymes after overexpression in E. coli and subsequent protein purification. Enzyme kinetics was measured for GSH and a series of model substrates. Our data revealed ubiquitously high expression of gstp, gstm (except in liver), gstr1, mgst3a and mgst3b, high expression of gsto2 in gills and ovaries, gsta in intestine and testes, gstt1a in liver, and gstz1 in liver, kidney and brain. All zebrafish Gsts catalyzed the conjugation of GSH to model GST substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and monochlorobimane (MCB), apart from Gsto2 and Gstz1 that catalyzed GSH conjugation to dehydroascorbate (DHA) and dichloroacetic acid (DCA), respectively. Affinity toward CDNB varied from 0.28 mM (Gstp2) to 3.69 mM (Gstm3), while affinity toward MCB was in the range of 5 μM (Gstt1a) to 250 μM (Gstp1). Affinity toward GSH varied from 0.27 mM (Gstz1) to 4.45 mM (Gstt1a). Turnover number for CDNB varied from 5.25s(-1) (Gstt1a) to 112s(-1) (Gstp2). Only Gst Pi enzymes utilized ethacrynic acid (ETA). We suggest that Gstp1, Gstp2, Gstt1a, Gstz1, Gstr1, Mgst3a and Mgst3b have important role in the biotransformation of xenobiotics, while Gst Alpha, Mu, Pi, Zeta and Rho classes are involved in the crucial physiological processes. In summary, this study provides the

  17. Significance of Polymorphisms and Expression of Enzyme-Encoding Genes Related to Glutathione in Hematopoietic Cancers and Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zmorzyński, Szymon; Świderska-Kołacz, Grażyna; Koczkodaj, Dorota; Filip, Agata Anna

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidant compounds such as glutathione and its enzymes have become the focus of attention of medical sciences. Glutathione, a specific tripeptide, is involved in many intercellular processes. The glutathione concentration is determined by the number of GAG repeats in gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase. GAG polymorphisms are associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia, berylliosis, diabetes, lung cancer, and nasopharyngeal tumors. Cancer cells with high glutathione concentration are resistant to chemotherapy treatment. The oxidized form of glutathione is formed by glutathione peroxidases (GPXs). The changes in activity of GPX1, GPX2, and GPX3 isoforms may be associated with the development of cancers, for example, prostate cancer or even colon cancer. Detoxification of glutathione conjugates is possible due to activity of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Polymorphisms in GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTO1 enzymes increase the risk of developing breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidases (GGTs) are responsible for glutathione degradation. Increased activity of GGT correlates with adverse prognosis in patients with breast cancer. Studies on genes encoding glutathione enzymes are continued in order to determine the correlation between DNA polymorphisms in cancer patients. PMID:26682223

  18. Antioxidant Protection of NADPH-Depleted Oligodendrocyte Precursor Cells Is Dependent on Supply of Reduced Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Kilanczyk, Ewa; Saraswat Ohri, Sujata; Whittemore, Scott R.

    2016-01-01

    The pentose phosphate pathway is the main source of NADPH, which by reducing oxidized glutathione, contributes to antioxidant defenses. Although oxidative stress plays a major role in white matter injury, significance of NADPH for oligodendrocyte survival has not been yet investigated. It is reported here that the NADPH antimetabolite 6-amino-NADP (6AN) was cytotoxic to cultured adult rat spinal cord oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) as well as OPC-derived oligodendrocytes. The 6AN-induced necrosis was preceded by increased production of superoxide, NADPH depletion, and lower supply of reduced glutathione. Moreover, survival of NADPH-depleted OPCs was improved by the antioxidant drug trolox. Such cells were also protected by physiological concentrations of the neurosteroid dehydroepiandrosterone (10−8 M). The protection by dehydroepiandrosterone was associated with restoration of reduced glutathione, but not NADPH, and was sensitive to inhibition of glutathione synthesis. A similar protective mechanism was engaged by the cAMP activator forskolin or the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) ligand G1. Finally, treatment with the glutathione precursor N-acetyl cysteine reduced cytotoxicity of 6AN. Taken together, NADPH is critical for survival of OPCs by supporting their antioxidant defenses. Consequently, injury-associated inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway may be detrimental for the myelination or remyelination potential of the white matter. Conversely, steroid hormones and cAMP activators may promote survival of NADPH-deprived OPCs by increasing a NADPH-independent supply of reduced glutathione. Therefore, maintenance of glutathione homeostasis appears as a critical effector mechanism for OPC protection against NADPH depletion and preservation of the regenerative potential of the injured white matter. PMID:27449129

  19. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis distinctly alters mitochondrial and cytosolic redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Hanafin, William P; Beaudoin, Jessica N; Bica, Denisa E; DiLiberto, Stephen J; Kenis, Paul JA; Gaskins, H Rex

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione couple GSH/GSSG is the most abundant cellular redox buffer and is not at equilibrium among intracellular compartments. Perturbation of glutathione poise has been associated with tumorigenesis; however, due to analytical limitations, the underlying mechanisms behind this relationship are poorly understood. In this regard, we have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real-time glutathione redox potentials in the cytosol and mitochondrial matrix of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells. First, we demonstrated that recovery time in both compartments depended upon the length of exposure to oxidative challenge with diamide, a thiol-oxidizing agent. We then monitored changes in glutathione poise in cytosolic and mitochondrial matrices following inhibition of glutathione (GSH) synthesis with L-buthionine sulphoximine (BSO). The mitochondrial matrix showed higher oxidation in the BSO-treated cells indicating distinct compartmental alterations in redox poise. Finally, the contributory role of the p53 protein in supporting cytosolic redox poise was demonstrated. Inactivation of the p53 pathway by expression of a dominant-negative p53 protein sensitized the cytosol to oxidation in BSO-treated tumor cells. As a result, both compartments of PF161-T + 53DD cells were equally oxidized ≈20 mV by inhibition of GSH synthesis. Conversely, mitochondrial oxidation was independent of p53 status in GSH-deficient tumor cells. Taken together, these findings indicate different redox requirements for the glutathione thiol/disulfide redox couple within the cytosol and mitochondria of resting cells and reveal distinct regulation of their redox poise in response to inhibition of glutathione biosynthesis. PMID:24586100

  20. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient γ-ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Timothy O; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-06-01

    Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M(2) seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione depletion

  1. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient γ -ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Jobe, Timothy O.; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M2 seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione

  2. Ethanol induced attenuation of oxidative stress is unable to alter mRNA expression pattern of catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S- transferase (GST1A), and superoxide dismutase (SOD3) enzymes in Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Minghui; Shariat-Madar, Bahbak; Haron, Mona H.; Wu, Mengmeng; Khan, Ikhlas A.; Dasmahapatra, Asok K.

    2010-01-01

    Although the mechanism of ethanol toxicity during embryogenesis is unknown, our earlier studies on Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryos indicated that the effects might be mediated through oxidative stress. In this study we have determined the oxidative stress and the mRNA content of four antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, and superoxide dismutase) during Japanese rice fish embryogenesis (from 0 day post-fertilization to hatching) and after exposing the embryos to ethanol (100 and 300 mM) for 48 h at three stages (0–2, 1–3 and 4–6 day post fertilization, dpf) of organogenesis. We observed that oxidative stress was minimal in blastula, gastrula or neurula stages, increased gradually with the advancement of morphogenesis and reached its maximum level in hatchlings. The antioxidant enzyme mRNAs were constitutively expressed throughout development; however, the expression pattern was not identical among the enzymes. Catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) mRNAs were minimal in the fertilized eggs, but increased significantly in 1 dpf and then either sharply dropped (SOD) or maintained a steady-state (catalase). Glutathione S-transferase (GST) was very high in fertilized eggs and sharply dropped 1 dpf and then gradually increased thereafter. Glutathione reductase (GR) maintained a steady-state throughout the development. Ethanol was able to attenuate oxidative stress in embryos exposed only to 300 mM 1–3 dpf; no significant difference with controls was observed in other ethanol-treated groups. The antioxidant enzyme mRNAs also remained unaltered after ethanol treatment. From these data we conclude that the attenuation of oxidative stress by ethanol is probably due to the inhibition of normal growth of the embryos rather than by inhibiting catalase, GST, GR or SOD- dependent activities. PMID:20965276

  3. Feedback inhibition by thiols outranks glutathione depletion: a luciferase-based screen reveals glutathione-deficient γ-ECS and glutathione synthetase mutants impaired in cadmium-induced sulfate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Timothy O; Sung, Dong-Yul; Akmakjian, Garo; Pham, Allis; Komives, Elizabeth A; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Schroeder, Julian I

    2012-06-01

    Plants exposed to heavy metals rapidly induce changes in gene expression that activate and enhance detoxification mechanisms, including toxic-metal chelation and the scavenging of reactive oxygen species. However, the mechanisms mediating toxic heavy metal-induced gene expression remain largely unknown. To genetically elucidate cadmium-specific transcriptional responses in Arabidopsis, we designed a genetic screen based on the activation of a cadmium-inducible reporter gene. Microarray studies identified a high-affinity sulfate transporter (SULTR1;2) among the most robust and rapid cadmium-inducible transcripts. The SULTR1;2 promoter (2.2 kb) was fused with the firefly luciferase reporter gene to quantitatively report the transcriptional response of plants exposed to cadmium. Stably transformed luciferase reporter lines were ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized, and stable M(2) seedlings were screened for an abnormal luciferase response during exposure to cadmium. The screen identified non-allelic mutant lines that fell into one of three categories: (i) super response to cadmium (SRC) mutants; (ii) constitutive response to cadmium (CRC) mutants; or (iii) non-response and reduced response to cadmium (NRC) mutants. Two nrc mutants, nrc1 and nrc2, were mapped, cloned and further characterized. The nrc1 mutation was mapped to the γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase gene and the nrc2 mutation was identified as the first viable recessive mutant allele in the glutathione synthetase gene. Moreover, genetic, HPLC mass spectrometry, and gene expression analysis of the nrc1 and nrc2 mutants, revealed that intracellular glutathione depletion alone would be insufficient to induce gene expression of sulfate uptake and assimilation mechanisms. Our results modify the glutathione-depletion driven model for sulfate assimilation gene induction during cadmium stress, and suggest that an enhanced oxidative state and depletion of upstream thiols, in addition to glutathione depletion

  4. Vitamin B-6 restriction tends to reduce the red blood cell glutathione synthesis rate without affecting red blood cell or plasma glutathione concentrations in healthy men and women123

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Yvonne; O'Rourke, Bruce; Gilbert, Lesa R; Keeling, Christine; Matthews, Dwight E; Stacpoole, Peter W

    2009-01-01

    Background: Glutathione plays various protective roles in the human body. Vitamin B-6 as pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP) is required as the coenzyme in the formation of glutathione precursors. Despite this obligatory role of PLP, previous studies from this laboratory showed that vitamin B-6 deficiency caused elevated glutathione concentrations in rat liver and human plasma. Objective: Our aim was to determine the effect of marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency (plasma PLP 20–30 nmol/L) on the rate of red blood cell (RBC) glutathione synthesis. Design: We measured plasma and RBC glutathione concentrations and the fractional and absolute synthesis rates of RBC glutathione using the stable-isotope-labeled glutathione precursor [1,2-13C2]glycine in 13 healthy volunteers aged 21–39 y. Results: Dietary vitamin B-6 restriction did not significantly affect the glutathione concentration in plasma (6.9 ± 1.9 compared with 6.7 ± 1.1 μmol/L) or RBCs (2068 ± 50 compared with 2117 ± 48 μmol/L). For RBC glutathione, the mean fractional synthesis rates were 54 ± 5%/d and 43 ± 4%/d (P = 0.10), and the absolute synthesis rates were 1116 ± 100 and 916 ± 92 μmol · L−1 · d−1 (P = 0.14) before and after vitamin B-6 restriction, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency tended to decrease mean RBC glutathione synthesis with no effect on RBC glutathione concentration, but the responses varied widely among individuals. Because the cysteine concentration in plasma and RBC did not change during vitamin B-6 restriction, we conclude that the effects of marginal vitamin B-6 deficiency on glutathione synthesis are not caused by altered precursor concentrations. PMID:19515736

  5. Regulative roles of glutathione reductase and four glutaredoxins in glutathione redox, antioxidant activity, and iron homeostasis of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Bin; Tang, Li; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple glutaredoxins (Grx) and glutathione reductase (Glr) are vital for the thiol-disulfide redox system in budding yeast but generally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we characterized the Beauveria bassiana redox system comprising dithiol Grx1, monothiol Grx2-4, Grx-like Grx5, and Glr orthologue. Each grx or glr deletion was compensated by increased transcripts of some other grx genes in normal cultures. Particularly, grx3 compensated the absence of grx1, grx2, grx5, or glr under oxidative stress while its absence was compensated only by undeletable grx4 under normal conditions but by most of other undeleted grx and glr genes in response to menadione. Consequently, the redox state was disturbed in Δglr more than in Δgrx3 but not in Δgrx1/2/5. Superoxide dismutases were more active in normal Δgrx1-3 cultures but less in Δgrx5 or Δglr response to menadione. Total catalase activity increased differentially in all the mutant cultures stressed with or without H2O2 while total peroxidase activity decreased more in the normal or H2O2-stressed culture of Δglr than of Δgrx3. Among the mutants, Δgrx3 showed slightly increased sensitivity to menadione or H2O2; Δglr exhibited greater sensitivity to thiol-oxidizing diamide than thiol-reducing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as well as increased sensitivity to the two oxidants. Intriguingly, all the mutants grew slower in a Fe(3+)-inclusive medium perhaps due to elevated transcripts of two Fe(3+) transporter genes. More or fewer phenotypes linked with biocontrol potential were altered in four deletion mutants excluding Δgrx5. All the changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Overall, Grx3 played more critical role than other Grx homologues in the Glr-dependent redox system of the fungal entomopathogen. PMID:26969041

  6. Selenium regulation of glutathione peroxidase in human hepatoma cell line Hep3B.

    PubMed

    Baker, R D; Baker, S S; LaRosa, K; Whitney, C; Newburger, P E

    1993-07-01

    Glutathione peroxidase is an important enzyme in cellular antioxidant defense systems, detoxifying peroxides and hydroperoxides. As a component of the glutathione cycle, it protects the liver from reactive oxygen metabolites. Selenocysteine is present at the catalytic site of glutathione peroxidase, and selenium availability regulates glutathione peroxidase enzyme activity. Hep3B cells, a well-differentiated human hepatoma-derived cell line, exhibited time-dependent decrease in glutathione peroxidase activity (nmol NADPH oxidized/min/mg protein, mean +/- SE) when incubated in selenium-free medium for 10 days (Day 0, 21.8 +/- 7.3; Day 2, 10.9 +/- 1.2; Day 4, 7.9 +/- 0.8; Day 6, 4.0 +/- 0.7; Day 8, 4.5 +/- 0.6; Day 10, 1.6 +/- 0.4). With the reintroduction of selenium, glutathione peroxidase activity returned. A second human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, demonstrated a similar pattern when depleted of and then repleted with selenium. To assess protein synthesis, glutathione peroxidase activity was measured in deficient and replete Hep3B cells incubated with and without selenium and with and without cycloheximide. Deficient cells (mean +/- SE) (4.9 +/- 0.2) showed an increase in glutathione peroxidase activity after 24 h in selenium-containing medium (11.6 +/- 0.2), but not when cycloheximide was included in the medium (6.9 +/- 0.5) or when cycloheximide and no selenium was included (5.3 +/- 0.8). Replete Hep3B cells (40.1 +/- 1.1) demonstrated decreased glutathione peroxidase after 24 h in medium without selenium (34.0 +/- 1.4), medium with both cycloheximide and selenium (34.0 +/- 2.6), and medium without selenium and containing cycloheximide (37.6 +/- 1.3). These data suggest that protein synthesis is needed for selenium repletion to exert control on glutathione peroxidase activity. Using a cDNA for human glutathione peroxidase (GPx1), selenium-deficient and replete Hep3B cell RNA was analyzed by Northern blot. mRNA for GPx was quantified by densitometry. The steady

  7. Delineation of the Pasteurellaceae-specific GbpA-family of glutathione-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Gram-negative bacterium Haemophilus influenzae is a glutathione auxotroph and acquires the redox-active tripeptide by import. The dedicated glutathione transporter belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-transporter superfamily and displays more than 60% overall sequence identity with the well-studied dipeptide (Dpp) permease of Escherichia coli. The solute binding protein (SBP) that mediates glutathione transport in H. influenzae is a lipoprotein termed GbpA and is 54% identical to E. coli DppA, a well-studied member of family 5 SBP's. The discovery linking GbpA to glutathione import came rather unexpectedly as this import-priming SBP was previously annotated as a heme-binding protein (HbpA), and was thought to mediate heme acquisition. Nonetheless, although many SBP's have been implicated in more than one function, a prominent physiological role for GbpA and its partner permease in heme acquisition appears to be very unlikely. Here, we sought to characterize five representative GbpA homologs in an effort to delineate the novel GbpA-family of glutathione-specific family 5 SBPs and to further clarify their functional role in terms of ligand preferences. Results Lipoprotein and non-lipoprotein GbpA homologs were expressed in soluble form and substrate specificity was evaluated via a number of ligand binding assays. A physiologically insignificant affinity for hemin was observed for all five GbpA homologous test proteins. Three out of five test proteins were found to bind glutathione and some of its physiologically relevant derivatives with low- or submicromolar affinity. None of the tested SBP family 5 allocrites interacted with the remaining two GbpA test proteins. Structure-based sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis show that the two binding-inert GbpA homologs clearly form a separate phylogenetic cluster. To elucidate a structure-function rationale for this phylogenetic differentiation, we determined the crystal structure of one of the

  8. Reassessing cellular glutathione homoeostasis: novel insights revealed by genetically encoded redox probes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Bruce

    2014-08-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant small molecule thiol in nearly all eukaryotes. Whole-cell levels of oxidized (GSSG) and reduced (GSH) glutathione are variable and responsive to genetic and chemical manipulations, which has led to their relative levels being widely used as a marker of the 'cellular redox state' and to indicate the level of 'oxidative stress' experienced by cells, tissues and organisms. However, the applicability of glutathione as a marker for a generalized 'cellular redox state' is questionable, especially in the light of recent observations in yeast cells. In yeast, whole-cell GSSG changes are almost completely dependent upon the activity of an ABC-C (ATP-binding cassette-C) transporter, Ycf1 (yeast cadmium factor 1), which mediates sequestration of GSSG to the vacuole. In the absence of Ycf1 whole-cell GSSG content is strongly decreased and extremely robust to perturbation. These observations are consistent with highly specific redox-sensitive GFP probe-based measurements of the cytosolic glutathione pool and indicate that cytosolic GSSG reductive systems are easily able to reduce nearly all GSSG formed, even following treatment with large concentrations of oxidant. In the present paper, I discuss the consequences of these new findings for our understanding of glutathione homoeostasis in the eukaryotic cell.

  9. Chlortetracycline detoxification in maize via induction of glutathione S-transferases after antibiotic exposure.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Michael H; Berry, James O; Aga, Diana S

    2007-02-15

    Soil contamination with nonmetabolized antibiotics is an emerging environmental concern, especially on agricultural croplands that receive animal manure as fertilizer. In this study, phytotoxicity of chlortetracycline (CTC) antibiotics on pinto beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and maize (Zea mays) was investigated under controlled conditions. When grown in CTC-treated soil, a significant increase in the activities of the plant stress proteins glutathione S-transferases (GST) and peroxidases (POX) were observed in maize plants, but not in pinto beans. In vitro conjugation reactions demonstrated that the induced GST in maize catalyzed the conjugation of glutathione (GSH) with CTC, producing stable conjugates that were structurally characterized using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The antibiotic-induced GST produced CTC-glutathione conjugate at relative concentrations 2-fold higher than that produced by constitutively expressed GST extracted from untreated maize. On the other hand, GST extracted from pinto beans (both treated and untreated) did not efficiently catalyze glutathione conjugation with CTC. These results suggest that maize is able to detoxify chlortetracycline via the glutathione pathway, whereas pinto beans cannot. This may explain the observed stunted growth of pinto beans after antibiotic treatment. This study demonstrates the importance of plant uptake in determining the fate of antibiotics in soil and their potential phytotoxicity to susceptible plants. PMID:17593756

  10. Comparison of oxidized and reduced glutathione in the bread-making qualities of rice batter.

    PubMed

    Yano, Hiroyuki

    2012-02-01

    The demand for gluten-free bread is growing as the recognition of celiac disease and wheat allergy has increased worldwide. In our previous study, reduced glutathione (GSH) was found to improve the gas-retaining properties of rice batter used for gluten-free bread. In this article, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) was shown to have the same effect. Moreover, sensory tests revealed that GSSG bread had a significantly reduced sulfurous odor. Analyses by a gas chromatography-flame photometric detector demonstrated the presence of hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan in the headspace of GSH bread, and also their significant reduction in GSSG bread. The viscoelastic properties and microstructures of GSSG and GSH bread did not noticeably differ. These observations suggest the usefulness of GSSG in making gluten-free rice bread and extend our knowledge of the use of glutathione in food processing. Practical Application: Glutathione, a widely-distributed peptide in cells, improves the bread-making quality of gluten-free rice batter. While both the reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione are effective, GSSG-bread has significantly reduced sulfurous odor compared to GSH-bread.

  11. PKLR promotes colorectal cancer liver colonization through induction of glutathione synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Alexander; Loo, Jia Min; Mital, Rohit; Weinberg, Ethan M.; Man, Fung Ying; Zeng, Zhaoshi; Paty, Philip B.; Saltz, Leonard; Janjigian, Yelena Y.; de Stanchina, Elisa; Tavazoie, Sohail F.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer metastasis to the liver is a major cause of cancer-related death; however, the genes and pathways that govern this metastatic colonization event remain poorly characterized. Here, using a large-scale in vivo RNAi screen, we identified liver and red blood cell pyruvate kinase (PKLR) as a driver of metastatic liver colonization. PKLR expression was increased in liver metastases as well as in primary colorectal tumors of patients with metastatic disease. Evaluation of a murine liver colonization model revealed that PKLR promotes cell survival in the tumor core during conditions of high cell density and oxygen deprivation by increasing glutathione, the primary endogenous antioxidant. PKLR negatively regulated the glycolytic activity of PKM2, the major pyruvate kinase isoenzyme known to regulate cellular glutathione levels. Glutathione is critical for metastasis, and we determined that the rate-limiting enzyme of glutathione synthesis, GCLC, becomes overexpressed in patient liver metastases, promotes cell survival under hypoxic and cell-dense conditions, and mediates metastatic liver colonization. RNAi-mediated inhibition of glutathione synthesis impaired survival of multiple colon cancer cell lines, and pharmacological targeting of this metabolic pathway reduced colonization in a primary patient-derived xenograft model. Our findings highlight the impact of metabolic reprogramming within the niche as metastases progress and suggest clinical potential for targeting this pathway in colorectal cancer. PMID:26784545

  12. Current status and emerging role of glutathione in food grade lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pophaly, Sarang Dilip; Singh, Rameshwar; Pophaly, Saurabh Dilip; Kaushik, Jai K; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar

    2012-08-25

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have taken centre stage in perspectives of modern fermented food industry and probiotic based therapeutics. These bacteria encounter various stress conditions during industrial processing or in the gastrointestinal environment. Such conditions are overcome by complex molecular assemblies capable of synthesizing and/or metabolizing molecules that play a specific role in stress adaptation. Thiols are important class of molecules which contribute towards stress management in cell. Glutathione, a low molecular weight thiol antioxidant distributed widely in eukaryotes and Gram negative organisms, is present sporadically in Gram positive bacteria. However, new insights on its occurrence and role in the latter group are coming to light. Some LAB and closely related Gram positive organisms are proposed to possess glutathione synthesis and/or utilization machinery. Also, supplementation of glutathione in food grade LAB is gaining attention for its role in stress protection and as a nutrient and sulfur source. Owing to the immense benefits of glutathione, its release by probiotic bacteria could also find important applications in health improvement. This review presents our current understanding about the status of glutathione and its role as an exogenously added molecule in food grade LAB and closely related organisms.

  13. Thalidomide resistance is based on the capacity of the glutathione-dependent antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Reimann, Kerstin; Klotz, Lars-Oliver; Rüther, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Thalidomide as an effective treatment for multiple myeloma and leprosy has also caused birth defects in thousands of children five decades ago particularly in Europe. Thus its use in humans remains limited. The rapid and fatal approval of thalidomide at that time ultimately was a consequence of the sole use of thalidomide-insensitive species in animal toxicity tests. Here, we aimed at elucidating the molecular basis for the resistance of mice to thalidomide teratogenicity. By using hydroethidine staining we demonstrate that thalidomide induces the formation of superoxide in embryonic fibroblasts of thalidomide-sensitive species but not in those of mice. As determined by trypan blue staining, scavenging of superoxide prevents thalidomide-induced apoptosis, a marker for thalidomide teratogenicity. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts are found to have higher glutathione levels than those of sensitive species and can be sensitized for thalidomide by glutathione depletion with diethyl maleate or diamide. Accordingly, experimental increase of glutathione levels in human embryonic fibroblasts by adding N-acetyl cysteine or glutathione ethyl ester to the culture medium counteracts thalidomide-induced apoptosis. Finally, we show that thalidomide-induced molecular pathology downstream of superoxide is essentially identical in human and sensitized mouse embryonic fibroblasts. In conclusion, thalidomide-resistance is based on the capacity of the glutathione-dependent antioxidant defense. We provide a basis to pharmacologically overcome the limitations of thalidomide use at humans and describe substantial differences between human and mouse embryonic cells regarding the protection against oxidative stress.

  14. Effect of transport on blood selenium and glutathione status in feeder lambs.

    PubMed

    Hall, J A; Bobe, G; Nixon, B K; Vorachek, W R; Hugejiletu; Nichols, T; Mosher, W D; Pirelli, G J

    2014-09-01

    Stress from transport may be linked to increased generation of reactive oxygen species, the removal of which requires reduced glutathione and selenium. The aim of this experiment was to examine the effect of transport on glutathione and Se status of feeder lambs. Recently weaned lambs (n = 40) were blocked by gender and BW on d 0 of the experiment and randomly assigned to 2 treatment groups: group 1, no transport and full access to feed and water (control), and group 2, 8-h road transport followed by another 16 h of feed deprivation (transport). After 24 h, both treatment groups were treated the same. All lambs were weighed, and blood samples were collected at 0, 8, 24, and 72 h and analyzed for whole-blood (WB) and serum Se concentrations, serum NEFA concentrations, and erythrocyte concentrations of glutathione. Transport of feeder lambs for 8 h followed by another 16 h of feed deprivation transiently (significant at 24 h but no longer different at 72 h) decreased BW and erythrocyte glutathione concentrations and increased serum NEFA and blood Se concentrations compared with control lambs. Our results suggest that 8 h of transport followed by another 16 h of feed deprivation results in fatty acid and Se mobilization from tissue stores with a coincident decrease in erythrocyte glutathione concentrations. PMID:25035242

  15. Pink-eyed Dilution Protein Modulates Arsenic Sensitivity and Intracellular Glutathione Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Staleva, Liliana; Manga, Prashiela; Orlow, Seth J.

    2002-01-01

    Mutations in the mouse p (pink-eyed dilution) and human P genes lead to melanosomal defects and ocular developmental abnormalities. Despite the critical role played by the p gene product in controlling tyrosinase processing and melanosome biogenesis, its precise biological function is still not defined. We have expressed p heterologously in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study its function in greater detail. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that p reaches the yeast vacuolar membrane via the prevacuolar compartment. Yeast cells expressing p exhibited increased sensitivity to a number of toxic compounds, including arsenicals. Similarly, cultured murine melanocytes expressing a functional p gene were also found to be more sensitive to arsenical compounds compared with p-null cell lines. Intracellular glutathione, known to play a role in detoxification of arsenicals, was diminished by 50% in p-expressing yeast. By using the glutathione-conjugating dye monochlorobimane, in combination with acivicin, an inhibitor of vacuolar gamma-glutamyl cysteine transpeptidase, involved in the breakdown of glutathione, we found that p facilitates the vacuolar accumulation of glutathione. Our data demonstrate that the pink-eyed dilution protein increases cellular sensitivity to arsenicals and other metalloids and can modulate intracellular glutathione metabolism. PMID:12475946

  16. Decreased glutathione reductase2 leads to early leaf senescence in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shunhua; Wang, Liang; Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glutathione reductase (GR) catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) and participates in the ascorbate‐glutathione cycle, which scavenges H2O2. Here, we report that chloroplastic/mitochondrial GR2 is an important regulator of leaf senescence. Seed development of the homozygous gr2 knockout mutant was blocked at the globular stage. Therefore, to investigate the function of GR2 in leaf senescence, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants with decreased GR2 using RNAi. The GR2 RNAi plants displayed early onset of age‐dependent and dark‐ and H2O2‐induced leaf senescence, which was accompanied by the induction of the senescence‐related marker genes SAG12 and SAG13. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis revealed that genes related to leaf senescence, oxidative stress, and phytohormone pathways were upregulated directly before senescence in RNAi plants. In addition, H2O2 accumulated to higher levels in RNAi plants than in wild‐type plants and the levels of H2O2 peaked in RNAi plants directly before the early onset of leaf senescence. RNAi plants showed a greater decrease in GSH/GSSG levels than wild‐type plants during leaf development. Our results suggest that GR2 plays an important role in leaf senescence by modulating H2O2 and glutathione signaling in Arabidopsis. PMID:26031939

  17. Folic acid and glutathione in the water column of the North East Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christine, Anne; Gall, Le; Van Den Berg, Constant M. G.

    1998-11-01

    Reactive folic acid and glutathione were determined in the water column of the north east Atlantic between 30 and 54°N, 20°W. Cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV) was used to determine these compounds on board ship at low nanomolar levels after minimal sample pretreatment. Folic acid was found to occur throughout the water column, whereas glutathione was found only in the upper water column as it was undetectable in deep waters. The concentration of glutathione ranged from <1 to 15 nmol/l, the folic acid concentrations generally between 0.10 and 4.0 nmol/l. Folic acid was found to follow the same trend as the Chl- a fluorescence in the upper water column but not in deeper waters. The data show that both folic acid and glutathione are very reactive in the oceanic water column, presumably as a result of in situ production and uptake by microorganisms. The high bioactivity was confirmed by rapid decreases in the concentrations of folic acid and glutathione in unfiltered seawater during storage over periods of hours.

  18. Change in metabolic status of glutathione by palladium nitrate in blood components.

    PubMed

    Mukhtiar, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Farid; Jan, Syed Umer; Khan, Haroon; Ullah, Naseem; Badshah, Amir

    2013-01-01

    This piece of research work present the toxicological impact of varied concentrations of palladium nitrate [Pd (NO3)2] by changing the chemical status of glutathione and the way how glutathione plays its role in detoxification and conjugation processes of [Pd (NO(3))(2))] in whole blood components (plasma and cytosolic fraction). The impact of different concentration of [Pd (NO3)2] on reduced glutathione level in whole blood component (plasma and cytosolic fraction) were measured spectrophotometrically following Standard Ellman's method. Compared with control sample, significant decrease in the GSH content in whole blood components (plasma and cytosolic fraction) was obtained with various concentrations (100µM-1000µM) of palladium nitrate. Depleted GSH level was more pronounced with time incubation period (0-90) minutes. These finding shows that changes in the GSH status produced by palladium nitrate could either be due to palladium nitrate and glutathione( Pd-SG) complex formation or by conversion of reduce glutathione (2GSH + Pd(+2) - GSSG). This change in the GSH metabolic status provides information regarding the mechanism of palladium, in blood components.

  19. Yeast mitochondrial glutathione is an essential antioxidant with mitochondrial thioredoxin providing a back-up system

    PubMed Central

    Gostimskaya, Irina; Grant, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione is an abundant, low-molecular-weight tripeptide whose biological importance is dependent upon its redox-active free sulphydryl moiety. Its role as the main determinant of thiol-redox control has been challenged such that it has been proposed to play a crucial role in iron–sulphur clusters maturation, and only a minor role in thiol redox regulation, predominantly as a back-up system for the cytoplasmic thioredoxin system. Here, we have tested the importance of mitochondrial glutathione in thiol-redox regulation. Glutathione reductase (Glr1) is an oxidoreductase which converts oxidized glutathione to its reduced form. Yeast Glr1 localizes to both the cytosol and mitochondria and we have used a Glr1M1L mutant that is constitutively localized to the cytosol to test the requirement for mitochondrial Glr1. We show that the loss of mitochondrial Glr1 specifically accounts for oxidant sensitivity of a glr1 mutant. Loss of mitochondrial Glr1 does not influence iron–sulphur cluster maturation and we have used targeted roGFP2 fluorescent probes to show that oxidant sensitivity is linked to an altered redox environment. Our data indicate mitochondrial glutathione is crucial for mitochondrial thiol-redox regulation, and the mitochondrial thioredoxin system provides a back-up system, but cannot bear the redox load of the mitochondria on its own. PMID:26898146

  20. Glutathione revisited: a vital function in iron metabolism and ancillary role in thiol-redox control

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Chitranshu; Igbaria, Aeid; D'Autreaux, Benoît; Planson, Anne-Gaëlle; Junot, Christophe; Godat, Emmanuel; Bachhawat, Anand K; Delaunay-Moisan, Agnès; Toledano, Michel B

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione contributes to thiol-redox control and to extra-mitochondrial iron–sulphur cluster (ISC) maturation. To determine the physiological importance of these functions and sort out those that account for the GSH requirement for viability, we performed a comprehensive analysis of yeast cells depleted of or containing toxic levels of GSH. Both conditions triggered an intense iron starvation-like response and impaired the activity of extra-mitochondrial ISC enzymes but did not impact thiol-redox maintenance, except for high glutathione levels that altered oxidative protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. While iron partially rescued the ISC maturation and growth defects of GSH-depleted cells, genetic experiments indicated that unlike thioredoxin, glutathione could not support by itself the thiol-redox duties of the cell. We propose that glutathione is essential by its requirement in ISC assembly, but only serves as a thioredoxin backup in cytosolic thiol-redox maintenance. Glutathione-high physiological levels are thus meant to insulate its cytosolic function in iron metabolism from variations of its concentration during redox stresses, a model challenging the traditional view of it as prime actor in thiol-redox control. PMID:21478822

  1. Cellular and mitochondrial glutathione redox imbalance in lymphoblastoid cells derived from children with autism

    PubMed Central

    James, S. Jill; Rose, Shannon; Melnyk, Stepan; Jernigan, Stefanie; Blossom, Sarah; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Gaylor, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Research into the metabolic phenotype of autism has been relatively unexplored despite the fact that metabolic abnormalities have been implicated in the pathophysiology of several other neurobehavioral disorders. Plasma biomarkers of oxidative stress have been reported in autistic children; however, intracellular redox status has not yet been evaluated. Lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs) derived from autistic children and unaffected controls were used to assess relative concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) and oxidized disulfide glutathione (GSSG) in cell extracts and isolated mitochondria as a measure of intracellular redox capacity. The results indicated that the GSH/GSSG redox ratio was decreased and percentage oxidized glutathione increased in both cytosol and mitochondria in the autism LCLs. Exposure to oxidative stress via the sulfhydryl reagent thimerosal resulted in a greater decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio and increase in free radical generation in autism compared to control cells. Acute exposure to physiological levels of nitric oxide decreased mitochondrial membrane potential to a greater extent in the autism LCLs, although GSH/GSSG and ATP concentrations were similarly decreased in both cell lines. These results suggest that the autism LCLs exhibit a reduced glutathione reserve capacity in both cytosol and mitochondria that may compromise antioxidant defense and detoxification capacity under prooxidant conditions.—James, S. J., Rose, S., Melnyk, S., Jernigan, S., Blossom, S., Pavliv, O., Gaylor, D. W. Cellular and mitochondrial glutathione redox imbalance in lymphoblastoid cells derived from children with autism. PMID:19307255

  2. Decreased glutathione reductase2 leads to early leaf senescence in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shunhua; Wang, Liang; Yang, Zhipan; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR) catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) and participates in the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, which scavenges H2 O2 . Here, we report that chloroplastic/mitochondrial GR2 is an important regulator of leaf senescence. Seed development of the homozygous gr2 knockout mutant was blocked at the globular stage. Therefore, to investigate the function of GR2 in leaf senescence, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants with decreased GR2 using RNAi. The GR2 RNAi plants displayed early onset of age-dependent and dark- and H2 O2 -induced leaf senescence, which was accompanied by the induction of the senescence-related marker genes SAG12 and SAG13. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis revealed that genes related to leaf senescence, oxidative stress, and phytohormone pathways were upregulated directly before senescence in RNAi plants. In addition, H2 O2 accumulated to higher levels in RNAi plants than in wild-type plants and the levels of H2 O2 peaked in RNAi plants directly before the early onset of leaf senescence. RNAi plants showed a greater decrease in GSH/GSSG levels than wild-type plants during leaf development. Our results suggest that GR2 plays an important role in leaf senescence by modulating H2 O2 and glutathione signaling in Arabidopsis.

  3. Current status and emerging role of glutathione in food grade lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have taken centre stage in perspectives of modern fermented food industry and probiotic based therapeutics. These bacteria encounter various stress conditions during industrial processing or in the gastrointestinal environment. Such conditions are overcome by complex molecular assemblies capable of synthesizing and/or metabolizing molecules that play a specific role in stress adaptation. Thiols are important class of molecules which contribute towards stress management in cell. Glutathione, a low molecular weight thiol antioxidant distributed widely in eukaryotes and Gram negative organisms, is present sporadically in Gram positive bacteria. However, new insights on its occurrence and role in the latter group are coming to light. Some LAB and closely related Gram positive organisms are proposed to possess glutathione synthesis and/or utilization machinery. Also, supplementation of glutathione in food grade LAB is gaining attention for its role in stress protection and as a nutrient and sulfur source. Owing to the immense benefits of glutathione, its release by probiotic bacteria could also find important applications in health improvement. This review presents our current understanding about the status of glutathione and its role as an exogenously added molecule in food grade LAB and closely related organisms. PMID:22920585

  4. The Glutathione Reductase GSR-1 Determines Stress Tolerance and Longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Jens; Drescher, Mike; Ajonina, Irene; Ajonina, Caroline; Hertel, Patrick; Woltersdorf, Christian; Liebau, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) and GSH-dependent enzymes play a key role in cellular detoxification processes that enable organism to cope with various internal and environmental stressors. However, it is often not clear, which components of the complex GSH-metabolism are required for tolerance towards a certain stressor. To address this question, a small scale RNAi-screen was carried out in Caenorhabditis elegans where GSH-related genes were systematically knocked down and worms were subsequently analysed for their survival rate under sub-lethal concentrations of arsenite and the redox cycler juglone. While the knockdown of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase led to a diminished survival rate under arsenite stress conditions, GSR-1 (glutathione reductase) was shown to be essential for survival under juglone stress conditions. gsr-1 is the sole GSR encoding gene found in C. elegans. Knockdown of GSR-1 hardly affected total glutathione levels nor reduced glutathione/glutathione disulphide (GSH/GSSG) ratio under normal laboratory conditions. Nevertheless, when GSSG recycling was impaired by gsr-1(RNAi), GSH synthesis was induced, but not vice versa. Moreover, the impact of GSSG recycling was potentiated under oxidative stress conditions, explaining the enormous effect gsr-1(RNAi) knockdown had on juglone tolerance. Accordingly, overexpression of GSR-1 was capable of increasing stress tolerance. Furthermore, expression levels of SKN-1-regulated GSR-1 also affected life span of C. elegans, emphasising the crucial role the GSH redox state plays in both processes. PMID:23593298

  5. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced alterations of glutathione status in immortalized rat dopaminergic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Drechsel, Derek A.; Liang, L.-P.; Patel, Manisha . E-mail: manisha.patel@uchsc.edu

    2007-05-01

    Decreased glutathione levels associated with increased oxidative stress are a hallmark of numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. GSH is an important molecule that serves as an anti-oxidant and is also a major determinant of cellular redox environment. Previous studies have demonstrated that neurotoxins can cause changes in reduced and oxidized GSH levels; however, information regarding steady state levels remains unexplored. The goal of this study was to characterize changes in cellular GSH levels and its regulatory enzymes in a dopaminergic cell line (N27) following treatment with the Parkinsonian toxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP{sup +}). Cellular GSH levels were initially significantly decreased 12 h after treatment, but subsequently recovered to values greater than controls by 24 h. However, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels were increased 24 h following treatment, concomitant with a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio prior to cell death. In accordance with these changes, ROS levels were also increased, confirming the presence of oxidative stress. Decreased enzymatic activities of glutathione reductase and glutamate-cysteine ligase by 20-25% were observed at early time points and partly account for changes in GSH levels after MPP{sup +} exposure. Additionally, glutathione peroxidase activity was increased 24 h following treatment. MPP{sup +} treatment was not associated with increased efflux of glutathione to the medium. These data further elucidate the mechanisms underlying GSH depletion in response to the Parkinsonian toxin, MPP{sup +}.

  6. Selenium concentrations and enzyme activities of glutathione metabolism in wild long-tailed ducks and common eiders

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Hoffman, David J.; Flint, Paul L.

    2011-01-01

    The relationships of selenium (Se) concentrations in whole blood with plasma activities of total glutathione peroxidase, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were studied in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) and common eiders (Somateria mollissima) sampled along the Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska, USA. Blood Se concentrations were >8 μg/g wet weight in both species. Linear regression revealed that the activities of total and Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase were significantly related to Se concentrations only in long-tailed ducks, raising the possibility that these birds were experiencing early oxidative stress.

  7. [Study on color reaction of copper(II)-neocuprine-glutathione-alcohol system].

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Liu, G; Zhang, Z; Liu, S; Wang, L

    2000-06-01

    The colour reaction of glutathione with copper(II)-neocuproine-alcohol was investigated in the present paper. The absorbance increased distinctly by about 13.8% when alcohol was added to the system. The maximum absorption wavelength lambda max of [Cu (neocuproine)2]+ was at 456 nm and the apparent molar absorptivity was 1.2 x 10(4) L.mol-1.cm-1 in the selected system. Linear dynamic relationship was obtained in the concentration range of 2-24 micrograms.mL-1 for glutathione. The regression equation was as following: A = 0.0104 + 0.0385c. The correlation coefficients was 0.9998. The recoveries obtained were between 98.5% and 99.9%. The relative standard deviations were less than 0.9% for all analyses. This method was used to determine glutathione in soybean extracts by the electromagnetic field technique and satisfactory results were obtained.

  8. Changes in cerebrospinal fluid levels of malondialdehyde and glutathione reductase activity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, V; Raffaele, R; Cosentino, E; Rizza, V

    1994-01-01

    The chemical composition of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is considered to reflect brain metabolism. In this study we measured malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and the activity of enzymes involved in antioxidative processes, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase, in human cerebrospinal fluid of multiple-sclerosis (MS) patients and normal healthy volunteers. Our results indicated that the cerebrospinal fluid in MS showed significantly higher endogenous levels of MDA than the control, as well as a much greater resistance to in-vitro stimulation test. In addition, we found the activity of GSH reductase significantly increased, about twice the control values, whereas the activity of glutathione peroxidase was markedly decreased as compared to control values. Our findings suggest that in MS the activity of antioxidant enzymes is modified, and indicates the conceivable possibility of a pathogenic role of oxidative stress in the determinism of the disease. PMID:7607784

  9. Glutathione depletion in antioxidant defense of differentiated NT2-LHON cybrids.

    PubMed

    Schoeler, S; Winkler-Stuck, K; Szibor, R; Haroon, M F; Gellerich, F N; Chamaon, K; Mawrin, C; Kirches, E

    2007-03-01

    The mechanism of retinal ganglion cell loss in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is still uncertain, and a role of enhanced superoxide production by the mutant mitochondrial complex I has been hypothesized. In the present study, it was shown that LHON cybrids, carrying the np11778 mutation, became selectively more H(2)O(2) sensitive compared with the parental cell line only following short-term retinoic acid differentiation. They contained a decreased cellular glutathione pool (49%, p< or =0.05), despite 1.5-fold enhanced expression of the regulatory subunit of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (p< or =0.05). This points to a reduction of the capacity to detoxify H(2)O(2) and to changes in thiol redox potential. The activity of the H(2)O(2) degrading enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and the activities of glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were unaffected.

  10. The Biochemical Adaptations of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to Fresh Fruits Reduced Fructose Concentrations and Glutathione-S Transferase Activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Kim, A-Young; Jung, Jin Kyo; Donahue, Kelly M; Jung, Chuleui; Choi, Man-Yeon; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-04-01

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America. The females have a serrated ovipositor that enables them to infest almost all ripening small fruits. To understand the physiological and metabolic basis of spotted wing drosophila food preferences for healthy ripening fruits, we investigated the biological and biochemical characteristics of spotted wing drosophila and compared them with those of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that the susceptibility to oxidative stressors was significantly increased in spotted wing drosophila compared with those of D. melanogaster. In addition, we found that spotted wing drosophila had significantly reduced glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity and gene numbers. Furthermore, fructose concentrations found in spotted wing drosophila were significantly lower than those of D. melanogaster. Our data strongly suggest that the altered food preferences of spotted wing drosophila may stem from evolutionary adaptations to fresh foods accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and GST activities.

  11. The Biochemical Adaptations of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to Fresh Fruits Reduced Fructose Concentrations and Glutathione-S Transferase Activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Kim, A-Young; Jung, Jin Kyo; Donahue, Kelly M; Jung, Chuleui; Choi, Man-Yeon; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-04-01

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America. The females have a serrated ovipositor that enables them to infest almost all ripening small fruits. To understand the physiological and metabolic basis of spotted wing drosophila food preferences for healthy ripening fruits, we investigated the biological and biochemical characteristics of spotted wing drosophila and compared them with those of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that the susceptibility to oxidative stressors was significantly increased in spotted wing drosophila compared with those of D. melanogaster. In addition, we found that spotted wing drosophila had significantly reduced glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity and gene numbers. Furthermore, fructose concentrations found in spotted wing drosophila were significantly lower than those of D. melanogaster. Our data strongly suggest that the altered food preferences of spotted wing drosophila may stem from evolutionary adaptations to fresh foods accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and GST activities. PMID:26921228

  12. Bioaccumulation of PCB-153 and effects on molecular biomarkers acetylcholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase in Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Liñán, Leticia; Bellas, Juan; Soriano, José Antonio; Concha-Graña, Estefanía; Muniategui, Soledad; Beiras, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    In this study, PCB-153 bioaccumulation kinetics and concentration-response experiments were performed employing wild Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels. In addition, the activity of three enzymatic biomarkers: glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), were measured in the mussel gills. The experimental data fitted well to an asymptotic accumulation model with a high bioconcentration factor (BCF) of 9324 L kg(-1) and a very limited depuration capacity, described by a low excretion rate coefficient (Kd = 0.083 d(-1)). This study reports by first time in mussels significant inhibition of GST activity and significant induction of GPx activity as a result of exposure to dissolved PCB-153. In contrast, AChE activity was unaffected at all concentrations and exposure times tested. The effects on both enzymes are time-dependent, which stresses the difficulties inherent to the use of these biomarkers in chemical pollution monitoring programs.

  13. High Glutathione and Glutathione Peroxidase-2 Levels Mediate Cell-Type-Specific DNA Damage Protection in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dannenmann, Benjamin; Lehle, Simon; Hildebrand, Dominic G.; Kübler, Ayline; Grondona, Paula; Schmid, Vera; Holzer, Katharina; Fröschl, Mirjam; Essmann, Frank; Rothfuss, Oliver; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells must strictly maintain genomic integrity to prevent transmission of mutations. In human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we found that genome surveillance is achieved via two ways, namely, a hypersensitivity to apoptosis and a very low accumulation of DNA lesions. The low apoptosis threshold was mediated by constitutive p53 expression and a marked upregulation of proapoptotic p53 target genes of the BCL-2 family, ensuring the efficient iPSC removal upon genotoxic insults. Intriguingly, despite the elevated apoptosis sensitivity, both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA lesions induced by genotoxins were less frequent in iPSCs compared to fibroblasts. Gene profiling identified that mRNA expression of several antioxidant proteins was considerably upregulated in iPSCs. Knockdown of glutathione peroxidase-2 and depletion of glutathione impaired protection against DNA lesions. Thus, iPSCs ensure genomic integrity through enhanced apoptosis induction and increased antioxidant defense, contributing to protection against DNA damage. PMID:25937369

  14. Bioaccumulation of PCB-153 and effects on molecular biomarkers acetylcholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase in Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Liñán, Leticia; Bellas, Juan; Soriano, José Antonio; Concha-Graña, Estefanía; Muniategui, Soledad; Beiras, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    In this study, PCB-153 bioaccumulation kinetics and concentration-response experiments were performed employing wild Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels. In addition, the activity of three enzymatic biomarkers: glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), were measured in the mussel gills. The experimental data fitted well to an asymptotic accumulation model with a high bioconcentration factor (BCF) of 9324 L kg(-1) and a very limited depuration capacity, described by a low excretion rate coefficient (Kd = 0.083 d(-1)). This study reports by first time in mussels significant inhibition of GST activity and significant induction of GPx activity as a result of exposure to dissolved PCB-153. In contrast, AChE activity was unaffected at all concentrations and exposure times tested. The effects on both enzymes are time-dependent, which stresses the difficulties inherent to the use of these biomarkers in chemical pollution monitoring programs. PMID:27176625

  15. Bioaccumulation of 4-nonylphenol and effects on biomarkers, acetylcholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase, in Mytilus galloprovincialis mussel gilla.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Liñán, Leticia; Bellas, Juan; Salgueiro-González, Noelia; Muniategui, Soledad; Beiras, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    Wild marine mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis showed a moderate bioaccumulation ability when exposed to waterborne 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), with a bioconcentration factor (BCF) of 6850 L Kg(-1) (dry weight). Kinetic and concentration-response experiments were performed and three enzymatic biomarkers in mussel gills were measured: Glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Exposure of mussels to environmentally relevant concentrations (25-100 μg L(-1)) of 4-nonylphenol significantly inhibited the AChE activity and induced the GST and GPx activities. GST induction was dose dependent whilst GPx activity showed a less consistent pattern, but in both cases the induction remained after a 10 d depuration period. Mussels seem capable of eliminating 4-NP from their tissues through a mechanism involving GST induction.

  16. Bioaccumulation of BDE-47 and effects on molecular biomarkers acetylcholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase in Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Liñán, Leticia; Bellas, Juan; Fumega, José; Beiras, Ricardo

    2015-03-01

    Mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis, showed a high bioaccumulation ability when exposed to waterborne tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), with a bioconcentration factor of 10,900 L Kg(-1) wet weight, and slow depuration rates in clean seawater. Kinetic and concentration-response experiments were performed measuring in the exposed mussel the activities of three molecular biomarkers: glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The long term (30 days) exposure of mussels to all concentrations (2-15 µg L(-1)) of BDE-47 significantly inhibited the AChE and GST activities, a result that supports the suitability of these biomarkers in marine pollution monitoring programs. However, GPx activity showed a less consistent pattern of response depending on the concentration and the duration of exposure.

  17. Glutathione-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles: electromagnetic interactions in a closely packed assembly.

    PubMed

    Basu, Soumen; Pal, Tarasankar

    2007-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles of variable sizes have been prepared by reducing HAuCl4 with trisodium citrate by Frens' method. The synthesized gold particles show intense surface plasmon band in the visible region. The optical resonances in the visible are due to the surface plasmon oscillation, which is a function of geometry of the particles. The work reported here describes the interaction between nanoscale gold particles and a biomolecule, glutathione at low pH. Glutathione, which is a major cellular antioxidant and consists of amino acids glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine, has been used as a molecular linker between the gold nanoparticles. In glutathione, the reactivity of the a-amines (adjacent to -COOH) is found to be pH-dependent. Linking via the a-amines are activated at low pH but suppressed at high pH due to electrostatic repulsive forces between the gold surfaces and the charged carboxylate groups. In colloidal solutions, the colour of gold nanoparticles may range from red to purple to blue, depending on the degree of aggregation as well as orientation of the individual particles within the aggregates. The citrate-functionalized gold nanoparticles with glutathione in variable acidic pH condition produce different but well-ordered aggregates. It is observed that a new peak appearing at a longer wavelength intensifies and shifts further to the red from the original peak position depending on the particle size, concentration of glutathione, and pH of the solution. The aggregates have been characterized by UV/Vis, FTIR, XRD, and TEM. On the basis of the first appearance of a clearly defined new peak at longer wavelength, a higher sensitivity of glutathione detection has been achieved with gold nanoparticles of larger dimension.

  18. The crucial protective role of glutathione against tienilic acid hepatotoxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiya, Takayoshi Mori, Kazuhiko Hattori, Chiharu Kai, Kiyonori Kataoka, Hiroko Masubuchi, Noriko Jindo, Toshimasa Manabe, Sunao

    2008-10-15

    To investigate the hepatotoxic potential of tienilic acid in vivo, we administered a single oral dose of tienilic acid to Sprague-Dawley rats and performed general clinicopathological examinations and hepatic gene expression analysis using Affymetrix microarrays. No change in the serum transaminases was noted at up to 1000 mg/kg, although slight elevation of the serum bile acid and bilirubin, and very mild hepatotoxic changes in morphology were observed. In contrast to the marginal clinicopathological changes, marked upregulation of the genes involved in glutathione biosynthesis [glutathione synthetase and glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gcl)], oxidative stress response [heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1] and phase II drug metabolism (glutathione S-transferase and UDP glycosyltransferase 1A6) were noted after 3 or 6 h post-dosing. The hepatic reduced glutathione level decreased at 3-6 h, and then increased at 24 or 48 h, indicating that the upregulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated gene and the late increase in hepatic glutathione are protective responses against the oxidative and/or electrophilic stresses caused by tienilic acid. In a subsequent experiment, tienilic acid in combination with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of Gcl caused marked elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with extensive centrilobular hepatocyte necrosis, whereas BSO alone showed no hepatotoxicity. The elevation of ALT by this combination was observed at the same dose levels of tienilic acid as the upregulation of the Nrf2-regulated genes by tienilic acid alone. In conclusion, these results suggest that the impairment of glutathione biosynthesis may play a critical role in the development of tienilic acid hepatotoxicity through extensive oxidative and/or electrophilic stresses.

  19. Age-Specific Effects on Rat Lung Glutathione and Antioxidant Enzymes after Inhaling Ultrafine Soot

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jackie K. W.; Kodani, Sean D.; Charrier, Jessie G.; Morin, Dexter; Edwards, Patricia C.; Anderson, Donald S.; Anastasio, Cort

    2013-01-01

    Vehicle exhaust is rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and is a dominant contributor to urban particulate pollution (PM). Exposure to PM is linked to respiratory and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in susceptible populations, such as children. PM can contribute to the development and exacerbation of asthma, and this is thought to occur because of the presence of electrophiles in PM or through electrophile generation via the metabolism of PAHs. Glutathione (GSH), an abundant intracellular antioxidant, confers cytoprotection through conjugation of electrophiles and reduction of reactive oxygen species. GSH-dependent phase II detoxifying enzymes glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase facilitate metabolism and conjugation, respectively. Ambient particulates are highly variable in composition, which complicates systematic study. In response, we have developed a replicable ultrafine premixed flame particle (PFP)-generating system for in vivo studies. To determine particle effects in the developing lung, 7–day-old neonatal and adult rats inhaled 22 μg/m3 PFP during a single 6-hour exposure. Pulmonary GSH and related phase II detoxifying gene and protein expression were evaluated 2, 24, and 48 hours after exposure. Neonates exhibited significant depletion of GSH despite higher initial baseline levels of GSH. Furthermore, we observed attenuated induction of phase II enzymes (glutamate cysteine ligase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase) in neonates compared with adult rats. We conclude that developing neonates have a limited ability to deviate from their normal developmental pattern that precludes adequate adaptation to environmental pollutants, which results in enhanced cytotoxicity from inhaled PM. PMID:23065132

  20. Glutathione as a skin whitening agent: Facts, myths, evidence and controversies.

    PubMed

    Sonthalia, Sidharth; Daulatabad, Deepashree; Sarkar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione is a low molecular weight thiol-tripeptide that plays a prominent role in maintaining intracellular redox balance. In addition to its remarkable antioxidant properties, the discovery of its antimelanogenic properties has led to its promotion as a skin-lightening agent. It is widely used for this indication in some ethnic populations. However, there is a dichotomy between evidence to support its efficacy and safety. The hype around its depigmentary properties may be a marketing gimmick of pharma-cosmeceutical companies. This review focuses on the various aspects of glutathione: its metabolism, mechanism of action and the scientific evidence to evaluate its efficacy as a systemic skin-lightening agent. Glutathione is present intracellularly in its reduced form and plays an important role in various physiological functions. Its skin-lightening effects result from direct as well as indirect inhibition of the tyrosinase enzyme and switching from eumelanin to phaeomelanin production. It is available in oral, parenteral and topical forms. Although the use of intravenous glutathione injections is popular, there is no evidence to prove its efficacy. In fact, the adverse effects caused by intravenous glutathione have led the Food and Drug Administration of Philippines to issue a public warning condemning its use for off-label indications such as skin lightening. Currently, there are three randomized controlled trials that support the skin-lightening effect and good safety profile of topical and oral glutathione. However, key questions such as the duration of treatment, longevity of skin-lightening effect and maintenance protocols remain unanswered. More randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with larger sample size, long-term follow-up and well-defined efficacy outcomes are warranted to establish the relevance of this molecule in disorders of hyperpigmentation and skin lightening. PMID:27088927

  1. Targeting brain cells with glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes: in vitro and in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Heba F; Ahmed, Sayed M; Hassaballah, Ashraf E; Omar, Mahmoud M

    2015-01-01

    Background The blood–brain barrier prevents many drug moieties from reaching the central nervous system. Therefore, glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes have been engineered to enhance the targeting of flucytosine to the brain. Methods Glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes were prepared by thin-film hydration technique and evaluated in the primary brain cells of rats. Lecithin, cholesterol, and span 65 were mixed at 1:1:1 molar ratio. The molar percentage of PEGylated glutathione varied from 0 mol% to 0.75 mol%. The cellular binding and the uptake of the targeted liposomes were both monitored by epifluorescent microscope and flow cytometry techniques. A biodistribution and a pharmacokinetic study of flucytosine and flucytosine-loaded glutathione–modulated liposomes was carried out to evaluate the in vivo brain-targeting efficiency. Results The size of glutathione-modulated nanoliposomes was <100 nm and the zeta potential was more than −65 mV. The cumulative release reached 70% for certain formulations. The cellular uptake increased as molar percent of glutathione increased to reach the maximum at 0.75 mol%. The uptake of the targeted liposomes by brain cells of the rats was three times greater than that of the nontargeted liposomes. An in vivo study showed that the relative efficiency was 2.632±0.089 and the concentration efficiency was 1.590±0.049, and also, the drug-targeting index was 3.670±0.824. Conclusion Overall, these results revealed that glutathione-PEGylated nanoliposomes enhance the effective delivery of flucytosine to brain and could become a promising new therapeutic option for the treatment of the brain infections. PMID:26229435

  2. [Glutathione redox system, immune status, antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides in hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Tapbergenov, S O; Sovetov, B S; Bekbosynova, R B; Bolysbekova, S M

    2015-01-01

    The immune status, components of the glutathione redox system, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and metabolism of purine nucleotides have been investigated in animals with experimental hypothyroidism. On day 8 after an increase in the number of leukocytes, lymphocytes, T-helpers and T-suppressors as well as increased number of B-lymphocytes was found in blood of thyroidectomized rats. This was accompanied by decreased activity of adenosine deaminase (AD), AMP-deaminase (AMPD), and 5'-nucleotidase (5'N) in blood, but the ratio of enzyme activity AD/AMPD increased. These changes in the activity of enzymes, involved in purine catabolism can be regarded as increased functional relationships between T and B lymphocytes in hypothyroidism. The functional changes of immune system cells were accompanied by increased activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), a decrease in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and the ratio GH/GPx. Thyroidectomized rats had increased amounts of total, oxidized (GSSG) and reduced glutathione (GSH), but the ratio GSH/GSSG decerased as compared with control animals. In the liver, hypothyroidism resulted in activation of SOD, GPx, decreased activity of GR and decreased ratio GR/GPx. At the same time, the levels of total, oxidized, and reduced glutathione increased, but the ratio GSH/GSSG as well as activities of enzymes involved in purine nucleotide metabolism ratio (and their ratio 5'N/AD + AMPD) decreased. All these data suggest a functional relationship of the glutathione redox system not only with antioxidant enzymes, but also activity of enzymes involved purine nucleotide metabolism and immune status.

  3. A high-performance liquid chromatography-based assay of glutathione transferase omega 1 supported by glutathione or non-physiological reductants.

    PubMed

    Németi, Balázs; Poór, Miklós; Gregus, Zoltán

    2015-01-15

    The unusual glutathione S-transferase GSTO1 reduces, rather than conjugates, endo- and xenobiotics, and its role in diverse cellular processes has been proposed. GSTO1 has been assayed spectrophotometrically by measuring the disappearance of its substrate, S-(4-nitrophenacyl)glutathione (4-NPG), in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol that regenerates GSTO1 from its mixed disulfide. To assay GSTO1 in rat liver cytosol, we have developed a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based procedure with two main advantages: (i) it measures the formation of the 4-NPG reduction product 4-nitroacetophenone, thereby offering improved sensitivity and accuracy, and (ii) it can use glutathione, the physiological reductant of GSTO1, which is impossible to do with the spectrophotometric procedure. Using the new assay, we show that (i) the GSTO1-catalyzed reduction of 4-NPG in rat liver cytosol also yields 1-(4-nitrophenyl)ethanol, whose formation from 4-nitroacetophenone requires NAD(P)H; (ii) the two assays measure comparable activities with 2-mercaptoethanol or tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine used as reductant; (iii) the cytosolic reduction of 4-NPG is inhibited by GSTO1 inhibitors (KT53, 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate, and zinc), although the inhibitory effect is strikingly influenced by the type of reductant in the assay and by the sequence of reductant and inhibitor addition. Characterization of GSTO1 inhibitors with the improved assay provides better understanding of interaction of these chemicals with the enzyme.

  4. Structure of Escherichia coli Grx2 in complex with glutathione: a dual-function hybrid of glutaredoxin and glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jun; Nadar, S Venkadesh; Li, Jiaojiao; Rosen, Barry P

    2014-07-01

    The structure of glutaredoxin 2 (Grx2) from Escherichia coli co-crystallized with glutathione (GSH) was solved at 1.60 Å resolution. The structure of a mutant with the active-site residues Cys9 and Cys12 changed to serine crystallized in the absence of glutathione was solved to 2.4 Å resolution. Grx2 has an N-terminal domain characteristic of glutaredoxins, and the overall structure is congruent with the structure of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Purified Grx2 exhibited GST activity. Grx2, which is the physiological electron donor for arsenate reduction by E. coli ArsC, was docked with ArsC. The docked structure could be fitted with GSH bridging the active sites of the two proteins. It is proposed that Grx2 is a novel Grx/GST hybrid that functions in two steps of the ArsC catalytic cycle: as a GST it catalyzes glutathionylation of the ArsC-As(V) intermediate and as a glutaredoxin it catalyzes deglutathionylation of the ArsC-As(III)-SG intermediate.

  5. O2 and glutathione effects on water radiolysis: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colliaux, A.; Gervais, B.; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C.; Beuve, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present a MC simulation of water radiolysis when O2 and glutathione are present in the solution. Our simulation is based on the continuum approximation proposed by Green and co-workers'. We investigate in particular the sensitivity of the yield of HO2•+O2-• to the concentration of O2 and glutathione and to the LET of the ionising radiation. We demonstrate that the production of HO2•/O2-• is highly sensitive to these parameters and that the variation of their yield with the O2 concentration shares remarkable similarities with the O2 effect reported for biological cell damage efficiency .

  6. Glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles: a surface ligand for minimizing serum protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Liu, Jinbin; Zhou, Chen; Yu, Mengxiao; Yang, Shengyang; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Shasha; Dean, Andrew; Sun, Xiankai; Zheng, Jie

    2014-08-13

    Ultrasmall glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles (GS-AuNPs) are known for their high resistance to serum protein adsorption. Our studies show that these NPs can serve as surface ligands to significantly enhance the physiological stability and lower the serum protein adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), in addition to rendering the NPs the luminescence property. After the incorporation of GS-AuNPs onto the surface of SPIONs to form the hybrid nanoparticles (HBNPs), these SPIONs' protein adsorption was about 10-fold lower than those of the pure glutathione-coated SPIONs suggesting that GS-AuNPs are capable of providing a stealth effect against serum proteins.

  7. Genetic Variations in Human Glutathione Transferase Enzymes: Significance for Pharmacology and Toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Josephy, P. David

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione transferase enzymes (GSTs) catalyze reactions in which electrophiles are conjugated to the tripeptide thiol glutathione. While many GST-catalyzed transformations result in the detoxication of xenobiotics, a few substrates, such as dihaloalkanes, undergo bioactivation to reactive intermediates. Many molecular epidemiological studies have tested associations between polymorphisms (especially, deletions) of human GST genes and disease susceptibility or response to therapy. This review presents a discussion of the biochemistry of GSTs, the sources—both genetic and environmental—of interindividual variation in GST activities, and their implications for pharmaco- and toxicogenetics; particular attention is paid to the Theta class GSTs. PMID:20981235

  8. gamma-Glutamylcysteinylglutamic acid--a new homologue of glutathione in maize seedlings exposed to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Meuwly, P; Thibault, P; Rauser, W E

    1993-12-28

    Exposure of plants to Cd induces the appearance of several thiols based on glutathione and known as class III metallothioneins (or phytochelatins). A new tripeptide with the structure gamma-GluCysGlu accumulated in roots and shoots of Cd-exposed maize seedlings. This thiol was purified and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The fragmentation pattern of the maize tripeptide was identical to that of the synthetic compound. Like glutathione, this new tripeptide may serve as a precursor for longer-chain peptides involved in metal detoxification through the formation of Cd-binding complexes. PMID:8282113

  9. Crystal and solution structural studies of mouse phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase 4

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Robert; Scanu, Sandra; Niessing, Dierk; Madl, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian glutathione peroxidase (GPx) family is a key component of the cellular antioxidative defence system. Within this family, GPx4 has unique features as it accepts a large class of hydroperoxy lipid substrates and has a plethora of biological functions, including sperm maturation, regulation of apoptosis and cerebral embryogenesis. In this paper, the structure of the cytoplasmic isoform of mouse phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (O70325-2 GPx4) with selenocysteine 46 mutated to cysteine is reported solved at 1.8 Å resolution using X-ray crystallography. Furthermore, solution data of an isotope-labelled GPx protein are presented. PMID:27710939

  10. Probing the binding of trypsin to glutathione-stabilized gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gongke; Liu, Xingbing; Yan, Changling; Bai, Guangyue; Lu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the interaction of trypsin with glutathione-stabilized Au nanoparticles (NPs) using fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy. We find that trypsin binds strongly to the Au NPs with a static quenching mechanism, and that the interaction is characteristic of positive cooperative binding. Furthermore, we determine the binding constants and the thermodynamic parameters, which suggest that the main binding forces between the glutathione-stabilized Au NPs and trypsin are electrostatic interactions and hydrogen bonding. Analysis of UV-vis absorption spectra suggests that aggregation of the Au NPs occurs in the trypsin/Au NPs system, which significantly alters the conformation of the protein.

  11. Oxidative stress protection and glutathione metabolism in response to hydrogen peroxide and menadione in riboflavinogenic fungus Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, S; Chandra, T S

    2014-11-01

    Ashbya gossypii is a plant pathogen and a natural overproducer of riboflavin and is used for industrial riboflavin production. A few literature reports depict a link between riboflavin overproduction and stress in this fungus. However, the stress protection mechanisms and glutathione metabolism are not much explored in A. gossypii. In the present study, an increase in the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase was observed in response to hydrogen peroxide and menadione. The lipid peroxide and membrane lipid peroxide levels were increased by H2O2 and menadione, indicating oxidative damage. The glutathione metabolism was altered with a significant increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR) and a decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in the presence of H2O2 and menadione. Expression of the genes involved in stress mechanism was analyzed in response to the stressors by semiquantitative RT-PCR. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of CTT1, SOD1, GSH1, YAP1, and RIB3 were increased by H2O2 and menadione, indicating the effect of stress at the transcriptional level. A preliminary bioinformatics study for the presence of stress response elements (STRE)/Yap response elements (YRE) depicted that the glutathione metabolic genes, stress genes, and the RIB genes hosted either STRE/YRE, which may enable induction of these genes during stress. PMID:25178419

  12. Molecular mimicry between cockroach and helminth glutathione S-transferases promotes cross-reactivity and cross-sensitization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The extensive similarities between helminth proteins and allergens are thought to contribute to helminth-driven allergic sensitization. We investigated the molecular and structural similarities between Bla g 5, a major glutathione-S transferase (GST) allergen of cockroaches, and the GST of Wucherer...

  13. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of glutathione transferase zeta 1 (GSTZ1a-1a)

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, Christopher D.; Zhong, Guo; Smeltz, Marci; James, Margaret O. McKenna, Robert

    2014-01-21

    Crystals of glutathione transferase zeta 1 were grown and shown to diffract X-rays to 3.1 Å resolution. They belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 42.0, b = 49.6, c = 54.6 Å, α = 82.9, β = 69.9, γ = 73.4°.

  14. A tyrosine-reactive irreversible inhibitor for glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1).

    PubMed

    Crawford, L A; Weerapana, E

    2016-05-24

    Glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1) mediates cellular defense against reactive electrophiles. Here, we report LAS17, a dichlorotriazine-containing compound that irreversibly inhibits GSTP1 and is selective for GSTP1 within cellular proteomes. Mass spectrometry and mutational studies identified Y108 as the site of modification, providing a unique mode of GSTP1 inhibition. PMID:27113843

  15. METALATHIONEIN AND GLUTATHIONE IN AN ACUTE RESPONSE TO COPPER IN MERCENARIA MERCENARIA BROWN CELLS IN VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Brown cells are found in the red glands of Mercenaria mercenaria (Bivalvia) and have been shown to accumulate, detoxify and excrete metals. Brown cell involvement in metal detoxification is due in part to endogenous glutathione (GSH) and metallothionein (MT). GSH and MT have been...

  16. Copper-dependent inhibition and oxidative inactivation with affinity cleavage of yeast glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keiko; Tsubouchi, Ryoko; Fukayama, Minoru; Yoshino, Masataka

    2014-06-01

    Effects of copper on the activity and oxidative inactivation of yeast glutathione reductase were analyzed. Glutathione reductase from yeast was inhibited by cupric ion and more potently by cuprous ion. Copper ion inhibited the enzyme noncompetitively with respect to the substrate GSSG and NADPH. The Ki values of the enzyme for Cu(2+) and Cu(+) ion were determined to be 1 and 0.35 μM, respectively. Copper-dependent inactivation of glutathione reductase was also analyzed. Hydrogen peroxide and copper/ascorbate also caused an inactivation with the cleavage of peptide bond of the enzyme. The inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme was prevented by addition of catalase, suggesting that hydroxyl radical produced through the cuprous ion-dependent reduction of oxygen is responsible for the inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme. SDS-PAGE and TOF-MS analysis confirmed eight fragments, which were further determined to result from the cleavage of the Met17-Ser18, Asn20-Thr21, Glu251-Gly252, Ser420-Pro421, Pro421-Thr422 bonds of the enzyme by amino-terminal sequencing analysis. Based on the kinetic analysis and no protective effect of the substrates, GSSG and NADPH on the copper-mediated inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme, copper binds to the sites apart from the substrate-sites, causing the peptide cleavage by hydroxyl radical. Copper-dependent oxidative inactivation/fragmentation of glutathione reductase can explain the prooxidant properties of copper under the in vivo conditions.

  17. Glutathione S-transferase class mu in French alcoholic cirrhotic patients.

    PubMed

    Groppi, A; Coutelle, C; Fleury, B; Iron, A; Begueret, J; Couzigou, P

    1991-09-01

    The lack of glutathione S-transferase mu (GST mu) was examined in 45 healthy French Caucasians and 45 alcoholic cirrhotic French Caucasians: microsamples of blood were taken and DNA amplified by the polymerase chain reaction. We have concluded that there is no relationship between this genotype and the development of alcoholic cirrhosis in these heavy consumers of ethanol.

  18. Glutathione depletion and acute exercise increase O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Peternelj, Tina Tinkara; Marsh, Susan A; Strobel, Natalie A; Matsumoto, Aya; Briskey, David; Dalbo, Vincent J; Tucker, Patrick S; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-02-01

    Post-translational modification of intracellular proteins with O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) profoundly affects protein structure, function, and metabolism. Although many skeletal muscle proteins are O-GlcNAcylated, the modification has not been extensively studied in this tissue, especially in the context of exercise. This study investigated the effects of glutathione depletion and acute exercise on O-GlcNAc protein modification in rat skeletal muscle. Diethyl maleate (DEM) was used to deplete intracellular glutathione and rats were subjected to a treadmill run. White gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were analyzed for glutathione status, O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) protein levels, and mRNA expression of OGT, O-GlcNAcase and glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase. DEM and exercise both reduced intracellular glutathione and increased O-GlcNAc. DEM upregulated OGT protein expression. The effects of the interventions were significant 4 h after exercise (P < 0.05). The changes in the mRNA levels of O-GlcNAc enzymes were different in the two muscles, potentially resulting from different rates of oxidative stress and metabolic demands between the muscle types. These findings indicate that oxidative environment promotes O-GlcNAcylation in skeletal muscle and suggest an interrelationship between cellular redox state and O-GlcNAc protein modification. This could represent one mechanism underlying cellular adaptation to oxidative stress and health benefits of exercise. PMID:25416863

  19. Mechanisms for redox actions of nicotine and glutathione in cell culture, relevant to periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Tinti, Federico; Soory, Mena

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative effect of nicotine was investigated using androgen biomarkers of redox status and wound healing in fibroblasts; using the antioxidant glutathione for confirmation of responses. Cultures of human gingival (HGF) and periosteal fibroblasts (HPF) were incubated with substrates 14C-testosterone/14C-4-androstenedione in the presence or absence of serial concentrations of nicotine (N100-500), glutathione (G1–5) and their combinations, in medium. At 24 h the medium was solvent extracted for metabolites, separated by TLC and quantified using radioisotope scanning. Nicotine caused significant inhibition in yields of the physiologically active metabolite 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in HGF and HPF, overcome to varying degrees by the anti-oxidant glutathione (n = 6; p<0.01, one way ANOVA); this is suggestive of moderation of an oxidative mechanism induced by nicotine. Down-regulation of 5α-reductase activity by nicotine resulting in reduced yields of DHT was overcome by glutathione. Overcoming oxidative stress in a redox environment is applicable to treatment outcome. PMID:22876341

  20. The role of glutathione detoxification pathway in MCLR-induced hepatotoxicity in SD rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Shangchun; Chen, Jun; Xie, Ping; Guo, Xiaochun; Fan, Huihui; Yu, Dezhao; Zeng, Cheng; Chen, Liang

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of glutathione (GSH) and its related enzymes in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats subjected to microcystin-leucine-arginine (MCLR)-induced hepatotoxicity. SD rats were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with MCLR after pretreating with or without buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis. The depletion of GSH with BSO enhanced MCLR-induced oxidative stress, resulting in more severe liver damage and higher MCLR accumulation. Similarly, the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA), total GSH (T-GSH), oxidized GSH (GSSG) and GSH were significantly enhanced in BSO pretreated rats following MCLR treatment. The study showed that the transcription of GSH-related enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), glutathione reductase (GR) varied in different ways (expect for glutathione peroxidase (GPx), whose gene expression was induced in all treated groups) with or without BSO pretreatment before MCLR exposure, suggesting an adaptative response of GSH-related enzymes at transcription level to combat enhancement of oxidative stress induced by MCLR when pretreated with BSO. These data suggested the tissues with low GSH concentration are highly vulnerable to MCLR toxicity and GSH was critical for the detoxification in MCLR-induced hepatotoxicity in vivo.

  1. Effect of cigarette smoke extract on the polymorphonuclear leukocytes chemiluminescence: influence of a filter containing glutathione.

    PubMed

    Zappacosta, B; Persichilli, S; Minucci, A; Fasanella, S; Scribano, D; Giardina, B; De Sole, P

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is known to be a risk factor for several chronic and neoplastic diseases. Many compounds formed by cigarette burning, ranging from particulate materials to water solutes and gaseous extracts, are considered to be noxious agents, and many biochemical and molecular mechanisms have been proposed for the toxic effects of cigarette smoke. The oral cavity and the upper respiratory tract represent the first contact areas for smoke compounds; even a single cigarette can produce marked effects on some components of the oral cavity, either chemical compounds, such as glutathione and enzymes, or cellular elements, such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Several studies suggest a protective role of glutathione against the noxious effects of tobacco smoke; the sulphydril groups of glutathione, in fact, could react with some smoke products, such as unsaturated aldehydes, leading to the formation of harmless intermediate compounds and simultaneously preventing the inactivation of metabolically essential molecules, such as some enzymes. In this paper we analyse the effect of a filter containing glutathione on the respiratory burst of polymorphonuclear leukocytes exposed to aqueous extract of cigarette smoke, measuring their chemiluminescence activity. The results of this paper indicate that the GSH-containing filter has a likely protective effect against the inhibition of cigarette smoke extract on polymorphonuclear leukocyte activity.

  2. Changes in cysteine, glutathione and phytochelatins in roots of maize seedlings exposed to cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Tukendorf, A. ); Rauser, W.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The effects of Cd on the contents of free cysteine, total glutathione and phytochelatin (PC) were measured in roots of intact maize seedlings. Crude extracts in 100 mM HCl were separated by reverse-phase HPLC and thiols quantitated by continuous addition of Ellman's reagent. Exposure to 3 {mu}M Cd for 15 min caused PCs to appear. The kinetics indicated that shorter PCs were substrates for longer PCs. Total glutathione levels declined with PC synthesis, free cysteine contents changed little. In the 1 cm apical region a high production of PCs occurred with a moderate loss of total glutathione. In the nature region (1-10 cm), PC content was 2.5 fold less than in species and total glutathione levels declined drastically. Exposure to 0.05 {mu}M Cd for 24 h induced PCs, more PCs appeared with greater Cd supplies. The roots produced PCs in excess of that required to chelate the Cd present, as if some PCs were compartmentalized or had not yet formed Cd-PC complexes.

  3. Effects of commercial selenium products on glutathione peroxidase activity and semen quality in stud boars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine how dietary supplementation of inorganic and organic selenium affects selenium concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in blood and sperm of sexually mature stud boars. Twenty-four boars of the Large White, Landrace, Pietrain, and Duroc breeds of opt...

  4. Plant glutathione peroxidases: emerging role of the antioxidant enzymes in plant development and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Bela, Krisztina; Horváth, Edit; Gallé, Ágnes; Szabados, László; Tari, Irma; Csiszár, Jolán

    2015-03-15

    The plant glutathione peroxidase (GPX) family consists of multiple isoenzymes with distinct subcellular locations which exhibit different tissue-specific expression patterns and environmental stress responses. Contrary to most of their counterparts in animal cells, plant GPXs contain cysteine instead of selenocysteine in their active site and while some of them have both glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin peroxidase functions, the thioredoxin regenerating system is much more efficient in vitro than the glutathione system. At present, the function of these enzymes in plants is not completely understood. The occurrence of thiol-dependent activities of plant GPX isoenzymes suggests that - besides detoxification of H2O2 and organic hydroperoxides - they may be involved in regulation of the cellular redox homeostasis by maintaining the thiol/disulfide or NADPH/NADP(+) balance. GPXs may represent a link existing between the glutathione- and the thioredoxin-based system. The various thiol buffers, including Trx, can affect a number of redox reactions in the cells most probably via modulation of thiol status. It is still required to identify the in vivo reductant for particular GPX isoenzymes and partners that GPXs interact with specifically. Recent evidence suggests that plant GPXs does not only protect cells from stress induced oxidative damage but they can be implicated in plant growth and development. Following a more general introduction, this study summarizes present knowledge on plant GPXs, highlighting the results on gene expression analysis, regulation and signaling of Arabidopsis thaliana GPXs and also suggests some perspectives for future research.

  5. Interaction between vitamin E and glutathione in rat brain: Effect of chronic ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Marcus, S R; Chandrakala, M V; Nadiger, H A

    1998-12-01

    The protection against ethanol-induced lipid peroxidation is rendered by antioxidants such as vitamin E and glutathione (GSH) interacting with each other and also functioning independently. A study of the levels of GSH and activities of glutathione peroxidase (GP), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione transferase (GST) in the cerebral cortex (CC), cerebellum (CB) and brain stem (BS) of vitamin E-supplemented and -deficient rats subjected to ethanol administration for 30 days was carried out. Chronic ethanol administration to vitamin E-supplemented rats elevated GP, GR and GST activities in the three regions and GSH levels in the CB. Chronic ethanol administration to vitamin E-deficient rats elevated GR activity in the three regions and GP activity in the CC and CB, decreased GST activity in the CC and CB, but did not alter GSH levels compared with normal rats subjected to chronic ethanol administration. The results indicate that vitamin E helps to maintain GSH levels to combat increased peroxidation while its absence has a deleterious effect.

  6. Characterization of affinity-purified isoforms of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1 glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Chee, Chin-Soon; Tan, Irene Kit-Ping; Alias, Zazali

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GST) were purified from locally isolated bacteria, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus Y1, by glutathione-affinity chromatography and anion exchange, and their substrate specificities were investigated. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the purified GST resolved into a single band with a molecular weight (MW) of 23 kDa. 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis showed the presence of two isoforms, GST1 (pI 4.5) and GST2 (pI 6.2) with identical MW. GST1 was reactive towards ethacrynic acid, hydrogen peroxide, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and trans,trans-hepta-2,4-dienal while GST2 was active towards all substrates except hydrogen peroxide. This demonstrated that GST1 possessed peroxidase activity which was absent in GST2. This study also showed that only GST2 was able to conjugate GSH to isoproturon, a herbicide. GST1 and GST2 were suggested to be similar to F0KLY9 (putative glutathione S-transferase) and F0KKB0 (glutathione S-transferase III) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain PHEA-2, respectively.

  7. DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1

    EPA Science Inventory


    DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1. R A Pegram1 and M K Ross2. 2Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 1Pharmacokinetics Branch, NHEERL, ORD, United States Environmental Protection Ag...

  8. Quantitative imaging of glutathione in live cells using a reversible reaction-based ratiometric fluorescent probe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining redox homeostasis inside cells. Currently, there are no methods available to quantitatively assess the GSH concentration in live cells. Live cell fluorescence imaging revolutionized the understanding of cell biology and has become an indispens...

  9. Glutathione: A Benign Alternative for the Synthesis of Nanomaterials and Magnetically Separable Organocatalyst in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Glutathione, a completely benign ubiquitous tripeptide, has been used as a reducing agent for the expeditious synthesis of various metal nanoparticles including Ag, Au, Pd and Pt under microwave irradiation conditions in less than one minute. The particles sizes were found to be ...

  10. A practical fluorogenic substrate for high-throughput screening of glutathione S-transferase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Morisaki, Fumika; Ogura, Asami; Morohashi, Kana; Enya, Sora; Niwa, Ryusuke; Goto, Shinji; Kojima, Hirotatsu; Okabe, Takayoshi; Nagano, Tetsuo; Inoue, Hideshi

    2015-07-21

    We report a new fluorogenic substrate for glutathione S-transferase (GST), 3,4-DNADCF, enabling the assay with a low level of nonenzymatic background reaction. Inhibitors against Noppera-bo/GSTe14 from Drosophila melanogaster were identified by high throughput screening using 3,4-DNADCF, demonstrating the utility of this substrate.

  11. Noninvasive quantification of ascorbate and glutathione concentration in the elderly human brain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, Ascorbate (Asc) and glutathione (GSH) concentrations were non-invasively quantified using double edited 1H MRS at 4T in the occipital cortex of healthy young(age 18 – 22 years, N = 22) and elderly (age 70 – 89 years, N = 22) human subjects. Elderly subjects had a lower GSH concentrati...

  12. Correlation between Glutathione Peroxidase Activity and Anthropometrical Parameters in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordonez, F. J.; Rosety-Rodriguez, M.

    2007-01-01

    Since we have recently found that regular exercise increased erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities such as glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in adolescents with Down syndrome, these programs may be recommended. This study was designed to assess the role of anthropometrical parameters as easy, economic and non-invasive biomarkers of GPX. Thirty-one…

  13. A tyrosine-reactive irreversible inhibitor for glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1).

    PubMed

    Crawford, L A; Weerapana, E

    2016-05-24

    Glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP1) mediates cellular defense against reactive electrophiles. Here, we report LAS17, a dichlorotriazine-containing compound that irreversibly inhibits GSTP1 and is selective for GSTP1 within cellular proteomes. Mass spectrometry and mutational studies identified Y108 as the site of modification, providing a unique mode of GSTP1 inhibition.

  14. Enteric glial cells protect neurons from oxidative stress in part via reduced glutathione.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Hind; Derkinderen, Pascal; Gomes, Priya; Chevalier, Julien; Aubert, Philippe; Masson, Damien; Galmiche, Jean-Paul; Vanden Berghe, Pieter; Neunlist, Michel; Lardeux, Bernard

    2010-04-01

    Enteric glial cells (EGCs) are essential in the control of gastrointestinal functions. Although lesions of EGCs are associated with neuronal degeneration in animal models, their direct neuroprotective role remains unknown. Therefore, the aims of this study were to demonstrate the direct neuroprotective effects of EGCs and to identify putative glial mediators involved. First, viral targeted ablation of EGCs in primary cultures of enteric nervous system increased neuronal death both under basal conditions and in the presence of oxidative stress (dopamine, hydrogen peroxide). Second, direct or indirect coculture experiments of EGC lines with primary cultures of enteric nervous system or neuroblastoma cell lines (SH-SY5Y) prevented neurotoxic effects induced by oxidative stress (increased membrane permeability, release of neuronal specific enolase, caspase-3 immunoreactivity, changes in [Ca(2+)](i) response). Finally, combining pharmacological inhibition and mRNA silencing methods, we demonstrated that neuroprotective effects of EGCs were mediated in part by reduced glutathione but not by oxidized glutathione or by S-nitrosoglutathione. Our study identified the neuroprotective effects of EGCs via their release of reduced glutathione, extending their critical role in physiological contexts and in enteric neuropathies.-Abdo, H., Derkinderen, P., Gomes, P., Chevalier, J., Aubert, P., Masson, D., Galmiche, J.-P., Vanden Berghe, P., Neunlist, M., Lardeux, B. Enteric glial cells protect neurons from oxidative stress in part via reduced glutathione.

  15. GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1-DEPENDENT METABOLISM OF THE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a prevalent drinking water disinfection by-product, was previously shown to be mutagenic in Salmonella expressing glutathione S-transferase (GST) theta 1-1 (GST T1-1). In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to study the...

  16. Effect of edetate disodium and reduced glutathione on absorption of acetazolamide from GI tract of rats.

    PubMed

    Schoenwald, R D; Ward, R L

    1976-05-01

    The absorption of acetazolamide suspensions from in situ rat gastric and intestinal loop segments was studied. In 1 hr, 66.2 and 64.3% remained unabsorbed from the rat stomach and intestine, respectively. Although 1% (w/v) reduced glutathione and 1% (w/v) (24 mM) edetate disodium had no effect on gastric absorption, drug absorption from the rat intestine (1 hr) was increased 1.5 and 2 times, respectively. It was hypothesized that the relatively poor intestinal absorption was due primarily to the formation of a pH-dependent (pH 4.5-10), nonabsorbable complex between acetazolamide and carbonic anhydrase present in the gut and that reduced glutathione acted as an inhibitor to promote intestinal absorption. Equilibrium dialysis studies showed that reduced glutathion could reduce the fraction of drug bound to human carbonic anhydrase B by one-half when present in a molar ratio 10 times that of acetazolamide; edetate disodium had no effect on the in vitro binding. It was, therefore, assumed that edetate disodium promoted an increase in intestinal absorption by altering the permeability of intestinal epithelium. Based upon present experimentation, however, the alteration of intestinal epithelium by reduced glutathione cannot be ruled out. PMID:6773

  17. Biomimetic 'Green' Synthesis of Nanomaterials Using Antioxidants-Vitamins, Glutathione and Polyphenols from Tea and Wine

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation summarizes our recent activity in chemical synthesis of nanomaterials via benign biomimetic ‘greener’ alternatives,1 such as the use antioxidants present in a variety of natural products, and ubiquitous glutathione in aqueous media.2 Vitamins B1, B2, C, and tea ...

  18. Glutathione Responsive Hyaluronic Acid Nanocapsules Obtained by Bioorthogonal Interfacial "Click" Reaction.

    PubMed

    Baier, Grit; Fichter, Michael; Kreyes, Andreas; Klein, Katja; Mailänder, Volker; Gehring, Stephan; Landfester, Katharina

    2016-01-11

    Azide-functionalized hyaluronic acid and disulfide dialkyne have been used for "click" reaction polymerization at the miniemulsion droplets interface leading to glutathione responsive nanocapsules (NCs). Inverse miniemulsion polymerization was chosen, due to its excellent performance properties, for example, tuning of size and size distribution, shell thickness/density, and high pay loading efficiency. The obtained size, size distribution, and encapsulation efficiency were checked via fluorescent spectroscopy, and the tripeptide glutathione was used to release an encapsulated fluorescent dye after cleavage of the nanocapsules shell. To show the glutathione-mediated intracellular cleavage of disulfide-containing NC shells, CellTracker was encapsulated into the nanocapsules. The cellular uptake in dendritic cells and the cleavage of the nanocapsules in the cells were studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Because of the mild reaction conditions used during the interfacial polymerization and the excellent cleavage properties, we believe that the synthesis of glutathione responsive hyaluronic acid NCs reported herein are of high interest for the encapsulation and release of sensitive compounds at high yields.

  19. Identification and characterization of a selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase in Setaria cervi

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anchal; Rathaur, Sushma . E-mail: sushmarathaur@yahoo.com

    2005-06-17

    Setaria cervi a bovine filarial parasite secretes selenium glutathione peroxidase during in vitro cultivation. A significant amount of enzyme activity was detected in the somatic extract of different developmental stages of the parasite. Among different stages, microfilariae showed a higher level of selenium glutathione peroxidase activity followed by males then females. However, when the activity was compared in excretory secretory products of these stages males showed higher activity than microfilariae and female worms. The enzyme was purified from female somatic extract using a combination of glutathione agarose and gel filtration chromatography, which migrated as a single band of molecular mass {approx}20 kDa. Selenium content of purified enzyme was estimated by atomic absorption spectroscopy and found to be 3.5 ng selenium/{mu}g of protein. Further, inhibition of enzyme activity by potassium cyanide suggested the presence of selenium at the active site of enzyme. This is the first report of identification of selenium glutathione peroxidase from any filarial parasite.

  20. Copper-dependent inhibition and oxidative inactivation with affinity cleavage of yeast glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Keiko; Tsubouchi, Ryoko; Fukayama, Minoru; Yoshino, Masataka

    2014-06-01

    Effects of copper on the activity and oxidative inactivation of yeast glutathione reductase were analyzed. Glutathione reductase from yeast was inhibited by cupric ion and more potently by cuprous ion. Copper ion inhibited the enzyme noncompetitively with respect to the substrate GSSG and NADPH. The Ki values of the enzyme for Cu(2+) and Cu(+) ion were determined to be 1 and 0.35 μM, respectively. Copper-dependent inactivation of glutathione reductase was also analyzed. Hydrogen peroxide and copper/ascorbate also caused an inactivation with the cleavage of peptide bond of the enzyme. The inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme was prevented by addition of catalase, suggesting that hydroxyl radical produced through the cuprous ion-dependent reduction of oxygen is responsible for the inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme. SDS-PAGE and TOF-MS analysis confirmed eight fragments, which were further determined to result from the cleavage of the Met17-Ser18, Asn20-Thr21, Glu251-Gly252, Ser420-Pro421, Pro421-Thr422 bonds of the enzyme by amino-terminal sequencing analysis. Based on the kinetic analysis and no protective effect of the substrates, GSSG and NADPH on the copper-mediated inactivation/fragmentation of the enzyme, copper binds to the sites apart from the substrate-sites, causing the peptide cleavage by hydroxyl radical. Copper-dependent oxidative inactivation/fragmentation of glutathione reductase can explain the prooxidant properties of copper under the in vivo conditions. PMID:24671306

  1. The concentration of ascorbic acid and glutathione in 13 provenances of Acacia melanoxylon.

    PubMed

    Wujeska-Klause, Agnieszka; Bossinger, Gerd; Tausz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Climate change can negatively affect sensitive tree species, affecting their acclimation and adaptation strategies. A common garden experiment provides an opportunity to test whether responses of trees from different provenances are genetically driven and if this response is related to factors at the site of origin. We hypothesized that antioxidative defence systems and leaf mass area ofAcacia melanoxylonR. Br. samples collected from different provenances will vary depending on local rainfall. Thirteen provenances ofA. melanoxylonoriginating from different rainfall habitats (500-2000 mm) were grown for 5 years in a common garden. For 2 years, phyllode samples were collected during winter and summer, for measurements of leaf mass area and concentrations of glutathione and ascorbic acid. Leaf mass area varied between seasons, years and provenances ofA. melanoxylon, and an increase was associated with decreasing rainfall at the site of origin. Ascorbic acid and glutathione concentrations varied between seasons, years (i.e., environmental factors) and among provenances ofA. melanoxylon In general, glutathione and ascorbic acid concentrations were higher in winter compared with summer. Ascorbic acid and glutathione were different among provenances, but this was not associated with rainfall at the site of origin. PMID:26960387

  2. An energy-saving glutathione production method from low-temperature cooked rice using amylase-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kim, Songhee; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Yoshida, Hideyo; Arai, Shogo; Ishii, Jun; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-05-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tripeptide that is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. Glutathione is industrially produced by fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Before the glutathione fermentation process with S. cerevisiae, a glucose extraction process from starchy materials is required. This glucose extraction is usually carried out by converting starchy materials to starch using high-temperature cooking and subsequent hydrolysis by amylases to convert starch to glucose. In this study, to develop an energy-saving glutathione production process by reducing energy consumption during the cooking step, we efficiently produced glutathione from low-temperature cooked rice using amylase-expressing S. cerevisiae. The combination of the amylase-expressing yeast with low-temperature cooking is potentially applicable to a variety of energy-saving bio-production methods of chemicals from starchy bio-resources. PMID:22294378

  3. An energy-saving glutathione production method from low-temperature cooked rice using amylase-expressing Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kim, Songhee; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Yoshida, Hideyo; Arai, Shogo; Ishii, Jun; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-05-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tripeptide that is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. Glutathione is industrially produced by fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Before the glutathione fermentation process with S. cerevisiae, a glucose extraction process from starchy materials is required. This glucose extraction is usually carried out by converting starchy materials to starch using high-temperature cooking and subsequent hydrolysis by amylases to convert starch to glucose. In this study, to develop an energy-saving glutathione production process by reducing energy consumption during the cooking step, we efficiently produced glutathione from low-temperature cooked rice using amylase-expressing S. cerevisiae. The combination of the amylase-expressing yeast with low-temperature cooking is potentially applicable to a variety of energy-saving bio-production methods of chemicals from starchy bio-resources.

  4. 1'-Acetoxychavicol acetate-induced cytotoxicity is accompanied by a rapid and drastic modulation of glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Mami; Xu, Shenghui; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko; Kennedy, David Opare; Murakami, Akira; Ohigashi, Hajime; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao

    2009-01-01

    The effect of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate (ACA), an anticarcinogenic compound naturally obtained from rhizomes and seeds of South East Asia plants, on the intracellular concentration of glutathione and the activities of enzymes related to glutathione metabolism was studied in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. We showed in a previous study that ACA induced apoptosis in tumor cells and the cell death was reversed by the addition of N-acetlycysteine or glutathione ethylester. Here we found that ACA caused a rapid decrease in glutathione level in less than 10 min after ACA exposure. At the time, glutathione reductase activity was significantly inhibited and gamma-glutamyl cysteine increased by ACA exposure. These results show that ACA caused the decrease in the intracellular GSH levels in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells, suggesting that ACA-induced decrease of the cellular GSH levels can lead to growth arrest of cancer and enhancement of the efficacy other anticancer drugs.

  5. Low levels of glutathione are sufficient for survival of keratinocytes after UV irradiation and for healing of mouse skin wounds.

    PubMed

    Telorack, Michèle; Abplanalp, Jeannette; Werner, Sabine

    2016-08-01

    Reduced levels of the cellular antioxidant glutathione are associated with premature skin aging, cancer and impaired wound healing, but the in vivo functions of glutathione in the skin remain largely unknown. Therefore, we analyzed mice lacking the modifier subunit of the glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm), the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glutathione biosynthesis. Glutathione levels in the skin of these mice were reduced by 70 %. However, neither skin development and homeostasis, nor UVA- or UVB-induced apoptosis in the epidermis were affected. Histomorphometric analysis of excisional wounds did not reveal wound healing abnormalities in young Gclm-deficient mice, while the area of hyperproliferative epithelium as well as keratinocyte proliferation were affected in aged mice. These findings suggest that low levels of glutathione are sufficient for wound repair in young mice, but become rate-limiting upon aging.

  6. Structural isomerization of synephrine influences its uptake and ensuing glutathione depletion in rat-isolated cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Luciana Grazziotin; Costa, Vera Marisa; de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Carvalho, Félix; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Remião, Fernando

    2011-08-01

    Synephrine is a natural compound, frequently added to ephedra-free dietary supplements for weight-loss, due to its effects as a nonspecific adrenergic agonist. Though only p-synephrine has been documented in plants, the presence of m-synephrine has also been reported in weight-loss products. The use of synephrine in dietary supplements was accompanied by reports of adverse effects, especially at the cardiovascular level. It is well known that the imbalance in cardiac glutathione levels can increase the risk of cardiomyopathy. The present work aimed to study the role of organic cation-mediated transport of m- and p-synephrine and the possibility that p- and m-synephrine induce intracellular changes in glutathione levels in calcium-tolerant freshly isolated cardiomyocytes from adult rat. After a 3 h incubation with 1 mM p- or m-synephrine, the intracellular content of synephrine was measured by gas chromatography/ion trap-mass spectrometry (GC/IT-MS); cell viability and intracellular glutathione levels were also determined. To evaluate the potential protective effects of antioxidants against the adverse effects elicited by m-synephrine, cells were pre-incubated for 30 min with Tiron (100 μM) or N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) (1 mM). To assess the influence of α(1)-adrenoceptors activation in glutathione depletion, a study with prazosin (100 nM) was also performed. The results obtained provide evidence that organic cation transporters OCT3 and OCT1 play a major role in m- and p-synephrine-mediated transport into the cardiomyocytes. The importance of these transporters seems similar for both isomers, although p-synephrine enters more into the cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, only m-synephrine induced intracellular total glutathione (GSHt) and reduced glutathione (GSH) depletion. NAC and Tiron were able to counteract the m-synephrine-induced GSH and GSHt decrease. On the other hand, the incubation with prazosin was not able to change m-synephrine-induced glutathione

  7. Effects of mercury and selenium on glutathione metabolism and oxidative stress in mallard ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    Earlier studies reported on the toxicity and related oxidative stress of different forms of Se, including seleno-D,L-methionine, in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). This study compares the effects of Se (seleno-D,L-methionine) and Hg (methylmercury chloride) separately and in combination. Mallard drakes received one of the following diets: untreated feed (controls), or feed containing 10 ppm Se, 10 ppm Hg, or 10 ppm Se in combination with 10 ppm Hg. After 10 weeks, blood, liver, and brain samples were collected for biochemical assays. The following clinical and biochemical alterations occurred in response to mercury exposure: hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations decreased; activities of the enzymes glutathione (GSH) peroxidase (plasma and liver), glutathione-S-transferase (liver), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PDH) (liver and brain) decreased; hepatic oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentration increased relative to reduced glutathione (GSH); and lipid peroxidation in the brain was evident as detected by increased thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS). Effects of Se alone included increased hepatic GSSG reductase activity and brain TBARS concentration. Se in combination with Hg partially or totally alleviated effects of Hg on GSH peroxidase, G-6-PDH, and GSSG. These findings are compared in relation to field observations for diving ducks and other aquatic birds. It is concluded that since both Hg and excess Se can affect thiol status, measurement of associated enzymes in conjunction with thiol status may be a useful bioindicator to discriminate between Hg and Se effects. The ability of Se to restore the activities of G-6-PDH, GSH peroxidase, and glutathione status involved in antioxidative defense mechanisms may be crucial to biological protection from the toxic effects of methyl mercury.

  8. Glutathione and its related enzymes in the gonad of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Hamed, R R; Saleh, N S M; Shokeer, A; Guneidy, R A; Abdel-Ghany, S S

    2016-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) concentration, the activity of its metabolizing enzymes, glutathione transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and the antioxidant enzyme catalase (CAT) in O. niloticus ovary and testis were examined. GSH concentration of O. niloticus testis exhibited high concentration (129 ± 21 nmol/g tissue) compared with GSH concentration (49.2 ± 8.3 nmol/g tissue) in the ovary. GST, GPx, GR, and CAT activities of O. niloticus testis exhibited high values compared with their corresponding values in ovary homogenates. However, protein concentration in ovary homogenates exhibited higher values (175 ± 40.6 mg) compared with testis homogenates (27.1 ± 3.7 mg). O. niloticus ovary was less effective in excretion of xenobiotices compared with the testis, where its function is mainly in increasing the protein content of the eggs; however, in O. niloticus testis, the glutathione cycle operated in accelerated way in the direction of reduced GSH production in order to protect the maturation stages in a save way. A simple reproducible procedure for the purification of GST from O. niloticus ovary was established. The enzymes proved to be homogenous as judged by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and its molecular weight was calculated to be 25.1 kDa. GST of O. niloticus ovary exhibited maximum activity at pH 7.5. The Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) of the purified ovary GST for GSH and CDNB was 0.076 mM and 1.0 mM, respectively. Cibacron blue was the most potent inhibitor of ovary GST activity (IC50 value, concentration of inhibitor that will give 50% inhibition, equal 0.002 μM). The specific activity of GST toward different electrophilic substrates was determined. GST activity toward benzyl isothiocyanate was the highest compared with phenethyl isothiocyanate and allyl isothiocyanate.

  9. A Lipid Transfer Protein Increases the Glutathione Content and Enhances Arabidopsis Resistance to a Trichothecene Mycotoxin

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, John E.; Bin-Umer, Mohamed Anwar; Widiez, Thomas; Finn, Daniel; McCormick, Susan; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) or scab is one of the most important plant diseases worldwide, affecting wheat, barley and other small grains. Trichothecene mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON) accumulate in the grain, presenting a food safety risk and health hazard to humans and animals. Despite considerable breeding efforts, highly resistant wheat or barley cultivars are not available. We screened an activation tagged Arabidopsis thaliana population for resistance to trichothecin (Tcin), a type B trichothecene in the same class as DON. Here we show that one of the resistant lines identified, trichothecene resistant 1 (trr1) contains a T-DNA insertion upstream of two nonspecific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes, AtLTP4.4 and AtLTP4.5. Expression of both nsLTP genes was induced in trr1 over 10-fold relative to wild type. Overexpression of AtLTP4.4 provided greater resistance to Tcin than AtLTP4.5 in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae relative to wild type or vector transformed lines, suggesting a conserved protection mechanism. Tcin treatment increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Arabidopsis and ROS stain was associated with the chloroplast, the cell wall and the apoplast. ROS levels were attenuated in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls. Exogenous addition of glutathione and other antioxidants enhanced resistance of Arabidopsis to Tcin while the addition of buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, increased sensitivity, suggesting that resistance was mediated by glutathione. Total glutathione content was significantly higher in Arabidopsis and in yeast overexpressing AtLTP4.4 relative to the controls, highlighting the importance of AtLTP4.4 in maintaining the redox state. These results demonstrate that trichothecenes cause ROS accumulation and overexpression of AtLTP4.4 protects against trichothecene-induced oxidative stress by increasing the glutathione

  10. Biomolecularly capped uniformly sized nanocrystalline materials: glutathione-capped ZnS nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Martínez, Claudia L.; Nguyen, Liem; Kho, Richard; Bae, Weon; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Klimov, Victor; Mehra, Rajesh K.

    1999-09-01

    Micro-organisms such as bacteria and yeasts form CdS to detoxify toxic cadmium ions. Frequently, CdS particles formed in yeasts and bacteria were found to be associated with specific biomolecules. It was later determined that these biomolecules were present at the surface of CdS. This coating caused a restriction in the growth of CdS particles and resulted in the formation of nanometre-sized semiconductors (NCs) that exhibited typical quantum confinement properties. Glutathione and related phytochelatin peptides were shown to be the biomolecules that capped CdS nanocrystallites synthesized by yeasts Candida glabrata and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Although early studies showed the existence of specific biochemical pathways for the synthesis of biomolecularly capped CdS NCs, these NCs could be formed in vitro under appropriate conditions. We have recently shown that cysteine and cysteine-containing peptides such as glutathione and phytochelatins can be used in vitro to dictate the formation of discrete sizes of CdS and ZnS nanocrystals. We have evolved protocols for the synthesis of ZnS or CdS nanocrystals within a narrow size distribution range. These procedures involve three steps: (1) formation of metallo-complexes of cysteine or cysteine-containing peptides, (2) introduction of stoichiometric amounts of inorganic sulfide into the metallo-complexes to initiate the formation of nanocrystallites and finally (3) size-selective precipitation of NCs with ethanol in the presence of Na+. The resulting NCs were characterized by optical spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), x-ray diffraction and electron diffraction. HRTEM showed that the diameter of the ZnS-glutathione nanocrystals was 3.45+/-0.5 nm. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction analyses indicated ZnS-glutathione to be hexagonal. Photocatalytic studies suggest that glutathione-capped ZnS nanocrystals prepared by our procedure are highly efficient in degrading a test model

  11. Withanolide A Prevents Neurodegeneration by Modulating Hippocampal Glutathione Biosynthesis during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Baitharu, Iswar; Jain, Vishal; Deep, Satya Narayan; Shroff, Sabita; Sahu, Jayanta Kumar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera root extract has been used traditionally in ayurvedic system of medicine as a memory enhancer. Present study explores the ameliorative effect of withanolide A, a major component of withania root extract and its molecular mechanism against hypoxia induced memory impairment. Withanolide A was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats before a period of 21 days pre-exposure and during 07 days of exposure to a simulated altitude of 25,000 ft. Glutathione level and glutathione dependent free radicals scavenging enzyme system, ATP, NADPH level, γ-glutamylcysteinyl ligase (GCLC) activity and oxidative stress markers were assessed in the hippocampus. Expression of apoptotic marker caspase 3 in hippocampus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional alteration and expression of GCLC and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)–related factor 2 (Nrf2) were investigated by real time PCR and immunoblotting respectively. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) level and impaired reduced gluatathione dependent free radical scavenging system in hippocampus resulting in elevated oxidative stress. Supplementation of withanolide A during hypoxic exposure increased GSH level, augmented GSH dependent free radicals scavenging system and decreased the number of caspase and hoescht positive cells in hippocampus. While withanolide A reversed hypoxia mediated neurodegeneration, administration of buthionine sulfoximine along with withanolide A blunted its neuroprotective effects. Exogenous administration of corticosterone suppressed Nrf2 and GCLC expression whereas inhibition of corticosterone synthesis upregulated Nrf2 as well as GCLC. Thus present study infers that withanolide A reduces neurodegeneration by restoring hypoxia induced glutathione depletion in hippocampus. Further, Withanolide A increases glutathione biosynthesis in neuronal cells by upregulating GCLC level through Nrf2 pathway in a corticosterone dependenet manner

  12. Glutathione: an intracellular and extracellular protective agent in Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Levels of glutathione, were measured in several aerobically grown strains of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli. External accumulation of GSH was inhibited by 30 mM NaN/sub 3/. Thus, GSH export may be energy dependent. Greater than 50% of the glutathione detected in the media was in the reduced form. Since the oxidized glutathione in the media could be accounted for by oxidation during aerobic incubation as well as in sample processing, the glutathione was predominantly exported in the reduced form. Extracellular glutathione was detected in log phase cultures of 2 out of 2 E. coli strains and 6 of 8 Salmonella strains tested. Two-dimensional paper chromatography of supernatants from cultures labelled with Na/sub 2//sup 35/SO/sub 4/ confirmed the presence of GSH and revealed five other sulfur-containing compounds in the media of Salmonella and E. coli cultures. Since media from cultures of an E. coli GSH/sup -/ strain contained compounds with identical R/sub f/'s, the five unidentified compounds were not derivatives of GSH. The addition of 26 ..mu..M GSH to cultures of TA1534 partially protected the bacteria from the toxic effects of 54 ..mu..M N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). When MNNG was preincubated with equimolar GSH, the mutagenicity of the MNNG was neutralized. The addition of micromolar GSH to cultures and E. coli GSH/sup -/ strain protected the cells from growth inhibition by micromolar concentrations of mercuric chloride, silver nitrate, cisplatin, cadmium chloride, and iodoacetamide. The data presented demonstrate that micromolar concentrations of external GSH can significantly shorten the recovery time of cells after exposure to toxic agents in the environment.

  13. Drought and salt stress tolerance of an Arabidopsis glutathione S-transferase U17 knockout mutant are attributed to the combined effect of glutathione and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-Hung; Jiang, Han-Wei; Hsieh, En-Jung; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chien, Ching-Te; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang; Lin, Tsan-Piao

    2012-01-01

    Although glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are thought to play major roles in oxidative stress metabolism, little is known about the regulatory functions of GSTs. We have reported that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE U17 (AtGSTU17; At1g10370) participates in light signaling and might modulate various aspects of development by affecting glutathione (GSH) pools via a coordinated regulation with phytochrome A. Here, we provide further evidence to support a negative role of AtGSTU17 in drought and salt stress tolerance. When AtGSTU17 was mutated, plants were more tolerant to drought and salt stresses compared with wild-type plants. In addition, atgstu17 accumulated higher levels of GSH and abscisic acid (ABA) and exhibited hyposensitivity to ABA during seed germination, smaller stomatal apertures, a lower transpiration rate, better development of primary and lateral root systems, and longer vegetative growth. To explore how atgstu17 accumulated higher ABA content, we grew wild-type plants in the solution containing GSH and found that they accumulated ABA to a higher extent than plants grown in the absence of GSH, and they also exhibited the atgstu17 phenotypes. Wild-type plants treated with GSH also demonstrated more tolerance to drought and salt stresses. Furthermore, the effect of GSH on root patterning and drought tolerance was confirmed by growing the atgstu17 in solution containing l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis. In conclusion, the atgstu17 phenotype can be explained by the combined effect of GSH and ABA. We propose a role of AtGSTU17 in adaptive responses to drought and salt stresses by functioning as a negative component of stress-mediated signal transduction pathways.

  14. Identification of Wild Yeast Strains and Analysis of Their β-Glucan and Glutathione Levels for Use in Makgeolli Brewing

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sun Hee; Kim, Hye Ryun; Kim, Jae Ho; Ahn, Byung Hak; Kim, Tae Wan

    2014-01-01

    Makgeolli, also known as Takju, is a non-filtered traditional Korean alcoholic beverage that contains various floating matter, including yeast cells, which contributes to its high physiological functionality. In the present study, we assessed the levels of β-glucan and glutathione in various yeast strains isolated from traditional Korean Nuruk and selected a β-glucan- and glutathione-rich yeast strain to add value to Makgeolli by enhancing its physiological functionality through increased levels of these compounds. Yeast β-glucan levels ranged from 6.26% to 32.69% (dry basis) and were strongly species-dependent. Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from Nuruk contained 25.53 µg/mg glutathione, 0.70 µg/mg oxidized glutathione, and 11.69 µg/g and 47.85 µg/g spermidine and L-ornithine monohydrochloride, respectively. To produce functional Makgeolli, a β-glucan- and glutathione-rich yeast strain was selected in a screening analysis. Makgeolli fermented with the selected yeast strain contained higher β-glucan and glutathione levels than commercial Makgeolli. Using the selected yeast strain to produce Makgeolli with high β-glucan and glutathione content may enable the production of functional Makgeolli. PMID:25606008

  15. Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Lactate and Glutathione Levels in Euthymic Bipolar I Disorder: 1H-MRS Study

    PubMed Central

    Pastorello, Bruno F.; Leite, Cláudia da Costa; Henning, Anke; Moreno, Ricardo A.; Garcia Otaduy, Maria Concepción

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are 2 closely integrated processes implicated in the physiopathology of bipolar disorder. Advanced proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques enable the measurement of levels of lactate, the main marker of mitochondrial dysfunction, and glutathione, the predominant brain antioxidant. The objective of this study was to measure brain lactate and glutathione levels in bipolar disorder and healthy controls. Methods: Eighty-eight individuals (50 bipolar disorder and 38 healthy controls) underwent 3T proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (2x2x4.5cm3) using a 2-D JPRESS sequence. Lactate and glutathione were quantified using the ProFit software program. Results: Bipolar disorder patients had higher dorsal anterior cingulate cortex lactate levels compared with controls. Glutathione levels did not differ between euthymic bipolar disorder and controls. There was a positive correlation between lactate and glutathione levels specific to bipolar disorder. No influence of medications on metabolites was observed. Conclusion: This is the most extensive magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of lactate and glutathione in bipolar disorder to date, and results indicated that euthymic bipolar disorder patients had higher levels of lactate, which might be an indication of altered mitochondrial function. Moreover, lactate levels correlated with glutathione levels, indicating a compensatory mechanism regardless of bipolar disorder diagnosis. PMID:27207914

  16. Farnesol-induced apoptosis in Candida albicans is mediated by Cdr1-p extrusion and depletion of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingsong; Krom, Bastiaan P; Sanglard, Dominique; Intapa, Chaidan; Dawson, Clinton C; Peters, Brian M; Shirtliff, Mark E; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Farnesol is a key derivative in the sterol biosynthesis pathway in eukaryotic cells previously identified as a quorum sensing molecule in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Recently, we demonstrated that above threshold concentrations, farnesol is capable of triggering apoptosis in C. albicans. However, the exact mechanism of farnesol cytotoxicity is not fully elucidated. Lipophilic compounds such as farnesol are known to conjugate with glutathione, an antioxidant crucial for cellular detoxification against damaging compounds. Glutathione conjugates act as substrates for ATP-dependent ABC transporters and are extruded from the cell. To that end, this current study was undertaken to validate the hypothesis that farnesol conjugation with intracellular glutathione coupled with Cdr1p-mediated extrusion of glutathione conjugates, results in total glutathione depletion, oxidative stress and ultimately fungal cell death. The combined findings demonstrated a significant decrease in intracellular glutathione levels concomitant with up-regulation of CDR1 and decreased cell viability. However, addition of exogenous reduced glutathione maintained intracellular glutathione levels and enhanced viability. In contrast, farnesol toxicity was decreased in a mutant lacking CDR1, whereas it was increased in a CDR1-overexpressing strain. Further, gene expression studies demonstrated significant up-regulation of the SOD genes, primary enzymes responsible for defense against oxidative stress, with no changes in expression in CDR1. This is the first study describing the involvement of Cdr1p-mediated glutathione efflux as a mechanism preceding the farnesol-induced apoptotic process in C. albicans. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying farnesol-cytotoxicity in C. albicans may lead to the development of this redox-cycling agent as an alternative antifungal agent. PMID:22205973

  17. Effects of growth hormone, melatonin, oestrogens and phytoestrogens on the oxidized glutathione (GSSG)/reduced glutathione (GSH) ratio and lipid peroxidation in aged ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Isabel; Fdez-Tresguerres, Jesús; Ariznavarreta, Carmen; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2010-12-01

    Ovariectomy constitutes a commonly used model in rats and mice for human menopause. After ovariectomy, an imbalance between oxidant production and antioxidant levels appears in favour of the former, with increased oxidative stress and consequently an acceleration of ageing. In the present work, the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH), a relevant antioxidant, and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), an oxidant compound, as well as lipid peroxidation (through malondialdehyde (MDA) levels), were studied in liver, heart, kidney and spleen homogenates of old (24 months of age) unovariectomized and ovariectomized female Wistar rats. The results showed a significant increase of the GSSG/GSH ratio, a marker of oxidative stress, and higher MDA production in all the studied organs of ovariectomized rats as compared with unovariectomized animals. These data confirm the idea that ovariectomy accelerates the ageing process. Administration of growth hormone (GH), melatonin (MEL) and oestrogens (OE), as well as soybean phytoestrogens (PE) for 10 weeks, between 22 and 24 months of age, was able to decrease oxidative stress in the investigated organs of ovariectomized old rats, therefore slowing down the ageing process in those animals.

  18. Sulforaphane and its glutathione conjugate but not sulforaphane nitrile induce UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UGT1A1) and glutathione transferase (GSTA1) in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Basten, Graham P; Bao, Yongping; Williamson, Gary

    2002-08-01

    Glucoraphanin in Brassica vegetables breaks down to either sulforaphane or sulforaphane nitrile depending on the conditions, and sulforaphane can be further conjugated with glutathione. Using a high-throughput microtitre plate assay and TaqMan real time quantitative RT-PCR to measure mRNA, we show that sulforaphane and its glutathione conjugate, but not the nitrile, increased significantly (P < 0.05) both UGT1A1 and GSTA1 mRNA levels in HepG2 and HT29 cells. These changes were accompanied by an increase in UGT1A1 protein, as assessed by immunoblotting, and a 2-8-fold increase in bilirubin glucuronidation. When treated together, the nitrile derivative did not affect sulforaphane induction. The induction of UGT1A1 and GSTA1 mRNA by sulforaphane was time and concentration dependent. The results show a functional induction of glucuronidation by sulforaphane but not sulforaphane nitrile, and show that the pathway of metabolism of glucosinolates in Brassica vegetables is important in determining the resulting biological and anticarcinogenic activities. PMID:12151360

  19. Evaluation of aflatoxin B/sub 1/ mutagenesis: addition of glutathione and glutathione-S-transferase to the Salmonella mutagenicity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, K.V.; Clayton, J.W.; Price, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of glutathione (GSH) and the combination of GSH and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) on aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB/sub 1/) mutagenesis in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 were tested. Ten concentrations of AFB/sub 1/ (0-1.0 ..mu..g/plate) were added to a liver microsomal homogenate (S9 mix) or to S9 mix containing GSH or S9 mix containing the combination of GSH + GST. One third of the samples were plated directly. Two-thirds were incubated for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C prior to plating, and of those, half included bacteria. The results show that the addition of GSH and GSH + GST affected AFB/sub 1/ mutagenesis by forming the AFB/sub 1/-GSH conjugate and decreasing the availability of AFB/sub 1/-8,9-epoxide. The effect of GST on GSH activity varied with the strain because of the different amounts of S9 mix used. The formation of the AFB/sub 1/-GSH conjugate was verified by using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography for quantitation of AFB/sub 1/ and detection of AFB/sub 1/-GSH.

  20. Effect of tocotrienol on the activities of cytosolic glutathione-dependent enzymes in rats treated with 2-acetylaminofluorene.

    PubMed

    Shamaan, N A; Wan Ngah, W Z; Ibrahim, R; Jarien, Z; Top, A G; Abdul Kadir, K

    1993-04-01

    The effect of tocotrienol on the activities of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in rats given 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) was investigated over a 20 week period. Liver and kidney GST and liver GR activities were significantly increased after AAF administration. Kidney GPx activities were significantly affected; activity assayed with cumene hydroperoxide (cu-OOH) was increased but activity assayed with H2O2 was reduced. Supplementation of the diet with tocotrienol in the AAF-treated rats reduced the increase in enzyme activities. Tocotrienol on its own had no effect on the enzyme activities.

  1. FAD-induced in vitro activation of glutathione reductase in the lens of B2 deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Ono, S; Hirano, H

    1984-04-01

    We studied the FAD-induced in vitro stimulation of lenticular glutathione reductase in riboflavin-deficient rats. The stimulatory effect of FAD on lenticular glutathione reductase in rats fed a B2-deficient diet for 4 weeks was remarkably higher than in paired control rats fed a B2-supplemented basal diet and control rats had ad libitum access to a B2-supplemented basal diet. The in vitro FAD stimulation effect on rat lenticular glutathione reductase represents a sensitive indicator of the B2 deficient status.

  2. Docking and molecular dynamics studies at trypanothione reductase and glutathione reductase active sites.

    PubMed

    Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot; Aguilera, Sara; Murphy, Miguel; Tapia, Orlando

    2002-05-01

    A theoretical docking study on the active sites of trypanothione reductase (TR) and glutathione reductase (GR) with the corresponding natural substrates, trypanothione disulfide (T[S]2) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), is reported. Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in order to check the robustness of the docking results. The energetic results are in agreement with previous experimental findings and show the crossed complexes have lower stabilization energies than the natural ones. To test DOCK3.5, four nitro furanic compounds, previously designed as potentially active anti-chagasic molecules, were docked at the GR and TR active sites with the DOCK3.5 procedure. A good correlation was found between differential inhibitory activity and relative interaction energy (affinity). The results provide a validation test for the use of DOCK3.5 in connection with the design of anti-chagasic drugs.

  3. Development of a glutathione production process from proteinaceous biomass resources using protease-displaying Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Kim, Songhee; Yoshida, Hideyo; Kiriyama, Kentaro; Kondo, Takashi; Okai, Naoko; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-02-01

    Glutathione is a valuable tri-peptide that is widely used in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. Glutathione is produced industrially by fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and supplementation of fermentation with several amino acids can increase intracellular GSH content. More recently, however, focus has been given to protein as a resource for biofuel and fine chemical production. We demonstrate that expression of a protease on the cell surface of S. cerevisiae enables the direct use of keratin and soy protein as a source of amino acids and that these substrates enhanced intracellular GSH content. Furthermore, fermentation using soy protein also enhanced cell concentration. GSH fermentation from keratin and to a greater extent from soy protein using protease-displaying yeast yielded greater GSH productivity compared to GSH fermentation with amino acid supplementation. This protease-displaying yeast is potentially applicable to a variety of processes for the bio-production of value-added chemicals from proteinaceous biomass resources. PMID:22075633

  4. Blocking Lactate Export by Inhibiting the Myc Target MCT1 Disables Glycolysis and Glutathione Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joanne R.; Yang, Chunying; Scott, Kristen E. N.; Cameron, Michael D.; Fallahi, Mohammad; Li, Weimin; Hall, Mark A.; Amelio, Antonio L.; Mishra, Jitendra K.; Li, Fangzheng; Tortosa, Mariola; Genau, Heide Marika; Rounbehler, Robert J.; Lu, Yunqi; Dang, Chi. V.; Kumar, K. Ganesh; Butler, Andrew A.; Bannister, Thomas D.; Hooper, Andrea T.; Unsal-Kacmaz, Keziban; Roush, William R.; Cleveland, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Myc oncoproteins induce genes driving aerobic glycolysis, including lactate dehydrogenase-A that generates lactate. Here we report that Myc controls transcription of the lactate transporter SLC16A1/MCT1, and that elevated MCT1 levels are manifest in premalignant and neoplastic Eμ-Myc transgenic B cells and in human malignancies with MYC or MYCN involvement. Notably, disrupting MCT1 function leads to an accumulation of intracellular lactate that rapidly disables tumor cell growth and glycolysis, provoking marked alterations in glycolytic intermediates, and reductions in glucose transport, and in levels of ATP, NADPH and glutathione. Reductions in glutathione then lead to increases in hydrogen peroxide, mitochondrial damage and, ultimately, cell death. Finally, forcing glycolysis by metformin treatment augments this response and the efficacy of MCT1 inhibitors, suggesting an attractive combination therapy for MYC/MCT1-expressing malignancies. PMID:24285728

  5. Irreversible Inhibition of Glutathione S-Transferase by Phenethyl Isothiocyanate (PEITC), a Dietary Cancer Chemopreventive Phytochemical

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Vandana; Dyba, Marzena A.; Holland, Ryan J.; Liang, Yu-He; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary isothiocyanates abundant as glucosinolate precursors in many edible cruciferous vegetables are effective for prevention of cancer in chemically-induced and transgenic rodent models. Some of these agents, including phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), have already advanced to clinical investigations. The primary route of isothiocyanate metabolism is its conjugation with glutathione (GSH), a reaction catalyzed by glutathione S-transferase (GST). The pi class GST of subunit type 1 (hGSTP1) is much more effective than the alpha class GST of subunit type 1 (hGSTA1) in catalyzing the conjugation. Here, we report the crystal structures of hGSTP1 and hGSTA1 each in complex with the GSH adduct of PEITC. We find that PEITC also covalently modifies the cysteine side chains of GST, which irreversibly inhibits enzymatic activity. PMID:27684484

  6. Purification and properties of glutathione reductase from the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, A.; Rivas, J.; Losada, M.

    1984-04-01

    An NADPH-glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) has been purified 6000-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity from the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 7119. The purified enzyme exhibits a specific activity of 249 U/mg and is characterized by being a dimeric flavin adenine dinucleotide-containing protein with a ratio of absorbance at 280 nm to absorbance at 462 nm of 5.8, a native molecular weight of 104,000, a Stokes radius of 4.13 nm, and a pI of 4.02. The enzyme activity is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents and heavy-metal ions, especially in the presence of NADPH, with oxidized glutathione behaving as a protective agent. As is the case with the same enzyme from other sources, the kinetic data are consistent with a branched mechanism. Nevertheless, the cyanobacterial enzyme presents three distinctive

  7. Enhanced success of Mexican bean beetle (coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on glutathione-enriched soybean leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, P.R.; Chiment, J.J. )

    1988-01-01

    Artificial augmentation of soybean leaves with reduced glutathione (GSH) elicited all of the same responses from Mexican bean beetle (MBB), Epilachna varivestis Mulsant, as did fumigation with the air pollutant sulfur dioxide. Larval growth, rate of development, and survivorship as well as adult fecundity and longevity were all significantly greater on excised leaves that had been allowed to imbibe a solution of the tripeptide. In addition, adults showed a strong preference for feeding on the treated leaves over nontreated leaves. Increased fecundity after feeding on treated leaves was a consequence of the earlier and longer period of egg laying rather than a change in the rate of egg production. The effects of GSH treatment were even more distinct than those produced by exposure of plants to the pollutant. These results establish the very close correlation between changes in foliar glutathione and alteration of MBB success on this plant in response to air pollution.

  8. Diversification of Fungal Specific Class A Glutathione Transferases in Saprotrophic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Frédérique; Harvengt, Luc; Didierjean, Claude; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Morel-Rouhier, Mélanie; Gelhaye, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) form a superfamily of multifunctional proteins with essential roles in cellular detoxification processes and endogenous metabolism. The distribution of fungal-specific class A GSTs was investigated in saprotrophic fungi revealing a recent diversification within this class. Biochemical characterization of eight GSTFuA isoforms from Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Coprinus cinereus demonstrated functional diversity in saprotrophic fungi. The three-dimensional structures of three P. chrysosporium isoforms feature structural differences explaining the functional diversity of these enzymes. Competition experiments between fluorescent probes, and various molecules, showed that these GSTs function as ligandins with various small aromatic compounds, derived from lignin degradation or not, at a L-site overlapping the glutathione binding pocket. By combining genomic data with structural and biochemical determinations, we propose that this class of GST has evolved in response to environmental constraints induced by wood chemistry. PMID:24278272

  9. Glibenclamide impairs responses of neutrophils against Burkholderia pseudomallei by reduction of intracellular glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Rinchai, Darawan; Nithichanon, Arnone; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Ato, Manabu; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2016-01-01

    The major risk factor for melioidosis, an infectious disease caused by B. pseudomallei, is diabetes mellitus. More than half of diabetic melioidosis patients in Thailand were prescribed glibenclamide. Recent evidence demonstrates that glibenclamide reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine production by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) of diabetic individuals in response to this bacterial infection. However, the mechanisms by which glibenclamide affects cytokine production are unknown. We found that PMNs from glibenclamide-treated diabetic individuals infected with live B. pseudomallei in vitro showed lower free glutathione (GSH) levels compared with those of healthy individuals. Glibenclamide decreased GSH levels and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) of PMNs after exposed to live B. pseudomallei. Moreover, glibenclamide reduced cytokine production and migration capacity of infected PMNs, whereas GSH could restore these functions. Taken together, our data show a link between the effect of glibenclamide on GSH and PMN functions in response to B. pseudomallei that may contribute to the susceptibility of diabetic individuals to B. pseudomallei infection. PMID:27713554

  10. Pharmacogenetics of azathioprine in inflammatory bowel disease: a role for glutathione-S-transferase?

    PubMed

    Stocco, Gabriele; Pelin, Marco; Franca, Raffaella; De Iudicibus, Sara; Cuzzoni, Eva; Favretto, Diego; Martelossi, Stefano; Ventura, Alessandro; Decorti, Giuliana

    2014-04-01

    Azathioprine is a purine antimetabolite drug commonly used to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In vivo it is active after reaction with reduced glutathione (GSH) and conversion to mercaptopurine. Although this reaction may occur spontaneously, the presence of isoforms M and A of the enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST) may increase its speed. Indeed, in pediatric patients with IBD, deletion of GST-M1, which determines reduced enzymatic activity, was recently associated with reduced sensitivity to azathioprine and reduced production of azathioprine active metabolites. In addition to increase the activation of azathioprine to mercaptopurine, GSTs may contribute to azathioprine effects even by modulating GSH consumption, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, genetic polymorphisms in genes for GSTs may be useful to predict response to azathioprine even if more in vitro and clinical validation studies are needed.

  11. Glutathione-Coated Luminescent Gold Nanoparticles: A Surface Ligand for Minimizing Serum Protein Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasmall glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles (GS-AuNPs) are known for their high resistance to serum protein adsorption. Our studies show that these NPs can serve as surface ligands to significantly enhance the physiological stability and lower the serum protein adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), in addition to rendering the NPs the luminescence property. After the incorporation of GS-AuNPs onto the surface of SPIONs to form the hybrid nanoparticles (HBNPs), these SPIONs’ protein adsorption was about 10-fold lower than those of the pure glutathione-coated SPIONs suggesting that GS-AuNPs are capable of providing a stealth effect against serum proteins. PMID:25029478

  12. Mercury(II) Complex Formation With Glutathione in Alkaline Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mah, V.; Jalilehvand, F.

    2009-05-19

    The structure and speciation of the complexes formed between mercury(II) ions and glutathione (GSH = L-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine) have been studied for a series of alkaline aqueous solutions (C{sub Hg{sup 2+}} {approx} 18 mmol dm{sup -3} and C{sub GSH} = 40-200 mmol dm{sup -3} at pH {approx} 10.5) by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and {sup 199}Hg NMR spectroscopy at ambient temperature. The dominant complexes are [Hg(GS){sub 2}]{sup 4-} and [Hg(GS){sub 3}]{sup 7-}, with mean Hg-S bond distances of 2.32(1) and 2.42(2) {angstrom} observed in digonal and trigonal Hg-S coordination, respectively. The proportions of the Hg{sup 2+}-glutathione complexes were evaluated by fitting linear combinations of model EXAFS oscillations representing each species to the experimental EXAFS spectra. The [Hg(GS){sub 4}]{sup 10-} complex, with four sulfur atoms coordinated at a mean Hg-S bond distance of 2.52(2) {angstrom}, is present in minor amounts (<30%) in solutions containing a large excess of glutathione (C{sub GSH} {ge} 160 mmol dm{sup -3}). Comparable alkaline mercury(II) cysteine (H{sub 2}Cys) solutions were also investigated and a reduced tendency to form higher complexes was observed, because the deprotonated amino group of Cys{sup 2-} allows the stable [Hg(S,N-Cys){sub 2}]{sup 2-} chelate to form. The effect of temperature on the distribution of the Hg{sup 2+}-glutathione complexes was studied by comparing the EXAFS spectra at ambient temperature and at 25 K of a series of glycerol/water (33/67, v/v) frozen glasses with and C{sub Hg{sup 2+}} {approx} 7 mmol dm{sup -3} and C{sub GSH} = 16-81 mmol dm{sup -3}. Complexes with high Hg-S coordination numbers, [Hg(GS){sub 3}]{sup 7-} and [Hg(GS){sub 4}]{sup 10-}, became strongly favored when just a moderate excess of glutathione (C{sub GSH} {ge} 28 mmol dm{sup -3}) was used in the glassy samples, as expected for a stepwise exothermic bond formation. Addition of glycerol had no effect on the Hg(II)-glutathione

  13. Glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles: a surface ligand for minimizing serum protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Liu, Jinbin; Zhou, Chen; Yu, Mengxiao; Yang, Shengyang; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Shasha; Dean, Andrew; Sun, Xiankai; Zheng, Jie

    2014-08-13

    Ultrasmall glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles (GS-AuNPs) are known for their high resistance to serum protein adsorption. Our studies show that these NPs can serve as surface ligands to significantly enhance the physiological stability and lower the serum protein adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), in addition to rendering the NPs the luminescence property. After the incorporation of GS-AuNPs onto the surface of SPIONs to form the hybrid nanoparticles (HBNPs), these SPIONs' protein adsorption was about 10-fold lower than those of the pure glutathione-coated SPIONs suggesting that GS-AuNPs are capable of providing a stealth effect against serum proteins. PMID:25029478

  14. Glutathione concentration and gamma-glutamyltransferase activity in water buffalo colostrum.

    PubMed

    Pero, M E; Pelagalli, A; Lombardi, P; Avallone, L

    2010-10-01

    Evidence is presented that the buffalo mammary gland contains enzymes that catalyse the synthesis and utilization of glutathione. A significant, inverse correlation (r = 0.79) was detected between colostrum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and glutathione (GSH), suggesting that the enzyme uses GSH as a substrate for its activity. A similar trend was shown in mammary gland homogenates (r = 0.75). Our results show that GSH is secreted into buffalo colostrum and suggest that the enzyme GGT degrades it. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the involvement of GGT-mediated GSH metabolism in the synthesis of colostrums, which elucidates the role of the enzyme that has always been reported very high in colostrum.

  15. A comparison of erythrocyte glutathione S-transferase activity from human foetuses and adults.

    PubMed Central

    Strange, R C; Johnston, J D; Coghill, D R; Hume, R

    1980-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity was measured in partially purified haemolysates of erythrocytes from human foetuses and adults. Enzyme activity was present in erythrocytes obtained between 12 and 40 weeks of gestation. The catalytic properties of the enzyme from foetal cells were similar to those of the enzyme from adult erythrocytes, indicating that probably only one form of the erythrocytes enzyme exists throughout foetal and adult life. PMID:7396875

  16. Response of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle to re-aeration following hypoxia in lupine roots.

    PubMed

    Garnczarska, Małgorzata

    2005-06-01

    The response of the enzymes and metabolites of the ascorbate-glutathione pathway to oxidative stress caused by re-aeration following hypoxia was studied in roots of hydroponically grown lupine (Lupinus luteus L. cv. Juno) seedlings. Lupine roots were deprived of oxygen by subjecting them to hypoxia for 48 and 72 h and then re-aerated for up to 4 h. An increased content of total ascorbate was observed in lupine roots immediately after hypoxia, whereas total glutathione level decreased. However, a significant increase in the reduced forms of both metabolites was found directly after hypoxia. Re-admission of oxygen caused the decrease of the ratios of reduced to oxidized forms of ascorbate and glutathione, indicating oxidative stress. While monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR, EC 1.6.5.4) activity remained unaltered during re-aeration the increase in activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11) and glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) was observed 30 min after transfer from hypoxic condition. Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.8.5.1) activity approached the control level during a whole re-aeration period. Native gel electrophoresis combined with specific activity staining revealed seven isoforms of APX, five isoforms of GR and three different proteins with DHA reductase activity in roots extracts. However, immediately after hypoxic treatment APX-5 isoform and GR-1 isoform were not observed in roots. This experimental system was also used to investigate superoxide anion level in roots utilizing the superoxide anion-specific indicator dihydroethidium (DHE). Intense DHE-derived fluorescence was found in re-aerated root tips as compared to control roots, indicating that re-aeration induced superoxide anion production in hypoxically pretreated roots.

  17. Transcriptional activation of glutathione pathways and role of glucose homeostasis during copper imbalance.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Natalia; Rivas, Nicole; del Pozo, Talía; Burkhead, Jason; Suazo, Miriam; González, Mauricio; Latorre, Mauricio

    2015-04-01

    Copper is an essential micronutrient for organism health. Dietary changes or pathologies linked to this metal induce changes in intracellular glutathione concentrations. Here, we studied the transcriptional activation of glutathione pathways in Jurkat cell lines, analyzing the effect of change in glucose homeostasis during a physiological and supra-physiological copper exposure. An immortalized line of human T lymphocyte cell line (Jurkat) was exposed to different copper and glucose conditions to mimic concentrations present in human blood. We applied treatments for 6 (acute) and 24 h (sustained) to 2 µM (physiological) or 20 µM (supra-physiological, Wilson disease scenario) of CuSO4 in combination with 25 mg/dL (hypoglycemia), 100 mg/dL (normal) and 200 mg/dL (hyperglycemia, diabetes scenario) of glucose. The results indicate that a physiological concentration of copper exposure does not induce transcriptional changes in the glutathione synthesis pathway after 6 or 24 h. The G6PDH gene (regeneration pathway), however, is induced during a supra-physiological copper condition. This data was correlated with the viability assays, where fluctuation in both glucose conditions (hypo and hyperglycemia scenario) affected Jurkat proliferation when 20 µM of CuSO4 was added to the culture media. Under a copper overload condition, the transcription of a component of glutathione regeneration pathway (G6PDH gene) is activated in cells chronically exposed to a hyperglycemia scenario, indicating that fluctuations in glucose concentration impact the resistance against the metal. Our findings illustrate the importance of glucose homeostasis during copper excess.

  18. Proteomic analysis of Ketogulonicigenium vulgare under glutathione reveals high demand for thiamin transport and antioxidant protection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qian; Zhang, Weiwen; Zhang, Lu; Qiao, Bin; Pan, Chensong; Yi, Hong; Wang, Lili; Yuan, Ying-jin

    2012-01-01

    Ketogulonicigenium vulgare, though grows poorly when mono-cultured, has been widely used in the industrial production of the precursor of vitamin C with the coculture of Bacillus megaterium. Various efforts have been made to clarify the synergic pattern of this artificial microbial community and to improve the growth and production ability of K. vulgare, but there is still no sound explanation. In previous research, we found that the addition of reduced glutathione into K. vulgare monoculture could significantly improve its growth and productivity. By performing SEM and TEM, we observed that after adding GSH into K. vulgare monoculture, cells became about 4-6 folds elongated, and formed intracytoplasmic membranes (ICM). To explore the molecular mechanism and provide insights into the investigation of the synergic pattern of the co-culture system, we conducted a comparative iTRAQ-2-D-LC-MS/MS-based proteomic analysis of K. vulgare grown under reduced glutathione. Principal component analysis of proteomic data showed that after the addition of glutathione, proteins for thiamin/thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) transport, glutathione transport and the maintenance of membrane integrity, together with several membrane-bound dehydrogenases had significant up-regulation. Besides, several proteins participating in the pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle were also up-regulated. Additionally, proteins combating intracellular reactive oxygen species were also up-regulated, which similarly occurred in K. vulgare when the co-cultured B. megaterium cells lysed from our former research results. This study reveals the demand for transmembrane transport of substrates, especially thiamin, and the demand for antioxidant protection of K. vulgare.

  19. The biological importance of glutathione peroxidase and peroxiredoxin backup systems in bivalves during peroxide exposure.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Rafael; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Uliano-Silva, Marcela; Delapedra, Gabriel; Arl, Miriam; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2014-10-01

    Organic peroxide elimination in eukaryotes essentially depends on glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx) enzymes, which are supported by their respective electron donors, glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx). This system depends on the ancillary enzymes glutathione reductase (GR) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) to maintain GSH and Trx in their reduced state. This study discusses the biological importance of GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx during cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) exposure in brown mussel Perna perna. ZnCl2 or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenze (CDNB) was used to decrease GR and TrxR activities in gills, as already reported with mammals and bivalves. ZnCl2 exposure lowered GR activity (28%), impaired the in vivo CHP decomposition and decreased the survival rates under CHP exposure. CDNB decreased GR (54%) and TrxR (73%) activities and induced glutathione depletion (99%), promoting diminished peroxide elimination and survival rates at a greater extent than ZnCl2. CDNB also increased the susceptibility of hemocytes to CHP toxicity. Despite being toxic and causing mortality at longer exposures, short (2 h) exposure to CHP promoted an up regulation of GSH (50 and 100 μM CHP) and protein-thiol (100 μM CHP) levels, which was blocked by ZnCl2 or CDNB pre-exposure. Results highlight the biological importance of GSH, GR and TrxR in supporting GPx and Prx activities, contributing to organic peroxides elimination and mussel survival under oxidative challenges. To our knowledge, this is the first work that demonstrates, albeit indirectly, the biological importance of GPx/GR/GSH and Prx/TrxR/Trx systems on in vivo organic peroxide elimination in bivalves.

  20. Glutathione-supported arsenate reduction coupled to arsenolysis catalyzed by ornithine carbamoyl transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeti, Balazs; Gregus, Zoltan

    2009-09-01

    Three cytosolic phosphorolytic/arsenolytic enzymes, (purine nucleoside phosphorylase [PNP], glycogen phosphorylase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) have been shown to mediate reduction of arsenate (AsV) to the more toxic arsenite (AsIII) in a thiol-dependent manner. With unknown mechanism, hepatic mitochondria also reduce AsV. Mitochondria possess ornithine carbamoyl transferase (OCT), which catalyzes phosphorolytic or arsenolytic citrulline cleavage; therefore, we examined if mitochondrial OCT facilitated AsV reduction in presence of glutathione. Isolated rat liver mitochondria were incubated with AsV, and AsIII formed was quantified. Glutathione-supplemented permeabilized or solubilized mitochondria reduced AsV. Citrulline (substrate for OCT-catalyzed arsenolysis) increased AsV reduction. The citrulline-stimulated AsV reduction was abolished by ornithine (OCT substrate inhibiting citrulline cleavage), phosphate (OCT substrate competing with AsV), and the OCT inhibitor norvaline or PALO, indicating that AsV reduction is coupled to OCT-catalyzed arsenolysis of citrulline. Corroborating this conclusion, purified bacterial OCT mediated AsV reduction in presence of citrulline and glutathione with similar responsiveness to these agents. In contrast, AsIII formation by intact mitochondria was unaffected by PALO and slightly stimulated by citrulline, ornithine, and norvaline, suggesting minimal role for OCT in AsV reduction in intact mitochondria. In addition to OCT, mitochondrial PNP can also mediate AsIII formation; however, its role in AsV reduction appears severely limited by purine nucleoside supply. Collectively, mitochondrial and bacterial OCT promote glutathione-dependent AsV reduction with coupled arsenolysis of citrulline, supporting the hypothesis that AsV reduction is mediated by phosphorolytic/arsenolytic enzymes. Nevertheless, because citrulline cleavage is disfavored physiologically, OCT may have little role in AsV reduction in vivo.

  1. Selectivity of silymarin on the increase of the glutathione content in different tissues of the rat.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, A; Aspillaga, M; Vial, S; Guerra, R

    1989-10-01

    Silymarin, a flavonoid extracted from the seeds of the milk thistle, Silybum marianum, increases the redox state and the total glutathione content of the liver, intestine, and stomach of the rat. The same treatment does not affect the levels of the tripeptides in the kidney, lung, and spleen. This selective effect of the flavonoid on the digestive organs is ascribed to its pharmacokinetics on the digestive track, where the biliary concentration of silymarin is increased and maintained via the entero-hepatic circulation.

  2. No Evidence of Exogenous Origin for the Abnormal Glutathione Redox State in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ballesteros, Alejandro; Jiang, Pan; Summerfelt, Ann; Du, Xiaoming; Chiappelli, Joshua; O’Donnell, Patricio; Kochunov, Peter; Hong, L. Elliot

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been associated with low glutathione (GSH), one of the most important substrates for natural defense against oxidative stress. This abnormality is often attributed to genetic or other pathological causes. However, low GSH in schizophrenia could also be due to insufficient antioxidant consumption or other exogenous factors. We evaluated GSH in relation to diet, smoking, and medication status in schizophrenia patients. We recruited 54 participants (29 schizophrenia patients and 25 normal controls). The Antioxidant Dietary Source Questions was used to estimate the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) from participants’ diet. GSH and the oxidized form of glutathione (GSSG) were assayed. We found that GSH was significantly lower (p < 0.001) while %GSSG was 2 to 5 fold higher (p = 0.023) in patients compared with controls. No evidence for lower TAC dietary intake was found in schizophrenia patients compared with controls; rather nominally higher TAC level was found in the patients diet (p=0.02). Analysis of consumption of individual food categories also failed to find evidence of reduced dietary antioxidant intake in schizophrenia patients. Smoking and medications did not significantly predict the GSH deficit either. However, there was a significant smoking by diagnosis interaction on GSH (p=0.026) such that smoking was associated with higher GSH level in controls while smoking in patients was not associated with this effect. Schizophrenia patients may have an impaired upregulation of GSH synthesis that normally occurs due to smoking-induced antioxidative response. Lower GSH was independently present in patients on clozapine (p = 0.005) and patients on other antipsychotics (p < 0.001) compared with controls. In conclusion, none of the exogenous sources played a major role in explaining abnormalities in the glutathione pathway in patients. The state of abnormal glutathione redox may therefore be a part of schizophrenia pathophysiology. PMID:23466187

  3. Anxiety modulates cognitive deficits in a perinatal glutathione deficit animal model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Preissmann, D; Dépré, M; Schenk, F; Gisquet-Verrier, P

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated long-term repercussion of early glutathione deficit by l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) injections as a rat model of schizophrenia. BSO rats were tested through various behavioral tasks requiring animals to take into account previously delivered information. We showed that relative to controls, BSO rats (1) were less active and more anxious in an Elevated Plus Maze test, allowing us to split them into two subgroups with high and low anxiety levels; (2) demonstrated normal abilities of behavioral flexibility tested with a rat-adapted version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), with even higher abilities in anxious BSO rats suggesting reduced interference of previously acquired rules; (3) did not forage normally in radial arm mazes and mainly used clockwise strategies; (4) exhibited a lack of habituation during a startle response task; and (5) showed a normal prepulse inhibition of the startle response (PPI) and a normal conditioned taste aversion (CTA). All these results indicate that early glutathione deficit provokes persistent changes in adulthood and improves the validity of this animal model of schizophrenia. They further suggest difficulties binding temporally separated events (WCST), except when the salience of this information is very strong (CTA). We propose that the transient glutathione deficit during cerebral development could alter a "cognitive binding" process in interaction with the emotional state that could possibly account for the disruption of integrative function that characterizes schizophrenia. PMID:27485658

  4. Enhanced radiation-sensitivity by preincubation with nitroimidazoles: Effect of glutathione depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, C.J. ); Skov, K.A. )

    1994-05-15

    The mechanism of enhanced radiosensitization by nitroheterocyclics after a preincubation period under hypoxic conditions was investigated. The hypothesis that this phenomenon was caused by glutathione depletion was tested. The phenomena of enhanced radiosensitization by nitroheterocyclics after a preincubation period under hypoxic conditions is potentially of importance therapeutically because essentially nonlethal preradiation exposures to the electron affinic drugs cause a much larger radiation sensitization than would otherwise be expected. We have investigated this interesting property of several 2-nitroimidazoles to determine its possible cause and to test various hypotheses about maximizing its possible therapeutic benefit. In view of many observations that thiols are depleted by incubation of cells with nitroimidazoles under hypoxic conditions, we have specifically investigated this aspect of the preincubation effect. Depletion of glutathione was either enhanced by an overnight incubation with buthionine sulfoximine or minimized by preincubation with a 2-nitroimidazole which is sterically inhibited from causing thiol depletion. When conditions were chosen which minimized variations in cellular glutathione content during the preincubation period, no preincubation effect was observed. At low, therapeutically relevant radiation doses, where 2-nitroimidazoles are less efficient sensitizers, the preincubation effect may be even more important, but thiol depletion still minimizes its impact in this region of the dose-response curve. These results suggest that the preincubation effect is caused by a [open quotes]self-sensitization[close quotes] involving the known enhancement of radiation sensitization by thiol depletion. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of glutathione peroxidase Gpx3 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhu; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2006-06-01

    The glutathione peroxidase Gpx3 from the yeast S. cerevisiae has been overexpressed, purified, crystallized and diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution. Gpx3 is a monomer in solution which is different from its counterparts in mammals. The glutathione peroxidase Gpx3 from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been overexpressed, purified and crystallized. Both gel-filtration and dynamic light-scattering (DLS) results indicate that Gpx3 is a monomer in solution at a concentration of about 2 mg ml{sup −1}, whereas glutathione peroxidases are normally tetrameric or dimeric. X-ray diffraction data from a single crystal of Gpx3 have been collected to 2.6 Å resolution. The crystals are triclinic and belong to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 38.187, b = 43.372, c = 56.870 Å, α = 71.405, β = 73.376, γ = 89.633°. There are two Gpx3 monomers in a crystallographic asymmetric unit. Preliminary analyses show that the yeast Gpx3 is quite different from those of mammals.

  6. Recognition and Detoxification of the Insecticide DDT by Drosophila melanogaster Glutathione S-Transferase D1

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Wai Yee; Feil, Susanne C.; Ng, Hooi Ling; Gorman, Michael A.; Morton, Craig J.; Pyke, James; McConville, Malcolm J.; Bieri, Michael; Mok, Yee-Foong; Robin, Charles; Gooley, Paul R.; Parker, Michael W.; Batterham, Philip

    2010-06-14

    GSTD1 is one of several insect glutathione S-transferases capable of metabolizing the insecticide DDT. Here we use crystallography and NMR to elucidate the binding of DDT and glutathione to GSTD1. The crystal structure of Drosophila melanogaster GSTD1 has been determined to 1.1 {angstrom} resolution, which reveals that the enzyme adopts the canonical GST fold but with a partially occluded active site caused by the packing of a C-terminal helix against one wall of the binding site for substrates. This helix would need to unwind or be displaced to enable catalysis. When the C-terminal helix is removed from the model of the crystal structure, DDT can be computationally docked into the active site in an orientation favoring catalysis. Two-dimensional {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence NMR experiments of GSTD1 indicate that conformational changes occur upon glutathione and DDT binding and the residues that broaden upon DDT binding support the predicted binding site. We also show that the ancestral GSTD1 is likely to have possessed DDT dehydrochlorinase activity because both GSTD1 from D. melanogaster and its sibling species, Drosophila simulans, have this activity.

  7. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase are equally active in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide in human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gaetani, G.F.; Galiano, S.; Canepa, L.; Ferraris, A.M.; Kirkman, H.N.

    1989-01-01

    Genetic deficiencies of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and NADPH predispose affected erythrocytes to destruction from peroxides. Conversely, genetic deficiencies of catalase do not predispose affected erythrocytes to peroxide-induced destruction. These observations have served to strengthen the assumption that the NADPH/glutathione/glutathione peroxidase pathway is the principal means for disposal of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. Recently, however, mammalian catalase was found to have tightly bound NADPH and to require NADPH for the prevention and reversal of inactivation by its toxic substrate (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/). Since both catalase and the glutathione pathway are dependent on NADPH for function, this finding raises the possibility that both mechanisms destroy H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in human erythrocytes. A comparison of normal and acatalasemic erythrocytes in the present study indicated that catalase accounts for more than half of the destruction of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is generated at a rate comparable to that which leads to hemolysis in G6PD- deficient erythrocytes.

  8. Optical biosensor consisting of glutathione-S-transferase for detection of captan.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Young-Kee; Song, Sun-Young; Lee, In-ho; Lee, Won-Hong

    2003-10-15

    The optical biosensor consisting of a glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-immobilized gel film was developed to detect captan in contaminated water. The sensing scheme was based on the decrease of yellow product, s-(2,4-dinitrobenzene) glutathione, produced from substrates, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione (GSH), due to the inhibition of GST reaction by captan. Absorbance of the product as the output of enzyme reaction was detected and the light was guided through the optical fibers. The enzyme reactor of the sensor system was fabricated by the gel entrapment technique for the immobilized GST film. The immobilized GST had the maximum activity at pH 6.5. The optimal concentrations of substrates were determined with 1 mM for both of CDNB and GSH. The optimum concentration of enzyme was also determined with 100 microg/ml. The activity of immobilized enzyme was fairly sustained during 30 days. The proposed biosensor could successfully detect the captan up to 2 ppm and the response time to steady signal was about 15 min.

  9. Biochemical manipulation of intracellular glutathione levels influences cytotoxicity to isolated human lymphocytes by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, C.L.; Innace, J.K.; Hovatter, R.C.; Meier, H.L.; Smith, W.J.

    1993-12-31

    Glutathione (GSH) is the major nonprotein thiol that can protect cells from damage due to electrophilic alkylating agents by forming conjugates with the agent. Sulfur mustard (HD) is an electrophilic alkylating agent that has potent mutagenic, carcinogenic, cytotoxic, and vesicant properties. Compounds that elevate or reduce intracellular levels of GSH may produce changes in cytotoxicity induced by sulfur mustard. Pretreatment of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) for 72 hr with 1 mM buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), which reduces intracellular GSH content to approximately 26% of control, appears to sensitize these in vitro cells to the cytotoxic effects of 10 AM HD but not to higher HD concentrations. Pretreatment of PBL for 48 hr with 10 mM N-acetyl cysteine (NA C), which elevates intracellular glutathione levels to 122% of control, appears to partially protect these in vitro cells from the cytotoxic effects of 10 LAIHD but not to higher HD concentrations. Augmentation of intracellular levels of glutathione may provide partial protection against cytotoxicity of sulfur mustard.

  10. Glutathione-Mediated Detoxification of Halobenzoquinone Drinking Water Disinfection Byproducts in T24 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hongquan; Le, X. Chris; Li, Xing-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Halobenzoquinones (HBQs) are a new class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and are capable of producing reactive oxygen species and causing oxidative damage to proteins and DNA in T24 human bladder carcinoma cells. However, the exact mechanism of the cytotoxicity of HBQs is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of glutathione (GSH) and GSH-related enzymes including glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in defense against HBQ-induced cytotoxicity in T24 cells. The HBQs are 2,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ), 2,6-dichloro-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DCMBQ), 2,3,6-trichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TriCBQ), and 2,6-dibromobenzoquinone (DBBQ). We found that depletion of cellular GSH could sensitize cells to HBQs and extracellular GSH supplementation could attenuate HBQ-induced cytotoxicity. HBQs caused significant cellular GSH depletion and increased cellular GST activities in a concentration-dependent manner. Our mass spectrometry study confirms that HBQs can conjugate with GSH, explaining in part the mechanism of GSH depletion by HBQs. The effects of HBQs on GPx activity are compound dependent; DCMBQ and DBBQ decrease cellular GPx activities, whereas DCBQ and TriCBQ have no significant effects. Pearson correlation analysis shows that the cellular GSH level is inversely correlated with ROS production and cellular GST activity in HBQ-treated cells. These results support a GSH and GSH-related enzyme-mediated detoxification mechanism of HBQs in T24 cells. PMID:24812012

  11. The effects of acute ethanol exposure and ageing on rat brain glutathione metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sommavilla, Michela; Sánchez-Villarejo, M Victoria; Almansa, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Vallejo, Violeta; Barcia, Jorge M; Romero, Francisco Javier; Miranda, María

    2012-09-01

    Binge alcohol consumption in adolescents is increasing, and it has been proposed that immature brain deals poorly with oxidative stress. The aim of our work was to study the effect of an acute dose of ethanol on glutathione (GSH) metabolism in frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum of juvenile and adult rats. We have observed no change in levels of glutathione produced by acute alcohol in the three brain areas studied of juvenile and adult rats. Only in the frontal cortex the ratio of GSH/GSSG was increased in the ethanol-treated adult rats. GSH levels in the hippocampus and striatum were significantly higher in adult animals compared to young ones. Higher glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in adult rats was observed in frontal cortex and in striatum. Our data show an increased GSH concentration and GPx activity in different cerebral regions of the adult rat, compared to the young ones, suggesting that age-related variations of total antioxidant defences in brain may predispose young brain structures to ethanol-induced, oxidative stress-mediated tissue damage.

  12. Increased glutathione contributes to stress tolerance and global translational changes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mei-Chun; Ko, Ko; Chang, Wan-Ling; Kuo, Wen-Chieh; Chen, Guan-Hong; Lin, Tsan-Piao

    2015-09-01

    Although glutathione is well known for its reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging function and plays a protective role in biotic stress, its regulatory function in abiotic stress still remains to be elucidated. Our previous study showed that exogenously applied reduced glutathione (GSH) could improve abiotic stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. Here, we report that endogenously increased GSH also conferred tolerance to drought and salt stress in Arabidopsis. Moreover, both exogenous and endogenous GSH delayed senescence and flowering time. Polysomal profiling results showed that global translation was enhanced after GSH treatment and by the induced increase of GSH level by salt stress. By performing transcriptomic analyses of steady-state and polysome-bound mRNAs in GSH-treated plants, we reveal that GSH has a substantial impact on translation. Translational changes induced by GSH treatment target numerous hormones and stress signaling molecules, which might contribute to the enhanced stress tolerance in GSH-treated plants. Our translatome analysis also revealed that abscisic acid (ABA), auxin and jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis, as well as signaling genes, were activated during GSH treatment, which has not been reported in previously published transcriptomic data. Together, our data suggest that the increased glutathione level results in stress tolerance and global translational changes. PMID:26213235

  13. Protein–Polymer Conjugation via Ligand Affinity and Photoactivation of Glutathione S-Transferase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A photoactivated, site-selective conjugation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to the glutathione (GSH) binding pocket of glutathione S-transferase (GST) is described. To achieve this, a GSH analogue (GSH-BP) was designed and chemically synthesized with three functionalities: (1) the binding affinity of GSH to GST, (2) a free thiol for polymer functionalization, and (3) a photoreactive benzophenone (BP) component. Different molecular weights (2 kDa, 5 kDa, and 20 kDa) of GSH-BP modified PEGs (GSBP-PEGs) were synthesized and showed conjugation efficiencies between 52% and 76% to GST. Diazirine (DA) PEG were also prepared but gave conjugation yields lower than for GSBP-PEGs. PEGs with different end-groups were also synthesized to validate the importance of each component in the end-group design. End-groups included glutathione (GS-PEG) and benzophenone (BP-PEG). Results showed that both GSH and BP were crucial for successful conjugation to GST. In addition, conjugations of 5 kDa GSBP-PEG to different proteins were investigated, including bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (Lyz), ubiquitin (Ubq), and GST-fused ubiquitin (GST-Ubq) to ensure specific binding to GST. By combining noncovalent and covalent interactions, we have developed a new phototriggered protein–polymer conjugation method that is generally applicable to GST-fusion proteins. PMID:25315970

  14. Depression of biliary glutathione excretion by chronic ethanol feeding in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Vendemiale, G.; Jayatilleke, E.; Shaw, S.; Lieber, C.S.

    1984-03-12

    The effects of chronic alcohol feeding on biliary glutathione excretion were studied in rats pair fed diets containing either ethanol (36% of total energy) or isocaloric carbohydrate for 4-6 weeks. An exteriorized biliary-duodenal fistula was established and total glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were measured. A significant decrease was observed in rats fed alcohol chronically compared to their pair fed controls in the biliary excretion of GSH (55.7 +/- 37.0 vs 243.1 +/- 29.0 ..mu..g/ml bile, p < 0.025) as well as biliary GSSG (12.5 +/- 5.0 vs 49.9 +/- 8.0 ..mu..g/ml bile, p < 0.05) and in bile flow (23.1 +/- 1.6 vs 29.2 +/- 1.3 ..mu..g/min, p < 0.05). An acute dose of ethanol tended to exaggerate the decrease on biliary GSH and GSSG in the two groups of animals. The depression in biliary GSH could not be attributed to decreased GSH synthesis since S/sup 35/-L-methionine incorporation into hepatic and biliary GSH was unchanged or even increased after chronic ethanol feeding. 22 references, 4 figures.

  15. Long-term tocotrienol supplementation and glutathione-dependent enzymes during hepatocarcinogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rahmat, A; Wan Ngah, W Z; Gapor, A; Khalid, B A

    1993-09-01

    The effects of long-term administration of tocotrienol on hepatocarcinogenesis in rats induced by diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) and 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) were investigated by the determination of plasma and liver gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), cytosolic glutathione reductase (GSSG-Rx), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Twenty-eight male Rattus norwegicus rats (120-160g) were divided according to treatments into four groups: control group, tocotrienol - supplemented diet group (30mg/kg food), DEN/AAF-treated group and DEN/AAF treated plus tocotrienol-supplemented-diet group (30mg/kg food). The rats were sacrificed after nine months. The results obtained indicated no difference in the morphology and histology of the livers of control and tocotrienol-treated rats. Greyish-white neoplastic nodules (two per liver) were found in all the DEN/ AAF treated rats (n-10) whereas only one nodule was found in one of the carcinogen treated rats receiving tocotrienol supplementation (n-6). Histological examination showed obvious cellular damage for both the DEN/AAF-treated rats and the tocotrienol-supplemented rats but were less severe in the latter. Treatment with DEN/AAF caused increases in GGT, GSH-Px, GST and GSSG-Rx activities when compared to controls. These increases were also observed when tocotrienol was supplemented with DEN/AAF but the increases were less when compared to the rats receiving DEN/AAF only.

  16. Application of glutathione to roots selectively inhibits cadmium transport from roots to shoots in oilseed rape

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione is a tripeptide involved in various aspects of plant metabolism. This study investigated the effects of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) applied to specific organs (source leaves, sink leaves, and roots) on cadmium (Cd) distribution and behaviour in the roots of oilseed rape plants (Brassica napus) cultured hydroponically. The translocation ratio of Cd from roots to shoots was significantly lower in plants that had root treatment of GSH than in control plants. GSH applied to roots reduced the Cd concentration in the symplast sap of root cells and inhibited root-to-shoot Cd translocation via xylem vessels significantly. GSH applied to roots also activated Cd efflux from root cells to the hydroponic solution. Inhibition of root-to-shoot translocation of Cd was visualized, and the activation of Cd efflux from root cells was also shown by using a positron-emitting tracer imaging system (PETIS). This study investigated a similar inhibitory effect on root-to-shoot translocation of Cd by the oxidized form of glutathione, GSSG. Inhibition of Cd accumulation by GSH was abolished by a low-temperature treatment. Root cells of plants exposed to GSH in the root zone had less Cd available for xylem loading by actively excluding Cd from the roots. Consequently, root-to-shoot translocation of Cd was suppressed and Cd accumulation in the shoot decreased. PMID:23364937

  17. Glutathione-mediated detoxification of halobenzoquinone drinking water disinfection byproducts in T24 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hongquan; Le, X Chris; Li, Xing-Fang

    2014-10-01

    Halobenzoquinones (HBQs) are a new class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and are capable of producing reactive oxygen species and causing oxidative damage to proteins and DNA in T24 human bladder carcinoma cells. However, the exact mechanism of the cytotoxicity of HBQs is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of glutathione (GSH) and GSH-related enzymes including glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in defense against HBQ-induced cytotoxicity in T24 cells. The HBQs are 2,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ), 2,6-dichloro-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DCMBQ), 2,3,6-trichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TriCBQ), and 2,6-dibromobenzoquinone (DBBQ). We found that depletion of cellular GSH could sensitize cells to HBQs and extracellular GSH supplementation could attenuate HBQ-induced cytotoxicity. HBQs caused significant cellular GSH depletion and increased cellular GST activities in a concentration-dependent manner. Our mass spectrometry study confirms that HBQs can conjugate with GSH, explaining in part the mechanism of GSH depletion by HBQs. The effects of HBQs on GPx activity are compound dependent; DCMBQ and DBBQ decrease cellular GPx activities, whereas DCBQ and TriCBQ have no significant effects. Pearson correlation analysis shows that the cellular GSH level is inversely correlated with ROS production and cellular GST activity in HBQ-treated cells. These results support a GSH and GSH-related enzyme-mediated detoxification mechanism of HBQs in T24 cells.

  18. Cotranslational Proteolysis Dominates Glutathione Homeostasis to Support Proper Growth and Development[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Frottin, Frédéric; Espagne, Christelle; Traverso, José A.; Mauve, Caroline; Valot, Benoît; Lelarge-Trouverie, Caroline; Zivy, Michel; Noctor, Graham; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2009-01-01

    The earliest proteolytic event affecting most proteins is the excision of the initiating Met (NME). This is an essential and ubiquitous cotranslational process tightly regulated in all eukaryotes. Currently, the effects of NME on unknown complex cellular networks and the ways in which its inhibition leads to developmental defects and cell growth arrest remain poorly understood. Here, we provide insight into the earliest molecular mechanisms associated with the inhibition of the NME process in Arabidopsis thaliana. We demonstrate that the developmental defects induced by NME inhibition are caused by an increase in cellular proteolytic activity, primarily induced by an increase in the number of proteins targeted for rapid degradation. This deregulation drives, through the increase of the free amino acids pool, a perturbation of the glutathione homeostasis, which corresponds to the earliest limiting, reversible step promoting the phenotype. We demonstrate that these effects are universally conserved and that the reestablishment of the appropriate glutathione status restores growth and proper development in various organisms. Finally, we describe a novel integrated model in which NME, protein N-α-acylation, proteolysis, and glutathione homeostasis operate in a sequentially regulated mechanism that directs both growth and development. PMID:19855051

  19. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and glutathione interplay in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Adamy, C; Le Corvoisier, P; Candiani, G; Kirsch, M; Pavoine, C; Defer, N; Bourin, M C; Su, J B; Vermes, E; Hittinger, L; Pecker, E

    2005-09-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha), in concert with neurohormones, contributes to chronic heart failure (CHF) progression. This implies that TNF a antagonism may constitute an important target for CHF therapy. However, clinical trials in CHF patients using compounds that trap TNF alpha, comprising infliximab, an antibody directed to TNF alpha, and etanercept, a soluble recombinant receptor of TNF alpha, gave disappointing results bringing back to light the dual, short-term beneficial and long-term harmful effect of TNF alpha. This review focuses on the dual, concentration- and time-related effects of TNF alpha, the yin and yang action of TNF alpha in cardiac ischemia/reperfusion and contraction. Importantly, the harmful effects of TNF a are related to glutathione deficiency, a common hallmark to several other chronic inflammatory diseases. Recently, in rat models of CHF, oral administration of the glutathione precursor, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), was shown to hinder pathways of TNF alpha harmful signalling and to rescue cardiac structure and function. These results suggest that glutathione deficiency in association with TNF alpha activation may play a role in the pathophysiology of CHF and that NAC may represent a potential therapy in CHF.

  20. Glutathione reductase 2 maintains the function of photosystem II in Arabidopsis under excess light.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shunhua; Jiang, Rui; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione reductase plays a crucial role in the elimination of H(2)O(2) molecules via the ascorbate-glutathione cycle. In this study, we used transgenic Arabidopsis plants with decreased glutathione reductase 2 (GR2) levels to investigate whether this GR2 activity protects the photosynthetic machinery under excess light. The transgenic plants were highly sensitive to excess light and accumulated high levels of H(2)O(2). Photosystem II (PSII) activity was significantly decreased in transgenic plants. Flash-induced fluorescence relaxation and thermoluminescence measurements demonstrated inhibition of electron transfer between Q(A) and Q(B) and decreased redox potential of Q(B) in transgenic plants. Immunoblot and blue native gel analysis showed that the levels of PSII proteins and PSII complexes were decreased in transgenic plants. Analyses of the repair of photodamaged PSII and in vivo pulse labeling of thylakoid proteins showed that the repair of photodamaged PSII is inhibited due to the inhibition of the synthesis of the D1 protein de novo in transgenic plants. Taken together, our results suggest that under excess light conditions, GR2 plays an important role in maintaining both the function of the acceptor side of PSII and the repair of photodamaged PSII by preventing the accumulation of H(2)O(2). In addition, our results provide details of the role of H(2)O(2) in vivo accumulation in photoinhibition in plants. PMID:26906429

  1. Mechanistic Details of Glutathione Biosynthesis Revealed by Crystal Structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-12-01

    Glutathione is a thiol-disulfide exchange peptide critical for buffering oxidative or chemical stress, and an essential cofactor in several biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. The rate-limiting step in its de novo biosynthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase, a broadly expressed enzyme for which limited structural information is available in higher eukaryotic species. Structural data are critical to the understanding of clinical glutathione deficiency, as well as rational design of enzyme modulators that could impact human disease progression. Here, we have determined the structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate cysteine ligase (ScGCL) in the presence of glutamate and MgCl{sub 2} (2.1 {angstrom}; R = 18.2%, R{sub free} = 21.9%), and in complex with glutamate, MgCl{sub 2}, and ADP (2.7 {angstrom}; R = 19.0%, R{sub free} = 24.2%). Inspection of these structures reveals an unusual binding pocket for the {alpha}-carboxylate of the glutamate substrate and an ATP-independent Mg{sup 2+} coordination site, clarifying the Mg{sup 2+} dependence of the enzymatic reaction. The ScGCL structures were further used to generate a credible homology model of the catalytic subunit of human glutamate cysteine ligase (hGCLC). Examination of the hGCLC model suggests that post-translational modifications of cysteine residues may be involved in the regulation of enzymatic activity, and elucidates the molecular basis of glutathione deficiency associated with patient hGCLC mutations.

  2. Direct assay of glutathione peroxidase activity using high-performance capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Pascual, P; Martinez-Lara, E; Bárcena, J A; López-Barea, J; Toribio, F

    1992-10-01

    A fast, sensitive and direct method has been developed for the determination of glutathione peroxidase activity (both selenium- and non-selenium-dependent) in cell-free preparations. The assay is based on the separation and quantitation of reduced and oxidized glutathione by capillary electrophoresis. The electrophoretic separation buffer was 100 mM sodium tetraborate (pH 8.2) containing 100 mM sodium dodecylsulphate. A micellar electrokinetic mechanism took place under these conditions, and a total mass recovery was observed for both peptides. The reproducibility of migration times was excellent (less than 3% variability). A linear detector response range was observed in the range 5-50 U/ml, and both the reproducibility and accuracy were satisfied. Samples out of this linear range could be analysed by either increasing the reaction time or diluting the enzyme preparation. The results obtained with the new direct capillary electrophoresis assay were compared with those derived from a reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatographic and spectrophotometric coupled assay. A very good agreement was found between the two direct assay methods in all samples. Capillary electrophoresis is a versatile technique that allows the automation of the glutathione peroxidase assay in a reproducible manner and within a relatively short time with sufficient accuracy and precision. PMID:1430007

  3. Anxiety modulates cognitive deficits in a perinatal glutathione deficit animal model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Preissmann, D; Dépré, M; Schenk, F; Gisquet-Verrier, P

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated long-term repercussion of early glutathione deficit by l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO) injections as a rat model of schizophrenia. BSO rats were tested through various behavioral tasks requiring animals to take into account previously delivered information. We showed that relative to controls, BSO rats (1) were less active and more anxious in an Elevated Plus Maze test, allowing us to split them into two subgroups with high and low anxiety levels; (2) demonstrated normal abilities of behavioral flexibility tested with a rat-adapted version of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), with even higher abilities in anxious BSO rats suggesting reduced interference of previously acquired rules; (3) did not forage normally in radial arm mazes and mainly used clockwise strategies; (4) exhibited a lack of habituation during a startle response task; and (5) showed a normal prepulse inhibition of the startle response (PPI) and a normal conditioned taste aversion (CTA). All these results indicate that early glutathione deficit provokes persistent changes in adulthood and improves the validity of this animal model of schizophrenia. They further suggest difficulties binding temporally separated events (WCST), except when the salience of this information is very strong (CTA). We propose that the transient glutathione deficit during cerebral development could alter a "cognitive binding" process in interaction with the emotional state that could possibly account for the disruption of integrative function that characterizes schizophrenia.

  4. Glutathione and transpiration as key factors conditioning oxidative stress in Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to uranium.

    PubMed

    Aranjuelo, Iker; Doustaly, Fany; Cela, Jana; Porcel, Rosa; Müller, Maren; Aroca, Ricardo; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Bourguignon, Jacques

    2014-04-01

    Although oxidative stress has been previously described in plants exposed to uranium (U), some uncertainty remains about the role of glutathione and tocopherol availability in the different responsiveness of plants to photo-oxidative damage. Moreover, in most cases, little consideration is given to the role of water transport in shoot heavy metal accumulation. Here, we investigated the effect of uranyl nitrate exposure (50 μM) on PSII and parameters involved in water transport (leaf transpiration and aquaporin gene expression) of Arabidopsis wild type (WT) and mutant plants that are deficient in tocopherol (vte1: null α/γ-tocopherol and vte4: null α-tocopherol) and glutathione biosynthesis (high content: cad1.3 and low content: cad2.1). We show how U exposure induced photosynthetic inhibition that entailed an electron sink/source imbalance that caused PSII photoinhibition in the mutants. The WT was the only line where U did not damage PSII. The increase in energy thermal dissipation observed in all the plants exposed to U did not avoid photo-oxidative damage of mutants. The maintenance of control of glutathione and malondialdehyde contents probed to be target points for the overcoming of photoinhibition in the WT. The relationship between leaf U content and leaf transpiration confirmed the relevance of water transport in heavy metals partitioning and accumulation in leaves, with the consequent implication of susceptibility to oxidative stress.

  5. Antenna-specific glutathione S-transferase in male silkmoth Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang; Hu, Xiao-Ming; Zhong, Xiao-Wu; Chen, Quan-Mei; Xia, Qing-You; Zhao, Ping

    2014-04-29

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that are widely distributed in different species. GSTs detoxify exogenous and endogenous substances by conjugation to reduced glutathione. We characterized BmGSTD4, an antenna-specific GST, in male silkmoths. The full-length mRNA of Bmgstd4 was cloned by RACE-PCR and contained an open reading frame of 738 bp encoding a 245 amino acid protein. The antenna specificity of BmGSTD4 was validated at the mRNA and protein levels and BmGSTD4 was shown to localize in the sensillum of male silkmoth antennae. Homology modeling and multi-sequence alignment suggested that BmGSTD4 was a typical GST belonging to the δ class and had a canonical GST fold with a conserved N-terminus, including a glutathione-binding site and a C-terminal domain harboring a hydrophobic substrate-binding site. Restricted expression of BmGSTD4 in silkmoth antennae combined with GST activity suggested that BmGSTD4 was involved in the detoxification of harmful chemicals.

  6. Fluorometric microplate assay to measure glutathione S-transferase activity in insects and mites using monochlorobimane.

    PubMed

    Nauen, Ralf; Stumpf, Natascha

    2002-04-15

    Elevated levels of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a major role as a mechanism of resistance to insecticides and acaricides in resistant pest insects and mites, respectively. Such compounds are either detoxicated directly via phase I metabolism or detoxicated by phase II metabolism of metabolites as formed by microsomal monooxygenases. Here we used monochlorobimane (MCB) as an artificial substrate and glutathione to determine total GST activity in equivalents of single pest insects and spider mites in a sensitive 96-well plate-based assay system by measuring the enzymatic conversion of MCB to its fluorescent bimane-glutathione adduct. The differentiation by their GST activity between several strains of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), with different degrees of resistance to numerous acaricides was more sensitive with MCB compared to the commonly used substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Compared to an acaricide-susceptible reference strain, one field population of T. urticae showed a more than 10-fold higher GST activity measured with MCB, in contrast to a less than 2-fold higher activity when CDNB was used. Furthermore, we showed that GST activity can be sensitively assessed with MCB in homogenates of pest insects such as Heliothis virescens, Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Yponomeutidae), and Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae). PMID:11950219

  7. Purification and partial characterization of glutathione transferase from the teleost Monopterus albus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Liang, Li; Wei, Tao; Zhang, Daming; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyze the transfer of glutathione to a variety of xenobiotic and toxic endogenous compounds. GSTs are phase II biotransformation enzymes and are proposed as biomarkers of environmental pollution. In this study, a cytosolic glutathione transferase (maGST) was purified from liver of the freshwater fish Monopterus albus by affinity chromatography. The maGST appeared to be a homodimer composed of two subunits each with a molecular weight of 26 kDa. This maGST showed high activity towards the substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl). Kinetic analysis with CDNB as substrate revealed a K(m) of 0.28 mM and V(max) of 15.68 micromol/min per mg of protein. It had maximum activity in the pH range 7.0-7.5, a broad optimum T(m) range of 30 degrees C-55 degrees C, and a high thermal stability with 77% of its initial activity at 45 degrees C. This high thermal stability of maGST could be related to the physiological adaptation of M. albus to high temperatures in tropical and subtropical environments.

  8. Modulation of Brain Glutathione Reductase and Peroxiredoxin 2 by α-Tocopheryl Phosphate.

    PubMed

    Uchoa, Mariana Figueiroa; de Souza, Luiz Felipe; Dos Santos, Danubia Bonfanti; Peres, Tanara Vieira; Mello, Danielle Ferraz; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy; Farina, Marcelo; Dafre, Alcir Luiz

    2016-08-01

    α-Tocopheryl phosphate (αTP) is a phosphorylated form of α-tocopherol. Since it is phosphorylated in the hydroxyl group that is essential for the antioxidant property of α-tocopherol, we hypothesized that αTP would modulate the antioxidant system, rather than being an antioxidant agent per se. α-TP demonstrated antioxidant activity in vitro against iron-induced oxidative stress in a mitochondria-enriched fraction preparation treated with 30 or 100 µM α-TP. However, this effect was not observed ex vivo with mitochondrial-enriched fraction from mice treated with an intracerebroventricular injection of 0.1 or 1 nmol/site of αTP. Two days after treatment (1 nmol/site αTP), peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2) and glutathione reductase (GR) expression and GR activity were decreased in cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Glutathione content, glutathione peroxidase, and thioredoxin reductase activities were not affected by αTP. In conclusion, the persistent decrease in GR and Prx2 protein content is the first report of an in vivo effect of αTP on protein expression in the mouse brain, potentially associated to a novel and biologically relevant function of this naturally occurring compound. PMID:26749581

  9. Kinetics of the conjugation of aniline mustards with glutathione and thiosulfate.

    PubMed

    Gamcsik, M P; Millis, K K; Hamill, T G

    1997-06-01

    The rates of the non-enzymatic conjugation of the substituted aniline mustards, melphalan, chlorambucil and p-(N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl))toluidine with glutathione and thiosulfate were determined using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using this method, the disappearance of drug and the formation of both the mono-thioether and bis-thioether conjugates can be monitored directly. For glutathione conjugation, the rate constants for the formation of the first and second aziridinium intermediates were similar. With thiosulfate conjugation, the rate constant for the formation of the first aziridinium intermediate is greater than the rate constant for the formation of the second aziridinium. This demonstrates that the type of nucleophile has a significant influence on the overall alkylating activity of these bifunctional mustards. The bisthioether adduct formed from the reaction between p-(N,N-bis([2-13C]-2-chloroethyl))toluidine and glutathione and thiosulfate can be identified and scrambling of the 13C label in the product provides strong evidence that the alkylation must occur through an aziridinium intermediate.

  10. Serum Malondialdehyde Concentration and Glutathione Peroxidase Activity in a Longitudinal Study of Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, María; Muriach, María; Romero, Francisco J.; Villar, Vincent M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The main goal of this study was to evaluate the presence of oxidative damage and to quantify its level in gestational diabetes. Methods Thirty-six healthy women and thirty-six women with gestational diabetes were studied in the three trimesters of pregnancy regarding their levels of oxidative stress markers. These women were diagnosed with diabetes in the second trimester of pregnancy. Blood glucose levels after 100g glucose tolerance test were higher than 190, 165 or 145 mg/dl, 1, 2 or 3 hours after glucose intake. Results The group of women with gestational diabetes had higher serum malondialdehyde levels, with significant differences between groups in the first and second trimester. The mean values of serum glutathione peroxidase activity in the diabetic women were significantly lower in the first trimester. In the group of women with gestational diabetes there was a negative linear correlation between serum malondialdehyde concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the second and third trimester. Conclusions In this observational and longitudinal study in pregnant women, the alterations attributable to oxidative stress were present before the biochemical detection of the HbA1c increase. Usual recommendations once GD is detected (adequate metabolic control, as well as any other normally proposed to these patients) lowered the concentration of malondialdehyde at the end of pregnancy to the same levels of the healthy controls. Serum glutathione peroxidase activity in women with gestational diabetes increased during the gestational period. PMID:27228087

  11. Sulforaphane reduces the alterations induced by quinolinic acid: modulation of glutathione levels.

    PubMed

    Santana-Martínez, R A; Galván-Arzáte, S; Hernández-Pando, R; Chánez-Cárdenas, M E; Avila-Chávez, E; López-Acosta, G; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Santamaría, A; Maldonado, P D

    2014-07-11

    Glutamate-induced excitotoxicity involves a state of acute oxidative stress, which is a crucial event during neuronal degeneration and is part of the physiopathology of neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, we evaluated the ability of sulforaphane (SULF), a natural dietary isothiocyanate, to induce the activation of transcription factor Nrf2 (a master regulator of redox state in the cell) in a model of striatal degeneration in rats infused with quinolinic acid (QUIN). Male Wistar rats received SULF (5mg/kg, i.p.) 24h and 5min before the intrastriatal infusion of QUIN. SULF increased the reduced glutathione (GSH) levels 4h after QUIN infusion, which was associated with its ability to increase the activity of glutathione reductase (GR), an antioxidant enzyme capable to regenerate GSH levels at 24h. Moreover, SULF treatment increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, while no changes were observed in γ-glutamyl cysteine ligase (GCL) activity. SULF treatment also prevented QUIN-induced oxidative stress (measured by oxidized proteins levels), the histological damage and the circling behavior. These results suggest that the protective effect of SULF could be related to its ability to preserve GSH levels and increase GPx and GR activities.

  12. GLUTATHIONE (GSH) CONCENTRATIONS VARY WITH THE CELL CYCLE IN MATURING HAMSTER OOCYTES, ZYGOTES AND PRE-IMPLANATION EMBRYOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract
    Glutathione (GSH) is thought to play critical roles in oocyte function including spindle maintenance and provision of reducing power needed to initiate sperm chromatin decondensation. Previous observations that GSH concentrations are higher in mature than immature o...

  13. [GLUTATHIONE SYSTEM ACTIVITY IN RAT TISSUES UNDER PHENYLETHYL BIGUANIDE ACTION ON THE BACKGROUND OF EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN ISCHEMIA/REPERFUSION DEVELOPMENT].

    PubMed

    Safonova, O A; Popova, T N; Kryl'skii, D V

    2016-01-01

    It was studied the total antioxidant activity, content of primary lipid peroxidation (LPO) products and reduced glutathione, and the activity of glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase in rat tissues under phenylethyl biguanide (phenfor- min) action on the background of experimental brain ischemia/reperfusion development. It is stablished the analyzed parameters, increasing under ischemia/reperfusion conditions in the brain and blood serum of animals, exhibit a decrease upon the introduction of this biguanide derivative. The obtained data can be explained by a decrease in degree of mobilization of the antioxidant system--in particular, of its glutathione chain--in the pathologic state. Hence, there is a need in NADPH supply for the system functioning compared with the pathology. Thus, phenylethyl biguanide demonstrates its antioxidant and protective properties under oxidative stress development that is accompanied by accumulation of the products of free radical oxidation of biomolecules during the ischemic brain injury. PMID:27159954

  14. Purification and kinetic analysis of cytosolic and mitochondrial thioredoxin glutathione reductase extracted from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Plancarte, Agustin; Nava, Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Thioredoxin glutathione reductases (TGRs) (EC 1.8.1.9) were purified to homogeneity from the cytosolic (cTsTGR) and mitochondrial (mTsTGR) fractions of Taenia solium, the agent responsible for neurocysticercosis, one of the major central nervous system parasitic diseases in humans. TsTGRs had a relative molecular weight of 132,000, while the corresponding value per subunit obtained under denaturing conditions, was of 62,000. Specific activities for thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase substrates for both TGRs explored were in the range or lower than values obtained for other platyhelminths and mammalian TGRs. cTsTGR and mTsTGR also showed hydroperoxide reductase activity using hydroperoxide as substrate. Km(DTNB) and Kcat(DTNB) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (88 µM and 1.9 s(-1); 45 µM and 12.6 s(-1), respectively) and Km(GSSG) and Kcat(GSSG) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (6.3 µM and 0.96 s(-1); 4 µM and 1.62 s(-1), respectively) were similar to or lower than those reported for mammalian TGRs. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that 12 peptides from cTsTGR and seven from mTsTGR were a match for gi|29825896 thioredoxin glutathione reductase [Echinococcus granulosus], confirming that both enzymes are TGRs. Both T. solium TGRs were inhibited by the gold compound auranofin, a selective inhibitor of thiol-dependent flavoreductases (I₅₀ = 3.25, 2.29 nM for DTNB and GSSG substrates, respectively for cTsTGR; I₅₀ = 5.6, 25.4 nM for mTsTGR toward the same substrates in the described order). Glutathione reductase activity of cTsTGR and mTsTGR exhibited hysteretic behavior with moderate to high concentrations of GSSG; this result was not observed either with thioredoxin, DTNB or NADPH. However, the observed hysteretic kinetics was suppressed with increasing amounts of both parasitic TGRs. These data suggest the existence of an effective substitute which may account for the lack of the detoxification enzymes glutathione reductase

  15. The role of mitochondrial phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PhGPx) is a unique selenoenzyme that directly detoxifies lipid hydroperoxides in situ . It therefore plays an important role in the protection of cellular membranes. PhGPx is expressed in most mammalian tissues. It is present as a mitochondrial form (L-PhGPx) and a cytosolic form (S-PhGPx). Overexpression of PhGPx has been shown to significantly protect cells from oxidative damage. The hypothesis of this thesis is that mitochondrial PhGPx (L-PhGPx) may play an important role in the resistance of cells to certain oxidative stress- mediated cancer therapies. A human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cell line was used as a cell model system in this research. It was stably transfected with human L-PhGPx sense cDNA. Four clones (P-1, P-2, P-3, and P-4) with 3- to 7-fold increases in PhGPx activity were selected for study. Overexpression of L-PhGPx did not significantly influence other cellular antioxidants, including superoxide dismutases, cytosolic glutathione peroxidase, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione. However, L-PhGPx did decrease the rate of cell growth. Cell plating efficiency was inversely correlated with effective PhGPx activity, which is defined as the product of cellular PhGPx activity and total glutathione. The biological functions of L-PhGPx have been investigated in cancer treatment, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and hyperthermia (HT). Both PDT and HT can induce oxidative stress. Overexpression of L-PhGPx in MCF-7 cells significantly increased the resistance of cells to PDT- and HT-mediated cytotoxicity. The effective PhGPx activity had a remarkable inverse linear correlation (r = -0.80) to the rate of removal of lipid hydroperoxides in living cells, and correlated positively with cell survival after photooxidation (r = 0.91). L-PhGPx protected mitochondrial function by preserving the mitochondrial membrane potential. These data demonstrate that L-PhGPx provides significant protection against

  16. One-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the reaction of phenyldichloroarsine with glutathione

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, K.; Adams, E.R.; O'Connor, R.J.; Chong, S.; McGown, E.L.

    1987-09-01

    /sup 14/C-labeled phenyldichloroarsine (PDA) enters the red blood cell and forms a 1:2 adduct with intracellular glutathione. Upon gel filtration of the hemolysate, (/sup 14/C)PDA was recovered with the glutathione-containing fractions. One-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to confirm the structure of the adduct and elucidate its stereochemistry, stability, and reactivity.

  17. Loss of hepatic monooxygenase activities, glutathione, and 'green pigment' formation after the administration of vinyl-cyclooctane to mice.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, P G; Citti, L; Fassina, G; Testai, E; Turchi, G

    1983-05-01

    Vinylcyclooctane, when administered to mice at 500 mg/kg, produced reduction of microsomal cytochrome P-450, heme, aminopyrine-N-demethylase and ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase activities with respect to control values; furthermore the hepatic reduced glutathione level was depleted suggesting that glutathione is involved in the vinylcyclooctane metabolism. The reduction of cytochrome P-450 and monooxygenase activities was accompanied by the formation of abnormal 'green pigments'.

  18. Hepatic glutathione metabolism and lipid peroxidation in response to excess dietary selenomethionine and selenite in mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; Krynitsky, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    Selenium from selenomethionine accumulated in a dose-dependent manner in the liver, resulting in a decrease in hepatic-reduced glutathione with a corresponding decrease in total hepatic thiols. There was a dose-dependent increase in the oxidized to reduced glutathione ratio, and an increase in lipid peroxidation. These findings indicate that Se in the diet at 10 ppm and higher causes significant sublethal alterations in mallard ducklings, and 20-40 ppm causes significant hepatotoxicity.

  19. Reduction in vitro of red cell glutathione reproduces defects of cellular sodium transport seen in oedematous malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Forrester, T; Golden, M; Brand, S; Swales, J

    1990-05-01

    Red cells in oedematous malnutrition (kwashiorkor) have an increased sodium content, 'leakiness' to sodium and enhanced sodium pumping. In non-oedematous malnutrition (marasmus) there is a reduction in the sodium pump activity. The explanation has hitherto been unknown but the glutathione content of red cells is low in kwashiorkor and normal in marasmus. We artificially lowered the glutathione content of normal red cells to values characteristic of mild oedematous malnutrition, using the enzyme inhibitors bischloronitrosourea (BCNU) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSOX). After preincubation, the cells were washed to remove the inhibitors and oxidized glutathione. Cellular content of sodium and potassium, and 86Rb influx were then measured. The reduction in glutathione reproduced the abnormalities of sodium content and flux observed in kwashiorkor. We suggest that oxidant stress in kwashiorkor, by reducing cellular glutathione, may affect cell membrane electrolyte transport. This may act through alterations in membrane sulfhydryl groups. Glutathione depletion may therefore play an important role in the clinical picture and natural history of oedematous malnutrition and may have relevance to other conditions where oxidant stress occurs.

  20. Effects of antioxidants on glutathione levels and clinical recovery from the malnutrition syndrome kwashiorkor--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Becker, K; Pons-Kühnemann, J; Fechner, A; Funk, M; Gromer, S; Gross, H-J; Grünert, A; Schirmer, R H

    2005-01-01

    Kwashiorkor is a severe edematous form of malnutrition with high prevalence and lethality in many African countries, and repeatedly has been reported to be associated with oxidative stress. The therapy of kwashiorkor is still ineffective. In this pilot study, we tested the hypothesis that oral application of thiol-containing antioxidants increases glutathione status and is beneficial for the clinical recovery of kwashiorkor patients. The longitudinal clinical intervention study was carried out at St Joseph's Hospital, Jirapa, Ghana. Children with severe kwashiorkor were randomly assigned to either a standard treatment (ST) receiving a therapeutic protocol based on the recommendations of the WHO or to one of three study groups receiving in addition 2 x 600 mg reduced glutathione or 2 x 50 mg alpha-lipoic acid or 2 x 100 mg N-acetylcysteine per day. Patients were followed up clinically and biochemically for 20 days and compared with 37 healthy controls. Both glutathione and alpha-lipoic acid supplementation had positive effects on survival. Also, the blood glutathione concentrations correlated positively with survival rates. Furthermore, the initial skin lesions, glutathione and total protein concentrations were found to be strong predictors of survival. The data strongly suggest that a therapy restoring the antioxidative capacity by applying cysteine equivalents in the form of glutathione and/or alpha-lipoic acid is beneficial for biochemical and clinical recovery of kwashiorkor patients.

  1. Glutathione-Mediated Regulation of ATP Sulfurylase Activity, SO42- Uptake, and Oxidative Stress Response in Intact Canola Roots.

    PubMed

    Lappartient, A. G.; Touraine, B.

    1997-05-01

    The dual role of glutathione as a transducer of S status (A.G. Lappartient and B. Touraine [1996] Plant Physiol 111: 147-157) and as an antioxidant was examined by comparing the effects of S deprivation, glutathione feeding, and H2O2 (oxidative stress) on SO42- uptake and ATP sulfurylase activity in roots of intact canola (Brassica napus L.). ATP sulfurylase activity increased and SO42- uptake rate severely decreased in roots exposed to 10 mM H2O2, whereas both increased in S-starved plants. In split-root experiments, an oxidative stress response was induced in roots remote from H2O2 exposure, as revealed by changes in the reduced glutathione (GSH) level and the GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio, but there was only a small decrease in SO42- uptake rate and no effect on ATP sulfurylase activity. Feeding plants with GSH increased GSH, but did not affect the GSH/GSSG ratio, and both ATP sulfurylase activity and SO42- uptake were inhibited. The responses of the H2O2-scavenging enzymes ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase to S starvation, GSH treatment, and H2O2 treatment were not to glutathione-mediated S demand regulatory process. We conclude that the regulation of ATP sulfurylase activity and SO42- uptake by S demand is related to GSH rather than to the GSH/GSSG ratio, and is distinct from the oxidative stress response. PMID:12223697

  2. Effects of Cyanobacterial Lipopolysaccharides from Microcystis on Glutathione-Based Detoxification Pathways in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Jaja-Chimedza, Asha; Gantar, Miroslav; Mayer, Gregory D.; Gibbs, Patrick D. L.; Berry, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacteria (“blue-green algae”) are recognized producers of a diverse array of toxic secondary metabolites. Of these, the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), produced by all cyanobacteria, remain to be well investigated. In the current study, we specifically employed the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo to investigate the effects of LPS from geographically diverse strains of the widespread cyanobacterial genus, Microcystis, on several detoxifying enzymes/pathways, including glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)/glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT), and compared observed effects to those of heterotrophic bacterial (i.e., E. coli) LPS. In agreement with previous studies, cyanobacterial LPS significantly reduced GST in embryos exposed to LPS in all treatments. In contrast, GPx moderately increased in embryos exposed to LPS, with no effect on reciprocal GR activity. Interestingly, total glutathione levels were elevated in embryos exposed to Microcystis LPS, but the relative levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione (i.e., GSH/GSSG) were, likewise, elevated suggesting that oxidative stress is not involved in the observed effects as typical of heterotrophic bacterial LPS in mammalian systems. In further support of this, no effect was observed with respect to CAT or SOD activity. These findings demonstrate that Microcystis LPS affects glutathione-based detoxification pathways in the zebrafish embryo, and more generally, that this model is well suited for investigating the apparent toxicophore of cyanobacterial LPS, including possible differences in structure-activity relationships between heterotrophic and cyanobacterial LPS, and teleost fish versus mammalian systems. PMID:22822454

  3. Determination of glutathione content in grape juice and wine by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Janes, Lucija; Lisjak, Klemen; Vanzo, Andreja

    2010-08-01

    A modified preparation of sample was developed for the determination of glutathione content in grape juice and wine by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection, using on-line pre-column derivatization. Ice-cold deoxygenated methanol was used to deactivate the oxidation enzymes in juices or wines and keep the glutathione stable. The optimum recovery of glutathione content in grape juice and wine was obtained when either the sample of grape juice or wine was mixed in ice-cold deoxygenated methanol in the ratio 10:90 (v:v) and further diluted in sodium acetate buffer in the ratio 1:1 (v:v). The optimized method was validated for linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, precision and uncertainty. According to the validation data the method is appropriate for the determination of glutathione content in grape juice and wine. Glutathione contents in grape juices made from White Muscat grapes and Sauvignon Blanc wines were analysed. The average glutathione content in 28 young Sauvignon Blanc wines was 12.5 mg L(-1). PMID:20678636

  4. Dysregulation of Glutathione Homeostasis Causes Oxido-reductive Stress and Cardiomyopathy in R120GCryAB Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Namakkal S.; Connell, Patrice; Christians, Elisabeth S.; Yan, Liang-Jun; Taylor, Ryan P.; Orosz, Andras; Zhang, Xia Q.; Stevenson, Tamara J.; Peshock, Ronald M.; Leopold, Jane A.; Barry, William H.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Odelberg, Shannon J.; Benjamin, Ivor J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Oxidative stress is widely implicated in pathogenic states including heart failure. In contrast, the role of ‘reductive stress,’ defined as the abnormal increase of reducing equivalents (e.g., glutathione, NADPH), remains controversial. Here we show that transgenic mice overexpressing cardiac-specific human R120G αB-crystallin (hR120GCryAB Tg) recapitulate protein aggregation cardiomyopathy and are under reductive stress linked to glutathione homeostasis. In myopathic hearts, increased recycling of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) and GSH/GSSG ratios were due to augmented expression and enzymatic activities of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase. The intercross of hR120GCryAB Tg cardiomyopathic animals with G6PD-deficient (20% normal G6PD activity) mice rescues hR120GCryAB Tg/G6PDmut progeny from increased G6PD activity, cardiac hypertrophy, and protein aggregation. These findings demonstrate that dysregulation of G6PD activity is necessary and sufficient for maladaptive reductive stress and suggest a novel therapeutic target for abrogating R120GCryAB cardiomyopathy and heart failure in humans. PMID:17693254

  5. Comparison of glutathione reductase activity and the intracellular glutathione reducing effects of 13 derivatives of 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shenghui; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko; Azuma, Hideki; Kennedy, David Opare; Konishi, Yotaro; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao

    2010-05-14

    In a previous study, we showed that (1'S)-acetoxychavicol acetate ((S)-ACA) caused a rapid decrease in glutathione (GSH) levels less than 15 min after exposure. (S)-ACA-induced cell death was reversed by the addition of N-acetylcysteine. In the current study, we investigated the inhibitory activities of 13 derivatives of (S)-ACA on tumor cell viability, intracellular GSH level and GR activity. Correlations were found among a decrease in cell viability, intracellular GSH levels and the activity of GR in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells treated with the various ACA analogues. A test of the 13 derivatives revealed that the structural factors regulating activity were as follows: (1) the para or 1'-position of acetoxyl group (or other acyl group) was essential, (2) the presence of a C2'-C3' double or triple bond was essential, and (3) the S configuration of the 1'-acetoxyl group was preferable.

  6. Structure-activity relationships for chemical and glutathione S-transferase-catalysed glutathione conjugation reactions of a series of 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Aar, E M; Bouwman, T; Commandeur, J N; Vermeulen, N P

    1996-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute an important class of phase II (de)toxifying enzymes, catalysing the conjugation of glutathione (GSH) with electrophilic compounds. In the present study, Km, kcat and kcat/Km values for the rat GST 1-1-, 3-3-, 4-4- and 7-7-catalysed conjugation reactions between GSH and a series of 10 different 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes, and the second-order rate constants (ks) of the corresponding base-catalysed reactions, were correlated with nine classical physicochemical parameters (electronic, steric and lipophilic) of the substituents and with 16 computer-calculated molecular parameters of the substrates and of the corresponding Meisenheimer complexes with MeS- as a model nucleophile for GS- (charge distributions and several energy values), giving structure-activity relationships. On the basis of an identical dependence of the base-catalysed as well as the GST 1-1- and GST 7-7-catalysed reactions on electronic parameters (among others, Hammett substituent constant sigma p and charge on p-nitro substituents), and the finding that the corresponding reactions catalysed by GSTs 3-3 and 4-4 depend to a significantly lesser extent on these parameters, it was concluded that the Mu-class GST isoenzymes have a rate-determining transition state in the conjugation reaction between 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes and GSH which is different from that of the other two GSTs. Several alternative rate-limiting transition states for GST 3-3 and 4-4 are discussed. Furthermore, based on the obtained structure-activity relationships, it was possible to predict the kcat/Km values of the four GST isoenzymes and the ks of the base-catalysed GSH conjugation of 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene. PMID:8973562

  7. Deficient synthesis of glutathione underlies oxidative stress in aging and can be corrected by dietary cysteine and glycine supplementation1234

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sanjeet G; Guthikonda, Anuradha P; Reid, Marvin; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Taffet, George E; Jahoor, Farook

    2011-01-01

    Background: Aging is associated with oxidative stress, but underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Objective: We tested whether glutathione deficiency occurs because of diminished synthesis and contributes to oxidative stress in aging and whether stimulating glutathione synthesis with its precursors cysteine and glycine could alleviate oxidative stress. Design: Eight elderly and 8 younger subjects received stable-isotope infusions of [2H2]glycine, after which red blood cell (RBC) glutathione synthesis and concentrations, plasma oxidative stress, and markers of oxidant damage (eg, F2-isoprostanes) were measured. Elderly subjects were restudied after 2 wk of glutathione precursor supplementation. Results: Compared with younger control subjects, elderly subjects had markedly lower RBC concentrations of glycine (486.7 ± 28.3 compared with 218.0 ± 23.7 μmol/L; P < 0.01), cysteine (26.2 ± 1.4 compared with 19.8 ± 1.3 μmol/L; P < 0.05), and glutathione (2.08 ± 0.12 compared with 1.12 ± 0.18 mmol/L RBCs; P < 0.05); lower glutathione fractional (83.14 ± 6.43% compared with 45.80 ± 5.69%/d; P < 0.01) and absolute (1.73 ± 0.16 compared with 0.55 ± 0.12 mmol/L RBCs per day; P < 0.01) synthesis rates; and higher plasma oxidative stress (304 ± 16 compared with 346 ± 20 Carratelli units; P < 0.05) and plasma F2-isoprostanes (97.7 ± 8.3 compared with 136.3 ± 11.3 pg/mL; P < 0.05). Precursor supplementation in elderly subjects led to a 94.6% higher glutathione concentration, a 78.8% higher fractional synthesis rate, a 230.9% higher absolute synthesis rate, and significantly lower plasma oxidative stress and F2-isoprostanes. No differences in these measures were observed between younger subjects and supplemented elderly subjects. Conclusions: Glutathione deficiency in elderly humans occurs because of a marked reduction in synthesis. Dietary supplementation with the glutathione precursors cysteine and glycine fully restores glutathione synthesis and

  8. Acetaminophen-induced depletion of glutathione and cysteine in the aging mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Richie, J P; Lang, C A; Chen, T S

    1992-07-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an essential role in the detoxification of acetaminophen (APAP) and the prevention of APAP-induced toxicity in the kidney. Our previous results demonstrated that a GSH deficiency is a general property of aging tissues, including the kidney, suggesting a hypothesis that senescent organisms are at greater risk to APAP-induced renal damage. To test this, C57BL/6NIA mice of different ages through the life span were injected with various doses of APAP, and the extent of GSH and cysteine (Cys) depletion and recovery were determined. At time intervals up to 24 hr, kidney cortex samples were obtained, processed and analyzed for glutathione status, namely GSH, glutathione disulfide (GSSG), Cys and cystine, using an HPLC method with dual electrochemical detection. In the uninjected controls, GSH and Cys concentrations decreased about 30% in the aging mouse, but the GSSG and cystine levels were unchanged during the life span. APAP administration depleted the kidney GSH and Cys contents in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Four hours after APAP administration, GSH levels of the young, growing (3- to 6-month) and the mature (12-month) mice decreased 34 and 58%, respectively, and recovered to near control values by 24 hr (95 and 98%). In contrast, the extent of depletion in old (31-month) mice was greater (64%) and the 24-hr recovery was less, returning only to 56%. Likewise, Cys levels of the young and mature mice decreased 49 and 65%, respectively, 4 hr following APAP, and increased to 99 and 85% by 24 hr. In contrast, in old mice, there was a 78% depletion after 4 hr followed by a recovery of only 65% by 24 hr. These results demonstrated clearly that in the aging mouse kidney, a GSH and Cys deficiency occurs that is accompanied by an impaired APAP detoxification capacity. PMID:1632827

  9. Evidences for a role of glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4) in methylmercury induced neurotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zemolin, A P P; Meinerz, D F; de Paula, M T; Mariano, D O C; Rocha, J B T; Pereira, A B; Posser, T; Franco, J L

    2012-12-01

    We evaluated the activity and expression of antioxidant enzymes in the cerebellum and cortex of Swiss adult male mice exposed to methylmercury (MeHg) in drinking water (40mg/L) during 21 days. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) were determined spectrophotometrically. The expression (protein levels) of GPx1 and GPx4 isoforms, TrxR1 as well as heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) were evaluated using specific antibodies and normalized by actin levels. The exposure of mice to MeHg caused a significant impairment in locomotors performance in the open field test (crossings and rearing). This result was followed by a significant reduction of GPx and TrxR activities in the cerebellum and cortex when compared to untreated animals. We also observed a substantial decrease in GPx1, GPx4 and TrxR1 protein levels in the cerebellum, while in the cerebral cortex, only GPx4 and TrxR1 were decreased after MeHg treatment. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes GR, GST, CAT and SOD were increased in the cerebellum after MeHg administration to mice. In contrast, only CAT was increased in the cerebral cortex of MeHg-treated animals. The expression of HSP70 was up-regulated only in the cerebellum where MeHg-exposed mice showed a significant increase in the immunocontent of HSP70 when compared to controls. This is the first report showing a role for GPx4 in the neurotoxicity induced by MeHg in vivo. In addition, our data indicates that the selenoproteins GPx and TrxR as main targets during MeHg exposure, which may be considered in biomarker studies.

  10. Abnormal glutathione and sulfate levels after interleukin 6 treatment and in tumor-induced cachexia.

    PubMed

    Hack, V; Gross, A; Kinscherf, R; Bockstette, M; Fiers, W; Berke, G; Dröge, W

    1996-08-01

    Excessive urea excretion associated with a negative nitrogen balance and massive loss of skeletal muscle mass (cachexia) is a frequent life threatening complication in malignancies and HIV infection. As these patients have often elevated interleukin-6 (IL-6) and abnormally low cystine levels, we have now determined the intracellular levels of glutathione and other cysteine derivatives in the liver and muscle tissue of IL-6-treated or tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice. IL-6 treatment or inoculation of the MCA-105 fibrosarcoma caused a significant increase in hepatic gamma-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase activity and a decrease in the sulfate level, glutamine/urea ratio, and glutamine/glutamate ratio, suggesting that a decrease of the proton generating cysteine catabolism in the liver may increase carbamoyl-phosphate synthesis and urea formation at the expense of net glutamine synthesis. Treatment with cysteine, conversely, caused an increase in sulfate, glutamine/urea ratios, and glutamine/glutamate ratios and may thus be a useful therapeutic tool in clinical medicine. In contrast to the liver, muscle tissue of tumor-bearing mice showed decreased glutathione and increased sulfate levels, suggesting that the cysteine pool may be drained by an increased cysteine catabolism in this tissue. The findings indicate that tumor cachexia is triggered initially by IL-6 and is later sustained by processes driven by an abnormal cysteine metabolism in different organs.-Hack, V., Gross, A., Kinscherf, R., Bockstette, M., Fiers, W., Berke, G., and Dröge, W. Abnormal glutathione and sulfate levels after interleukin 6 treatment and in tumor-induced cachexia.

  11. A biophysically based mathematical model for the catalytic mechanism of glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Pannala, Venkat R; Bazil, Jason N; Camara, Amadou K S; Dash, Ranjan K

    2013-12-01

    Glutathione reductase (GR) catalyzes the reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) using NADPH as the reducing cofactor, and thereby maintains a constant GSH level in the system. GSH scavenges superoxide (O2(*-)) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) nonenzymatically or by serving as an electron donor to several enzymes involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification. In either case, GSH oxidizes to GSSG and is subsequently regenerated by the catalytic action of GR. Although the GR kinetic mechanism has been extensively studied under various experimental conditions with variable substrates and products, the catalytic mechanism has not been studied in terms of a mechanistic model that accounts for the effects of the substrates and products on the reaction kinetics. The aim of this study is therefore to develop a comprehensive mathematical model for the catalytic mechanism of GR. We use available experimental data on GR kinetics from various species/sources to develop the mathematical model and estimate the associated model parameters. The model simulations are consistent with the experimental observation that GR operates via both ping-pong and sequential branching mechanisms based on relevant concentrations of its reaction substrate GSSG. Furthermore, we show the observed pH-dependent substrate inhibition of GR activity by GSSG and bimodal behavior of GR activity with pH. The model presents a unique opportunity to understand the effects of products on the kinetics of GR. The model simulations show that under physiological conditions, where both substrates and products are present, the flux distribution depends on the concentrations of both GSSG and NADP(+), with ping-pong flux operating at low levels and sequential flux dominating at higher levels. The kinetic model of GR may serve as a key module for the development of integrated models for ROS-scavenging systems to understand protection of cells under normal and oxidative stress

  12. Effect of glutathione S-transferase M1 polymorphisms on biomarkers of exposure and effects.

    PubMed Central

    Srám, R J

    1998-01-01

    Genotypes responsible for interindividual differences in ability to activate or detoxify genotoxic agents are recognized as biomarkers of susceptibility. Among the most studied genotypes are human glutathione transferases. The relationship of genetic susceptibility to biomarkers of exposure and effects was studied especially in relation to the genetic polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1). For this review papers reporting the effect of GSTM1 genotype on DNA adducts, protein adducts, urine mutagenicity, Comet assay parameters, chromosomal aberrations, sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), micronuclei, and hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase mutations were assessed. Subjects in groups occupationally exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, benzidine, pesticides, and 1,3-butadiene were included. As environmentally exposed populations, autopsy donors, coal tar-treated patients, smokers, nonsmokers, mothers, postal workers, and firefighters were followed. From all biomarkers the effect of GSTM1 and N-acetyl transferase 2 was seen in coke oven workers on mutagenicity of urine and of glutathione S-transferase T1 on the chromosomal aberrations in subjects from 1,3-butadiene monomer production units. Effects of genotypes on DNA adducts were found from lung tissue of autopsy donors and from placentas of mothers living in an air-polluted region. The GSTM1 genotype affected mutagenicity of urine in smokers and subjects from polluted regions, protein adducts in smokers, SCE in smokers and nonsmokers, and Comet assay parameters in postal workers. A review of all studies on GSTM1 polymorphisms suggests that research probably has not reached the stage where results can be interpreted to formulate preventive measures. The relationship between genotypes and biomarkers of exposure and effects may provide an important guide to the risk assessment of human exposure to mutagens and carcinogens. PMID:9539016

  13. The DinB Superfamily Includes Novel Mycothiol, Bacillithiol and Glutathione S-transferases

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Gerald L.; Leung, Stephan S.; Wakabayashi, Judy I.; Rawat, Mamta; Fahey, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    The superfamily of glutathione S-transferases has been the subject of extensive study but Actinobacteria produce mycothiol (MSH) in place of glutathione and no mycothiol S-transferase (MST) has been identified. Using mycothiol and monochlorobimane as substrates a MST activity was detected in extracts of Mycobacterium smegmatis and purified sufficiently to allow identification of MSMEG_0887, a member the DUF664 family of the DinB superfamily, as the MST. The identity of the M. smegmatis and homologous Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv0443) enzymes was confirmed by cloning and the expressed proteins were found to be active with MSH but not bacillithiol (BSH) or glutathione (GSH). Bacillus subtilis YfiT is another member of the DinB superfamily but this bacterium produces BSH. The YfiT protein was shown to have S-transferase activity with monochlorobimane when assayed with BSH but not with MSH or GSH. Enterococcus faecalis EF_3021 shares some homology with MSMEG_0887 but this organism produces GSH but not MSH or BSH. Cloned and expressed EF_0321 was active with monochlorobimane and GSH but not with MSH or BSH. MDMPI_2 is another member of the DinB superfamily and has been previously shown to have mycothiol-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase activity. Three of the eight families of the DinB superfamily include proteins shown to catalyze thiol-dependent metabolic or detoxification activities. Since more than two-thirds of the sequences assigned to the DinB superfamily are members of these families it seems likely that such activity is dominant in the DinB superfamily. PMID:22059487

  14. Changes in the pig small intestinal mucosal glutathione kinetics after weaning.

    PubMed

    Degroote, J; Michiels, J; Claeys, E; Ovyn, A; De Smet, S

    2012-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) serves as a major endogenous antioxidant and its kinetics have been poorly described in the weaned pig. This study was to assess the effect of birth weight, sex, and days postweaning on the small intestine (SI) mucosal GSH kinetics. At weaning (18.8 ± 0.44 d) 34 pairs of intrauterine growth restricted (IUGR) and normal birth weight sex-matched littermates were selected and fed a starter diet ad libitum until 1 h before sampling at 0, 2, 5, 12 and 28 d postweaning. Mucosa was collected from 2 SI sites, at 5% and at 75% of total length, to determine GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and plasm GSH-Px and MDA. At both 5 and 75% of total length, the GSH-Px activity and GSH concentrations increased gradually with increasing days postweaning to peak at day 12 (P < 0.05). The GSH-Px activity and GSH concentrations at 5% of SI length were consistently higher as compared to 75% of SI length (e.g., at day 12, 43.2 and 28.9 units/mg protein and 21.5 and 15.4 μmol/g protein, respectively). The GSSG:GSH ratio at 5% of total length was 2-fold higher at day 5 compared to all other days (P < 0.05), possibly indicating that the mucosal redox balance was disturbed in that time window. The higher GSH-Px activity, GSH content, and GSSG:GSH ratio in the proximal SI might illustrate the higher need for antioxidant action at that site. Plasma MDA and GSH-Px activity followed a comparable pattern as in the small intestine.

  15. Dansyl glutathione as a trapping agent for the quantitative estimation and identification of reactive metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gan, Jinping; Harper, Timothy W; Hsueh, Mei-Mann; Qu, Qinling; Humphreys, W Griffith

    2005-05-01

    A sensitive and quantitative method was developed for the estimation of reactive metabolite formation in vitro. The method utilizes reduced glutathione (GSH) labeled with a fluorescence tag as a trapping agent and fluorescent detection for quantitation. The derivatization of GSH was accomplished by reaction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) with dansyl chloride to form dansylated GSSG. Subsequent reduction of the disulfide bond yielded dansylated GSH (dGSH). Test compounds were incubated with human liver microsomes in the presence of dGSH and NADPH, and the resulting mixtures were analyzed by HPLC coupled with a fluorescence detector and a mass spectrometer for the quantitation and mass determination of the resulting dGSH adducts. The comparative chemical reactivity of dGSH vs GSH was investigated by monitoring the reaction of each with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene or R-(+)-pulegone after bioactivation. dGSH was found to be equivalent to GSH in chemical reactivity toward both thiol reactive molecules. dGSH did not serve as a cofactor for glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated conjugation of 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene in incubations with either human liver S9 fractions or a recombinant GST, GSTM1-1. Reference compounds were tested in this assay, including seven compounds that have been reported to form GSH adducts along with seven drugs that are among the most prescribed in the current U.S. market and have not been reported to form GSH adducts. dGSH adducts were detected and quantitated in incubations with all seven positive reference compounds; however, there were no dGSH adducts observed with any of the widely prescribed drugs. In comparison with existing methods, this method is sensitive, quantitative, cost effective, and easy to implement. PMID:15892584

  16. Inherited glutathione-S-transferase deficiency is a risk factor for pulmonary asbestosis.

    PubMed

    Smith, C M; Kelsey, K T; Wiencke, J K; Leyden, K; Levin, S; Christiani, D C

    1994-09-01

    Pulmonary diseases attributable to asbestos exposure constitute a significant public health burden, yet few studies have investigated potential genetic determinants of susceptibility to asbestos-related diseases. The glutathione-S-transferases are a family of conjugating enzymes that both catalyze the detoxification of a variety of potentially cytotoxic electrophilic agents and act in the generation of sulfadipeptide leukotriene inflammatory mediators. The gene encoding glutathione-S-transferase class mu (GSTM-1) is polymorphic; approximately 50% of Caucasian individuals have a homozygous deletion of this gene and do not produce functional enzyme. Glutathione-S-transferase mu (GST-mu) deficiency has been previously reported to be associated with smoking-induced lung cancer. We conducted a cross-sectional study to examine the prevalence of the homozygous deletion for the GSTM-1 gene in members of the carpentry trade occupationally exposed to asbestos. Members of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America attending their 1991 National Union conference were invited to participate. Each participant was offered a chest X-ray and was asked to complete a comprehensive questionnaire and have their blood drawn. All radiographs were assessed for the presence of pneumoconiosis in a blinded fashion by a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health-certified International Labor Office "B" reader. Individual GSTM-1 status was determined using polymerase chain reaction methods. Six hundred fifty-eight workers were studied. Of these, 80 (12.2%) had X-ray abnormalities associated with asbestos exposure. Individuals genetically deficient in GST-mu were significantly more likely to have radiographic evidence of nonmalignant asbestos-related disease than those who were not deficient (chi 2 = 5.0; P < 0.03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Copper-induced synthesis of ascorbate, glutathione and phytochelatins in the marine alga Ulva compressa (Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Mellado, Macarena; Contreras, Rodrigo A; González, Alberto; Dennett, Geraldine; Moenne, Alejandra

    2012-02-01

    In order to analyze the synthesis of antioxidant and heavy metal-chelating compounds in response to copper stress, the marine alga Ulva compressa (Chlorophyta) was exposed to 10 μM copper for 7 days and treated with inhibitors of ASC synthesis, lycorine, and GSH synthesis, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). The levels of ascorbate, in its reduced (ASC) and oxidized (DHA) forms, glutathione, in its reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) forms, and phytochelatins (PCs) were determined as well as activities of enzymes involved in ASC synthesis, L-galactose dehydrogenase (GDH) and L-galactono 1,4 lactone dehydrogenase (GLDH), and in GSH synthesis, γ-glutamylcysteine synthase (γ-GCS) and glutathione synthase (GS). The level of ASC rapidly decreased to reach a minimum at day 1 that remained low until day 7, DHA decreased until day 1 but slowly increased up to day 7 and its accumulation was inhibited by lycorine. In addition, GSH level increased to reach a maximal level at day 5 and GSSG increased up to day 7 and their accumulation was inhibited by BSO. Activities of GDH and GLDH increased until day 7 and GLDH was inhibited by lycorine. Moreover, activities of γ-GCS and GS increased until day 7 and γ-GCS was inhibited by BSO. Furthermore, PC2, PC3 and PC4, increased until day 7 and their accumulation was inhibited by BSO. Thus, copper induced the synthesis of ascorbate, glutathione and PCs in U. compressa suggesting that these compounds are involved in copper tolerance. Interestingly, U. compressa is, until now, the only ulvophyte showing ASC, GSH and PCs synthesis in response to copper excess.

  18. Trimeric microsomal glutathione transferase 2 displays one third of the sites reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shabbir; Thulasingam, Madhuranayaki; Palombo, Isolde; Daley, Daniel O; Johnson, Kenneth A; Morgenstern, Ralf; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2015-10-01

    Human microsomal glutathione transferase 2 (MGST2) is a trimeric integral membrane protein that belongs to the membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG) family. The mammalian MAPEG family consists of six members where four have been structurally determined. MGST2 activates glutathione to form a thiolate that is crucial for GSH peroxidase activity and GSH conjugation reactions with electrophilic substrates, such as 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Several studies have shown that MGST2 is able to catalyze a GSH conjugation reaction with the epoxide LTA4 forming the pro-inflammatory LTC4. Unlike its closest homologue leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S), MGST2 appears to activate its substrate GSH using only one of the three potential active sites [Ahmad S, et al. (2013) Biochemistry. 52, 1755-1764]. In order to demonstrate and detail the mechanism of one-third of the sites reactivity of MGST2, we have determined the enzyme oligomeric state, by Blue native PAGE and Differential Scanning Calorimetry, as well as the stoichiometry of substrate and substrate analog inhibitor binding to MGST2, using equilibrium dialysis and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry, respectively. Global simulations were used to fit kinetic data to determine the catalytic mechanism of MGST2 with GSH and CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) as substrates. The best fit was observed with 1/3 of the sites catalysis as compared with a simulation where all three sites were active. In contrast to LTC4S, MGST2 displays a 1/3 the sites reactivity, a mechanism shared with the more distant family member MGST1 and recently suggested also for microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1.

  19. Oral supplementation with whey proteins increases plasma glutathione levels of HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Micke, P; Beeh, K M; Schlaak, J F; Buhl, R

    2001-02-01

    HIV infection is characterized by an enhanced oxidant burden and a systemic deficiency of the tripeptide glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant. The semi-essential amino acid cysteine is the main source of the free sulfhydryl group of GSH and limits its synthesis. Therefore, different strategies to supplement cysteine supply have been suggested to increase glutathione levels in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral supplementation with two different cysteine-rich whey protein formulas on plasma GSH levels and parameters of oxidative stress and immune status in HIV-infected patients. In a prospective double blind clinical trial, 30 patients (25 male, 5 female; mean age (+/- SD) 42 +/- 9.8 years) with stable HIV infection (221 +/- 102 CD4 + lymphocytes L-1) were randomized to a supplemental diet with a daily dose of 45 g whey proteins of either Protectamin (Fresenius Kabi, Bad Hamburg, Germany) or Immunocal (Immunotec, Vandreuil, Canada) for two weeks. Plasma concentrations of total, reduced and oxidized GSH, superoxide anion (O2-) release by blood mononuclear cells, plasma levels of TNF-alpha and interleukins 2 and 12 were quantified with standard methods at baseline and after therapy. Pre-therapy, plasma GSH levels (Protectamin: 1.92 +/- 0.6 microM; Immunocal: 1.98 +/- 0.9 microM) were less than normal (2.64 +/- 0.7 microM, P = 0.03). Following two weeks of oral supplementation with whey proteins, plasma GSH levels increased in the Protectamin group by 44 +/- 56% (2.79 +/- 1.2 microM, P = 0.004) while the difference in the Immunocal group did not reach significance (+ 24.5 +/- 59%, 2.51 +/- 1.48 microM, P = 0.43). Spontaneous O2- release by blood mononuclear cells was stable (20.1 +/- 14.2 vs. 22.6 +/- 16.1 nmol h-1 10-6 cells, P = 0.52) whereas PMA-induced O2- release decreased in the Protectamin group (53.7 +/- 19 vs. 39.8 +/- 18 nmol h-1 10-6 cells, P = 0.04). Plasma concentrations of TNF-alpha and interleukins 2 and

  20. Biological evaluation of some uracil derivatives as potent glutathione reductase inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güney, Murat; Ekinci, Deniz; Ćavdar, Huseyin; Şentürk, Murat; Zilbeyaz, Kani

    2016-04-01

    Discovery of glutathione reductase (GR) inhibitors has become very popular recently due to antimalarial and anticancer activities. In this study, GR inhibitory capacities of some uracil derivatives (UDCs) (1-4) were reported. Some commercially available molecules (5-6) were also tested for comparison reasons. The novel UDCs were obtained in high yields using simple chemical procedures and exhibited much potent inhibitory activities against GR at low nanomolar concentrations with IC50 values ranging from 2.68 to 166.6 nM as compared with well-known agents.

  1. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase in subjects of Mediterranean origin. A family study.

    PubMed

    Gerli, G C; Mongiat, R; Gualandri, V; Orsini, G B; Porta, E

    1984-01-01

    Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) was assayed in subjects of Mediterranean origin and the distribution of the data obtained seems to confirm the existence of two alleles coding for low and high enzyme activity. In order to define the limits of expected genotypes less arbitrarily we studied families where parents' genotypes could allow us to define that of the children. Gene frequencies were calculated from genotype frequencies of an unrelated population and from crossings distribution by the Hardy-Weinberg equation. We observed a good agreement between gene frequencies obtained by these two different methods. PMID:6469259

  2. Role of reduced glutathione in the amelioration of nicotine-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dey, S K; Roy, S

    2010-04-01

    Nicotine, a major toxic component of cigarette smoke has been identified as a major risk factor for different diseases. This study investigates the role of reduce glutathione (GSH) against nicotine treated liver and kidney toxicity. Results showed that the application of 80 mg GSH per kg body weight per day exert protective effect against nicotine-induced liver and kidney toxicity by modulating the biochemical marker enzyme LDH, lipid peroxidation and augmenting antioxidant defense system. To our knowledge, this is the first finding of this sort. PMID:20221824

  3. Glutathion S-transferase activity and DDT-susceptibility of Malaysian mosquitos.

    PubMed

    Lee, H L; Chong, W L

    1995-03-01

    Comparative DDT-susceptibility status and glutathion s-transferase (GST) activity of Malaysian Anopheles maculatus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti was investigated to ascertain the role of this enzyme in DDT resistance. The standardised WHO dose-mortality bioassay tests were used to determine DDT susceptibility in these mosquitos, whilst GST microassay (Brogdon and Barber, 1990) was conducted to measure the activity of this enzyme in mosquito homogenate. It appeared that DDT susceptibility status of Malaysian mosquitos was not correlated with GST activity.

  4. Inhibition of the differentiation of human myeloid cell lines by redox changes induced through glutathione depletion.

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, F; Agosti, V; Morrone, G; Morra, F; Cuomo, C; Russo, T; Venuta, S; Cimino, F

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of redox changes in vivo on the differentiation of two human myeloid cell lines, HL-60 and KG-1. The glutathione-depleting agent diethyl maleate (DEM) prevented the development of differentiated features in response to phorbol esters, including adherence of the cells to plastic surfaces and repression of the myeloperoxidase and CD34 genes. Moreover, DEM abolished phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced activation of the transcription factors AP-1 and Egr-1, suggesting that inhibition of differentiation may be due, at least in part, to redox modifications of these proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7519845

  5. Reaction kinetics and targeting to cellular glutathione S-transferase of the glutathione peroxidase mimetic PhSeZnCl and its D,L-polylactide microparticle formulation.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, D; Piroddi, M; Tidei, C; Giovagnoli, S; Pietrella, D; Manevich, Y; Tew, K D; Giustarini, D; Rossi, R; Townsend, D M; Santi, C; Galli, F

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic properties and cellular effects of the glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-mimetic compound PhSeZnCl or its d,l-lactide polymer microencapsulation form (M-PhSeZnCl) were investigated and compared with the prototypical Se-organic compounds ebselen and diselenide (PhSe)2. PhSeZnCl was confirmed to catalyze the ping-pong reaction of GPx with higher Vmax than ebselen and (PhSe)2, but the catalytic efficiency calculated for the cosubstrates glutathione (GSH) and H2O2, and particularly the high reactivity against thiols (lowest KM for GSH in the series of test molecules), suggested poor biological applicability of PhSeZnCl as a GPx mimetic. Cytotoxicity of PhSeZnCl was demonstrated in various cancer cell lines via increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, depletion of intracellular thiols, and induction of apoptosis. Experiments carried out in GSH S-transferase P (GSTP)-overexpressing K562 human erythroleukemia cells and in GSTP1-1-knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated that this cytosolic enzyme represents a preferential target of the redox disturbances produced by this Se-compound with a key role in controlling H2O2 generation and the perturbation of stress/survival kinase signaling. Microencapsulation was adopted as a strategy to control the thiol reactivity and oxidative stress effects of PhSeZnCl, then assessing applications alternative to anticancer. The uptake of this "depowered" GPx-mimetic formulation, which occurred through an endocytosis-like mechanism, resulted in a marked reduction of cytotoxicity. In MCF-7 cells transfected with different allelic variants of GSTP, M-PhSeZnCl lowered the burst of cellular ROS induced by the exposure to extracellular H2O2, and the extent of this effect changed between the GSTP variants. Microencapsulation is a straightforward strategy to mitigate the toxicity of thiol-reactive Se-organic drugs that enhanced the antioxidant and cellular protective effects of PhSeZnCl. A mechanistic linkage of

  6. Thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid interconversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a possible metabolic pathway under the control of the glutathione redox cycle.

    PubMed

    Elskens, M T; Penninckx, M J

    1997-07-01

    A rapid decrease of intracellular glutathione (GSH) was observed when exponentially growing cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were treated with sublethal concentrations of either dimethyldithiocarbamic acid or thiram [bis(dimethylthiocarbamoyl) disulfide]. The underlying mechanism of this effect possibly involves the intracellular oxidation of dimethyldithiocarbamate anions to thiram, which in turn oxidizes GSH. Overall, a linear relationship was found between thiram concentrations up to 21 microM and production of oxidized GSH (GSSG). Cytochrome c can serve as the final electron acceptor for dimethyldithiocarbamate reoxidation, and it was demonstrated in vitro that NADPH handles the final electron transfer from GSSG to the fungicide by glutathione reductase. These cycling reactions induce transient alterations in the intracellular redox state of several electron carriers and interfere with the respiration of the yeast. Thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid also inactivate yeast glutathione reductase when the fungicide is present within the cells as the disulfide. Hence, whenever the GSH regeneration rate falls below its oxidation rate, the GSH:GSSG molar ratio drops from 45 to 1. Inhibition of glutathione reductase may be responsible for the saturation kinetics observed in rates of thiram elimination and uptake by the yeast. The data suggest also a leading role for the GSH redox cycle in the control of thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid fungitoxicity. Possible pathways for the handling of thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid by yeast are considered with respect to the physiological status, the GSH content, and the activity of glutathione reductase of the cells.

  7. 1,4-Naphthoquinones and Others NADPH-Dependent Glutathione Reductase-Catalyzed Redox Cyclers as Antimalarial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Belorgey, Didier; Lanfranchi, Don Antoine; Davioud-Charvet, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The homodimeric flavoenzyme glutathione reductase catalyzes NADPH-dependent glutathione disulfide reduction. This reaction is important for keeping the redox homeostasis in human cells and in the human pathogen Plasmodium falciparum. Different types of NADPH-dependent disulfide reductase inhibitors were designed in various chemical series to evaluate the impact of each inhibition mode on the propagation of the parasites. Against malaria parasites in cultures the most potent and specific effects were observed for redox-active agents acting as subversive substrates for both glutathione reductases of the Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. In their oxidized form, these redox-active compounds are reduced by NADPH-dependent flavoenzyme-catalyzed reactions in the cytosol of infected erythrocytes. In their reduced forms, these compounds can reduce molecular oxygen to reactive oxygen species, or reduce oxidants like methemoglobin, the major nutrient of the parasite, to indigestible hemoglobin. Furthermore, studies on a fluorinated suicide-substrate of the human glutathione reductase indicate that the glutathione reductase-catalyzed bioactivation of 3-benzylnaphthoquinones to the corresponding reduced 3-benzoyl metabolites is essential for the observed antimalarial activity. In conclusion, the antimalarial lead naphthoquinones are suggested to perturb the major redox equilibria of the targeted cells. These effects result in development arrest of the parasite and contribute to the removal of the parasitized erythrocytes by macrophages. PMID:23116403

  8. Effects of protein deficiency and food restriction on lung ascorbic acid and glutathione in rats exposed to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Dubick, M.A.; Heng, H.; Rucker, R.B.

    1985-08-01

    Weanling (52 +/- 4 g) or adult (259 +/- 16 g) male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed ad libitum casein-based diets containing 4 or 16% protein. A third group (food restricted) was fed daily the 16% protein diet, but at the food intake level of the 4% protein group. After 3 wk (weanling) or 5 wk (adults), half of the rats in each group were continuously exposed to 0.64 ppm ozone for 7 d. Ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione levels were then measured. In the heart and liver from weanling rats, ascorbic acid concentrations were lower in the protein-deficient group than in either control group. In the liver from weanling rats glutathione concentrations were also reduced in response to protein deficiency. Exposure to ozone produced no additional response. For adult rats the response for liver glutathione was similar to that of the weanlings. The liver ascorbate concentration, however, was consistently lower in adult rats compared to weanlings exposed to ozone. In lungs from adult rats, the ascorbic acid concentration was lower in the protein-deficient group than in either control group. On a whole-organ basis, both ascorbic acid and glutathione were usually higher in lungs from rats exposed to ozone than from those exposed to air. Interestingly, protein deficiency did not appear to compromise the lung's ability to maintain, in relative terms, the ascorbic acid or glutathione concentration in response to ozone.

  9. An Investigation of Glutathione-Platinum(II) Interactions by Means of the Flow Injection Analysis Using Glassy Carbon Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Zitka, Ondrej; Huska, Dalibor; Krizkova, Sona; Adam, Vojtech; Chavis, Grace J.; Trnkova, Libuse; Horna, Ales; Hubalek, Jaromir; Kizek, Rene

    2007-01-01

    Despite very intensive research in the synthesising of new cytostatics, cisplatin is still one of the most commonly used anticancer drugs. Therefore, an investigation of interactions of cisplatin with different biologically important amino acids, peptides and proteins is very topical. In the present paper, we utilized flow injection analysis coupled with electrochemical detection to study and characterize the behaviour of various forms of glutathione (reduced glutathione – GSH, oxidized glutathione – GSSG and S-nitroso glutathione – GSNO). The optimized conditions were as follows: mobile phase consisted of acetate buffer (pH 3) with a flow rate of 1 mL min-1. Based on results obtained we chose 850 mV as the optimal potential for detection of GSH and 1,100 mV as the optimal potential for detection of GSSG and GSNO. The detection limits of GSH, GSSG and GSNO were 100 pg mL-1, 50 ng mL-1 and 300 pg mL-1, respectively. Further, the optimized technique was used for investigation of interactions between cisplatin and GSH. We were able to observe the interaction between GSH and cisplatin via decrease in the signal corresponding to glutathione. Moreover, we evaluated the formation of the complex by spectrometry. The spectrometric results obtained were in good agreement with electrochemical ones.

  10. Thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid interconversion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a possible metabolic pathway under the control of the glutathione redox cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Elskens, M T; Penninckx, M J

    1997-01-01

    A rapid decrease of intracellular glutathione (GSH) was observed when exponentially growing cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were treated with sublethal concentrations of either dimethyldithiocarbamic acid or thiram [bis(dimethylthiocarbamoyl) disulfide]. The underlying mechanism of this effect possibly involves the intracellular oxidation of dimethyldithiocarbamate anions to thiram, which in turn oxidizes GSH. Overall, a linear relationship was found between thiram concentrations up to 21 microM and production of oxidized GSH (GSSG). Cytochrome c can serve as the final electron acceptor for dimethyldithiocarbamate reoxidation, and it was demonstrated in vitro that NADPH handles the final electron transfer from GSSG to the fungicide by glutathione reductase. These cycling reactions induce transient alterations in the intracellular redox state of several electron carriers and interfere with the respiration of the yeast. Thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid also inactivate yeast glutathione reductase when the fungicide is present within the cells as the disulfide. Hence, whenever the GSH regeneration rate falls below its oxidation rate, the GSH:GSSG molar ratio drops from 45 to 1. Inhibition of glutathione reductase may be responsible for the saturation kinetics observed in rates of thiram elimination and uptake by the yeast. The data suggest also a leading role for the GSH redox cycle in the control of thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid fungitoxicity. Possible pathways for the handling of thiram and dimethyldithiocarbamic acid by yeast are considered with respect to the physiological status, the GSH content, and the activity of glutathione reductase of the cells. PMID:9212433

  11. Optimization of glutathione production in batch and fed-batch cultures by the wild-type and recombinant strains of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha DL-1

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tripeptide glutathione (gamma-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine) is the most abundant non-protein thiol that protects cells from metabolic and oxidative stresses and is widely used as medicine, food additives and in cosmetic industry. The methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha is regarded as a rich source of glutathione due to the role of this thiol in detoxifications of key intermediates of methanol metabolism. Cellular and extracellular glutathione production of H. polymorpha DL-1 in the wild type and recombinant strains which overexpress genes of glutathione biosynthesis (GSH2) and its precursor cysteine (MET4) was studied. Results Glutathione producing capacity of H. polymorpha DL-1 depending on parameters of cultivation (dissolved oxygen tension, pH, stirrer speed), carbon substrate (glucose, methanol) and type of overexpressed genes of glutathione and its precursor biosynthesis during batch and fed-batch fermentations were studied. Under optimized conditions of glucose fed-batch cultivation, the glutathione productivity of the engineered strains was increased from ~900 up to ~ 2300 mg of Total Intracellular Glutathione (TIG) or GSH+GSSGin, per liter of culture medium. Meantime, methanol fed-batch cultivation of one of the recombinant strains allowed achieving the extracellular glutathione productivity up to 250 mg of Total Extracellular Glutathione (TEG) or GSH+GSSGex, per liter of the culture medium. Conclusions H. polymorpha is an competitive glutathione producer as compared to other known yeast and bacteria strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida utilis, Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis etc.) with good perspectives for further improvement especially for production of extracellular form of glutathione. PMID:21255454

  12. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  13. A fluorescent probe for intracellular cysteine overcoming the interference by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Tian, Minggang; Guo, Fuqiang; Sun, Yuming; Zhang, Weijia; Miao, Fang; Liu, Yong; Song, Guofen; Ho, Cheuk-Lam; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Sun, Jing Zhi; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2014-08-28

    Cysteine (Cys) plays important roles in many physiological processes of eukaryotic cells and its detection in cells is of fundamental significance. However, glutathione (GSH), homocysteine, N-acetyl-L-cysteine and other thiols greatly hamper the detection of Cys. In particular, GSH strongly interferes with the detection of cellular Cys (30–200 μM) due to its high intracellular concentration (1–10 mM). In this work, an off–on fluorescent probe (HOTA) for the detection of Cys is presented. This probe possesses both excellent sensitivity and satisfactory selectivity for cellular Cys detection: with the addition of 200 μM Cys, the fluorescence intensity of the probe (10 μM) enhanced 117-fold and the detection limit was calculated to be 13.47 μM, which is lower than the cellular Cys concentration; the probe also selectively detected 30–200 μM cysteine over 1–10 mM glutathione. Consequently, cell imaging experiments were performed with probe HOTA. Furthermore, the results of the thiol-blocking and GSH synthesis inhibiting experiments confirmed that the intracellular emission mainly originates from the interaction between Cys and HOTA.

  14. Association between herbivore stress and glutathione S-transferase expression in Pinus brutia Ten.

    PubMed

    Semiz, A; Çelik-Turgut, G; Semiz, G; Özgün, Ö; Şen, A

    2016-01-01

    Plants have developed mechanisms to defend themselves against many factors including biotic stress such as herbivores and pathogens. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) is a glutathione-dependent detoxifying enzyme and plays critical roles in stress tolerance and detoxification metabolism in plants. Pinus brutia Ten. is a prominent native forest tree species in Turkey, due to both its economic and ecological assets. One of the problems faced by P. brutia afforestation sites is the attacks by pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea wilkinsoni Tams.). In this study, we investigated the changes in activity and mRNA expression of GST in pine samples taken from both resistant and susceptible clones against T. wilkinsoni over a nine month period in a clonal seed orchard. It was found that the average cytosolic GST activities of trees in March and July were significantly higher than the values obtained in November. November was considered to be the control since trees were not under stress yet. In addition, RT-PCR results clearly showed that levels of GST transcripts in March and July samples were significantly higher as compared to the level seen in November. These findings strongly suggest that GST activity from P. brutia would be a valuable marker for exposure to herbivory stress. PMID:27064879

  15. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Reduces Oxidative Injury via Glutathione Activity in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shoulong; Yu, Kun; Wu, Qian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Baolu; Liu, Guoshi; Liu, Yixun; Lian, Zhengxing

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important sensor of Gram-negative bacteria and can trigger activation of the innate immune system. Increased activation of TLR4 can lead to the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, the pathway whereby TLR4 affects antioxidant activity was studied. In TLR4-overexpressing sheep, TLR4 expression was found to be related to the integration copy number when monocytes were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Consequently, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) was increased, which could increase the activation of prooxidative stress enzymes. Meanwhile, activation of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), was increased. Real-time PCR showed that expression of activating protein-1 (AP-1) and the antioxidative-related genes was increased. By contrast, the expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT) were reduced. In transgenic sheep, glutathione (GSH) levels were dramatically reduced. Furthermore, transgenic sheep were intradermally injected with LPS in each ear. The amounts of inflammatory infiltrates were correlated with the number of TLR4 copies that were integrated in the genome. Additionally, the translation of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) was increased. Our findings indicated that overexpression of TLR4 in sheep could ameliorate oxidative injury through GSH secretion that was induced by LPS stimulation. Furthermore, TLR4 promoted γ-GCS translation through the AP-1 pathway, which was essential for GSH synthesis. PMID:26640618

  16. Purification and characterization of a glutathione S-transferase from Mucor mucedo.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Ragaa R; Abu-Shady, Mohamed R; El-Beih, Fawkia M; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem A; Afifi, Ola M

    2005-01-01

    An intracellular glutathione transferase was purified to homogenity from the fungus, Mucor mucedo, using DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange and glutathione affinity chromatography. Gel filtration chromatography and SDS-PAGE revealed that the purified GST is a homodimer with approximate native and subunit molecular mass of 53 kDa and 23.4 kDa, respectively. The enzyme has a pI value of 4.8, a pH optimum at pH 8.0 and apparent activation energy (Ea) of 1.42 kcal mol(-1). The purified GST acts readily on CDNB with almost negligible peroxidase activity and the activity was inhibited by Cibacron Blue (IC50 0.252 microM) and hematin (IC50 3.55 microM). M. mucedo GST displayed a non-Michaelian behavior. At low (0.1-0.3 mM) and high (0.3-2 mM) substrate concentration, Km (GSH) was calculated to be 0.179 and 0.65 mM, whereas Km(CDNB) was 0.531 and 11 mM and k(cat) was 39.8 and 552 s(-1), respectively. The enzyme showed apparent pKa values of 6-6.5 and 8.0.

  17. The gut microbiota modulates host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Shoaie, Saeed; Bergentall, Mattias; Ghaffari, Pouyan; Zhang, Cheng; Larsson, Erik; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-10-16

    The gut microbiota has been proposed as an environmental factor that promotes the progression of metabolic diseases. Here, we investigated how the gut microbiota modulates the global metabolic differences in duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, liver, and two white adipose tissue depots obtained from conventionally raised (CONV-R) and germ-free (GF) mice using gene expression data and tissue-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs). We created a generic mouse metabolic reaction (MMR) GEM, reconstructed 28 tissue-specific GEMs based on proteomics data, and manually curated GEMs for small intestine, colon, liver, and adipose tissues. We used these functional models to determine the global metabolic differences between CONV-R and GF mice. Based on gene expression data, we found that the gut microbiota affects the host amino acid (AA) metabolism, which leads to modifications in glutathione metabolism. To validate our predictions, we measured the level of AAs and N-acetylated AAs in the hepatic portal vein of CONV-R and GF mice. Finally, we simulated the metabolic differences between the small intestine of the CONV-R and GF mice accounting for the content of the diet and relative gene expression differences. Our analyses revealed that the gut microbiota influences host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice.

  18. A bacterial glutathione transporter (Escherichia coli CydDC) exports reductant to the periplasm.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Marc S; Robinson, Hilary C; Poole, Robert K

    2005-09-16

    Glutathione (GSH), a major biological antioxidant, maintains redox balance in prokaryotes and eukaryotic cells and forms exportable conjugates with compounds of pharmacological and agronomic importance. However, no GSH transporter has been characterized in a prokaryote. We show here that a heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette-type transporter, CydDC, mediates GSH transport across the Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane. In everted membrane vesicles, GSH is imported via an ATP-driven, protonophore-insensitive, orthovanadate-sensitive mechanism, equating with export to the periplasm in intact cells. GSH transport and cytochrome bd quinol oxidase assembly are abolished in the cydD1 mutant. Glutathione disulfide (GSSG) was not transported in either Cyd(+) or Cyd(-) strains. Exogenous GSH restores defective swarming motility and benzylpenicillin sensitivity in a cydD mutant and also benzylpenicillin sensitivity in a gshA mutant defective in GSH synthesis. Overexpression of the cydDC operon in dsbD mutants defective in disulfide bond formation restores dithiothreitol tolerance and periplasmic cytochrome b assembly, revealing redundant pathways for reductant export to the periplasm. These results identify the first prokaryotic GSH transporter and indicate a key role for GSH in periplasmic redox homeostasis. PMID:16040611

  19. Novel substrate specificity of glutathione synthesis enzymes from Streptococcus agalactiae and Clostridium acetobutylicum

    SciTech Connect

    Kino, Kuniki . E-mail: kkino@waseda.jp; Kuratsu, Shoko; Noguchi, Atsushi; Kokubo, Masahiro; Nakazawa, Yuji; Arai, Toshinobu; Yagasaki, Makoto; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2007-01-12

    Glutathione (GSH) is synthesized by {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS) and glutathione synthetase (GS) in living organisms. Recently, bifunctional fusion protein, termed {gamma}-GCS-GS catalyzing both {gamma}-GCS and GS reactions from gram-positive firmicutes Streptococcus agalactiae, has been reported. We revealed that in the {gamma}-GCS activity, S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS had different substrate specificities from those of Escherichia coli {gamma}-GCS. Furthermore, S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS synthesized several kinds of {gamma}-glutamyltripeptide, {gamma}-Glu-X{sub aa}-Gly, from free three amino acids. In Clostridium acetobutylicum, the genes encoding {gamma}-GCS and putative GS were found to be immediately adjacent by BLAST search, and had amino acid sequence homology with S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS, respectively. We confirmed that the proteins expressed from each gene showed {gamma}-GCS and GS activity, respectively. C. acetobutylicum GS had broad substrate specificities and synthesized several kinds of {gamma}-glutamyltripeptide, {gamma}-Glu-Cys-X{sub aa}. Whereas the substrate specificities of {gamma}-GCS domain protein and GS domain protein of S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS were the same as those of S. agalactiae {gamma}-GCS-GS.

  20. Effects of beta-naphthoflavone on hepatic biotransformation and glutathione biosynthesis in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Hughes, Erin M; Gallagher, Evan P

    2004-01-01

    We are investigating the effects of in vivo exposure of prototypical enzyme inducing agents on hepatic biotransformation enzyme expression in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), a predatory game fish found throughout the United States and Canada. The current study targeted those genes involved in biotransformation and oxidative stress that may be regulated by Ah-receptor-dependent pathways. Exposure of bass to beta-naphthoflavone (beta-NF, 66 mg/kg, i.p.) elicited a 7-9-fold increase in hepatic microsomal cytochrome P4501A-dependent ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) activities, but did not affect cytosolic GST catalytic activities toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) or 5-androstene-3,17-dione (ADI). Glutathione S-transferase A (GST-A) mRNA expression exhibited a transient, but non-significant increase following exposure to beta-NF, and generally tracked the minimal changes observed in GST-CDNB activities. Expression of the mRNA encoding glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione (GSH) biosynthesis, was increased 1.7-fold by beta-NF. Changes in GCLC mRNA expression were paralleled by increases in intracellular GSH. In summary, largemouth bass hepatic CYP1A-dependent and GSH biosynthetic pathways, and to a lesser extent GST, are responsive to exposure to beta-NF.

  1. pH-dependent immobilization of urease on glutathione-capped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Garg, Seema; De, Arnab; Mozumdar, Subho

    2015-05-01

    Urease is a nickel-dependent metalloenzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form ammonia and carbon dioxide. Although the enzyme serves a significant role in several detoxification and analytical processes, its usability is restricted due to high cost, availability in small amounts, instability, and a limited possibility of economic recovery from a reaction mixture. Hence, there is a need to develop an efficient, simple, and reliable immobilization strategy for the enzyme. In this study, the carboxyl terminated surface of glutathione-capped gold nanoparticles have been utilized as a solid support for the covalent attachment of urease. The immobilization has been carried out at different pH conditions so as to elucidate its effect on the immobilization efficiency and enzyme bioactivity. The binding of the enzyme has been quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed through techniques like ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, intrinsic steady state fluorescence, and circular dichorism. The bioactivity of the immobilized enzyme was investigated with respect to the native enzyme under different thermal conditions. Recyclability and shelf life studies of the immobilized enzyme have also been carried out. Results reveal that the immobilization is most effective at pH of 7.4 followed by that in an acidic medium and is least in alkaline environment. The immobilized enzyme also exhibits enhance activity in comparison to the native form at physiological temperature. The immobilized urease (on gold glutathione nanoconjugates surface) can be effectively employed for biosensor fabrication, immunoassays and as an in vivo diagnostic tool in the future.

  2. Expression of glutathione and gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase mRNA is Jun dependent.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, K R; Meredith, M J; Kerr, L D; Soltaninassab, S R; Spitz, D R; Xu, Z Q; Freeman, M L

    1997-05-29

    The gene GLCLC encodes the catalytic subunit of gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase (glutamate-cysteine ligase E.C. 6.3.2.2), the rate limiting enzyme for glutathione synthesis. When HepG2 cells were exposed to the serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OA), increased expression of GLCLC was observed, as was the development of resistance to xenobiotic induced GSH depletion. Okadaic acid is known to activate both NF-kappaB and AP-1 activity. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activity by overexpression of an IkappaB alpha transdominant inhibitor or exposure to the protease inhibitor TLCK did not inhibit the OA mediated increase in GLCLC transcripts. Fibroblasts derived from a mouse containing a c-Jun null mutation exhibited diminished AP-1 binding activity, reduced levels of GLCLC message, and a correspondingly low GSH concentration compared to wild type cells. When the null cells, which express Jun B and Jun D, were exposed to OA, AP-1 binding activity increased, as did expression of GLCLC message. These results indicate that AP-1 transcription factors participate in the regulation of glutathione metabolism.

  3. Brain-targeted delivery of docetaxel by glutathione-coated nanoparticles for brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Grover, Aditya; Hirani, Anjali; Pathak, Yashwant; Sutariya, Vijaykumar

    2014-12-01

    Gliomas are some of the most aggressive types of cancers but the blood-brain barrier acts as an obstacle to therapeutic intervention in brain-related diseases. The blood-brain barrier blocks the permeation of potentially toxic compounds into neural tissue through the interactions of brain endothelial cells with glial cells (astrocytes and pericytes) which induce the formation of tight junctions in endothelial cells lining the blood capillaries. In the present study, we characterize a glutathione-coated docetaxel-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticle, show its in vitro drug release data along with cytotoxicity data in C6 and RG2 cells, and investigate its trans-blood-brain barrier permeation through the establishment of a Transwell cellular co-culture. We show that the docetaxel-loaded nanoparticle's size enables its trans-blood-brain barrier permeation; the nanoparticle exhibits a steady, sustained release of docetaxel; the drug is able to induce cell death in glioma models; and the glutathione-coated nanoparticle is able to permeate through the Transwell in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

  4. Identification of Glutathione S-Transferase Pi as a Protein Involved in Parkinson Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Min; Bradner, Joshua; Bammler, Theo K.; Eaton, David L.; Zhang, JianPeng; Ye, ZuCheng; Wilson, Angela M.; Montine, Thomas J.; Pan, Catherine; Zhang, Jing

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) typically affects the cortical regions during the later stages of disease, with neuronal loss, gliosis, and formation of diffuse cortical Lewy bodies in a significant portion of patients with dementia. To identify novel proteins involved in PD progression, we prepared synaptosomal fractions from the frontal cortices of pathologically verified PD patients at different stages along with age-matched controls. Protein expression profiles were compared using a robust quantitative proteomic technique. Approximately 100 proteins displayed significant differences in their relative abundances between PD patients at various stages and controls; three of these proteins were validated using independent techniques. One of the confirmed proteins, glutathione S-transferase Pi, was further investigated in cellular models of PD, demonstrating that its level was intimately associated with several critical cellular processes that are directly related to neurodegeneration in PD. These results have, for the first time, suggested that the levels of glutathione S-transferase Pi may play an important role in modulating the progression of PD. PMID:19498008

  5. Glutathione conjugation of busulfan produces a hydroxyl radical-trapping dehydroalanine metabolite.

    PubMed

    Peer, Cody J; Younis, Islam R; Leonard, Stephen S; Gannett, Peter M; Minarchick, Valerie C; Kenyon, Allison J; Rojanasakul, Yon; Callery, Patrick S

    2012-12-01

    The Phase 2 drug metabolism of busulfan yields a glutathione conjugate that undergoes a β-elimination reaction. The elimination product is an electrophilic metabolite that is a dehydroalanine-containing tripeptide, γ-glutamyldehydroalanylglycine (EdAG). In the process, glutathione lacks thiol-related redox properties and gains a radical scavenging dehydroalanine group. EdAG scavenged hydroxyl radical generated in the Fenton reaction in a concentration-dependent manner was monitored by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The apparent rate of hydroxyl radical scavenging was in the same range as published values for known antioxidants, including N-acyl dehydroalanines. A captodatively stabilized carbon-centered radical intermediate was spin trapped in the reaction of EdAG with hydroxyl radical. The proposed structure of a stable product in the Fenton reaction with EdAG was consistent with that of a γ-glutamylserylglycyl dimer. Observation of the hydroxyl trapping properties of EdAG suggests that the busulfan metabolite EdAG may contribute to or mitigate redox-related cytotoxicity associated with the therapeutic use of busulfan, and reaffirms indicators that support a role in free radical biology for dehydroalanine-containing peptides and proteins.

  6. Miners compensated for pneumoconiosis and glutathione s-transferases M1 and T1 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anna; Ebbinghaus, Rainer; Prager, Hans-Martin; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of quartz-containing dust produces reversible inflammatory changes in lungs resulting in irreversible fibrotic changes termed pneumoconiosis. Due to the inflammatory process in the lungs, highly reactive substances are released that may be detoxified by glutathione S-transferases. Therefore, 90 hard coal miners with pneumoconiosis as a recognized occupational disease (in Germany: Berufskrankheit BK 4101) were genotyped for glutathione S-transferases M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1) according to standard methods. Furthermore, occupational exposure and smoking habits were assessed by questionnaire. Changes in a chest x-ray were classified according to ILO classification 2000. Of the investigated hard coal miners 43% were GSTM1 negative whereas 57% were GSTM1 positive. The arithmetic mean of the age at time of investigation was 74.2 yr (range: 42-87 yr). Seventy-four percent of the hard coal miners reported being ever smokers, while 26% denied smoking. All hard coal miners provided pneumoconiosis-related changes in the chest x-ray. The observed frequency of GSTM1 negative hard coal miners was not different from frequencies reported for general Caucasian populations and in agreement with findings reported for Chinese coal miners. In contrast, in a former study, 16 of 19 German hard coal miners (84%) with urinary bladder cancer displayed a GSTM1 negative genotype. The outcome of this study provides evidence that severely occupationally exposed Caucasian hard coal miners do not present an elevated level of GSTM1 negative individuals. PMID:22686319

  7. Systematic analysis of reactivities and fragmentation of glutathione and its isomer GluCysGly.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shan; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dong; Gong, Yiyi; Wang, Qingtao; Deng, Haiteng

    2014-09-18

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant tripeptide in human cells and plays an important role in protecting cells' integrity against oxidative stress. GSH has an unusual amide linkage formed between the γ-carboxylic group of the glutamic acid in its side-chain and the amine group of cysteine residue. In the present study, we have compared reactivities of GSH to its isomer GluCysGly (ECG), which has a regular amide bond formed between the α-carboxylic group of glutamic acid and the amine group of cysteine residue. The fragmentation pattern of GSH ions in the gas phase is different from that of ECG ions, showing that the loss of H2O is the major dissociation pathway in ECG fragmentation. This is consistent with the dissociation pathway predicted by density functional calculation. Formation of GSSG from oxidation of GSH is faster than that of ECG disulfide, and the gas phase fragmentation pattern of GSSG is different from that of ECG disulfide. GSH and ECG display similar rates in nucleophilic aromatic substitution when reacting with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). However, in the presence of glutathione S-transferases (GST), substitution of CDNB by GSH is 10 times faster than that by ECG. GSH and ECG also show differences in clustering patterns in the gas phase. Taken together, our results shed light on understanding effects of unique boding structure in GSH on its stability and reactivities.

  8. Structural and thermodynamic properties of kappa class glutathione transferase from Camelus dromedarius.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Fouad, Dalia; Labrou, Nikolaos E; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman M; Ismael, Mohamed A; Saeed, Hesham M; Ataya, Farid S

    2016-07-01

    The Arabian camel, Camelus dromedarius is naturally adapted to extreme desert climate and has evolved protective mechanisms to limit oxidative stress. The mitochondrial kappa class glutathione transferase enzyme is a member of GST supergene family that represents an important enzyme group in cellular Phase II detoxification machinery and is involved in the protection against oxidative stress and xenobiotics. In the present study, C. dromedarius kappa class glutathione transferase (CdGSTK1-1) was cloned, expressed in E. coli BL21, purified and its structural, thermodynamic and unfolding pathway was investigated. The results showed that CdGSTK1-1 has unique trimeric structure, exhibits low thermostability and a complex equilibrium unfolding profile. It unfolds through three folding states with formation of thinly populated intermediate species. The melting points (Tm) of the first unfolding transition was 40.3±0.2°C and Tm of the second unfolding transition was 49.1±0.1°C. The van't Hoff enthalpy of the first and second transition were 298.7±13.2 and 616.5±2.4kJ/mol, respectively. Moreover, intrinsic fluorescence and near-UV CD studies indicates that substrate binding does not leads to major conformational changes in CdGSTK1-1. PMID:27044344

  9. Glutathione-dependent extracellular ferric reductase activities in dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zarnowski, Robert; Woods, Jon P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, extracellular glutathione-dependent ferric reductase (GSH-FeR) activities in different dimorphic zoopathogenic fungal species were characterized. Supernatants from Blastomyces dermatitidis, Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Sporothrix schenckii strains grown in their yeast form were able to reduce iron enzymically with glutathione as a cofactor. Some variations in the level of reduction were noted amongst the strains. This activity was stable in acidic, neutral and slightly alkaline environments and was inhibited when trivalent aluminium and gallium ions were present. Using zymography, single bands of GSH-FeRs with apparent molecular masses varying from 430 to 460 kDa were identified in all strains. The same molecular mass range was determined by size exclusion chromatography. These data demonstrate that dimorphic zoopathogenic fungi produce and secrete a family of similar GSH-FeRs that may be involved in the acquisition and utilization of iron. Siderophore production by these and other fungi has sometimes been considered to provide a full explanation of iron acquisition in these organisms. Our work reveals an additional common mechanism that may be biologically and pathogenically important. Furthermore, while some characteristics of these enzymes such as extracellular location, cofactor utilization and large size are not individually unique, when considered together and shared across a range of fungi, they represent an important novel physiological feature. PMID:16000713

  10. Glutathione and GSH-dependent enzymes in patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Czeczot, Hanna; Scibior, Dorota; Skrzycki, Michał; Podsiad, Małgorzata

    2006-01-01

    We investigated glutathione level, activities of selenium independent GSH peroxidase, selenium dependent GSH peroxidase, GSH S-transferase, GSH reductase and the rate of lipid peroxidation expressed as the level of malondialdehyde in liver tissues obtained from patients diagnosed with cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. GSH level was found to be lower in malignant tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues and it was higher in cancer than in cirrhotic tissue. Non-Se-GSH-Px activity was lower in cancer tissue compared with adjacent normal liver or cirrhotic tissue, while Se-GSH-Px activity in cancer was found to be similar to its activity in cirrhotic tissue and lower compared to control tissue. An increase in GST activity was observed in cirrhotic tissue compared with cancer tissue, whereas the GST activity in cancer was lower than in adjacent normal tissue. The activity of GSH-R was similar in cirrhotic and cancer tissues, but higher in cancer tissue compared to control liver tissue. An increased level of MDA was found in cancer tissue in comparison with control tissue, besides its level was higher in cancer tissue than in cirrhotic tissue. Our results show that the antioxidant system of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma is severely impaired. This is associated with changes of glutathione level and activities of GSH-dependent enzymes in liver tissue. GSH and enzymes cooperating with it are important factors in the process of liver diseases development.

  11. Endogenous salicylic acid is required for promoting cadmium tolerance of Arabidopsis by modulating glutathione metabolisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Liu, Chen; Li, Hua; Yi, Keke; Ding, Nengfei; Li, Ningyu; Lin, Yicheng; Fu, Qinglin

    2016-10-01

    A few studies with NahG transgenic lines of Arabidopsis show that depletion of SA enhances cadmium (Cd) tolerance. However, it remains some uncertainties that the defence signaling may be a result of catechol accumulation in NahG transgenic lines but not SA deficiency. Here, we conducted a set of hydroponic assays with another SA-deficient mutant sid2 to examine the endogenous roles of SA in Cd tolerance, especially focusing on the glutathione (GSH) cycling. Our results showed that reduced SA resulted in negative effects on Cd tolerance, including decreased Fe uptake and chlorophyll concentration, aggravation of oxidative damage and growth inhibition. Cd exposure significantly increased SA concentration in wild-type leaves, but did not affect it in sid2 mutants. Depletion of SA did not disturb the Cd uptake in either roots or shoots. The reduced Cd tolerance in sid2 mutants is due to the lowered GSH status, which is associated with the decreased expression of serine acetyltransferase along with a decline in contents of non-protein thiols, phytochelatins, and the lowered transcription and activities of glutathione reductase1 (GR1) which reduced GSH regeneration. Finally, the possible mode of SA signaling through the GR/GSH pathway during Cd exposure is discussed. PMID:27209521

  12. THE EFFECT OF X-RADIATION ON THE GLUTATHIONE METABOLISM OF INTACT ERYTHROCYTES IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Klebanoff, S. J.

    1958-01-01

    The x-irradiation of intact washed erythrocytes results in an inhibition of the glyoxalase activity of the cells chiefly as a result of a decrease in the reduced glutathione level. The percentage inhibition is markedly increased by an increase in the dilution of the cells in physiological saline suggesting that the effect of radiation is indirect, via the production in the aqueous medium of free radicals, H2O2, etc. This is supported by the decrease in the inhibition produced by lowering the oxygen tension or by the addition of catalase. The inhibition of glyoxalase activity is also decreased by the addition of methylglyoxal, plasma, adenosine, inosine, glucose, and a number of other sugars to the erythrocyte suspension prior to radiation. Furthermore, some reactivation of the glyoxalase system results from the addition of plasma, glucose, adenosine, and inosine following radiation. These results are discussed in relation to the role of SH compounds, particularly glutathione, in the toxicity of ionizing radiations. PMID:13514007

  13. Functional Diversification of Fungal Glutathione Transferases from the Ure2p Class

    PubMed Central

    Thuillier, Anne; Ngadin, Andrew A.; Thion, Cécile; Billard, Patrick; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Gelhaye, Eric; Morel, Mélanie

    2011-01-01

    The glutathione-S-transferase (GST) proteins represent an extended family involved in detoxification processes. They are divided into various classes with high diversity in various organisms. The Ure2p class is especially expanded in saprophytic fungi compared to other fungi. This class is subdivided into two subclasses named Ure2pA and Ure2pB, which have rapidly diversified among fungal phyla. We have focused our analysis on Basidiomycetes and used Phanerochaete chrysosporium as a model to correlate the sequence diversity with the functional diversity of these glutathione transferases. The results show that among the nine isoforms found in P. chrysosporium, two belonging to Ure2pA subclass are exclusively expressed at the transcriptional level in presence of polycyclic aromatic compounds. Moreover, we have highlighted differential catalytic activities and substrate specificities between Ure2pA and Ure2pB isoforms. This diversity of sequence and function suggests that fungal Ure2p sequences have evolved rapidly in response to environmental constraints. PMID:22164343

  14. Glutathione peroxidase potentiates the inhibition of platelet function by S-nitrosothiols.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, J E; Frei, B; Welch, G N; Loscalzo, J

    1995-01-01

    GSH peroxidase (Px) catalyzes the reduction of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH), known metabolic products of platelets and vascular cells. Because interactions between these cells are modulated by nitric oxide (NO) and LOOH inactivate NO, we investigated the effect of GSH-Px on the inhibition of platelet function by the naturally occurring S-nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-glutathione (SNO-Glu). Concentrations of SNO-Glu that alone did not inhibit platelet function (subthreshold inhibitory concentrations) were added to platelet-rich plasma together with GSH-Px (0.2-20 U/ml); this led to a dose-dependent inhibition of platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.6 U/ml GSH-Px. In the presence of subthreshold inhibitory concentrations of SNO-Glu, the LOOH, 5-hydroperoxy-6,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid, increased platelet aggregation, an effect reversed by GSH-Px. Glutathione and SNO-Glu were equally effective as cosubstrates for GSH-Px. Incubation of SNO-Glu with GSH-Px for 1 min led to a 48.5% decrease in the concentration of SNO-Glu. Incubation of SNO-Glu with serum albumin led to the formation of S-nitroso-albumin, an effect enhanced by GSH-Px. These observations suggest that GSH-Px has two functions: reduction of LOOH, thereby preventing inactivation of NO, and metabolism of SNO-Glu, thereby liberating NO and/or supporting further transnitrosation reactions. PMID:7615810

  15. Glutathione S-transferases of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica have unusually large molecular mass.

    PubMed Central

    Foley, V; Sheehan, D

    1998-01-01

    Two similar glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), which do not bind to glutathione- or S-hexylglutathione-agarose affinity resins, have been purified from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. An approx. 400-fold purification was obtained by a combination of DEAE-Sephadex, phenyl-Sepharose, hydroxyapatite and Mono-Q anion-exchange chromatography. The native molecular mass of both proteins was estimated as approx. 110 kDa by both Superose-12 gel-filtration chromatography and non-denaturing electrophoresis. SDS/PAGE indicated a subunit mass of 50 kDa. Reverse-phase HPLC of purified proteins gave a single, well-resolved, peak, suggesting that the proteins are homodimers. Identical behaviour on HPLC, native electrophoresis and SDS/PAGE, N-terminal sequencing, sensitivity to a panel of inhibitors and identical specific activities with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrate suggest that the two isoenzymes are very similar. The enzymes do not immunoblot with antisera to any of the main GST classes, and N-terminal sequencing suggests no clear relationship with previously characterized enzymes, such as that of the fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium [Dowd, Buckley and Sheehan (1997) Biochem. J. 324, 243-248]. It is possible that the two isoenzymes arise as a result of post-translational modification of a single GST isoenzyme. PMID:9677348

  16. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Reduces Oxidative Injury via Glutathione Activity in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shoulong; Yu, Kun; Wu, Qian; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Baolu; Liu, Guoshi; Liu, Yixun; Lian, Zhengxing

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is an important sensor of Gram-negative bacteria and can trigger activation of the innate immune system. Increased activation of TLR4 can lead to the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, the pathway whereby TLR4 affects antioxidant activity was studied. In TLR4-overexpressing sheep, TLR4 expression was found to be related to the integration copy number when monocytes were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Consequently, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) was increased, which could increase the activation of prooxidative stress enzymes. Meanwhile, activation of an antioxidative enzyme, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), was increased. Real-time PCR showed that expression of activating protein-1 (AP-1) and the antioxidative-related genes was increased. By contrast, the expression levels of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT) were reduced. In transgenic sheep, glutathione (GSH) levels were dramatically reduced. Furthermore, transgenic sheep were intradermally injected with LPS in each ear. The amounts of inflammatory infiltrates were correlated with the number of TLR4 copies that were integrated in the genome. Additionally, the translation of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) was increased. Our findings indicated that overexpression of TLR4 in sheep could ameliorate oxidative injury through GSH secretion that was induced by LPS stimulation. Furthermore, TLR4 promoted γ-GCS translation through the AP-1 pathway, which was essential for GSH synthesis. PMID:26640618

  17. Similarities between N-Acetylcysteine and Glutathione in Binding to Lead(II) Ions.

    PubMed

    Sisombath, Natalie S; Jalilehvand, Farideh

    2015-12-21

    N-Acetylcysteine is a natural thiol-containing antioxidant, a precursor for cysteine and glutathione, and a potential detoxifying agent for heavy metal ions. However, previous accounts of the efficiency of N-acetylcysteine (H2NAC) in excretion of lead are few and contradicting. Here, we report results on the nature of lead(II) complexes formed with N-acetylcysteine in aqueous solution, which were obtained by combining information from several spectroscopic methods, including (207)Pb, (13)C, and (1)H NMR, Pb LIII-edge X-ray absorption, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, and electro-spray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Two series of solutions were used containing CPb(II) = 10 and 100 mM, respectively, varying the H2NAC/Pb(II) mole ratios from 2.1 to 10.0 at pH 9.1-9.4. The coordination environments obtained resemble those previously found for the Pb(II) glutathione system: at a ligand-to-lead mole ratio of 2.1, dimeric or oligomeric Pb(II) N-acetylcysteine complexes are formed, while a trithiolate [Pb(NAC)3](4-) complex dominates in solutions with H2NAC/Pb(II) mole ratios >3.0. PMID:26624959

  18. Predicted binding of certain antifilarial compounds with glutathione-S-transferase of human Filariids

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Mohd; Baig, Mohd Hassan; Bajpai, Preeti; Srivastava, Ashwini Kumar; Ahmad, Khurshid; Mustafa, Huma

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferase is a major phase-II detoxification enzyme in parasitic helminthes. Previous research highlights the importance of GSTs in the establishment of chronic infections in cytotoxic microenvironments. Filarial nematodes depend on these detoxification enzymes for their survival in the host. GST plays an important role in filariasis and other diseases. GST from W.bancrofti and B.malayi are very much different from human GST. This structural difference makes GST potential chemotherapeutic targets for antifilarial treatment. In this study we have checked the efficacy of some well known antifilarial compounds against GST from B.malayi and W.bancrofti. The structure of BmGST was modeled using modeller9v10 and was submitted to PMDB. Molecular docking study reveals arbindazole to be the most potent compounds against GST from both the filarial parasites. Role of some residues playing important role in the binding of compounds within the active site of GST has also been revealed in the present study. The BmGST and WbGST structural information and docking studies could aid in screening new antifilarials or selective inhibitors for chemotherapy against filariasis. Abbreviations GST - Glutathione-S-transferase, Bm - Brugia malayi, Wb - Wuchereria bancrofti. PMID:23516334

  19. Enhanced Neuroprotective Effects of Coadministration of Tetrandrine with Glutathione in Preclinical Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang-Yun; Mei, Guang-Hai; Dong, Qiang; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhuang-Li; Su, Jing-Jing; Tang, Yu-Ping; Jin, Xue-Hong; Zhou, Hou-Guang; Huang, Yan-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. In this study we examined the influence of tetrandrine (Tet) on the neuroprotective effects of glutathione (GSH) in the 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA-) lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Levels in the redox system, dopamine (DA) metabolism, dopaminergic neuronal survival, and apoptosis of the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum, as well as the rotational behavior of animals were examined after a 50-day administration of GSH + Tet (or GSH) and/or L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) to PD rats. Ethics Committee of Huashan Hospital, Fudan University approved the protocol (number SYXK2009-0082). Results. Administration of GSH or Tet alone did not show any significant effects on the factors evaluated in the PD rats. However, in the GSH + Tet group, we observed markedly decreased oxidative damage, inhibition of DA metabolism and enhanced DA synthesis, increased tyrosine hydroxylase- (TH-) immunopositive neuronal survival, and delayed apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in the SN. Animal rotational behavior was improved in the GSH + Tet group. Additionally, coadministration of GSH + Tet appeared to offset the possible oxidative neurotoxicity induced by L-dopa. Conclusion. In this study, we demonstrated that tetrandrine allowed occurrence of the neuroprotective effect of glutathione probably due to inhibition of P-glycoprotein on 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat models of Parkinson's disease, including rats undergoing long-term L-dopa treatment. PMID:26664824

  20. Enhanced Neuroprotective Effects of Coadministration of Tetrandrine with Glutathione in Preclinical Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang-Yun; Mei, Guang-Hai; Dong, Qiang; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Zhuang-Li; Su, Jing-Jing; Tang, Yu-Ping; Jin, Xue-Hong; Zhou, Hou-Guang; Huang, Yan-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Aim. In this study we examined the influence of tetrandrine (Tet) on the neuroprotective effects of glutathione (GSH) in the 6-hydroxydopamine- (6-OHDA-) lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods. Levels in the redox system, dopamine (DA) metabolism, dopaminergic neuronal survival, and apoptosis of the substantia nigra (SN) and striatum, as well as the rotational behavior of animals were examined after a 50-day administration of GSH + Tet (or GSH) and/or L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) to PD rats. Ethics Committee of Huashan Hospital, Fudan University approved the protocol (number SYXK2009-0082). Results. Administration of GSH or Tet alone did not show any significant effects on the factors evaluated in the PD rats. However, in the GSH + Tet group, we observed markedly decreased oxidative damage, inhibition of DA metabolism and enhanced DA synthesis, increased tyrosine hydroxylase- (TH-) immunopositive neuronal survival, and delayed apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in the SN. Animal rotational behavior was improved in the GSH + Tet group. Additionally, coadministration of GSH + Tet appeared to offset the possible oxidative neurotoxicity induced by L-dopa. Conclusion. In this study, we demonstrated that tetrandrine allowed occurrence of the neuroprotective effect of glutathione probably due to inhibition of P-glycoprotein on 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat models of Parkinson's disease, including rats undergoing long-term L-dopa treatment. PMID:26664824

  1. Corneal aldehyde dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase activity after excimer laser keratectomy in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Bilgihan, K.; Bilgihan, A.; Turkozkan, N.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The free radical balance of the eye may be changed by excimer laser keratectomy. Previous studies have demonstrated that excimer laser keratectomy increases the corneal temperature, decreases the superoxide dismutase activity of the aqueous, and induces lipid peroxidation in the superficial corneal stroma. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) are known to play an important role in corneal metabolism, particularly in detoxification of aldehydes, which are generated from free radical reactions.
METHODS—In three groups of guinea pigs mechanical corneal de-epithelialisation was performed in group I, superficial corneal photoablation in group II, and deep corneal photoablation in group III, and the corneal ALDH and GST activities measured after 48 hours.
RESULTS—The mean ALDH and GST activities of group I and II showed no differences compared with the controls (p>0.05). The corneal ALDH activities were found to be significantly decreased (p<0.05) and GST activities increased (p<0.05) in group III.
CONCLUSION—These results suggest that excimer laser treatment of high myopia may change the ALDH and GST activities, metabolism, and free radical balance of the cornea.

 Keywords: excimer laser keratectomy; aldehyde dehydrogenase; glutathione S-transferase PMID:9602629

  2. Effect of cadmium and calcium treatments on phytochelatin and glutathione levels in citrus plants.

    PubMed

    López-Climent, M F; Arbona, V; Pérez-Clemente, R M; Zandalinas, S I; Gómez-Cadenas, A

    2014-01-01

    Industry residues, phosphate fertilisers and wastewater as a source of irrigation have considerably increased levels of heavy metals in the soil, mainly cadmium (Cd(2+)). To test the effects of a calcium (Ca(2+)) treatment on Cd(2+) accumulation and plant tolerance to this heavy metal, plants of two citrus genotypes, Cleopatra mandarin (CM) and Carrizo citrange (CC), were watered with increasing concentrations of Cd(2+), and phytochelatin (PC) and glutathione (GSH) content were measured. Both genotypes were able to synthesise PCs in response to heavy metal intoxication, although CM seems to be a better Cd(2+) excluder than CC. However, data indicate that CC plants had a higher capacity for regenerating GSH than CM plants. In this context, the effects of Ca(2+) treatment on Cd(2+) accumulation, plant survival and PC, GSH and oxidised glutathione (GSSG) content were assessed. Data indicate that treatment with Ca(2+) had two positive effects on citrus physiology: it reduced Cd(+2) uptake into roots and also increased GSH content (even in the absence of Cd(2+)). Overall, the data indicate that although Cd(2+) exclusion is a powerful mechanism to avoid heavy metal build-up into photosynthetic organs, the capacity to maintain optimum GSH levels to feed PC biosynthesis could also be an important factor in stress tolerance.

  3. Catalytic and structural diversity of the fluazifop-inducible glutathione transferases from Phaseolus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Chronopoulou, Evangelia; Madesis, Panagiotis; Asimakopoulou, Basiliki; Platis, Dimitrios; Tsaftaris, Athanasios; Labrou, Nikolaos E

    2012-06-01

    Plant glutathione transferases (GSTs) comprise a large family of inducible enzymes that play important roles in stress tolerance and herbicide detoxification. Treatment of Phaseolus vulgaris leaves with the aryloxyphenoxypropionic herbicide fluazifop-p-butyl resulted in induction of GST activities. Three inducible GST isoenzymes were identified and separated by affinity chromatography. Their full-length cDNAs with complete open reading frame were isolated using RACE-RT and information from N-terminal amino acid sequences. Analysis of the cDNA clones showed that the deduced amino acid sequences share high homology with GSTs that belong to phi and tau classes. The three isoenzymes were expressed in E. coli and their substrate specificity was determined towards 20 different substrates. The results showed that the fluazifop-inducible glutathione transferases from P. vulgaris (PvGSTs) catalyze a broad range of reactions and exhibit quite varied substrate specificity. Molecular modeling and structural analysis was used to identify key structural characteristics and to provide insights into the substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes. These results provide new insights into catalytic and structural diversity of GSTs and the detoxifying mechanism used by P. vulgaris.

  4. Selective inhibitors of glutathione transferase P1 with trioxane structure as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, Maria; Teusch, Nicole; Schenk, Tobias; Sheikh, Miriam; Aricioglu, Rocky Z; Borowski, Swantje H; Neudörfl, Jörg-Martin; Baumann, Ulrich; Griesbeck, Axel G; Pietsch, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The response to chemotherapy in cancer patients is frequently compromised by drug resistance. Although chemoresistance is a multifactorial phenomenon, many studies have demonstrated that altered drug metabolism through the expression of phase II conjugating enzymes, including glutathione transferases (GSTs), in tumor cells can be directly correlated with resistance against a wide range of marketed anticancer drugs. In particular, overexpression of glutathione transferase P1 (GSTP1) appears to be a factor for poor prognosis during cancer therapy. Former and ongoing clinical trials have confirmed GSTP1 inhibition as a principle for antitumor therapy. A new series of 1,2,4-trioxane GSTP1 inhibitors were designed via a type II photooxygenation route of allylic alcohols followed by acid-catalyzed peroxyacetalization with aldehydes. A set of novel inhibitors exhibit low micromolar to high nanomolar inhibition of GSTP1, revealing preliminary SAR for further lead optimization. Importantly, high selectivity over another two human GST classes (GSTA1 and GSTM2) has been achieved. The trioxane GSTP1 inhibitors may therefore serve as a basis for the development of novel drug candidates in overcoming chemoresistance.

  5. Structural insights into the dehydroascorbate reductase activity of human omega-class glutathione transferases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Huina; Brock, Joseph; Liu, Dan; Board, Philip G; Oakley, Aaron J

    2012-07-13

    The reduction of dehydroascorbate (DHA) to ascorbic acid (AA) is a vital cellular function. The omega-class glutathione transferases (GSTs) catalyze several reductive reactions in cellular biochemistry, including DHA reduction. In humans, two isozymes (GSTO1-1 and GSTO2-2) with significant DHA reductase (DHAR) activity are found, sharing 64% sequence identity. While the activity of GSTO2-2 is higher, it is significantly more unstable in vitro. We report the first crystal structures of human GSTO2-2, stabilized through site-directed mutagenesis and determined at 1.9 Å resolution in the presence and absence of glutathione (GSH). The structure of a human GSTO1-1 has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution in complex with the reaction product AA, which unexpectedly binds in the G-site, where the glutamyl moiety of GSH binds. The structure suggests a similar mode of ascorbate binding in GSTO2-2. This is the first time that a non-GSH-based reaction product has been observed in the G-site of any GST. AA stacks against a conserved aromatic residue, F34 (equivalent to Y34 in GSTO2-2). Mutation of Y34 to alanine in GSTO2-2 eliminates DHAR activity. From these structures and other biochemical data, we propose a mechanism of substrate binding and catalysis of DHAR activity.

  6. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction studies of glutathione S-transferase from Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Motohiko; Harada, Shigeharu; Satow, Yoshinori; Inoue, Hideshi; Takahashi, Kenji

    1996-10-01

    Crystals of glutathione S-transferase from Escherichia coli have been obtained by use of polyethylene glycol 6000 as a precipitant. The crystallization was performed in the presence of a glutathione sulfonate inhibitor under the acidic condition, with combination of the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion and the macro-seeding procedures. The crystals are of a thin-plate shape with typical sizes of 1.0 × 0.5 × 0.1 mm, and are stable against X-ray irradiation. They belong to the space group P2 12 12 1 with cell parameters of a = 90.47 Å, b = 93.87 Å and c = 51.10 Å, and diffract X-rays at least up to 2.3 Å resolution. The solvent content is 48% in volume, when a homodimeric molecule of the enzyme is assumed to occupy an asymmetric unit of the crystal. The crystals are suitable for three-dimensional structural studies. Diffraction data of the native crystal have been collected.

  7. NEW STRATEGIES FOR THE ISOLATION AND ACTIVITY DETERMINATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING TYPE-4 GLUTATHIONE PEROXIDASE

    PubMed Central

    Kernstock, Robert M.; Girotti, Albert W.

    2008-01-01

    Type 4 glutathione peroxidase (GPx4) is a widely expressed mammalian selenoenzyme known to play a vital role in cytoprotection against lipid hydroperoxide (LOOH)-mediated oxidative stress and regulation of oxidative signaling cascades. Since prokaryotes are not equipped to express mammalian selenoproteins, preparation of recombinant GPx4 via commonly used bacterial transformation is not feasible. A published procedure for isolating the enzyme from rat testis employs affinity chromatography on bromosulfophthalein-glutathione-linked agarose as the penultimate step in purification. Since this resin is no longer commercially available and preparing it in satisfactory operational form is tedious, we have developed an alternative purification approach based on sequential anion exchange, size exclusion, and cation exchange chromatography. Final preparations were found to be essentially homogeneous in GPx4 (Mr ∼20 kDa), as demonstrated by SDS-PAGE with protein staining and immunoblotting. Specific enzymatic activity was determined using a novel thin layer chromatographic approach in which the kinetics of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide loss or cholesterol-7α-hydroperoxide loss were monitored. A >400-fold purification of active enzyme has been attained. The relatively straightforward isolation procedure described should prove valuable for further functional studies on GPx4, e.g. how its ability to catalyze LOOH reduction compares with that of other LOOH detoxifying enzymes. PMID:18723092

  8. [Effects of exogenous NO on ascorbate-glutathione cycle in loquat leaves under low temperature stress].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Cheng; Chen, Jian-Qin; Liang, Jie; Yang, Wei-Bo; Wu, Jing-Jing; Chen, Li-Qin; Liu, Mei-Qiong; Chen, Li-Ping

    2009-06-01

    Three-year-old 'Zaozhong No. 6' loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl.) seedlings were foliar-sprayed with 0.2, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mmol x L(-1) of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), subjected to low temperature (-3 degrees) stress for 6 hours, and then cultured at 25 degrees C for four days. The antioxidant metabolites and enzymes in the seedling leaves were determined 0, 1, and 4 days after recovery. Comparing with the control (water spraying), all SNP treatments had a decreased H2O2 content but an increased content of glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AsA) and increased activity of ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDAR) in the seedling leaves. Four days after recovery, the H2O2 content in the seedling leaves treated with 0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP decreased by 75.53%, while the GSH and AsA contents and the APX, GR, DHAR and MDAR activities were increased by 29.12%, 23.40%, 50.0%, 44.4%, 49.53%, and 62.68%, respectively. All of these suggested that appropriate dosage of exogenous NO could enhance the activity of antioxidant system in loquat leaves and alleviated the cell injury of loquat leaves under low temperature stress. In this study, the appropriate dosage of NO was 0.5 mmol x L(-1) of SNP.

  9. Preferential regeneration of thioredoxin from parasitic flatworm Fasciola gigantica using glutathione system.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ankita; Pandey, Tripti; Kumar, Bijay; Tripathi, Timir

    2015-11-01

    The maintenance of cellular redox homeostasis is a crucial adaptive problem faced by parasites, and its disruption can shift the biochemical balance toward the host. The thioredoxin (Trx) system plays a key role in redox metabolism and defense against oxidative stress. In this study, biochemical experiments were performed on Fasciola gigantica Thioredoxin1 (FgTrx1). The recombinant FgTrx1 exists as a monomer and catalyzes the reduction of insulin. FgTrx1 is preferentially regenerated by the glutathione (GSH) system using glutathione reductase (GR). The regeneration of FgTrx1 by the conventional Trx system is much less as compared to the GSH system, suggesting that FgTrx1 could be acting as glutaredoxin (Grx). DNA nicking and hydroperoxide assay suggests that it protects the DNA from radical-induced oxidative damage. Thus, FgTrx1 might play a role in parasite survival as it can regenerate itself even in the absence of the canonical Trx system and also protect the cells from ROS induced damage. Further, we propose that the GR activity of FgTrx1 is not restricted to -CXXC- motif but is regulated by residues present in close proximity to the -CXXC- motif, through manipulation of the redox potential or the pKa of the active site Cys residues.

  10. Tyrosine administration decreases glutathione and stimulates lipid and protein oxidation in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Sgaravatti, Angela M; Magnusson, Alessandra S; de Oliveira, Amanda S; Rosa, Andréa P; Mescka, Caroline Paula; Zanin, Fernanda R; Pederzolli, Carolina D; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Wajner, Moacir; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo

    2009-09-01

    Tyrosine levels are abnormally elevated in tissues and physiological fluids of patients with inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism especially in tyrosinemia type II which is caused by deficiency of tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) and provokes eyes, skin and central nervous system disturbances. We have recently reported that tyrosine promoted oxidative stress in vitro but the exact mechanisms of brain damage in these disorder are poorly known. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo effect of L-tyrosine (500 mg/Kg) on oxidative stress indices in cerebral cortex homogenates of 14-day-old Wistar rats. A single injection of L-tyrosine decreased glutathione (GSH) and thiol-disulfide redox state (SH/SS ratio) while thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, protein carbonyl content and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity were enhanced. In contrast, the treatment did not affect ascorbic acid content, and the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. These results indicate that acute administration of L-tyrosine may impair antioxidant defenses and stimulate oxidative damage to lipids and proteins in cerebral cortex of young rats in vivo. This suggests that oxidative stress may represent a pathophysiological mechanism in hypetyrosinemic patients.

  11. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  12. A Simple HPLC-UV Method for the Determination of Glutathione in PC-12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Appala, Raju N; Chigurupati, Sridevi; Appala, Raju V V S S; Krishnan Selvarajan, Kesavanarayanan; Islam Mohammad, Jahidul

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive and simple HPLC-UV method was developed and validated for the assay of glutathione (GSH) in PC-12 cells. Glutathione is a major intracellular antioxidant having multiple biological effects, best known for its cytoprotective effects against cell damage from reactive oxygen species and toxic reactive metabolites and regulating the cellular redox homeostasis. Due to its own sulfhydryl (SH) group, GSH readily reacts with Ellman's reagent to form a stable dimer which allows for quantitative estimation of GSH in biological systems by UV detection. The separation was achieved using a C8 column with a mobile phase consisting of phosphate buffer adjusted to pH 2.5 (mobile phase A) and acetonitrile (mobile phase B), running in a segmented gradient manner at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, and UV detection was performed at 280 nm. The developed HPLC-UV method was validated with respect to precision, accuracy, robustness, and linearity within a range of 1-20 μg/mL. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.05 and 0.1 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, the method shows the applicability for monitoring the oxidative stress in PC-12 cells. PMID:27127683

  13. The gut microbiota modulates host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Shoaie, Saeed; Bergentall, Mattias; Ghaffari, Pouyan; Zhang, Cheng; Larsson, Erik; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota has been proposed as an environmental factor that promotes the progression of metabolic diseases. Here, we investigated how the gut microbiota modulates the global metabolic differences in duodenum, jejunum, ileum, colon, liver, and two white adipose tissue depots obtained from conventionally raised (CONV-R) and germ-free (GF) mice using gene expression data and tissue-specific genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs). We created a generic mouse metabolic reaction (MMR) GEM, reconstructed 28 tissue-specific GEMs based on proteomics data, and manually curated GEMs for small intestine, colon, liver, and adipose tissues. We used these functional models to determine the global metabolic differences between CONV-R and GF mice. Based on gene expression data, we found that the gut microbiota affects the host amino acid (AA) metabolism, which leads to modifications in glutathione metabolism. To validate our predictions, we measured the level of AAs and N-acetylated AAs in the hepatic portal vein of CONV-R and GF mice. Finally, we simulated the metabolic differences between the small intestine of the CONV-R and GF mice accounting for the content of the diet and relative gene expression differences. Our analyses revealed that the gut microbiota influences host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice. PMID:26475342

  14. The Ascorbate-glutathione-α-tocopherol Triad in Abiotic Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Szarka, András; Tomasskovics, Bálint; Bánhegyi, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    The life of any living organism can be defined as a hurdle due to different kind of stresses. As with all living organisms, plants are exposed to various abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity, extreme temperatures and chemical toxicity. These primary stresses are often interconnected, and lead to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants, which are highly reactive and toxic and cause damage to proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and DNA, which ultimately results in oxidative stress. Stress-induced ROS accumulation is counteracted by enzymatic antioxidant systems and non-enzymatic low molecular weight metabolites, such as ascorbate, glutathione and α-tocopherol. The above mentioned low molecular weight antioxidants are also capable of chelating metal ions, reducing thus their catalytic activity to form ROS and also scavenge them. Hence, in plant cells, this triad of low molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbate, glutathione and α-tocopherol) form an important part of abiotic stress response. In this work we are presenting a review of abiotic stress responses connected to these antioxidants. PMID:22605990

  15. The ascorbate-glutathione-α-tocopherol triad in abiotic stress response.

    PubMed

    Szarka, András; Tomasskovics, Bálint; Bánhegyi, Gábor

    2012-01-01

    The life of any living organism can be defined as a hurdle due to different kind of stresses. As with all living organisms, plants are exposed to various abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity, extreme temperatures and chemical toxicity. These primary stresses are often interconnected, and lead to the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants, which are highly reactive and toxic and cause damage to proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and DNA, which ultimately results in oxidative stress. Stress-induced ROS accumulation is counteracted by enzymatic antioxidant systems and non-enzymatic low molecular weight metabolites, such as ascorbate, glutathione and α-tocopherol. The above mentioned low molecular weight antioxidants are also capable of chelating metal ions, reducing thus their catalytic activity to form ROS and also scavenge them. Hence, in plant cells, this triad of low molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbate, glutathione and α-tocopherol) form an important part of abiotic stress response. In this work we are presenting a review of abiotic stress responses connected to these antioxidants. PMID:22605990

  16. Evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains with enhanced glutathione production obtained by an evolution-based strategy.

    PubMed

    Mezzetti, Francesco; De Vero, Luciana; Giudici, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    In winemaking, the application of glutathione (GSH) has been the subject of ever-growing interest because of its important role in limiting must and wine oxidation and in protecting various aromatic compounds. Glutathione concentration in wine is highly variable, involving as it does several factors from must, through alcoholic fermentation, to yeast strain activity. Consequently, the development of new wine yeast strains able to improve flavor stability is in great demand. To generate evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with enhanced GSH production, we have applied an evolution-based strategy that combines the sexual recombination of spores with the application of molybdate, which is toxic for the cells at high concentration, as specific selective pressure. Eight molybdate-resistant strains were selected and further screened for GSH production in synthetic grape must and in microvinification assay. By this nongenetically modified strategy, we obtained two evolved strains, Mo21T2-5 and Mo21T2-12, both able to enhance GSH content in wine with an increase of 100% and 36%, respectively, compared with the parental strain 21T2, and 120% and 50% compared with initial GSH content in the must. PMID:25041878

  17. A Simple HPLC-UV Method for the Determination of Glutathione in PC-12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Appala, Raju N.; Appala, Raju V. V. S. S.

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive and simple HPLC-UV method was developed and validated for the assay of glutathione (GSH) in PC-12 cells. Glutathione is a major intracellular antioxidant having multiple biological effects, best known for its cytoprotective effects against cell damage from reactive oxygen species and toxic reactive metabolites and regulating the cellular redox homeostasis. Due to its own sulfhydryl (SH) group, GSH readily reacts with Ellman's reagent to form a stable dimer which allows for quantitative estimation of GSH in biological systems by UV detection. The separation was achieved using a C8 column with a mobile phase consisting of phosphate buffer adjusted to pH 2.5 (mobile phase A) and acetonitrile (mobile phase B), running in a segmented gradient manner at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, and UV detection was performed at 280 nm. The developed HPLC-UV method was validated with respect to precision, accuracy, robustness, and linearity within a range of 1–20 μg/mL. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.05 and 0.1 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, the method shows the applicability for monitoring the oxidative stress in PC-12 cells. PMID:27127683

  18. Selenocysteine oxidation in glutathione peroxidase catalysis: an MS-supported quantum mechanics study.

    PubMed

    Orian, Laura; Mauri, Pierluigi; Roveri, Antonella; Toppo, Stefano; Benazzi, Louise; Bosello-Travain, Valentina; De Palma, Antonella; Maiorino, Matilde; Miotto, Giovanni; Zaccarin, Mattia; Polimeno, Antonino; Flohé, Leopold; Ursini, Fulvio

    2015-10-01

    Glutathione peroxidases (GPxs) are enzymes working with either selenium or sulfur catalysis. They adopted diverse functions ranging from detoxification of H(2)O(2) to redox signaling and differentiation. The relative stability of the selenoenzymes, however, remained enigmatic in view of the postulated involvement of a highly unstable selenenic acid form during catalysis. Nevertheless, density functional theory calculations obtained with a representative active site model verify the mechanistic concept of GPx catalysis and underscore its efficiency. However, they also allow that the selenenic acid, in the absence of the reducing substrate, reacts with a nitrogen in the active site. MS/MS analysis of oxidized rat GPx4 complies with the predicted structure, an 8-membered ring, in which selenium is bound as selenenylamide to the protein backbone. The intermediate can be re-integrated into the canonical GPx cycle by glutathione, whereas, under denaturing conditions, its selenium moiety undergoes β-cleavage with formation of a dehydro-alanine residue. The selenenylamide bypass prevents destruction of the redox center due to over-oxidation of the selenium or its elimination and likely allows fine-tuning of GPx activity or alternate substrate reactions for regulatory purposes.

  19. Miners compensated for pneumoconiosis and glutathione s-transferases M1 and T1 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anna; Ebbinghaus, Rainer; Prager, Hans-Martin; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of quartz-containing dust produces reversible inflammatory changes in lungs resulting in irreversible fibrotic changes termed pneumoconiosis. Due to the inflammatory process in the lungs, highly reactive substances are released that may be detoxified by glutathione S-transferases. Therefore, 90 hard coal miners with pneumoconiosis as a recognized occupational disease (in Germany: Berufskrankheit BK 4101) were genotyped for glutathione S-transferases M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1) according to standard methods. Furthermore, occupational exposure and smoking habits were assessed by questionnaire. Changes in a chest x-ray were classified according to ILO classification 2000. Of the investigated hard coal miners 43% were GSTM1 negative whereas 57% were GSTM1 positive. The arithmetic mean of the age at time of investigation was 74.2 yr (range: 42-87 yr). Seventy-four percent of the hard coal miners reported being ever smokers, while 26% denied smoking. All hard coal miners provided pneumoconiosis-related changes in the chest x-ray. The observed frequency of GSTM1 negative hard coal miners was not different from frequencies reported for general Caucasian populations and in agreement with findings reported for Chinese coal miners. In contrast, in a former study, 16 of 19 German hard coal miners (84%) with urinary bladder cancer displayed a GSTM1 negative genotype. The outcome of this study provides evidence that severely occupationally exposed Caucasian hard coal miners do not present an elevated level of GSTM1 negative individuals.

  20. Indication for joint replacement and glutathione s-transferases M1 and T1 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Klein, Torsten; Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In most patients with osteoarthritis (OA), therapy-resistant pain is the indication for hip or knee replacement. Glutathione S-transferases, particularly glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1), are involved in metabolism of highly reactive metabolites that may be generated by inflammatory processes. In total, 148 patients with indication for hip or knee replacement and 129 patients of the same hospital without indication for joint replacement were genotyped for GSTM1 and GSTT1 and interviewed by a newly developed questionnaire for occupational and nonoccupational risk factors of hip and/or knee osteoarthritis. Mean age was 70.9 yr in OA cases and 67.4 yr in controls. The frequency of GSTM1 negative in the OA case group was (45%) in the lower range compared to values in Caucasian general population (approximately 50%), whereas the frequency in the controls was normal (51%). The frequency of GSTT1 negative genotype in OA cases and controls was normal. The normal distribution of the GSTM1 negative genotype in patients with indication for hip or knee replacement indicates that the role GSTM1 in these patients is different from that in other aseptic inflammatory diseases such as ozone-related inflammatory reactions of the respiratory tract.