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Sample records for glutathione s-transferase p1-1

  1. 8-Methoxypsoralen is a competitive inhibitor of glutathione S-transferase P1-1

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Diêgo Madureira; de Farias, Marcel Tavares; Teles, André Lacerda Braga; dos Santos Junior, Manoelito Coelho; de Cerqueira, Martins Dias; Lima, Rute Maria Ferreira; El-Bachá, Ramon Santos

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is known to protect healthy brain cells from potentially dangerous chemical agents, but there are many evidences supporting the idea that this protective action is extended to tumor cells. Since the process of angiogenesis in brain tumors leads to BBB breakdown, biochemical characteristics of the BBB seem to be more relevant than physical barriers to protect tumor cells from chemotherapy. In fact, a number of resistance related factors were already demonstrated to be component of both BBB and tumor cells. The enzyme glutathione S-transferases (GST) detoxify electrophilic xenobiotics and endogenous secondary metabolites formed during oxidative stress. A role has been attributed to GST in the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. This study characterized 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) as a human GST P1-1 (hGST P1-1) inhibitor. To identify and characterize the potential inhibitory activity of 8-MOP, we studied the enzyme kinetics of the conjugation of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) with GSH catalyzed by hGST P1-1. We report here that 8-MOP competitively inhibited hGST P1-1 relative to CDNB, but there was an uncompetitive inhibition relative to GSH. Chromatographic analyses suggest that 8-MOP is not a substrate. Molecular docking simulations suggest that 8-MOP binds to the active site, but its position prevents the GSH conjugation. Thus, we conclude that 8-MOP is a promising prototype for new GST inhibitors pharmacologically useful in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders and the resistance of cancer to chemotherapy. PMID:25324722

  2. Human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 functions as an estrogen receptor α signaling modulator

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiyuan; An, Byoung Ha; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Jong Hoon; Kang, Young Sook; Chang, Minsun

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • GSTP induces the classical ERα signaling event. • The functional GSTP is a prerequisite for GSTP-induced ERα transcription activity. • The expression of RIP140, a transcription cofactor, was inhibited by GSTP protein. • We propose the novel non-enzymatic role of GSTP. - Abstract: Estrogen receptor α (ERα) plays a crucial role in estrogen-mediated signaling pathways and exerts its action as a nuclear transcription factor. Binding of the ligand-activated ERα to the estrogen response element (ERE) is a central part of ERα-associated signal transduction pathways and its aberrant modulation is associated with many disease conditions. Human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP) functions as an enzyme in conjugation reactions in drug metabolism and as a regulator of kinase signaling pathways. It is overexpressed in tumors following chemotherapy and has been associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer. In this study, a novel regulatory function of GSTP has been proposed in which GSTP modulates ERE-mediated ERα signaling events. Ectopic expression of GSTP was able to induce the ERα and ERE-mediated transcriptional activities in ERα-positive but GSTP-negative MCF7 human breast cancer cells. This inductive effect of GSTP on the ERE-transcription activity was diminished when the cells express a mutated form of the enzyme or are treated with a GSTP-specific chemical inhibitor. It was found that GSTP inhibited the expression of the receptor interacting protein 140 (RIP140), a negative regulator of ERα transcription, at both mRNA and protein levels. Our study suggests a novel non-enzymatic role of GSTP which plays a significant role in regulating the classical ERα signaling pathways via modification of transcription cofactors such as RIP140.

  3. Interactions of alpha, beta-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones with human glutathione S-transferase P1-1.

    PubMed

    van Iersel, M L; Ploemen, J P; Lo Bello, M; Federici, G; van Bladeren, P J

    1997-12-12

    In the present study the irreversible inhibition of human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1) by alpha, beta-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones was studied. When GSTP1-1 was incubated with a 50-fold molar excess of the aldehydes acrolein (ACR) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and the ketones curcumin (CUR) and ethacrynic acid (EA) at 22 degrees C, all of them inactivated GSTP1-1. The remaining activity after 4 h of incubation in all cases was lower than 10%. The aldehydes crotonaldehyde (CRA), cinnamaldehyde (CA) and trans-2-hexenal were found to inhibit GSTP1-1 only at a 5000-fold molar excess and even then, for example, for CA a higher remaining activity of 17% was observed. The same inhibition experiments were conducted with 3 mutants of GSTP1-1: the C47S and C101S mutants and the double mutant C47S/C101S. Remaining activity for C47S varied between +/- 40% for CRA, CA, CUR and HEX and +/- 80% for ACR, EA and HNE. For C101S it varied between 0 and 9% and for the double mutant C47S/C101S, activity after 4 h of incubation was variable. Again it varied between +/- 40% for CRA, CA, CUR and HEX and +/- 80% for ACR, EA and HNE. EA is known to react almost exclusively with cysteine 47. When [14C]EA was incubated with the GSTP1-1, modified by the alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, no [14C]EA was incorporated in the enzyme, indicating that in all cases this cysteine residue was one of the major targets. Since Michael addition with these reagents is known to be reversible, the results of incubation of the inactivated enzymes with an excess of glutathione (GSH) were determined. For all compounds, a restoration of the catalytic activity was observed. The results indicate that alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyl derivatives inhibit GSTP1-1 irreversibly mainly by binding to cysteine residues of GSTP1-1, especially Cys-47, This means that some of these compounds (e.g. CUR) might modify GST activity in vivo when GSH concentrations are low by covalent binding to the enzyme.

  4. Identifying and characterizing binding sites on the irreversible inhibition of human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 by S-thiocarbamoylation.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; Primavera, Alessandra; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Téllez-Sanz, Ramiro; Barón, Carmen; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; Lo Bello, Mario; García-Fuentes, Luís

    2012-07-23

    Human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (hGST P1-1) is involved in cell detoxification processes through the conjugation of its natural substrate, reduced glutathione (GSH), with xenobiotics. GSTs are known to be overexpressed in tumors, and naturally occurring isothiocyanates, such as benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), are effective cancer chemopreventive compounds. To identify and characterize the potential inhibitory mechanisms of GST P1-1 induced by isothiocyanate conjugates, we studied the binding of GST P1-1 and some cysteine mutants to the BITC-SG conjugate as well as to the synthetic S-(N-benzylcarbamoylmethyl)glutathione conjugate (BC-SG). We report here the inactivation of GST P1-1 through the covalent modification of two Cys47 residues per dimer and one Cys101. The evidence has been compiled by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). ITC experiments suggest that the BITC-SG conjugate generates adducts with Cys47 and Cys101 at physiological temperatures through a corresponding kinetic process, in which the BITC moiety is covalently bound to these enzyme cysteines through an S-thiocarbamoylation reaction. ESI-MS analysis of the BITC-SG incubated enzymes indicates that although the Cys47 in each subunit is covalently attached to the BITC ligand moiety, only one of the Cys101 residues in the dimer is so attached. A plausible mechanism is given for the emergence of inactivation through the kinetic processes with both cysteines. Likewise, our molecular docking simulations suggest that steric hindrance is the reason why only one Cys101 per dimer is covalently modified by BITC-SG. No covalent inactivation of GST P1-1 with the BC-SG inhibitor has been observed. The affinities and inhibitory potencies for both conjugates are high and very similar, but slightly lower for BC-SG. Thus, we conclude that the presence of the sulfur atom from the isothiocyanate moiety in BITC-SG is crucial for its irreversible inhibition of

  5. Green tea catechins in chemoprevention of cancer: a molecular docking investigation into their interaction with glutathione S-transferase (GST P1-1).

    PubMed

    Artali, Roberto; Beretta, Giangiacomo; Morazzoni, Paolo; Bombardelli, Ezio; Meneghetti, Fiorella

    2009-02-01

    The anti- and pro-oxidant effects of green tea catechins have been implicated in the alterations of cellular functions determining their chemoprotective and therapeutic potentials in toxicity and diseases. The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs; EC 2.5.1.18) family is a widely distributed phase-II detoxifying enzymes and the GST P1-1 isoenzyme has been shown to catalyze the conjugation of GSH with some alkylating anti-cancer agents, suggesting that over-expression of GST P1-1 would result in tumor cell resistance. Here we report the docking study of four green tea catechins and four alkylating anticancer drugs into the GST P1-1 model, as GSTs were found to be affected by tea catechins. The EGCG ligands exhibit higher docking potential with respect to the anticancer agents, with a ligand-receptor interaction pattern indicating an high conformational stability. Consequently, the competition mechanisms favourable for the green tea catechins could lead to enzyme(s) desensitisation with a reduction of the alkylating drugs metabolism. The results provide a useful theoretical contribution in understanding the biochemical mechanisms implicated in the chemotherapeutic use of green tea catechins in oxidative stress-related diseases.

  6. Nitric oxide storage and transport in cells are mediated by glutathione S-transferase P1-1 and multidrug resistance protein 1 via dinitrosyl iron complexes.

    PubMed

    Lok, Hiu Chuen; Suryo Rahmanto, Yohan; Hawkins, Clare L; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Morrow, Charles S; Townsend, Alan J; Ponka, Prem; Richardson, Des R

    2012-01-02

    Nitrogen monoxide (NO) plays a role in the cytotoxic mechanisms of activated macrophages against tumor cells by inducing iron release. We showed that NO-mediated iron efflux from cells required glutathione (GSH) (Watts, R. N., and Richardson, D. R. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 4724-4732) and that the GSH-conjugate transporter, multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1), mediates this release potentially as a dinitrosyl-dithiol iron complex (DNIC; Watts, R. N., Hawkins, C., Ponka, P., and Richardson, D. R. (2006) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 7670-7675). Recently, glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GST P1-1) was shown to bind DNICs as dinitrosyl-diglutathionyl iron complexes. Considering this and that GSTs and MRP1 form an integrated detoxification unit with chemotherapeutics, we assessed whether these proteins coordinately regulate storage and transport of DNICs as long lived NO intermediates. Cells transfected with GSTP1 (but not GSTA1 or GSTM1) significantly decreased NO-mediated 59Fe release from cells. This NO-mediated 59Fe efflux and the effect of GST P1-1 on preventing this were observed with NO-generating agents and also in cells transfected with inducible nitric oxide synthase. Notably, 59Fe accumulated in cells within GST P1-1-containing fractions, indicating an alteration in intracellular 59Fe distribution. Furthermore, electron paramagnetic resonance studies showed that MCF7-VP cells transfected with GSTP1 contain significantly greater levels of a unique DNIC signal. These investigations indicate that GST P1-1 acts to sequester NO as DNICs, reducing their transport out of the cell by MRP1. Cell proliferation studies demonstrated the importance of the combined effect of GST P1-1 and MRP1 in protecting cells from the cytotoxic effects of NO. Thus, the DNIC storage function of GST P1-1 and ability of MRP1 to efflux DNICs are vital in protection against NO cytotoxicity.

  7. Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of ethacrynic acid analogues on glutathione-s-transferase P1-1 activity inhibition.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guisen; Yu, Tao; Wang, Rui; Wang, Xiaobing; Jing, Yongkui

    2005-06-02

    Ethacrynic acid (EA) is a glutathione-s-transferase pi (GSTP1-1) inhibitor. Fifteen of EA analogues were designed and synthesized and their inhibition on GSTP1-1 activity was tested in lysate of human leukemia HL-60 cells. These compounds were synthesized using substituted phenol as precursors through reacting with 2-chlorocarboxylic acid and acylation. Structure-activity analysis indicates that replacements of chlorides of EA by methyl, bromide, and fluoride at 3' position remain the GSTP1-1 inhibitory effect. The compounds without any substitute at 3' position lose the activity on GSTP1-1 inhibition. These data suggest that the substitution of 3' position of EA is necessary for inhibiting GSTP1-1 activity.

  8. Direct evidence for the covalent modification of glutathione-S-transferase P1-1 by electrophilic prostaglandins: implications for enzyme inactivation and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Gayarre, Javier; Avellano, M Isabel; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2007-01-15

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GST) catalyze the conjugation of electrophilic compounds to glutathione, thus playing a key role in cell survival and tumor chemoresistance. Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are electrophilic eicosanoids that display potent antiproliferative properties, through multiple mechanisms not completely elucidated. Here we show that the cyPG 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2) binds to GSTP1-1 covalently, as demonstrated by mass spectrometry and by the use of biotinylated 15d-PGJ2. Moreover, cyPG inactivate GSTP1-1 irreversibly. The presence of the cyclopentenone moiety is important for these effects. Covalent interactions also occur in cells, in which 15d-PGJ2 binds to endogenous GSTP1-1, irreversibly reduces GST free-thiol content and inhibits GST activity. Protein delivery of GSTP1-1 improves cell survival upon serum deprivation whereas 15d-PGJ2-treated GSTP1-1 displays a reduced protective effect. These results show the first evidence for the formation of stable adducts between cyPG and GSTP1-1 and may offer new perspectives for the development of irreversible GST inhibitors as anticancer agents.

  9. Ethacrynic acid butyl-ester induces apoptosis in leukemia cells through a hydrogen peroxide mediated pathway independent of glutathione S-transferase P1-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Li, Chunmin; Song, Dandan; Zhao, Guisen; Zhao, Linxiang; Jing, Yongkui

    2007-08-15

    Ethacrynic acid (EA), a glutathione S-transferase inhibitor and diuretic agent, inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in cancer cells. To improve the activities, the structure of EA has been modified, and it has been shown that EA esters had an increased cell growth inhibitory ability compared with nonesterified analogue. EA butyl-ester (EABE) was synthesized, and its apoptosis induction ability was studied. The efficacy of EABE was compared with that of EA, and the mechanisms of action were studied in HL-60 leukemia cells. EABE exhibited greater cell growth inhibitory and apoptosis induction abilities than did EA. EABE-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells correlated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species, the death receptor 5 (DR5), and caspase activation and decreased levels of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Pretreatment with antioxidants, either N-acetylcysteine or catalase, completely blocked EABE-induced apoptosis, H2O2 accumulation, and up-regulation of DR5 levels. RG19, a subclone of Raji cells stably transfected with a GSTpi expression vector, and K562 cells with high endogenous GSTP1-1 activity were less sensitive to EABE-induced apoptosis. EABE was more rapidly taken up than EA by HL-60 cells as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements of intracellular concentrations. These results suggest that (a) H2O2 production is a mediator of EABE and EA-induced apoptosis; (b) GSTP1-1 plays a negative role in EABE and EA-induced apoptosis; and (c) the activity of EABE is greater than EA due to its more rapid entry into cells.

  10. Novel oxadiazole analogues derived from ethacrynic acid: design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationships in inhibiting the activity of glutathione S-transferase P1-1 and cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmei; Liu, Guyue; Li, Hongcai; Zhang, Yun; Song, Dandan; Li, Chunmin; Wang, Rui; Liu, Bo; Liang, Wen; Jing, Yongkui; Zhao, Guisen

    2010-02-11

    Ethacrynic acid (EA) is a glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GST P1-1) inhibitor with weak antiproliferative ability in tumor cells. By use of the principle of bioisosterism, a series of novel EA oxadiazole analogues were designed and synthesized. The structure-activity relationships of inhibiting GST P1-1 activity and cell proliferation of those EA analogues were investigated in human leukemia HL-60 cells. Our data revealed that those EA oxadiazole analogues had improved antiproliferative activity and most of them had similar or better inhibitory effects on GST P1-1 activity than EA. Compound 6u was one of the potent antiproliferative agents without inhibition of GST P1-1 activity. Compounds 6r and 6s were two potent cell growth inhibitors in several solid tumor cell lines with the concentrations inhibiting half of cell growth of less than 5 microM. Our data suggest that these EA oxadiazole analogues are promising antitumor agents that may act through GST P1-1 inhibition-dependent and/or -independent pathways.

  11. Combined expression of multidrug resistance protein (MRP) and glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1) in MCF7 cells and high level resistance to the cytotoxicities of ethacrynic acid but not oxazaphosphorines or cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Morrow, C S; Smitherman, P K; Townsend, A J

    1998-10-15

    We tested the hypothesis that combined increased expression of human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1), an enzyme that catalyzes the conjugation with glutathione of several toxic electrophiles, and the glutathione-conjugate efflux pump, multidrug resistance protein (MRP), confers high level resistance to the cytotoxicities of anticancer and other drugs. To accomplish this, we developed MCF7 breast carcinoma cell derivatives that express high levels of GSTP1-1 and MRP, alone and in combination. Parental MCF7 cells, which express no GSTP1-1 and negligible MRP, served as control cells. We found that either MRP or GSTP1-1 alone conferred significant resistance to ethacrynic acid cytotoxicity. Moreover, combined expression of GSTP1-1 and MRP conferred a high level of resistance to ethacrynic acid that was greater than resistance conferred by either protein alone. Increased MRP was also associated with modest resistance to the oxazaphosphorine compounds mafosfamide, 4-hydroxycyclophosphamide, and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide. However, coordinated expression of GSTP1-1 with MRP failed to augment this modest resistance. Similarly, GSTP1-1 had no effect on the sensitivities to cisplatin of MCF7 cells regardless of MRP expression. These results establish that coordinated expression of MRP and GSTP1-1 can confer high level resistance to the cytotoxicities of some drugs, including ethacrynic acid, but that such resistance is variable and does not apply to all toxic drugs that can potentially form glutathione conjugates in either spontaneous or GSTP1-1-catalyzed reactions.

  12. GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    GLUTATHIONE s-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE. M K Ross1 and R A Pegram2. 1Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL/ORD, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  13. GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    GLUTATHIONE s-TRANSFERASE-MEDIATED METABOLISM OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE. M K Ross1 and R A Pegram2. 1Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 2Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL/ORD, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangl...

  14. Inhibition of glutathione S-transferase P1-1 in mouse lung epithelial cells by the tumor promoter 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylene-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHT-quinone methide): protein adducts investigated by electrospray mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lemercier, Jean-Noël; Meier, Brent W; Gomez, Jose D; Thompson, John A

    2004-12-01

    Oxidation of the food preservative 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT) by mouse lung cytochrome P450 produces electrophilic quinone methides thought to promote lung tumors in mice by covalent binding to critical proteins. Specific pulmonary targets of 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylenecyclohexa-2,5-dienone (BHT-QM) have not been identified, however. The present work was undertaken to determine if glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1) is alkylated by BHT-QM, as this protein is overexpressed in tumors and has important roles in protecting cells from electrophiles and oxidants and in regulating stress kinases. This work was conducted with cell lines C10 and E10 derived from mouse lung epithelia and their spontaneous transformants, the tumorigenic cell lines A5 and E9. Cytosolic GSTs were isolated by affinity chromatography and analyzed by ESI-LC/MS. Ion current chromatograms indicated that GSTP1 predominates over the other isoforms, especially in tumorigenic cells. Treatment with BHT-QM inhibited cytosolic GST activity by 28-44%, and inhibition was exacerbated by depleting intracellular GSH. Alkylation of GSTP1 by BHT-QM was investigated by separating cytosolic proteins with two-dimensional SDS-PAGE and detecting adducts by Western blotting with polyclonal antibodies that recognize the BHT group. The identity of GSTP1 comigrating with immunoreactive material was confirmed by in-gel proteolysis and LC/MS/MS analysis. Human GSTP1 was utilized to investigate the specific residues involved in QM binding. The only peptide adduct detected in digests of monoadducted GSTP1 corresponded to Cys101, whereas adducts at Cys14, Cys47, and Cys101 were identified from the trialkylated protein. Losses of transferase activity were most influenced by alkylation at Cys47, but binding to Cys14 appeared to inhibit the activity further. These findings demonstrate that cytosolic GSTP1 may be a target for BHT-QM resulting in decreased cellular protection from electrophiles and oxidants

  15. Glutathione-S-transferase activity in malarial parasites.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, P; Puri, S K; Kamboj, K K; Pandey, V C

    1999-04-01

    Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity has been detected in rodent (Plasmodium berghei, P. yoelii), simian (P. knowlesi) and human (P. falciparum) malarial parasites, and in different intraerythrocytic stages of P. knowlesi (schizont > ring > trophozoite). In chloroquine-resistant strains of rodent and human malarial parasites GST activity significantly increases compared to sensitive strains. Further, the increase in enzyme activity is directly related to drug pressure of resistant P. berghei. Complete inhibition of chloroquine-sensitive and resistant P. berghei glutathione-S-transferase activities was observed at 2.5 and 5. micrometer concentration of hemin, respectively. An inverse relationship was found between the heme level and enzyme activity of chloroquine-resistant and sensitive P. berghei. Chloroquine, artemisinin, and primaquine noticeably inhibited GST activity in P. knowlesi.

  16. [Glutathione S-transferase of alpha class from pike liver].

    PubMed

    Borvinskaia, E V; Smirnov, L P; Nemova, N N

    2013-01-01

    In this study, glutathione S-transferase (GST) was isolated from the liver of pike Esox lucius, which was homogenous according to SDS-PAGE and isoelectrofocusing. It is a homodimer with subunits mass 25235.36 Da (according to HPLC-MS/MS) and pI about 6.4. Substrate specificity, thermostability, some kinetic characteristics and optimum pH were determined. The enzyme was identified as Alpha class GST.

  17. Chromatofocusing of glutathione S-transferases from human kidney.

    PubMed

    Koskelo, K; Icén, A

    1984-04-01

    The glutathione S-transferase isoenzyme patterns of four human kidneys have been determined by chromatofocusing. The elution profiles were essentially similar in each tissue. Two major basic transferases and one acidic were partially characterized. All three were inhibited by bilirubin but considerable differences were found in the rate and extent of inactivation. The molecular weights, KM values and pH optima were similar to the values for transferases from other tissues. Chromatofocusing was found to be effective for the separation and purification of human glutathione transferases.

  18. Characterization of glutathione S-transferase of Taenia solium.

    PubMed

    Vibanco-Pérez, N; Jiménez, L; Merchant, M T; Landa, A

    1999-06-01

    A Taenia solium glutathione-S-transferase fraction (SGSTF) was isolated from a metacestode crude extract by affinity chromatography on reduced glutathione (GSH)-sepharose. The purified fraction displayed a specific glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity of 2.8 micromol/min/mg and glutathione peroxidase selenium-independent activity of 0.22 micromol/min/mg. Enzymatic characterization of the fraction suggested that the activity was closer to the mammalian mu-class GSTs. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, gel filtration, and enzyme activity analysis showed that the fraction was composed of a major band of Mr = 26 kd and that the active enzyme was dimeric. Immunohistochemical studies using specific antibodies against the major 26-kd band of the SGSTF indicated that GST protein was present in the tegument, parenchyma, protonephridial, and tegumentary cytons of the T. solium metacestode. Antibodies generated against the SGSTF tested in western blot showed cross-reactivity against GSTs purified from Taenia saginata, T. taeniaeformis, and T. crassiceps, but did not react with GSTs from Schistosoma mansoni, or mice, rabbit, and pig liver tissue. Furthermore, immunization of mice with SGSTF reduced the metacestode burden up to 74.2%. Our findings argue in favor of GST having an important role in the survival of T. solium in its hosts.

  19. Glutathione S-transferase class {pi} polymorphism in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Aivaliotis, M.J.; Cantu, T.; Gilligan, R.

    1995-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) comprises a family of isozymes with broad substrate specificities. One or more GST isozymes are present in most animal tissues and function in several detoxification pathways through the conjugation of reduced glutathione with various electrophiles, thereby reducing their potential toxicity. Four soluble GST isozymes encoded by genes on different chromosomes have been identified in humans. The acidic class pi GST, GSTP (previously designated GST-3), is widely distributed in adult tissues and appears to be the only GST isozyme present in leukocytes and placenta. Previously reported electrophoretic analyses of erythrocyte and leukocyte extracts revealed single bands of activity, which differed slightly in mobility between the two cell types, or under other conditions, a two-banded pattern. To our knowledge, no genetically determined polymorphisms have previously been reported in GSTP from any species. We now report a polymorphism of GSTP in baboon leukocytes, and present family data that verifies autosomal codominant inheritance. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Nutricati, Eliana; Miceli, Antonio; Blando, Federica; De Bellis, Luigi

    2006-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) are multifunctional proteins encoded by a large gene family, divided on the basis of sequence identity into phi, tau, theta, zeta and lambda classes. The phi and tau classes are present only in plants. GSTs appear to be ubiquitous in plants and are involved in herbicide detoxification and stress response, but little is known about the precise role of GSTs in normal plant physiology and during biotic and abiotic stress response. Two cDNAs representing the two plant classes tau and phi, AtGSTF9 and AtGSTU26, were expressed in vitro and the corresponding proteins were analysed. Both GSTs were able to catalyse a glutathione conjugation to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), but they were inactive as transferases towards p-nitrobenzylchloride (pNBC). AtGSTF9 showed activity towards benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) and an activity as glutathione peroxidase with cumene hydroperoxide (CumHPO). AtGSTU26 was not active as glutathione peroxidase and towards BITC. RT-PCR analysis was used to evaluate the expression of the two genes in response to treatment with herbicides and safeners, chemicals, low and high temperature. Our results reveal that AtGSTU26 is induced by the chloroacetanilide herbicides alachlor and metolachlor and the safener benoxacor, and after exposure to low temperatures. In contrast, AtGSTF9 seems not to be influenced by the treatments employed.

  1. Glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms in thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Alba; Céspedes, Walkiria; Xamena, Noel; Surrallés, Jordi; Creus, Amadeu; Galofré, Pere; Marcos, Ricardo

    2003-02-10

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) are enzymes involved in the metabolism of many carcinogens and mutagens, also acting as important free-radical scavengers. The existence of different genetic polymorphisms in human populations has proven to be a susceptibility factor for different tumours. Nevertheless, as far as we know, for thyroid cancer no study has been conducted until now linking its incidence to genetic susceptibility biomarkers. The present investigation has been conducted to detect the possible association between polymorphism at the GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genes and thyroid cancer incidence. Thus, 134 thyroid cancer patients and 116 controls, all from the urban district of Barcelona (Spain), have been included in this study. The results indicate that, according to the calculated odds ratio, the frequencies of the different genotypes found in the group of cancer patients do not significantly differ from those values obtained in the controls. This is true for the overall data as well as for the tumour characterization as follicular and papillar types. In addition, none of the possible combinations of mutant genotypes were shown to be risk factors. Finally, when the sex of the patients, the age of tumour onset, and life-style habits were also taken into account, no influence was observed related to the different genotypes. In conclusion, the results obtained in this study clearly suggest that those susceptibility factors related to the different GST polymorphic enzymes are not a predisposing factor in thyroid cancer disease.

  2. Squid glutathione S-transferase. Relationships with other glutathione S-transferases and S-crystallins of cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Tomarev, S I; Zinovieva, R D; Guo, K; Piatigorsky, J

    1993-02-25

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18) was purified from the digestive gland of the squid Ommastrephes sloani pacificus. It had high enzymatic activity for the 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene substrate and was composed of a major and a minor polypeptide band, both with molecular masses near 25 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. GST cDNA clones were derived from the digestive gland mRNA. The deduced GSTs of the longest cDNAs (pGST5 and pGST11) containing the entire coding sequence have a molecular mass near 23 kDa. Sequence comparisons showed that the squid GST is 42-44% identical to both squid and octopus S-crystallins (the major proteins of the lens), 32-34% identical to class pi and 29-32% identical to class alpha GSTs of vertebrates, and 19-23% identical to other GSTs of vertebrates and insects. Northern blot hybridization revealed that GST mRNAs were much more abundant in the digestive gland than in the testis, mantle, or lens. Analysis of a squid GST gene indicated that it has an exon-intron structure similar to that of the vertebrate class pi GST gene. An apparently novel repetitive element was identified in the 5'-flanking sequence of the squid GST gene. Our results suggest that multiple duplications of an ancestral GST gene gave rise to a family of enzymatically inactive crystallins specialized for lens refraction and one (or two) active GST enzyme expressed preferentially, but not exclusively, in the digestive gland in squids. This differs from the innovation of refractive function from a metabolic enzyme by increased expression in the lens with minimal or no gene duplication, as occurred among the enzyme-crystallins of vertebrates.

  3. Expression of glutathione S-transferase during rat liver development.

    PubMed Central

    Tee, L B; Gilmore, K S; Meyer, D J; Ketterer, B; Vandenberghe, Y; Yeoh, G C

    1992-01-01

    The ontogeny of rat liver glutathione S-transferase (EC 2.5.1.18) (GSTs) during foetal and postnatal development was investigated. The GSTs are dimers, the subunits of which belong to three multigene families, Alpha (subunits 1, 2, 8 and 10), Mu (subunits 3, 4, 6, 9 and 11) and Pi (subunit 7) [Mannervik, Alin, Guthenberg, Jennsson, Tahir, Warholm & Jörnvall (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 82, 7202-7206; Kispert, Meyer, Lalor, Coles & Ketterer (1989) Biochem. J. 260, 789-793]. There is considerable structural homology within each gene family, with the result that whereas reverse-phase h.p.l.c. successfully differentiates individual subunits, immunocytochemical and Northern-blotting analyses may only differentiate families. Enzymic activity, h.p.l.c. and Northern blotting indicated that expression of GST increased from very low levels at 12 days of foetal growth to substantial amounts at day 21. At birth, GST concentrations underwent a dramatic decline and remained low until 5-10 days post partum, after which they increased to adult levels. During the period under study, GST subunits underwent differential expression. The Mu family had a lower level of expression than the Alpha family, and, within the Alpha family, subunit 1 was more dominant in the adult than the foetus. Subunit 2 is the major form in the foetus. Most noteworthy were subunits 7 and 10, which were prominent in the foetus, but present at low levels post partum. Immunocytochemical analysis of the 17-day foetal and newborn rat livers showed marked differences in the distribution of GSTs in hepatocytes. In the 17-day foetal liver Pi greater than Alpha greater than Mu whereas in the newborns Alpha greater than Mu much greater than Pi. Erythropoietic cells were not stained for any of the three GST families. Steady-state mRNA concentrations in the foetus correlated with the relative transcription of the Alpha, Mu and Pi class genes. However, in those genes expressed post partum, namely the Alpha and

  4. Expression of glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase pi in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Glutathione (GSH) is one of the most important agents of the antioxidant defense system of the cell because, in conjunction with the enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione S transferase pi (GSTpi), it plays a central role in the detoxification and biotransformation of chemotherapeutic drugs. This study evaluated the expression of GSH and the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes by immunohistochemistry in 30 canine mammary tumors, relating the clinicopathological parameters, clinical outcome and survival of the bitches. In an in vitro study, the expression of the genes glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLC) and glutathione synthetase (GSS) that synthesize GSH and GSH-Px gene were verified by qPCR and subjected to treatment with doxorubicin, to check the resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy. Results The immunohistochemical expression of GSH, GSH-Px and GSTpi was compared with the clinical and pathological characteristics and the clinical outcome in the bitches, including metastasis and death. The results showed that high immunoexpression of GSH was correlated to the absence of tumor ulceration and was present in dogs without metastasis (P < 0.05). There was significant correlation of survival with the increase of GSH (P < 0.05). The expression of the GSH-Px and GSTpi enzymes showed no statistically significant correlation with the analyzed variables (p > 0.05). The analysis of the relative expression of genes responsible for the synthesis of GSH (GCLC and GSS) and GSH-Px by quantitative PCR was done with cultured cells of 10 tumor fragments from dogs with mammary tumors. The culture cells showed a decrease in GCLC and GSS expression when compared with no treated cells (P < 0.05). High GSH immunoexpression was associated with better clinical outcomes. Conclusion Therefore, high expression of the GSH seems to play an important role in the clinical outcome of patients with mammary tumors and suggest its use as prognostic marker. The in

  5. The Glutathione System of Aspergillus nidulans Involves a Fungus-specific Glutathione S-Transferase*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ikuo; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2009-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is involved in cellular defense mechanisms for xenobiotics and reactive oxygen species. This study investigated glutathione-dependent mechanisms in the model organism Aspergillus nidulans. A recombinant dimeric protein of A. nidulans glutathione reductase (GR) contained FAD and reduced oxidized glutathione (GSSG) using NADPH as an electron donor. A deletion strain of the GR gene (glrA) accumulated less intracellular reduced glutathione (GSH), indicating that the fungal GR contributes to GSSG reduction in vivo. Growth of the deletion strain of glrA was temperature-sensitive, and this phenotype was suppressed by adding GSH to the medium. The strain subsequently accumulated more intracellular superoxide, and cell-free respiration activity was partly defective. Growth of the strain decreased in the presence of oxidants, which induced glrA expression 1.5-6-fold. These results indicated that the fungal glutathione system functions as an antioxidant mechanism in A. nidulans. Our findings further revealed an initial proteomic differential display on GR-depleted and wild type strains. Up-regulation of thioredoxin reductase, peroxiredoxins, catalases, and cytochrome c peroxidase in the glrA-deletion strain revealed interplay between the glutathione system and both the thioredoxin system and hydrogen peroxide defense mechanisms. We also identified a hypothetical, up-regulated protein in the GR-depleted strains as glutathione S-transferase, which is unique among Ascomycetes fungi. PMID:19171936

  6. Plasmodium spp. membrane glutathione S-transferases: detoxification units and drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Lisewski, Andreas M.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane glutathione S-transferases from the class of membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism (MAPEG) form a superfamily of detoxification enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of reduced glutathione (GSH) to a broad spectrum of xenobiotics and hydrophobic electrophiles. Evolutionarily unrelated to the cytosolic glutathione S-transferases, they are found across bacterial and eukaryotic domains, for example in mammals, plants, fungi and bacteria in which significant levels of glutathione are maintained. Species of genus Plasmodium, the unicellular protozoa that are commonly known as malaria parasites, do actively support glutathione homeostasis and maintain its metabolism throughout their complex parasitic life cycle. In humans and in other mammals, the asexual intraerythrocytic stage of malaria, when the parasite feeds on hemoglobin, grows and eventually asexually replicates inside infected red blood cells (RBCs), is directly associated with host disease symptoms and during this critical stage GSH protects the host RBC and the parasite against oxidative stress from parasite-induced hemoglobin catabolism. In line with these observations, several GSH-dependent Plasmodium enzymes have been characterized including glutathione reductases, thioredoxins, glyoxalases, glutaredoxins and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs); furthermore, GSH itself have been found to associate spontaneously and to degrade free heme and its hydroxide, hematin, which are the main cytotoxic byproducts of hemoglobin catabolism. However, despite the apparent importance of glutathione metabolism for the parasite, no membrane associated glutathione S-transferases of genus Plasmodium have been previously described. We recently reported the first examples of MAPEG members among Plasmodium spp. PMID:28357217

  7. Induction of Glutathione S-Transferase Isozymes in Sorghum by Herbicide Antidotes 1

    PubMed Central

    Dean, John V.; Gronwald, John W.; Eberlein, Charlotte V.

    1990-01-01

    Certain chemicals referred to as herbicide antidotes protect sorghum from injury by chloroacetanilide herbicides such as metolachlor. The effect of herbicide antidotes on the glutathione S-transferase isozyme complement of etiolated sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) shoots was examined. Elution profiles of glutathione S-transferase isozymes from untreated and antidote-treated seedlings were generated by fast protein liquid chromatography utilizing an anion exchange (Mono Q) column. In untreated seedlings, there were two glutathione S-transferase isozymes, a major isozyme which exhibited activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and a minor isozyme which exhibited activity toward metolachlor. Treating sorghum seedlings with various antidotes (flurazole, oxabetrinil, CGA-133205, naphthalic anhydride, dichlormid) resulted in the appearance of four to five additional glutathione S-transferase isozymes (de-pending on the particular antidote) which exhibited activity toward metolachlor as a substrate and little or no activity with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Treating etiolated sorghum shoots with metolachlor was also found to induce at least four isozymes which exhibited activity toward the herbicide. An increase in glutathione S-transferase activity, measured with metolachlor as substrate, was detected within 4 h after treatment with 30 micromolar oxabetrinil, but 36 hours were required for maximum expression of activity. Addition of either the transcription inhibitor cordycepin or the translation inhibitor cycloheximide inhibited the appearance of glutathione S-transferase activity measured with metolachlor as substrate. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that antidotes confer protection against metolachlor injury in sorghum by inducing the de novo synthesis of glutathione S-transferase isozymes which catalyze the detoxification of the herbicide. PMID:16667299

  8. A High-Throughput 1,536-Well Luminescence Assay for Glutathione S-Transferase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute a family of detoxification enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of glutathione with a variety of hydrophobic compounds, including drugs and their metabolites, to yield water-soluble derivatives that are excreted in urine or bile. Profiling the effect of small molecules on GST activity is an important component in the characterization of drug candidates and compound libraries. Additionally, specific GST isozymes have been implicated in drug resistance, especially in cancer, and thus represent potential targets for intervention. To date, there are no sensitive miniaturized high-throughput assays available for GST activity detection. A series of GST substrates containing a masked luciferin moiety have been described recently, offering the potential for configuring a sensitive screening assay via coupled luciferase reaction and standard luminescence detection. We report on the optimization and miniaturization of this homogeneous method to 1,536-well format using GSTs from 3 different species: mouse isozyme A4-4, human isozymes A1-1, M1-1, and P1-1, and the major GST from the parasitic worm Schistosoma japonicum. PMID:20085484

  9. Purification and Biochemical Characterization of Glutathione S-Transferase from Down Syndrome and Normal Children Erythrocytes: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Ragaa R.; Maharem, Tahany M.; Abdel-Meguid, Nagwa; Sabry, Gilane M.; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem; Guneidy, Rasha A.

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the phenotypic manifestation of trisomy 21. Our study was concerned with the characterization and purification of glutathione S-transferase enzyme (GST) from normal and Down syndrome (DS) erythrocytes to illustrate the difference in the role of this enzyme in the cell. Glutathione S-transferase and glutathione (GSH) was…

  10. Purification and Biochemical Characterization of Glutathione S-Transferase from Down Syndrome and Normal Children Erythrocytes: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamed, Ragaa R.; Maharem, Tahany M.; Abdel-Meguid, Nagwa; Sabry, Gilane M.; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem; Guneidy, Rasha A.

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the phenotypic manifestation of trisomy 21. Our study was concerned with the characterization and purification of glutathione S-transferase enzyme (GST) from normal and Down syndrome (DS) erythrocytes to illustrate the difference in the role of this enzyme in the cell. Glutathione S-transferase and glutathione (GSH) was…

  11. Identification of a diazinon-metabolizing glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Yamada, Naotaka

    2016-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase superfamily play key roles in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics. We report herein the identification and characterization of a novel glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. The enzyme (bmGSTu2) conjugates glutathione to 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as metabolizing diazinon, one of the organophosphate insecticides. Quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis of transcripts demonstrated that bmGSTu2 expression was induced 1.7-fold in a resistant strain of B. mori. Mutagenesis of putative amino acid residues in the glutathione-binding site revealed that Ile54, Glu66, Ser67, and Asn68 are crucial for enzymatic function. These results provide insights into the catalysis of glutathione conjugation in silkworm by bmGSTu2 and into the detoxification of organophosphate insecticides. PMID:27440377

  12. Glutathione mediated regulation of oligomeric structure and functional activity of Plasmodium falciparum glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Timir; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja; Bhakuni, Vinod

    2007-10-17

    In contrast to many other organisms, the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum possesses only one typical glutathione S-transferase. This enzyme, PfGST, cannot be assigned to any of the known GST classes and represents a most interesting target for antimalarial drug development. The PfGST under native conditions forms non-covalently linked higher aggregates with major population (approximately 98%) being tetramer. However, in the presence of 2 mM GSH, a dimer of PfGST is observed. Recently reported study on binding and catalytic properties of PfGST indicated a GSH dependent low-high affinity transition with simultaneous binding of two GSH molecules to PfGST dimer suggesting that GSH binds to low affinity inactive enzyme dimer converting it to high affinity functionally active dimer. In order to understand the role of GSH in tetramer-dimer transition of PfGST as well as in modulation of functional activity of the enzyme, detailed structural, functional and stability studies on recombinant PfGST in the presence and absence of GSH were carried out. Our data indicate that the dimer - and not the tetramer - is the active form of PfGST, and that substrate saturation is directly paralleled by dissociation of the tetramer. Furthermore, this dissociation is a reversible process indicating that the tetramer-dimer equilibrium of PfGST is defined by the surrounding GSH concentration. Equilibrium denaturation studies show that the PfGST tetramer has significantly higher stability compared to the dimer. The enhanced stability of the tetramer is likely to be due to stronger ionic interactions existing in it. This is the first report for any GST where an alteration in oligomeric structure and not just small conformational change is observed upon GSH binding to the enzyme. Furthermore we also demonstrate a reversible mechanism of regulation of functional activity of Plasmodium falciparum glutathione S-transferase via GSH induced dissociation of functionally inactive tetramer into

  13. Global deletion of glutathione S-Transferase A4 exacerbates developmental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We established a mouse model of developmental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by feeding a high polyunsaturated fat liquid diet to female glutathione-S-transferase 4-4 (Gsta4-/-)/peroxisome proliferator activated receptor a (Ppara-/-) double knockout 129/SvJ mice for 12 weeks from weaning. We us...

  14. GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1-DEPENDENT METABOLISM OF THE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a prevalent drinking water disinfection by-product, was previously shown to be mutagenic in Salmonella expressing glutathione S-transferase (GST) theta 1-1 (GST T1-1). In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to study the...

  15. GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1-DEPENDENT METABOLISM OF THE DISINFECTION BYPRODUCT BROMODICHLOROMETHANE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT
    Bromodichloromethane (BDCM), a prevalent drinking water disinfection by-product, was previously shown to be mutagenic in Salmonella expressing glutathione S-transferase (GST) theta 1-1 (GST T1-1). In the present study, in vitro experiments were performed to study the...

  16. DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1

    EPA Science Inventory


    DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1. R A Pegram1 and M K Ross2. 2Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 1Pharmacokinetics Branch, NHEERL, ORD, United States Environmental Protection Ag...

  17. DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1

    EPA Science Inventory


    DNA BINDING POTENTIAL OF BROMODICHLOROMETHANE MEDIATED BY GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1-1. R A Pegram1 and M K Ross2. 2Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; 1Pharmacokinetics Branch, NHEERL, ORD, United States Environmental Protection Ag...

  18. Allyl isothiocyanate depletes glutathione and upregulates expression of glutathione S-transferases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Øverby, Anders; Stokland, Ragni A.; Åsberg, Signe E.; Sporsheim, Bjørnar; Bones, Atle M.

    2015-01-01

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) is a phytochemical associated with plant defense in plants from the Brassicaceae family. AITC has long been recognized as a countermeasure against external threats, but recent reports suggest that AITC is also involved in the onset of defense-related mechanisms such as the regulation of stomatal aperture. However, the underlying cellular modes of action in plants remain scarcely investigated. Here we report evidence of an AITC-induced depletion of glutathione (GSH) and the effect on gene expression of the detoxification enzyme family glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Treatment of A. thaliana wild-type with AITC resulted in a time- and dose-dependent depletion of cellular GSH. AITC-exposure of mutant lines vtc1 and pad2-1 with elevated and reduced GSH-levels, displayed enhanced and decreased AITC-tolerance, respectively. AITC-exposure also led to increased ROS-levels in the roots and loss of chlorophyll which are symptoms of oxidative stress. Following exposure to AITC, we found that GSH rapidly recovered to the same level as in the control plant, suggesting an effective route for replenishment of GSH or a rapid detoxification of AITC. Transcriptional analysis of genes encoding GSTs showed an upregulation in response to AITC. These findings demonstrate cellular effects by AITC involving a reversible depletion of the GSH-pool, induced oxidative stress, and elevated expression of GST-encoding genes. PMID:25954298

  19. Glutathione mediated regulation of oligomeric structure and functional activity of Plasmodium falciparum glutathione S-transferase

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Timir; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja; Bhakuni, Vinod

    2007-01-01

    Background In contrast to many other organisms, the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum possesses only one typical glutathione S-transferase. This enzyme, PfGST, cannot be assigned to any of the known GST classes and represents a most interesting target for antimalarial drug development. The PfGST under native conditions forms non-covalently linked higher aggregates with major population (~98%) being tetramer. However, in the presence of 2 mM GSH, a dimer of PfGST is observed. Recently reported study on binding and catalytic properties of PfGST indicated a GSH dependent low-high affinity transition with simultaneous binding of two GSH molecules to PfGST dimer suggesting that GSH binds to low affinity inactive enzyme dimer converting it to high affinity functionally active dimer. In order to understand the role of GSH in tetramer-dimer transition of PfGST as well as in modulation of functional activity of the enzyme, detailed structural, functional and stability studies on recombinant PfGST in the presence and absence of GSH were carried out. Results Our data indicate that the dimer – and not the tetramer – is the active form of PfGST, and that substrate saturation is directly paralleled by dissociation of the tetramer. Furthermore, this dissociation is a reversible process indicating that the tetramer-dimer equilibrium of PfGST is defined by the surrounding GSH concentration. Equilibrium denaturation studies show that the PfGST tetramer has significantly higher stability compared to the dimer. The enhanced stability of the tetramer is likely to be due to stronger ionic interactions existing in it. Conclusion This is the first report for any GST where an alteration in oligomeric structure and not just small conformational change is observed upon GSH binding to the enzyme. Furthermore we also demonstrate a reversible mechanism of regulation of functional activity of Plasmodium falciparum glutathione S-transferase via GSH induced dissociation of functionally

  20. Expression of human glutathione S-transferase 2 in Escherichia coli. Immunological comparison with the basic glutathione S-transferases isoenzymes from human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Board, P G; Pierce, K

    1987-01-01

    A plasmid, termed pTacGST2, which contains the complete coding sequence of a GST2 (glutathione S-transferase 2) subunit and permits the expression of the protein in Escherichia coli was constructed. The expressed protein had the same subunit Mr as the enzyme from normal human liver and retained its catalytic function with both GST and glutathione peroxidase activity. Antiserum raised against the bacterially synthesized protein cross-reacted with all the basic GST isoenzymes in human liver. The electrophoretic mobility in agarose of the bacterially expressed isoenzyme suggested that its pI is identical with that of the cationic isoenzyme from human liver previously termed GST2 type 1. The available evidence suggests that the three common cationic isoenzymes found in human liver are the products of two very similar gene loci. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3325043

  1. Microinjected glutathione S-transferase Yb subunits translocate to the cell nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, C F; Yeoman, L C

    1987-01-01

    We have previously shown that a 30 kDa DNA-binding protein isolated from rat cell nuclei exhibits the chemical and immunological properties of glutathione S-transferase Yb subunits [Bennett, Spector & Yeoman (1986) J. Cell Biol. 102, 600-609]. It was of interest, therefore, to determine whether Yb subunits isolated from rat liver nuclei would return to nuclear fractions upon reintroduction to cell cytoplasms via red-blood-cell-mediated fusion. Labelled Yb subunits were associated with nuclear fractions 60 min after cell fusion. The microinjected protein remained associated with the nuclei for 18 h and was not extractable with low-salt washes. In addition, injected Yb subunits were found to equally distribute between extractable (56%) and residual (44%) nuclear fractions. These experiments demonstrate that glutathione S-transferase Yb subunits isolated from nuclei rapidly translocate to nuclei upon reintroduction into cell cytoplasms. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3689337

  2. The synthesis of ethacrynic acid thiazole derivatives as glutathione S-transferase pi inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Liu, Guyue; Li, Hongcai; Yang, Xinmei; Jing, Yongkui; Zhao, Guisen

    2012-04-01

    Glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi) is a phase II enzyme which protects cells from death and detoxifies chemotherapeutic agents in cancer cells. Ethacrynic acid (EA) is a weak GSTpi inhibitor. Structure modifications were done to improve the ability of EA to inhibit GSTpi activity. Eighteen EA thiazole derivatives were designed and synthesized. Compounds 9a, 9b and 9c with a replacement of carboxyl group of EA by a heterocyclic thiazole exhibited improvement over EA to inhibit GSTpi activity.

  3. Human glutathione S-transferases. Characterization of the anionic forms from lung and placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Dao, D D; Partridge, C A; Kurosky, A; Awasthi, Y C

    1984-01-01

    Anionic glutathione S-transferases were purified from human lung and placenta. Chemical and immunochemical characterization, including polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, gave strong evidence that the anionic lung and placental enzymes are chemically similar, if not identical, proteins. The electrophoretic mobilities of both proteins were identical in conventional alkaline gels as well as in gels containing sodium dodecyl sulphate. Gel filtration of the intact active enzyme established an Mr value of 45000; however, with sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis under dissociating conditions a subunit Mr of 22500 was obtained. Amino acid sequence analysis of the N-terminal region of the placental enzyme revealed a single polypeptide sequence identical with that of lung. Results obtained from immunoelectrophoresis, immunotitration, double immunodiffusion and rocket immunoelectrophoresis also indicated the anionic lung and placental enzymes to be closely similar. The chemical similarity of these two proteins was further supported by protein compositional analysis and fragment analysis after chemical hydrolysis. Immunochemical comparison of the anionic lung and placental enzymes with human liver glutathione S-transferases revealed cross-reactivity with the anionic omega enzyme, but no cross-reactivity was detectable with the cationic enzymes. Comparison of the N-terminal region of the human anionic enzyme with reported sequences of rat liver glutathione S-transferases gave strong evidence of chemical similarity, indicating that these enzymes are evolutionarily related. However, computer analysis of the 30-residue N-terminal sequence did not show any significant chemical similarity to any other reported protein sequence, pointing to the fact that the glutathione S-transferases represent a unique class of proteins. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:6466318

  4. Purification and characterization of hepatic glutathione S-transferases of rhesus monkeys. A family of enzymes similar to the human hepatic glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed Central

    Hoesch, R M; Boyer, T D

    1988-01-01

    Thirteen forms of glutathione S-transferase were purified from the livers of female rhesus monkeys (Macaque mulatta). Most (74.7%) of the activity in the hepatic cytosol adhered well to the GSH affinity column and could be eluted only with the addition of GSH to the eluting buffer. The predominant isoenzymes (n = 5) in this 'high-affinity' fraction had alkaline pI values (greater than 9.0) and contained a subunit with an Mr value of 24,000. All of these isoenzymes had high organic peroxidase activity and, on the basis of amino acid analysis, substrate specificities and affinity for non-substrate ligands, appear to belong to the family of glutathione S-transferases that have been termed alpha [Mannervik, Alin, Guthenberg, Jensson, Tahir, Warholm & Jörnvall (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 82, 7202-7206]. Also within the high-affinity fraction was an isoenzyme with an acidic (5.8) pI value. This acidic isoenzyme was composed of a unique subunit (Mr 23,000). The N-terminal sequence (ten residues) of this acidic enzyme was identical with that of a human form that is referred to as pi. The predominant form of enzyme in the 'low-affinity' (eluted from the GSH affinity column with an increase in buffer pH) fraction was a homodimer of a 26,000-Mr subunit. It had an alkaline pI (greater than 9.0) but it lacked organic peroxidase activity. The N-terminal sequence (ten residues) of this enzyme was identical with that of a human enzyme referred to as mu. The substrate specificities and affinity for non-substrate ligands of this monkey enzyme also were similar to those of the human enzyme. In conclusion, the liver cytosol of rhesus monkeys contains a number of glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes that are very similar to the human hepatic enzymes. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3390162

  5. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fusion based assays for studying protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Vikis, Haris G; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-fusion proteins have become an effective reagent to use in the study of protein-protein interactions. GST-fusion proteins can be produced in bacterial and mammalian cells in large quantities and purified rapidly. GST can be coupled to a glutathione matrix, which permits its use as an effective affinity column to study interactions in vitro or to purify protein complexes in cells expressing the GST-fusion protein. Here, we provide a technical description of the utilization of GST-fusion proteins as both a tool to study protein-protein interactions and also as a means to purify interacting proteins.

  6. Value of glutathion-S transferase pi as a prognostic factor in epithelial ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Saip, P; Tuzlali, S; Demir, K; Sakar, B; Yavuz, E; Berkman, S; Bengisu, E; Topuz, E

    2005-01-01

    The association between glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi) and other clinicopathological parameters, response to chemotherapy and clinical outcome were investigated in chemotherapy naive epithelial ovarian cancer patients. Paraffin-embedded material from 55 patients were used for immunohistochemical analysis. All patients had received six cycles of cisplatinum-based chemotherapy and 41 of them were revalued by laparotomy. Pre- and post-chemotherapy GSTpi staining were detected in the cancer tissues of 18/55 (32.7%) and 5/14 (35.7%) patients, respectively. GSTpi expression was not associated with other clinicopathologic parameters. Of 17 patients with postoperative measurable residual disease clinical response was observed in 4/7 of GSTpi positive and in 9/10 GSTpi negative patients (p = 0.25). Pathologic complete response (pCR) was achieved in 5/8 of GSTpi positive and 11/22 of GSTpi negative cases (p = 0.69). There was no significant difference in overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS) according to initial GSTpi status. However the PFS of the five patients (median 22 +/- 5.9 months) who had postchemotherapy positive GSTpi was significantly shorter than the nine patients (10.0 +/- 2.19 months) who had negative GSTpi (p = 0.006). This difference was not observed in overall survival. These results suggest that initial immunohistochemical staining of GSTpi does not aid in the prediction of pCR and clinical outcome in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer. Nonetheless investigation of GSTpi expression after chemotherapy needs further evaluation.

  7. Characterization of glutathione S-transferase from dwarf pine needles (Pinus mugo Turra).

    PubMed

    Schröder, P; Rennenberg, H

    1992-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase activity conjugating xenobiotics with glutathione (GSH) was found in extracts from needles of dwarf pine (Pinus mugo Turra). In vivo incubation of needle segments with the herbicide fluorodifen at 25 degrees C resulted in conversion of the xenobiotic to water-soluble products at initial rates of 0.7 nmol h(-1) g(fw) (-1). At 15 degrees C, the initial rate of product formation was decreased to 0.1 nmol h(-1) g(fw) (-1). In vitro conjugation studies with chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB) as model substrates gave apparent K(m) values of 0.5 mM GSH and 1.14 mM CDNB in the GSH/CDNB system and 0.3 mM GSH and 0.44 mM DCNB in the GSH/DCNB system. The pH optimum was between 7.7 and 7.9 for both the GSH/CDNB and the GSH/DCNB systems. The temperature optimum for these model substrates was between 30 and 35 degrees C, and only minute amounts of enzyme activity were detected at 15 degrees C. The activation energy in the temperature range of 15 to 30 degrees C was 46 kJ mol(-1). Dwarf pine glutathione S-transferase exhibited an approximate molecular weight of 52 kD.

  8. Glutathione-S-transferase selective release of metformin from its sulfonamide prodrug.

    PubMed

    Rautio, Jarkko; Vernerová, Monika; Aufderhaar, Imke; Huttunen, Kristiina M

    2014-11-01

    In this study, three sulfonamide prodrugs of metformin were designed and synthesized. The bioconversion of the sulfonamide prodrugs by glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was evaluated in rat and human liver S9 fractions as well as with recombinant human GST forms. One of the prodrugs (3) was bioactivated by GST and released metformin in a quantitative manner, whereas the two others were enzymatically stable. Prodrug 3 had a much higher logD value relative to metformin and it was reasonably stable in both acidic buffer and rat small intestine homogenate, which indicates that this prodrug has the potential to increase the oral absorption of metformin.

  9. Glutathion S-transferase activity and DDT-susceptibility of Malaysian mosquitos.

    PubMed

    Lee, H L; Chong, W L

    1995-03-01

    Comparative DDT-susceptibility status and glutathion s-transferase (GST) activity of Malaysian Anopheles maculatus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti was investigated to ascertain the role of this enzyme in DDT resistance. The standardised WHO dose-mortality bioassay tests were used to determine DDT susceptibility in these mosquitos, whilst GST microassay (Brogdon and Barber, 1990) was conducted to measure the activity of this enzyme in mosquito homogenate. It appeared that DDT susceptibility status of Malaysian mosquitos was not correlated with GST activity.

  10. Genomic organization of the glutathione S-transferase family in insects.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Robert

    2011-12-01

    Cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a large and diverse gene family in insects. They are classified into six major subclasses. Sigma, Omega, Zeta, and Theta have representatives across Metazoa while Delta and Epsilon are specific to Insecta and Holometabola, respectively. In this study, GSTs are assigned to a subclass by a combination of literature, phylogenetic, and genomic evidence. Moreover, it is confirmed that GSTs frequently cluster by genomic position as a result of recent gene expansions. These expansions are largely explained by the number of protein-coding genes in the genome, although life history is another contributing factor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Null genotypes of glutathione S-transferase μ1 and glutathione S-transferase θ1 are associated with osteosarcoma risk: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    HAN, JICHENG; DENG, WEI; WANG, LAIYING; QI, WANLI

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genetic polymorphisms has been reported to be associated with osteosarcoma; however, the results of previous studies are conflicting. Thus, in the present study, a meta-analysis was conducted to investigate the effects of GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms on osteosarcoma risk. A literature search was performed in the PubMed, Cochrane Library and China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases to identify case-control studies published prior to March 2014. Data were extracted and pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. In addition, Begg’s test was used to measure publication bias. Sensitivity analysis were performed to ensure the accuracy of the results. The meta-analysis results demonstrated no significant association between the null genotype of GSTM1 and osteosarcoma risk (OR=0.83; 95% CI, 0.37–1.85). By contrast, the results revealed a significant association for the comparison of null vs. non-null genotypes of GSTT1 (OR=1.54; 95% CI, 1.09–2.19). In conclusion, the GSTT1 null genotype may be associated with an increased risk of developing osteosarcoma. Further studies with larger sample sizes and well-designed methodologies are required to verify these conclusions. PMID:25789067

  12. Human liver glutathione S-transferase psi. Chemical characterization and secondary-structure comparison with other mammalian glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S V; Kurosky, A; Awasthi, Y C

    1987-01-01

    The isolation and chemical characterization of the anionic human liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) psi (pI 5.5) are described and compared with other GST isoenzymes reported for rat and human. Amino acid compositional analysis, substrate specificity and isoelectric focusing indicated that GST psi is a unique isoenzyme form of GST. Strikingly, however, amino acid sequence analysis of the N-terminal region indicated that GST psi was identical with GST mu in the first 23 amino acid residues reported. It is likely that these two enzyme forms are at least partially structurally related. In order to investigate further the genetic relationship of GST psi to other reported GST isoenzymes, secondary-structure analysis was performed. Despite substantial differences in the N-terminal-region amino acid sequences of some of the GST isoenzymes, the secondary structure of all the isoenzymes is highly conserved at their N-termini. The general uniformity of the secondary structure of this enzyme class at their N-termini strongly indicated that the observed diversity of these isoenzymes probably occurred as a result of a mechanism of gene duplication followed by divergence rather than a mechanism of convergent evolution. PMID:3606582

  13. Glutathione S-transferase alpha 1 risk polymorphism and increased bilateral thalamus mean diffusivity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Spalletta, Gianfranco; Piras, Fabrizio; Gravina, Paolo; Bello, Mario Lo; Bernardini, Sergio; Caltagirone, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage in brain cells is one of the factors hypothesized to be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1*B polymorphism, a genotype associated with a higher risk of oxidative damage, is associated with increased frequency of schizophrenia diagnosis. Thus, here we studied Glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1 polymorphism and diffusion tensor imaging-mean diffusivity (MD) data on deep grey matter brain structures in 56 patients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revised (DSM-IV-TR) schizophrenia. Clinical diagnosis and psychopathological symptom severity were assessed by using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR (SCID-P) and the Scales for Assessment of Positive and Negative Symptoms (SAPS and SANS). Results confirmed that patients with schizophrenia who were carriers of the GSTA1 *B risk allele had an increased MD in bilateral thalami and increased severity of auditory and global hallucinations in comparison with non-B carriers. Thus, oxidative stress associated factors may be implicated in specific mechanisms of schizophrenia such as altered microstructure of the thalami and specific psychopathological features of auditory hallucinations.

  14. Vaccination of buffaloes with Fasciola gigantica recombinant glutathione S-transferase and fatty acid binding protein.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Niranjan; Anju, Varghese; Gaurav, Nagar; Chandra, Dinesh; Samanta, S; Gupta, S C; Adeppa, J; Raina, O K

    2012-01-01

    Fasciola gigantica, causative agent of tropical fasciolosis, inflicts substantial economic losses on the livestock industry, affecting severely buffalo productivity in the tropical countries. Very few vaccination trials with different target antigens against F. gigantica infection have been conducted in this host. Present study describes a vaccination trial in buffaloes with F. gigantica recombinant glutathione S-transferase and fatty acid binding protein. The two recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and evaluated for their immunoprophylactic potential in buffalo calves, using montanide 70 M-VG, a mineral oil-based adjuvant, for delivering the antigens. Buffalo calves were distributed in three groups, with group I, II and III calves immunized with recombinant glutathione S-transferase, fatty acid binding protein and a cocktail of these two antigens, respectively. Immunization of the calves evoked a mixed IgG1 and IgG2 antibody response. Present vaccination trial in these animals achieved a maximum protection level of 35%, when the two antigens were used in combination. Eosinophils were measured in both immunized and non-immunized challenge control animals, which showed a steady increase in their count in response to immunization with both the antigens and infection with F. gigantica, respectively.

  15. Miners compensated for pneumoconiosis and glutathione s-transferases M1 and T1 genotypes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anna; Ebbinghaus, Rainer; Prager, Hans-Martin; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inhalation of quartz-containing dust produces reversible inflammatory changes in lungs resulting in irreversible fibrotic changes termed pneumoconiosis. Due to the inflammatory process in the lungs, highly reactive substances are released that may be detoxified by glutathione S-transferases. Therefore, 90 hard coal miners with pneumoconiosis as a recognized occupational disease (in Germany: Berufskrankheit BK 4101) were genotyped for glutathione S-transferases M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1) according to standard methods. Furthermore, occupational exposure and smoking habits were assessed by questionnaire. Changes in a chest x-ray were classified according to ILO classification 2000. Of the investigated hard coal miners 43% were GSTM1 negative whereas 57% were GSTM1 positive. The arithmetic mean of the age at time of investigation was 74.2 yr (range: 42-87 yr). Seventy-four percent of the hard coal miners reported being ever smokers, while 26% denied smoking. All hard coal miners provided pneumoconiosis-related changes in the chest x-ray. The observed frequency of GSTM1 negative hard coal miners was not different from frequencies reported for general Caucasian populations and in agreement with findings reported for Chinese coal miners. In contrast, in a former study, 16 of 19 German hard coal miners (84%) with urinary bladder cancer displayed a GSTM1 negative genotype. The outcome of this study provides evidence that severely occupationally exposed Caucasian hard coal miners do not present an elevated level of GSTM1 negative individuals.

  16. Irreversible Inhibition of Glutathione S-Transferase by Phenethyl Isothiocyanate (PEITC), a Dietary Cancer Chemopreventive Phytochemical

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Vandana; Dyba, Marzena A.; Holland, Ryan J.; Liang, Yu-He; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2016-01-01

    Dietary isothiocyanates abundant as glucosinolate precursors in many edible cruciferous vegetables are effective for prevention of cancer in chemically-induced and transgenic rodent models. Some of these agents, including phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), have already advanced to clinical investigations. The primary route of isothiocyanate metabolism is its conjugation with glutathione (GSH), a reaction catalyzed by glutathione S-transferase (GST). The pi class GST of subunit type 1 (hGSTP1) is much more effective than the alpha class GST of subunit type 1 (hGSTA1) in catalyzing the conjugation. Here, we report the crystal structures of hGSTP1 and hGSTA1 each in complex with the GSH adduct of PEITC. We find that PEITC also covalently modifies the cysteine side chains of GST, which irreversibly inhibits enzymatic activity. PMID:27684484

  17. Biochemical properties of an omega-class glutathione S-transferase of the silkmoth, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kohji; Nagaoka, Sumiharu; Banno, Yutaka; Aso, Yoichi

    2009-05-01

    A cDNA encoding an omega-class glutathione S-transferase of the silkmoth, Bombyx mori (bmGSTO), was cloned by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The resulting clone was sequenced and deduced for amino acid sequence, which revealed 40, 40, and 39% identities to omega-class GSTs from human, pig, and mouse, respectively. A recombinant protein (rbmGSTO) was functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells in a soluble form and purified to homogeneity. rbmGSTO was able to catalyze the biotranslation of glutathione with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, a model substrate for GST, as well as with 4-hydroxynonenal, a product of lipid peroxidation. This enzyme was shown to have high affinity for organophosphorus insecticide and was present abundantly in silkmoth strain exhibiting fenitrothion resistance. These results indicate that bmGSTO could be involved in the increase in level of insecticide resistance for lepidopteran insects.

  18. Reversal of hypermethylation and reactivation of glutathione S-transferase pi 1 gene by curcumin in breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Umesh; Sharma, Ujjawal; Rathi, Garima

    2017-02-01

    One of the mechanisms for epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes is hypermethylation of cytosine residue at CpG islands at their promoter region that contributes to malignant progression of tumor. Therefore, activation of tumor suppressor genes that have been silenced by promoter methylation is considered to be very attractive molecular target for cancer therapy. Epigenetic silencing of glutathione S-transferase pi 1, a tumor suppressor gene, is involved in various types of cancers including breast cancer. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes can be reversed by several molecules including natural compounds such as polyphenols that can act as a hypomethylating agent. Curcumin has been found to specifically target various tumor suppressor genes and alter their expression. To check the effect of curcumin on the methylation pattern of glutathione S-transferase pi 1 gene in MCF-7 breast cancer cell line in dose-dependent manner. To check the reversal of methylation pattern of hypermethylated glutathione S-transferase pi 1, MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was treated with different concentrations of curcumin for different time periods. DNA and proteins of treated and untreated cell lines were isolated, and methylation status of the promoter region of glutathione S-transferase pi 1 was analyzed using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assay, and expression of this gene was analyzed by immunoblotting using specific antibodies against glutathione S-transferase pi 1. A very low and a nontoxic concentration (10 µM) of curcumin treatment was able to reverse the hypermethylation and led to reactivation of glutathione S-transferase pi 1 protein expression in MCF-7 cells after 72 h of treatment, although the IC50 value of curcumin was found to be at 20 µM. However, curcumin less than 3 µM of curcumin could not alter the promoter methylation pattern of glutathione S-transferase pi 1. Treatment of breast cancer MCF-7 cells with curcumin causes

  19. Molecular mimicry between cockroach and helminth glutathione S-transferases promotes cross-reactivity and cross-sensitization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The extensive similarities between helminth proteins and allergens are thought to contribute to helminth-driven allergic sensitization. We investigated the molecular and structural similarities between Bla g 5, a major glutathione-S transferase (GST) allergen of cockroaches, and the GST of Wucherer...

  20. Glutathione-S-transferase-pi (GST-pi) expression in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kaprilian, Christina; Horti, Maria; Kandilaris, Kosmas; Skolarikos, Andreas; Trakas, Nikolaos; Kastriotis, Ioannis; Deliveliotis, Charalambos

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance correlates with unfavourable treatment outcomes in numerous cancers including renal cell carcinoma. The expression and clinical relevance of Glutathione-S-transferase-pi (GST-pi), a multidrug resistance factor, in kidney tumors remain controversial. We analyzed the expression of GST-pi in 60 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinoma samples by immunohistochemistry and compared them with matched normal regions of the kidney. A significantly higher expression of GST-pi was observed in 87% of clear cell carcinoma and 50% of papillary subtypes. GST-pi expression did not correlate with tumor grade or patient survival. GST-pi is unlikely to be a prognostic factor for renal cell carcinoma. However, further studies with large number of samples are warranted to establish the role of GST-pi, if any, in intrinsic or acquired resistance of renal cell carcinoma to conventional treatments.

  1. SKN-1-independent transcriptional activation of glutathione S-transferase 4 (GST-4) by EGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Detienne, Giel; Van de Walle, Pieter; De Haes, Wouter; Schoofs, Liliane; Temmerman, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    In C. elegans research, transcriptional activation of glutathione S-transferase 4 (gst-4) is often used as a read-out for SKN-1 activity. While many heed an assumed non-exclusivity of the GFP reporter signal driven by the gst-4 promoter to SKN-1, this is also often ignored. We here show that gst-4 can also be transcriptionally activated by EOR-1, a transcription factor mediating effects of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) pathway. Along with enhancing exogenous oxidative stress tolerance, EOR-1 inde-pendently of SKN-1 increases gst-4 transcription in response to augmented EGF signaling. Our findings caution researchers within the C. elegans community to always rely on sufficient experimental controls when assaying SKN-1 transcriptional activity with a gst-4p::gfp reporter, such as SKN-1 loss-of-function mutants and/or additional target genes next to gst-4.

  2. Glutathione S-transferase mediates an ageing response to mitochondrial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Dancy, Beverley M.; Brockway, Nicole; Ramadasan-Nair, Renjini; Yang, Yoing; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Morgan, Philip G.

    2016-01-01

    To understand primary mitochondrial disease, we utilized a complex I-deficient Caenorhabditis elegans mutant, gas-1. These animals strongly upregulate the expression of gst-14 (encoding a glutathione S-transferase). Knockdown of gst-14 dramatically extends the lifespan of gas-1 and increases hydroxynonenal (HNE) modified mitochondrial proteins without improving complex I function. We observed no change in reactive oxygen species levels as measured by Mitosox staining, consistent with a potential role of GST-14 in HNE clearance. The upregulation of gst-14 in gas-1 animals is specific to the pharynx. These data suggest that an HNE-mediated response in the pharynx could be beneficial for lifespan extension in the context of complex I dysfunction in C. elegans. Thus, whereas HNE is typically considered damaging, our work is consistent with recent reports of its role in signaling, and that in this case, the signal is pro-longevity in a model of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26704446

  3. Activity of carboxylesterases, glutathione-S-transferase and monooxygenase on Rhipicephalus microplus exposed to fluazuron.

    PubMed

    Gaudêncio, Fabrício Nascimento; Klafke, Guilherme Marcondes; Tunholi-Alves, Vinícius Menezes; Ferreira, Thaís Paes; Coelho, Cristiane Nunes; da Fonseca, Adivaldo Henrique; da Costa Angelo, Isabele; Pinheiro, Jairo

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of the exposure to fluazuron on the activity of common pesticide detoxification enzyme groups in the cattle tick (Rhipicephalus microplus). Engorged females of a susceptible strain (POA) and a resistant strain (Jaguar) were exposed in vitro to fluazuron and their eggs and larvae were used to compare the activities of the general esterases, mixed-function oxidases (MFO) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). The results showed significant elevation in MFO contents and esterases activity in the resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain, in eggs and larvae respectively. In the POA strain, the MFO activity in eggs was down-regulated by fluazuron exposure. Based on these results, it can be concluded that different detoxification enzymes can act in distinct pathways depending on the tick's development stage, and may be related to fluazuron detoxification in resistant strains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Glutathione-S-transferase-pi (GST-pi) expression in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Horti, Maria; Kandilaris, Kosmas; Skolarikos, Andreas; Trakas, Nikolaos; Kastriotis, Ioannis; Deliveliotis, Charalambos

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance correlates with unfavourable treatment outcomes in numerous cancers including renal cell carcinoma. The expression and clinical relevance of Glutathione-S-transferase-pi (GST-pi), a multidrug resistance factor, in kidney tumors remain controversial. We analyzed the expression of GST-pi in 60 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded renal cell carcinoma samples by immunohistochemistry and compared them with matched normal regions of the kidney. A significantly higher expression of GST-pi was observed in 87% of clear cell carcinoma and 50% of papillary subtypes. GST-pi expression did not correlate with tumor grade or patient survival. GST-pi is unlikely to be a prognostic factor for renal cell carcinoma. However, further studies with large number of samples are warranted to establish the role of GST-pi, if any, in intrinsic or acquired resistance of renal cell carcinoma to conventional treatments.

  5. Phi Class of Glutathione S-transferase Gene Superfamily Widely Exists in Nonplant Taxonomic Groups

    PubMed Central

    Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes involved in detoxification of noxious compounds and protection against oxidative damage. GST class Phi (GSTF), one of the important classes of plant GSTs, has long been considered as plant specific but was recently found in basidiomycete fungi. However, the range of nonplant taxonomic groups containing GSTFs remains unknown. In this study, the distribution and phylogenetic relationships of nonplant GSTFs were investigated. We identified GSTFs in ascomycete fungi, myxobacteria, and protists Naegleria gruberi and Aureococcus anophagefferens. GSTF occurrence in these bacteria and protists correlated with their genome sizes and habitats. While this link was missing across ascomycetes, the distribution and abundance of GSTFs among ascomycete genomes could be associated with their lifestyles to some extent. Sequence comparison, gene structure, and phylogenetic analyses indicated divergence among nonplant GSTFs, suggesting polyphyletic origins during evolution. Furthermore, in silico prediction of functional partners suggested functional diversification among nonplant GSTFs. PMID:26884677

  6. Mechanistic studies of inactivation of glutathione S-transferase Pi isozyme by a haloenol lactone derivative.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jiang; Liu, Guangxian; Tozkoparan, Birsen; Wen, Dingyi

    2005-03-01

    Cancer chemotherapy often fails due to acquired drug resistance. One of the most critical biochemical changes observed in drug-resistant tumor cells is over-expression of glutathione S-transferase Pi isozyme (GSTP1). Glutathione S-transferase inhibitors have been used as potentiating agents of chemotherapeutic drugs. Earlier we reported haloenol lactone 1 as a site-directed GSTP1 inactivator. We proposed that enzymatic hydrolysis of the haloenol lactone may be the initial step of GSTP1 chemical modification, resulting in the inactivation of the enzyme. Enzyme inactivation is initiated through addition of Cys-47 to the lactone ring, which is opened in the process to form an alpha-bromoketone adduct. The acidity of Cys-47 confers good leaving group properties, and rapid hydrolysis occurs to generate an alpha-bromoketoacid intermediate. The reaction may proceed via alkylation of the transient thioester to form a six-membered ring episulfonium ion intermediate which would be yet more reactive toward hydrolysis, with either process leading to the observed mass increase of 230 Da. To probe the importance of the bromine of the lactone in GST inactivation, we designed and synthesized compound 2. Unlike lactone 1, lactone 2 did not show time-dependent inhibitory effect on GSTP1. Incubation of compounds 1 and 2 with excess of N-acetyl cysteine produced the corresponding di-N-acetyl cysteine conjugate and mono-N-acetyl cysteine conjugate, respectively. To probe the role of Cys-47 in the inactivation of GSTP1 by compound 1, we prepared mutant C47A GSTP1. The mutant GSTP1 still showed good activity toward CDNB, but it lost susceptibility to the inactivation by compound 1. In addition, LC-MS/MS technique allowed us to identify the modified Cys-47 after the enzyme was exposed to compound 1.

  7. Insights into ligand binding to a glutathione S-transferase from mango: Structure, thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Chavira, Ignacio; Contreras-Vergara, Carmen A; Arvizu-Flores, Aldo A; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; Lopez-Zavala, Alonso A; García-Orozco, Karina D; Hernandez-Paredes, Javier; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Stojanoff, Vivian; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Islas-Osuna, Maria A

    2017-04-01

    We studied a mango glutathione S-transferase (GST) (Mangifera indica) bound to glutathione (GSH) and S-hexyl glutathione (GSX). This GST Tau class (MiGSTU) had a molecular mass of 25.5 kDa. MiGSTU Michaelis-Menten kinetic constants were determined for their substrates obtaining a Km, Vmax and kcat for CDNB of 0.792 mM, 80.58 mM min(-1) and 68.49 s(-1) respectively and 0.693 mM, 105.32 mM min(-1) and 89.57 s(-1), for reduced GSH respectively. MiGSTU had a micromolar affinity towards GSH (5.2 μM) or GSX (7.8 μM). The crystal structure of the MiGSTU in apo or bound to GSH or GSX generated a model that explains the thermodynamic signatures of binding and showed the importance of enthalpic-entropic compensation in ligand binding to Tau-class GST enzymes.

  8. Recognition and Detoxification of the Insecticide DDT by Drosophila melanogaster Glutathione S-Transferase D1

    SciTech Connect

    Low, Wai Yee; Feil, Susanne C.; Ng, Hooi Ling; Gorman, Michael A.; Morton, Craig J.; Pyke, James; McConville, Malcolm J.; Bieri, Michael; Mok, Yee-Foong; Robin, Charles; Gooley, Paul R.; Parker, Michael W.; Batterham, Philip

    2010-06-14

    GSTD1 is one of several insect glutathione S-transferases capable of metabolizing the insecticide DDT. Here we use crystallography and NMR to elucidate the binding of DDT and glutathione to GSTD1. The crystal structure of Drosophila melanogaster GSTD1 has been determined to 1.1 {angstrom} resolution, which reveals that the enzyme adopts the canonical GST fold but with a partially occluded active site caused by the packing of a C-terminal helix against one wall of the binding site for substrates. This helix would need to unwind or be displaced to enable catalysis. When the C-terminal helix is removed from the model of the crystal structure, DDT can be computationally docked into the active site in an orientation favoring catalysis. Two-dimensional {sup 1}H,{sup 15}N heteronuclear single-quantum coherence NMR experiments of GSTD1 indicate that conformational changes occur upon glutathione and DDT binding and the residues that broaden upon DDT binding support the predicted binding site. We also show that the ancestral GSTD1 is likely to have possessed DDT dehydrochlorinase activity because both GSTD1 from D. melanogaster and its sibling species, Drosophila simulans, have this activity.

  9. Optical biosensor consisting of glutathione-S-transferase for detection of captan.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Young-Kee; Song, Sun-Young; Lee, In-ho; Lee, Won-Hong

    2003-10-15

    The optical biosensor consisting of a glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-immobilized gel film was developed to detect captan in contaminated water. The sensing scheme was based on the decrease of yellow product, s-(2,4-dinitrobenzene) glutathione, produced from substrates, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione (GSH), due to the inhibition of GST reaction by captan. Absorbance of the product as the output of enzyme reaction was detected and the light was guided through the optical fibers. The enzyme reactor of the sensor system was fabricated by the gel entrapment technique for the immobilized GST film. The immobilized GST had the maximum activity at pH 6.5. The optimal concentrations of substrates were determined with 1 mM for both of CDNB and GSH. The optimum concentration of enzyme was also determined with 100 microg/ml. The activity of immobilized enzyme was fairly sustained during 30 days. The proposed biosensor could successfully detect the captan up to 2 ppm and the response time to steady signal was about 15 min.

  10. HPV antibody detection by ELISA with capsid protein L1 fused to glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Sehr, Peter; Müller, Martin; Höpfl, Reinhard; Widschwendter, Andreas; Pawlita, Michael

    2002-10-01

    An alternative enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was developed to analyze antibodies to human papillomavirus capsid antigens. The assay uses glutathione crosslinked to casein to capture the major capsid protein L1 from human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6b, 16 and 18 fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST) as antigen. The method allows efficient one-step purification of L1 fusion protein from crude bacterial lysates on ELISA plates coated with glutathione casein. The GST-L1 capture ELISA detected HPV 16 antibodies with high type specificity. Comparison with the current "gold-standard" for L1-serology that uses virus-like particles (VLP) as antigen demonstrated similar assay sensitivity. Pairwise comparison of the absorbance values of 105 human sera obtained in the two ELISA formats for HPV 16 showed a R(2) value of linear regression of 0.68. Conformity of the two ELISAs in classification of sera as HPV 16 L1 antibody-positive or -negative was verified with Cohen's kappa test, yielding a value of 0.62. These data indicate that the GST-L1 capture ELISA is similar in performance to the VLP ELISA. The ease of antigen production and purification in the GST-based ELISA will be advantageous to screen large sample numbers in vaccine trials or epidemiological studies examining immune responses to many HPV types in parallel.

  11. Atrazine Resistance in a Velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti) Biotype Due to Enhanced Glutathione S-Transferase Activity 1

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael P.; Gronwald, John W.

    1991-01-01

    We previously reported that a velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medic) biotype found in Maryland was resistant to atrazine because of an enhanced capacity to detoxify the herbicide via glutathione conjugation (JW Gronwald, Andersen RN, Yee C [1989] Pestic Biochem Physiol 34: 149-163). The biochemical basis for the enhanced atrazine conjugation capacity in this biotype was examined. Glutathione levels and glutathione S-transferase activity were determined in extracts from the atrazine-resistant biotype and an atrazine-susceptible or “wild-type” velvetleaf biotype. In both biotypes, the highest concentration of glutathione (approximately 500 nanomoles per gram fresh weight) was found in leaf tissue. However, no significant differences were found in glutathione levels in roots, stems, or leaves of either biotype. In both biotypes, the highest concentration of glutathione S-transferase activity measured with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene or atrazine as substrate was in leaf tissue. Glutathione S-transferase measured with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as substrate was 40 and 25% greater in leaf and stem tissue, respectively, of the susceptible biotype compared to the resistant biotype. In contrast, glutathione S-transferase activity measured with atrazine as substrate was 4.4- and 3.6-fold greater in leaf and stem tissue, respectively, of the resistant biotype. Kinetic analyses of glutathione S-transferase activity in leaf extracts from the resistant and susceptible biotypes were performed with the substrates glutathione, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, and atrazine. There was little or no change in apparent Km values for glutathione, atrazine, or 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. However, the Vmax for glutathione and atrazine were approximately 3-fold higher in the resistant biotype than in the susceptible biotype. In contrast, the Vmax for 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene was 30% lower in the resistant biotype. Leaf glutathione S-transferase isozymes that exhibit activity with

  12. MIF protein are theta-class glutathione S-transferase homologs.

    PubMed

    Blocki, F A; Ellis, L B; Wackett, L P

    1993-12-01

    MIF proteins are mammalian polypeptides of approximately 13,000 molecular weight. This class includes human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a rat liver protein that has glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity (TRANSMIF), and the mouse delayed early response gene 6 (DER6) protein. MIF proteins were previously linked to GSTs by demonstrating transferase activity and observing N-terminal sequence homology with a mu-class GST (Blocki, F.A., Schlievert, P.M., & Wackett, L.P., 1992, Nature 360, 269-270). In this study, MIF proteins are shown to be structurally related to the theta class of GSTs. This is established in three ways. First, unique primary sequence patterns are developed for each of the GST gene classes. The patterns identify the three MIF proteins as theta-like transferase homologs. Second, pattern analysis indicates that GST members of the theta class contain a serine residue in place of the N-terminal tyrosine that is implicated in glutathione deprotonation and activation in GSTs of known structure (Liu, S., et al., 1992, J. Biol. Chem. 267, 4296-4299). The MIF proteins contain a threonine at this position. Third, polyclonal antibodies raised against recombinant human MIF cross-react on Western blots with rat theta GST but not with alpha and mu GSTs. That MIF proteins have glutathione-binding ability may provide a common structural key toward understanding the varied functions of this widely distributed emerging gene family. Because theta is thought to be the most ancient evolutionary GST class, MIF proteins may have diverged early in evolution but retained a glutathione-binding domain.

  13. Functional complementation of anthocyanin sequestration in the vacuole by widely divergent glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed Central

    Alfenito, M R; Souer, E; Goodman, C D; Buell, R; Mol, J; Koes, R; Walbot, V

    1998-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) traditionally have been studied in plants and other organisms for their ability to detoxify chemically diverse herbicides and other toxic organic compounds. Anthocyanins are among the few endogenous substrates of plant GSTs that have been identified. The Bronze2 (Bz2) gene encodes a type III GST and performs the last genetically defined step of the maize anthocyanin pigment pathway. This step is the conjugation of glutathione to cyanidin 3-glucoside (C3G). Glutathionated C3G is transported to the vacuole via a tonoplast Mg-ATP-requiring glutathione pump (GS-X pump). Genetically, the comparable step in the petunia anthocyanin pathway is controlled by the Anthocyanin9 (An9) gene. An9 was cloned by transposon tagging and found to encode a type I plant GST. Bz2 and An9 have evolved independently from distinct types of GSTs, but each is regulated by the conserved transcriptional activators of the anthocyanin pathway. Here, a phylogenetic analysis is presented, with special consideration given to the origin of these genes and their relaxed substrate requirements. In particle bombardment tests, An9 and Bz2 functionally complement both mutants. Among several other GSTs tested, only soybean GmGST26A (previously called GmHsp26A and GH2/4) and maize GSTIII were found to confer vacuolar sequestration of anthocyanin. Previously, these genes had not been associated with the anthocyanin pathway. Requirements for An9 and Bz2 gene function were investigated by sequencing functional and nonfunctional germinal revertants of an9-T3529, bz2::Ds, and bz2::Mu1. PMID:9668133

  14. Calorimetric studies of ligands binding to glutathione S-transferase from the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; Barón, Carmen; García-Maroto, Federico; Aguilera, Ana M; García-Fuentes, Luís

    2013-03-19

    Glutathione S-transferase, from the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfGST), exerts a protective role in the organism and is thus considered an interesting target for antimalarial drug development. In contrast to other GSTs, it is present in solution as a tetramer and a dimer in equilibrium, which is induced by glutathione (GSH). These properties prevent a calorimetric titration from being conducted upon binding of ligands to this protein's G-site. Thermodynamic characterization can be an optimal strategy for antimalarial drug development, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the only technique that allows the separation of the binding energy into both enthalpic and entropic contributions. This information facilitates an understanding of the changes in the drugs' substituents, improving their affinity and specificity. In this study, we have applied a nontypical ITC procedure, based on the dissociation of the ligand-protein complex, to calorimetrically study the binding of the GSH substrate, and the glutathione sulfonate competitive inhibitor, to dimeric PfGST over a temperature range of 15-37 °C. The optimal experimental conditions for applying this procedure have been optimized by studying the dimer to tetramer conversion using size exclusion chromatography. The binding of these ligands to dimeric PfGST is noncooperative, the affinity of glutathione sulfonate being approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than that of its natural substrate GSH. The binding of both ligands is enthalpically favorable and entropically unfavorable at all the studied temperatures. These results demonstrate that, although PfGST presents differences when compared to other known GSTs, these ligands bind to its dimeric form with a similar affinity and energetic balance. However, in contrast to that of other GSTs, the binding of GSH to protein, in the absence of the ligand, is slow.

  15. Association between herbivore stress and glutathione S-transferase expression in Pinus brutia Ten.

    PubMed

    Semiz, A; Çelik-Turgut, G; Semiz, G; Özgün, Ö; Şen, A

    2016-03-31

    Plants have developed mechanisms to defend themselves against many factors including biotic stress such as herbivores and pathogens. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) is a glutathione-dependent detoxifying enzyme and plays critical roles in stress tolerance and detoxification metabolism in plants. Pinus brutia Ten. is a prominent native forest tree species in Turkey, due to both its economic and ecological assets. One of the problems faced by P. brutia afforestation sites is the attacks by pine processionary moth (Thaumetopoea wilkinsoni Tams.). In this study, we investigated the changes in activity and mRNA expression of GST in pine samples taken from both resistant and susceptible clones against T. wilkinsoni over a nine month period in a clonal seed orchard. It was found that the average cytosolic GST activities of trees in March and July were significantly higher than the values obtained in November. November was considered to be the control since trees were not under stress yet. In addition, RT-PCR results clearly showed that levels of GST transcripts in March and July samples were significantly higher as compared to the level seen in November. These findings strongly suggest that GST activity from P. brutia would be a valuable marker for exposure to herbivory stress.

  16. Glutathione S-transferase pi in an arsenic-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, J F; Wang, H F; Tam, M F; Lee, T C

    1992-01-01

    A glutathione S-transferase (GST) was purified from an arsenic-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cell line, SA7. The SA7 GST was shown to catalyse the conjugation of glutathione and ethacrynic acid, a specific substrate for Pi class GST. Its N-terminal amino-acid sequence has 80% identical residues to that of rat GST P and human GST pi. Thus, the GST purified from SA7 cells belongs to the Pi family. Treatment with Cibacron Blue or ethacrynic acid, which are GST inhibitors, significantly decreased the resistance of SA7 cells to sodium arsenite. On the other hand, pretreatment of SA7N cells, a partial revertant of SA7 cells, with sublethal doses of sodium arsenite, cadmium acetate or zinc sulphate resulted in re-elevation of GST activities and the cells regained the arsenic resistance. The regained arsenic resistance was well correlated with the levels of GST pi which were induced dose-dependently by zinc sulphate. Heat-shock treatment (45 degrees C for 10 min) did not increase GST pi expression or arsenic resistance of SA7N cells. The results indicate that GST pi is possibly involved in the mechanism of arsenic detoxification. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. Fig. 6. PMID:1472011

  17. Differential regulation of three genes encoding glutathione S-transferases in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Gyum; Kim, Byung-Chul; Park, Eun-Hee; Ahn, Kisup; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2004-12-31

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are detoxifying enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of glutathione with a variety of reactive electrophilic compounds. Three GST genes were previously characterized in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In this work, we examined the transcriptional regulation of these genes using individual GST-lacZ fusions and RT-PCR. Basal synthesis of beta-galactosidase from the GSTII-lacZ fusion was higher than from the GSTI-lacZ and GSTIII-lacZ fusion. Diethylmaleate (0.2 mM) greatly enhanced the synthesis of beta-galactosidase from the GSTII-lacZ fusion, but did not affect synthesis from the other two fusion genes. A switch to 0.3% glucose or 0.3% sucrose as sole carbon source enhanced expression from the GSTIII-lacZ fusion gene, while sodium nitroprusside (1.5 mM), tert-butylhydroquinone (0.2 mM), and L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (0.01 mM) increased expression of the GSTII gene. The effects of these agents on GST mRNA levels were confirmed by measurements employing RT-PCR. Our results suggest that transcription of the three S. pombe GST genes is subjected to differential regulation under various stress conditions, and may be linked to their different physiological functions.

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of potential modulators of malarial glutathione-S-transferase(s).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rumana; Srivastava, Arvind K; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Batra, Sanjay; Walter, Rolf D

    2007-06-01

    Glutathione-S-transferase(s) (E.C.2.5.1.18, GSTs) have been investigated in parasitic protozoans with respect to their biochemistry and they have been identified as potential vaccine candidates in protozoan parasites and as a target in the synthesis of new antiparasitic agents. In a search towards the identification of novel biochemical targets for antimalarial drug design, the area of Plasmodium glutathione metabolism provides a number of promising chemotherapeutic targets. GST activity was determined in various subcellular fractions of malarial parasites Plasmodium yoelii and was found to be localized mainly in the cytosolic fraction (specific activity, c. 0.058 +/- 0.016 micromol/min/mg protein). Hemin, a known inhibitor of mammalian GST(s), maximally inhibited this enzyme from P. yoelii to nearly 86%. In a search towards synthetic modulators of malarial GST(s), 575 compounds belonging to various chemical classes were screened for their effect on crude GST from P. yoelii and 92 compounds belonging to various chemical classes were studied on recombinant GST from P. falciparum. Among all the compounds screened, 83 compounds inhibited/stimulated the enzyme from P. yoelii/P. falciparum to the extent of 40% or more.

  19. Purification and biochemical characterization of cytosolic glutathione-S-transferase from malarial parasites Plasmodium yoelii.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rumana; Srivastava, Arvind K

    2007-02-01

    Glutathione (GSH) metabolism represents a potential target for antiparasitic drug design. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), an important enzyme of the GSH cycle, is considered to be an essential detoxification enzyme in parasitic species. Soluble GST from rodent malarial parasites Plasmodium yoelii was purified to homogeneity using a combination of salt precipitation, affinity chromatography on GSH-sepharose 6B and ultrafiltration. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis revealed a single band and activity staining was also detected on PAGE gels. Kinetic studies on the purified enzyme revealed significant differences between the parasitic and mammalian enzymes. The purified enzyme exhibited an optimum pH of 8.2 and K (m) values of 0.2+/-0.213 and 3.3+/-0.056 mM with respect to co-substrate GSH and substrate 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), respectively. Hemin, the known mammalian GST inhibitor was found to be a potent inhibitor of P. yoelii GST, with a K (i) of 4.0 microM.

  20. Glutathione S-transferase from malarial parasites: structural and functional aspects.

    PubMed

    Deponte, Marcel; Becker, Katja

    2005-01-01

    Malaria represents an emerging disease because of increasing parasite resistance against available drugs and because of increasing geographical distribution of the causative agent, Plasmodium falciparum. The complete genome of Plasmodium was sequenced recently, revealing that the parasite harbors only one glutathione S-transferase (PfGST). This observation was of particular interest: First, certain antimalarial drugs such as chloroquine and methylene blue presumably influence the glutathione metabolism in which PfGST is involved. Second, PfGST might play a significant role in drug resistance. PfGST was studied in parasite extracts and as recombinant protein, and its x-ray structure has been solved. The available data indicate that the homodimeric PfGST cannot be assigned to any of the previously known GST classes. PfGST exhibits significant structural differences to human GSTs, particularly at the so-called hydrophobic binding pocket (H-site) where the second substrate binds. Inhibition of PfGST is expected to act at different vulnerable metabolic sites of the parasite in parallel; it is likely to disturb GSH-dependent detoxification processes, to increase the levels of cytotoxic peroxides, and possibly to increase the concentration of toxic hemin. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge on PfGST, including aspects of structure, function, and future drug development.

  1. Glutathione S-transferase Copy Number Variation Alters Lung Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Marcus W.; Hackett, Neil R; Salit, Jacqueline; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Omberg, Larsson; Mezey, Jason; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes catalyze the conjugation of xenobiotics to glutathione. Based on reports that inherited copy number variations (CNV) modulate some GST gene expression levels, and that the small airway epithelium (SAE) and alveolar macrophages (AM) are involved early in the pathogenesis of smoking-induced lung disease, we asked: do germline CNVs modulate GST expression levels in SAE and AM? Methods Microarrays were used to survey GST gene expression in SAE and AM obtained by bronchoscopy from current smokers and nonsmokers, and to determine CNV genotypes. Results Twenty six % of subjects were null for both GSTM1 alleles, with reduced GSTM1 mRNA levels seen in both SAE and AM. Thirty % of subjects had homozygous deletions of GSTT1 with reduced mRNA levels in both tissues. Interestingly, GSTT2B, exhibited homozygous deletion in blood in 27% of subjects and was not expressed in SAE in the remainder of subjects but was expressed in AM of heterozygotes and wild type subjects, proportionate to genotype. Conclusions These data show a germline CNV-mediated linear relationship of genotype to expression level suggesting minimal compensation of gene expression levels in heterozygotes consistent with GST polymorphisms playing a role in the risk of smoking-associated xenobiotic-induced lung disease. PMID:21349909

  2. Relationship between oxidative stress, glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms and hydroxyurea treatment in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danilo Grünig Humberto; Belini Junior, Edis; Torres, Lidiane de Souza; Ricci Júnior, Octávio; Lobo, Clarisse de Castro; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia Regina; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves

    2011-06-15

    This study evaluated the oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity markers in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients with and without treatment with hydroxyurea. We assessed GSTT1, GSTM1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms in patients and a control group. The study groups were composed of 48 subjects without hemoglobinopathies and 28 SCA patients, 13 treated with HU [SCA (+HU)], and 15 SCA patients not treated with HU [SCA (-HU)]. We observed a significant difference for GSTP1 polymorphisms in SCA patients with the V/V genotype that showed higher glutathione (GSH) and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) (p=0.0445 and p=0.0360), respectively, compared with the I/I genotype. HU use was associated with a 35.2% decrease in the lipid peroxidation levels of the SCA (+HU) group (p<0.0001). Moreover, the SCA (+HU) group showed higher TEAC as compared to the control group (p=0.002). We did not find any significant difference in glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity between the groups (p=0.76), but the catalase (CAT) activity was about 17% and 30% decreased in the SCA (+HU) and SCA (-HU) groups, respectively (p<0.00001). Whereas the plasma GSH levels were ~2 times higher in the SCA patients than the control group (p=0.0005). HU use has contributed to higher CAT activity and TEAC, and lower lipid peroxidation in patients under treatment. These findings may explain the influence of HU in ameliorating oxidative stress on SCA subjects.

  3. Copper-Induced Inactivation of Camel Liver Glutathione S-Transferase.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Anwar; Malik, Ajamaluddin; Jagirdar, Haseeb; Rabbani, Nayyar; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman M; Ismael, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes and play an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics and protection against oxidative stress. Camel liver glutathione transferase (cGST) was recently isolated and characterized in our lab. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of monovalent, divalent, and trivalent cations on its activity and stability. Cu(++) was found to be the potent inhibitor of GST activity which loses complete activity at 0.5-mM concentration. Other metal ions did not inhibit GST even at higher concentration of 2 mM. GST incubated with Cu(++) (0.1 mM) resulted decrease in free sulfhydryl groups by 55%, whereas other metal ions did not show any effect on free thiol content. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed formation of GST aggregates instantly in the presence of Cu(++), which further increased in molecular size with increase in time of incubation. DTT treatment resulted in de-aggregation of GST oligomers to its monomeric form. However, the GST activity was not recovered completely after de-aggregation. Cu(++) was found to inhibit GST activity by accelerating the inter- and intra-disulfide bond formation. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) results showed that Cu(++)-catalyzed air oxidation of sulfhydryl groups leads to minor conformational changes in the GST.

  4. Enzyme immobilization in porous silicon: quantitative analysis of the kinetic parameters for glutathione-S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Delouise, Lisa A; Miller, Benjamin L

    2005-04-01

    Porous silicon matrixes are attractive materials for the construction of biosensors and may also have utility for the production of immobilized enzyme bioreactors. In an effort to gain a quantitative understanding of the effects of immobilization on enzyme activity, we compared the activity of glutathione-S-transferase immobilized in electrochemically etched porous silicon films (approximately 6.5 microm thick) with the enzyme in solution. Kinetic measurements were made by varying the glutathione concentration while maintaining a fixed saturating concentration of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. The reaction kinetics follow steady-state equilibrium behavior. The specific activity of the free enzyme in solution is approximately 4x higher than the immobilized enzyme, for which we measured an apparent K'(m)(GSH) value of 1.0 +/- 0.3. The maximum velocity, V'(max), is linearly proportional to immobilized enzyme concentration, but the magnitude is approximately 20 times lower than that in solution. Results suggest approximately 25% of the enzyme is bound with the catalytic site in an inactive conformation or in a hindered orientation. Finally, the effects of hydration and exposure to denaturants on the immobilized enzyme activity are presented.

  5. Co-Induction of a Glutathione-S-transferase, a Glutathione Transporter and an ABC Transporter in Maize by Xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqian; Song, Xiaoyu; Li, Xuefeng; Wang, Chengju

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione conjugation reactions are one of the principal mechanisms that plants utilize to detoxify xenobiotics. The induction by four herbicides (2,4-D, atrazine, metolachlor and primisulfuron) and a herbicide safener (dichlormid) on the expression of three genes, ZmGST27, ZmGT1 and ZmMRP1, encoding respectively a glutathione-S-transferase, a glutathione transporter and an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter was studied in maize. The results demonstrate that the inducing effect on gene expression varies with both chemicals and genes. The expression of ZmGST27 and ZmMRP1 was up-regulated by all five compounds, whereas that of ZmGT1 was increased by atrazine, metolachlor, primisulfuron and dichlormid, but not by 2,4-D. For all chemicals, the inducing effect was first detected on ZmGST27. The finding that ZmGT1 is activated alongside ZmGST27 and ZmMRP1 suggests that glutathione transporters are an important component in the xenobiotic detoxification system of plants. PMID:22792398

  6. The glutathione-S-transferase Mu 1 null genotype modulates ozone-induced airway inflammation in humans*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Glutathione-S-Transferase Mu 1 null genotype has been reported to be a risk factor for acute respiratory disease associated with increases in ambient air ozone. Ozone is known to cause an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. Howev...

  7. The glutathione-S-transferase Mu 1 null genotype modulates ozone-induced airway inflammation in humans*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Glutathione-S-Transferase Mu 1 null genotype has been reported to be a risk factor for acute respiratory disease associated with increases in ambient air ozone. Ozone is known to cause an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. Howev...

  8. Effects of heavy metals and nitroaromatic compounds on horseradish glutathione S-transferase and peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Nepovím, Ales; Podlipná, Radka; Soudek, Petr; Schröder, Peter; Vanek, Tomás

    2004-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) and peroxidase (POX) activities have a direct relation to the effect of stress on plant metabolism. Changes in the activities of the enzymes were therefore studied. Horseradish hairy roots were treated by selected bivalent ions of heavy metals (HMs) and nitroaromatic compounds (NACs). We have shown differences in GST activity when assayed with substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB). The conjugation of DCNB catalysed by GST was inhibited in all roots treated with HMs as compared to non-treated roots, whereas NACs caused induction of the activity in dependence on the exposition time and concentration of compounds. The conjugation of CDNB by GST was not affected to the same extent. The increase of GST activity was determined in cultures treated by nickel (0.1 mM) and diaminonitrotoluenes (DANTs, 0.1 mM) for 6 h, whereas the roots treated by 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (ADNT) and dinitrotoluene (DNT, 1.0 mM) needed 27 h treatment to induce the activity. The POX activity of cultures treated by HMs was inhibited to 17-35% in comparison to non-treated cultures. The POX activity of roots treated by TNT (0.1 and 1.0 mM) for 6 and 27 h and by ADNT (0.1 and 1.0 mM) for 6 h was inhibited. A partial increase of POX activity was measured in roots treated by all NACs for 27 h. The content of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in the roots differed significantly. It was followed as a symptom of the stress reaction of the plant metabolism to the effect of NACs and HMs.

  9. Inhibition of the recombinant cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Guneidy, Rasha A; Shahein, Yasser E; Abouelella, Amira M K; Zaki, Eman R; Hamed, Ragaa R

    2014-09-01

    Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) annulatus is a bloodsucking ectoparasite that causes severe production losses in the cattle industry. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro effects of tannic acid, hematin (GST inhibitors) and different plant extracts (rich in tannic acid) on the activity of the recombinant glutathione S-transferase enzyme of the Egyptian cattle tick R. annulatus (rRaGST), in order to confirm their ability to inhibit the parasitic essential detoxification enzyme glutathione S-transferase. Extraction with 70% ethanol of Hibiscus cannabinus (kenaf flowers), Punica granatum (red and white pomegranate peel), Musa acuminata (banana peel) (Musaceae), Medicago sativa (alfalfa seeds), Tamarindus indicus (seed) and Cuminum cyminum (cumin seed) were used to assess: (i) inhibitory capacities of rRaGST and (ii) their phenolic and flavonoid contents. Ethanol extraction of red pomegranate peel contained the highest content of phenolic compounds (29.95mg gallic acid/g dry tissue) compared to the other studied plant extracts. The highest inhibition activities of rRaGST were obtained with kenaf and red pomegranate peel (P. granatum) extracts with IC50 values of 0.123 and 0.136mg dry tissue/ml, respectively. Tannic acid was the more effective inhibitor of rRaGST with an IC50 value equal to 4.57μM compared to delphinidine-HCl (IC50=14.9±3.1μM). Gossypol had a weak inhibitory effect (IC50=43.7μM), and caffeic acid had almost no effect on tick GST activity. The IC50 values qualify ethacrynic acid as a potent inhibitor of rRaGST activity (IC50=0.034μM). Cibacron blue and hematin showed a considerable inhibition effect on rRaGST activity, and their IC50 values were 0.13μM and 7.5μM, respectively. The activity of rRaGST was highest for CDNB (30.2μmol/min/mg protein). The enzyme had also a peroxidatic activity (the specific activity equals 26.5μmol/min/mg protein). Both tannic acid and hematin inhibited rRaGST activity non-competitively with respect to GSH and

  10. Identification, genomic organization and expression pattern of glutathione S-transferase in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Yu, Quanyou; Lu, Cheng; Li, Bin; Fang, Shoumin; Zuo, Weidong; Dai, Fangyin; Zhang, Ze; Xiang, Zhonghuai

    2008-12-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a multifunctional supergene family and some play an important role in insecticide resistance. We have identified 23 putative cytosolic GSTs by searching the new assembly of the Bombyx mori genome sequence. Phylogenetic analyses on the amino acid sequences reveal that 21 of the B. mori GSTs fall into six classes represented in other insects, the other two being unclassified. The majority of the silkworm GSTs belong to the Delta, Epsilon, and Omega classes. Most members of each class are tandemly arranged in the genome, except for the Epsilon GSTs. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) corresponding to 19 of the 23 GSTs were found in available databases. Furthermore RT-PCR experiments detected expression of all the GSTs in multiple tissues on day 3 of fifth instar larvae. Surprisingly, we found little or no expression of most Delta and Epsilon GSTs in the fat body, which is thought to be the main detoxification organ. This may explain the sensitivity of the silkworm to certain insecticides. Our data provide some insights into the evolution of the B. mori GST family and the functions of individual GST enzymes.

  11. Urinary π-glutathione S-transferase Predicts Advanced Acute Kidney Injury Following Cardiovascular Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shu, Kai-Hsiang; Wang, Chih-Hsien; Wu, Che-Hsiung; Huang, Tao-Min; Wu, Pei-Chen; Lai, Chien-Heng; Tseng, Li-Jung; Tsai, Pi-Ru; Connolly, Rory; Wu, Vin-Cent

    2016-08-16

    Urinary biomarkers augment the diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI), with AKI after cardiovascular surgeries being a prototype of prognosis scenario. Glutathione S-transferases (GST) were evaluated as biomarkers of AKI. Urine samples were collected in 141 cardiovascular surgical patients and analyzed for urinary alpha-(α-) and pi-(π-) GSTs. The outcomes of advanced AKI (KDIGO stage 2, 3) and all-cause in-patient mortality, as composite outcome, were recorded. Areas under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and multivariate generalized additive model (GAM) were applied to predict outcomes. Thirty-eight (26.9%) patients had AKI, while 12 (8.5%) were with advanced AKI. Urinary π-GST differentiated patients with/without advanced AKI or composite outcome after surgery (p < 0.05 by generalized estimating equation). Urinary π-GST predicted advanced AKI at 3 hrs post-surgery (p = 0.033) and composite outcome (p = 0.009), while the corresponding ROC curve had AUC of 0.784 and 0.783. Using GAM, the cutoff value of 14.7 μg/L for π-GST showed the best performance to predict composite outcome. The addition of π-GST to the SOFA score improved risk stratification (total net reclassification index = 0.47). Thus, urinary π-GST levels predict advanced AKI or hospital mortality after cardiovascular surgery and improve in SOFA outcome assessment specific to AKI.

  12. Organometallic ruthenium anticancer complexes inhibit human glutathione-S-transferase π.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu; Huang, Yongdong; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Fuyi; Habtemariam, Abraha; Luo, Qun; Li, Xianchan; Wu, Kui; Sadler, Peter J; Xiong, Shaoxiang

    2013-11-01

    The organometallic ruthenium(II) anticancer complexes [(η(6)-arene)Ru(en)Cl](+) (arene = p-cymene (1), biphenyl (2) or 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (3); en = ethylenediamine), exhibit in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities. In the present work, we show that they inhibit human glutathione-S-transferase π (GSTπ) with IC50 values of 59.4 ± 1.3, 63.2 ± 0.4 and 37.2 ± 1.1 μM, respectively. Mass spectrometry revealed that complex 1 binds to the S-donors of Cys15, Cys48 within the G-site and Cys102 at the interface of the GSTπ dimer, while complex 2 binds to Cys48 and Met92 at the dimer interface and complex 3 to Cys15, Cys48 and Met92. Moreover, the binding of complex 1 to Cys15 and Cys102, complex 2 to Cys48 and complex 3 to Cys15 induces the irreversible oxidation of the coordinated thiolates to sulfenates. Molecular modeling studies indicate that the coordination of the {(arene)Ru(en)}(2+) fragment to Cys48 blocks the hydrophilic G-site sterically, perhaps preventing substrate from proper positioning and accounting for the reduction in enzymatic activity of ruthenated GSTπ. The binding of the ruthenium arene complexes to Cys102 or Met92 disrupts the dimer interface which is an essential structural feature for the proper functioning of GSTπ, perhaps also contributing to the inhibition of GSTπ. © 2013.

  13. Inhibition of insect glutathione S-transferase (GST) by conifer extracts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiling; Zhao, Zhong; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh M; Arnason, John T; Liu, Rui; Walshe-Roussel, Brendan; Waye, Andrew; Liu, Suqi; Saleem, Ammar; Cáceres, Luis A; Wei, Qin; Scott, Ian M

    2014-12-01

    Insecticide synergists biochemically inhibit insect metabolic enzyme activity and are used both to increase the effectiveness of insecticides and as a diagnostic tool for resistance mechanisms. Considerable attention has been focused on identifying new synergists from phytochemicals with recognized biological activities, specifically enzyme inhibition. Jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.), black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP.), balsam fir (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill.), and tamarack larch (Larix laricina (Du Roi) Koch) have been used by native Canadians as traditional medicine, specifically for the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties based on enzyme inhibitory activity. To identify the potential allelochemicals with synergistic activity, ethanol crude extracts and methanol/water fractions were separated by Sephadex LH-20 chromatographic column and tested for in vitro glutathione S-transferase (GST) inhibition activity using insecticide-resistant Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) midgut and fat-body homogenate. The fractions showing similar activity were combined and analyzed by ultra pressure liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A lignan, (+)-lariciresinol 9'-p-coumarate, was identified from P. mariana cone extracts, and L. laricina and A. balsamea bark extracts. A flavonoid, taxifolin, was identified from P. mariana and P. banksiana cone extracts and L. laricina bark extracts. Both compounds inhibit GST activity with taxifolin showing greater activity compared to (+)-lariciresinol 9'-p-coumarate and the standard GST inhibitor, diethyl maleate. The results suggested that these compounds can be considered as potential new insecticide synergists. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mechanistic evaluation and transcriptional signature of a glutathione S-transferase omega 1 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Kavya; Samanta, Soma; Kyani, Anahita; Yang, Suhui; Tamura, Shuzo; Ziemke, Elizabeth; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Li, Si; Chinnaswamy, Krishnapriya; Otake, Hiroyuki; Debnath, Bikash; Yarovenko, Vladimir; Sebolt-Leopold, Judith S.; Ljungman, Mats; Neamati, Nouri

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1) is an atypical GST isoform that is overexpressed in several cancers and has been implicated in drug resistance. Currently, no small-molecule drug targeting GSTO1 is under clinical development. Here we show that silencing of GSTO1 with siRNA significantly impairs cancer cell viability, validating GSTO1 as a potential new target in oncology. We report on the development and characterization of a series of chloroacetamide-containing potent GSTO1 inhibitors. Co-crystal structures of GSTO1 with our inhibitors demonstrate covalent binding to the active site cysteine. These potent GSTO1 inhibitors suppress cancer cell growth, enhance the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin and inhibit tumour growth in colon cancer models as single agent. Bru-seq-based transcription profiling unravelled novel roles for GSTO1 in cholesterol metabolism, oxidative and endoplasmic stress responses, cytoskeleton and cell migration. Our findings demonstrate the therapeutic utility of GSTO1 inhibitors as anticancer agents and identify the novel cellular pathways under GSTO1 regulation in colorectal cancer. PMID:27703239

  15. Glutathione-S-transferase activity of Fucus spp. as a biomarker of environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Cairrão, E; Couderchet, M; Soares, A M V M; Guilhermino, L

    2004-12-20

    Coastal zones are important areas from both ecological and economical points of view. However, in the last decades, in several regions of the globe, they have been increasingly impacted by complex discharges of contaminants and by marine traffic accidents. The Portuguese Atlantic coast is particularly exposed to these contaminants due to the proximity of important navigation routes. Several rocky shore organisms have been tested and used as bioindicators of environmental contamination. However, to the best of our knowledge Fucus spp., which are key species in rocky shore communities, have not been used as bioindicators in monitoring studies based on biomarkers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity of several Fucus species (Fucus ceranoides, Fucus spiralis var. platycarpus, Fucus spiralis var. spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus var. vesiculosus) to discriminate sites with different contamination levels along the Portuguese Northwestern coast, between the Minho river estuary and the Aveiro's Lagoon, as an environmental biomarker. With the exception of F. spiralis var. spiralis, for which a confusing pattern of activity was found requiring further analysis, all the other species and varieties showed higher GST levels in more contaminated sites than in less contaminated ones, indicating that Fucus spp. are suitable for use as bioindicators and their GSTs as biomarkers of environmental contamination in coastal zones and estuaries.

  16. Association study of Glutathione S-Transferase polymorphisms and risk of endometriosis in an Iranian population

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, Mina; Saliminejad, Kioomars; Heidarizadeh, Masood; Kamali, Koorosh; Memariani, Toktam; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endometriosis influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Associations of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) genes polymorphisms in endometriosis have been investigated by various researchers; however, the results are not consistent. Objective: We examined the associations of GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes and GSTP1 313 A/G polymorphisms with endometriosis in an Iranian population. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, 151 women with diagnosis of endometriosis and 156 normal healthy women as control group were included. The genotyping was determined using multiplex PCR and PCR- RFLP methods. Results: The GSTM1 null genotype was significantly higher (p=0.027) in the cases (7.3%) than the control group (1.3%). There was no significant difference between the frequency of GSTT1 genotypes between the cases and controls. The GSTP1 313 AG genotype was significantly lower (p=0.048) in the case (33.1%) than the control group (44.4%). Conclusion: Our results showed that GSTM1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms may be associated with susceptibility of endometriosis in Iranian women. PMID:27351025

  17. Pyrene-induced changes of glutathione-S-transferase activities in different microalgal species.

    PubMed

    Lei, An-Ping; Wong, Yuk-Shan; Tam, Nora Fung-Yee

    2003-01-01

    The glutathione-S-transferase (GST, EC 2.5.1.18) activities in different freshwater microalgal species, namely, Chlorella vulgaris, Scenedesmus quadricauda, Scenedesmus platydiscus and Selenastrum capricornutum under the control condition (without pyrene addition) and at different pyrene concentrations were compared. During 7-days incubation under the control condition (without pyrene addition), all microalgal species exhibited measurable GST activities but the activities varied significantly among species and the difference could be more than 100-fold. The addition of pyrene at concentrations ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 mg l(-1) to microalgal cultures led to changes in GST activities but the patterns of changes varied from species to species. Among the four species, remarkably decreases in GST activities were found in S. quadricauda, a species most sensitive to pyrene toxicity, at high pyrene concentrations. On the contrary, GST activities in S. platydiscus and Se. capricornutum increased significantly as pyrene concentrations increased. These two species were found to be more resistant to pyrene and had higher efficiencies in metabolising pyrene than other species. C. vulgaris did not show any significant change in their GST activities with the addition of pyrene, and pyrene was not metabolised by this species. These results suggest that pyrene-induced changes of GST activities in microalgae might be related to their resistance and their ability to metabolise pyrene. In general, the pyrene-induced changes of GST activities were higher at 4-days than at 1- and 7-days incubation in all microalgae.

  18. Molecular Evolution of Glutathione S-Transferases in the Genus Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Low, Wai Yee; Ng, Hooi Ling; Morton, Craig J.; Parker, Michael W.; Batterham, Philip; Robin, Charles

    2007-01-01

    As classical phase II detoxification enzymes, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) have been implicated in insecticide resistance and may have evolved in response to toxins in the niche-defining feeding substrates of Drosophila species. We have annotated the GST genes of the 12 Drosophila species with recently sequenced genomes and analyzed their molecular evolution. Gene copy number variation is attributable mainly to unequal crossing-over events in the large δ and ɛ clusters. Within these gene clusters there are also GST genes with slowly diverging orthologs. This implies that they have their own unique functions or have spatial/temporal expression patterns that impose significant selective constraints. Searches for positively selected sites within the GSTs identified G171K in GSTD1, a protein that has previously been shown to be capable of metabolizing the insecticide DDT. We find that the same radical substitution (G171K) in the substrate-binding domain has occurred at least three times in the Drosophila radiation. Homology-modeling places site 171 distant from the active site but adjacent to an alternative DDT-binding site. We propose that the parallel evolution observed at this site is an adaptive response to an environmental toxin and that sequencing of historical alleles suggests that this toxin was not a synthetic insecticide. PMID:18039872

  19. Genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase Z1 in an Iranian population.

    PubMed

    Nafissi, Samane; Saadat, Iraj; Saadat, Mostafa

    2011-06-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in gene encoding glutathione S-transferase Z1 (GSTZ1, a member of class zeta) have been defined. Previous studies have revealed that there was significant difference between populations for allelic frequency of several members of GSTs. In order to get more insight into the genetic structure of Iranian population the present study was done on Iranian Persian population who living in Shiraz (Fars province). The total study subjects consisted of 689 unrelated healthy individuals. Genetic polymorphisms for G-1002A, Glu32Lys and Gly42Arg of the GSTZ1 were detected by RFLP-PCR-based method. Allelic frequency of 32Lys, 42Arg, and -1002G was 0.2337, 0.0298 and 0.2184, respectively. The study population was at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the polymorphisms of GSTZ1. Based on the complete dataset, these polymorphisms show significant linkage disequilibrium. Iranian gene pool showed intermediate frequency for alleles and haplotypes of GSTZ1 polymorphisms in comparison with European and Asian countries, which confirmed our previous reports for other genetic polymorphisms.

  20. Characterization of the safener-induced glutathione S-transferase isoform II from maize.

    PubMed

    Holt, D C; Lay, V J; Clarke, E D; Dinsmore, A; Jepson, I; Bright, S W; Greenland, A J

    1995-01-01

    The safener-induced maize (Zea mays L.) glutathione S-transferase, GST II (EC 2.5.1.18) and another predominant isoform, GST I, were purified from extracts of maize roots treated with the safeners R-25788 (N,N-diallyl-2-dichloroacetamide) or R-29148 (3-dichloroacetyl-2,2,5-trimethyl-1,3-oxazolidone). The isoforms GST I and GST II are respectively a homodimer of 29-kDa (GST-29) subunits and a heterodimer of 29- and 27-kDa (GST-27) subunits, while GST I is twice as active with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as GST II, GST II is about seven times more active against the herbicide, alachlor. Western blotting using antisera raised against GST-29 and GST-27 showed that GST-29 is present throughout the maize plant prior to safener treatment. In contrast, GST-27 is only present in roots of untreated plants but is induced in all the major aerial organs of maize after root-drenching with safener. The amino-acid sequences of proteolytic fragments of GST-27 show that it is related to GST-29 and identical to the 27-kDa subunit of GST IV.

  1. In-vitro effect of flavonoids from Solidago canadensis extract on glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Apáti, Pál; Houghton, Peter J; Kite, Geoffrey; Steventon, Glyn B; Kéry, Agnes

    2006-02-01

    Solidago canadensis is typical of a flavonoid-rich herb and the effect of an aqueous ethanol extract on glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity using HepG2 cells was compared with those of the flavonol quercetin and its glycosides quercitrin and rutin, found as major constituents. The composition of the extract was determined by HPLC and rutin was found to be the major flavonoidal component of the extract. Total GST activity was assessed using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as a substrate. The glycosides rutin and quercitrin gave dose-dependent increases in GST activity, with a 50% and 24.5% increase at 250 mM, respectively, while the aglycone quercetin inhibited the enzyme by 30% at 250 mM. The total extract of the herb gave an overall dose-dependent increase, the fractions corresponding to the flavonoids showed activating effects while those containing caffeic acid derivatives were inhibitory. The activity observed corresponds to that reported for similar compounds in-vivo using rats, thus the HepG2 cell line could serve as a more satisfactory method of assessing the effects of extracts and compounds on GST.

  2. Study on the biochemical characterization of herbicide detoxification enzyme, glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun-Young; Kong, Kwang-Hoon

    2007-01-01

    To gain further insight into herbicide detoxification, we studied the herbicide activity and specificity toward glutathione S-transferases from human and rice. In this study, the genes of the plant specific phi and tau class GST enzymes from Oryza sativa (OsGST) and human pi class GST enzyme (hGSTP1-1) were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli with the pET and pKK vector systems, respectively. The gene products were purified to homogeneity by GSH Sepharose affinity column chromatography. The herbicide specificity of the enzymes was investigated by enzyme-catalyzed conjugation of GSH with chloroacetanilide, diphenylether and chloro-s-triazine herbicides. The hGSTP1-1 showed very high specific activity toward atrazine. On the other hand, the phi class OsGST enzymes showed high specific activity toward chloroacetanilide herbicides, acetochlor, alachlor and metolachlor. The tau class GST enzymes displayed remarkable activity toward the diphenylether herbicide, fluorodifen. From these results, we conclude that the phi and the tau class GST enzymes show herbicide specificities and also they play an important role in the detoxification reaction of plant toward herbicides.

  3. Developmental expression and stress induction of glutathione S-transferase in the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Feng; Davey; S D Pang A; Ladd; Retnakaran; Tomkins; Zheng; Palli

    2001-01-01

    Developmental and stress-induced expression of Choristoneura fumiferana glutathione S-transferase (CfGST) mRNA and protein were examined using Northern blots and Western blots. High levels of CfGST mRNA and protein were detected in 1st instar larvae and diapausing 2nd instar larvae. Expression of CfGST gradually decreased during larval development from 3rd to 5th instar, after which the expression increased once again, reaching peak levels in 6th instar larvae. CfGST mRNA and protein were undetectable in the pupal stage. Exposure to low temperature did not induce an increase in CfGST expression. Feeding on balsam fir foliage resulted in an increase in the expression of CfGST as compared to larvae that fed on artificial diet. The bacterial insecticide, Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin (Bt), the non-steroidal ecdysone analog, tebufenozide, and the synthetic pyrethroid, permethrin, induced the expression of CfGST mRNA in 5th instar larvae, whereas the chitin synthesis inhibitor, diflubenzuron, did not have any such effect. These results suggest that CfGST plays an important role in detoxifying various allelochemicals and insecticides in the spruce budworm. The developmental expression pattern strongly suggests that in addition to detoxification, CfGST might be involved in other functions.

  4. Glutathione S-transferases as a cefpiramide binding protein in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Guji, A; Nishiya, H; Aoki, M; Ohyatsu, I; Yamaguchi, M; Tokumura, Y; Sugiyama, H; Miyashita, T; Ono, Y; Kunii, O

    1995-03-01

    To clarify the intrahepatical transport mechanism of cefpiramide, we investigated effects of various agents mainly excreted into the bile by several different mechanisms on the biliary excretion of cefpiramide in rats. Sulfobromophthalein, indocyanine green, bilirubin and probenecid, known to be bound to glutathione S-transferases (GST) (EC 2.5.1.18) in liver cytosol, reduced the biliary excretion of cefpiramide, while neither secretory IgA, which is transported via vesicles in the liver, nor colchicine, which inhibits movements of vesicles, had any effect on the excretion of cefpiramide. Propranolol and metoprolol, metabolized by mixed function oxidases, had no effect on the biliary excretion of cefpiramide. In the chromatography of liver cytosol, the amount of sulfobromophthalein or benzylpenicillin bound to the GST fraction decreased in the presence of cefpiramide or probenecid. The study showed that cefpiramide was transported in the liver without relation to mixed function oxidases or vesichle-mediated transporting system, but in relation to GST which binds cefpiramide, sulfobromophthalein, benzylpenicillin and probenecid, indicating an important role of GST in the cefpiramide excretion into the bile.

  5. Purification and kinetic mechanism of the major glutathione S-transferase from bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Young, P R; Briedis, A V

    1989-01-01

    The major glutathione S-transferase isoenzyme from bovine brain was isolated and purified approx. 500-fold. The enzyme has a pI of 7.39 +/- 0.02 and consists of two non-identical subunits having apparent Mr values of 22,000 and 24,000. The enzyme is uniformly distributed in brain, and kinetic data at pH 6.5 with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate suggest a random rapid-equilibrium mechanism. The kinetics of inhibition by product, by GSH analogues and by NADH are consistent with the suggested mechanism and require inhibitor binding to several different enzyme forms. Long-chain fatty acids are excellent inhibitors of the enzyme, and values of 1nKi for hexanoic acid, octanoic acid, decanoic acid and lauric acid form a linear series when plotted as a function of alkyl chain length. A free-energy change of -1900 J/mol (-455 cal/mol) per CH2 unit is calculated for the contribution of hydrophobic binding energy to the inhibition constants. The turnover number of the purified enzyme dimer is approx. 3400/min. When compared with the second-order rate constant for the reaction between CDNB and GSH, the enzyme is providing a rate acceleration of about 1000-fold. The role of entropic contributions to this small rate acceleration is discussed. PMID:2930465

  6. Comparison of glycation of glutathione S-transferase by methylglyoxal, glucose or fructose.

    PubMed

    Boušová, Iva; Průchová, Zuzana; Trnková, Lucie; Dršata, Jaroslav

    2011-11-01

    Glycation is a process closely related to the aging and pathogenesis of diabetic complications. In this process, reactive α-dicarbonyl compounds (e.g., methylglyoxal) cause protein modification accompanied with potential loss of their biological activity and persistence of damaged molecules in tissues. We suppose that glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), a group of cytosolic biotransformation enzymes, may be modified by glycation in vivo, which would provide a rationale of its use as a model protein for studying glycation reactions. Glycation of GST by methylglyoxal, fructose, and glucose in vitro was studied. The course of protein glycation was evaluated using the following criteria: enzyme activity, formation of advanced glycation end-products using fluorescence and western blotting, amine content, protein conformation, cross linking and aggregation, and changes in molecular charge of GST. The ongoing glycation by methylglyoxal 2 mM resulted in pronounced decrease in the GST activity. It also led to the loss of 14 primary amino groups, which was accompanied by changes in protein mobility during native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Formation of cross links with molecular weight of 75 kDa was observed. Obtained results can contribute to understanding of changes, which proceed in metabolism of xenobiotics during diabetes mellitus and ageing.

  7. Development of pyrethroid-like fluorescent substrates for glutathione S-transferase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huazhang; Yao, Hongwei; Liu, Jun-Yan; Samra, Aman I.; Kamita, Shizuo G.; Cornel, Anthony J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive substrates is critical for the development of precise and rapid assays for detecting changes in glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity that are associated with GST-mediated metabolism of insecticides. In this study, six pyrethroid-like compounds were synthesized and characterized as substrates for insect and mammalian GSTs. All of the substrates were esters composed of the same alcohol moiety, 7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, and acid moieties that structurally mimic some commonly used pyrethroid insecticides including cypermethrin and cyhalothrin. CpGSTD1, a recombinant Delta class GST from the mosquito Culex pipiens, metabolized our pyrethroid-like substrates with both chemical and geometric (i.e., the cis-isomers were metabolized at 2- to 5-fold higher rates than the corresponding trans-isomers) preference. A GST preparation from mouse liver also metabolized most of our pyrethroid-like substrates with both chemical and geometric preference but at 10- to 170-fold lower rates. CpGSTD1 and mouse GSTs metabolized CDNB, a general GST substrate, at more than 200-fold higher rates than our novel pyrethroid-like substrates. There was a 10-fold difference in the specificity constant (kcat/KM ratio) of CpGSTD1 for CDNB and those of CpGSTD1 for cis-DCVC and cis-TFMCVC suggesting that cis-DCVC and cis-TFMCVC may be useful for the detection of GST-based metabolism of pyrethroids in mosquitoes. PMID:23000005

  8. Glutathion-S-Transferase P1 polymorphisms association with broncopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Karagianni, P; Rallis, D; Fidani, L; Porpodi, M; Kalinderi, K; Tsakalidis, C; Nikolaidis, N

    2013-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress, characterized by the excretion of pre-oxidative and anti-oxidative proteases, has a key role in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). One of the many host anti-oxidant enzymes is glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), with three polymorphic alleles having been identified: homozygous ile, heterozygous ile/val and homozygous val isomorph. The aim of this study was to examine the genetic predisposition to BPD in the GSTP1 polymorphisms. Methods: A prospective case-control study was carried out in the 2nd Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Aristotle University in Thessaloniki, Greece during 2008. The genetic polymorphisms of GSTP1 in 28 preterms <32 weeks gestational age (GA) with BPD compared to 74 controls (33 preterms without BPD and 41 healthy terms) were examined. Results: The homozygous ile isomorph was predominant in all groups (preterms with BPD: 82%, preterms without BPD: 70%, healthy terms: 78%), followed by the heterozygous ile/val (14%, 18% and 20% respectively) and the homozygous val isomorph (4%, 12% and 2% respectively). The homozygous ile isomorph was also identified in the majority of preterms with mild (80%), moderate (100%) and severe (73%) BPD. The GSTP1 genetic distribution did not differ between the groups and GSTP1 polymorphisms were not associated with the severity of BPD. Conclusions: This study could not confirm an association between GSTP1 polymorphisms and the development of BPD or the severity of the disease. PMID:25031518

  9. Prolactin confers resistance against cisplatin in breast cancer cells by activating glutathione-S-transferase.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, Elizabeth W; Schwemberger, Sandy J; LaPensee, Christopher R; Bahassi, El Mustapha; Afton, Scott E; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2009-08-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle for successful treatment of breast cancer patients. Given that prolactin (PRL) acts as an anti-apoptotic/survival factor in the breast, we postulated that it antagonizes cytotoxicity by chemotherapeutic drugs. Treatment of breast cancer cells with PRL caused variable resistance to taxol, vinblastine, doxorubicin and cisplatin. PRL prevented cisplatin-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In the presence of PRL, significantly less cisplatin was bound to DNA, as determined by mass spectroscopy, and little DNA damage was seen by gamma-H2AX staining. PRL dramatically increased the activity of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), which sequesters cisplatin in the cytoplasm; this increase was abrogated by Jak and mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. PRL upregulated the expression of the GSTmu, but not the pi, isozyme. A GST inhibitor abrogated antagonism of cisplatin cytotoxicity by PRL. In conclusion, PRL confers resistance against cisplatin by activating a detoxification enzyme, thereby reducing drug entry into the nucleus. These data provide a rational explanation for the ineffectiveness of cisplatin in breast cancer, which is characterized by high expression of both PRL and its receptor. Suppression of PRL production or blockade of its actions should benefit patients undergoing chemotherapy by allowing for lower drug doses and expanded drug options.

  10. Genetic Variations of Glutathione S-Transferase Influence on Blood Cadmium Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Khansakorn, Nitchaphat; Wongwit, Waranya; Tharnpoophasiam, Prapin; Hengprasith, Bunlue; Suwannathon, Lerson; Chanprasertyothin, Suwannee; Sura, Thunyachai; Kaojarern, Sming; Sritara, Piyamit; Sirivarasai, Jintana

    2012-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are involved in biotransformation and detoxification of cadmium (Cd). Genetic polymorphisms in these genes may lead to interindividual variation in Cd susceptibility. The objective of this study was to assess the association of GSTs (GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 Val105Ile) polymorphisms with blood Cd concentrations in a nonoccupationally exposed population. The 370 blood samples were analyzed for Cd concentration and polymorphisms in GSTs genes. Geometric mean of blood Cd among this population was 0.46 ± 0.02 μg/L (with 95% CI; 0.43–0.49 μg/L). Blood Cd concentrations in subjects carrying GSTP1 Val/Val genotype were significantly higher than those with Ile/Ile and Ile/Val genotypes. No significant differences in blood Cd concentrations among individual with gene deletions of GSTT1 and GSTM1 were observed. GSTP1/GSTT1 and GSTP1/GSTM1 combinations showed significantly associated with increase in blood Cd levels. This study indicated that polymorphisms of GSTP1 combined with GSTT1 and/or GSTM1 deletion are likely to influence on individual susceptibility to cadmium toxicity. PMID:22291700

  11. Contribution of glutathione S-transferase gene polymorphisms to development of skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Zeyuan; Liu, Ting; Li, Xiang; Xu, Xiaoxia; Fan, Dongli

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glutathione S-transferase (GST) family genes are of vital importance in maintaining cellular defence systems, protecting cells against the toxic effects of reactive oxygen produced during the synthesis of melanin, and detoxifying environmental mutagens and chemical or synthetic drugs. As no previous meta-analyses have examined the association of polymorphisms at GSTT1, GSTP1 Ile105Val with skin cancer risk and independently published studies have produced inconsistent conclusions, we were promoted to estimate the associations in the largest study to date. Methods: Computer-assisted searches were carried out to systematically identify the studies of GST polymorphisms and skin cancer. The eligibility of studies was evaluated following the requirements of inclusion criteria. Risk of skin cancers (OR and 95% CI) was assessed with the fixed or random effects meta-analysis. Major findings: The fixed effects meta-analysis of 15 studies suggested no overall association between GSTT1 null and skin cancer. Nor was there a significant association in any subgroup. However, in the stratified analysis by histologic type for GSTP1 Ile105Val, we found 1.56 times higher risk of malignant melanoma (MM) among people with the 105-Val/Val genotype (Val/Val vs. Ile/Ile: OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.05-2.32, pheterogeneity = 0.584). Conclusions: These statistical data demonstrate that Ile105Val polymorphism of the GSTP1 gene may have genetic contribution to the development of skin cancer, MM in particular. PMID:25785008

  12. Biochemical characterization and distribution of glutathione S-transferases in leaping mullet (Liza saliens).

    PubMed

    Sen, A; Kirikbakan, A

    2004-09-01

    In this study, feral leaping mullet (Liza saliens) liver cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were investigated and characterized using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and ethacrynic acid (EA) as substrates. The average GST activities towards CDNB and EA were found to be 1365 +/- 41 and 140 +/- 20 nmol/min per mg protein, respectively. The effects of cytosolic protein amount and temperature ranging from 4 to 70 degrees C on enzyme activities were examined. While both activities towards CDNB and EA showed similar dependence on protein amount, temperature optima were found as 37 and 42 degrees C, respectively. In addition, the effects of pH on GST-CDNB and -EA activities were studied and different pH activity profiles were observed. For both substrates, GST activities were found to obey Michaelis-Menten kinetics with apparent V(max) and K(m) values of 1661 nmol/min per mg protein and 0.24 mM and 157 nmol/min per mg protein and 0.056 mM for CDNB and EA, respectively. Distribution of GST in Liza saliens tissues was investigated and compared with other fish species. Very high GST activities were measured in tissues from Liza saliens such as liver, kidney, testis, proximal intestine, and gills. Moreover, our results suggested that GST activities from Liza saliens would be a valuable biomarker for aquatic pollution.

  13. Evaluation of glutathione S-transferase activity in human buccal epithelial dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y K; Lin, L M

    1997-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and amount of GST alpha, mu and pi isoforms were measured in 40 patients with histopathologically confirmed oral epithelial dysplasia (OED) and squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa. The results were compared with those of normal mucosa in an equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Mean total GST activities were significantly elevated from normal buccal mucosa for mild OED, moderate OED, severe OED and squamous cell carcinoma. GST activity of value approximating 100 nmol/min/mg distinguished between normal and dysplasia, and of value about 400 nmol/min/mg delineated between dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma were observed. GST pi was the predominant class in both the diseased and normal buccal mucosa examined. This class pi GST was present at an intracellular concentration, which was significantly higher in diseased buccal mucosa than in normal buccal mucosa. These results indicated that pi class GST was the major form of this enzyme in the cytosolic fraction of oral mucosa. The severity of OED related to squamous cell carcinoma development seemed to increase concomitantly with an increase in the level of this enzyme. Further studies will validate the role of GST pi estimation in predicting the potential malignancy of OED.

  14. Synthesis and structure--activity relationship of new cytotoxic agents targeting human glutathione-S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Rotili, Dante; De Luca, Anastasia; Tarantino, Domenico; Pezzola, Silvia; Forgione, Mariantonietta; Morozzo Della Rocca, Blasco; Falconi, Mattia; Mai, Antonello; Caccuri, Anna Maria

    2015-01-07

    The 6-((7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)thio)hexan-1-ol (NBDHEX, 1), a "suicide inhibitor" of the glutathione-S-transferase GSTP1-1, showed pro-apoptotic properties in tumor cells, but in vivo studies were limited by poor bioavailability and high affinity towards GSTM2-2, expressed in many non-cancerous tissues. Here we describe the synthesis and biological characterization of new 1 analogs (2-40), in which the hydroxyhexyl portion at the C4-sulfur atom has been replaced with phenyl-containing moieties as well as substituted alkyl chains. Some of the new compounds displayed 10-100 times increased water-solubility (8, 11, 17, 26-28, 34, 35), and most of them showed higher GSTP1-1 selectivity (2-20, 23-26, 31-33, 35) than 1. The presence of a phenyl ring with polar substituents is in general associated, with some exceptions (23, 24) to low cytotoxicity in osteosarcoma U-2OS cells. Differently, some alkyl derivatives possess cytotoxicity comparable (26, 34, 35) or higher (30, 32) than 1. Among the novel compounds, selected ones (26, 27, 34, and 35) deserve further investigation for their anticancer potential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. A test for adequate wastewater treatment based on glutathione S transferase isoenzyme profile.

    PubMed

    Grammou, A; Samaras, P; Papadimitriou, C; Papadopoulos, A I

    2013-04-01

    Discharge to the environment of treated or non-treated municipal wastewater imposes several threats to coastal and estuarine ecosystems which are difficult to assess. In our study we evaluate the use of the isoenzyme profile of glutathione S transferase (GST) in combination with the kinetic characteristics of the whole enzyme and of heme peroxidase, as a test of adequate treatment of municipal wastewater. For this reason, Artemia nauplii were incubated in artificial seawater prepared by wastewater samples, such as secondary municipal effluents produced by a conventional activated sludge unit and advanced treated effluents produced by the employment of coagulation, activated carbon adsorption and chlorination as single processes or as combined ones. Characteristic changes of the isoenzyme pattern and the enzymes' kinetic properties were caused by chlorinated secondary municipal effluent or by secondary non-chlorinated effluent. Advanced treatment by combination of coagulation and/or carbon adsorption resulted to less prominent changes, suggesting more adequate treatment. Our results suggest that GST isoenzyme profile in combination with the kinetic properties of the total enzyme family is a sensitive test for the evaluation of the adequateness of the treatment of reclaimed wastewater and the reduction of potentially harmful compounds. Potentially, it may offer a 'fingerprint' characteristic of a particular effluent and probably of the treatment level it has been subjected.

  16. Kinetic study on the irreversible thermal denaturation of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; García-Maroto, Federico; García-Fuentes, Luis

    2006-05-01

    The thermal unfolding pathway of the Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase (Sj26GST) was previously interpreted by applying equilibrium thermodynamics and a reversible two-state model (Kaplan et al., (1997) Protein Science, 6, 399-406), though weak support for this interpretation was provided. In our study, thermal denaturation of Sj26GST has been re-examined by differential scanning calorimetry in the pH range of 6.5-8.5 and in the presence of the substrate and S-hexylglutathione. Calorimetric traces were found to be irreversible and highly scan-rate dependent. Thermogram shapes, as well as their scan-rate dependence, can be globally explained by assuming that thermal denaturation takes place according to one irreversible step described by a first-order kinetic constant that changes with temperature, as given by an Arrhenius equation. On the basis of this model, values for the rate constant as a function of temperature and the activation energy have been determined. Data also indicate that binding of GSH or S-hexylglutathione just exert a very little stabilising effect on the dimeric structure of the molecule.

  17. A glutathione S-transferase gene associated with antioxidant properties isolated from Apis cerana cerana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuchang; Liu, Feng; Jia, Haihong; Yan, Yan; Wang, Hongfang; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2016-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are an important family of multifunctional enzymes in aerobic organisms. They play a crucial role in the detoxification of exogenous compounds, especially insecticides, and protection against oxidative stress. Most previous studies of GSTs in insects have largely focused on their role in insecticide resistance. Here, we isolated a theta class GST gene designated AccGSTT1 from Apis cerana cerana and aimed to explore its antioxidant and antibacterial attributes. Analyses of homology and phylogenetic relationships suggested that the predicted amino acid sequence of AccGSTT1 shares a high level of identity with the other hymenopteran GSTs and that it was conserved during evolution. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AccGSTT1 is most highly expressed in adult stages and that the expression profile of this gene is significantly altered in response to various abiotic stresses. These results were confirmed using western blot analysis. Additionally, a disc diffusion assay showed that a recombinant AccGSTT1 protein may be roughly capable of inhibiting bacterial growth and that it reduces the resistance of Escherichia coli cells to multiple adverse stresses. Taken together, these data indicate that AccGSTT1 may play an important role in antioxidant processes under adverse stress conditions.

  18. Hepatic glutathione and glutathione S-transferase in selenium deficiency and toxicity in the chick

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. S.

    1989-01-01

    First, the hepatic activity of GSH-T{sub CDNB} was increased only under conditions of severe oxidative stress produced by combined Se- and vitamin E (VE)-deficiency, indicating that VE also affects GSH metabolism. Second, the incorporation of {sup 35}S-methionine into GSH and protein was about 4- and 2-fold higher, respectively, in Se- and VE-deficient chick hepatocytes as compared to controls. Third, chicks injected with the glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHpx) inhibitor, aurothioglucose (AuTG), showed increase hepatic GSH-T{sub CDNB} activity and plasma GSH concentration regardless of their Se status. Fourth, the effect of ascorbic acid (AA), on GSH metabolism was studied. Chicks fed 1000 ppm AA showed decreased hepatic GSH concentration compared to chicks fed no AA in a Se- and VE-deficient diet. Fifth, chicks fed excess Se showed increase hepatic activity of GSH-T{sub CDNB} and GSH concentration regardless of VE status.

  19. Characterization of the basic glutathione S-transferase B1 and B2 subunits from human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Stockman, P K; McLellan, L I; Hayes, J D

    1987-01-01

    The basic glutathione S-transferases in human liver are composed of at least two immunochemically distinct polypeptides, designated B1 and B2. These subunits exist as homodimers, but can hybridize to form the B1B2 heterodimer [Stockman, Beckett & Hayes (1985) Biochem. J. 227, 457-465]. Although these basic glutathione S-transferases possess similar catalytic properties, the B2 subunit exhibits significantly greater selenium-independent glutathione peroxidase activity than subunit B1. The use of the ligands haematin, tributyltin acetate and Bromosulphophthalein as inhibitors of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene-GSH-conjugating activity clearly discriminate between the B1 and B2 subunits and should help facilitate their identification. Peptide mapping experiments showed that B1 and B2 are structurally distinct, but related, subunits; subunit B1 yielded 43 tryptic peptides, seven of which were unique, whereas subunit B2 yielded 40 tryptic peptides, four of which were unique. PMID:3663118

  20. Characterization of the ligandin site of maize glutathione S-transferase I

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cytosolic GSTs (glutathione S-transferases) are a major reserve of high-capacity binding proteins and exhibit ligand-binding properties for a large variety of compounds. In the present study, the binding of two non-substrate anthraquinone dyes VBAR (Vilmafix Blue A-R) and CB3GA (Cibacron Blue 3GA) to maize (Zea mays) GST I was investigated. The results showed that the enzyme was specifically and irreversible inactivated by VBAR with a Kd of 35.5±2.2 μM and a k3 of 0.47 min−1. Proteolytic cleavage of the VBAR-modified enzyme and subsequent separation of peptides gave only one modified peptide. Sequencing of the modified peptide revealed the target site of VBAR reaction to be Lys41. CB3GA binds reversibly to GST I and behaves as a competitive inhibitor towards CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and glutathione. CB3GA binding to GST I is accompanied by a characteristic spectral change in the absorption at positive maximum (670 nm) which exhibited a hyperbolic dependence on dye concentration with a Kd of 12.1±0.5 μM. Site-directed mutagenesis of selected residues (Trp12, Phe35, Lys41, Asn49, Gln53, Ser67 and Ile118) was employed, and the mutated enzymes were assessed for CB3GA binding. These results, together with molecular-modelling studies, established that the ligandin-binding site of GST I is located mainly in the hydrophobic binding site. The ability of VBAR to specifically inactivate GST I was exploited further to demonstrate the specific binding of several plant hormones and flavonoids to GST I. The inactivation of other GST isoenzymes by VBAR was also investigated, and it was concluded that VBAR may have wide applicability as an affinity label for probing structure–function relationships of GST isoenzymes. PMID:15196053

  1. Characterization of the complex of glutathione S-transferase pi and 1-cysteine peroxiredoxin.

    PubMed

    Ralat, Luis A; Misquitta, Stephanie A; Manevich, Yefim; Fisher, Aron B; Colman, Roberta F

    2008-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferase pi has been shown to reactivate 1-cysteine peroxiredoxin (1-Cys Prx) by formation of a complex [L.A. Ralat, Y. Manevich, A.B. Fisher, R.F. Colman, Biochemistry 45 (2006) 360-372]. A model of the complex was proposed based on the crystal structures of the two enzymes. We have now characterized the complex of GST pi/1-Cys Prx by determining the M(w) of the complex, by measuring the catalytic activity of the GST pi monomer, and by identifying the interaction sites between GST pi and 1-Cys Prx. The M(w) of the purified GST pi/1-Cys Prx complex is 50,200 at pH 8.0 in the presence of 2.5mM glutathione, as measured by light scattering, providing direct evidence that the active complex is a heterodimer composed of equimolar amounts of the two proteins. In the presence of 4M KBr, GST pi is dissociated to monomer and retains catalytic activity, but the K(m) value for GSH is increased substantially. To identify the peptides of GST pi that interact with 1-Cys Prx, GST pi was digested with V8 protease and the peptides were purified. The binding by 1-Cys Prx of each of four pure GST pi peptides (residues 41-85, 115-124, 131-163, and 164-197) was investigated by protein fluorescence titration. An apparent stoichiometry of 1mol/subunit 1-Cys Prx was measured for each peptide and the formation of the heterodimer is decreased when these peptides are included in the incubation mixture. These results support our proposed model of the heterodimer.

  2. Genetic Deficiency of Glutathione S-Transferase P Increases Myocardial Sensitivity to Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Guo, Yiru; Jagatheesan, Ganapathy; Kilfoil, Peter; Haberzettl, Petra; Hill, Bradford G.; Baba, Shahid P.; Guo, Luping; Wetzelberger, Karin; Obal, Detlef; Rokosh, D. Gregg; Prough, Russell A.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Velayutham, Murugesan; Zweier, Jay L.; Hoetker, David; Riggs, Daniel W.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bolli, Roberto; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) results in the generation of oxygen-derived free radicals and the accumulation of lipid peroxidation-derived unsaturated aldehydes. However, the contribution of aldehydes to myocardial I/R injury has not been assessed. Objective We tested the hypothesis that removal of aldehydes by glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP) diminishes I/R injury. Methods and Results In adult male C57BL/6 mouse hearts, Gstp1/2 was the most abundant GST transcript followed by Gsta4 and Gstm4.1, and GSTP activity was a significant fraction of the total GST activity. mGstp1/2 deletion reduced total GST activity, but no compensatory increase in GSTA and GSTM or major antioxidant enzymes was observed. Genetic deficiency of GSTP did not alter cardiac function, but in comparison with hearts from wild-type (WT) mice, the hearts isolated from GSTP-null mice were more sensitive to I/R injury. Disruption of the GSTP gene also increased infarct size after coronary occlusion in situ. Ischemia significantly increased acrolein in hearts, and GSTP deficiency induced significant deficits in the metabolism of the unsaturated aldehyde, acrolein, but not in the metabolism 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) or trans-2-hexanal; and, upon ischemia, the GSTP-null hearts accumulated more acrolein-modified proteins than WT hearts. GSTP-deficiency did not affect I/R-induced free radical generation, JNK activation or depletion of reduced glutathione. Acrolein-exposure induced a hyperpolarizing shift in INa, and acrolein-induced cell death was delayed by SN-6, a Na+/Ca++ exchange inhibitor. Cardiomyocytes isolated from GSTP-null hearts were more sensitive than WT myocytes to acrolein-induced protein crosslinking and cell death. Conclusions GSTP protects the heart from I/R injury by facilitating the detoxification of cytotoxic aldehydes such as acrolein. PMID:26169370

  3. Characterisation of Dermanyssus gallinae glutathione S-transferases and their potential as acaricide detoxification proteins.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Kathryn; Wright, Harry W; Bull, Robert S; Huntley, John F; Nisbet, Alasdair J

    2015-06-26

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) facilitate detoxification of drugs by catalysing the conjugation of the reduced glutathione (GSH) to electrophilic xenobiotic substrates and therefore have a function in multi-drug resistance. As a result, knowledge of GSTs can inform both drug resistance in, and novel interventions for, the control of endo- and ectoparasite species. Acaricide resistance and the need for novel control methods are both pressing needs for Dermanyssus gallinae, a highly economically important haematophagous ectoparasite of poultry. A transcriptomic database representing D. gallinae was examined and 11 contig sequences were identified with GST BlastX identities. The transcripts represented by 3 contigs, designated Deg-GST-1, -2 and -3, were fully sequenced and further characterized by phylogenetic analysis. Recombinant versions of Deg-GST-1, -2 and -3 (rDeg-GST) were enzymically active and acaricide-binding properties of the rDeg-GSTs were established by evaluating the ability of selected acaricides to inhibit the enzymatic activity of rDeg-GSTs. 6 of the identified GSTs belonged to the mu class, followed by 3 kappa, 1 omega and 1 delta class molecules. Deg-GST-1 and -3 clearly partitioned with orthologous mu class GSTs and Deg-GST-2 partitioned with delta class GSTs. Phoxim, permethrin and abamectin significantly inhibited rDeg-GST-1 activity by 56, 35 and 17% respectively. Phoxim also inhibited rDeg-2-GST (14.8%) and rDeg-GST-3 (20.6%) activities. Deg-GSTs may have important roles in the detoxification of pesticides and, with the increased occurrence of acaricide resistance in this species worldwide, Deg-GSTs are attractive targets for novel interventions.

  4. Induction of glutathione S-transferases in Arabidopsis by herbicide safeners.

    PubMed

    DeRidder, Ben P; Dixon, David P; Beussman, Douglas J; Edwards, Robert; Goldsbrough, Peter B

    2002-11-01

    Herbicide safeners increase herbicide tolerance in cereals but not in dicotyledenous crops. The reason(s) for this difference in safening is unknown. However, safener-induced protection in cereals is associated with increased expression of herbicide detoxifying enzymes, including glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings growing in liquid medium with various safeners similarly resulted in enhanced GST activities toward a range of xenobiotics with benoxacor, fenclorim, and fluxofenim being the most effective. Safeners also increased the tripeptide glutathione content of Arabidopsis seedlings. However, treatment of Arabidopsis plants with safeners had no effect on the tolerance of seedlings to chloroacetanilide herbicides. Each safener produced a distinct profile of enhanced GST activity toward different substrates suggesting a differential induction of distinct isoenzymes. This was confirmed by analysis of affinity-purified GST subunits by two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. AtGSTU19, a tau class GST, was identified as a dominant polypeptide in all samples. When AtGSTU19 was expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant enzyme was highly active toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as chloroacetanilide herbicides. Immunoblot analysis confirmed that AtGSTU19 was induced in response to several safeners. Differential induction of tau GSTs, as well as members of the phi and theta classes by safeners, was demonstrated by RNA-blot analysis. These results indicate that, although Arabidopsis may not be protected from herbicide injury by safeners, at least one component of their detoxification systems is responsive to these compounds.

  5. Induction of Glutathione S-Transferases in Arabidopsis by Herbicide Safeners1

    PubMed Central

    DeRidder, Ben P.; Dixon, David P.; Beussman, Douglas J.; Edwards, Robert; Goldsbrough, Peter B.

    2002-01-01

    Herbicide safeners increase herbicide tolerance in cereals but not in dicotyledenous crops. The reason(s) for this difference in safening is unknown. However, safener-induced protection in cereals is associated with increased expression of herbicide detoxifying enzymes, including glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Treatment of Arabidopsis seedlings growing in liquid medium with various safeners similarly resulted in enhanced GST activities toward a range of xenobiotics with benoxacor, fenclorim, and fluxofenim being the most effective. Safeners also increased the tripeptide glutathione content of Arabidopsis seedlings. However, treatment of Arabidopsis plants with safeners had no effect on the tolerance of seedlings to chloroacetanilide herbicides. Each safener produced a distinct profile of enhanced GST activity toward different substrates suggesting a differential induction of distinct isoenzymes. This was confirmed by analysis of affinity-purified GST subunits by two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. AtGSTU19, a tau class GST, was identified as a dominant polypeptide in all samples. When AtGSTU19 was expressed in Escherichia coli, the recombinant enzyme was highly active toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, as well as chloroacetanilide herbicides. Immunoblot analysis confirmed that AtGSTU19 was induced in response to several safeners. Differential induction of tau GSTs, as well as members of the phi and theta classes by safeners, was demonstrated by RNA-blot analysis. These results indicate that, although Arabidopsis may not be protected from herbicide injury by safeners, at least one component of their detoxification systems is responsive to these compounds. PMID:12428014

  6. Plasmodium falciparum glutathione S-transferase--structural and mechanistic studies on ligand binding and enzyme inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Nicole; Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Deponte, Marcel; Wende, Wolfgang; Zimmermann, Herbert; Becker, Katja

    2006-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum (PfGST) represents a novel class of GST isoenzymes. Since the architecture of the PfGST substrate binding site differs significantly from its human counterparts and there is only this one isoenzyme present in the parasite, PfGST is considered a highly attractive target for antimalarial drug development. Here we report the mechanistic, kinetic, and structural characterization of PfGST as well as its interaction with different ligands. Our data indicate that in solution PfGST is present as a tetramer that dissociates into dimers in the presence of glutathione (GSH). Fluorescence spectroscopy shows that in the presence of GSH GST serves as ligandin for parasitotoxic ferriprotoporphyrin IX with a high- and a low-affinity binding site. This is supported by a clear uncompetitive inhibition type. Site-directed mutagenesis studies demonstrate that neither Cys 86 nor Cys 101 contribute to the peroxidase activity of the enzyme, which is thus performed GSH-dependently at the active site. Tyr 9 is responsible for the deprotonation of GSH and Lys 15, but also Gln 71 are involved in GSH binding. We furthermore report the 2.4 A resolution X-ray structure of PfGST cocrystallized with the inhibitor S-hexylglutathione. In comparison with a previously reported structure obtained by crystal soaking, differences occur at the C-terminal end of helix alpha4 and at the S-hexylmoiety of the inhibitor. We furthermore show that, in contrast to previous reports, the antimalarial drug artemisinin is not metabolized by PfGST.

  7. Glutathione S-transferase of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum: characterization of a potential drug target.

    PubMed

    Harwaldt, Petra; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja

    2002-05-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), which occur abundantly in most organisms, are essentially involved in the intracellular detoxification of numerous substances including chemotherapeutic agents, and thus play a major role in the development of drug resistance. A gene encoding a protein with sequence identity of up to 37% with known GSTs was identified on chromosome 14 of the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum. It was amplified using gametocyte cDNA and expressed in Escherichia coli as a hexahistidyl-tagged protein of 26 kDa subunit size. The homodimeric enzyme (PfGST) was found to catalyse the glutathione (GSH)-dependent modification of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and other typical GST substrates such as o-nitrophenyl acetate, ethacrynic acid, and cumene hydroperoxide. The Km value for GSH was 164+/-20 microM. PfGST was inhibited by cibacron blue (Ki=0.5 microM), S-hexylglutathione (Ki=35 microM), and protoporphyrin IX (Ki=10 microM). Hemin, a most toxic compound for parasitised erythrocytes, was found to be an uncompetitive ligand of PfGST with a Ki of 6.5 microM. Based on the activity of PfGST in extracts of P. falciparum, the enzyme represents 1 to 10% of cellular protein and might therefore serve as an efficient in vivo buffer for parasitotoxic hemin. Destabilising ligands of GST are thus expected to be synergistic with the antimalarial drug chloroquine, which itself was found to be a very weak inhibitor of PfGST (IC50>200 microM). X-ray quality crystals of PfGST (250x200x50 microm) will serve as starting point for structure-based drug design.

  8. Functional characterization of glutathione S-transferases associated with insecticide resistance in Tetranychus urticae.

    PubMed

    Pavlidi, Nena; Tseliou, Vasilis; Riga, Maria; Nauen, Ralf; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Labrou, Nikolaos E; Vontas, John

    2015-06-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is one of the most important agricultural pests world-wide. It is extremely polyphagous and develops resistance to acaricides. The overexpression of several glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) has been associated with insecticide resistance. Here, we functionally expressed and characterized three GSTs, two of the delta class (TuGSTd10, TuGSTd14) and one of the mu class (TuGSTm09), which had been previously associated with striking resistance phenotypes against abamectin and other acaricides/insecticides, by transcriptional studies. Functional analysis showed that all three GSTs were capable of catalyzing the conjugation of both 1-chloro-2,4 dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene(DCNB) to glutathione (GSH), as well as exhibiting GSH-dependent peroxidase activity toward Cumene hydroperoxide (CumOOH). The steady-state kinetics of the T. urticae GSTs for the GSH/CDNB conjugation reaction were determined and compared with other GSTs. The interaction of the three recombinant proteins with several acaricides and insecticides was also investigated. TuGSTd14 showed the highest affinity toward abamectin and a competitive type of inhibition, which suggests that the insecticide may bind to the H-site of the enzyme. The three-dimensional structure of the TuGSTd14 was predicted based on X-ray structures of delta class GSTs using molecular modeling. Structural analysis was used to identify key structural characteristics and to provide insights into the substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of TuGSTd14.

  9. Glutathione S-transferase π complexes with and stimulates Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Hideo; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Shunsuke; Hayashi, Yutaro; Nishino, Hideaki; Kawamura, Masaru; Wu, Chau H

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) was found to complex with the Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase as shown by binding assay using quartz crystal microbalance. The complexation was obstructed by the addition of antiserum to the α-subunit of the Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase, suggesting the specificity of complexation between GST and the Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments, using the anti-α-subunit antiserum to precipitate the GST-Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase complex and then using antibodies specific to an isoform of GST to identify the co-precipitated proteins, revealed that GSTπ was complexed with the Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase. GST stimulated the Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity up to 1.4-fold. The level of stimulation exhibited a saturable dose-response relationship with the amount of GST added, although the level of stimulation varied depending on the content of GSTπ in the lots of GST received from supplier. The stimulation was also obtained when recombinant GSTπ was used, confirming the results. When GST was treated with reduced glutathione, GST activity was greatly stimulated, whereas the level of stimulation of the Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity was similar to that when untreated GST was added. When GST was treated with H₂O₂, GST activity was greatly diminished while the stimulation of the Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity was preserved. The results suggest that GSTπ complexes with the Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase and stimulates the latter independent of its GST activity. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Purification and characterization of a glutathione S-transferase from benoxacor-treated maize (Zea mays).

    PubMed Central

    Irzyk, G P; Fuerst, E P

    1993-01-01

    A glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozyme from maize (Zea mays Pioneer hybrid 3906) treated with the dichloroacetamide herbicide safener benoxacor (CGA-154281) was purified to homogeneity and partially characterized. The enzyme, assayed with metolachlor as a substrate, was purified approximately 200-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography on Mono Q resins, and affinity chromatography on S-hexylglutathione agarose from total GST activity present in etiolated shoots. The purified protein migrated during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) as a single band with a molecular mass of 27 kD. Using nondenaturing PAGE, we determined that the native protein has a molecular mass of about 57 kD and that the protein exists as a dimer. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed only a single protein with an isoelectric point of 5.75 and molecular mass of 27 kD. These results further suggest that the protein exists as a homodimer of two identical 27-kD subunits. The enzyme was most active with substrates possessing a chloroacetamide structure. trans-Cinnamic acid and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene were not effective substrates. Apparent Km values for the enzyme were 10.8 microM for the chloroacetamide metolachlor and 292 microM for glutathione. The enzyme was active from pH 6 to 9, with a pH optimum between 7.5 and 8. An apparently blocked amino terminus of the intact protein prevented direct amino acid sequencing. The enzyme was digested with trypsin, and the amino acid sequences of several peptide fragments were obtained. The sequence information for the isolated GST we have designated "GST IV" indicates that the enzyme is a unique maize GST but shares some homology with maize GSTs I and III. PMID:8278534

  11. Glutathione S-transferase P protects against cyclophosphamide-induced cardiotoxicity in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, Daniel J.; Haberzettl, Petra; Jagatheesan, Ganapathy; Baba, Shahid; Merchant, Michael L.; Prough, Russell A.; Williams, Jessica D.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2015-06-01

    High-dose chemotherapy regimens using cyclophosphamide (CY) are frequently associated with cardiotoxicity that could lead to myocyte damage and congestive heart failure. However, the mechanisms regulating the cardiotoxic effects of CY remain unclear. Because CY is converted to an unsaturated aldehyde acrolein, a toxic, reactive CY metabolite that induces extensive protein modification and myocardial injury, we examined the role of glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP), an acrolein-metabolizing enzyme, in CY cardiotoxicity in wild-type (WT) and GSTP-null mice. Treatment with CY (100–300 mg/kg) increased plasma levels of creatine kinase-MB isoform (CK·MB) and heart-to-body weight ratio to a significantly greater extent in GSTP-null than WT mice. In addition to modest yet significant echocardiographic changes following acute CY-treatment, GSTP insufficiency was associated with greater phosphorylation of c-Jun and p38 as well as greater accumulation of albumin and protein–acrolein adducts in the heart. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed likely prominent modification of albumin, kallikrein-1-related peptidase, myoglobin and transgelin-2 by acrolein in the hearts of CY-treated mice. Treatment with acrolein (low dose, 1–5 mg/kg) also led to increased heart-to-body weight ratio and myocardial contractility changes. Acrolein induced similar hypotension in GSTP-null and WT mice. GSTP-null mice also were more susceptible than WT mice to mortality associated with high-dose acrolein (10–20 mg/kg). Collectively, these results suggest that CY cardiotoxicity is regulated, in part, by GSTP, which prevents CY toxicity by detoxifying acrolein. Thus, humans with low cardiac GSTP levels or polymorphic forms of GSTP with low acrolein-metabolizing capacity may be more sensitive to CY toxicity. - Graphical abstract: Cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment results in P450-mediated metabolic formation of phosphoramide mustard and acrolein (3-propenal). Acrolein is either metabolized and

  12. Vitamin C levels in blood are influenced by polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Horska, Alexandra; Mislanova, Csilla; Bonassi, Stefano; Ceppi, Marcello; Volkovova, Katarina; Dusinska, Maria

    2011-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are intimately involved in combating oxidative stress and in detoxifying xenobiotics. Our objective was to examine possible interactions between polymorphisms in GST genes and plasma vitamin C, tocopherols and carotenoids in 149 reference subjects and 239 subjects occupationally exposed to mineral fibres (asbestos, rock wool, glass fibre), agents that induce oxidative stress. Deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1, and substitution 105Ile/Val in GSTP1 genes were determined by PCR, antioxidants in plasma were measured by HPLC. Tocopherols and carotenoids were affected by age, sex, smoking, occupational exposure to fibres, but not by GST polymorphisms. Vitamin C level was influenced by sex, smoking and occupational exposure. Subjects with deletion of GST had lower vitamin C levels compared with subjects carrying the functional gene variant. Vitamin C levels varied according to GSTM1 polymorphism in the whole group (p < 0.05), in all reference subjects (p < 0.05), in the asbestos factory reference group (p < 0.05), and according to GSTT1 polymorphism in reference group of the rock wool plant (p < 0.05). Vitamin C levels were approximately 20% lower in subjects with both functionally deficient genes in the whole group (p < 0.01) and in all non-exposed subjects (p < 0.05). The correspondence of lower vitamin C levels with non-functional GST isoenzymes may indicate a causal connection between two antioxidant defence pathways, also the underlying mechanism is not yet clear. It seems that supplementation by natural antioxidants is particularly important for subjects with unfavourable genetic makeup and in those exposed to oxidative stress.

  13. Green tea consumption and glutathione S-transferases genetic polymorphisms on the risk of adult leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Min; Xie, Xing; Jin, Jie; Holman, C D'Arcy J

    2017-03-01

    Green tea may have a beneficial role of inhibiting leukemia. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are known to detoxify certain carcinogens. We investigated the roles of green tea consumption and polymorphisms of GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 on the risk of adult leukemia, and to determine whether the associations varied within GSTs genotypes. A multicenter case-control study was conducted in China, 2008-2013. It comprised 442 incident, hematologically confirmed adult leukemia cases and 442 outpatient controls, individually matched to cases by gender, birth quinquennium and study site. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a validated questionnaire. Genetic polymorphisms were assayed by PCR. An inverse association between green tea consumption and adult leukemia risk was observed. Compared with non-tea drinkers, the adjusted odds ratios (95 % confidence intervals) were 0.50 (0.27-0.93), 0.31 (0.17-0.55) and 0.53 (0.29-0.99) for those who, respectively, consumed green tea >20 years, ≥2 cups daily and dried tea leaves >1000 g annually. In assessing the associations by GSTs genotypes, risk reduction associated with green tea consumption was stronger in individuals with the GSTT1-null genotype (OR 0.24; 95 % CI 0.11-0.53) than GSTT1-normal carriers (OR 0.67; 95 % CI 0.42-1.05; P interaction = 0.02). GSTM1 and GSTP1 did not significantly modify the inverse association of leukemia with green tea. The results suggest that regular daily green tea consumption may reduce leukemia risk in Chinese adults regardless of GSTM1 and GSTP1 polymorphic status. The association between green tea and adult leukemia risk varied with GSTT1 genotype and highlights further study.

  14. Glutathione S Transferases Polymorphisms Are Independent Prognostic Factors in Lupus Nephritis Treated with Cyclophosphamide

    PubMed Central

    Verstuyft, Céline; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Hummel, Aurélie; Le Guern, Véronique; Sacré, Karim; Meyer, Olivier; Daugas, Eric; Goujard, Cécile; Sultan, Audrey; Lobbedez, Thierry; Galicier, Lionel; Pourrat, Jacques; Le Hello, Claire; Godin, Michel; Morello, Rémy; Lambert, Marc; Hachulla, Eric; Vanhille, Philippe; Queffeulou, Guillaume; Potier, Jacky; Dion, Jean-Jacques; Bataille, Pierre; Chauveau, Dominique; Moulis, Guillaume; Farge-Bancel, Dominique; Duhaut, Pierre; Saint-Marcoux, Bernadette; Deroux, Alban; Manuzak, Jennifer; Francès, Camille; Aumaitre, Olivier; Bezanahary, Holy; Becquemont, Laurent; Bienvenu, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate association between genetic polymorphisms of GST, CYP and renal outcome or occurrence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in lupus nephritis (LN) treated with cyclophosphamide (CYC). CYC, as a pro-drug, requires bioactivation through multiple hepatic cytochrome P450s and glutathione S transferases (GST). Methods We carried out a multicentric retrospective study including 70 patients with proliferative LN treated with CYC. Patients were genotyped for polymorphisms of the CYP2B6, CYP2C19, GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes. Complete remission (CR) was defined as proteinuria ≤0.33g/day and serum creatinine ≤124 µmol/l. Partial remission (PR) was defined as proteinuria ≤1.5g/day with a 50% decrease of the baseline proteinuria value and serum creatinine no greater than 25% above baseline. Results Most patients were women (84%) and 77% were Caucasian. The mean age at LN diagnosis was 41 ± 10 years. The frequency of patients carrying the GST null genotype GSTT1-, GSTM1-, and the Ile→105Val GSTP1 genotype were respectively 38%, 60% and 44%. In multivariate analysis, the Ile→105Val GSTP1 genotype was an independent factor of poor renal outcome (achievement of CR or PR) (OR = 5.01 95% CI [1.02–24.51]) and the sole factor that influenced occurrence of ADRs was the GSTM1 null genotype (OR = 3.34 95% CI [1.064–10.58]). No association between polymorphisms of cytochrome P450s gene and efficacy or ADRs was observed. Conclusion This study suggests that GST polymorphisms highly impact renal outcome and occurrence of ADRs related to CYC in LN patients. PMID:27002825

  15. Glutathione S-transferase M1 null genotype related to poor prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shushan; Wang, Zengfang; Wang, Zengyan; Duan, Quanhong; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Jun; Sun, Beicheng

    2016-08-01

    Published studies showed controversial findings about the relationship between glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) null genotype and clinical outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer. We performed a meta-analysis to quantitatively assess the association between GSTM1 null genotype and prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer. We systematically searched Pubmed, Embase, and Web of Science to identify prospective or retrospective cohort studies assessing the association of GSTM1 null genotype with overall survival (OS) or disease-free survival (DFS) in colorectal cancer. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) were used to assess the association of GSTM1 null genotype with OS or DFS. Finally, 15 studies from 14 publications with 4326 colorectal cancer patients were included into the meta-analysis. There was no heterogeneity in the meta-analysis relating OS (I (2) = 0 %) and DFS (I (2) = 0 %). Overall, GSTM1 null genotype was significantly associated with poor OS in patients with colorectal cancer (HR = 1.18, 95 % CI 1.07-1.30, P = 0.001). In addition, GSTM1 null genotype was also significantly associated with poor DFS in patients with colorectal cancer (HR = 1.15, 95 % CI 1.03-1.28, P = 0.015). No obvious risk of publication bias was observed. GSTM1 null genotype is significantly associated with poor OS and DFS in patients with colorectal cancer, which suggests that GSTM1 null genotype confers poor effect on the prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  16. Cloning, expression and identification of two glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes from Perna viridis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenzhen; Chen, Rong; Zuo, Zhenghong; Mo, Zhengping; Yu, Ang

    2013-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs; EC 2.5.1.18) are phase II enzymes involved in major detoxification reactions of xenobiotic in many organisms. In the present study, two classes of GSTs (PvGST1 and PvGST2) were cloned from P. viridis by rapid amplification of cDNA ends method. Sequence alignments and phylogenetic analysis together supported that PvGST1 and PvGST2 belonged to the pi and omega classes, respectively. The PvGST1 cDNA was 1214 nucleotides (nt) in length and contained a 618 nt open reading frame (ORF) encoding 206 amino acid residues, and had 46 nt of 5'-untranslated region (UTR) and a 3' UTR of 550 nt including a tailing signal (AATAAA) and a poly (A) tail. The molecular mass of the predicted PvGST1 was 23.815kDa, with the calculated isoelectric point being 5.39. PvGST2 was 1093bp, consisting of a 5' UTR of 13bp, a 3' UTR of 246bp and an ORF of 834bp. The deduced protein was composed of 278 amino acids, with an estimated molecular mass of 32.476kDa and isoelectric point of 8.88. Tissue distribution analysis of the PvGST1 and PvGST2 mRNA revealed that the GST expression level was higher in digestive gland and gonad, while lower in gill and mantle in both genders. Molecular modeling analysis of two GSTs implicated their various functions account for their different enzymatic features. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimization of storage and stability of camel liver glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ajamaluddin; Jagirdar, Haseeb; Rabbani, Nayyar; Khan, Mohd Shahnawaz; Ahmed, Anwar; Al-Senaidy, Abdulrahman M; Ismael, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes and play an important role in cellular detoxification. Besides this, GSTs act as cytosolic carrier proteins that bind hydrophobic compounds such as heme, bilirubin, steroids, and polycyclic hydrocarbons. GST has great importance in biotechnology, as it is a target for vaccine and drug development and biosensors development for xenobiotics. Moreover, the GST tag has been extensively used for protein expression and purification. Until now, biophysical properties of camel liver GST have not been characterized. In the present study we have purified camel (Camelus dromedarius) liver GST to homogeneity in a single step by affinity chromatography with 23.4-fold purification and 60.6% yield. Our results showed that maximal activity of GST was at pH 6.5 and it was stable in the pH range of 5 to 10. The optimum temperature was 55°C and the Tm was 57°C. The chemical chaperone glycerol (3.3 M) was able to protect GST activity and aggregation against thermal denaturation by stabilizing the protein structure at 50 and 57°C, respectively. However, L-arginine (125 mM) did not protect GST against thermal stress. Far-ultraviolet circular dichroism (CD) spectra showed that glycerol protected the secondary structure of GST while L-arginine induced conformational changes under thermal stress. In conclusion, our studies on the GST stability suggest that glycerol works as a stabilizer and L-arginine acts as a destabilizer.

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase Z1 (GSTZ1) and susceptibility to preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Saadat, Mostafa; Anvar, Zahra; Namavar-Jahromi, Bahia; Saadat, Iraj

    2012-09-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) is a complex disorder affected by genetic and environmental factors. Although the exact genes involved in development of PE are still not fully discovered, an important role for oxidative stress in its pathogenesis is accepted. In the present study, the association between the functional genetic polymorphisms in codons 32, 42 and nucleotide -1002 of glutathione S-transferases Z1 (GSTZ1) and susceptibility to PE was investigated. The present case-control study was performed on 151 preeclapmtic patients, and a total of 200 normal pregnant women, as a control group. The healthy control group was frequency matched with the age of the preeclamptic patients. Control subjects had no history of previous pregnancies with PE. Genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP assay. There was no significant association between G-1002A and Glu32Lys polymorphisms of GSTZ1 with PE risk. The variant allele of Gly42Arg polymorphism decreased the risk of PE (OR = 0.24, 95 % CI 0.08-0.73, P = 0.012). The haplotype of "-1002A, 32Lys, 42Arg" (having three variant alleles) versus to the other haplotypes significantly decreased among PE patients compared to the control group (5.0 vs. 0.9 percent among control and PE patient groups, respectively; χ(2) = 9.328, df = 1, P = 0.002). The present results indicate that the haplotype of "-1002A, 32Lys, 42Arg" (containing three variant alleles) of GSTZ1 have protective effect compared to the other haplotypes.

  19. Glutathione-S-transferase P protects against endothelial dysfunction induced by exposure to tobacco smoke.

    PubMed

    Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; Prough, Russell A; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-05-01

    Exposure to tobacco smoke impairs endothelium-dependent arterial dilation. Reactive constituents of cigarette smoke are metabolized and detoxified by glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs). Although polymorphisms in GST genes are associated with the risk of cancer in smokers, the role of these enzymes in regulating the cardiovascular effects of smoking has not been studied. The P isoform of GST (GSTP), which catalyzes the conjugation of electrophilic molecules in cigarette smoke such as acrolein, was expressed in high abundance in the mouse lung and aorta. Exposure to tobacco smoke for 3 days (5 h/day) decreased total plasma protein. These changes were exaggerated in GSTP(-/-) mice. Aortic rings isolated from tobacco smoke-exposed GSTP(-/-) mice showed greater attenuation of ACh-evoked relaxation than those from GSTP(+/+) mice. The lung, plasma, and aorta of mice exposed to tobacco smoke or acrolein (for 5 h) accumulated more acrolein-adducted proteins than those tissues of mice exposed to air, indicating that exposure to tobacco smoke results in the systemic delivery of acrolein. Relative to GSTP(+/+) mice, modification of some proteins by acrolein was increased in the aorta of GSTP(-/-) mice. Aortic rings prepared from GSTP(-/-) mice that inhaled acrolein (1 ppm, 5 h/day for 3 days) or those exposed to acrolein in an organ bath showed diminished ACh-induced arterial relaxation more strongly than GSTP(+/+) mice. Acrolein-induced endothelial dysfunction was prevented by pretreatment of the aorta with N-acetylcysteine. These results indicate that GSTP protects against the endothelial dysfunction induced by tobacco smoke exposure and that this protection may be related to the detoxification of acrolein or other related cigarette smoke constituents.

  20. Genetic polymorphism in three glutathione s-transferase genes and breast cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Woldegiorgis, S.; Ahmed, R.C.; Zhen, Y.; Erdmann, C.A.; Russell, M.L.; Goth-Goldstein, R.

    2002-04-01

    The role of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzyme family is to detoxify environmental toxins and carcinogens and to protect organisms from their adverse effects, including cancer. The genes GSTM1, GSTP1, and GSTT1 code for three GSTs involved in the detoxification of carcinogens, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and benzene. In humans, GSTM1 is deleted in about 50% of the population, GSTT1 is absent in about 20%, whereas the GSTP1 gene has a single base polymorphism resulting in an enzyme with reduced activity. Epidemiological studies indicate that GST polymorphisms increase the level of carcinogen-induced DNA damage and several studies have found a correlation of polymorphisms in one of the GST genes and an increased risk for certain cancers. We examined the role of polymorphisms in genes coding for these three GST enzymes in breast cancer. A breast tissue collection consisting of specimens of breast cancer patients and non-cancer controls was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence or absence of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes and for GSTP1 single base polymorphism by PCR/RFLP. We found that GSTM1 and GSTT1 deletions occurred more frequently in cases than in controls, and GSTP1 polymorphism was more frequent in controls. The effective detoxifier (putative low-risk) genotype (defined as presence of both GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes and GSTP1 wild type) was less frequent in cases than controls (16% vs. 23%, respectively). The poor detoxifier (putative high-risk) genotype was more frequent in cases than controls. However, the sample size of this study was too small to provide conclusive results.

  1. Glutathione-S-transferase profiles in the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.

    PubMed

    Rajarapu, Swapna Priya; Mittapalli, Omprakash

    2013-05-01

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire is a recently discovered invasive insect pest of ash, Fraxinus spp. in North America. Glutathione-S-transferases (GST) are a multifunctional superfamily of enzymes which function in conjugating toxic compounds to less toxic and excretable forms. In this study, we report the molecular characterization and expression patterns of different classes of GST genes in different tissues and developmental stages plus their specific activity. Multiple sequence alignment of all six A. planipennis GSTs (ApGST-E1, ApGST-E2, ApGST-E3, ApGST-O1, ApGST-S1 and ApGST-μ1) revealed conserved features of insect GSTs and a phylogenetic analysis grouped the GSTs within the epsilon, sigma, omega and microsomal classes of GSTs. Real time quantitative PCR was used to study field collected samples. In larval tissues high mRNA levels for ApGST-E1, ApGST-E3 and ApGST-O1 were obtained in the midgut and Malpighian tubules. On the other hand, ApGST-E2 and ApGST-S1 showed high mRNA levels in fat body and ApGST-μ1 showed constitutive levels in all the tissues assayed. During development, mRNA levels for ApGST-E2 were observed to be the highest in feeding instars, ApGST-S1 in prepupal instars; while the others showed constitutive patterns in all the developmental stages examined. At the enzyme level, total GST activity was similar in all the tissues and developmental stages assayed. Results obtained suggest that A. planipennis is potentially primed with GST-driven detoxification to metabolize ash allelochemicals. To our knowledge this study represents the first report of GSTs in A. planipennis and also in the family of wood boring beetles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Global Deletion of Glutathione S-Transferase A4 Exacerbates Developmental Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Ronis, Martin; Mercer, Kelly; Engi, Bridgette; Pulliam, Casey; Zimniak, Piotr; Hennings, Leah; Shearn, Colin; Badger, Thomas; Petersen, Dennis

    2017-02-01

    We established a mouse model of developmental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by feeding a high polyunsaturated fat liquid diet to female glutathione-S-transferase 4-4 (Gsta4(-/-))/peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (Ppara(-/-)) double knockout 129/SvJ mice for 12 weeks from weaning. We used it to probe the importance of lipid peroxidation in progression of NASH beyond simple steatosis. Feeding Gsta4(-/-)/Ppara(-/-) double-knockout (dKO) mice liquid diets containing corn oil resulted in a percentage fat-dependent increase in steatosis and necroinflammatory injury (P < 0.05). Increasing fat to 70% from 35% resulted in increases in formation of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts accompanied by evidence of stellate cell activation, matrix remodeling, and fibrosis (P < 0.05). Comparison of dKO mice with wild-type (Wt) and single knockout mice revealed additive effects of Gsta4(-/-) and Ppara(-/-) silencing on steatosis, 4-hydroxynonenal adduct formation, oxidative stress, serum alanine amino transferase, expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, Il6, interferon mRNA, and liver pathology (P < 0.05). Induction of Cyp2e1 protein by high-fat diet was suppressed in Gsta4(-/-) and dKO groups (P < 0.05). The dKO mice had similar levels of markers of stellate cell activation and matrix remodeling as Ppara(-/-) single KO mice. These data suggest that lipid peroxidation products play a role in progression of liver injury to steatohepatitis in NASH produced by high-fat feeding during development but appear less important in development of fibrosis. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization and expression profiling of glutathione S-transferases in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.).

    PubMed

    You, Yanchun; Xie, Miao; Ren, Nana; Cheng, Xuemin; Li, Jianyu; Ma, Xiaoli; Zou, Minming; Vasseur, Liette; Gurr, Geoff M; You, Minsheng

    2015-03-05

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional detoxification enzymes that play important roles in insects. The completion of several insect genome projects has enabled the identification and characterization of GST genes over recent years. This study presents a genome-wide investigation of the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, a species in which the GSTs are of special importance because this pest is highly resistant to many insecticides. A total of 22 putative cytosolic GSTs were identified from a published P. xylostella genome and grouped into 6 subclasses (with two unclassified). Delta, Epsilon and Omega GSTs were numerically superior with 5 genes for each of the subclasses. The resulting phylogenetic tree showed that the P. xylostella GSTs were all clustered into Lepidoptera-specific branches. Intron sites and phases as well as GSH binding sites were strongly conserved within each of the subclasses in the GSTs of P. xylostella. Transcriptome-, RNA-seq- and qRT-PCR-based analyses showed that the GST genes were developmental stage- and strain-specifically expressed. Most of the highly expressed genes in insecticide resistant strains were also predominantly expressed in the Malpighian tubules, midgut or epidermis. To date, this is the most comprehensive study on genome-wide identification, characterization and expression profiling of the GST family in P. xylostella. The diversified features and expression patterns of the GSTs are inferred to be associated with the capacity of this species to develop resistance to a wide range of pesticides and biological toxins. Our findings provide a base for functional research on specific GST genes, a better understanding of the evolution of insecticide resistance, and strategies for more sustainable management of the pest.

  4. Increased transcription of Glutathione S-transferases in acaricide exposed scabies mites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that Sarcoptes scabiei var. hominis mites collected from scabies endemic communities in northern Australia show increasing tolerance to 5% permethrin and oral ivermectin. Previous findings have implicated detoxification pathways in developing resistance to these acaricides. We investigated the contribution of Glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes to permethrin and ivermectin tolerance in scabies mites using biochemical and molecular approaches. Results Increased in vitro survival following permethrin exposure was observed in S. scabiei var. hominis compared to acaricide naïve mites (p < 0.0001). The addition of the GST inhibitor diethyl maleate restored in vitro permethrin susceptibility, confirming GST involvement in permethrin detoxification. Assay of GST enzymatic activity in mites demonstrated that S. scabiei var. hominis mites showed a two-fold increase in activity compared to naïve mites (p < 0.0001). Increased transcription of three different GST molecules was observed in permethrin resistant S. scabiei var. canis- mu 1 (p < 0.0001), delta 1 (p < 0.001), and delta 3 (p < 0.0001). mRNA levels of GST mu 1, delta 3 and P-glycoprotein also significantly increased in S. scabiei var. hominis mites collected from a recurrent crusted scabies patient over the course of ivermectin treatment. Conclusions These findings provide further support for the hypothesis that increased drug metabolism and efflux mediate permethrin and ivermectin resistance in scabies mites and highlight the threat of emerging acaricide resistance to the treatment of scabies worldwide. This is one of the first attempts to define specific genes involved in GST mediated acaricide resistance at the transcriptional level, and the first application of such studies to S. scabiei, a historically challenging ectoparasite. PMID:20482766

  5. Effects of chlorpyrifos on glutathione S-transferase in migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guohua; Liu, Ting; Guo, Yaping; Zhang, Xueyao; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2014-02-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a typical organophosphate pesticide and is among the most widely used worldwide. The objective of the present investigation was to assess the effect of chlorpyrifos exposure on glutathione S-transferase in Locusta migratoria. In the present study, chlorpyrifos (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4mgg(-1) body weight) was topically applied in the abdomen of locusts. The GST activity, mRNA levels of ten L. migratoria GSTs and protein levels of four representative GSTs were detected. The results showed that chlorpyrifos treatment caused significant decrease of 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB) and p-nitro-benzyl chloride (p-NBC) activities, whereas 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) activity was not altered in locusts. The mRNA levels of seven L. migratoria GSTs, including LmGSTs2, LmGSTs3, LmGSTs4, LmGSTs5, LmGSTs6, LmGSTt1, and LmGSTu1, were decreased after chlorpyrifos exposure. The protein levels of LmGSTs5, LmGSTt1 and LmGSTu1 were significantly decreased at higher doses of chlorpyrifos. However, chlorpyrifos elevated the mRNA and protein expression of LmGSTd1. It indicated that LmGSTd1 might contribute to the resistance of locust to organophosphate pesticides such as chlorpyrifos, whereas the decrease in other GSTs might be an economic compensation by the insect to differentially regulate the expression of enzymes involved in the detoxification of insecticides on the expense of those that are not.

  6. Effects of Local Heart Irradiation in a Glutathione S-Transferase Alpha 4-Null Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Boerma, Marjan; Singh, Preeti; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Sharma, Sunil; Singh, Sharda P

    2015-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 (GSTA4-4) is one of the enzymes responsible for the removal of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), an electrophilic product of lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes during oxidative stress. 4-HNE is a direct activator of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor with many target genes encoding antioxidant and anti-electrophile enzymes. We have previously shown that Gsta4-null mice on a 129/Sv background exhibited increased activity of Nrf2 in the heart. Here we examined the sensitivity of this Gsta4-null mouse model towards cardiac function and structure loss due to local heart irradiation. Male Gsta4-null and wild-type mice were exposed to a single X-ray dose of 18 Gy to the heart. Six months after irradiation, immunohistochemical staining for respiratory complexes 2 and 5 indicated that radiation exposure had caused most pronounced alterations in mitochondrial morphology in Gsta4-null mice. On the other hand, wild-type mice showed a decline in cardiac function and an increase in plasma levels of troponin-I, while no such changes were observed in Gsta4-null mice. Radiation-induced Nrf2-target gene expression only in Gsta4-null mice. In conclusion, although loss of GSTA4-4 led to enhanced susceptibility of cardiac mitochondria to radiation-induced loss of morphology, cardiac function was preserved in Gsta4-null mice. We propose that this protection against cardiac function loss may occur, at least in part, by upregulation of the Nrf2 pathway.

  7. Characterization and functional analysis of four glutathione S-transferases from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guohua; Jia, Miao; Liu, Ting; Zhang, Xueyao; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play an important role in detoxification of xenobiotics in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. In this study, four GSTs (LmGSTd1, LmGSTs5, LmGSTt1, and LmGSTu1) representing different classes were identified from the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. These four proteins were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble fusion proteins, purified by Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid agarose column and biochemically characterized. LmGSTd1, LmGSTs5, and LmGSTu1 showed high activities with 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), detectable activity with p-nitro-benzyl chloride (p-NBC) and 1, 2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene (DCNB), whereas LmGSTt1 showed high activity with p-NBC and detectable activity with CDNB. The optimal pH of the locust GSTs ranged between 7.0 to 9.0. Ethacrynic acid and reactive blue effectively inhibited all four GSTs. LmGSTs5 was most sensitive to heavy metals (Cu(2+) and Cd(2+)). The maximum expression of the four GSTs was observed in Malpighian tubules and fat bodies as evaluated by western blot. The nymph mortalities after carbaryl treatment increased by 28 and 12% after LmGSTs5 and LmGSTu1 were silenced, respectively. The nymph mortalities after malathion and chlorpyrifos treatments increased by 26 and 18% after LmGSTs5 and LmGSTu1 were silenced, respectively. These results suggest that sigma GSTs in L. migratoria play a significant role in carbaryl detoxification, whereas some of other GSTs may also involve in the detoxification of carbaryl and chlorpyrifos.

  8. Radiosensitivity in HeLa cervical cancer cells overexpressing glutathione S-transferase π 1

    PubMed Central

    YANG, LIANG; LIU, REN; MA, HONG-BIN; YING, MING-ZHEN; WANG, YA-JIE

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the effect of overexpressed exogenous glutathione S-transferase π 1 (GSTP1) gene on the radiosensitivity of the HeLa human cervical cancer cell line and conduct a preliminarily investigation into the underlying mechanisms of the effect. The full-length sequence of human GSTP1 was obtained by performing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers based on the GenBank sequence of GSTP1. Subsequently, the gene was cloned into a recombinant eukaryotic expression plasmid, and the resulting construct was confirmed by restriction analysis and DNA sequencing. A HeLa cell line that was stably expressing high levels of GSTP1 was obtained through stable transfection of the constructed plasmids using lipofectamine and screening for G418 resistance, as demonstrated by reverse transcription-PCR. Using the transfected HeLa cells, a colony formation assay was conducted to detect the influence of GSTP1 overexpression on the cell radiosensitivity. Furthermore, flow cytometry was used to investigate the effect of GSTP1 overexpression on cell cycle progression, with the protein expression levels of the cell cycle regulating factor cyclin B1 detected using western blot analysis. Colony formation and G2/M phase arrest in the GSTP1-expressing cells were significantly increased compared with the control group (P<0.01). In addition, the expression of cyclin B1 was significantly reduced in the GSTP1-expressing cells. These results demonstrated that increased expression of GSTP1 inhibits radiosensitivity in HeLa cells. The mechanism underlying this effect may be associated with the ability of the GSTP1 protein to reduce cyclin B1 expression, resulting in significant G2/M phase arrest. PMID:26622693

  9. Purification and characterization of glutathione S-transferases of human kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S V; Leal, T; Ansari, G A; Awasthi, Y C

    1987-01-01

    Several forms of glutathione S-transferase (GST) are present in human kidney, and the overall isoenzyme pattern of kidney differs significantly from those of other human tissues. All the three major classes of GST isoenzymes (alpha, mu and pi) are present in significant amounts in kidney, indicating that GST1, GST2 and GST3 gene loci are expressed in this tissue. More than one form of GST is present in each of these classes of enzymes, and individual variations are observed for these classes. The structural, immunological and functional properties of GST isoenzymes of three classes differ significantly from each other, whereas the isoenzymes belonging to the same class have similar properties. All the cationic GST isoenzymes of human kidney except for GST 9.1 are heterodimers of 26,500-Mr and 24,500-Mr subunits. GST 9.1 is a dimer of 24,500-Mr subunits. All the cationic isoenzymes of kidney GST cross-react with antibodies raised against a mixture of GST alpha, beta, gamma, delta and epsilon isoenzymes of liver. GST 6.6 and GST 5.5 of kidney are dimers of 26,500-Mr subunits and are immunologically similar to GST psi of liver. Unlike other human tissues, kidney has at least two isoenzymes (pI 4.7 and 4.9) associated with the GST3 locus. Both these isoenzymes are dimers of 22,500-Mr subunits and are immunologically similar to GST pi of placenta. Some of the isoenzymes of kidney do not correspond to known GST isoenzymes from other human tissues and may be specific to this tissue. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3118868

  10. Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) polymorphisms are associated with relapse after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Cotignola, Javier; Leonardi, Daiana B.; Shahabi, Ahva; Acuña, Alejandro D.; Stern, Mariana C.; Navone, Nora; Scorticati, Carlos; De Siervi, Adriana; Mazza, Osvaldo; Vazquez, Elba

    2013-01-01

    Background Organ confined prostate cancer (PCa) can be cured by radical retropubic prostatectomy (RRP); however, some tumors will still recur. Current tools fail to identify patients at risk of recurrence. Glutathione-S-Transferases (GSTs) are involved in the metabolism of carcinogens, hormones and drugs. Thus, genetic polymorphisms that modify the GSTs activities may modify the risk of PCa recurrence. Methods We retrospectively recruited Argentine PCa patients treated with RRP to study the association between GSTs polymorphisms and PCa biochemical relapse after RRP. We genotyped germline DNA in 105 patients for: GSTP1 c.313 A>G (p.105 Ile>Val, rs1695) by PCR-RFLP; and GSTT1 null and GSTM1 null polymorphisms by multiplex-PCR. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate these associations. Results Patients with GSTP1 c.313 GG genotype showed shorter biochemical relapse-free survival (BRFS) (p=0.003) and higher risk for recurrence in unadjusted (Hazard Ratio (HR)=3.16, 95% Confidence Interval (95% CI)=1.41–7.06, p=0.005) and multivariate models (HR=3.01, 95% CI=1.13–8.02, p=0.028). We did not find significant associations for GSTT1 and GSTM1 genotypes. In addition, we found shorter BRFS (p=0.010) and increased risk for recurrence for patients having 2 or more risk alleles when we combined the genotypes of the three GSTs in multivariate models (HR=3.06, 95% CI=1.20–7.80, p=0.019). Conclusions Our results give support to the implementation of GSTs genotyping for personalized therapies as a novel alternative for PCa management for patients who undergo RRP. This is the first study that examined GST polymorphisms in PCa progression in Argentine men. Replication of our findings in larger cohort is warranted. PMID:23146971

  11. Comparative Genomics of the Anopheline Glutathione S-Transferase Epsilon Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, Constância; Müller, Pie; Dyer, Naomi; Wilding, Craig; Rigden, Daniel; Donnelly, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Enzymes of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) family play critical roles in detoxification of xenobiotics across many taxa. While GSTs are ubiquitous both in animals and plants, the GST epsilon class (GSTE) is insect-specific and has been associated with resistance to chemical insecticides. While both Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae GSTE clusters consist of eight members, only four putative orthologs are identifiable between the species, suggesting independent expansions of the class in each lineage. We used a primer walking approach, sequencing almost the entire cluster from three Anopheles species (An. stephensi, An. funestus (both Cellia subgenus) and An. plumbeus (Anopheles subgenus)) and compared the sequences to putative orthologs in An. gambiae (Cellia) in an attempt to trace the evolution of the cluster within the subfamily Anophelinae. Furthermore, we measured transcript levels from the identified GSTE loci by real time reverse transcription PCR to determine if all genes were similarly transcribed at different life stages. Among the species investigated, gene order and orientation were similar with three exceptions: (i) GSTE1 was absent in An. plumbeus; (ii) GSTE2 is duplicated in An. plumbeus and (iii) an additional transcriptionally active pseudogene (ψAsGSTE2) was found in An. stephensi. Further statistical analysis and protein modelling gave evidence for positive selection on codons of the catalytic site in GSTE5 albeit its origin seems to predate the introduction of chemical insecticides. Gene expression profiles revealed differences in expression pattern among genes at different life stages. With the exception of GSTE1, ψAsGSTE2 and GSTE2b, all Anopheles species studied share orthologs and hence we assume that GSTE expansion generally predates radiation into subgenera, though the presence of GSTE1 may also suggest a recent duplication event in the Old World Cellia subgenus, instead of a secondary loss. The modifications of the catalytic site

  12. [Effects of Tagetes erecta extracts on glutathione S-transferase and protease activities and protein content in Tetranychus viennensis].

    PubMed

    Shi, Guang-lu; Wang, You-nian; Wang, Hong-lei; Zhao, Li-lin; Liu, Su-qi; Cao, Hui; Yu, Tong-quan; Lu, Ping

    2007-02-01

    With in vivo and in vitro Tagetes erecta roots under light and dark as test materials, this paper studied the effects of their extracts on the glutathione S-transferase and protease activities and protein content in Tetranychus viennensis. The results showed that the chloroform extract of T. erecta roots had the highest light-activated activity, followed by water extract, and methanol extract. After treated with chloroform extract, the glutathione S-transferase and protease activities in T. viennensis increased markedly, while its protein content decreased obviously. The variation degree of T. viennensis protease activity and protein content was significantly higher when the chloroform extract came from the T. erecta roots under light, suggesting that there existed active matters in the extract, which could promote the activation of protease, and thus, the decomposition of protein in T. viennensis. The bioactivity of T. erecta metabolites was mainly of light-activated one.

  13. Possible prenatal impact of sertraline on human placental glutathione S-transferase-π.

    PubMed

    Dalmizrak, O; Kulaksiz-Erkmen, G; Ozer, N

    2012-05-01

    Sertraline (SER), a tricyclic antidepressant, is considered to belong to the group of selective amine reuptake inhibitors. Its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and transplacental transport has been reported previously. It is widely distributed in the brain and is bound to human glutathione S-transferase-π (GST-π). If SER is taken during pregnancy, it gets accumulated in the embryo and fetus, and some studies have suggested it may cause congenital malformations, thus the study of the interaction of GST-π with antidepressants is crucial. In this study, the interaction of human placental GST-π with SER in the presence of the natural ligand, reduced glutathione (GSH) and a xenobiotic ligand, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) was investigated. The V(m) values obtained at variable [CDNB] and variable [GSH] were 61.3 ± 2.3 and 46.4 ± 1.7 U/mg protein, respectively. The k(cat) and k(cat)/K(m) values for GSH and CDNB were 3.63 × 10(6) s(-1), 2.59 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1) and 4.79 × 10(6) s(-1), 1.29 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The half maximal inhibitory concentration value for SER was 4.60 mM. At constant [CDNB] and variable [GSH] the inhibition type was linear mixed-type, with K(s), α, and K(i) values of 0.14 ± 0.02, 2.90 ± 1.64, and 2.18 ± 0.80 mM, respectively. On the other hand, at fixed [GSH] and at variable [CDNB], the inhibition type was competitive, with K(i) value of 0.96 ± 0.10 mM. Thus, these findings weaken the importance of the protective role of GST against toxic electrophiles in vivo in adults, but due to its immature enterohepatic system SER may accumulate in the fetus and cause congenital malformations.

  14. Effects of imidacloprid on detoxifying enzyme glutathione S-transferase on Folsomia candida (Collembola).

    PubMed

    Sillapawattana, Panwad; Schäffer, Andreas

    2016-04-20

    Chemical analyses of the environment can document contamination by various xenobiotics, but it is also important to understand the effect of pollutants on living organisms. Thus, in the present work, we investigated the effect of the pesticide imidacloprid on the detoxifying enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) from Folsomia candida (Collembola), a standard test organism for estimating the effects of pesticides and environmental pollutants on non-target soil arthropods. Test animals were treated with different concentrations of imidacloprid for 48 h. Changes in steady-state levels of GST messenger RNA (mRNA) and GST enzyme activity were investigated. Extracted proteins were separated according to their sizes by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the resolved protein bands were detected by silver staining. The size of the glutathione (GSH) pool in Collembola was also determined. A predicted protein sequence of putative GSTs was identified with animals from control group. A 3-fold up-regulation of GST steady-state mRNA levels was detected in the samples treated with 5.0 mg L(-1) imidacloprid compared to the control, while a 2.5- and 2.0- fold up-regulation was found in organisms treated with 2.5 and 7.5 mg L(-1) imidacloprid, respectively. GST activity increased with increasing imidacloprid amounts from an initial activity of 0.11 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein in the control group up to 0.25 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein in the sample treated with the 5.0 mg L(-1) of pesticide. By contrast, the total amount of GSH decreased with increasing imidacloprid concentration. The results suggest that the alteration of GST activity, steady-state level of GST mRNA, and GSH level may be involved in the response of F. candida to the exposure of imidacloprid and can be used as biomarkers to monitor the toxic effects of imidacloprid and other environmental pollutants on Collembola.

  15. Catalytic characterization of human microsomal glutathione S-transferase 2: identification of rate-limiting steps.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shabbir; Niegowski, Damian; Wetterholm, Anders; Haeggström, Jesper Z; Morgenstern, Ralf; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes

    2013-03-12

    Microsomal glutathione S-transferase 2 (MGST2) is a 17 kDa trimeric integral membrane protein homologous to leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S). MGST2 has been suggested to catalyze the biosynthesis of the pro-inflammatory mediator leukotriene C4 (LTC4) in cells devoid of LTC4S. A detailed biochemical study of MGST2 is critical for the understanding of its cellular function and potential role as an LTC4-producing enzyme. Here we have characterized the substrate specificity and catalytic properties of purified MGST2 by steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetic experiments. In comparison with LTC4S, which has a catalytic efficiency of 8.7 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), MGST2, with a catalytic efficiency of 1.8 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), is considerably less efficient in producing LTC4. However, the two enzymes display a similar KM(LTA4) of 30-40 μM. While LTC4S has one activated glutathione (GSH) (forming a thiolate) per enzyme monomer, the MGST2 trimer seems to display only third-of-the-sites reactivity for thiolate activation, which in part would explain its lower catalytic efficiency. Furthermore, MGST2 displays GSH-dependent peroxidase activity of ∼0.2 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) toward several lipid hydroperoxides. MGST2, but not LTC4S, is efficient in catalyzing conjugation of the electrophilic substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal with GSH. Using stopped-flow pre-steady-state kinetics, we have characterized the full catalytic reaction of MGST2 with CDNB and GSH as substrates, showing an initial rapid equilibrium binding of GSH followed by thiolate formation. Burst kinetics for the CDNB-GSH conjugation step was observed only at low GSH concentrations (thiolate anion formation becoming rate-limiting under these conditions). Product release is rapid and does not limit the overall reaction. Therefore, in general, the chemical conjugation step is rate-limiting for MGST2 at physiological GSH concentrations. MGST2 and LTC4S

  16. Comprehensive characterization of three glutathione S-transferase family proteins from black rockfish (Sebastes schlegelii).

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, J D H E; Bathige, S D N K; Nam, Bo-Hye; Noh, Jae Koo; Lee, Jehee

    2016-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are categorized as phase II enzymes, which form an important multifunctional family associated with a wide variety of catalytic activities. GSTω, GSTρ, and GSTθ are cytosolic GSTs which have been extensively studied in a variety of organisms; however, few studies have focused on teleosts. Those paralogs from black rockfish (Sebastes schlegelii; RfGSTω, RfGSTρ, and RfGSTθ, respectively) were molecularly, biochemically, and functionally characterized to determine their antioxidant extent and protective aptitudes upon pathogenic stress. RfGSTω, RfGSTρ, and RfGSTθ, contained open reading frames of 717bp, 678bp, and 720bp respectively, which encoded respective proteins of 239, 226, and 240 amino acids in length. In silico analysis revealed that all RfGSTs possessed characteristic N-terminal domains bearing glutathione (GSH)-binding sites, and C-terminal domains containing substrate-binding sites. Recombinant RfGSTω (rRfGSTω) catalyzed the conjugation of GSH to dehydroascorbate (DHA), while rRfGSTθ and rRfGSTρ catalyzed to the model GST substrate 1-Chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Kinetic analysis revealed variation in Km and Vmax values for each rRfGST, indicating their different conjugation rates. The optimum conditions (pH and temperature) and inhibition assays of each protein demonstrated different optimal ranges showing their wide range of activity as an assembly. RfGSTω and RfGSTθ paralogs demonstrated their antioxidant potential towards H2O2 and heavy metals (Cd, Zn, and Cu) in vitro, while RfGSTρ had an antioxidant potential only towards heavy metals (Zn and Cu). Though all the paralogs were ubiquitously expressed in different magnitudes, RfGSTω was highly expressed in blood, whereas RfGSTρ and RfGSTθ were highly expressed in liver. The mRNA expression of RfGSTω and RfGSTθ, upon Streptococcus iniae and poly I:C stimulation, revealed a significantly up-regulated expression, whereas RfGSTρ m

  17. Functional classification and biochemical characterization of a novel rho class glutathione S-transferase in Synechocystis PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Tripti; Chhetri, Gaurav; Chinta, Ramesh; Kumar, Bijay; Singh, Dev Bukhsh; Tripathi, Timir; Singh, Arvind Kumar

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel class of glutathione S-transferase (GST) from the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 (sll1545) which catalyzes the detoxification of the water pollutant dichloroacetate and also shows strong glutathione-dependent peroxidase activity representing the classical activities of zeta and theta/alpha class respectively. Interestingly, sll1545 has very low sequence and structural similarity with these classes. This is the first report of dichloroacetate degradation activity by any bacterial GST. Based on these results we classify sll1545 to a novel GST class, rho. The present data also indicate potential biotechnological and industrial applications of cyanobacterial GST in dichloroacetate-polluted areas. PMID:25685659

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the glutathione S-transferase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, C; Perbandt, M; Betzel, Ch; Walter, R D; Liebau, E

    2003-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) belong to a family of detoxification enzymes that conjugate glutathione to various xenobiotics, thus facilitating their expulsion from the cells. For high-resolution crystallographic investigations, GST from the human malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum was overexpressed in bacterial cells and crystallized using hanging-drop vapour diffusion. X-ray intensity data to 2.8 A resolution were collected from an orthorhombic crystal form with unit-cell parameters a = 62.2, b = 88.3, c = 75.3 A. A search for heavy-atom derivatives has been initiated, along with phase-determination efforts by molecular replacement.

  19. Glutathione S-transferase in the midgut tissue of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars exposed to dietary cadmium.

    PubMed

    Vlahović, Milena; Ilijin, Larisa; Mrdaković, Marija; Todorović, Dajana; Matić, Dragana; Lazarević, Jelica; Mataruga, Vesna Perić

    2016-06-01

    Activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST) in midgut of gypsy moth caterpillars exposed to 10 and 30μg Cd/g dry food was examined. Based on the enzyme reaction through conjugation with glutathione, overall activity remained unaltered after acute and chronic treatment. No-observed-effect-concentration (10μg Cd/g dry food) significantly increased activity only after 3-day recovery following cadmium administration. Almost all comparisons of the indices of phenotypic plasticity revealed statistically significant differences. Despite the facts that GST has important role in xenobiotic biotransformation, our results indicate that this enzyme in insect midgut does not represent the key factor in cadmium detoxification.

  20. Isolation, cloning and large scale expression of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) protein of Polymyxa betae.

    PubMed

    Safarpour, H; Safarnejad, M R

    2012-01-01

    The plasmodiophoromycete Polymyxa betae, an obligate parasite of sugar-beet roots, is a natural vector of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV). To develop protein based diagnosis for any pathogenic agents including P. betae, a specific immunogenic protein has to be prepared. The glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is expressed in all the morphologically different stages of the pathogen's life cycle, and then it is a good candidate as an immunogenic agent for developing of specific antibodies and diagnostic purposes. The present study describes isolation, cloning and large scale expression and purification of P. betae GST protein. For this aim, total RNA was initially isolated from infected plants and corresponding cDNA was constructed by using reverse transcriptase and oligo-dT primer as well as mRNA as a template. The gene encoding GST was isolated and PCR-amplified from the synthesized cDNA by using specific primers. The amplified fragments were preliminary cloned into pTZ57R/T cloning vector. Intact clone containing right sequence was selected after digestion, PCR amplification and subsequent sequencing analysis. Next, GST encoding region having right sequence was recovered and sub-cloned into pET28a bacterial expression vector. Large scale expression of recombinant protein was performed in BL21-de3 strain of E. coli and purification was carried out under native situation through Immobolized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) in column containing Ni-NTA agarose beads. Successful expression and purification steps were confirmed by SDS-PAGE followed by western blotting analysis. These results confirmed the high purity and integrity of GST protein which was around 21 kDa. Generally, the total yield of the purified protein in the culture medium was estimated at around 3.5 mg/mL. After purification, a major part of the purified proteins was precipitated identified as excess GST. To improve the solubility, the final concentration of purified protein was reduced

  1. Genetic and epigenetic regulation and expression signatures of glutathione S-transferases in developing mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Cui, Julia Yue; Choudhuri, Supratim; Knight, Tamara R; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2010-07-01

    The hepatic glutathione S-transferases (Gsts) are critical phase II enzymes in protecting cellular macromolecules against electrophiles and oxidative stress. Little is known about the ontogeny of Gsts and the underlying regulatory mechanisms during liver development. Therefore, in this study, the ontogeny and the regulatory mechanisms of 19 known Gst isoforms were investigated in mouse liver from 2 days before birth to postnatal day 45. With the exception of Gstm5 and MGst2 that showed a progressive decline in postnatal messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, most other Gst isoforms showed a progressive increase in postnatal mRNA expression. Two-way hierarchical clustering revealed three distinct expression patterns of these Gsts isoforms: perinatal, adolescent, and adult enriched. The expression signatures of certain Gst isoforms showed positive association with the ontogeny of critical xenobiotic-sensing transcription factors, including aryl hydrocarbon receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, and NF-E2-related factor-2. Specifically, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with the next generation sequencing technology (ChIP-Seq) revealed direct PXR-binding sites to the Gsta, Gstm, Gstt, and Gstp polycistron clusters as well as to the Mgst1 gene locus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis demonstrated that DNA methylation and histone H3K27-trimethylation (H3K27me3), two-gene expression-suppressing epigenetic marks, were consistently low around the Gstz1 gene locus. In contrast, enrichment of histone H3K4-dimethylation (H3K4me2), a hallmark for gene activation, increased 60% around the Gstz1 gene locus from prenatal to the young adult period. Regression analysis revealed a strong correlation between the enrichment of H3K4me2 and Gstz1 mRNA expression (r = 0.76). In conclusion, this study characterized three distinct ontogenic expression signatures of the 19 Gst isoforms

  2. 4-Hydroxynonenal induces apoptosis in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes: the protective role of glutathione-S-transferase

    PubMed Central

    Vaillancourt, France; Fahmi, Hassan; Shi, Qin; Lavigne, Patrick; Ranger, Pierre; Fernandes, Julio C; Benderdour, Mohamed

    2008-01-01

    Introduction 4-Hydroxynonenal (HNE) is one of the most abundant and reactive aldehydes of lipid peroxidation products and exerts various effects on intracellular and extracellular signalling cascades. We have previously shown that HNE at low concentrations could be considered as an important mediator of catabolic and inflammatory processes in osteoarthritis (OA). In the present study, we focused on characterizing the signalling cascade induced by high HNE concentration involved in cell death in human OA chondrocytes. Methods Markers of apoptosis were quantified with commercial kits. Protein levels were evaluated by Western blotting. Glutathione (GSH) and ATP levels were measured with commercial kits. Glucose uptake was assessed by 2-deoxy-D-[3H]-glucose. The role of GSH-S-transferase A4-4 (GSTA4-4) in controlling HNE-induced chondrocyte apoptosis was investigated by chondrocyte transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) or with the expression vector of GSTA4-4. Results Our data showed that HNE at concentrations of up to 10 μM did not alter cell viability but was cytotoxic at concentrations of greater than or equal to 20 μM. HNE-induced chondrocyte death exhibited several classical hallmarks of apoptosis, including caspase activation, cytochrome c and apoptosis-induced factor release from mitochondria, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, Bcl-2 downregulation, Bax upregulation, and DNA fragmentation. Our study of signalling pathways revealed that HNE suppressed pro-survival Akt kinase activity but, in contrast, induced Fas/CD95 and p53 expression in chondrocytes. All of these effects were inhibited by an antioxidant, N-acetyl-cysteine. Analysis of cellular energy and redox status showed that HNE induced ATP, NADPH, and GSH depletion and inhibited glucose uptake and citric acid cycle activity. GSTA4-4 ablation by the siRNA method augmented HNE cytotoxicity, but, conversely, its overexpression efficiently protected chondrocytes from HNE-induced cell death

  3. Glutathione S-transferase activity in follicular fluid from women undergoing ovarian stimulation: role in maturation.

    PubMed

    Meijide, Susana; Hernández, M Luisa; Navarro, Rosaura; Larreategui, Zaloa; Ferrando, Marcos; Ruiz-Sanz, José Ignacio; Ruiz-Larrea, M Begoña

    2014-10-01

    Female infertility involves an emotional impact for the woman, often leading to a state of anxiety and low self-esteem. The assisted reproduction techniques (ART) are used to overcome the problem of infertility. In a first step of the in vitro fertilization therapy women are subjected to an ovarian stimulation protocol to obtain mature oocytes, which will result in competent oocytes necessary for fertilization to occur. Ovarian stimulation, however, subjects the women to a high physical and psychological stress, thus being essential to improve ART and to find biomarkers of dysfunction and fertility. GSH is an important antioxidant, and is also used in detoxification reactions, catalysed by glutathione S-transferases (GST). In the present work, we have investigated the involvement of GST in follicular maturation. Patients with fertility problems and oocyte donors were recruited for the study. From each woman follicles at two stages of maturation were extracted at the preovulatory stage. Follicular fluid was separated from the oocyte by centrifugation and used as the enzyme source. GST activity was determined based on its conjugation with 3,4-dichloronitrobenzene and the assay was adapted to a 96-well microplate reader. The absorbance was represented against the incubation time and the curves were adjusted to linearity (R(2)>0.990). Results showed that in both donors and patients GST activity was significantly lower in mature oocytes compared to small ones. These results suggest that GST may play a role in the follicle maturation by detoxifying xenobiotics, thus contributing to the normal development of the oocyte. Supported by FIS/FEDER (PI11/02559), Gobierno Vasco (Dep. Educación, Universiades e Investigación, IT687-13), and UPV/EHU (CLUMBER UFI11/20 and PES13/58). The work was approved by the Ethics Committee of the UPV/EHU (CEISH/96/2011/RUIZLARREA), and performed according to the UPV/EHU and IVI-Bilbao agreement (Ref. 2012/01). Copyright © 2014. Published by

  4. Association of glutathione-S-transferase gene polymorphism and lipoprotein subclasses in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Vekic, Jelena; Zeljkovic, Aleksandra; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana; Damjanovic, Tatjana; Suvakov, Sonja; Matic, Marija; Savic-Radojevic, Ana; Simic, Tatjana; Spasojevic-Kalimanovska, Vesna; Gojkovic, Tamara; Spasic, Slavica; Dimkovic, Nada

    2014-04-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by profound dyslipidemia and enhanced oxidative stress. The patients also show evidence of exhausted and/or deficient anti-oxidative defense enzymes, one of them being glutathione-S-transferase (GST). This study investigates relationship between GST gene polymorphism and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses in ESRD. GSTM1, T1, and P1 genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in 160 patients undergoing hemodialysis. LDL and HDL subclasses were separated by gradient gel electrophoresis and biochemical parameters were measured by routine laboratory methods. GSTM1-positive patients had higher proportion of small, dense LDL III particles than those with GSTM1-null genotype (P<0.05). Similarly, GSTP1-Ile/Ile patients had higher proportion of LDL III (P<0.05), but more HDL 2b and less HDL 3a particles than GSTP1-Ile/Val and Val/Val carriers (P<0.05). LDL subclass distribution in smokers with GSTM1-null genotype was shifted towards smaller particles, as compared to GSTM1-positive and GSTM1-null non-smokers. Smokers with GSTP1-Ile/Val and Val/Val genotypes had smaller LDL size than their non-smoking counterparts (P<0.05). Both smokers and non-smokers with GSTP1 Ile/Ile genotype had more LDL III particles than non-smokers carrying Val allele. Non-smokers with GSTP1 Ile/Ile genotype had more HDL 2b subclasses than non-smokers with GSTP1-Ile/Val and Val/Val (P<0.05), but less HDL 3a particles than smokers with GSTP1-Ile/Val and Val/Val genotypes (P<0.05). GSTT1 gene polymorphism had no effect on lipoprotein subclass distributions. Our results demonstrate significant associations between low activity GST genotypes and proatherogenic lipoprotein particles in hemodialysis patients which might further increase their cardiovascular disease risk. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  5. Modulation of human glutathione s-transferases by polyphenon e intervention.

    PubMed

    Chow, H-H Sherry; Hakim, Iman A; Vining, Donna R; Crowell, James A; Tome, Margaret E; Ranger-Moore, James; Cordova, Catherine A; Mikhael, Dalia M; Briehl, Margaret M; Alberts, David S

    2007-08-01

    Green tea consumption has been associated with decreased risk of certain types of cancers in humans. Induction of detoxification enzymes has been suggested as one of the biochemical mechanisms responsible for the cancer-preventive effect of green tea. We conducted this clinical study to determine the effect of repeated green tea polyphenol administration on a major group of detoxification enzymes, glutathione S-transferases (GST). A total of 42 healthy volunteers underwent a 4-week washout period by refraining from tea or tea-related products. At the end of the washout period, a fasting blood sample was collected, and plasma and lymphocytes were isolated for assessment of GST activity and level. Following the baseline evaluation, study participants underwent 4 weeks of green tea polyphenol intervention in the form of a standardized Polyphenon E preparation at a dose that contains 800 mg epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) once a day. Polyphenon E was taken on an empty stomach to optimize the oral bioavailability of EGCG. Upon completion of the intervention, samples were collected for postintervention GST assessment. Four weeks of Polyphenon E intervention enhanced the GST activity in blood lymphocytes from 30.7 +/- 12.2 to 35.1 +/- 14.3 nmol/min/mg protein, P = 0.058. Analysis based on baseline activity showed that a statistically significant increase (80%, P = 0.004) in GST activity was observed in individuals with baseline activity in the lowest tertile, whereas a statistically significant decrease (20%, P = 0.02) in GST activity was observed in the highest tertile. In addition, Polyphenon E intervention significantly increased the GST-pi level in blood lymphocytes from 2,252.9 +/- 734.2 to 2,634.4 +/- 1,138.3 ng/mg protein, P = 0.035. Analysis based on baseline level showed that this increase was only significant (P = 0.003) in individuals with baseline level in the lowest tertile, with a mean increase of 80%. Repeated Polyphenon E administration had minimal effects

  6. Regulation of aflatoxin B1-metabolizing aldehyde reductase and glutathione S-transferase by chemoprotectors.

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, L I; Judah, D J; Neal, G E; Hayes, J D

    1994-01-01

    Ingestion of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) represents a major risk factor in the aetiology of human hepatocellular carcinoma. In the rat, the harmful effects of AFB1 can be prevented by the administration of certain drugs which induce hepatic detoxification enzymes. We have previously shown that treatment of rats with the chemoprotector ethoxyquin (EQ) results in a marked increase in expression of the Alpha-class glutathione S-transferase (GST) Yc2 subunit which has high activity towards AFB1-8,9-epoxide [Hayes, Judah, McLellan, Kerr, Peacock and Neal (1991) Biochem. J. 279, 385-398]. To allow an assessment of whether the increased expression of GST Yc2 represents a general adaptive resistance mechanism to chemical stress, that is invoked by both chemoprotectors and carcinogens, we have examined the effects of EQ, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), phenobarbital (PB), AFB1, 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC) and clofibrate on the AFB1-glutathione-conjugating activity and the GST subunit levels in rat liver. In addition, the effect of these drugs on the hepatic levels of an aldehyde reductase (AFB1-AR) that metabolizes the cytotoxic dialdehydic form of AFB1 has been studied as this enzyme also appears to be important in chemoprotection. Administration of the antioxidants EQ, BHA or BHT, as well as PB, led to a marked increase in levels of the GST Yc2 subunit in rat liver, and this increase coincided with a substantial rise in the GST activity towards AFB1-8,9-epoxide; neither AFB1, 3-MC nor clofibrate caused induction of Yc2 or any of the GST subunits examined. Among the xenobiotics studied, EQ was found to be the most effective inducing agent for the Yc2 subunit as well as Yc1, Yb1 and Yf. However, PB was equally as effective as EQ in increasing levels of the Ya-type subunits, although it was not found to be as potent an inducer of the other GST subunits, including Yc2. In addition to induction of GST, EQ caused a substantial increase in the hepatic

  7. Neuroantibodies (NAB) in African-American Children: Associations with Gender, Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST)Pi Polymorphisms (SNP) and Heavy Metals

    EPA Science Inventory

    CONTACT (NAME ONLY): Hassan El-Fawal Abstract Details PRESENTATION TYPE: Platform or Poster CURRENT CATEGORY: Neurodegenerative Disease | Biomarkers | Neurotoxicity, Metals KEYWORDS: Autoantibodies, Glutathione-S-Transferase, DATE/TIME LAST MODIFIED: DATE/TIME SUBMITTED: Abs...

  8. Neuroantibodies (NAB) in African-American Children: Associations with Gender, Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST)Pi Polymorphisms (SNP) and Heavy Metals

    EPA Science Inventory

    CONTACT (NAME ONLY): Hassan El-Fawal Abstract Details PRESENTATION TYPE: Platform or Poster CURRENT CATEGORY: Neurodegenerative Disease | Biomarkers | Neurotoxicity, Metals KEYWORDS: Autoantibodies, Glutathione-S-Transferase, DATE/TIME LAST MODIFIED: DATE/TIME SUBMITTED: Abs...

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a glutathione S-transferase from Xylella fastidiosa

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Wanius; Travensolo, Regiane F.; Rodrigues, Nathalia C.; Muniz, João R. C.; Caruso, Célia S.; Lemos, Eliana G. M.; Araujo, Ana Paula U.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2008-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase from X. fastidiosa (xfGST) has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.23 Å. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) form a group of multifunctional isoenzymes that catalyze the glutathione-dependent conjugation and reduction reactions involved in the cellular detoxification of xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds. GST from Xylella fastidiosa (xfGST) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by conventional affinity chromatography. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of xfGST is described. The purified protein was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method, producing crystals that belonged to the triclinic space group P1. The unit-cell parameters were a = 47.73, b = 87.73, c = 90.74 Å, α = 63.45, β = 80.66, γ = 94.55°. xfGST crystals diffracted to 2.23 Å resolution on a rotating-anode X-ray source.

  10. Catalog of 46 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the microsomal glutathione S-transferase 1 (MGST1) gene.

    PubMed

    Iida, A; Saito, S; Sekine, A; Harigae, S; Osawa, S; Mishima, C; Kondo, K; Kitamura, Y; Nakamura, Y

    2001-01-01

    A major goal in our laboratory is to understand the role of common genetic variations among individual patients as regards susceptibility to common diseases and differences in therapeutic efficacy and/or side effects of drugs. As an addition to the high-density SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) maps of 12 glutathione S-transferase and related genes reported earlier, we provide here an SNP map of the microsomal glutathione S-transferase 1 (MGST1) gene. Among 48 healthy Japanese volunteers examined. we identified a total of 46 SNPs at this locus, 36 of which had not been reported before: 4 in the promoter region, 34 in introns, 3 in the 3' untranslated region, and 5 in the 3' flanking region. No SNP was found in 5'untranslated or coding regions. The ratio of transition to transversion was approximately 1.2:1. Among the 13 insertion-deletion polymorphisms was a 2-bp deletion in the coding region of MGST1 in DNA from one of the volunteers, which resulted in a frame-shift mutation. Since the gene product encoded by this mutant allele would lack the C-terminal half including the MAPEG (membrane-associated proteins in eicosanoid and glutathione metabolism) domain, MGST1 activity is likely to be reduced in the carrier's cells. The SNP map presented here adds to the archive of tools for studying complex genetic diseases, population migration patterns, and a variety of pharmacogenetic possibilities.

  11. Association between three genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase Z1 (GSTZ1) and susceptibility to bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Zahra; Saadat, Iraj; Saadat, Mostafa

    2012-06-30

    The association between polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase Z1 (GSTZ1) and susceptibility to bipolar disorder (BPD) is investigated. This study was performed on 228 BPD patients and 234 control subjects. Among early-onset patients, the variant alleles of Glu32Lys and G-1002A increased BPD susceptibility. The haplotype "-1002G, 32Glu, 42Gly" versus the other haplotypes was significantly decreased among early-onset patients compared to controls (P=0.016). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of glutathione S-transferase activity as a biomarker of PAH pollution in mudskipper, Boleophthalmus dussumieri, Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Sinaei, Mahmood; Rahmanpour, Shirin

    2013-03-01

    As an attempt to study on the biomarkers types to assess the specification of the pollutants and health status of marine ecosystems, sediments and biota (i.e., Boleophthalmus dussumieri) were collected from the Persian Gulf. The liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in mudskipper was higher as compared with that in blood which could be illustrated by high metabolic rate in this organ, its key role in the metabolism of PAHs detoxification and specificity of enzymes composition. The results suggest that the liver GST activity in B. dussumieri was PAH inducible and could be extended as a biomarker of PAH pollution.

  13. Functional and structural roles of the glutathione-binding residues in maize (Zea mays) glutathione S-transferase I.

    PubMed Central

    Labrou, N E; Mello, L V; Clonis, Y D

    2001-01-01

    The isoenzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) I from maize (Zea mays) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and its catalytic mechanism was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis and dynamic studies. The results showed that the enzyme promotes proton dissociation from the GSH thiol and creates a thiolate anion with high nucleophilic reactivity by lowering the pK(a) of the thiol from 8.7 to 6.2. Steady-state kinetics fit well to a rapid equilibrium, random sequential Bi Bi mechanism, with intrasubunit modulation between the GSH binding site (G-site) and the electrophile binding site (H-site). The rate-limiting step of the reaction is viscosity-dependent, and thermodynamic data suggest that product release is rate-limiting. Five residues of GST I (Ser(11), His(40), Lys(41), Gln(53) and Ser(67)), which are located in the G-site, were individually replaced with alanine and their structural and functional roles in the 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) conjugation reaction were investigated. On the basis of steady-state kinetics, difference spectroscopy and limited proteolysis studies it is concluded that these residues: (1) contribute to the affinity of the G-site for GSH, as they are involved in side-chain interaction with GSH; (2) influence GSH thiol ionization, and thus its reactivity; (3) participate in k(cat) regulation by affecting the rate-limiting step of the reaction; and (4) in the cases of His(40), Lys(41) and Gln(53) play an important role in the structural integrity of, and probably in the flexibility of, the highly mobile short 3(10)-helical segment of alpha-helix 2 (residues 35-46), as shown by limited proteolysis experiments. These structural perturbations are probably transmitted to the H-site through changes in Phe(35) conformation. This accounts for the modulation of K(CDNB)(m) by His(40), Lys(41) and Gln(53), and also for the intrasubunit communication between the G- and H-sites. Computer simulations using CONCOORD were applied to maize

  14. Multiple inhibition of glutathione S-transferase A from rat liver by glutathione derivatives: kinetic analysis supporting a steady-state random sequential mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobson, I; Warholm, M; Mannervik, B

    1979-01-01

    Glutathione derivatives inhibit glutathione S-transferase A [cf. Biochem. J. (1975) 147, 513--522]. The steady-state kinetics of this inhibition have been investigated in detail by using S-octyglutathione, glutathione disulphide and S-(2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl)glutathione: the last compound is a product of the enzyme-catalused reaction. Interpreted in terms of generalized denotations of inhibition patterns, the compounds were found to be competitive with the substrate glutathione. Double-inhibition experiments involving simultaneous use of two inhibitors indicated exclusive binding of the inhibitors to the enzyme. The discrimination between alternative rate equations has been based on the results of weighted non-linear regression analysis. The experimental error was determined by replicate measurements and was found to increase with velocity. The established error structure was used as a basis for weighting in the regression and to construct confidence levels for the judgement of goodness-of-fit of rate equations fitted to experimental data. The results obtained support a steady-state random model for the mechanism of action of glutathione S-transferase A and exclude a number of simple kinetic models. PMID:444209

  15. The glutathione conjugate of ethacrynic acid can bind to human pi class glutathione transferase P1-1 in two different modes.

    PubMed

    Oakley, A J; Lo Bello, M; Mazzetti, A P; Federici, G; Parker, M W

    1997-12-08

    The diuretic drug ethacrynic acid, an inhibitor of pi class glutathione S-transferase, has been tested in clinical trials as an adjuvant in chemotherapy. We recently solved the crystal structure of this enzyme in complex with ethacrynic acid and its glutathione conjugate. Here we present a new structure of the ethacrynic-glutathione conjugate complex. In this structure the ethacrynic moiety of the complex is shown to bind in a completely different orientation to that previously observed. Thus there are at least two binding modes possible, an observation of great importance to the design of second generation inhibitors of the enzyme.

  16. An ethylene-responsive flower senescence-related gene from carnation encodes a protein homologous to glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R C; Goldsbrough, P B; Woodson, W R

    1991-08-01

    Carnation flower petal senescence is associated with the expression of specific senescence-related mRNAs, several of which were previously cloned. The cDNA clone pSR8 represents a transcript which accumulates specifically in senescing flower petals in response to ethylene. Here we report the structural characterization of this cDNA. A second cDNA clone was isolated based on shared sequence homology with pSR8. This clone, pSR8.4, exhibited an overlapping restriction endonuclease map with pSR8 and contained an additional 300 nucleotides. Primer extension analysis revealed the combined cDNAs to be near full-length and the transcript to accumulate in senescing petals. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of SR8 cDNAs revealed an open reading frame of 220 amino acids sufficient to encode a 25 kDa polypeptide. Comparison of the deduced polypeptide sequence of pSR8 with other peptide sequences revealed significant similarity with glutathione s-transferases from a variety of organisms. The predicted polypeptide sequence shared 44%, 53% and 52% homology with GSTs from maize, Drosophila and man, respectively. We discuss our results in relation to the biochemistry of flower petal senescence and the possible role of glutathione s-transferase in this developmental process.

  17. Cantharidin Impedes Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase in the Midgut of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rashid Ahmed; Liu, Ji Yuan; Rashid, Maryam; Wang, Dun; Zhang, Ya Lin

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have implicated glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) as one of the major reasons for insecticide resistance. Therefore, effectiveness of new candidate compounds depends on their ability to inhibit GSTs to prevent metabolic detoxification by insects. Cantharidin, a terpenoid compound of insect origin, has been developed as a bio-pesticide in China, and proves highly toxic to a wide range of insects, especially lepidopteran. In the present study, we test cantharidin as a model compound for its toxicity, effects on the mRNA transcription of a model Helicoverpa armigera glutathione S-transferase gene (HaGST) and also for its putative inhibitory effect on the catalytic activity of GSTs, both in vivo and in vitro in Helicoverpa armigera, employing molecular and biochemical methods. Bioassay results showed that cantharidin was highly toxic to H. armigera. Real-time qPCR showed down-regulation of the HaGST at the mRNA transcript ranging from 2.5 to 12.5 folds while biochemical assays showed in vivo inhibition of GSTs in midgut and in vitro inhibition of rHaGST. Binding of cantharidin to HaGST was rationalized by homology and molecular docking simulations using a model GST (1PN9) as a template structure. Molecular docking simulations also confirmed accurate docking of the cantharidin molecule to the active site of HaGST impeding its catalytic activity. PMID:23528854

  18. Aniline exposure associated with up-regulated transcriptional responses of three glutathione S-transferase Delta genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chan, Wen-Chiao; Chien, Yi-Chih; Chien, Cheng-I

    2015-03-01

    Complex transcriptional profile of glutathione S-transferase Delta cluster genes occurred in the developmental process of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The purpose of this project was to quantify the expression levels of Gst Delta class genes altered by aniline exposure and to understand the relationship between aniline dosages and the variation of Gst Delta genes expressed in D. melanogaster. Using RT-PCR expression assays, the expression patterns of the transcript mRNAs of the glutathione S-transferase Delta genes were revealed and their expression levels were measured at eggs, larvae, pupae and adults. The adult stage was selected for further dose-response assays. After analysis, the results indicated that three Gst Delta genes (Gst D2, Gst D5 and Gst D6) were found to show a peak of up-regulated transcriptional response at 6-8h of exposure of aniline. Furthermore, the dose-response relationship of their induction levels within the dose regiments (from 1.2 to 2.0 μl/tube) had been measured. The expression patterns and annotations of these genes were discussed in the context.

  19. Inhibition of glutathione-S-transferase from Plasmodium yoelii by protoporphyrin IX, cibacron blue and menadione: implications and therapeutic benefits.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rumana; Srivastava, Arvind K

    2008-03-01

    The rapidly developing resistance to drugs used for prophylaxis and treatment of malaria makes the identification of novel drug targets necessary. Glutathione-S-transferase (GST, E.C. 2.5.1.18), an important enzyme of the glutathione (GSH) cycle, is considered to be an essential detoxification enzyme in malarial parasites. Selective inhibition of this enzyme from malarial parasites by various classes of inhibitors may be viewed as a potential chemotherapeutic strategy to combat malaria. Purified GST from Plasmodium yoelii was inhibited by compounds like protoporphyrin IX, cibacron blue, as well as by the GSH depletor menadione. Cytosolic GST was inhibited to varying degrees by each compound. A characteristic inhibitor constant (Ki) was obtained for each inhibitor. The possible consequences of selective inhibition of parasitic GST to that of the host are discussed in relation to the chemotherapy of malaria.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a glutathione S-transferase from Xylella fastidiosa

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Wanius; Travensolo, Regiane F.; Rodrigues, Nathalia C.; Muniz, João R. C.; Caruso, Célia S.; Lemos, Eliana G. M.; Araujo, Ana Paula U.; Carrilho, Emanuel

    2008-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) form a group of multifunctional isoenzymes that catalyze the glutathione-dependent conjugation and reduction reactions involved in the cellular detoxification of xenobiotic and endobiotic compounds. GST from Xylella fastidiosa (xfGST) was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified by conventional affinity chromatography. In this study, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of xfGST is described. The purified protein was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method, producing crystals that belonged to the triclinic space group P1. The unit-cell parameters were a = 47.73, b = 87.73, c = 90.74 Å, α = 63.45, β = 80.66, γ = 94.55°. xfGST crystals diffracted to 2.23 Å resolution on a rotating-anode X-ray source. PMID:18259055

  1. In vitro binding of acetic acid and its chlorinated derivatives by the soluble glutathione S-transferases from rat liver.

    PubMed

    Dierickx, P J

    1984-05-01

    The in vitro interaction of acetic acid and its chlorinated derivatives with rat liver glutathione S-transferases (GST) was studied, using glutathione (GSH) and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrates. The investigated compounds inhibited the GST activity in crude extracts in a dose dependent manner. Each of the different GST isoenzymes was inhibited by each of the compounds under study, albeit at very different degrees. Kinetic studies never revealed competitive inhibition kinetics, with GSH nor CDNB as the variable substrate. Titration of remaining GSH in appropriate incubation mixtures revealed no GST catalyzed conjugation with GSH. It is concluded that acetic acid and its chlorinated derivatives interact with GST by direct binding to these proteins. This binding could have a protective function against these compounds.

  2. Glutathione S-transferase from the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana: identification, characterization, localization, cDNA cloning, and expression.

    PubMed

    Feng, Q L; Davey, K G; Pang, A S; Primavera, M; Ladd, T R; Zheng, S C; Sohi, S S; Retnakaran, A; Palli, S R

    1999-09-01

    A 23-kDa protein that was present at higher levels in diapausing 2nd instar larvae than in feeding 2nd instar larvae of Choristoneura fumiferana was purified, and polyclonal antibodies were raised against this protein. The antibodies were subsequently used to screen a cDNA library that was constructed using RNA from 2nd instar larvae. Eight identical cDNA clones were isolated. The cDNA clone had a 665-bp insert and the longest open reading frame coded for a 203-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 23.37 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence showed high similarity to glutathione S-transferases and therefore, the cDNA clone was named C. fumiferana glutathione S-transferase (CfGST). Identity of CfGST was confirmed by using affinity-purification as well as enzyme activity assay. CfGST was closer in similarity to insect GST2 members than GST1 members. The apparent Vmax of the purified CfGST towards the substrates glutathione and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenezene (CDNB) were similar. However, the enzyme had a three-fold higher affinity towards CDNB than glutathione. Analyses using Northern blot, immunoblot and immunocytochemistry demonstrated that the fat body was the major tissue where the enzyme was synthesized and stored. Higher levels of CfGST protein were present in diapausing 2nd instar larvae compared to feeding 2nd and 6th instar larvae, suggesting that besides detoxification CfGST may have other roles during insect development that are not readily apparent at present. The CfGST cDNA was expressed in a recombinant baculovirus expression system and an active enzyme was produced.

  3. [Research on the association between glutathione S-transferase P1 genic polymorphism and heart rate and blood pressure].

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Sun, Xuechuan; Zhao, Guangcai

    2011-06-01

    Oxidative stress may reduce cardiovascular function. Glutathione Stransferases(GSTs) play an important role in cell defending against oxidative stress. Glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) gene is one of the most intensively investigated glutathione S-transferase genes in epidemiologic studies. The GSTP1 gene displays a polymorphism at codon 105 (Ile105 Val), which results in an enzyme with altered substrate affinity. To date, there have been few studies evaluating whether Ilel05Val polymorphism of GSTP1 gene has an effect on cardiovascular function in the broad masses of people. In this study, we investigated the relationship between Ile105 Val polymorphism of GSTP1 gene and heart rate and blood pressure in 197 unrelated adult males of Han nationality. It was found that there were two types of the GSTP1 genotypes, Ile105/Ile105 and Ile105/Val105, but genotype Val105/Val105 was not found, and the frequencies of IleIes/Ileos and Ile105/Val105 genotypes were 78% and 22% respectively. Comparison with individuals with lie105/Val105 genotype showed that those with Ile105/Ile105 genotype had higher rest heart rate and maximal heart rate mean values. However, whether for rest heart rate and maximal heart rate or for heart rate reserve, no significant differences were found between the two genotype groups (P>0.05). Compared with individuals with Ile105/Val105 genotype, those with Iler105/Ile105 genotype had higher systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure mean values and lower diastolic blood pressure mean value. However, for systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, no significant differences were found between the two genotype groups (P>0.05). The results suggested that Ile105 Val polymorphism of GSTP1 gene may not be associated with heart rate and blood pressure in the broad masses of people.

  4. Glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) null polymorphisms, smoking, and their interaction in oral cancer: a HuGE review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Jiang; Hao, Ke; Shi, Rong; Zhao, Genming; Jiang, Guo-Xin; Song, Yiqing; Xu, Xiaohui; Ma, Jin

    2011-04-15

    The association between glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) null polymorphisms and oral cancer is not consistent across studies, and data on their interaction with smoking in oral cancer are lacking. The authors systematically searched PubMed and SciVerse Scopus for case-control studies examining the association between null genotypes of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes and oral cancer. Twenty-eight case-control studies published in English were identified. Summary odds ratios were derived via random-effects models. The summary odds ratio for the GSTM1 null genotype was 1.43 in Asians (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.14, 1.78; P < 0.01, I (2) = 73%) and 0.98 in Caucasians (95% CI: 0.76, 1.28; P = 0.91, I (2) = 0%). Case-only analysis of 6 studies (552 cases) showed an inverse multiplicative interaction between GSTM1 null polymorphisms and smoking (ever/high levels of smoking vs. never/low levels) (odds ratio (OR) = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.32, 0.82; P = 0.01, I (2) = 34%). The GSTT1 null genotype was not significantly associated with oral cancer in Asians (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.82, 1.38; P = 0.63, I (2) = 65%) or Caucasians (OR = 1.04, 95% CI: 0.41, 2.65; P = 0.93, I (2) = 55%). In conclusion, the GSTM1 null genotype may be associated with a higher risk of oral cancer in Asians but not in Caucasians, and this effect may be modified by smoking status. The GSTT1 null genotype may not be associated with oral cancer.

  5. Influence of the H-site residue 108 on human glutathione transferase P1-1 ligand binding: structure-thermodynamic relationships and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; Parker, Lorien J; Primavera, Alessandra; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; Barón, Carmen; Morton, Craig J; Mazzetti, Anna Paola; Lo Bello, Mario; Parker, Michael W; García-Fuentes, Luis

    2009-12-01

    The effect of the Y108V mutation of human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (hGST P1-1) on the binding of the diuretic drug ethacrynic acid (EA) and its glutathione conjugate (EASG) was investigated by calorimetric, spectrofluorimetric, and crystallographic studies. The mutation Tyr 108 --> Val resulted in a 3D-structure very similar to the wild type (wt) enzyme, where both the hydrophobic ligand binding site (H-site) and glutathione binding site (G-site) are unchanged except for the mutation itself. However, due to a slight increase in the hydrophobicity of the H-site, as a consequence of the mutation, an increase in the entropy was observed. The Y108V mutation does not affect the affinity of EASG for the enzyme, which has a higher affinity (K(d) approximately 0.5 microM) when compared with those of the parent compounds, K(d) (EA) approximately 13 microM, K(d) (GSH) approximately 25 microM. The EA moiety of the conjugate binds in the H-site of Y108V mutant in a fashion completely different to those observed in the crystal structures of the EA or EASG wt complex structures. We further demonstrate that the Delta C(p) values of binding can also be correlated with the potential stacking interactions between ligand and residues located in the binding sites as predicted from crystal structures. Moreover, the mutation does not significantly affect the global stability of the enzyme. Our results demonstrate that calorimetric measurements maybe useful in determining the preference of binding (the binding mode) for a drug to a specific site of the enzyme, even in the absence of structural information.

  6. Influence of the H-site residue 108 on human glutathione transferase P1-1 ligand binding: Structure-thermodynamic relationships and thermal stability

    PubMed Central

    Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; Parker, Lorien J; Primavera, Alessandra; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; Barón, Carmen; Morton, Craig J; Paola Mazzetti, Anna; Lo Bello, Mario; Parker, Michael W; García-Fuentes, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The effect of the Y108V mutation of human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (hGST P1-1) on the binding of the diuretic drug ethacrynic acid (EA) and its glutathione conjugate (EASG) was investigated by calorimetric, spectrofluorimetric, and crystallographic studies. The mutation Tyr 108 → Val resulted in a 3D-structure very similar to the wild type (wt) enzyme, where both the hydrophobic ligand binding site (H-site) and glutathione binding site (G-site) are unchanged except for the mutation itself. However, due to a slight increase in the hydrophobicity of the H-site, as a consequence of the mutation, an increase in the entropy was observed. The Y108V mutation does not affect the affinity of EASG for the enzyme, which has a higher affinity (Kd ∼ 0.5 μM) when compared with those of the parent compounds, , . The EA moiety of the conjugate binds in the H-site of Y108V mutant in a fashion completely different to those observed in the crystal structures of the EA or EASG wt complex structures. We further demonstrate that the ΔCp values of binding can also be correlated with the potential stacking interactions between ligand and residues located in the binding sites as predicted from crystal structures. Moreover, the mutation does not significantly affect the global stability of the enzyme. Our results demonstrate that calorimetric measurements maybe useful in determining the preference of binding (the binding mode) for a drug to a specific site of the enzyme, even in the absence of structural information. PMID:19780048

  7. Sex-specific constitutive expression of the pre-neoplastic marker glutathione S-transferase, YfYf, in mouse liver.

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, L I; Hayes, J D

    1987-01-01

    Hepatic glutathione S-transferase isoenzyme content has been investigated in both sexes of three inbred strains of mice (DBA/2, C3H/He, C57BL6). A polypeptide (Mr 24,800), which is immunologically related to Yf purified from rat lung, was found to be expressed as a major form in all male mouse livers but represented only a minor enzyme form in female mouse liver. Glutathione S-transferases comprising subunits with molecular masses of 25,800 (Ya) or 26,400 (Yb) were present in males and females of the three strains under investigation. Cytosolic isoenzymes from all strains and sexes were purified to apparent homogeneity and no significant inter-strain differences in the properties of the individual forms were observed. In addition, no differences were detected in the microsomal glutathione S-transferase content of the different strains or sexes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3663166

  8. Glutathione S-Transferases Interact with AMP-Activated Protein Kinase: Evidence for S-Glutathionylation and Activation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Polge, Cécile; Ramirez, Sacnicte; Michelland, Sylvie; Sève, Michel; Vertommen, Didier; Rider, Mark; Lentze, Nicolas; Auerbach, Daniel; Schlattner, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular and whole body energy sensor with manifold functions in regulating energy homeostasis, cell morphology and proliferation in health and disease. Here we apply multiple, complementary in vitro and in vivo interaction assays to identify several isoforms of glutathione S-transferase (GST) as direct AMPK binding partners: Pi-family member rat GSTP1 and Mu-family members rat GSTM1, as well as Schistosoma japonicum GST. GST/AMPK interaction is direct and involves the N-terminal domain of the AMPK β-subunit. Complex formation of the mammalian GSTP1 and -M1 with AMPK leads to their enzymatic activation and in turn facilitates glutathionylation and activation of AMPK in vitro. GST-facilitated S-glutathionylation of AMPK may be involved in rapid, full activation of the kinase under mildly oxidative physiological conditions. PMID:23741294

  9. Characterization of an omega-class glutathione S-transferase in the stress response of the silkmoth.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Teshiba, S; Shigeoka, Y; Aso, Y; Banno, Y; Fujiki, T; Katakura, Y

    2011-06-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily is involved in detoxification of various xenobiotics. Using real-time PCR, mRNA encoding an omega-class GST of Bombyx mori (bmGSTO) was shown to be induced after exposure to various environmental stresses. A soluble form of recombinant protein (rbmGSTO) was functionally overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and purified to homogeneity. Cys 38 and Pro 39 were found to be highly conserved in omega-class GSTs, and their roles were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis/kinetic analysis. Mutations of Cys 38 and Pro 39 residues affected the catalytic efficiency of enzymes, indicating that the presence of Cys 38 and Pro 39 residues is important for bmGSTO activity. Thus, bmGSTO could contribute to increasing the environmental stress resistance of lepidopteran insects.

  10. Transcriptome-wide identification and expression analysis of glutathione S-transferase genes involved in flavonoids accumulation in Dracaena cambodiana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia-Hong; Li, Hui-Liang; Guo, Dong; Wang, Ying; Dai, Hao-Fu; Mei, Wen-Li; Peng, Shi-Qing

    2016-07-01

    Dragon's blood is a traditional medicine widely used in the world, and the main components of which are flavonoids. However, little is known about its formation mechanism. Previous studies indicate that plant glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes are involved in transportation of flavonoids from cytosolic synthesis to vacuolar accumulation. In this study, 20 Dracaena cambodiana GST genes (DcGSTs) were identified based on transcriptome database. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 20 DcGSTs belonged to seven different classes. Tissue-specific expression analysis suggested that DcGSTs displayed differential expressions either in their transcript abundance or expression patterns under normal growth conditions. The transcript profiles of three DcGSTs in response to the inducer of dragon's blood were strongly correlated with flavonoids biosynthetic genes, consistent with dragon's blood accumulation. Our survey provides useful information for future studies on GST genes involved in dragon's blood formation in D. cambodiana. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, and comparative analysis with five additional insects.

    PubMed

    Shi, Houxia; Pei, Lianghong; Gu, Shasha; Zhu, Shicheng; Wang, Yanyun; Zhang, Yi; Li, Bin

    2012-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferases are important detoxification enzymes involved in insecticide resistance. Sequencing the Tribolium castaneum genome provides an opportunity to investigate the structure, function, and evolution of GSTs on a genome-wide scale. Thirty-six putative cytosolic GSTs and 5 microsomal GSTs have been identified in T. castaneum. Furthermore, 40, 35, 13, 23, and 32 GSTs have been discovered the other insects, Drosophila, Anopheles, Apis, Bombyx, and Acyrthosiphon, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that insect-specific GSTs, Epsilon and Delta, are the largest species-specific expanded GSTs. In T. castaneum, most GSTs are tandemly arranged in three chromosomes. Particularly, Epsilon GSTs have an inverted long-fragment duplication in the genome. Other four widely distributed classes are highly conserved in all species. Given that GSTs specially expanded in Tribolium castaneum, these genes might help to resist poisonous chemical environments and produce resistance to kinds of different insecticides. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. S-Glutathionylation of Keap1: a new role for glutathione S-transferase pi in neuronal protection.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Andreia Neves; Marques, Carla; Guedes, Rita C; Castro-Caldas, Margarida; Rodrigues, Elsa; van Horssen, Jack; Gama, Maria João

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative stress is a key pathological feature of Parkinson's disease (PD). Glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTP) is a neuroprotective antioxidant enzyme regulated at the transcriptional level by the antioxidant master regulator nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Here, we show for the first time that upon MPTP-induced oxidative stress, GSTP potentiates S-glutathionylation of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), an endogenous repressor of Nrf2, in vivo. S-glutathionylation of Keap1 leads to Nrf2 activation and subsequently increases expression of GSTP. This positive feedback regulatory loop represents a novel mechanism by which GSTP elicits antioxidant protection in the brain.

  13. Transgenic Arabidopsis Plants Expressing Tomato Glutathione S-Transferase Showed Enhanced Resistance to Salt and Drought Stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Xing, Xiao-Juan; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Peng, Ri-He; Xue, Yong; Zhao, Wei; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Although glutathione S-transferases (GST, EC 2.5.1.18) are involved in response to abiotic stress, limited information is available regarding gene function in tomato. In this study, a GST gene from tomato, designated LeGSTU2, was cloned and functionally characterized. Expression profile analysis results showed that it was expressed in roots and flowers, and the transcription was induced by salt, osmotic, and heat stress. The gene was then introduced to Arabidopsis by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants were normal in terms of growth and maturity compared with wild-type plants. Transgenic plants also showed an enhanced resistance to salt and osmotic stress induced by NaCl and mannitol. The increased tolerance of transgenic plants was correlated with the changes in proline, malondialdehyde and antioxidative emzymes activities. Our results indicated that the gene from tomato plays a positive role in improving tolerance to salinity and drought stresses in Arabidopsis.

  14. Electrophoretic pattern of glutathione S-transferase (GST) in antibiotic resistance Gram-positive bacteria from poultry litter.

    PubMed

    Pugazhendhi, Arivalagan; Dhanarani, Sridevi; Shankar, Congeevaram; Prakash, Piruthiviraj; Ranganathan, Kuppusamy; Saratale, Rijuta Ganesh; Thamaraiselvi, Kaliannan

    2017-09-01

    The present study is aimed to assess the role of glutathione S-transferase (GST) in antibiotic resistance among the bacteria isolated from the poultry litter and to identify the effect of GST to reduce the antimicrobial activity of antibiotics. Induction of various antibiotics to Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Micrococcus sp. isolated from the poultry litter showed that the activity of GST was three to four folds higher than those of control. Analysis of the isozyme pattern of GST revealed that variation in the expression may be due to antibiotic resistance. The results concluded that GST might play an important role in the protection against the toxic effect of the antimicrobial agents which leads bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of heavy metal-induced genes encoding glutathione S-transferases in the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices.

    PubMed

    Waschke, A; Sieh, D; Tamasloukht, M; Fischer, K; Mann, P; Franken, P

    2006-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are able to alleviate the stress for plants caused by heavy metal contamination of soil. To analyze the molecular response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to these pollutants, a subtractive cDNA library was constructed using RNA from Glomus intraradices extraradical hyphae of a root organ culture treated with a mixture of Cd, Zn, and Cu. Screening by reverse Northern blot analysis indicated that, among 308 clones, 17% correspond to genes up-regulated by heavy metals. Sequence analysis of part of the clones resulted, amongst others, in the identification of six genes putatively coding for glutathione S-transferases belonging to two different classes of these enzymes. Expression analyses indicated that the genes are differentially expressed during fungal development and that their RNA accumulation dramatically increases in extraradical hyphae grown in a heavy metal-containing solution.

  16. Molecular screening of insecticides with sigma glutathione S-transferases (GST) in cotton aphid Aphis gossypii using docking.

    PubMed

    Gawande, Nilesh Dinkar; Subashini, Swaminathan; Murugan, Marimuthu; Subbarayalu, Mohankumar

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are one of the major families of detoxifying enzymes that detoxifies different chemical compounds including insecticides in different insect species. Among the GST subclasses, sigma GSTs are found to be the most abundant and conserved among different insect orders. These GSTs are found to play an important role in lipid peroxidation as well as detoxification. Cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii is the most damaging sucking pest with a wide range of hosts and vector of more than 50 plant viruses. Resistance to insecticides in A. gossypii is reported in India and in other countries. Glutathione S transferases (GSTs), an oxidative enzyme is understood to have a role in insecticide resistance and plant resistance breakdown. In relation to this, we have focused on the sigma 1 (GenBank Accession No: JN989964.1) and sigma 2 (GenBank Accession No: JN989965.1) GSTs of A. gossypii and their interaction with plant natural compounds and insecticides. Molecular screening of different insecticides (Chlorphinamidine, Mevinphos, Nitenpyrum, Piperonyl butoxide, Tetrachlorovinphos, Pyrethrins, Resmetrin, Pirimicarb and Dinotefuran) and known plant derived natural compounds (Catechin, Gossypol, Myrcene, Kaempferol, P-coumaric acid, Quercetin, Tannins, α-mangostin, Capsaicin, Cinnamic acid, Citronellal, Curcumin, Dicumarol, Ellagic acid, Eugenol, Geriniol, Isoeugenol, Juglone, Menadione, Methyl jasmonate, Morin, Myricetin, Myristicin, Piperine, Plumbagin, Tangitinin C, Thymol, Vanillin, Alpha pipene, α-terpineol Apigenin and β-Caryophyllene) with sigma 1 and sigma 2 GST protein models was completed using Maestro 9.3 (Schrodinger, USA). This exercise showed the binding of piperonyl butoxide with sigma 1 GST and tannin with sigma 2 GST for further consideration.

  17. Association between glutathione S-transferase M1 null genotype and risk of gallbladder cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Li; Han, Bing; Zhai, Hong-Peng; Cheng, Xin-Hua; Ma, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a family of enzymes which are involved in the detoxification of potential carcinogens. Glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) null genotype can impair the enzyme activity of GSTs and is suspected to increase the susceptibility to gallbladder cancer. Previous studies investigating the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of gallbladder cancer reported inconsistent findings. To quantify the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of gallbladder cancer, we performed a meta-analysis of published studies. We searched PubMed, Embase, and Wanfang databases for all possible studies. We estimated the pooled odds ratio (OR) with its 95% confidence interval (95% CI) to assess the association. Meta-analysis of total included studies showed that GSTM1 null genotype was not associated with gallbladder cancer risk (OR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.88-1.46, P = 0.332). Subgroup analysis by ethnicity showed that there was no association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk of gallbladder cancer in both Caucasians and Asians. However, meta-analysis of studies with adjusted estimations showed that GSTM1 null genotype was associated with increased risk of gallbladder cancer (OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.02-2.09, P = 0.038). Thus, this meta-analysis shows that GSTM1 null genotype is likely to be associated with risk of gallbladder cancer. More studies with well design and large sample size are needed to further validate the association between GSTM1 null genotype and gallbladder cancer.

  18. An association between glutathione S-transferase P1 gene polymorphism and younger age at onset of lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Miller, David P; Asomaning, Kofi; Liu, Geoffrey; Wain, John C; Lynch, Thomas J; Neuberg, Donna; Su, Li; Christiani, David C

    2006-10-01

    Among the genes that encode the glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily of Phase 2 metabolizing enzymes, GSTP1 has the highest expression in the lung. The polymorphic GSTP1 gene encodes glutathione S-transferase pi, which is an enzyme that detoxifies cigarette carcinogens, such as benzo-[a]-pyrene. The variant GSTP1 GG genotype is associated with lower enzymatic activity and higher DNA adduct levels in human lymphocytes compared with the AA genotype. The authors evaluated the association of GSTP1 genotypes with lung cancer in 1921 cases and 1343 controls of Caucasian descent by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques. The results were analyzed with multiple logistic regression adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and pack-years. To investigate specifically the subset of younger lung cancer patients and controls, the effect of age (either as a dichotomous or continuous variable in separate models) was analyzed as a modifying factor of the association between the GSTP1 polymorphism and lung cancer. The GSTP1 GG genotype was not associated with an overall increased risk of lung cancer (adjusted odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.78-1.34) compared with the GSTP1 AA genotype. In both models that evaluated the gene-age interaction, an overall statistically significant interaction (P < .01) was observed between age and the GG genotype. However, for the model that included age as a dichotomous variable, the odds ratio of lung cancer risk with the GG genotype compared with the AA among individuals age

  19. Genetic polymorphisms in glutathione-S-transferases are associated with anxiety and mood disorders in nicotine dependence

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo de Castro, Márcia Regina; Ehara Watanabe, Maria Angelica; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Odebrecht Vargas, Heber; Vissoci Reiche, Edna Maria; Kaminami Morimoto, Helena; Dodd, Seetal; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Nicotine dependence is associated with an increased risk of mood and anxiety disorders and suicide. The primary hypothesis of this study was to identify whether the polymorphisms of two glutathione-S-transferase enzymes (GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes) predict an increased risk of mood and anxiety disorders in smokers with nicotine dependence. Materials and methods Smokers were recruited at the Centre of Treatment for Smokers. The instruments were a sociodemographic questionnaire, Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence, diagnoses of mood disorder and nicotine dependence according to DSM-IV (SCID-IV), and the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test. Anxiety disorder was assessed based on the treatment report. Laboratory assessment included glutathione-S-transferases M1 (GSTM1) and T1 (GSTT1), which were detected by a multiplex-PCR protocol. Results Compared with individuals who had both GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes, a higher frequency of at least one deletion of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes was identified in anxious smokers [odds ratio (OR)=2.21, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.05–4.65, P=0.034], but there was no association with bipolar and unipolar depression (P=0.943). Compared with nonanxious smokers, anxious smokers had a greater risk for mood disorders (OR=4.67; 95% CI=2.24–9.92, P<0.001), lung disease (OR=6.78, 95% CI=1.95–23.58, P<0.003), and suicide attempts (OR=17.01, 95% CI=2.23–129.91, P<0.006). Conclusion This study suggests that at least one deletion of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes represents a risk factor for anxious smokers. These two genes may modify the capacity for the detoxification potential against oxidative stress. PMID:24637631

  20. Caffeine junkie: an unprecedented glutathione S-transferase-dependent oxygenase required for caffeine degradation by Pseudomonas putida CBB5.

    PubMed

    Summers, Ryan M; Seffernick, Jennifer L; Quandt, Erik M; Yu, Chi Li; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Subramanian, Mani V

    2013-09-01

    Caffeine and other N-methylated xanthines are natural products found in many foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Therefore, it is not surprising that bacteria have evolved to live on caffeine as a sole carbon and nitrogen source. The caffeine degradation pathway of Pseudomonas putida CBB5 utilizes an unprecedented glutathione-S-transferase-dependent Rieske oxygenase for demethylation of 7-methylxanthine to xanthine, the final step in caffeine N-demethylation. The gene coding this function is unusual, in that the iron-sulfur and non-heme iron domains that compose the normally functional Rieske oxygenase (RO) are encoded by separate proteins. The non-heme iron domain is located in the monooxygenase, ndmC, while the Rieske [2Fe-2S] domain is fused to the RO reductase gene, ndmD. This fusion, however, does not interfere with the interaction of the reductase with N1- and N3-demethylase RO oxygenases, which are involved in the initial reactions of caffeine degradation. We demonstrate that the N7-demethylation reaction absolutely requires a unique, tightly bound protein complex composed of NdmC, NdmD, and NdmE, a novel glutathione-S-transferase (GST). NdmE is proposed to function as a noncatalytic subunit that serves a structural role in the complexation of the oxygenase (NdmC) and Rieske domains (NdmD). Genome analyses found this gene organization of a split RO and GST gene cluster to occur more broadly, implying a larger function for RO-GST protein partners.

  1. The silkworm glutathione S-transferase gene noppera-bo is required for ecdysteroid biosynthesis and larval development.

    PubMed

    Enya, Sora; Daimon, Takaaki; Igarashi, Fumihiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Uchibori, Miwa; Sezutsu, Hideki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2015-06-01

    Insect molting and metamorphosis are tightly controlled by ecdysteroids, which are important steroid hormones that are synthesized from dietary sterols in the prothoracic gland. One of the ecdysteroidogenic genes in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is noppera-bo (nobo), also known as GSTe14, which encodes a member of the epsilon class of glutathione S-transferases. In D. melanogaster, nobo plays a crucial role in utilizing cholesterol via regulating its transport and/or metabolism in the prothoracic gland. However, it is still not known whether the orthologs of nobo from other insects are also involved in ecdysteroid biosynthesis via cholesterol transport and/or metabolism in the prothoracic gland. Here we report genetic evidence showing that the silkworm Bombyx mori ortholog of nobo (nobo-Bm; GSTe7) is essential for silkworm development. nobo-Bm is predominantly expressed in the prothoracic gland. To assess the functional importance of nobo-Bm, we generated a B. mori genetic mutant of nobo-Bm using TALEN-mediated genome editing. We show that loss of nobo-Bm function causes larval arrest and a glossy cuticle phenotype, which are rescued by the application of 20-hydroxyecdysone. Moreover, the prothoracic gland cells isolated from the nobo-Bm mutant exhibit an abnormal accumulation of 7-dehydrocholesterol, a cholesterol metabolite. These results suggest that the nobo family of glutathione S-transferases is essential for development and for the regulation of sterol utilization in the prothoracic gland in not only the Diptera but also the Lepidoptera. On the other hand, loss of nobo function mutants of D. melanogaster and B. mori abnormally accumulates different sterols, implying that the sterol utilization in the PG is somewhat different between these two insect species.

  2. Structure of monomeric Na-GST-3, a glutathione S-transferase from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus.

    PubMed

    Kelleher, Alan; Zhan, Bin; Asojo, Oluwatoyin A

    2013-08-01

    Necator americanus is the major cause of human hookworm infection, which is a global cause of anemia in the developing world. Ongoing efforts to control hookworm infection include the identification of candidate vaccine antigens as well as potential therapeutic targets from the infective L3 larval stages and adult stages of the parasite. One promising family of proteins are the adult-stage-secreted cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Nematode GSTs facilitate the inactivation and degradation of a variety of electrophilic substrates (drugs) via the nucleophilic addition of reduced glutathione. Parasite GSTs also play significant roles in multi-drug resistance and the modulation of host immune defense mechanisms. Here, the structure of Na-GST-3, one of three GSTs secreted by adult-stage N. americanus, is reported. Unlike most GST structures, the Na-GST-3 crystal contains a monomer in the asymmetric unit. However, the monomer forms a prototypical GST dimer across the crystallographic twofold. A glutathione from the fermentation process is bound to the monomer. The overall binding cavity of Na-GST-3 is reminiscent of that of other N. americanus GSTs and is larger and capable of binding a wider array of ligands than GSTs from organisms that have other major detoxifying mechanisms. Furthermore, despite having low sequence identity to the host GST, Na-GST-3 has a greater tertiary-structure similarity to human sigma-class GST than was observed for the other N. americanus GSTs.

  3. Attenuation of lung fibrosis in mice with a clinically relevant inhibitor of glutathione-S-transferase π

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, David H.; van der Velden, Jos L.J.; Lahue, Karolyn G.; Qian, Xi; Schneider, Robert W.; Iberg, Martina S.; Nolin, James D.; Casey, Dylan T.; Tew, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Henderson, Colin J.; Wolf, C. Roland; Butnor, Kelly J.; Taatjes, Douglas J.; Budd, Ralph C.; Irvin, Charles G.; van der Vliet, Albert; Flemer, Stevenson; Anathy, Vikas; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a debilitating lung disease characterized by excessive collagen production and fibrogenesis. Apoptosis in lung epithelial cells is critical in IPF pathogenesis, as heightened loss of these cells promotes fibroblast activation and remodeling. Changes in glutathione redox status have been reported in IPF patients. S-glutathionylation, the conjugation of glutathione to reactive cysteines, is catalyzed in part by glutathione-S-transferase π (GSTP). To date, no published information exists linking GSTP and IPF to our knowledge. We hypothesized that GSTP mediates lung fibrogenesis in part through FAS S-glutathionylation, a critical event in epithelial cell apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that GSTP immunoreactivity is increased in the lungs of IPF patients, notably within type II epithelial cells. The FAS-GSTP interaction was also increased in IPF lungs. Bleomycin- and AdTGFβ-induced increases in collagen content, α-SMA, FAS S-glutathionylation, and total protein S-glutathionylation were strongly attenuated in Gstp–/– mice. Oropharyngeal administration of the GSTP inhibitor, TLK117, at a time when fibrosis was already apparent, attenuated bleomycin- and AdTGFβ-induced remodeling, α-SMA, caspase activation, FAS S-glutathionylation, and total protein S-glutathionylation. GSTP is an important driver of protein S-glutathionylation and lung fibrosis, and GSTP inhibition via the airways may be a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of IPF. PMID:27358914

  4. Nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi prevents apoptosis by reducing the oxidative stress-induced formation of exocyclic DNA products.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Kensaku; Goto, Shinji; Okunaga, Tomohiro; Ihara, Yoshito; Tsuji, Kentaro; Kawai, Yoshichika; Uchida, Koji; Osawa, Toshihiko; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Kondo, Takahito

    2004-12-01

    We previously found that nuclear glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi) accumulates in cancer cells resistant to anticancer drugs, suggesting that it has a role in the acquisition of resistance to anticancer drugs. In the present study, the effect of oxidative stress on the nuclear translocation of GSTpi and its role in the protection of DNA from damage were investigated. In human colonic cancer HCT8 cells, the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced increase in nuclear condensation, the population of sub-G(1) peak, and the number of TUNEL-positive cells were observed in cells pretreated with edible mushroom lectin, an inhibitor of the nuclear transport of GSTpi. The DNA damage and the formation of lipid peroxide were dependent on the dose of H(2)O(2) and the incubation time. Immunological analysis showed that H(2)O(2) induced the nuclear accumulation of GSTpi but not of glutathione peroxidase. Formation of the 7-(2-oxo-hepyl)-substituted 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine adduct by the reaction of 13-hydroperoxyoctadecadienoic acid (13-HPODE) with 2'-deoxyguanosine was inhibited by GSTpi in the presence of glutathione. The conjugation product of 4-oxo-2-nonenal, a lipid aldehyde of 13-HPODE, with GSH in the presence of GSTpi, was identified by LS/MS. These results suggested that nuclear GSTpi prevents H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage by scavenging the formation of lipid-peroxide-modified DNA.

  5. Structures of yeast glutathione-S-transferase Gtt2 reveal a new catalytic type of GST family

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiao-Xiao; Jiang, Yong-Liang; He, Yong-Xing; Bao, Rui; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are ubiquitous detoxification enzymes that catalyse the conjugation of electrophilic substrates to glutathione. Here, we present the crystal structures of Gtt2, a GST of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in apo and two ligand-bound forms, at 2.23 Å, 2.20 Å and 2.10 Å, respectively. Although Gtt2 has the overall structure of a GST, the absence of the classic catalytic essential residues—tyrosine, serine and cysteine—distinguishes it from all other cytosolic GSTs of known structure. Site-directed mutagenesis in combination with activity assays showed that instead of the classic catalytic residues, a water molecule stabilized by Ser129 and His123 acts as the deprotonator of the glutathione sulphur atom. Furthermore, only glycine and alanine are allowed at the amino-terminus of helix-α1 because of stereo-hindrance. Taken together, these results show that yeast Gtt2 is a novel atypical type of cytosolic GST. PMID:19851333

  6. Decreased Glutathione S-transferase Level and Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia Associated with Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A Perspective Review.

    PubMed

    Al-Abdi, Sameer Yaseen

    2017-02-01

    Classically, genetically decreased bilirubin conjugation and/or hemolysis account for the mechanisms contributing to neonatal hyperbilirubinemia associated with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. However, these mechanisms are not involved in most cases of this hyperbilirubinemia. Additional plausible mechanisms for G6PD deficiency-associated hyperbilirubinemia need to be considered. Glutathione S-transferases (GST) activity depends on a steady quantity of reduced form of glutathione (GSH). If GSH is oxidized, it is reduced back by glutathione reductase, which requires the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). The main source of NADPH is the pentose phosphate pathway, in which G6PD is the first enzyme. Rat kidney GSH, rat liver GST, and human red blood cell GST levels have been found to positively correlate with G6PD levels in their respective tissues. As G6PD is expressed in hepatocytes, it is expected that GST levels would be significantly decreased in hepatocytes of G6PD-deficient neonates. As hepatic GST binds bilirubin and prevents their reflux into circulation, hypothesis that decreased GST levels in hepatocytes is an additional mechanism contributing to G6PD deficiency-associated hyperbilirubinemia seems plausible. Evidence for and against this hypothesis are discussed in this article hoping to stimulate further research on the role of GST in G6PD deficiency-associated hyperbilirubinemia.

  7. Interaction of the electrophilic ketoprofenyl-glucuronide and ketoprofenyl-coenzyme A conjugates with cytosolic glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Osbild, Sandra; Bour, Jérome; Maunit, Benoît; Guillaume, Cécile; Asensio, Carine; Muller, Jean-François; Netter, Patrick; Kirsch, Glbert; Bagrel, Denyse; Lapicque, Françoise; Battaglia, Eric

    2008-02-01

    Carboxylic acid-containing drugs are metabolized mainly through the formation of glucuronide and coenzyme A esters. These conjugates have been suspected to be responsible for the toxicity of several nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs because of the reactivity of the electrophilic ester bond. In the present study we investigated the reactivity of ketoprofenyl-acylglucuronide (KPF-OG) and ketoprofenyl-acyl-coenzyme A (KPF-SCoA) toward cytosolic rat liver glutathione S-transferases (GST). We observed that KPF-SCoA, but not KPF-OG inhibited the conjugation of 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene and 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide catalyzed by both purified cytosolic rat liver GST and GST from FAO and H5-6 rat hepatoma cell lines. Photoaffinity labeling with KPF-SCoA suggested that the binding of this metabolite may overlap the binding site of 4-methylumbelliferone sulfate. Furthermore, high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry analysis showed that both hydrolysis and transacylation reactions were observed in the presence of GST and glutathione. The formation of ketoprofenyl-S-acyl-glutathione could be kinetically characterized (apparent K(m) = 196.0 +/- 70.6 microM). It is concluded that KPF-SCoA is both a GST inhibitor and a substrate of a GST-dependent transacylation reaction. The reactivity and inhibitory potency of thioester CoA derivatives toward GST may have potential implications on the reported in vivo toxicity of some carboxylic acid-containing drugs.

  8. Purification and biochemical characterization of glutathione S-transferase from Down syndrome and normal children erythrocytes: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Ragaa R; Maharem, Tahany M; Abdel-Meguid, Nagwa; Sabry, Gilane M; Abdalla, Abdel-Monem; Guneidy, Rasha A

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the phenotypic manifestation of trisomy 21. Our study was concerned with the characterization and purification of glutathione S-transferase enzyme (GST) from normal and Down syndrome (DS) erythrocytes to illustrate the difference in the role of this enzyme in the cell. Glutathione S-transferase and glutathione (GSH) was determined in ten DS and ten healthy children matched for age (3-10 years). DS group exhibited significantly lower GST value (2.7 units/gHb) as compared to controls (6.6 units/gHb) (40.9%). GST activity was significantly decreased to 40.9% in the DS group as compared to controls. Also GSH concentration was significantly decreased to 60.6% in the DS group compared to the controls. Glutathione transferase was purified from erythrocytes of normal and DS pooled blood samples by affinity chromatography with specific activity of 23.7% and 7.9%, respectively. The effect of freezing and thawing, storage time of freezing and GSH concentration on the stability of the enzyme were examined. Normal GST exhibited a pH optimum at pH 7 followed by sharp decrease, however DS GST exhibited pH optimum between pH 7.5 and 8. The Km values for 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and GSH were 0.205 mM and 0.786 mM, respectively, for normal GST, and 0.318 mM and 1.307 mM, respectively for DS GST. The activation energy (Ea) was calculated to be 2.25 and 4.25 cal/mol for normal GST and 3.8 cal/mol for DS GST. Normal and DS GST were inhibited by the same inhibitors (hematin, bromosulfophthalein and cibacron blue), but with different degree. On kinetic basis, the individuals with lower overall GST activity and slight differences in some kinetic characters are at greater risk from xenobiotic contamination as compared to those with higher overall GST activity observed in normal individuals.

  9. Age-Related Changes in Antioxidant and Glutathione S-Transferase Enzyme Activities in the Asian Clam.

    PubMed

    Vranković, J

    2016-03-01

    Aging is accompanied by increased production of free oxygen radicals and impairment of normal cellular functions. The aim of this work was to provide preliminary data on age-related differences in the activities of antioxidant enzymes and phase II biotransformation enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) in a wild population of the Asian clam Corbicula fluminea. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), and GST were assessed in visceral mass of four age classes (0+-, 1+-, 2+-, and 3+-year-old) of C. fluminea clams. Age-related changes were seen in antioxidant enzyme status: levels of total SOD (totSOD) (P < 0.05), MnSOD, and CuZnSOD (P < 0.05) activities increased progressively during aging from younger to older clams. Changes in CAT and GR activities with advancing age were found, the levels being the highest in age class II, then being lower in age classes III and IV (P < 0.05). Activities of GPX and GST were lower in the senescent individuals (2+- and 3+-year-old clams) compared with young individuals (0+- and 1+-year-old clams). Overall, the decline of glutathione-dependent enzyme activities, coupled with higher and lower activities of totSOD and CAT, respectively, as the individual grows older, may render the older animals more susceptible to oxidative stress. Data reported here are not intended to be exhaustive since they concern only age/size structure of the population at one locality, so more detailed studies on both the developmental stages and levels of antioxidant enzymes of this new alien species in Serbian rivers are required.

  10. Salinity effects on activity and expression of glutathione S-transferases in white sturgeon and Chinook salmon.

    PubMed

    Donham, Rachel T; Morin, Dexter; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2006-02-01

    This study evaluated the activity and expression of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) detoxification isoenzymes in juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) and Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during acclimation from freshwater (2 per thousand) to estuarine (15 per thousand) salinity conditions. In white sturgeon, GST activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) increased significantly (P = 0.005; n = 5) with elevated salinity, but not for the Chinook salmon (P = 0.174; n = 10). GST activity of both sturgeon and salmon toward ethacrynic acid (ETHA) did not significantly change with elevated salinity (P = 0.516 with n = 3, and P = 0.125 with n = 3, respectively). Expression of the GST classes, and hepatic glutathione (GSH) concentration, as determined by HPLC, also did not significantly change with increased salinity. In conclusion, overall GST activity in white sturgeon, but not Chinook salmon, is stimulated by elevated water salinity, thus electrophilic chemicals such as pesticides may be more effectively detoxified by sturgeon as they undergo seaward migration.

  11. Organophosphate pesticides increase the expression of alpha glutathione S-transferase in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Medina-Díaz, I M; Rubio-Ortíz, M; Martínez-Guzmán, M C; Dávalos-Ibarra, R L; Rojas-García, A E; Robledo-Marenco, M L; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; Girón-Pérez, M I; Elizondo, G

    2011-12-01

    Chlorpyrifos and methyl parathion are among the most widely used insecticides in the world. Human populations are constantly exposed to low doses of both due to their extensive use and presence in food and drinking water. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) catalyzes the conjugation of glutathione on electrophilic substrates and is an important line of defense in the protection of cellular components from reactive species. GST alpha1 (GSTA1) is the predominant isoform of GST expressed in the human liver; thus, determining the effect of insecticides on GSTA1 transcription is very important. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of methyl parathion and chlorpyrifos on GSTA1 gene expression in HepG2 cells using real time PCR, and activity and immunoreactive protein assays. The results demonstrated that exposure to methyl parathion and chlorpyrifos increased the level of GSTA1 mRNA, GSTA1 immunoreactive protein and GST activity relative to a control. These results demonstrated that these insecticides can increase the expression of GSTA1. In conclusion, HepG2 cell cultures treated with methyl parathion and chlorpyrifos could be a useful model for studying the function of GSTA1 and its role in the metabolism of xenobiotics in the liver.

  12. Response of glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes to cadmium exposure in the marine pollution indicator worm, Perinereis nuntia.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Ji; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Park, Gyung Soo; Lee, Jehee; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2011-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) is a phase II enzyme that functions as a detoxicant by catalyzing the conjugation of reduced glutathione with a variety of xenobiotics via cysteine thiol. Molecular genetic approaches using gene biomarkers show substantial relevance as sensitive biomarkers for the indication of pollution levels. In order to use GSTs as molecular biomarkers for marine pollution monitoring, we cloned and sequenced the full-length cDNA of seven GST genes from the marine polychaete Perinereis nuntia. The deduced amino acid sequence of Pn-GSTs showed a high similarity to those of other species that clustered into the same clades in a phylogenetic analysis. In addition, to evaluate Pn-GSTs as useful biomarkers on effects after cadmium (Cd) exposure, we exposed sublethal concentrations of Cd (5, 50, and 500 μg/L) to P. nuntia, and they showed relatively different but significantly increases, depending on exposure time and Cd concentrations. Particularly, Pn-GST-omega and Pn-GST-sigma genes were highly sensitive with a clear dose-dependent manner on mRNA expression. The total GST activities also have significantly increased levels at higher concentrations of Cd exposure. These results indicate that Pn-GSTs play important roles in Cd-induced oxidative stress in terms of the physiological changes relating to metabolism and cell protection, and those genes would have great potential as molecular biomarkers to monitor marine environmental health.

  13. Glutathione S-transferase SlGSTE1 in Spodoptera litura may be associated with feeding adaptation of host plants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaopeng; Xu, Zhibin; Zou, Haiwang; Liu, Jisheng; Chen, Shuna; Feng, Qili; Zheng, Sichun

    2016-03-01

    Spodoptera litura is polyphagous pest insect and feeds on plants of more than 90 families. In this study the role of glutathione S-transferase epilson 1 (slgste1) in S. litura in detoxification was examined. This gene was up-regulated in the midgut of S. litura at the transcriptional and protein levels when the insect fed on Brassica juncea or diet containing phytochemicals such as indole-3-carbinol and allyl-isothiocyanate that are metabolic products of sinigrin and glucobrassicin in B. juncea. The SlGSTE1 could catalyze the conjugation of reduced glutathione and indole-3-carbinol and allyl-isothiocyanate, as well as xanthotoxin, which is a furanocoumarin, under in vitro condition. When the expression of Slgste1 in the larvae was suppressed with RNAi, the larval growth and feeding rate were decreased. Furthermore, the up-regulated expression of the SlGSTE1 protein in the midgut of larvae that fed on different host plants was detected by 2-DE and ESI/MS analysis. The feeding adaptation from the most to the least of the larvae for the various host plants was Brassica alboglabra, Brassica linn. Pekinensis, Cucumis sativus, Ipomoea batatas, Arachis hypogaea and Capsicum frutescens. All the results together suggest that Slgste1 is a critical detoxifying enzyme that is induced by phytochmicals in the host plants and, inter alia, may be related to host plant adaptation of S. litura. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression of the affinity tags, glutathione-S-transferase and maltose-binding protein, in tobacco chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Niaz; Michoux, Franck; McCarthy, James; Nixon, Peter J

    2012-04-01

    Chloroplast transformation offers an exciting platform for the safe, inexpensive and large-scale production of recombinant proteins in plants. An important advantage for the isolation of proteins produced in the chloroplast would be the use of affinity tags for rapid purification by affinity chromatography. To date, only His-tags have been used. In this study, we have tested the feasibility of expressing two additional affinity tags: glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and a His-tagged derivative of the maltose-binding protein (His₆-MBP). By using the chloroplast 16S rRNA promoter and 5' untranslated region of phage T7 gene 10, GST and His₆-MBP were expressed in homoplastomic tobacco plants at approximately 7% and 37% of total soluble protein, respectively. GST could be purified by one-step-affinity purification using a glutathione column. Much better recoveries were obtained for His₆-MBP by using a twin-affinity purification procedure involving first immobilised nickel followed by binding to amylose. Interestingly, expression of GST led to cytoplasmic male sterility. Overall, our work expands the tools available for purifying recombinant proteins from the chloroplast.

  15. Bioaccumulation of 4-nonylphenol and effects on biomarkers, acetylcholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase, in Mytilus galloprovincialis mussel gilla.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Liñán, Leticia; Bellas, Juan; Salgueiro-González, Noelia; Muniategui, Soledad; Beiras, Ricardo

    2015-05-01

    Wild marine mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis showed a moderate bioaccumulation ability when exposed to waterborne 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), with a bioconcentration factor (BCF) of 6850 L Kg(-1) (dry weight). Kinetic and concentration-response experiments were performed and three enzymatic biomarkers in mussel gills were measured: Glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Exposure of mussels to environmentally relevant concentrations (25-100 μg L(-1)) of 4-nonylphenol significantly inhibited the AChE activity and induced the GST and GPx activities. GST induction was dose dependent whilst GPx activity showed a less consistent pattern, but in both cases the induction remained after a 10 d depuration period. Mussels seem capable of eliminating 4-NP from their tissues through a mechanism involving GST induction.

  16. Bioaccumulation of PCB-153 and effects on molecular biomarkers acetylcholinesterase, glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione peroxidase in Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Liñán, Leticia; Bellas, Juan; Soriano, José Antonio; Concha-Graña, Estefanía; Muniategui, Soledad; Beiras, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    In this study, PCB-153 bioaccumulation kinetics and concentration-response experiments were performed employing wild Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels. In addition, the activity of three enzymatic biomarkers: glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), were measured in the mussel gills. The experimental data fitted well to an asymptotic accumulation model with a high bioconcentration factor (BCF) of 9324 L kg(-1) and a very limited depuration capacity, described by a low excretion rate coefficient (Kd = 0.083 d(-1)). This study reports by first time in mussels significant inhibition of GST activity and significant induction of GPx activity as a result of exposure to dissolved PCB-153. In contrast, AChE activity was unaffected at all concentrations and exposure times tested. The effects on both enzymes are time-dependent, which stresses the difficulties inherent to the use of these biomarkers in chemical pollution monitoring programs.

  17. The Biochemical Adaptations of Spotted Wing Drosophila (Diptera: Drosophilidae) to Fresh Fruits Reduced Fructose Concentrations and Glutathione-S Transferase Activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phuong; Kim, A-Young; Jung, Jin Kyo; Donahue, Kelly M; Jung, Chuleui; Choi, Man-Yeon; Koh, Young Ho

    2016-04-01

    Spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii Matsumura, is an invasive and economically damaging pest in Europe and North America. The females have a serrated ovipositor that enables them to infest almost all ripening small fruits. To understand the physiological and metabolic basis of spotted wing drosophila food preferences for healthy ripening fruits, we investigated the biological and biochemical characteristics of spotted wing drosophila and compared them with those of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that the susceptibility to oxidative stressors was significantly increased in spotted wing drosophila compared with those of D. melanogaster. In addition, we found that spotted wing drosophila had significantly reduced glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity and gene numbers. Furthermore, fructose concentrations found in spotted wing drosophila were significantly lower than those of D. melanogaster. Our data strongly suggest that the altered food preferences of spotted wing drosophila may stem from evolutionary adaptations to fresh foods accompanied by alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and GST activities.

  18. INDUCTION OF DNA-PROTEIN CROSSLINKS BY THE METABOLISM OF DICHLOROMETHANE IN V79 CELL LINES TRANSFECTED WITH THE MURINE GLUTATHIONE-S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1 GENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloromethane (DCM) is considered a probable human carcinogen. Laboratory studies have shown an increased incidence of lung and liver cancer in mice but not in rats or hamsters. Despite the correlation between metabolism of DCM by the glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pathway and...

  19. Differential transcription of cytochrome P450s and glutathione S transferases in DDT-susceptible and resistant Drosophila melanogaster strains in response to DDT and oxidative stress

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Metabolic DDT resistance in Drosophila melanogaster has previously been associated with constitutive over-transcription of cytochrome P450s. Increased P450 activity has also been associated with increased oxidative stress. In contrast, over-transcription of glutathione S transferases (GSTs) has been...

  20. INDUCTION OF DNA-PROTEIN CROSSLINKS BY THE METABOLISM OF DICHLOROMETHANE IN V79 CELL LINES TRANSFECTED WITH THE MURINE GLUTATHIONE-S-TRANSFERASE THETA 1 GENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dichloromethane (DCM) is considered a probable human carcinogen. Laboratory studies have shown an increased incidence of lung and liver cancer in mice but not in rats or hamsters. Despite the correlation between metabolism of DCM by the glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pathway and...

  1. 1-3-A Resolution Structure of Human Glutathione S-Transferase With S-Hexyl Glutathione Bound Reveals Possible Extended Ligandin Binding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Trong, I.Le; Stenkamp, R.E.; Ibarra, C.; Atkins, W.M.; Adman, E.T.

    2005-08-22

    Cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a critical role in xenobiotic binding and metabolism, as well as in modulation of oxidative stress. Here, the high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of homodimeric human GSTA1-1 in the apo form and in complex with S-hexyl glutathione (two data sets) are reported at 1.8, 1.5, and 1.3A respectively. At this level of resolution, distinct conformations of the alkyl chain of S-hexyl glutathione are observed, reflecting the nonspecific nature of the hydrophobic substrate binding site (H-site). Also, an extensive network of ordered water, including 75 discrete solvent molecules, traverses the open subunit-subunit interface and connects the glutathione binding sites in each subunit. In the highest-resolution structure, three glycerol moieties lie within this network and directly connect the amino termini of the glutathione molecules. A search for ligand binding sites with the docking program Molecular Operating Environment identified the ordered water network binding site, lined mainly with hydrophobic residues, suggesting an extended ligand binding surface for nonsubstrate ligands, the so-called ligandin site. Finally, detailed comparison of the structures reported here with previously published X-ray structures reveal a possible reaction coordinate for ligand-dependent conformational changes in the active site and the C-terminus.

  2. Endogenous antioxidant enzymes and glutathione S-transferase in protection of mesothelioma cells against hydrogen peroxide and epirubicin toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Kinnula, K.; Linnainmaa, K.; Raivio, K. O.; Kinnula, V. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have previously shown that cultured malignant mesothelioma cells contain elevated manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) mRNA levels and activities compared with non-malignant mesothelial cells. As many cytotoxic drugs generate both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, we assessed the relative significance of catalase and the glutathione redox cycle, as well as glutathione S-transferase (GST), in protecting these cells against hydrogen peroxide and epirubicin toxicity. Mesothelioma cell lines containing high (M38K cells) and low (M14K cells) MnSOD, and non-malignant MeT-5A mesothelial cells were selected for the study. M38K cells were the most resistant of these three cell types to hydrogen peroxide (0.1-0.5 mM, 4 h) and epirubicin (0.1-0.5 microg ml(-1), 48 h) as judged by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and by high-energy nucleotide (ATP, ADP, AMP) depletion. Total glutathione was higher in M38K cells (63.8 +/- 20.3 nnmol mg(-1) protein) than in M14K (25.2 +/- 8.2 nmol mg[-1]) or MeT-5A cells (23.5 +/- 4.5 nmol mg[-1]). Furthermore, GST specific activity was higher in M38K cells (111.3 +/- 15.8 U mg[-1]) than in M14K cells (77.4 +/- 6.6 U mg[-1]) or in MeT-5A cells (68.8 +/- 7.6 U mg[-1]). Western blotting indicated the presence of GST-pi in all these cells, the reactivity again being highest in M38K cells. Depletion of glutathione by buthionine sulphoximine and inhibition of catalase by aminotriazole enhanced hydrogen peroxide toxicity in all cell types, while only the depletion of glutathione increased epirubicin toxicity. We conclude that simultaneous induction of multiple antioxidant enzymes can occur in human mesothelioma cells. In addition to the high MnSOD activity, hydrogen peroxide scavenging antioxidant enzymes, glutathione and GST can partly explain the high hydrogen peroxide and epirubicin resistance of these cells in vitro. Images Figure 4 PMID:9569045

  3. Purification and biochemical characterization of glutathione S-transferases from four field populations of Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel) (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Hu, Fei; Dou, Wei; Wang, Jing-Jing; Jia, Fu-Xian; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2011-12-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a group of detoxification enzymes that catalyze the nucleophilic addition of glutathione to a wide variety of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. In this study, GSTs were purified from four field populations of Bactrocera dorsalis with different insecticide susceptibilities by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography. The populations were collected from Dongguan (DG) and Guangzhou (GZ) of the Guangdong Province, Haikou of the Hainan province (HN), and Kunming of the Yunnan province (YN), China. Differences in GST characteristics among the four populations were studied using purified enzyme samples through comparative SDS-PAGE, kinetic, and inhibition experiments. The specific activities of the purified enzymes were similar, but the purification yield of the GZ population (31.54%) was the lowest. SDS-PAGE analysis showed only one band at approximately 23 kDa for these four populations. Kinetic analyses showed that the affinities of the purified GSTs from the GZ and YN populations for 1-chloro-2.4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) were much higher than those of GSTs from the other two populations, whereas the HN population had the highest catalytic capability in terms of V(max) value. The optimum temperature for CDNB conjugation was 37 °C and the optimum pH was 7.5 in all four populations. Inhibition kinetics showed that ethacrynic acid, diethyl maleate, tetraethylthiuram disulfide, curcumin, bromosulfalein, and β-cypermethrin had excellent inhibitory effects on GSTs in the four populations of B. dorsalis, but the low inhibitory effects of malathion and avermectin did not differ between populations. These results suggest that GSTs may have a role in detoxification of β-cypermethrin in B. dorsalis.

  4. In vitro kinetics of hepatic glutathione s-transferase conjugation in largemouth bass and brown bullheads

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, E.P.; Sheehy, K.M.; Lame, M.W.; Segall, H.J.

    2000-02-01

    The kinetics of glutathione 5-transferase (GST) catalysis were investigated in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and brown bullheads (Amerius nebulosus), two freshwater fish species found in a variety of polluted waterways in the eastern US. The initial rates of hepatic GST activity toward four GST substrates, including 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, ethacrynic acid, {Delta}5-androstene-17-dione, and nitrobutyl chloride, were significantly higher in brown bullheads than in largemouth bass. Hepatic GST activity toward 1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene, a {mu}-class GST substrate in rodents, was not detectable in either species. Liver cytosolic GSTs were more efficient in bullheads than in bass at catalyzing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene-reduced glutathione (CDNB-GSH) conjugation over a broad range of electrophile (CDNB) concentrations, including those representative of environmental exposure. In contrast, largemouth bass maintained higher ambient concentrations of GSH, the nucleophilic cofactor for GST-mediated conjugation, than brown bullheads. Biphasic kinetics for GST-CDNB conjugation under conditions of variable GSH concentration were apparent in Eadie-Hofstee plots of the kinetic data, suggesting the presence of at least two hepatic GST isozymes with markedly different K{sub m} values for GSH in both species. The GST-CDNB reaction rate data obtained under conditions of variable GSH were well fitted (R{sup 2} = 0.999) by the two-enzyme Michaelis-Menten equation. In addition, Western blotting experiments confirmed the presence of two different hepatic GST-like proteins in both largemouth bass and brown bullhead liver. Collectively, these findings indicate that largemouth bass and brown bullhead GSTs catalyze the conjugation of structurally diverse, class-specific GST substrates, and that brown bullheads exhibit higher initial rates of GST activity than largemouth bass. The relatively higher rates of in vitro liver GST activity at the low substrate concentrations

  5. Surface immobilization of protein via biosilification catalyzed by silicatein fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST).

    PubMed

    Ki, Mi-Ran; Yeo, Ki Baek; Pack, Seung Pil

    2013-05-01

    Silicatein from Suberites domuncula was known to catalyze silica deposition in vitro under near neutral pH and ambient temperature conditions. In this study, we employed GST-glutathione (GSH) interaction system to increase the production of silicatein and develop an efficient protein immobilization method. Recombinant silicatein fused with GST (GST-SIL) was produced in E. coli and the GST-SIL protein was employed on GSH-coated glass plate. GST-SIL bound surface or matrix can catalyze the formation of silica layer in the presence of tetraethyl orthosilicate as a substrate at an ambient temperature and neutral pH. During silicatein-mediated silicification, green fluorescent protein (GFP) or horseradish peroxidase (HRP) can be efficiently immobilized on the silica surface. Immobilized GFP or HRP retained their activity and were released gradually. This biocompatible silica coating technique can be employed to prepare biomolecule-immobilized surfaces or matrixes, which are useful for the development of biocatalytic, diagnostic and biosensing system, or tissue culture scaffolds.

  6. X-ray structure of glutathione S-transferase from the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Becker, Andreas; Rahlfs, Stefan; Harwaldt, Petra; Schirmer, R Heiner; Kabsch, Wolfgang; Becker, Katja

    2003-11-25

    GSTs catalyze the conjugation of glutathione with a wide variety of hydrophobic compounds, generally resulting in nontoxic products that can be readily eliminated. In contrast to many other organisms, the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum possesses only one GST isoenzyme (PfGST). This GST is highly abundant in the parasite, its activity was found to be increased in chloroquine-resistant cells, and it has been shown to act as a ligandin for parasitotoxic hemin. Thus, the enzyme represents a promising target for antimalarial drug development. We now have solved the crystal structure of PfGST at a resolution of 1.9 A. The homodimeric protein of 26 kDa per subunit represents a GST form that cannot be assigned to any of the known GST classes. In comparison to other GSTs, and, in particular, to the human isoforms, PfGST possesses a shorter C-terminal section resulting in a more solvent-accessible binding site for the hydrophobic and amphiphilic substrates. The structure furthermore reveals features in this region that could be exploited for the design of specific PfGST inhibitors.

  7. X-ray structure of glutathione S-transferase from the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Fritz-Wolf, Karin; Becker, Andreas; Rahlfs, Stefan; Harwaldt, Petra; Schirmer, R. Heiner; Kabsch, Wolfgang; Becker, Katja

    2003-01-01

    GSTs catalyze the conjugation of glutathione with a wide variety of hydrophobic compounds, generally resulting in nontoxic products that can be readily eliminated. In contrast to many other organisms, the malarial parasite Plasmodium falciparum possesses only one GST isoenzyme (PfGST). This GST is highly abundant in the parasite, its activity was found to be increased in chloroquine-resistant cells, and it has been shown to act as a ligandin for parasitotoxic hemin. Thus, the enzyme represents a promising target for antimalarial drug development. We now have solved the crystal structure of PfGST at a resolution of 1.9 Å. The homodimeric protein of 26 kDa per subunit represents a GST form that cannot be assigned to any of the known GST classes. In comparison to other GSTs, and, in particular, to the human isoforms, PfGST possesses a shorter C-terminal section resulting in a more solvent-accessible binding site for the hydrophobic and amphiphilic substrates. The structure furthermore reveals features in this region that could be exploited for the design of specific PfGST inhibitors. PMID:14623980

  8. Drought and salt stress tolerance of an Arabidopsis glutathione S-transferase U17 knockout mutant are attributed to the combined effect of glutathione and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-Hung; Jiang, Han-Wei; Hsieh, En-Jung; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chien, Ching-Te; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang; Lin, Tsan-Piao

    2012-01-01

    Although glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are thought to play major roles in oxidative stress metabolism, little is known about the regulatory functions of GSTs. We have reported that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE U17 (AtGSTU17; At1g10370) participates in light signaling and might modulate various aspects of development by affecting glutathione (GSH) pools via a coordinated regulation with phytochrome A. Here, we provide further evidence to support a negative role of AtGSTU17 in drought and salt stress tolerance. When AtGSTU17 was mutated, plants were more tolerant to drought and salt stresses compared with wild-type plants. In addition, atgstu17 accumulated higher levels of GSH and abscisic acid (ABA) and exhibited hyposensitivity to ABA during seed germination, smaller stomatal apertures, a lower transpiration rate, better development of primary and lateral root systems, and longer vegetative growth. To explore how atgstu17 accumulated higher ABA content, we grew wild-type plants in the solution containing GSH and found that they accumulated ABA to a higher extent than plants grown in the absence of GSH, and they also exhibited the atgstu17 phenotypes. Wild-type plants treated with GSH also demonstrated more tolerance to drought and salt stresses. Furthermore, the effect of GSH on root patterning and drought tolerance was confirmed by growing the atgstu17 in solution containing l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis. In conclusion, the atgstu17 phenotype can be explained by the combined effect of GSH and ABA. We propose a role of AtGSTU17 in adaptive responses to drought and salt stresses by functioning as a negative component of stress-mediated signal transduction pathways.

  9. Structure of glutathione S-transferase 1 from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus (Na-GST-1) in complex with glutathione.

    PubMed

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A; Ceccarelli, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase 1 from Necator americanus (Na-GST-1) is a vaccine candidate for hookworm infection that has a high affinity for heme and metal porphyrins. As part of attempts to clarify the mechanism of heme detoxification by hookworm GSTs, co-crystallization and soaking studies of Na-GST-1 with the heme-like molecules protoporphyrin IX disodium salt, hematin and zinc protoporphyrin were undertaken. While these studies did not yield the structure of the complex of Na-GST-1 with any of these molecules, co-crystallization experiments resulted in the first structures of the complex of Na-GST-1 with the substrate glutathione. The structures of the complex of Na-GST-1 with glutathione were solved from pathological crystalline aggregates comprising more than one crystal form. These first structures of the complex of Na-GST-1 with the substrate glutathione were solved by molecular replacement from data collected with a sealed-tube home source using the previously reported apo structure as the search model.

  10. Molecular cloning, characterization and positively selected sites of the glutathione S-transferase family from Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueyao; Wang, Jianxin; Zhang, Min; Qin, Guohua; Li, Daqi; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds and are related to insecticide resistance. The purpose of this study was to provide new information on the molecular characteristics and the positive selection of locust GSTs. Based on the transcriptome database, we sequenced 28 cytosolic GSTs and 4 microsomal GSTs from the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria). We assigned the 28 cytosolic GSTs into 6 classes--sigma, epsilon, delta, theta, omega and zeta, and the 4 microsomal GSTs into 2 subclasses--insect and MGST3. The tissue- and stage-expression patterns of the GSTs differed at the mRNA level. Further, the substrate specificities and kinetic constants of the cytosolic GSTs differed markedly at the protein level. The results of likelihood ratio tests provided strong evidence for positive selection in the delta class. The result of Bayes Empirical Bayes analysis identified 4 amino acid sites in the delta class as positive selection sites. These sites were located on the protein surface. Our findings will facilitate the elucidation of the molecular characteristics and evolutionary aspects of insect GST superfamily.

  11. Modification of the association between maternal smoke exposure and congenital heart defects by polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohong; Liu, Zhen; Deng, Ying; Li, Shengli; Mu, Dezhi; Tian, Xiaoxian; Lin, Yuan; Yang, Jiaxiang; Li, Jun; Li, Nana; Wang, Yanping; Chen, Xinlin; Deng, Kui; Zhu, Jun

    2015-10-12

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) arise through various combinations of genetic and environmental factors. Our study explores how polymorphisms in the glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes affect the association between cigarette smoke exposure and CHDs. We analysed 299 mothers of children with CHDs and 284 mothers of children without any abnormalities who were recruited from six hospitals. The hair nicotine concentration (HNC) was used to quantify maternal smoke exposure, and the maternal GSTT1, and GSTM1 and GSTP1 genes were sequenced. We found a trend of higher adjusted odds ratios with higher maternal HNC levels, suggesting a dose-response relationship between maternal smoke exposure and CHDs. The lowest HNC range associated with an increased risk of CHDs was 0.213-0.319 ng/mg among the mothers with functional deletions of GSTM1 or GSTT1and 0.319-0.573 ng/mg among the mothers with normal copies of GSTM1 and GSTT1. In addition, the adjusted odds ratio for an HNC of >0.573 ng/mg was 38.53 among the mothers with the GSTP1 AG or GG genotype, which was 7.76 (χ(2) = 6.702, p = 0.010) times greater than the AOR in the mothers with GSTP1 AA genotype. Our study suggests that polymorphisms of maternal GST genes may modify the association of maternal smoke exposure with CHDs.

  12. Expression profiles of seven glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes in cadmium-exposed river pufferfish (Takifugu obscurus).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hyoung; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jehee; Han, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2010-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) plays a critical role in detoxification pathways. In this study, we report cloning and expression of seven genes of the GST family of the pufferfish Takifugu obscurus together with mRNA tissue distribution pattern and time-course of expression in response to exposure to cadmium. At basal levels of tissue expression, GST-Mu is highly expressed in liver compared with other tissues. When fish were exposed to cadmium (5 mg/L for 96 h), expression of GST-MAPEG, GST-Mu, GST-Omega, and GST-Zeta was greatly increased, whereas GST-Alpha and GST-Kappa genes showed no significant response. These findings suggest that gene expression of a number of GST isoforms in T. obscurus is modulated in response to exposure to cadmium. We propose GST-Mu, GST-Theta, and GST-Zeta as candidate biomarkers for heavy metal exposure in this fish.

  13. Expansion Mechanisms and Functional Divergence of the Glutathione S-Transferase Family in Sorghum and Other Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Yunhua; Cheng, Yansong; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Kumar, Nadimuthu; Ramamoorthy, Rengasamy; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Jiang, Shu-Ye

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) exist in various eukaryotes and function in detoxification of xenobiotics and in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. We have carried out a genome-wide survey of this gene family in 10 plant genomes. Our data show that tandem duplication has been regarded as the major expansion mechanism and both monocot and dicot plants may have practiced different expansion and evolutionary history. Non-synonymous substitutions per site (Ka) and synonymous substitutions per site (Ks) analyses showed that N- and C-terminal functional domains of GSTs (GST_N and GST_C) seem to have evolved under a strong purifying selection (Ka/Ks < 1) under different selective pressures. Differential evolutionary rates between GST_N and GST_C and high degree of expression divergence have been regarded as the major drivers for the retention of duplicated genes and the adaptability to various stresses. Expression profiling also indicated that the gene family plays a role not only in stress-related biological processes but also in the sugar-signalling pathway. Our survey provides additional annotation of the plant GST gene family and advance the understanding of plant GSTs in lineage-specific expansion and species diversification. PMID:21169340

  14. Glutathione S-Transferase of Brown Planthoppers (Nilaparvata lugens) Is Essential for Their Adaptation to Gramine-Containing Host Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing-Ya; Jin, Yu; Ling, Bing; Du, Jin-Ping; Li, Gui-Hua; Qin, Qing-Ming; Cai, Qing-Nian

    2013-01-01

    Plants have evolved complex processes to ward off attacks by insects. In parallel, insects have evolved mechanisms to thwart these plant defenses. To gain insight into mechanisms that mediate this arms race between plants and herbivorous insects, we investigated the interactions between gramine, a toxin synthesized by plants of the family Gramineae, and glutathione S transferase (GST), an enzyme found in insects that is known to detoxify xenobiotics. Here, we demonstrate that rice (Oryza sativa), a hydrophytic plant, also produces gramine and that rice resistance to brown planthoppers (Nilaparvata lugens, BPHs) is highly associated with in planta gramine content. We also show that gramine is a toxicant that causes BPH mortality in vivo and that knockdown of BPH GST gene nlgst1-1 results in increased sensitivity to diets containing gramine. These results suggest that the knockdown of key detoxification genes in sap-sucking insects may provide an avenue for increasing their sensitivity to natural plant-associated defense mechanisms. PMID:23700450

  15. Exposure to ethylene oxide in hospitals: biological monitoring and influence of glutathione S-transferase and epoxide hydrolase polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Haufroid, Vincent; Merz, Brigitte; Hofmann, Annette; Tschopp, Alois; Lison, Dominique; Hotz, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    Ethylene oxide is considered as a human carcinogen. A biomarker of exposure would be a useful instrument to assess the risk in occupationally exposed workers. This cross-sectional study aimed at examining (a) whether the urinary excretion of a metabolite of ethylene oxide, 2-hydroxyethyl mercapturic acid (HEMA), could be used for monitoring occupational exposure and (b) whether glutathione S-transferase (GST) and epoxide hydrolase genotypes influenced biological monitoring. Exposure to ethylene oxide was measured by personal sampling in 80 hospital workers (95% of those eligible). HEMA concentrations were determined in three urine samples (baseline, end of shift, and next morning) by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. GSTs (GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1) and epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1) were also genotyped. The influence of exposure, genotypes, and several other factors was examined in multiple regression analyses. Exposure was always <1 parts per million. On a group basis, exposure and a non-null GSTT1 genotype increased the HEMA concentrations in the urine sample collected at the end of the shift and these factors remained statistically significant after considering possible confounding or modifying factors.

  16. Rapid development of glutathione-S-transferase-dependent drug resistance in vitro and its prevention by ethacrynic acid.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, P B; Zhu, M; Zhang, Y; Chinen, N; Frenkel, G D

    1999-02-08

    Exposure of A2780 human ovarian tumor cells to a low concentration of melphalan in vitro for 7 days resulted in the development of melphalan resistance. This resistance was not a stable characteristic of the cells since it was lost after 2 weeks in culture in the absence of drug. The melphalan-resistant cells exhibited significant cross-resistance to cisplatin but only minor cross-resistance to doxorubicin. The resistant cells had elevated levels of glutathione-S-transferase activity and mRNA. Exposure of the cells to the ethacrynic acid resulted in a decrease in enzyme activity as well as a reversal of their drug-resistant phenotype, indicating that the enzyme is involved in the resistance. When ethacrynic acid was present during the 7-day exposure of the cells to melphalan, the development of drug resistance was prevented. This system may serve as a useful preliminary step in screening for agents which can prevent the development of chemotherapy-induced drug resistance in human cancer.

  17. Glutathione S-transferases are involved in thiamethoxam resistance in the field whitefly Bemisia tabaci Q (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; He, Chao; Xie, Wen; Liu, Yating; Xia, Jixing; Yang, Zezong; Guo, Litao; Wen, Yanan; Wang, Shaoli; Wu, Qingjun; Yang, Fengshan; Zhou, Xiaomao; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-11-01

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, has developed a high level of resistance to thiamethoxam, a second generation neonicotinoid insecticide that has been widely used to control this pest. In this study, we assessed the level of cross-resistance, the activities of detoxifying enzymes, and the expression profiles of 23 glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes in a thiamethoxam-resistant ant and -susceptible strain of Bemisia tabaci Q. The thiamethoxam-resistant strain showed a moderate level of cross-resistance to another nicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid, a low level of cross-resistance to acetamiprid and nitenpyram, and no significant cross-resistance to abamectin and bifenthrin. Among detoxifying enzymes, only GSTs had significantly higher activity in the resistant strain than in the susceptible strain. Seven of 23 GST genes were over-expressed in the resistant strain relative to the susceptible strain. Using the technology of RNA interference to knockdown a GST gene (GST14), the results showed that silencing GST14 increased the mortality of whiteflies to thiamethoxam in Bemisia tabaci. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Induction of glutathione-S-transferase-pi by short-chain fatty acids in the intestinal cell line Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Stein, J; Schröder, O; Bonk, M; Oremek, G; Lorenz, M; Caspary, W F

    1996-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a multigene family of detoxification and metabolizing enzymes that have been linked with the susceptibility of tissues to environmental carcinogens. In addition to their role as the main energy source in the colonic mucosa, short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) have been found to act as potent antiproliferative and differentiating agents in various cancer cell lines. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of SCFAs on the induction of GSTpi in the intestine as a possible new anticarcinogenic mechanism of SCFAs. Studies were performed in Caco-2 cells, a cell line resembling functionally normal enterocytes. Cells, cultured in DMEM supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum, were studied from day 0 dpc (days post confluence) until 21 dpc and culture. SCFAs (acetate, propionate, butyrate) were added to give a final concentration of 5 mmol L(-1). At 0, 3, 6, 9, 15, and 21 dpc, protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (AP) and GSTpi were measured. Butyrate supplementation significantly (P < or = 0.01) increased GSTpi levels compared with controls in a concentration-dependent manner. The effect was detectable within 3 dpc with a maximum at 15 dpc. In contrast to butyrate, the other SCFAs tested had no (acetate) or little effect (propionate). In conclusion, the data suggest that the anticancer effect of butyrate in part may be based on the induction of GSTpi activity, resulting in an enhanced detoxification capacity of the gut.

  19. Decreased lung function associated with occupational exposure to epichlorohydrin and the modification effects of glutathione s-transferase polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jiin-Chyuan; Cheng, Tsun-Jen; Kuo, Hsen-Wen; Chang, Ming J W

    2004-03-01

    Epichlorohydrin (1-chloro-2,3,-epoxypropane; ECH) is a strong irritant of the eyes, respiratory tract, and skin. Because the toxic effect of various chemicals can be modified by metabolic traits, in this study, we also investigated the influence of the glutathione S-transferase (GSTM1) and (GSTT1) genes on the toxic effect of ECH. In the GSTM1 null genotype workers, there is a dose-response of lung function tests (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, MMEF) for ECH exposure, but not in the GSTM1 non-null genotype workers. The ECH exposure was found to be significantly associated with a decreased FEV1 value (P = 0.09) and a decreased MMEF value (P = 0.053) after adjusting for other factors. The GSTM1 null genotype was found to be significantly associated with a decreased FEV1 value (P = 0.038), decreased FEV1/FVC value (P = 0.056), and decreased MMEF value (P = 0.012) after adjusting for other factors. This study indicates that obstructive lung abnormalities and small airway lung damage are associated with ECH exposure, and ECH workers with GSTM1 null-type are also associated with increased respiratory damage.

  20. Characterization of glutathione S-transferases from Sus scrofa, Cydia pomonella and Triticum aestivum: their responses to cantharidin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue-Qing; Zhang, Ya-Lin

    2015-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a key role in detoxification of xenobiotics in organisms. However, their other functions, especially response to the natural toxin cantharidin produced by beetles in the Meloidae and Oedemeridae families, are less known. We obtained GST cDNAs from three sources: Cydia pomonella (CpGSTd1), Sus scrofa (SsGSTα1), and Triticum aestivum (TaGSTf3). The predicted molecular mass is 24.19, 25.28 and 24.49 kDa, respectively. These proteins contain typical N-terminal and C-terminal domains. Recombinant GSTs were heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as soluble fusion proteins. Their optimal activities are exhibited at pH 7.0-7.5 at 30 °C. Activity of CpGSTd1 is strongly inhibited by cantharidin and cantharidic acid, but is only slightly suppressed by the demethylated analog of cantharidin and cantharidic acid. Enzymatic assays revealed that cantharidin has no effect on SsGSTα1 activity, while it significantly stimulates TaGSTf3 activity, with an EC50 value of 0.3852 mM. Activities of these proteins are potently inhibited by the known GST competitive inhibitor: S-hexylglutathione (GTX). Our results suggest that these GSTs from different sources share similar structural and biochemical characteristics. Our results also suggest that CpGSTd1 might act as a binding protein with cantharidin and its analogs.

  1. Tissue-specific expression and localization of safener-induced glutathione S-transferase proteins in Triticum tauschii.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Dean E; Zhang, Qin; Xu, Fangxiu; Vaughn, Kevin C

    2003-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) gene expression was examined in the coleoptile and new leaf tissue of etiolated shoots of the diploid wheat species Triticum tauschii (Coss.) Schmal., which is considered to be a progenitor and the D-genome donor to cultivated, hexaploid bread wheat Triticum aestivum L. GST expression (mRNA, protein, and enzyme activity with a herbicide substrate) in these shoot tissues was examined in response to herbicide safener treatment. Two different antibody probes, raised against the same safener-inducible GST protein (TtGSTU1) but differing in their specificity, were utilized to determine tissue distribution and subcellular localization of GST proteins in etiolated shoots. GST transcripts, immunoreactive GST proteins, and herbicide-metabolizing activity were all highest in the coleoptile of etiolated, safener-treated T. tauschii shoots. Anti-GST immunolabeling was strongest in the outer epidermal and adjoining sub-epidermal cells in both coleoptiles and new leaves following safener treatment. Our data indicate that safeners protect grass crops from herbicide injury by dramatically inducing the expression of GST proteins in the outer cell layers of the coleoptile, which prevents the herbicide from reaching the sensitive new leaves of etiolated shoots as they emerge from the soil.

  2. A Genomics Approach to the Comprehensive Analysis of the Glutathione S-Transferase Gene Family in Soybean and Maize

    PubMed Central

    McGonigle, Brian; Keeler, Sharon J.; Lau, Sze-Mei Cindy; Koeppe, Mary K.; O'Keefe, Daniel P.

    2000-01-01

    By BLAST searching a large expressed sequence tag database for glutathione S-transferase (GST) sequences we have identified 25 soybean (Glycine max) and 42 maize (Zea mays) clones and obtained accurate full-length GST sequences. These clones probably represent the majority of members of the GST multigene family in these species. Plant GSTs are divided according to sequence similarity into three categories: types I, II, and III. Among these GSTs only the active site serine, as well as another serine and arginine in or near the “G-site” are conserved throughout. Type III GSTs have four conserved sequence patches mapping to distinct structural features. Expression analysis reveals the distribution of GSTs in different tissues and treatments: Maize GSTI is overall the most highly expressed in maize, whereas the previously unknown GmGST 8 is most abundant in soybean. Using DNA microarray analysis we observed increased expression among the type III GSTs after inducer treatment of maize shoots, with different genes responding to different treatments. Protein activity for a subset of GSTs varied widely with seven substrates, and any GST exhibiting greater than marginal activity with chloro-2,4 dinitrobenzene activity also exhibited significant activity with all other substrates, suggesting broad individual enzyme substrate specificity. PMID:11080288

  3. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding a maize glutathione-S-transferase in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Moore, R E; Davies, M S; O'Connell, K M; Harding, E I; Wiegand, R C; Tiemeier, D C

    1986-09-25

    The isolation and characterization of a family of maize glutathione-S-transferases (GST's) has been described previously. These enzymes are designated GSTs I, II and III based on size, substrate specificity and responsiveness to safeners. GST III has been shown to act on the herbicide alachlor as well as the commonly used substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Clones were isolated from a maize cDNA library in lambda gt10. Three clones contained the entire coding region for GST III. The sequences of these clones were consistent with the known amino terminal GST III protein sequence. Moreover, expression of one of these clones in E. coli resulted in a GST activity as measured with both CDNB and alachlor, proving that at least one of the clones encodes an active GST III species. With the enzyme expressed in E. coli it will become possible to study enzyme structure-function relationships ex planta. While a number of different GST proteins are present in maize tissue the GST III gene is present in single or low copy in the genome.

  4. Influence of chemical treatments on glutathione S-transferases of maize with activity towards metolachlor and cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Cottingham, C K; Hatzios, K K; Meredith, S

    1998-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity extracted from shoots of 3-day-old etiolated seedlings of maize (Zea mays L., Northrup-King 9283 hybrid) and the induction of soluble and membrane-bound GST activity by the safener benoxacor, the herbicide metolachlor and their combination (CGA-180937) were investigated. GST activity extracted from maize shoots was detected in both cytosolic and microsomal fractions and utilized 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), metolachlor, and trans-cinnamic acid (CA) as substrates. Soluble GST activity extracted from maize shoots was greater than microsomal with CDNB or metolachlor as substrate. Membrane-bound GST activity was greater than soluble with cinnamic acid as substrate. Washing the microsomal preparations from maize shoots with Triton X-100 increased GST(CA) activity. Pretreatment with the safener benoxacor or a formulated combination of the herbicide metolachlor with benoxacor induced soluble GST(CDNB), GST(metolachlor) and GST(CA) activities in maize shoots. Benoxacor and CGA-180937 induced also membrane-bound GST(CDNB) and GST(CA) activities in maize shoots, but did not affect membrane-bound GST(metolachlor) activity. These results confirm that maize contains multiple GST isozymes that differ in their substrate specificity and inducibility by safeners or other chemicals.

  5. Festuca arundinacea, glutathione S-transferase and herbicide safeners: a preliminary case study to reduce herbicidal pollution.

    PubMed

    Scarponi, Luciano; Del Buono, Daniele

    2009-11-01

    The expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in Festuca arundinacea was investigated in response to the following herbicide safeners: benoxacor, cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazol-ethyl, fenclorim, fluxofenim and oxabetrinil. All the above compounds enhanced the GST activity tested towards the "model" substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Assays of GST activity towards the herbicides terbuthylazine (N(2)-tert-butyl-6-chloro-N(4)-ethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) and butachlor (N-butoxymethyl-2-chloro-2',6'-diethylacetanilide) as substrates also showed the ability of the safeners to enhance the enzyme activity towards both these herbicides, with the exception of cloquintocet-mexyl for the enzyme activity towards butachlor. As a consequence of the above effects at a macro-scale level, decreased herbicide accumulation and persistence were ascertained in response to the addition of the safener benoxacor to both terbuthylazine and butachlor treatments. These results are discussed in terms of capacity of benoxacor to induce herbicide detoxification in Festuca arundinacea with a view to utilizing them in reducing herbicide pollution.

  6. Cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding a maize glutathione-S-transferase in E. coli.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R E; Davies, M S; O'Connell, K M; Harding, E I; Wiegand, R C; Tiemeier, D C

    1986-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of a family of maize glutathione-S-transferases (GST's) has been described previously. These enzymes are designated GSTs I, II and III based on size, substrate specificity and responsiveness to safeners. GST III has been shown to act on the herbicide alachlor as well as the commonly used substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Clones were isolated from a maize cDNA library in lambda gt10. Three clones contained the entire coding region for GST III. The sequences of these clones were consistent with the known amino terminal GST III protein sequence. Moreover, expression of one of these clones in E. coli resulted in a GST activity as measured with both CDNB and alachlor, proving that at least one of the clones encodes an active GST III species. With the enzyme expressed in E. coli it will become possible to study enzyme structure-function relationships ex planta. While a number of different GST proteins are present in maize tissue the GST III gene is present in single or low copy in the genome. Images PMID:3532034

  7. Cloning, characterization and expression of two glutathione S-transferase cDNAs in the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yufen; Krell, Peter J; Ladd, Tim; Feng, Qili; Zheng, Sichun

    2009-01-01

    Two Choristoneura fumiferana glutathione S-transferase cDNAs (CfGSTs4 and CfGSTd5) were cloned from a cDNA library constructed using mRNA from the midgut cell line, CF-203. These cDNAs encoded two structurally different proteins with a predicted molecular mass of 23 and 24 kDa, respectively. Amino acid sequence analysis indicates that CfGSTs4 and CfGSTd5 contained Sigma and Delta GST domain, respectively. CfGSTs4 cDNA was expressed as a recombinant protein with the same molecular mass as predicted. Semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR analyses indicated that both of these genes were expressed in the epidermis, fat body, and midgut of the 6th instar larvae, as well as CF-203 cells. CfGSTs4 was highly and almost constantly expressed in all tissues during the 6th instar stage. There were higher levels of CfGSTs4 protein in the midgut and fat body than in the epidermis. CfGSTd5 was expressed in the fat body when the insects underwent pupal molting and was constantly expressed in the epidermis and midgut during 6th instar development. CfGSTs4 expression was not affected by ecdysone agonist tebufenozide (RH5992), whereas CfGSTd5 expression was slightly suppressed by the compound.

  8. Cloning and characterization of two glutathione S-transferase cDNAs in the spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Sichun; Deng, Huimin; Ladd, Tim; Tomkins, Bill L; Krell, Peter J; Feng, Qili

    2007-11-01

    Two Choristoneura fumiferana glutathione S-transferase cDNAs were cloned from a cDNA library constructed using mRNA from the midgut cell line, CF-203. These cDNAs (CfGST2, CfGST3) encoded two structurally different proteins with a predicted molecular mass of 21 and 24 kDa, respectively, which was confirmed through protein expression in a bacterial system. Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR analyses revealed that the transcripts of these two genes were present in the epidermis, fat body, and midgut of the 6th instar larvae. CfGST2 was expressed in the fat body when the insects were close to pupal molting, while it was constantly expressed in the other two tissues during the 6th instar stage. CfGST3 gene was expressed highly and constantly in all of the tissues throughout the 6th instar stage. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that CfGST2 and CfGST3 proteins were present mainly in the fat body and epidermis and no protein was detected in the midgut. CfGST2 and CfGST3 were different from CfGST reported before (Feng et al., 1999: Insect Biochem Mol Biol 29:779-793) in amino acid sequence, expression pattern, and responsiveness to tebufenozide.

  9. Identification of Putative Carboxylesterase and Glutathione S-transferase Genes from the Antennae of the Chilo suppressalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su; Gong, Zhong-Jun; Rao, Xiang-Jun; Li, Mao-Ye; Li, Shi-Guang

    2015-01-01

    In insects, rapid degradation of odorants in antennae is extremely important for the sensitivity of olfactory receptor neurons. Odorant degradation in insect antennae is mediated by multiple enzymes, especially the carboxylesterases (CXEs) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). The Asiatic rice borer, Chilo suppressalis, is an economically important lepidopteran pest which causes great economic damage to cultivated rice crops in many Asian countries. In this study, we identified 19 putative CXE and 16 GST genes by analyzing previously constructed antennal transcriptomes of C. suppressalis. BLASTX best hit results showed that these genes are most homologous to their respective orthologs in other lepidopteran species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that these CXE and GST genes were clustered into various clades. Reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays showed that three CXE genes (CsupCXE8, CsupCXE13, and CsupCXE18) are antennae-enriched. These genes are candidates for involvement in odorant degradation. Unexpectedly, none of the GST genes were found to be antennae-specific. Our results pave the way for future researches of the odorant degradation mechanism of C. suppressalis at the molecular level. PMID:26198868

  10. Genome-Wide Analysis of the Glutathione S-Transferase Gene Family in Capsella rubella: Identification, Expression, and Biochemical Functions

    PubMed Central

    He, Gang; Guan, Chao-Nan; Chen, Qiang-Xin; Gou, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Wei; Zeng, Qing-Yin; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Extensive subfunctionalization might explain why so many genes have been maintained after gene duplication, which provides the engine for gene family expansion. However, it is still a particular challenge to trace the evolutionary dynamics and features of functional divergences in a supergene family over the course of evolution. In this study, we identified 49 Glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes from the Capsella rubella, a close relative of Arabidopsis thaliana and a member of the mustard family. Capsella GSTs can be categorized into eight classes, with tau and phi GSTs being the most numerous. The expansion of the two classes mainly occurs through tandem gene duplication, which results in tandem-arrayed gene clusters on chromosomes. By integrating phylogenetic analysis, expression patterns, and biochemical functions of Capsella and Arabidopsis GSTs, functional divergence, both in gene expression and enzymatic properties, were clearly observed in paralogous gene pairs in Capsella (even the most recent duplicates), and orthologous GSTs in Arabidopsis/Capsella. This study provides functional evidence for the expansion and organization of a large gene family in closely related species. PMID:27630652

  11. Cloning, characterisation and bacterial expression of full length cDNA for the mouse liver microsomal glutathione S-transferase.

    PubMed

    Raza, H; Mullick, J; John, A; Bhagwat, S V; Avadhani, N G

    2000-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA encoding full length microsomal glutathione S-transferase (MGST) from mouse liver. The cDNA was isolated by RT-PCR using primers designed from published cDNA sequence of rat MGST with the addition of 5' Nde-1 and 3' HindIII sites, and cloned into bacterial expression vector pSP19T7LT. Deduced amino acid sequence (155 amino acids, calculated mol.mass 17512 Dalton) confirmed the identity of microsomal GST from mouse liver which has sequence homology with that of rat and human liver MGST1. Recombinant GST cDNA (Genbank accession # 159050) was expressed in BL21(DE3) in the presence of 1 mM IPTG at 30 degrees C. The expressed GST protein was found to be localised in the bacterial membrane as determined by measuring catalytic activity using CDNB and cumene hydroperoxide substrates, SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. We have demonstrated the cloning and expression of full length cDNA for MGST from mouse liver and have characterised the functionally active product as MGST protein. These results should facilitate studies on the role of MGST in the regulation of chemical carcinogenesis and in the prevention of oxidative stress caused by endogenous and exogenous chemicals.

  12. Altered expression of glutathione S-transferases in the liver of xenobiotic-resistant mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    SciTech Connect

    Armknecht, S.; Kaattari, S.; Cooper, P.; Van Veld, P.

    1995-12-31

    Aquatic organisms frequently inhabit areas where biochemical adaptations to harsh chemical environments are necessary for survival. In the Elizabeth River VA, a population of mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) inhabits a site severely contaminated with PAH of creosote origin. Although hepatic neoplasms are observed in adult mummichog, these fish are resistant to the acute effects of creosote contaminated sediments. The laboratory is currently investigating biochemical mechanisms of resistance in these fish and the role that biochemical adaptations play in the carcinogenic process. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) levels and activity are elevated three- to four-fold in livers of mummichog collected from the contaminated site relative to that of clean reference sites (Fish Physiol. Biochem. 9, 369, 1991). GSTs from livers of adult mummichog from resistant and reference site fish were purified by S-hexylglutathione affinity chromatography and isoelectric focusing. At least four forms were observed from each population with similar isoelectric focusing patterns in the basic pH range. However, there were differences in staining intensities of a protein with an isoelectric point of 8.1. Antibodies to mammalian GST 7-7, an important form that is overexpressed and involved in drug resistance in various tumor cell lines, did not recognize any present forms in mummichog liver. Monoclonal antibodies are currently being developed for the GST forms in resistant mummichog in order to allow a better understanding of factors influencing their regulation.

  13. Glutathione S-transferase T1 mismatch constitutes a risk factor for de novo immune hepatitis after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Isabel; Sousa, Jose M; Gavilán, Francisco; Bernardos, Angel; Wichmann, Ingeborg; Nuñez-Roldán, Antonio

    2004-09-01

    A new form of autoimmune hepatitis referred to as de novo, has been reported after liver transplantation during the past 5 years. The features are identical to those of classical autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), but the facts involved in the onset and outcome of this type of graft dysfunction are still unclear. The identification of antibodies directed to glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) in the sera of patients with de novo immune hepatitis led us to the description of an alloimmune reaction due to a GSTT1 genetic incompatibility between donor and recipient. We analyzed a cohort of 110 liver transplant patients treated in the liver transplant unit of our hospital during a period of 1 year, from September 2002 to October 2003. We found the following distribution of the GSTT1 genotypes (recipient/donor): +/+ = 66, +/- = 23, -/+ = 15, -/- = 6. Six of these patients were diagnosed with de novo immune hepatitis; all of them belong to the group of negative recipients with positive donors, and all produced anti-GSTT1 antibodies. This genetic combination is associated with a statistically significant increased risk of de novo immune hepatitis (IH) in liver transplant patients (P < .0001 by the Fisher exact test). In conclusion, our results clearly establish the importance of the GSTT1 genotype from donor and recipient of a liver transplant as a predictive marker for de novo IH. At the same time, we confirmed our initial results that only this particular donor/recipient combination triggers the anti-GSTT1 antibody production.

  14. Secreted Opisthorchis viverrini glutathione S-transferase regulates cell proliferation through AKT and ERK pathways in cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Daorueang, Daoyot; Thuwajit, Peti; Roitrakul, Sittiruk; Laha, Thewarach; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Endo, Yaeta; Thuwajit, Chanitra

    2012-03-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini can develop mitogenic substances into the excretory/secretory product (ESP) that may play an important role in promoting the genesis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). In the present study, glutathione S-transferase (GST) is identified as being secreted into Ov-ESP and acting as one of the parasitic mitogens. Its proliferative effect and possible mechanism were explored and its association with the tumor development is proposed. Ov-ESP was concentrated and purified by gel filtration chromatography. SDS-PAGE, 2-DE, and LC-MS/MS identified GST predominantly expressed in the proliferative ESP fraction. The recombinant OvGST (rOvGST) was produced by wheat germ cell-free expression and confirmed by an MTS assay to have a proliferative function on NIH-3T3 murine fibroblasts and MMNK1 non-tumorigenic human bile duct epithelial cells in a dose dependent manner with different optimal doses. The cell surface binding of rOvGST was confirmed in vitro and the activation of both pAKT and pERK was revealed as the mechanism of OvGST-mediated cell proliferation. With support from the observation of secreted OvGST on the biliary cells surrounding the parasites, it is suggested that OvGST can promote cell proliferation that consequently may accelerate the genesis of CCA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Circadian regulation of permethrin susceptibility by glutathione S-transferase (BgGSTD1) in the German cockroach (Blattella germanica).

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Hsien; Lee, Chi-Mei; Huang, Jia-Hsin; Lee, How-Jing

    2014-06-01

    The daily susceptibility rhythm to permethrin and the expression level of the delta class glutathione S-transferase (BgGSTD1) gene were investigated in Blattella germanica. Male cockroaches were exposed to the same concentration of permethrin at different times in a light-dark cycle, and results showed that the highest resistance occurred at night. Furthermore, the circadian rhythmicity of permethrin susceptibility was demonstrated by the highest resistance at subjective night under constant darkness. The mRNA level of the BgGSTD1 gene in the fat body of B. germanica peaked early in the day or subjective day under light-dark or constant dark conditions, whereas enzyme activity of cytosolic GSTs did not reflect the rhythmic pattern as well as BgGSTD1 expression. RNA interference (RNAi) was employed to study the function of BgGSTD1 in the circadian rhythm of permethrin susceptibility in B. germanica. Both BgGSTD1 mRNA level and cytosolic GSTs activity were significantly decreased by dsGSTD1 injection. In addition, survival of B. germanica with silenced BgGSTD1 was significantly decreased at night but not in the day when the cockroaches were exposed to permethrin. Total cytosolic GSTs activity demonstrated that is not the only gene involved in the circadian regulation of the permethrin resistance, although it is one of the major regulators of permethrin resistance.

  16. Expression of glutathione S-transferases in poplar trees (Populus trichocarpa) exposed to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT).

    PubMed

    Brentner, Laura B; Mukherji, Sachiyo T; Merchie, Kate M; Yoon, Jong Moon; Schnoor, Jerald L; Van Aken, Benoit

    2008-10-01

    Twelve Populus genes were identified from Arabidopsis thaliana sequences previously shown to be induced by exposure to 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Using the resources of the Poplar Genome Project and National Center for Biotechnology Information databases, Populus conserved domains were identified and used to design gene specific primers. RNA extracted from root tissues of TNT-exposed hydroponic poplar plants was used to quantify the expression of genes by reverse-transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cyclophilin and 18S ribosomal DNA genes were used as internal standards. Exposure to TNT resulted in a significant increase of gene expression of two glutathione S-transferases (GST), peaking at levels of 25.0 +/- 13.1 and 10 +/- 0.7 fold the expression level of non-exposed plants after 24 h for each of the GST genes, respectively. This paper demonstrates the use of functional genomics information from the model plant species, Arabidopsis, to identify genes which may be important in detoxification of TNT in the model phytoremediation species, Populus trichocarpa.

  17. Pi class glutathione S-transferase genes are regulated by Nrf 2 through an evolutionarily conserved regulatory element in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takafumi; Takagi, Yaeko; Osanai, Hitoshi; Li, Li; Takeuchi, Miki; Katoh, Yasutake; Kobayashi, Makoto; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2005-01-01

    Pi class GSTs (glutathione S-transferases) are a member of the vertebrate GST family of proteins that catalyse the conjugation of GSH to electrophilic compounds. The expression of Pi class GST genes can be induced by exposure to electrophiles. We demonstrated previously that the transcription factor Nrf 2 (NF-E2 p45-related factor 2) mediates this induction, not only in mammals, but also in fish. In the present study, we have isolated the genomic region of zebrafish containing the genes gstp1 and gstp2. The regulatory regions of zebrafish gstp1 and gstp2 have been examined by GFP (green fluorescent protein)-reporter gene analyses using microinjection into zebrafish embryos. Deletion and point-mutation analyses of the gstp1 promoter showed that an ARE (antioxidant-responsive element)-like sequence is located 50 bp upstream of the transcription initiation site which is essential for Nrf 2 transactivation. Using EMSA (electrophoretic mobility-shift assay) analysis we showed that zebrafish Nrf 2–MafK heterodimer specifically bound to this sequence. All the vertebrate Pi class GST genes harbour a similar ARE-like sequence in their promoter regions. We propose that this sequence is a conserved target site for Nrf 2 in the Pi class GST genes. PMID:15654768

  18. Computational QM/MM Study of the Reaction Mechanism of Human Glutathione S-Transferase A3-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Stenta, Marco; Altoè, Piero; Bottoni, Andrea; Garavelli, Marco; Spinelli, Domenico

    2007-12-01

    Human Glutathione S-Transferase A3-3(hGSTA3-3) is the most efficient human steroid double-bond isomerase enzyme. It catalyzes the double bond isomerization of Δ5-androstene-3,17-dione (Δ5-AD) and Δ5-pregnene-3,20-dione (Δ5-PD). The isomerization products are the precursors of the steroid hormones testosterone and progesterone. We have carried out a QM/MM study to elucidate some interesting aspects of the enzyme catalytic mechanism. In particular, we have analyzed either a concerted or a stepwise reaction path. Moreover, we have attempted to rationalize the electrostatic effects on the catalytic activity of the residues surrounding the active site. Specifically, we have performed a "finger print" analysis to determine the electrostatic contribution of each aminoacid residue to the global electrostatic term, thus ranking the effect of the various aminoacids in the course of the reaction. In this way, we have highlighted the most important terms affecting the stabilization-destabilization of the enzyme.

  19. Polymorphisms and allele frequencies of glutathione S-transferases A1 and P1 genes in the Polish population.

    PubMed

    Skrzypczak-Zielinska, M; Zakerska-Banaszak, O; Tamowicz, B; Sobieraj, I; Drweska-Matelska, N; Szalata, M; Slomski, R; Mikstacki, A

    2015-03-31

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) A1 and P1 are crucial enzymes involved in the biotransformation of drugs, carcinogens, and toxins, and their activity may influence drug response, susceptibility to diseases, and carcinogenesis. The genes encoding these enzymes, GSTA1 and GSTP1, have been examined in many studies because of their genetic variability, which may affect enzymatic activity. The goal of this study was to determine the distribution of the alleles GSTA1*A/*B and GSTP1*A, *B, and *C in the Polish population. A total of 160 subjects from the Polish population were genotyped for 2 polymorphisms (I105V and A114V) in the GSTP1 gene using pyrosequencing. The promoter region of the GSTA1 gene was screened using sequencing. The detected variants were subjected to haplotype analysis. We found that the distribution of the alleles GSTA1*A/*B and GSTP1*A, *B, and *C in the Polish population correspond to the results of studies in Caucasians. Furthermore, we identified additional single nucleotide polymorphisms, excluding 3 well-known changes (G-52A, C-69T, T-567G), which are linked to alleles GSTA1*A/*B, that affect enzyme activity. A total of 4 haplotypes were identified in 160 Polish individuals.

  20. Cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in pediatric solid tumors: the role of glutathione S-transferases and megalin genetic polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Choeyprasert, Worawut; Sawangpanich, Rachchadol; Lertsukprasert, Krisna; Udomsubpayakul, Umaporn; Songdej, Duantida; Unurathapan, Usanarat; Pakakasama, Samart; Hongeng, Suradej

    2013-05-01

    Cisplatin-induced ototoxicity, an important dose-limiting side effect, has proven high interindividual variability. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are isoenzymes involved in cellular detoxification processes. Megalin has been demonstrated to bind aminoglycosides, known to be similar to cisplatin for their ototoxicity. The GSTs and megalin expression is genetically polymorphic, which might be responsible for the variability in cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. The genotyping of GSTM1, GSTT1 polymorphisms, and 2 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at megalin genes, rs2075252 and rs2228171, were performed in 68 children diagnosed with solid tumors who received cisplatin-based chemotherapy. After the end of treatment, audiometry demonstrated hearing loss in 79.4% of patients according to Brock classification. The cumulative cisplatin dose >400 mg/m is associated with increased risk of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity [odds ratio (OR), 17.5; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.09-98.62]. GSTT1 wild genotype and C-allele of rs2228171 SNPs of megalin gene occurred with higher frequency in patients with ototoxicity (P=0.023; OR, 10; 95% CI, 1.80-56.00 and P=0.034; OR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.22-5.82, respectively). In conclusion, our results suggested that GSTT1 wild genotype and C-allele of rs2228171 SNPs might be risk factors for ototoxicity. The cumulative cisplatin dose <400 mg/m should be beneficial in order to ameliorate ototoxicity.

  1. Genetic Polymorphism of the Glutathione S-Transferase M1 and T1 Genes in Three Distinct Arab Populations

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Abdel Halim; Yaqoob, Alaeddin; Ali, Muhalab; Handu, Shailandra; Fadel, Raouf; Abu-Hijleh, Marwan; Almawi, Wassim

    2011-01-01

    Deletion polymorphisms for the glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene are associated with increased risk of cancer, and are implicated in detoxifying mutagenic electrophilic compounds. GST Polymorphic variants were reported for different populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequencies of GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes among Bahraini, Lebanese and Tunisian Arabs. GST genotyping was done by multiplex PCR-based methods. Study subjects comprised 167 Bahrainis, 141 Lebanese and 186 Tunisians unrelated healthy individuals. GSTM1 deletion homozygosity of 49.7%, 52.5% and 63.4% were recorded for Bahraini, Lebanese and Tunisians, respectively. Among Bahrainis, the prevalence of GSTT1 null homozygotes was 28.7%, while in higher rates were seen in Lebanese (37.6%) and Tunisians (37.1%). Our results indicate that there are no major differences in allelic distribution of GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes between the three Arab populations investigated except between Bahrainis and Tunisians regarding the allelic distribution of GSTM1 gene (P = 0.013). Combined analysis of both genes revealed that 14.4% of Bahrainis, 16.3% of Lebanese and 21.0% of Tunisians harbor the deleted genotype of both genes. This is the first study that addresses GST gene polymorphism in Bahraini and Lebanese Arabs, and will help genetic studies on the association of GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms with disease risks and drug effects in Arab populations. PMID:22048273

  2. Glutathione S-transferase (placental) as a marker of transformation in the human cervix uteri: an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed Central

    Randall, B. J.; Angus, B.; Akiba, R.; Hall, A.; Cattan, A. R.; Proctor, S. J.; Jones, R. A.; Horne, C. H.

    1990-01-01

    Using an indirect immunohistochemical technique on paraffin sections, employing a polyclonal antibody to the acidic (placental) form of glutathione-S-transferase (GST), we have evaluated cytoplasmic and nuclear staining in a series of 67 cervical biopsies including normal non neoplastic tissue, immature squamous metaplasia, all grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive carcinomas of keratinising and non-keratinising types. No differences in cytoplasmic staining between the varied lesions studied were seen. However, there were marked differences in nuclear staining. While normal non-neoplastic stratified squamous epithelium showed weak staining of the lower one-third of the epithelium only, in immature squamous metaplasia and in all grades of CIN there was intense nuclear staining in all layers of the epithelium. Invasive carcinomas showed generally less intense nuclear staining than CIN lesions. Endocervical cell nuclei also showed intense nuclear staining. These findings indicate that GST is of limited use as a marker of transformation in the human cervix uteri. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2223578

  3. Protective effect of glutathione S-transferase-fused mutant staphylococcal enterotoxin C against Staphylococcus aureus-induced bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jing-Chun; Zhang, Bao-Jun; Lin, Yan-Chun; Wang, Quan-Kai; Qian, Ai-Dong; Nakane, Akio; Hu, Dong-Liang; Tong, Guang-Zhi

    2010-05-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated that immunization with nontoxic mutant staphylococcal enterotoxin C (mSEC) provides protection against Staphylococcus aureus infection in mouse models. In the present study, we investigated whether vaccination with a glutathione S-transferase-fused SEC (GST-mSEC) can protect against S. aureus-induced bovine mastitis. Cows were immunized with the GST-mSEC plus alum adjuvant and then challenged with viable S. aureus by an intramammary route. The results showed that immunization with GST-mSEC-induced production of SEC-specific antibodies in sera and the high titers of antibodies could persist for over 12 weeks. Importantly, immunization with GST-mSEC also induced production of SEC-specific antibodies in milk. The somatic cell counts in the milk from S. aureus challenged quarters of vaccinated lactating cows were significantly lower than those of the non-vaccinated control animals. Furthermore, the sera from GST-mSEC-immunized cows significantly inhibited interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production from mouse spleen cells induced by wild-type SEC. These results suggest that vaccination with GST-mSEC provides protection against S. aureus-induced bovine mastitis and that the protection might be mediated by SEC-neutralizing antibodies. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Changes in the swimming activity and the glutathione S-transferase activity of Jenynsia multidentata fed with microcystin-RR.

    PubMed

    Cazenave, Jimena; Nores, María L; Miceli, Martín; Díaz, María P; Wunderlin, Daniel A; Bistoni, María A

    2008-02-01

    We report the effects of sublethal doses of microcystin-RR (MC-RR) on the swimming activity of Jenynsia multidentata as well as the simultaneous response of its detoxication system by measuring glutathion S-transferase (GST) activities in the liver and brain of fish. MC-RR was applied on the food pellets at doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1 microg g(-1). Swimming activity was recorded 10 min each hour over 24h by using a computer-based image processing system, which facilitates quantification of two measures of fish swimming behaviour (average velocity, movement percentage). Results show that low levels of cyanotoxin increased the swimming activity, while the highest dose used produced significant changes with respect to control group only since approximately 20 h of exposure, when the swimming activity was decreased. On the other hand, GST activity was significantly increased only in the liver and brain of fish fed with the highest MC-RR dose. Both results suggest that fish are reacting to the stress caused by low doses of MC-RR by increasing their swimming activity, raising further questions on the probable neurotoxicity of MCs, and presenting the behavioural change as a good biomarker of early toxic stress. On the other hand, fish reduced their swimming speed at the highest MC-RR dose, when the detoxication activity began, which can be hypothesized to be a reallocation of their energy, favouring detoxication over swimming activity.

  5. Molecular Cloning, Characterization and Positively Selected Sites of the Glutathione S-Transferase Family from Locusta migratoria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Qin, Guohua; Li, Daqi; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that are involved in the metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds and are related to insecticide resistance. The purpose of this study was to provide new information on the molecular characteristics and the positive selection of locust GSTs. Based on the transcriptome database, we sequenced 28 cytosolic GSTs and 4 microsomal GSTs from the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria). We assigned the 28 cytosolic GSTs into 6 classes—sigma, epsilon, delta, theta, omega and zeta, and the 4 microsomal GSTs into 2 subclasses—insect and MGST3. The tissue- and stage-expression patterns of the GSTs differed at the mRNA level. Further, the substrate specificities and kinetic constants of the cytosolic GSTs differed markedly at the protein level. The results of likelihood ratio tests provided strong evidence for positive selection in the delta class. The result of Bayes Empirical Bayes analysis identified 4 amino acid sites in the delta class as positive selection sites. These sites were located on the protein surface. Our findings will facilitate the elucidation of the molecular characteristics and evolutionary aspects of insect GST superfamily. PMID:25486043

  6. Identification of a glutathione S-transferase associated with microsomes of tumor cells resistant to nitrogen mustards.

    PubMed

    Clapper, M L; Tew, K D

    1989-06-15

    Walker 256 rat mammary carcinoma cells resistant to chlorambucil (WR) exhibited an approximate 4-fold increase in glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as compared to the sensitive parent cell line (WS). WR cells maintained without biannual exposure to chlorambucil (WRr) reverted to the sensitive phenotype and possessed GST levels equivalent to WS. Mitochondria, microsomes and cytosol were isolated from WS, WR and WRr cell lines and analyzed for their GST composition. GST activity in each subcellular compartment of resistant cells was increased over the sensitive cells. Antibodies raised against total rat liver cytosolic GST crossreacted in resistant cells with two microsomal proteins (25.7 kD and 29 kD). The 29 kD protein was not detected in microsomal fractions from either WS or WRr and this protein was found to be dissimilar from cytosolic GST subunits in its isoelectric point (pI 6.7) and migration on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. In addition, the 29 kD microsome-associated GST from WR cells was immunologically distinct from a 14 kD GST subunit previously identified in rat liver microsomes. These data implicate the induction of a specific microsomal GST subunit in WR cells following drug selection and suggest its potential involvement in the establishment of cellular resistance to chlorambucil.

  7. Modification of the association between maternal smoke exposure and congenital heart defects by polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohong; Liu, Zhen; Deng, Ying; Li, Shengli; Mu, Dezhi; Tian, Xiaoxian; Lin, Yuan; Yang, Jiaxiang; Li, Jun; Li, Nana; Wang, Yanping; Chen, Xinlin; Deng, Kui; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) arise through various combinations of genetic and environmental factors. Our study explores how polymorphisms in the glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes affect the association between cigarette smoke exposure and CHDs. We analysed 299 mothers of children with CHDs and 284 mothers of children without any abnormalities who were recruited from six hospitals. The hair nicotine concentration (HNC) was used to quantify maternal smoke exposure, and the maternal GSTT1, and GSTM1 and GSTP1 genes were sequenced. We found a trend of higher adjusted odds ratios with higher maternal HNC levels, suggesting a dose-response relationship between maternal smoke exposure and CHDs. The lowest HNC range associated with an increased risk of CHDs was 0.213–0.319 ng/mg among the mothers with functional deletions of GSTM1 or GSTT1and 0.319–0.573 ng/mg among the mothers with normal copies of GSTM1 and GSTT1. In addition, the adjusted odds ratio for an HNC of >0.573 ng/mg was 38.53 among the mothers with the GSTP1 AG or GG genotype, which was 7.76 (χ2 = 6.702, p = 0.010) times greater than the AOR in the mothers with GSTP1 AA genotype. Our study suggests that polymorphisms of maternal GST genes may modify the association of maternal smoke exposure with CHDs. PMID:26456689

  8. Suppression of glutathione S-transferase placental form-positive foci development in rat hepatocarcinogenesis by Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    PubMed

    Takekoshi, Hideo; Mizoguchi, Toru; Komasa, Yoko; Chubachi, Hirofumi; Inoue, Yukari; Imanishi, Hideyo; Nakano, Masuo

    2005-08-01

    The modifying effects of dietary administration of dried Chlorella pyrenoidosa powder (C. pyrenoidosa) on the development of glutathione S-transferase placental form-positive foci (GST-P-positive foci), which are putative preneoplastic lesions, in male F344 rats were investigated using a medium-term liver bioassay system. In rats given 10% C. pyrenoidosa in a basal diet, the number and area of GST-P-positive foci in the rat livers, which diethylnitrosamine (DEN) initiated and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f] quinoxaline (MeIQx) promoted, were significantly decreased compared with those fed a basal diet not containing C. pyrenoidosa. The inhibition percentage of the number and area of GST-P-positive foci > or =0.2 mm in diameter was 67.6 and 74.2%, respectively (p<0.01). Furthermore, C. pyrenoidosa significantly decreased the number of GST-P-positive foci induced by MeIQx alone. The inhibition percentage of the number of GST-P-positive foci <0.2 mm in diameter was 52% (p<0.01). These results suggest that C. pyrenoidosa has chemopreventive effects against hepatocarcinogenesis in rats. C. pyrenoidosa appears to be a promising chemopreventive agent for human liver neoplasia and carcinogenesis induced by heterocyclic amines such as MeIQx.

  9. The Glutathione-S-Transferase, Cytochrome P450 and Carboxyl/Cholinesterase Gene Superfamilies in Predatory Mite Metaseiulus occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Marjorie A.

    2016-01-01

    Pesticide-resistant populations of the predatory mite Metaseiulus (= Typhlodromus or Galendromus) occidentalis (Arthropoda: Chelicerata: Acari: Phytoseiidae) have been used in the biological control of pest mites such as phytophagous Tetranychus urticae. However, the pesticide resistance mechanisms in M. occidentalis remain largely unknown. In other arthropods, members of the glutathione-S-transferase (GST), cytochrome P450 (CYP) and carboxyl/cholinesterase (CCE) gene superfamilies are involved in the diverse biological pathways such as the metabolism of xenobiotics (e.g. pesticides) in addition to hormonal and chemosensory processes. In the current study, we report the identification and initial characterization of 123 genes in the GST, CYP and CCE superfamilies in the recently sequenced M. occidentalis genome. The gene count represents a reduction of 35% compared to T. urticae. The distribution of genes in the GST and CCE superfamilies in M. occidentalis differs significantly from those of insects and resembles that of T. urticae. Specifically, we report the presence of the Mu class GSTs, and the J’ and J” clade CCEs that, within the Arthropoda, appear unique to Acari. Interestingly, the majority of CCEs in the J’ and J” clades contain a catalytic triad, suggesting that they are catalytically active. They likely represent two Acari-specific CCE clades that may participate in detoxification of xenobiotics. The current study of genes in these superfamilies provides preliminary insights into the potential molecular components that may be involved in pesticide metabolism as well as hormonal/chemosensory processes in the agriculturally important M. occidentalis. PMID:27467523

  10. Polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase are risk factors for perioperative acute myocardial infarction after cardiac surgery: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Viktória; Gasz, Balazs; Balatonyi, Borbala; Jaromi, Luca; Kisfali, Peter; Borsiczky, Balazs; Jancso, Gabor; Marczin, Nandor; Szabados, Sandor; Melegh, Bela; Nasri, Alotti; Roth, Elisabeth

    2014-04-01

    In the present study we explored glutathione S-transferase (GST) polymorphisms in selected patients who experienced accelerated myocardial injury following open heart surgery and compared these to a control group of patients without postoperative complications. 758 Patients were enrolled from which 132 patients were selected to genotype analysis according to exclusion criteria. Patients were divided into the following groups: Group I: control patients (n = 78) without and Group II.: study patients (n = 54) with evidence of perioperative myocardial infarction. Genotyping for GSTP1 A (Ile105Ile/Ala113Ala), B (Ile105Val/Ala113Ala) and C (Ile105Val/Ala113Val) alleles was performed by using real-time-PCR. The heterozygous AC allele was nearly three times elevated (18.5 vs. 7.7 %) in the patients who suffered postoperative myocardial infarction compared to controls. Contrary, we found allele frequency of 14.1 % for homozygous BB allele in the control group whereas no such allele combination was present in the study group. These preliminary results may suggest the protective role for the B and C alleles during myocardial oxidative stress whereas the A allele may represent predisposing risk for cellular injury in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  11. Overexpression and amplification of glutathione S-transferase pi gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Pavelic, Z P; Li, Y; Gleich, L; Gartside, P S; Pavelic, L; Gluckman, J L; Stambrook, P J

    1997-01-01

    Human glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) may serve as a useful tumor marker because of the high frequency with which it is found in elevated levels in several tumor types. To determine whether GST-pi is useful as an indicator for cancers of the head and neck, expression of GST-pi mRNA was investigated by Northern analysis in this tumor type. Overexpression of GST-pi mRNA was detected in 9 of 36 (25%) primary head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). When Southern blot analysis was used to examine the relationship between overexpression and amplification of the GST-pi gene, only 3 of 36 tumors (8%) showed GST-pi gene amplification. Thus, gene amplification is not critical to GST-pi mRNA overexpression in HNSCCs. Moderately and poorly differentiated HNSCCs tended to manifest elevated GST-pi mRNA compared with well differentiated tumors (30% for moderately and poorly differentiated tumors versus none of the well differentiated tumors examined). However, there was no significant correlation between GST-% mRNA overexpression and clinical stage, T stage (tumor size), N stage (neck nodal status), pathological nodes, or patient survival.

  12. Glutathione S-transferase gene variations influence BU pharmacokinetics and outcome of hematopoietic SCT in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M; Rezgui, M A; Théoret, Y; Uppugunduri, C R S; Mezziani, S; Vachon, M-F; Desjean, C; Rousseau, J; Labuda, M; Przybyla, C; Duval, M; Champagne, M; Peters, C; Bittencourt, H; Krajinovic, M

    2013-07-01

    BU is a key compound of conditioning regimens in children undergoing hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). Inter-individual differences in BU pharmacokinetics (PKs) might affect BU efficacy and toxicity. As BU is mainly metabolized by glutathione S-transferase (GST), we investigated the relationship between GSTA1, GSTM1 and GSTP1 genotypes with first-dose BU PKs, and the relationship with HSCT outcomes in 69 children receiving myeloablative conditioning regimen. GSTM1 null genotype correlated with higher BU exposure and lower clearance in patients older than 4 years (P ≤ 0.04). In accordance with the suggested functional role, GSTA1*A2 haplotype was associated with lower drug levels and higher drug clearance (P ≤ 0.03). Gene-dosage effect was also observed (P ≤ 0.007). GSTA1 haplotypes were associated with HSCT outcomes. Patients with two copies of haplotype *A2 had better event free survival (P=0.03). In contrast, homozygous individuals for haplotypes *B and *B1 had higher occurrence of veno-occlusive disease (P=0.009). GSTM1 null individuals older than 4 years had more frequently graft versus host disease (P=0.03). In conclusion, we showed that GST gene variants influence BU PK and outcomes of HSCT in children. A model for the dosage adjustment with the inclusion of genetic and non-genetic factors should be evaluated in a future prospective validation cohort.

  13. Glutathione S-transferase iso-enzymes in perfusate from pumped kidneys are associated with delayed graft function.

    PubMed

    Hall, I E; Bhangoo, R S; Reese, P P; Doshi, M D; Weng, F L; Hong, K; Lin, H; Han, G; Hasz, R D; Goldstein, M J; Schröppel, B; Parikh, C R

    2014-04-01

    Accurate and reliable assessment tools are needed in transplantation. The objective of this prospective, multi-center study was to determine the associations of the alpha and pi iso-enzymes of glutathione S-transferase (GST), measured from perfusate solution at the start and end (base and post) of kidney allograft machine perfusion, with subsequent delayed graft function (DGF). We also compared GST iso-enzyme perfusate levels from discarded versus transplanted kidneys. A total of 428 kidneys were linked to outcomes as recorded by the United Network of Organ Sharing. DGF, defined as any dialysis in the first week of transplant, occurred in 141 recipients (32%). Alpha- and pi-GST levels significantly increased during machine perfusion. The adjusted relative risks (95% confidence interval) of DGF with each log-unit increase in base and post pi-GST were 1.14 (1.0-1.3) and 1.36 (1.1-1.8), respectively. Alpha-GST was not independently associated with DGF. There were no significant differences in GST values between discarded and transplanted kidneys, though renal resistance was significantly higher in discarded kidneys. We found pi-GST at the end of machine perfusion to be independently associated with DGF. Further studies should elucidate the utility of GST for identifying injured kidneys with regard to organ allocation, discard and recipient management decisions.

  14. Variants of glutathione s-transferase pi 1 exhibit differential enzymatic activity and inhibition by heavy metals

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich, Jaclyn M.; Basu, Niladri

    2012-01-01

    Nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in glutathione s-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1; Ile/Val 105, Ala/Val 114) have been associated with altered toxicant metabolism in epidemiological cohorts. We explored the impact of GSTP1 genotype on enzyme kinetics and heavy metal inhibition in vitro. Four GSTP1 allozymes (105/114: Ile/Ala, Val/Ala, Ile/Val, Val/Val) were expressed in and purified from E. coli. Enzyme activity assays quantifying the rate of glutathione conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) revealed significant differences in kinetic parameters depending on genotype (p<0.01). Allozymes with Ile105 had better catalytic efficiency and greater affinity for CDNB (mean ±SEM: Ile105 Ala114 Km= 0.33±0.07 mM vs. Val105 Ala114 Km=1.15±0.07 mM). Inhibition of GSTP1 activity by heavy metals was assessed following treatment with mercury (inorganic- HgCl2, methylmercury- MeHg), selenium, cadmium, lead, arsenic, and manganese. All allozymes were inhibited by HgCl2 (IC50 range: 24.1–172 μM), MeHg (93.9–480 μM), and selenium (43.7–62.8 μM). Genotype significantly influenced the potency of mercury with GSTP1 Ile105 Val114 the least sensitive and Val105 Ala114 the most sensitive to inhibition by HgCl2 and MeHg. Overall, genotype of two nonsynonymous polymorphisms in GSTP1 influenced enzyme kinetics pertaining to an electrophilic substrate and inhibition by two mercury species. PMID:22401947

  15. Dual protective role for glutathione S-transferase class pi against VCD-induced ovotoxicity in the rat ovary.

    PubMed

    Keating, Aileen F; Sen, Nivedita; Sipes, I Glenn; Hoyer, Patricia B

    2010-09-01

    The occupational chemical 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) selectively destroys ovarian small pre-antral follicles in rats and mice via apoptosis. Detoxification of VCD can occur through glutathione conjugation, catalyzed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes. Further, GST class pi (GSTp) can negatively regulate JNK activity through protein:protein interactions in extra-ovarian tissues. Dissociation of this protein complex in the face of chemical exposure releases the inhibition of pro-apoptotic JNK. Increased JNK activity during VCD-induced ovotoxicity has been shown in isolated ovarian small pre-antral follicles following in vivo dosing of rats (80mg/kg/day; 15days, i.p.). The present study investigated the pattern of ovarian GSTp expression during VCD exposure. Additionally, the effect of VCD on an ovarian GSTp:JNK protein complex was investigated. PND4 F344 rat ovaries were incubated in control medium+/-VCD (30muM) for 2-8days. VCD increased ovarian GSTp mRNA (P <0.05) relative to control on d4-d8; whereas GSTp protein was increased (P<0.05) on d6-d8. A GSTp:JNK protein complex was detected by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting in ovarian tissues. Relative to control, the amount of GSTp-bound JNK was increased (P=0.09), while unbound JNK was decreased (P<0.05) on d6 of VCD exposure. The VCD-induced decrease in unbound JNK was preceded by a decrease in phosphorylated c-Jun which occurred on d4. These findings are in support of a possible dual protective role for GSTp in the rat ovary, consisting of metabolism of VCD and inhibition of JNK-initiated apoptosis.

  16. Influence of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) inhibition on lung epithelial cell injury: role of oxidative stress and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Marianne E; Boshier, Piers R; Wakabayashi, Kenji; Keun, Hector C; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Kirkham, Paul A; Adcock, Ian M; Barton, Paul J; Takata, Masao; Marczin, Nandor

    2015-06-15

    Oxidant-mediated tissue injury is key to the pathogenesis of acute lung injury. Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are important detoxifying enzymes that catalyze the conjugation of glutathione with toxic oxidant compounds and are associated with acute and chronic inflammatory lung diseases. We hypothesized that attenuation of cellular GST enzymes would augment intracellular oxidative and metabolic stress and induce lung cell injury. Treatment of murine lung epithelial cells with GST inhibitors, ethacrynic acid (EA), and caffeic acid compromised lung epithelial cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. These inhibitors also potentiated cell injury induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), tert-butyl-hydroperoxide, and hypoxia and reoxygenation (HR). SiRNA-mediated attenuation of GST-π but not GST-μ expression reduced cell viability and significantly enhanced stress (H2O2/HR)-induced injury. GST inhibitors also induced intracellular oxidative stress (measured by dihydrorhodamine 123 and dichlorofluorescein fluorescence), caused alterations in overall intracellular redox status (as evidenced by NAD(+)/NADH ratios), and increased protein carbonyl formation. Furthermore, the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine completely prevented EA-induced oxidative stress and cytotoxicity. Whereas EA had no effect on mitochondrial energetics, it significantly altered cellular metabolic profile. To explore the physiological impact of these cellular events, we used an ex vivo mouse-isolated perfused lung model. Supplementation of perfusate with EA markedly affected lung mechanics and significantly increased lung permeability. The results of our combined genetic, pharmacological, and metabolic studies on multiple platforms suggest the importance of GST enzymes, specifically GST-π, in the cellular and whole lung response to acute oxidative and metabolic stress. These may have important clinical implications. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Sulfur amino acid restriction induces the pi class of glutathione S-transferase expression in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chen, Haw-Wen; Yang, Jaw-Ji; Liu, Kai-Li; Lii, Chong-Kuei

    2005-05-01

    The regulation of genes by amino acids is attracting increasing attention. In the present study, we investigated the restriction of expression of the pi class of glutathione S-transferase (GST Yp) by sulfur amino acids. Hepatocytes isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured with L-15-based medium containing low (LSAA; 0.1 mmol/L L-methionine and 0.1 mmol/L L-cysteine) or high (HSAA; 0.5 mmol/L L-methionine and 0.2 mmol/L L-cysteine) amounts of sulfur amino acids for up to 6 d. Cellular protein contents did not differ between LSAA- and HSAA-treated cells over the entire period. In contrast, glutathione concentrations were suppressed by the LSAA medium and on d 6 were only 20% of those of HSAA-treated cells (P < 0.05). As shown by immunoblot analysis, GST Yp protein levels were greater in LSAA-treated cells than in HSAA-treated cells (P < 0.05). The induction of GST Yp by L-methionine and L-cysteine restriction was not affected by insulin and dexamethasone, but the latter suppressed GST Yp expression (P < 0.05). LSAA increased GST Yp mRNA levels and GST activity toward ethacrynic acid (P < 0.05). GST Yp induction occurred only in cells with a limited supply of L-methionine; restriction of L-isoleucine, L-leucine, L-lysine, and L-phenylalanine had no significant effect. In contrast with the induction of GST Yp, the expression of the GST isoforms Ya and Yb was not changed by amino acid restriction. In conclusion, hepatic GST Yp gene expression is upregulated by a limited availability of sulfur amino acids.

  18. A glutathione S-transferase regulated by light and hormones participates in the modulation of Arabidopsis seedling development.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han-Wei; Liu, Ming-Jung; Chen, Ing-Chien; Huang, Chiung-Huei; Chao, Li-Ya; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang

    2010-12-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) have been well documented to be involved in diverse aspects of biotic and abiotic stresses, especially detoxification processes. Whether they regulate plant development remains unclear. Here, we report on our isolation by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of a plant GST, AtGSTU17, from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and demonstrate that its expression is regulated by multiple photoreceptors, especially phytochrome A (phyA) under all light conditions. Further physiological studies indicated that AtGSTU17 participates in various aspects of seedling development, including hypocotyl elongation, anthocyanin accumulation, and far-red light-mediated inhibition of greening with a requirement of functional phyA. The loss-of-function mutant of AtGSTU17 (atgstu17) resulted in reduced biomass of seedlings and number of lateral roots in the presence of auxin, as well as insensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated inhibition of root elongation, with similarity to different phyA mutant alleles. Moreover, the root phenotype conferred by atgstu17 was reflected by histochemical β-glucuronidase staining of AtGSTU17 promoter activity with the addition of auxin or ABA. Further microarray analysis of wild-type Columbia and atgstu17 seedlings treated with far-red irradiation or ABA revealed that AtGSTU17 might modulate hypocotyl elongation by positively regulating some light-signaling components and negatively regulating a group of auxin-responsive genes and modulate root development by negatively controlling an auxin transport protein in the presence of ABA. Therefore, our data reveal that AtGSTU17 participates in light signaling and might modulate various aspects of Arabidopsis development by affecting glutathione pools via a coordinated regulation with phyA and phytohormones.

  19. Organ-Specific Expression of Glutathione S-Transferases and the Efficacy of Herbicide Safeners in Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    DeRidder, Ben P.; Goldsbrough, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    The functions of plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) under normal growth conditions are poorly understood, but their activity as detoxification enzymes has been harnessed in agriculture for selective weed control. Herbicide safeners protect monocot crops from herbicide injury but have little effect on weedy monocot or dicot species. Protection by safeners is associated with expression of herbicide-metabolizing enzymes including GSTs, but the basis for selective action of safeners between monocots and dicots is not known. To address this question we have studied the response of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to various safeners. Benoxacor, fenclorim, and fluxofenim did not protect Arabidopsis from herbicide injury but did induce RNA expression of the glutathione-conjugate transporters encoded by AtMRP1, AtMRP2, AtMRP3, and AtMRP4. These safeners also induced the organ-specific expression of AtGSTU19 and AtGSTF2, two previously characterized Arabidopsis GSTs from different classes of this enzyme family. RNA hybridization, immunoblot, and reporter gene analyses indicated expression of AtGSTU19 induced by safeners predominated in roots. To test the hypothesis that increased expression of AtGSTU19 would be sufficient to provide tolerance to chloroacetamide herbicides, a chimeric gene was produced containing the open reading frame for this GST driven by a constitutive promoter. Plants containing this transgene had a modest increase in AtGSTU19 protein, predominantly in roots, but this had no effect on tolerance to chloroacetamide herbicides. The localized induction of GSTs by safeners in roots of Arabidopsis may explain why these compounds are unable to provide herbicide tolerance to dicot plant species. PMID:16361527

  20. Organ-specific expression of glutathione S-transferases and the efficacy of herbicide safeners in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    DeRidder, Ben P; Goldsbrough, Peter B

    2006-01-01

    The functions of plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) under normal growth conditions are poorly understood, but their activity as detoxification enzymes has been harnessed in agriculture for selective weed control. Herbicide safeners protect monocot crops from herbicide injury but have little effect on weedy monocot or dicot species. Protection by safeners is associated with expression of herbicide-metabolizing enzymes including GSTs, but the basis for selective action of safeners between monocots and dicots is not known. To address this question we have studied the response of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) to various safeners. Benoxacor, fenclorim, and fluxofenim did not protect Arabidopsis from herbicide injury but did induce RNA expression of the glutathione-conjugate transporters encoded by AtMRP1, AtMRP2, AtMRP3, and AtMRP4. These safeners also induced the organ-specific expression of AtGSTU19 and AtGSTF2, two previously characterized Arabidopsis GSTs from different classes of this enzyme family. RNA hybridization, immunoblot, and reporter gene analyses indicated expression of AtGSTU19 induced by safeners predominated in roots. To test the hypothesis that increased expression of AtGSTU19 would be sufficient to provide tolerance to chloroacetamide herbicides, a chimeric gene was produced containing the open reading frame for this GST driven by a constitutive promoter. Plants containing this transgene had a modest increase in AtGSTU19 protein, predominantly in roots, but this had no effect on tolerance to chloroacetamide herbicides. The localized induction of GSTs by safeners in roots of Arabidopsis may explain why these compounds are unable to provide herbicide tolerance to dicot plant species.

  1. Characterization of rat pancreatic glutathione S-transferases by chromatofocusing, reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    March, T H; Jeffery, E H; Wallig, M A

    1998-10-01

    The cytosolic glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a family of phase II detoxifying isoenzymes that catalyze the interaction of the tripeptide thiol glutathione (GSH) with a wide variety of reactive and often toxic or carcinogenic electrophilic substrates. Pancreatic GSTs, however, have only been partially characterized. In this study, pancreatic cytosolic GSTs from male Fisher 344 rats were semipurified by affinity chromatography and then analyzed for isoenzyme content by chromatofocusing (fast protein liquid chromatography) and for subunit content by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. In addition, polyclonal rabbit antisera were produced against homodimeric isoenzymes purified from rat liver and kidney, including the alpha class isoenzymes 1-1 and 2-2, the mu class isoenzyme 4-4, and the pi class isoenzyme 7-7. These antisera were used in immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the distribution of the pancreatic GSTs. A range of 0.5-1.6% of the total protein in rat pancreatic cytosol was found to be GST protein. The most abundant subunits present were the pi subunit 7 and mu subunits 3 and 4. Using modified methodology, smaller amounts of the alpha subunit 2 and the mu subunit 6 were detected, whereas very small amounts of the alpha subunits 1 and 8 were present. The IHC demonstrated that the GSTs were in large part limited to the duct system of the exocrine pancreas, with positive staining of endothelial cells and stroma observed for the alpha and mu subunits. Isoenzymes containing the alpha subunit 2 were preferentially expressed in centroacinar cells and small ductules, whereas those containing the mu subunit 4 and the pi subunit 7 were more prevalent within larger ductules and ducts. The lumens of the largest ducts also contained the two subunits 4 and 7. It is concluded that the acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas may lack the protection against electrophilic toxic and

  2. Dual localization of glutathione S-transferase in the cytosol and mitochondria: implications in oxidative stress, toxicity and disease.

    PubMed

    Raza, Haider

    2011-11-01

    Glutathione (GSH) conjugating enzymes, glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), are present in different subcellular compartments including cytosol, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and plasma membrane. The regulation and function of GSTs have implications in cell growth, oxidative stress as well as disease progression and prevention. Of the several mitochondria localized forms, GSTK (GST kappa) is mitochondria-specific since it contains N-terminal canonical and cleavable mitochondria targeting signals. Other forms like GST alpha, mu and pi purified from mitochondria are similar to the cytosolic molecular forms or 'echoproteins'. Altered GST expression has been implicated in hepatic, cardiac and neurological diseases. Mitochondria-specific GSTK has also been implicated in obesity, diabetes and related metabolic disorders. Studies have shown that silencing the GSTA4 (GST alpha) gene resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, as was also seen in GSTA4 null mice, which could contribute to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. This review highlights the significance of the mitochondrial GST pool, particularly the mechanism and significance of dual targeting of GSTA4-4 under in vitro and in vivo conditions. GSTA4-4 is targeted in the mitochondria by activation of the internal cryptic signal present at the C-terminus of the protein by protein-kinase-dependent phosphorylation and cytosolic heat shock protein (Hsp70) chaperone. Mitochondrial GST pi, on the other hand, has been shown to have two uncleaved cryptic signals rich in positively charged amino acids at the N-terminal region. Both physiological and pathophysiological implications of GST translocation to mitochondria are discussed in the review.

  3. Dual protective role for Glutathione S-transferase class pi against VCD-induced ovotoxicity in the rat ovary

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Aileen F.; Sen, Nivedita; Sipes, I. Glenn; Hoyer, Patricia B.

    2010-09-01

    The occupational chemical 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) selectively destroys ovarian small pre-antral follicles in rats and mice via apoptosis. Detoxification of VCD can occur through glutathione conjugation, catalyzed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes. Further, GST class pi (GSTp) can negatively regulate JNK activity through protein:protein interactions in extra-ovarian tissues. Dissociation of this protein complex in the face of chemical exposure releases the inhibition of pro-apoptotic JNK. Increased JNK activity during VCD-induced ovotoxicity has been shown in isolated ovarian small pre-antral follicles following in vivo dosing of rats (80 mg/kg/day; 15 days, i.p.). The present study investigated the pattern of ovarian GSTp expression during VCD exposure. Additionally, the effect of VCD on an ovarian GSTp:JNK protein complex was investigated. PND4 F344 rat ovaries were incubated in control medium {+-} VCD (30 {mu}M) for 2-8 days. VCD increased ovarian GSTp mRNA (P < 0.05) relative to control on d4-d8; whereas GSTp protein was increased (P < 0.05) on d6-d8. A GSTp:JNK protein complex was detected by immunoprecipitation and Western blotting in ovarian tissues. Relative to control, the amount of GSTp-bound JNK was increased (P = 0.09), while unbound JNK was decreased (P < 0.05) on d6 of VCD exposure. The VCD-induced decrease in unbound JNK was preceded by a decrease in phosphorylated c-Jun which occurred on d4. These findings are in support of a possible dual protective role for GSTp in the rat ovary, consisting of metabolism of VCD and inhibition of JNK-initiated apoptosis.

  4. The metabolic bioactivation of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) mediated by tyrosinase selectively inhibits glutathione S-transferase

    PubMed Central

    Kudugunti, Shashi K.; Thorsheim, Helen; Yousef, Mohammad S.; Guan, Lan; Moridani, Majid Y.

    2011-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) play major roles in drug resistance in melanoma. In this study, we investigated caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) as a selective GST inhibitor in the presence of tyrosinase, which is abundant in melanoma cells. Tyrosinase bioactivates CAPE to an o-quinone, which reacts with glutathione to form CAPE-SG conjugate. Our findings indicate that 90% CAPE was metabolized by tyrosinase after a 60-min incubation. LC–MS/MS analyses identified a CAPE-SG conjugate as a major metabolite. In the presence of tyrosinase, CAPE (10–25 µM) showed 70–84% GST inhibition; whereas in the absence of tyrosinase, CAPE did not inhibit GST. CAPE-SG conjugate and CAPE-quinone (25 µM) demonstrated ≥85% GST inhibition via reversible and irreversible mechanisms, respectively. Comparing with CDNB and GSH, the non-substrate CAPE acted as a weak, reversible GST inhibitor at concentrations >50 µM. Furthermore, MK-571, a selective MRP inhibitor, and probenecid, a non-selective MRP inhibitor, decrease the IC50 of CAPE (15 µM) by 13% and 21%, apoptotic cell death by 3% and 13%, and mitochondrial membrane potential in human SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells by 10% and 56%, respectively. Moreover, computational docking analyses suggest that CAPE binds to the GST catalytic active site. Caffeic acid, a hydrolyzed product of CAPE, showed a similar GST inhibition in the presence of tyrosinase. Although, as controls, 4-hydroxyanisole and l-tyrosine were metabolized by tyrosinase to form quinones and glutathione conjugates, they exhibited no GST inhibition in the absence and presence of tyrosinase. In conclusion, both CAPE and caffeic acid selectively inhibited GST in the presence of tyrosinase. Our results suggest that intracellularly formed quinones and glutathione conjugates of caffeic acid and CAPE may play major roles in the selective inhibition of GST in SK-MEL-28 melanoma cells. Moreover, the inhibition of MRP

  5. Synthesis and glutathione S-transferase structure-affinity relationships of nonpeptide and peptidase-stable glutathione analogues.

    PubMed

    Klotz, P; Slaoui-Hasnaoui, A; Banères, J L; Duckert, J F; Rossi, J C; Kerbal, A

    1998-06-18

    A series of nonpeptidic glutathione analogues where the peptide bonds were replaced by simple carbon-carbon bonds or isosteric E double bonds were prepared. The optimal length for the two alkyl chains on either side of the mercaptomethyl group was evaluated using structure-affinity relationships. Affinities of the analogues 14a-f, 23, and 25 were evaluated for a recombinant GST enzyme using a new affinity chromatography method previously developed in our laboratory. Analysis of these analogues gives an additional understanding for GST affinity requirements: (a) the carbon skeleton must conserve that of glutathione since analogue 14a showed the best affinity (IC50 = 5.2 microM); (b) the GST G site is not able to accommodate a chain length elongation of one methylene group (no affinity for analogues 14c,f); (c) a one-methylene group chain length reduction is tolerated, much more for the "Glu side" (14d, IC50 = 10.1 microM) than for the "Gly side" (14b, IC50 = 1800 microM); (d) the mercaptomethyl group must remain at position 5 as shown from the null affinity of the 6-mercaptomethyl analogue 14e; (e) the additional peptide isosteric E double bond (25) or hydroxyl derivative (23) in 14e did not help to retrieve affinity. This work reveals useful information for the design of new selective nonpeptidic and peptidase-stable glutathione analogues.

  6. Enantioselective induction of a glutathione-S-transferase, a glutathione transporter and an ABC transporter in maize by Metolachlor and its (S)-isomer.

    PubMed

    Pang, Sen; Ran, Zhaojin; Liu, Zhiqian; Song, Xiaoyu; Duan, Liusheng; Li, Xuefeng; Wang, Chengju

    2012-01-01

    The metabolism of chiral herbicides in plants remains poorly understood. Glutathione conjugation reactions are one of the principal mechanisms that plants utilize to detoxify xenobiotics. The induction by rac- and S-metolachlor of the expression of three genes, ZmGST27, ZmGT1 and ZmMRP1, encoding respectively a glutathione-S-transferase, a glutathione transporter and an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter was studied in maize. The results demonstrate that the inducing effect of rac- and S-metolachlor on the expression of ZmGST27 and ZmGT1 is comparable. However, the inducing effect of rac-metolachlor on ZmMRP1 expression is more pronounced than that of S-metolachlor. Furthermore, vanadate, an ABC transporter inhibitor, could greatly reduce the difference in herbicidal activity between rac- and S-metolachlor. These results suggest that the ABC transporters may preferentially transport conjugates of rac-metolachlor, leading to a faster metabolism of the latter. Through comparing the expression of ZmGST27, ZmMRP1 and ZmGT1 after treatment by rac- and S-metolachlor, we provide novel insights into the metabolic processes of chiral herbicides in plants.

  7. Enantioselective Induction of a Glutathione-S-Transferase, a Glutathione Transporter and an ABC Transporter in Maize by Metolachlor and Its (S)-Isomer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiqian; Song, Xiaoyu; Duan, Liusheng; Li, Xuefeng; Wang, Chengju

    2012-01-01

    The metabolism of chiral herbicides in plants remains poorly understood. Glutathione conjugation reactions are one of the principal mechanisms that plants utilize to detoxify xenobiotics. The induction by rac- and S-metolachlor of the expression of three genes, ZmGST27, ZmGT1 and ZmMRP1, encoding respectively a glutathione-S-transferase, a glutathione transporter and an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter was studied in maize. The results demonstrate that the inducing effect of rac- and S-metolachlor on the expression of ZmGST27 and ZmGT1 is comparable. However, the inducing effect of rac-metolachlor on ZmMRP1 expression is more pronounced than that of S-metolachlor. Furthermore, vanadate, an ABC transporter inhibitor, could greatly reduce the difference in herbicidal activity between rac- and S-metolachlor. These results suggest that the ABC transporters may preferentially transport conjugates of rac-metolachlor, leading to a faster metabolism of the latter. Through comparing the expression of ZmGST27, ZmMRP1 and ZmGT1 after treatment by rac- and S-metolachlor, we provide novel insights into the metabolic processes of chiral herbicides in plants. PMID:23144728

  8. The three-dimensional structure of the human Pi class glutathione transferase P1-1 in complex with the inhibitor ethacrynic acid and its glutathione conjugate.

    PubMed

    Oakley, A J; Rossjohn, J; Lo Bello, M; Caccuri, A M; Federici, G; Parker, M W

    1997-01-21

    The potent diuretic drug ethacrynic acid has been tested in clinical trials as an adjuvant in chemotherapy. Its target is the detoxifying enzyme glutathione transferase which is often found overexpressed in cancer tissues. We have solved the crystal structures of human pi class glutathione transferase P1-1 in complex with the inhibitor ethacrynic acid and its glutathione conjugate. Ethacrynic acid is found to bind in a nonproductive mode to one of the ligand binding sites of the enzyme (the H site) while the glutathione binding site (G site) is occupied by solvent molecules. There are no structural rearrangements of the G site in the absence of ligand. The structure indicates that bound glutathione is required for ethacrynic acid to dock into the H site in a productive binding mode. The binding of the ethacrynic acid-glutathione conjugate shows that the contacts of the glutathione moiety with the protein are identical to those observed in crystal structures of the enzyme with other glutathione-based substrates and inhibitors. The ethacrynic acid moiety of the conjugate binds in the H site in a fashion that has not been observed in crystal structures of other glutathione-based inhibitor complexes. The crystal structures implicate Tyr 108 as an electrophilic participant in the Michael addition of glutathione to ethacrynic acid.

  9. Glutathione S-transferase conjugation of organophosphorus pesticides yields S-phospho-, S-aryl-, and S-alkylglutathione derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Casida, John E

    2007-08-01

    Pesticide detoxification is a central feature of selective toxicity and safety evaluation. Two of the principal enzymes involved are GSH S-transferases (GSTs) and cytochrome P450s acting alone and together. More than 100 pesticides are organophosphorus (OP) compounds, but with few exceptions, their GSH conjugates have not been directly observed in vitro or in vivo. The major insecticides chlorpyrifos (CP) and diazinon are of particular interest as multifunctional substrates with diverse metabolites, while ClP(S)(OEt) 2 and the cotton defoliant tribufos are possible precursors of phosphorylated GSH conjugates. Formation of GSH conjugates by GST with GSH was studied in vitro with and without metabolic activation by human liver microsomes or P450 3A4 with NADPH. Metabolites were analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS). Five GSH conjugates were identified from CP and chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO), i.e., GSCP and GSCPO in which the 6-chloro substituent of CP and CPO, respectively, is displaced by GSH; S-(3,5,6-trichloropyridin-2-yl)glutathione; S-(3,5-dichloro-6-hydroxypyridin-2-yl)glutathione; and S-ethylglutathione. GST of a human liver microsomal preparation but not P450 3A4 with GSH metabolized CP to GSCP. With GST and GSH, diazinon and diazoxon gave S-(2-isopropyl-4-methylpyrimidin-6-yl)glutathione and ClP(S)(OEt) 2 yielded GSP(S)(OEt) 2. With microsomes, NADPH, GST, and GSH tribufos gave GSP(O)(SBu) 2. The liver of intraperitoneally treated mice contained GSCP from CP, GSP(S)(OEt) 2 from ClP(S)(OEt) 2, and GSP(O)(SBu) 2 from tribufos. GSP(S)(OEt) 2 and GSP(O)(SBu) 2 are the first S-phosphoglutathione metabolites observed in vitro and in vivo directly by LC-ESI-MS. Nine other OP pesticides gave only O-dealkylation in the GST/GSH system. GST-catalyzed metabolism joins P450s and hydrolases as important contributors to OP detoxification.

  10. Structures of thermolabile mutants of human glutathione transferase P1-1.

    PubMed

    Rossjohn, J; McKinstry, W J; Oakley, A J; Parker, M W; Stenberg, G; Mannervik, B; Dragani, B; Cocco, R; Aceto, A

    2000-09-15

    An N-capping box motif (Ser/Thr-Xaa-Xaa-Asp) is strictly conserved at the beginning of helix alpha6 in the core of virtually all glutathione transferases (GST) and GST-related proteins. It has been demonstrated that this local motif is important in determining the alpha-helical propensity of the isolated alpha6-peptide and plays a crucial role in the folding and stability of GSTs. Its removal by site-directed mutagenesis generated temperature-sensitive folding mutants unable to refold at physiological temperature (37 degrees C). In the present work, variants of human GSTP1-1 (S150A and D153A), in which the capping residues have been substituted by alanine, have been generated and purified for structural analysis. Thus, for the first time, temperature-sensitive folding mutants of an enzyme, expressed at a permissive temperature, have been crystallized and their three-dimensional structures determined by X-ray crystallography. The crystal structures of human pi class GST temperature-sensitive mutants provide a basis for understanding the structural origin of the dramatic effects observed on the overall stability of the enzyme at higher temperatures upon single substitution of a capping residue. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Benzene Uptake and Glutathione S-transferase T1 Status as Determinants of S-Phenylmercapturic Acid in Cigarette Smokers in the Multiethnic Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Haiman, Christopher A.; Patel, Yesha M.; Stram, Daniel O.; Carmella, Steven G.; Chen, Menglan; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Le Marchand, Loic; Hecht, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    Research from the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) demonstrated that, for the same quantity of cigarette smoking, African Americans and Native Hawaiians have a higher lung cancer risk than Whites, while Latinos and Japanese Americans are less susceptible. We collected urine samples from 2,239 cigarette smokers from five different ethnic groups in the MEC and analyzed each sample for S-phenylmercapturic acid (SPMA), a specific biomarker of benzene uptake. African Americans had significantly higher (geometric mean [SE] 3.69 [0.2], p<0.005) SPMA/ml urine than Whites (2.67 [0.13]) while Japanese Americans had significantly lower levels than Whites (1.65 [0.07], p<0.005). SPMA levels in Native Hawaiians and Latinos were not significantly different from those of Whites. We also conducted a genome-wide association study in search of genetic risk factors related to benzene exposure. The glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) deletion explained between 14.2–31.6% (p = 5.4x10-157) and the GSTM1 deletion explained between 0.2%-2.4% of the variance (p = 1.1x10-9) of SPMA levels in these populations. Ethnic differences in levels of SPMA remained strong even after controlling for the effects of these two deletions. These results demonstrate the powerful effect of GSTT1 status on SPMA levels in urine and show that uptake of benzene in African American, White, and Japanese American cigarette smokers is consistent with their lung cancer risk in the MEC. While benzene is not generally considered a cause of lung cancer, its metabolite SPMA could be a biomarker for other volatile lung carcinogens in cigarette smoke. PMID:26959369

  12. Simulation of interindividual differences in inactivation of reactive para-benzoquinone imine metabolites of diclofenac by glutathione S-transferases in human liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    den Braver, Michiel W; Zhang, Yongjie; Venkataraman, Harini; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Commandeur, Jan N M

    2016-07-25

    Diclofenac is a widely prescribed NSAID that causes severe idiosyncratic drug induced liver injury (IDILI) in a small part of the patient population. Formation of protein-reactive metabolites is considered to play a role in the development of diclofenac-induced IDILI. Therefore, a high hepatic activity of enzymes involved in bioactivation of diclofenac is expected to increase the risk for liver injury. However, the extent of covalent protein binding may also be determined by activity of protective enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). This is supported by an association study in which a correlation was found between NSAID-induced IDILI and the combined null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1. In the present study, the activity of 10 different recombinant human GSTs in inactivation of protein-reactive quinoneimine (QI) metabolites of diclofenac was tested. Both at low and high GSH concentrations, high activities of GSTA1-1, A2-2, A3-3, M1-1, M3-3 and P1-1 in the inactivation of these QIs were found. By using the expression levels of GSTs in livers of 22 donors, a 6-fold variation in GST-dependent inactivation of reactive diclofenac metabolites was predicted. Moreover, it was shown in vitro that GSTs can strongly increase the efficiency of GSH to protect against the alkylation of the model thiol N-acetylcysteine by reactive diclofenac metabolites. The results of this study demonstrate that variability of GST expression may significantly contribute to the inter-individual differences in susceptibility to diclofenac-induced liver injury. In addition, expression levels of GSTs in in vitro models for hepatotoxicity may be important factors determining sensitivity to diclofenac cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Role of induced glutathione-S-transferase from Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) HaGST-8 in detoxification of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Labade, Chaitali P; Jadhav, Abhilash R; Ahire, Mehul; Zinjarde, Smita S; Tamhane, Vaijayanti A

    2017-09-15

    The present study deals with glutathione-S-transferase (GST) based detoxification of pesticides in Helicoverpa armigera and its potential application in eliminating pesticides from the environment. Dietary exposure of a pesticide mixture (organophosphates - chlorpyrifos and dichlorvos, pyrethroid - cypermethrin; 2-15ppm each) to H. armigera larvae resulted in a dose dependant up-regulation of GST activity and gene expression. A variant GST from H. armigera (HaGST-8) was isolated from larvae fed with 10ppm pesticide mixture and it was recombinantly expressed in yeast (Pichia pastoris HaGST-8). HaGST-8 had a molecular mass of 29kDa and was most active at pH 9 at 30°C. GC-MS and LC-HRMS analysis validated that HaGST-8 was effective in eliminating organophosphate type of pesticides and partially reduced the cypermethrin content (53%) from aqueous solutions. Unlike the untransformed yeast, P. pastoris HaGST-8 grew efficiently in media supplemented with pesticide mixtures (200 and 400ppm each pesticide) signifying the detoxification ability of HaGST-8. The amino acid sequence of HaGST-8 and the already reported sequence of HaGST-7 had just 2 mismatches. The studies on molecular interaction strengths revealed that HaGST-8 had stronger binding affinities with organophosphate, pyrethroid, organochloride, carbamate and neonicotinoid type of pesticides. The abilities of recombinant HaGST-8 to eliminate pesticides and P. pastoris HaGST-8 to grow profusely in the presence of high level of pesticide content can be applied for removal of such residues from food, water resources and bioremediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Serum glutathione S-transferase B1 activity as an index of liver function in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rattenbury, J M; Taylor, C J; Heath, P K; Howie, A F; Beckett, G J

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate serum glutathione S-transferase B1 (GST B1), a highly sensitive test of hepatocellular function, as a means of identifying liver disease in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS--The presence of liver disease was sought over a three year period in 60 children with CF, using a combination of clinical assessment, ultrasound examination, conventional biochemical tests of liver function (LFTs), and measurement of GST B1. RESULTS--Reference ranges for serum GST B1 were established in a paediatric control population. The 95% value (4.55 micrograms/l) was similar to the upper limit of normal previously derived in adults. Mean (SE) serum GST B1 activities were higher in the CF population (9.0 (1.14) micrograms/l) than in age matched controls (2.4 (0.15) micrograms/l). Ten patients with CF showed clinical signs of liver dysfunction. All but one had a serum GST B1 > 4.55 micrograms/l. Twelve other patients had elevated LFTs without clinically evident liver dysfunction, six had abnormal ultrasound scans and two showed both of these anomalies. Thirty patients with CF had neither biochemical, ultrasonographic nor clinical signs of liver disease. On review three years later, clinically important liver disease was reaffirmed in eight of the 10 index cases and had become apparent in a further eight, all of whom had elevated GST B1 activities. Five (36%) of the patients with elevated LFTs and two (33%) with isolated ultrasound changes continued to show these abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS--The limitations of conventional LFTs and ultrasound scans were evident from this study. The results suggest that elevated GST B1 activities may be a better predictor of hepatic dysfunction in CF than conventional LFTs. PMID:7560208

  15. Transcriptional profiles of glutathione-S-Transferase isoforms, Cyp, and AOE genes in atrazine-exposed zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Glisic, Branka; Hrubik, Jelena; Fa, Svetlana; Dopudj, Nela; Kovacevic, Radmila; Andric, Nebojsa

    2016-02-01

    Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) superfamily consists of multiple members involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Expressional pattern of the GST isoforms in adult fish has been used as a biomarker of exposure to environmental chemicals. However, GST transcriptional responses vary across organs, thus requiring a cross-tissue examination of multiple mRNAs for GST profiling in an animal after chemical exposure. Zebrafish embryos express all GST isoforms as adult fish and could therefore represent an alternative model for identification of biomarkers of exposure. To evaluate such a possibility, we studied a set of cytosolic and microsomal GST isoform-specific expression profiles in the zebrafish embryos after exposure to atrazine, a widely used herbicide. Expression of the GST isoforms was compared with that of CYP genes involved in the phase I of xenobiotic metabolism and antioxidant enzyme (AOE) genes. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we showed dynamic changes in the expressional pattern of twenty GST isoforms, cyp1a, cyp3a65, ahr2, and four AOEs in early development of zebrafish. Acute (48 and 72 h) exposure of 24 h-old embryos to atrazine, from environmentally relevant (0.005 mg/L) to high (40 mg/L) concentrations, caused a variety of transient, albeit minor changes (<2.5-fold) in the GST isoforms, ahr2 and AOE genes response. However, expression of cyp1a and cyp3a65 mRNA was markedly and consistently induced by high doses of atrazine (5 and 40 mg/L). In summary, an analysis of the response of multiple systems in the zebrafish embryos provided a comprehensive understanding of atrazine toxicity and its potential impact on biological processes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene polymorphisms, cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer risk among Chinese in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Koh, Woon-Puay; Nelson, Heather H; Yuan, Jian-Min; Van den Berg, David; Jin, Aizhen; Wang, Renwei; Yu, Mimi C

    2011-10-01

    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Putative colorectal procarcinogens in tobacco smoke include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic aromatic amines that are known substrates of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). This study examined the influence of functional GST gene polymorphisms on the smoking-colorectal cancer association in a population known to be minimally exposed to dietary sources of these procarcinogens. Incident cases of colorectal cancer (n = 480) and matched controls (n = 1167) were selected from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based prospective cohort of 63 257 men and women who have been followed since 1993. We determined the deletion polymorphisms of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and the functional polymorphism at codon 105 of GSTP1 for each subject. A three level composite GST index was used to examine if GST profile affected a smoker's risk of developing colorectal cancer. While there was no statistically significant association between cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer risk among subjects absent of any at-risk GST genotypes, smokers possessing two to three at-risk GST genotypes exhibited a statistically significant increased risk of colorectal cancer compared with non-smokers (P = 0.0002). In this latter stratum, heavy smokers exhibited a >5-fold increased risk relative to never-smokers (odds ratio, 5.43; 95% confidence interval, 2.22-13.23). Subjects with one at-risk GST genotype displayed a statistically significant but weaker association with smoking. These findings suggest that GST gene polymorphisms influence interindividual susceptibility to smoking-associated colorectal cancer. Our data indicate an important role for GST enzymes in the detoxification of colorectal carcinogens in tobacco smoke.

  17. Comprehensive expression analysis suggests overlapping and specific roles of rice glutathione S-transferase genes during development and stress responses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are the ubiquitous enzymes that play a key role in cellular detoxification. Although several GSTs have been identified and characterized in various plant species, the knowledge about their role in developmental processes and response to various stimuli is still very limited. In this study, we report genome-wide identification, characterization and comprehensive expression analysis of members of GST gene family in crop plant rice, to reveal their function(s). Results A systematic analysis revealed the presence of at least 79 GST genes in the rice genome. Phylogenetic analysis grouped GST proteins into seven classes. Sequence analysis together with the organization of putative motifs indicated the potential diverse functions of GST gene family members in rice. The tandem gene duplications have contributed a major role in expansion of this gene family. Microarray data analysis revealed tissue-/organ- and developmental stage-specific expression patterns of several rice GST genes. At least 31 GST genes showed response to plant hormones auxin and cytokinin. Furthermore, expression analysis showed the differential expression of quite a large number of GST genes during various abiotic stress (20), arsenate stress (32) and biotic stress (48) conditions. Many of the GST genes were commonly regulated by developmental processes, hormones, abiotic and biotic stresses. Conclusion The transcript profiling suggests overlapping and specific role(s) of GSTs during various stages of development in rice. Further, the study provides evidence for the role of GSTs in mediating crosstalk between various stress and hormone response pathways and represents a very useful resource for functional analysis of selected members of this family in rice. PMID:20109239

  18. Risk of autistic disorder in affected offspring of mothers with a glutathione S-transferase P1 haplotype.

    PubMed

    Williams, Tanishia A; Mars, Audrey E; Buyske, Steven G; Stenroos, Edward S; Wang, Rong; Factura-Santiago, Marivic F; Lambert, George H; Johnson, William G

    2007-04-01

    To test whether polymorphisms of the glutathione S-transferase P1 gene (GSTP1) act in the mother during pregnancy to contribute to the phenotype of autistic disorder (AD) in her fetus. Transmission disequilibrium testing (TDT) in case mothers and maternal grandparents. Autistic disorder may result from multiple genes and environmental factors acting during pregnancy and afterward. Teratogenic alleles act in mothers during pregnancy to contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders in their offspring; however, only a handful have been identified. GSTP1 is a candidate susceptibility gene for AD because of its tissue distribution and its role in oxidative stress, xenobiotic metabolism, and JNK regulation. We genotyped GSTP1*G313A and GSTP1*C341T polymorphisms in 137 members of 49 families with AD. All probands received a clinical diagnosis of AD by Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic testing. Association of haplotypes with AD was tested by the TDT-Phase program, using the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for uncertain haplotypes and for incomplete parental genotypes, with standard measures of statistical significance. The GSTP1*A haplotype was overtransmitted to case mothers (P = .01 [P = .03 using permutation testing]; odds ratio, 2.67 [95% confidence interval, 1.39-5.13]). Results of the combined haplotype and genotype analyses suggest that the GSTP1-313 genotype alone determined the observed haplotype effect. Overtransmission of the GSTP1*A haplotype to case mothers suggests that action in the mother during pregnancy likely increases the likelihood of AD in her fetus. If this is confirmed and is a result of a gene-environment interaction occurring during pregnancy, these findings could lead to the design of strategies for prevention or treatment.

  19. Enzymatic Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase and Dental Fluorosis Among Children Receiving Two Different Levels of Naturally Fluoridated Water.

    PubMed

    Bonola-Gallardo, Irvin; Irigoyen-Camacho, María Esther; Vera-Robles, Liliana; Campero, Antonio; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to measure the activity of the enzyme glutathione S-transferase (GST) in saliva and to compare the activity of this enzyme in children with and without dental fluorosis in communities with different concentrations of naturally fluoridated water. A total of 141 schoolchildren participated in this cross-sectional study. Children were selected from two communities: one with a low (0.4 ppm) and the other with a high (1.8 ppm) water fluoride concentration. Dental fluorosis was evaluated by applying the Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index (TFI) criteria. Stimulated saliva was obtained, and fluoride concentration and GST activity were measured. The GST activity was compared among children with different levels of dental fluorosis using multinomial logistic regression models and odds ratios (OR). The mean age of the children was 10.6 (±1.03) years. Approximately half of the children showed dental fluorosis (52.5 %). The average GST activity was 0.5678 (±0.1959) nmol/min/μg. A higher concentration of fluoride in the saliva was detected in children with a higher GST activity (p = 0.039). A multinomial logistic regression model used to evaluate the GST activity and the dental fluorosis score identified a strong association between TFI = 2-3 (OR = 15.44, p = 0.007) and TFI ≥ 4 (OR = 55.40, p = 0.026) and the GST activity level, compared with children showing TFI = 0-1, adjusted for age and sex. Schoolchildren with higher levels of dental fluorosis and a higher fluoride concentration in the saliva showed greater GST activity. The increased GST activity most likely was the result of the body's need to inactivate free radicals produced by exposure to fluoride.

  20. Comparative study of acetylcholinesterase and glutathione S-transferase activities of closely related cave and surface Asellus aquaticus (Isopoda: Crustacea).

    PubMed

    Jemec, Anita; Škufca, David; Prevorčnik, Simona; Fišer, Žiga; Zidar, Primož

    2017-01-01

    The freshwater isopod crustacean Asellus aquaticus has recently been developed as an emerging invertebrate cave model for studying evolutionary and developmental biology. Mostly morphological and genetic differences between cave and surface A. aquaticus populations have been described up to now, while scarce data are available on other aspects, including physiology. The purpose of this study was to advance our understanding of the physiological differences between cave A. aquaticus and its surface-dwelling counterparts. We sampled two surface populations from the surface section of the sinking Pivka River (central Slovenia, Europe), i.e. locality Pivka Polje, and locality Planina Polje, and one cave population from the subterranean section of the sinking Pivka River, i.e. locality Planina Cave. Animals were sampled in spring, summer and autumn. We measured the activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in individuals snap-frozen in the field immediately after collection. Acetylcholinesterase is likely related to animals' locomotor activity, while GST activity is related to the metabolic activity of an organism. Our study shows significantly lower AChE and GST activities in the cave population in comparison to both surface A. aquaticus populations. This confirms the assumption that cave A. aquaticus have lower locomotor and metabolic activity than surface A. aquaticus in their respective natural environments. In surface A. aquaticus populations, seasonal fluctuations in GST activity were observed, while these were less pronounced in individuals from the more stable cave environment. On the other hand, AChE activity was generally season-independent in all populations. To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind conducted in A. aquaticus. Our results show that among closely related cave and surface A. aquaticus populations also physiological differences are present besides the morphological and genetic. These findings

  1. Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) Gene Diversity in the Crustacean Calanus finmarchicus--Contributors to Cellular Detoxification.

    PubMed

    Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C; Passamaneck, Yale; Christie, Andrew E; Lenz, Petra H

    2015-01-01

    Detoxification is a fundamental cellular stress defense mechanism, which allows an organism to survive or even thrive in the presence of environmental toxins and/or pollutants. The glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily is a set of enzymes involved in the detoxification process. This highly diverse protein superfamily is characterized by multiple gene duplications, with over 40 GST genes reported in some insects. However, less is known about the GST superfamily in marine organisms, including crustaceans. The availability of two de novo transcriptomes for the copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, provided an opportunity for an in depth study of the GST superfamily in a marine crustacean. The transcriptomes were searched for putative GST-encoding transcripts using known GST proteins from three arthropods as queries. The identified transcripts were then translated into proteins, analyzed for structural domains, and annotated using reciprocal BLAST analysis. Mining the two transcriptomes yielded a total of 41 predicted GST proteins belonging to the cytosolic, mitochondrial or microsomal classes. Phylogenetic analysis of the cytosolic GSTs validated their annotation into six different subclasses. The predicted proteins are likely to represent the products of distinct genes, suggesting that the diversity of GSTs in C. finmarchicus exceeds or rivals that described for insects. Analysis of relative gene expression in different developmental stages indicated low levels of GST expression in embryos, and relatively high expression in late copepodites and adult females for several cytosolic GSTs. A diverse diet and complex life history are factors that might be driving the multiplicity of GSTs in C. finmarchicus, as this copepod is commonly exposed to a variety of natural toxins. Hence, diversity in detoxification pathway proteins may well be key to their survival.

  2. Glutathione S-transferase m1 and t1 null genotypes increase susceptibility to idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Lucena, M Isabel; Andrade, Raúl J; Martínez, Carmen; Ulzurrun, Eugenia; García-Martín, Elena; Borraz, Yolanda; Fernández, M Carmen; Romero-Gomez, Manuel; Castiella, Agustin; Planas, Ramón; Costa, Joan; Anzola, Sandra; Agúndez, José A G

    2008-08-01

    Individual vulnerability to drug-induced liver injury (DILI) might result from deficiencies in the detoxification process, which determines the level of exposure to the reactive metabolite. We evaluated whether a genetically determined reduction in the ability to detoxify electrophilic compounds, such as that expected among individuals with glutathione S-transferase (GST) null genotypes, might play a role in determining the risk for DILI and its clinical expression. Genomic DNA from 154 patients (74 men, 80 women; mean age, 53 years) with a diagnosis of DILI as assessed with the Council for International Organizations of Medical Science scale and 250 sex- and age-matched healthy controls were analyzed. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based method was used to detect GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene deletions. Carriers of double GSTT1-M1 null genotypes had a 2.70-fold increased risk of developing DILI compared with noncarriers (odds ratio 2.70, 95% confidence interval 1.45-5.03; P = 0.003). The odds ratio for DILI patients receiving antibacterials, and NSAIDs were 3.52 (P = 0.002), and 5.61 (P = 0.001), respectively. Patients with amoxicillin-clavulanate hepatotoxicity (n = 32) had a 2.81-fold increased risk (P = 0.037). Patients classified by the combined GSTT1 and GSTM1 null genotypes did not differ with regard to the type of injury, clinical presentation, or outcome, except for the predominance of women in the combined null genotype (P < 0.001). The double-null genotype for GSTT1 and GSTM1 might play a role in determining the susceptibility to develop DILI, as a general mechanism that occurs regardless of the type of drug involved, and predominantly in women.

  3. Dioxin receptor and C/EBP regulate the function of the glutathione S-transferase Ya gene xenobiotic response element.

    PubMed Central

    Pimental, R A; Liang, B; Yee, G K; Wilhelmsson, A; Poellinger, L; Paulson, K E

    1993-01-01

    The rat glutathione S-transferase Ya gene xenobiotic response element (XRE) has both constitutive and xenobiotic-inducible activity. We present evidence that the XRE is regulated by both the constitutive C/EBP transcription factor and the xenobiotic-activated dioxin receptor. A ligand-activated XRE-binding protein was shown to be dioxin receptor by specific antibody immunodepletion and binding of highly purified receptor. Identification of C/EBP alpha as the constitutive binding protein was demonstrated by competition with a C/EBP binding site, protein-DNA cross-linking to determine the molecular weight of the constitutive protein(s), specific antibody immunodepletion, and binding of purified bacterially expressed C/EBP alpha. Mutational analysis of the XRE revealed that the constitutive factor (C/EBP alpha) shares a nearly identical overlapping binding site with the dioxin receptor. In functional testing of the putative C/EBP-XRE interaction, cotransfected C/EBP alpha activated an XRE test promoter in the non-xenobiotic-responsive HeLa cell line. Unexpectedly, cotransfected C/EBP alpha had no effect on basal activity but significantly increased the xenobiotic response of the XRE test promoter in the xenobiotic-responsive, C/EBP-positive HepG2 cell line. Furthermore, inhibition of C/EBP-binding protein(s) in HepG2 cells by transfection of C/EBP oligonucleotides suppressed the xenobiotic response. These results suggest that C/EBP alpha and dioxin receptor recognize the same DNA sequence element and that transcriptional regulation can occur by cooperative interactions between these two transcription factors. Images PMID:8391636

  4. A novel biomarker for marine environmental pollution of pi-class glutathione S-transferase from Mytilus coruscus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huihui; He, Jianyu; Zhao, Rongtao; Chi, Changfeng; Bao, Yongbo

    2015-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are the superfamily of phase II detoxification enzymes that play crucial roles in innate immunity. In this study, a pi-class GST homolog was identified from Mytilus coruscus (named as McGST1, KC525103). The full-length cDNA sequence of McGST1 was 621bp with a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 70bp and a 3'-UTR of 201bp. The deduced amino acid sequence was 206 residues in length with theoretical pI/MW of 5.60/23.72kDa, containing the conserved G-site and diversiform H-site. BLASTn analysis and phylogenetic relationship strongly suggested that this cDNA sequence was a member of pi class GST family. The prediction of secondary structure displayed a preserved N-terminal and a C-terminal comprised with α-helixes. Quantitative real time RT-PCR showed that constitutive expression of McGST1 was occurred, with increasing order in mantle, muscle, gill, hemocyte, gonad and hepatopancreas. The stimulation of bacterial infection, heavy metals and 180CST could up-regulate McGST1 mRNA expression in hepatopancreas with time-dependent manners. The maximum expression appeared at 6h after pathogenic bacteria injected, with 10-fold in Vibrio alginolyticus and 16-fold in Vibrio harveyi higher than that of the control. The highest point of McGST1 mRNA appeared at different time for exposure to copper (10-fold at day 15), cadmium (9-fold at day10) and 180 CST (10-fold at day 15). These results suggested that McGST1 played a significant role in antioxidation and might potentially be used as indicators and biomarkers for detection of marine environmental pollution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nuclear translocation of glutathione S-transferase {pi} is mediated by a non-classical localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakatsu, Miho; Goto, Shinji; Yoshida, Takako; Urata, Yoshishige; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is abrogated by the deletion of the last 16 amino acid residues in the carboxy-terminal region, indicating that residues 195-208 of GST{pi} are required for nuclear translocation. {yields} The lack of a contiguous stretch of positively charged amino acid residues within the carboxy-terminal region of GST{pi}, suggests that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is mediated by a non-classical nuclear localization signal. {yields} An in vitro transport assay shows that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is dependent on cytosolic factors and ATP. -- Abstract: Glutathione S-transferase {pi} (GST{pi}), a member of the GST family of multifunctional enzymes, is highly expressed in human placenta and involved in the protection of cellular components against electrophilic compounds or oxidative stress. We have recently found that GST{pi} is expressed in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus in some cancer cells, and that the nuclear expression of GST{pi} appears to correlate with resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Although the mitochondrial targeting signal of GST{pi} was previously identified in the amino-terminal region, the mechanism of nuclear translocation remains completely unknown. In this study, we find that the region of GST{pi}195-208 is critical for nuclear translocation, which is mediated by a novel and non-classical nuclear localization signal. In addition, using an in vitro transport assay, we demonstrate that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} depends on the cytosolic extract and ATP. Although further experiments are needed to understand in depth the precise mechanism of nuclear translocation of GST{pi}, our results may help to establish more efficient anti-cancer therapy, especially with respect to resistance to anti-cancer drugs.

  6. Association of glutathione S-transferase T1 and M1 genotypes with chronic liver diseases among Filipinos.

    PubMed

    Baclig, Michael O; Alvarez, May R; Lozada, Xerxes Morgan R; Mapua, Cynthia A; Lozano-Kühne, Jingky P; Dimamay, Mark Pierre S; Natividad, Filipinas F; Gopez-Cervantes, Juliet; Matias, Ronald R

    2012-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST) supergene family is made up of four gene families responsible for the biotransformation of drugs and other xenobiotics. Genetic variations in this supergene family influence individual detoxification levels and may contribute to the development of cancer. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to evaluate the association between GST polymorphism among Filipino patients positive for hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA) and clinically diagnosed as either with chronic active hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma as well as normal individuals negative for HBV infection. Multiplex PCR was used to detect the presence or absence of the GSTT1 and GSTM1 polymorphisms in peripheral blood. DNA sequencing of the S gene region of the virus was used to determine the predominant genotype found among HBV-infected patients. Our results showed that the odds of having a chronic liver disease is only 0.95 (95% CI 0.58-1.57) among those with GSTT1 null genotype compared to those with GSTT1+ genotype. On the other hand, the odds of chronic liver disease is 17.85 times (95% CI 7.34-43.45) for those with GSTM1 null genotype compared to those with GSTM1+ genotype. Using the GSTT1+/GSTM1+ genotype as the reference, both GSTT1+/GSTM1- (OR 16.61; 95% CI 6.69-41.22) and GSTT1-/GSTM1- (OR 11.91; 95% CI 4.48-31.66) genotypes seem to be risk factors for chronic liver disease. From our observations, we conclude that polymorphism in GSTM1 null genotype (OR 17.85; 95% CI 7.34-43.45) seem to be associated with an increased risk of chronic liver disease among Filipinos.

  7. Association of glutathione S-transferase T1 and M1 genotypes with chronic liver diseases among Filipinos

    PubMed Central

    Baclig, Michael O; Alvarez, May R; Lozada, Xerxes Morgan R; Mapua, Cynthia A; Lozano-Kühne, Jingky P; Dimamay, Mark Pierre S; Natividad, Filipinas F; Gopez-Cervantes, Juliet; Matias, Ronald R

    2012-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST) supergene family is made up of four gene families responsible for the biotransformation of drugs and other xenobiotics. Genetic variations in this supergene family influence individual detoxification levels and may contribute to the development of cancer. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to evaluate the association between GST polymorphism among Filipino patients positive for hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA) and clinically diagnosed as either with chronic active hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma as well as normal individuals negative for HBV infection. Multiplex PCR was used to detect the presence or absence of the GSTT1 and GSTM1 polymorphisms in peripheral blood. DNA sequencing of the S gene region of the virus was used to determine the predominant genotype found among HBV-infected patients. Our results showed that the odds of having a chronic liver disease is only 0.95 (95% CI 0.58-1.57) among those with GSTT1 null genotype compared to those with GSTT1+ genotype. On the other hand, the odds of chronic liver disease is 17.85 times (95% CI 7.34-43.45) for those with GSTM1 null genotype compared to those with GSTM1+ genotype. Using the GSTT1+/GSTM1+ genotype as the reference, both GSTT1+/GSTM1- (OR 16.61; 95% CI 6.69-41.22) and GSTT1-/GSTM1- (OR 11.91; 95% CI 4.48-31.66) genotypes seem to be risk factors for chronic liver disease. From our observations, we conclude that polymorphism in GSTM1 null genotype (OR 17.85; 95% CI 7.34-43.45) seem to be associated with an increased risk of chronic liver disease among Filipinos. PMID:22724052

  8. A sigma-class glutathione S-transferase from Solen grandis that responded to microorganism glycan and organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jialong; Wei, Xiumei; Xu, Jie; Yang, Dinglong; Liu, Xiangquan; Yang, Jianmin; Fang, Jinghui; Hu, Xiaoke

    2012-06-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a superfamily of antioxidant enzymes, which play crucial roles in detoxification and protection of tissues from oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, a sigma-class GST was identified from razor clam Solen grandis (designated as SgGST-S1), and its expression patterns, both in tissues and toward microorganism glycan as well as organic contaminants stimulation, were then characterized. The full-length cDNA of SgGST-S1 was of 1291 bp, containing a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 27 bp, and a 3' UTR of 619 bp with a poly (A) tail. The open reading frame (ORF) was of 645 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 214 amino acids with the predicted molecular weight of 24.8 kDa, which shared 47% identity with GST from Ruditapes philippinarum. The analysis of conserved domain and phylogenetic relationship strongly suggested that SgGST-S1 was a member of sigma-class GST. The mRNA of SgGST-S1 was constitutively expressed in all tested tissues of healthy razor clam, including mantle, gill, gonad, hemocytes, muscle, and hepatopancreas, and it was highly expressed in hepatopancreas. The mRNA expression of SgGST-S1 in hemocytes was significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01) after razor clam was stimulated by peptidoglycan (PGN) or β-1, 3-glucan, but not LPS. In addition, the SgGST-S1 transcript level was also significantly (P < 0.01) induced by exposure of benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) or Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDE). All the results indicated that SgGST-S1 might serve as an antioxidant enzyme involving in the detoxification cause by both microorganism glycan and organic contaminants.

  9. Glutathione S-transferases M1, T1, and P1 and breast cancer: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Florian D; Taioli, Emanuela; Maugard, Christine; Zheng, Wei; Pinto, Luis F Ribeiro; Ambrosone, Christine; Parl, Fritz F; Nedelcheva-Kristensen, Vessela; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo

    2004-09-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes are involved in the metabolism of various carcinogens. Deletion polymorphisms in the genes GSTM1 and GSTT1 and a base transition polymorphism at codon 105 (Ile-->Val) in GSTP1 were investigated in relation to breast cancer risk. Tobacco smoking and reproductive factors were examined as potential effect modifiers. Individual data from seven case-control studies were pooled within the International Collaborative Study on Genetic Susceptibility to Environmental Carcinogens. To measure the effect of GSTs on breast cancer risk, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed adjusting for study center and age. The modifying effect was investigated by stratification on variables of smoking habits and reproductive history. A total of 2,048 cases with breast cancer and 1,969 controls were analyzed. The relative odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of breast cancer was 0.98 (0.86-1.12) with the GSTM1 null, 1.11 (0.87-1.41) with the GSTT1 null, 1.01 (0.79-1.28) with GSTP1 heterozygous mutants, and 0.93 (0.62-1.38) with GSTP1 homozygous mutants. Stratification by smoking or reproductive factors did not reveal a modifying effect of these variables, nor was there any association between GSTM1 and age at diagnosis of breast cancer. This is the largest study investigating susceptibility to breast cancer due to polymorphisms in the GST genes. The results conclusively show that single gene GST polymorphisms do not confer a substantial risk of breast cancer to its carriers. Furthermore, GSTs did not interact with smoking or reproductive history to modify cancer risk.

  10. Glutathione S-transferase Z1 (GSTZ1) gene polymorphism in gastric cancer: a preliminary study in a Turkish population.

    PubMed

    Karakaş-Celik, Sevim; Aras, Nurcan; Ateş, Cengiz

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether there is a relationship between genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase zeta 1 (GSTZ1) and gastric cancer. The contribution of GSTZ1 genotypes to susceptibility to the risk of gastric cancer (GC) is still unclear. Using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method in an ethnic Turkish population, we examined the frequency of the GSTZ1 gene polymorphism in patients with GC patients (n = 73) and control individuals (n = 80). For GSTZ1 A94G polymorphism, in the group of patients with the GC, the frequency of the GG genotype was quite a bit higher in comparison with that of the control group; however, this increase was not statistically significant. For the GSTZ1 A124G polymorphism, the GSTZ1 heterozygous genotype (AG) occurred more frequently in GC patients than in controls; however, it was not associated with risk of developing GC. We found no significant association between the A94G or A124G variants of the GSTZ1 gene and risk of gastric cancer. Our data indicate no association between GSTZ1 genotypes and risk of gastric cancer. Despite its marked decline in many industrialized countries, gastric cancer remains the most common cause of death by cancer in areas such as Japan, Turkey, and South America. Gastric cancer (GC) is a disease of complex etiology that involves intimately interconnected infectious, dietary, environmental, and genetic factors. Although it has been estimated that 67% of GCs could be prevented by implementing lifestyle changes, the fact that some individuals develop GC but others do not, despite exposure to similar potentially carcinogenic factors, suggests that genetic predisposition may also play an important role in the etiology of GC.

  11. Characterization of a low expression haplotype in canine glutathione S-transferase (GSTT1) and its prevalence in golden retrievers.

    PubMed

    Craft, S; Ekena, J; Mayer, B; Thamm, D H; Saba, C; Chun, R; Trepanier, L A

    2017-08-25

    Glutathione S-transferase-theta (GSTT1) is a carcinogen detoxification enzyme, and low activity variants are associated with lymphoma in humans. We recently found a variant in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of canine GSTT1, *101_102insT, which was predicted to change miRNA binding and was found in 5 of 17 golden retriever (GR) dogs with lymphoma but none of 14 healthy GRs. The aim of this study was to determine whether this variant led to decreased GSTT1 expression and was a discernible risk factor for lymphoma within the GR breed. On resequencing, *101_102insT appeared to be in complete linkage disequilibrium with 3 additional 3'UTR variants, leading to the inferred haplotype *3T>C; *101_102insT; *190C>A; *203T>C. In canine livers that were heterozygous for this variant haplotype, GSTT1 protein expression was significantly lower compared to the reference haplotype (densitometry .40 vs .64, P = .022), and GSTT1 transcript levels by qPCR were also significantly lower (fold difference .52, P = .012), without evidence of substantial allelic expression imbalance. The variant haplotype led to >50% decrease in expression in vitro (.31 ± .07 vs .64 ± .19; P = .019). We found no significant difference in minor allele frequencies between 71 GR dogs with lymphoma (MAF .162) and 33 healthy age-matched controls (MAF .136, P = .69). Our results indicate that the variant GSTT1 3'UTR haplotype containing *101_102insT reduces gene expression, which could lead to impaired carcinogen detoxification, but was not a detectable risk factor for lymphoma in GR dogs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The epsilon glutathione S-transferases contribute to the malathion resistance in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    PubMed

    Lu, Xue-Ping; Wang, Luo-Luo; Huang, Yong; Dou, Wei; Chen, Chang-Tong; Wei, Dong; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2016-02-01

    Epsilon glutathione S-transferases (eGSTs) play important roles in xenobiotics detoxification and insecticides resistance in insects. However, the molecular mechanisms of eGSTs-mediated insecticide resistance remain largely unknown in the Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel), one of the most notorious pests in the world. Here, we investigated the roles of eight GST genes which belonged to epsilon class (BdGSTe1, BdGSTe2, BdGSTe3, BdGSTe4, BdGSTe5, BdGSTe6, BdGSTe7 and BdGSTe9) in conferring malathion resistance in B. dorsalis. Adult developmental stage-, sex- and tissue-specific expression patterns of the eight eGST genes were analyzed via quantitative reverse transcription PCR. The results showed that BdGSTe2, BdGSTe3, BdGSTe4 and BdGSTe9 were abundant in the midgut, fat body and Malpighian tubules. Notably, BdGSTe2, BdGSTe4 and BdGSTe9 were significantly overexpressed in a malathion-resistant (MR) strain of B. dorsalis compared to the malathion-susceptible (MS) strain. Functional expression and cytotoxicity assays showed significantly higher malathion detoxification capabilities in BdGSTe2-, BdGSTe3-, BdGSTe4- and BdGSTe9-expressing Sf9 cells compared to the parental and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing Sf9 cells. Moreover, malathion susceptibility in MS adults was increased 30%, 14%, and 33% when BdGSTe2, BdGSTe3 and BdGSTe4 mRNA levels were repressed by RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown, respectively. Taken together, overexpression of the isoforms of eGSTs, including BdGSTe2, BdGSTe4, and particularly, BdGSTe9 plays an important role in the malathion resistant development in B. dorsalis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Growth hormone alters the glutathione S-transferase and mitochondrial thioredoxin systems in long-living Ames dwarf mice.

    PubMed

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene; Brown-Borg, Holly M

    2014-10-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH's actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance.

  14. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of a novel class glutathione S-transferase from the fungus Cunninghamella elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chang-Jun; Kim, Seong-Jae; Kim, Yong-Hak; Stingley, Robin; Cerniglia, Carl E

    2002-01-01

    The structural gene for glutathione S-transferase (CeGST1-1) in the fungus Cunninghamella elegans was cloned by screening a cDNA library using a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on the N-terminal sequence of the purified protein. Open reading frame analysis indicated that the cegst1 gene encodes a protein of 210 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 25% sequence identity with the sequence of the Pi-class GST from Danio rerio (zebrafish). Similarity was also shown with the Alpha-class GST from Fasciola hepatica (liver fluke; 23% identity), the Mu class from Mus musculus (22%) and the Sigma class from Ommastrephes sloani (squid; 21%). Further screening of a cDNA library with the cegst1 gene probe revealed the presence of another GST isoenzyme (CeGST2-2) in this fungus, which shows 84% sequence identity with CeGST1-1 at the amino acid level. Reverse transcription PCR revealed that cegst2 was also expressed at the mRNA level in the fungus C. elegans. Both cegst genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli using the expression vector pQE51, displaying specific activities with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene of 2.04 and 0.75 micromol/min per mg of protein respectively. Both enzymes exhibited a similar substrate specificity and inhibition profile, indicating that CeGST1-1 and CeGST2-2 belong to the same GST class. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that Tyr(10) in the N-terminal region is essential for catalysis of CeGST1-1. We propose from these results that the CeGSTs are novel Gamma-class GSTs and designated as GSTG1-1 and GSTG2-2 respectively. PMID:12196209

  15. [Glutathione S-transferase M1 polymorphism and susceptibility to breast cancer in Chinese population: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Wan, Guoxing; Li, Feng; Li, Wenqin; Sun, Jianping; Cao, Yuwen

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the published data on association between present/null polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and breast cancer risk in Chinese population in order to abttain a more precise and comprehensive estimation of the relationship. A meta-analysis was performed to investigate the association between GSTM1 polymorphism and susceptibility to breast cancer in Chinese population by searching Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane library, CNKI, VIP, Wanfang and CBD database. The data were screened according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, and extracted, and the quality of included studies was evaluated. The pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated using RevMan 5.2 and Stata 12.0 software. Publication bias and sensitivity analysis were also assessed. A total of 15 case-control studies involving 5,176 cases and 5 890 controls were included in the meta-analysis. The results showed that individuals with GSTM1 null genotype harbored a significantly increased risk of breast cancer compared to that with GSTM1 non-null genotype in Chinese population (OR=1.34, 95%CI=1.12-1.60, P=0.002). The subgroup analysis by region revealed that the individuals with GSTM1 null genotype were significantly associated with an increased risk of breast cancer in southern and northern China populations (southern: OR=1.14, 95%CI=1.01-1.28, P=0.03; northern: OR=2.65, 95%CI=2.04-3.34, P<0.01). The current meta-analysis demonstrates that the GSTM1 polymorphism is significantly associated with susceptibility to breast cancer in Chinese population, and the GSTM1-deficit may increase the risk of breast cancer.

  16. Renal and vascular glutathione S-transferase mu is not affected by pharmacological intervention to reduce systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Koh-Tan, Han Hui Caline; Graham, Delyth; Hamilton, Carlene A; Nicoll, Gavin; Fields, Laura; McBride, Martin W; Young, Barbara; Dominiczak, Anna F

    2009-08-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated reduced rat glutathione S-transferase mu type 1 (Gstm1) expression in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSPs), when compared with the normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rat. This study investigated the effects of angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker (ARB) and a diuretic/vasodilator combination on the expression levels of rat Gstm1 and other Gstm isoforms. Antihypertensive treatments of young and mature SHRSPs with an ARB and a diuretic/vasodilator combination improved SBP but did not affect the expression levels of Gstm1. Although Gstm1 is a member of a family of highly homologous genes, with the exception of Gstm2, there was no evidence for compensatory increase in expression of other Gstm isoforms. In contrast, we observed reduced expression of several other Gstm isoforms in untreated SHRSPs. Untreated SHRSPs demonstrated increased renal and vascular oxidative stress, both of which were not significantly affected by the antihypertensive treatments. Untreated SHRSPs scored significantly higher when assessed for renal histopathological damage, and this was improved by antihypertensive treatments. These results suggest that reduced Gstm1 expression in SHRSPs is due to strain-dependent genetic abnormalities, playing a causative role in the development of hypertension, probably through oxidative stress pathway. Renal changes occur as a consequence of increased blood pressure and can be improved when treated with antihypertensive drugs. In silico comparative genome analysis combined with expression studies in rat and human vascular tissue revealed that there are possible four human homologues (GSTM1, GSTM2, GSTM4 and GSTM5) for rat Gstm1.

  17. Glutathione S-Transferase (GST) Gene Diversity in the Crustacean Calanus finmarchicus – Contributors to Cellular Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Passamaneck, Yale; Christie, Andrew E.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2015-01-01

    Detoxification is a fundamental cellular stress defense mechanism, which allows an organism to survive or even thrive in the presence of environmental toxins and/or pollutants. The glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily is a set of enzymes involved in the detoxification process. This highly diverse protein superfamily is characterized by multiple gene duplications, with over 40 GST genes reported in some insects. However, less is known about the GST superfamily in marine organisms, including crustaceans. The availability of two de novo transcriptomes for the copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, provided an opportunity for an in depth study of the GST superfamily in a marine crustacean. The transcriptomes were searched for putative GST-encoding transcripts using known GST proteins from three arthropods as queries. The identified transcripts were then translated into proteins, analyzed for structural domains, and annotated using reciprocal BLAST analysis. Mining the two transcriptomes yielded a total of 41 predicted GST proteins belonging to the cytosolic, mitochondrial or microsomal classes. Phylogenetic analysis of the cytosolic GSTs validated their annotation into six different subclasses. The predicted proteins are likely to represent the products of distinct genes, suggesting that the diversity of GSTs in C. finmarchicus exceeds or rivals that described for insects. Analysis of relative gene expression in different developmental stages indicated low levels of GST expression in embryos, and relatively high expression in late copepodites and adult females for several cytosolic GSTs. A diverse diet and complex life history are factors that might be driving the multiplicity of GSTs in C. finmarchicus, as this copepod is commonly exposed to a variety of natural toxins. Hence, diversity in detoxification pathway proteins may well be key to their survival. PMID:25945801

  18. Genetic variability of DNA repair mechanisms and glutathione-S-transferase genes influences treatment outcome in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Goričar, Katja; Kovač, Viljem; Jazbec, Janez; Zakotnik, Branko; Lamovec, Janez; Dolžan, Vita

    2015-04-01

    Osteosarcoma patients are commonly treated with cisplatin-based preoperative and postoperative chemotherapy. Cisplatin binds to DNA and forms both intrastrand and interstrand crosslinks, inhibiting DNA replication. Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) participate in cisplatin detoxification, while several independent DNA repair mechanisms repair cisplatin-induced lesions. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of genetic variability of DNA repair mechanisms and GSTs on efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin-based chemotherapy in osteosarcoma patients. A total of 66 osteosarcoma patients were genotyped for ERCC1, ERCC2, NBN, RAD51, XRCC3, and GSTP1 polymorphisms, as well as GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene deletion. We determined the influence of polymorphisms on survival and treatment outcome using Cox regression and logistic regression. Carriers of at least one polymorphic ERCC2 rs1799793 allele had longer event-free survival (EFS) (P=0.006; hazard ratio (HR)=0.28; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.11-0.70). Polymorphic GSTP1 rs1138272 allele was associated with both shorter EFS and OS (P=0.005; HR=3.67; 95%CI=1.47-9.16; and P=0.004; HR=3.52; 95%CI=1.51-8.22, respectively). Compared to the reference NBN CAA haplotype, NBN CGA haplotype was associated with shorter EFS (P=0.001; HR=4.12; 95%CI=1.77-9.56). Our results suggest that DNA repair polymorphisms and GST polymorphisms could be used as predictive factors for cisplatin-based chemotherapy in osteosarcoma patients and could contribute to treatment personalization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Glutathione S-transferase omega-1 modifies age-at-onset of Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Ju; Oliveira, Sofia A; Xu, Puting; Martin, Eden R; Stenger, Judith E; Scherzer, Clemens R; Hauser, Michael A; Scott, William K; Small, Gary W; Nance, Martha A; Watts, Ray L; Hubble, Jean P; Koller, William C; Pahwa, Rajesh; Stern, Mathew B; Hiner, Bradley C; Jankovic, Joseph; Goetz, Christopher G; Mastaglia, Frank; Middleton, Lefkos T; Roses, Allen D; Saunders, Ann M; Schmechel, Donald E; Gullans, Steven R; Haines, Jonathan L; Gilbert, John R; Vance, Jeffery M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Hulette, Christine; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A

    2003-12-15

    We previously reported genetic linkage of loci controlling age-at-onset in Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) to a 15 cM region on chromosome 10q. Given the large number of genes in this initial starting region, we applied the process of 'genomic convergence' to prioritize and reduce the number of candidate genes for further analysis. As our second convergence factor we performed gene expression studies on hippocampus obtained from AD patients and controls. Analysis revealed that four of the genes [stearoyl-CoA desaturase; NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase 1 beta subcomplex 8; protease, serine 11; and glutathione S-transferase, omega-1 (GSTO1)] were significantly different in their expression between AD and controls and mapped to the 10q age-at-onset linkage region, the first convergence factor. Using 2814 samples from our AD dataset (1773 AD patients) and 1362 samples from our PD dataset (635 PD patients), allelic association studies for age-at-onset effects in AD and PD revealed no association for three of the candidates, but a significant association was found for GSTO1 (P=0.007) and a second transcribed member of the GST omega class, GSTO2 (P=0.005), located next to GSTO1. The functions of GSTO1 and GSTO2 are not well understood, but recent data suggest that GSTO1 maybe involved in the post-translational modification of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta. This is provocative given reports of the possible role of inflammation in these two neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Fine Particle, Ozone Exposure, and Asthma/Wheezing: Effect Modification by Glutathione S-transferase P1 Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Bing-Fang; Young, Li-Hao; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Tung, Kuan-Yen; Wang, Pei-Chuan; Su, Ming-Wei; Lee, Yungling Leo

    2013-01-01

    Background There are limited studies on the role of interaction between exposure to ambient air pollution and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) P1 on the risk of asthma/wheezing among children, which provided suggestive, but inconclusive results. Methods To assess the joint effect of air pollutants and GSTP1 on asthma/wheezing, we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional study of 3,825 children in Taiwan Children Health Study. The studied determinants were three GSTP1 Ile105Val (rs 1695) genotypes (Ile-Ile; Ile-Val and Val-Val) and expoure to ambient air pollutants. We used routine air-pollution monitoring data for ozone (O3) and particles with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 µm or less (PM2.5). The effect estimates were presented as odds ratios (ORs) per interquartile changes for PM2.5 and O3. Findings In a two-stage hierarchical model adjusting for confounding, the risk of asthma was negatively associated with PM2.5 (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.60; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45, 0.82) and O3 (OR 0.74; 95% CI 0.60, 0.90) among Ile105 homozygotes, but positively associated with PM2.5 (OR 1.52; 95% CI 1.01, 2.27) and O3 (OR 1.19; 95% CI 0.91, 1.57) among those with at least one val105 allele (interaction p value = 0.001 and 0.03, respectively). A similar tendency of effect modification between PM2.5 and O3 and GSTP1 on wheezing was found. Conclusion Children who carried Ile105 variant allele and exposed to PM2.5 and O3 may be less likely to occurrence of asthma/wheezing. PMID:23357926

  1. Perfluorooctanoic acid induces gene promoter hypermethylation of glutathione-S-transferase Pi in human liver L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Meiping; Peng, Siyuan; Martin, Francis L; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Liangpo; Wang, Zhanlin; Dong, Sijun; Shen, Heqing

    2012-06-14

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is one of the most commonly used perfluorinated compounds. Being a persistent environmental pollutant, it can accumulate in human tissues via various exposure routes. PFOA may interfere in a toxic fashion on the immune system, liver, development, and endocrine systems. In utero human exposure had been associated with cord serum global DNA hypomethylation. In light of this, we investigated possible PFOA-induced DNA methylation alterations in L02 cells in order to shed light into its epigenetic-mediated mechanisms of toxicity in human liver. L02 cells were exposed to 5, 10, 25, 50 or 100 mg/L PFOA for 72h. Global DNA methylation levels were determined by LC/ESI-MS, glutathione-S-transferase Pi (GSTP) gene promoter DNA methylation was investigated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with bisulfite sequencing, and consequent mRNA expression levels were measured with quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. A dose-related increase of GSTP promoter methylation at the transcription factor specificity protein 1 (SP1) binding site was observed. However, PFOA did not significantly influence global DNA methylation; nor did it markedly alter the promoter gene methylation of p16 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A), ERα (estrogen receptor α) or PRB (progesterone receptor B). In addition, PFOA significantly elevated mRNA transcript levels of DNMT3A (which mediates de novo DNA methylation), Acox (lipid metabolism) and p16 (cell apoptosis). Considering the role of GSTP in detoxification, aberrant methylation may be pivotal in PFOA-mediated toxicity response via the inhibition of SP1 binding to GSTP promoter.

  2. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene polymorphisms, cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer risk among Chinese in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Woon-Puay; Nelson, Heather H.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Van den Berg, David; Jin, Aizhen; Wang, Renwei; Yu, Mimi C.

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for colorectal cancer. Putative colorectal procarcinogens in tobacco smoke include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic aromatic amines that are known substrates of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). This study examined the influence of functional GST gene polymorphisms on the smoking–colorectal cancer association in a population known to be minimally exposed to dietary sources of these procarcinogens. Incident cases of colorectal cancer (n = 480) and matched controls (n = 1167) were selected from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based prospective cohort of 63 257 men and women who have been followed since 1993. We determined the deletion polymorphisms of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and the functional polymorphism at codon 105 of GSTP1 for each subject. A three level composite GST index was used to examine if GST profile affected a smoker’s risk of developing colorectal cancer. While there was no statistically significant association between cigarette smoking and colorectal cancer risk among subjects absent of any at-risk GST genotypes, smokers possessing two to three at-risk GST genotypes exhibited a statistically significant increased risk of colorectal cancer compared with non-smokers (P = 0.0002). In this latter stratum, heavy smokers exhibited a >5-fold increased risk relative to never-smokers (odds ratio, 5.43; 95% confidence interval, 2.22–13.23). Subjects with one at-risk GST genotype displayed a statistically significant but weaker association with smoking. These findings suggest that GST gene polymorphisms influence interindividual susceptibility to smoking-associated colorectal cancer. Our data indicate an important role for GST enzymes in the detoxification of colorectal carcinogens in tobacco smoke. PMID:21803734

  3. Influence of Glutathione S-Transferase Polymorphisms on Cognitive Functioning Effects Induced by p,p′-DDT among Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Eva; Sunyer, Jordi; Castro-Giner, Francesc; Estivill, Xavier; Julvez, Jordi; Ribas-Fitó, Nuria; Torrent, Maties; Grimalt, Joan O.; de Cid, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    Background Early-life exposure to p,p′-DDT [2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane] is associated with a decrease in cognitive skills among preschoolers at 4 years of age. We hypothesized that genetic variability in glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes (GSTP1, GSTM1, and GSTT1) could influence the effects of prenatal exposure to p,p′-DDT. Methods We used data from 326 children assessed in a prospective population-based birth cohort at the age of 4 years. In that study, the McCarthy Scales of Children’s Abilities were administrated by psychologists, organochlorine compounds were measured in cord serum, and genotyping was conducted for the coding variant Ile105Val from GSTP1 and for null alleles from GSTM1 and GSTT1. We used linear regression models to measure the association between organochlorines and neurodevelopmental scores by GST polymorphisms. Results p,p′-DDT cord serum concentration was inversely associated with general cognitive, memory, quantitative, and verbal skills, as well as executive function and working memory, in children who had any GSTP1 Val-105 allele. GSTP1 polymorphisms and prenatal p,p′-DDT exposure showed a statistically significant interaction for general cognitive skills (p = 0.05), quantitative skills (p = 0.02), executive function (p = 0.01), and working memory (p = 0.02). There were no significant associations between p,p′-DDT and cognitive functioning at 4 years of age according to GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms. Conclusions Results indicate that children with GSTP1 Val-105 allele were at higher risk of the adverse cognitive functioning effects of prenatal p,p′-DDT exposure. PMID:19057715

  4. Genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily and arsenic metabolism in residents of the Red River Delta, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Hisato; Fujihara, Junko; Kunito, Takashi; Takeshita, Haruo; Minh, Tu Binh; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Viet, Pham Hung; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2010-02-01

    To elucidate the role of genetic factors in arsenic metabolism, we investigated associations of genetic polymorphisms in the members of glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily with the arsenic concentrations in hair and urine, and urinary arsenic profile in residents in the Red River Delta, Vietnam. Genotyping was conducted for GST omega1 (GSTO1) Ala140Asp, Glu155del, Glu208Lys, Thr217Asn, and Ala236Val, GST omega2 (GSTO2) Asn142Asp, GST pi1 (GSTP1) Ile105Val, GST mu1 (GSTM1) wild/null, and GST theta1 (GSTT1) wild/null. There were no mutation alleles for GSTO1 Glu208Lys, Thr217Asn, and Ala236Val in this population. GSTO1 Glu155del hetero type showed higher urinary concentration of As(V) than the wild homo type. Higher percentage of DMA(V) in urine of GSTM1 wild type was observed compared with that of the null type. Strong correlations between GSTP1 Ile105Val and arsenic exposure level and profile were observed in this study. Especially, heterozygote of GSTP1 Ile105Val had a higher metabolic capacity from inorganic arsenic to monomethyl arsenic, while the opposite trend was observed for ability of metabolism from As(V) to As(III). Furthermore, other factors including sex, age, body mass index, arsenic level in drinking water, and genotypes of As (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) were also significantly co-associated with arsenic level and profile in the Vietnamese. To our knowledge, this is the first study indicating the associations of genetic factors of GST superfamily with arsenic metabolism in a Vietnamese population.

  5. [A study on sex chromosome mosaicism--endocrinological and immunohistochemical findings with glutathion S-transferase in the gonads].

    PubMed

    Nonomura, K; Koyama, T; Toyota, K; Asano, Y; Gotoh, T; Togashi, M; Koyanagi, T; Adachi, Y; Fujieda, K

    1990-03-01

    In order to clarify the clinical aspects of sex chromosomal mosaicism, we evaluated the karyotypes, the anatomy of external genitalia and internal ductal system, the pituitary-gonadal function, and the histopathology of the gonads by immuno-staining for glutathion S-transferase (GST) in 5 patients who had been all raised as female. Three patients have the 45, X/46, XYq- karyotype in the initial lymphocyte culture or the subsequent culture of skin fibroblasts. Another two karyotypes were 45, X/46, XYq-/47, XYq-, Yq- and 45, X/46, XdicY. Thus, Y chromosome of all patients retained short arms in which the testis determining factor is encoded. Three prepubertal patients were referred to us for their ambigious external genitalia and two postpubertal patients were for the short statures. Although the vaginal orifice was separated from the urethral meatus in all of them, the phallic enlargement was noted in 4 patients and the posterior labial fusion in 2 patients. The oldest patient had a normal female appearance of external genitalia except the vaginal septum. Serum gonadotrophin (GnH) levels were basically high in the postopubertal patients and the responses of GnH to LH-RH were significantly increased in the prepubertal patients. Serum testosterone levels to hCG stimulation ranged from no response to low normal response. All patients underwent the exploratory laparotomy together with the feminizing genitoplasty. The gonads in 3 patients, diagnosed as mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD), consisted of a unilateral testis and a contralateral streak gonad. Two patients had variants, including one with bilateral dysgenetic testis and another with bilateral streak gonads.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Cardiovascular Effects of Ozone in Healthy Subjects with and without Deletion of Glutathione-S-Transferase M1

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Mark W.; Pietropaoli, Anthony; Dentler, Michael; Chalupa, David; Little, Erika L.; Stewart, Judith; Frasier, Lauren; Oakes, David; Wiltshire, Jelani; Vora, Rathin; Utell, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Context Exposure to ozone has acute respiratory effects, but few human clinical studies have evaluated cardiovascular effects. Objective We hypothesized that ozone exposure alters pulmonary and systemic vascular function, and cardiac function, with more pronounced effects in subjects with impaired antioxidant defense from deletion of the glutathione S-transferase M1 gene (GSTM1 null). Methods 24 young, healthy never-smoker subjects (12 GSTM1 null) inhaled filtered air, 100 ppb ozone, and 200 ppb ozone for 3 hours, with intermittent exercise, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover fashion. Exposures were separated by at least 2 weeks. Vital signs, spirometry, arterial and venous blood nitrite levels, impedance cardiography, peripheral arterial tonometry, estimation of pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), and blood microparticles and platelet activation were measured at baseline and during 4 hours after each exposure. Results Ozone inhalation decreased lung function immediately after exposure (mean±SE change in FEV1, air: −0.03±0.04 L; 200 ppb ozone: −0.30±0.07 L; p<0.001). The immediate post-exposure increase in blood pressure, caused by the final 15-minute exercise period, was blunted by 200 ppb ozone exposure (mean±SE change for air: 16.7±2.6 mm Hg; 100 ppb ozone: 14.5±2.4 mm Hg; 200 ppb ozone: 8.5±2.5 mm Hg; p=0.02). We found no consistent effects of ozone on any other measure of cardiac or vascular function. All results were independent of the GSTM1 genotype. Conclusions We did not find convincing evidence for early acute adverse cardiovascular consequences of ozone exposure in young healthy adults. The ozone-associated blunting of the blood-pressure response to exercise is of unclear clinical significance. PMID:25600221

  7. Transcriptional effects on glutathione S-transferases in first feeding Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae exposed to crude oil.

    PubMed

    Olsvik, P A; Nordtug, T; Altin, D; Lie, K K; Overrein, I; Hansen, B H

    2010-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other oil compounds are known to induce stress and impact health of marine organisms. Water-soluble fractions of oil contain components known to induce glutathione S-transferases (GSTs), one of the major classes of phase II detoxifying enzymes present in essentially all eukaryotic organisms. In this study, the transcriptional responses of six GSTs (GST pi, GST mu, GST omega, GST theta, GSY zeta and GST kappa) were examined in early larvae of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua exposed to five concentrations of dispersed oil (containing oil droplets and water-soluble fraction) and water-soluble fractions (WSF) of oil. When Atlantic cod larvae were exposed to WSF (containing 1.31+/-0.31microg summation PAH/L for 4 days), expression of GSTM3 and GSTO1 was significantly increased, whereas no differences in GST expression were observed in larvae exposed to a corresponding 50% lower amount of dispersed oil (containing 0.36+/-0.10 microg summation PAH/L for 4 days). The study suggest that although the oil clearly had severe negative effects on the larvae (i.e. concentration-dependent lethality and growth reduction), only minor effects on GST transcription could be observed using RNA obtained from pooled whole-larvae homogenates. This result indicates that the expression of these important detoxification enzymes is only moderately inducible at such an early developmental stage either reflecting low tolerance of cod larvae to dispersed oil or alternatively that using whole-larvae homogenates may have masked tissue-specific mRNA induction.

  8. Expression level and DNA methylation status of Glutathione-S-transferase genes in normal murine prostate and TRAMP tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mavis, Cory K.; Kinney, Shannon R. Morey; Foster, Barbara A.; Karpf, Adam R.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glutathione-S-transferase (Gst) genes are down-regulated in human prostate cancer, and GSTP1 silencing is mediated by promoter DNA hypermethylation in this malignancy. We examined Gst gene expression and Gst promoter DNA methylation in normal murine prostates and Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) tumors. METHODS Primary and metastatic tumors were obtained from TRAMP mice, and normal prostates were obtained from strain-matched WT mice (n=15/group). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to measure GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1 mRNA expression, and Western blotting and immunohistochemical staining was used to measure GstM1 and GstP1 protein expression. MassARRAY Quantitative Methylation Analysis was used to measure DNA methylation of the 5’ CpG islands of GstA4, GstK1, GstM1, GstO1, and GstP1. TRAMP-C2 cells were treated with the epigenetic remodeling drugs decitabine and trichostatin A (TSA) alone and in combination, and Gst gene expression was measured. RESULTS Of the genes analyzed, GstM1 and GstP1 were expressed at highest levels in normal prostate. All five Gst genes showed greatly reduced expression in primary tumors compared to normal prostate, but not in tumor metastases. Gst promoter methylation was unchanged in TRAMP tumors compared to normal prostate. Combined decitabine + TSA treatment significantly enhanced the expression of 4/5 Gst genes in TRAMP-C2 cells. CONCLUSIONS Gst genes are extensively downregulated in primary but not metastatic TRAMP tumors. Promoter DNA hypermethylation does not appear to drive Gst gene repression in TRAMP primary tumors; however, pharmacological studies using TRAMP cells suggest the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in Gst gene repression. PMID:19444856

  9. Glutathione S-Transferases M1 and P1 Prevent Aggravation of Allergic Responses by Secondhand Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Gilliland, Frank D.; Li, Yu-Fen; Gong, Henry; Diaz-Sanchez, David

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: Secondhand tobacco smoke (SHS) and traffic-related air pollutants are associated with asthma and allergy. Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) and SHS can interact with allergens in exacerbating allergic airway diseases through generation of reactive oxygen species. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) metabolize reactive oxygen species and detoxify electrophilic xenobiotics present in SHS and DEPs. Objectives: We tested the hypotheses that functional GSTM1-null genotype and GSTP1 codon 105 variants (Ile105 and Val105) are determinants of allergic responses to SHS, and that responses to SHS and DEPs are correlated. Methods and Measurements: In a randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial, 19 ragweed allergen–sensitive subjects who had previously participated in a DEP trial were challenged intranasally with allergen after having been exposed to either clean air or SHS at separate visits. Nasal allergen–specific IgE, histamine, IL-4, and IFN-γ levels were measured before and after allergen challenge. Main Results: Individuals with GSTM1-null or GSTP1 Ile105 genotypes showed larger nasal responses to allergens with SHS compared with clean air. GSTM1-null subjects had a larger increase in IgE than GSTM1-present subjects (median, 173.3 vs. 46.7 U/ml; p = 0.03), and the Ile105 GSTP1 genotype subjects had increased histamine (median, 10.2 vs. 4.6 nM; p = 0.01) after SHS plus allergen challenge. Responses to SHS and DEPs were correlated. Enhancement of IgE and histamine was greatest in the subjects with both the GSTM1-null and GSTP1 Ile/Ile genotypes. Conclusions: GSTM1 and GSTP1 are important cytoprotective factors that reduce SHS and DEP exacerbation of allergic responses. PMID:17023730

  10. Glutathione S-transferases in human renal cortex and neoplastic tissue: enzymatic activity, isoenzyme profile and immunohistochemical localization.

    PubMed

    Rodilla, V; Benzie, A A; Veitch, J M; Murray, G I; Rowe, J D; Hawksworth, G M

    1998-05-01

    1. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in the cytosol of renal cortex and tumours from eight men and eight women was measured using 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as a substrate. GST activities ranged from 685 to 2192 nmol/min/mg protein in cortex (median 1213) and from non-detectable (minimum 45) to 2424 nmol/min/mg protein in tumours (median 469). The activities in the tumours were lower than those in the normal cortices (p < 0.05). 2. In men, the activity in the cortical cytosol was in all cases higher than that measured in the corresponding tumours (p < 0.05). In women, the difference in activity between cortices and tumours was not significantly different (p > 0.05). 3. The age of the patients ranged from 42 to 81 years (median 62) and was not found to play a role in the levels of GST activity observed in cortex or in renal tumours from either sex. 4. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemical studies confirmed that GST-alpha was the predominant form expressed both in normal cortex and tumour and probably accounted for most of the GST activity present in these samples. GST-mu and GST-phi were expressed in both tumours and normal cortex and, while in some cases the level of expression in the cortices was higher than that found in the tumours, the reverse was also observed. Within the GST-mu class, GST M1/M2 was only detected in one sample (tumour), which showed the highest overall expression of GST-mu. GSTM3 was the predominant isoenzyme of the mu class in normal and tumour tissue, whereas GTM4 and GSTM5 were not detected. 5. These differences could have functional significance where xenobiotics or cytotoxic drugs are specific substrates for the different classes of GSTs.

  11. Effects of insect viruses and pesticides on glutathione S-transferase activity and gene expression in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Gui, Zhongzheng; Hou, Chengxiang; Liu, Ting; Qin, Guangxin; Li, Muwang; Jin, Byungrae

    2009-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) is a gene family generally associated with detoxification and plays an important role in detoxifying exogenous compounds. The silkworm Bombyx mori is an important economic animal for silk production. However, it is liable to infection by a number of viruses and chemical agents that can contaminate its food and growing environment. Here we conducted a comparative study of strain- and tissue-specific expressions of GST in the silkworm under infections by Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) and Bombyx mori densonucleosis virus (BmDNV) and under the stress of pesticides (insecticide and herbicide). BmDNV induced an increase of GST at 24 h and a decrease at 48 and 72 h in the midgut of the DNV-susceptible strain and a decrease at 24 h and increase at 48 and 72 h in the midgut of the DNV-tolerant strain. BmDNV induced a significant increase of GST from 24 to 72 h in the fat body of both DNV-susceptible and DNV-tolerant strains. In contrast, BmNPV induced a significant decrease of GST in both the fat body and midgut of the NPV-susceptible strain and induced increase of GST from 24 to 48 h in the midgut and at 72 h in the fat body of the NPV-tolerant strain. All of these results suggest that BmGST activity varies with the strain, tissue, feeding behavior, and developmental stage of the silkworm. On treating silkworm larvae with pesticides (insecticide and herbicide), expression of the BmGSTS2 gene increased noticeably in the midgut and reached a peak at 6 to 12 h. The mRNA level of BmGSTS2 in the midgut increased during administration of the chemicals, suggesting that the induction of BmGSTS2 is part of the defense mechanism against exogenous chemicals.

  12. Sirtuin 3 enhanced drug sensitivity of human hepatoma cells through glutathione S-transferase pi 1/JNK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xue-Fei; Zhang, Wen-Lu; Ren, Ji-Hua; Zhou, Li; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Ke; Li, Wan-Yu; Liu, Bo; Yang, Qiu-Xia; Cheng, Sheng-Tao; Huang, Li-Xia; Huang, Ai-Long; Chen, Juan

    2016-01-01

    SIRT3, a class III histone deacetylase, has been implicated in various cancers as a novel therapeutic target. In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we previously reported that SIRT3 induced cell apoptosis by regulating GSK-3β/Bax signaling pathway. Downregulation of SIRT3 in HCC cells facilitates tumor cell survival. In this study, we found that chemotherapeutic agents (doxorubicin, cisplatin and epirubicin) and sorafenib treatment downregulated SIRT3 mRNA and protein levels in three HCC cell lines. MTS assay found that SIRT3 overexpression sensitized liver cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents and sorafenib in SMMC-7721, Huh-7 and PLC/PRF/5 cell lines. Moreover, SIRT3 overexpression promoted chemotherapeutic agents-induced or sorafenib-induced apoptosis as evidenced by flow cytometry, enhanced PARP cleavage and enhanced Caspase-9 cleavage in three HCC cells. In contrast, SIRT3 silencing increased drug resistance of HCC cells to chemotherapeutic agents. Mechanistic study found that SIRT3 downregulated the mRNA and protein levels of glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1), which is a member of phase II detoxification enzymes families involved in metabolizing for chemotherapeutic agents. Moreover, SIRT3 decreased the amount of GSTP1 that was associated with JNK, which finally contributed the activation of JNK activity and activation of downstream target c-Jun and Bim. Importantly, GSTP1 overexpression or JNK inhibitor abolished SIRT3-induced apoptosis in HCC cells exposed to chemotherapeutic agents. Finally, there was a negative correlation between SIRT3 expression and GSTP1 expression in human HCC tissues. Together, our findings revealed SIRT3 could enhance the drug sensitivity of HCC cells to an array of chemotherapeutic agents. SIRT3 may serve as a potential target for improving the chemosensitivity of HCC patients. PMID:27367026

  13. Growth Hormone Alters the Glutathione S-Transferase and Mitochondrial Thioredoxin Systems in Long-Living Ames Dwarf Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene

    2014-01-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH’s actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance. PMID:24285747

  14. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) family in barley: identification of members, enzyme activity, and gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Rezaei, Mohammad Kazem; Shobbar, Zahra-Sadat; Shahbazi, Maryam; Abedini, Raha; Zare, Sajjad

    2013-09-15

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is one of the most important cereals in many developing countries where drought stress considerably diminishes agricultural production. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs EC 2.5.1.18) are multifunctional enzymes which play a crucial role in cellular detoxification and oxidative stress tolerance. In this study, 84 GST genes were identified in barley by a comprehensive in silico approach. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis grouped these HvGST proteins in eight classes. The largest numbers of the HvGST genes (50) were included in the Tau class followed by 21 genes in Phi, five in Zeta, two in DHAR, two in EF1G, two in Lambda, and one each in TCHQD and Theta classes. Phylogenetic analysis of the putative GSTs from Arabidopsis, rice, and barley indicated that major functional diversification within the GST family predated the monocot/dicot divergence. However, intra-specious duplication seems to be common. Expression patterns of five GST genes from Phi and Tau classes were investigated in three barley genotypes (Yusof [drought-tolerant], Moroc9-75 [drought-sensitive], and HS1 [wild ecotype]) under control and drought-stressed conditions, during the vegetative stage. All investigated genes were up-regulated significantly under drought stress and/or showed a higher level of transcripts in the tolerant cultivar. Additionally, GST enzyme activity was superior in Yusof and induced in the extreme-drought-treated leaves, while it was not changed in Moroc9-75 under drought conditions. Moreover, the lowest and highest levels of lipid peroxidation were observed in the Yusof and Moroc9-75 cultivars, respectively. Based on the achieved results, detoxification and antioxidant activity of GSTs might be considered an important factor in the drought tolerance of barley genotypes for further investigations.

  15. Antibodies against glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) in patients with de novo immune hepatitis following liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, I; Wichmann, I; Sousa, J M; Bernardos, A; Franco, E; García-Lozano, J R; Núñez-Roldán, A

    2001-01-01

    Four patients of 283 liver-transplant recipients (1·4%) developed de novo immune-mediated hepatitis approximately 2 years after transplantation. Antibodies showing an unusual liver/kidney cytoplasmic staining pattern were detected in the sera of all four patients and one of them was used to screen a human liver cDNA expression library with the aim of identifying the antigenic target of these newly developed antibodies. After cloning and sequencing the gene, it was identified as the gene encoding the glutathion-S-transferase T1 (GSTT1), a 29-kD molecular weight protein, expressed abundantly in liver and kidney. Sera from the other three patients also contained anti-GSTT1 antibodies, two of them demonstrated by immunoblot analysis against the recombinant antigen and the other, which was negative by immunoblot, gave a positive reaction when used directly to screen the same library, suggesting it to be directed to a conformational epitope. The GSTT1 enzyme is the product of a single polymorphic gene that is absent from 20% of the Caucasian population. When we analysed the GSTT1 genotype of the four patients described above, we found that this gene is absent from all of them. Three donor paraffin embedded DNA samples were available and were shown to be positive for GSSTT1 genotype. In accordance with these results, we suggest that this form of post-transplant de novo immune hepatitis, that has been reported as autoimmune hepatitis by others, could be the result of an antigraft reaction in individuals lacking the GSTT1 phenotype, in which the immune system recognizes the GSTT1 protein as a non-self antigen, being the graft dysfunction not the result of an autoimmune reaction, but the consequence of an alo-reactive immune response. PMID:11737073

  16. Genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily and arsenic metabolism in residents of the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Hisato; Fujihara, Junko; Kunito, Takashi; Takeshita, Haruo; Tu Binh Minh; Pham Thi Kim Trang; Pham Hung Viet; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2010-02-01

    To elucidate the role of genetic factors in arsenic metabolism, we investigated associations of genetic polymorphisms in the members of glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily with the arsenic concentrations in hair and urine, and urinary arsenic profile in residents in the Red River Delta, Vietnam. Genotyping was conducted for GST omega1 (GSTO1) Ala140Asp, Glu155del, Glu208Lys, Thr217Asn, and Ala236Val, GST omega2 (GSTO2) Asn142Asp, GST pi1 (GSTP1) Ile105Val, GST mu1 (GSTM1) wild/null, and GST theta1 (GSTT1) wild/null. There were no mutation alleles for GSTO1 Glu208Lys, Thr217Asn, and Ala236Val in this population. GSTO1 Glu155del hetero type showed higher urinary concentration of As{sup V} than the wild homo type. Higher percentage of DMA{sup V} in urine of GSTM1 wild type was observed compared with that of the null type. Strong correlations between GSTP1 Ile105Val and arsenic exposure level and profile were observed in this study. Especially, heterozygote of GSTP1 Ile105Val had a higher metabolic capacity from inorganic arsenic to monomethyl arsenic, while the opposite trend was observed for ability of metabolism from As{sup V} to As{sup III}. Furthermore, other factors including sex, age, body mass index, arsenic level in drinking water, and genotypes of As (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) were also significantly co-associated with arsenic level and profile in the Vietnamese. To our knowledge, this is the first study indicating the associations of genetic factors of GST superfamily with arsenic metabolism in a Vietnamese population.

  17. Purification of Glutathione S-Transferase pi from Erythrocytes and Evaluation of the Inhibitory Effect of Hypericin.

    PubMed

    Turk, Seyhan; Kulaksiz Erkmen, Gulnihal; Dalmizrak, Ozlem; Ogus, I Hamdi; Ozer, Nazmi

    2015-12-01

    Hypericin is a photosensitizer compound used in the photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT is an alternative cancer treatment strategy whose function is dependent on the photosensitizers accumulating selectively in tumor cells and following visible or infra-red light induced activation lead to the apoptosis/necrosis of the tumor cells via the formation of reactive oxygen species. Thus, the cellular redox balance is essential for the efficacy of PDT. Among the protective enzyme systems glutathione S-transferases (GST, E.C.2.5.1.18) function in detoxification, protection against oxidative stress and intracellular transport of molecules. It is known that isoenzymes of GST and especially GST-pi is increased in cancer cells and it plays very important functions in the development of resistance to anticancer drugs. Since photosensitizers are used intravenously, it is important to elucidate the effects of photosensitizers on the erythrocyte enzymes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of hypericin on human erythrocyte GST-pi (heGST-pi). Purification yield of 71% and purification fold of 2550 were achieved by using conventional chromatographic methods. The specific activity of the enzyme is found as 51 U/mg protein. Hypericin inhibited heGST-pi in a dose dependent manner and inhibition was biphasic. Noncompetitive type of inhibition was observed with both substrates, GSH and CDNB. The inhibitory constant (K i ) values obtained from Lineweaver-Burk, Dixon, secondary plots; slope and y-intercept versus 1/S (substrate) and from non-linear regression analysis were in good correlation: K i (GSH) was calculated as 0.19 ± 0.01 μM and K i (CDNB) as 0.26 ± 0.03 μM.

  18. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a glutathione S-transferase involved in both anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin accumulation in Camelina sativa (Brassicaceae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Tang, Y; Zhang, M; Cai, F; Qin, J; Wang, Q; Liu, C; Wang, G; Xu, L; Yang, L; Li, J; Wang, Z; Li, X

    2012-12-21

    Recently, we found that the Arabidopsis TT19 protein, a glutathione S-transferase, has two functional domains that influence both anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin accumulation. To further understand the function of this protein in the other species, we cloned a cDNA encoding a glutathione S-transferase (namely CMGSTF12) from Camelina sativa, an oil crop that has received renewed interest due to its biofuel value and high omega-3 levels. Southern blot analysis demonstrated one copy of CMGSTF12 in C. sativa. Transformation of the Arabidopsis loss-of-function tt19-1 mutant with CMGSTF12 cDNA complemented accumulation of anthocyanin in vegetative tissues and resulted in the wild-type level of proanthocyanidin (both extractable and unextractable) in seeds. No obvious flavonoid accumulation changes were detected in the transgenic seeds, indicating that CMGSTF12 may only involve the lower flavonoid pathway, further proving that the TT19 protein controls accumulation of unextractable proanthocyanidin.

  19. A Simple Colorimetric Assay for Specific Detection of Glutathione-S Transferase Activity Associated with DDT Resistance in Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Rajatileka, Shavanti; Steven, Andrew; Hemingway, Janet; Ranson, Hilary; Paine, Mark; Vontas, John

    2010-01-01

    Background Insecticide-based methods represent the most effective means of blocking the transmission of vector borne diseases. However, insecticide resistance poses a serious threat and there is a need for tools, such as diagnostic tests for resistance detection, that will improve the sustainability of control interventions. The development of such tools for metabolism-based resistance in mosquito vectors lags behind those for target site resistance mutations. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed and validated a simple colorimetric assay for the detection of Epsilon class Glutathione transferases (GST)-based DDT resistance in mosquito species, such as Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue and yellow fever worldwide. The colorimetric assay is based on the specific alkyl transferase activity of Epsilon GSTs for the haloalkene substrate iodoethane, which produces a dark blue colour highly correlated with AaGSTE2-2-overexpression in individual mosquitoes. The colour can be measured visually and spectrophotometrically. Conclusions/Significance The novel assay is substantially more sensitive compared to the gold standard CDNB assay and allows the discrimination of moderate resistance phenotypes. We anticipate that it will have direct application in routine vector monitoring as a resistance indicator and possibly an important impact on disease vector control. PMID:20824165

  20. Susceptibility to endometrial cancer: influence of allelism at p53, glutathione S-transferase (GSTM1 and GSTT1) and cytochrome P-450 (CYP1A1) loci.

    PubMed Central

    Esteller, M.; García, A.; Martínez-Palones, J. M.; Xercavins, J.; Reventós, J.

    1997-01-01

    A case-control study was designed to identify associations between polymorphisms at p53, cytochrome P-450 (CYP1A1) and glutathione-S-transferases and endometrial cancer susceptibility. Among all polymorphisms analysed, an insertional variant in p53 (P53PIN3) and two polymorphisms in the 3'-end and exon 7 of CYP1A1 showed significant association with enhanced endometrial cancer risk. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9155064

  1. Glutathione S-transferases and UDP-glycosyltransferases Are Involved in Response to Aluminum Stress in Flax

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Alexey A.; Krasnov, George S.; Rozhmina, Tatiana A.; Kishlyan, Natalya V.; Zyablitsin, Alexander V.; Sadritdinova, Asiya F.; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V.; Fedorova, Maria S.; Yurkevich, Olga Y.; Muravenko, Olga V.; Bolsheva, Nadezhda L.; Kudryavtseva, Anna V.; Melnikova, Nataliya V.

    2016-01-01

    About 30% of the world's ice-free land area is occupied by acid soils. In soils with pH below 5, aluminum (Al) releases to the soil solution, and becomes highly toxic for plants. Therefore, breeding of varieties that are resistant to Al is needed. Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is grown worldwide for fiber and seed production. Al toxicity in acid soils is a serious problem for flax cultivation. However, very little is known about mechanisms of flax resistance to Al and the genetics of this resistance. In the present work, we sequenced 16 transcriptomes of flax cultivars resistant (Hermes and TMP1919) and sensitive (Lira and Orshanskiy) to Al, which were exposed to control conditions and aluminum treatment for 4, 12, and 24 h. In total, 44.9–63.3 million paired-end 100-nucleotide reads were generated for each sequencing library. Based on the obtained high-throughput sequencing data, genes with differential expression under aluminum exposure were revealed in flax. The majority of the top 50 up-regulated genes were involved in transmembrane transport and transporter activity in both the Al-resistant and Al-sensitive cultivars. However, genes encoding proteins with glutathione transferase and UDP-glycosyltransferase activity were in the top 50 up-regulated genes only in the flax cultivars resistant to aluminum. For qPCR analysis in extended sampling, two UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs), and three glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) were selected. The general trend of alterations in the expression of the examined genes was the up-regulation under Al stress, especially after 4 h of Al exposure. Moreover, in the flax cultivars resistant to aluminum, the increase in expression was more pronounced than that in the sensitive cultivars. We speculate that the defense against the Al toxicity via GST antioxidant activity is the probable mechanism of the response of flax plants to aluminum stress. We also suggest that UGTs could be involved in cell wall modification and protection

  2. Glutathione S-transferase pi modulates NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory responses in lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jane T.; Qian, Xi; van der Velden, Jos L.J.; Chia, Shi Biao; McMillan, David H.; Flemer, Stevenson; Hoffman, Sidra M.; Lahue, Karolyn G.; Schneider, Robert W.; Nolin, James D.; Anathy, Vikas; van der Vliet, Albert; Townsend, Danyelle M.; Tew, Kenneth D.; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a transcription factor family critical in the activation of pro- inflammatory responses. The NF-κB pathway is regulated by oxidant-induced post-translational modifications. Protein S-glutathionylation, or the conjugation of the antioxidant molecule, glutathione to reactive cysteines inhibits the activity of inhibitory kappa B kinase beta (IKKβ), among other NF-κB proteins. Glutathione S-transferase Pi (GSTP) is an enzyme that has been shown to catalyze protein S-glutathionylation (PSSG) under conditions of oxidative stress. The objective of the present study was to determine whether GSTP regulates NF-κB signaling, S-glutathionylation of IKK, and subsequent pro-inflammatory signaling. We demonstrated that, in unstimulated cells, GSTP associated with the inhibitor of NF-κB, IκBα. However, exposure to LPS resulted in a rapid loss of association between IκBα and GSTP, and instead led to a protracted association between IKKβ and GSTP. LPS exposure also led to increases in the S-glutathionylation of IKKβ. SiRNA-mediated knockdown of GSTP decreased IKKβ-SSG, and enhanced NF-κB nuclear translocation, transcriptional activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TLK117, an isotype-selective inhibitor of GSTP, also enhanced LPS-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, suggesting that the catalytic activity of GSTP is important in repressing NF-κB activation. Expression of both wild-type and catalytically-inactive Y7F mutant GSTP significantly attenuated LPS- or IKKβ-induced production of GM-CSF. These studies indicate a complex role for GSTP in modulating NF-κB, which may involve S-glutathionylation of IKK proteins, and interaction with NF-κB family members. Our findings suggest that targeting GSTP is a potential avenue for regulating the activity of this prominent pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory transcription factor. PMID:27058114

  3. Benzene exposure assessed by metabolite excretion in Estonian oil shale mineworkers: influence of glutathione s-transferase polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Mette; Poole, Jason; Autrup, Herman; Muzyka, Vladimir; Jensen, Annie; Loft, Steffen; Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2004-11-01

    Measurement of urinary excretion of the benzene metabolites S-phenylmercapturic acid (S-PMA) and trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) has been proposed for assessing benzene exposure, in workplaces with relatively high benzene concentrations. Excretion of S-PMA and t,t-MA in underground workers at an oil shale mine were compared with the excretion in workers engaged in various production assignments above ground. In addition, possible modifying effects of genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferases T1 (GSTT1), M1 (GSTM1), and P1 (GSTP1) on the excretion of S-PMA and t,t-MA were investigated. Fifty underground workers and 50 surface workers participated. Blood samples and three urine samples were collected from each worker: (a) a preshift sample collected the morning after a weekend, (b) a postshift sample 1 collected after the first shift, and (c) a postshift sample 2 collected after the last shift of the week. Personal benzene exposure was 114 +/- 35 mug/m(3) in surface workers (n = 15) and 190 +/- 50 mug/m(3) in underground workers (n = 15) in measurements made prior to the study. We found t,t-MA excretion to be significantly higher in underground workers after the end of shifts 1 and 2 compared with the corresponding surface workers. The same picture, although not significant, was seen for S-PMA excretion. Excretion of S-PMA and t,t-MA was found to increase significantly during the working week in underground workers but not in those employed on the surface. Both t,t-MA and S-PMA excretion were significantly higher in smokers compared with nonsmokers. Subjects carrying the GSTT1 wild-type excreted higher concentrations of S-PMA than subjects carrying the null genotype, suggesting that it is a key enzyme in the glutathione conjugation that leads to S-PMA. The results support the use of benzene metabolites as biomarkers for assessment of exposure at modest levels and warrant for further investigations of health risks of occupational benzene exposure in shale

  4. Evaluation of aflatoxin B/sub 1/ mutagenesis: addition of glutathione and glutathione-S-transferase to the Salmonella mutagenicity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, K.V.; Clayton, J.W.; Price, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of glutathione (GSH) and the combination of GSH and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) on aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB/sub 1/) mutagenesis in the Salmonella mutagenicity assay using Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100 were tested. Ten concentrations of AFB/sub 1/ (0-1.0 ..mu..g/plate) were added to a liver microsomal homogenate (S9 mix) or to S9 mix containing GSH or S9 mix containing the combination of GSH + GST. One third of the samples were plated directly. Two-thirds were incubated for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C prior to plating, and of those, half included bacteria. The results show that the addition of GSH and GSH + GST affected AFB/sub 1/ mutagenesis by forming the AFB/sub 1/-GSH conjugate and decreasing the availability of AFB/sub 1/-8,9-epoxide. The effect of GST on GSH activity varied with the strain because of the different amounts of S9 mix used. The formation of the AFB/sub 1/-GSH conjugate was verified by using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography for quantitation of AFB/sub 1/ and detection of AFB/sub 1/-GSH.

  5. Two Pear Glutathione S-Transferases Genes Are Regulated during Fruit Development and Involved in Response to Salicylic Acid, Auxin, and Glucose Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hai-Yan; Li, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Xing; Chen, Liang; Xiang, Di-Ying; Zhang, Yu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Two genes encoding putative glutathione S-transferase proteins were isolated from pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) and designated PpGST1 and PpGST2. The deduced PpGST1 and PpGST2 proteins contain conserved Glutathione S-transferase N-terminal domain (GST_N) and Glutathione S-transferase, C-terminal domain (GST_C). Using PCR amplification technique, the genomic clones corresponding to PpGST1 and PpGST2 were isolated and shown to contain two introns and a singal intron respectively with typical GT/AG boundaries defining the splice junctions. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that PpGST1 belonged to Phi class of GST superfamilies and had high homology with apple MdGST, while PpGST2 was classified into the Tau class of GST superfamilies. The expression of PpGST1 and PpGST2 genes was developmentally regulated in fruit. Further study demonstrated that PpGST1 and PpGST2 expression was remarkably induced by glucose, salicylic acid (SA) and indole-3-aceticacid (IAA) treatments in pear fruit, and in diseased fruit. These data suggested that PpGST1 and PpGST2 might be involved in response to sugar, SA, and IAA signaling during fruit development of pear. PMID:24587129

  6. Two pear glutathione S-transferases genes are regulated during fruit development and involved in response to salicylic acid, auxin, and glucose signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Yan; Li, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Xing; Chen, Liang; Xiang, Di-Ying; Zhang, Yu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    Two genes encoding putative glutathione S-transferase proteins were isolated from pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) and designated PpGST1 and PpGST2. The deduced PpGST1 and PpGST2 proteins contain conserved Glutathione S-transferase N-terminal domain (GST_N) and Glutathione S-transferase, C-terminal domain (GST_C). Using PCR amplification technique, the genomic clones corresponding to PpGST1 and PpGST2 were isolated and shown to contain two introns and a singal intron respectively with typical GT/AG boundaries defining the splice junctions. Phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated that PpGST1 belonged to Phi class of GST superfamilies and had high homology with apple MdGST, while PpGST2 was classified into the Tau class of GST superfamilies. The expression of PpGST1 and PpGST2 genes was developmentally regulated in fruit. Further study demonstrated that PpGST1 and PpGST2 expression was remarkably induced by glucose, salicylic acid (SA) and indole-3-aceticacid (IAA) treatments in pear fruit, and in diseased fruit. These data suggested that PpGST1 and PpGST2 might be involved in response to sugar, SA, and IAA signaling during fruit development of pear.

  7. Diuretic drug binding to human glutathione transferase P1-1: potential role of Cys-101 revealed in the double mutant C47S/Y108V.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; Parker, Lorien J; Primavera, Alessandra; Wielens, Jerome; Holien, Jessica K; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; Aguilera, Ana M; Nuccetelli, Marzia; Mazzetti, Anna P; Lo Bello, Mario; Parker, Michael W; García-Fuentes, Luis

    2011-01-01

    The diuretic drug ethacrynic acid (EA), both an inhibitor and substrate of pi class glutathione S-transferase (GST P1-1), has been tested in clinical trials as an adjuvant in chemotherapy. We recently studied the role of the active site residue Tyr-108 in binding EA to the enzyme and found that the analysis was complicated by covalent binding of this drug to the highly reactive Cys-47. Previous attempts to eliminate this binding by chemical modification yielded ambiguous results and therefore we decided here to produce a double mutant C47S/Y108V by site directed mutagenesis and further expression in Escherichia coli and the interaction of EA and its GSH conjugate (EASG) examined by calorimetric studies and X-ray diffraction. Surprisingly, in the absence of Cys-47, Cys-101 (located at the dimer interface) becomes a target for modification by EA, albeit at a lower conjugation rate than Cys-47. The Cys-47 → Ser mutation in the double mutant enzyme induces a positive cooperativity between the two subunits when ligands with affinity to G-site bind to enzyme. However, this mutation does not seem to affect the thermodynamic properties of ligand binding to the electrophilic binding site (H-site) and the thermal or chemical stability of this double mutant does not significantly affect the unfolding mechanism in either the absence or presence of ligand. Crystal structures of apo and an EASG complex are essentially identical with a few exceptions in the H-site and in the water network at the dimer interface.

  8. Protective role for ovarian glutathione S-transferase isoform pi during 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced ovotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Poulomi Keating, Aileen F.

    2012-04-15

    7,12-Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) destroys ovarian follicles at all developmental stages. This study investigated a role for the glutathione S-transferase (Gst) isoforms alpha (a), mu (m) and pi (p) and the transcription factors, Ahr and Nrf2, during DMBA-induced ovotoxicity, and their regulation by phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) signaling. Negative regulation of JNK by GSTP during DMBA exposure was also studied. Post-natal day (PND) 4 Fischer 344 rat ovaries were exposed to vehicle control (1% DMSO) ± DMBA (1 μM) or vehicle control (1% DMSO) ± LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor; 20 μM) for 1, 2, 4, or 6 days. Total RNA or protein was isolated, followed by RT-PCR or Western blotting to determine mRNA or protein level, respectively. Immunoprecipitation using an anti-GSTP antibody was performed to determine interaction between GSTP and JNK, followed by Western blotting to determine JNK and p-c-Jun protein level. DMBA had no impact on Gsta, Gstm or Nrf2 mRNA level, but increased Gstp mRNA and protein after 2 days. Ahr mRNA and protein increased after 2 and 4 days of DMBA exposure, respectively and DMBA increased NRF2 protein level after 4 days. JNK bound to GSTP was increased during DMBA exposure, with a concomitant decrease in unbound JNK and p-c-Jun. Ahr and Gstp mRNA were decreased (2 days) and increased (4 days) by PI3K inhibition, while Gstm mRNA increased (P < 0.05) after both time points, and there was no effect on Nrf2 mRNA. PI3K inhibition increased AHR, NRF2 and GSTP protein level. These findings support involvement of ovarian GSTP during DMBA exposure, and indicate a regulatory role for the PI3K signaling pathway on ovarian xenobiotic metabolism gene expression. -- Highlights: ► Ovarian GSTP is activated in response to DMBA exposure. ► AhR and Nrf2 transcription factors are up-regulated by DMBA. ► PI3K signaling regulates Ahr, Nrf2 and Gstp expression. ► GSTP negatively regulates ovarian JNK in response to DMBA exposure.

  9. Fluoxetine-induced toxicity results in human placental glutathione S-transferase-π (GST-π) dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Dalmizrak, Ozlem; Kulaksiz-Erkmen, Gulnihal; Ozer, Nazmi

    2016-10-01

    The antidepressant drug fluoxetine (FLU) is considered in the group of selective serotonine re-uptake inhibitors. Its distribution in brain and binding to human brain glutathione S-transferase-π (GST-π) have been shown. FLU can cross blood brain barrier and placenta, accumulate in fetus and may cause congenital malformations. To elucidate the interaction of placental GST-π with FLU. First, concentration-dependent inhibition of human placental GST-π was evaluated by using different FLU concentrations and then 0.3125, 0.625, 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mM FLU concentrations were chosen and tested while keeping GSH concentration constant and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) concentration varied and vice versa. The data were evaluated with different kinetic models and Statistica 9.00 for Windows. The Vm, at variable [CDNB] (142 ± 16 U/mg protein) was 3 times higher than the Vm obtained at variable [GSH] (49 ± 4 U/mg protein). On the other hand, the Km for CDNB was ∼10 times higher than the Km for GSH (1.99 ± 0.36 mM versus 0.21 ± 0.06 mM). The IC50 value for FLU was 8.6 mM. Both at constant [CDNB] and variable [GSH] and at constant [GSH] and variable [CDNB] the inhibition types were competitive with the Ki values of 5.62 ± 4.37 and 8.09 ± 1.27 mM, respectively. Although the Ki values obtained for FLU in vitro are high, due to their uneven distribution, long elimination time and inhibitory behavior on detoxification systems, it may cause defects in adults but these effects may be much more severe in fetus and result in congenital malformations.

  10. Glutathione-S-transferase A3 knockout mice are sensitive to acute cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Ilic, Zoran; Crawford, Dana; Egner, Patricia A.; Sell, Stewart

    2010-02-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a major risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in humans. However, mice, a major animal model for the study of AFB1 carcinogenesis, are resistant, due to high constitutive expression, in the mouse liver, of glutathione S-transferase A3 subunit (mGSTA3) that is lacking in humans. Our objective was to establish that a mouse model for AFB1 toxicity could be used to study mechanisms of toxicity that are relevant for human disease, i.e., an mGSTA3 knockout (KO) mouse that responds to toxicants such as AFB1 in a manner similar to humans. Exons 3-6 of the mGSTA3 were replaced with a neomycin cassette by homologous recombination. Southern blotting, RT-PCR, Western blotting, and measurement of AFB1-N{sup 7}-DNA adduct formation were used to evaluate the mGSTA3 KO mice. The KO mice have deletion of exons 3-6 of the mGSTA3 gene, as expected, as well as a lack of mGSTA3 expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Three hours after injection of 5 mg/kg AFB1, mGSTA3 KO mice have more than 100-fold more AFB1-N{sup 7}-DNA adducts in their livers than do similarly treated wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, the mGSTA3 KO mice die of massive hepatic necrosis, at AFB1 doses that have minimal toxic effects in WT mice. We conclude that mGSTA3 KO mice are sensitive to the acute cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of AFB1, confirming the crucial role of GSTA3 subunit in protection of normal mice against AFB1 toxicity. We propose the mGSTA3 KO mouse as a useful model with which to study the interplay of risk factors leading to HCC development in humans, as well as for testing of additional possible functions of mGSTA3.

  11. Decreased glutathione S-transferase expression and activity and altered sex steroids in Lake Apopka brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallagher, E.P.; Gross, T.S.; Sheehy, K.M.

    2001-01-01

    A number of freshwater lakes and reclaimed agricultural sites in Central Florida have been the receiving waters for agrochemical and municipal runoff. One of these sites, Lake Apopka, is also a eutrophic system that has been the focus of several case studies reporting altered reproductive activity linked to bioaccumulation of persistent organochlorine chemicals in aquatic species. The present study was initiated to determine if brown bullheads (Ameriurus nebulosus) from the north marsh of Lake Apopka (Lake Apopka Marsh) exhibit an altered capacity to detoxify environmental chemicals through hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST)-mediated conjugation as compared with bullheads from a nearby reference site (Lake Woodruff). We also compared plasma sex hormone concentrations (testosterone, 17-?? estradiol, and 11 keto-testosterone) in bullheads from the two sites. Female bullheads from Lake Apopka had 40% lower initial rate GST conjugative activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB), 50% lower activity towards p-nitrobutyl chloride (NBC), 33% lower activity toward ethacrynic acid (ECA), and 43% lower activity toward ??5-androstene-3,17-dione (??5-ADI), as compared with female bullheads from Lake Woodruff. Enzyme kinetic analyses demonstrated that female bullheads from Lake Apopka had lower GST-catalyzed CDNB clearance than did female Lake Woodruff bullheads. Western blotting studies of bullhead liver cytosolic proteins demonstrated that the reduced GST catalytic activities in female Lake Apopka bullheads were accompanied by lower expression of hepatic GST protein. No site differences were observed with respect to GST activities or GST protein expression in male bullheads. Female Lake Apopka bullheads also had elevated concentrations of plasma androgens (testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone) as compared with females from Lake Woodruff. In contrast, male Lake Apopka bullheads had elevated levels of plasma estrogen but similar levels of androgens as compared with

  12. Cardiovascular effects of ozone in healthy subjects with and without deletion of glutathione-S-transferase M1.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Mark W; Pietropaoli, Anthony; Dentler, Michael; Chalupa, David; Little, Erika L; Stewart, Judith; Frasier, Lauren; Oakes, David; Wiltshire, Jelani; Vora, Rathin; Utell, Mark J

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to ozone has acute respiratory effects, but few human clinical studies have evaluated cardiovascular effects. We hypothesized that ozone exposure alters pulmonary and systemic vascular function, and cardiac function, with more pronounced effects in subjects with impaired antioxidant defense from deletion of the glutathione-S-transferase M1 gene (GSTM1 null). Twenty-four young, healthy never-smoker subjects (12 GSTM1 null) inhaled filtered air, 100 ppb ozone and 200 ppb ozone for 3 h, with intermittent exercise, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover fashion. Exposures were separated by at least 2 weeks. Vital signs, spirometry, arterial and venous blood nitrite levels, impedance cardiography, peripheral arterial tonometry, estimation of pulmonary capillary blood volume (Vc), and blood microparticles and platelet activation were measured at baseline and during 4 h after each exposure. Ozone inhalation decreased lung function immediately after exposure (mean ± standard error change in FEV1, air: -0.03 ± 0.04 L; 200 ppb ozone: -0.30 ± 0.07 L; p < 0.001). The immediate post-exposure increase in blood pressure, caused by the final 15-min exercise period, was blunted by 200 ppb ozone exposure (mean ± standard error change for air: 16.7 ± 2.6 mmHg; 100 ppb ozone: 14.5 ± 2.4 mmHg; 200 ppb ozone: 8.5 ± 2.5 mmHg; p = 0.02). We found no consistent effects of ozone on any other measure of cardiac or vascular function. All results were independent of the GSTM1 genotype. We did not find convincing evidence for early acute adverse cardiovascular consequences of ozone exposure in young healthy adults. The ozone-associated blunting of the blood pressure response to exercise is of unclear clinical significance.

  13. The glutathione S-transferase M1 and P1 polymorphisms and rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, Gwan Gyu; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Lee, Young Ho

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the Glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and P1 (GSTP1) polymorphisms confer susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Meta-analysis was performed on the associations between the GSTM1 and GSTP1 null genotypes and RA, and on the association between smoking or seropositive status and the GSTM1 null genotype in RA patients. Twelve studies involving 3,990 RA patients and 2,815 controls were included in the meta-analysis. All 12 studies examined the GSTM1 polymorphism and three the GSTP1 polymorphism. Meta-analysis of GSTM1 null polymorphism in 2,291 RA and 2,713 control subjects revealed no association between RA and the GSTM1 null genotype (OR = 1.139, 95 % CI = 0.914-1.419, p = 0.246). Stratification by ethnicity indicated no association between the GSTM1 null genotype and RA in Asians or Europeans (OR = 1.245, 95 % CI = 0.729-2.124, p = 0.422; OR = 1.023, 95 % CI = 0.794-1.318, p = 0.863). Furthermore, there was no association between smoking and the GSTM1 null genotype (OR = 0.943, 95 % CI = 0.734-1.210, p = 0.642). In addition, no association was found between seropositive status including anti-CCP (anti-citrullinated antibody) and/or RF (rheumatoid factor) and the GSTM1 null genotype. Meta-analysis of 915 RA and 1,082 controls revealed no association between RA and the GSTP1 null genotype (OR = 0.965, 95 % CI = 0.802-1.161, p = 0.704). Furthermore, stratification by ethnicity indicated no association between the GSTP1 null genotype and RA in Europeans (OR = 0.794, 95 % CI = 0.594-1.061, p = 0.119). This meta-analysis suggests that the GSTM1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms are not associated with the risk of RA. However, due to the small number of studies included and our inability to perform subgroup analysis by environmental factors, further studies are required to explore the roles played by GSTM1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of RA.

  14. The synergy of tobacco and alcohol and glutathione S-transferase θ 1 gene deletion and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    D’ Mello, Sarah; Bavle, Radhika Manoj; Paremala, K; Makarla, Soumya; Sudhakara, M; Bhatt, Madhura

    2016-01-01

    Background: Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the leading cancer among males in India. It is related to tobacco habits and alcohol consumption as well as the individual susceptibility for xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme polymorphisms. Glutathione S-transferase θ 1 (GSTT1) is a Phase II metabolic enzyme which is directly involved in catalyzing chemicals to mutagenic intermediates. This gene is characterized by genetic polymorphism resulting in complete gene deletion and subsequent absence of the enzyme, which ultimately dictates the risk of cancer development. Scraping buccal mucosa to obtain DNA from the cells is a simple, readily acceptable and rapid method to detect and assess the gene. Aim: To assess GSTT1 gene deletion in individuals giving a history of tobacco smoking and/or chewing and alcohol consumption and absence of clinically detectable lesions; and in OSCC cases to gauge if GSTT1 gene deletion confers protection to an individual and whether it can be used as a “single” marker to arrive at this conclusion. To validate the use of buccal scrape for determining the genotype of an individual by assessing the polymorphism at GSTT1 gene locus (22q11.2). Materials and Methods: Fifty-two cases were evaluated using buccal mucosal scrapes of tobacco habituates for 8 or more years, without clinically evident lesion (Group I) and from mucosa of tobacco habituates with clinically evident and histopathologically confirmed OSCC (Group II). DNA extraction and genotype at GSTT1 gene locus was determined by polymerase chain reaction assay. Statistical Analysis: The results were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: 90.66% of subjects had GSTT1 null genotype in Group I subjects. In Group II, subjects with both clinically and histopathologically diagnosed oral cancer, about 76.96% had GSTT1 null genotype. Conclusion: GSTT1 null genotype confers protection to individuals with tobacco habits and alcohol consumption, predominantly to those who used

  15. [Transferring the Suaeda salsa glutathione S-transferase and catalase genes enhances low temperature stress resistance in transgenic rice seedlings].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Yun; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Zhao, Yan-Xiu; Zhang, Hui

    2006-04-01

    The GST (glutathione S-transferase) and GST+CAT1 (catalase 1) of Suaeda salsa were introduced into a low temperature-sensitive rice cultivar (Oryza sativa cv. Zhonghua No.11) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation under the control of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter, and the transformed calli and plantlets were screened on Murashige and Skoog (1962) medium supplemented with hygromycin 25 microg/mL and cefotaxime 300 microg/mL. The putative primary transformants (T(0) generation) were acclimatized at 26 degrees C /22 degrees C in a greenhouse for 7 d, and then transplanted to the field, where they grew up to maturity under outdoor conditions. 25 and 14 independent transgenic lines of T(1) generation carrying the GST and GST+CAT1 genes, respectively, were identified by PCR amplification. Transgene expression was monitored by RNA-blot hybridization using total RNA samples from leaf tissues. To investigate whether expressing the Suaeda salsa GST and GST+CAT1 in transgenic rice increased low temperature stress tolerance, the T(4) 14-day-old transgenic and non-transgenic rice seedlings were transferred to a low temperature (day 7 degrees C/night 4 degrees C) growth chamber for 3-6 d. The experimental data showed that expressing the Suaeda salsa GST and GST+CAT1 enhanced low temperature stress resistance in transgenic rice seedlings. When treated with low temperature, both GST and CAT activity increased in the transformants with the time of temperature treatment. These transgenic rice plant seedlings exhibited a higher level of photosynthetic capacity than those of the non-transgenic control seedlings under low temperature treatment. Whereas, there were lower H(2)O(2) and MDA (malondialdehyde) content, and relative electrolyte leakage through the plasma membrane was also lower in transgenic rice seedlings than in the parent line under low temperature condition. The results also indicated that GST+CAT1 co-expression conferred greater level of low

  16. Analysis of glutathione S-transferase allergen cross-reactivity in a North American population: Relevance for molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Geoffrey A; Pedersen, Lars C; Glesner, Jill; Edwards, Lori L; Zakzuk, Josefina; London, Robert E; Arruda, Luisa Karla; Chapman, Martin D; Caraballo, Luis; Pomés, Anna

    2015-11-01

    It is not clear whether cross-reactivity or cosensitization to glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) occurs in tropical and subtropical environments. In the United States, Bla g 5 is the most important GST allergen and lack of coexposure to GSTs from certain species allows a better assessment of cross-reactivity. To examine the molecular structure of GST allergens from cockroach (Bla g 5), dust mites (Der p 8 and Blo t 8), and helminth (Asc s 13) for potential cross-reactive sites, and to assess the IgE cross-reactivity of sensitized patients from a temperate climate for these allergens for molecular diagnostic purposes. Four crystal structures were determined. Sera from patients allergic to cockroach and mite were tested for IgE reactivity to these GSTs. A panel of 6 murine anti-Bla g 5 mAb was assessed for cross-reactivity with the other 3 GSTs using antibody binding assays. Comparisons of the allergen structures, formed by 2-domain monomers that dimerize, revealed few contiguous regions of similar exposed residues, rendering cross-reactivity unlikely. Accordingly, anti-Bla g 5 or anti-Der p 8 IgE from North American patients did not recognize Der p 8 or Bla g 5, respectively, and neither showed binding to Blo t 8 or Asc s 13. A weaker binding of anti-Bla g 5 IgE to Der p 8 versus Bla g 5 (∼ 100-fold) was observed by inhibition assays, similar to a weak recognition of Der p 8 by anti-Bla g 5 mAb. Patients from tropical Colombia had IgE to all 4 GSTs. The lack of significant IgE cross-reactivity among the 4 GSTs is in agreement with the low shared amino acid identity at the molecular surface. Each GST is needed for accurate molecular diagnosis in different geographic areas. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  17. Immunogenicity assessment of HPV16/18 vaccine using the glutathione S-transferase L1 multiplex serology assay.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Hilary A; Waterboer, Tim; Porras, Carolina; Kemp, Troy J; Pawlita, Michael; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Wacholder, Sholom; Gonzalez, Paula; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; Esser, Mark; Matys, Katie; Poncelet, Sylviane; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST)-L1 multiplex serology assay has favorable properties for use in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies, including low cost, high throughput capacity, and low serum volume requirement. Therefore, we evaluated the GST-L1 assay as a measure of HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity. Our study population included 65 women selected from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial who received the bivalent HPV16/18 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine at the recommended 0/1/6-month schedule. We tested replicate serum samples from months 0/1/12 (i.e., after 0/1/3 doses) by GST-L1 and 3 other commonly used serology assays, VLP-ELISA, SEAP-NA, and cLIA. We calculated the percentage of women seropositive by GST-L1 by time point and HPV type (14 HPV types), and compared GST-L1 to other assays using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. After 1 vaccine dose, seropositivity by GST-L1 was 40% each for HPV16 and HPV18, increasing to 100% and 98%, respectively, after 3 doses. Seropositivity after 3 doses ranged from 32% to 69% for HPV types 31/33/45, for which partial vaccine efficacy is reported, though increases also occurred for types with no evidence for cross-protection (e.g., HPV77). GST-L1 correlated best after 3 doses with VLP-ELISA (HPV16 and HPV18 each ρ = 0.72) and SEAP-NA (HPV16 ρ = 0.65, HPV18 ρ = 0.71) (all P < 0.001); correlation was lower with cLIA. The GST-L1 is suitable for evaluating HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity after 3 vaccine doses, although in contrast to other assays it may classify some samples as HPV16/18 seronegative. The assay's utility is limited for lower antibody levels such as after receipt of 1 dose.

  18. Glutathione S-transferase L1 multiplex serology as a measure of cumulative infection with human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several assays are used to measure type-specific serological responses to human papillomavirus (HPV), including the bead-based glutathione S-transferase (GST)-L1 multiplex serology assay and virus-like particle (VLP)-based ELISA. We evaluated the high-throughput GST-L1, which is increasingly used in epidemiologic research, as a measure of cumulative HPV infection and future immune protection among HPV-unvaccinated women. Methods We tested enrollment sera from participants in the control arm of the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (n = 488) for HPV16 and HPV18 using GST-L1, VLP-ELISA, and two assays that measure neutralizing antibodies (cLIA and SEAP-NA). With statistical adjustment for sampling, we compared GST-L1 serostatus to established HPV seropositivity correlates and incident cervical HPV infection using odds ratios. We further compared GST-L1 to VLP-ELISA using pair-wise agreement statistics and by defining alternate assay cutoffs. Results Odds of HPV16 GST-L1 seropositivity increased with enrollment age (OR = 1.20 per year, 95%CI 1.03-1.40) and lifetime number of sexual partners (OR = 2.06 per partner, 95%CI 1.49-2.83), with similar results for HPV18. GST-L1 seropositivity did not indicate protection from incident infection over 4 years of follow-up (HPV16 adjusted OR = 1.72, 95%CI 0.95-3.13; HPV18 adjusted OR = 0.38, 95%CI 0.12-1.23). Seroprevalence by GST-L1 (HPV16 and HPV18, respectively) was 5.0% and 5.2%, compared to 19.4% and 23.8% by VLP-ELISA, giving positive agreement of 39.2% and 20.8%. Lowering GST-L1 seropositivity cutoffs improved GST-L1/VLP-ELISA positive agreement to 68.6% (HPV16) and 61.5% (HPV18). Conclusions Our data support GST-L1 as a marker of cumulative HPV infection, but not immune protection. At lower seropositivity cutoffs, GST-L1 better approximates VLP-ELISA. PMID:24588945

  19. Immunogenicity assessment of HPV16/18 vaccine using the glutathione S-transferase L1 multiplex serology assay

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Hilary A; Waterboer, Tim; Porras, Carolina; Kemp, Troy J; Pawlita, Michael; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Wacholder, Sholom; Gonzalez, Paula; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; Esser, Mark; Matys, Katie; Poncelet, Sylviane; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Pinto, Ligia A; Safaeian, Mahboobeh

    2014-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST)-L1 multiplex serology assay has favorable properties for use in clinical trials and epidemiologic studies, including low cost, high throughput capacity, and low serum volume requirement. Therefore, we evaluated the GST-L1 assay as a measure of HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity. Our study population included 65 women selected from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial who received the bivalent HPV16/18 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine at the recommended 0/1/6-month schedule. We tested replicate serum samples from months 0/1/12 (i.e., after 0/1/3 doses) by GST-L1 and 3 other commonly used serology assays, VLP-ELISA, SEAP-NA, and cLIA. We calculated the percentage of women seropositive by GST-L1 by time point and HPV type (14 HPV types), and compared GST-L1 to other assays using Spearman rank correlation coefficients. After 1 vaccine dose, seropositivity by GST-L1 was 40% each for HPV16 and HPV18, increasing to 100% and 98%, respectively, after 3 doses. Seropositivity after 3 doses ranged from 32% to 69% for HPV types 31/33/45, for which partial vaccine efficacy is reported, though increases also occurred for types with no evidence for cross-protection (e.g., HPV77). GST-L1 correlated best after 3 doses with VLP-ELISA (HPV16 and HPV18 each ρ = 0.72) and SEAP-NA (HPV16 ρ = 0.65, HPV18 ρ = 0.71) (all P < 0.001); correlation was lower with cLIA. The GST-L1 is suitable for evaluating HPV16/18 vaccine immunogenicity after 3 vaccine doses, although in contrast to other assays it may classify some samples as HPV16/18 seronegative. The assay's utility is limited for lower antibody levels such as after receipt of 1 dose. PMID:25483632

  20. A Tau Class Glutathione-S-Transferase is Involved in Trans-Resveratrol Transport Out of Grapevine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Márquez, Ascensión; Martínez-Esteso, María J.; Vilella-Antón, María T.; Sellés-Marchart, Susana; Morante-Carriel, Jaime A.; Hurtado, Elias; Palazon, Javier; Bru-Martínez, Roque

    2017-01-01

    Vitis vinifera cell cultures respond to pathogens and elicitors by synthesizing and extracellularly accumulating stilbenoid phytoalexins. Large amounts of trans-resveratrol (t-R) are produced when a cell culture is elicited with methylated cyclodextrins (MBCD), either alone or combined with methyl jasmonate (MeJA). t-R transport to the extracellular medium, which represents the apoplastic space, would place this antifungal defense right in the battlefield to efficiently fight against pathogen attack. Yet despite their physiological relevance, these transport pathways are mostly unknown. A broad hypothesis-free DIGE-based proteomic experiment of a temporal series of elicited grapevine cell cultures was performed to explore the expression profiles of t-R biosynthetic proteins and other co-expressing proteins potentially involved in such a cell response. A correlation between two tau class glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) with several stilbene synthase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase isoforms, and with the t-R metabolite itself, was found and further assessed by a qRT-PCR gene expression analysis. The best candidate, GSTU-2, was cloned from the cDNA of the MBCD + MeJA-elicited grapevine cells and used for Agrobacterium-mediated grapevine cell transformation. The non-elicited lines that overexpressed GSTU-2 displayed an extracellular t-R accumulating phenotype, but stabilization of t-R required the addition to culture medium of adsorbent compounds, e.g., PVP or β-cyclodextrin. The wild-type cell cultures accumulated no t-R, not even in the presence of adsorbents. The transient expression of the GSTU-2-GFP fusion proteins in grapevine cells showed localisation in the plasma membrane, and the immunoprecipitation of HA-tagged GSTU-2 revealed its interaction with HIR, a plasma membrane-bound protein. These findings are consistent with a functional role in transport. This is the first report providing several pieces of experimental evidence for the involvement of a

  1. A Tau Class Glutathione-S-Transferase is Involved in Trans-Resveratrol Transport Out of Grapevine Cells.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Márquez, Ascensión; Martínez-Esteso, María J; Vilella-Antón, María T; Sellés-Marchart, Susana; Morante-Carriel, Jaime A; Hurtado, Elias; Palazon, Javier; Bru-Martínez, Roque

    2017-01-01

    Vitis vinifera cell cultures respond to pathogens and elicitors by synthesizing and extracellularly accumulating stilbenoid phytoalexins. Large amounts of trans-resveratrol (t-R) are produced when a cell culture is elicited with methylated cyclodextrins (MBCD), either alone or combined with methyl jasmonate (MeJA). t-R transport to the extracellular medium, which represents the apoplastic space, would place this antifungal defense right in the battlefield to efficiently fight against pathogen attack. Yet despite their physiological relevance, these transport pathways are mostly unknown. A broad hypothesis-free DIGE-based proteomic experiment of a temporal series of elicited grapevine cell cultures was performed to explore the expression profiles of t-R biosynthetic proteins and other co-expressing proteins potentially involved in such a cell response. A correlation between two tau class glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) with several stilbene synthase and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase isoforms, and with the t-R metabolite itself, was found and further assessed by a qRT-PCR gene expression analysis. The best candidate, GSTU-2, was cloned from the cDNA of the MBCD + MeJA-elicited grapevine cells and used for Agrobacterium-mediated grapevine cell transformation. The non-elicited lines that overexpressed GSTU-2 displayed an extracellular t-R accumulating phenotype, but stabilization of t-R required the addition to culture medium of adsorbent compounds, e.g., PVP or β-cyclodextrin. The wild-type cell cultures accumulated no t-R, not even in the presence of adsorbents. The transient expression of the GSTU-2-GFP fusion proteins in grapevine cells showed localisation in the plasma membrane, and the immunoprecipitation of HA-tagged GSTU-2 revealed its interaction with HIR, a plasma membrane-bound protein. These findings are consistent with a functional role in transport. This is the first report providing several pieces of experimental evidence for the involvement of a

  2. [Analysis of serum glutathione S-transferase and urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine in coke oven workers].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ai-lin; Zou, Ya-ling; Lu, Wen-hong; Wang, Zeng-zhen; Lu, Wen-qing

    2005-10-01

    To investigate the application of serum glutathione S-transferase (GST) and urinary 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) as the monitoring biomarkers for coke oven workers exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). 47 male coke oven workers and 31 male control workers were investigated. Urinary 8-OHdG and serum GST were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection and test kit. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) as internal exposure of PAHs was also determined simultaneously by alkaline hydrolysis and HPLC. The values of urinary 1-OHP, serum GST and urinary 8-OHdG were reported as median with interquartile range (P(25)-P(75)). Urinary 1-OHP [5.7 (1.4-12.0) micromol/mol Cr], serum GST [22.1 (14.9-31.2) U/ml], and urinary 8-OHdG [1.9 (1.4-15.4) micromol/mol Cr] in coke oven workers were significantly higher than in control workers [3.0 (0.5-6.4) micromol/mol Cr (P < 0.05), 13.1 (9.5-16.7) U/ml (P < 0.01), and 1.3 (1.0-4.0) micromol/mol Cr (P < 0.05) respectively]. Categorizing by smoking status, significant differences in urinary 1-OHP and serum GST were found only in smokers among coke oven workers compared to control workers (P < 0.01), and 8-OHdG levels only in non-smokers (P < 0.01). Additionally, there was significant correlation between urinary 1-OHP and serum GST activity (r(s) = 0.31, P < 0.01, n = 78). The multiple logistic regression analysis showed that coke oven workers were at the higher risk of having GST activities above 16.7 U/ml (OR = 13.2) and 8-OHdG levels above 1.8 micromol/mol creatinine (OR = 4.4). High body mass index was an independent factor to affect urinary 8-OHdG levels. The elevated serum GST activities and increased oxidative DNA damage were found in the coke oven workers. Occupational exposure and smoking interact on each other. Serum GST may be used as a biomarker for assessing the exposure of PAHs. Assay of urinary 8-OHdG may be useful for evaluating the risk of lung cancer in coke

  3. Does Occupational Exposure to Solvents and Pesticides in Association with Glutathione S-Transferase A1, M1, P1, and T1 Polymorphisms Increase the Risk of Bladder Cancer? The Belgrade Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Savic-Radojevic, Ana R.; Bulat, Petar V.; Pljesa-Ercegovac, Marija S.; Dragicevic, Dejan P.; Djukic, Tatjana I.; Simic, Tatjana P.; Pekmezovic, Tatjana D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We investigated the role of the glutathione S-transferase A1, M1, P1 and T1 gene polymorphisms and potential effect modification by occupational exposure to different chemicals in Serbian bladder cancer male patients. Patients and Methods A hospital-based case-control study of bladder cancer in men comprised 143 histologically confirmed cases and 114 age-matched male controls. Deletion polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 was identified by polymerase chain reaction method. Single nucleotide polymorphism of glutathione S-transferase A1 and P1 was identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism method. As a measure of effect size, odds ratio (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence interval (95%CI) was calculated. Results The glutathione S-transferase A1, T1 and P1 genotypes did not contribute independently toward the risk of bladder cancer, while the glutathione S-transferase M1-null genotype was overrepresented among cases (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.1–4.2, p = 0.032). The most pronounced effect regarding occupational exposure to solvents and glutathione S-transferase genotype on bladder cancer risk was observed for the low activity glutathione S-transferase A1 genotype (OR = 9.2, 95% CI = 2.4–34.7, p = 0.001). The glutathione S-transferase M1-null genotype also enhanced the risk of bladder cancer among subjects exposed to solvents (OR = 6,5, 95% CI = 2.1–19.7, p = 0.001). The risk of bladder cancer development was 5.3–fold elevated among glutathione S-transferase T1-active patients exposed to solvents in comparison with glutathione S-transferase T1-active unexposed patients (95% CI = 1.9–15.1, p = 0.002). Moreover, men with glutathione S-transferase T1-active genotype exposed to pesticides exhibited 4.5 times higher risk in comparison with unexposed glutathione S-transferase T1-active subjects (95% CI = 0.9–22.5, p = 0.067). Conclusion Null or low-activity genotypes of the

  4. Retinoid X receptor alpha Regulates the expression of glutathione s-transferase genes and modulates acetaminophen-glutathione conjugation in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guoli; Chou, Nathan; He, Lin; Gyamfi, Maxwell A; Mendy, Alphonse J; Slitt, Angela L; Klaassen, Curtis D; Wan, Yu-Jui Y

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear receptors, including constitutive androstane receptor, pregnane X receptor, and retinoid X receptor (RXR), modulate acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity by regulating the expression of phase I cytochrome P450 (P450) genes. It has not been fully resolved, however, whether they regulate APAP detoxification at the phase II level. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the role of RXRalpha in phase II enzyme-mediated detoxification of APAP. Wild-type and hepatocyte-specific RXRalpha knockout mice were treated with a toxic dose of APAP (500 mg/kg i.p.). Mutant mice were protected from APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, even though basal liver glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly lower in mutant mice compared with those of wild-type mice. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of APAP metabolites revealed significantly greater levels of APAP-GSH conjugates in livers and bile of mutant mice compared with those of wild-type mice. Furthermore, hepatocyte RXRalpha deficiency altered the gene expression profile of the glutathione S-transferase (Gst) family. Basal expression of 13 of 15 Gst genes studied was altered in hepatocyte-specific RXRalpha-deficient mice. This probably led to enhanced APAP-GSH conjugation and reduced accumulation of N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine, a toxic electrophile that is produced by biotransformation of APAP by phase I P450 enzymes. In conclusion, the data presented in this study define an RXRalpha-Gst regulatory network that controls APAP-GSH conjugation. This report reveals a potential novel strategy to enhance the detoxification of APAP or other xenobiotics by manipulating Gst activity through RXRalpha-mediated pathways.

  5. Structure-activity relationships for chemical and glutathione S-transferase-catalysed glutathione conjugation reactions of a series of 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Aar, E M; Bouwman, T; Commandeur, J N; Vermeulen, N P

    1996-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute an important class of phase II (de)toxifying enzymes, catalysing the conjugation of glutathione (GSH) with electrophilic compounds. In the present study, Km, kcat and kcat/Km values for the rat GST 1-1-, 3-3-, 4-4- and 7-7-catalysed conjugation reactions between GSH and a series of 10 different 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes, and the second-order rate constants (ks) of the corresponding base-catalysed reactions, were correlated with nine classical physicochemical parameters (electronic, steric and lipophilic) of the substituents and with 16 computer-calculated molecular parameters of the substrates and of the corresponding Meisenheimer complexes with MeS- as a model nucleophile for GS- (charge distributions and several energy values), giving structure-activity relationships. On the basis of an identical dependence of the base-catalysed as well as the GST 1-1- and GST 7-7-catalysed reactions on electronic parameters (among others, Hammett substituent constant sigma p and charge on p-nitro substituents), and the finding that the corresponding reactions catalysed by GSTs 3-3 and 4-4 depend to a significantly lesser extent on these parameters, it was concluded that the Mu-class GST isoenzymes have a rate-determining transition state in the conjugation reaction between 2-substituted 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzenes and GSH which is different from that of the other two GSTs. Several alternative rate-limiting transition states for GST 3-3 and 4-4 are discussed. Furthermore, based on the obtained structure-activity relationships, it was possible to predict the kcat/Km values of the four GST isoenzymes and the ks of the base-catalysed GSH conjugation of 1-chloro-4-nitrobenzene. PMID:8973562

  6. Urine α-Glutathione S-transferase, systemic inflammation and arterial function in juvenile type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, Peter; Liuba, Petru

    2012-01-01

    Despite marked improvement in therapy and monitoring of patients with insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes, diabetic nephropathy remains a serious complication, with subsequent end-stage renal disease in about 20% of cases. To investigate in young patients with type 1 diabetes whether urine α-Glutathione S-transferase to creatinine ratio (α-GST:crea) relates to markers of systemic inflammation and subclinical vasculopathy. Children and adolescents (median age and diabetes duration 14 and 6 years, respectively) with type 1 diabetes screened in a previous study for proximal tubular (urine α-GST:crea ratio) and renal (plasma creatinine, cystatin C glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and timed urine albumin excretion rate (AER)) function were, within the same timeframe, also investigated for vascular (blood pressure, carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and compliance (CAC), brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and plasma cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and inflammatory (C-reactive protein (CRP), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)) profiles. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) was assessed through questionnaire (n=67 respondents). None of the patients (n=69) had overt renal insufficiency. AER correlated with age (p=0.01, r=0.3), diabetes duration (p=0.02, r=0.3), FMD (p=0.04, r=-0.3, n=52), CAC (p=0.03, r=-0.3, n=62) and cGMP (p=0.01, r=-0.3, n=59). α-GST:crea was lower (p=0.03) in patients than in controls. α-GST:crea appeared to be particularly lower in older patients (p=0.004, r=-0.34 vs age), in those with worse diabetic control (p=0.03, r=-0.26 vs HbA1c), and in those with lower carotid artery elasticity (p=0.017, r=0.3 vs CAC). Although ETS had no direct significant impact on α-GST:crea, α-GST:crea correlated with FMD only in patients with ETS (r=0.5, p=0.009, n=13). α-GST:crea showed positive association with TNF-α (p=0.01, r=0.3). In children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes, lower levels of urine excretion of

  7. Sea-urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) glutathione S-transferases and cholinesterase activities as biomarkers of environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Isabel; García, Luz Maria; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2005-04-01

    Activities of glutathione S-transferases (GST) and cholinesterase (ChE) from Paracentrotus lividus were investigated as possible biomarkers of environmental contamination in the coastal zone. In the first phase of the study, the activity of both enzymes was determined in various tissues in order to select the most appropriate ones to be used in the following assays. In the second phase, the ChEs present in ambulacra were characterized using different substrates and selective inhibitors. In the next phase, laboratory bioassays were performed with dilutions of water-accommodated fraction of #4 fuel-oil (WAF) and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) to determine the response of those enzymes to these pollutants and, finally, the activity of both enzymes was determined during a year in indigenous specimens from six sites on the Northwest coast of Portugal, with different pollution levels, to determine basal values and seasonal variations of ChE and GST activities. Among the several tissues tested, ambulacra and the anterior portion of the intestine were selected for ChE and GST assays, respectively. The determination of ChE in ambulacra tissue may be performed in a non-destructive way. Ambulacra ChE hydrolysed acetylthiocholine preferentially to propionylthiocholine and butyrylthiocholine and, inhibition by excess of substrate was observed. Enzymatic activity was almost fully inhibited by eserine sulfate (>98%) at concentrations equal or higher than 6.25 microM. Sensitivity to both BW284C51 (reaching 98% at 200 microM) and iso-OMPA (73% at 8 mM) was found. In laboratory bioassays, GSTs activity was inhibited by WAF and induced by BaP, whereas ChE activity was not affected by any of these environmental contaminants. Seasonal variations in enzymatic activities were found. For example, in a reference site, ChE values changed from 52.2 +/- 9.3 U mg(-1) protein in autumn to 71.8 +/- 13.3 U mg(-1) protein in spring, while GST activity changed from 129.9 +/- 29.8 U mg(-1) protein in winter

  8. Purification of glutathione S-transferase from Van Lake fish (Chalcalburnus tarichii Pallas) muscle and investigation of some metal ions effect on enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Aksoy, Mine; Ozaslan, M Serhat; Kufrevioglu, O Irfan

    2016-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are an important enzyme family which play a critical role in detoxification system. In our study, GST was purified from muscle tissue of Chalcalburnus tarichii Pallas with 301.5-fold purification and 19.07% recovery by glutathione agarose affinity chromatography. The purity of enzyme was checked by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, showing a two band, because of having heterodimer structure. KM values were 1.59 and 0.53 mM for 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and glutathione (GSH), respectively. Vmax values for CDNB and GSH were also determined as 5.58 and 1.88 EU/mL, respectively. In addition, inhibition effects of Ag(+), Cu(2+), Cd(2+), Fe(3+), Pb(2+), Cr(2+), Co(2+) and Zn(2+) metal ions were investigated on the enzyme activity and IC50, Ki values were calculated for these metal ions.

  9. Messenger RNA encoding a glutathione-S-transferase responsible for herbicide tolerance in maize is induced in response to safener treatment.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, R C; Shah, D M; Mozer, T J; Harding, E I; Diaz-Collier, J; Saunders, C; Jaworski, E G; Tiemeier, D C

    1986-07-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GST's) in maize represent a family of enzymes which conjugate glutathione to several major classes of pre-emergent, selective herbicides. Chemicals termed safeners have been demonstrated to increase the tolerance of maize toward such herbicides when the maize seed has been previously treated with safeners. It has subsequently been shown that corresponding increases in glutathione-S-transferase species occur. To determine whether these compounds act at a transcriptional level we have used synthetic oligonucleotide probes to isolate cDNA clones encoding the major GST polypeptide subunit, designated GST A. The identity of the clones has been confirmed by hybrid-selected mRNA translation and immunoprecipitation using antibodies made against this GST species as well as by production of active GST in yeast cells transformed with an expression vector containing the cloned DNA. GST A has been found to be encoded in a mRNA of 1.1 kb. Sequencing of cDNA products obtained by primer extension of maize mRNA using our oligonucleotide probes is consistent with this mRNA corresponding to the isolated cDNA clone. Using the clone as a probe for Northern analysis we have found a three to four-fold increase in the steady state level of this mRNA in maize tissue grown from safener-treated seeds. The level of safener which gives this induction is comparable to that required to obtain herbicide tolerance in the field.

  10. The role of glutathione S-transferases in the detoxification of some organophosphorus insecticides in larvae and pupae of the yellow mealworm, Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    PubMed

    Kostaropoulos, I; Papadopoulos, A I; Metaxakis, A; Boukouvala, E; Papadopoulou-Mourkidou, E

    2001-06-01

    The correlation between the natural levels of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and the tolerance to the organophosphorus insecticides parathion-methyl and paraoxon-methyl, as well as the interaction of affinity-purified enzyme and the insecticides were investigated in order to collect further information on the role of the glutathione S-transferase system as a mechanism of defence against insecticides in insects. The studies were carried out on the larvae and pupae of the coleopteran Tenebrio molitor L, which exhibit varying natural levels of GST activity. Stage-dependent susceptibility of the insect against insecticides was observed during the first 24 h. However, 48 h after treatment, the KD50 value increased significantly due to the recovery of some individuals. Simultaneous injection of insecticide with compounds which inhibit GST activity in vitro caused an alteration in susceptibility of insects 24 or 48 h post-treatment, depending on stage and insecticide used. Inhibition studies combined with competitive fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that the insecticides probably bind to the active site of the enzyme, thus inhibiting its activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene in a competitive manner. High-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography revealed that T molitor GST catalyses the conjugation of the insecticides studied to a reduced form of glutathione (GSH). From the above experimental results, it is considered that GST offers a protection against the organophosphorus insecticides studied by active site binding and subsequent conjugation with GSH.

  11. Identification and clarification of the role of key active site residues in bacterial glutathione S-transferase zeta/maleylpyruvate isomerase

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Ti; Li, De-Feng; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Application of site-directed mutagenesis to probe the active site residues of glutathione-dependent maleylpyruvate isomerase. {yields} Two conserved residues, Arg8 and Arg176, in zeta class glutathione S-transferases are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization. {yields} Arg109, found exclusively in NagL, participates in k{sub cat} regulation. {yields} The T11A mutant exhibited a significantly decreased K{sub m} value for glutathione with little impact on maleylpyruvate kinetics. {yields} The Thr11 residue appears to have significance in the evolution of glutathione S-transferase classes. -- Abstract: The maleylpyruvate isomerase NagL from Ralstonia sp. strain U2, which has been structurally characterized previously, catalyzes the isomerization of maleylpyruvate to fumarylpyruvate. It belongs to the class zeta glutathione S-transferases (GSTZs), part of the cytosolic GST family (cGSTs). In this study, site-directed mutagenesis was conducted to probe the functions of 13 putative active site residues. Steady-state kinetic information for mutants in the reduced glutathione (GSH) binding site, suggested that (a) Gln64 and Asp102 interact directly with the glutamyl moiety of glutathione, (b) Gln49 and Gln64 are involved in a potential electron-sharing network that influences the ionization of the GSH thiol. The information also suggests that (c) His38, Asn108 and Arg109 interact with the GSH glycine moiety, (d) His104 has a role in the ionization of the GSH sulfur and the stabilization of the maleyl terminal carboxyl group in the reaction intermediate and (e) Arg110 influences the electron distribution in the active site and therefore the ionization of the GSH thiolate. Kinetic data for mutants altered in the substrate-binding site imply that (a) Arg8 and Arg176 are critical for maleylpyruvate orientation and enolization, and (b) Arg109 (exclusive to NagL) participates in k{sub cat} regulation. Surprisingly, the T11A mutant had a

  12. Activity of glutathione S-transferase in the hepatopancreas is not influenced by the molting cycle in the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator.

    PubMed

    Hotard, Sarah; Zou, Enmin

    2008-09-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) in the hepatopancreas of crustaceans has been suggested as a biomarker for organic pollution. However, much of crustacean physiology is known to exhibit a cyclic characteristic because of the periodic shedding of the confining exoskeleton. The goal of this study was to determine whether hepatopancreatic GST activity varies during the molting cycle using the fiddler crab, Uca pugilator, as the model. Neither the molting cycle nor 20-hydroxyecdysone injection had a significant effect on hepatopancreatic GST activity, suggesting GST activity is not under control of the molting hormone in Uca pugilator.

  13. Reaction kinetics and targeting to cellular glutathione S-transferase of the glutathione peroxidase mimetic PhSeZnCl and its d,l-polylactide microparticle formulation

    PubMed Central

    Bartolini, D.; Piroddi, M.; Tidei, C.; Giovagnoli, S.; Pietrella, D.; Manevich, Y.; Tew, K.D.; Giustarini, D.; Rossi, R.; Townsend, D.M.; Santi, C.; Galli, F.

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic properties and cellular effects of the glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-mimetic compound PhSeZnCl or its d,l-lactide polymer microencapsulation form (M-PhSeZnCl) were investigated and compared with the prototypical Se-organic compounds ebselen and diselenide (PhSe)2. PhSeZnCl was confirmed to catalyze the ping-pong reaction of GPx with higher Vmax than ebselen and (PhSe)2, but the catalytic efficiency calculated for the cosubstrates glutathione (GSH) and H2O2, and particularly the high reactivity against thiols (lowest KM for GSH in the series of test molecules), suggested poor biological applicability of PhSeZnCl as a GPx mimetic. Cytotoxicity of PhSeZnCl was demonstrated in various cancer cell lines via increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, depletion of intracellular thiols, and induction of apoptosis. Experiments carried out in GSH S-transferase P (GSTP)-overexpressing K562 human erythroleukemia cells and in GSTP1-1-knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated that this cytosolic enzyme represents a preferential target of the redox disturbances produced by this Se-compound with a key role in controlling H2O2 generation and the perturbation of stress/survival kinase signaling. Microencapsulation was adopted as a strategy to control the thiol reactivity and oxidative stress effects of PhSeZnCl, then assessing applications alternative to anticancer. The uptake of this “depowered” GPx-mimetic formulation, which occurred through an endocytosis-like mechanism, resulted in a marked reduction of cytotoxicity. In MCF-7 cells transfected with different allelic variants of GSTP, M-PhSeZnCl lowered the burst of cellular ROS induced by the exposure to extracellular H2O2, and the extent of this effect changed between the GSTP variants. Microencapsulation is a straightforward strategy to mitigate the toxicity of thiol-reactive Se-organic drugs that enhanced the antioxidant and cellular protective effects of PhSeZnCl. A mechanistic linkage

  14. Reaction kinetics and targeting to cellular glutathione S-transferase of the glutathione peroxidase mimetic PhSeZnCl and its D,L-polylactide microparticle formulation.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, D; Piroddi, M; Tidei, C; Giovagnoli, S; Pietrella, D; Manevich, Y; Tew, K D; Giustarini, D; Rossi, R; Townsend, D M; Santi, C; Galli, F

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic properties and cellular effects of the glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-mimetic compound PhSeZnCl or its d,l-lactide polymer microencapsulation form (M-PhSeZnCl) were investigated and compared with the prototypical Se-organic compounds ebselen and diselenide (PhSe)2. PhSeZnCl was confirmed to catalyze the ping-pong reaction of GPx with higher Vmax than ebselen and (PhSe)2, but the catalytic efficiency calculated for the cosubstrates glutathione (GSH) and H2O2, and particularly the high reactivity against thiols (lowest KM for GSH in the series of test molecules), suggested poor biological applicability of PhSeZnCl as a GPx mimetic. Cytotoxicity of PhSeZnCl was demonstrated in various cancer cell lines via increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, depletion of intracellular thiols, and induction of apoptosis. Experiments carried out in GSH S-transferase P (GSTP)-overexpressing K562 human erythroleukemia cells and in GSTP1-1-knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated that this cytosolic enzyme represents a preferential target of the redox disturbances produced by this Se-compound with a key role in controlling H2O2 generation and the perturbation of stress/survival kinase signaling. Microencapsulation was adopted as a strategy to control the thiol reactivity and oxidative stress effects of PhSeZnCl, then assessing applications alternative to anticancer. The uptake of this "depowered" GPx-mimetic formulation, which occurred through an endocytosis-like mechanism, resulted in a marked reduction of cytotoxicity. In MCF-7 cells transfected with different allelic variants of GSTP, M-PhSeZnCl lowered the burst of cellular ROS induced by the exposure to extracellular H2O2, and the extent of this effect changed between the GSTP variants. Microencapsulation is a straightforward strategy to mitigate the toxicity of thiol-reactive Se-organic drugs that enhanced the antioxidant and cellular protective effects of PhSeZnCl. A mechanistic linkage of

  15. Amitriptyline may have a supportive role in cancer treatment by inhibiting glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-π) and alpha (GST-α).

    PubMed

    Kulaksiz-Erkmen, Gulnihal; Dalmizrak, Ozlem; Dincsoy-Tuna, Gamze; Dogan, Arın; Ogus, I Hamdi; Ozer, Nazmi

    2013-02-01

    A tricyclic anti-depressant, amitriptyline, is a highly prescribed drug for cancer patients for mood elevation but there are limited studies about the interaction of amitriptyline with glutathione S-transferases pi (GST-π) and glutathione S-transferases alpha (GST-α). GST isozymes have been implicated in chemotherapeutic drug resistance. We demonstrated that the concentration dependent inhibition of GST-π and GST-α by amitriptyline followed inverse hyperbolic inhibition curves with IC(50) values of 5.54 and 8.32 mM, respectively. When the varied substrate was GSH, amitriptyline inhibited both isozymes competitively and similar K(i) values were found for GST-π (K(i) = 1.61 ± 0.17 mM) and GST-α (K(i) = 1.45 ± 0.20 mM). On the other hand, when the varied substrate was CDNB, the inhibition types were non-competitive for GST-π (K(i) = 1.98 ± 0.31 mM) and competitive for GST-α (K(i) = 1.57 ± 0.16 mM). Amitriptyline, in addition to its antidepressant effect, might also have a minor supportive role on the effectiveness of the anticancer drugs by decreasing their elimination through inhibiting GST-π and GST-α.

  16. Evaluation of the influence of housefly maggot meal (magmeal) diets on catalase, glutathione S-transferase and glycogen concentration in the liver of Oreochromis niloticus fingerling.

    PubMed

    Ogunji, Johnny O; Nimptsch, Jorge; Wiegand, Claudia; Schulz, Carsten

    2007-08-01

    Influence of housefly maggot meal (magmeal) diets on the activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glycogen concentration in liver of Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus fingerling was evaluated. Triplicate groups of fifteen fish (initial average weight 2.0+/-0.1 g) were fed eight weeks with seven test diets (in average 36% crude protein, dry matter) formulated by replacing fish meal with magmeal. Percentage body weight gain (591-724.46%), food conversion ratio (1.05-1.22) and standard growth rate (3.45-3.76) in all feeding groups were not significantly different (P<0.05). No significant difference (P<0.05) was observed in liver glycogen reserve (175.27-236.88 micromol g(-1)) among the fish groups. Hepatic catalase activity also did not differ significantly. However, elevated glutathione S-transferases activities were observed when fish received higher dietary magmeal concentration. This might have been temporary with no real physiological implication when appraised by the growth responses. These results indicate that magmeal was well utilized by the fish and its incorporation into tilapia diets seems to have no oxidative stress generating effect on fish metabolism and may not be containing any compound that stimulates the generation of reactive oxygen species. Magmeal can effectively be used as an alternative protein source in tilapia fingerling production.

  17. Effect of ethacrynic acid, a glutathione-S-transferase inhibitor, on nitroglycerin-mediated cGMP elevation and vasorelaxation of rabbit aortic strips.

    PubMed

    Kenkare, S R; Benet, L Z

    1993-07-20

    The effects of ethacrynic acid (ECA), an inhibitor of glutathione-S-transferase, on both the pharmacologic and biochemical responses of aortic tissue to nitroglycerin (GTN) were evaluated. Using the rabbit aortic strip model, relaxation responses to 0.6 microM GTN were measured with and without ECA (0.2 mM) pretreatment. These same strips were frozen, and the concentrations of cGMP in the strips were measured using a 3H-labeled radioimmunoassay. Both the relaxation response and the increase in cGMP upon GTN treatment were reduced significantly by pretreatment of the strips with ECA. A correlation was observed between the decreases in the pharmacodynamic and biochemical responses upon ECA pretreatment. cGMP levels in strips treated with sodium nitroprusside, which generates nitric oxide by mechanisms distinct from that for organic nitrates, were not decreased by ECA pretreatment. These observations suggest that the mechanism of GTN action involves a glutathione-S-transferase-mediated metabolic step for GTN and that the isozyme(s) involved in this activation process may be inhibited by ECA.

  18. Glutathione S-transferases M1-1 and T1-1 as risk modifiers for renal cell cancer associated with occupational exposure to chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Buzio, L; De Palma, G; Mozzoni, P; Tondel, M; Buzio, C; Franchini, I; Axelson, O; Mutti, A

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the possible interaction between occupational risk factors and genotype for glutathione S-transferases M1 and T1 (GSTM1 and GSTT1) in renal cell cancer (RCC). Methods: One hundred patients with RCC and 200 outpatient controls were enrolled at Parma University Hospital. The polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1-1 (GSTM1) and T1-1 (GSTT1) were investigated by PCR; occupational history was collected by a structured questionnaire. Results: Subjects with GSTM1 present genotype showed higher risks for RCC, compared to GSTM1 null subjects, if exposed to metals (OR 2.73; 95% CI 0.91 to 8.22 v 1.14; 95% CI 0.46 to 2.82) or pesticides (OR 3.46; 95% CI 1.12 to 10.74 v 1.59; 95% CI 0.48 to 5.34). The GSTT1 present genotype also enhanced the risk (about twofold) of RCC among subjects exposed to solvents and pesticides, compared with those GSTT1 null. Conclusions: Results support the hypothesis that GSTM1 and GSTT1 polymorphisms can interact with several occupational exposures to significantly modify the risk of RCC among exposed subjects. PMID:14504370

  19. Molecular cloning and differential expression patterns of sigma and omega glutathione S-transferases from Venerupis philippinarum to heavy metals and benzo[a]pyrene exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linbao; Wu, Huifeng; Liu, Xiaoli; Chen, Leilei; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Jianmin; You, Liping

    2012-05-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are a class of enzymes that facilitate the detoxification of xenobiotics, and also play important roles in antioxidant defense. We identified two glutathione S-transferase isoforms (VpGSTS, sigma GST; VpGSTO, omega GST) from Venerupis philippinarum by RACE approaches. The open reading frames of VpGSTS and VpGSTO were of 612 bp and 729 bp, encoding 203 and 242 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 22.88 and 27.94 kDa, respectively. The expression profiles of VpGSTS and VpGSTO responded to heavy metals and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) exposure were investigated by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. The expression of VpGSTS and VpGSTO were both rapidly up-regulated, however, they showed differential expression patterns to different toxicants. Cd displayed stronger induction of VpGSTS expression with an approximately 12-fold increase than that of VpGSTO with a maximum 6.4-fold rise. Cu exposure resulted in similar expression patterns for both VpGSTS and VpGSTO. For B[a]P exposure, the maximum induction of VpGSTO was approximately two times higher than that of VpGSTS. Altogether, these findings implied the involvement of VpGSTS and VpGSTO in host antioxidant responses, and highlighted their potential as a biomarker to Cd and B[a]P exposure.

  20. Tyrosine 8 contributes to catalysis but is not required for activity of rat liver glutathione S-transferase, 1-1.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Barycki, J. J.; Colman, R. F.

    1996-01-01

    Reaction of rat liver glutathione S-transferase, isozyme 1-1, with 4-(fluorosulfonyl)benzoic acid (4-FSB), a xenobiotic substrate analogue, results in a time-dependent inactivation of the enzyme to a final value of 35% of its original activity when assayed at pH 6.5 with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as substrate. The rate of inactivation exhibits a nonlinear dependence on the concentration of 4-FSB from 0.25 mM to 9 mM, characterized by a KI of 0.78 mM and kmax of 0.011 min-1. S-Hexylglutathione or the xenobiotic substrate analogue, 2,4-dinitrophenol, protects against inactivation of the enzyme by 4-FSB, whereas S-methylglutathione has little effect on the reaction. These experiments indicate that reaction occurs within the active site of the enzyme, probably in the binding site of the xenobiotic substrate, close to the glutathione binding site. Incorporation of [3,5-3H]-4-FSB into the enzyme in the absence and presence of S-hexylglutathione suggests that modification of one residue is responsible for the partial loss of enzyme activity. Tyr 8 and Cys 17 are shown to be the reaction targets of 4-FSB, but only Tyr 8 is protected against 4-FSB by S-hexylglutathione. DTT regenerates cysteine from the reaction product of cysteine and 4-FSB, but does not reactivate the enzyme. These results show that modification of Tyr 8 by 4-FSB causes the partial inactivation of the enzyme. The Michaelis constants for various substrates are not changed by the modification of the enzyme. The pH dependence of the enzyme-catalyzed reaction of glutathione with CDNB for the modified enzyme, as compared with the native enzyme, reveals an increase of about 0.9 in the apparent pKa, which has been interpreted as representing the ionization of enzyme-bound glutathione; however, this pKa of about 7.4 for modified enzyme remains far below the pK of 9.1 for the -SH of free glutathione. Previously, it was considered that Tyr 8 was essential for GST catalysis. In contrast, we conclude that

  1. Structure of a Drosophila sigma class glutathione S-transferase reveals a novel active site topography suited for lipid peroxidation products.

    PubMed

    Agianian, Bogos; Tucker, Paul A; Schouten, Arie; Leonard, Kevin; Bullard, Belinda; Gros, Piet

    2003-02-07

    Insect glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) are grouped in three classes, I, II and recently III; class I (Delta class) enzymes together with class III members are implicated in conferring resistance to insecticides. Class II (Sigma class) GSTs, however, are poorly characterized and their exact biological function remains elusive. Drosophila glutathione S-transferase-2 (GST-2) (DmGSTS1-1) is a class II enzyme previously found associated specifically with the insect indirect flight muscle. It was recently shown that GST-2 exhibits considerable conjugation activity for 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a lipid peroxidation product, raising the possibility that it has a major anti-oxidant role in the flight muscle. Here, we report the crystal structure of GST-2 at 1.75A resolution. The GST-2 dimer shows the canonical GST fold with glutathione (GSH) ordered in only one of the two binding sites. While the GSH-binding mode is similar to other GST structures, a distinct orientation of helix alpha6 creates a novel electrophilic substrate-binding site (H-site) topography, largely flat and without a prominent hydrophobic-binding pocket, which characterizes the H-sites of other GSTs. The H-site displays directionality in the distribution of charged/polar and hydrophobic residues creating a binding surface that explains the selectivity for amphipolar peroxidation products, with the polar-binding region formed by residues Y208, Y153 and R145 and the hydrophobic-binding region by residues V57, A59, Y211 and the C-terminal V249. A structure-based model of 4-HNE binding is presented. The model suggest that residues Y208, R145 and possibly Y153 may be key residues involved in catalysis.

  2. Caribbean yellow band disease compromises the activity of catalase and glutathione S-transferase in the reef-building coral Orbicella faveolata exposed to anthracene.

    PubMed

    Montilla, Luis Miguel; Ramos, Ruth; García, Elia; Cróquer, Aldo

    2016-05-03

    Healthy and diseased corals are threatened by different anthropogenic sources, such as pollution, a problem expected to become more severe in the near future. Despite the fact that coastal pollution and coral diseases might represent a serious threat to coral reef health, there is a paucity of controlled experiments showing whether the response of diseased and healthy corals to xenobiotics differs. In this study, we exposed healthy and Caribbean yellow band disease (CYBD)-affected Orbicella faveolata colonies to 3 sublethal concentrations of anthracene to test if enzymatic responses to this hydrocarbon were compromised in CYBD-affected tissues. For this, a 2-factorial fully orthogonal design was used in a controlled laboratory bioassay, using tissue condition (2 levels: apparently healthy and diseased) and pollutant concentration (4 levels: experimental control, 10, 30 and 100 ppb concentration) as fixed factors. A permutation-based ANOVA (PERMANOVA) was used to test the effects of condition and concentration on the specific activity of 3 enzymatic biomarkers: catalase, glutathione S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase. We found a significant interaction between the concentration of anthracene and the colony condition for catalase (Pseudo-F = 3.84, df = 3, p < 0.05) and glutathione S-transferase (Pseudo-F = 3.29, df = 3, p < 0.05). Moreover, our results indicated that the enzymatic response to anthracene in CYBD-affected tissues was compromised, as the activity of these enzymes decreased 3- to 4-fold compared to healthy tissues. These results suggest that under a potential scenario of increasing hydrocarbon coastal pollution, colonies of O. faveolata affected with CYBD might become more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of chemical pollution.

  3. Fusarium moniliforme extract fed before a single dose of diethylnitrosamine increases the numbers of placental glutathione S-transferase positive hepatocytes in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lebepe, S.; Hendrich, S. )

    1991-03-11

    The carcinogenic potential of an alcohol:water (1:1) extract of Fusarium moniliforme (FUSX), containing 20 ppm fumonisin B{sub 1} was assayed. Groups of six 5-week-old female F344/N rats were fed a semipurified diet, with and without FUSX. A dose of initiating agent, diethylnitrosamine, was given orally. Placental glutathione S-transferase-positive (PGST(+)) hepatocytes were detected by immunohistochemistry and counted on 5 frozen hepatic sections/rat, as an endpoint to assess early stages of carcinogenesis. FUSX had significant co-initiating activity. Fusarium moniliforme infection of feed has been shown to promote hepatocarcinogenesis, and may pose a cocarcinogenic risk even during short-term, low-level exposure.

  4. Enhanced glutathione S-transferase expression in 2-hydroxyamino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine-resistant IEC-18 cells.

    PubMed

    Teubner, W; Fuchs, J I; Steinberg, P

    2007-05-01

    In the present study we show that repeated exposure of the rat intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-18 to 2-hydroxyamino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (N-OH-PhIP), from a toxicological point of view the most relevant phase-1 metabolite of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP, the main heterocyclic aromatic amine present in processed meat), led to the selection of N-OH-PhIP-resistant IEC-18 cells. This phenomenon was accompanied by a fivefold increase in total glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, measured with the broad-spectrum substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, in the N-OH-PhIP-resistant IEC-18 cells. Furthermore, a Western blotting analysis revealed that the expression of GST subunits A1, A3, A4, M1 and P1 was enhanced in the N-OH-PhIP-resistant IEC-18 cells.

  5. Virtual screening and in vitro assay of potential drug like inhibitors from spices against Glutathione-S-Transferase of Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Rosana O; Moorkoth, Dinsha; Azeez, Shamina; Eapen, Santhosh J

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) enzymes are critical antioxidant and detoxification system responsible for long-term existence of nematodes in host species. Hence, 16 phytochemicals predicted and reported to have potential nematicidal activity have been docked to GST enzyme of Meloidogyne incognita to assess their binding affinity and inhibitory activity. In vitro effects of these phytochemicals from in silico results have been done for validation of docking studies and efficacy in GST inhibition of following compounds such as alpha- pinene, alpha- terpineol, beta- caryophyllene, capsaicin, cinnamic acid, citronellol, curcumin, eugenol, geraniol, isoeugenol, linalool, myristicin, neral, NVA (N-vanillylnonanamide), piperine, vanillin have been revealed. Nematode inhibition in vitro bioassay for selected compounds could conclude that maximum mortality was observed with highest concentrations of beta- caryophyllene (78%) followed by eugenol (61.6%), cinnamic acid (55%) and N-vanillylnonanamide (49%). These findings thus suggest that the above phytochemicals could be potentially developed as nematicidal molecules against M. incognita infections. PMID:22553389

  6. Activity of carboxylesterase and glutathione S-transferase in different life-stages of carabid beetle (Poecilus cupreus) exposed to toxic metal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wilczek, Grazyna; Kramarz, Paulina; Babczyńska, Agnieszka

    2003-04-01

    Among the cytoplasmatic enzymes responsible for neutralization of organic xenobiotics, carboxylesterases (CarE) and glutathione S-transferases (GST) play important roles. Our study tested to what extent dietary Zn or Cd could modify the activity of CarE and GST at different life-stages of the carabid beetle Poecilus cupreus. Treatment and stage effects generally were statistically significant. For CarE activity in the beetles exposed to cadmium, only treatment was a significant factor. In all cases, the interaction between studied factors was statistically significant, implying that the physiological condition of the animals may enhance or reduce enzyme activity. We also observed differences between animals treated with cadmium and zinc in the pattern of enzyme activity, and a difference in GST activity measured with two different substrates. Our results confirmed that in studying enzyme activity under metal stress one should consider the animal's life-stage and sex.

  7. Over-expression of a glutathione S-transferase gene, GsGST, from wild soybean (Glycine soja) enhances drought and salt tolerance in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Zhu, Yanming; Li, Yong; Yang, Liang; Zhao, Xiaowen; Cai, Hua; Bai, Xi

    2010-08-01

    Glycine soja is a species of soybean that survives in adverse environments including high salt and drought conditions. We constructed a cDNA library from G. soja seedlings treated with NaCl and isolated a glutathione S-transferase gene (GsGST: GQ265911) from the library. The cDNA encoding GsGST contains an open reading frame of 660 bp and the predicted protein belongs to the tau class of GST family proteins. Tobacco plants over-expressing the GsGST gene showed sixfold higher GST activity than wild-type plants. Transgenic tobacco plants exhibited enhanced dehydration tolerance. T(2) transgenic tobacco plants showed higher tolerance at the seedling stage than wild-type plants to salt and mannitol as demonstrated by longer root length and less growth retardation.

  8. Glutathione S-transferase T1 and myeloperoxidase −463 G>A genotypes in lung cancer patients of Kumaun region

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Arundhati; Bag, Niladri; Jeena, Lalit Mohan; Jyala, Narayan Singh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Null genetic polymorphism of Glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) and -463 G>A promoter polymorphism of myeloperoxidase (MPO) were studied for association with lung cancer. Materials and Methods: In a case- control study 26 lung cancer patients and 33 healthy individuals from hilly Kumaun region of northern India were investigated. DNA was extracted from peripheral blood. GSTT1 null polymorphism was detected by duplex PCR, and MPO polymorphism was detected by performing PCR-RFLP. Results: An increased but statistically non- significant risk for lung cancer was found for GSTT1 null genotype. No association for MPO -463G>A genotype was evident. Conclusion: Further study with large sample size may reveal such association in this population. PMID:25097401

  9. Effects of mace (Myristica fragrans, Houtt.) on cytosolic glutathione S-transferase activity and acid soluble sulfhydryl level in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Kumari, M V; Rao, A R

    1989-07-15

    The aril of plant Myristica fragrans Houtt. commonly known as mace, which is consumed as a spice as well as used as a folk-medicine, was screened for its effects on the levels of cytosolic glutathione S-transferase (GST) and acid-soluble sulfhydryl (SH) groups in the liver of young adult male and female Swiss albino mice. Animals were assorted into 4 groups comprised of either sex and received either normal diet (negative control), 1% 2,3-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyanisole (BHA) diet (positive control), 1% mace diet or 2% mace diet for 10 days. There was a significant increase in the GST activity in the liver of mice exposed to BHA or mace. In addition, there was a significant increase in the SH content in the liver of mice fed on 1% BHA and 2% mace diets.

  10. Regulation of glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit gene expression: Identification of a unique xenobiotic-responsive element controlling inducible expression by planar aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Rushmore, T.H.; King, R.G.; Pickett, C.B. ); Paulson, K.E. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors have identified a region in the 5{prime} flanking sequence of the glutathione S-transferase Ya subunit gene that contains a unique xenobiotic-responsive element (XRE). The regulatory region spans nucleotides {minus}722 to {minus}682 of the 5{prime} flanking sequence and is responsible for part of the basal level as well as inducible expression of the Ya subunit gene by planar aromatic compounds such as {beta}-naphthoflavone ({beta}-NF) and 3-methylcholanthrene. The DNA sequence of this region ({beta}-NF-responsive element) is distinct from the DNA sequence of the XRE found in the cytochrome P-450 IA1 gene. In addition to the region containing the {beta}-NF-responsive element, two other regulatory regions of the Ya subunit gene have been identified. The data suggest that regulation of gene expression by planar aromatic compounds can be mediated by a DNA sequence this is distinct from the XRE sequence.

  11. Selective induction of glutathione S-transferases in round spermatids from the Brown-Norway rat by the chemotherapeutic regimen for testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Delbès, Geraldine; Chan, Donovan; Hales, Barbara F; Trasler, Jacquetta M; Robaire, Bernard

    2013-04-01

    Chemotherapeutic drugs can affect DNA in male germ cells, thereby impacting on the integrity of the genome transmitted to offspring. Drug metabolizing enzymes can protect cells from xenobiotic insult. We analyzed the expression pattern of such enzymes in isolated round spermatids from rats exposed to drugs used to treat testicular cancer: bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP). The number of isozymes expressed and the overall relative expression values were highest for the glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). Moreover, BEP treatment significantly increased the expression of 8 GSTs and 3 aldehyde dehydrogenases. Increased expression of GST isozymes was confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Although Gst genes can be targets for epigenetic modifications, promoter DNA methylation was not affected by BEP treatment. As GSTs are involved in drug resistance mechanisms, we hypothesize that BEP induction of GST expression may lead to the survival of damaged germ cells and the production of abnormal sperm.

  12. Involvement of cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferase, and epoxide hydrolase in the metabolism of aflatoxin B1 and relevance to risk of human liver cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Guengerich, F P; Johnson, W W; Ueng, Y F; Yamazaki, H; Shimada, T

    1996-01-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in the effect of variations in activities of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes on cancer incidence. This interest has accelerated with the development of methods for analyzing genetic polymorphisms. However, progress in epidemiology has been slow and the contributions of polymorphisms to risks from individual chemicals and mixtures are often controversial. A series of studies is presented to show the complexities encountered with a single chemical, aflatoxin B1 (AFB1). AFB1 is oxidized by human cytochrome P450 enzymes to several products. Only one of these, the 8,9-exo-epoxide, appears to be mutagenic and the others are detoxication products. P450 3A4, which can both activate and detoxicate AFB1, is found in the liver and the small intestine. In the small intestine, the first contact after oral exposure, epoxidation would not lead to liver cancer. The (nonenzymatic) half-life of the epoxide has been determined to be approximately 1 sec at 23 degrees C and neutral pH. Although the half-life is short, AFB1-8,9-exo-epoxide does react with DNA and glutathione S-transferase. Levels of these conjugates have been measured and combined with the rate of hydrolysis in a kinetic model to predict constants for binding of the epoxide with DNA and glutathione S-transferase. A role for epoxide hydrolase in alteration of AFB1 hepatocarcinogenesis has been proposed, although experimental evidence is lacking. Some inhibition of microsome-generated genotoxicity was observed with rat epoxide hydrolase; further information on the extent of contribution of this enzyme to AFB1 metabolism is not yet available. PMID:8781383

  13. Studies of the relationship between the catalytic activity and binding of non-substrate ligands by the glutathione S-transferases.

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, T D; Vessey, D A; Holcomb, C; Saley, N

    1984-01-01

    The dimeric enzyme glutathione S-transferase B is composed of two dissimilar subunits, referred to as Ya and Yc. Transferase B (YaYc) and two other transferases that are homodimers of the individual Ya and Yc subunits were purified from rat liver. Inhibition of these three enzymes by Indocyanine Green, biliverdin and several bile acids was investigated at different values of pH (range 6.0-8.0). Indocyanine Green, biliverdin and chenodeoxycholate were found to be effective inhibitors of transferases YaYc and YcYc at low (pH 6.0) but not high (pH 8.0) values of pH. Between these extremes of pH intermediate degrees of inhibition were observed. Cholate and taurochenodeoxycholate, however, were ineffective inhibitors of transferase YcYc at all values of pH. The observed differences in bile acids appeared to be due, in part, to differences in their state of ionization. In contrast with the above results, transferase YaYa was inhibited by at least 80% by the non-substrate ligands at all values of pH. These effects of pH on the three transferases could not be accounted for by pH-induced changes in the enzyme's affinity for the inhibitor. Thus those glutathione S-transferases that contain the Yc subunit are able to act simultaneously as both enzymes and binding proteins. In addition to enzyme structure, the state of ionization of the non-substrate ligands may also influence whether the transferases can perform both functions simultaneously. PMID:6696720

  14. Glutathione S-transferase expression in pollution-associated hepatic lesions of brown bullheads (Ameiurus nebulosus) from the Cuyahoga River, Cleveland, Ohio.

    PubMed

    Henson, K L; Gallagher, E P

    2004-07-01

    In rodents, overexpression of glutathione S-transferase pi is a characteristic feature of foci of cellular alteration (FCA) and neoplastic liver lesions induced by genotoxic chemicals. Alterations of glutathione S-transferase (GST) expression in hepatic lesions have also been reported in fish exposed to environmental carcinogens, and cellular GST expression may be an important determinant of growth and progression of chemical-associated liver tumors in certain fish species. In the present study, GST expression was examined in hepatic lesions of brown bullheads (n = 44) from the Cuyahoga River, a highly industrialized site located in Cleveland, Ohio. GST proteins were detected by immunohistochemistry and polyclonal antibodies that recognize either two major bullhead GST proteins or a pi-like GST isoform. Hepatic lesions were present in 70% of the fish and included biliary hyperplasia and biliary fibrosis; eosinophilic, basophilic, clear cell, and vacuolated FCA; and biliary neoplasms. Eosinophilic FCA and biliary tumors were the most prevalent preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. GST expression in hyperplastic biliary tissue, FCA and tumors did not markedly differ from that of surrounding normal hepatocytes or biliary epithelium. Some hepatocytes within eosinophilic FCA had decreased GST expression. A complete absence of GST immunoreactive protein was not observed in any lesion, and there were no marked differences when comparing GST pi to overall GST expression. Our results indicate that GST expression in hepatic lesions of brown bullhead exposed to environmental carcinogens does not significantly differ from that in surrounding normal cells and is therefore not a useful predictor of environmental carcinogenesis in this species. Furthermore, the regulation and expression of GST pi in bullhead hepatocarcinogenesis appears to differ markedly from that during hepatocarcinogenesis in rats and some other fish species.

  15. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Ho, Joseph X.; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary L.; Ji, Xinhua; Rueker, Florian; Carter, Daniel C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2 with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  16. A chloroplast-localized and auxin-induced glutathione S-transferase from phreatophyte Prosopis juliflora confer drought tolerance on tobacco.

    PubMed

    George, Suja; Venkataraman, Gayatri; Parida, Ajay

    2010-03-01

    Plant growth and productivity are adversely affected by various abiotic stress factors. In our previous study, we used Prosopis juliflora, a drought-tolerant tree species of Fabaceae, as a model plant system for mining genes functioning in abiotic stress tolerance. Large-scale random EST sequencing from a cDNA library obtained from drought-stressed leaves of 2-month-old P. juliflora plants resulted in identification of three different auxin-inducible glutathione S-transferases. In this paper, we report the cellular localization and the ability to confer drought tolerance in transgenic tobacco of one of these GSTs (PjGSTU1). PjGSTU1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and GST and GPX activities in total protein samples were assayed and compared with controls. The results indicated that PjGSTU1 protein forms a functional homo-dimer in recombinant bacteria with glutathione transferase as well as glutathione peroxidase activities. PjGSTU1 transgenic tobacco lines survived better under conditions of 15% PEG stress compared with control un-transformed plants. In vivo localization studies for PjGSTU1 using GFP fusion revealed protein localization in chloroplasts of transgenic plants. The peroxidase activity of PjGSTU1 and its localization in the chloroplast indicates a possible role for PjGSTU1 in ROS removal.

  17. Inactivation of mouse liver glutathione S-transferase YfYf (Pi class) by ethacrynic acid and 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid).

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M F; Mantle, T J

    1993-01-01

    Mouse liver glutathione S-transferase YfYf (Pi class) reacts with [14C]ethacrynic acid to form a covalent adduct with a stoichiometry of 1 mol per mol of subunit. Proteolytic digestion of the enzyme-[14C]ethacrynic acid adduct with V8 protease produced an 11 kDa fragment containing radioactivity. Sequencing revealed this to be an N-terminal peptide (minus the first 15 residues, terminating at Glu-112) which contains only one cysteine residue (Cys-47). This is tentatively identified as the site of ethacrynic attachment. Kinetic studies reveal that glutathione S-conjugates protect against inactivation by ethacrynic acid, but the level of protection is not consistent with their potency as product inhibitors. A model is proposed in which glutathione S-conjugates and ethacrynic acid compete for the free enzyme, and a second molecule of ethacrynic acid reacts covalently with the enzyme-ethacrynic acid complex. The native protein contains one thiol reactive with 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) at neutral pH. The resultant mixed disulphide, like the ethacrynic acid adduct, is inactive, but treatment with cyanide (which incorporates on a mol for mol basis) restores activity to 35% of that of the native enzyme. Images Figure 4 PMID:8363586

  18. Modulation of the glutathione S-transferase in Ochrobactrum anthropi: function of xenobiotic substrates and other forms of stress.

    PubMed Central

    Favaloro, B; Tamburro, A; Trofino, M A; Bologna, L; Rotilio, D; Heipieper, H J

    2000-01-01

    The gluthathione S-transferase gene of the atrazine-degrading bacterium Ochrobactrum anthropi (OaGST) encodes a single-subunit polypeptide of 201 amino acid residues (Favaloro et al. 1998, Biochem. J. 335, 573-579). RNA blot analysis showed that the gene is transcribed into an mRNA of about 800 nucleotides, indicating a monocistronic transcription of the OaGST gene. The modulation of OaGST in this bacterium, in the presence of different stimulants, was investigated. The level of expression of OaGST was detected both by measuring the mRNA level and by immunoblotting experiments. OaGST is a constitutive enzyme which is also inducible by several stimulants. In fact, atrazine caused an increase in the expression of OaGST even at concentrations which had no effect on growth rates of the bacteria. Moreover, the presence of other aromatic substrates of this bacterium, such as phenol and chlorophenols, leads to a marked enhancement in OaGST expression. In this case, the expression of OaGST was related to growth inhibition and membrane damage caused by these hydrophobic compounds, and to the adaptive responses of the cell membranes. On the other hand, toluene and xylene, two aromatic compounds not degradable by this bacterium, did not induce the OaGST expression. The same was observed for other stress conditions such as low pH, heat shock, hydrogen peroxide, osmotic stress, starvation, the presence of aliphatic alcohols or heavy metals. These results suggest a co-regulation of the OaGST gene by the catabolic pathways of phenols and chlorophenols in this bacterium. Therefore, OaGST could function as a detoxifying agent within the catabolism of these xenobiotics. PMID:10677378

  19. COMPARATIVE EXPRESSION OF TWO ALPHA CLASS GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASES IN HUMAN ADULT AND PRENATAL LIVER TISSUES. (R827441)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The ability of the fetus to detoxify transplacental drugs and chemicals can be a critical determinant of teratogenesis and developmental toxicity. Developmentally regulated expression of alpha class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is of particular int...

  20. COMPARATIVE EXPRESSION OF TWO ALPHA CLASS GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASES IN HUMAN ADULT AND PRENATAL LIVER TISSUES. (R827441)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The ability of the fetus to detoxify transplacental drugs and chemicals can be a critical determinant of teratogenesis and developmental toxicity. Developmentally regulated expression of alpha class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is of particular int...

  1. Functional analysis of genetic polymorphism in Wuchereria bancrofti glutathione S-transferase antioxidant gene: impact on protein structure and enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sakthidevi, Moorthy; Prabhu, Prince Rajaiah; Chowdhary, Swati; Hoti, Sugeerappa Laxmanappa; Kaliraj, Perumal

    2013-01-01

    Wuchereria bancrofti glutathione S-transferase (Wb-GST) is referred as a promising chemotherapeutic target for lymphatic filariasis. GST represents the major class of detoxifying enzymes of the tissue dwelling parasitic helminths. Though many inhibition studies were carried out for Wb-GST, understanding its genetic distribution in parasite population is necessary to develop ideal inhibitor. Our genetic polymorphic studies exposed the existence of three variant Wb-GST alleles in the four endemic regions of India. Moreover, it also revealed the variability in the distribution of Wb-GST alleles in the studied population. Therefore we cloned, expressed and purified the recombinant variant Wb-GST proteins to study the mutation impact on its structure and hence on its catalysis. Among the studied mutations, the I60F/G78S substitutions in the N-terminal domain and loop region connecting the two domains of Wb-GST lowered the affinity for glutathione and its analog, S-hexyl glutathione. Moreover, molecular modeling and docking studies revealed that the I60F/G78S mutations affected the proximity of Trp38 and Arg95 in glutathione binding site resulting in weaker interaction with S-hexyl glutathione. Besides, the variants also had lower affinity (Ki) and higher IC50 values for well-known GST inhibitors. Interestingly, the Wb-GST variant proteins showed enhanced catalytic efficiency for lipid peroxidation products which are produced due to oxidative stress. Thus, our study provides evidence for the functional impact of mutations on Wb-GST protein and also spotlights the mechanisms of parasite survival against the host oxidative stress environment.

  2. A Chinese cabbage (Brassica campetris subsp. Chinensis) τ-type glutathione-S-transferase stimulates Arabidopsis development and primes against abiotic and biotic stress.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chih-Wei; Bakshi, Madhunita; Sherameti, Irena; Dong, Sheqin; Reichelt, Michael; Oelmüller, Ralf; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2016-12-01

    The beneficial root-colonizing fungus Piriformospora indica stimulates root development of Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris subsp. Chinensis) and this is accompanied by the up-regulation of a τ-class glutathione (GSH)-S-transferase gene (BcGSTU) (Lee et al. 2011) in the roots. BcGSTU expression is further promoted by osmotic (salt and PEG) and heat stress. Ectopic expression of BcGSTU in Arabidopsis under the control of the 35S promoter results in the promotion of root and shoot growth as well as better performance of the plants under abiotic (150 mM NaCl, PEG, 42 °C) and biotic (Alternaria brassicae infection) stresses. Higher levels of glutathione, auxin and stress-related (salicylic and jasmonic acid) phytohormones as well as changes in the gene expression profile result in better performance of the BcGSTU expressors upon exposure to stress. Simultaneously the plants are primed against upcoming stresses. We propose that BcGSTU is a target of P. indica in Chinese cabbage roots because the enzyme participates in balancing growth and stress responses, depending on the equilibrium of the symbiotic interaction. A comparable function of BcGST in transgenic Arabidopsis makes the enzyme a valuable tool for agricultural applications.

  3. Molecular Cloning, Biochemical Characterization, and Partial Protective Immunity of the Heme-Binding Glutathione S-Transferases from the Human Hookworm Necator americanus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Bin; Perally, Samirah; Brophy, Peter M.; Xue, Jian; Goud, Gaddam; Liu, Sen; Deumic, Vehid; de Oliveira, Luciana M.; Bethony, Jeffrey; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Jiang, Desheng; Gillespie, Portia; Xiao, Shu-hua; Gupta, Richi; Loukas, Alex; Ranjit, Najju; Lustigman, Sara; Oksov, Yelena; Hotez, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Hookworm glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are critical for parasite blood feeding and survival and represent potential targets for vaccination. Three cDNAs, each encoding a full-length GST protein from the human hookworm Necator americanus (and designated Na-GST-1, Na-GST-2, and Na-GST-3, respectively) were isolated from cDNA based on their sequence similarity to Ac-GST-1, a GST from the dog hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. The open reading frames of the three N. americanus GSTs each contain 206 amino acids with 51% to 69% sequence identity between each other and Ac-GST-1. Sequence alignment with GSTs from other organisms shows that the three Na-GSTs belong to a nematode-specific nu-class GST family. All three Na-GSTs, when expressed in Pichia pastoris, exhibited low lipid peroxidase and glutathione-conjugating enzymatic activities but high heme-binding capacities, and they may be involved in the detoxification and/or transport of heme. In two separate vaccine trials, recombinant Na-GST-1 formulated with Alhydrogel elicited 32 and 39% reductions in adult hookworm burdens (P < 0.05) following N. americanus larval challenge relative to the results for a group immunized with Alhydrogel alone. In contrast, no protection was observed in vaccine trials with Na-GST-2 or Na-GST-3. On the basis of these and other preclinical data, Na-GST-1 is under possible consideration for further vaccine development. PMID:20145100

  4. Isolation of a cDNA clone and localization of human glutathione S-transferase 2 genes to chromosome band 6p12

    SciTech Connect

    Board, P.G.; Webb, G.C.

    1987-04-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GST) (glutathione transferase; EC 2.5.1.18) are a family of enzymes responsible for the metabolism of a broad range of xenobiotics and carcinogens. A cDNA clone containing the entire amino acid coding sequence of a human GST-2 subunit has been isolated using a lambdagt11 expression library. The complete nucleotide sequence and a partial restriction map are presented. The subunit is composed of 221 amino acids with a molecular weight of 25,425 before post translational modification. The deduced amino acid sequence is rich in lysine, which is consistent with the relatively high pI of GST-2. The human sequence shows considerable homology with the rat Ya and Yc GST sequences but little homology with the rat GSTp and Yb subunit sequences. Southern blots of restriction digests of human DNA indicate that there may be multiple GST-2 genes. In situ hybridization of the cloned cDNA to human chromosomes produces intense labeling only over band p12 on the short arm of chromosome 6 near the centromere. This indicates that the GST-2 gene(s) are located only at this site.

  5. The identification and oxidative stress response of a zeta class glutathione S-transferase (GSTZ1) gene from Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huiru; Meng, Fei; Jia, Haihong; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2012-06-01

    Glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) play an important role in protecting organisms against the toxicity of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, no information is available for GSTs in the Chinese honey bee (Apis cerana cerana). In this study, we isolated and characterized a zeta class GST gene (AccGSTZ1) from the Chinese honey bee. This gene is present in a single copy and harbors five exons. The deduced amino acid sequence of AccGSTZ1 shared high sequence identity with homologous proteins and contained the highly conserved features of this gene family. The temporal and spatial expression profiles of AccGSTZ1 showed that AccGSTZ1 was highly expressed in fourth instar larvae during development, and the mRNA level of AccGSTZ1 was higher in the epidermis than that in other tissues. The expression pattern under oxidative stress revealed that AccGSTZ1 transcription was significantly upregulated by external factors, such as temperature challenges and H(2)O(2) treatment. The characterization of the purified protein revealed that AccGSTZ1 had low glutathione-conjugating activity, but the recombinant AccGSTZ1 protein displayed high antioxidant activity under oxidative stress. These data suggest that AccGSTZ1 is an oxidative stress-inducible antioxidant enzyme that plays an important role in the protection against oxidative stress and may be of critical importance for the survival of the honey bees.

  6. Purification, molecular cloning, and characterization of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) from pigmented Vitis vinifera L. cell suspension cultures as putative anthocyanin transport proteins.

    PubMed

    Conn, Simon; Curtin, Chris; Bézier, Annie; Franco, Chris; Zhang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The ligandin activity of specific glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is necessary for the transport of anthocyanins from the cytosol to the plant vacuole. Five GSTs were purified from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Gamay Fréaux cell suspension cultures by glutathione affinity chromatography. These proteins underwent Edman sequencing and mass spectrometry fingerprinting, with the resultant fragments aligned with predicted GSTs within public databases. The corresponding coding sequences were cloned, with heterologous expression in Escherichia coli used to confirm GST activity. Transcriptional profiling of these candidate GST genes and key anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway genes (PAL, CHS, DFR, and UFGT) in cell suspensions and grape berries against anthocyanin accumulation demonstrated strong positive correlation with two sequences, VvGST1 and VvGST4, respectively. The ability of VvGST1 and VvGST4 to transport anthocyanins was confirmed in the heterologous maize bronze-2 complementation model, providing further evidence for their function as anthocyanin transport proteins in grape cells. Furthermore, the differential induction of VvGST1 and VvGST4 in suspension cells and grape berries suggests functional differences between these two proteins. Further investigation of these candidate ligandins may identify a mechanism for manipulating anthocyanin accumulation in planta and in vitro suspension cells.

  7. Efficient synthesis of α-fluoromethylhistidine di-hydrochloride and demonstration of its efficacy as a glutathione S-transferase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Considine, Kelly L; Stefanidis, Lazaros; Grozinger, Karl G; Audie, Joseph; Alper, Benjamin J

    2017-03-15

    Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) is an enzyme that converts histidine to histamine. Inhibition of HDC has several medical applications, and HDC inhibitors are of considerable interest for the study of histidine metabolism. (S)-α-Fluoromethylhistidine di-hydrochloride (α-FMH) is a potent HDC inhibitor that is commercially available at high cost in small amounts only. Here we report a novel, inexpensive, and efficient method for synthesis of α-FMH using methyl 2-aziridinyl-3-(N-triphenylmethyl-4-imidazolyl) propionate and HF/pyridine, with experimental yield of 57%. To identify novel targets for α-FMH, we developed a three step in silico work-flow for identifying physically plausible protein targets. The work-flow resulted in 21 protein target hits, including several enzymes involved in glutathione metabolism, and notably, two isozymes of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily, which plays a central role in drug metabolism. In view of this predictive data, the efficacy of α-FMH as a GST inhibitor was investigated in vitro. α-FMH was demonstrated to be an effective inhibitor of GST at micromolar concentration, suggesting that off-target effects of α-FMH may limit physiological drug metabolism and elimination by GST-dependent mechanisms. The present study therefore provides new avenues for obtaining α-FMH and for studying its biochemical effects, with potential implications for drug development.

  8. Comparative activities of glutathione-S-transferase and dialdehyde reductase toward aflatoxin B1 in livers of experimental and farm animals.

    PubMed

    Tulayakul, P; Sakuda, S; Dong, K S; Kumagai, S

    2005-08-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the relative activities of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and aldehyde reductase toward aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in relation to the variation of species susceptibilities, we studied the in vitro cytosolic GST and reductase activities in liver tissues from male Fischer rats, ICR mice and golden hamsters, adult male rainbow trouts and female piglets. The GST activity was determined by incubating the liver cytosol with glutathione (GSH) and AFB1 in the presence of the hamster liver microsomes to metabolize AFB1 to AFB1-8, 9-epoxide. The reaction product, AFB1 and GSH conjugate (AFB1-GSH), was quantified with HPLC. The reductase activity was determined by incubating liver cytosol with AFB1-dialdehyde, followed by the quantification of the metabolic product, AFB1-dialcohol, with HPLC. All the animal species possessed the GST activities, and AFB1-GSH formed increasingly with the increase of the AFB1 concentration according to the model of first-order enzyme reaction kinetics. The V(max) and K(m) values of the GST activities in rodent species were higher and lower, respectively, than those in the trout and pig, being consistent with the relative susceptibilities to AFB1 of these animal species. However, no relationship was noted between the reductase activity and species susceptibility. Thus, the result of this study shows that GST toward AFB1, but not aldehyde reductase, is a determinant of the variation of species susceptibilities.

  9. Stress-responsive expression of a glutathione S-transferase (delta) gene in waterflea Daphnia magna challenged by microcystin-producing and microcystin-free Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Kai; Gu, Lei; Li, Bangping; Lu, Yichun; Wu, Changcan; Guan, Haoyong; Yang, Zhou

    2016-06-01

    Harmful cyanobacterial blooms resulting from eutrophication and global warming have emerged as a worldwide environmental concern. Some zooplankton populations, including Daphnia, have been shown to adapt locally to microcystin-producing Microcystis. Previous in vitro experiments indicate that glutathione-S-transferase (GST) may act as the first step of detoxification in Daphnia by conjugating microcystins (MCs) with glutathione. The GST family is categorized into many classes, and different classes present distinct responses to MC detoxification. To date, however, the molecular mechanism of single class GST participation in buffering the toxic effects of MCs in Daphnia remains poorly known. In this study, a full-length delta-GST cDNA of Daphnia magna (Dm-dGST) was isolated and characterized through bioinformatics. Differential gene expression studies revealed that short-term exposure to microcystin-producing (MP) Microcystis aeruginosa increased Dm-dGST transcript levels. By contrast, long-term exposure to MP or microcystin-free (MF) M. aeruginosa decreased Dm-dGST transcript levels. Together with changes in three other antioxidation biomarkers (catalase, CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase), it is concluded that Dm-dGST can potentially biotransform MCs to reduce their toxicity. The present study highlights the importance of Dm-dGST in response to MC toxicity and may thus facilitate future research on the molecular mechanisms of MC tolerance in zooplankton under an increasing eutrophic world.

  10. Variable Levels of Glutathione S-Transferases Are Responsible for the Differential Tolerance to Metolachlor between Maize (Zea mays) Shoots and Roots.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongzhi; Xu, Li; Pang, Sen; Liu, Zhiqian; Wang, Kai; Wang, Chengju

    2017-01-11

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play important roles in herbicide tolerance. However, studies on GST function in herbicide tolerance among plant tissues are still lacking. To explore the mechanism of metolachlor tolerance difference between maize shoots and roots, the effects of metolachlor on growth, GST activity, and the expression of the entire GST gene family were investigated. It was found that this differential tolerance to metolachlor was correlated with contrasting GST activity between the two tissues and can be eliminated by a GST inhibitor. An in vitro metolachlor-glutathione conjugation assay confirmed that the transformation of metolachlor is 2-fold faster in roots than in shoots. The expression analysis of the GST gene family revealed that most GST genes are expressed much higher in roots than shoots, both in control and in metolachlor-treated plants. Taken together, higher level expression of most GST genes, leading to higher GST activity and faster herbicide transformation, appears to be responsible for the higher tolerance to metolachlor of maize roots than shoots.

  11. Two epsilon glutathione S-transferase cDNAs from the common cutworm, Spodoptera litura: characterization and developmental and induced expression by insecticides.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huimin; Huang, Yufen; Feng, Qili; Zheng, Sichun

    2009-12-01

    Two Spodoptera litura glutathione S-transferase cDNAs (Slgste2 and Slgste3) which were cloned from a midgut cDNA, encoded two structurally distinct proteins with a predicted molecular mass of 25 and 24kDa, respectively. Slgste2 and Slgste3 were single-copy genes in the S. litura genome and there was no intron within the genes. The transcripts and proteins of Slgste2 and Slgste3 were predominately present in the midgut of the 5th and 6th instar larvae. The apparent Vmax of the purified SlGSTE2 and SlGSTE3 recombinant proteins towards the substrates glutathione and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenezene (CDNB) were similar. Slgste2 expression was up-regulated by 1-naphthyl methylcarbamate (carbaryl), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis-(p-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT), deltamethrin, tebufenozide (RH5992) and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), but not affected by malathion, while Slgste3 expression was slightly up-regulated by carbaryl, Bt and DDT, but not affected by RH5992, malathion and deltamethrin. The results suggest that Slgste2 and Slgste3 may play roles in detoxifying various insecticides in S. litura.

  12. Identification, genomic organization, and oxidative stress response of a sigma class glutathione S-transferase gene (AccGSTS1) in the honey bee, Apis cerana cerana.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huiru; Jia, Haihong; Gao, Hongru; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2013-07-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multifunctional antioxidant enzyme superfamily that play pivotal roles in both detoxification and protection against oxidative damage caused by reactive oxygen species. In this study, a complementary DNA (cDNA) encoding a sigma class GST was identified in the Chinese honey bee, Apis cerana cerana (AccGSTS1). AccGSTS1 was constitutively expressed in all tissues of adult worker bees, including the brain, fat body, epidermis, muscle, and midgut, with particularly robust transcription in the fat body. Relative messenger RNA expression levels of AccGSTS1 at different developmental stages varied, with the highest levels of expression observed in adults. The potential function of AccGSTS1 in cellular defenses against abiotic stresses (cold, heat, UV, H2O2, HgCl2, and insecticides) was investigated. AccGSTS1 was significantly upregulated in response to all of the treatment conditions examined, although the induction levels were varied. Recombinant AccGSTS1 protein showed characteristic glutathione-conjugating catalytic activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Functional assays revealed that AccGSTS1 could remove H2O2, thereby protecting DNA from oxidative damage. Escherichia coli overexpressing AccGSTS1 showed long-term resistance under conditions of oxidative stress. Together, these results suggest that AccGSTS1 is a crucial antioxidant enzyme involved in cellular antioxidant defenses and honey bee survival.

  13. Glyceryl trinitrate metabolism in the quail embryo by the glutathione S-transferases leads to a perturbation in redox status and embryotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bardai, Ghalib K; Hales, Barbara F; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2013-07-01

    Exposure of stage 9 quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) embryos to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) induces malformations that were associated in previous studies with an increase in protein nitration. Increased nitration suggests metabolism of GTN by the embryo. The goals of this study were to characterize the enzymes and co-factors required for GTN metabolism by quail embryos, and to determine the effects of in ovo treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione (GSH), on GTN embryotoxicity. GTN treatment of quail embryos resulted in an increase in nitrite, a decrease in total GSH, and an increase in the ratio of NADP(+)/NADPH, indicating that redox balance may be compromised in exposed embryos. Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs; EC 2.5.1.18) purified from the whole embryo (K(m) 0.84 mM; V(max) 36 μM/min) and the embryonic eye (K(m) 0.20 mM; V(max) 30 μM/min) had GTN-metabolizing activity (1436 and 34 nmol/min/mg, respectively); the addition of ethacrynic acid, an inhibitor of GST activity, decreased GTN metabolism. Peptide sequencing of the GST isozymes indicated that alpha- or mu-type GSTs in the embryo and embryonic eye had GTN metabolizing activity. NAC co-treatment partially protected against the effects of GTN exposure. Thus, GTN denitration by quail embryo GSTs may represent a key initial step in the developmental toxicity of GTN.

  14. Isolation of a cDNA clone and localization of human glutathione S-transferase 2 genes to chromosome band 6p12.

    PubMed Central

    Board, P G; Webb, G C

    1987-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferases (GST) (glutathione transferase; EC 2.5.1.18) are a family of enzymes responsible for the metabolism of a broad range of xenobiotics and carcinogens. A cDNA clone containing the entire amino acid coding sequence of a human GST-2 subunit has been isolated using a lambda gt11 expression library. The complete nucleotide sequence and a partial restriction map are presented. The subunit is composed of 221 amino acids with a molecular weight of 25,425 before posttranslational modification. The deduced amino acid sequence is rich in lysine, which is consistent with the relatively high pI of GST-2. The human sequence shows considerable homology with the rat Ya and Yc GST sequences but little homology with the rat GSTp and Yb subunit sequences. Southern blots of restriction digests of human DNA indicate that there may be multiple GST-2 genes. In situ hybridization of the cloned cDNA to human chromosomes produces intense labeling only over band p12 on the short arm of chromosome 6 near the centromere. This indicates that the GST-2 gene(s) are located only at this site. Images PMID:3031680

  15. Purification, molecular cloning, and characterization of glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) from pigmented Vitis vinifera L. cell suspension cultures as putative anthocyanin transport proteins

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Simon; Curtin, Chris; Bézier, Annie; Franco, Chris; Zhang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The ligandin activity of specific glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) is necessary for the transport of anthocyanins from the cytosol to the plant vacuole. Five GSTs were purified from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Gamay Fréaux cell suspension cultures by glutathione affinity chromatography. These proteins underwent Edman sequencing and mass spectrometry fingerprinting, with the resultant fragments aligned with predicted GSTs within public databases. The corresponding coding sequences were cloned, with heterologous expression in Escherichia coli used to confirm GST activity. Transcriptional profiling of these candidate GST genes and key anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway genes (PAL, CHS, DFR, and UFGT) in cell suspensions and grape berries against anthocyanin accumulation demonstrated strong positive correlation with two sequences, VvGST1 and VvGST4, respectively. The ability of VvGST1 and VvGST4 to transport anthocyanins was confirmed in the heterologous maize bronze-2 complementation model, providing further evidence for their function as anthocyanin transport proteins in grape cells. Furthermore, the differential induction of VvGST1 and VvGST4 in suspension cells and grape berries suggests functional differences between these two proteins. Further investigation of these candidate ligandins may identify a mechanism for manipulating anthocyanin accumulation in planta and in vitro suspension cells. PMID:18836188

  16. A mu-class glutathione S-transferase from the marine shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei: molecular cloning and active-site structural modeling.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Vergara, Carmen A; Harris-Valle, Citlalli; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    A cDNA clone coding for a mu-class glutathione S-transferase (GST) was isolated from a hepatopancreas cDNA library from the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. The deduced amino acid sequence (215 amino acids) has >50% identity to rodents and other mammals mu-class GSTs. Using RT-PCR, the shrimp GST transcript was detected in hepatopancreas, hemocytes, gills, and muscle, but not in pleopods. The shrimp GST sequence was computer modeled and found to fit the classical two-domain GST structure. Domain I, containing the glutathione (GSH) binding site, is more conserved compared to the flexible C-terminal domain II. Residue Q208 appears to be a key to substrate specificity by comparison with mammalian GST mutants. This position is commonly occupied by serine or threonine in mammalian mu-class GSTs, and shrimp Q208 may affect the affinity to substrates like aminochrome or 1,3-dimethyl-2-cyano-1-nitrosoguanidine. This is the first report of molecular cloning and structural modeling of a crustacean GST and provides new insights into the nature of the detoxification response on marine invertebrates.

  17. Comparison of epsilon- and delta-class glutathione S-transferases: the crystal structures of the glutathione S-transferases DmGSTE6 and DmGSTE7 from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Scian, Michele; Le Trong, Isolde; Mazari, Aslam M. A.; Mannervik, Bengt; Atkins, William M.; Stenkamp, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    Cytosolic glutathione transferases (GSTs) comprise a large family of enzymes with canonical structures that diverge functionally and structurally among mammals, invertebrates and plants. Whereas mammalian GSTs have been characterized extensively with regard to their structure and function, invertebrate GSTs remain relatively unstudied. The invertebrate GSTs do, however, represent potentially important drug targets for infectious diseases and agricultural applications. In addition, it is essential to fully understand the structure and function of invertebrate GSTs, which play important roles in basic biological processes. Invertebrates harbor delta- and epsilon-class GSTs, which are not found in other organisms. Drosophila melanogaster GSTs (DmGSTs) are likely to contribute to detoxication or antioxidative stress during development, but they have not been fully characterized. Here, the structures of two epsilon-class GSTs from Drosophila, DmGSTE6 and DmGSTE7, are reported at 2.1 and 1.5 Å resolution, respectively, and are compared with other GSTs to identify structural features that might correlate with their biological functions. The structures of DmGSTE6 and DmGSTE7 are remarkably similar; the structures do not reveal obvious sources of the minor functional differences that have been observed. The main structural difference between the epsilon- and delta-class GSTs is the longer helix (A8) at the C-termini of the epsilon-class enzymes. PMID:26457432

  18. Mechanistic insights into EgGST1, a Mu class glutathione S-transferase from the cestode parasite Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Arbildi, Paula; Turell, Lucía; López, Verónica; Alvarez, Beatriz; Fernández, Verónica

    2017-08-30

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) comprise a major detoxification system in helminth parasites, displaying both catalytic and non-catalytic activities. The kinetic mechanism of these enzymes is complex and depends on the isoenzyme which is being analyzed. Here, we characterized the kinetic mechanism of rEgGST1, a recombinant form of a cytosolic GST from Echinococcus granulosus (EgGST1), which is related to the Mu-class of mammalian enzymes, using the canonical substrates glutathione (GSH) and 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB). Initial rate and product inhibition studies were consistent with a steady-state random sequential mechanism, where both substrates are bound to the enzyme before the products are released. Kinetic constants were also determined (pH 6.5 and 30 °C). Moreover, rEgGST1 lowered the pKa of GSH from 8.71 ± 0.07 to 6.77 ± 0.08, and enzyme-bound GSH reacted with CDNB 1 × 10(5) times faster than free GSH at pH 7.4. Finally, the dissociation of the enzyme-GSH complex was studied by means of intrinsic fluorescence, as well as that of the complex with the anthelminth drug mebendazole. This is the first report on mechanistic issues related to a helminth parasitic GST. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Gilliland, G. L.; Ji, X.; Ruker, F.; Carter, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Muster T et al., 1993, J Virol 67:6642-6647) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class (Ji X, Zhang P, Armstrong RN, Gilliland GL, 1992, Biochemistry 31:10169-10184) was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(3)2(1)2, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  20. Conversion of nitroglycerin to nitric oxide in microsomes of the bovine coronary artery smooth muscle is not primarily mediated by glutathione-S-transferases.

    PubMed

    Chung, S J; Chong, S; Seth, P; Jung, C Y; Fung, H L

    1992-02-01

    The pharmacological action of organic nitrate vasodilators [e.g., nitroglycerin (NTG)] is thought to be mediated through metabolic conversion to nitric oxide (NO); conversion leads to vasodilatation, whereas diminished conversion in chronic therapy may lead to pharmacological tolerance. The biochemical nature of this process, however, is poorly understood. Glutathione-S-transferases (GST) have been shown to metabolize organic nitrates in the liver, but it is not known whether these enzymes are involved in this pharmacologically relevant process. We, therefore, compared the activities of conversion of NTG to NO vs. those of GST in microsomal suspensions of bovine coronary artery smooth muscle tissue. A classical GST substrate, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, inhibited NO production in microsomes, suggesting possible involvement of GST in organic nitrate activation. However, GST activity derived from microsomes exhibited a different heat lability profile compared to that of NO generation. Known inhibitors of GST (viz., indomethacin and bromosulfophthalein) did not alter the NO-generating activity in microsomes. Glutathione was a critical cofactor for GST, but not for NO generation from NTG, and thiols other than glutathione (e.g., N-acetyl-L-cysteine and thiosalicylic acid) also could facilitate NO production. Moreover, comparison to a commercially available purified liver GST preparation showed that, at the same GST activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, the microsomal incubation produced about 8 times more NO than the purified liver GST. Radiation inactivation analysis of the functional molecular sizes of GST and the NO-producing enzyme(s) suggested that the enzymes were of different molecular weights (54 kD and 160 kD, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Gilliland, G. L.; Ji, X.; Ruker, F.; Carter, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Muster T et al., 1993, J Virol 67:6642-6647) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class (Ji X, Zhang P, Armstrong RN, Gilliland GL, 1992, Biochemistry 31:10169-10184) was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(3)2(1)2, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  2. Glutathione S-transferase omega genes in Alzheimer and Parkinson disease risk, age-at-diagnosis and brain gene expression: an association study with mechanistic implications.

    PubMed

    Allen, Mariet; Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S; Miles, Richard; Nair, Asha A; Crook, Julia E; Pankratz, V Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Rowley, Christopher N; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Bisceglio, Gina; Ortolaza, Alexandra I; Palusak, Ryan; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Georgescu, Constantin; Schultz, Debra; Rakhshan, Fariborz; Kolbert, Christopher P; Jen, Jin; Sando, Sigrid B; Aasly, Jan O; Barcikowska, Maria; Uitti, Ryan J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Ross, Owen A; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-04-11

    Glutathione S-transferase omega-1 and 2 genes (GSTO1, GSTO2), residing within an Alzheimer and Parkinson disease (AD and PD) linkage region, have diverse functions including mitigation of oxidative stress and may underlie the pathophysiology of both diseases. GSTO polymorphisms were previously reported to associate with risk and age-at-onset of these diseases, although inconsistent follow-up study designs make interpretation of results difficult. We assessed two previously reported SNPs, GSTO1 rs4925 and GSTO2 rs156697, in AD (3,493 ADs vs. 4,617 controls) and PD (678 PDs vs. 712 controls) for association with disease risk (case-controls), age-at-diagnosis (cases) and brain gene expression levels (autopsied subjects). We found that rs156697 minor allele associates with significantly increased risk (odds ratio = 1.14, p = 0.038) in the older ADs with age-at-diagnosis > 80 years. The minor allele of GSTO1 rs4925 associates with decreased risk in familial PD (odds ratio = 0.78, p = 0.034). There was no other association with disease risk or age-at-diagnosis. The minor alleles of both GSTO SNPs associate with lower brain levels of GSTO2 (p = 4.7 × 10-11-1.9 × 10-27), but not GSTO1. Pathway analysis of significant genes in our brain expression GWAS, identified significant enrichment for glutathione metabolism genes (p = 0.003). These results suggest that GSTO locus variants may lower brain GSTO2 levels and consequently confer AD risk in older age. Other glutathione metabolism genes should be assessed for their effects on AD and other chronic, neurologic diseases.

  3. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, K.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Gilliland, G. L.; Ji, X.; Rüker, F.; Carter, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Muster T et al., 1993, J Virol 67:6642-6647) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class (Ji X, Zhang P, Armstrong RN, Gilliland GL, 1992, Biochemistry 31:10169-10184) was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(3)2(1)2, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed. PMID:7538846

  4. Role of Glutathione S-Transferase in Coronary Artery Disease Patients with and Without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ritu; Singh, Balwant

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Glutathione S – transferase (GST) is an important enzyme in detoxification and helps in lowering oxidative stress. It is speculated that this enzyme is induced under conditions of oxidative stress as a protective mechanism. Aim To evaluate the status of Glutathione S–transferase in Coronary artery disease patients with and without type 2 Diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods The study was conducted in the Department of Biotechnology, Swami Satyanand College of Management and Technology in collaboration with Department of Biochemistry, Govt Medical College Amritsar. A total of 133 diagnosed cases of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) were selected from the OPD and Medicine Ward of a private hospital, Amritsar. CAD patients were segregated into two groups i.e., group-1 and group-2 on the basis if they had Type 2 Diabetes mellitus or not. A total of 110 ages and sex matched healthy individuals were taken as controls from the general population. Written informed consent was obtained from all the subjects. All the subjects were investigated for serum GST activity, Total antioxidant status, plasma GSH levels, serum MDA and lipid profile. Results Serum GST activity was significantly high (p<0.05) in CAD patients as compared to controls. CAD patients having Type 2 Diabetes had more raised serum GST activity, indicating marked oxidative stress in these patients. This was supported from the observation that serum MDA levels were also significantly (p<0.05) high in CAD patients with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus. Total antioxidant status was significantly depressed (p<0.05) in CAD patients whether diabetic or non-diabetic as compared to controls. No significant difference (p>0.05) in plasma GSH levels were observed between CAD patients and controls. Age and sex related variations in serum GST activity were insignificant (p>0.05) Conclusion Increased serum GST activity in CAD patients especially with Type 2 Diabetes is suggestive of a protective mechanism to combat

  5. The association between genetic damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes and polymorphisms of three glutathione S-transferases in Chinese workers exposed to 1,3-butadiene.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuemei; Zhang, Tianliang; Zhao, Jing; Zhou, Jingyang; Shao, Hua; Zhou, Zhonghua; Kong, Fanling; Feng, Nannan; Sun, Yuan; Shan, Baode; Xia, Zhaolin

    2013-01-20

    1,3-Butadiene (BD) has been classified as a human carcinogen, group I; however, the relationship between polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferases that metabolize BD and chromosomal damage is not clear. The present study used sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assays to detect chromosomal damage in peripheral lymphocytes of 44 BD-exposed workers and 39 non-exposed healthy controls. PCR and PCR-RFLP were employed to detect three known glutathione S-transferase polymorphisms GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1 (Ile105Val). The data demonstrated that the micronucleus (CBMN) frequency in BD-exposed workers was significantly higher than that in controls (frequency ratio (FR)=1.48, 95% CI: 1.14-1.91, P<0.01), and the CBMN frequency was higher in workers exposed to higher cumulative BD levels (FR=1.70, 95% CI: 1.28-2.27, P<0.01). However, differences in SCE frequency were not observed (FR=1.14, 95% CI: 0.81-1.61, P>0.05). Among exposed workers, chromosomal damage was related to BD exposure levels (FR=1.35, 95% CI: 1.02-1.80, P<0.05); age, older workers exhibited higher MN frequencies than younger workers (FR=1.45, 95% CI: 1.14-1.84, P<0.05); and years of work, those with more years of work exhibited higher MN frequencies than those with fewer years (FR=1.40, 95% CI: 1.10-1.77, P<0.05). Multivariate Poisson regression analysis showed that those who carried GSTM1 (-) (FR=1.48, 95% CI: 1.14-1.92) or GSTT1 (-) (FR=1.42, 95% CI: 1.10-1.83) genotypes, and especially those who carried both (FR=2.10, 95% CI: 1.43-3.09) exhibited significantly higher MN frequencies than those carrying GSTM1 (+), GSTT1 (+) genotypes or their combination. The GSTP1 Val genotype did not affect MN frequency (P>0.05). Our results suggested that higher levels of BD exposure in the workplace resulted in increased chromosomal damage, and that polymorphisms in GSTT1 and GSTM1 genes might modulate the genotoxic effects of BD exposure. Furthermore, the GSTT1 and GSTM1

  6. Co-induction of glutathione-S-transferases and multidrug resistance associated protein by xenobiotics in wheat.

    PubMed

    Theodoulou, Frederica L; Clark, Ian M; He, Xiao-Li; Pallett, Kenneth E; Cole, David J; Hallahan, David L

    2003-02-01

    Herbicide safeners are known to protect monocotyledonous crops from herbicide injury by accelerating the metabolism of herbicides. We have investigated the effects of the safener cloquintocetmexyl, which protects small-grain cereals against the graminicidal herbicide, clodinafop-propargyl. Subtractive suppression hybridisation was used to identify wheat genes which are up-regulated by treatment not only with cloquintocet-mexyl but also with phenobarbital, which is known to stimulate xenobiotic metabolism in animals and plants. DNA sequences of five glutathione transferases (GSTs) belonging to three different classes and a multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) homologue were identified in the screen. The chemical inducibility of these clones was confirmed by Northern analysis. The MRP protein was shown to be induced by treatments with cloquintocet-mexyl and phenobarbital and to be localised to the tonoplast. Since clodinafop-propargyl is not known to be metabolised by glutathionylation, the significance of GST induction is interpreted in terms of a generalised response to chemical stress, particularly the generation of active oxygen species. This work establishes herbicide safeners as useful tools for the identification of genes encoding herbicide-metabolising enzymes.

  7. Site-specific Arylation of Rat Glutathione S-Transferase A1 and A2 by Bromobenzene Metabolites in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Koen, Yakov M.; Yue, Weimin; Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Williams, Todd D.; Hanzlik, Robert P.

    2006-01-01

    The hepatotoxicity of bromobenzene (BB) derives from its reactive metabolites (epoxides and quinones) which arylate cellular proteins. Application of proteomic methods to liver proteins from rats treated with an hepatotoxic dose of [14C]-BB has identified more than 40 target proteins, but no adducted peptides have yet been observed. Because such proteins are known to contain bromophenyl- and bromodihydroxyphenyl derivatives of cysteine, histidine and lysine, the failure to observe modified peptides has been attributed to the low level of total covalent binding and to the “dilution” effect of multiple metabolites reacting at multiple sites on multiple proteins. In this work glutathione transferase, a well known and abundant BB-target protein, was isolated from liver cytosol of rats treated with 14C-BB using a GSH-agarose affinity column and further resolved by reverse phase HPLC into subunits M1, M2, A1, A2 and A3. The subunits were identified by a combination of SDS-PAGE, whole-molecule mass spectrometry and peptide mass mapping and found to contain radioactivity corresponding to 0.01 - 0.05 adduct per molecule of protein. Examination of tryptic digests of these subunits by MALDI-TOF and ESI-MS again failed to reveal any apparent adducted peptides despite observed sequence coverages up to 87%. However, using HPLC-LTQ-FTMS to search for predicted modified tryptic peptides revealed peaks corresponding, with a high degree of mass accuracy, to a bromobenzoquinone adduct of peptide 89-119 in both GSTA1 and A2. The identity of these adducts and their location at Cys-111 was confirmed by MS-MS. No evidence for the presence of any putative BB-adducts in GST M1, M2 or A3 was obtained. This work highlights the challenges involved in the unambiguous identification of reactive metabolite adducts formed in vivo. PMID:17112229

  8. Heterologous expression and characterization of a sigma glutathione S-transferase involved in carbaryl detoxification from oriental migratory locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis (Meyen).

    PubMed

    Qin, Guohua; Jia, Miao; Liu, Ting; Zhang, Xueyao; Guo, Yaping; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2012-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play a major role in detoxification of xenobiotics and resistance to insecticides in insects. In the present study, a sigma-class GST gene (LmGSTs3) was identified from the locust, Locusta migratoria manilensis. Its full-length cDNA sequence is 828 bp containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 612 bp that encodes 204 amino acid residues. The predicted protein molecular mass and pI are 23.4 kDa and 7.62, respectively. Recombinant LmGSTs3 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble fusion protein. Its optimal activity was observed at pH 8.0. Incubation for 30 min at temperatures below 40 °C scarcely affected activity. The LmGSTs3 at pH values between 4.0 and 11.0 retained more than 80% of its original activity. Ethacrynic acid and cibacron blue were very effective inhibitors of LmGSTs3 with I50-values 1.7 and 3.7 μM, respectively. In response to heavy metal (CuSO4, CdCl2) exposure there was a concentration-dependent and time-dependent decrease in activity. The nymph mortalities after carbaryl treatment increased 38.7% after LmGSTs3 were silenced. These results suggest that LmGSTs3 may be involved in carbaryl detoxification in L. migratoria manilensis.

  9. Glutathione S-Transferase Gene Family in Gossypium raimondii and G. arboreum: Comparative Genomic Study and their Expression under Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yating; Li, Cong; Zhang, Yi; He, Qiuling; Daud, Muhammad K.; Chen, Jinhong; Zhu, Shuijin

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) play versatile functions in multiple aspects of plant growth and development. A comprehensive genome-wide survey of this gene family in the genomes of G. raimondii and G. arboreum was carried out in this study. Based on phylogenetic analyses, the GST gene family of both two diploid cotton species could be divided into eight classes, and approximately all the GST genes within the same subfamily shared similar gene structure. Additionally, the gene structures between the orthologs were highly conserved. The chromosomal localization analyses revealed that GST genes were unevenly distributed across the genome in both G. raimondii and G. arboreum. Tandem duplication could be the major driver for the expansion of GST gene families. Meanwhile, the expression analysis for the selected 40 GST genes showed that they exhibited tissue-specific expression patterns and their expression were induced or repressed by salt stress. Those findings shed lights on the function and evolution of the GST gene family in Gossypium species. PMID:26904090

  10. Glutathione S-transferase ( GST) gene expression profiles in two marine bivalves exposed to BDE-47 and their potential molecular mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Wu, Huifeng; Wang, Qing; Li, Xuehua; Zhao, Jianmin

    2015-05-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are phase II enzymes that facilitate the detoxification of xenobiotics and play important roles in antioxidant defense. We investigated the expression patterns of seven Venerupis philippinarum GSTs ( VpGSTs) and four Mytilus galloprovincialis GSTs ( MgGSTs) following exposure to BDE-47. Differential expressions of the seven VpGSTs and four Mg GSTs transcripts were observed, with differences between the hepatopancreas and gills. Among these GSTs, the sigma classes ( VpGSTS1, VpGSTS2, VpGSTS3, MgGST1, and MgGST3) were highly expressed in response to BDE-47 exposure, demonstrating their potential as molecular biomarkers for environmental biomonitoring studies. We obtained the three-dimensional crystal structures of VpGSTs and MgGSTs by homologous modeling. A model to elucidate the binding interactions between the ligands and receptors was defined by molecular docking. Hydrophobic and π were the most often observed interactions between BDE-47 and the GSTs.

  11. Evaluation of glutathione S-transferase T1 deletion polymorphism on type 2 diabetes mellitus risk in Zoroastrian females in Yazd, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Afrand, Mohammadhosain; Khalilzadeh, Saeedhossein; Bashardoost, Nasrollah; Sheikhha, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: There has been much interest in the role of free radicals and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM). The aim of this study was to assess the possible association between genetic polymorphisms of the glutathione S-transferase-Theta (GSTT1) and the risk of the development of DM in Zoroastrian females in Yazd, Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a case-control study in which GSTT1 polymorphism was genotyped in 51 randomly selected DM patients and 50 randomly selected healthy controls among Zoroastrian females whose ages ranged from 40 to 70. Results: The frequencies of GSTT1 null genotype and GSTT1 present were 72% and 28%, respectively, in control samples, while in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), the frequencies of GSTT1 null genotype and GSTT1 present were 27.5% and 72.5%, respectively. There were higher levels of triglyceride (TG), fasting blood sugar (FBS), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), Urea, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in cases of GSTT1 null genotype compared to the GSTT1 present genotype in controls. Conclusions: Our results indicated that healthy subjects had a higher frequency of the GSTT1 null genotype than patients with T2DM. However, we observed no significant association between the GSTT1 null genotype and T2DM in the current study. PMID:25593839

  12. Comparative Hepatotoxicity of Aflatoxin B1 among Workers Exposed to Different Organic Dust with Emphasis on Polymorphism Role of Glutathione S-Transferase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Saad-Hussein, Amal; Shahy, Eman M.; Shaheen, Weam; Taha, Mona M.; Mahdy-Abdallah, Heba; Ibrahim, Khadiga S.; Hafez, Salwa F.; Fadl, Nevein N.; El-Shamy, Karima A.

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The study aimed to investigate effects of organic dust exposure from different sources on aflatoxin B1-albumin adducts (AFB1/Alb), and role of glutathione S-transferase (GST) gene polymorphism in hepatotoxicity of (AFB1) among exposed workers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Liver enzymes, AFB1/Alb, and GST polymorphism were estimated in 132 wheat flour dust and 87 woods sawmill workers, and 156 controls. RESULTS: Results revealed that AFB1/Alb and liver enzymes were significantly elevated in exposed workers compared to controls, and were significantly higher in sawmill workers compared to flour workers. AFB1/Alb in flour and sawmill workers with GSTT1 and GSTM1&GSTT1 null genotypes were significantly higher than controls, and in sawmill workers with GSTM1&GSTT1 null than flour workers. Liver enzymes (ALT and AST) in sawmill workers were significantly higher than flour workers and controls in all GST polymorphism; except in GSTT1 polymorphism, where these enzymes were significantly higher in the two exposed groups than controls. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, organic dust exposure may cause elevation in AFB1/Alb and liver enzymes of exposed workers, and GST gene polymorphism plays an important role in susceptibility to hepatic parenchymal cell injury; except in workers with GSTT1&GSTM1 null genotype, gene susceptibility seemed to have little role and the main role was for environmental exposures. PMID:27335608

  13. Functional divergence of the glutathione S-transferase supergene family in Physcomitrella patens reveals complex patterns of large gene family evolution in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jing; Han, Xue-Min; Ren, Lin-Ling; Yang, Hai-Ling; Zeng, Qing-Yin

    2013-02-01

    Plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional proteins encoded by a large gene family that play major roles in the detoxification of xenobiotics and oxidative stress metabolism. To date, studies on the GST gene family have focused mainly on vascular plants (particularly agricultural plants). In contrast, little information is available on the molecular characteristics of this large gene family in nonvascular plants. In addition, the evolutionary patterns of this family in land plants remain unclear. In this study, we identified 37 GST genes from the whole genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens, a nonvascular representative of early land plants. The 37 P. patens GSTs were divided into 10 classes, including two new classes (hemerythrin and iota). However, no tau GSTs were identified, which represent the largest class among vascular plants. P. patens GST gene family members showed extensive functional divergence in their gene structures, gene expression responses to abiotic stressors, enzymatic characteristics, and the subcellular locations of the encoded proteins. A joint phylogenetic analysis of GSTs from P. patens and other higher vascular plants showed that different class GSTs had distinct duplication patterns during the evolution of land plants. By examining multiple characteristics, this study revealed complex patterns of evolutionary divergence among the GST gene family in land plants.

  14. Galangin induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via regulation of ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 and glutathione S-transferase P.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deuk Ae; Jeon, Young Keul; Nam, Myeong Jin

    2012-03-01

    Galangin has been shown to have anti-cancer property against several types of cancer cells. Many studies have described the anti-oxidant and apoptotic effects of galangin. However, the mechanism of galangin-induced apoptosis has not yet been studied for human gastric cancer cells. We investigated galangin-induced apoptosis of human gastric cancer SNU-484 cells. Galangin inhibited proliferation of SNU-484 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The results showed that galangin significantly decreased the viability of SNU-484 cells at 50-200 μM for 24 h and 48 h. Galangin-induced cell death was characterized with the changes in cell morphology, DNA fragmentation, cell cycle, activation of caspase-3/-9, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, and expression of MAP kinase such as ERK1/2 and JNK. For identification of proteins potentially involved in apoptosis, a two-dimensional electrophoresis was employed. Proteomic analysis showed that several proteins were associated with anti-cancer properties of galangin. Of particular interest, these proteins included ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (Uch-L1) and glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP), which are involved in apoptosis of SNU-484 cells. Western blot analysis confirmed up-regulation of Uch-L1 and down-regulation of GSTP following galangin treatment. Our results suggest that Uch-L1 and GSTP be involved in galangin-induced apoptosis in human gastric cancer SNU-484 cells.

  15. Patterns of persistent DNA damage associated with sun exposure and the glutathione S-transferase M1 genotype in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Mark L; Hubbard, Karen; Utti, Charles; Clas, Brian; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Hill, Helene Z; Orlow, Irene

    2009-01-01

    Solar radiation can lead to changes affecting DNA metabolism resulting in loss of DNA integrity. Skin specimens obtained from melanoma patients treated at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center were used to study patterns of DNA fragmentation using the comet assay and levels of deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) using real-time PCR. Skin specimens were classified according to the glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) genotype (either wild type [WT] or null) and patient sunburn history. GSTM1 null individuals with a sunburn history showed increased levels of both DNA fragmentation by comet assays and mtDNA deletions relative to GSTM1 WT patients with little or no sunburn history. Microarray analyses identified a number of genes whose expression was upregulated >or=5-fold in cells from GSTM1-null patients or from those reporting histories of sunburn. These genes encoded small molecule transporters, various growth factor/chemokine receptors, transcription factors and tumor suppressors. Of 17 genes directly involved in DNA repair, three DNA ligases were highly upregulated while the RAD23 UV excision repair gene and the Growth Arrest and DNA Damage gene (GADD45) were downregulated. These findings support the idea that exposure to solar radiation early in life may induce long-term cellular changes that lead to persistent DNA damage and altered patterns of gene expression.

  16. Analyses of Genetic Variations of Glutathione S-Transferase Mu1 and Theta1 Genes in Bangladeshi Tannery Workers and Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Akther, Jobaida; Ebihara, Akio; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Islam, Laila N.; Suzuki, Fumiaki; Hosen, Md. Ismail; Hossain, Mahmud; Nabi, A. H. M. Nurun

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) belong to a group of multigene detoxification enzymes, which defend cells against oxidative stress. Tannery workers are at risk of oxidative damage that is usually detoxified by GSTs. This study investigated the genotypic frequencies of GST Mu1 (GSTM1) and GST Theta1 (GSTT1) in Bangladeshi tannery workers and healthy controls followed by their status of oxidative stress and total GST activity. Of the 188 individuals, 50.0% had both GSTM1 and GSTT1 (+/+), 12.2% had GSTM1 (+/−), 31.4% had GSTT1 (−/+) alleles, and 6.4% had null genotypes (−/−) with respect to both GSTM1 and GSTT1 alleles. Among 109 healthy controls, 54.1% were double positive, 9.2% had GSTM1 allele, 32.1% had GSTT1 allele, and 4.6% had null genotypes. Out of 79 tannery workers, 44.3% were +/+, 16.8% were +/−, 30.5% were −/+, and 8.4% were −/−. Though the polymorphic genotypes or allelic variants of GSTM1 and GSTT1 were distributed among the study subjects with different frequencies, the differences between the study groups were not statistically significant. GST activity did not vary significantly between the two groups and also among different genotypes while level of lipid peroxidation was significantly higher in tannery workers compared to controls irrespective of their GST genotypes. PMID:27294127

  17. Coinduction of cytochrome P450IIE1, glutathione S-transferases and microsomal epoxide hydrolase by nitrogen- and sulfur-containing heterocycles in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.G.; Novak, R.F. )

    1991-03-15

    The effects of thiazole, pyrazine, pyridazine and pyrimidine on cytochrome P450IIE1, the glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) have been examined at the molecular level. Administration of each of these compounds to rats was found to elevate hepatic P450IIE1, the GSTs, and mEH simultaneously, as evidenced by catalytic activities, SDS-PAGE and immunoblot analyses. Hepatic tissue was obtained at 24, 48 and 72 h during the treatment regimen. RNA and LiCl precipitated from hepatic tissue homogenized in guanidinium thiocyanate and poly(A){sup +} RNA was isolated using oligo(dT) cellulose. Slot and Northern blot analyses of poly(A){sup +} RNA isolated from rats during the 3 d treatment regimen revealed an {approximately}4 to 5-fold decrease in P450IIE1 mRNA at 24 h after treatment with a slight increase noted for 48 and 72 h relative to untreated animals. In contrast, an {approximately}8 to 14-fold increase in GST {alpha}-class mRNA and an {approximately}17- to 20-fold increase in mEH mRNA was monitored at 48 to 72 h as compared to untreated animals. These results revealed that these heterocyclic compounds induce both Phase 1 and Phase 2 drug metabolizing enzymes simultaneously through different molecular mechanisms.

  18. A meta-analysis of the relationship between glutathione S-transferase T1 null/presence gene polymorphism and the risk of lung cancer including 31802 subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua-Fu; Feng, Xu; Zheng, Bao-Shi; Qian, Jun; He, Wei

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) null/presence gene polymorphism and the risk of lung cancer from the published reports are still conflicting. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between GSTT1 null/presence gene polymorphism and the risk of lung cancer using meta-analysis method. The association studies were identified from PubMed, and Cochrane Library on July 1, 2012, and eligible investigations were included and synthesized using meta-analysis method. 51 reports were recruited into this meta-analysis for the association of null genotype of GSTT1 with lung cancer susceptibility, consisting of 15,140 patients with lung cancer and 16,662 controls. There was a marked association between GSTT1 null genotype and lung cancer risk in overall populations (OR = 1.15, 95 % CI 1.04-1.27, P = 0.007). Furthermore, GSTT1 null genotype was associated with the lung cancer risk in Asians (OR = 1.47, 95 % CI 1.23-1.76, P < 0.0001). However, GSTT1 null genotype was not associated with the risk of lung cancer in Caucasians, Brazilian population and Africans. In conclusion, GSTT1 null genotype is associated with the lung cancer in overall populations and in Asians.

  19. Glutathione S-transferase GSTT1 genotypes and susceptibility to cancer: studies of interactions with GSTM1 in lung, oral, gastric and colorectal cancers.

    PubMed

    Deakin, M; Elder, J; Hendrickse, C; Peckham, D; Baldwin, D; Pantin, C; Wild, N; Leopard, P; Bell, D A; Jones, P; Duncan, H; Brannigan, K; Alldersea, J; Fryer, A A; Strange, R C

    1996-04-01

    Allelism in glutathione S-transferase GSTM1 and GSTT1 has been suggested as a risk factor in various cancers. Accordingly, we describe a group of case-control studies carried out to identify associations between GSTT1 genotypes and susceptibility to lung, oral, gastric and colorectal cancers. The frequencies of the putatively high risk GSTT1 null genotype were not increased in the lung, oral or gastric cancer cases compared with controls but the frequency of this genotype was significantly increased (P = 0.0011, odds ratio = 1.88) in the colorectal cancer cases. No significant interactions between the GSTT1 and GSTM1 null genotypes types were identified in the cancer groups studied. Indeed, no significant associations between GSTM1 genotypes and susceptibility were identified though further evidence was obtained that the protective effect of GSTM1*A and GSTM1*B is not equal. The data complement studies showing that GSTT1 null is associated with an increased susceptibility to total ulcerative colitis and suggests that this enzyme is important in the detoxification of unidentified xenobiotics in the large intestine.

  20. Induction of the pi class of glutathione S-transferase by carnosic acid in rat Clone 9 cells via the p38/Nrf2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Yuan; Wu, Chi-Rei; Chang, Shu-Wei; Wang, Yu-Jung; Wu, Jia-Jiuan; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    2015-06-01

    Induction of phase II enzymes is important in cancer chemoprevention. We compared the effect of rosemary diterpenes on the expression of the pi class of glutathione S-transferase (GSTP) in rat liver Clone 9 cells and the signaling pathways involved. Culturing cells with 1, 5, 10, or 20 μM carnosic acid (CA) or carnosol (CS) for 24 h in a dose-dependent manner increased the GSTP expression. CA was more potent than CS. The RNA level and the enzyme activity of GSTP were also enhanced by CA treatment. Treatment with 10 μM CA highly induced the reporter activity of the enhancer element GPEI. Furthermore, CA markedly increased the translocation of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) from the cytosol to the nucleus after 30 to 60 min. CA the stimulated the protein induction of p38, nuclear Nrf2, and GSTP was diminished in the presence of SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). In addition, SB203580 pretreatment or silencing of Nrf2 by siRNA suppressed the CA-induced GPEI-DNA binding activity and GSTP protein expression. Knockdown of p38 or Nrf2 by siRNA abolished the activation of p38 and Nrf2 as well as the protein induction and enzyme activity of GSTP by CA. These results suggest that CA up-regulates the expression and enzyme activity of GSTP via the p38/Nrf2/GPEI pathway.

  1. Induction of wheat and maize glutathione S-transferase by some herbicide safeners and their effect on enzyme activity against butachlor and terbuthylazine.

    PubMed

    Scarponi, Luciano; Quagliarini, Elisa; Del Buono, Daniele

    2006-10-01

    The expression of glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in wheat and maize shoots was investigated in response to treatments with the herbicide safeners benoxacor, cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazole-ethyl, fenclorim, fluxofenim and oxabetrinil. These safeners significantly enhanced the GST activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) as a 'standard' substrate, with the exception of oxabetrinil in maize. The enhancements of GST (CDNB) activity were found to be concomitant with increases in V(max) (the reaction rate when the enzyme is fully saturated by the substrate) in wheat following cloquintocet-mexyl and fenchlorazole-ethyl treatments, and in maize following fenchlorazole-ethyl treatment. Otherwise, decreases in V(max) were observed in wheat and maize following fenclorim and fluxofenim treatments. With the exception of oxabetrinil, all the safeners significantly reduced the apparent K(M) (the substrate concentration required for 50% of maximum GST activity) of both wheat and maize GST. The V(max) and K(M) variations following safener treatments are discussed in terms of an increased expression of GST enzymes and an increased affinity for the CDNB substrate. The activity of wheat and maize GST was also assayed towards butachlor and terbuthylazine respectively; the results indicate the ability of cloquintocet-mexyl, fenchlorazole-ethyl and fluxofenim to enhance the enzyme activity in wheat and of benoxacor and fenchlorazole-ethyl to do so in maize.

  2. Identification and expression profiles of fifteen delta-class glutathione S-transferase genes from a stored-product pest, Liposcelis entomophila (Enderlein) (Psocoptera: Liposcelididae).

    PubMed

    Jing, Tian-Xing; Wu, Yu-Xian; Li, Ting; Wei, Dan-Dan; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-04-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) comprise a diverse family of enzymes found ubiquitously in aerobic organisms and they play important roles in insecticide resistance. In this study, we tested the sensitivities of Liposcelis entomophila, collected from four different field populations, to three insecticides. The results showed that the insects from Tongliang population had a relatively higher tolerance to malathion and propuxor than insects from other field populations. The insecticide sensitivities of different populations detected in psocids may be due to the different control practices. Through sequence mining and phylogenetic analyses, we identified 15 delta class GST genes that contained the conserved motifs of the GSTs. Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) analysis indicated that the 15 GST genes were expressed at all tested developmental stages, and 12 GST genes had significantly higher expression levels in adulthood than in egg stage. The expression levels of 15 GST genes in different field populations showed that 9 GST genes were significantly higher in Tongliang population compared to other populations. Furthermore, Q-PCR confirmed that the expression of several delta class GSTs was upregulated at different times after malathion, propuxor and deltamethrine exposure with the LC50 concentration of insecticide. Taken together, these findings showed that delta class GST genes have various expression levels in different developmental stages and different field populations, and they were up-regulated in response to insecticide exposure, which suggested that these GSTs may be associated with insecticide metabolism in psocids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The schistosome glutathione S-transferase P28GST, a unique helminth protein, prevents intestinal inflammation in experimental colitis through a Th2-type response with mucosal eosinophils

    PubMed Central

    Driss, V; El Nady, M; Delbeke, M; Rousseaux, C; Dubuquoy, C; Sarazin, A; Gatault, S; Dendooven, A; Riveau, G; Colombel, J F; Desreumaux, P; Dubuquoy, L; Capron, M

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal helminth parasites are potent inducers of T helper type 2 (Th2) response and have a regulatory role, notably on intestinal inflammation. As infection with schistosomes is unlikely to provide a reliable treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, we have investigated the beneficial effect of a schistosome enzymatic protein, the 28-kDa glutathione S-transferase (P28GST), on the modulation of disease activity and immune responses in experimental colitis. Our results showed that immunization with recombinant P28GST is at least as efficient as established schistosome infection to reduce colitis lesions and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Considering underlying mechanisms, the decrease of inflammatory parameters was associated with the polarization of the immune system toward a Th2 profile, with local and systemic increases of interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-5. Dense eosinophil infiltration was observed in the colons of P28GST-immunized rats and mice. Depletion of eosinophils by treatment with an anti-Siglec-F monoclonal antibody and use of IL-5-deficient mice led to the loss of therapeutic effect, suggesting the crucial role for eosinophils in colitis prevention by P28GST. These findings reveal that immunization with P28GST, a unique recombinant schistosome enzyme, ameliorates intestinal inflammation through eosinophil-dependent modulation of harmful type 1 responses, representing a new immuno-regulatory strategy against inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26174763

  4. Significant association of Glutathione S-transferase T1 null genotype with prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis of 26,393 subjects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qing; Du, Jun; Yao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies on the association between Glutathione S-transferase T1 (GSTT1) polymorphism and risk of prostate cancer showed inconclusive results. To clarify this possible association, we conducted a meta-analysis of published studies. DATA WERE COLLECTED FROM THE FOLLOWING ELECTRONIC DATABASES: Pubmed, Embase, and Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM). The odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (95%CI) was used to assess the strength of the association. We summarized the data on the association between GSTT1 null genotype and risk of prostate cancer in the overall population, and performed subgroup analyses by ethnicity, adjusted ORs, and types of controls. Ultimately, a total of 43 studies with a total of 26,393 subjects (9,934 cases and 16,459 controls) were eligible for meta-analysis. Overall, there was a significant association between GSTT1 null genotype and increased risk of prostate cancer (OR = 1.14, 95%CI 1.01-1.29, P = 0.034). Meta-analysis of adjusted ORs also showed a significant association between GSTT1 null genotype and increased risk of prostate cancer (OR= 1.34, 95%CI 1.09-1.64, P = 0.006). Similar results were found in the subgroup analyses by ethnicity and types of controls. This meta-analysis demonstrates that GSTT1 null genotype is associated with prostate cancer susceptibility, and GSTT1 null genotype contributes to increased risk of prostate cancer.

  5. Genetic polymorphism of the glutathione-S-transferase P1 gene (GSTP1) and susceptibility to prostate cancer in the Kashmiri population.

    PubMed

    Qadri, Q; Sameer, A S; Shah, Z A; Hamid, A; Alam, S; Manzoor, S; Siddiqi, M A

    2011-12-06

    Glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) is a critical enzyme of the phase II detoxification pathway. One of the common functional polymorphisms of GSTP1 is A→G at nucleotide 313, which results in an amino acid substitution (Ile105Val) at the substrate binding site of GSTP1 and reduces catalytic activity of GSTP1. To investigate the GSTP1 Ile105Val genotype frequency in prostate cancer cases in the Kashmiri population, we designed a case-control study, in which 50 prostate cancer cases and 45 benign prostate hyperplasia cases were studied for GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphism, compared to 80 controls taken from the general population, employing the PCR-RFLP technique. We found the frequency of the three different genotypes of GSTP1 Ile105Val in our ethnic Kashmir population, i.e., Ile/Ile, Ile/Val and Val/Val, to be 52.4, 33.3 and 14.3% among prostate cancer cases, 48.5, 37.5 and 14% among benign prostate hyperplasia cases and 73.8, 21.3 and 5% in the control population, respectively. There was a significant association between the GSTP1 Ile/Val genotype and the advanced age group among the cases. We conclude that GSTP1 Ile/Val polymorphism is involved in the risk of prostate cancer development in our population.

  6. The schistosome glutathione S-transferase P28GST, a unique helminth protein, prevents intestinal inflammation in experimental colitis through a Th2-type response with mucosal eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Driss, V; El Nady, M; Delbeke, M; Rousseaux, C; Dubuquoy, C; Sarazin, A; Gatault, S; Dendooven, A; Riveau, G; Colombel, J F; Desreumaux, P; Dubuquoy, L; Capron, M

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal helminth parasites are potent inducers of T helper type 2 (Th2) response and have a regulatory role, notably on intestinal inflammation. As infection with schistosomes is unlikely to provide a reliable treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases, we have investigated the beneficial effect of a schistosome enzymatic protein, the 28-kDa glutathione S-transferase (P28GST), on the modulation of disease activity and immune responses in experimental colitis. Our results showed that immunization with recombinant P28GST is at least as efficient as established schistosome infection to reduce colitis lesions and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Considering underlying mechanisms, the decrease of inflammatory