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Sample records for glycan microarray strategy

  1. Are glycan biosensors an alternative to glycan microarrays?

    PubMed Central

    Hushegyi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates (glycans) play an important role in nature and study of their interaction with proteins or intact cells can be useful for understanding many physiological and pathological processes. Such interactions have been successfully interrogated in a highly parallel way using glycan microarrays, but this technique has some limitations. Thus, in recent years glycan biosensors in numerous progressive configurations have been developed offering distinct advantages compared to glycan microarrays. Thus, in this review advances achieved in the field of label-free glycan biosensors are discussed. PMID:27231487

  2. Current Protocols in Chemical Biology Construction and Use of Glycan Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher T.; Zhang, Yalong; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosylation is an important post-translational modification that influences many biological processes critical for development, normal physiologic function, and diseases. Unfortunately, progress towards understanding the roles of glycans in biology has been slow due to the challenges of studying glycans and the proteins that interact with them. Glycan microarrays provide a high-throughput approach for the rapid analysis of carbohydrate-macromolecule interactions. Protocols detailed here are intended to help laboratories with basic familiarity of DNA or protein microarrays to begin printing and performing assays using glycan microarrays. Basic and advanced data processing are also detailed, along with strategies for improving reproducibility of data collected with glycan arrays. PMID:23836542

  3. Identification of Antigenic Glycans from Schistosoma mansoni by Using a Shotgun Egg Glycan Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Mickum, Megan L.; Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Song, Xuezheng; Dorabawila, Nelum; Mandalasi, Msano; Lasanajak, Yi; Luyai, Anthony; Secor, W. Evan; Wilkins, Patricia P.; Van Die, Irma; Smith, David F.; Nyame, A. Kwame

    2016-01-01

    Infection of mammals by the parasitic helminth Schistosoma mansoni induces antibodies to glycan antigens in worms and eggs, but the differential nature of the immune response among infected mammals is poorly understood. To better define these responses, we used a shotgun glycomics approach in which N-glycans from schistosome egg glycoproteins were prepared, derivatized, separated, and used to generate an egg shotgun glycan microarray. This array was interrogated with sera from infected mice, rhesus monkeys, and humans and with glycan-binding proteins and antibodies to gather information about the structures of antigenic glycans, which also were analyzed by mass spectrometry. A major glycan antigen targeted by IgG from different infected species is the FLDNF epitope [Fucα3GalNAcβ4(Fucα3)GlcNAc-R], which is also recognized by the IgG monoclonal antibody F2D2. The FLDNF antigen is expressed by all life stages of the parasite in mammalian hosts, and F2D2 can kill schistosomula in vitro in a complement-dependent manner. Different antisera also recognized other glycan determinants, including core β-xylose and highly fucosylated glycans. Thus, the natural shotgun glycan microarray of schistosome eggs is useful in identifying antigenic glycans and in developing new anti-glycan reagents that may have diagnostic applications and contribute to developing new vaccines against schistosomiasis. PMID:26883596

  4. Concept, strategy and realization of lectin-based glycan profiling.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-08-01

    Lectins are a diverse group of carbohydrate-binding proteins. Each lectin has its own specificity profile. It is believed that lectins exist in all living organisms that produce glycans. From a practical viewpoint, lectins have been used extensively in biochemical fields including proteomics due to their usefulness as detection and enrichment tools for specific glycans. Nevertheless, they have often been underestimated as probes, especially compared with antibodies, because of their low affinity and broad specificity. However, together with the concept of glycomics, such properties of lectins are now considered to be suitable for the task of 'profiling' in order to cover a wider range of ligands. Recently there has been rapid movement in the field of proteomics aimed at the investigation of glycan-related biomarkers. This is partly because of limitations of the present approach of simply following changes in protein-level expression, without paying sufficient attention to the fact and effects of glycosylation. The trend is reflected in the frequent use of lectins in the contexts of glycoprotein enrichment and glycan profiling. However, there are many aspects to be considered in using lectins, which differ considerably from antibodies. In this article, the author, as a developer of two unique methodologies, frontal affinity chromatography (FAC) and the lectin microarray, describes critical points concerning the use of lectins, together with the concept, strategy and means to achieve advances in these emerging glycan profiling technologies. PMID:18390573

  5. A Sialylated Glycan Microarray Reveals Novel Interactions of Modified Sialic Acids with Proteins and Viruses*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Lasanajak, Yi; Tappert, Mary M.; Air, Gillian M.; Tiwari, Vinod K.; Cao, Hongzhi; Chokhawala, Harshal A.; Zheng, Haojie; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2011-01-01

    Many glycan-binding proteins in animals and pathogens recognize sialic acid or its modified forms, but their molecular recognition is poorly understood. Here we describe studies on sialic acid recognition using a novel sialylated glycan microarray containing modified sialic acids presented on different glycan backbones. Glycans terminating in β-linked galactose at the non-reducing end and with an alkylamine-containing fluorophore at the reducing end were sialylated by a one-pot three-enzyme system to generate α2–3- and α2–6-linked sialyl glycans with 16 modified sialic acids. The resulting 77 sialyl glycans were purified and quantified, characterized by mass spectrometry, covalently printed on activated slides, and interrogated with a number of key sialic acid-binding proteins and viruses. Sialic acid recognition by the sialic acid-binding lectins Sambucus nigra agglutinin and Maackia amurensis lectin-I, which are routinely used for detecting α2–6- and α2–3-linked sialic acids, are affected by sialic acid modifications, and both lectins bind glycans terminating with 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-glycero-d-galactonononic acid (Kdn) and Kdn derivatives stronger than the derivatives of more common N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). Three human parainfluenza viruses bind to glycans terminating with Neu5Ac or Neu5Gc and some of their derivatives but not to Kdn and its derivatives. Influenza A virus also does not bind glycans terminating in Kdn or Kdn derivatives. An especially novel aspect of human influenza A virus binding is its ability to equivalently recognize glycans terminated with either α2–6-linked Neu5Ac9Lt or α2–6-linked Neu5Ac. Our results demonstrate the utility of this sialylated glycan microarray to investigate the biological importance of modified sialic acids in protein-glycan interactions. PMID:21757734

  6. Serum antibody screening by surface plasmon resonance using a natural glycan microarray.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Arjen R; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; Wuhrer, M

    2008-01-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based natural glycan microarray was developed for screening of interactions between glycans and carbohydrate-binding proteins (CBPs). The microarray contained 144 glycan samples and allowed the real-time and simultaneous screening for recognition by CBPs without the need of fluorescent labeling. Glycans were released from their natural source and coupled by reductive amination with the fluorescent labels 2-aminobenzamide (2AB) or anthranilic acid (AA) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation making use of the fluorescent tag. The released and labeled glycans, in addition to fluorescently labeled synthetic glycans and (neo)glycoproteins, were printed on an epoxide-activated chip at fmol amounts. This resulted in covalent immobilization, with the epoxide groups forming covalent bonds to the secondary amine groups present on the fluorescent glycoconjugates. The generated SPR glycan array presented a subset of the glycan repertoire of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of the array in the simultaneous detection of glycan-specific serum antibodies, the anti-glycan antibody profiles from sera of S. mansoni-infected individuals as well as from non-endemic uninfected controls were recorded. The SPR screening was sensitive for differences between infection sera and control sera, and revealed antibody titers and antibody classes (IgG or IgM). All SPR analyses were performed with a single SPR array chip, which required regeneration and blocking of the chip before the application of a serum sample. Our results indicate that SPR-based arrays constructed from glycans of natural or synthetic origin, pure or as mixture, can be used for determining serum antibody profiles as possible markers for the infection status of an individual.

  7. Comprehensive profiling of accessible surface glycans of mammalian sperm using a lectin microarray

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that cell surface glycans or glycocalyx play important roles in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of the sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic research (sperm glycobiology) and clinical studies, such as diagnostics of infertility. As a group of natural glycan binders, lectin is an ideal tool for cell surface glycan profiling. However, because of the lack of effective technology, only a few lectins have been tested for lectin-sperm binding profiles. To address this challenge, we have developed a procedure for high-throughput probing of mammalian sperm with 91 lectins on lectin microarrays. Normal sperm from human, boar, bull, goat and rabbit were collected and analyzed on the lectin microarrays. Positive bindings of a set of ~50 lectins were observed for all the sperm of 5 species, which indicated a wide range of glycans are on the surface of mammalian sperm. Species specific lectin bindings were also observed. Clustering analysis revealed that the distances of the five species according to the lectin binding profiles are consistent with that of the genome sequence based phylogenetic tree except for rabbit. The procedure that we established in this study could be generally applicable for sperm from other species or defect sperm from the same species. We believe the lectin binding profiles of the mammalian sperm that we established in this study are valuable for both basic research and clinical studies. PMID:24629138

  8. Glycan labeling strategies and their use in identification and quantification

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. R.; Zauner, G.; Huhn, C.; Bruggink, C.; Deelder, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Most methods for the analysis of oligosaccharides from biological sources require a glycan derivatization step: glycans may be derivatized to introduce a chromophore or fluorophore, facilitating detection after chromatographic or electrophoretic separation. Derivatization can also be applied to link charged or hydrophobic groups at the reducing end to enhance glycan separation and mass-spectrometric detection. Moreover, derivatization steps such as permethylation aim at stabilizing sialic acid residues, enhancing mass-spectrometric sensitivity, and supporting detailed structural characterization by (tandem) mass spectrometry. Finally, many glycan labels serve as a linker for oligosaccharide attachment to surfaces or carrier proteins, thereby allowing interaction studies with carbohydrate-binding proteins. In this review, various aspects of glycan labeling, separation, and detection strategies are discussed. Figure MALDI-FTICR-MS of 2AA-labeled total plasma N-glycans PMID:20225063

  9. A Miniaturized Glycan Microarray Assay for Assessing Avidity and Specificity of Influenza A Virus Hemagglutinins.

    PubMed

    McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C; de Vries, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinins recognize sialic acids on the cell surface as functional receptors to gain entry into cells. Wild waterfowl are the natural reservoir for IAV, but IAV can cross the species barrier to poultry, swine, horses and humans. Avian viruses recognize sialic acid attached to a penultimate galactose by a α2-3 linkage (avian-type receptors) whereas human viruses preferentially recognize sialic acid with a α2-6 linkage (human-type receptors). To monitor if avian viruses are adapting to human type receptors, several methods can be used. Glycan microarrays with diverse libraries of synthetic sialosides are increasingly used to evaluate receptor specificity. However, this technique is not used for measuring avidities. Measurement of avidity is typically achieved by evaluating the binding of serially diluted hemagglutinin or virus to glycans adsorbed to conventional polypropylene 96-well plates. In this assay, glycans with α2-3 or α2-6 sialic acids are coupled to biotin and adsorbed to streptavidin plates, or are coupled to polyacrylamide (PAA) which directly adsorb to the plastic. We have significantly miniaturized this assay by directly printing PAA-linked sialosides and their non PAA-linked counterparts on micro-well glass slides. This set-up, with 48 arrays on a single slide, enables simultaneous assays of 6 glycan binding proteins at 8 dilutions, interrogating 6 different glycans, including two non-sialylated controls. This is equivalent to 18x 96-well plates in the traditional plate assay. The glycan array format decreases consumption of compounds and biologicals and thus greatly enhances efficiency. PMID:27284789

  10. A multivariate approach for high throughput pectin profiling by combining glycan microarrays with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sousa, António G; Ahl, Louise I; Pedersen, Henriette L; Fangel, Jonatan U; Sørensen, Susanne O; Willats, William G T

    2015-05-29

    Pectin-one of the most complex biomacromolecules in nature has been extensively studied using various techniques. This has been done so in an attempt to understand the chemical composition and conformation of pectin, whilst discovering and optimising new industrial applications of the polymer. For the last decade the emergence of glycan microarray technology has led to a growing capacity of acquiring simultaneous measurements related to various carbohydrate characteristics while generating large collections of data. Here we used a multivariate analysis approach in order to analyse a set of 359 pectin samples probed with 14 different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) regression were utilised to obtain the most optimal qualitative and quantitative information from the spotted microarrays. The potential use of microarray technology combined with chemometrics for the accurate determination of degree of methyl-esterification (DM) and degree of blockiness (DB) was assessed. PMID:25950120

  11. Correlation Index-Based Responsible-Enzyme Gene Screening (CIRES), a Novel DNA Microarray-Based Method for Enzyme Gene Involved in Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Harumi; Takematsu, Hiromu; Fujinawa, Reiko; Naito, Yuko; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Suzuki, Akemi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori

    2007-01-01

    Background Glycan biosynthesis occurs though a multi-step process that requires a variety of enzymes ranging from glycosyltransferases to those involved in cytosolic sugar metabolism. In many cases, glycan biosynthesis follows a glycan-specific, linear pathway. As glycosyltransferases are generally regulated at the level of transcription, assessing the overall transcriptional profile for glycan biosynthesis genes seems warranted. However, a systematic approach for assessing the correlation between glycan expression and glycan-related gene expression has not been reported previously. Methodology To facilitate genetic analysis of glycan biosynthesis, we sought to correlate the expression of genes involved in cell-surface glycan formation with the expression of the glycans, as detected by glycan-recognizing probes. We performed cross-sample comparisons of gene expression profiles using a newly developed, glycan-focused cDNA microarray. Cell-surface glycan expression profiles were obtained using flow cytometry of cells stained with plant lectins. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for these profiles and were used to identify enzyme genes correlated with glycan biosynthesis. Conclusions This method, designated correlation index-based responsible-enzyme gene screening (CIRES), successfully identified genes already known to be involved in the biosynthesis of certain glycans. Our evaluation of CIRES indicates that it is useful for identifying genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycan chains that can be probed with lectins using flow cytometry. PMID:18043739

  12. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E.; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-10-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2-6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2-3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms.

  13. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2-6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2-3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms. PMID:26508590

  14. Individuality Normalization when Labeling with Isotopic Glycan Hydrazide Tags (INLIGHT): A Novel Glycan-Relative Quantification Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, S. Hunter; Taylor, Amber D.; Muddiman, David C.

    2013-09-01

    The Individuality Normalization when Labeling with Isotopic Glycan Hydrazide Tags (INLIGHT) strategy for the sample preparation, data analysis, and relative quantification of N-linked glycans is presented. Glycans are derivatized with either natural (L) or stable-isotope labeled (H) hydrazide reagents and analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled online to a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. A simple glycan ladder, maltodextrin, is first used to demonstrate the relative quantification strategy in samples with negligible analytical and biological variability. It is shown that after a molecular weight correction attributable to isotopic overlap and a post-acquisition normalization of the data to account for any systematic bias, a plot of the experimental H:L ratio versus the calculated H:L ratio exhibits a correlation of unity for maltodextrin samples mixed in different ratios. We also demonstrate that the INLIGHT approach can quantify species over four orders of magnitude in ion abundance. The INLIGHT strategy is further demonstrated in pooled human plasma, where it is shown that the post-acquisition normalization is more effective than using a single spiked-in internal standard. Finally, changes in glycosylation are able to be detected in complex biological matrices, when spiked with a glycoprotein. The ability to spike in a glycoprotein and detect change at the glycan level validates both the sample preparation and data analysis strategy, making INLIGHT an invaluable relative quantification strategy for the field of glycomics.

  15. Glycoconjugate microarray based on an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted detection principle for investigation of glycan-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Hiroaki; Mori, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Noboru; Yabe, Rikio; Iwaki, Jun; Shikanai, Toshihide; Angata, Takashi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-10-01

    The extensive involvement of glycan-binding proteins (GBPs) as regulators in diverse biological phenomena provides a fundamental reason to investigate their glycan-binding specificities. Here, we developed a glycoconjugate microarray based on an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted detection principle for investigation of GBPs. Eighty-nine selected multivalent glycoconjugates comprising natural glycoproteins, neo-glycoproteins, and polyacrylamide (PAA)-conjugated glycan epitopes were immobilized on an epoxy-activated glass slide. The GBP binding was monitored by an evanescent-field fluorescence-assisted scanner at equilibrium without washing steps. The detection principle also allows direct application of unpurified GBPs with the aid of specific antibodies. Model experiments using plant lectins (RCA120, ConA, and SNA), galectins (3 and 8), a C-type lectin (DC-SIGN) and a siglec (CD22) provided data consistent with previous work within 4 h using less than 40 ng of GBPs per analysis. As an application, serum profiling of antiglycan antibodies (IgG and IgM) was performed with Cy3-labeled secondary antibodies. Moreover, novel carbohydrate-binding ability was demonstrated for a human IL-18 binding protein. Thus, the developed glycan array is useful for investigation of various types of GBPs, with the added advantage of wash-free analysis.

  16. Host Tissue and Glycan Binding Specificities of Avian Viral Attachment Proteins Using Novel Avian Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Vries, Robert P.; Eggert, Amber M.; Wandee, Nantaporn; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, Monique H.

    2015-01-01

    The initial interaction between viral attachment proteins and the host cell is a critical determinant for the susceptibility of a host for a particular virus. To increase our understanding of avian pathogens and the susceptibility of poultry species, we developed novel avian tissue microarrays (TMAs). Tissue binding profiles of avian viral attachment proteins were studied by performing histochemistry on multi-species TMA, comprising of selected tissues from ten avian species, and single-species TMAs, grouping organ systems of each species together. The attachment pattern of the hemagglutinin protein was in line with the reported tropism of influenza virus H5N1, confirming the validity of TMAs in profiling the initial virus-host interaction. The previously believed chicken-specific coronavirus (CoV) M41 spike (S1) protein displayed a broad attachment pattern to respiratory tissues of various avian species, albeit with lower affinity than hemagglutinin, suggesting that other avian species might be susceptible for chicken CoV. When comparing tissue-specific binding patterns of various avian coronaviral S1 proteins on the single-species TMAs, chicken and partridge CoV S1 had predominant affinity for the trachea, while pigeon CoV S1 showed marked preference for lung of their respective hosts. Binding of all coronaviral S1 proteins was dependent on sialic acids; however, while chicken CoV S1 preferred sialic acids type I lactosamine (Gal(1-3)GlcNAc) over type II (Gal(1-4)GlcNAc), the fine glycan specificities of pigeon and partridge CoVs were different, as chicken CoV S1-specific sialylglycopolymers could not block their binding to tissues. Taken together, TMAs provide a novel platform in the field of infectious diseases to allow identification of binding specificities of viral attachment proteins and are helpful to gain insight into the susceptibility of host and organ for avian pathogens. PMID:26035584

  17. Data Analysis Strategies for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Paula; Dasilva, Noelia; González-González, María; Matarraz, Sergio; Casado-Vela, Juan; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays constitute a new platform which allows the discovery and characterization of proteins. According to different features, such as content, surface or detection system, there are many types of protein microarrays which can be applied for the identification of disease biomarkers and the characterization of protein expression patterns. However, the analysis and interpretation of the amount of information generated by microarrays remain a challenge. Further data analysis strategies are essential to obtain representative and reproducible results. Therefore, the experimental design is key, since the number of samples and dyes, among others aspects, would define the appropriate analysis method to be used. In this sense, several algorithms have been proposed so far to overcome analytical difficulties derived from fluorescence overlapping and/or background noise. Each kind of microarray is developed to fulfill a specific purpose. Therefore, the selection of appropriate analytical and data analysis strategies is crucial to achieve successful biological conclusions. In the present review, we focus on current algorithms and main strategies for data interpretation.

  18. Data Analysis Strategies for Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Díez, Paula; Dasilva, Noelia; González-González, María; Matarraz, Sergio; Casado-Vela, Juan; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays constitute a new platform which allows the discovery and characterization of proteins. According to different features, such as content, surface or detection system, there are many types of protein microarrays which can be applied for the identification of disease biomarkers and the characterization of protein expression patterns. However, the analysis and interpretation of the amount of information generated by microarrays remain a challenge. Further data analysis strategies are essential to obtain representative and reproducible results. Therefore, the experimental design is key, since the number of samples and dyes, among others aspects, would define the appropriate analysis method to be used. In this sense, several algorithms have been proposed so far to overcome analytical difficulties derived from fluorescence overlapping and/or background noise. Each kind of microarray is developed to fulfill a specific purpose. Therefore, the selection of appropriate analytical and data analysis strategies is crucial to achieve successful biological conclusions. In the present review, we focus on current algorithms and main strategies for data interpretation. PMID:27605336

  19. Dual modifications strategy to quantify neutral and sialylated N-glycans simultaneously by MALDI-MS.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Warren, Peter G; Froehlich, John W; Lee, Richard S

    2014-07-01

    Differences in ionization efficiency among neutral and sialylated glycans prevent direct quantitative comparison by their respective mass spectrometric signals. To overcome this challenge, we developed an integrated chemical strategy, Dual Reactions for Analytical Glycomics (DRAG), to quantitatively compare neutral and sialylated glycans simultaneously by MALDI-MS. Initially, two glycan samples to be compared undergo reductive amination with 2-aminobenzoic acid and 2-(13)[C6]-aminobenzoic acid, respectively. The different isotope-incorporated glycans are then combined and subjected to the methylamidation of the sialic acid residues in one mixture, homogenizing the ionization responses for all neutral and sialylated glycans. By this approach, the expression change of relevant glycans between two samples is proportional to the ratios of doublet signals with a static 6 Da mass difference in MALDI-MS and the change in relative abundance of any glycan within samples can also be determined. The strategy was chemically validated using well-characterized N-glycans from bovine fetuin and IgG from human serum. By comparing the N-glycomes from a first morning (AM) versus an afternoon (PM) urine sample obtained from a single donor, we further demonstrated the ability of DRAG strategy to measure subtle quantitative differences in numerous urinary N-glycans.

  20. A general strategy for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of asymmetrically branched N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Chinoy, Zoeisha S; Ambre, Shailesh G; Peng, Wenjie; McBride, Ryan; de Vries, Robert P; Glushka, John; Paulson, James C; Boons, Geert-Jan

    2013-07-26

    A systematic, efficient means of producing diverse libraries of asymmetrically branched N-glycans is needed to investigate the specificities and biology of glycan-binding proteins. To that end, we describe a core pentasaccharide that at potential branching positions is modified by orthogonal protecting groups to allow selective attachment of specific saccharide moieties by chemical glycosylation. The appendages were selected so that the antenna of the resulting deprotected compounds could be selectively extended by glycosyltransferases to give libraries of asymmetrical multi-antennary glycans. The power of the methodology was demonstrated by the preparation of a series of complex oligosaccharides that were printed as microarrays and screened for binding to lectins and influenza-virus hemagglutinins, which showed that recognition is modulated by presentation of minimal epitopes in the context of complex N-glycans. PMID:23888036

  1. Synthesis and microarray-assisted binding studies of core xylose and fucose containing N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Brzezicka, Katarzyna; Echeverria, Begoña; Serna, Sonia; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2015-05-15

    The synthesis of a collection of 33 xylosylated and core-fucosylated N-glycans found only in nonmammalian organisms such as plants and parasitic helminths has been achieved by employing a highly convergent chemo-enzymatic approach. The influence of these core modifications on the interaction with plant lectins, with the human lectin DC-SIGN (Dendritic Cell-Specific Intercellular adhesion molecule-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin), and with serum antibodies from schistosome-infected individuals was studied. Core xylosylation markedly reduced or completely abolished binding to several mannose-binding plant lectins and to DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor present on antigen presenting cells. Employing the synthetic collection of core-fucosylated and core-xylosylated N-glycans in the context of a larger glycan array including structures lacking these core modifications, we were able to dissect core xylose and core fucose specific antiglycan antibody responses in S. mansoni infection sera, and we observed clear and immunologically relevant differences between children and adult groups infected with this parasite. The work presented here suggests that, quite similar to bisecting N-acetylglucosamine, core xylose distorts the conformation of the unsubstituted glycan, with important implications for the immunogenicity and protein binding properties of complex N-glycans.

  2. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry profiling of N-glycans in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded clinical tissue blocks and tissue microarrays.

    PubMed

    Powers, Thomas W; Neely, Benjamin A; Shao, Yuan; Tang, Huiyuan; Troyer, Dean A; Mehta, Anand S; Haab, Brian B; Drake, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    A recently developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) method to spatially profile the location and distribution of multiple N-linked glycan species in frozen tissues has been extended and improved for the direct analysis of glycans in clinically derived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Formalin-fixed tissues from normal mouse kidney, human pancreatic and prostate cancers, and a human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue microarray were processed by antigen retrieval followed by on-tissue digestion with peptide N-glycosidase F. The released N-glycans were detected by MALDI-IMS analysis, and the structural composition of a subset of glycans could be verified directly by on-tissue collision-induced fragmentation. Other structural assignments were confirmed by off-tissue permethylation analysis combined with multiple database comparisons. Imaging of mouse kidney tissue sections demonstrates specific tissue distributions of major cellular N-linked glycoforms in the cortex and medulla. Differential tissue distribution of N-linked glycoforms was also observed in the other tissue types. The efficacy of using MALDI-IMS glycan profiling to distinguish tumor from non-tumor tissues in a tumor microarray format is also demonstrated. This MALDI-IMS workflow has the potential to be applied to any FFPE tissue block or tissue microarray to enable higher throughput analysis of the global changes in N-glycosylation associated with cancers.

  3. Glycan microarray analysis of the carbohydrate-recognition specificity of native and recombinant forms of the lectin ArtinM

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.; Cecílio, N.T.; Carvalho, F.C.; Roque-Barreira, M.C.; Feizi, T.

    2015-01-01

    This article contains data related to the researc.h article entitled “Yeast-derived ArtinM shares structure, carbohydrate recognition, and biological effects with native ArtinM” by Cecílio et al. (2015) [1]. ArtinM, a D-mannose-binding lectin isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus, exerts immunomodulatory and regenerative activities through its Carbohydrate Recognition Domain (CRD) (Souza et al., 2013; Mariano et al., 2014 [2], [3]). The limited availability of the native lectin (n-ArtinM) led us to characterize a recombinant form of the protein, obtained by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (y-ArtinM). We compared the carbohydrate-binding specificities of y-ArtinM and n-ArtinM by analyzing the binding of biotinylated preparations of the two lectin forms using a neoglycolipid (NGL)-based glycan microarray. Data showed that y-ArtinM mirrored the specificity exhibited by n-ArtinM. PMID:26793748

  4. Glycan microarray analysis of the carbohydrate-recognition specificity of native and recombinant forms of the lectin ArtinM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Cecílio, N T; Carvalho, F C; Roque-Barreira, M C; Feizi, T

    2015-12-01

    This article contains data related to the researc.h article entitled "Yeast-derived ArtinM shares structure, carbohydrate recognition, and biological effects with native ArtinM" by Cecílio et al. (2015) [1]. ArtinM, a D-mannose-binding lectin isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus, exerts immunomodulatory and regenerative activities through its Carbohydrate Recognition Domain (CRD) (Souza et al., 2013; Mariano et al., 2014 [2], [3]). The limited availability of the native lectin (n-ArtinM) led us to characterize a recombinant form of the protein, obtained by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (y-ArtinM). We compared the carbohydrate-binding specificities of y-ArtinM and n-ArtinM by analyzing the binding of biotinylated preparations of the two lectin forms using a neoglycolipid (NGL)-based glycan microarray. Data showed that y-ArtinM mirrored the specificity exhibited by n-ArtinM. PMID:26793748

  5. Glycan microarray analysis of the carbohydrate-recognition specificity of native and recombinant forms of the lectin ArtinM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Cecílio, N T; Carvalho, F C; Roque-Barreira, M C; Feizi, T

    2015-12-01

    This article contains data related to the researc.h article entitled "Yeast-derived ArtinM shares structure, carbohydrate recognition, and biological effects with native ArtinM" by Cecílio et al. (2015) [1]. ArtinM, a D-mannose-binding lectin isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus, exerts immunomodulatory and regenerative activities through its Carbohydrate Recognition Domain (CRD) (Souza et al., 2013; Mariano et al., 2014 [2], [3]). The limited availability of the native lectin (n-ArtinM) led us to characterize a recombinant form of the protein, obtained by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (y-ArtinM). We compared the carbohydrate-binding specificities of y-ArtinM and n-ArtinM by analyzing the binding of biotinylated preparations of the two lectin forms using a neoglycolipid (NGL)-based glycan microarray. Data showed that y-ArtinM mirrored the specificity exhibited by n-ArtinM.

  6. Microbial Glycan Microarrays Define Key Features of Host-Microbial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Arthur, Connie M.; McBride, Ryan; Berger, Oren; Razi, Nahid; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Rodrigues, Lilian C.; Gourdine, Jean-Philippe; Noll, Alexander J.; von Gunten, Stephan; Smith, David F.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Paulson, James C.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic approaches continue to provide unprecedented insight into the microbiome, yet host immune interactions with diverse microbiota can be difficult to study. We therefore generated a microbial microarray containing defined antigens isolated from a broad range of microbial flora to examine adaptive and innate immunity. Serological studies with this microarray show that immunoglobulins from multiple mammalian species exhibit unique patterns of reactivity, while exposure of animals to distinct microbes induces specific serological recognition. While adaptive immunity exhibited plasticity toward microbial antigens, immunological tolerance limits reactivity toward self. We discovered that several innate immune galectins exhibit specific recognition of microbes that express self-like antigens, leading to direct killing of a broad range of gram negative and positive microbes. Thus, host protection against microbes appears to represent a balance between adaptive and innate immunity to defend against evolving antigenic determinants while protecting against molecular mimicry. PMID:24814672

  7. High-throughput screening of monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall glycans by hierarchical clustering of their carbohydrate microarray binding profiles

    PubMed Central

    Moller, Isabel; Marcus, Susan E.; Haeger, Ash; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Verhoef, Rene; Schols, Henk; Ulvskov, Peter; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Knox, J. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma cell lines were created following immunisation with a crude extract of cell wall polymers from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to rapidly screen the specificities of individual monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), their binding to microarrays containing 50 cell wall glycans immobilized on nitrocellulose was assessed. Hierarchical clustering of microarray binding profiles from newly produced mAbs, together with the profiles for mAbs with previously defined specificities allowed the rapid assignments of mAb binding to antigen classes. mAb specificities were further investigated using subsequent immunochemical and biochemical analyses and two novel mAbs are described in detail. mAb LM13 binds to an arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitope and mAb LM14, binds to an epitope occurring on arabinogalactan-proteins. Both mAbs display novel patterns of recognition of cell walls in plant materials. PMID:17629746

  8. Microarrays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plomin, Robert; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are revolutionizing genetics by making it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands of DNA markers and to assess the expression (RNA transcripts) of all of the genes in the genome. Microarrays are slides the size of a postage stamp that contain millions of DNA sequences to which single-stranded DNA or RNA can hybridize. This…

  9. Crystallographic and Glycan Microarray Analysis of Human Polyomavirus 9 VP1 Identifies N-Glycolyl Neuraminic Acid as a Receptor Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Zaigham Mahmood; Liu, Yan; Neu, Ursula; Gilbert, Michel; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9) is a closely related homologue of simian B-lymphotropic polyomavirus (LPyV). In order to define the architecture and receptor binding properties of HPyV9, we solved high-resolution crystal structures of its major capsid protein, VP1, in complex with three putative oligosaccharide receptors identified by glycan microarray screening. Comparison of the properties of HPyV9 VP1 with the known structure and glycan-binding properties of LPyV VP1 revealed that both viruses engage short sialylated oligosaccharides, but small yet important differences in specificity were detected. Surprisingly, HPyV9 VP1 preferentially binds sialyllactosamine compounds terminating in 5-N-glycolyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) over those terminating in 5-N-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), whereas LPyV does not exhibit such a preference. The structural analysis demonstrated that HPyV9 makes specific contacts, via hydrogen bonds, with the extra hydroxyl group present in Neu5Gc. An equivalent hydrogen bond cannot be formed by LPyV VP1. IMPORTANCE The most common sialic acid in humans is 5-N-acetyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), but various modifications give rise to more than 50 different sialic acid variants that decorate the cell surface. Unlike most mammals, humans cannot synthesize the sialic acid variant 5-N-glycolyl neuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) due to a gene defect. Humans can, however, still acquire this compound from dietary sources. The role of Neu5Gc in receptor engagement and in defining viral tropism is only beginning to emerge, and structural analyses defining the differences in specificity for Neu5Ac and Neu5Gc are still rare. Using glycan microarray screening and high-resolution protein crystallography, we have examined the receptor specificity of a recently discovered human polyomavirus, HPyV9, and compared it to that of the closely related simian polyomavirus LPyV. Our study highlights critical differences in the specificities of both viruses

  10. Structural characterization by multistage mass spectrometry (MSn) of human milk glycans recognized by human rotaviruses.

    PubMed

    Ashline, David J; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Prasad, Venkataram; Estes, Mary K; Cummings, Richard D; Smith, David F; Reinhold, Vernon N

    2014-11-01

    We have shown that recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the human rotavirus outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains (N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain (B223) recognize unique glycans within the repertoire of human milk glycans. The accompanying study by Yu et al.(2), describes a human milk glycan shotgun glycan microarray that led to the identification of 32 specific glycans in the human milk tagged glycan library that were recognized by these human rotaviruses. These microarray analyses also provided a variety of metadata about the recognized glycan structures compiled from anti-glycan antibody and lectin binding before and after specific glycosidase digestions, along with compositional information from mass analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry. To deduce glycan sequence and utilize information predicted by analyses of metadata from each glycan, 28 of the glycan targets were retrieved from the tagged glycan library for detailed sequencing using sequential disassembly of glycans by ion-trap mass spectrometry. Our aim is to obtain a deeper structural understanding of these key glycans using an orthogonal approach for structural confirmation in a single ion trap mass spectrometer. This sequential ion disassembly strategy details the complexities of linkage and branching in multiple compositions, several of which contained isomeric mixtures including several novel structures. The application of this approach exploits both library matching with standard materials and de novo approaches. This combination together with the metadata generated from lectin and antibody-binding data before and after glycosidase digestions provide a heretofore-unavailable level of analytical detail to glycan structure analysis. The results of these studies showed that, among the 28 glycan targets analyzed, 27 unique structures were identified, and 23 of the human milk glycans recognized by human rotaviruses represent

  11. Immobilization strategies for single-chain antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Miller, Keith D.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Gonzalez, Rachel M.; Apiyo, David O.; Engelmann, Heather E.; Srinivastava, Sudhir; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2008-06-01

    Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays have great potential for validating biomarkers of disease. ELISA relies on robust affinity reagents that retain activity when immobilized or when labeled for detection. Single-chain antibodies (scFv) are affinity reagents that have greater potential for high-throughput production than traditional immunoglobin G (IgG). Unfortunately, scFv are typically less stabile than IgG and not always suitable for use in sandwich ELISAs. We therefore investigated different immobilization strategies and scFv structural modifications to see if we could develop a more robust scFv reagent. Two promising strategies that emerged from these studies: 1) the precapture of epitope-tagged scFv using an anti-epitope antibody and 2) the direct printing of a thioredoxin/scFv fusion protein on glass slides. The use of either strategy improved the stability of immobilized scFv and increased the sensitivity of the scFv ELISA microarray assays, although the anti-epitope precapture method had a risk of reagent transfer. Using the direct printing method, we show that anti-PSA scFv are highly specific when tested against 21 different IgG-based assays. Finally, the scFv microarray PSA assay gave comparable results (R2 = 0.95) to a commercial 96-well ELISA when tested using serum samples. Overall, these results suggest that minor modifications of the scFv protein structure are sufficiently to produce reagents that are suitable for use in multiplex assay systems.

  12. Global Identification and Differential Distribution Analysis of Glycans in Subcellular Fractions of Bladder Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Huang, Luyu; Zhang, Jiaxu; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular components and their associated biological processes is crucial for cellular function. Protein glycosylation provides a basis for diversity of protein functions. Diversity of glycan composition in animal cells remains poorly understood. We used differential centrifugation techniques to isolate four subcellular protein fractions from homogenate of metastatic bladder YTS1 cells, low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells and normal bladder epithelia HCV29 cells: microsomal (Mic), mitochondrial (Mito), nuclear (Nuc), and cytosolic (Cyto). An integrated strategy combining lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was then applied to evaluate protein glycosylation of the four fractions. Lectin microarray analysis revealed significant differences among the four fractions in terms of glycan binding to the lectins LCA, AAL, MPL, WGA and PWM in YTS1 cell, STL, Jacalin, VVA, LCA and WGA in KK47, and ConA, GNA, VVA and ACA in HCV29 cell. Among a total of 40, 32 and 15 N-glycans in four fractions of three cells detected by MS analysis, high-mannose and fucosylated structures were predominant, 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 5 N-glycans in KK47 and 7 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in all four fractions; and 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 16 N-glycans in KK47, and 3 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in only one fraction. Glycans in the latter category are considered potential markers for the corresponding organelles. The integrated strategy described here allows detailed examination of glycomes subcellular fraction with high resolution and sensitivity, and will be useful for elucidation of the functional roles of glycans and corresponding glycosylated proteins in distinct organelles. PMID:27313494

  13. Quantitative Analysis of Glycans, Related Genes, and Proteins in Two Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Lines using an Integrated Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Li, Dongliang; Pang, Xingchen; Yang, Ganglong; Deeg, H. Joachim; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Altered expressions of glycans is associated with cell-cell signal transduction and regulation of cell functions in the bone marrow microenvironment. Studies of this microenvironment often use two human bone marrow stromal cell lines, HS5 and HS27a, co-cultured with myeloid cells. We hypothesized that differential protein glycosylation between these two cell lines may contribute to functional differences in in vitro co-culture models. In this study, we applied an integrated strategy using genomic, proteomic, and functional glycomic techniques for global expression profiling of N-glycans and their related genes and enzymes in HS5 vs. HS27a cells. HS5 cells showed significantly enhanced levels of bisecting N-glycans (catalyzed by MGAT3), whereas HS27a cells showed enhanced levels of Galβ1, 4GlcNAc (catalyzed by β4GalT1). This integrated strategy provides useful information regarding the functional roles of glycans and their related glycogenes and glycosyltransferases in the bone marrow microenvironment, and a basis for future studies of crosstalk among stromal cells and myeloma cells in co-culture. PMID:25936519

  14. PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR PROCESSING AND ANALYZING SPOTTED OLIGONUCLEOTIDE MICROARRAY DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thoughtful data analysis is as important as experimental design, biological sample quality, and appropriate experimental procedures for making microarrays a useful supplement to traditional toxicology. In the present study, spotted oligonucleotide microarrays were used to profile...

  15. Automated Motif Discovery from Glycan Array Data

    PubMed Central

    Cholleti, Sharath R.; Agravat, Sanjay; Morris, Tim; Saltz, Joel H.; Song, Xuezheng

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Assessing interactions of a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or lectin with glycans on a microarray generates large datasets, making it difficult to identify a glycan structural motif or determinant associated with the highest apparent binding strength of the GBP. We have developed a computational method, termed GlycanMotifMiner, that uses the relative binding of a GBP with glycans within a glycan microarray to automatically reveal the glycan structural motifs recognized by a GBP. We implemented the software with a web-based graphical interface for users to explore and visualize the discovered motifs. The utility of GlycanMotifMiner was determined using five plant lectins, SNA, HPA, PNA, Con A, and UEA-I. Data from the analyses of the lectins at different protein concentrations were processed to rank the glycans based on their relative binding strengths. The motifs, defined as glycan substructures that exist in a large number of the bound glycans and few non-bound glycans, were then discovered by our algorithm and displayed in a web-based graphical user interface (http://glycanmotifminer.emory.edu). The information is used in defining the glycan-binding specificity of GBPs. The results were compared to the known glycan specificities of these lectins generated by manual methods. A more complex analysis was also carried out using glycan microarray data obtained for a recombinant form of human galectin-8. Results for all of these lectins show that GlycanMotifMiner identified the major motifs known in the literature along with some unexpected novel binding motifs. PMID:22877213

  16. Automated motif discovery from glycan array data.

    PubMed

    Cholleti, Sharath R; Agravat, Sanjay; Morris, Tim; Saltz, Joel H; Song, Xuezheng; Cummings, Richard D; Smith, David F

    2012-10-01

    Assessing interactions of a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or lectin with glycans on a microarray generates large datasets, making it difficult to identify a glycan structural motif or determinant associated with the highest apparent binding strength of the GBP. We have developed a computational method, termed GlycanMotifMiner, that uses the relative binding of a GBP with glycans within a glycan microarray to automatically reveal the glycan structural motifs recognized by a GBP. We implemented the software with a web-based graphical interface for users to explore and visualize the discovered motifs. The utility of GlycanMotifMiner was determined using five plant lectins, SNA, HPA, PNA, Con A, and UEA-I. Data from the analyses of the lectins at different protein concentrations were processed to rank the glycans based on their relative binding strengths. The motifs, defined as glycan substructures that exist in a large number of the bound glycans and few non-bound glycans, were then discovered by our algorithm and displayed in a web-based graphical user interface ( http://glycanmotifminer.emory.edu ). The information is used in defining the glycan-binding specificity of GBPs. The results were compared to the known glycan specificities of these lectins generated by manual methods. A more complex analysis was also carried out using glycan microarray data obtained for a recombinant form of human galectin-8. Results for all of these lectins show that GlycanMotifMiner identified the major motifs known in the literature along with some unexpected novel binding motifs. PMID:22877213

  17. Development and Applications of the Lectin Microarray.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Jun; Kuno, Atsushi; Tateno, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    The lectin microarray is an emerging technology for glycomics. It has already found maximum use in diverse fields of glycobiology by providing simple procedures for differential glycan profiling in a rapid and high-throughput manner. Since its first appearance in the literature in 2005, many application methods have been developed essentially on the same platform, comprising a series of glycan-binding proteins immobilized on an appropriate substrate such as a glass slide. Because the lectin microarray strategy does not require prior liberation of glycans from the core protein in glycoprotein analysis, it should encourage researchers not familiar with glycotechnology to use glycan analysis in future work. This feasibility should provide a broader range of experimental scientists with good opportunities to investigate novel aspects of glycoscience. Applications of the technology include not only basic sciences but also the growing fields of bio-industry. This chapter describes first the essence of glycan profiling and the basic fabrication of the lectin microarray for this purpose. In the latter part the focus is on diverse applications to both structural and functional glycomics, with emphasis on the wide applicability now available with this new technology. Finally, the importance of developing advanced lectin engineering is discussed.

  18. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Day, Christopher J.; Tran, Elizabeth N.; Semchenko, Evgeny A.; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Ng, Preston S. K.; King, Rebecca M.; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A.; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein–glycan or protein–protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host–glycan:bacterial–glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (KD) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  19. Glycan:glycan interactions: High affinity biomolecular interactions that can mediate binding of pathogenic bacteria to host cells.

    PubMed

    Day, Christopher J; Tran, Elizabeth N; Semchenko, Evgeny A; Tram, Greg; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E; Ng, Preston S K; King, Rebecca M; Ulanovsky, Rachel; McAtamney, Sarah; Apicella, Michael A; Tiralongo, Joe; Morona, Renato; Korolik, Victoria; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-12-29

    Cells from all domains of life express glycan structures attached to lipids and proteins on their surface, called glycoconjugates. Cell-to-cell contact mediated by glycan:glycan interactions have been considered to be low-affinity interactions that precede high-affinity protein-glycan or protein-protein interactions. In several pathogenic bacteria, truncation of surface glycans, lipooligosaccharide (LOS), or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have been reported to significantly reduce bacterial adherence to host cells. Here, we show that the saccharide component of LOS/LPS have direct, high-affinity interactions with host glycans. Glycan microarrays reveal that LOS/LPS of four distinct bacterial pathogens bind to numerous host glycan structures. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the affinity of these interactions and revealed 66 high-affinity host-glycan:bacterial-glycan pairs with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) ranging between 100 nM and 50 µM. These glycan:glycan affinity values are similar to those reported for lectins or antibodies with glycans. Cell assays demonstrated that glycan:glycan interaction-mediated bacterial adherence could be competitively inhibited by either host cell or bacterial glycans. This is the first report to our knowledge of high affinity glycan:glycan interactions between bacterial pathogens and the host. The discovery of large numbers of glycan:glycan interactions between a diverse range of structures suggests that these interactions may be important in all biological systems. PMID:26676578

  20. Fluorescence assay for glycan expression on living cancer cells based on competitive strategy coupled with dual-functionalized nanobiocomposites.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Lu, Danqin; Lin, Bin; Sun, Qianqian; Liu, Kai; Xu, Lili; Zhang, Shengping; Hu, Chen; Wang, Chuangui; Xu, Zhiai; Zhang, Wen

    2013-11-21

    Cell surface glycans are a class of sophisticated biomolecules related to cancer development and progression, and their analysis is of great significance for early cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, we proposed a fluorescence assay to evaluate glycan expression on living cancer cells based on a competitive strategy coupled with dual-functionalized nanobiocomposites. The competitive assay was conducted between living cancer cells and thiomannosyl derivatives using concanavalin A (Con A)-modified electrode as the interaction platform. To impart fluorescence signaling ability to competitive derivatives, quantum dots (QDs) were anchored on BSA-protected Au nanoparticles, and thiomannosyl derivatives were further immobilized on the nanoparticle surface through Au-S binding. Due to the spacing between QDs and Au nanoparticles by BSA, the {QDs-Au-BSA-mannose} nanobiocomposites maintained the fluorescence of QDs and showed binding ability with the Con A-modified electrode. Au nanorods (AuNRs)-modified electrode was used as an effective substrate to immobilize Con A. This assay was successfully applied to the analysis of two cancer cells lines (A549 and QGY-7701). The method is simple and shows promise for the study of glycan expression on living cancer cells.

  1. Oxidative Release of Natural Glycans for Functional Glycomics

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuezheng; Ju, Hong; Lasanajak, Yi; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Glycans have essential roles in biology and the etiology of many diseases. A major hurdle in studying glycans through functional glycomics is the lack of methods to release glycans from diverse types of biological samples. Here we describe an elegant yet simple oxidative strategy using household bleach to release all types of free reducing N-glycans and O-glycan-acids from glycoproteins, and glycan nitriles from glycosphingolipids. Released glycans are directly useful in glycomic analyses and can be derivatized fluorescently for functional glycomics. This chemical method overcomes the limitations in glycan generation and promotes archiving and characterization of human and animal glycomes and their functions. PMID:27135973

  2. Microarrays in Glycoproteomics Research

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Tingting; Haab, Brian B.

    2009-01-01

    Microarrays have been extremely useful for investigating binding interactions among diverse types of molecular species, with the main advantage being the ability to examine many interactions using small amount of samples and reagents. Microarrays are increasingly being used to advance research in the field of glycobiology, which is the study of the nature and function and carbohydrates in health and disease. Several types of microarrays are being used in the study of glycans and proteins in glycobiology, including glycan arrays to study the recognition of carbohydrates, lectin arrays to determine carbohydrate expression on purified proteins or on cells, and antibody arrays to examine the variation in particular glycan structures on specific proteins. This review will cover the technology and applications of these types of microarrays, as well as their use for obtaining complementary information on various aspects of glycobiology. PMID:19389548

  3. Protein Microarrays-Based Strategies for Life Detection in Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, Víctor; Rivas, Luis A.; Gómez-Elvira, Javier

    2008-03-01

    The detection of organic molecules of unambiguous biological origin is fundamental for the confirmation of present or past life. Planetary exploration requires the development of miniaturized apparatus for in situ life detection. Analytical techniques based on mass spectrometry have been traditionally used in space science. Following the Viking landers, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for organic detection has gained general acceptance and has been used successfully in the Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan. Microfluidics allows the development of miniaturized capillary electrophoresis devices for the detection of important molecules for life, like amino acids or nucleobases. Recently, a new approach is gaining acceptance in the space science community: the application of the well-known, highly specific, antibody-antigen affinity interaction for the detection and identification of organics and biochemical compounds. Antibodies can specifically bind a plethora of structurally different compounds of a broad range of molecular sizes, from amino acids level to whole cells. Antibody microarray technology allows us to look for the presence of thousands of different compounds in a single assay and in just one square centimeter. Herein, we discuss several important issues—most of which are common with other instruments dealing with life signature detection in the solar system—that must be addressed in order to use antibody microarrays for life detection and planetary exploration. These issues include (1) preservation of biomarkers, (2) the extraction techniques for biomarkers, (3) terrestrial analogues, (4) the antibody stability under space environments, (5) the selection of unequivocal biomarkers for the antibody production, or (6) the instrument design and implementation.

  4. Protein Microarrays-Based Strategies for Life Detection in Astrobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parro, Víctor; Rivas, Luis A.; Gómez-Elvira, Javier

    The detection of organic molecules of unambiguous biological origin is fundamental for the confirmation of present or past life. Planetary exploration requires the development of miniaturized apparatus for in situ life detection. Analytical techniques based on mass spectrometry have been traditionally used in space science. Following the Viking landers, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for organic detection has gained general acceptance and has been used successfully in the Cassini-Huygens mission to Titan. Microfluidics allows the development of miniaturized capillary electrophoresis devices for the detection of important molecules for life, like amino acids or nucleobases. Recently, a new approach is gaining acceptance in the space science community: the application of the well-known, highly specific, antibody-antigen affinity interaction for the detection and identification of organics and biochemical compounds. Antibodies can specifically bind a plethora of structurally different compounds of a broad range of molecular sizes, from amino acids level to whole cells. Antibody microarray technology allows us to look for the presence of thousands of different compounds in a single assay and in just one square centimeter. Herein, we discuss several important issues—most of which are common with other instruments dealing with life signature detection in the solar system—that must be addressed in order to use antibody microarrays for life detection and planetary exploration. These issues include (1) preservation of biomarkers, (2) the extraction techniques for biomarkers, (3) terrestrial analogues, (4) the antibody stability under space environments, (5) the selection of unequivocal biomarkers for the antibody production, or (6) the instrument design and implementation.

  5. CrossNorm: a novel normalization strategy for microarray data in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lixin; Lo, Leung-Yau; Tang, Nelson L. S.; Wang, Dong; Leung, Kwong-Sak

    2016-01-01

    Normalization is essential to get rid of biases in microarray data for their accurate analysis. Existing normalization methods for microarray gene expression data commonly assume a similar global expression pattern among samples being studied. However, scenarios of global shifts in gene expressions are dominant in cancers, making the assumption invalid. To alleviate the problem, here we propose and develop a novel normalization strategy, Cross Normalization (CrossNorm), for microarray data with unbalanced transcript levels among samples. Conventional procedures, such as RMA and LOESS, arbitrarily flatten the difference between case and control groups leading to biased gene expression estimates. Noticeably, applying these methods under the strategy of CrossNorm, which makes use of the overall statistics of the original signals, the results showed significantly improved robustness and accuracy in estimating transcript level dynamics for a series of publicly available datasets, including titration experiment, simulated data, spike-in data and several real-life microarray datasets across various types of cancers. The results have important implications for the past and the future cancer studies based on microarray samples with non-negligible difference. Moreover, the strategy can also be applied to other sorts of high-throughput data as long as the experiments have global expression variations between conditions. PMID:26732145

  6. A universal multiplex PCR strategy for 100-plex amplification using a hydrophobically patterned microarray.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Guo, Shu-Juan; Shao, Ning; Tu, Shun; Xu, Miao; Ren, Zhao-Rui; Ling, Xing; Wang, Guo-Qing; Lin, Zhi-Xin; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2011-11-01

    Both basic research and clinical medicine have urgent demands for highly efficient strategies to simultaneously identify many different DNA sequences within a single tube. Effective and simultaneous amplification of multiple target sequences is a prerequisite for any successful multiple nucleic acid detection method. Multiplex PCR is one of the best choices for this purpose. However, due to the intrinsic interference and competition among primer pairs in the same tube, multiple rounds of highly empirical optimization procedures are usually required to establish a successful multiplex PCR reaction. To address this challenge, we report here a universal multiplex PCR strategy that is capable of over 100-plex amplification using a specially designed microarray in which hydrophilic microwells are patterned on a hydrophobic chip. On such an array, primer pairs tagged with a universal sequence are physically separated in individual hydrophilic microwells on an otherwise hydrophobic chip, enabling many unique PCR reactions to be proceeded simultaneously during the first step of the procedure. The PCR products are then isolated and further amplified from the universal sequences, producing a sufficient amount of material for analysis by conventional gel electrophoresis or DNA microarray technology. This strategy is abbreviated as "MPH&HPM" for "Multiplex PCR on a Hydrophobically and Hydrophilically Patterned Microarray". The feasibility of this method is first demonstrated by a multiplex PCR reaction for the simultaneous detection of eleven pneumonia-causing pathogens. Further, we demonstrate the power of this strategy with a highly successful 116-plex PCR reaction that required only little prior optimization. The effectiveness of the MPH&HPM strategy with clinical samples is then illustrated with the detection of deleted exons of the Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) gene, the results are in excellent agreement with the clinical records. Because of its generality

  7. Recognition of Microbial Glycans by Human Intelectin

    PubMed Central

    Wesener, Darryl A.; Wangkanont, Kittikhun; McBride, Ryan; Song, Xuezheng; Kraft, Matthew B.; Hodges, Heather L.; Zarling, Lucas C.; Splain, Rebecca A.; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Paulson, James C.; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    The glycans displayed on mammalian cells can differ markedly from those on microbes. Such differences could, in principle, be read by carbohydrate-binding proteins, or lectins. We used glycan microarrays to show that human intelectin-1 (hIntL-1) does not bind known human glycan epitopes but interacts with multiple glycan epitopes found exclusively on microbes: β-linked d-galactofuranose (β-Galf), d-phospho-glycerol-modified glycans, heptoses, d-glycero-d-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KO) and 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct–2-ulosonic acid (KDO). The 1.6 Å resolution crystal structure of hIntL-1 bound to β-Galf revealed that hIntL-1 uses a bound calcium ion to coordinate terminal exocyclic 1,2-diols. N-Acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid widespread in human glycans, possesses an exocyclic 1,2-diol but does not bind hInt-1, likely due to unfavorable steric and electronic effects. Human IntL-1 marks only Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes that display surface glycans with terminal 1,2-diol groups. This ligand selectivity suggests hIntL-1 functions in microbial surveillance. PMID:26148048

  8. Glycan and lectin biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  9. Glycan and lectin biosensors.

    PubMed

    Belický, Štefan; Katrlík, Jaroslav; Tkáč, Ján

    2016-06-30

    A short description about the importance of glycan biorecognition in physiological (blood cell type) and pathological processes (infections by human and avian influenza viruses) is provided in this review. Glycans are described as much better information storage media, compared to proteins or DNA, due to the extensive variability of glycan structures. Techniques able to detect an exact glycan structure are briefly discussed with the main focus on the application of lectins (glycan-recognising proteins) in the specific analysis of glycans still attached to proteins or cells/viruses. Optical, electrochemical, piezoelectric and micromechanical biosensors with immobilised lectins or glycans able to detect a wide range of analytes including whole cells/viruses are also discussed. PMID:27365034

  10. Functional Protein Microarray Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shaohui; Xie, Zhi; Qian, Jiang; Blackshaw, Seth; Zhu, Heng

    2010-01-01

    Functional protein microarrays are emerging as a promising new tool for large-scale and high-throughput studies. In this article, we will review their applications in basic proteomics research, where various types of assays have been developed to probe binding activities to other biomolecules, such as proteins, DNA, RNA, small molecules, and glycans. We will also report recent progress of using functional protein microarrays in profiling protein posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, acetylation, and nitrosylation. Finally, we will discuss potential of functional protein microarrays in biomarker identification and clinical diagnostics. We strongly believe that functional protein microarrays will soon become an indispensible and invaluable tool in proteomics research and systems biology. PMID:20872749

  11. Comparison of three microarray probe annotation pipelines: differences in strategies and their effect on downstream analysis

    PubMed Central

    Neerincx, Pieter BT; Casel, Pierrot; Prickett, Dennis; Nie, Haisheng; Watson, Michael; Leunissen, Jack AM; Groenen, Martien AM; Klopp, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Background Reliable annotation linking oligonucleotide probes to target genes is essential for functional biological analysis of microarray experiments. We used the IMAD, OligoRAP and sigReannot pipelines to update the annotation for the ARK-Genomics Chicken 20 K array as part of a joined EADGENE/SABRE workshop. In this manuscript we compare their annotation strategies and results. Furthermore, we analyse the effect of differences in updated annotation on functional analysis for an experiment involving Eimeria infected chickens and finally we propose guidelines for optimal annotation strategies. Results IMAD, OligoRAP and sigReannot update both annotation and estimated target specificity. The 3 pipelines can assign oligos to target specificity categories although with varying degrees of resolution. Target specificity is judged based on the amount and type of oligo versus target-gene alignments (hits), which are determined by filter thresholds that users can adjust based on their experimental conditions. Linking oligos to annotation on the other hand is based on rigid rules, which differ between pipelines. For 52.7% of the oligos from a subset selected for in depth comparison all pipelines linked to one or more Ensembl genes with consensus on 44.0%. In 31.0% of the cases none of the pipelines could assign an Ensembl gene to an oligo and for the remaining 16.3% the coverage differed between pipelines. Differences in updated annotation were mainly due to different thresholds for hybridisation potential filtering of oligo versus target-gene alignments and different policies for expanding annotation using indirect links. The differences in updated annotation packages had a significant effect on GO term enrichment analysis with consensus on only 67.2% of the enriched terms. Conclusion In addition to flexible thresholds to determine target specificity, annotation tools should provide metadata describing the relationships between oligos and the annotation assigned to them

  12. Parvovirus glycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Halder, Sujata; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-08-01

    Members of the Parvoviridae utilize glycan receptors for cellular attachment and subsequent interactions determine transduction efficiency or pathogenic outcome. This review focuses on the identity of the glycan receptors utilized, their capsid binding footprints, and a discussion of the overlap of these sites with tropism, transduction, and pathogenicity determinants. Despite high sequence diversity between the different genera, most parvoviruses bind to negatively charged glycans, such as sialic acid and heparan sulfate, abundant on cell surface membranes. The capsid structure of these viruses exhibit high structural homology enabling common regions to be utilized for glycan binding. At the same time the sequence diversity at the common footprints allows for binding of different glycans or differential binding of the same glycan.

  13. Parvovirus Glycan Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin-Ya; Halder, Sujata; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Parvoviridae utilize glycan receptors for cellular attachment and subsequent interactions determine transduction efficiency or pathogenic outcome. This review focuses on the identity of the glycan receptors utilized, their capsid binding footprints, and a discussion of the overlap of these sites with tropism, transduction, and pathogenicity determinants. Despite high sequence diversity between the different genera, most parvoviruses bind to negatively charged glycans, such as sialic acid and heparan sulfate, abundant on cell surface membranes. The capsid structure of these viruses exhibit high structural homology enabling common regions to be utilized for glycan binding and at the same time the sequence diversity at the common footprints allows for binding of different glycans or differential binding of the same glycan. PMID:25047752

  14. A lectin-based cell microarray approach to analyze the mammalian granulosa cell surface glycosylation profile.

    PubMed

    Accogli, Gianluca; Desantis, Salvatore; Martino, Nicola Antonio; Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena; Gemeiner, Peter; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-10-01

    The high complexity of glycome, the repertoire of glycans expressed in a cell or in an organism, is difficult to analyze and the use of new technologies has accelerated the progress of glycomics analysis. In the last decade, the microarray approaches, and in particular glycan and lectin microarrays, have provided new insights into evaluation of cell glycosylation status. Here we present a cell microarray method based on cell printing on microarray slides for the analysis of the glycosylation pattern of the cell glycocalyx. In order to demonstrate the reliability of the developed method, the glycome profiles of equine native uncultured mural granulosa cells (uGCs) and in vitro cultured mural granulosa cells (cGCs) were determined and compared. The method consists in the isolation of GCs, cell printing into arrays on microarray slide, incubation with a panel of biotinylated lectins, reaction with fluorescent streptavidin and signal intensity detection by a microarray scanner. Cell microarray technology revealed that glycocalyx of both uGCs and cGCs contains N-glycans, sialic acid terminating glycans, N-acetylglucosamine and O-glycans. The comparison of uGCs and cGCs glycan signals indicated an increase in the expression of sialic acids, N-acetylglucosamine, and N-glycans in cGCs. Glycan profiles determined by cell microarray agreed with those revealed by lectin histochemistry. The described cell microarray method represents a simple and sensitive procedure to analyze cell surface glycome in mammalian cells.

  15. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrea; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i) conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii) whole mucin microarrays; and (iii) microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments. PMID:27600247

  16. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrea; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i) conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii) whole mucin microarrays; and (iii) microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments.

  17. Glycans as targets for therapeutic antitumor antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rabu, Catherine; McIntosh, Richard; Jurasova, Zuzana; Durrant, Lindy

    2012-08-01

    Glycans represent a vast class of molecules that modify either proteins or lipids. They exert and regulate important and complex functions in both normal and cancer cell metabolism. As such, the most immunogenic glycans have been targeted in passive and active immunotherapy in human cancer for the past 25 years but it is only recently that techniques have become available to uncover novel glycan targets. The main focus of this review article is to highlight why and how monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing glycans, and in particular the glycans expressed on glycolipids, are being used in various strategies to target and kill cancer cells. The article reports on the historical use of mAbs and on very recent progress made in antitumor therapy using the anti-GD2 mAb and the antiganglioside mAbs, anti-N-glycolylneuraminic acid mAb and anti-Lewis mAb. Anti-GD2 is showing great promise in Phase III clinical trials in adjuvant treatment of neuroblastoma. Racotumomab, an anti-idiotypic mAb mimicking N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing gangliosides, is currently being tested in a randomized, controlled Phase II/III clinical trial. This article also presents various strategies used by different groups to develop mAbs against these naturally poorly immunogenic glycans.

  18. Preparation of Glycan Arrays Using Pyridylaminated Glycans.

    PubMed

    Nakakita, Shin-Ichi; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    We describe the method to prepare neoglycoproteins from the conjugation of bovine serum albumin and pyridylaminated glycans. Large quantities of glycans (>1 mg) can be pyridylaminated and then converted to their 1-amino-1-deoxy derivatives by reaction with hydrogen followed by hydrazine. These pyridylaminated glycans can then be conjugated to bovine serum albumin via esterification with N-( m-maleimidobenzoyloxy)succinimide to form a neoglycoprotein, e.g., glycosylated bovine serum albumin. As a demonstration, we prepared High-mannose bovine serum albumin, which was immobilized on an activated glass slide. Then, we showed that the neoglycoprotein bind to Cy3-labeled Lens culinaris agglutinin, a mannose-specific plant lectin, as detected using an evanescent-field-activated fluorescence scanner system. PMID:26614079

  19. Evaluation of a field-portable DNA microarray platform and nucleic acid amplification strategies for the detection of arboviruses, arthropods, and bloodmeals.

    PubMed

    Grubaugh, Nathan D; Petz, Lawrence N; Melanson, Vanessa R; McMenamy, Scott S; Turell, Michael J; Long, Lewis S; Pisarcik, Sarah E; Kengluecha, Ampornpan; Jaichapor, Boonsong; O'Guinn, Monica L; Lee, John S

    2013-02-01

    Highly multiplexed assays, such as microarrays, can benefit arbovirus surveillance by allowing researchers to screen for hundreds of targets at once. We evaluated amplification strategies and the practicality of a portable DNA microarray platform to analyze virus-infected mosquitoes. The prototype microarray design used here targeted the non-structural protein 5, ribosomal RNA, and cytochrome b genes for the detection of flaviviruses, mosquitoes, and bloodmeals, respectively. We identified 13 of 14 flaviviruses from virus inoculated mosquitoes and cultured cells. Additionally, we differentiated between four mosquito genera and eight whole blood samples. The microarray platform was field evaluated in Thailand and successfully identified flaviviruses (Culex flavivirus, dengue-3, and Japanese encephalitis viruses), differentiated between mosquito genera (Aedes, Armigeres, Culex, and Mansonia), and detected mammalian bloodmeals (human and dog). We showed that the microarray platform and amplification strategies described here can be used to discern specific information on a wide variety of viruses and their vectors.

  20. Evaluation of a Field-Portable DNA Microarray Platform and Nucleic Acid Amplification Strategies for the Detection of Arboviruses, Arthropods, and Bloodmeals

    PubMed Central

    Grubaugh, Nathan D.; Petz, Lawrence N.; Melanson, Vanessa R.; McMenamy, Scott S.; Turell, Michael J.; Long, Lewis S.; Pisarcik, Sarah E.; Kengluecha, Ampornpan; Jaichapor, Boonsong; O'Guinn, Monica L.; Lee, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Highly multiplexed assays, such as microarrays, can benefit arbovirus surveillance by allowing researchers to screen for hundreds of targets at once. We evaluated amplification strategies and the practicality of a portable DNA microarray platform to analyze virus-infected mosquitoes. The prototype microarray design used here targeted the non-structural protein 5, ribosomal RNA, and cytochrome b genes for the detection of flaviviruses, mosquitoes, and bloodmeals, respectively. We identified 13 of 14 flaviviruses from virus inoculated mosquitoes and cultured cells. Additionally, we differentiated between four mosquito genera and eight whole blood samples. The microarray platform was field evaluated in Thailand and successfully identified flaviviruses (Culex flavivirus, dengue-3, and Japanese encephalitis viruses), differentiated between mosquito genera (Aedes, Armigeres, Culex, and Mansonia), and detected mammalian bloodmeals (human and dog). We showed that the microarray platform and amplification strategies described here can be used to discern specific information on a wide variety of viruses and their vectors. PMID:23249687

  1. Human DC-SIGN Binds Specific Human Milk Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Alexander J.; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Duska-McEwen, Geralyn; Buck, Rachael H.; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Human milk glycans (HMGs) are prebiotics, pathogen receptor decoys, and regulators of host physiology and immune responses. Mechanistically, human lectins (glycan-binding proteins, hGBPs) expressed by dendritic cells (DC) are of major interest, as these cells directly contact HMGs. To explore such interactions, we screened many C-type lectins and Siglecs expressed by DC for glycan binding on microarrays presenting over 200 HMGs. Unexpectedly, DC-SIGN showed robust binding to many HMGs, whereas other C-type lectins failed to bind, and Siglecs-5 and -9 showed weak binding to a few glycans. By contrast, most hGBPs bound to multiple glycans on other microarrays lacking HMGs. An α-linked fucose residue was characteristic of HMGs bound by DC-SIGN. Binding of DC-SIGN to the simple HMGs 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL) and 3-fucosyllactose (3-FL) was confirmed by flow cytometry to beads conjugated with 2′-FL or 3-FL, as well as the ability of the free glycans to inhibit DC-SIGN binding. 2′-FL had an IC50 of ~1 mM for DC-SIGN, which is within the physiological concentration of 2′-FL in human milk. These results demonstrate that DC-SIGN among the many hGBPs expressed by DC binds to α-fucosylated HMGs, and suggest that such interactions may be important in influencing immune responses in the developing infant. PMID:26976925

  2. Pre-embedding Method of Electron Microscopy for Glycan Localization in Mammalian Tissues and Cells Using Lectin Probes.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Takata, Kuniaki; Kawakami, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the study of glycans is progressing remarkably by the development of glycan analysis systems using mass spectrometry, glycan profiling systems using lectin microarrays, and glycoprotein analysis by the isotope-coded glycosylation site-specific tagging method. With these methodologies, glycan structures and biological functions are being elucidated. In the study of glycan function as well as disease diagnosis, it is important to examine the localization of glycans in tissues and cells. Histochemical methods using lectin probes can localize glycans in the tissues and cells. This chapter describes a pre-embedding electron microscopic method for glycan localization in which tissue sections and cells are incubated with lectin prior to embedding in resin. PMID:27515086

  3. Recognition of microbial glycans by human intelectin-1.

    PubMed

    Wesener, Darryl A; Wangkanont, Kittikhun; McBride, Ryan; Song, Xuezheng; Kraft, Matthew B; Hodges, Heather L; Zarling, Lucas C; Splain, Rebecca A; Smith, David F; Cummings, Richard D; Paulson, James C; Forest, Katrina T; Kiessling, Laura L

    2015-08-01

    The glycans displayed on mammalian cells can differ markedly from those on microbes. Such differences could, in principle, be 'read' by carbohydrate-binding proteins, or lectins. We used glycan microarrays to show that human intelectin-1 (hIntL-1) does not bind known human glycan epitopes but does interact with multiple glycan epitopes found exclusively on microbes: β-linked D-galactofuranose (β-Galf), D-phosphoglycerol-modified glycans, heptoses, D-glycero-D-talo-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KO) and 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (KDO). The 1.6-Å-resolution crystal structure of hIntL-1 complexed with β-Galf revealed that hIntL-1 uses a bound calcium ion to coordinate terminal exocyclic 1,2-diols. N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), a sialic acid widespread in human glycans, has an exocyclic 1,2-diol but does not bind hIntL-1, probably owing to unfavorable steric and electronic effects. hIntL-1 marks only Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes that display surface glycans with terminal 1,2-diol groups. This ligand selectivity suggests that hIntL-1 functions in microbial surveillance. PMID:26148048

  4. Gene expression profiling and identification of resistance genes to Aspergillus flavus infection in peanut through EST and microarray strategies.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baozhu; Fedorova, Natalie D; Chen, Xiaoping; Wan, Chun-Hua; Wang, Wei; Nierman, William C; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Yu, Jiujiang

    2011-07-01

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus infect peanut seeds and produce aflatoxins, which are associated with various diseases in domestic animals and humans throughout the world. The most cost-effective strategy to minimize aflatoxin contamination involves the development of peanut cultivars that are resistant to fungal infection and/or aflatoxin production. To identify peanut Aspergillus-interactive and peanut Aspergillus-resistance genes, we carried out a large scale peanut Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) project which we used to construct a peanut glass slide oligonucleotide microarray. The fabricated microarray represents over 40% of the protein coding genes in the peanut genome. For expression profiling, resistant and susceptible peanut cultivars were infected with a mixture of Aspergillusflavus and parasiticus spores. The subsequent microarray analysis identified 62 genes in resistant cultivars that were up-expressed in response to Aspergillus infection. In addition, we identified 22 putative Aspergillus-resistance genes that were constitutively up-expressed in the resistant cultivar in comparison to the susceptible cultivar. Some of these genes were homologous to peanut, corn, and soybean genes that were previously shown to confer resistance to fungal infection. This study is a first step towards a comprehensive genome-scale platform for developing Aspergillus-resistant peanut cultivars through targeted marker-assisted breeding and genetic engineering. PMID:22069737

  5. The use of lectin microarray for assessing glycosylation of therapeutic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycans or carbohydrates attached to therapeutic glycoproteins can directly affect product quality, safety and efficacy, and therefore must be adequately analyzed and controlled throughout product life cycles. However, the complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. In this study, we evaluated the utility of a lectin microarray for assessing protein glycans. Using commercial lectin chips, which contain 45 lectins toward distinct glycan structures, we were able to determine the lectin binding patterns of a panel of 15 therapeutic proteins, including 8 monoclonal antibodies. Lectin binding signals were analyzed to generate glycan profiles that were generally consistent with the known glycan patterns for these glycoproteins. In particular, the lectin-based microarray was found to be highly sensitive to variations in the terminal carbohydrate structures such as galactose versus sialic acid epitopes. These data suggest that lectin microarray could be used for screening glycan patterns of therapeutic glycoproteins. PMID:26918373

  6. Assessment of a direct hybridization microarray strategy for comprehensive monitoring of genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    PubMed

    Turkec, Aydin; Lucas, Stuart J; Karacanli, Burçin; Baykut, Aykut; Yuksel, Hakki

    2016-03-01

    Detection of GMO material in crop and food samples is the primary step in GMO monitoring and regulation, with the increasing number of GM events in the world market requiring detection solutions with high multiplexing capacity. In this study, we test the suitability of a high-density oligonucleotide microarray platform for direct, quantitative detection of GMOs found in the Turkish feed market. We tested 1830 different 60nt probes designed to cover the GM cassettes from 12 different GM cultivars (3 soya, 9 maize), as well as plant species-specific and contamination controls, and developed a data analysis method aiming to provide maximum throughput and sensitivity. The system was able specifically to identify each cultivar, and in 10/12 cases was sensitive enough to detect GMO DNA at concentrations of ⩽1%. These GMOs could also be quantified using the microarray, as their fluorescence signals increased linearly with GMO concentration. PMID:26471572

  7. Developing an Efficient and General Strategy for Immobilization of Small Molecules onto Microarrays Using Isocyanate Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenggang; Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P; Cui, Zhaomeng; Li, Quanfu; Dang, Yongjun; Mi, Lan; Zheng, Fengyun; Fei, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule microarray (SMM) is an effective platform for identifying lead compounds from large collections of small molecules in drug discovery, and efficient immobilization of molecular compounds is a pre-requisite for the success of such a platform. On an isocyanate functionalized surface, we studied the dependence of immobilization efficiency on chemical residues on molecular compounds, terminal residues on isocyanate functionalized surface, lengths of spacer molecules, and post-printing treatment conditions, and we identified a set of optimized conditions that enable us to immobilize small molecules with significantly improved efficiencies, particularly for those molecules with carboxylic acid residues that are known to have low isocyanate reactivity. We fabricated microarrays of 3375 bioactive compounds on isocyanate functionalized glass slides under these optimized conditions and confirmed that immobilization percentage is over 73%. PMID:26999137

  8. Assessment of a direct hybridization microarray strategy for comprehensive monitoring of genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    PubMed

    Turkec, Aydin; Lucas, Stuart J; Karacanli, Burçin; Baykut, Aykut; Yuksel, Hakki

    2016-03-01

    Detection of GMO material in crop and food samples is the primary step in GMO monitoring and regulation, with the increasing number of GM events in the world market requiring detection solutions with high multiplexing capacity. In this study, we test the suitability of a high-density oligonucleotide microarray platform for direct, quantitative detection of GMOs found in the Turkish feed market. We tested 1830 different 60nt probes designed to cover the GM cassettes from 12 different GM cultivars (3 soya, 9 maize), as well as plant species-specific and contamination controls, and developed a data analysis method aiming to provide maximum throughput and sensitivity. The system was able specifically to identify each cultivar, and in 10/12 cases was sensitive enough to detect GMO DNA at concentrations of ⩽1%. These GMOs could also be quantified using the microarray, as their fluorescence signals increased linearly with GMO concentration.

  9. Developing an Efficient and General Strategy for Immobilization of Small Molecules onto Microarrays Using Isocyanate Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chenggang; Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P.; Cui, Zhaomeng; Li, Quanfu; Dang, Yongjun; Mi, Lan; Zheng, Fengyun; Fei, Yiyan

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule microarray (SMM) is an effective platform for identifying lead compounds from large collections of small molecules in drug discovery, and efficient immobilization of molecular compounds is a pre-requisite for the success of such a platform. On an isocyanate functionalized surface, we studied the dependence of immobilization efficiency on chemical residues on molecular compounds, terminal residues on isocyanate functionalized surface, lengths of spacer molecules, and post-printing treatment conditions, and we identified a set of optimized conditions that enable us to immobilize small molecules with significantly improved efficiencies, particularly for those molecules with carboxylic acid residues that are known to have low isocyanate reactivity. We fabricated microarrays of 3375 bioactive compounds on isocyanate functionalized glass slides under these optimized conditions and confirmed that immobilization percentage is over 73%. PMID:26999137

  10. Developing an Efficient and General Strategy for Immobilization of Small Molecules onto Microarrays Using Isocyanate Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chenggang; Zhu, Xiangdong; Landry, James P; Cui, Zhaomeng; Li, Quanfu; Dang, Yongjun; Mi, Lan; Zheng, Fengyun; Fei, Yiyan

    2016-03-16

    Small-molecule microarray (SMM) is an effective platform for identifying lead compounds from large collections of small molecules in drug discovery, and efficient immobilization of molecular compounds is a pre-requisite for the success of such a platform. On an isocyanate functionalized surface, we studied the dependence of immobilization efficiency on chemical residues on molecular compounds, terminal residues on isocyanate functionalized surface, lengths of spacer molecules, and post-printing treatment conditions, and we identified a set of optimized conditions that enable us to immobilize small molecules with significantly improved efficiencies, particularly for those molecules with carboxylic acid residues that are known to have low isocyanate reactivity. We fabricated microarrays of 3375 bioactive compounds on isocyanate functionalized glass slides under these optimized conditions and confirmed that immobilization percentage is over 73%.

  11. Immune-Signatures for Lung Cancer Diagnostics: Evaluation of Protein Microarray Data Normalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Brezina, Stefanie; Soldo, Regina; Kreuzhuber, Roman; Hofer, Philipp; Gsur, Andrea; Weinhaeusel, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    New minimal invasive diagnostic methods for early detection of lung cancer are urgently needed. It is known that the immune system responds to tumors with production of tumor-autoantibodies. Protein microarrays are a suitable highly multiplexed platform for identification of autoantibody signatures against tumor-associated antigens (TAA). These microarrays can be probed using 0.1 mg immunoglobulin G (IgG), purified from 10 µL of plasma. We used a microarray comprising recombinant proteins derived from 15,417 cDNA clones for the screening of 100 lung cancer samples, including 25 samples of each main histological entity of lung cancer, and 100 controls. Since this number of samples cannot be processed at once, the resulting data showed non-biological variances due to “batch effects”. Our aim was to evaluate quantile normalization, “distance-weighted discrimination” (DWD), and “ComBat” for their effectiveness in data pre-processing for elucidating diagnostic immune-signatures. “ComBat” data adjustment outperformed the other methods and allowed us to identify classifiers for all lung cancer cases versus controls and small-cell, squamous cell, large-cell, and adenocarcinoma of the lung with an accuracy of 85%, 94%, 96%, 92%, and 83% (sensitivity of 0.85, 0.92, 0.96, 0.88, 0.83; specificity of 0.85, 0.96, 0.96, 0.96, 0.83), respectively. These promising data would be the basis for further validation using targeted autoantibody tests.

  12. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins. PMID:20726799

  13. Lectin microarrays for glycomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Garima; Surolia, Avadhesha; Sampathkumar, Srinivasa-Gopalan

    2010-08-01

    Glycomics is the study of comprehensive structural elucidation and characterization of all glycoforms found in nature and their dynamic spatiotemporal changes that are associated with biological processes. Glycocalyx of mammalian cells actively participate in cell-cell, cell-matrix, and cell-pathogen interactions, which impact embryogenesis, growth and development, homeostasis, infection and immunity, signaling, malignancy, and metabolic disorders. Relative to genomics and proteomics, glycomics is just growing out of infancy with great potential in biomedicine for biomarker discovery, diagnosis, and treatment. However, the immense diversity and complexity of glycan structures and their multiple modes of interactions with proteins pose great challenges for development of analytical tools for delineating structure function relationships and understanding glyco-code. Several tools are being developed for glycan profiling based on chromatography, mass spectrometry, glycan microarrays, and glyco-informatics. Lectins, which have long been used in glyco-immunology, printed on a microarray provide a versatile platform for rapid high throughput analysis of glycoforms of biological samples. Herein, we summarize technological advances in lectin microarrays and critically review their impact on glycomics analysis. Challenges remain in terms of expansion to include nonplant derived lectins, standardization for routine clinical use, development of recombinant lectins, and exploration of plant kingdom for discovery of novel lectins.

  14. Human Milk Contains Novel Glycans That Are Potential Decoy Receptors for Neonatal Rotaviruses*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Mickum, Megan L.; Ashline, David J.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Estes, Mary K.; Reinhold, Vernon N.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Human milk contains a rich set of soluble, reducing glycans whose functions and bioactivities are not well understood. Because human milk glycans (HMGs) have been implicated as receptors for various pathogens, we explored the functional glycome of human milk using shotgun glycomics. The free glycans from pooled milk samples of donors with mixed Lewis and Secretor phenotypes were labeled with a fluorescent tag and separated via multidimensional HPLC to generate a tagged glycan library containing 247 HMG targets that were printed to generate the HMG shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). To investigate the potential role of HMGs as decoy receptors for rotavirus (RV), a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children, we interrogated the HMG SGM with recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the RV outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain, B223(G10P[11]). Glycans that were bound by RV attachment proteins were selected for detailed structural analyses using metadata-assisted glycan sequencing, which compiles data on each glycan based on its binding by antibodies and lectins before and after exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion of the SGM, coupled with independent MSn analyses. These complementary structural approaches resulted in the identification of 32 glycans based on RV VP8* binding, many of which are novel HMGs, whose detailed structural assignments by MSn are described in a companion report. Although sialic acid has been thought to be important as a surface receptor for RVs, our studies indicated that sialic acid is not required for binding of glycans to individual VP8* domains. Remarkably, each VP8* recognized specific glycan determinants within a unique subset of related glycan structures where specificity differences arise from subtle differences in glycan structures. PMID:25048705

  15. Systemic Fluorescence Imaging of Zebrafish Glycans with Bioorthogonal Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Paresh; Beahm, Brendan J.; Shieh, Peyton

    2015-01-01

    Vertebrate glycans constitute a large, important, and dynamic set of post-translational modifications that are notoriously difficult to manipulate and image. Although the chemical reporter strategy has been used in conjunction with bioorthogonal chemistry to image the external glycosylation state of live zebrafish and detect tumor-associated glycans in mice, the ability to image glycans systemically within a live organism has remained elusive. Here, we report a method that combines the metabolic incorporation of a cyclooctyne-functionalized sialic acid derivative with a ligation reaction of a fluorogenic tetrazine, allowing for the imaging of sialylated glycoconjugates within live zebrafish embryos. PMID:26230529

  16. Cross-comparison of Protein Recognition of Sialic Acid Diversity on Two Novel Sialoglycan Microarrays*

    PubMed Central

    Padler-Karavani, Vered; Song, Xuezheng; Yu, Hai; Hurtado-Ziola, Nancy; Huang, Shengshu; Muthana, Saddam; Chokhawala, Harshal A.; Cheng, Jiansong; Verhagen, Andrea; Langereis, Martijn A.; Kleene, Ralf; Schachner, Melitta; de Groot, Raoul J.; Lasanajak, Yi; Matsuda, Haruo; Schwab, Richard; Chen, Xi; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Varki, Ajit

    2012-01-01

    DNA and protein arrays are commonly accepted as powerful exploratory tools in research. This has mainly been achieved by the establishment of proper guidelines for quality control, allowing cross-comparison between different array platforms. As a natural extension, glycan microarrays were subsequently developed, and recent advances using such arrays have greatly enhanced our understanding of protein-glycan recognition in nature. However, although it is assumed that biologically significant protein-glycan binding is robustly detected by glycan microarrays, there are wide variations in the methods used to produce, present, couple, and detect glycans, and systematic cross-comparisons are lacking. We address these issues by comparing two arrays that together represent the marked diversity of sialic acid modifications, linkages, and underlying glycans in nature, including some identical motifs. We compare and contrast binding interactions with various known and novel plant, vertebrate, and viral sialic acid-recognizing proteins and present a technical advance for assessing specificity using mild periodate oxidation of the sialic acid chain. These data demonstrate both the diversity of sialic acids and the analytical power of glycan arrays, showing that different presentations in different formats provide useful and complementary interpretations of glycan-binding protein specificity. They also highlight important challenges and questions for the future of glycan array technology and suggest that glycan arrays with similar glycan structures cannot be simply assumed to give similar results. PMID:22549775

  17. Modular synthesis of N-glycans and arrays for the hetero-ligand binding analysis of HIV antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivatare, Sachin S.; Chang, Shih-Huang; Tsai, Tsung-I.; Tseng, Susan Yu; Shivatare, Vidya S.; Lin, Yih-Shyan; Cheng, Yang-Yu; Ren, Chien-Tai; Lee, Chang-Chun David; Pawar, Sujeet; Tsai, Charng-Sheng; Shih, Hao-Wei; Zeng, Yi-Fang; Liang, Chi-Hui; Kwong, Peter D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2016-04-01

    A new class of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) from HIV donors has been reported to target the glycans on gp120—a glycoprotein found on the surface of the virus envelope—thus renewing hope of developing carbohydrate-based HIV vaccines. However, the version of gp120 used in previous studies was not from human T cells and so the glycosylation pattern could be somewhat different to that found in the native system. Moreover, some antibodies recognized two different glycans simultaneously and this cannot be detected with the commonly used glycan microarrays on glass slides. Here, we have developed a glycan microarray on an aluminium-oxide-coated glass slide containing a diverse set of glycans, including homo- and mixed N-glycans (high-mannose, hybrid and complex types) that were prepared by modular chemo-enzymatic methods to detect the presence of hetero-glycan binding behaviours. This new approach allows rapid screening and identification of optimal glycans recognized by neutralizing antibodies, and could speed up the development of HIV-1 vaccines targeting cell surface glycans.

  18. Surface expression patterns of defined glycan antigens change during Schistosoma mansoni cercarial transformation and development of schistosomula.

    PubMed

    Smit, Cornelis H; Homann, Arne; van Hensbergen, Vincent P; Schramm, Gabriele; Haas, Helmut; van Diepen, Angela; Hokke, Cornelis H

    2015-12-01

    During the complex lifecycle of Schistosoma mansoni, a large variety of glycans is expressed. To many of these glycans, antibodies are induced by the infected host and some might be targets for vaccines or diagnostic tests. Spatial changes in glycan expression during schistosome development are largely unexplored. To study the surface-exposed glycans during the important initial stages of infection, we analyzed the binding of a panel of anti-glycan monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to cercariae and schistosomula up to 72 h after transformation by immunofluorescence microscopy. The mAb specificity toward their natural targets was studied using a microarray containing a wide range of schistosomal N-glycans, O-glycans and glycosphingolipid glycans. With the exception of GalNAcβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (LDN-F), mono- and multifucosylated GalNAcβ1-4GlcNAc (LDN)-motifs were exposed at the surface of all developmental stages studied. Multifucosylated LDN-motifs were present on cercarial glycocalyx-derived O-glycans as well as cercarial glycolipids. In contrast, the Galβ1-4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc (Lewis X) and LDN-F-motifs, also expressed on cercarial glycolipids, and in addition on a range of cercarial N- and O-glycans, became surface expressed only after transformation of cercariae to schistosomula. In line with the documented shedding of the O-glycan-rich cercarial glycocalyx after transformation these observations suggest that surface accessible multifucosylated LDN-motifs are mostly expressed by O-glycans in cercariae, but principally by glycosphingolipids in schistosomula. We hypothesize that these temporal changes in surface exposure of glycan antigens are relevant to the interaction with the host during the initial stages of infection with schistosomes and discuss the potential of these glycan antigens as intervention targets. PMID:26347524

  19. Comparative glycan profiling of Ceratopteris richardii ‘C-Fern’ gametophytes and sporophytes links cell-wall composition to functional specialization

    PubMed Central

    Eeckhout, Sharon; Leroux, Olivier; Willats, William G. T.; Popper, Zoë A.; Viane, Ronald L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Innovations in vegetative and reproductive characters were key factors in the evolutionary history of land plants and most of these transformations, including dramatic changes in life cycle structure and strategy, necessarily involved cell-wall modifications. To provide more insight into the role of cell walls in effecting changes in plant structure and function, and in particular their role in the generation of vascularization, an antibody-based approach was implemented to compare the presence and distribution of cell-wall glycan epitopes between (free-living) gametophytes and sporophytes of Ceratopteris richardii ‘C-Fern’, a widely used model system for ferns. Methods Microarrays of sequential diamino-cyclohexane-tetraacetic acid (CDTA) and NaOH extractions of gametophytes, spores and different organs of ‘C-Fern’ sporophytes were probed with glycan-directed monoclonal antibodies. The same probes were employed to investigate the tissue- and cell-specific distribution of glycan epitopes. Key Results While monoclonal antibodies against pectic homogalacturonan, mannan and xyloglucan widely labelled gametophytic and sporophytic tissues, xylans were only detected in secondary cell walls of the sporophyte. The LM5 pectic galactan epitope was restricted to sporophytic phloem tissue. Rhizoids and root hairs showed similarities in arabinogalactan protein (AGP) and xyloglucan epitope distribution patterns. Conclusions The differences and similarities in glycan cell-wall composition between ‘C-Fern’ gametophytes and sporophytes indicate that the molecular design of cell walls reflects functional specialization rather than genetic origin. Glycan epitopes that were not detected in gametophytes were associated with cell walls of specialized tissues in the sporophyte. PMID:24699895

  20. Glycan-based biomarkers for mucopolysaccharidoses

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Roger; Brown, Jillian R.; Lorey, Fred; Dickson, Patricia I.; Crawford, Brett E.; Esko, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) result from attenuation or loss of enzyme activities required for lysosomal degradation of the glycosaminoglycans, hyaluronan, heparan sulfate, chondroitin/dermatan sulfate, and keratan sulfate. This review provides a summary of glycan biomarkers that have been used to characterize animal models of MPS, for diagnosis of patients, and for monitoring therapy based on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and enzyme replacement therapy. Recent advances have focused on the non-reducing terminus of the glycosaminoglycans that accumulate as biomarkers, using a combination of enzymatic digestion with bacterial enzymes followed by quantitative liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. These new methods provide a simple, rapid diagnostic strategy that can be applied to samples of urine, blood, cerebrospinal fluid, cultured cells and dried blood spots from newborn infants. Analysis of the non-reducing end glycans provides a method for monitoring enzyme replacement and substrate reduction therapies and serves as a discovery tool for uncovering novel biomarkers and new forms of mucopolysaccharidoses. PMID:23958290

  1. Microarray Analysis in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Bhawe, Kaumudi M.; Aghi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis in glioblastomas is done using either cell lines or patient samples as starting material. A survey of the current literature points to transcript-based microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based tissue microarrays as being the preferred methods of choice in cancers of neurological origin. Microarray analysis may be carried out for various purposes including the following: To correlate gene expression signatures of glioblastoma cell lines or tumors with response to chemotherapy (DeLay et al., Clin Cancer Res 18(10):2930–2942, 2012)To correlate gene expression patterns with biological features like proliferation or invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells (Jiang et al., PLoS One 8(6):e66008, 2013)To discover new tumor classificatory systems based on gene expression signature, and to correlate therapeutic response and prognosis with these signatures (Huse et al., Annu Rev Med 64(1):59–70, 2013; Verhaak et al., Cancer Cell 17(1):98–110, 2010) While investigators can sometimes use archived tumor gene expression data available from repositories such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus to answer their questions, new arrays must often be run to adequately answer specific questions. Here, we provide a detailed description of microarray methodologies, how to select the appropriate methodology for a given question, and analytical strategies that can be used. Experimental methodology for protein microarrays is outside the scope of this chapter, but basic sample preparation techniques for transcript-based microarrays are included here. PMID:26113463

  2. Microarray Analysis in Glioblastomas.

    PubMed

    Bhawe, Kaumudi M; Aghi, Manish K

    2016-01-01

    Microarray analysis in glioblastomas is done using either cell lines or patient samples as starting material. A survey of the current literature points to transcript-based microarrays and immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based tissue microarrays as being the preferred methods of choice in cancers of neurological origin. Microarray analysis may be carried out for various purposes including the following: i. To correlate gene expression signatures of glioblastoma cell lines or tumors with response to chemotherapy (DeLay et al., Clin Cancer Res 18(10):2930-2942, 2012). ii. To correlate gene expression patterns with biological features like proliferation or invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells (Jiang et al., PLoS One 8(6):e66008, 2013). iii. To discover new tumor classificatory systems based on gene expression signature, and to correlate therapeutic response and prognosis with these signatures (Huse et al., Annu Rev Med 64(1):59-70, 2013; Verhaak et al., Cancer Cell 17(1):98-110, 2010). While investigators can sometimes use archived tumor gene expression data available from repositories such as the NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus to answer their questions, new arrays must often be run to adequately answer specific questions. Here, we provide a detailed description of microarray methodologies, how to select the appropriate methodology for a given question, and analytical strategies that can be used. Experimental methodology for protein microarrays is outside the scope of this chapter, but basic sample preparation techniques for transcript-based microarrays are included here. PMID:26113463

  3. N-glycans of growth factor receptors: their role in receptor function and disease implications.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Motoko; Hasegawa, Yoshihiro; Gao, Congxiao; Kuroki, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Numerous signal-transduction-related molecules are secreted proteins or membrane proteins, and the mechanism by which these molecules are regulated by glycan chains is a very important issue for developing an understanding of the cellular events that transpire. This review covers the functional regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), ErbB3 and the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor by N-glycans. This review shows that the N-glycans play important roles in regulating protein conformation and interactions with carbohydrate recognition molecules. These results point to the possibility of a novel strategy for controlling cell signalling and developing novel glycan-based therapeutics. PMID:27612953

  4. Community-Based Network Study of Protein-Carbohydrate Interactions in Plant Lectins Using Glycan Array Data

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Adeel; Lee, Juyong; Lee, Jooyoung

    2014-01-01

    Lectins play major roles in biological processes such as immune recognition and regulation, inflammatory responses, cytokine signaling, and cell adhesion. Recently, glycan microarrays have shown to play key roles in understanding glycobiology, allowing us to study the relationship between the specificities of glycan binding proteins and their natural ligands at the omics scale. However, one of the drawbacks in utilizing glycan microarray data is the lack of systematic analysis tools to extract information. In this work, we attempt to group various lectins and their interacting carbohydrates by using community-based analysis of a lectin-carbohydrate network. The network consists of 1119 nodes and 16769 edges and we have identified 3 lectins having large degrees of connectivity playing the roles of hubs. The community based network analysis provides an easy way to obtain a general picture of the lectin-glycan interaction and many statistically significant functional groups. PMID:24755681

  5. Glycans on influenza hemagglutinin affect receptor binding and immune response

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Juine-Ruey; Tseng, Yung-Chieh; Hsu, Che-Hsiung; Hung, Yu-Fu; Chen, Shih-Wei; Chen, Chin-Mei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Cheng, Ting-Jen; Cheng, Yih-Shyun E.; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Wu, Chung-Yi; Ma, Che; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2009-01-01

    Recent cases of avian influenza H5N1 and the swine-origin 2009 H1N1 have caused a great concern that a global disaster like the 1918 influenza pandemic may occur again. Viral transmission begins with a critical interaction between hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein, which is on the viral coat of influenza, and sialic acid (SA) containing glycans, which are on the host cell surface. To elucidate the role of HA glycosylation in this important interaction, various defined HA glycoforms were prepared, and their binding affinity and specificity were studied by using a synthetic SA microarray. Truncation of the N-glycan structures on HA increased SA binding affinities while decreasing specificity toward disparate SA ligands. The contribution of each monosaccharide and sulfate group within SA ligand structures to HA binding energy was quantitatively dissected. It was found that the sulfate group adds nearly 100-fold (2.04 kcal/mol) in binding energy to fully glycosylated HA, and so does the biantennary glycan to the monoglycosylated HA glycoform. Antibodies raised against HA protein bearing only a single N-linked GlcNAc at each glycosylation site showed better binding affinity and neutralization activity against influenza subtypes than the fully glycosylated HAs elicited. Thus, removal of structurally nonessential glycans on viral surface glycoproteins may be a very effective and general approach for vaccine design against influenza and other human viruses. PMID:19822741

  6. Automated Solution-Phase Synthesis of Insect Glycans to Probe the Binding Affinity of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Linz, Lucas B; Bonning, Bryony C; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2015-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV)--a plant RNA virus transmitted exclusively by aphids--causes disease in multiple food crops. However, the aphid-virus interactions required for disease transmission are poorly understood. For virus transmission, PEMV binds to a heavily glycosylated receptor aminopeptidase N in the pea aphid gut and is transcytosed across the gut epithelium into the aphid body cavity prior to release in saliva as the aphid feeds. To investigate the role of glycans in PEMV-aphid interactions and explore the possibility of viral control through blocking a glycan interaction, we synthesized insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides by automated solution-phase synthesis. The route features a mannose building block with C-5 ester enforcing a β-linkage, which also provides a site for subsequent chain extension. The resulting insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides with fluorous tags were used in a fluorous microarray to analyze binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled PEMV; however, no specific binding between the insect glycan and PEMV was detected. To confirm these microarray results, we removed the fluorous tag from the trimannosides for isothermal titration calorimetry studies with unlabeled PEMV. The ITC studies confirmed the microarray results and suggested that this particular glycan-PEMV interaction is not involved in virus uptake and transport through the aphid. PMID:26457763

  7. Automated Solution-Phase Synthesis of Insect Glycans to Probe the Binding Affinity of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Linz, Lucas B; Bonning, Bryony C; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2015-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV)--a plant RNA virus transmitted exclusively by aphids--causes disease in multiple food crops. However, the aphid-virus interactions required for disease transmission are poorly understood. For virus transmission, PEMV binds to a heavily glycosylated receptor aminopeptidase N in the pea aphid gut and is transcytosed across the gut epithelium into the aphid body cavity prior to release in saliva as the aphid feeds. To investigate the role of glycans in PEMV-aphid interactions and explore the possibility of viral control through blocking a glycan interaction, we synthesized insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides by automated solution-phase synthesis. The route features a mannose building block with C-5 ester enforcing a β-linkage, which also provides a site for subsequent chain extension. The resulting insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides with fluorous tags were used in a fluorous microarray to analyze binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled PEMV; however, no specific binding between the insect glycan and PEMV was detected. To confirm these microarray results, we removed the fluorous tag from the trimannosides for isothermal titration calorimetry studies with unlabeled PEMV. The ITC studies confirmed the microarray results and suggested that this particular glycan-PEMV interaction is not involved in virus uptake and transport through the aphid.

  8. Two-Dimensional N-Glycan Distribution Mapping of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tissues by MALDI-Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Powers, Thomas W; Holst, Stephanie; Wuhrer, Manfred; Mehta, Anand S; Drake, Richard R

    2015-01-01

    A new mass spectrometry imaging approach to simultaneously map the two-dimensional distribution of N-glycans in tissues has been recently developed. The method uses Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) to spatially profile the location and distribution of multiple N-linked glycan species released by peptide N-glycosidase F in frozen or formalin-fixed tissues. Multiple formalin-fixed human hepatocellular carcinoma tissues were evaluated with this method, resulting in a panel of over 30 N-glycans detected. An ethylation reaction of extracted N-glycans released from adjacent slides was done to stabilize sialic acid containing glycans, and these structures were compared to N-glycans detected directly from tissue profiling. In addition, the distribution of singly fucosylated N-glycans detected in tumor tissue microarray cores were compared to the histochemistry staining pattern of a core fucose binding lectin. As this MALDI-IMS workflow has the potential to be applied to any formalin-fixed tissue block or tissue microarray, the advantages and limitations of the technique in context with other glycomic methods are also summarized. PMID:26501333

  9. Approaches toward High-Mannose-Type Glycan Libraries.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Kohki; Seko, Akira; Takeda, Yoichi; Ito, Yukishige

    2016-02-01

    Asparagine-linked (N-linked) sugar chains are widely found in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which has attracted renewed attention because of its participation in the glycoprotein quality control process. In the ER, newly formed glycoproteins are properly folded to higher-order structures by the action of a variety of lectin chaperones and processing enzymes and are transported into the Golgi, while terminally misfolded glycoproteins are carried into the cytosol for degradation. A group of proteins related to this system are known to recognize subtle differences in the high-mannose-type oligosaccharide structures of glycoproteins; however, their molecular foundations are still unclear. In order to gain a more precise understanding, our group has established a strategy for the systematic synthesis of high-mannose-type glycans. More recently, we have developed "top-down" chemoenzymatic approaches that allow expeditious access to theoretically all types of high-mannose glycans. This strategy comprehensively delivered 37 high-mannose-type glycans, including G1M9-M3 glycans, and opened up the possibility of the elucidation of structure-function relationships with a series of high-mannose-type glycans. PMID:26493153

  10. Identifying human milk glycans that inhibit norovirus binding using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jing; Piskarev, Vladimir E; Xia, Ming; Huang, Pengwei; Jiang, Xi; Likhosherstov, Leonid M; Novikova, Olga S; Newburg, David S; Ratner, Daniel M

    2013-12-01

    Human milk glycans inhibit binding between norovirus and its host glycan receptor; such competitive inhibition by human milk glycans is associated with a reduced risk of infection. The relationship between the presence of specific structural motifs in the human milk glycan and its ability to inhibit binding by specific norovirus strains requires facile, accurate and miniaturized-binding assays. Toward this end, a high-throughput biosensor platform was developed based on surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) of glycan microarrays. The SPRi was validated, and its utility was tested, by measuring binding specificities between defined human milk glycan epitopes and the capsids of two common norovirus strains, VA387 and Norwalk. Human milk oligosaccharide (HMOS)-based neoglycoconjugates, including chemically derived neoglycoproteins and oligosaccharide-glycine derivatives, were used to represent polyvalent glycoconjugates and monovalent oligosaccharides, respectively, in human milk. SPRi binding results established that the glycan motifs that bind norovirus capsids depend upon strain; VA387 capsid interacts with two neoglycoproteins, whereas Norwalk capsid binds to a different set of HMOS motifs in the form of both polyvalent neoglycoproteins and monovalent oligosaccharides. SPRi competitive binding assays further demonstrated that specific norovirus-binding glycans are able to inhibit norovirus capsid binding to their host receptors. A polyvalent neoglycoconjugate with clustered carbohydrate moieties is required for the inhibition of VA387 capsid binding to host receptor glycans, whereas both monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent neoglycoconjugates are able to inhibit Norwalk capsid binding to its host receptor. Binding of HMOS and HMOS-based neoglycoconjugates to norovirus capsids depends upon the specific strain characteristics, implying that HMOS and their polyvalent derivatives are potential anti-adhesive agents for norovirus prophylaxis.

  11. Structural Characterization of Serum N-Glycans by Methylamidation, Fluorescent Labeling, and Analysis by Microchip Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Indranil; Snyder, Christa M; Zhou, Xiaomei; Campos, Margit I; Alley, William R; Novotny, Milos V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2016-09-20

    To characterize the structures of N-glycans derived from human serum, we report a strategy that combines microchip electrophoresis, standard addition, enzymatic digestion, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). We compared (i) electrophoretic mobilities of known N-glycans from well-characterized (standard) glycoproteins through standard addition, (ii) the electrophoretic mobilities of N-glycans with their molecular weights determined by MALDI-MS, and (iii) electrophoretic profiles of N-glycans enzymatically treated with fucosidase. The key step to identify the sialylated N-glycans was to quantitatively neutralize the negative charge on both α2,3- and α2,6-linked sialic acids by covalent derivatization with methylamine. Both neutralized and nonsialylated N-glycans from these samples were then reacted with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid (APTS) to provide a fluorescent label and a triple-negative charge, separated by microchip electrophoresis, and detected by laser-induced fluorescence. The methylamidation step leads to a 24% increase in the peak capacity of the separation and direct correlation of electrophoretic and MALDI-MS results. In total, 37 unique N-glycan structures were assigned to 52 different peaks recorded in the electropherograms of the serum samples. This strategy ensures the needed separation efficiency and detectability, easily resolves linkage and positional glycan isomers, and is highly reproducible.

  12. Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard-Blum, S.

    Proteins are key actors in the life of the cell, involved in many physiological and pathological processes. Since variations in the expression of messenger RNA are not systematically correlated with variations in the protein levels, the latter better reflect the way a cell functions. Protein microarrays thus supply complementary information to DNA chips. They are used in particular to analyse protein expression profiles, to detect proteins within complex biological media, and to study protein-protein interactions, which give information about the functions of those proteins [3-9]. They have the same advantages as DNA microarrays for high-throughput analysis, miniaturisation, and the possibility of automation. Section 18.1 gives a brief overview of proteins. Following this, Sect. 18.2 describes how protein microarrays can be made on flat supports, explaining how proteins can be produced and immobilised on a solid support, and discussing the different kinds of substrate and detection method. Section 18.3 discusses the particular format of protein microarrays in suspension. The diversity of protein microarrays and their applications are then reported in Sect. 18.4, with applications to therapeutics (protein-drug interactions) and diagnostics. The prospects for future developments of protein microarrays are then outlined in the conclusion. The bibliography provides an extensive list of reviews and detailed references for those readers who wish to go further in this area. Indeed, the aim of the present chapter is not to give an exhaustive or detailed analysis of the state of the art, but rather to provide the reader with the basic elements needed to understand how proteins are designed and used.

  13. A Novel Strategy for Gene Selection of Microarray Data Based on Gene-to-Class Sensitivity Information

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fei; Sun, Wei; Ling, Qing-Hua

    2014-01-01

    To obtain predictive genes with lower redundancy and better interpretability, a hybrid gene selection method encoding prior information is proposed in this paper. To begin with, the prior information referred to as gene-to-class sensitivity (GCS) of all genes from microarray data is exploited by a single hidden layered feedforward neural network (SLFN). Then, to select more representative and lower redundant genes, all genes are grouped into some clusters by K-means method, and some low sensitive genes are filtered out according to their GCS values. Finally, a modified binary particle swarm optimization (BPSO) encoding the GCS information is proposed to perform further gene selection from the remainder genes. For considering the GCS information, the proposed method selects those genes highly correlated to sample classes. Thus, the low redundant gene subsets obtained by the proposed method also contribute to improve classification accuracy on microarray data. The experiments results on some open microarray data verify the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed approach. PMID:24844313

  14. Automated Solution-Phase Synthesis of Insect Glycans to Probe the Binding Affinity of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV)—a plant RNA virus transmitted exclusively by aphids—causes disease in multiple food crops. However, the aphid-virus interactions required for disease transmission are poorly understood. For virus transmission, PEMV binds to a heavily glycosylated receptor aminopeptidase N in the pea aphid gut and is transcytosed across the gut epithelium into the aphid body cavity prior to release in saliva as the aphid feeds. To investigate the role of glycans in PEMV–aphid interactions and explore the possibility of viral control through blocking a glycan interaction, we synthesized insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides by automated solution-phase synthesis. The route features a mannose building block with C-5 ester enforcing a β-linkage, which also provides a site for subsequent chain extension. The resulting insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides with fluorous tags were used in a fluorous microarray to analyze binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled PEMV; however, no specific binding between the insect glycan and PEMV was detected. To confirm these microarray results, we removed the fluorous tag from the trimannosides for isothermal titration calorimetry studies with unlabeled PEMV. The ITC studies confirmed the microarray results and suggested that this particular glycan–PEMV interaction is not involved in virus uptake and transport through the aphid. PMID:26457763

  15. Site-specific and covalent attachment of his-tagged proteins by chelation assisted photoimmobilization: a strategy for microarraying of protein ligands.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Emma M; Enander, Karin; Bui, Lan; Lundström, Ingemar; Konradsson, Peter; Liedberg, Bo

    2013-09-17

    A novel strategy for site-specific and covalent attachment of proteins has been developed, intended for robust and controllable immobilization of histidine (His)-tagged ligands in protein microarrays. The method is termed chelation assisted photoimmobilization (CAP) and was demonstrated using human IgG-Fc modified with C-terminal hexahistidines (His-IgGFc) as the ligand and protein A as the analyte. Alkanethiols terminated with either nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), benzophenone (BP), or oligo(ethylene glycol) were synthesized and mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were prepared on gold and thoroughly characterized by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), ellipsometry, and contact angle goniometry. In the process of CAP, NTA chelates Ni(2+) and the complex coordinates the His-tagged ligand in an oriented assembly. The ligand is then photoimmobilized via BP, which forms covalent bonds upon UV light activation. In the development of affinity biosensors and protein microarrays, site-specific attachment of ligands in a fashion where analyte binding sites are available is often preferred to random coupling. Analyte binding performance of ligands immobilized either by CAP or by standard amine coupling was characterized by surface plasmon resonance in combination with IRAS. The relative analyte response with randomly coupled ligand was 2.5 times higher than when site-specific attachment was used. This is a reminder that also when immobilizing ligands via residues far from the binding site, there are many other factors influencing availability and activity. Still, CAP provides a valuable expansion of protein immobilization techniques since it offers attractive microarraying possibilities amenable to applications within proteomics. PMID:24007525

  16. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood-brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus.

  17. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse.

    PubMed

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2016-03-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood-brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  18. DNA microarray-based experimental strategy for trustworthy expression profiling of the hippocampal genes by astaxanthin supplementation in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Yook, Jang Soo; Shibato, Junko; Rakwal, Randeep; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring astaxantin (ASX) is one of the noticeable carotenoid and dietary supplement, which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and neuroprotective effects in the brain through crossing the blood–brain barrier. Specially, we are interested in the role of ASX as a brain food. Although ASX has been suggested to have potential benefit to the brain function, the underlying molecular mechanisms and events mediating such effect remain unknown. Here we examined molecular factors in the hippocampus of adult mouse fed ASX diets (0.1% and 0.5% doses) using DNA microarray (Agilent 4 × 44 K whole mouse genome chip) analysis. In this study, we described in detail our experimental workflow and protocol, and validated quality controls with the housekeeping gene expression (Gapdh and Beta-actin) on the dye-swap based approach to advocate our microarray data, which have been uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus (accession number GSE62197) as a gene resource for the scientific community. This data will also form an important basis for further detailed experiments and bioinformatics analysis with an aim to unravel the potential molecular pathways or mechanisms underlying the positive effects of ASX supplementation on the brain, in particular the hippocampus. PMID:26981356

  19. Tissue Microarrays.

    PubMed

    Dancau, Ana-Maria; Simon, Ronald; Mirlacher, Martina; Sauter, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Modern next-generation sequencing and microarray technologies allow for the simultaneous analysis of all human genes on the DNA, RNA, miRNA, and methylation RNA level. Studies using such techniques have lead to the identification of hundreds of genes with a potential role in cancer or other diseases. The validation of all of these candidate genes requires in situ analysis of high numbers of clinical tissues samples. The tissue microarray technology greatly facilitates such analysis. In this method minute tissue samples (typically 0.6 mm in diameter) from up to 1000 different tissues can be analyzed on one microscope glass slide. All in situ methods suitable for histological studies can be applied to TMAs without major changes of protocols, including immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization, or RNA in situ hybridization. Because all tissues are analyzed simultaneously with the same batch of reagents, TMA studies provide an unprecedented degree of standardization, speed, and cost efficiency.

  20. Chromosome Microarray.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Over the last half century, knowledge about genetics, genetic testing, and its complexity has flourished. Completion of the Human Genome Project provided a foundation upon which the accuracy of genetics, genomics, and integration of bioinformatics knowledge and testing has grown exponentially. What is lagging, however, are efforts to reach and engage nurses about this rapidly changing field. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with several frequently ordered genetic tests including chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization followed by a comprehensive review of chromosome microarray. It shares the complexity of microarray including how testing is performed and results analyzed. A case report demonstrates how this technology is applied in clinical practice and reveals benefits and limitations of this scientific and bioinformatics genetic technology. Clinical implications for maternal-child nurses across practice levels are discussed. PMID:27276104

  1. Biophysical characterization of lectin-glycan interactions for therapeutics, vaccines and targeted drug-delivery.

    PubMed

    Christie, Michelle P; Toth, Istvan; Simerská, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Lectin-glycan interactions play a role in biological processes, host-pathogen interactions and in disease. A more detailed understanding of these interactions is not only useful for the elucidation of their biological function but can also be applied in immunology, drug development and delivery and diagnostics. We review some commonly used biophysical techniques for studying lectin-glycan interactions; namely: frontal affinity chromatography, glycan/lectin microarray, surface plasmon resonance, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescent assays, enzyme linked lectin sorbent assay and saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Each method is evaluated on efficiency, cost and throughput. We also consider the advantages and limitations of each technique and provide examples of their application in biology, drug discovery and delivery, immunology, glycoprofiling and biosensing. PMID:25531972

  2. Developments in the Identification of Glycan Biomarkers for the Detection of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ruhaak, L. Renee; Miyamoto, Suzanne; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in glycosylation readily occur in cancer and other disease states. Thanks to recent advances in the development of analytical techniques and instrumentation, especially in mass spectrometry, it is now possible to identify blood-derived glycan-based biomarkers using glycomics strategies. This review is an overview of the developments made in the search for glycan-based cancer biomarkers and the technologies currently in use. It is anticipated that the progressing instrumental and bioinformatics developments will allow the identification of relevant glycan biomarkers for the diagnosis, early detection, and monitoring of cancer treatment with sufficient sensitivity and specificity for clinical use. PMID:23365456

  3. The detection and discovery of glycan motifs in biological samples using lectins and antibodies: new methods and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Huiyuan; Hsueh, Peter; Kletter, Doron; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Recent research is uncovering unexpected ways that glycans contribute to biology, as well as new strategies for combatting disease using approaches involving glycans. To make full use of glycans for clinical applications, we need more detailed information on the location, nature, and dynamics of glycan expression in vivo. Such studies require the use of specimens acquired directly from patients. Effective studies of clinical specimens require low-volume assays, high precision measurements, and the ability to process many samples. Assays using affinity reagents—lectins and glycan-binding antibodies—can meet these requirements, but further developments are needed to make the methods routine and effective. Recent advances in the use of glycan-binding proteins could meet that need. The advances involve improved determination of specificity using glycan arrays; the availability of databases for mining and analyzing glycan array data; lectin engineering methods; and the ability to quantitatively interpret lectin measurements. Here we describe many of the challenges and opportunities involved in the application of these new approaches to the study of biological samples. The new tools hold promise for developing methods to improve the outcomes of patients afflicted with diseases characterized by aberrant glycan expression. PMID:25727148

  4. Plasmon waveguide resonance for sensing glycan-lectin interactions.

    PubMed

    Alves, Isabel; Kurylo, Ievgen; Coffinier, Yannick; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Zaitsev, Vladimir; Harté, Etienne; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2015-05-11

    Carbohydrate-modified interfaces have been shown to be valuable tools for the study of protein-glycan recognition events. Label-free approache such as plasmonic based techniques are particularly attractive. This paper describes a new analytical platform for the sensitive and selective screening of carbohydrate-lectin interactions using plasmon waveguide resonance. Planar optical waveguides (POW), consisting of glass prisms coated with silver (50 nm) and silica (460 nm) layers were derivatized with mannose or lactose moieties. The specific association of the resulting interface with selected lectins was assessed by following the changes in its plasmonic response. The immobilization strategy investigated in this work is based on the formation of a covalent bond between propargyl-functionalized glycans and surface-linked azide groups via a Cu(I) "click" chemistry. Optimization of the surface architecture through the introduction of an oligo(ethylene glycol) spacer between the plasmonic surface and the glycan ligands provided an interface which allowed screening of glycan-lectin interactions in a highly selective manner. The limit of detection (LOD) of this method for this particular application was found to be in the subnanomolar range (0.5 nM), showing it to constitute a promising analytical platform for future development and use in a pharmaceutical or biomedical setting.

  5. Characterization of the N-glycans of female Angiostrongylus cantonensis worms.

    PubMed

    Veríssimo, Carolina M; Morassutti, Alessandra L; von Itzstein, Mark; Sutov, Grigorij; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; McAtamney, Sarah; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Glycoconjugates play a crucial role in the host-parasite relationships of helminthic infections, including angiostrongyliasis. It has previously been shown that the antigenicity of proteins from female Angiostrongylus cantonensis worms may depend on their associated glycan moieties. Here, an N-glycan profile of A. cantonensis is reported. A total soluble extract (TE) was prepared from female A. cantonensis worms and was tested by western blot before and after glycan oxidation or N- and O-glycosidase treatment. The importance of N-glycans for the immunogenicity of A. cantonensis was demonstrated when deglycosylation of the TE with PNGase F completely abrogated IgG recognition. The TE was also fractionated using various lectin columns [Ulex europaeus (UEA), concanavalin A (Con A), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Triticum vulgaris (WGA) and Lycopersicon esculentum (LEA)], and then each fraction was digested with PNGase F. Released N-glycans were analyzed with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS. Complex-type, high mannose, and truncated glycan structures were identified in all five fractions. Sequential MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis of the major MS peaks identified complex-type structures, with a α1-6 fucosylated core and truncated antennas. Glycoproteins in the TE were labeled with BodipyAF558-SE dye for a lectin microarray analysis. Fluorescent images were analyzed with ProScanArray imaging software followed by statistical analysis. A total of 29 lectins showed positive binding to the TE. Of these, Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-I), PNA, and Wisteria floribunda (WFA), which recognize galactose (Gal) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), exhibited high affinity binding. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that female A. cantonensis worms have characteristic helminth N-glycans.

  6. Characterization of the N-glycans of female Angiostrongylus cantonensis worms.

    PubMed

    Veríssimo, Carolina M; Morassutti, Alessandra L; von Itzstein, Mark; Sutov, Grigorij; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; McAtamney, Sarah; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Graeff-Teixeira, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Glycoconjugates play a crucial role in the host-parasite relationships of helminthic infections, including angiostrongyliasis. It has previously been shown that the antigenicity of proteins from female Angiostrongylus cantonensis worms may depend on their associated glycan moieties. Here, an N-glycan profile of A. cantonensis is reported. A total soluble extract (TE) was prepared from female A. cantonensis worms and was tested by western blot before and after glycan oxidation or N- and O-glycosidase treatment. The importance of N-glycans for the immunogenicity of A. cantonensis was demonstrated when deglycosylation of the TE with PNGase F completely abrogated IgG recognition. The TE was also fractionated using various lectin columns [Ulex europaeus (UEA), concanavalin A (Con A), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Triticum vulgaris (WGA) and Lycopersicon esculentum (LEA)], and then each fraction was digested with PNGase F. Released N-glycans were analyzed with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS. Complex-type, high mannose, and truncated glycan structures were identified in all five fractions. Sequential MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis of the major MS peaks identified complex-type structures, with a α1-6 fucosylated core and truncated antennas. Glycoproteins in the TE were labeled with BodipyAF558-SE dye for a lectin microarray analysis. Fluorescent images were analyzed with ProScanArray imaging software followed by statistical analysis. A total of 29 lectins showed positive binding to the TE. Of these, Bandeiraea simplicifolia (BS-I), PNA, and Wisteria floribunda (WFA), which recognize galactose (Gal) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), exhibited high affinity binding. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that female A. cantonensis worms have characteristic helminth N-glycans. PMID:27107931

  7. Microarray platform for omics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecklenburg, Michael; Xie, Bin

    2001-09-01

    Microarray technology has revolutionized genetic analysis. However, limitations in genome analysis has lead to renewed interest in establishing 'omic' strategies. As we enter the post-genomic era, new microarray technologies are needed to address these new classes of 'omic' targets, such as proteins, as well as lipids and carbohydrates. We have developed a microarray platform that combines self- assembling monolayers with the biotin-streptavidin system to provide a robust, versatile immobilization scheme. A hydrophobic film is patterned on the surface creating an array of tension wells that eliminates evaporation effects thereby reducing the shear stress to which biomolecules are exposed to during immobilization. The streptavidin linker layer makes it possible to adapt and/or develop microarray based assays using virtually any class of biomolecules including: carbohydrates, peptides, antibodies, receptors, as well as them ore traditional DNA based arrays. Our microarray technology is designed to furnish seamless compatibility across the various 'omic' platforms by providing a common blueprint for fabricating and analyzing arrays. The prototype microarray uses a microscope slide footprint patterned with 2 by 96 flat wells. Data on the microarray platform will be presented.

  8. Recruiting the Host’s Immune System To Target Helicobacter pylori’s Surface Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Kaewsapsak, Pornchai; Esonu, Onyinyechi; Dube, Danielle H.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the increased prevalence of bacterial strains that are resistant to existing antibiotics, there is an urgent need for new antibacterial strategies. Bacterial glycans are an attractive target for new treatments, as they are frequently linked to pathogenesis and contain distinctive structures that are absent in humans. We set out to develop a novel targeting strategy based on surface glycans present on the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori (Hp). In this study, metabolic labeling of bacterial glycans with an azide-containing sugar allowed selective delivery of immune stimulants to azide-covered Hp. We established that Hp’s surface glycans are labeled by treatment with the metabolic substrate peracetylated N-azidoacetylglucosamine (Ac4GlcNAz). By contrast, mammalian cells treated with Ac4GlcNAz exhibit no incorporation of the chemical label within extracellular glycans. We further demonstrated that the Staudinger ligation between azides and phosphines proceeds under acidic conditions with only a small loss of efficiency. We then targeted azide-covered Hp with phosphines conjugated to the immune stimulant 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP), a compound capable of directing a host immune response against these cells. Finally, we report that immune effector cells catalyze selective damage in vitro to DNP-covered Hp in the presence of anti-DNP antibodies. The technology reported herein represents a novel strategy to target Hp based on its glycans. PMID:23512824

  9. Microarrays under the microscope

    PubMed Central

    Wildsmith, S E; Elcock, F J

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology is a rapidly advancing area, which is gaining popularity in many biological disciplines from drug target identification to predictive toxicology. Over the past few years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of methods and techniques available for carrying out this form of gene expression analysis. The techniques and associated peripherals, such as slide types, deposition methods, robotics, and scanning equipment, are undergoing constant improvement, helping to drive the technology forward in terms of robustness and ease of use. These rapid developments, combined with the number of options available and the associated hyperbole, can prove daunting for the new user. This review aims to guide the researcher through the various steps of conducting microarray experiments, from initial strategy to analysing the data, with critical examination of the benefits and disadvantages along the way. PMID:11212888

  10. Mucin glycan foraging in the human gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Tailford, Louise E.; Crost, Emmanuelle H.; Kavanaugh, Devon; Juge, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The availability of host and dietary carbohydrates in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a key role in shaping the structure-function of the microbiota. In particular, some gut bacteria have the ability to forage on glycans provided by the mucus layer covering the GI tract. The O-glycan structures present in mucin are diverse and complex, consisting predominantly of core 1-4 mucin-type O-glycans containing α- and β- linked N-acetyl-galactosamine, galactose and N-acetyl-glucosamine. These core structures are further elongated and frequently modified by fucose and sialic acid sugar residues via α1,2/3/4 and α2,3/6 linkages, respectively. The ability to metabolize these mucin O-linked oligosaccharides is likely to be a key factor in determining which bacterial species colonize the mucosal surface. Due to their proximity to the immune system, mucin-degrading bacteria are in a prime location to influence the host response. However, despite the growing number of bacterial genome sequences available from mucin degraders, our knowledge on the structural requirements for mucin degradation by gut bacteria remains fragmented. This is largely due to the limited number of functionally characterized enzymes and the lack of studies correlating the specificity of these enzymes with the ability of the strain to degrade and utilize mucin and mucin glycans. This review focuses on recent findings unraveling the molecular strategies used by mucin-degrading bacteria to utilize host glycans, adapt to the mucosal environment, and influence human health. PMID:25852737

  11. Glycan variation and evolution in the eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Anthony P; Berry, Monica

    2015-07-01

    In this review, we document the evolution of common glycan structures in the eukaryotes, and illustrate the considerable variety of oligosaccharides existing in these organisms. We focus on the families of N- and O-glycans, glycosphingolipids, glycosaminoglycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors, sialic acids (Sias), and cytoplasmic and nuclear glycans. We also outline similar and divergent aspects of the glycans during evolution within the groups, which include inter- and intraspecies differences, molecular mimicry, viral glycosylation adaptations, glycosyltransferase specificity relating to function, and the natural dynamism powering these events. Finally, we present an overview of the patterns of glycosylation found within the groups comprising the Eukaryota, namely the Deuterostomia, Fungi, Viridiplantae, Nematoda, and Arthropoda.

  12. Glycan Engineering for Cell and Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Matthew E.; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-surface glycans are a diverse class of macromolecules that participate in many key biological processes, including cell-cell communication, development, and disease progression. Thus, the ability to modulate the structures of glycans on cell surfaces provides a powerful means not only to understand fundamental processes but also to direct activity and elicit desired cellular responses. Here, we describe methods to sculpt glycans on cell surfaces and highlight recent successes in which artificially engineered glycans have been employed to control biological outcomes such as the immune response and stem cell fate. PMID:26933739

  13. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  14. The logic of automated glycan assembly.

    PubMed

    Seeberger, Peter H

    2015-05-19

    Carbohydrates are the most abundant biopolymers on earth and part of every living creature. Glycans are essential as materials for nutrition and for information transfer in biological processes. To date, in few cases a detailed correlation between glycan structure and glycan function has been established. A molecular understanding of glycan function will require pure glycans for biological, immunological, and structural studies. Given the immense structural complexity of glycans found in living organisms and the lack of amplification methods or expression systems, chemical synthesis is the only means to access usable quantities of pure glycan molecules. While the solid-phase synthesis of DNA and peptides has become routine for decades, access to glycans has been technically difficult, time-consuming and confined to a few expert laboratories. In this Account, the development of a comprehensive approach to the automated synthesis of all classes of mammalian glycans, including glycosaminoglycans and glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchors, as well as bacterial and plant carbohydrates is described. A conceptual advance concerning the logic of glycan assembly was required in order to enable automated execution of the synthetic process. Based on the central glycosidic bond forming reaction, a general concept for the protecting groups and leaving groups has been developed. Building blocks that can be procured on large scale, are stable for prolonged periods of time, but upon activation result in high yields and selectivities were identified. A coupling-capping and deprotection cycle was invented that can be executed by an automated synthesis instrument. Straightforward postsynthetic protocols for cleavage from the solid support as well as purification of conjugation-ready oligosaccharides have been established. Introduction of methods to install selectively a wide variety of glycosidic linkages has enabled the rapid assembly of linear and branched oligo- and

  15. Gene expression profiling and identification of resistance genes to aspergillus flavus infection in peanut through EST and microarray strategies.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus infect peanut seeds and produce aflatoxins, which are associated with various diseases in domestic animals and humans throughout the world. The most cost-effective strategy to minimize aflatoxin contamination involves the development of peanut cultivars that are...

  16. Aptamer Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Angel-Syrett, Heather; Collett, Jim; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2009-01-02

    In vitro selection can yield specific, high-affinity aptamers. We and others have devised methods for the automated selection of aptamers, and have begun to use these reagents for the construction of arrays. Arrayed aptamers have proven to be almost as sensitive as their solution phase counterparts, and when ganged together can provide both specific and general diagnostic signals for proteins and other analytes. We describe here technical details regarding the production and processing of aptamer microarrays, including blocking, washing, drying, and scanning. We will also discuss the challenges involved in developing standardized and reproducible methods for binding and quantitating protein targets. While signals from fluorescent analytes or sandwiches are typically captured, it has proven possible for immobilized aptamers to be uniquely coupled to amplification methods not available to protein reagents, thus allowing for protein-binding signals to be greatly amplified. Into the future, many of the biosensor methods described in this book can potentially be adapted to array formats, thus further expanding the utility of and applications for aptamer arrays.

  17. Glycan Moieties as Bait to Fish Plasma Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fei; Zhao, Qun; Sui, Zhigang; Liang, Yu; Jiang, Hao; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-05-17

    Plasma membrane proteome analysis is of significance for screening candidate biomarkers and drug targets. However, due to their low abundance and lack of specific groups that can enable their capture, the plasma membrane proteins (PMPs) are under-represented. On the basis of the fact that PMPs are embedded in or anchored to the phospholipid bilayer of the plasma membrane and the glycan moieties of proteins and lipids located on the plasma membrane are exposed outside of the cell surface, we proposed a strategy to capture PMPs, termed as glycan moieties-directed PMPs enrichment (GMDPE). With the glycan moieties exposed outside of the cells as bait to ensure the selectivity and the phospholipid bilayer as raft to provide the sensitivity, we applied this strategy into the plasma membrane proteome analysis of HeLa cells, and in total, 772 PMPs were identified, increased by 4.5 times compared to those identified by the reported cell surface biotinylation method. Notably, among them, 86 CD antigens and 16 ion channel proteins were confidently identified. All these results demonstrated that our proposed approach has great potential in the large scale plasma membrane proteome profiling.

  18. The HIV glycan shield as a target for broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Doores, Katie J

    2015-12-01

    The HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the sole target for HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). HIV Env is one of the most heavily glycosylated proteins known, with approximately half of its mass consisting of host-derived N-linked glycans. The high density of glycans creates a shield that impedes antibody recognition but, critically, some of the most potent and broadly active bnAbs have evolved to recognize epitopes formed by these glycans. Although the virus hijacks the host protein synthesis and glycosylation machinery to generate glycosylated HIV Env, studies have shown that HIV Env glycosylation diverges from that typically observed on host-derived glycoproteins. In particular, the high density of glycans leads to a nonself motif of underprocessed oligomannose-type glycans that forms the target of some of the most broad and potent HIV bnAbs. This review discusses the changing perception of the HIV glycan shield, and summarizes the protein-directed and cell-directed factors controlling HIV Env glycosylation that impact on HIV bnAb recognition and HIV vaccine design strategies.

  19. Analysis of zwitterionic and anionic N-linked glycans from invertebrates and protists by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B H

    2016-06-01

    Glycomic analyses over the years have revealed that non-vertebrate eukaryotes express oligosaccharides with inorganic and zwitterionic modifications which are either occurring in different contexts as compared to, or are absent from, mammals. Examples of anionic N-glycans (carrying sulphate or phosphate) are known from amoebae, fungi, molluscs and insects, while zwitterionic modifications by phosphorylcholine, phosphoethanolamine and aminoethylphosphonate occur on N-, O- and lipid-linked glycans from trichomonads, annelids, fungi, molluscs, insects, cestodes and nematodes. For detection of zwitterionic and anionic glycans, mass spectrometry has been a key method, but their ionic character affects the preparation and purification; therefore, as part of a glycomic strategy, the possibility of their presence must be considered in advance. On the other hand, their ionisation and fragmentation in positive and negative ion mode mass spectrometry as well as specific chemical or enzymatic treatments can prove diagnostic to their analysis. In our laboratory, we combine solid-phase extraction, reversed and normal phase HPLC, MALDI-TOF MS, exoglycosidase digests and hydrofluoric acid treatment to reveal N-glycans modified with anionic and zwitterionic moieties in a wide range of organisms. It is to be anticipated that, as more species are glycomically analysed, zwitterionic and anionic modifications of N-glycans will prove rather widespread. This knowledge is - in the longer term - then the basis for understanding the function of this cornucopia of glycan modifications. PMID:26899268

  20. Analysis of zwitterionic and anionic N-linked glycans from invertebrates and protists by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B H

    2016-06-01

    Glycomic analyses over the years have revealed that non-vertebrate eukaryotes express oligosaccharides with inorganic and zwitterionic modifications which are either occurring in different contexts as compared to, or are absent from, mammals. Examples of anionic N-glycans (carrying sulphate or phosphate) are known from amoebae, fungi, molluscs and insects, while zwitterionic modifications by phosphorylcholine, phosphoethanolamine and aminoethylphosphonate occur on N-, O- and lipid-linked glycans from trichomonads, annelids, fungi, molluscs, insects, cestodes and nematodes. For detection of zwitterionic and anionic glycans, mass spectrometry has been a key method, but their ionic character affects the preparation and purification; therefore, as part of a glycomic strategy, the possibility of their presence must be considered in advance. On the other hand, their ionisation and fragmentation in positive and negative ion mode mass spectrometry as well as specific chemical or enzymatic treatments can prove diagnostic to their analysis. In our laboratory, we combine solid-phase extraction, reversed and normal phase HPLC, MALDI-TOF MS, exoglycosidase digests and hydrofluoric acid treatment to reveal N-glycans modified with anionic and zwitterionic moieties in a wide range of organisms. It is to be anticipated that, as more species are glycomically analysed, zwitterionic and anionic modifications of N-glycans will prove rather widespread. This knowledge is - in the longer term - then the basis for understanding the function of this cornucopia of glycan modifications.

  1. Glycans In The Immune system and The Altered Glycan Theory of Autoimmunity: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Maverakis, Emanual; Kim, Kyoungmi; Shimoda, Michiko; Gershwin, M. Eric; Patel, Forum; Wilken, Reason; Raychaudhuri, Siba; Ruhaak, L. Renee; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2015-01-01

    Herein we will review the role of glycans in determining the functionality and specificity of various components of the immune system. Specific topics covered include: the specific glycosylation sites of IgE, IgM, IgD, IgE, IgA, and IgG; how glycans can encode “self” identity by functioning as either danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) or self-associated molecular patterns (SAMPs); the role of glycans as markers of protein integrity and age; how the glycocalyx can dictate the migration pattern of immune cells; and how the combination of Fc N-glycans and Ig isotype dictate the effector function of immunoglobulins. We speculate that the latter may be responsible for the well-documented association between alterations of the serum glycome and autoimmunity. Due to technological limitations, the extent of these autoimmune-associated glycan alterations and their role in disease pathophysiology has not been fully elucidated to date. Thus, we also review the current technologies available for glycan analysis, placing an emphasis on Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM), a rapid high-throughput technology that has great potential for glycan biomarker research. Finally, we put forth The Altered Glycan Theory of Autoimmunity, which states that each autoimmune disease will have a unique glycan signature characterized by the site-specific relative abundances of individual glycan structures on immune cells and serum proteins, especially the site-specific glycosylation patterns of specific antibody classes and subclasses. PMID:25578468

  2. Therapeutic Targeting of Siglecs using Antibody- and Glycan-Based Approaches.

    PubMed

    Angata, Takashi; Nycholat, Corwin M; Macauley, Matthew S

    2015-10-01

    The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs) are a family of immunomodulatory receptors whose functions are regulated by their glycan ligands. Siglecs are attractive therapeutic targets because of their cell type-specific expression pattern, endocytic properties, high expression on certain lymphomas/leukemias, and ability to modulate receptor signaling. Siglec-targeting approaches with therapeutic potential encompass antibody- and glycan-based strategies. Several antibody-based therapies are in clinical trials and continue to be developed for the treatment of lymphoma/leukemia and autoimmune disease, while the therapeutic potential of glycan-based strategies for cargo delivery and immunomodulation is a promising new approach. Here we review these strategies with special emphasis on emerging approaches and disease areas that may benefit from targeting the Siglec family. PMID:26435210

  3. Improved method for drawing of a glycan map, and the first page of glycan atlas, which is a compilation of glycan maps for a whole organism.

    PubMed

    Natsuka, Shunji; Masuda, Mayumi; Sumiyoshi, Wataru; Nakakita, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Glycan Atlas is a set of glycan maps over the whole body of an organism. The glycan map that includes data of glycan structure and quantity displays micro-heterogeneity of the glycans in a tissue, an organ, or cells. The two-dimensional glycan mapping is widely used for structure analysis of N-linked oligosaccharides on glycoproteins. In this study we developed a comprehensive method for the mapping of both N- and O-glycans with and without sialic acid. The mapping data of 150 standard pyridylaminated glycans were collected. The empirical additivity rule which was proposed in former reports was able to adapt for this extended glycan map. The adapted rule is that the elution time of pyridylamino glycans on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is expected to be the simple sum of the partial elution times assigned to each monosaccharide residue. The comprehensive mapping method developed in this study is a powerful tool for describing the micro-heterogeneity of the glycans. Furthermore, we prepared 42 pyridylamino (PA-) glycans from human serum and were able to draw the map of human serum N- and O-glycans as an initial step of Glycan Atlas editing.

  4. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.898 Bakers yeast glycan. Bakers yeast glycan may be safely used in food in accordance with the following conditions: (a) Bakers yeast glycan is the comminuted, washed, pasteurized,...

  5. Profiling of core fucosylated N-glycans using a novel bacterial lectin that specifically recognizes α1,6 fucosylated chitobiose

    PubMed Central

    Vainauskas, Saulius; Duke, Rebecca M.; McFarland, James; McClung, Colleen; Ruse, Cristian; Taron, Christopher H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel fucose-binding lectin (SL2-1) from the bacterium Streptomyces rapamycinicus was identified by analysis of metagenomic DNA sequences. SL2-1 belongs to a new group of bacterial fucose-specific lectins that have no similarity to known bacterial fucose-binding proteins, but are related to certain eukaryotic fucose-binding lectins. The 17 kDa protein was expressed recombinantly in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Glycan microarray analysis with fluorescently labeled recombinant SL2-1 demonstrated its ability to bind to core α1-6 fucosylated N-glycans, but not to core α1-3 fucosylated N-glycans, or other α1-2, α1-3 and α1-4 fucosylated oligosaccharides. The minimal high affinity binding epitope of SL2-1 was α1-6 fucosylated di-n-acetylchitobiose. The recombinant lectin was efficient in detection of N-glycan core fucosylation using lectin blotting and lectin ELISA assays. Finally, a workflow using SL2-1 for selective and quantitative profiling of core fucosylated N-glycans using UPLC-HILIC-FLR analysis was established. The approach was validated for selective capture and analysis of core fucosylated N-glycans present in complex glycan mixtures derived from mammalian serum IgG. PMID:27678371

  6. Combining 3D structure with glycan array data provides insight into the origin of glycan specificity.

    PubMed

    Grant, Oliver C; Tessier, Matthew B; Meche, Lawrence; Mahal, Lara K; Foley, Bethany L; Woods, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Defining how a glycan-binding protein (GBP) specifically selects its cognate glycan from among the ensemble of glycans within the cellular glycome is an area of intense study. Powerful insight into recognition mechanisms can be gained from 3D structures of GBPs complexed to glycans; however, such structures remain difficult to obtain experimentally. Here an automated 3D structure generation technique, called computational carbohydrate grafting, is combined with the wealth of specificity information available from glycan array screening. Integration of the array data with modeling and crystallography allows generation of putative co-complex structures that can be objectively assessed and iteratively altered until a high level of agreement with experiment is achieved. Given an accurate model of the co-complexes, grafting is also able to discern which binding determinants are active when multiple potential determinants are present within a glycan. In some cases, induced fit in the protein or glycan was necessary to explain the observed specificity, while in other examples a revised definition of the minimal binding determinants was required. When applied to a collection of 10 GBP-glycan complexes, for which crystallographic and array data have been reported, grafting provided a structural rationalization for the binding specificity of >90% of 1223 arrayed glycans. A webtool that enables researchers to perform computational carbohydrate grafting is available at www.glycam.org/gr (accessed 03 March 2016).

  7. Combining 3D structure with glycan array data provides insight into the origin of glycan specificity.

    PubMed

    Grant, Oliver C; Tessier, Matthew B; Meche, Lawrence; Mahal, Lara K; Foley, Bethany L; Woods, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    Defining how a glycan-binding protein (GBP) specifically selects its cognate glycan from among the ensemble of glycans within the cellular glycome is an area of intense study. Powerful insight into recognition mechanisms can be gained from 3D structures of GBPs complexed to glycans; however, such structures remain difficult to obtain experimentally. Here an automated 3D structure generation technique, called computational carbohydrate grafting, is combined with the wealth of specificity information available from glycan array screening. Integration of the array data with modeling and crystallography allows generation of putative co-complex structures that can be objectively assessed and iteratively altered until a high level of agreement with experiment is achieved. Given an accurate model of the co-complexes, grafting is also able to discern which binding determinants are active when multiple potential determinants are present within a glycan. In some cases, induced fit in the protein or glycan was necessary to explain the observed specificity, while in other examples a revised definition of the minimal binding determinants was required. When applied to a collection of 10 GBP-glycan complexes, for which crystallographic and array data have been reported, grafting provided a structural rationalization for the binding specificity of >90% of 1223 arrayed glycans. A webtool that enables researchers to perform computational carbohydrate grafting is available at www.glycam.org/gr (accessed 03 March 2016). PMID:26911287

  8. Statistical analysis of the Bacterial Carbohydrate Structure Data Base (BCSDB): Characteristics and diversity of bacterial carbohydrates in comparison with mammalian glycans

    PubMed Central

    Herget, Stephan; Toukach, Philip V; Ranzinger, René; Hull, William E; Knirel, Yuriy A; von der Lieth, Claus-Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Background There are considerable differences between bacterial and mammalian glycans. In contrast to most eukaryotic carbohydrates, bacterial glycans are often composed of repeating units with diverse functions ranging from structural reinforcement to adhesion, colonization and camouflage. Since bacterial glycans are typically displayed at the cell surface, they can interact with the environment and, therefore, have significant biomedical importance. Results The sequence characteristics of glycans (monosaccharide composition, modifications, and linkage patterns) for the higher bacterial taxonomic classes have been examined and compared with the data for mammals, with both similarities and unique features becoming evident. Compared to mammalian glycans, the bacterial glycans deposited in the current databases have a more than ten-fold greater diversity at the monosaccharide level, and the disaccharide pattern space is approximately nine times larger. Specific bacterial subclasses exhibit characteristic glycans which can be distinguished on the basis of distinctive structural features or sequence properties. Conclusion For the first time a systematic database analysis of the bacterial glycome has been performed. This study summarizes the current knowledge of bacterial glycan architecture and diversity and reveals putative targets for the rational design and development of therapeutic intervention strategies by comparing bacterial and mammalian glycans. PMID:18694500

  9. Structural Feature Ions for Distinguishing N- and O-Linked Glycan Isomers by LC-ESI-IT MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everest-Dass, Arun V.; Abrahams, Jodie L.; Kolarich, Daniel; Packer, Nicolle H.; Campbell, Matthew P.

    2013-06-01

    Glycomics is the comprehensive study of glycan expression in an organism, cell, or tissue that relies on effective analytical technologies to understand glycan structure-function relationships. Owing to the macro- and micro-heterogeneity of oligosaccharides, detailed structure characterization has required an orthogonal approach, such as a combination of specific exoglycosidase digestions, LC-MS/MS, and the development of bioinformatic resources to comprehensively profile a complex biological sample. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) has emerged as a key tool in the structural analysis of oligosaccharides because of its high sensitivity, resolution, and robustness. Here, we present a strategy that uses LC-ESI-MS/MS to characterize over 200 N- and O-glycans from human saliva glycoproteins, complemented by sequential exoglycosidase treatment, to further verify the annotated glycan structures. Fragment-specific substructure diagnostic ions were collated from an extensive screen of the literature available on the detailed structural characterization of oligosaccharides and, together with other specific glycan structure feature ions derived from cross-ring and glycosidic-linkage fragmentation, were used to characterize the glycans and differentiate isomers. The availability of such annotated mass spectrometric fragmentation spectral libraries of glycan structures, together with such substructure diagnostic ions, will be key inputs for the future development of the automated elucidation of oligosaccharide structures from MS/MS data.

  10. Solid-phase glycan isolation for glycomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuang; Zhang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most significant protein PTMs. The biological activities of proteins are dramatically changed by the glycans associated with them. Thus, structural analysis of the glycans of glycoproteins in complex biological or clinical samples is critical in correlation with the functions of glycans with diseases. Profiling of glycans by HPLC-MS is a commonly used technique in analyzing glycan structures and quantifying their relative abundance in different biological systems. Methods relied on MS require isolation of glycans from negligible salts and other contaminant ions since salts and ions may interfere with the glycans, resulting in poor glycan ionization. To accomplish those objectives, glycan isolation and clean-up methods including SPE, liquid-phase extraction, chromatography, and electrophoresis have been developed. Traditionally, glycans are isolated from proteins or peptides using a combination of hydrophobic and hydrophilic columns: proteins and peptides remain on hydrophobic absorbent while glycans, salts, and other hydrophilic reagents are collected as flowthrough. The glycans in the flowthrough are then purified through graphite-activated carbon column by hydrophilic interaction LC. Yet, the drawback in these affinity-based approaches is nonspecific binding. As a result, chemical methods by hydrazide or oxime have been developed for solid-phase isolation of glycans with high specificity and yield. Combined with high-resolution MS, specific glycan isolation techniques provide tremendous potentials as useful tools for glycomics analysis. PMID:23090885

  11. Microarrays, Integrated Analytical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combinatorial chemistry is used to find materials that form sensor microarrays. This book discusses the fundamentals, and then proceeds to the many applications of microarrays, from measuring gene expression (DNA microarrays) to protein-protein interactions, peptide chemistry, carbodhydrate chemistry, electrochemical detection, and microfluidics.

  12. Manufacturing of microarrays.

    PubMed

    Petersen, David W; Kawasaki, Ernest S

    2007-01-01

    DNA microarray technology has become a powerful tool in the arsenal of the molecular biologist. Capitalizing on high precision robotics and the wealth of DNA sequences annotated from the genomes of a large number of organisms, the manufacture of microarrays is now possible for the average academic laboratory with the funds and motivation. Microarray production requires attention to both biological and physical resources, including DNA libraries, robotics, and qualified personnel. While the fabrication of microarrays is a very labor-intensive process, production of quality microarrays individually tailored on a project-by-project basis will help researchers shed light on future scientific questions.

  13. Novel 3-Dimensional Dendrimer Platform for Glycolipid Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zhou, Xichun

    2011-01-01

    Glycolipids are important biological molecules that modulate cellular recognitions and pathogen adhesions. In this paper, we report a sensitive glycolipid microarray for non-covalently immobilizing glycolipids on a microarray substrate and we perform a set of immunoassays to explore glycolipid-protein interactions. This substrate utilizes a three-dimensional hydrazide-functionalized dendrimer monolayer attached onto a microscopic glass surface, which possesses the characteristics to adsorb glycoliplids non-covalently and facilitates multivalent attributes on the substrate surface. In the proof-of-concept experiments, gangliosides such as GM1, FucGM1, GM3, GD1b, GT1b, and GQ1b, and a lipoarabinomannan were tested on the substrate and interrogated with toxins and antibodies. The resulting glycolipid microarrays exhibited hypersensitivity and specificity for detection of glycolipid-protein interactions. In particular, a robust and specific binding of a pentameric cholera toxin B subunit to the GM1 glycolipid spotted on the array has demonstrated its superiority in sensitivity and specificity. In addition, this glycolipid microarray substrate was used to detect lipoarabinomannan in buffer within a limit-of-detection of 125 ng/mL. Furthermore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) Lipoarabinomannan was tested in human urine specimens on this platform, which can effectively identify urine samples either infected or not infected with Mtb. The results of this work suggest the possibility of using this glycolipid microarray platform to fabricate glycoconjugate microarrays, which includes free glycans and glycolipids and potential application in detection of pathogen and toxin. PMID:21820887

  14. Plasma Anti-Glycan Antibody Profiles Associated with Nickel level in Urine.

    PubMed

    Vuskovic, Marko; Barbuti, Anna-Maria; Goldsmith-Rooney, Emma; Glassman, Laura; Bovin, Nicolai; Pass, Harvey; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng; Chen, Meichi; Yan, Bing; Niu, Jingping; Qu, Qingshan; Costa, Max; Huflejt, Margaret

    2013-12-30

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are widely used in industrial and commercial products including household and cooking utensils, jewelry, dental appliances and implants. Occupational exposure to nickel is associated with an increased risk for lung and nasal cancers, is the most common cause of contact dermatitis and has an extensive effect on the immune system. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (i) to evaluate immune response to the occupational exposure to nickel measured by the presence of anti-glycan antibodies (AGA) using a new biomarker-discovery platform based on printed glycan arrays (PGA), and (ii) to evaluate and compile a sequence of bioinformatics and statistical methods which are specifically relevant to PGA-derived information and to identification of putative "Ni toxicity signature". The PGAs are similar to DNA microarrays, but contain deposits of various carbohydrates (glycans) instead of spotted DNAs. The study uses data derived from a set of 89 plasma specimens and their corresponding demographic information. The study population includes three subgroups: subjects directly exposed to Nickel that work in a refinery, subjects environmentally exposed to Nickel that live in a city where the refinery is located and subjects that live in a remote location. The paper describes the following sequence of nine data processing and analysis steps: (1) Analysis of inter-array reproducibility based on benchmark sera; (2) Analysis of intra-array reproducibility; (3) Screening of data - rejecting glycans which result in low intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), high coefficient of variation and low fluorescent intensity; (4) Analysis of inter-slide bias and choice of data normalization technique; (5) Determination of discriminatory subsamples based on multiple bootstrap tests; (6) Determination of the optimal signature size (cardinality of selected feature set) based on multiple cross-validation tests; (7) Identification of the top discriminatory glycans and their

  15. The Sweet Side of Immune Evasion: Role of Glycans in the Mechanisms of Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Nardy, Ana Flávia Fernandes Ribas; Freire-de-Lima, Leonardo; Freire-de-Lima, Célio Geraldo; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Glycans are part of the essential components of a cell. These compounds play a fundamental role in several physiopathological processes, including cell differentiation, adhesion, motility, signal transduction, host–pathogen interactions, tumor cell invasion, and metastasis development. Glycans are also able to exert control over the changes in tumor immunogenecity, interfering with tumor editing events and leading to immune-resistant cancer cells. The involvement of glycans in cancer progression is related to glycosylation alterations. Understanding such changes is, therefore, extremely useful to set the stage for their use as biomarkers, improving the diagnostics and therapeutic strategies. Herein, we discuss the basis of how modifications in glycosylation patterns may contribute to cancer genesis and progression as well as their importance in oncology field. PMID:27014629

  16. DNA Microarrays in Herbal Drug Research

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Preeti; Joshi, Kalpana; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2006-01-01

    Natural products are gaining increased applications in drug discovery and development. Being chemically diverse they are able to modulate several targets simultaneously in a complex system. Analysis of gene expression becomes necessary for better understanding of molecular mechanisms. Conventional strategies for expression profiling are optimized for single gene analysis. DNA microarrays serve as suitable high throughput tool for simultaneous analysis of multiple genes. Major practical applicability of DNA microarrays remains in DNA mutation and polymorphism analysis. This review highlights applications of DNA microarrays in pharmacodynamics, pharmacogenomics, toxicogenomics and quality control of herbal drugs and extracts. PMID:17173108

  17. Notable Aspects of Glycan-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    This mini review highlights several interesting aspects of glycan-mediated interactions that are common between cells, bacteria, and viruses. Glycans are ubiquitously found on all living cells, and in the extracellular milieu of multicellular organisms. They are known to mediate initial binding and recognition events of both immune cells and pathogens with their target cells or tissues. The host target tissues are hidden under a layer of secreted glycosylated decoy targets. In addition, pathogens can utilize and display host glycans to prevent identification as foreign by the host's immune system (molecular mimicry). Both the host and pathogens continually evolve. The host evolves to prevent infection and the pathogens evolve to evade host defenses. Many pathogens express both glycan-binding proteins and glycosidases. Interestingly, these proteins are often located at the tip of elongated protrusions in bacteria, or in the leading edge of the cell. Glycan-protein interactions have low affinity and, as a result, multivalent interactions are often required to achieve biologically relevant binding. These enable dynamic forms of adhesion mechanisms, reviewed here, and include rolling (cells), stick and roll (bacteria) or surfacing (viruses). PMID:26340640

  18. Notable Aspects of Glycan-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    This mini review highlights several interesting aspects of glycan-mediated interactions that are common between cells, bacteria, and viruses. Glycans are ubiquitously found on all living cells, and in the extracellular milieu of multicellular organisms. They are known to mediate initial binding and recognition events of both immune cells and pathogens with their target cells or tissues. The host target tissues are hidden under a layer of secreted glycosylated decoy targets. In addition, pathogens can utilize and display host glycans to prevent identification as foreign by the host’s immune system (molecular mimicry). Both the host and pathogens continually evolve. The host evolves to prevent infection and the pathogens evolve to evade host defenses. Many pathogens express both glycan-binding proteins and glycosidases. Interestingly, these proteins are often located at the tip of elongated protrusions in bacteria, or in the leading edge of the cell. Glycan-protein interactions have low affinity and, as a result, multivalent interactions are often required to achieve biologically relevant binding. These enable dynamic forms of adhesion mechanisms, reviewed here, and include rolling (cells), stick and roll (bacteria) or surfacing (viruses). PMID:26340640

  19. Glycans in Medicinal Chemistry: An Underexploited Resource.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2015-08-01

    The biological relevance of glycans as mediators of key physiological processes, including disease-related mechanisms, makes them attractive targets for a wide range of medical applications. Despite their important biological roles, especially as molecular recognition elements, carbohydrates have not been fully exploited as therapeutics mainly due to the scarcity of structure-activity correlations and their non-drug-like properties. A more detailed understanding of the complex carbohydrate structures and their associated functions should contribute to the development of new glycan-based pharmaceuticals. Recent significant progress in oligosaccharide synthesis and chemical glycobiology has renewed the interest of the medicinal chemistry community in carbohydrates. This promises to increase our possibilities to harness them in drug discovery efforts for the development of new and more effective, synthetic glycan-based therapeutics and vaccines.

  20. Exploring the specificities of glycan-binding proteins using glycan array data and the GlycoSearch software

    PubMed Central

    Kletter, Doron; Curnutte, Bryan; Maupin, Kevin; Bern, Marshall; Haab, Brian B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The glycan array is a powerful tool for investigating the specificities of glycan-binding proteins. By incubating a glycan-binding protein on a glycan array, the relative binding to hundreds of different oligosaccharides can be quantified in parallel. Based on these data, much information can be obtained about the preference of a glycan-binding protein for specific subcomponents of oligosaccharides, or motifs. In many cases the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data can be time consuming and imprecise if done manually. Recently we developed software, called GlycoSearch, to facilitate the analysis and interpretation of glycan array data based on the previously developed methods called Motif Segregation and Outlier Motif Analysis. Here we describe the principles behind the software, the use of the software, and an example application. The automated, objective, and precise analysis of glycan array data should enhance the value of the data for a broad range of research applications. PMID:25753713

  1. Glycobiology simplified: diverse roles of glycan recognition in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schnaar, Ronald L

    2016-06-01

    Glycans and complementary glycan-binding proteins are essential components in the language of cell-cell interactions in immunity. The study of glycan function is the purview of glycobiology, which has often been presented as an unusually complex discipline. In fact, the human glycome, composed of all of its glycans, is built primarily from only 9 building blocks that are combined by enzymes (writers) with specific and limited biosynthetic capabilities into a tractable and increasingly accessible number of potential glycan patterns that are functionally read by several dozen human glycan-binding proteins (readers). Nowhere is the importance of glycan recognition better understood than in infection and immunity, and knowledge in this area has already led to glycan mimetic anti-infective and anti-inflammatory drugs. This review includes a brief tutorial on human glycobiology and a limited number of specific examples of glycan-binding protein-glycan interactions that initiate and regulate inflammation. Examples include representatives from different glycan-binding protein families, including the C-type lectins (E-selectin, P-selectin, dectin-1, and dectin-2), sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins 8 and 9), galectins (galectin-1, galectin-3, and galectin-9), as well as hyaluronic acid-binding proteins. As glycoscience technologies advance, opportunities for enhanced understanding of glycans and their roles in leukocyte cell biology provide increasing opportunities for discovery and therapeutic intervention. PMID:27004978

  2. Glycobiology simplified: diverse roles of glycan recognition in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Schnaar, Ronald L

    2016-06-01

    Glycans and complementary glycan-binding proteins are essential components in the language of cell-cell interactions in immunity. The study of glycan function is the purview of glycobiology, which has often been presented as an unusually complex discipline. In fact, the human glycome, composed of all of its glycans, is built primarily from only 9 building blocks that are combined by enzymes (writers) with specific and limited biosynthetic capabilities into a tractable and increasingly accessible number of potential glycan patterns that are functionally read by several dozen human glycan-binding proteins (readers). Nowhere is the importance of glycan recognition better understood than in infection and immunity, and knowledge in this area has already led to glycan mimetic anti-infective and anti-inflammatory drugs. This review includes a brief tutorial on human glycobiology and a limited number of specific examples of glycan-binding protein-glycan interactions that initiate and regulate inflammation. Examples include representatives from different glycan-binding protein families, including the C-type lectins (E-selectin, P-selectin, dectin-1, and dectin-2), sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins 8 and 9), galectins (galectin-1, galectin-3, and galectin-9), as well as hyaluronic acid-binding proteins. As glycoscience technologies advance, opportunities for enhanced understanding of glycans and their roles in leukocyte cell biology provide increasing opportunities for discovery and therapeutic intervention.

  3. Microarrays in hematology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Josef; Flower, Darren; Rigley, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Microarrays are fast becoming routine tools for the high-throughput analysis of gene expression in a wide range of biologic systems, including hematology. Although a number of approaches can be taken when implementing microarray-based studies, all are capable of providing important insights into biologic function. Although some technical issues have not been resolved, microarrays will continue to make a significant impact on hematologically important research. PMID:11753074

  4. Characterizing the release of bioactive N-glycans from dairy products by a novel endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase.

    PubMed

    Karav, Sercan; Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega De Moura; Le Parc, Annabelle; Liu, Yan; Mills, David A; Block, David E; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase isolated from B. infantis ATCC 15697 (EndoBI-1) is a novel enzyme that cleaves N-N'-diacetyl chitobiose moieties found in the N-glycan core of high mannose, hybrid, and complex N-glycans. These conjugated N-glycans are recently shown as a new prebiotic source that stimulates the growth of a key infant gut microbe, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. Infantis. The effects of pH (4.45-8.45), temperature (27.5-77.5°C), reaction time (15-475 min), and enzyme/protein ratio (1:3,000-1:333) were evaluated on the release of N-glycans from bovine colostrum whey by EndoBI-1. A central composite design was used, including a two-level factorial design (2(4)) with four center points and eight axial points. In general, low pH values, longer reaction times, higher enzyme/protein ratio, and temperatures around 52°C resulted in the highest yield. The results demonstrated that bovine colostrum whey, considered to be a by/waste product, can be used as a glycan source with a yield of 20 mg N-glycan/g total protein under optimal conditions for the ranges investigated. Importantly, these processing conditions are suitable to be incorporated into routine dairy processing activities, opening the door for an entirely new class of products (released bioactive glycans and glycan-free milk). The new enzyme's activity was also compared with a commercially available enzyme, showing that EndoBI-1 is more active on native proteins than PNGase F and can be efficiently used during pasteurization, streamlining its integration into existing processing strategies. PMID:26097235

  5. Characterizing the Release of Bioactive N-Glycans from Dairy Products by a Novel Endo-β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase

    PubMed Central

    Karav, Sercan; Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega De Moura; Le Parc, Annabelle; Liu, Yan; Mills, David A.; Block, David E.; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase isolated from B. infantis ATCC 15697 (EndoBI-1) is a novel enzyme that cleaves N-N′-diacetyl chitobiose moieties found in the N-glycan core of high mannose, hybrid, and complex N-glycans. These conjugated N-glycans are recently shown as a new prebiotic source that stimulates the growth of a key infant gut microbe, Bifi-dobacterium longum subsp. Infantis. The effects of pH (4.45–8.45), temperature (27.5–77.5°C), reaction time (15–475 min), and enzyme/protein ratio (1:3,000–1:333) were evaluated on the release of N-glycans from bovine colostrum whey by EndoBI-1. A central composite design was used, including a two-level factorial design (24) with four center points and eight axial points. In general, low pH values, longer reaction times, higher enzyme/protein ratio, and temperatures around 52°C resulted in the highest yield. The results demonstrated that bovine colostrum whey, considered to be a by/waste product, can be used as a glycan source with a yield of 20 mg N-glycan/g total protein under optimal conditions for the ranges investigated. Importantly, these processing conditions are suitable to be incorporated into routine dairy processing activities, opening the door for an entirely new class of products (released bioactive glycans and glycan-free milk). The new enzyme’s activity was also compared with a commercially available enzyme, showing that EndoBI-1 is more active on native proteins than PNGase F and can be efficiently used during pasteurization, streamlining its integration into existing processing strategies. PMID:26097235

  6. Proximal glycans outside of the epitopes regulate the presentation of HIV-1 envelope gp120 helper epitopes1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hualin; Xu, Chong-Feng; Blais, Steven; Wan, Qi; Zhang, Hui-Tang; Landry, Samuel J.; Hioe, Catarina E.

    2010-01-01

    Glycosylation of HIV-1 envelope gp120 determines not only the proper structure, but also the immune responses against this antigen. While glycans may be part of specific epitopes or shield other epitopes from T cells and antibodies, this study provides evidence for a different immunomodulatory function of glycans associated with gp120 residues N230 and N448. These glycans are required for efficient MHC class II-restricted presentation of nearby CD4 T-cell epitopes, even though they are not part of the epitopes. The glycans do not affect CD4 T cell recognition of more distant epitopes, and are not essential for the proper folding and function of gp120. Data on CD4 T-cell recognition of N448 mutants combined with proteolysis analyses and surface electrostatic potential calculation around residue N448 support the notion that N448-glycan near the epitope's C-terminus renders the site to be surface accessible and allows its efficient processing. In contrast, the N230-glycan contributes to the nearby epitope presentation at a step other than the proteolytic processing of the epitope. Hence, N-glycans can determine CD4 T-cell recognition of nearby gp120 epitopes by regulating the different steps in the MHC class II processing and presentation pathway after APCs acquire the intact gp120 antigen exogenously. Modifications of amino acids bearing glycans at the C termini of gp120 helper epitopes may prove to be a useful strategy for enhancing the immunogenicity of HIV-1 envelope gp120. PMID:19414790

  7. Twenty Years of Mycobacterial Glycans: Furanosides and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Lowary, Todd L

    2016-07-19

    galactofuranose residues. These molecules have now found application in biochemical, immunological, and structural biology investigations, which have shed light on their biosynthesis and how these motifs are recognized by both the innate and adaptive immune systems. More recently, attention has been directed toward the synthesis of another class of immunologically active mycobacterial cell wall glycans, the extractable glycolipids. In this case, efforts have been primarily on phenolic glycolipids, and the compounds synthesized have been used to evaluate their ability to modulate cytokine release. Over the past 20 years, the use of chemical synthesis to provide increasingly complex glycan structures has provided significant benefit to the burgeoning field of mycobacterial glycobiology. Through the efforts of groups from around the globe, access to these compounds is now possible via relatively straightforward methods. As the pool of mycobacterial glycans continues to grow, so too will our understanding of their role in disease, which will undoubtedly lead to new strategies to prevent or treat mycobacterial infections. PMID:27294709

  8. Nanoengineered glycan sensors enabling native glycoprofiling for medicinal applications: towards profiling glycoproteins without labeling or liberation steps.

    PubMed

    Reuel, Nigel F; Mu, Bin; Zhang, Jingqing; Hinckley, Allison; Strano, Michael S

    2012-09-01

    Nanoengineered glycan sensors may help realize the long-held goal of accurate and rapid glycoprotein profiling without labeling or glycan liberation steps. Current methods of profiling oligosaccharides displayed on protein surfaces, such as liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, capillary electrophoresis, and microarray methods, are limited by sample pretreatment and quantitative accuracy. Microarrayed platforms can be improved with methods that better estimate kinetic parameters rather than simply reporting relative binding information. These quantitative glycan sensors are enabled by an emerging class of nanoengineered materials that differ in their mode of signal transduction from traditional methods. Platforms that respond to mass changes include a quartz crystal microbalance and cantilever sensors. Electronic response can be detected from electrochemical, field effect transistor, and pore impedance sensors. Optical methods include fluorescent frontal affinity chromatography, surface plasmon resonance methods, and fluorescent carbon nanotubes. After a very brief primer on glycobiology and its connection to medicine, these emerging systems are critically reviewed for their potential use as core sensors in future glycoprofiling tools. PMID:22868627

  9. Automated glycan assembly of xyloglucan oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Dallabernardina, Pietro; Schuhmacher, Frank; Seeberger, Peter H; Pfrengle, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    We report the automated glycan assembly of oligosaccharide fragments related to the hemicellulose xyloglucan (XG). Iterative addition of monosaccharide and disaccharide building blocks to a solid support provided seven cellulose and xyloglucan fragments including XXGG- and XXXG-type oligosaccharides. PMID:26553949

  10. Glycotherapy: New Advances Inspire a Reemergence of Glycans in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hudak, Jason E.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of the 20th century marked the dawn of modern medicine with glycan-based therapies at the forefront. However, glycans quickly became overshadowed as DNA- and protein-focused treatments became readily accessible. The recent development of new tools and techniques to study and produce structurally defined carbohydrates has spurred renewed interest in the therapeutic applications of glycans. This review focuses on advances within the past decade that are bringing glycan-based treatments back to the forefront of medicine and the technologies that are driving these efforts. These include the use of glycans themselves as therapeutic molecules as well as engineering protein and cell surface glycans to suit clinical applications. Glycan therapeutics offer a rich and promising frontier for developments in the academic, biopharmaceutical, and medical fields. PMID:24269151

  11. Regulation of glycan structures in murine embryonic stem cells: combined transcript profiling of glycan-related genes and glycan structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Nairn, Alison V; Aoki, Kazuhiro; dela Rosa, Mitche; Porterfield, Mindy; Lim, Jae-Min; Kulik, Michael; Pierce, J Michael; Wells, Lance; Dalton, Stephen; Tiemeyer, Michael; Moremen, Kelley W

    2012-11-01

    The abundance and structural diversity of glycans on glycoproteins and glycolipids are highly regulated and play important roles during vertebrate development. Because of the challenges associated with studying glycan regulation in vertebrate embryos, we have chosen to study mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as they differentiate into embryoid bodies (EBs) or into extraembryonic endodermal (ExE) cells as a model for cellular differentiation. We profiled N- and O-glycan structures isolated from these cell populations and examined transcripts encoding the corresponding enzymatic machinery for glycan biosynthesis in an effort to probe the mechanisms that drive the regulation of glycan diversity. During differentiation from mouse ES cells to either EBs or ExE cells, general trends were detected. The predominance of high mannose N-glycans in ES cells shifted to an equal abundance of complex and high mannose structures, increased sialylation, and increased α-Gal termination in the differentiated cell populations. Whereas core 1 O-glycan structures predominated in all three cell populations, increased sialylation and increased core diversity characterized the O-glycans of both differentiated cell types. Increased polysialylation was also found in both differentiated cell types. Differences between the two differentiated cell types included greater sialylation of N-glycans in EBs, whereas α-Gal-capped structures were more prevalent in ExE cells. Changes in glycan structures generally, but not uniformly, correlated with alterations in transcript abundance for the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting that transcriptional regulation contributes significantly to the regulation of glycan expression. Knowledge of glycan structural diversity and transcript regulation should provide greater understanding of the roles of protein glycosylation in vertebrate development.

  12. Versatile High Resolution Oligosaccharide Microarrays for Plant Glycobiology and Cell Wall Research*

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Henriette L.; Fangel, Jonatan U.; McCleary, Barry; Ruzanski, Christian; Rydahl, Maja G.; Ralet, Marie-Christine; Farkas, Vladimir; von Schantz, Laura; Marcus, Susan E.; Andersen, Mathias C. F.; Field, Rob; Ohlin, Mats; Knox, J. Paul; Clausen, Mads H.; Willats, William G. T.

    2012-01-01

    Microarrays are powerful tools for high throughput analysis, and hundreds or thousands of molecular interactions can be assessed simultaneously using very small amounts of analytes. Nucleotide microarrays are well established in plant research, but carbohydrate microarrays are much less established, and one reason for this is a lack of suitable glycans with which to populate arrays. Polysaccharide microarrays are relatively easy to produce because of the ease of immobilizing large polymers noncovalently onto a variety of microarray surfaces, but they lack analytical resolution because polysaccharides often contain multiple distinct carbohydrate substructures. Microarrays of defined oligosaccharides potentially overcome this problem but are harder to produce because oligosaccharides usually require coupling prior to immobilization. We have assembled a library of well characterized plant oligosaccharides produced either by partial hydrolysis from polysaccharides or by de novo chemical synthesis. Once coupled to protein, these neoglycoconjugates are versatile reagents that can be printed as microarrays onto a variety of slide types and membranes. We show that these microarrays are suitable for the high throughput characterization of the recognition capabilities of monoclonal antibodies, carbohydrate-binding modules, and other oligosaccharide-binding proteins of biological significance and also that they have potential for the characterization of carbohydrate-active enzymes. PMID:22988248

  13. DNA Microarray Technology

    SciTech Connect

    WERNER-WASHBURNE, MARGARET; DAVIDSON, GEORGE S.

    2002-01-01

    Collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of New Mexico Biology Department resulted in the capability to train students in microarray techniques and the interpretation of data from microarray experiments. These studies provide for a better understanding of the role of stationary phase and the gene regulation involved in exit from stationary phase, which may eventually have important clinical implications. Importantly, this research trained numerous students and is the basis for three new Ph.D. projects.

  14. DNA microarrays in neuropsychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, E R; Srivastava, L K; Quirion, R

    2001-08-01

    Recent advances in experimental genomics, coupled with the wealth of sequence information available for a variety of organisms, have the potential to transform the way pharmacological research is performed. At present, high-density DNA microarrays allow researchers to quickly and accurately quantify gene-expression changes in a massively parallel manner. Although now well established in other biomedical fields, such as cancer and genetics research, DNA microarrays have only recently begun to make significant inroads into pharmacology. To date, the major focus in this field has been on the general application of DNA microarrays to toxicology and drug discovery and design. This review summarizes the major microarray findings of relevance to neuropsychopharmacology, as a prelude to the design and analysis of future basic and clinical microarray experiments. The ability of DNA microarrays to monitor gene expression simultaneously in a large-scale format is helping to usher in a post-genomic age, where simple constructs about the role of nature versus nurture are being replaced by a functional understanding of gene expression in living organisms. PMID:11479006

  15. Glycans pattern the phase behaviour of lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Guidotti, Guido; Manoharan, Vinothan N.; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-02-01

    Hydrated networks of glycans (polysaccharides)—in the form of cell walls, periplasms or gel-like matrices—are ubiquitously present adjacent to cellular plasma membranes. Yet, despite their abundance, the function of glycans in the extracellular milieu is largely unknown. Here we show that the spatial configuration of glycans controls the phase behaviour of multiphase model lipid membranes: inhomogeneous glycan networks stabilize large lipid domains at the characteristic length scale of the network, whereas homogeneous networks suppress macroscopic lipid phase separation. We also find that glycan-patterned phase separation is thermally reversible—thus indicating that the effect is thermodynamic rather than kinetic—and that phase patterning probably results from a preferential interaction of glycans with ordered lipid phases. These findings have implications for membrane-mediated transport processes, potentially rationalize long-standing observations that differentiate the behaviour of native and model membranes and may indicate an intimate coupling between cellular lipidomes and glycomes.

  16. Glycan Evolution in Response to Collaboration, Conflict, and Constraint*

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Stevan A.; Gagneux, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Glycans, oligo- and polysaccharides secreted or attached to proteins and lipids, cover the surfaces of all cells and have a regulatory capacity and structural diversity beyond any other class of biological molecule. Glycans may have evolved these properties because they mediate cellular interactions and often face pressure to evolve new functions rapidly. We approach this idea two ways. First, we discuss evolutionary innovation. Glycan synthesis, regulation, and mode of chemical interaction influence the spectrum of new forms presented to evolution. Second, we describe the evolutionary conflicts that arise when alleles and individuals interact. Glycan regulation and diversity are integral to these biological negotiations. Glycans are tasked with such an amazing diversity of functions that no study of cellular interaction can begin without considering them. We propose that glycans predominate the cell surface because their physical and chemical properties allow the rapid innovation required of molecules on the frontlines of evolutionary conflict. PMID:23329843

  17. Enhanced Aromatic Sequons Increase Oligosaccharyltransferase Glycosylation Efficiency and Glycan Homogeneity.

    PubMed

    Murray, Amber N; Chen, Wentao; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Hanson, Sarah R; Wiseman, R Luke; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Powers, David L; Powers, Evan T; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2015-08-20

    N-Glycosylation plays an important role in protein folding and function. Previous studies demonstrate that a phenylalanine residue introduced at the n-2 position relative to an Asn-Xxx-Thr/Ser N-glycosylation sequon increases the glycan occupancy of the sequon in insect cells. Here, we show that any aromatic residue at n-2 increases glycan occupancy in human cells and that this effect is dependent upon oligosaccharyltransferase substrate preferences rather than differences in other cellular processing events such as degradation or trafficking. Moreover, aromatic residues at n-2 alter glycan processing in the Golgi, producing proteins with less complex N-glycan structures. These results demonstrate that manipulating the sequence space surrounding N-glycosylation sequons is useful both for controlling glycosylation efficiency, thus enhancing glycan occupancy, and for influencing the N-glycan structures produced. PMID:26190824

  18. Site occupancy and glycan compositional analysis of two soluble recombinant forms of the attachment glycoprotein of Hendra virus.

    PubMed

    Colgrave, Michelle L; Snelling, Hayley J; Shiell, Brian J; Feng, Yan-Ru; Chan, Yee-Peng; Bossart, Katharine N; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B; Broder, Christopher C; Michalski, Wojtek P

    2012-04-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) continues to cause morbidity and mortality in both humans and horses with a number of sporadic outbreaks. HeV has two structural membrane glycoproteins that mediate the infection of host cells: the attachment (G) and the fusion (F) glycoproteins that are essential for receptor binding and virion-host cell membrane fusion, respectively. N-linked glycosylation of viral envelope proteins are critical post-translation modifications that have been implicated in roles of structural integrity, virus replication and evasion of the host immune response. Deciphering the glycan composition and structure on these glycoproteins may assist in the development of glycan-targeted therapeutic intervention strategies. We examined the site occupancy and glycan composition of recombinant soluble G (sG) glycoproteins expressed in two different mammalian cell systems, transient human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and vaccinia virus (VV)-HeLa cells, using a suite of biochemical and biophysical tools: electrophoresis, lectin binding and tandem mass spectrometry. The N-linked glycans of both VV and HEK293-derived sG glycoproteins carried predominantly mono- and disialylated complex-type N-glycans and a smaller population of high mannose-type glycans. All seven consensus sequences for N-linked glycosylation were definitively found to be occupied in the VV-derived protein, whereas only four sites were found and characterized in the HEK293-derived protein. We also report, for the first time, the existence of O-linked glycosylation sites in both proteins. The striking characteristic of both proteins was glycan heterogeneity in both N- and O-linked sites. The structural features of G protein glycosylation were also determined by X-ray crystallography and interactions with the ephrin-B2 receptor are discussed.

  19. Turning-Off Signaling by Siglecs, Selectins, and Galectins: Chemical Inhibition of Glycan-Dependent Interactions in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cagnoni, Alejandro J.; Pérez Sáez, Juan M.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.; Mariño, Karina V.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation, a common feature associated with malignancy, has been implicated in important events during cancer progression. Our understanding of the role of glycans in cancer has grown exponentially in the last few years, concurrent with important advances in glycomics and glycoproteomic technologies, paving the way for the validation of a number of glycan structures as potential glycobiomarkers. However, the molecular bases underlying cancer-associated glycan modifications are still far from understood. Glycans exhibit a natural heterogeneity, crucial for their diverse functional roles as specific carriers of biologically relevant information. This information is decoded by families of proteins named lectins, including sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin (Ig)-like lectins (siglecs), C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), and galectins. Siglecs are primarily expressed on the surface of immune cells and differentially control innate and adaptive immune responses. Among CLRs, selectins are a family of cell adhesion molecules that mediate interactions between cancer cells and platelets, leukocytes, and endothelial cells, thus facilitating tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Galectins, a family of soluble proteins that bind β-galactoside-containing glycans, have been implicated in diverse events associated with cancer biology such as apoptosis, homotypic cell aggregation, angiogenesis, cell migration, and tumor-immune escape. Consequently, individual members of these lectin families have become promising targets for the design of novel anticancer therapies. During the past decade, a number of inhibitors of lectin–glycan interactions have been developed including small-molecule inhibitors, multivalent saccharide ligands, and more recently peptides and peptidomimetics have offered alternatives for tackling tumor progression. In this article, we review the current status of the discovery and development of chemical lectin inhibitors and discuss novel strategies to

  20. Formation and characterization of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride substrates.

    PubMed

    Manning, Mary; Redmond, Gareth

    2005-01-01

    A versatile method for direct, covalent attachment of DNA microarrays at silicon nitride layers, previously deposited by chemical vapor deposition at silicon wafer substrates, is reported. Each microarray fabrication process step, from silicon nitride substrate deposition, surface cleaning, amino-silanation, and attachment of a homobifunctional cross-linking molecule to covalent immobilization of probe oligonucleotides, is defined, characterized, and optimized to yield consistent probe microarray quality, homogeneity, and probe-target hybridization performance. The developed microarray fabrication methodology provides excellent (high signal-to-background ratio) and reproducible responsivity to target oligonucleotide hybridization with a rugged chemical stability that permits exposure of arrays to stringent pre- and posthybridization wash conditions through many sustained cycles of reuse. Overall, the achieved performance features compare very favorably with those of more mature glass based microarrays. It is proposed that this DNA microarray fabrication strategy has the potential to provide a viable route toward the successful realization of future integrated DNA biochips.

  1. Regulation of Glycan Structures in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nairn, Alison V.; Aoki, Kazuhiro; dela Rosa, Mitche; Porterfield, Mindy; Lim, Jae-Min; Kulik, Michael; Pierce, J. Michael; Wells, Lance; Dalton, Stephen; Tiemeyer, Michael; Moremen, Kelley W.

    2012-01-01

    The abundance and structural diversity of glycans on glycoproteins and glycolipids are highly regulated and play important roles during vertebrate development. Because of the challenges associated with studying glycan regulation in vertebrate embryos, we have chosen to study mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells as they differentiate into embryoid bodies (EBs) or into extraembryonic endodermal (ExE) cells as a model for cellular differentiation. We profiled N- and O-glycan structures isolated from these cell populations and examined transcripts encoding the corresponding enzymatic machinery for glycan biosynthesis in an effort to probe the mechanisms that drive the regulation of glycan diversity. During differentiation from mouse ES cells to either EBs or ExE cells, general trends were detected. The predominance of high mannose N-glycans in ES cells shifted to an equal abundance of complex and high mannose structures, increased sialylation, and increased α-Gal termination in the differentiated cell populations. Whereas core 1 O-glycan structures predominated in all three cell populations, increased sialylation and increased core diversity characterized the O-glycans of both differentiated cell types. Increased polysialylation was also found in both differentiated cell types. Differences between the two differentiated cell types included greater sialylation of N-glycans in EBs, whereas α-Gal-capped structures were more prevalent in ExE cells. Changes in glycan structures generally, but not uniformly, correlated with alterations in transcript abundance for the corresponding biosynthetic enzymes, suggesting that transcriptional regulation contributes significantly to the regulation of glycan expression. Knowledge of glycan structural diversity and transcript regulation should provide greater understanding of the roles of protein glycosylation in vertebrate development. PMID:22988249

  2. Production of active human glucocerebrosidase in seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana complex-glycan-deficient (cgl) plants.

    PubMed

    He, Xu; Galpin, Jason D; Tropak, Michael B; Mahuran, Don; Haselhorst, Thomas; von Itzstein, Mark; Kolarich, Daniel; Packer, Nicolle H; Miao, Yansong; Jiang, Liwen; Grabowski, Gregory A; Clarke, Lorne A; Kermode, Allison R

    2012-04-01

    There is a clear need for efficient methods to produce protein therapeutics requiring mannose-termination for therapeutic efficacy. Here we report on a unique system for production of active human lysosomal acid β-glucosidase (glucocerebrosidase, GCase, EC 3.2.1.45) using seeds of the Arabidopsis thaliana complex-glycan-deficient (cgl) mutant, which are deficient in the activity of N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase I (EC 2.4.1.101). Gaucher disease is a prevalent lysosomal storage disease in which affected individuals inherit mutations in the gene (GBA1) encoding GCase. A gene cassette optimized for seed expression was used to generate the human enzyme in seeds of the cgl (C5) mutant, and the recombinant GCase was mainly accumulated in the apoplast. Importantly, the enzymatic properties including kinetic parameters, half-maximal inhibitory concentration of isofagomine and thermal stability of the cgl-derived GCase were comparable with those of imiglucerase, a commercially available recombinant human GCase used for enzyme replacement therapy in Gaucher patients. N-glycan structural analyses of recombinant cgl-GCase showed that the majority of the N-glycans (97%) were mannose terminated. Additional purification was required to remove ∼15% of the plant-derived recombinant GCase that possessed potentially immunogenic (xylose- and/or fucose-containing) N-glycans. Uptake of cgl-derived GCase by mouse macrophages was similar to that of imiglucerase. The cgl seed system requires no addition of foreign (non-native) amino acids to the mature recombinant GCase protein, and the dry transgenic seeds represent a stable repository of the therapeutic protein. Other strategies that may completely prevent plant-like complex N-glycans are discussed, including the use of a null cgl mutant. PMID:22061999

  3. Glycan array data management at Consortium for Functional Glycomics.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, Maha; Sasisekharan, Ram; Raman, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    Glycomics or the study of structure-function relationships of complex glycans has reshaped post-genomics biology. Glycans mediate fundamental biological functions via their specific interactions with a variety of proteins. Recognizing the importance of glycomics, large-scale research initiatives such as the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG) were established to address these challenges. Over the past decade, the Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG) has generated novel reagents and technologies for glycomics analyses, which in turn have led to generation of diverse datasets. These datasets have contributed to understanding glycan diversity and structure-function relationships at molecular (glycan-protein interactions), cellular (gene expression and glycan analysis), and whole organism (mouse phenotyping) levels. Among these analyses and datasets, screening of glycan-protein interactions on glycan array platforms has gained much prominence and has contributed to cross-disciplinary realization of the importance of glycomics in areas such as immunology, infectious diseases, cancer biomarkers, etc. This manuscript outlines methodologies for capturing data from glycan array experiments and online tools to access and visualize glycan array data implemented at the CFG.

  4. Chemical Probing of Glycans in Cells and Organisms†

    PubMed Central

    Rouhanifard, Sara H.; Nordstrøm, Lars Ulrik; Zheng, Tianqing; Wu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Among the four major building blocks of life, glycans play essential roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Due to their non-templated biosynthesis, advances towards elucidating the molecular details of glycan functions are relatively slow compared with the pace of protein and nucleic acid research. Over the past 30 years, chemical tools have emerged as powerful allies to genetics and molecular biology in the study of glycans in their native environment. This tutorial review will provide an overview of the recent technological developments in the field, as well as the progress in the application of these techniques to probe glycans in cells and organisms. PMID:23257905

  5. Chemical probing of glycans in cells and organisms.

    PubMed

    Rouhanifard, Sara H; Nordstrøm, Lars Ulrik; Zheng, Tianqing; Wu, Peng

    2013-05-21

    Among the four major building blocks of life, glycans play essential roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes. Due to their non-templated biosynthesis, advances towards elucidating the molecular details of glycan functions are relatively slow compared with the pace of protein and nucleic acid research. Over the past 30 years, chemical tools have emerged as powerful allies to genetics and molecular biology in the study of glycans in their native environment. This tutorial review will provide an overview of the recent technological developments in the field, as well as the progress in the application of these techniques to probe glycans in cells and organisms.

  6. Lectin-Glycan Interaction Network-Based Identification of Host Receptors of Microbial Pathogenic Adhesins

    PubMed Central

    Ielasi, Francesco S.; Alioscha-Perez, Mitchel; Donohue, Dagmara; Claes, Sandra; Sahli, Hichem; Schols, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The first step in the infection of humans by microbial pathogens is their adherence to host tissue cells, which is frequently based on the binding of carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectin-like adhesins) to human cell receptors that expose glycans. In only a few cases have the human receptors of pathogenic adhesins been described. A novel strategy—based on the construction of a lectin-glycan interaction (LGI) network—to identify the potential human binding receptors for pathogenic adhesins with lectin activity was developed. The new approach is based on linking glycan array screening results of these adhesins to a human glycoprotein database via the construction of an LGI network. This strategy was used to detect human receptors for virulent Escherichia coli (FimH adhesin), and the fungal pathogens Candida albicans (Als1p and Als3p adhesins) and C. glabrata (Epa1, Epa6, and Epa7 adhesins), which cause candidiasis. This LGI network strategy allows the profiling of potential adhesin binding receptors in the host with prioritization, based on experimental binding data, of the most relevant interactions. New potential targets for the selected adhesins were predicted and experimentally confirmed. This methodology was also used to predict lectin interactions with envelope glycoproteins of human-pathogenic viruses. It was shown that this strategy was successful in revealing that the FimH adhesin has anti-HIV activity. PMID:27406561

  7. Efficient convergent synthesis of bi-, tri-, and tetra-antennary complex type N-glycans and their HIV-1 antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Shivatare, Sachin S; Chang, Shih-Huang; Tsai, Tsung-I; Ren, Chien-Tai; Chuang, Hong-Yang; Hsu, Li; Lin, Chih-Wei; Li, Shiou-Ting; Wu, Chung-Yi; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2013-10-16

    The structural diversity of glycoproteins often comes from post-translational glycosylation with heterogeneous N-glycans. Understanding the complexity of glycans related to various biochemical processes demands a well-defined synthetic sugar library. We report herein a unified convergent strategy for the rapid production of bi-, tri-, and tetra-antennary complex type N-glycans with and without terminal N-acetylneuraminic acid residues connected via the α-2,6 or α-2,3 linkages. Moreover, using sialyltransferases to install sialic acid can minimize synthetic steps through the use of shared intermediates to simplify the complicated procedures associated with conventional sialic acid chemistry. Furthermore, these synthetic complex oligosaccharides were compiled to create a glycan array for the profiling of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies PG9 and PG16 that were isolated from HIV infected donors. From the study of antibody PG16, we identified potential natural and unnatural glycan ligands, which may facilitate the design of carbohydrate-based immunogens and hasten the HIV vaccine development.

  8. Transduction of Glycan-Lectin Binding using Near Infrared Fluorescent Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Glycan Profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuel, Nigel; Ahn, Jin-Ho; Kim, Jong-Ho; Zhang, Jingqing; Boghossian, Ardemis; Mahal, Lara; Strano, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a sensor array employing recombinant lectins as glycan recognition sites tethered via Histidine tags to Ni2+ complexes that act as fluorescent quenchers for semi-conducting single walled carbon nanotubes embedded in a chitosan to measure binding kinetics of model glycans. Two higher-affined glycan-lectin pairs are explored: fucose (Fuc) to PA-IIL and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to GafD. The dissociation constants (KD) for these pairs as free glycans (106 and 19 μM respectively) and streptavidin-tethered (142 and 50 μM respectively) were found. The absolute detection limit for the current platform was found to be 2 μg of glycosylated protein or 100 ng of free glycan to 20 μg of lectin. Glycan detection is demonstrated at the single nanotube level (GlcNAc to GafD). Over a population of 1000 nanotubes, 289 of the SWNT sensors had signals strong enough to yield kinetic information (KD of 250 ± 10 μM). We are also able to identify the locations of ``strong-transducers'' on the basis of dissociation constant (4 sensors with KD < 10 μM) or overall signal modulation (8 sensors with > 5% quench response). The ability to pinpoint strong-binding, single sensors is promising to build a nanoarray of glycan-lectin transducers as a method to profile glycans without protein labeling or glycan liberation pretreatment steps.

  9. Investigating the global genomic diversity of Escherichia coli using a multi-genome DNA microarray platform with novel gene prediction strategies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The gene content of a diverse group of 183 unique Escherichia coli and Shigella isolates was determined using the Affymetrix GeneChip® E. coli Genome 2.0 Array, originally designed for transcriptome analysis, as a genotyping tool. The probe set design utilized by this array provided the opportunity to determine the gene content of each strain very accurately and reliably. This array constitutes 10,112 independent genes representing four individual E. coli genomes, therefore providing the ability to survey genes of several different pathogen types. The entire ECOR collection, 80 EHEC-like isolates, and a diverse set of isolates from our FDA strain repository were included in our analysis. Results From this study we were able to define sets of genes that correspond to, and therefore define, the EHEC pathogen type. Furthermore, our sampling of 63 unique strains of O157:H7 showed the ability of this array to discriminate between closely related strains. We found that individual strains of O157:H7 differed, on average, by 197 probe sets. Finally, we describe an analysis method that utilizes the power of the probe sets to determine accurately the presence/absence of each gene represented on this array. Conclusions These elements provide insights into understanding the microbial diversity that exists within extant E. coli populations. Moreover, these data demonstrate that this novel microarray-based analysis is a powerful tool in the field of molecular epidemiology and the newly emerging field of microbial forensics. PMID:21733163

  10. Raman-based microarray readout: a review.

    PubMed

    Haisch, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    For a quarter of a century, microarrays have been part of the routine analytical toolbox. Label-based fluorescence detection is still the commonest optical readout strategy. Since the 1990s, a continuously increasing number of label-based as well as label-free experiments on Raman-based microarray readout concepts have been reported. This review summarizes the possible concepts and methods and their advantages and challenges. A common label-based strategy is based on the binding of selective receptors as well as Raman reporter molecules to plasmonic nanoparticles in a sandwich immunoassay, which results in surface-enhanced Raman scattering signals of the reporter molecule. Alternatively, capture of the analytes can be performed by receptors on a microarray surface. Addition of plasmonic nanoparticles again leads to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal, not of a label but directly of the analyte. This approach is mostly proposed for bacteria and cell detection. However, although many promising readout strategies have been discussed in numerous publications, rarely have any of them made the step from proof of concept to a practical application, let alone routine use. Graphical Abstract Possible realization of a SERS (Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering) system for microarray readout. PMID:26973235

  11. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer.

  12. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer. PMID:27237321

  13. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures. PMID:26039143

  14. Multivalent display of minimal Clostridium difficile glycan epitopes mimics antigenic properties of larger glycans

    PubMed Central

    Broecker, Felix; Hanske, Jonas; Martin, Christopher E.; Baek, Ju Yuel; Wahlbrink, Annette; Wojcik, Felix; Hartmann, Laura; Rademacher, Christoph; Anish, Chakkumkal; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic cell-surface glycans are promising vaccine candidates against Clostridium difficile. The complexity of large, highly antigenic and immunogenic glycans is a synthetic challenge. Less complex antigens providing similar immune responses are desirable for vaccine development. Based on molecular-level glycan–antibody interaction analyses, we here demonstrate that the C. difficile surface polysaccharide-I (PS-I) can be resembled by multivalent display of minimal disaccharide epitopes on a synthetic scaffold that does not participate in binding. We show that antibody avidity as a measure of antigenicity increases by about five orders of magnitude when disaccharides are compared with constructs containing five disaccharides. The synthetic, pentavalent vaccine candidate containing a peptide T-cell epitope elicits weak but highly specific antibody responses to larger PS-I glycans in mice. This study highlights the potential of multivalently displaying small oligosaccharides to achieve antigenicity characteristic of larger glycans. The approach may result in more cost-efficient carbohydrate vaccines with reduced synthetic effort. PMID:27091615

  15. Predominant Expression of Hybrid N-Glycans Has Distinct Cellular Roles Relative to Complex and Oligomannose N-Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Hall, M. Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A.; Zhu, Yong; Dayal, Sahil; Whitman, Austin A.; Schwalbe, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation modulates growth, maintenance, and stress signaling processes. Consequently, altered N-glycosylation is associated with reduced fitness and disease. Therefore, expanding our understanding of N-glycans in altering biological processes is of utmost interest. Herein, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/caspase9 (CRISPR/Cas9) technology was employed to engineer a glycosylation mutant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell line, K16, which expresses predominantly hybrid type N-glycans. This newly engineered cell line enabled us to compare N-glycan effects on cellular properties of hybrid type N-glycans, to the well-established Pro−5 and Lec1 cell lines, which express complex and oligomannose types of N-glycans, respectively. Lectin binding studies revealed the predominant N-glycan expressed in K16 is hybrid type. Cell dissociation and migration assays demonstrated the greatest strength of cell–cell adhesion and fastest migratory rates for oligomannose N-glycans, and these properties decreased as oligomannose type were converted to hybrid type, and further decreased upon conversion to complex type. Next, we examined the roles of three general types of N-glycans on ectopic expression of E-cadherin, a cell–cell adhesion protein. Microscopy revealed more functional E-cadherin at the cell–cell border when N-glycans were oligomannose and these levels decreased as the oligomannose N-glycans were processed to hybrid and then to complex. Thus, we provide evidence that all three general types of N-glycans impact plasma membrane architecture and cellular properties. PMID:27304954

  16. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Gilgunn, Sarah; Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J; O'Kennedy, Richard J; Rudd, Pauline M; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases.

  17. Site-specific protein glycosylation analysis with glycan isomer differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hua, Serenus; Nwosu, Charles C; Strum, John S; Seipert, Richard R; An, Hyun Joo; Zivkovic, Angela M; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2012-05-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common yet diverse post-translational modifications. Information on glycan heterogeneity and glycosite occupancy is increasingly recognized as crucial to understanding glycoprotein structure and function. Yet, no approach currently exists with which to holistically consider both the proteomic and glycomic aspects of a system. Here, we developed a novel method of comprehensive glycosite profiling using nanoflow liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MS) that shows glycan isomer-specific differentiation on specific sites. Glycoproteins were digested by controlled non-specific proteolysis in order to produce informative glycopeptides. High-resolution, isomer-sensitive chromatographic separation of the glycopeptides was achieved using microfluidic chip-based capillaries packed with graphitized carbon. Integrated LC/MS/MS not only confirmed glycopeptide composition but also differentiated glycan and peptide isomers and yielded structural information on both the glycan and peptide moieties. Our analysis identified at least 13 distinct glycans (including isomers) corresponding to five compositions at the single N-glycosylation site on bovine ribonuclease B, 59 distinct glycans at five N-glycosylation sites on bovine lactoferrin, 13 distinct glycans at one N-glycosylation site on four subclasses of human immunoglobulin G, and 20 distinct glycans at five O-glycosylation sites on bovine κ-casein. Porous graphitized carbon provided effective separation of glycopeptide isomers. The integration of nano-LC with MS and MS/MS of non-specifically cleaved glycopeptides allows quantitative, isomer-sensitive, and site-specific glycoprotein analysis.

  18. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y

    PubMed Central

    Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R.; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J.; O’Kennedy, Richard J.; Rudd, Pauline M.; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:27459092

  19. Comprehensive N-Glycan Profiling of Avian Immunoglobulin Y.

    PubMed

    Gilgunn, Sarah; Millán Martín, Silvia; Wormald, Mark R; Zapatero-Rodríguez, Julia; Conroy, Paul J; O'Kennedy, Richard J; Rudd, Pauline M; Saldova, Radka

    2016-01-01

    Recent exploitation of the avian immune system has highlighted its suitability for the generation of high-quality, high-affinity antibodies to a wide range of antigens for a number of therapeutic and biotechnological applications. The glycosylation profile of potential immunoglobulin therapeutics is species specific and is heavily influenced by the cell-line/culture conditions used for production. Hence, knowledge of the carbohydrate moieties present on immunoglobulins is essential as certain glycan structures can adversely impact their physicochemical and biological properties. This study describes the detailed N-glycan profile of IgY polyclonal antibodies from the serum of leghorn chickens using a fully quantitative high-throughput N-glycan analysis approach, based on ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) separation of released glycans. Structural assignments revealed serum IgY to contain complex bi-, tri- and tetra-antennary glycans with or without core fucose and bisects, hybrid and high mannose glycans. High sialic acid content was also observed, with the presence of rare sialic acid structures, likely polysialic acids. It is concluded that IgY is heavily decorated with complex glycans; however, no known non-human or immunogenic glycans were identified. Thus, IgY is a potentially promising candidate for immunoglobulin-based therapies for the treatment of various infectious diseases. PMID:27459092

  20. O-Glycan analysis of cellobiohydrolase I from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Bubner, Patricia; Bauer, Stefan; Somerville, Chris R

    2016-06-01

    We describe here the composition of the O-linked glycans on the Neurospora crassa cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI), which accounts for approximately 40% of the protein secreted by cells growing in the presence of cellulose. CBHI is O-glycosylated with six types of linear, and three types of branched, O-glycans containing approximately equal amounts of mannose and galactose. In addition to the classic fungal O-glycans with reducing end mannoses, we also identified reducing end galactoses which suggest the existence of a protein-O-galactosyltransferase in N. crassa Because of the excellent genetic resources available for N. crassa, the knowledge of the CBHI O-glycans may enable the future evaluation of the role of O-glycosylation on cellulase function and the development of directed O-glycan/cellulase engineering. PMID:26762173

  1. O-Glycan analysis of cellobiohydrolase I from Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Bubner, Patricia; Bauer, Stefan; Somerville, Chris R

    2016-06-01

    We describe here the composition of the O-linked glycans on the Neurospora crassa cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI), which accounts for approximately 40% of the protein secreted by cells growing in the presence of cellulose. CBHI is O-glycosylated with six types of linear, and three types of branched, O-glycans containing approximately equal amounts of mannose and galactose. In addition to the classic fungal O-glycans with reducing end mannoses, we also identified reducing end galactoses which suggest the existence of a protein-O-galactosyltransferase in N. crassa Because of the excellent genetic resources available for N. crassa, the knowledge of the CBHI O-glycans may enable the future evaluation of the role of O-glycosylation on cellulase function and the development of directed O-glycan/cellulase engineering.

  2. N-linked glycan characterization of heterologous proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Huijuan; Miele, Robert G; Mitchell, Teresa I; Gerngross, Tillman U

    2007-01-01

    Our laboratory has focused on the re-engineered of the secretory pathway of Pichia pastoris to perform glycosylation reactions that mimic processing of N-glycans in humans and other higher mammals (1,2). A reporter protein with a single N-linked glycosylation site, a His-tagged Kringle 3 domain of human plasminogen (K3), was used to identify combinations of optimal leader/catalytic domain(s) to recreate human N-glycan processing in the Pichia system. In this chapter we describe detailed protocols for high-throughput purification of K3, enzymatic release of N-glycans, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the released N-glycans. The developed protocols can be adapted to the characterization of N-glycans from any purified protein expressed in P. pastoris.

  3. The Role of Sialyl Glycan Recognition in Host Tissue Tropism of the Avian Parasite Eimeria tenella

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, James; Campanero-Rhodes, Maria A.; Blake, Damer P.; Palma, Angelina S.; Chai, Wengang; Ferguson, David J. P.; Simpson, Peter; Feizi, Ten; Tomley, Fiona M.; Matthews, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Eimeria spp. are a highly successful group of intracellular protozoan parasites that develop within intestinal epithelial cells of poultry, causing coccidiosis. As a result of resistance against anticoccidial drugs and the expense of manufacturing live vaccines, it is necessary to understand the relationship between Eimeria and its host more deeply, with a view to developing recombinant vaccines. Eimeria possesses a family of microneme lectins (MICs) that contain microneme adhesive repeat regions (MARR). We show that the major MARR protein from Eimeria tenella, EtMIC3, is deployed at the parasite-host interface during the early stages of invasion. EtMIC3 consists of seven tandem MAR1-type domains, which possess a high specificity for sialylated glycans as shown by cell-based assays and carbohydrate microarray analyses. The restricted tissue staining pattern observed for EtMIC3 in the chicken caecal epithelium indicates that EtMIC3 contributes to guiding the parasite to the site of invasion in the chicken gut. The microarray analyses also reveal a lack of recognition of glycan sequences terminating in the N-glycolyl form of sialic acid by EtMIC3. Thus the parasite is well adapted to the avian host which lacks N-glycolyl neuraminic acid. We provide new structural insight into the MAR1 family of domains and reveal the atomic resolution basis for the sialic acid-based carbohydrate recognition. Finally, a preliminary chicken immunization trial provides evidence that recombinant EtMIC3 protein and EtMIC3 DNA are effective vaccine candidates. PMID:22022267

  4. Microarrays for Undergraduate Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Nguyen, Lisa L.; Denyer, Gareth S.; Johnston, Jill M.

    2006-01-01

    A microarray experiment is presented that, in six laboratory sessions, takes undergraduate students from the tissue sample right through to data analysis. The model chosen, the murine erythroleukemia cell line, can be easily cultured in sufficient quantities for class use. Large changes in gene expression can be induced in these cells by…

  5. Loss of intestinal O-glycans promotes spontaneous duodenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Nan; Bergstrom, Kirk; Fu, Jianxin; Xie, Biao; Chen, Weichang; Xia, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    Mucin-type O-glycans, primarily core 1- and core 3-derived O-glycans, are the major mucus barrier components throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Previous reports identified the biological role of O-glycans in the stomach and colon. However, the biological function of O-glycans in the small intestine remains unknown. Using mice lacking intestinal core 1- and core 3-derived O-glycans [intestinal epithelial cell C1galt1(-/-);C3GnT(-/-) or double knockout (DKO)], we found that loss of O-glycans predisposes DKO mice to spontaneous duodenal tumorigenesis by ∼1 yr of age. Tumor incidence did not increase with age; however, tumors advanced in aggressiveness by 20 mo. O-glycan deficiency was associated with reduced luminal mucus in DKO mice before tumor development. Altered intestinal epithelial homeostasis with enhanced baseline crypt proliferation characterizes these phenotypes as assayed by Ki67 staining. In addition, fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis reveals a significantly lower bacterial burden in the duodenum compared with the large intestine. This phenotype is not reduced with antibiotic treatment, implying O-glycosylation defects, rather than bacterial-induced inflammation, which causes spontaneous duodenal tumorigenesis. Moreover, inflammatory responses in DKO duodenal mucosa are mild as assayed with histology, quantitative PCR for inflammation-associated cytokines, and immunostaining for immune cells. Importantly, inducible deletion of intestinal O-glycans in adult mice leads to analogous spontaneous duodenal tumors, although with higher incidence and heightened severity compared with mice with O-glycans constitutive deletion. In conclusion, these studies reveal O-glycans within the small intestine are critical determinants of duodenal cancer risk. Future studies will provide insights into the pathogenesis in the general population and those at risk for this rare but deadly cancer.

  6. Glycan characterization of biopharmaceuticals: Updates and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Planinc, Ana; Bones, Jonathan; Dejaegher, Bieke; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Delporte, Cédric

    2016-05-19

    Therapeutic proteins are rapidly becoming the most promising class of pharmaceuticals on the market due to their successful treatment of a vast array of serious diseases, such as cancers and immune disorders. Therapeutic proteins are produced using recombinant DNA technology. More than 60% of therapeutic proteins are posttranslationally modified following biosynthesis by the addition of N- or O-linked glycans. Glycosylation is the most common posttranslational modifications of proteins. However, it is also the most demanding and complex posttranslational modification from the analytical point of view. Moreover, research has shown that glycosylation significantly impacts stability, half-life, mechanism of action and safety of a therapeutic protein. Considering the exponential growth of biotherapeutics, this present review of the literature (2009-2015) focuses on the characterization of protein glycosylation, which has witnessed an improvement in methodology. Furthermore, it discusses current issues in the fields of production and characterization of therapeutic proteins. This review also highlights the problem of non-standard requirements for the approval of biosimilars with regard to their glycosylation and discusses recent developments and perspectives for improved glycan characterization.

  7. Sulfated glycans in sea urchin fertilization.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2015-02-01

    Fertilization is a controlled cell-cell interaction event that ultimately leads to the union of the gametes involved in reproduction. Fertilization is characterized by three major steps: (i) sperm binding to the extracellular matrix that coats the egg, inducing thereby the acrosome reaction; (ii) penetration of the acrosome-reacted sperm through the egg coat until its contact with the egg plasma membrane; and (iii) adhesion and fusion of the cell membranes of both gametes and the interchange of genetic materials. The acrosome reaction in the first step is important because it ensures that fertilization occurs only between gametes of homologous species. This specificity is primarily driven by the structure of egg jelly coat glycans recognized by a lectin-like binding protein (receptor) in the sperm membrane. Sea urchin fertilization is the best model utilized for understanding carbohydrate-mediated acrosome reactions. This report aims at describing the biochemical basis of regulatory mechanisms exerted by sea urchin sulfated fucans and galactans of well-defined chemical structures on the egg-sperm recognition process during fertilization of this invertebrate. Flagellasialin, a sulfated polysialic acid-containing glycoprotein found in sea urchin sperm flagella, is another sulfated glycan example also involved in fertilization of the echinoderm.

  8. Glycan characterization of biopharmaceuticals: Updates and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Planinc, Ana; Bones, Jonathan; Dejaegher, Bieke; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Delporte, Cédric

    2016-05-19

    Therapeutic proteins are rapidly becoming the most promising class of pharmaceuticals on the market due to their successful treatment of a vast array of serious diseases, such as cancers and immune disorders. Therapeutic proteins are produced using recombinant DNA technology. More than 60% of therapeutic proteins are posttranslationally modified following biosynthesis by the addition of N- or O-linked glycans. Glycosylation is the most common posttranslational modifications of proteins. However, it is also the most demanding and complex posttranslational modification from the analytical point of view. Moreover, research has shown that glycosylation significantly impacts stability, half-life, mechanism of action and safety of a therapeutic protein. Considering the exponential growth of biotherapeutics, this present review of the literature (2009-2015) focuses on the characterization of protein glycosylation, which has witnessed an improvement in methodology. Furthermore, it discusses current issues in the fields of production and characterization of therapeutic proteins. This review also highlights the problem of non-standard requirements for the approval of biosimilars with regard to their glycosylation and discusses recent developments and perspectives for improved glycan characterization. PMID:27126786

  9. Highly specific purification of N-glycans using phosphate-based derivatization as an affinity tag in combination with Ti(4+)-SPE enrichment for mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Peng, Ye; Bin, Zhichao; Wang, Huijie; Lu, Haojie

    2016-08-31

    N-linked protein glycosylation is involved in regulation of a wide variety of cellular processes and associated with numerous diseases. Highly specific identification of N-glycome remains a challenge while its biological significance is acknowledged. The relatively low abundance of glycan in complex biological mixtures, lack of basic sites for protonation, and suppression by other highly abundant proteins/peptides lead to the particularly poor detection sensitivity of N-glycans in the MS analysis. Therefore, the highly specific purification procedure becomes a crucial step prior to MS analysis of the N-glycome. Herein, a novel N-glycans enrichment approach based on phosphate derivatization combined with Ti(4+)-SPE (solid phase extraction) was developed. Briefly, in this strategy, N-glycans were chemically labeled with a phospho-group at their reducing ends, such that the Ti(4+)-SPE microspheres were able to capture the phospho-containing glycans. The enrichment method was developed and optimized using model oligosaccharides (maltoheptaose DP7 and sialylated glycan A1) and also glycans from a standard glycoprotein (asialofetuin, ASF). This method experimentally showed high derivatization efficiency (almost 100%), excellent selectivity (analyzing DP7 in the digests of bovine serum albumin at a mass ratio of 1:100), high enriching recovery (90%), good reproducibility (CV<15%) as well as high sensitivity (LOD at fmol level). At last, the proposed method was successfully applied in the profiling of N-glycome in human serum, in which a total of 31 N-glycan masses were identified. PMID:27506354

  10. Highly specific purification of N-glycans using phosphate-based derivatization as an affinity tag in combination with Ti(4+)-SPE enrichment for mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Peng, Ye; Bin, Zhichao; Wang, Huijie; Lu, Haojie

    2016-08-31

    N-linked protein glycosylation is involved in regulation of a wide variety of cellular processes and associated with numerous diseases. Highly specific identification of N-glycome remains a challenge while its biological significance is acknowledged. The relatively low abundance of glycan in complex biological mixtures, lack of basic sites for protonation, and suppression by other highly abundant proteins/peptides lead to the particularly poor detection sensitivity of N-glycans in the MS analysis. Therefore, the highly specific purification procedure becomes a crucial step prior to MS analysis of the N-glycome. Herein, a novel N-glycans enrichment approach based on phosphate derivatization combined with Ti(4+)-SPE (solid phase extraction) was developed. Briefly, in this strategy, N-glycans were chemically labeled with a phospho-group at their reducing ends, such that the Ti(4+)-SPE microspheres were able to capture the phospho-containing glycans. The enrichment method was developed and optimized using model oligosaccharides (maltoheptaose DP7 and sialylated glycan A1) and also glycans from a standard glycoprotein (asialofetuin, ASF). This method experimentally showed high derivatization efficiency (almost 100%), excellent selectivity (analyzing DP7 in the digests of bovine serum albumin at a mass ratio of 1:100), high enriching recovery (90%), good reproducibility (CV<15%) as well as high sensitivity (LOD at fmol level). At last, the proposed method was successfully applied in the profiling of N-glycome in human serum, in which a total of 31 N-glycan masses were identified.

  11. Structural Analysis of N- and O-glycans Using ZIC-HILIC/Dialysis Coupled to NMR Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yi; Feng, Ju; Deng, Shuang; Cao, Li; Zhang, Qibin; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Zhaorui; Jiang, Yuxuan; Zink, Erika M.; Baker, Scott E.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Hu, Jian Z.; Wu, Si

    2014-11-19

    Protein glycosylation, an important and complex post-translational modification (PTM), is involved in various biological processes including the receptor-ligand and cell-cell interaction, and plays a crucial role in many biological functions. However, little is known about the glycan structures of important biological complex samples, and the conventional glycan enrichment strategy (i.e., size-exclusion column [SEC] separation,) prior to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detection is time-consuming and tedious. In this study, we employed SEC, Zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (ZIC-HILIC), and ZIC-HILIC coupled with dialysis strategies to enrich the glycopeptides from the pronase E digests of RNase B, followed by NMR analysis of the glycoconjugate. Our results suggest that the ZIC-HILIC enrichment coupled with dialysis is the most efficient, which was thus applied to the analysis of biological complex sample, the pronase E digest of the secreted proteins from the fungi Aspergillus niger. The NMR spectra revealed that the secreted proteins from A. niger contain both N-linked glycans with a high-mannose core and O-linked glycans bearing mannose and glucose with 1->3 and 1->6 linkages. In all, our study provides compelling evidence that ZIC-HILIC separation coupled to dialysis is superior to the commonly used SEC separation to prepare glycopeptides for the downstream NMR analysis, which could greatly facilitate the future NMR-based glycoproteomics research.

  12. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins pneumolysin and streptolysin O require binding to red blood cell glycans for hemolytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Shewell, Lucy K.; Harvey, Richard M.; Higgins, Melanie A.; Day, Christopher J.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Chen, Austen Y.; Gillen, Christine M.; James, David B. A.; Alonzo, Francis; Torres, Victor J.; Walker, Mark J.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) pneumolysin (Ply) is a key virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Membrane cholesterol is required for the cytolytic activity of this toxin, but it is not clear whether cholesterol is the only cellular receptor. Analysis of Ply binding to a glycan microarray revealed that Ply has lectin activity and binds glycans, including the Lewis histo-blood group antigens. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that Ply has the highest affinity for the sialyl LewisX (sLeX) structure, with a Kd of 1.88 × 10−5 M. Ply hemolytic activity against human RBCs showed dose-dependent inhibition by sLeX. Flow cytometric analysis and Western blots showed that blocking binding of Ply to the sLeX glycolipid on RBCs prevents deposition of the toxin in the membrane. The lectin domain responsible for sLeX binding is in domain 4 of Ply, which contains candidate carbohydrate-binding sites. Mutagenesis of these predicted carbohydrate-binding residues of Ply resulted in a decrease in hemolytic activity and a reduced affinity for sLeX. This study reveals that this archetypal CDC requires interaction with the sLeX glycolipid cellular receptor as an essential step before membrane insertion. A similar analysis conducted on streptolysin O from Streptococcus pyogenes revealed that this CDC also has glycan-binding properties and that hemolytic activity against RBCs can be blocked with the glycan lacto-N-neotetraose by inhibiting binding to the cell surface. Together, these data support the emerging paradigm shift that pore-forming toxins, including CDCs, have cellular receptors other than cholesterol that define target cell tropism. PMID:25422425

  13. Separation of one-pot procedure released O-glycans as 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone derivatives by hydrophilic interaction and reversed-phase liquid chromatography followed by identification using electrospray mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengjian; Yuan, Jiangbei; Wang, Zhongfu; Huang, Linjuan

    2013-01-25

    Qualitative and quantitative analysis of naturally-occurring complex glycans is essential for glycomics, which focuses on the studies of structure-function correlations of saccharides. We previously reported a one-pot procedure for the non-reductive release from glycoproteins and in situ labeling with 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) of O-glycans (C. Wang et al., Proteomics 11 (2011) 4229). Here we describe an HPLC-based O-glycan analytical strategy that combines a range of techniques including the one-pot procedure, independent separation by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and identification by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The complex mixtures of both neutral and sialylated O-glycans as bis-PMP derivatives released from glycoproteins using the one-pot procedure could be well separated by HILIC based on their size or by RP-HPLC depending on the type of linkage and their resulting three-dimensional (3D) structure, and their structure could be characterized by the ESI-MS and MS/MS analysis of the eluted glycan fractions. The validity of the current strategy was confirmed by the analysis of O-glycans released by the one-pot procedure from some standard glycoproteins, including porcine stomach mucin (PSM), bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) and bovine fetuin. The applicability of the current method to complex biological samples was also demonstrated by the analysis of mucin-type glycans from fetal bovine serum (FBS) and frog egg-jelly coat (FEC). This strategy, a powerful analytical tool that features the combination of different techniques, is useful for the qualitative and quantitative O-glycan analysis of more complex biological samples and has a potential for constructing an O-glycan analysis and structure database.

  14. Interactome Mapping: Using Protein Microarray Technology to Reconstruct Diverse Protein Networks

    PubMed Central

    Uzoma, Ijeoma; Zhu, Heng

    2013-01-01

    A major focus of systems biology is to characterize interactions between cellular components, in order to develop an accurate picture of the intricate networks within biological systems. Over the past decade, protein microarrays have greatly contributed to advances in proteomics and are becoming an important platform for systems biology. Protein microarrays are highly flexible, ranging from large-scale proteome microarrays to smaller customizable microarrays, making the technology amenable for detection of a broad spectrum of biochemical properties of proteins. In this article, we will focus on the numerous studies that have utilized protein microarrays to reconstruct biological networks including protein–DNA interactions, posttranslational protein modifications (PTMs), lectin–glycan recognition, pathogen–host interactions and hierarchical signaling cascades. The diversity in applications allows for integration of interaction data from numerous molecular classes and cellular states, providing insight into the structure of complex biological systems. We will also discuss emerging applications and future directions of protein microarray technology in the global frontier. PMID:23395178

  15. Navigating public microarray databases.

    PubMed

    Penkett, Christopher J; Bähler, Jürg

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-escalating amount of data being produced by genome-wide microarray studies, it is of increasing importance that these data are captured in public databases so that researchers can use this information to complement and enhance their own studies. Many groups have set up databases of expression data, ranging from large repositories, which are designed to comprehensively capture all published data, through to more specialized databases. The public repositories, such as ArrayExpress at the European Bioinformatics Institute contain complete datasets in raw format in addition to processed data, whilst the specialist databases tend to provide downstream analysis of normalized data from more focused studies and data sources. Here we provide a guide to the use of these public microarray resources.

  16. Modifications of Glycans: Biological Significance and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Muthana, Saddam M.; Campbell, Christopher; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a central role in a wide range of biological processes. As with nucleic acids and proteins, modifications of specific sites within the glycan chain can modulate a carbohydrate’s overall biological function. For example, acylation, methylation, sulfation, epimerization, and phosphorylation can occur at various positions within a carbohydrate to modulate bioactivity. Therefore, there is significant interest in identifying discrete carbohydrate modifications and understanding their biological effects. Additionally, enzymes that catalyze those modifications and proteins that bind modified glycans provide numerous targets for therapeutic intervention. This review will focus on modifications of glycans that occur after the oligomer/polymer has been assembled, generally referred to as postglycosylational modifications. PMID:22195988

  17. Systems Analysis of N-Glycan Processing in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hossler, Patrick; Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2007-01-01

    N-glycosylation plays a key role in the quality of many therapeutic glycoprotein biologics. The biosynthesis reactions of these oligosaccharides are a type of network in which a relatively small number of enzymes give rise to a large number of N-glycans as the reaction intermediates and terminal products. Multiple glycans appear on the glycoprotein molecules and give rise to a heterogeneous product. Controlling the glycan distribution is critical to the quality control of the product. Understanding N-glycan biosynthesis and the etiology of microheterogeneity would provide physiological insights, and facilitate cellular engineering to enhance glycoprotein quality. We developed a mathematical model of glycan biosynthesis in the Golgi and analyzed the various reaction variables on the resulting glycan distribution. The Golgi model was modeled as four compartments in series. The mechanism of protein transport across the Golgi is still controversial. From the viewpoint of their holding time distribution characteristics, the two main hypothesized mechanisms, vesicular transport and Golgi maturation models, resemble four continuous mixing-tanks (4CSTR) and four plug-flow reactors (4PFR) in series, respectively. The two hypotheses were modeled accordingly and compared. The intrinsic reaction kinetics were first evaluated using a batch (or single PFR) reactor. A sufficient holding time is needed to produce terminally-processed glycans. Altering enzyme concentrations has a complex effect on the final glycan distribution, as the changes often affect many reaction steps in the network. Comparison of the glycan profiles predicted by the 4CSTR and 4PFR models points to the 4PFR system as more likely to be the true mechanism. To assess whether glycan heterogeneity can be eliminated in the biosynthesis of biotherapeutics the 4PFR model was further used to assess whether a homogeneous glycan profile can be created through metabolic engineering. We demonstrate by the spatial

  18. Multiple Novel Functions of Henipavirus O-glycans: The First O-glycan Functions Identified in the Paramyxovirus Family

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jacquelyn A.; Nicola, Anthony V.; Baum, Linda G.; Aguilar, Hector C.

    2016-01-01

    O-linked glycosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification in organisms belonging to several kingdoms. Both microbial and host protein glycans are used by many pathogens for host invasion and immune evasion, yet little is known about the roles of O-glycans in viral pathogenesis. Reportedly, there is no single function attributed to O-glycans for the significant paramyxovirus family. The paramyxovirus family includes many important pathogens, such as measles, mumps, parainfluenza, metapneumo- and the deadly Henipaviruses Nipah (NiV) and Hendra (HeV) viruses. Paramyxoviral cell entry requires the coordinated actions of two viral membrane glycoproteins: the attachment (HN/H/G) and fusion (F) glycoproteins. O-glycan sites in HeV G were recently identified, facilitating use of the attachment protein of this deadly paramyxovirus as a model to study O-glycan functions. We mutated the identified HeV G O-glycosylation sites and found mutants with altered cell-cell fusion, G conformation, G/F association, viral entry in a pseudotyped viral system, and, quite unexpectedly, pseudotyped viral F protein incorporation and processing phenotypes. These are all important functions of viral glycoproteins. These phenotypes were broadly conserved for equivalent NiV mutants. Thus our results identify multiple novel and pathologically important functions of paramyxoviral O-glycans, paving the way to study O-glycan functions in other paramyxoviruses and enveloped viruses. PMID:26867212

  19. Complex N-Glycans Are Essential, but Core 1 and 2 Mucin O-Glycans, O-Fucose Glycans, and NOTCH1 Are Dispensable, for Mammalian Spermatogenesis1

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Frank; Lu, Linchao; Williams, Suzannah A.; Stanley, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT To identify roles in spermatogenesis for major subclasses of N- and O-glycans and Notch signaling, male mice carrying floxed C1galt1, Pofut1, Notch1 or Mgat1 alleles and a testis-specific Cre recombinase transgene were generated. T-synthase (C1GALT1) transfers Gal to generate core 1 and core 2 mucin O-glycans; POFUT1 transfers O-fucose to particular epidermal growth factor-like repeats and is essential for canonical Notch signaling; and MGAT1 (GlcNAcT-I) transfers GlcNAc to initiate hybrid and complex N-glycan synthesis. Cre recombinase transgenes driven by various promoters were investigated, including Stra8-iCre expressed in spermatogonia, Sycp1-Cre expressed in spermatocytes, Prm1-Cre expressed in spermatids, and AMH-Cre expressed in Sertoli cells. All Cre transgenes deleted floxed alleles, but efficiencies varied widely. Stra8-iCre was the most effective, deleting floxed Notch1 and Mgat1 alleles with 100% efficiency and floxed C1galt1 and Pofut1 alleles with ∼80% efficiency, based on transmission of deleted alleles. Removal of C1galt1, Pofut1, or Notch1 in spermatogonia had no effect on testicular weight, histology, or fertility. However, males in which the synthesis of complex N-glycans was blocked by deletion of Mgat1 in spermatogonia did not produce sperm. Spermatogonia, spermatocytes, and spermatids were generated, but most spermatids formed giant multinucleated cells or symplasts, and apoptosis was increased. Therefore, although core 1 and 2 mucin O-glycans, NOTCH1, POFUT1, O-fucose glycans, and Notch signaling are dispensable, MGAT1 and complex N-glycans are essential for spermatogenesis. PMID:22492969

  20. Screening and characterization of plant cell walls using carbohydrate microarrays.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Iben; Willats, William G T

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells are surrounded by cell walls built largely from complex carbohydrates. The primary walls of growing plant cells consist of interdependent networks of three polysaccharide classes: cellulose, cross-linking glycans (also known as hemicelluloses), and pectins. Cellulose microfibrils are tethered together by cross-linking glycans, and this assembly forms the major load-bearing component of primary walls, which is infiltrated with pectic polymers. In the secondary walls of woody tissues, pectins are much reduced and walls are reinforced with the phenolic polymer lignin. Plant cell walls are essential for plant life and also have numerous industrial applications, ranging from wood to nutraceuticals. Enhancing our knowledge of cell wall biology and the effective use of cell wall materials is dependent to a large extent on being able to analyse their fine structures. We have developed a suite of techniques based on microarrays probed with monoclonal antibodies with specificity for cell wall components, and here we present practical protocols for this type of analysis.

  1. Fc glycans of therapeutic antibodies as critical quality attributes

    PubMed Central

    Reusch, Dietmar; Tejada, Max L

    2015-01-01

    Critical quality attributes (CQA) are physical, chemical, biological or microbiological properties or characteristics that must be within an appropriate limit, range or distribution to ensure the desired product quality, safety and efficacy. For monoclonal antibody therapeutics that rely on fraction crystalizable (Fc)-mediated effector function for their clinical activity, the terminal sugars of Fc glycans have been shown to be critical for safety or efficacy. Different glycosylation variants have also been shown to influence the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic behavior while other Fc glycan structural elements may be involved in adverse immune reactions. This review focuses on the role of Fc glycans as CQAs. Fc glycan information from the published literature is summarized and evaluated for impact on patient safety, immunogenicity, bioactivity and pharmacodynamics/pharmacokinetics. PMID:26263923

  2. Chemically-blocked Antibody Microarray for Multiplexed High-throughput Profiling of Specific Protein Glycosylation in Complex Samples

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chen; Wonsidler, Joshua L.; Li, Jianwei; Du, Yanming; Block, Timothy; Haab, Brian; Chen, Songming

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we describe an effective protocol for use in a multiplexed high-throughput antibody microarray with glycan binding protein detection that allows for the glycosylation profiling of specific proteins. Glycosylation of proteins is the most prevalent post-translational modification found on proteins, and leads diversified modifications of the physical, chemical, and biological properties of proteins. Because the glycosylation machinery is particularly susceptible to disease progression and malignant transformation, aberrant glycosylation has been recognized as early detection biomarkers for cancer and other diseases. However, current methods to study protein glycosylation typically are too complicated or expensive for use in most normal laboratory or clinical settings and a more practical method to study protein glycosylation is needed. The new protocol described in this study makes use of a chemically blocked antibody microarray with glycan-binding protein (GBP) detection and significantly reduces the time, cost, and lab equipment requirements needed to study protein glycosylation. In this method, multiple immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are printed directly onto the microarray slides and the N-glycans on the antibodies are blocked. The blocked, immobilized glycoprotein-specific antibodies are able to capture and isolate glycoproteins from a complex sample that is applied directly onto the microarray slides. Glycan detection then can be performed by the application of biotinylated lectins and other GBPs to the microarray slide, while binding levels can be determined using Dylight 549-Streptavidin. Through the use of an antibody panel and probing with multiple biotinylated lectins, this method allows for an effective glycosylation profile of the different proteins found in a given human or animal sample to be developed. Introduction Glycosylation of protein, which is the most ubiquitous post-translational modification on proteins, modifies

  3. Surface chemistries for antibody microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-05-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays promise to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The original technology for printing ELISA microarray chips and capturing antibodies on slides was derived from the DNA microarray field. However, due to the need to maintain antibody structure and function when immobilized, surface chemistries used for DNA microarrays are not always appropriate for ELISA microarrays. In order to identify better surface chemistries for antibody capture, a number of commercial companies and academic research groups have developed new slide types that could improve antibody function in microarray applications. In this review we compare and contrast the commercially available slide chemistries, as well as highlight some promising recent advances in the field.

  4. Neutral glycans from sandfish skin can reduce friction of polymers.

    PubMed

    Vihar, Boštjan; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-03-01

    The lizardScincus scincus, also known as sandfish, can move through aeolian desert sand in a swimming-like manner. A prerequisite for this ability is a special integument, i.e. scales with a very low friction for sand and a high abrasion resistance. Glycans in the scales are causally related to the low friction. Here, we analysed the glycans and found that neutral glycans with five to nine mannose residues are important. If these glycans were covalently bound to acrylic polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylic car coatings at a density of approximately one molecule per 4 nm², friction for and adhesion of sand particles could be reduced to levels close to those observed with sandfish scales. This was also found true, if the glycans were isolated from sources other than sandfish scales like plants such as almonds or mistletoe. We speculate that these neutral glycans act as low density spacers separating sand particles from the dense scales thereby reducing van der Waals forces. PMID:27030038

  5. Sugars Communicate through Water: Oriented Glycans Induce Water Structuring

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M.; Fontani, Giacomo; Reusch, Frieder B.; Roba, Marcella; Spencer, Nicholas D.; Crockett, Rowena

    2013-01-01

    Cells are coated with a glycocalyx—a layer of carbohydrate-containing biomolecules, such as glycoproteins. Although the structure and orientation of the cell-surface glycans are frequently regarded as being random, we have found, using α-1-acid glycoprotein and antitrypsin as model systems for surface glycans, that this is not the case. A glycoprotein monolayer was adsorbed onto hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates. Surface-force measurements revealed that the orientation of the glycans with respect to the aqueous solution has a profound effect on the structure of vicinal water. The glycan antennae of the surface-adsorbed glycoproteins apparently impose an ordering on the water, resulting in a strong repulsive force over some tens of nanometers with superposed film-thickness transitions ranging from ≈0.7 to 1.8 nm. When the glycan orientation is modified by chemical means, this long-range repulsion disappears. These results may provide an explanation as to why the multiantennary structure is ubiquitous in glycoproteins. Although direct, specific interactions between glycans and other biomolecules are essential for their functionality, these results indicate that glycans’ long-range structuring of water may also influence their ability to interact with biomolecules in their vicinity. PMID:23790377

  6. Neutral glycans from sandfish skin can reduce friction of polymers

    PubMed Central

    Vihar, Boštjan; Hanisch, Franz Georg; Baumgartner, Werner

    2016-01-01

    The lizard Scincus scincus, also known as sandfish, can move through aeolian desert sand in a swimming-like manner. A prerequisite for this ability is a special integument, i.e. scales with a very low friction for sand and a high abrasion resistance. Glycans in the scales are causally related to the low friction. Here, we analysed the glycans and found that neutral glycans with five to nine mannose residues are important. If these glycans were covalently bound to acrylic polymers like poly(methyl methacrylate) or acrylic car coatings at a density of approximately one molecule per 4 nm², friction for and adhesion of sand particles could be reduced to levels close to those observed with sandfish scales. This was also found true, if the glycans were isolated from sources other than sandfish scales like plants such as almonds or mistletoe. We speculate that these neutral glycans act as low density spacers separating sand particles from the dense scales thereby reducing van der Waals forces. PMID:27030038

  7. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, Davis Austin

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons), 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)

  8. The analysis of sialylation, N-glycan branching, and expression of O-glycans in seminal plasma of infertile men.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Ewa M; Kałuża, Anna; Zimmer, Mariusz; Ferens-Sieczkowska, Mirosława

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates are known to mediate some events involved in successful fertilization. Although some studies on the glycosylation of seminal plasma proteins are available, the total glycan profile was rarely analyzed as a feature influencing fertilization potential. In this work we aimed to compare some glycosylation traits in seminal plasma glycoproteins of fertile and infertile men. The following findings emerge from our studies: (1) in human seminal plasma the presence and alterations of O-linked glycans were observed; (2) the expression of SNA-reactive sialic acid significantly differs between asthenozoospermia and both normozoospermic (fertile and infertile) groups; (3) the expression of PHA-L-reactive highly branched N-glycans was significantly lower in oligozoospermic patients than in both normozoospermic groups. Indication of the appropriate lectins that would enable the possibly precise determination of the glycan profile seems to be a good supplement to mass spectrum analysis. Extension of the lectin panel is useful for the further research.

  9. Blood Plasma-Derived Anti-Glycan Antibodies to Sialylated and Sulfated Glycans Identify Ovarian Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Chinarev, Alexander; Schoetzau, Andreas; Fedier, André; Bovin, Nicolai V.; Hacker, Neville F.; Jacob, Francis; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Altered levels of naturally occurring anti-glycan antibodies (AGA) circulating in human blood plasma are found in different pathologies including cancer. Here the levels of AGA directed against 22 negatively charged (sialylated and sulfated) glycans were assessed in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC, n = 22) patients and benign controls (n = 31) using our previously developed suspension glycan array (SGA). Specifically, the ability of AGA to differentiate between controls and HGSOC, the most common and aggressive type of ovarian cancer with a poor outcome was determined. Results were compared to CA125, the commonly used ovarian cancer biomarker. AGA to seven glycans that significantly (P<0.05) differentiated between HGSOC and control were identified: AGA to top candidates SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF (both IgM) differentiated comparably to CA125. The area under the curve (AUC) of a panel of AGA to 5 glycans (SiaTn, 6-OSulfo-TF, 6-OSulfo-LN, SiaLea, and GM2) (0.878) was comparable to CA125 (0.864), but it markedly increased (0.985) when combined with CA125. AGA to SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF were also valuable predictors for HGSOC when CA125 values appeared inconclusive, i.e. were below a certain threshold. AGA-glycan binding was in some cases isotype-dependent and sensitive to glycosidic linkage switch (α2–6 vs. α2–3), to sialylation, and to sulfation of the glycans. In conclusion, plasma-derived AGA to sialylated and sulfated glycans including SiaTn and 6-OSulfo-TF detected by SGA present a valuable alternative to CA125 for differentiating controls from HGSOC patients and for predicting the likelihood of HGSOC, and may be potential HGSOC tumor markers. PMID:27764122

  10. Galatrox is a C-type lectin in Bothrops atrox snake venom that selectively binds LacNAc-terminated glycans and can induce acute inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sartim, Marco A; Riul, Thalita B; Del Cistia-Andrade, Camillo; Stowell, Sean R; Arthur, Connie M; Sorgi, Carlos A; Faccioli, Lucia H; Cummings, Richard D; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Sampaio, Suely V

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that snake venom contains glycan-binding proteins (GBPs), although the binding specificity and biological activities of many of these GBPs is unclear. Here we report our studies on the glycan binding specificity and activities of galatrox, a Bothrops atrox snake venom-derived GBP. Glycan microarray analysis indicates that galatrox binds most strongly to glycans expressing N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc), with a significant preference for Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ over Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ compounds. Galatrox also bound immobilized laminin, a LacNAc-dense extracellular matrix component, suggesting that this GBP can bind LacNAc-bearing glycoproteins. As several endogenous mammalian GBPs utilize a similar binding LacNAc binding preference to regulate neutrophil and monocyte activity, we hypothesized that galatrox may mediate B. atrox toxicity through regulation of leukocyte activity. Indeed, galatrox bound neutrophils and promoted leukocyte chemotaxis in a carbohydrate-dependent manner. Similarly, galatrox administration into the mouse peritoneal cavity induced significant neutrophil migration and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-6. Exposure of bone marrow-derived macrophages to galatrox induced generation of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-6, TNF-α, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine. This signaling by galatrox was mediated via its carbohydrate recognition domain by activation of the TLR4-mediated MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. These results indicate that galatrox has pro-inflammatory activity through its interaction with LacNAc-bearing glycans on neutrophils, macrophages and extracellular matrix proteins and induce the release of pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:24973254

  11. Galatrox is a C-type lectin in Bothrops atrox snake venom that selectively binds LacNAc-terminated glycans and can induce acute inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sartim, Marco A; Riul, Thalita B; Del Cistia-Andrade, Camillo; Stowell, Sean R; Arthur, Connie M; Sorgi, Carlos A; Faccioli, Lucia H; Cummings, Richard D; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Sampaio, Suely V

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies indicate that snake venom contains glycan-binding proteins (GBPs), although the binding specificity and biological activities of many of these GBPs is unclear. Here we report our studies on the glycan binding specificity and activities of galatrox, a Bothrops atrox snake venom-derived GBP. Glycan microarray analysis indicates that galatrox binds most strongly to glycans expressing N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc), with a significant preference for Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ over Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ compounds. Galatrox also bound immobilized laminin, a LacNAc-dense extracellular matrix component, suggesting that this GBP can bind LacNAc-bearing glycoproteins. As several endogenous mammalian GBPs utilize a similar binding LacNAc binding preference to regulate neutrophil and monocyte activity, we hypothesized that galatrox may mediate B. atrox toxicity through regulation of leukocyte activity. Indeed, galatrox bound neutrophils and promoted leukocyte chemotaxis in a carbohydrate-dependent manner. Similarly, galatrox administration into the mouse peritoneal cavity induced significant neutrophil migration and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-6. Exposure of bone marrow-derived macrophages to galatrox induced generation of pro-inflammatory mediators IL-6, TNF-α, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine. This signaling by galatrox was mediated via its carbohydrate recognition domain by activation of the TLR4-mediated MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. These results indicate that galatrox has pro-inflammatory activity through its interaction with LacNAc-bearing glycans on neutrophils, macrophages and extracellular matrix proteins and induce the release of pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:24973254

  12. Ecotoxicogenomics: Microarray interlaboratory comparability.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dorsch, Doris E; Bay, Steven M; Moore, Shelly; Layton, Blythe; Mehinto, Alvine C; Vulpe, Chris D; Brown-Augustine, Marianna; Loguinov, Alex; Poynton, Helen; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Perkins, Edward J; Escalon, Lynn; Denslow, Nancy D; Cristina, Colli-Dula R; Doan, Tri; Shukradas, Shweta; Bruno, Joy; Brown, Lorraine; Van Agglen, Graham; Jackman, Paula; Bauer, Megan

    2016-02-01

    Transcriptomic analysis can complement traditional ecotoxicology data by providing mechanistic insight, and by identifying sub-lethal organismal responses and contaminant classes underlying observed toxicity. Before transcriptomic information can be used in monitoring and risk assessment, it is necessary to determine its reproducibility and detect key steps impacting the reliable identification of differentially expressed genes. A custom 15K-probe microarray was used to conduct transcriptomics analyses across six laboratories with estuarine amphipods exposed to cyfluthrin-spiked or control sediments (10 days). Two sample types were generated, one consisted of total RNA extracts (Ex) from exposed and control samples (extracted by one laboratory) and the other consisted of exposed and control whole body amphipods (WB) from which each laboratory extracted RNA. Our findings indicate that gene expression microarray results are repeatable. Differentially expressed data had a higher degree of repeatability across all laboratories in samples with similar RNA quality (Ex) when compared to WB samples with more variable RNA quality. Despite such variability a subset of genes were consistently identified as differentially expressed across all laboratories and sample types. We found that the differences among the individual laboratory results can be attributed to several factors including RNA quality and technical expertise, but the overall results can be improved by following consistent protocols and with appropriate training.

  13. Glycans and cancer: role of N-glycans in cancer biomarker, progression and metastasis, and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Kizuka, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation is catalyzed by various glycosyltransferase enzymes which are mostly located in the Golgi apparatus in cells. These enzymes glycosylate various complex carbohydrates such as glycoproteins, glycolipids, and proteoglycans. The enzyme activity of glycosyltransferases and their gene expression are altered in various pathophysiological situations including cancer. Furthermore, the activity of glycosyltransferases is controlled by various factors such as the levels of nucleotide sugars, acceptor substrates, nucleotide sugar transporters, chaperons, and endogenous lectin in cancer cells. The glycosylation results in various functional changes of glycoproteins including cell surface receptors and adhesion molecules such as E-cadherin and integrins. These changes confer the unique characteristic phenotypes associated with cancer cells. Therefore, glycans play key roles in cancer progression and treatment. This review focuses on glycan structures, their biosynthetic glycosyltransferases, and their genes in relation to their biological significance and involvement in cancer, especially cancer biomarkers, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, cancer progression and metastasis, and therapeutics. Major N-glycan branching structures which are directly related to cancer are β1,6-GlcNAc branching, bisecting GlcNAc, and core fucose. These structures are enzymatic products of glycosyltransferases, GnT-V, GnT-III, and Fut8, respectively. The genes encoding these enzymes are designated as MGAT5 (Mgat5), MGAT3 (Mgat3), and FUT8 (Fut8) in humans (mice in parenthesis), respectively. GnT-V is highly associated with cancer metastasis, whereas GnT-III is associated with cancer suppression. Fut8 is involved in expression of cancer biomarker as well as in the treatment of cancer. In addition to these enzymes, GnT-IV and GnT-IX (GnT-Vb) will be also discussed in relation to cancer.

  14. Evidence for a Lectin Specific for Sulfated Glycans in the Salivary Gland of the Malaria Vector, Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Ma, Dongying; Andersen, John F.; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland homogenate (SGH) from the female mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae, An. stephensi, An. freeborni, An. dirus and An. albimanus were found to exhibit hemagglutinating (lectin) activity. Lectin activity was not found for male An. gambiae, or female Ae aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, Phlebotomus duboscqi, and Lutzomyia longipalpis. With respect to species-specificity, An. gambiae SGH agglutinates red blood cells (RBC) from humans, horse, sheep, goat, pig, and cow; it is less active for rats RBC, and not detectable for guinea-pigs or chicken RBC. Notably, lectin activity was inhibited by low concentrations of dextran sulfate 50–500 K, fucoidan, heparin, laminin, heparin sulfate proteoglycan, sialyl-containing glycans (e.g. 3′-sialyl Lewis X, and 6′-sialyl lactose), and gangliosides (e.g. GM3, GD1, GD1b, GTB1, GM1, GQ1B), but not by simple sugars. These results imply that molecule(s) in the salivary gland target sulfated glycans. SGH from An. gambiae was also found to promote agglutination of HL-60 cells which are rich in sialyl Lewis X, a glycan that decorates PSGL-1, the neutrophils receptor that interacts with endothelial cell P-selectin. Accordingly, SGH interferes with HL-60 cells adhesion to immobilized P-selectin. Because An. gambiae SGH expresses galectins, one member of this family (herein named Agalectin) was expressed in E. coli. Recombinant Agalectin behaves as a non-covalent homodimer. It does not display lectin activity, and does not interact with 500 candidates tested in a Glycan microarray. Gel-filtration chromatography of the SGH of An. gambiae identified a fraction with hemagglutinating activity, which was analyzed by 1D PAGE followed by in-gel tryptic digestion, and nano-LC MS/MS. This approach identified several genes which emerge as candidates for a lectin targeting sulfated glycans, the first with this selectivity to be reported in the SGH of a blood-sucking arthropod. The role of salivary molecules (sialogenins) with lectin

  15. Evidence for a lectin specific for sulfated glycans in the salivary gland of the malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Francischetti, Ivo M B; Ma, Dongying; Andersen, John F; Ribeiro, José M C

    2014-01-01

    Salivary gland homogenate (SGH) from the female mosquitoes Anopheles gambiae, An. stephensi, An. freeborni, An. dirus and An. albimanus were found to exhibit hemagglutinating (lectin) activity. Lectin activity was not found for male An. gambiae, or female Ae aegypti, Culex quinquefasciatus, Phlebotomus duboscqi, and Lutzomyia longipalpis. With respect to species-specificity, An. gambiae SGH agglutinates red blood cells (RBC) from humans, horse, sheep, goat, pig, and cow; it is less active for rats RBC, and not detectable for guinea-pigs or chicken RBC. Notably, lectin activity was inhibited by low concentrations of dextran sulfate 50-500 K, fucoidan, heparin, laminin, heparin sulfate proteoglycan, sialyl-containing glycans (e.g. 3'-sialyl Lewis X, and 6'-sialyl lactose), and gangliosides (e.g. GM3, GD1, GD1b, GTB1, GM1, GQ1B), but not by simple sugars. These results imply that molecule(s) in the salivary gland target sulfated glycans. SGH from An. gambiae was also found to promote agglutination of HL-60 cells which are rich in sialyl Lewis X, a glycan that decorates PSGL-1, the neutrophils receptor that interacts with endothelial cell P-selectin. Accordingly, SGH interferes with HL-60 cells adhesion to immobilized P-selectin. Because An. gambiae SGH expresses galectins, one member of this family (herein named Agalectin) was expressed in E. coli. Recombinant Agalectin behaves as a non-covalent homodimer. It does not display lectin activity, and does not interact with 500 candidates tested in a Glycan microarray. Gel-filtration chromatography of the SGH of An. gambiae identified a fraction with hemagglutinating activity, which was analyzed by 1D PAGE followed by in-gel tryptic digestion, and nano-LC MS/MS. This approach identified several genes which emerge as candidates for a lectin targeting sulfated glycans, the first with this selectivity to be reported in the SGH of a blood-sucking arthropod. The role of salivary molecules (sialogenins) with lectin activity is

  16. Recent strategies targeting HIV glycans in vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Horiya, Satoru; MacPherson, Iain S; Krauss, Isaac J

    2014-12-01

    Although efforts to develop a vaccine against HIV have so far met with little success, recent studies of HIV-positive patients with strongly neutralizing sera have shown that the human immune system is capable of producing potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs), some of which neutralize up to 90% of HIV strains. These antibodies bind conserved vulnerable sites on the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120, and identification of these sites has provided exciting clues about the design of potentially effective vaccines. Carbohydrates have a key role in this field, as a large fraction of bnAbs bind carbohydrates or combinations of carbohydrate and peptide elements on gp120. Additionally, carbohydrates partially mask some peptide surfaces recognized by bnAbs. The use of engineered glycoproteins and other glycostructures as vaccines to elicit antibodies with broad neutralizing activity is therefore a key area of interest in HIV vaccine design.

  17. DNA microarray technology for target identification and validation.

    PubMed

    Jayapal, Manikandan; Melendez, Alirio J

    2006-01-01

    1. Microarrays, a recent development, provide a revolutionary platform to analyse thousands of genes at once. They have enormous potential in the study of biological processes in health and disease and, perhaps, microarrays have become crucial tools in diagnostic applications and drug discovery. 2. Microarray based studies have provided the essential impetus for biomedical experiments, such as identification of disease-causing genes in malignancies and regulatory genes in the cell cycle mechanism. Microarrays can identify genes for new and unique potential drug targets, predict drug responsiveness for individual patients and, finally, initiate gene therapy and prevention strategies. 3. The present article reviews the principles and technological concerns, as well as the steps involved in obtaining and analysing of data. Furthermore, applications of microarray based experiments in drug target identifications and validation strategies are discussed. 4. To exemplify how this tool can be useful, in the present review we provide an overview of some of the past and potential future aspects of microarray technology and present a broad overview of this rapidly growing field.

  18. Glycans Are a Novel Biomarker of Chronological and Biological Ages

    PubMed Central

    Krištić, Jasminka; Vučković, Frano; Menni, Cristina; Klarić, Lucija; Keser, Toma; Beceheli, Ivona; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Novokmet, Mislav; Mangino, Massimo; Thaqi, Kujtim; Rudan, Pavao; Novokmet, Natalija; Šarac, Jelena; Missoni, Saša; Kolčić, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Aulchenko, Yurii; Valdes, Ana; Wilson, James F.; Gornik, Olga; Primorac, Dragan; Zoldoš, Vlatka; Spector, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Fine structural details of glycans attached to the conserved N-glycosylation site significantly not only affect function of individual immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules but also mediate inflammation at the systemic level. By analyzing IgG glycosylation in 5,117 individuals from four European populations, we have revealed very complex patterns of changes in IgG glycosylation with age. Several IgG glycans (including FA2B, FA2G2, and FA2BG2) changed considerably with age and the combination of these three glycans can explain up to 58% of variance in chronological age, significantly more than other markers of biological age like telomere lengths. The remaining variance in these glycans strongly correlated with physiological parameters associated with biological age. Thus, IgG glycosylation appears to be closely linked with both chronological and biological ages. Considering the important role of IgG glycans in inflammation, and because the observed changes with age promote inflammation, changes in IgG glycosylation also seem to represent a factor contributing to aging. Significance Statement Glycosylation is the key posttranslational mechanism that regulates function of immunoglobulins, with multiple systemic repercussions to the immune system. Our study of IgG glycosylation in 5,117 individuals from four European populations has revealed very extensive and complex changes in IgG glycosylation with age. The combined index composed of only three glycans explained up to 58% of variance in age, considerably more than other biomarkers of age like telomere lengths. The remaining variance in these glycans strongly correlated with physiological parameters associated with biological age; thus, IgG glycosylation appears to be closely linked with both chronological and biological ages. The ability to measure human biological aging using molecular profiling has practical applications for diverse fields such as disease prevention and treatment, or forensics. PMID:24325898

  19. The Genopolis Microarray Database

    PubMed Central

    Splendiani, Andrea; Brandizi, Marco; Even, Gael; Beretta, Ottavio; Pavelka, Norman; Pelizzola, Mattia; Mayhaus, Manuel; Foti, Maria; Mauri, Giancarlo; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression databases are key resources for microarray data management and analysis and the importance of a proper annotation of their content is well understood. Public repositories as well as microarray database systems that can be implemented by single laboratories exist. However, there is not yet a tool that can easily support a collaborative environment where different users with different rights of access to data can interact to define a common highly coherent content. The scope of the Genopolis database is to provide a resource that allows different groups performing microarray experiments related to a common subject to create a common coherent knowledge base and to analyse it. The Genopolis database has been implemented as a dedicated system for the scientific community studying dendritic and macrophage cells functions and host-parasite interactions. Results The Genopolis Database system allows the community to build an object based MIAME compliant annotation of their experiments and to store images, raw and processed data from the Affymetrix GeneChip® platform. It supports dynamical definition of controlled vocabularies and provides automated and supervised steps to control the coherence of data and annotations. It allows a precise control of the visibility of the database content to different sub groups in the community and facilitates exports of its content to public repositories. It provides an interactive users interface for data analysis: this allows users to visualize data matrices based on functional lists and sample characterization, and to navigate to other data matrices defined by similarity of expression values as well as functional characterizations of genes involved. A collaborative environment is also provided for the definition and sharing of functional annotation by users. Conclusion The Genopolis Database supports a community in building a common coherent knowledge base and analyse it. This fills a gap between a local

  20. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  1. Fluorous modified magnetic mesoporous silica composites-incorporated fluorous solid-phase extraction for the specific enrichment of N-linked glycans with simultaneous exclusion of proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Man; Deng, Chunhui

    2016-10-01

    Taking advantage of fluorine-fluorine interactions, fluorous solid-phase extraction (FSPE) is emerging as a novel approach in proteomics research. Notably, silica gel bound with perfluoroalkyl groups was applied to the FSPE of N-linked glycans. Based on previous studies, mesoporous silica coated magnetic nanoparticles bound with perfluoroalkyl groups were synthesized for the specific enrichment of N-linked glycans in this study. The magnetic nanoparticles-incorporated FSPE strategy successfully identified 22 N-linked glycans from the OVA digest with a concentration of 0.5μg/μL, and achieved a detection limit of 5ng/μL (with 16 N-linked glycans identified). It also showed good day-to-day reproducibility. Its selectivity towards BSA protein is 1:200 (molar ratio), showing excellent size-exclusion effect. In addition, the present method proved to be effective for the analysis of the human serum digest, opening up new prospect for the identification of glycans and proteins with other post-translational modifications in biological environment. PMID:27474286

  2. Living-Cell Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yarmush, Martin L.; King, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Living cells are remarkably complex. To unravel this complexity, living-cell assays have been developed that allow delivery of experimental stimuli and measurement of the resulting cellular responses. High-throughput adaptations of these assays, known as living-cell microarrays, which are based on microtiter plates, high-density spotting, microfabrication, and microfluidics technologies, are being developed for two general applications: (a) to screen large-scale chemical and genomic libraries and (b) to systematically investigate the local cellular microenvironment. These emerging experimental platforms offer exciting opportunities to rapidly identify genetic determinants of disease, to discover modulators of cellular function, and to probe the complex and dynamic relationships between cells and their local environment. PMID:19413510

  3. Tiling Microarray Analysis Tools

    2005-05-04

    TiMAT is a package of 23 command line Java applications for use in the analysis of Affymetrix tiled genomic microarray data. TiMAT enables: 1) Rebuilding the genome annotation for entire tiled arrays (repeat filtering, chromosomal coordinate assignment). 2) Post processing of oligo intensity values (quantile normalization, median scaling, PMMM transformation), 3) Significance testing (Wilcoxon rank sum and signed rank tests, intensity difference and ratio tests) and Interval refinement (filtering based on multiple statistics, overlap comparisons),more » 4) Data visualization (detailed thumbnail/zoomed view with Interval Plots and data export to Affymetrix's Integrated Genome Browser) and Data reports (spreadsheet summaries and detailed profiles)« less

  4. Common glycoproteins expressing polylactosamine-type glycans on matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cells show different glycan profiles.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Mitsui, Yosuke; Kakoi, Naotaka; Yamada, Keita; Hayakawa, Takao; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2014-02-01

    Recently, we reported comparative analysis of glycoproteins which express cancer-specific N-glycans on various cancer cells and identified 24 glycoproteins having polylactosamine (polyLacNAc)-type N-glycans that are abundantly present in malignant cells [ Mitsui et al., J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 2012 , 70 , 718 - 726 ]. In the present study, we applied the technique to comparative studies on common glycoproteins present in the matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines. Metastatic melanoma cells (WM266-4) contained a large amount of polyLacNAc-type N-glycans in comparison with primary melanoma cells (WM115). To identify the glycoproteins expressing these N-glycans, glycopeptides having polyLacNAc-type N-glycans were captured by a Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA)-immobilized agarose column. The captured glycopeptides were analyzed by LC/MS after removing N-glycans, and some glycoproteins such as basigin, lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) were identified in both WM115 and WM266-4 cells. The expression level of polyLacNAc of CSPG4 in WM266-4 cells was significantly higher than that in WM115 cells. In addition, sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains in CSPG4 showed dramatic changes between these cell lines. These data show that characteristic glycans attached to common proteins observed in different stages of cancer cells will be useful markers for determining degree of malignancies of tumor cells. PMID:24354860

  5. Engineering galectin–glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Farhadi, Shaheen A

    2016-01-01

    Galectins, a 15-member family of soluble carbohydrate-binding proteins, are receiving increasing interest as therapeutic targets for immunotherapy and immunomodulation due to their role as extracellular signals that regulate innate and adaptive immune cell phenotype and function. However, different galectins can have redundant, synergistic, or antagonistic signaling activity in normal immunological responses, such as resolution of inflammation and induction of antigen-specific tolerance. In addition, certain galectins can be hijacked to promote progression of immunopathologies, such as tumor immune privilege, metastasis, and viral infection, while others can inhibit these processes. Thus, eliciting a desired immunological outcome will likely necessitate therapeutics that can precisely enhance or inhibit particular galectin–glycan interactions. Multivalency is an important determinant of the affinity and specificity of natural galectin–glycan interactions, and is emerging as a key design element for therapeutics that can effectively manipulate galectin bioactivity. This minireview surveys current molecular and biomaterial engineering approaches to create therapeutics that can stabilize galectin multivalency or recapitulate natural glycan multivalency (i.e. “the glycocluster effect”). In particular, we highlight examples of using natural and engineered multivalent galectins for immunosuppression and immune tolerance, with a particular emphasis on treating autoimmune diseases or avoiding transplant rejection. In addition, we present examples of multivalent inhibitors of galectin–glycan interactions to maintain or restore T-cell function, with a particular emphasis on promoting antitumor immunity. Finally, we discuss emerging opportunities to further engineer galectin–glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation. PMID:27229902

  6. Sulfated glycans in network rewiring and plasticity after neuronal injuries.

    PubMed

    Kadomatsu, Kenji; Sakamoto, Kazuma

    2014-01-01

    Biopolymers in the human body belong to three major classes: polynucleotides (DNA, RNA), polypeptides (proteins) and polysaccharides (glycans). Although striking progress in our understanding of neurobiology has been achieved through a focus on polypeptides as the main players, important biological functions are also expected to be attributable to glycans. Nonetheless, the significance of glycans remains largely unexplored. In this review, we focus on the roles of sulfated glycans. Axonal regeneration/sprouting after injuries does not easily occur in the adult mammalian central nervous system. This is due to the low intrinsic potential of regeneration and the emerging inhibitory molecules. The latter include the sulfated long glycans chondroitin sulfate (CS) and keratan sulfate (KS). Enzymatic ablation of CS or KS, and genetic ablation of KS promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury. Interestingly, the combination of CS and KS ablations exhibits neither additive nor synergistic effects. Thus, KS and CS work in the same pathway in inhibition of axonal regeneration/sprouting. Furthermore, CS has been implicated in neural plasticity as a functional component of the perineuronal nets surrounding inhibitory interneurons. Elucidation of the mechanisms of action for KS and CS will pave the way to treatments to promote network rewiring and plasticity after neuronal injuries.

  7. Engineering galectin-glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Shaheen A; Hudalla, Gregory A

    2016-05-01

    Galectins, a 15-member family of soluble carbohydrate-binding proteins, are receiving increasing interest as therapeutic targets for immunotherapy and immunomodulation due to their role as extracellular signals that regulate innate and adaptive immune cell phenotype and function. However, different galectins can have redundant, synergistic, or antagonistic signaling activity in normal immunological responses, such as resolution of inflammation and induction of antigen-specific tolerance. In addition, certain galectins can be hijacked to promote progression of immunopathologies, such as tumor immune privilege, metastasis, and viral infection, while others can inhibit these processes. Thus, eliciting a desired immunological outcome will likely necessitate therapeutics that can precisely enhance or inhibit particular galectin-glycan interactions. Multivalency is an important determinant of the affinity and specificity of natural galectin-glycan interactions, and is emerging as a key design element for therapeutics that can effectively manipulate galectin bioactivity. This minireview surveys current molecular and biomaterial engineering approaches to create therapeutics that can stabilize galectin multivalency or recapitulate natural glycan multivalency (i.e. "the glycocluster effect"). In particular, we highlight examples of using natural and engineered multivalent galectins for immunosuppression and immune tolerance, with a particular emphasis on treating autoimmune diseases or avoiding transplant rejection. In addition, we present examples of multivalent inhibitors of galectin-glycan interactions to maintain or restore T-cell function, with a particular emphasis on promoting antitumor immunity. Finally, we discuss emerging opportunities to further engineer galectin-glycan interactions for immunotherapy and immunomodulation. PMID:27229902

  8. Arenavirus Glycan Shield Promotes Neutralizing Antibody Evasion and Protracted Infection.

    PubMed

    Sommerstein, Rami; Flatz, Lukas; Remy, Melissa M; Malinge, Pauline; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Sahin, Mehmet; Bergthaler, Andreas; Igonet, Sebastien; Ter Meulen, Jan; Rigo, Dorothée; Meda, Paolo; Rabah, Nadia; Coutard, Bruno; Bowden, Thomas A; Lambert, Paul-Henri; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pinschewer, Daniel D

    2015-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa virus (LASV) can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. As a major impediment to vaccine development, delayed and weak neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses represent a unifying characteristic of both natural infection and all vaccine candidates tested to date. To investigate the mechanisms underlying arenavirus nAb evasion we engineered several arenavirus envelope-chimeric viruses and glycan-deficient variants thereof. We performed neutralization tests with sera from experimentally infected mice and from LASV-convalescent human patients. NAb response kinetics in mice correlated inversely with the N-linked glycan density in the arenavirus envelope protein's globular head. Additionally and most intriguingly, infection with fully glycosylated viruses elicited antibodies, which neutralized predominantly their glycan-deficient variants, both in mice and humans. Binding studies with monoclonal antibodies indicated that envelope glycans reduced nAb on-rate, occupancy and thereby counteracted virus neutralization. In infected mice, the envelope glycan shield promoted protracted viral infection by preventing its timely elimination by the ensuing antibody response. Thus, arenavirus envelope glycosylation impairs the protective efficacy rather than the induction of nAbs, and thereby prevents efficient antibody-mediated virus control. This immune evasion mechanism imposes limitations on antibody-based vaccination and convalescent serum therapy. PMID:26587982

  9. Arenavirus Glycan Shield Promotes Neutralizing Antibody Evasion and Protracted Infection

    PubMed Central

    Malinge, Pauline; Magistrelli, Giovanni; Fischer, Nicolas; Sahin, Mehmet; Bergthaler, Andreas; Igonet, Sebastien; ter Meulen, Jan; Rigo, Dorothée; Meda, Paolo; Rabah, Nadia; Coutard, Bruno; Bowden, Thomas A.; Lambert, Paul-Henri; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pinschewer, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa virus (LASV) can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans. As a major impediment to vaccine development, delayed and weak neutralizing antibody (nAb) responses represent a unifying characteristic of both natural infection and all vaccine candidates tested to date. To investigate the mechanisms underlying arenavirus nAb evasion we engineered several arenavirus envelope-chimeric viruses and glycan-deficient variants thereof. We performed neutralization tests with sera from experimentally infected mice and from LASV-convalescent human patients. NAb response kinetics in mice correlated inversely with the N-linked glycan density in the arenavirus envelope protein’s globular head. Additionally and most intriguingly, infection with fully glycosylated viruses elicited antibodies, which neutralized predominantly their glycan-deficient variants, both in mice and humans. Binding studies with monoclonal antibodies indicated that envelope glycans reduced nAb on-rate, occupancy and thereby counteracted virus neutralization. In infected mice, the envelope glycan shield promoted protracted viral infection by preventing its timely elimination by the ensuing antibody response. Thus, arenavirus envelope glycosylation impairs the protective efficacy rather than the induction of nAbs, and thereby prevents efficient antibody-mediated virus control. This immune evasion mechanism imposes limitations on antibody-based vaccination and convalescent serum therapy. PMID:26587982

  10. Structural evolution of glycan recognition by a family of potent HIV antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Garces, Fernando; Sok, Devin; Kong, Leopold; McBride, Ryan; Kim, Helen J.; Saye-Francisco, Karen F.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Hua, Yuanzi; Cupo, Albert; Moore, John P.; Paulson, James C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) is densely covered with self-glycans that should help shield it from recognition by the human immune system. Here we examine how a particularly potent family of broadly neutralizing antibodies (Abs) has evolved common and distinct structural features to counter the glycan shield and interact with both glycan and protein components of HIV Env. The inferred germline antibody already harbors potential binding pockets for a glycan and a short protein segment. Affinity maturation then leads to divergent evolutionary branches that either focus on a single glycan and protein segment (e.g. Ab PGT124) or engage multiple glycans (e.g. Abs PGT121-123). Furthermore, other surrounding glycans are avoided by selecting an appropriate initial antibody shape that prevents steric hindrance. Such molecular recognition lessons are important for engineering proteins that can recognize or accommodate glycans. PMID:25259921

  11. Improving N-Glycan Coverage using HPLC-MS with Electrospray Ionization at Subambient Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Marginean, Ioan; Kronewitter, Scott R.; Moore, Ronald J.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-10-01

    Human serum glycan profiling with mass spectrometry (MS) has been employed to study several disease conditions and is demonstrating promise for e.g. clinical biomarker discovery. However, the poor glycan ionization efficiency and the large dynamic range of glycan concentrations in human sera hinder comprehensive profiling. In particular, large glycans are problematic because they are present at low concentrations and prone to fragmentation. Here we show that the sub-ambient pressure ionization with nanoelectrospray (SPIN)-MS can expand the serum glycome profile when compared with the conventional atmospheric pressure electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS with a heated capillary inlet. Notably, the ions generated by the SPIN interface were observed at higher charge states for 50% of the annotated glycans. Out of a total of 130 detected glycans, 34 were only detected with the SPIN-MS, resulting in improved coverage of glycan families as well as of glycans with larger numbers of labile monosaccharides.

  12. High-throughput carbohydrate microarray profiling of 27 antibodies demonstrates widespread specificity problems.

    PubMed

    Manimala, Joseph C; Roach, Timothy A; Li, Zhitao; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C

    2007-08-01

    Progress toward understanding the biological roles of carbohydrates has been remarkably slow, and efforts to exploit this class of biopolymers as diagnostic and therapeutic targets have proven extremely challenging. Both basic and clinical research rely heavily on identifying and monitoring expression levels of carbohydrates. Over the last 30 years, the majority of expression information has been derived from antibody- and lectin-binding studies. Using a carbohydrate microarray containing 80 different glycans and glycoproteins, the specificities of 27 antiglycan antibodies were evaluated, including antibodies to histo-blood group A, B, and H antigens (81FR2.2, CLCP-19B, B389, 92FR-A2, B480, B460, B376, and B393), Lewis antigens (7LE, 15C02, 28, ZC-18C, 121SLE, CA199.02, PR.5C5, 2-25LE, BR55, T174, T218, F3, A70-C/C8, FR4A5, and K21), and other tumor-associated antigens (B389, 1A4, B1.1, and 5B5). In total, evaluation of over 2000 individual carbohydrate-protein interactions was carried out. More than half of the antibodies considered to be specific for their designated antigen were found to cross-react with other glycans. The cross-reactive glycans could be mistaken for the designated antigen in biopsy samples or other biological samples, leading to inaccurate conclusions. PMID:17483136

  13. Protecting group-free immobilization of glycans for affinity chromatography using glycosylsulfonohydrazide donors.

    PubMed

    Hernandez Armada, Daniel; Santos, Jobette T; Richards, Michele R; Cairo, Christopher W

    2015-11-19

    A variety of applications in glycobiology exploit affinity chromatography through the immobilization of glycans to a solid support. Although several strategies are known, they may provide certain advantages or disadvantages in how the sugar is attached to the affinity matrix. Additionally, the products of some methods may be hard to characterize chemically due to non-specific reactions. The lack of specificity in standard immobilization reactions makes affinity chromatography with expensive oligosaccharides challenging. As a result, methods for specific and efficient immobilization of oligosaccharides remain of interest. Herein, we present a method for the immobilization of saccharides using N'-glycosylsulfonohydrazide (GSH) carbohydrate donors. We have compared GSH immobilization to known strategies, including the use of divinyl sulfone (DVS) and cyanuric chloride (CC), for the generation of affinity matrices. We compared immobilization methods by determining their immobilization efficiency, based on a comparison of the mass of immobilized carbohydrate and the concentration of active binding sites (determined using lectins). Our results indicate that immobilization using GSH donors can provide comparable amounts of carbohydrate epitopes on solid support while consuming almost half of the material required for DVS immobilization. The lectin binding capacity observed for these two methods suggests that GSH immobilization is more efficient. We propose that this method of oligosaccharide immobilization will be an important tool for glycobiologists working with precious glycan samples purified from biological sources. PMID:26454791

  14. Glycobiology of cell death: when glycans and lectins govern cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, R G; Rabinovich, G A

    2013-01-01

    Although one typically thinks of carbohydrates as associated with cell growth and viability, glycosylation also has an integral role in many processes leading to cell death. Glycans, either alone or complexed with glycan-binding proteins, can deliver intracellular signals or control extracellular processes that promote initiation, execution and resolution of cell death programs. Herein, we review the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins as essential components of the cell death machinery during physiologic and pathologic settings. PMID:23703323

  15. Complicated N-linked glycans in simple organisms

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Birgit; Hykollari, Alba; Yan, Shi; Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B. H.

    2013-01-01

    Although countless genomes have now been sequenced, the glycomes of the vast majority of eukaryotes still present a series of unmapped frontiers. However, strides are being made in a few groups of invertebrate and unicellular organisms as regards their N-glycans and N-glycosylation pathways. Thereby, the traditional classification of glycan structures inevitably approaches its boundaries. Indeed, the glycomes of these organisms are rich in surprises including a multitude of modifications of the core regions of N-glycans and unusual antennae. From the actually rather limited glycomic information we have, it is nevertheless obvious that the biotechnological, developmental and immunological relevance of these modifications, especially in insect cell lines, model organisms and parasites means that deciphering unusual glycomes is of more than just academic interest. PMID:22944671

  16. Using CRISPR-Cas9 to quantify the contributions of O-glycans, N-glycans and Glycosphingolipids to human leukocyte-endothelium adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Stolfa, Gino; Mondal, Nandini; Zhu, Yuqi; Yu, Xinheng; Buffone, Alexander; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    There is often interest in dissecting the relative contributions of the N-glycans, O-glycans and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in regulating complex biological traits like cell signaling, adhesion, development and metastasis. To address this, we developed a CRISPR-Cas9 toolkit to selectively truncate each of these commonly expressed glycan-types. Here, O-glycan biosynthesis was truncated by knocking-out Core 1 β3Gal-T Specific Molecular Chaperone (COSMC), N-glycans by targeting the β1,2 GlcNAc-transferase (MGAT1) and GSLs by deleting UDP-glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG). These reagents were applied to reveal the glycoconjugates regulating human myeloid cell adhesion to selectins under physiological shear-flow observed during inflammation. These functional studies show that leukocyte rolling on P- and L-selectin is ablated in cells lacking O-glycans, with N-glycan truncation also increasing cell rolling velocity on L-selectin. All three glycan families contributed to E-selectin dependent cell adhesion with N-glycans contributing to all aspects of the leukocyte adhesion cascade, O-glycans only being important during initial recruitment, and GSLs stabilizing slow cell rolling and the transition to firm arrest. Overall, the genome editing tools developed here may be broadly applied in studies of cellular glycosylation. PMID:27458028

  17. Glycan Node Analysis: A Bottom-up Approach to Glycomics.

    PubMed

    Zaare, Sahba; Aguilar, Jesús S; Hu, Yueming; Ferdosi, Shadi; Borges, Chad R

    2016-05-22

    Synthesized in a non-template-driven process by enzymes called glycosyltransferases, glycans are key players in various significant intra- and extracellular events. Many pathological conditions, notably cancer, affect gene expression, which can in turn deregulate the relative abundance and activity levels of glycoside hydrolase and glycosyltransferase enzymes. Unique aberrant whole glycans resulting from deregulated glycosyltransferase(s) are often present in trace quantities within complex biofluids, making their detection difficult and sometimes stochastic. However, with proper sample preparation, one of the oldest forms of mass spectrometry (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, GC-MS) can routinely detect the collection of branch-point and linkage-specific monosaccharides ("glycan nodes") present in complex biofluids. Complementary to traditional top-down glycomics techniques, the approach discussed herein involves the collection and condensation of each constituent glycan node in a sample into a single independent analytical signal, which provides detailed structural and quantitative information about changes to the glycome as a whole and reveals potentially deregulated glycosyltransferases. Improvements to the permethylation and subsequent liquid/liquid extraction stages provided herein enhance reproducibility and overall yield by facilitating minimal exposure of permethylated glycans to alkaline aqueous conditions. Modifications to the acetylation stage further increase the extent of reaction and overall yield. Despite their reproducibility, the overall yields of N-acetylhexosamine (HexNAc) partially permethylated alditol acetates (PMAAs) are shown to be inherently lower than their expected theoretical value relative to hexose PMAAs. Calculating the ratio of the area under the extracted ion chromatogram (XIC) for each individual hexose PMAA (or HexNAc PMAA) to the sum of such XIC areas for all hexoses (or HexNAcs) provides a new normalization method that

  18. Glycan Analysis by Reversible Reaction to Hydrazide Beads and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuang J.; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Investigation into glycoproteins and their associated glycans is the key to understanding the function of glycoproteins in biological pathways and disease development. Current methods for glycan analysis are generally based on multiple preparation processes to separate glycans from proteins and other molecules prior to analysis. During the multistep purification processes, glycans are continuously lost and the procedure increases the difficulty for accurate quantitative analysis of glycans. Here we describe the development of a novel technique, which uses hydrazide beads to capture glycans. It is based on the conjugation of glycans to hydrazide beads through the formation of reversible hydrazone, washing out unbound nonglycans, then releasing captured glycans by acids. The results showed that the glycans were able to be isolated from concatenate peptides by using hydrazide beads. This technique was also applied to the analysis of glycans from sera sample. The integrated capture-release on the solid-phase simplifies the procedure for glycan preparation from a complex mixture and can be a powerful tool for glycan analysis. PMID:22304307

  19. Salmonella Degrades the Host Glycocalyx Leading to Altered Infection and Glycan Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Arabyan, Narine; Park, Dayoung; Foutouhi, Soraya; Weis, Allison M; Huang, Bihua C; Williams, Cynthia C; Desai, Prerak; Shah, Jigna; Jeannotte, Richard; Kong, Nguyet; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Weimer, Bart C

    2016-01-01

    Complex glycans cover the gut epithelial surface to protect the cell from the environment. Invasive pathogens must breach the glycan layer before initiating infection. While glycan degradation is crucial for infection, this process is inadequately understood. Salmonella contains 47 glycosyl hydrolases (GHs) that may degrade the glycan. We hypothesized that keystone genes from the entire GH complement of Salmonella are required to degrade glycans to change infection. This study determined that GHs recognize the terminal monosaccharides (N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), galactose, mannose, and fucose) and significantly (p < 0.05) alter infection. During infection, Salmonella used its two GHs sialidase nanH and amylase malS for internalization by targeting different glycan structures. The host glycans were altered during Salmonella association via the induction of N-glycan biosynthesis pathways leading to modification of host glycans by increasing fucosylation and mannose content, while decreasing sialylation. Gene expression analysis indicated that the host cell responded by regulating more than 50 genes resulting in remodeled glycans in response to Salmonella treatment. This study established the glycan structures on colonic epithelial cells, determined that Salmonella required two keystone GHs for internalization, and left remodeled host glycans as a result of infection. These data indicate that microbial GHs are undiscovered virulence factors. PMID:27389966

  20. Salmonella Degrades the Host Glycocalyx Leading to Altered Infection and Glycan Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Arabyan, Narine; Park, Dayoung; Foutouhi, Soraya; Weis, Allison M.; Huang, Bihua C.; Williams, Cynthia C.; Desai, Prerak; Shah, Jigna; Jeannotte, Richard; Kong, Nguyet; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; Weimer, Bart C.

    2016-01-01

    Complex glycans cover the gut epithelial surface to protect the cell from the environment. Invasive pathogens must breach the glycan layer before initiating infection. While glycan degradation is crucial for infection, this process is inadequately understood. Salmonella contains 47 glycosyl hydrolases (GHs) that may degrade the glycan. We hypothesized that keystone genes from the entire GH complement of Salmonella are required to degrade glycans to change infection. This study determined that GHs recognize the terminal monosaccharides (N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac), galactose, mannose, and fucose) and significantly (p < 0.05) alter infection. During infection, Salmonella used its two GHs sialidase nanH and amylase malS for internalization by targeting different glycan structures. The host glycans were altered during Salmonella association via the induction of N-glycan biosynthesis pathways leading to modification of host glycans by increasing fucosylation and mannose content, while decreasing sialylation. Gene expression analysis indicated that the host cell responded by regulating more than 50 genes resulting in remodeled glycans in response to Salmonella treatment. This study established the glycan structures on colonic epithelial cells, determined that Salmonella required two keystone GHs for internalization, and left remodeled host glycans as a result of infection. These data indicate that microbial GHs are undiscovered virulence factors. PMID:27389966

  1. Glycan analysis by reversible reaction to hydrazide beads and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang J; Zhang, Hui

    2012-03-01

    Investigation into glycoproteins and their associated glycans is the key to understanding the function of glycoproteins in biological pathways and disease development. Current methods for glycan analysis are generally based on multiple preparation processes to separate glycans from proteins and other molecules prior to analysis. During the multistep purification processes, glycans are continuously lost and the procedure increases the difficulty for accurate quantitative analysis of glycans. Here we describe the development of a novel technique, which uses hydrazide beads to capture glycans. It is based on the conjugation of glycans to hydrazide beads through the formation of reversible hydrazone, washing out unbound nonglycans, then releasing captured glycans by acids. The results showed that the glycans were able to be isolated from concatenate peptides by using hydrazide beads. This technique was also applied to the analysis of glycans from sera sample. The integrated capture-release on the solid-phase simplifies the procedure for glycan preparation from a complex mixture and can be a powerful tool for glycan analysis. PMID:22304307

  2. Surface Enzyme Chemistries for Ultrasensitive Microarray Biosensing with SPR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Jennifer B; Corn, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    The sensitivity and selectivity of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensing with nucleic acid microarrays can be greatly enhanced by exploiting various nucleic acid ligases, nucleases, and polymerases that manipulate the surface-bound DNA and RNA. We describe here various examples from each of these different classes of surface enzyme chemistries that have been incorporated into novel detection strategies that either drastically enhance the sensitivity of or create uniquely selective methods for the SPRI biosensing of proteins and nucleic acids. A dual-element generator-detector microarray approach that couples a bioaffinity adsorption event on one microarray element to nanoparticle-enhanced SPRI measurements of nucleic acid hybridization adsorption on a different microarray element is used to quantitatively detect DNA, RNA, and proteins at femtomolar concentrations. Additionally, this dual-element format can be combined with the transcription and translation of RNA from surface-bound double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) templates for the on-chip multiplexed biosynthesis of aptamer and protein microarrays in a microfluidic format; these microarrays can be immediately used for real-time SPRI bioaffinity sensing measurements.

  3. Surface Enzyme Chemistries for Ultrasensitive Microarray Biosensing with SPR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Fasoli, Jennifer B; Corn, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    The sensitivity and selectivity of surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI) biosensing with nucleic acid microarrays can be greatly enhanced by exploiting various nucleic acid ligases, nucleases, and polymerases that manipulate the surface-bound DNA and RNA. We describe here various examples from each of these different classes of surface enzyme chemistries that have been incorporated into novel detection strategies that either drastically enhance the sensitivity of or create uniquely selective methods for the SPRI biosensing of proteins and nucleic acids. A dual-element generator-detector microarray approach that couples a bioaffinity adsorption event on one microarray element to nanoparticle-enhanced SPRI measurements of nucleic acid hybridization adsorption on a different microarray element is used to quantitatively detect DNA, RNA, and proteins at femtomolar concentrations. Additionally, this dual-element format can be combined with the transcription and translation of RNA from surface-bound double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) templates for the on-chip multiplexed biosynthesis of aptamer and protein microarrays in a microfluidic format; these microarrays can be immediately used for real-time SPRI bioaffinity sensing measurements. PMID:25641598

  4. Implications of plant glycans in the development of innovative vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Salazar-González, Jorge A; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    Plant glycans play a central role in vaccinology: they can serve as adjuvants and/or delivery vehicles or backbones for the synthesis of conjugated vaccines. In addition, genetic engineering is leading to the development of platforms for the production of novel polysaccharides in plant cells, an approach with relevant implications for the design of new types of vaccines. This review contains an updated outlook on this topic and provides key perspectives including a discussion on how the molecular pharming field can be linked to the production of innovative glycan-based and conjugate vaccines.

  5. GlycoPattern: a web platform for glycan array mining

    PubMed Central

    Agravat, Sanjay B.; Saltz, Joel H.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: GlycoPattern is Web-based bioinformatics resource to support the analysis of glycan array data for the Consortium for Functional Glycomics. This resource includes algorithms and tools to discover structural motifs, a heatmap visualization to compare multiple experiments, hierarchical clustering of Glycan Binding Proteins with respect to their binding motifs and a structural search feature on the experimental data. Availability and implementation: GlycoPattern is freely available on the Web at http://glycopattern.emory.edu with all major browsers supported. Contact: sanjay.agravat@emory.edu PMID:25143288

  6. Implications of plant glycans in the development of innovative vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Salazar-González, Jorge A; Decker, Eva L; Reski, Ralf

    2016-07-01

    Plant glycans play a central role in vaccinology: they can serve as adjuvants and/or delivery vehicles or backbones for the synthesis of conjugated vaccines. In addition, genetic engineering is leading to the development of platforms for the production of novel polysaccharides in plant cells, an approach with relevant implications for the design of new types of vaccines. This review contains an updated outlook on this topic and provides key perspectives including a discussion on how the molecular pharming field can be linked to the production of innovative glycan-based and conjugate vaccines. PMID:26890067

  7. Emergent FDA biodefense issues for microarray technology: process analytical technology.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Sandy

    2004-11-01

    A successful biodefense strategy relies upon any combination of four approaches. A nation can protect its troops and citizenry first by advanced mass vaccination, second, by responsive ring vaccination, and third, by post-exposure therapeutic treatment (including vaccine therapies). Finally, protection can be achieved by rapid detection followed by exposure limitation (suites and air filters) or immediate treatment (e.g., antibiotics, rapid vaccines and iodine pills). All of these strategies rely upon or are enhanced by microarray technologies. Microarrays can be used to screen, engineer and test vaccines. They are also used to construct early detection tools. While effective biodefense utilizes a variety of tactical tools, microarray technology is a valuable arrow in that quiver.

  8. Microarray Analysis of Microbial Weathering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson-Francis, K.; van Houdt, R.; Leys, N.; Mergeay, M.; Cockell, C. S.

    2010-04-01

    Microarray analysis of the heavy metal resistant bacterium, Cupriavidus metallidurans CH34 was used to investigate the genes involved in the weathering. The results demonstrated that large porin and membrane transporter genes were unregulated.

  9. N-glycan transition of the early developmental stage in Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Risa; Hirotsu, Naoki; Miyanishi, Nobumitsu

    2016-08-26

    N-Glycosylation is one of the post-translational modifications. In animals, N-glycans linked to proteins function in cell-cell recognition, sorting, transport, and other biological phenomena. However, in plants, N-glycan-mediated biological functions remain obscure. In a previous study, we showed that the main type of N-glycan transition is from the paucimannosidic to complex type before and after germination in Oryza sativa, suggesting that transitions of N-glycan, including those of glycoproteins and glycosyltransferases, are closely associated with plant growth. To further elucidate the relationship between N-glycan structure and plant growth, we analyzed the structures of N-glycans expressed in O. sativa seedlings grown under light conditions and performed comparative analyses of the structures in the shoot and root. The analyses show that fundamental N-glycan structures are common to the shoot and root, whereas paucimannosidic-type N-glycans dramatically decreased in the root grown under light conditions. Further, to investigate the effects of light on N-glycan structures in O. sativa seedlings, we analyzed N-glycan structures in O. sativa seedlings grown in the dark. Understandably, N-glycan expression in the root was almost unaffected by light. However, despite a marked difference in phenotype, N-glycan expression in the shoot was also unaffected by light. This result suggests that the shoot and root of O. sativa have different glycoproteins and distinct N-glycan synthetic systems. Thus, we propose that the N-glycan synthetic system of the O. sativa shoot is almost unaffected by light conditions and that many photosynthesis-related proteins are not modified by N-glycans.

  10. [Protein microarrays and personalized medicine].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiabo; Schneiderhan-Marra, Nicole; Joos, Thomas O

    2011-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, DNA microarrays have achieved a robust analytical performance, enabling their use for analyzing the whole transcriptome or for screening thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a single experiment. DNA microarrays allow scientists to correlate gene expression signatures with disease progression, to screen for disease-specific mutations, and to treat patients according to their individual genetic profiles; however, the real key is proteins and their manifold functions. It is necessary to achieve a greater understanding of not only protein function and abundance but also their role in the development of diseases. Protein concentrations have been shown to reflect the physiological and pathologic state of an organ, tissue, or cells far more directly than DNA, and proteins can be profiled effectively with protein microarrays, which require only a small amount of sample material. Protein microarrays have become wellestablished tools in basic and applied research, and the first products have already entered the in vitro diagnostics market. This review focuses on protein microarray applications for biomarker discovery and validation, disease diagnosis, and use within the area of personalized medicine. Protein microarrays have proved to be reliable research tools in screening for a multitude of parameters with only a minimal quantity of sample and have enormous potential in applications for diagnostic and personalized medicine.

  11. Analysis of site-specific N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi.

    PubMed

    Hang, Ivan; Lin, Chia-wei; Grant, Oliver C; Fleurkens, Susanna; Villiger, Thomas K; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo; Woods, Robert J; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus

    2015-12-01

    The hallmark of N-linked protein glycosylation is the generation of diverse glycan structures in the secretory pathway. Dynamic, non-template-driven processes of N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi provide the cellular setting for structural diversity. We applied newly developed mass spectrometry-based analytics to quantify site-specific N-glycan remodeling of the model protein Pdi1p expressed in insect cells. Molecular dynamics simulation, mutational analysis, kinetic studies of in vitro processing events and glycan flux analysis supported the defining role of the protein in N-glycan processing. PMID:26240167

  12. Databases of Conformations and NMR Structures of Glycan Determinants.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anita; Drouillard, Sophie; Rivet, Alain; Perez, Serge

    2015-12-01

    The present study reports a comprehensive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) characterization and a systematic conformational sampling of the conformational preferences of 170 glycan moieties of glycosphingolipids as produced in large-scale quantities by bacterial fermentation. These glycans span across a variety of families including the blood group antigens (A, B and O), core structures (Types 1, 2 and 4), fucosylated oligosaccharides (core and lacto-series), sialylated oligosaccharides (Types 1 and 2), Lewis antigens, GPI-anchors and globosides. A complementary set of about 100 glycan determinants occurring in glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans has also been structurally characterized using molecular mechanics-based computation. The experimental and computational data generated are organized in two relational databases that can be queried by the user through a user-friendly search engine. The NMR ((1)H and (13)C, COSY, TOCSY, HMQC, HMBC correlation) spectra and 3D structures are available for visualization and download in commonly used structure formats. Emphasis has been given to the use of a common nomenclature for the structural encoding of the carbohydrates and each glycan molecule is described by four different types of representations in order to cope with the different usages in chemistry and biology. These web-based databases were developed with non-proprietary software and are open access for the scientific community available at http://glyco3d.cermav.cnrs.fr.

  13. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives §...

  14. 21 CFR 172.898 - Bakers yeast glycan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bakers yeast glycan. 172.898 Section 172.898 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  15. Structural basis of glycan interaction in gastroenteric viral pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, B.V. Venkataram; Shanker, Sreejesh; Hu, Liya; Choi, Jae-Mun; Crawford, Sue E; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; Atmar, Robert L; Estes, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    A critical event in the life cycle of a virus is its initial attachment to host cells. This involves recognition by the viruses of specific receptors on the cell surface, including glycans. Viruses typically exhibit strain-dependent variations in recognizing specific glycan receptors, a feature that contributes significantly to cell tropism, host specificity, host adaptation and interspecies transmission. Examples include influenza viruses, noroviruses, rotaviruses, and parvoviruses. Both rotaviruses and noroviruses are well known gastroenteric pathogens that are of significant global health concern. While rotaviruses, in the family Reoviridae, are the major causative agents of life-threatening diarrhea in children, noroviruses, which belong to Caliciviridae family, cause epidemic and sporadic cases of acute gastroenteritis across all age groups. Both exhibit enormous genotypic and serotypic diversity. Consistent with this diversity each exhibits strain-dependent variations in the types of glycans they recognize for cell attachment. This chapter reviews current status of the structural biology of such strain-dependent glycan specificities in these two families of viruses. PMID:25073118

  16. A Bitter Sweet Symphony: Immune Responses to Altered O-glycan Epitopes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cornelissen, Lenneke A.M.; Van Vliet, Sandra J.

    2016-01-01

    The appearance of aberrant glycans on the tumor cell surface is one of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. Glycosylation is an important post-translation modification of proteins and lipids and is strongly affected by oncogenesis. Tumor-associated glycans have been extensively characterized regarding their composition and tumor-type specific expression patterns. Nevertheless whether and how tumor-associated glycans contribute to the observed immunomodulatory actions by tumors has not been extensively studied. Here, we provide a detailed overview of the current knowledge on how tumor-associated O-glycans affect the anti-tumor immune response, thereby focusing on truncated O-glycans present on epithelial tumors and mucins. These tumor-associated O-glycans and mucins bind a variety of lectin receptors on immune cells to facilitate the subsequently induction of tolerogenic immune responses. We, therefore, postulate that tumor-associated glycans not only support tumor growth, but also actively contribute to immune evasion. PMID:27153100

  17. A Bitter Sweet Symphony: Immune Responses to Altered O-glycan Epitopes in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Van Vliet, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    The appearance of aberrant glycans on the tumor cell surface is one of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. Glycosylation is an important post-translation modification of proteins and lipids and is strongly affected by oncogenesis. Tumor-associated glycans have been extensively characterized regarding their composition and tumor-type specific expression patterns. Nevertheless whether and how tumor-associated glycans contribute to the observed immunomodulatory actions by tumors has not been extensively studied. Here, we provide a detailed overview of the current knowledge on how tumor-associated O-glycans affect the anti-tumor immune response, thereby focusing on truncated O-glycans present on epithelial tumors and mucins. These tumor-associated O-glycans and mucins bind a variety of lectin receptors on immune cells to facilitate the subsequently induction of tolerogenic immune responses. We, therefore, postulate that tumor-associated glycans not only support tumor growth, but also actively contribute to immune evasion.

  18. Paper analytical devices for dynamic evaluation of cell surface N-glycan expression via a bimodal biosensor based on multibranched hybridization chain reaction amplification.

    PubMed

    Liang, Linlin; Lan, Feifei; Li, Li; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua; Ren, Na; Liu, Haiyun; Yan, Mei

    2016-12-15

    A novel colorimetric/fluorescence bimodal lab-on-paper cyto-device was fabricated based on concanavalin A (Con A)-integrating multibranched hybridization chain reaction (mHCR). The product of mHCR was modified PtCu nanochains (colorimetric signal label) and graphene quantum dot (fluorescence signal label) for in situ and dynamically evaluating cell surface N-glycan expression. In this strategy, preliminary detection was carried out through colorimetric method, if needed, then the fluorescence method was applied for a precise determination. Au-Ag-paper devices increased the surface areas and active sites for immobilizing larger amount of aptamers, and then specifically and efficiently captured more cancer cells. Moreover, it could effectively reduce the paper background fluorescence. Due to the specific recognition of Con A with mannose and the effective signal amplification of mHCR, the proposed strategy exhibited excellent high sensitivity for the cytosensing of MCF-7 cells ranging from 100 to 1.0×10(7) and 80-5.0×10(7) cellsmL(-1) with the detection limit of 33 and 26 cellsmL(-1) for colorimetric and fluorescence, respectively. More importantly, this strategy was successfully applied to dynamically monitor cell-surface multi-glycans expression on living cells under external stimuli of inhibitors as well as for N-glycan expression inhibitor screening. These results implied that this biosensor has potential in studying complex native glycan-related biological processes and elucidating the N-glycan-related diseases in biological and physiological processes.

  19. Engineering the Campylobacter jejuni N-glycan to create an effective chicken vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Nothaft, Harald; Davis, Brandi; Lock, Yee Ying; Perez-Munoz, Maria Elisa; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Walter, Jens; Coros, Colin; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a predominant cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. Source-attribution studies indicate that chickens are the main reservoir for infection, thus elimination of C. jejuni from poultry would significantly reduce the burden of human disease. We constructed glycoconjugate vaccines combining the conserved C. jejuni N-glycan with a protein carrier, GlycoTag, or fused to the Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide-core. Vaccination of chickens with the protein-based or E. coli-displayed glycoconjugate showed up to 10-log reduction in C. jejuni colonization and induced N-glycan-specific IgY responses. Moreover, the live E. coli vaccine was cleared prior to C. jejuni challenge and no selection for resistant campylobacter variants was observed. Analyses of the chicken gut communities revealed that the live vaccine did not alter the composition or complexity of the microbiome, thus representing an effective and low-cost strategy to reduce C. jejuni in chickens and its subsequent entry into the food chain. PMID:27221144

  20. Glycan modification of antigen alters its intracellular routing in dendritic cells, promoting priming of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Ho, Nataschja I; Litjens, Manja; Kalay, Hakan; Boks, Martine Annemarie; Cornelissen, Lenneke AM; Kaur Singh, Satwinder; Saeland, Eirikur; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Ossendorp, Ferry A; Unger, Wendy WJ; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    Antigen uptake by dendritic cells and intracellular routing of antigens to specific compartments is regulated by C-type lectin receptors that recognize glycan structures. We show that the modification of Ovalbumin (OVA) with the glycan-structure LewisX (LeX) re-directs OVA to the C-type lectin receptor MGL1. LeX-modification of OVA favored Th1 skewing of CD4+ T cells and enhanced cross-priming of CD8+ T cells. While cross-presentation of native OVA requires high antigen dose and TLR stimuli, LeX modification reduces the required amount 100-fold and obviates its dependence on TLR signaling. The OVA-LeX-induced enhancement of T cell cross-priming is MGL1-dependent as shown by reduced CD8+ effector T cell frequencies in MGL1-deficient mice. Moreover, MGL1-mediated cross-presentation of OVA-LeX neither required TAP-transporters nor Cathepsin-S and was still observed after prolonged intracellular storage of antigen in Rab11+LAMP1+ compartments. We conclude that controlled neo-glycosylation of antigens can crucially influence intracellular routing of antigens, the nature and strength of immune responses and should be considered for optimizing current vaccination strategies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11765.001 PMID:26999763

  1. Sialylation of the prion protein glycans controls prion replication rate and glycoform ratio.

    PubMed

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2015-01-01

    Prion or PrP(Sc) is a proteinaceous infectious agent that consists of a misfolded and aggregated form of a sialoglycoprotein called prion protein or PrP(C). PrP(C) has two sialylated N-linked carbohydrates. In PrP(Sc), the glycans are directed outward, with the terminal sialic acid residues creating a negative charge on the surface of prion particles. The current study proposes a new hypothesis that electrostatic repulsion between sialic residues creates structural constraints that control prion replication and PrP(Sc) glycoform ratio. In support of this hypothesis, here we show that diglycosylated PrP(C) molecules that have more sialic groups per molecule than monoglycosylated PrP(C) were preferentially excluded from conversion. However, when partially desialylated PrP(C) was used as a substrate, recruitment of three glycoforms into PrP(Sc) was found to be proportional to their respective populations in the substrate. In addition, hypersialylated molecules were also excluded from conversion in the strains with the strongest structural constraints, a strategy that helped reduce electrostatic repulsion. Moreover, as predicted by the hypothesis, partial desialylation of PrP(C) significantly increased the replication rate. This study illustrates that sialylation of N-linked glycans creates a prion replication barrier that controls replication rate and glycoform ratios and has broad implications. PMID:26576925

  2. Sialylation of the prion protein glycans controls prion replication rate and glycoform ratio

    PubMed Central

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2015-01-01

    Prion or PrPSc is a proteinaceous infectious agent that consists of a misfolded and aggregated form of a sialoglycoprotein called prion protein or PrPC. PrPC has two sialylated N-linked carbohydrates. In PrPSc, the glycans are directed outward, with the terminal sialic acid residues creating a negative charge on the surface of prion particles. The current study proposes a new hypothesis that electrostatic repulsion between sialic residues creates structural constraints that control prion replication and PrPSc glycoform ratio. In support of this hypothesis, here we show that diglycosylated PrPC molecules that have more sialic groups per molecule than monoglycosylated PrPC were preferentially excluded from conversion. However, when partially desialylated PrPC was used as a substrate, recruitment of three glycoforms into PrPSc was found to be proportional to their respective populations in the substrate. In addition, hypersialylated molecules were also excluded from conversion in the strains with the strongest structural constraints, a strategy that helped reduce electrostatic repulsion. Moreover, as predicted by the hypothesis, partial desialylation of PrPC significantly increased the replication rate. This study illustrates that sialylation of N-linked glycans creates a prion replication barrier that controls replication rate and glycoform ratios and has broad implications. PMID:26576925

  3. Carbohydrate derivative-functionalized biosensing toward highly sensitive electrochemical detection of cell surface glycan expression as cancer biomarker.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinai; Lu, Wenjie; Shen, Jianzhong; Jiang, Yuxiang; Han, En; Dong, Xiaoya; Huang, Jiali

    2015-12-15

    Accurate and highly sensitive detection of glycan expression on cell surface is extremely important for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Herein, a carbohydrate derivative-functionalized biosensor was developed for electrochemical detection of the expression level of cell surface glycan (mannose used as model). Thiomannosyl dimer was synthesized to design the thiomannosyl-functionalized biosensor by direct and rapid one-step protocols. The biosensing surface-confined mannose could effectively mimic the presentation of cell surface mannose and was responsible for competing with mannose on cancer cells in incubation solution. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved by exploiting the excellent conductivity of multiwalled carbon nanotube/Au nanoparticle (MWNT/AuNP), the amplification effect of MWNTs, and the favorable catalytic ability of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Using competitive strategy, the developed biosensor exhibits attractive performances for the analysis of mannose expression with rapid response, high sensitivity and accuracy, and possesses great promise for evaluation of cell surface glycan expression by using a greater variety of lectins.

  4. Electron Capture Dissociation of Divalent Metal-adducted Sulfated N-Glycans Released from Bovine Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Håkansson, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Sulfated N-glycans released from bovine thyroid stimulating hormone (bTSH) were ionized with the divalent metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+, and Co by electrospray ionization (ESI). These metal-adducted species were subjected to infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) and the corresponding fragmentation patterns were compared. IRMPD generated extensive glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages, but most product ions suffered from sulfonate loss. Internal fragments were also observed, which complicated the spectra. ECD provided complementary structural information compared with IRMPD, and all observed product ions retained the sulfonate group, allowing sulfonate localization. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of ECD towards metal-adducted sulfated N-glycans released from a glycoprotein. Due to the ability of IRMPD and ECD to provide complementary structural information, the combination of the two strategies is a promising and valuable tool for glycan structural characterization. The influence of different metal ions was also examined. Calcium adducts appeared to be the most promising species because of high sensitivity and ability to provide extensive structural information.

  5. MALDI-MS analysis of sialylated N-glycan linkage isomers using solid-phase two step derivatization method.

    PubMed

    Li, Henghui; Gao, Wenjie; Feng, Xiaojun; Liu, Bi-Feng; Liu, Xin

    2016-06-14

    Sialic acids usually locate at the terminal of many glycan structures in either α(2,3) or α(2,6) linkage, playing different roles in various biological and pathological processes. Several linkage specific carboxyl derivatization methods have been reported to discriminate between α(2,3) and α(2,6)-linked sialic acids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Among them, ethyl esterification was recently reported to achieve linkage specific derivatization between α(2,3) and α(2,6)-linked sialic acids with good selectivity. However, the method suffered from the instability of the generated lactones and byproducts of the derivatives. To overcome these shortcomings, a solid-phase two step derivatization method was introduced to convert the α(2,6)-linked sialic acid into ethyl esters and the α(2,3)-inked counterparts into N-methyl amides, respectively. Under the optimized derivatization conditions, our method was able to achieve accurate relative quantification of N-glycan as well as their corresponding sialylated linkage types, superior to the ethyl esterification method. The solid phase derivatization strategy was further applied to investigate N-glycans from biosimilar antibody drug and human serum from patients and healthy volunteers. This method has the potential to be used in the biomarker discovery and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:27181647

  6. A Machine Learning Based Approach to de novo Sequencing of Glycans from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kumozaki, Shotaro; Sato, Kengo; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-01-01

    Recently, glycomics has been actively studied and various technologies for glycomics have been rapidly developed. Currently, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is one of the key experimental tools for identification of structures of oligosaccharides. MS/MS can observe MS/MS peaks of fragmented glycan ions including cross-ring ions resulting from internal cleavages, which provide valuable information to infer glycan structures. Thus, the aim of de novo sequencing of glycans is to find the most probable assignments of observed MS/MS peaks to glycan substructures without databases. However, there are few satisfiable algorithms for glycan de novo sequencing from MS/MS spectra. We present a machine learning based approach to de novo sequencing of glycans from MS/MS spectrum. First, we build a suitable model for the fragmentation of glycans including cross-ring ions, and implement a solver that employs Lagrangian relaxation with a dynamic programming technique. Then, to optimize scores for the algorithm, we introduce a machine learning technique called structured support vector machines that enable us to learn parameters including scores for cross-ring ions from training data, i.e., known glycan mass spectra. Furthermore, we implement additional constraints for core structures of well-known glycan types including N-linked glycans and O-linked glycans. This enables us to predict more accurate glycan structures if the glycan type of given spectra is known. Computational experiments show that our algorithm performs accurate de novo sequencing of glycans. The implementation of our algorithm and the datasets are available at http://glyfon.dna.bio.keio.ac.jp/. PMID:26671799

  7. Suggestive evidence for Darwinian Selection against asparagine-linked glycans of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Bushkin, G Guy; Ratner, Daniel M; Cui, Jike; Banerjee, Sulagna; Duraisingh, Manoj T; Jennings, Cameron V; Dvorin, Jeffrey D; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Robertson, Seth D; Steffen, Martin; O'Keefe, Barry R; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2010-02-01

    We are interested in asparagine-linked glycans (N-glycans) of Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii, because their N-glycan structures have been controversial and because we hypothesize that there might be selection against N-glycans in nucleus-encoded proteins that must pass through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) prior to threading into the apicoplast. In support of our hypothesis, we observed the following. First, in protists with apicoplasts, there is extensive secondary loss of Alg enzymes that make lipid-linked precursors to N-glycans. Theileria makes no N-glycans, and Plasmodium makes a severely truncated N-glycan precursor composed of one or two GlcNAc residues. Second, secreted proteins of Toxoplasma, which uses its own 10-sugar precursor (Glc(3)Man(5)GlcNAc(2)) and the host 14-sugar precursor (Glc(3)Man(9)GlcNAc(2)) to make N-glycans, have very few sites for N glycosylation, and there is additional selection against N-glycan sites in its apicoplast-targeted proteins. Third, while the GlcNAc-binding Griffonia simplicifolia lectin II labels ER, rhoptries, and surface of plasmodia, there is no apicoplast labeling. Similarly, the antiretroviral lectin cyanovirin-N, which binds to N-glycans of Toxoplasma, labels ER and rhoptries, but there is no apicoplast labeling. We conclude that possible selection against N-glycans in protists with apicoplasts occurs by eliminating N-glycans (Theileria), reducing their length (Plasmodium), or reducing the number of N-glycan sites (Toxoplasma). In addition, occupation of N-glycan sites is markedly reduced in apicoplast proteins versus some secretory proteins in both Plasmodium and Toxoplasma.

  8. Comparing Bacterial DNA Microarray Fingerprints

    SciTech Connect

    Willse, Alan R.; Chandler, Darrell P.; White, Amanda M.; Protic, Miroslava; Daly, Don S.; Wunschel, Sharon C.

    2005-08-15

    Detecting subtle genetic differences between microorganisms is an important problem in molecular epidemiology and microbial forensics. In a typical investigation, gel electrophoresis is used to compare randomly amplified DNA fragments between microbial strains, where the patterns of DNA fragment sizes are proxies for a microbe's genotype. The limited genomic sample captured on a gel is often insufficient to discriminate nearly identical strains. This paper examines the application of microarray technology to DNA fingerprinting as a high-resolution alternative to gel-based methods. The so-called universal microarray, which uses short oligonucleotide probes that do not target specific genes or species, is intended to be applicable to all microorganisms because it does not require prior knowledge of genomic sequence. In principle, closely related strains can be distinguished if the number of probes on the microarray is sufficiently large, i.e., if the genome is sufficiently sampled. In practice, we confront noisy data, imperfectly matched hybridizations, and a high-dimensional inference problem. We describe the statistical problems of microarray fingerprinting, outline similarities with and differences from more conventional microarray applications, and illustrate the statistical fingerprinting problem for 10 closely related strains from three Bacillus species, and 3 strains from non-Bacillus species.

  9. A general framework for designing and validating oligomer-based DNA microarrays and its application to Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Carlos J; Senger, Ryan S; Spath, Iwona S; Borden, Jacob R; Sillers, Ryan; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2007-07-01

    While DNA microarray analysis is widely accepted as an essential tool for modern biology, its use still eludes many researchers for several reasons, especially when microarrays are not commercially available. In that case, the design, construction, and use of microarrays for a sequenced organism constitute substantial, time-consuming, and expensive tasks. Recently, it has become possible to construct custom microarrays using industrial manufacturing processes, which offer several advantages, including speed of manufacturing, quality control, no up-front setup costs, and need-based microarray ordering. Here, we describe a strategy for designing and validating DNA microarrays manufactured using a commercial process. The 22K microarrays for the solvent producer Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 are based on in situ-synthesized 60-mers employing the Agilent technology. The strategy involves designing a large library of possible oligomer probes for each target (i.e., gene or DNA sequence) and experimentally testing and selecting the best probes for each target. The degenerate C. acetobutylicum strain M5 lacking the pSOL1 megaplasmid (with 178 annotated open reading frames [genes]) was used to estimate the level of probe cross-hybridization in the new microarrays and to establish the minimum intensity for a gene to be considered expressed. Results obtained using this microarray design were consistent with previously reported results from spotted cDNA-based microarrays. The proposed strategy is applicable to any sequenced organism.

  10. Protein microarrays: prospects and problems.

    PubMed

    Kodadek, T

    2001-02-01

    Protein microarrays are potentially powerful tools in biochemistry and molecular biology. Two types of protein microarrays are defined. One, termed a protein function array, will consist of thousands of native proteins immobilized in a defined pattern. Such arrays can be utilized for massively parallel testing of protein function, hence the name. The other type is termed a protein-detecting array. This will consist of large numbers of arrayed protein-binding agents. These arrays will allow for expression profiling to be done at the protein level. In this article, some of the major technological challenges to the development of protein arrays are discussed, along with potential solutions.

  11. Trimeric HIV-1-Env Structures Define Glycan Shields from Clades A, B, and G.

    PubMed

    Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B E; Soto, Cinque; Lemmin, Thomas; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Kong, Rui; Thomas, Paul V; Wagh, Kshitij; Zhou, Tongqing; Behrens, Anna-Janina; Bylund, Tatsiana; Choi, Chang W; Davison, Jack R; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Joyce, M Gordon; Kwon, Young Do; Pancera, Marie; Taft, Justin; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Shivatare, Sachin S; Shivatare, Vidya S; Lee, Chang-Chun D; Wu, Chung-Yi; Bewley, Carole A; Burton, Dennis R; Koff, Wayne C; Connors, Mark; Crispin, Max; Baxa, Ulrich; Korber, Bette T; Wong, Chi-Huey; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D

    2016-05-01

    The HIV-1-envelope (Env) trimer is covered by a glycan shield of ∼90 N-linked oligosaccharides, which comprises roughly half its mass and is a key component of HIV evasion from humoral immunity. To understand how antibodies can overcome the barriers imposed by the glycan shield, we crystallized fully glycosylated Env trimers from clades A, B, and G, visualizing the shield at 3.4-3.7 Å resolution. These structures reveal the HIV-1-glycan shield to comprise a network of interlocking oligosaccharides, substantially ordered by glycan crowding, that encase the protein component of Env and enable HIV-1 to avoid most antibody-mediated neutralization. The revealed features delineate a taxonomy of N-linked glycan-glycan interactions. Crowded and dispersed glycans are differently ordered, conserved, processed, and recognized by antibody. The structures, along with glycan-array binding and molecular dynamics, reveal a diversity in oligosaccharide affinity and a requirement for accommodating glycans among known broadly neutralizing antibodies that target the glycan-shielded trimer.

  12. Property Graph vs RDF Triple Store: A Comparison on Glycan Substructure Search

    PubMed Central

    Alocci, Davide; Mariethoz, Julien; Horlacher, Oliver; Bolleman, Jerven T.; Campbell, Matthew P.; Lisacek, Frederique

    2015-01-01

    Resource description framework (RDF) and Property Graph databases are emerging technologies that are used for storing graph-structured data. We compare these technologies through a molecular biology use case: glycan substructure search. Glycans are branched tree-like molecules composed of building blocks linked together by chemical bonds. The molecular structure of a glycan can be encoded into a direct acyclic graph where each node represents a building block and each edge serves as a chemical linkage between two building blocks. In this context, Graph databases are possible software solutions for storing glycan structures and Graph query languages, such as SPARQL and Cypher, can be used to perform a substructure search. Glycan substructure searching is an important feature for querying structure and experimental glycan databases and retrieving biologically meaningful data. This applies for example to identifying a region of the glycan recognised by a glycan binding protein (GBP). In this study, 19,404 glycan structures were selected from GlycomeDB (www.glycome-db.org) and modelled for being stored into a RDF triple store and a Property Graph. We then performed two different sets of searches and compared the query response times and the results from both technologies to assess performance and accuracy. The two implementations produced the same results, but interestingly we noted a difference in the query response times. Qualitative measures such as portability were also used to define further criteria for choosing the technology adapted to solving glycan substructure search and other comparable issues. PMID:26656740

  13. Bitter-sweet symphony: glycan-lectin interactions in virus biology.

    PubMed

    Van Breedam, Wander; Pöhlmann, Stefan; Favoreel, Herman W; de Groot, Raoul J; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2014-07-01

    Glycans are carbohydrate modifications typically found on proteins or lipids, and can act as ligands for glycan-binding proteins called lectins. Glycans and lectins play crucial roles in the function of cells and organs, and in the immune system of animals and humans. Viral pathogens use glycans and lectins that are encoded by their own or the host genome for their replication and spread. Recent advances in glycobiological research indicate that glycans and lectins mediate key interactions at the virus-host interface, controlling viral spread and/or activation of the immune system. This review reflects on glycan-lectin interactions in the context of viral infection and antiviral immunity. A short introduction illustrates the nature of glycans and lectins, and conveys the basic principles of their interactions. Subsequently, examples are discussed highlighting specific glycan-lectin interactions and how they affect the progress of viral infections, either benefiting the host or the virus. Moreover, glycan and lectin variability and their potential biological consequences are discussed. Finally, the review outlines how recent advances in the glycan-lectin field might be transformed into promising new approaches to antiviral therapy.

  14. Quantitative Glycomics Strategies*

    PubMed Central

    Mechref, Yehia; Hu, Yunli; Desantos-Garcia, Janie L.; Hussein, Ahmed; Tang, Haixu

    2013-01-01

    The correlations between protein glycosylation and many biological processes and diseases are increasing the demand for quantitative glycomics strategies enabling sensitive monitoring of changes in the abundance and structure of glycans. This is currently attained through multiple strategies employing several analytical techniques such as capillary electrophoresis, liquid chromatography, and mass spectrometry. The detection and quantification of glycans often involve labeling with ionic and/or hydrophobic reagents. This step is needed in order to enhance detection in spectroscopic and mass spectrometric measurements. Recently, labeling with stable isotopic reagents has also been presented as a very viable strategy enabling relative quantitation. The different strategies available for reliable and sensitive quantitative glycomics are herein described and discussed. PMID:23325767

  15. Ultrasensitive detection of cancer cells and glycan expression profiling based on a multivalent recognition and alkaline phosphatase-responsive electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaojiao; He, Yao; Zhang, Youyu; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2014-09-01

    A multivalent recognition and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-responsive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for cancer cell detection and in situ evaluation of cell surface glycan expression was developed on a poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-conjugated, chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) electrode interface. In this strategy, the multivalency and high affinity of the cell-targeted aptamers on rGO provided a highly efficient cell recognition platform on the electrode. The ALP and concanavalin A (Con A) coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) nanoprobes allowed the ALP enzyme-catalyzed production of phenols that inhibited the ECL reaction of Ru(bpy)32+ on the rGO electrode interface, affording fast and highly sensitive ECL cytosensing and cell surface glycan evaluation. Combining the multivalent aptamer interface and ALP nanoprobes, the ECL cytosensor showed a detection limit of 38 CCRF-CEM cells per mL in human serum samples, broad dynamic range and excellent selectivity. In addition, the proposed biosensor provided a valuable insight into dynamic profiling of the expression of different glycans on cell surfaces, based on the carbohydrates recognized by lectins applied to the nanoprobes. This biosensor exhibits great promise in clinical diagnosis and drug screening.A multivalent recognition and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-responsive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for cancer cell detection and in situ evaluation of cell surface glycan expression was developed on a poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-conjugated, chemically reduced graphene oxide (rGO) electrode interface. In this strategy, the multivalency and high affinity of the cell-targeted aptamers on rGO provided a highly efficient cell recognition platform on the electrode. The ALP and concanavalin A (Con A) coated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) nanoprobes allowed the ALP enzyme-catalyzed production of phenols that inhibited the ECL reaction of Ru(bpy)32+ on the rGO electrode

  16. Glycan Side Reaction May Compromise ETD-Based Glycopeptide Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darula, Zsuzsanna; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.

    2014-06-01

    Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) is one of the most frequently used buffer ingredients. Among other things, it is recommended and is usually used for lectin-based affinity enrichment of glycopeptides. Here we report that sialic acid, a common `capping' unit in both N- and O-linked glycans may react with this chemical, and this side reaction may compromise glycopeptide identification when ETD spectra are the only MS/MS data used in the database search. We show that the modification may alter N- as well as O-linked glycans, the Tris-derivative is still prone to fragmentation both in `beam-type' CID (HCD) and ETD experiments, at the same time—since the acidic carboxyl group was `neutralized'—it will display a different retention time than its unmodified counterpart. We also suggest solutions that—when incorporated into existing search engines—may significantly improve the reliability of glycopeptide assignments.

  17. Sweet complementarity: the functional pairing of glycans with lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabius, H-J; Manning, J C; Kopitz, J; André, S; Kaltner, H

    2016-05-01

    Carbohydrates establish the third alphabet of life. As part of cellular glycoconjugates, the glycans generate a multitude of signals in a minimum of space. The presence of distinct glycotopes and the glycome diversity are mapped by sugar receptors (antibodies and lectins). Endogenous (tissue) lectins can read the sugar-encoded information and translate it into functional aspects of cell sociology. Illustrated by instructive examples, each glycan has its own ligand properties. Lectins with different folds can converge to target the same epitope, while intrafamily diversification enables functional cooperation and antagonism. The emerging evidence for the concept of a network calls for a detailed fingerprinting. Due to the high degree of plasticity and dynamics of the display of genes for lectins the validity of extrapolations between different organisms of the phylogenetic tree yet is inevitably limited. PMID:26956894

  18. Marine Non-Glycosaminoglycan Sulfated Glycans as Potential Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Pomin, Vitor H.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfated fucans (SFs) and sulfated galactans (SGs) are currently the marine non-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) sulfated glycans most studied in glycomics. These compounds exhibit therapeutic effects in several pathophysiological systems such as blood coagulation, thrombosis, neovascularization, cancer, inflammation, and microbial infections. As analogs of the largely employed GAGs and due to some limitations of the GAG-based therapies, SFs and SGs comprise new carbohydrate-based therapeutics available for clinical studies. Here, the principal structural features and the major mechanisms of action of the SFs and SGs in the above-mentioned pathophysiological systems are presented. Discussion is also given on the current challenges and the future perspectives in drug development of these marine glycans. PMID:26690451

  19. Host-pathogen co-evolution and glycan interactions.

    PubMed

    Le Pendu, Jacques; Nyström, Kristina; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Noroviruses and rotavirus A bind to polymorphic glycans of the histo-blood group type (HBGAs). Norovirus strains that bind to HBGAs can collectively infect all humans but each strain only infects a subgroup of the population, suggesting a past co-evolution that led to a trade-off where the human population is partly protected whilst the virus circulation is maintained. We termed 'Herd Innate Protection' the host species partial protection provided by the HBGAs polymorphism. Given its recent emergence, high virulence and HBGAs attachment, RHDV provides a model for studying calicivirus-host co-evolution. Field observations documented evolution of the virus ability to recognize the host HBGAs diversity and reciprocal strain-dependent selection of HBGA phenotypes following outbreaks, indicating host-pathogen co-evolution involving glycan polymorphisms.

  20. Microarray Developed on Plastic Substrates.

    PubMed

    Bañuls, María-José; Morais, Sergi B; Tortajada-Genaro, Luis A; Maquieira, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    There is a huge potential interest to use synthetic polymers as versatile solid supports for analytical microarraying. Chemical modification of polycarbonate (PC) for covalent immobilization of probes, micro-printing of protein or nucleic acid probes, development of indirect immunoassay, and development of hybridization protocols are described and discussed. PMID:26614067

  1. Microfluidic microarray systems and methods thereof

    SciTech Connect

    West, Jay A. A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.

    2009-04-28

    Disclosed are systems that include a manifold in fluid communication with a microfluidic chip having a microarray, an illuminator, and a detector in optical communication with the microarray. Methods for using these systems for biological detection are also disclosed.

  2. The N-Glycan Cluster from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris

    PubMed Central

    Dupoiron, Stéphanie; Zischek, Claudine; Ligat, Laetitia; Carbonne, Julien; Boulanger, Alice; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Lautier, Martine; Rival, Pauline; Arlat, Matthieu; Jamet, Elisabeth; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Albenne, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycans are widely distributed in living organisms but represent only a small fraction of the carbohydrates found in plants. This probably explains why they have not previously been considered as substrates exploited by phytopathogenic bacteria during plant infection. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, the causal agent of black rot disease of Brassica plants, possesses a specific system for GlcNAc utilization expressed during host plant infection. This system encompasses a cluster of eight genes (nixE to nixL) encoding glycoside hydrolases (GHs). In this paper, we have characterized the enzymatic activities of these GHs and demonstrated their involvement in sequential degradation of a plant N-glycan using a N-glycopeptide containing two GlcNAcs, three mannoses, one fucose, and one xylose (N2M3FX) as a substrate. The removal of the α-1,3-mannose by the α-mannosidase NixK (GH92) is a prerequisite for the subsequent action of the β-xylosidase NixI (GH3), which is involved in the cleavage of the β-1,2-xylose, followed by the α-mannosidase NixJ (GH125), which removes the α-1,6-mannose. These data, combined to the subcellular localization of the enzymes, allowed us to propose a model of N-glycopeptide processing by X. campestris pv. campestris. This study constitutes the first evidence suggesting N-glycan degradation by a plant pathogen, a feature shared with human pathogenic bacteria. Plant N-glycans should therefore be included in the repertoire of molecules putatively metabolized by phytopathogenic bacteria during their life cycle. PMID:25586188

  3. Glycan-Targeted Virus-like Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Baksh, Michael; Nycholat, Corwin; Paulson, James C.; Kitagishi, Hiroaki; Finn, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) have proven to be versatile platforms for chemical and functionalization for a variety of purposes in biomedicine, catalysis, and materials science. We here the simultaneous modification of the bacteriophage Qβ VLP with a metalloporphyrin derivative photodynamic therapy and a glycan ligand for specific targeting of cells bearing the CD-22 receptor. This application benefits from the presence of the targeting function and the delivery of a high local concentration of singlet oxygen-generating payload. PMID:22827531

  4. Structural bases for N-glycan processing by mannoside phosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Ladevèze, Simon; Cioci, Gianluca; Roblin, Pierre; Mourey, Lionel; Tranier, Samuel; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2015-06-01

    The first crystal structure of Uhgb_MP, a β-1,4-mannopyranosyl-chitobiose phosphorylase belonging to the GH130 family which is involved in N-glycan degradation by human gut bacteria, was solved at 1.85 Å resolution in the apo form and in complex with mannose and N-acetylglucosamine. SAXS and crystal structure analysis revealed a hexameric structure, a specific feature of GH130 enzymes among other glycoside phosphorylases. Mapping of the -1 and +1 subsites in the presence of phosphate confirmed the conserved Asp104 as the general acid/base catalytic residue, which is in agreement with a single-step reaction mechanism involving Man O3 assistance for proton transfer. Analysis of this structure, the first to be solved for a member of the GH130_2 subfamily, revealed Met67, Phe203 and the Gly121-Pro125 loop as the main determinants of the specificity of Uhgb_MP and its homologues towards the N-glycan core oligosaccharides and mannan, and the molecular bases of the key role played by GH130 enzymes in the catabolism of dietary fibre and host glycans.

  5. Structural bases for N-glycan processing by mannoside phosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Ladevèze, Simon; Cioci, Gianluca; Roblin, Pierre; Mourey, Lionel; Tranier, Samuel; Potocki-Véronèse, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    The first crystal structure of Uhgb_MP, a β-1,4-mannopyranosyl-chitobiose phosphorylase belonging to the GH130 family which is involved in N-glycan degradation by human gut bacteria, was solved at 1.85 Å resolution in the apo form and in complex with mannose and N-acetylglucosamine. SAXS and crystal structure analysis revealed a hexameric structure, a specific feature of GH130 enzymes among other glycoside phosphorylases. Mapping of the −1 and +1 subsites in the presence of phosphate confirmed the conserved Asp104 as the general acid/base catalytic residue, which is in agreement with a single-step reaction mechanism involving Man O3 assistance for proton transfer. Analysis of this structure, the first to be solved for a member of the GH130_2 subfamily, revealed Met67, Phe203 and the Gly121–Pro125 loop as the main determinants of the specificity of Uhgb_MP and its homologues towards the N-glycan core oligosaccharides and mannan, and the molecular bases of the key role played by GH130 enzymes in the catabolism of dietary fibre and host glycans. PMID:26057673

  6. Identification of glycoproteins containing specific glycans using a lectin-chemical method.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Shah, Punit; De Marzo, Angelo M; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Li, Qianqian; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common protein modifications. Each glycoprotein can be glycosylated at multiple glycosites, and each glycosites can be modified by different glycans. Due to this heterogeneity of glycosylation, it has proven difficult to study the structure-function relationship of specific glycans and their affected glycoproteins. Here, we report a novel method for rapid and quantitative identification of glycoproteins containing specific glycans. Lectin affinity isolations are followed by chemical immobilization of the captured glycopeptides, allowing the identification of glycoproteins containing specific glycans by subsequent mass spectrometry. The application of the method should be useful to facilitate our understanding of how changes in glycan associate with diseases, and to discover novel glycoproteins with certain glycans that could serve as biomarkers or therapeutic targets.

  7. Metabolic Labeling and Imaging of N-Linked Glycans in Arabidopsis Thaliana.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuntao; Wu, Jie; Chen, Xing

    2016-08-01

    Molecular imaging of glycans has been actively pursued in animal systems for the past decades. However, visualization of plant glycans remains underdeveloped, despite that glycosylation is essential for the life cycle of plants. Metabolic glycan labeling in Arabidopsis thaliana by using N-azidoacetylglucosamine (GlcNAz) as the chemical reporter is reported. GlcNAz is metabolized through the salvage pathway of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and incorporated into N-linked glycans, and possibly intracellular O-GlcNAc. Click-labeling with fluorescent probes enables visualization of newly synthesized N-linked glycans. N-glycosylation in the root tissue was discovered to possess distinct distribution patterns in different developmental zones, suggesting that N-glycosylation is regulated in a developmental stage-dependent manner. This work shows the utility of metabolic glycan labeling in elucidating the function of N-linked glycosylation in plants.

  8. Glycan Arrays: From Basic Biochemical Research to Bioanalytical and Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-06-12

    A major branch of glycobiology and glycan-focused biomedicine studies the interaction between carbohydrates and other biopolymers, most importantly, glycan-binding proteins. Today, this research into glycan-biopolymer interaction is unthinkable without glycan arrays, tools that enable high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate interaction partners. Glycan arrays offer many applications in basic biochemical research, for example, defining the specificity of glycosyltransferases and lectins such as immune receptors. Biomedical applications include the characterization and surveillance of influenza strains, identification of biomarkers for cancer and infection, and profiling of immune responses to vaccines. Here, we review major applications of glycan arrays both in basic and applied research. Given the dynamic nature of this rapidly developing field, we focus on recent findings. PMID:27306309

  9. Glycan Arrays: From Basic Biochemical Research to Bioanalytical and Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissner, Andreas; Seeberger, Peter H.

    2016-06-01

    A major branch of glycobiology and glycan-focused biomedicine studies the interaction between carbohydrates and other biopolymers, most importantly, glycan-binding proteins. Today, this research into glycan-biopolymer interaction is unthinkable without glycan arrays, tools that enable high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate interaction partners. Glycan arrays offer many applications in basic biochemical research, for example, defining the specificity of glycosyltransferases and lectins such as immune receptors. Biomedical applications include the characterization and surveillance of influenza strains, identification of biomarkers for cancer and infection, and profiling of immune responses to vaccines. Here, we review major applications of glycan arrays both in basic and applied research. Given the dynamic nature of this rapidly developing field, we focus on recent findings.

  10. Tracking surface glycans on live cancer cells with single molecule sensitivity**

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hao; English, Brian P.; Hazan, Rachel B.; Wu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Using a combination of metabolically labeled glycans, bioorthogonal Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition and controlled bleaching of fluorescent probes conjugated to azide or alkyne tagged glycans, we achieve a sufficiently low spatial density of dye labeled glycans enabling dynamic single-molecule tracking and super-resolution imaging of N-linked sialic acids and O-linked GalNAc on the membrane of live cells. Analysis of the trajectories of these dye labeled glycans in mammary cancer cells reveal constrained diffusion of both N- and O-linked glycans which we interpret as reflecting the mobility of the glycan rather than caused by transient immobilization due to spatial inhomogeneities on the plasma membrane. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) imaging reveals the structure of dynamic membrane nanotubes. PMID:25515330

  11. Targeting host-derived glycans on enveloped viruses for antibody-based vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Crispin, Max; Doores, Katie J.

    2016-01-01

    The surface of enveloped viruses can be extensively glycosylated. Unlike the glycans coating pathogens such as bacteria and fungi, glycans on viruses are added and processed by the host-cell during biosynthesis. Glycoproteins are typically subjected to α-mannosidase processing and Golgi-mediated glycosyltransferase extension to form complex-type glycans. In envelope viruses, exceptions to this default pathway are common and lead to the presence of oligomannose-type glycan structures on the virion surface. In one extreme example, HIV-1 utilizes a high density of glycans to limit host antibody recognition of protein. However, the high density limits glycan processing and the resulting oligomannose structures can be recognised by broadly neutralising antibodies isolated form HIV-1 infected patients. Here we discuss how divergence from host-cell glycosylation can be targeted for vaccine design. PMID:25747313

  12. Effects of N-glycan precursor length diversity on quality control of protein folding and on protein glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, John; Robbins, Phillips W

    2015-05-01

    Asparagine-linked glycans (N-glycans) of medically important protists have much to tell us about the evolution of N-glycosylation and of N-glycan-dependent quality control (N-glycan QC) of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. While host N-glycans are built upon a dolichol-pyrophosphate-linked precursor with 14 sugars (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2), protist N-glycan precursors vary from Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 (Acanthamoeba) to Man9GlcNAc2 (Trypanosoma) to Glc3Man5GlcNAc2 (Toxoplasma) to Man5GlcNAc2 (Entamoeba, Trichomonas, and Eimeria) to GlcNAc2 (Plasmodium and Giardia) to zero (Theileria). As related organisms have differing N-glycan lengths (e.g. Toxoplasma, Eimeria, Plasmodium, and Theileria), the present N-glycan variation is based upon secondary loss of Alg genes, which encode enzymes that add sugars to the N-glycan precursor. An N-glycan precursor with Man5GlcNAc2 is necessary but not sufficient for N-glycan QC, which is predicted by the presence of the UDP-glucose:glucosyltransferase (UGGT) plus calreticulin and/or calnexin. As many parasites lack glucose in their N-glycan precursor, UGGT product may be identified by inhibition of glucosidase II. The presence of an armless calnexin in Toxoplasma suggests secondary loss of N-glycan QC from coccidia. Positive selection for N-glycan sites occurs in secreted proteins of organisms with N-glycan QC and is based upon an increased likelihood of threonine but not serine in the +2 position versus asparagine. In contrast, there appears to be selection against N-glycan length in Plasmodium and N-glycan site density in Toxoplasma. Finally, there is suggestive evidence for N-glycan-dependent ERAD in Trichomonas, which glycosylates and degrades the exogenous reporter mutant carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*).

  13. The Microarray Revolution: Perspectives from Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewster, Jay L.; Beason, K. Beth; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Evans, Irene M.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, microarray analysis has become a key experimental tool, enabling the analysis of genome-wide patterns of gene expression. This review approaches the microarray revolution with a focus upon four topics: 1) the early development of this technology and its application to cancer diagnostics; 2) a primer of microarray research,…

  14. Quantitation of Permethylated N-Glycans through Multiple-Reaction Monitoring (MRM) LC-MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyue; Hu, Yunli; DeSantos-Garcia, Janie L.; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-04-01

    The important biological roles of glycans and their implications in disease development and progression have created a demand for the development of sensitive quantitative glycomics methods. Quantitation of glycans existing at low abundance is still analytically challenging. In this study, an N-linked glycans quantitation method using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) on a triple quadrupole instrument was developed. Optimum normalized collision energy (CE) for both sialylated and fucosylated N-glycan was determined to be 30%, whereas it was found to be 35% for either fucosylated or sialylated N-glycans. The optimum CE for mannose and complex type N-glycan was determined to be 35%. Additionally, the use of three transitions was shown to facilitate reliable quantitation. A total of 88 N-glycan compositions in human blood serum were quantified using this MRM approach. Reliable detection and quantitation of these glycans was achieved when the equivalence of 0.005 μL of blood serum was analyzed. Accordingly, N-glycans down to the 100th of a μL level can be reliably quantified in pooled human blood serum, spanning a dynamic concentration range of three orders of magnitude. MRM was also effectively utilized to quantitatively compare the expression of N-glycans derived from brain-targeting breast carcinoma cells (MDA-MB-231BR) and metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). Thus, the described MRM method of permethylated N-glycan enables a rapid and reliable identification and quantitation of glycans derived from glycoproteins purified or present in complex biological samples.

  15. O-glycan inhibitors generate aryl-glycans, induce apoptosis and lead to growth inhibition in colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Patsos, Georgios; Hebbe-Viton, Virginie; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine; Masselot, David; San Martin, Raul; Greenwood, Rosemary; Paraskeva, Christos; Klein, Andreas; Graessmann, Monika; Michalski, Jean Claude; Gallagher, Timothy; Corfield, Anthony

    2009-04-01

    Our studies provide direct evidence that O-glycosylation pathways play a role in the regulation of cell growth through apoptosis and proliferation pathways. A series of small molecular weight analogs of the GalNAc-alpha-1-O-serine/threonine structure based on 1-benzyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-O-d-galactopyranoside have been synthesized and tested in the human colorectal cancer cell lines PC/AA/C1/SB10C and HCA7/C29. Three inhibitors, 1-benzyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-O-D-galactopyranoside, and the corresponding 2-azido- and C-glycoside analogs were screened in these colorectal cancer cell lines at 0.5 mM and showed induction of apoptosis and downregulation of proliferation. Treatment of both cell lines with inhibitors led to changes in glycosylation detected with peanut lectin. The inhibition of glycosyltransferase activity in cell homogenates from human colorectal mucosal cells and cultured cell lines could be shown. The competitive action of the inhibitors resulted in the intracellular formation of 28 aryl-glycan products which were identified by MALDI and electrospray mass spectroscopy. The structures showed a differential pattern for each of the inhibitors in both cell lines. Gene array analysis of the glycogenes illustrated a pattern of glycosyltransferases that matched the glycan structures found in glycoproteins and aryl-glycans formed in the PC/AA/C1/SB10C cells; however, there was no action of the three inhibitors on glycogene transcript levels. The inhibitors act at both intermediary metabolic and genomic levels, resulting in altered protein glycosylation and aryl-glycan formation. These events may play a part in growth arrest.

  16. Improved nonreductive O-glycan release by hydrazinolysis with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid addition.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Radoslaw P; Royle, Louise; Gardner, Richard A; Bondt, Albert; Fernandes, Daryl L; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2014-05-15

    The study of protein O-glycosylation is receiving increasing attention in biological, medical, and biopharmaceutical research. Improved techniques are required to allow reproducible and quantitative analysis of O-glycans. An established approach for O-glycan analysis relies on their chemical release in high yield by hydrazinolysis, followed by fluorescent labeling at the reducing terminus and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) profiling. However, an unwanted degradation known as "peeling" often compromises hydrazinolysis for O-glycan analysis. Here we addressed this problem using low-molarity solutions of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in hydrazine for O-glycan release. O-linked glycans from a range of different glycoproteins were analyzed, including bovine fetuin, bovine submaxillary gland mucin, and serum immunoglobulin A (IgA). The data for the O-glycans released by hydrazine with anhydrous EDTA or disodium salt dihydrate EDTA show high yields of the native O-glycans compared with the peeled product, resulting in a markedly increased robustness of the O-glycan profiling method. The presented method for O-glycan release demonstrates significant reduction in peeling and reduces the number of sample handling steps prior to release.

  17. Comparative analysis of N-glycans in the ungerminated and germinated stages of Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Risa; Hirotsu, Naoki; Miyanishi, Nobumitsu

    2015-12-11

    All fundamental information such as signal transduction, metabolic control, infection, cell-to-cell signaling, and cell differentiation related to the growth of plants are preserved in germs. In preserving these information, glycans have a key role and are involved in the development and differentiation of organisms. Glycans which exist in rice germ are expected to have an important role in germination. In this study, we performed structural and correlation analysis of the N-glycans in rice germ before and after germination. Our results confirmed that the N-glycans in the ungerminated stage of the rice germ had low number of N-glycans consisting only of six kinds especially with high-mannose and paucimannose type N-glycans being 16.0% and 76.7%, respectively. On the other hand, after 48 hours germinated germ stage, there was an increase in the complex type N-glycans with the appearance of Lewis a structure, the most complex type and a decrease in paucimannose types. These results suggest that at least six kinds of N-glycans are utilized for long time preservation of rice seed, while the diversification of most complex types of N-glycans is produced an environment dependent for shoot formation of rice. PMID:26513758

  18. Atomic visualization of a flipped-back conformation of bisected glycans bound to specific lectins

    PubMed Central

    Nagae, Masamichi; Kanagawa, Mayumi; Morita-Matsumoto, Kana; Hanashima, Shinya; Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    Glycans normally exist as a dynamic equilibrium of several conformations. A fundamental question concerns how such molecules bind lectins despite disadvantageous entropic loss upon binding. Bisected glycan, a glycan possessing bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is potentially a good model for investigating conformational dynamics and glycan-lectin interactions, owing to the unique ability of this sugar residue to alter conformer populations and thus modulate the biological activities. Here we analyzed bisected glycan in complex with two unrelated lectins, Calsepa and PHA-E. The crystal structures of the two complexes show a conspicuous flipped back glycan structure (designated ‘back-fold’ conformation), and solution NMR analysis also provides evidence of ‘back-fold’ glycan structure. Indeed, statistical conformational analysis of available bisected and non-bisected glycan structures suggests that bisecting GlcNAc restricts the conformations of branched structures. Restriction of glycan flexibility by certain sugar residues may be more common than previously thought and impinges on the mechanism of glycoform-dependent biological functions. PMID:26971576

  19. Comprehensive analysis of the N-glycan biosynthetic pathway using bioinformatics to generate UniCorn: A theoretical N-glycan structure database.

    PubMed

    Akune, Yukie; Lin, Chi-Hung; Abrahams, Jodie L; Zhang, Jingyu; Packer, Nicolle H; Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko F; Campbell, Matthew P

    2016-08-01

    Glycan structures attached to proteins are comprised of diverse monosaccharide sequences and linkages that are produced from precursor nucleotide-sugars by a series of glycosyltransferases. Databases of these structures are an essential resource for the interpretation of analytical data and the development of bioinformatics tools. However, with no template to predict what structures are possible the human glycan structure databases are incomplete and rely heavily on the curation of published, experimentally determined, glycan structure data. In this work, a library of 45 human glycosyltransferases was used to generate a theoretical database of N-glycan structures comprised of 15 or less monosaccharide residues. Enzyme specificities were sourced from major online databases including Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Glycan, Consortium for Functional Glycomics (CFG), Carbohydrate-Active enZymes (CAZy), GlycoGene DataBase (GGDB) and BRENDA. Based on the known activities, more than 1.1 million theoretical structures and 4.7 million synthetic reactions were generated and stored in our database called UniCorn. Furthermore, we analyzed the differences between the predicted glycan structures in UniCorn and those contained in UniCarbKB (www.unicarbkb.org), a database which stores experimentally described glycan structures reported in the literature, and demonstrate that UniCorn can be used to aid in the assignment of ambiguous structures whilst also serving as a discovery database.

  20. Extensive determination of glycan heterogeneity reveals an unusual abundance of high mannose glycans in enriched plasma membranes of human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    An, Hyun Joo; Gip, Phung; Kim, Jaehan; Wu, Shuai; Park, Kun Wook; McVaugh, Cheryl T; Schaffer, David V; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2012-04-01

    Most cell membrane proteins are known or predicted to be glycosylated in eukaryotic organisms, where surface glycans are essential in many biological processes including cell development and differentiation. Nonetheless, the glycosylation on cell membranes remains not well characterized because of the lack of sensitive analytical methods. This study introduces a technique for the rapid profiling and quantitation of N- and O-glycans on cell membranes using membrane enrichment and nanoflow liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry of native structures. Using this new method, the glycome analysis of cell membranes isolated from human embryonic stem cells and somatic cell lines was performed. Human embryonic stem cells were found to have high levels of high mannose glycans, which contrasts with IMR-90 fibroblasts and a human normal breast cell line, where complex glycans are by far the most abundant and high mannose glycans are minor components. O-Glycosylation affects relatively minor components of cell surfaces. To verify the quantitation and localization of glycans on the human embryonic stem cell membranes, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry were performed. Proteomics analyses were also performed and confirmed enrichment of plasma membrane proteins with some contamination from endoplasmic reticulum and other membranes. These findings suggest that high mannose glycans are the major component of cell surface glycosylation with even terminal glucoses. High mannose glycans are not commonly presented on the surfaces of mammalian cells or in serum yet may play important roles in stem cell biology. The results also mean that distinguishing stem cells from other mammalian cells may be facilitated by the major difference in the glycosylation of the cell membrane. The deep structural analysis enabled by this new method will enable future mechanistic studies on the biological significance of high mannose glycans on stem cell membranes and provide a general tool to examine

  1. Effects of N-glycan precursor length diversity on quality control of protein folding and on protein glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, John; Robbins, Phillips W.

    2014-01-01

    Asparagine-linked glycans (N-glycans) of medically important protists have much to tell us about the evolution of N-glycosylation and of N-glycan-dependent quality control (N-glycan QC) of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum. While host N-glycans are built upon a dolichol-pyrophosphate-linked precursor with 14 sugars (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2), protist N-glycan precursors vary from Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 (Acanthamoeba) to Man9GlcNAc2 (Trypanosoma) to Glc3Man5GlcNAc2 (Toxoplasma) to Man5GlcNAc2 (Entamoeba, Trichomonas, and Eimeria) to GlcNAc2 (Plasmodium and Giardia) to zero (Theileria). As related organisms have differing N-glycan lengths (e.g. Toxoplasma, Eimeria, Plasmodium, and Theileria), the present N-glycan variation is based upon secondary loss of Alg genes, which encode enzymes that add sugars to the N-glycan precursor. An N-glycan precursor with Man5GlcNAc2 is necessary but not sufficient for N-glycan QC, which is predicted by the presence of the UDP-glucose:glucosyltransferase (UGGT) plus calreticulin and/or calnexin. As many parasites lack glucose in their N-glycan precursor, UGGT product may be identified by inhibition of glucosidase II. The presence of an armless calnexin in Toxoplasma suggests secondary loss of N-glycan QC from coccidia. Positive selection for N-glycan sites occurs in secreted proteins of organisms with NG-QC and is based upon an increased likelihood of threonine but not serine in the second position versus asparagine. In contrast, there appears to be selection against N-glycan length in Plasmodium and N-glycan site density in Toxoplasma. Finally, there is suggestive evidence for N-glycan-dependent ERAD in Trichomonas, which glycosylates and degrades the exogenous reporter mutant carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*). PMID:25475176

  2. Microarray technology for use in molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Vernon, Suzanne D; Whistler, Toni

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful laboratory tool for the simultaneous assessment of the activity of thousands genes. Remarkable advances in biological sample collection, preparation and automation of hybridization have enabled the application of microarray technology to large, population-based studies. Now, microarrays have the potential to serve as screening tools for the detection of altered gene expression activity that might contribute to diseases in human populations. Reproducible and reliable microarray results depend on multiple factors. In this chapter, biological sample parameters are introduced that should be considered for any microarray experiment. Then, the microarray technology that we have successfully applied to limited biological sample from all our molecular epidemiology studies is detailed. This reproducible and reliable approach for using microarrays should be applicable to any biological questions asked.

  3. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  4. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Jun; Heo, Jin Yeong; Kim, Hi Chul; Kim, Jin Yeop; Liuzzi, Michel; Soloveva, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the biology of selected cellular models. After reverse-transfection of microRNAs and siRNA, the cellular phenotype generated by microRNAs regulated NF-κB expression comparably to the siRNA. The ability to print microRNA molecules for reverse transfection into cells is opening up the wide horizon for the phenotypic high content screening of microRNA libraries using cellular disease models.

  5. Self-Assembling Protein Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Bhullar, Bhupinder; Eisenstein, Samuel; Rosen, Benjamin; Lau, Albert Y.; C. Walter, Johannes; LaBaer, Joshua

    2004-07-01

    Protein microarrays provide a powerful tool for the study of protein function. However, they are not widely used, in part because of the challenges in producing proteins to spot on the arrays. We generated protein microarrays by printing complementary DNAs onto glass slides and then translating target proteins with mammalian reticulocyte lysate. Epitope tags fused to the proteins allowed them to be immobilized in situ. This obviated the need to purify proteins, avoided protein stability problems during storage, and captured sufficient protein for functional studies. We used the technology to map pairwise interactions among 29 human DNA replication initiation proteins, recapitulate the regulation of Cdt1 binding to select replication proteins, and map its geminin-binding domain.

  6. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  7. Microarrays, antiobesity and the liver

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Chávez, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    In this review, the microarray technology and especially oligonucleotide arrays are exemplified with a practical example taken from the perilipin−/− mice and using the dChip software, available for non-lucrative purposes. It was found that the liver of perilipin−/− mice was healthy and normal, even under high-fat diet when compared with the results published for the scd1−/− mice, which under high-fat diets had a darker liver, suggestive of hepatic steatosis. Scd1 is required for the biosynthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids and plays a key role in the hepatic synthesis of triglycerides and of very-low-density lipoproteins. Both models of obesity resistance share many similar phenotypic antiobesity features, however, the perilipin−/− mice had a significant downregulation of stearoyl CoA desaturases scd1 and scd2 in its white adipose tissue, but a normal level of both genes inside the liver, even under high-fat diet. Here, different microarray methodologies are discussed, and also some of the most recent discoveries and perspectives regarding the use of microarrays, with an emphasis on obesity gene expression, and a personal remark on my findings of increased expression for hemoglobin transcripts and other hemo related genes (hemo-like), and for leukocyte like (leuko-like) genes inside the white adipose tissue of the perilipin−/− mice. In conclusion, microarrays have much to offer in comparative studies such as those in antiobesity, and also they are methodologies adequate for new astounding molecular discoveries [free full text of this article PMID:15657555

  8. Site-Specifically Labeled Immunoconjugates for Molecular Imaging--Part 1: Cysteine Residues and Glycans.

    PubMed

    Adumeau, Pierre; Sharma, Sai Kiran; Brent, Colleen; Zeglis, Brian M

    2016-02-01

    Due to their remarkable selectivity and specificity for cancer biomarkers, immunoconjugates have emerged as extremely promising vectors for the delivery of diagnostic radioisotopes and fluorophores to malignant tissues. Paradoxically, however, these tools for precision medicine are synthesized in a remarkably imprecise way. Indeed, the vast majority of immunoconjugates are created via the random conjugation of bifunctional probes (e.g., DOTA-NCS) to amino acids within the antibody (e.g., lysines). Yet antibodies have multiple copies of these residues throughout their macromolecular structure, making control over the location of the conjugation reaction impossible. This lack of site specificity can lead to the formation of poorly defined, heterogeneous immunoconjugates with suboptimal in vivo behavior. Over the past decade, interest in the synthesis and development of site-specifically labeled immunoconjugates--both antibody-drug conjugates as well as constructs for in vivo imaging--has increased dramatically, and a number of reports have suggested that these better defined, more homogeneous constructs exhibit improved performance in vivo compared to their randomly modified cousins. In this two-part review, we seek to provide an overview of the various methods that have been developed to create site-specifically modified immunoconjugates for positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, and fluorescence imaging. We will begin with an introduction to the structure of antibodies and antibody fragments. This is followed by the core of the work: sections detailing the four different approaches to site-specific modification strategies based on cysteine residues, glycans, peptide tags, and unnatural amino acids. These discussions will be divided into two installments: cysteine residues and glycans will be detailed in Part 1 of the review, while peptide tags and unnatural amino acids will be addressed in Part 2. Ultimately, we sincerely hope

  9. Examination of Glycan Profiles from IgG-Depleted Human Immunoglobulins Facilitated by Microscale Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, Martin; Mann, Benjamin F.; Goetz, John A.; Novotny, Milos V.

    2012-01-01

    Among the most important proteins involved in the disease and healing processes are the immunoglobulins (Igs). Although many of the Igs have been studied through proteomics, aside from IgG, immunoglobulin carbohydrates have not been extensively characterized in different states of health. It seems valuable to develop techniques that permit us to understand changes in the structures and abundances of Ig glycans in the context of disease onset and progression. We have devised a strategy for characterization of the glycans for the Ig classes other than IgG (i.e. A, D, E, and M) that contain kappa light chains, while using only a few microliters of biological material. First, we designed a microcolumn containing the recombinant Protein L that was immobilized on macroporous silica particles. A similarly designed Protein G microcolumn was utilized to first perform an on-line depletion of the IgG from the sample, human blood serum, and thereby facilitate enrichment of the other Igs. While only 3 μL of serum were used in these analyses, we were able to recover a significantly-enriched fraction of non-IgG immunoglobulins. The enrichment properties of the Protein L column were characterized using a highly sensitive label-free quantitative proteomics LC-MS/MS approach, and the glycomic profiles of enriched immunoglobulins were measured by MALDI-TOF-MS. As a proof-of-principle, a comparative study was conducted using blood serum from a small group of lung cancer patients and a group of age-matched cancer-free individuals to demonstrate that the method is suitable for investigation of glycosylation changes in disease. The results were in agreement with a glycomic investigation of whole blood serum from a much larger lung cancer cohort. PMID:22360417

  10. Graphene based soft nanoreactors for facile "one-step" glycan enrichment and derivatization for MALDI-TOF-MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haihong; Pan, Yiting; Tong, Wei; Zhang, Wanjun; Ren, Xiaojun; Tian, Fang; Peng, Bo; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yangjun; Deng, Yulin; Qin, Weijie; Qian, Xiaohong

    2013-12-15

    Protein glycosylation is involved in the control of many important biological processes and structural alterations of the N-linked glycans are correlated with various kinds of disease. High-throughput N-glycan profiling is a key technique for elucidating the functions of glycans in biological process and disease development as well as discovering new diagnostic biomarkers. However, the low abundance of glycans existing in living organism, the competition/suppression effect of other highly abundant biological molecules and the inherent lack of alkalinity and hydrophobicity of glycans leads to particularly poor detection sensitivity in MS analysis. Here, we demonstrated the first "one-step" approach for highly efficient glycan enrichment and derivatization using reduced graphene oxide as nanoreactors and 1-pyrenebutyric hydrazide for glycan capture and derivatization, which resulted in a 33-fold increase in the glycan detection sensitivity in MALDI-TOF-MS and the identification of 48N-glycoforms from human plasma.

  11. Quantitative profiling of O-glycans by electrospray ionization- and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry after in-gel derivatization with isotope-coded 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone.

    PubMed

    Sić, Siniša; Maier, Norbert M; Rizzi, Andreas M

    2016-09-01

    The potential and benefits of isotope-coded labeling in the context of MS-based glycan profiling are evaluated focusing on the analysis of O-glycans. For this purpose, a derivatization strategy using d0/d5-1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) is employed, allowing O-glycan release and derivatization to be achieved in one single step. The paper demonstrates that this release and derivatization reaction can be carried out also in-gel with only marginal loss in sensitivity compared to in-solution derivatization. Such an effective in-gel reaction allows one to extend this release/labeling method also to glycoprotein/glycoform samples pre-separated by gel-electrophoresis without the need of extracting the proteins/digested peptides from the gel. With highly O-glycosylated proteins (e.g. mucins) LODs in the range of 0.4 μg glycoprotein (100 fmol) loaded onto the electrophoresis gel can be attained, with minor glycosylated proteins (like IgAs, FVII, FIX) the LODs were in the range of 80-100 μg (250 pmol-1.5 nmol) glycoprotein loaded onto the gel. As second aspect, the potential of isotope coded labeling as internal standardization strategy for the reliable determination of quantitative glycan profiles via MALDI-MS is investigated. Towards this goal, a number of established and emerging MALDI matrices were tested for PMP-glycan quantitation, and their performance is compared with that of ESI-based measurements. The crystalline matrix 2,6-dihydroxyacetophenone (DHAP) and the ionic liquid matrix N,N-diisopropyl-ethyl-ammonium 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (DIEA-THAP) showed potential for MALDI-based quantitation of PMP-labeled O-glycans. We also provide a comprehensive overview on the performance of MS-based glycan quantitation approaches by comparing sensitivity, LOD, accuracy and repeatability data obtained with RP-HPLC-ESI-MS, stand-alone nano-ESI-MS with a spray-nozzle chip, and MALDI-MS. Finally, the suitability of the isotope-coded PMP labeling strategy for O-glycan

  12. Bacterial identification and subtyping using DNA microarray and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Al-Khaldi, Sufian F; Mossoba, Magdi M; Allard, Marc M; Lienau, E Kurt; Brown, Eric D

    2012-01-01

    The era of fast and accurate discovery of biological sequence motifs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is here. The co-evolution of direct genome sequencing and DNA microarray strategies not only will identify, isotype, and serotype pathogenic bacteria, but also it will aid in the discovery of new gene functions by detecting gene expressions in different diseases and environmental conditions. Microarray bacterial identification has made great advances in working with pure and mixed bacterial samples. The technological advances have moved beyond bacterial gene expression to include bacterial identification and isotyping. Application of new tools such as mid-infrared chemical imaging improves detection of hybridization in DNA microarrays. The research in this field is promising and future work will reveal the potential of infrared technology in bacterial identification. On the other hand, DNA sequencing by using 454 pyrosequencing is so cost effective that the promise of $1,000 per bacterial genome sequence is becoming a reality. Pyrosequencing technology is a simple to use technique that can produce accurate and quantitative analysis of DNA sequences with a great speed. The deposition of massive amounts of bacterial genomic information in databanks is creating fingerprint phylogenetic analysis that will ultimately replace several technologies such as Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis. In this chapter, we will review (1) the use of DNA microarray using fluorescence and infrared imaging detection for identification of pathogenic bacteria, and (2) use of pyrosequencing in DNA cluster analysis to fingerprint bacterial phylogenetic trees.

  13. Glycan-functionalized diamond nanoparticles as potent E. coli anti-adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barras, Alexandre; Martin, Fernando Ariel; Bande, Omprakash; Baumann, Jean-Sébastien; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Boukherroub, Rabah; Beloin, Christophe; Siriwardena, Aloysius; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-02-01

    Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation on biotic surfaces or medical devices is an increasing source of infections in clinical settings. A large proportion of these biofilm-related infections are caused by Escherichia coli, a major nosocomial pathogen, in which the major adhesion factor is the FimH adhesin located at the tip of type 1 fimbriae. Inhibition of FimH-mediated adhesion has been identified as an efficient antibiotic-alternative strategy to potentially reduce E. coli-related infections. In this article we demonstrate that nanodiamond particles, covently modified with mannose moieties by a ``click'' chemistry approach, are able to efficiently inhibit E. coli type 1 fimbriae-mediated adhesion to eukaryotic cells with relative inhibitory potency (RIP) of as high as 9259 (bladder cell adhesion assay), which is unprecedented when compared with RIP values previously reported for alternate multivalent mannose-functionalized nanostructures designed to inhibit E. coli adhesion. Also remarkable is that these novel mannose-modified NDs reduce E. coli biofilm formation, a property previously not observed for multivalent glyco-nanoparticles and rarely demonstrated for other multivalent or monovalent mannose glycans. This work sets the stage for the further evaluation of these novel NDs as an anti-adhesive therapeutic strategy against E. coli-derived infections.Bacterial attachment and subsequent biofilm formation on biotic surfaces or medical devices is an increasing source of infections in clinical settings. A large proportion of these biofilm-related infections are caused by Escherichia coli, a major nosocomial pathogen, in which the major adhesion factor is the FimH adhesin located at the tip of type 1 fimbriae. Inhibition of FimH-mediated adhesion has been identified as an efficient antibiotic-alternative strategy to potentially reduce E. coli-related infections. In this article we demonstrate that nanodiamond particles, covently modified with

  14. Coordinate regulation of glycan degradation and polysaccharide capsule biosynthesis by a prominent human gut symbiont.

    PubMed

    Martens, Eric C; Roth, Robyn; Heuser, John E; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2009-07-01

    Bacteria in the distal human gut have evolved diverse abilities to metabolize complex glycans, including the capacity to degrade these compounds as nutrients and to assemble their component sugars into new polymers such as extracellular capsules. The human gut bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is well endowed with the ability to metabolize both host- and diet-derived glycans. Its genome contains 88 different polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) for complex glycan catabolism and eight different gene clusters for capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis. Here, we investigate one of the prominent mechanisms by which this gut symbiont regulates many PULs involved in host mucin O-glycan degradation; namely, transcriptional regulation via the concerted interactions of cell-envelope-localized TonB-dependent transporters, extra-cytoplasmic function sigma factors and anti-sigma factors, which participate together in a regulatory pathway termed trans-envelope signaling. Unexpectedly, we found that several different trans-envelope signaling switches involved in PUL-mediated O-glycan degradation also modulate capsular polysaccharide synthesis. A novel regulatory pathway, which is dependent on expression of O-glycan-targeting outer membrane proteins, governs this coordinated regulation of glycan catabolism and capsule synthesis. This latter finding provides a new link in the dynamic interplay between complex glycan metabolism, microbial physiology, and host responses that occurs during colonization of the gut.

  15. Glycan Profiling Shows Unvaried N-Glycomes in MSC Clones with Distinct Differentiation Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katherine M.; Thomas-Oates, Jane E.; Genever, Paul G.; Ungar, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types have different N-glycomes in mammals. This means that cellular differentiation is accompanied by changes in the N-glycan profile. Yet when the N-glycomes of cell types with differing fates diverge is unclear. We have investigated the N-glycan profiles of two different clonal populations of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). One clone (Y101), when differentiated into osteoblasts, showed a marked shift in the glycan profile toward a higher abundance of complex N-glycans and more core fucosylation. Yet chemical inhibition of complex glycan formation during osteogenic differentiation did not prevent the formation of functional osteoblasts. However, the N-glycan profile of another MSC clone (Y202), which cannot differentiate into osteoblasts, was not significantly different from that of the clone that can. Interestingly, incubation of Y202 cells in osteogenic medium caused a similar reduction of oligomannose glycan content in this non-differentiating cell line. Our analysis implies that the N-glycome changes seen upon differentiation do not have direct functional links to the differentiation process. Thus N-glycans may instead be important for self-renewal rather than for cell fate determination. PMID:27303666

  16. Glycomic Analysis of Glycans Released from Glycoproteins Using Chemical Immobilization and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuang; Zhang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of most common protein modifications and is involved in many biological activities. N-linked and O-linked glycosylation not only represents abundant glycan modifications, but also are structurally diverse. Mass spectrometry has emerged as a major method for glycomic analysis. However, glycan extraction from proteins and glycan modification are two critical steps in glycomic analysis of glycans using mass spectrometry. In this protocol, we describe a novel and high-throughput method for isolation and modification of glycans from glycoproteins using a chemoenzymatic approach on solid-phase. Proteins are first immobilized to a solid support and unconjugated molecules are washed away; glycans, while still linked to glycoproteins on the solid support, can be treated enzymatically or chemically on solid-phase for glycan derivatization. Glycans are then released from the solid support for analysis by mass spectrometry. The procedures outlined are robust and useful for high-throughput glycomic analysis from complex biological or clinical samples. PMID:25205566

  17. Serum N-Glycan Profiling Predicts Prognosis in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Maho; Tobisawa, Yuki; Yoneyama, Tohru; Tsushima, Megumi; Hirose, Kazuko; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Koie, Takuya; Saitoh, Hisao; Yamaya, Kanemitsu; Funyu, Tomihisa; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2013-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of serum N-glycan profiling for prognosis in hemodialysis patients. Methods. Serum N-glycan analysis was performed in 100 hemodialysis patients in June 2008 using the glycoblotting method, which allows high-throughput, comprehensive, and quantitative N-glycan analysis. All patients were longitudinally followed up for 5 years. To evaluate the independent predictors for prognosis, patients' background, blood biochemistry, and N-glycans intensity were analyzed using Cox regression multivariate analysis. Selected N-glycans and independent factors were evaluated using the log-rank test with the Kaplan-Meier method to identify the predictive indicators for prognosis. Each patient was categorized according to the number of risk factors to evaluate the predictive potential of the risk criteria for prognosis. Results. In total, 56 N-glycan types were identified in the hemodialysis patients. Cox regression multivariate analysis showed cardiovascular events, body mass index, maximum intima media thickness, and the serum N-glycan intensity of peak number 49 were predictive indicators for overall survival. Risk classification according to the number of independent risk factors revealed significantly poor survival by increasing the number of risk factors. Conclusions. Serum N-glycan profiling may have a potential to predict prognosis in patients undergoing hemodialysis. PMID:24453820

  18. Ultrasensitive detection of influenza viruses with a glycan-based impedimetric biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Hushegyi, András; Pihíková, Dominika; Bertók, Tomáš; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, René; Tkac, Jan

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasensitive impedimetric glycan-based biosensor for reliable and selective detection of inactivated, but intact influenza viruses H3N2 was developed. Such glycan-based approach has a distinct advantage over antibody-based detection of influenza viruses since glycans are natural viral receptors with a possibility to selectively distinguish between potentially pathogenic influenza subtypes by the glycan-based biosensors. Build-up of the biosensor was carefully optimized with atomic force microscopy applied for visualization of the biosensor surface after binding of viruses with the topology of an individual viral particle H3N2 analyzed. The glycan biosensor could detect a glycan binding lectin with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 aM. The biosensor was finally applied for analysis of influenza viruses H3N2 with LOD of 13 viral particles in 1 μl, what is the lowest LOD for analysis of influenza viral particles by the glycan-based device achieved so far. The biosensor could detect H3N2 viruses selectively with a sensitivity ratio of 30 over influenza viruses H7N7. The impedimetric biosensor presented here is the most sensitive glycan-based device for detection of influenza viruses and among the most sensitive antibody or aptamer based biosensor devices. PMID:26765527

  19. Ultrasensitive detection of influenza viruses with a glycan-based impedimetric biosensor.

    PubMed

    Hushegyi, András; Pihíková, Dominika; Bertok, Tomas; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, René; Tkac, Jan

    2016-05-15

    An ultrasensitive impedimetric glycan-based biosensor for reliable and selective detection of inactivated, but intact influenza viruses H3N2 was developed. Such glycan-based approach has a distinct advantage over antibody-based detection of influenza viruses since glycans are natural viral receptors with a possibility to selectively distinguish between potentially pathogenic influenza subtypes by the glycan-based biosensors. Build-up of the biosensor was carefully optimized with atomic force microscopy applied for visualization of the biosensor surface after binding of viruses with the topology of an individual viral particle H3N2 analyzed. The glycan biosensor could detect a glycan binding lectin with a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 aM. The biosensor was finally applied for analysis of influenza viruses H3N2 with LOD of 13 viral particles in 1 μl, what is the lowest LOD for analysis of influenza viral particles by the glycan-based device achieved so far. The biosensor could detect H3N2 viruses selectively with a sensitivity ratio of 30 over influenza viruses H7N7. The impedimetric biosensor presented here is the most sensitive glycan-based device for detection of influenza viruses and among the most sensitive antibody or aptamer based biosensor devices.

  20. Malonic acid suppresses mucin-type O-glycan degradation during hydrazine treatment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Goso, Yukinobu

    2016-03-01

    Hydrazine treatment is frequently used for releasing mucin-type O-glycans (O-glycans) from glycoproteins because the method provides O-glycans that retain a reducible GalNAc at their reducing end, which is available for fluorescent labeling. However, many O-glycans are degraded by "peeling" during this treatment. In the current study, it was found that malonic acid suppressed O-glycan degradation during hydrazine treatment of bovine fetuin or porcine gastric mucin in both the gas and liquid phases. This is paradoxical because the release of O-glycans from glycoproteins occurs under alkaline conditions. However, malonic acid seems to prevent the degradation through its acidic property given that other weak acids also prevented the degradation. Accordingly, disodium malonate did not suppress O-glycan degradation. Application of this method to rat gastric mucin demonstrated that the majority of the major O-glycans obtained in the presence of malonic acid were intact, whereas those obtained in the absence of malonic acid were degraded. These results suggest that hydrazine treatment in the presence of malonic acid would allow glycomic analysis of native mucin glycoproteins.

  1. Role of Glycans in Cancer Cells Undergoing Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Xin; Tan, Zengqi; Chen, Si; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The term “cancer” refers to a group of diseases involving abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process whereby epithelial cells lose their cell polarity and cell–cell adhesion ability, and acquire migratory and invasive properties to gain mesenchymal phenotype, is an important step leading to tumor metastasis. Glycans, such as N-glycans, O-glycans, and glycosphingolipids, are involved in numerous biological processes, including inflammation, virus/bacteria–host interactions, cell–cell interactions, morphogenesis, and cancer development and progression. Aberrant expression of glycans has been observed in several EMT models, and the functional roles of such glycans in cancer development and progression has been investigated. We summarize here recent research progress regarding the functions of glycans in cancer cells undergoing EMT. Better understanding of the mechanisms underlying aberrant glycan patterns in EMT and cancer will facilitate the development of such glycans as cancer biomarkers or as targets in design and synthesis of anti-tumor drugs. PMID:26925388

  2. Loss of Core 1-derived O-Glycans Decreases Breast Cancer Development in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kai; Herzog, Brett H.; Fu, Jianxin; Sheng, Minjia; Bergstrom, Kirk; McDaniel, J. Michael; Kondo, Yuji; McGee, Samuel; Cai, Xiaofeng; Li, Ping; Chen, Hong; Xia, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    Mucin-type core 1-derived O-glycans, one of the major types of O-glycans, are highly expressed in mammary gland epithelium. Abnormal O-glycans such as Tn antigen are found in over 90% of breast cancers; however, the in vivo role of these aberrant O-glycans in the etiology of breast cancer is unclear. We generated mice with mammary epithelial specific deletion of core 1-derived O-glycans. By crossing with two spontaneous mouse breast cancer models, we determined that loss of core 1-derived O-glycans delays the onset and progression of breast cancer development. Deficiency of core 1 O-glycosylation impaired the localization of Muc1, a major O-glycoprotein, on the apical surfaces of mammary epithelium. Signaling mediated by Muc1, which is critical for breast cancer development, was also defective in the absence of core 1 O-glycans. This study reveals an unexpected role of core 1-derived O-glycans in breast cancer development in mice. PMID:26124270

  3. Structure of ten free N-glycans in ripening tomato fruit. Arabinose is a constituent of a plant N-glycan.

    PubMed Central

    Priem, B; Gitti, R; Bush, C A; Gross, K C

    1993-01-01

    The concentration-dependent stimulatory and inhibitory effect of N-glycans on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit ripening was recently reported (B. Priem and K.C. Gross [1992] Plant Physiol 98: 399-401). We report here the structure of 10 free N-glycans in mature green tomatoes. N-Glycans were purified from fruit pericarp by ethanolic extraction, desalting, concanavalin A-Sepharose chromatography, and amine-bonded silica high performance liquid chromatography. N-Glycan structures were determined using 500 MHz 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, and glycosyl linkage methylation analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A novel arabinosyl-containing N-glycan, Man alpha 1-->6(Ara alpha 1-->2)Man beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->4(Fuc alpha 1-->3)GlcNAc, was purified from a retarded concanavalin A fraction. The location of the arabinosyl residue was the same as the xylosyl residue in complex N-glycans. GlcNAc[5']Man3(Xyl)GlcNAc(Fuc)GlcNAc and GlcNAc[5']Man2GlcNAc(Fuc)GlcNAc were also purified from the weakly retained fraction. The oligomannosyl N-glycans Man5GlcNAc, Man6GlcNAc, Man7GlcNAc, and Man8GlcNAc were purified from a strongly retained concanavalin A fraction. The finding of free Man5GlcNAc in situ was important physiologically because previously we had described it as a promoter of tomato ripening when added exogenously. Mature green pericarp tissue contained more than 1 microgram of total free N-glycan/g fresh weight. Changes in N-glycan composition were determined during ripening by comparing glycosyl and glycosyl-linkage composition of oligosaccharidic extracts from fruit at different developmental stages. N-Glycans were present in pericarp tissue at all stages of development. However, the amount increased during ripening, as did the relative amount of xylosyl-containing N-glycans. PMID:8108510

  4. A potent and broad neutralizing antibody recognizes and penetrates the HIV glycan shield.

    PubMed

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J; Walker, Laura M; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P; Olson, William C; Ward, Andrew B; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R; Burton, Dennis R; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-11-25

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man(9) at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short β-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificity. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface. PMID:21998254

  5. Recent advances in Employing Molecular Modelling to Determine the Specificity of Glycan-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Oliver C.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Impressive improvements in docking performance can be achieved by applying energy bonuses to poses in which glycan hydroxyl groups occupy positions otherwise preferred by bound waters. In addition, inclusion of glycosidic conformational energies allows unlikely glycan conformations to be appropriately penalized. A method for predicting the binding specificity of glycan-binding proteins has been developed, which is based on grafting glycan branches onto a minimal binding determinant in the binding site. Grafting can be used either to screen virtual libraries of glycans, such as the known glycome, or to identify docked poses of minimal binding determinants that are consistent with specificity data. The reviewed advances allow accurate modelling of carbohydrate-protein 3D co-complexes, but challenges remain in ranking the affinity of congeners. PMID:25108191

  6. A Potent and Broad Neutralizing Antibody Recognizes and Penetrates the HIV Glycan Shield

    SciTech Connect

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C.; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-10-15

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man{sub 9} at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short {beta}-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificify. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  7. A potent and broad neutralizing antibody recognizes and penetrates the HIV glycan shield.

    PubMed

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J; Walker, Laura M; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P; Olson, William C; Ward, Andrew B; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R; Burton, Dennis R; Wilson, Ian A

    2011-11-25

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man(9) at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short β-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificity. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  8. Integrated Amplification Microarrays for Infectious Disease Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Darrell P.; Bryant, Lexi; Griesemer, Sara B.; Gu, Rui; Knickerbocker, Christopher; Kukhtin, Alexander; Parker, Jennifer; Zimmerman, Cynthia; George, Kirsten St.; Cooney, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    This overview describes microarray-based tests that combine solution-phase amplification chemistry and microarray hybridization within a single microfluidic chamber. The integrated biochemical approach improves microarray workflow for diagnostic applications by reducing the number of steps and minimizing the potential for sample or amplicon cross-contamination. Examples described herein illustrate a basic, integrated approach for DNA and RNA genomes, and a simple consumable architecture for incorporating wash steps while retaining an entirely closed system. It is anticipated that integrated microarray biochemistry will provide an opportunity to significantly reduce the complexity and cost of microarray consumables, equipment, and workflow, which in turn will enable a broader spectrum of users to exploit the intrinsic multiplexing power of microarrays for infectious disease diagnostics.

  9. Microarray data analysis and mining approaches.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Francesca; Botta, Marco; Calogero, Raffaele A

    2007-12-01

    Microarray based transcription profiling is now a consolidated methodology and has widespread use in areas such as pharmacogenomics, diagnostics and drug target identification. Large-scale microarray studies are also becoming crucial to a new way of conceiving experimental biology. A main issue in microarray transcription profiling is data analysis and mining. When microarrays became a methodology of general use, considerable effort was made to produce algorithms and methods for the identification of differentially expressed genes. More recently, the focus has switched to algorithms and database development for microarray data mining. Furthermore, the evolution of microarray technology is allowing researchers to grasp the regulative nature of transcription, integrating basic expression analysis with mRNA characteristics, i.e. exon-based arrays, and with DNA characteristics, i.e. comparative genomic hybridization, single nucleotide polymorphism, tiling and promoter structure. In this article, we will review approaches used to detect differentially expressed genes and to link differential expression to specific biological functions.

  10. Evolutionary Forces Shaping the Golgi Glycosylation Machinery: Why Cell Surface Glycans Are Universal to Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varki, Ajit

    2011-01-01

    Despite more than 3 billion years since the origin of life on earth, the powerful forces of biological evolution seem to have failed to generate any living cell that is devoid of a dense and complex array of cell surface glycans. Thus, cell surface glycans seem to be as essential for life as having a DNA genetic code, diverse RNAs, structural/functional proteins, lipid-based membranes, and metabolites that mediate energy flux and signaling. The likely reasons for this apparently universal law of biology are considered here, and include the fact that glycans have the greatest potential for generating diversity, and thus evading recognition by pathogens. This may also explain why in striking contrast to the genetic code, glycans show widely divergent patterns between taxa. On the other hand, glycans have also been coopted for myriad intrinsic functions, which can vary in their importance for organismal survival. In keeping with these considerations, a significant percentage of the genes in the typical genome are dedicated to the generation and/or turnover of glycans. Among eukaryotes, the Golgi is the subcellular organelle that serves to generate much of the diversity of cell surface glycans, carrying out various glycan modifications of glycoconjugates that transit through the Golgi, en route to the cell surface or extracellular destinations. Here I present an overview of general considerations regarding the selective forces shaping evolution of the Golgi glycosylation machinery, and then briefly discuss the common types of variations seen in each major class of glycans, finally focusing on sialic acids as an extreme example of evolutionary glycan diversity generated by the Golgi. Future studies need to address both the phylogenetic diversity the Golgi and the molecular mechanisms for its rapid responses to intrinsic and environmental stimuli. PMID:21525513

  11. Exquisite specificity of mitogenic lectin from Cephalosporium curvulum to core fucosylated N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Shashikala R; Eligar, Sachin M; Ballal, Suhas; Belur, Shivakumar; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Swamy, Bale M

    2016-02-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins that are gaining attention as important tools for the identification of specific glycan markers expressed during different stages of the cancer. We earlier reported the purification of a mitogenic lectin from human pathogenic fungus Cephalosporium curvulum (CSL) that has complex sugar specificity when analysed by hapten inhibition assay. In the present study, we report the fine sugar specificity of CSL as determined by glycan array analysis. The results revealed that CSL has exquisite specificity towards core fucosylated N-glycans. Fucosylated trimannosyl core is the basic structure required for the binding of CSL. The presence of fucose in the side chain further enhances the avidity of CSL towards such glycans. The affinity of CSL is drastically reduced towards the non-core fucosylated glycans, in spite of their side chain fucosylation. CSL showed no binding to the tested O-glycans and monosaccharides. These observations suggest the unique specificity of CSL towards core fucosylated N-glycans, which was further validated by binding of CSL to human colon cancer epithelial and hepatocarcinoma cell lines namely HT29 and HepG2, respectively, that are known to express core fucosylated N-glycans, using AOL and LCA as positive controls. LCA and AOL are fucose specific lectins that are currently being used clinically for the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinomas. Most of the gastrointestinal markers express core fucosylated N-glycans. The high affinity and exclusive specificity of CSL towards α1-6 linkage of core fucosylated glycans compared to other fucose specific lectins, makes it a promising molecule that needs to be further explored for its application in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancer.

  12. Automated Microarray Image Analysis Toolbox for MATLAB

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Willse, Alan R.; Protic, Miroslava; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2005-09-01

    The Automated Microarray Image Analysis (AMIA) Toolbox for MATLAB is a flexible, open-source microarray image analysis tool that allows the user to customize analysis of sets of microarray images. This tool provides several methods of identifying and quantify spot statistics, as well as extensive diagnostic statistics and images to identify poor data quality or processing. The open nature of this software allows researchers to understand the algorithms used to provide intensity estimates and to modify them easily if desired.

  13. Surface free energy and microarray deposition technology.

    PubMed

    McHale, Glen

    2007-03-01

    Microarray techniques use a combinatorial approach to assess complex biochemical interactions. The fundamental goal is simultaneous, large-scale experimentation analogous to the automation achieved in the semiconductor industry. However, microarray deposition inherently involves liquids contacting solid substrates. Liquid droplet shapes are determined by surface and interfacial tension forces, and flows during drying. This article looks at how surface free energy and wetting considerations may influence the accuracy and reliability of spotted microarray experiments.

  14. Mass Spectrometric Screening of Ovarian Cancer with Serum Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Han; Park, Chang Won; Um, Dalho; Baek, Ki Hwang; Jo, Yohahn; An, Hyunjoo; Kim, Yangsun; Kim, Tae Jin

    2014-01-01

    Changes of glycosylation pattern in serum proteins have been linked to various diseases including cancer, suggesting possible development of novel biomarkers based on the glycomic analysis. In this study, N-linked glycans from human serum were quantitatively profiled by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and compared between healthy controls and ovarian cancer patients. A training set consisting of 40 healthy controls and 40 ovarian cancer cases demonstrated an inverse correlation between P value of ANOVA and area under the curve (AUC) of each candidate biomarker peak from MALDI-TOF MS, providing standards for the classification. A multibiomarker panel composed of 15 MALDI-TOF MS peaks resulted in AUC of 0.89, 80~90% sensitivity, and 70~83% specificity in the training set. The performance of the biomarker panel was validated in a separate blind test set composed of 23 healthy controls and 37 ovarian cancer patients, leading to 81~84% sensitivity and 83% specificity with cut-off values determined by the training set. Sensitivity of CA-125, the most widely used ovarian cancer marker, was 74% in the training set and 78% in the test set, respectively. These results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS-mediated serum N-glycan analysis could provide critical information for the screening of ovarian cancer. PMID:24648610

  15. Marine sulfated glycans with serpin-unrelated anticoagulant properties.

    PubMed

    Glauser, Bianca F; Mourão, Paulo A S; Pomin, Vitor H

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms are a rich source of sulfated polysaccharides with unique structures. Fucosylated chondroitin sulfate (FucCS) from the sea cucumber Ludwigothurea grisea and sulfated galactan from the red alga Botryocladia occidentalis are one of these unusual molecules. Besides their uncommon structures, they also exhibit high anticoagulant and antithrombotic effects. Earlier, it was considered that the anticoagulant activities of these two marine glycans were driven mainly by a catalytic serpin-dependent mechanism likewise the mammalian heparins. Its serpin-dependent anticoagulant action relies on promoting thrombin and/or factor Xa inhibition by their specific natural inhibitors (the serpins antithrombin and heparin cofactor II). However, as opposed to heparins, these two previously mentioned marine glycans were proved still capable in promoting coagulation inhibition using serpin-free plasmas. This puzzle observation was further investigated and clearly demonstrated that the cucumber FucCS and the red algal sulfated galactan have an unusual serpin-independent anticoagulant effect by inhibiting the formation of factor Xa and/or thrombin through the procoagulants tenase and prothrombinase complexes, respectively. These marine polysaccharides with unusual anticoagulant effects open clearly new perspectives for the development of new antithrombotic drugs as well as push the glycomics project.

  16. THE ABRF MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2005: TAKING THE PULSE ON THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years microarray technology has evolved into a critical component of any discovery based program. Since 1999, the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Microarray Research Group (MARG) has conducted biennial surveys designed to generate a pr...

  17. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts.

    PubMed

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  18. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. PMID:27600077

  19. Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Jonczyk, Rebecca; Kurth, Tracy; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays.

  20. Highly parallel microbial diagnostics using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Loy, Alexander; Bodrossy, Levente

    2006-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays are highly parallel hybridization platforms, allowing rapid and simultaneous identification of many different microorganisms and viruses in a single assay. In the past few years, researchers have been confronted with a dramatic increase in the number of studies reporting development and/or improvement of oligonucleotide microarrays for microbial diagnostics, but use of the technology in routine diagnostics is still constrained by a variety of factors. Careful development of microarray essentials (such as oligonucleotide probes, protocols for target preparation and hybridization, etc.) combined with extensive performance testing are thus mandatory requirements for the maturation of diagnostic microarrays from fancy technological gimmicks to robust and routinely applicable tools.

  1. DNA nanostructure-based universal microarray platform for high-efficiency multiplex bioanalysis in biofluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Dongfang; Wen, Yanli; Liu, Gang; Dong, Haoqing; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-10-22

    Microarrays of biomolecules have greatly promoted the development of the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical assays because of their remarkably parallel and high-throughput assay capability. Immobilization strategies for biomolecules on a solid support surface play a crucial role in the fabrication of high-performance biological microarrays. In this study, rationally designed DNA tetrahedra carrying three amino groups and one single-stranded DNA extension were synthesized by the self-assembly of four oligonucleotides, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography purification. We fabricated DNA tetrahedron-based microarrays by covalently coupling the DNA tetrahedron onto glass substrates. After their biorecognition capability was evaluated, DNA tetrahedron microarrays were utilized for the analysis of different types of bioactive molecules. The gap hybridization strategy, the sandwich configuration, and the engineering aptamer strategy were employed for the assay of miRNA biomarkers, protein cancer biomarkers, and small molecules, respectively. The arrays showed good capability to anchor capture biomolecules for improving biorecognition. Addressable and high-throughput analysis with improved sensitivity and specificity had been achieved. The limit of detection for let-7a miRNA, prostate specific antigen, and cocaine were 10 fM, 40 pg/mL, and 100 nM, respectively. More importantly, we demonstrated that the microarray platform worked well with clinical serum samples and showed good relativity with conventional chemical luminescent immunoassay. We have developed a novel approach for the fabrication of DNA tetrahedron-based microarrays and a universal DNA tetrahedron-based microarray platform for the detection of different types of bioactive molecules. The microarray platform shows great potential for clinical diagnosis.

  2. DNA nanostructure-based universal microarray platform for high-efficiency multiplex bioanalysis in biofluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Dongfang; Wen, Yanli; Liu, Gang; Dong, Haoqing; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-10-22

    Microarrays of biomolecules have greatly promoted the development of the fields of genomics, proteomics, and clinical assays because of their remarkably parallel and high-throughput assay capability. Immobilization strategies for biomolecules on a solid support surface play a crucial role in the fabrication of high-performance biological microarrays. In this study, rationally designed DNA tetrahedra carrying three amino groups and one single-stranded DNA extension were synthesized by the self-assembly of four oligonucleotides, followed by high-performance liquid chromatography purification. We fabricated DNA tetrahedron-based microarrays by covalently coupling the DNA tetrahedron onto glass substrates. After their biorecognition capability was evaluated, DNA tetrahedron microarrays were utilized for the analysis of different types of bioactive molecules. The gap hybridization strategy, the sandwich configuration, and the engineering aptamer strategy were employed for the assay of miRNA biomarkers, protein cancer biomarkers, and small molecules, respectively. The arrays showed good capability to anchor capture biomolecules for improving biorecognition. Addressable and high-throughput analysis with improved sensitivity and specificity had been achieved. The limit of detection for let-7a miRNA, prostate specific antigen, and cocaine were 10 fM, 40 pg/mL, and 100 nM, respectively. More importantly, we demonstrated that the microarray platform worked well with clinical serum samples and showed good relativity with conventional chemical luminescent immunoassay. We have developed a novel approach for the fabrication of DNA tetrahedron-based microarrays and a universal DNA tetrahedron-based microarray platform for the detection of different types of bioactive molecules. The microarray platform shows great potential for clinical diagnosis. PMID:25299733

  3. Insights into glycan biosynthesis in chemically-induced hepatocellular carcinoma in rats: A glycomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Amr; Bashir, Asma; Zaki, Nazar; McCarthy, Diane; Ahmed, Sanjida; Lotfy, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the qualitative and quantitative changes in N-linked glycosylation, which occurred in association with diethyl nitrosamine-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in rodents. METHODS: Liver tissues of (1) normal (non-tumor-bearing) rats; and (2) tumor-bearing rats; were collected and were used for histological and GlycanMap® analyses. Briefly, GlycanMap® analysis is a high-throughput assay that provides a structural and quantitative readout of protein-associated glycans using a unique, automated 96-well assay technology coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and custom bioinformatics. Histopathological studies were carried out to ensure the development of HCC in the tested animals. RESULTS: The N-glycomic analysis revealed 5 glycans; Glc1Man9GlcNAc2, Gal2Man3GlcNac4Fuc1Neu1, Man4GlcNac2, Gal2Man3GlcNac4Neu3OAc3, and Man3GlcNac5Fuc1, which showed significant changes in rat HCC tissues when compared with normal liver tissues. Four glycans were increased (P < 0.05) and Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 was decreased (5.89 ± 0.45 vs 3.54 ± 0.21, P < 0.01) in HCC tissues compared to normal liver tissues. An increase (66.5 ± 1.05 vs 62.7 ± 1.1, P < 0.05) in high-mannose structures in HCC rats was observed compared to normal rats. Importantly, HCC rats showed an increase (P < 0.05) in both tumor-associated carbohydrates and in branched glycans. The changes in glycans correlated well with glycan flow changes reported in the glycan biosynthetic pathway, which indicates the importance of enzyme activities involved in glycan synthesis at different subcellular localizations. CONCLUSION: The reported HCC-associated changes in glycan flow and subcellular localization explain the increase in high mannose glycans and siayl Lewis glycans common in HCC liver tissues. PMID:26034352

  4. 2008 Microarray Research Group (MARG Survey): Sensing the State of Microarray Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution and transformation, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. Th...

  5. THE ABRF-MARG MICROARRAY SURVEY 2004: TAKING THE PULSE OF THE MICROARRAY FIELD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past several years, the field of microarrays has grown and evolved drastically. In its continued efforts to track this evolution, the ABRF-MARG has once again conducted a survey of international microarray facilities and individual microarray users. The goal of the surve...

  6. Identification of manipulated variables for a glycosylation control strategy.

    PubMed

    St Amand, Melissa M; Radhakrishnan, Devesh; Robinson, Anne S; Ogunnaike, Babatunde A

    2014-10-01

    N-linked glycan distribution affects important end-use characteristics such as the bioactivity and efficacy of many therapeutic proteins, (including monoclonal antibodies), in vivo. Yet, obtaining desired glycan distributions consistently during batch-to-batch production can be challenging for biopharmaceutical manufacturers. While an appropriately implemented on-line glycosylation control strategy during production can help to ensure a consistent glycan distribution, to date no such strategies have been reported. Our goal is to develop and validate a comprehensive strategy for effective on-line control of glycosylation, the successful achievement of which requires first identifying appropriate manipulated variables that can be used to direct the glycan distribution to a desired state. While various culture conditions such as bioreactor process variables, media type, and media supplements have been shown to affect the glycan distribution, in this study we focus on the latter. Specifically, we implemented a statistically designed series of experiments to determine the significant main effects (as well as interaction effects) of media supplementation with manganese, galactose, ammonia and found that each had significant effects on certain glycans. We also include data indicating the glycosylation enzyme gene transcript levels as well as the intracellular nucleotide sugar concentrations in the presence of the media supplements to provide insight into the intracellular conditions that may be contributing to the changes in glycan distribution. The acquired experimental data sets were then used to identify which glycans can be controlled by the media supplements and to what degree. We determined that MnCl2 can be used as a manipulated variable to increase the relative abundance of M51 and decrease FA2 simultaneously, and galactose can be used as a manipulated variable to increase the relative abundance of FA2G1 and decrease FA2 and A2 simultaneously.

  7. Small-molecule microarrays as tools in ligand discovery

    PubMed Central

    Vegas, Arturo J.; Fuller, Jason H.; Koehler, Angela N.

    2009-01-01

    Small molecules that bind and modulate specific protein targets are increasingly used as tools to decipher protein function in a cellular context. Identifying specific small-molecule probes for each protein in the proteome will require miniaturized assays that permit screening large collections of compounds against large numbers of proteins in a highly parallel fashion. Simple and general binding assays involving small-molecule microarrays can be used to identify probes for nearly any protein in the proteome. The assay may be used to identify ligands for proteins in the absence of knowledge about structure or function. In this tutorial review, we introduce small-molecule microarrays (SMMs) as tools for ligand discovery; discuss methods for manufacturing SMMs, including both non-covalent and covalent attachment strategies; and provide examples of ligand discovery involving SMMs. PMID:18568164

  8. Lectin-based protein microarray analysis of differences in serum alpha-2-macroglobulin glycosylation between patients with colorectal cancer and persons without cancer.

    PubMed

    Šunderić, Miloš; Šedivá, Alena; Robajac, Dragana; Miljuš, Goran; Gemeiner, Peter; Nedić, Olgica; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-07-01

    Glycosylation is co- and posttranslational modifications affecting proteins. The glycopattern changes are associated with changes in biological function and are involved in many diseases including cancer. We present the lectin-based protein microarray method enabling determination of differences in protein glycosylation. The method involves isolation of targeted protein from samples by immunoprecipitation, spotting of protein from multiple samples into arrays on a microarray slide, incubation with set of biotinylated lectins, the reaction with fluorescent conjugate of streptavidin, and detection of fluorescent intensities by microarray scanner. Lectin-based protein microarray was applied in investigation of differences in alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2M) glycosylation isolated from sera samples of healthy persons and patients with colorectal cancer (CC). From 14 lectins used in analysis, statistically significant differences (Student's t-test, P < 0.05) between two groups of samples (persons without cancer and CC patients) were found for 5 of them. α2M molecules isolated from sera of CC patients have higher content of α2,6 sialic acid, N-acetylglucosamine and mannose residues, and tri-/tetraantennary complex type high-mannose N-glycans. A novel lectin-based protein microarray developed and described can serve as a suitable analytical technique for sensitive, simple, fast, and high-throughput determination of differences in protein glycosylation isolated from serum or other samples.

  9. Plasma High-Mannose and Complex/Hybrid N-Glycans Are Associated with Hypercholesterolemia in Humans and Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Liang; Li, Qianwei; Li, Lingmei; Lin, Yan; Zhao, Sihai; Wang, Weirong; Wang, Rong; Li, Yongqin; Yuan, Jiangbei; Wang, Chengjian; Wang, Zhongfu; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2016-01-01

    N-glycans play important roles in various pathophysiological processes and can be used as clinical diagnosis markers. However, plasma N-glycans change and their pathophysiological significance in the setting of hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, is unknown. Here, we collected plasma from both hypercholesterolemic patients and cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits, and determined the changes in the whole-plasma N-glycan profile by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We found that both the hypercholesterolemic patients and rabbits showed a dramatic change in their plasma glycan profile. Compared with healthy subjects, the hypercholesterolemic patients exhibited higher plasma levels of a cluster of high-mannose and complex/hybrid N-glycans (mainly including undecorated or sialylated glycans), whereas only a few fucosylated or fucosylated and sialylated N-glycans were increased. Additionally, cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits also displayed increased plasma levels of high-mannose in addition to high complex/hybrid N-glycan levels. The whole-plasma glycan profiles revealed that the plasma N-glycan levels were correlated with the plasma cholesterol levels, implying that N-glycans may be a target for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26999365

  10. Plasma High-Mannose and Complex/Hybrid N-Glycans Are Associated with Hypercholesterolemia in Humans and Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liang; Li, Qianwei; Li, Lingmei; Lin, Yan; Zhao, Sihai; Wang, Weirong; Wang, Rong; Li, Yongqin; Yuan, Jiangbei; Wang, Chengjian; Wang, Zhongfu; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2016-01-01

    N-glycans play important roles in various pathophysiological processes and can be used as clinical diagnosis markers. However, plasma N-glycans change and their pathophysiological significance in the setting of hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, is unknown. Here, we collected plasma from both hypercholesterolemic patients and cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits, and determined the changes in the whole-plasma N-glycan profile by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We found that both the hypercholesterolemic patients and rabbits showed a dramatic change in their plasma glycan profile. Compared with healthy subjects, the hypercholesterolemic patients exhibited higher plasma levels of a cluster of high-mannose and complex/hybrid N-glycans (mainly including undecorated or sialylated glycans), whereas only a few fucosylated or fucosylated and sialylated N-glycans were increased. Additionally, cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits also displayed increased plasma levels of high-mannose in addition to high complex/hybrid N-glycan levels. The whole-plasma glycan profiles revealed that the plasma N-glycan levels were correlated with the plasma cholesterol levels, implying that N-glycans may be a target for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26999365

  11. Chemical and Structural Analysis of an Antibody Folding Intermediate Trapped during Glycan Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Human IgG Fc glycosylation modulates immunological effector functions such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis. Engineering of Fc glycans therefore enables fine-tuning of the therapeutic properties of monoclonal antibodies. The N-linked glycans of Fc are typically complex-type, forming a network of noncovalent interactions along the protein surface of the Cγ2 domain. Here, we manipulate the mammalian glycan-processing pathway to trap IgG1 Fc at sequential stages of maturation, from oligomannose- to hybrid- to complex-type glycans, and show that the Fc is structurally stabilized following the transition of glycans from their hybrid- to complex-type state. X-ray crystallographic analysis of this hybrid-type intermediate reveals that N-linked glycans undergo conformational changes upon maturation, including a flip within the trimannosyl core. Our crystal structure of this intermediate reveals a molecular basis for antibody biogenesis and provides a template for the structure-guided engineering of the protein–glycan interface of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:23025485

  12. Structural basis of glycan specificity in neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant rotavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; Sankaran, Banumathi; Yu, Ying; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2015-09-30

    We report that strain-dependent variation of glycan recognition during initial cell attachment of viruses is a critical determinant of host specificity, tissue-tropism and zoonosis. Rotaviruses (RVs), which cause life-threatening gastroenteritis in infants and children, display significant genotype-dependent variations in glycan recognition resulting from sequence alterations in the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4. The structural basis of this genotype-dependent glycan specificity, particularly in human RVs, remains poorly understood. Here, from crystallographic studies, we show how genotypic variations configure a novel binding site in the VP8* of a neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant to uniquely recognize either type I or type II precursor glycans, and to restrict type II glycan binding in the bovine counterpart. In conclusion, such a distinct glycan-binding site that allows differential recognition of the precursor glycans, which are developmentally regulated in the neonate gut and abundant in bovine and human milk provides a basis for age-restricted tropism and zoonotic transmission of G10P[11] rotaviruses.

  13. GlyTouCan 1.0 – The international glycan structure repository

    PubMed Central

    Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko; Agravat, Sanjay; Aoki, Nobuyuki P.; Arpinar, Sena; Cummings, Richard D.; Fujita, Akihiro; Fujita, Noriaki; Hart, Gerald M.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Matsubara, Masaaki; Moreman, Kelley W.; Okuda, Shujiro; Pierce, Michael; Ranzinger, René; Shikanai, Toshihide; Shinmachi, Daisuke; Solovieva, Elena; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Tsuchiya, Shinichiro; Yamada, Issaku; York, William S.; Zaia, Joseph; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Glycans are known as the third major class of biopolymers, next to DNA and proteins. They cover the surfaces of many cells, serving as the ‘face’ of cells, whereby other biomolecules and viruses interact. The structure of glycans, however, differs greatly from DNA and proteins in that they are branched, as opposed to linear sequences of amino acids or nucleotides. Therefore, the storage of glycan information in databases, let alone their curation, has been a difficult problem. This has caused many duplicated efforts when integration is attempted between different databases, making an international repository for glycan structures, where unique accession numbers are assigned to every identified glycan structure, necessary. As such, an international team of developers and glycobiologists have collaborated to develop this repository, called GlyTouCan and is available at http://glytoucan.org/, to provide a centralized resource for depositing glycan structures, compositions and topologies, and to retrieve accession numbers for each of these registered entries. This will thus enable researchers to reference glycan structures simply by accession number, as opposed to by chemical structure, which has been a burden to integrate glycomics databases in the past. PMID:26476458

  14. GlyTouCan 1.0--The international glycan structure repository.

    PubMed

    Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko; Agravat, Sanjay; Aoki, Nobuyuki P; Arpinar, Sena; Cummings, Richard D; Fujita, Akihiro; Fujita, Noriaki; Hart, Gerald M; Haslam, Stuart M; Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Matsubara, Masaaki; Moreman, Kelley W; Okuda, Shujiro; Pierce, Michael; Ranzinger, René; Shikanai, Toshihide; Shinmachi, Daisuke; Solovieva, Elena; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Tsuchiya, Shinichiro; Yamada, Issaku; York, William S; Zaia, Joseph; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Glycans are known as the third major class of biopolymers, next to DNA and proteins. They cover the surfaces of many cells, serving as the 'face' of cells, whereby other biomolecules and viruses interact. The structure of glycans, however, differs greatly from DNA and proteins in that they are branched, as opposed to linear sequences of amino acids or nucleotides. Therefore, the storage of glycan information in databases, let alone their curation, has been a difficult problem. This has caused many duplicated efforts when integration is attempted between different databases, making an international repository for glycan structures, where unique accession numbers are assigned to every identified glycan structure, necessary. As such, an international team of developers and glycobiologists have collaborated to develop this repository, called GlyTouCan and is available at http://glytoucan.org/, to provide a centralized resource for depositing glycan structures, compositions and topologies, and to retrieve accession numbers for each of these registered entries. This will thus enable researchers to reference glycan structures simply by accession number, as opposed to by chemical structure, which has been a burden to integrate glycomics databases in the past. PMID:26476458

  15. Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilin glycan contributes to CR3 activation during challenge of primary cervical epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Michael P.; Jen, Freda E.-C.; Roddam, Louise F.; Apicella, Michael A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Expression of type IV pili by Neisseria gonorrhoeae plays a critical role in mediating adherence to human epithelial cells. Gonococcal pilin is modified with an O-linked glycan, which may be present as a di- or monosaccharide because of phase variation of select pilin glycosylation genes. It is accepted that bacterial proteins may be glycosylated; less clear is how the protein glycan may mediate virulence. Using primary, human, cervical epithelial (i.e. pex) cells, we now provide evidence to indicate that the pilin glycan mediates productive cervical infection. In this regard, pilin glycan-deficient mutant gonococci exhibited an early hyper-adhesive phenotype but were attenuated in their ability to invade pex cells. Our data further indicate that the pilin glycan was required for gonococci to bind to the I-domain region of complement receptor 3, which is naturally expressed by pex cells. Comparative, quantitative, infection assays revealed that mutant gonococci lacking the pilin glycan did not bind to the I-domain when it is in a closed, low-affinity conformation and cannot induce an active conformation to complement receptor 3 during pex cell challenge. To our knowledge, these are the first data to directly demonstrate how a protein-associated bacterial glycan may contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:21371235

  16. Structural basis of glycan specificity in neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant rotavirus

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; Sankaran, Banumathi; Yu, Ying; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2015-09-30

    We report that strain-dependent variation of glycan recognition during initial cell attachment of viruses is a critical determinant of host specificity, tissue-tropism and zoonosis. Rotaviruses (RVs), which cause life-threatening gastroenteritis in infants and children, display significant genotype-dependent variations in glycan recognition resulting from sequence alterations in the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4. The structural basis of this genotype-dependent glycan specificity, particularly in human RVs, remains poorly understood. Here, from crystallographic studies, we show how genotypic variations configure a novel binding site in the VP8* of a neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant to uniquely recognize either type I or type IImore » precursor glycans, and to restrict type II glycan binding in the bovine counterpart. In conclusion, such a distinct glycan-binding site that allows differential recognition of the precursor glycans, which are developmentally regulated in the neonate gut and abundant in bovine and human milk provides a basis for age-restricted tropism and zoonotic transmission of G10P[11] rotaviruses.« less

  17. A nonself sugar mimic of the HIV glycan shield shows enhanced antigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Doores, Katie J.; Fulton, Zara; Hong, Vu; Patel, Mitul K.; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wormald, Mark R.; Finn, M.G.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2011-08-24

    Antibody 2G12 uniquely neutralizes a broad range of HIV-1 isolates by binding the high-mannose glycans on the HIV-1 surface glycoprotein, gp120. Antigens that resemble these natural epitopes of 2G12 would be highly desirable components for an HIV-1 vaccine. However, host-produced (self)-carbohydrate motifs have been unsuccessful so far at eliciting 2G12-like antibodies that cross-react with gp120. Based on the surprising observation that 2G12 binds nonproteinaceous monosaccharide D-fructose with higher affinity than D-mannose, we show here that a designed set of nonself, synthetic monosaccharides are potent antigens. When introduced to the terminus of the D1 arm of protein glycans recognized by 2G12, their antigenicity is significantly enhanced. Logical variation of these unnatural sugars pinpointed key modifications, and the molecular basis of this increased antigenicity was elucidated using high-resolution crystallographic analyses. Virus-like particle protein conjugates containing such nonself glycans are bound more tightly by 2G12. As immunogens they elicit higher titers of antibodies than those immunogenic conjugates containing the self D1 glycan motif. These antibodies generated from nonself immunogens also cross-react with this self motif, which is found in the glycan shield, when it is presented in a range of different conjugates and glycans. However, these antibodies did not bind this glycan motif when present on gp120.

  18. Reconstructed glycan profile for evaluation of operating status of the endoplasmic reticulum glycoprotein quality control.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Shogo; Isoyama, Miho; Hirano, Makoto; Yamaya, Kenta; Ito, Yukishige; Matsuo, Ichiro; Totani, Kiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Glycoprotein oligosaccharides function as tags for protein quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Since most of proteins are glycosylated and function only after they are properly folded, glycoprotein glycan profiles in the ER might be useful to analyze various cellular status including diseases. Here, we examined whether ER glycan-processing profiles in diabetic rats and osteoporotic mice as models might have different cellular status from those of normal controls. Direct analysis of glycoprotein-processing profiles in the ER is often hampered by glycoforms that are retro-translocated to the ER from other cellular compartments. Moreover, when we focus on the mixture of glycoproteins as the processing substrates, the glycan-processing efficiencies are influenced by the aglycon states including their polypeptide folding. To overcome this problem, we reconstructed glycan profiles using ER extracts as an enzymatic source and synthetic glycoprotein mimetic having homogeneous aglycon as a substrate, resulted in disease-specific glycan profiles. To understand such differences, we also analyzed the activity, and expression level, of each glycan-related enzyme. These glycan profiles are expected to be useful indexes for operational status of the ER glycoprotein quality control, and may also give information to classify some diseases.

  19. Comparative studies on glycoproteins expressing polylactosamine-type N-glycans in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Yosuke; Yamada, Keita; Hara, Sayaka; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Hayakawa, Takao; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2012-11-01

    In the series of our previous reports, we showed that some cancer cell lines specifically express polylactosamine-type N-glycans and such glycans were often modified with fucose and sulfate residues. To confirm the proteins expressing these glycans, glycopeptide mixture obtained by digestion of whole protein fractions with trypsin was captured by a polylactosamine-specific lectin, Datura strasmonium agglutinin (DSA). And the peptides and glycans of the captured glycopeptides after digestion with N-glycoamidase F were extensively analyzed by HPLC and MS techniques. We found that some glycoproteins such as CD107a and CD107b commonly contained polylactosamine-type glycans in all the examined cancer cells. But integrin-α5 (CD49e) and carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CD66e) having these glycans were specifically found in U937 (human T-lymphoma) and MKN45 (human gastric cancer) cells, respectively. These data clearly indicate that specific glycans attached to specific proteins will be promising markers for specific tumors with high accuracy. PMID:22795310

  20. GlyTouCan 1.0--The international glycan structure repository.

    PubMed

    Aoki-Kinoshita, Kiyoko; Agravat, Sanjay; Aoki, Nobuyuki P; Arpinar, Sena; Cummings, Richard D; Fujita, Akihiro; Fujita, Noriaki; Hart, Gerald M; Haslam, Stuart M; Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Matsubara, Masaaki; Moreman, Kelley W; Okuda, Shujiro; Pierce, Michael; Ranzinger, René; Shikanai, Toshihide; Shinmachi, Daisuke; Solovieva, Elena; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Tsuchiya, Shinichiro; Yamada, Issaku; York, William S; Zaia, Joseph; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Glycans are known as the third major class of biopolymers, next to DNA and proteins. They cover the surfaces of many cells, serving as the 'face' of cells, whereby other biomolecules and viruses interact. The structure of glycans, however, differs greatly from DNA and proteins in that they are branched, as opposed to linear sequences of amino acids or nucleotides. Therefore, the storage of glycan information in databases, let alone their curation, has been a difficult problem. This has caused many duplicated efforts when integration is attempted between different databases, making an international repository for glycan structures, where unique accession numbers are assigned to every identified glycan structure, necessary. As such, an international team of developers and glycobiologists have collaborated to develop this repository, called GlyTouCan and is available at http://glytoucan.org/, to provide a centralized resource for depositing glycan structures, compositions and topologies, and to retrieve accession numbers for each of these registered entries. This will thus enable researchers to reference glycan structures simply by accession number, as opposed to by chemical structure, which has been a burden to integrate glycomics databases in the past.

  1. Presence of galactosylated core fucose on N-glycans in the planaria Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Wilson, Iain B H

    2011-06-01

    Planarial species are of especial interest to biologists due to the phenomenon of pluripotency and, in comparison to other developmental processes, it can be hypothesised that glycan-lectin interactions may play a role. In order to examine the N-glycans of one of these organisms, Dugesia japonica, peptide:N-glycosidase A was employed and the released glycans were subject to pyridylamination, HPLC and mass spectrometric analysis. A range of oligomannosidic glycans was observed with a trimethylated Man(5) GlcNAc(2) structure being the dominant species. Three glycans were also observed to contain deoxyhexose; in particular, a glycan with the composition Hex(4) HexNAc(2) Fuc(1) Me(2) was revealed by exoglycosidase digestion, in combination with MS/MS, to contain a galactosylated core α1,6-fucose residue, whereas this core modification was found to be capped with a methylhexose residue in the case of a Hex(5) HexNAc(2) Fuc(1) Me(3) structure. This is the first report of these types of structures in a platyhelminth and indicates that the 'GalFuc' modification of N-glycans is not just restricted to molluscs and nematodes.

  2. Glycan binding avidity determines the systemic fate of adeno-associated virus type 9.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shen; Bryant, Kelli D; Sun, Junjiang; Brown, Sarah M; Troupes, Andrew; Pulicherla, Nagesh; Asokan, Aravind

    2012-10-01

    Glycans are key determinants of host range and transmissibility in several pathogens. In the case of adeno-associated viruses (AAV), different carbohydrates serve as cellular receptors in vitro; however, their contributions in vivo are less clear. A particularly interesting example is adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9), which displays systemic tropism in mice despite low endogenous levels of its primary receptor (galactose) in murine tissues. To understand this further, we studied the effect of modulating glycan binding avidity on the systemic fate of AAV9 in mice. Intravenous administration of recombinant sialidase increased tissue levels of terminally galactosylated glycans in several murine tissues. These conditions altered the systemic tropism of AAV9 into a hepatotropic phenotype, characterized by markedly increased sequestration within the liver sinusoidal endothelium and Kupffer cells. In contrast, an AAV9 mutant with decreased glycan binding avidity displayed a liver-detargeted phenotype. Altering glycan binding avidity also profoundly affected AAV9 persistence in blood circulation. Our results support the notion that high glycan receptor binding avidity appears to impart increased liver tropism, while decreased avidity favors systemic spread of AAV vectors. These findings may not only help predict species-specific differences in tropism for AAV9 on the basis of tissue glycosylation profiles, but also provide a general approach to tailor AAV vectors for systemic or hepatic gene transfer by reengineering capsid-glycan interactions. PMID:22787229

  3. ANALYSIS OF GLYCANS DERIVED FROM GLYCOCONJUGATES BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS-MASS SPECTROMETRY

    PubMed Central

    Mechref, Yehia

    2012-01-01

    The high structural variation of glycan derived from glycoconjugates, which substantially increases with the molecular size of a protein, contributes to the complexity of glycosylation patterns commonly associated with glycoconjugates. In the case of glycoproteins, such variation originates from the multiple glycosylation sites of proteins and the number of glycan structures associated with each site (microheterogeneity). The ability to comprehensively characterize highly complex mixture of glycans has been analytically stimulating and challenging. Although the most powerful mass spectrometric (MS) and tandem MS techniques are capable of providing a wealth of structural information, they are still not able to readily identify isomeric glycan structures without high order tandem MS (MSn). The analysis of isomeric glycan structures has been attained using several separation methods, including high-pH anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC), hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) and gas chromatography (GC). However, capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microfluidics capillary electrophoresis (MCE) offer high separation efficiency and resolutions, allowing the separation of closely related glycan structures. Therefore, interfacing CE and MCE to MS is a powerful analytical approach, allowing potentially comprehensive and sensitive analysis of complex glycan samples. This review describes and discusses the utility of different CE and MCE approaches in the structural characterization of glycoproteins and the feasibility of interfacing these approaches to mass spectrometry. PMID:22180203

  4. Structural basis of glycan specificity in neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Czako, Rita; Sankaran, Banumathi; Yu, Ying; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.; Estes, Mary K.; Venkataram Prasad, B. V.

    2015-01-01

    Strain-dependent variation of glycan recognition during initial cell attachment of viruses is a critical determinant of host specificity, tissue-tropism and zoonosis. Rotaviruses (RVs), which cause life-threatening gastroenteritis in infants and children, display significant genotype-dependent variations in glycan recognition resulting from sequence alterations in the VP8* domain of the spike protein VP4. The structural basis of this genotype-dependent glycan specificity, particularly in human RVs, remains poorly understood. Here, from crystallographic studies, we show how genotypic variations configure a novel binding site in the VP8* of a neonate-specific bovine-human reassortant to uniquely recognize either type I or type II precursor glycans, and to restrict type II glycan binding in the bovine counterpart. Such a distinct glycan-binding site that allows differential recognition of the precursor glycans, which are developmentally regulated in the neonate gut and abundant in bovine and human milk provides a basis for age-restricted tropism and zoonotic transmission of G10P[11] rotaviruses. PMID:26420502

  5. The Mechanism by which 146-N-Glycan Affects the Active Site of Neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pi; Wang, Zhonghua; Zhang, Lijie; Li, Dongmei; Lin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    One of the most conserved glycosylation sites of neuraminidase (NA) is 146-N-glycan. This site is adjacent to the 150-cavity of NA, which is found within the active site and thought to be a target for rational drug development against the antiviral resistance of influenza. Here, through a total of 2.4 μs molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we demonstrated that 146-N-glycan can stabilize the conformation of the 150-loop that controls the volume of the 150-cavity. Moreover, with 146-N-glycan, our simulation result was more consistent with crystal structures of NAs than simulations conducted without glycans. Cluster analysis of the MD trajectories showed that 146-N-glycan adopted three distinct conformations: monomer-bridged, dimer-bridged and standing. Of these conformations, the dimer-bridged 146-N-glycan was the most stable one and contributed to stabilization of the 150-loop conformation. Furthermore, our simulation revealed that various standing conformations of 146-N-glycan could block the entrance of the binding pocket. This result was consistent with experimental data and explained the relatively low activity of inhibitors with flexible substituents toward the 150-cavity. Together, our results lead us to hypothesize that rigid and hydrophobic substituents could serve as better inhibitors targeting the 150-cavity. PMID:26267136

  6. Rapid magnetic bead based sample preparation for automated and high throughput N-glycan analysis of therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Váradi, Csaba; Lew, Clarence; Guttman, András

    2014-06-17

    Full automation to enable high throughput N-glycosylation profiling and sequencing with good reproducibility is vital to fulfill the contemporary needs of the biopharmaceutical industry and requirements of national regulatory agencies. The most prevalently used glycoanalytical methods of capillary electrophoresis and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, while very efficient, both necessitate extensive sample preparation and cleanup, including glycoprotein capture, N-glycan release, fluorescent derivatization, purification, and preconcentration steps during the process. Currently used protocols to fulfill these tasks require multiple centrifugation and vacuum-centrifugation steps, making liquid handling robot mediated automated sample preparation difficult and expensive. In this paper we report on a rapid magnetic bead based sample preparation approach that enables full automation including all the process phases just in a couple of hours without requiring any centrifugation and/or vacuum centrifugation steps. This novel protocol has been compared to conventional glycan sample preparation strategies using standard glycoproteins (IgG, fetuin, and RNase B) and featured rapid processing time, high release and labeling efficiency, good reproducibility, and the potential of easy automation.

  7. Affinity Maturation of a Potent Family of HIV Antibodies Is Primarily Focused on Accommodating or Avoiding Glycans.

    PubMed

    Garces, Fernando; Lee, Jeong Hyun; de Val, Natalia; de la Pena, Alba Torrents; Kong, Leopold; Puchades, Cristina; Hua, Yuanzi; Stanfield, Robyn L; Burton, Dennis R; Moore, John P; Sanders, Rogier W; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-12-15

    The high-mannose patch on the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoprotein is the epicenter for binding of the potent broadly neutralizing PGT121 family of antibodies, but strategies for generating such antibodies by vaccination have not been defined. We generated structures of inferred antibody intermediates by X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy to elucidate the molecular events that occurred during evolution of this family. Binding analyses revealed that affinity maturation was primarily focused on avoiding, accommodating, or binding the N137 glycan. The overall antibody approach angle to Env was defined very early in the maturation process, yet some variation evolved in the PGT121 family branches that led to differences in glycan specificities in their respective epitopes. Furthermore, we determined a crystal structure of the recombinant BG505 SOSIP.664 HIV-1 trimer with a PGT121 family member at 3.0 Å that, in concert with these antibody intermediate structures, provides insights to advance design of HIV vaccine candidates. PMID:26682982

  8. Studying bovine early embryo transcriptome by microarray.

    PubMed

    Dufort, Isabelle; Robert, Claude; Sirard, Marc-André

    2015-01-01

    Microarrays represent a significant advantage when studying gene expression in early embryo because they allow for a speedy study of a large number of genes even if the sample of interest contains small quantities of genetic material. Here we describe the protocols developed by the EmbryoGENE Network to study the bovine transcriptome in early embryo using a microarray experimental design.

  9. Microarrays Made Simple: "DNA Chips" Paper Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Betsy

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarray technology is revolutionizing biological science. DNA microarrays (also called DNA chips) allow simultaneous screening of many genes for changes in expression between different cells. Now researchers can obtain information about genes in days or weeks that used to take months or years. The paper activity described in this article…

  10. Application of microarray technology in pulmonary diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Patlakas, George; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2004-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful tool that have multiple applications both in clinical and cell biology arenas of common lung diseases. To exemplify how this tool can be useful, in this review, we will provide an overview of the application of microarray technology in research relevant to common lung diseases and present some of the future perspectives. PMID:15585067

  11. Sensing immune responses with customized peptide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Schirwitz, Christopher; Loeffler, Felix F; Felgenhauer, Thomas; Stadler, Volker; Breitling, Frank; Bischoff, F Ralf

    2012-12-01

    The intent to solve biological and biomedical questions in high-throughput led to an immense interest in microarray technologies. Nowadays, DNA microarrays are routinely used to screen for oligonucleotide interactions within a large variety of potential interaction partners. To study interactions on the protein level with the same efficiency, protein and peptide microarrays offer similar advantages, but their production is more demanding. A new technology to produce peptide microarrays with a laser printer provides access to affordable and highly complex peptide microarrays. Such a peptide microarray can contain up to 775 peptide spots per cm², whereby the position of each peptide spot and, thus, the amino acid sequence of the corresponding peptide, is exactly known. Compared to other techniques, such as the SPOT synthesis, more features per cm² at lower costs can be synthesized which paves the way for laser printed peptide microarrays to take on roles as efficient and affordable biomedical sensors. Here, we describe the laser printer-based synthesis of peptide microarrays and focus on an application involving the blood sera of tetanus immunized individuals, indicating the potential of peptide arrays to sense immune responses.

  12. Identification of glycan structure alterations on cell membrane proteins in desoxyepothilone B resistant leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miyako; Saldanha, Rohit; Göbel, Anja; Kavallaris, Maria; Packer, Nicolle H

    2011-11-01

    Resistance to tubulin-binding agents used in cancer is often multifactorial and can include changes in drug accumulation and modified expression of tubulin isotypes. Glycans on cell membrane proteins play important roles in many cellular processes such as recognition and apoptosis, and this study investigated whether changes to the glycan structures on cell membrane proteins occur when cells become resistant to drugs. Specifically, we investigated the alteration of glycan structures on the cell membrane proteins of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CEM) cells that were selected for resistance to desoxyepothilone B (CEM/dEpoB). The glycan profile of the cell membrane glycoproteins was obtained by sequential release of N- and O-glycans from cell membrane fraction dotted onto polyvinylidene difluoride membrane with PNGase F and β-elimination respectively. The released glycan alditols were analyzed by liquid chromatography (graphitized carbon)-electrospray ionization tandem MS. The major N-glycan on CEM cell was the core fucosylated α2-6 monosialo-biantennary structure. Resistant CEM/dEpoB cells had a significant decrease of α2-6 linked sialic acid on N-glycans. The lower α2-6 sialylation was caused by a decrease in activity of β-galactoside α2-6 sialyltransferase (ST6Gal), and decreased expression of the mRNA. It is clear that the membrane glycosylation of leukemia cells changes during acquired resistance to dEpoB drugs and that this change occurs globally on all cell membrane glycoproteins. This is the first identification of a specific glycan modification on the surface of drug resistant cells and the mechanism of this downstream effect on microtubule targeting drugs may offer a route to new interventions to overcome drug resistance.

  13. Automated Glycan Sequencing from Tandem Mass Spectra of N-Linked Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Yih; Mayampurath, Anoop; Zhu, Rui; Zacharias, Lauren; Song, Ehwang; Wang, Lei; Mechref, Yehia; Tang, Haixu

    2016-06-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine experimental tool for proteomic biomarker analysis of human blood samples, partly due to the large availability of informatics tools. As one of the most common protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) in mammals, protein glycosylation has been observed to alter in multiple human diseases and thus may potentially be candidate markers of disease progression. While mass spectrometry instrumentation has seen advancements in capabilities, discovering glycosylation-related markers using existing software is currently not straightforward. Complete characterization of protein glycosylation requires the identification of intact glycopeptides in samples, including identification of the modification site as well as the structure of the attached glycans. In this paper, we present GlycoSeq, an open-source software tool that implements a heuristic iterated glycan sequencing algorithm coupled with prior knowledge for automated elucidation of the glycan structure within a glycopeptide from its collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrum. GlycoSeq employs rules of glycosidic linkage as defined by glycan synthetic pathways to eliminate improbable glycan structures and build reasonable glycan trees. We tested the tool on two sets of tandem mass spectra of N-linked glycopeptides cell lines acquired from breast cancer patients. After employing enzymatic specificity within the N-linked glycan synthetic pathway, the sequencing results of GlycoSeq were highly consistent with the manually curated glycan structures. Hence, GlycoSeq is ready to be used for the characterization of glycan structures in glycopeptides from MS/MS analysis. GlycoSeq is released as open source software at https://github.com/chpaul/GlycoSeq/ . PMID:27111718

  14. Versatile metal-organic framework-functionalized magnetic graphene nanoporous composites: As deft matrix for high-effective extraction and purification of the N-linked glycans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxi; Wang, Yanan; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin; Yang, Pengyuan

    2016-08-17

    The highly selective enrichment of N-linked glycans from complex biological sample is still very important but challenging task due to the ultra-low abundance, complicated structures and strong ion suppress effect caused by distractors such as proteins, peptides and salts. Here, we firstly present a novel metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-functionalized magnetic nanoporous carbon-graphene composites (C-magG@ZIF-8) synthesized through a smart process. The obtained materials enjoy the unique properties including strong magnetic responsiveness, a large sum of graphitized carbon pore, remarkable biocompatibility and large specific surface area. By virtue of these unique properties, the C-magG@ZIF-8 composites displayed excellent selectivity and sensitivity, good recyclability and incredible size exclusion ability (roughly 2000 times) in the N-linked glycans analysis. Furthermore, 48 N-linked glycans were clearly identified from the normal human serum treated with the C-magG@ZIF-8. There is reason to believe that our smart strategy offers new possibilities for preparing the MOFs-functionalized composites for large-scale characterization of glycoproteomics by mass spectrometry analysis.

  15. Microarray Applications in Microbial Ecology Research.

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, T.; Schadt, C.; Zhou, J.

    2006-04-06

    Microarray technology has the unparalleled potential tosimultaneously determine the dynamics and/or activities of most, if notall, of the microbial populations in complex environments such as soilsand sediments. Researchers have developed several types of arrays thatcharacterize the microbial populations in these samples based on theirphylogenetic relatedness or functional genomic content. Several recentstudies have used these microarrays to investigate ecological issues;however, most have only analyzed a limited number of samples withrelatively few experiments utilizing the full high-throughput potentialof microarray analysis. This is due in part to the unique analyticalchallenges that these samples present with regard to sensitivity,specificity, quantitation, and data analysis. This review discussesspecific applications of microarrays to microbial ecology research alongwith some of the latest studies addressing the difficulties encounteredduring analysis of complex microbial communities within environmentalsamples. With continued development, microarray technology may ultimatelyachieve its potential for comprehensive, high-throughput characterizationof microbial populations in near real-time.

  16. Real-time DNA microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2009-01-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e. real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation in the capturing spots, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other signal amplitude-affecting non-idealities. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing in microarrays, similar to all affinity-based biosensors, is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we subsequently use as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to empirically validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:19723688

  17. Real-time DNA microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Hassibi, Arjang; Vikalo, Haris; Riechmann, José Luis; Hassibi, Babak

    2009-11-01

    We present a quantification method for affinity-based DNA microarrays which is based on the real-time measurements of hybridization kinetics. This method, i.e. real-time DNA microarrays, enhances the detection dynamic range of conventional systems by being impervious to probe saturation in the capturing spots, washing artifacts, microarray spot-to-spot variations, and other signal amplitude-affecting non-idealities. We demonstrate in both theory and practice that the time-constant of target capturing in microarrays, similar to all affinity-based biosensors, is inversely proportional to the concentration of the target analyte, which we subsequently use as the fundamental parameter to estimate the concentration of the analytes. Furthermore, to empirically validate the capabilities of this method in practical applications, we present a FRET-based assay which enables the real-time detection in gene expression DNA microarrays. PMID:19723688

  18. In good company: association between fungal glycans generates molecular complexes with unique functions

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The biological properties of fungal immunogens have historically utilized testing of isolated molecules. Recent findings, however, indicate that fungal glycans differing in structure and function can interact to form hybrid complexes with unique properties. In the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, chitin-like molecules associate with capsular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) to form functionally distinct glycan complexes. Such interactions between glycans that result in the formation of structures with different functions strongly suggest that additional molecular complexes with unknown properties may exist in fungal pathogens. Moreover, the identification of these novel complexes has stimulated the search of new immunogens with potential to protect human and animal hosts against systemic mycoses. PMID:22787459

  19. In good company: association between fungal glycans generates molecular complexes with unique functions.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marcio L; Nimrichter, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    The biological properties of fungal immunogens have historically utilized testing of isolated molecules. Recent findings, however, indicate that fungal glycans differing in structure and function can interact to form hybrid complexes with unique properties. In the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, chitin-like molecules associate with capsular glucuronoxylomannan (GXM) to form functionally distinct glycan complexes. Such interactions between glycans that result in the formation of structures with different functions strongly suggest that additional molecular complexes with unknown properties may exist in fungal pathogens. Moreover, the identification of these novel complexes has stimulated the search of new immunogens with potential to protect human and animal hosts against systemic mycoses.

  20. A refined palate: Bacterial consumption of host glycans in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Marcobal, Angela; Southwick, Audrey M; Earle, Kristen A; Sonnenburg, Justin L

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine houses a dense microbial ecosystem in which the struggle for nutrients creates a continual and dynamic selective force. Host-produced mucus glycans provide a ubiquitous source of carbon and energy for microbial species. Not surprisingly, many gut resident bacteria have become highly adapted to efficiently consume numerous distinct structures present in host glycans. We propose that sophistication in mucus consumption is a trait most likely to be found in gut residents that have co-evolved with hosts, microbes that have adapted to the complexity associated with the host glycan landscape. PMID:23720460

  1. Neonatal Gut Microbiota and Human Milk Glycans Cooperate to Attenuate Infection and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; He, Yingying

    2015-12-01

    Glycans of the intestinal mucosa and oligosaccharides of human milk influence the early colonization of the infant gut and establishment of mucosal homeostasis, and differences in colonization of the gut influence the ontogeny of glycans on the surface of the intestinal mucosa, proinflammatory signaling, homeostasis, and resilience to insult. This interkingdom reciprocal interaction is typical of a mutualistic symbiotic relationship. The period in which the infant gut most needs protection from hypersensitive inflammation overlaps with the recommended period of exclusive nursing; electively substituting artificial formula that lacks human milk protective glycans seems ill advised, especially for premature infants.

  2. Tissue Microarrays in Clinical Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, David; Kenney, Challayne; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2008-01-01

    The tissue microarray is a recently-implemented, high-throughput technology for the analysis of molecular markers in oncology. This research tool permits the rapid assessment of a biomarker in thousands of tumor samples, using commonly available laboratory assays such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Although introduced less than a decade ago, the TMA has proven to be invaluable in the study of tumor biology, the development of diagnostic tests, and the investigation of oncological biomarkers. This review describes the impact of TMA-based research in clinical oncology and its potential future applications. Technical aspects of TMA construction, and the advantages and disadvantages inherent to this technology are also discussed. PMID:18314063

  3. DNA Microarrays for Identifying Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Nölte, M.; Weber, H.; Silkenbeumer, N.; Hjörleifsdottir, S.; Hreggvidsson, G. O.; Marteinsson, V.; Kappel, K.; Planes, S.; Tinti, F.; Magoulas, A.; Garcia Vazquez, E.; Turan, C.; Hervet, C.; Campo Falgueras, D.; Antoniou, A.; Landi, M.; Blohm, D.

    2008-01-01

    In many cases marine organisms and especially their diverse developmental stages are difficult to identify by morphological characters. DNA-based identification methods offer an analytically powerful addition or even an alternative. In this study, a DNA microarray has been developed to be able to investigate its potential as a tool for the identification of fish species from European seas based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences. Eleven commercially important fish species were selected for a first prototype. Oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rDNA sequences obtained from 230 individuals of 27 fish species. In addition, more than 1200 sequences of 380 species served as sequence background against which the specificity of the probes was tested in silico. Single target hybridisations with Cy5-labelled, PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments from each of the 11 species on microarrays containing the complete set of probes confirmed their suitability. True-positive, fluorescence signals obtained were at least one order of magnitude stronger than false-positive cross-hybridisations. Single nontarget hybridisations resulted in cross-hybridisation signals at approximately 27% of the cases tested, but all of them were at least one order of magnitude lower than true-positive signals. This study demonstrates that the 16S rDNA gene is suitable for designing oligonucleotide probes, which can be used to differentiate 11 fish species. These data are a solid basis for the second step to create a “Fish Chip” for approximately 50 fish species relevant in marine environmental and fisheries research, as well as control of fisheries products. PMID:18270778

  4. Synthetic Human NOTCH1 EGF Modules Unraveled Molecular Mechanisms for the Structural and Functional Roles of Calcium Ions and O-Glycans in the Ligand-Binding Region.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Shun; Koide, Ryosuke; Hinou, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    2016-02-01

    The Notch signaling pathway is an evolutionarily highly conserved mechanism that operates across multicellular organisms and is critical for cell-fate decisions during development and homeostasis in most tissues. Notch signaling is modified by posttranslational glycosylations of the Notch extracellular EGF-like domain. To evaluate the structural and functional roles of various glycoforms at multiple EGF domains in the human Notch transmembrane receptor, we established a universal method for the construction of NOTCH1 EGF modules displaying the desired O-glycans at the designated glycosylation sites. The versatility of this strategy was demonstrated by the rapid and highly efficient synthesis of NOTCH1 EGF12 concurrently having a β-D-glucopyranose-initiated glycan (Xylα1 → 3Xylα1 → 3Glcβ1 →) at Ser458 and α-L-fucopyranose-initiated glycan (Neu5Acα2 → 3Galβ1 → 4GlcNAcβ1 → 3Fucα1 →) at Thr466. The efficiency of the proper folding of the glycosylated EGF12 was markedly enhanced in the presence of 5 mM CaCl2. A nuclear magnetic resonance study revealed the existence of strong nuclear Overhauser effects between key sugar moieties and neighboring amino acid residues, indicating that both O-glycans contribute independently to the intramolecular stabilization of the antiparallel β-sheet structure in the ligand-binding region of EGF12. A preliminary test using synthetic human NOTCH1 EGF modules showed significant inhibitory effects on the proliferation and adhesiveness of human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line A549, demonstrating for the first time evidence that exogenously applied synthetic EGF modules have the ability to interact with intrinsic Notch ligands on the surface of cancer cells.

  5. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Extracting Spectra of N-Glycans Directly from Incubation Mixtures Following Glycan Release: Application to Glycans from Engineered Glycoforms of Intact, Folded HIV gp120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, David J.; Sobott, Frank; Crispin, Max; Wrobel, Antoni; Bonomelli, Camille; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Scarff, Charlotte A.; Thalassinos, Konstantinos; Scrivens, James H.

    2011-03-01

    The analysis of glycosylation from native biological sources is often frustrated by the low abundances of available material. Here, ion mobility combined with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry have been used to extract the spectra of N-glycans released with PNGase F from a serial titration of recombinantly expressed envelope glycoprotein, gp120, from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Analysis was also performed on gp120 expressed in the α-mannosidase inhibitor, and in a matched mammalian cell line deficient in GlcNAc transferase I. Without ion mobility separation, ESI spectra frequently contained no observable ions from the glycans whereas ions from other compounds such as detergents and residual buffer salts were abundant. After ion mobility separation on a Waters T-wave ion mobility mass spectrometer, the N-glycans fell into a unique region of the ion mobility/ m/z plot allowing their profiles to be extracted with good signal:noise ratios. This method allowed N-glycan profiles to be extracted from crude incubation mixtures with no clean-up even in the presence of surfactants such as NP40. Furthermore, this technique allowed clear profiles to be obtained from sub-microgram amounts of glycoprotein. Glycan profiles were similar to those generated by MALDI-TOF MS although they were more susceptible to double charging and fragmentation. Structural analysis could be accomplished by MS/MS experiments in either positive or negative ion mode but negative ion mode gave the most informative spectra and provided a reliable approach to the analysis of glycans from small amounts of glycoprotein.

  6. Glycan complexity dictates microbial resource allocation in the large intestine

    PubMed Central

    Rogowski, Artur; Briggs, Jonathon A.; Mortimer, Jennifer C.; Tryfona, Theodora; Terrapon, Nicolas; Lowe, Elisabeth C.; Baslé, Arnaud; Morland, Carl; Day, Alison M.; Zheng, Hongjun; Rogers, Theresa E.; Thompson, Paul; Hawkins, Alastair R.; Yadav, Madhav P.; Henrissat, Bernard; Martens, Eric C.; Dupree, Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the human gut microbiota is controlled primarily through the degradation of complex dietary carbohydrates, but the extent to which carbohydrate breakdown products are shared between members of the microbiota is unclear. We show here, using xylan as a model, that sharing the breakdown products of complex carbohydrates by key members of the microbiota, such as Bacteroides ovatus, is dependent on the complexity of the target glycan. Characterization of the extensive xylan degrading apparatus expressed by B. ovatus reveals that the breakdown of the polysaccharide by the human gut microbiota is significantly more complex than previous models suggested, which were based on the deconstruction of xylans containing limited monosaccharide side chains. Our report presents a highly complex and dynamic xylan degrading apparatus that is fine-tuned to recognize the different forms of the polysaccharide presented to the human gut microbiota. PMID:26112186

  7. Morphological and glycan features of the camel oviduct epithelium.

    PubMed

    Accogli, Gianluca; Monaco, Davide; El Bahrawy, Khalid Ahmed; El-Sayed, Ashraf Abd El-Halim; Ciannarella, Francesca; Beneult, Benedicte; Lacalandra, Giovanni Michele; Desantis, Salvatore

    2014-07-01

    This study describes regional differences in the oviduct of the one-humped camel (Camelus dromedarius) during the growth phase (GP) and the mature phase (MP) of the follicular wave by means of morphometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and glycohistochemistry investigations. Epithelium height significantly increased in the ampulla and decreased in the isthmus passing from the GP to the MP. Under SEM, non-ciliated cells displayed apical blebs (secretory) or short microvilli. Cilia glycocalyx expressed glycans terminating with sialic acid linked α2,6 to Gal/GalNAc (SNA affinity) throughout the oviducts of GP and MP and sialic acid linked α2,3 to Galβ1,3GalNAc (MAL II and KOH-sialidase (K-s)-PNA staining) throughout the MP oviducts. Non-ciliated cells displayed lectin-binding sites from the supra-nuclear cytoplasm to the luminal surface. Ampulla non-ciliated cells showed O-linked (mucin-type) sialoglycans (MAL II and K-s-PNA) during GP and MP and N-linked sialoglycans (SNA) during the MP. Isthmus non-ciliated cells expressed SNA reactivity in GP and MP, also K-s-PNA binders in MP, and MAL II and PNA affinity (Galβ1,3GalNAc) during GP. Galβ1,3GalNAc was sialilated in the non-ciliated cells of GP UTJ. Luminal surface lacked of Galβ1,3GalNAc in GP and MP, whereas it expressed α2,6- and α2,3-linked sialic acids. In GP intraluminal substance reacted with SNA, MAL II, K-s-PNA in ampulla and only with MAL II in the isthmus and UTJ. These results demonstrate that the morphology and the glycan pattern of the camel oviductal epithelium vary during the follicular wave and that could relate to the region-specific functions.

  8. Specific N-glycans of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Surface and the Abnormal Increase of Core-α-1, 6-fucosylated Triantennary Glycan via N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases-IVa Regulation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Huan; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Yubao; Li, Tingting; Zhan, Chao; Huo, Wenjuan; He, Anshun; Yao, Yuanfei; Jin, Yu; Qu, Youpeng; Sun, Xue-Long; Li, Yu

    2015-11-05

    Glycosylation alterations of cell surface proteins are often observed during the progression of malignancies. The specific cell surface N-glycans were profiled in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with clinical tissues (88 tumor and adjacent normal tissues) and the corresponding serum samples of HCC patients. The level of core-α-1,6-fucosylated triantennary glycan (NA3Fb) increased both on the cell surface and in the serum samples of HCC patients (p < 0.01). Additionally, the change of NA3Fb was not influenced by Hepatitis B virus (HBV)and cirrhosis. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression of N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa (GnT-IVa), which was related to the synthesis of the NA3Fb, was substantially increased in HCC tissues. Knockdown of GnT-IVa leads to a decreased level of NA3Fb and decreased ability of invasion and migration in HCC cells. NA3Fb can be regarded as a specific cell surface N-glycan of HCC. The high expression of GnT-IVa is the cause of the abnormal increase of NA3Fb on the HCC cell surface, which regulates cell migration. This study demonstrated the specific N-glycans of the cell surface and the mechanisms of altered glycoform related with HCC. These findings lead to better understanding of the function of glycan and glycosyltransferase in the tumorigenesis, progression and metastasis of HCC.

  9. Modulation of O-glycans and N-glycans on murine CD8 T cells fails to alter annexin V ligand induction by galectin 1.

    PubMed

    Carlow, Douglas A; Williams, Michael J; Ziltener, Hermann J

    2003-11-15

    Thymic negative selection and contraction of responding T cell oligoclones after infection represent important cell ablation processes required for maintaining T cell homeostasis. It has been proposed that galectin 1 contributes to these processes through interaction with lactosyl sequences principally on cell surface glycoproteins bearing core 2 (C2GnT1)-branched O-glycans. According to this model, specific T cell surface proteins cross-linked by galectin 1 induce signaling, ligand redistribution, and apoptosis in both immature thymocytes and activated T cells. The influence of lactosyl residues contained in branched O-glycans or complex N-glycans on galectin 1 binding and induction of annexin V ligand in murine CD8 T cells was assessed. Neither galectin binding nor galectin-induced expression of annexin V ligand was perturbed under conditions in which: 1) C2GnT1 activity was differentially induced by CD8 T cell activation/culture with IL-2 vs IL-4; 2) activated CD8(+) T cells lacked C2GnT1 expression; or 3) complex N-glycan formation was blocked by swainsonine. The maintenance of galectin 1 binding and induced annexin V expression under conditions that alter lactosamine abundance on O- or complex N-glycans suggest that galectin 1-mediated apoptosis is neither a simple function of fluctuating C2GnT1 activity nor a general C2GnT1-dependent mechanism underlying contraction of CD8 T cells subsequent to activation.

  10. Use of Genomic DNA as A Reference in DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yunfeng

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray has become a mainstream technology to explore gene expression profiles, identify novel genes involved in a biological process of interest and predict their function, and determine biomarkers that are relevant to a given phenotype or disease. Typical two-channel microarray studies use an experimental design called the complementary DNA (cDNA) reference method, in which samples from test and control conditions are compared directly on a microarray slide. A substantial limitation of this strategy is that it is nearly impossible to compare data between experiments because the reference sample composition is subjected to changes at the level of experimental design and thereby not consistent from one experiment to another. Using genomic DNA as common reference will effectively overcome this limitation. This chapter describes detailed methods to prepare genomic DNA of high quality, label with fluorescent dye, co-hybridize with cDNA samples, and the subsequent data analyses. In addition, notes are provided to help the readers to obtain optimal results using the procedure.

  11. A multivariate prediction model for microarray cross-hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yian A; Chou, Cheng-Chung; Lu, Xinghua; Slate, Elizabeth H; Peck, Konan; Xu, Wenying; Voit, Eberhard O; Almeida, Jonas S

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression microarray analysis is one of the most popular molecular diagnostic techniques in the post-genomic era. However, this technique faces the fundamental problem of potential cross-hybridization. This is a pervasive problem for both oligonucleotide and cDNA microarrays; it is considered particularly problematic for the latter. No comprehensive multivariate predictive modeling has been performed to understand how multiple variables contribute to (cross-) hybridization. Results We propose a systematic search strategy using multiple multivariate models [multiple linear regressions, regression trees, and artificial neural network analyses (ANNs)] to select an effective set of predictors for hybridization. We validate this approach on a set of DNA microarrays with cytochrome p450 family genes. The performance of our multiple multivariate models is compared with that of a recently proposed third-order polynomial regression method that uses percent identity as the sole predictor. All multivariate models agree that the 'most contiguous base pairs between probe and target sequences,' rather than percent identity, is the best univariate predictor. The predictive power is improved by inclusion of additional nonlinear effects, in particular target GC content, when regression trees or ANNs are used. Conclusion A systematic multivariate approach is provided to assess the importance of multiple sequence features for hybridization and of relationships among these features. This approach can easily be applied to larger datasets. This will allow future developments of generalized hybridization models that will be able to correct for false-positive cross-hybridization signals in expression experiments. PMID:16509965

  12. Microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic immunoassay system.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsik; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-05-01

    A microarray-based analytical platform has been utilized as a powerful tool in biological assay fields. However, an analyte depletion problem due to the slow mass transport based on molecular diffusion causes low reaction efficiency, resulting in a limitation for practical applications. This paper presents a novel method to improve the efficiency of microarray-based immunoassay via an optically induced electrokinetic phenomenon by integrating an optoelectrofluidic device with a conventional glass slide-based microarray format. A sample droplet was loaded between the microarray slide and the optoelectrofluidic device on which a photoconductive layer was deposited. Under the application of an AC voltage, optically induced AC electroosmotic flows caused by a microarray-patterned light actively enhanced the mass transport of target molecules at the multiple assay spots of the microarray simultaneously, which reduced tedious reaction time from more than 30 min to 10 min. Based on this enhancing effect, a heterogeneous immunoassay with a tiny volume of sample (5 μl) was successfully performed in the microarray-integrated optoelectrofluidic system using immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-IgG, resulting in improved efficiency compared to the static environment. Furthermore, the application of multiplex assays was also demonstrated by multiple protein detection.

  13. Negative-ion Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry and Microarray Analyses of Developmentally-regulated Antigens Based on Type 1 and Type 2 Backbone Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yibing; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Chai, Wengang

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 (Galβ1-3GlcNAc) and type 2 (Galβ1-4GlcNAc) sequences are constituents of the backbones of a large family of glycans of glycoproteins and glycolipids whose branching and peripheral substitutions are developmentally-regulated. It is highly desirable to have micro-sequencing methods that can be used to precisely identify and monitor these oligosaccharide sequences with high sensitivity. Negative-ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation has been used for characterization of branching points, peripheral substitutions and partial assignment of linkages in reducing oligosaccharides. We now extend this method to characterizing entire sequences of linear type 1 and type 2 chain-based glycans, focusing on the type 1 and -2 units in the internal regions including the linkages connecting type 1 and type 2 disaccharide units. We apply the principles to sequence analysis of closely related isomeric oligosaccharides and demonstrate by microarray analyses distinct binding activities of antibodies and a lectin toward various combinations of type 1 and 2 units joined by 1,3- and 1,6-linkages. These sequence-specific carbohydrate-binding proteins are in turn valuable tools for detecting and distinguishing the type 1 and type 2-based developmentally-regulated glycan sequences. PMID:26530895

  14. An integrated 3D-printed platform for the automated isolation of N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Mao; Laborda, Pedro; Conway, Louis Patrick; Duan, Xu-Chu; Huang, Kun; Liu, Li; Voglmeir, Josef

    2016-10-01

    The development of techniques for the rapid analysis of N-glycans is a key step in enabling the roles of glycoproteins in biological processes to be studied. Analysis is usually performed through the liberation of the carbohydrate moieties from proteins, followed by fluorescent labeling and identification using either standardized HPLC or mass spectrometry techniques. A simple and robust automated process for the release and isolation of N-glycans would greatly improve analytical throughput and reproducibility, and is thus highly desirable. Inspired by the increasing number of reported projects involving open source labware, which allows the design and construction of otherwise inaccessible laboratory equipment using low-cost 3D printers, we used this technique to fabricate a platform for the automated isolation of N-glycans. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated the successful recovery of glycan samples from the glycoprotein model fetuin using our self-made 3D-printed equipment.

  15. Microbe–Host Interactions are Positively and Negatively Regulated by Galectin–Glycan Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Linda G.; Garner, Omai B.; Schaefer, Katrin; Lee, Benhur

    2014-01-01

    Microbe–host interactions are complex processes that are directly and indirectly regulated by a variety of factors, including microbe presentation of specific molecular signatures on the microbial surface, as well as host cell presentation of receptors that recognize these pathogen signatures. Cell surface glycans are one important class of microbial signatures that are recognized by a variety of host cell lectins. Host cell lectins that recognize microbial glycans include members of the galectin family of lectins that recognize specific glycan ligands on viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. In this review, we will discuss the ways that the interactions of microbial glycans with host cell galectins positively and negatively regulate pathogen attachment, invasion, and survival, as well as regulate host responses that mitigate microbial pathogenesis. PMID:24995007

  16. In situ recognition of cell-surface glycans and targeted imaging of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao-Ding; Cheng, Han; Chen, Wei-Hai; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent sensors capable of recognizing cancer-associated glycans, such as sialyl Lewis X (sLex) tetrasaccharide, have great potential for cancer diagnosis and therapy. Studies on water-soluble and biocompatible sensors for in situ recognition of cancer-associated glycans in live cells and targeted imaging of cancer cells are very limited at present. Here we report boronic acid-functionalized peptide-based fluorescent sensors (BPFSs) for in situ recognition and differentiation of cancer-associated glycans, as well as targeted imaging of cancer cells. By screening BPFSs with different structures, it was demonstrated that BPFS1 with a FRGDF peptide could recognize cell-surface glycan of sLex with high specificity and thereafter fluorescently label and discriminate cancer cells through the cooperation with the specific recognition between RGD and integrins. The newly developed peptide-based sensor will find great potential as a fluorescent probe for cancer diagnosis. PMID:24042097

  17. Glycan clustering stabilizes the mannose patch of HIV-1 and preserves vulnerability to broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Laura K.; Spencer, Daniel I. R.; Royle, Louise; Bonomelli, Camille; Seabright, Gemma E.; Behrens, Anna-Janina; Kulp, Dan; Menis, Sergey; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Dunlop, D. Cameron; Crispin, Daniel J.; Bowden, Thomas A.; Ward, Andrew B.; Schief, William R.; Doores, Katie J.; Crispin, Max

    2015-01-01

    The envelope spike of HIV-1 employs a ‘glycan shield’ to protect itself from antibody-mediated neutralization. Paradoxically, however, potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) have been isolated which target this shield. The unusually high glycan density on the gp120 subunit limits processing during biosynthesis, leaving a region of under-processed oligomannose-type structures which is a primary target of these bnAbs. Here we investigate the contribution of individual glycosylation sites to formation of this so-called intrinsic mannose patch. Deletion of individual sites has a limited effect on the overall size of the intrinsic mannose patch but leads to changes in the processing of neighboring glycans. These structural changes are largely tolerated by a panel of glycan-dependent bnAbs targeting these regions, indicating a degree of plasticity in their recognition. These results support the intrinsic mannose patch as a stable target for vaccine design. PMID:26105115

  18. Glycan clustering stabilizes the mannose patch of HIV-1 and preserves vulnerability to broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Laura K; Spencer, Daniel I R; Royle, Louise; Bonomelli, Camille; Seabright, Gemma E; Behrens, Anna-Janina; Kulp, Daniel W; Menis, Sergey; Krumm, Stefanie A; Dunlop, D Cameron; Crispin, Daniel J; Bowden, Thomas A; Scanlan, Christopher N; Ward, Andrew B; Schief, William R; Doores, Katie J; Crispin, Max

    2015-06-24

    The envelope spike of HIV-1 employs a 'glycan shield' to protect itself from antibody-mediated neutralization. Paradoxically, however, potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) that target this shield have been isolated. The unusually high glycan density on the gp120 subunit limits processing during biosynthesis, leaving a region of under-processed oligomannose-type structures, which is a primary target of these bnAbs. Here we investigate the contribution of individual glycosylation sites in the formation of this so-called intrinsic mannose patch. Deletion of individual sites has a limited effect on the overall size of the intrinsic mannose patch but leads to changes in the processing of neighbouring glycans. These structural changes are largely tolerated by a panel of glycan-dependent bnAbs targeting these regions, indicating a degree of plasticity in their recognition. These results support the intrinsic mannose patch as a stable target for vaccine design.

  19. An integrated 3D-printed platform for the automated isolation of N-glycans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Mao; Laborda, Pedro; Conway, Louis Patrick; Duan, Xu-Chu; Huang, Kun; Liu, Li; Voglmeir, Josef

    2016-10-01

    The development of techniques for the rapid analysis of N-glycans is a key step in enabling the roles of glycoproteins in biological processes to be studied. Analysis is usually performed through the liberation of the carbohydrate moieties from proteins, followed by fluorescent labeling and identification using either standardized HPLC or mass spectrometry techniques. A simple and robust automated process for the release and isolation of N-glycans would greatly improve analytical throughput and reproducibility, and is thus highly desirable. Inspired by the increasing number of reported projects involving open source labware, which allows the design and construction of otherwise inaccessible laboratory equipment using low-cost 3D printers, we used this technique to fabricate a platform for the automated isolation of N-glycans. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated the successful recovery of glycan samples from the glycoprotein model fetuin using our self-made 3D-printed equipment. PMID:27423878

  20. Enzymes for N-Glycan Branching and Their Genetic and Nongenetic Regulation in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    N-glycan, a fundamental and versatile protein modification in mammals, plays critical roles in various physiological and pathological events including cancer progression. The formation of N-glycan branches catalyzed by specific N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases [GnT-III, GnT-IVs, GnT-V, GnT-IX (Vb)] and a fucosyltransferase, Fut8, provides functionally diverse N-glycosylated proteins. Aberrations of these branches are often found in cancer cells and are profoundly involved in cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. In this review, we focus on the GlcNAc and fucose branches of N-glycans and describe how their expression is dysregulated in cancer by genetic and nongenetic mechanisms including epigenetics and nucleotide sugar metabolisms. We also survey the roles that these N-glycans play in cancer progression and therapeutics. Finally, we discuss possible applications of our knowledge on basic glycobiology to the development of medicine and biomarkers for cancer therapy. PMID:27136596

  1. GlycoBase and autoGU: resources for interpreting HPLC-glycan data.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Matthew P; Royle, Lousie; Rudd, Pauline M

    2015-01-01

    The biological relevance of protein glycosylation has made glycomics, the comprehensive study to identify all glycans in an organism, indispensable in many research fields. Determining the structure and functional relationship of glycoproteins requires the comprehensive characterization of glycan structures by a range of analytical methods. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a well-established technology commonly used for the complete structural elucidation of N- and O-linked glycans; however, the analysis of data is a major bottleneck and robust bioinformatic solutions are required. This chapter describes the availability of databases and tools, GlycoBase and autoGU developed in conjunction with the EUROCarbDB initiative, to assist the interpretation of HPLC-glycan data collections.

  2. Enzymes for N-Glycan Branching and Their Genetic and Nongenetic Regulation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    N-glycan, a fundamental and versatile protein modification in mammals, plays critical roles in various physiological and pathological events including cancer progression. The formation of N-glycan branches catalyzed by specific N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases [GnT-III, GnT-IVs, GnT-V, GnT-IX (Vb)] and a fucosyltransferase, Fut8, provides functionally diverse N-glycosylated proteins. Aberrations of these branches are often found in cancer cells and are profoundly involved in cancer growth, invasion and metastasis. In this review, we focus on the GlcNAc and fucose branches of N-glycans and describe how their expression is dysregulated in cancer by genetic and nongenetic mechanisms including epigenetics and nucleotide sugar metabolisms. We also survey the roles that these N-glycans play in cancer progression and therapeutics. Finally, we discuss possible applications of our knowledge on basic glycobiology to the development of medicine and biomarkers for cancer therapy. PMID:27136596

  3. The GlycanBuilder and GlycoWorkbench glycoinformatics tools: updates and new developments.

    PubMed

    Damerell, David; Ceroni, Alessio; Maass, Kai; Ranzinger, Rene; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M

    2012-11-01

    During the EUROCarbDB project our group developed the GlycanBuilder and GlycoWorkbench glycoinformatics tools. This short communication summarizes the capabilities of these two tools and updates which have been made since the original publications in 2007 and 2008. GlycanBuilder is a tool that allows for the fast and intuitive drawing of glycan structures; this tool can be used standalone, embedded in web pages and can also be integrated into other programs. GlycoWorkbench has been designed to semi-automatically annotate glycomics data. This tool can be used to annotate mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS spectra of free oligosaccharides, N and O-linked glycans, GAGs (glycosaminoglycans) and glycolipids, as well as MS spectra of glycoproteins. PMID:23109548

  4. Exploring the interactions between bacteriophage-encoded glycan binding proteins and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David J; Sacher, Jessica C; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-10-01

    There is an unprecedented interest in glycobiology due to the increasing appreciation of its impact on all aspects of life. Likewise, bacteriophage biology is enjoying a new renaissance as the post-antibiotic era fuels the search for novel ways to control harmful bacteria. Phages have spent the last 3 billion years developing ways of recognizing and manipulating bacterial surface glycans. Therefore, phages comprise a massive reservoir of glycan-binding and -hydrolyzing proteins with the potential to be exploited for glycan analysis, bacterial diagnostics and therapeutics. We discuss phage tail proteins that recognize bacterial surface polysaccharides, endolysins that bind and cleave peptidoglycan, Ig-like proteins that attach to mucin glycans, and phage effector proteins that recognize both bacterial and eukaryotic oligosaccharides.

  5. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo.

  6. Differentiation of Cancer Cell Origin and Molecular Subtype by Plasma Membrane N-Glycan Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Serenus; Saunders, Mary; Dimapasoc, Lauren M.; Jeong, Seung Hyup; Kim, Bum Jin; Kim, Suhee; So, Minkyung; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Jae Han; Lam, Kit S.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; An, Hyun Joo

    2014-01-01

    In clinical settings, biopsies are routinely used to determine cancer type and grade based on tumor cell morphology, as determined via histochemical or immunohistochemical staining. Unfortunately, in a significant number of cases, traditional biopsy results are either inconclusive or do not provide full subtype differentiation, possibly leading to inefficient or ineffective treatment. Glycomic profiling of the cell membrane offers an alternate route towards cancer diagnosis. In this study, isomer-sensitive nano-LC/MS was used to directly obtain detailed profiles of the different N-glycan structures present on cancer cell membranes. Membrane N-glycans were extracted from cells representing various subtypes of breast, lung, cervical, ovarian, and lymphatic cancer. Chip-based porous graphitized carbon nano-LC/MS was used to separate, identify, and quantify the native N-glycans. Structure-sensitive N-glycan profiling identified hundreds of glycan peaks per cell line, including multiple isomers for most compositions. Hierarchical clusterings based on Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quickly compare and separate each cell line according to originating organ and disease subtype. Based simply on the relative abundances of broad glycan classes (e.g. high mannose, complex/hybrid fucosylated, complex/hybrid sialylated, etc.) most cell lines were readily differentiated. More closely-related cell lines were differentiated based on several-fold differences in the abundances of individual glycans. Based on characteristic N-glycan profiles, primary cancer origins and molecular subtypes could be distinguished. These results demonstrate that stark differences in cancer cell membrane glycosylation can be exploited to create an MS-based biopsy, with potential applications towards cancer diagnosis and direction of treatment. PMID:24303873

  7. Two types of galactosylated fucose motifs are present on N-glycans of Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Wilson, Iain B H

    2015-06-01

    N-Glycans from the nematode Haemonchus contortus (barber pole worm), a parasite of sheep and cattle, were the first to be described to possess up to three fucose residues associated with the N,N'-diacetylchitobiosyl core, two being on the reducing-terminal proximal GlcNAc and one on the distal core GlcNAc residue. The assumption was that truncated glycans from this organism with three hexose residues have the composition Man3GlcNAc2Fuc1-3. In this study, we have performed HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS/MS in combination with selected digestions of N-glycans from Haemonchus. A dominant trifucosylated Hex3HexNAc2Fuc3 glycan was modified not only with α1,6-fucose but also with a proximal core α1,3-fucose and a galactosylated distal α1,3-fucose; thereby, only two of the hexose residues were mannose. Other N-glycans displayed galactosylation of the core α1,6-fucose, antennal fucosylation or modification with phosphorylcholine. Thus, the N-glycans of Haemonchus contain a number of potentially immunogenic glycan epitopes also found in other parasites and our proposed structures are in line with the previously defined specificity of nematode glycosyltransferases as we show that distal fucosylation and the presence of an α1,6-mannose are apparently mutually exclusive. These data are thereby of importance for engineering cell lines capable of mimicking Haemonchus-type N-glycans in the preparation of recombinant proteins as vaccine candidates.

  8. Glycan structure of Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor as revealed by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R; Rehder, Douglas S

    2016-09-15

    Disagreement exists regarding the O-glycan structure attached to human vitamin D binding protein (DBP). Previously reported evidence indicated that the O-glycan of the Gc1S allele product is the linear core 1 NeuNAc-Gal-GalNAc-Thr trisaccharide. Here, glycan structural evidence is provided from glycan linkage analysis and over 30 serial glycosidase-digestion experiments which were followed by analysis of the intact protein by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Results demonstrate that the O-glycan from the Gc1F protein is the same linear trisaccharide found on the Gc1S protein and that the hexose residue is galactose. In addition, the putative anti-cancer derivative of DBP known as Gc Protein-derived Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF, which is formed by the combined action of β-galactosidase and neuraminidase upon DBP) was analyzed intact by ESI-MS, revealing that the activating E. coli β-galactosidase cleaves nothing from the protein-leaving the glycan structure of active GcMAF as a Gal-GalNAc-Thr disaccharide, regardless of the order in which β-galactosidase and neuraminidase are applied. Moreover, glycosidase digestion results show that α-N-Acetylgalactosamindase (nagalase) lacks endoglycosidic function and only cleaves the DBP O-glycan once it has been trimmed down to a GalNAc-Thr monosaccharide-precluding the possibility of this enzyme removing the O-glycan trisaccharide from cancer-patient DBP in vivo. PMID:27503803

  9. Worms to the rescue: can worm glycans protect from autoimmune diseases?

    PubMed

    Kuijk, Loes M; van Die, Irma

    2010-04-01

    Autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases represent a significant health burden, especially in Western societies. For the majority of these diseases, no cure exists. Recently, research on parasitic worms (helminths) has demonstrated great potential for whole worms, their eggs or their excretory/secretory proteins in down-regulating inflammatory responses both in vitro and in vivo, in various disease models and, in some cases, even in clinical trials. The worms are thought to induce Th2 and regulatory T cells, interfere with Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and to down-regulate Th17 and Th1 responses. The molecular mechanisms underlying the worms' ability to modulate the host immune response are not well understood, and many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the observed immune modulation. Increasing evidence suggests that carbohydrate structures (glycans), for example, phosphorylcholine-modified glycans or Galbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAc- (Lewis X, Le(X)) containing glycans, expressed by the worms contribute to these modulating properties by their interaction with antigen presenting cells. Helminths express a broad variety of protein- and lipid-linked glycans on their surface and on secretory products. These glycans differ in amount and composition and several of these structures are species specific. However, worms also express glycan antigens that are found in a wide variety of different species. Some of these "common" worm glycans are particularly interesting with regard to regulating host responses, because they have the potential to interact with C-type lectins on dendritic cells and thereby may interfere with T-cell polarization. Helminths and helminth-derived molecules form a novel and promising group of therapeutics for autoinflammatory diseases. However, much has to be learned about the molecular mechanisms behind the helminth-mediated antiinflammatory properties. This review will describe some of the emerging evidence in selected disease areas as

  10. Progress in the application of DNA microarrays.

    PubMed Central

    Lobenhofer, E K; Bushel, P R; Afshari, C A; Hamadeh, H K

    2001-01-01

    Microarray technology has been applied to a variety of different fields to address fundamental research questions. The use of microarrays, or DNA chips, to study the gene expression profiles of biologic samples began in 1995. Since that time, the fundamental concepts behind the chip, the technology required for making and using these chips, and the multitude of statistical tools for analyzing the data have been extensively reviewed. For this reason, the focus of this review will be not on the technology itself but on the application of microarrays as a research tool and the future challenges of the field. PMID:11673116

  11. Chromosome microarrays in diagnostic testing: interpreting the genomic data.

    PubMed

    Peters, Greg B; Pertile, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    DNA-based Chromosome MicroArrays (CMAs) are now well established as diagnostic tools in clinical genetics laboratories. Over the last decade, the primary application of CMAs has been the genome-wide detection of a particular class of mutation known as copy number variants (CNVs). Since 2010, CMA testing has been recommended as a first-tier test for detection of CNVs associated with intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders, and/or multiple congenital anomalies…in the post-natal setting. CNVs are now regarded as pathogenic in 14-18 % of patients referred for these (and related) disorders.Through consideration of clinical examples, and several microarray platforms, we attempt to provide an appreciation of microarray diagnostics, from the initial inspection of the microarray data, to the composing of the patient report. In CMA data interpretation, a major challenge comes from the high frequency of clinically irrelevant CNVs observed within "patient" and "normal" populations. As might be predicted, the more common and clinically insignificant CNVs tend to be the smaller ones <100 kb in length, involving few or no known genes. However, this relationship is not at all straightforward: CNV length and gene content are only very imperfect indicators of CNV pathogenicity. Presently, there are no reliable means of separating, a priori, the benign from the pathological CNV classes.This chapter also considers sources of technical "noise" within CMA data sets. Some level of noise is inevitable in diagnostic genomics, given the very large number of data points generated in any one test. Noise further limits CMA resolution, and some miscalling of CNVs is unavoidable. In this, there is no ideal solution, but various strategies for handling noise are available. Even without solutions, consideration of these diagnostic problems per se is informative, as they afford critical insights into the biological and technical underpinnings of CNV discovery. These are indispensable

  12. Methylated glycans as conserved targets of animal and fungal innate defense.

    PubMed

    Wohlschlager, Therese; Butschi, Alex; Grassi, Paola; Sutov, Grigorij; Gauss, Robert; Hauck, Dirk; Schmieder, Stefanie S; Knobel, Martin; Titz, Alexander; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Hengartner, Michael O; Aebi, Markus; Künzler, Markus

    2014-07-01

    Effector proteins of innate immune systems recognize specific non-self epitopes. Tectonins are a family of β-propeller lectins conserved from bacteria to mammals that have been shown to bind bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We present experimental evidence that two Tectonins of fungal and animal origin have a specificity for O-methylated glycans. We show that Tectonin 2 of the mushroom Laccaria bicolor (Lb-Tec2) agglutinates Gram-negative bacteria and exerts toxicity toward the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting a role in fungal defense against bacteria and nematodes. Biochemical and genetic analysis of these interactions revealed that both bacterial agglutination and nematotoxicity of Lb-Tec2 depend on the recognition of methylated glycans, namely O-methylated mannose and fucose residues, as part of bacterial LPS and nematode cell-surface glycans. In addition, a C. elegans gene, termed samt-1, coding for a candidate membrane transport protein for the presumptive donor substrate of glycan methylation, S-adenosyl-methionine, from the cytoplasm to the Golgi was identified. Intriguingly, limulus lectin L6, a structurally related antibacterial protein of the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, showed properties identical to the mushroom lectin. These results suggest that O-methylated glycans constitute a conserved target of the fungal and animal innate immune system. The broad phylogenetic distribution of O-methylated glycans increases the spectrum of potential antagonists recognized by Tectonins, rendering this conserved protein family a universal defense armor. PMID:24879441

  13. Glycan Reader: automated sugar identification and simulation preparation for carbohydrates and glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Jo, Sunhwan; Song, Kevin C; Desaire, Heather; MacKerell, Alexander D; Im, Wonpil

    2011-11-15

    Understanding how glycosylation affects protein structure, dynamics, and function is an emerging and challenging problem in biology. As a first step toward glycan modeling in the context of structural glycobiology, we have developed Glycan Reader and integrated it into the CHARMM-GUI, http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/glycan. Glycan Reader greatly simplifies the reading of PDB structure files containing glycans through (i) detection of carbohydrate molecules, (ii) automatic annotation of carbohydrates based on their three-dimensional structures, (iii) recognition of glycosidic linkages between carbohydrates as well as N-/O-glycosidic linkages to proteins, and (iv) generation of inputs for the biomolecular simulation program CHARMM with the proper glycosidic linkage setup. In addition, Glycan Reader is linked to other functional modules in CHARMM-GUI, allowing users to easily generate carbohydrate or glycoprotein molecular simulation systems in solution or membrane environments and visualize the electrostatic potential on glycoprotein surfaces. These tools are useful for studying the impact of glycosylation on protein structure and dynamics.

  14. Golgi self-correction generates bioequivalent glycans to preserve cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mkhikian, Haik; Mortales, Christie-Lynn; Zhou, Raymond W; Khachikyan, Khachik; Wu, Gang; Haslam, Stuart M; Kavarian, Patil; Dell, Anne; Demetriou, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Essential biological systems employ self-correcting mechanisms to maintain cellular homeostasis. Mammalian cell function is dynamically regulated by the interaction of cell surface galectins with branched N-glycans. Here we report that N-glycan branching deficiency triggers the Golgi to generate bioequivalent N-glycans that preserve galectin-glycoprotein interactions and cellular homeostasis. Galectins bind N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc) units within N-glycans initiated from UDP-GlcNAc by the medial-Golgi branching enzymes as well as the trans-Golgi poly-LacNAc extension enzyme β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (B3GNT). Marginally reducing LacNAc content by limiting N-glycans to three branches results in T-cell hyperactivity and autoimmunity; yet further restricting branching does not produce a more hyperactive state. Rather, new poly-LacNAc extension by B3GNT maintains galectin binding and immune homeostasis. Poly-LacNAc extension is triggered by redistribution of unused UDP-GlcNAc from the medial to trans-Golgi via inter-cisternal tubules. These data demonstrate the functional equivalency of structurally dissimilar N-glycans and suggest a self-correcting feature of the Golgi that sustains cellular homeostasis. PMID:27269286

  15. Investigation of glycan evolution based on a comprehensive analysis of glycosyltransferases using phylogenetic profiling

    PubMed Central

    Tomono, Takayoshi; Kojima, Hisao; Fukuchi, Satoshi; Tohsato, Yukako; Ito, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Glycans play important roles in such cell-cell interactions as signaling and adhesion, including processes involved in pathogenic infections, cancers, and neurological diseases. Glycans are biosynthesized by multiple glycosyltransferases (GTs), which function sequentially. Excluding mucin-type O-glycosylation, the non-reducing terminus of glycans is biosynthesized in the Golgi apparatus after the reducing terminus is biosynthesized in the ER. In the present study, we performed genome-wide analyses of human GTs by investigating the degree of conservation of homologues in other organisms, as well as by elucidating the phylogenetic relationship between cephalochordates and urochordates, which has long been controversial in deuterostome phylogeny. We analyzed 173 human GTs and functionally linked glycan synthesis enzymes by phylogenetic profiling and clustering, compiled orthologous genes from the genomes of other organisms, and converted them into a binary sequence based on the presence (1) or absence (0) of orthologous genes in the genomes. Our results suggest that the non-reducing terminus of glycans is biosynthesized by newly evolved GTs. According to our analysis, the phylogenetic profiles of GTs resemble the phylogenetic tree of life, where deuterostomes, metazoans, and eukaryotes are resolved into separate branches. Lineage-specific GTs appear to play essential roles in the divergence of these particular lineages. We suggest that urochordates lose several genes that are conserved among metazoans, such as those expressing sialyltransferases, and that the Golgi apparatus acquires the ability to synthesize glycans after the ER acquires this function. PMID:27493855

  16. Golgi self-correction generates bioequivalent glycans to preserve cellular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Mkhikian, Haik; Mortales, Christie-Lynn; Zhou, Raymond W; Khachikyan, Khachik; Wu, Gang; Haslam, Stuart M; Kavarian, Patil; Dell, Anne; Demetriou, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Essential biological systems employ self-correcting mechanisms to maintain cellular homeostasis. Mammalian cell function is dynamically regulated by the interaction of cell surface galectins with branched N-glycans. Here we report that N-glycan branching deficiency triggers the Golgi to generate bioequivalent N-glycans that preserve galectin-glycoprotein interactions and cellular homeostasis. Galectins bind N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc) units within N-glycans initiated from UDP-GlcNAc by the medial-Golgi branching enzymes as well as the trans-Golgi poly-LacNAc extension enzyme β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (B3GNT). Marginally reducing LacNAc content by limiting N-glycans to three branches results in T-cell hyperactivity and autoimmunity; yet further restricting branching does not produce a more hyperactive state. Rather, new poly-LacNAc extension by B3GNT maintains galectin binding and immune homeostasis. Poly-LacNAc extension is triggered by redistribution of unused UDP-GlcNAc from the medial to trans-Golgi via inter-cisternal tubules. These data demonstrate the functional equivalency of structurally dissimilar N-glycans and suggest a self-correcting feature of the Golgi that sustains cellular homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14814.001 PMID:27269286

  17. Galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching in N-linked glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Andrew G.; Hayes, Jerrard M.; Bezak, Tania; Głuchowska, Sonia A.; Cosgrave, Eoin F. J.; Struwe, Weston B.; Stroop, Corné J. M.; Kok, Han; van de Laar, Teun; Rudd, Pauline M.; Tipton, Keith F.; Davey, Gavin P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein N-glycosylation is a common post-translational modification that produces a complex array of branched glycan structures. The levels of branching, or antennarity, give rise to differential biological activities for single glycoproteins. However, the precise mechanism controlling the glycan branching and glycosylation network is unknown. Here, we constructed quantitative mathematical models of N-linked glycosylation that predicted new control points for glycan branching. Galactosyltransferase, which acts on N-acetylglucosamine residues, was unexpectedly found to control metabolic flux through the glycosylation pathway and the level of final antennarity of nascent protein produced in the Golgi network. To further investigate the biological consequences of glycan branching in nascent proteins, we glycoengineered a series of mammalian cells overexpressing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). We identified a mechanism in which galactosyltransferase 4 isoform regulated N-glycan branching on the nascent protein, subsequently controlling biological activity in an in vivo model of hCG activity. We found that galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching decisions taken in the Golgi of the cell, which might ultimately control the biological activity of nascent glycoprotein. PMID:25271059

  18. Cellular O-Glycome Reporter/Amplification to Explore O-Glycans of Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kudelka, Matthew R.; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Wang, Yingchun; Duong, Duc M.; Song, Xuezheng; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M.; Cummings, Richard D.; Ju, Tongzhong

    2015-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation plays key roles in many biological processes, but the repertoire of O-glycans synthesized by cells is difficult to determine. Here we describe a new approach termed Cellular O-Glycome Reporter/Amplification (CORA), a sensitive method to amplify and profile mucin-type O-glycans synthesized by living cells. Cells incubated with peracetylated benzyl-α-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc-α-Benzyl) convert it to a large variety of modified O-glycan derivatives that are secreted from cells, allowing easy purification for analysis by HPLC and mass spectrometry (MS). CORA results in ~100–1000-fold increase in sensitivity over conventional O-glycan analyses and identifies a more complex repertoire of O-glycans in more than a dozen cell types from Homo sapiens and Mus musculus. Furthermore, CORA coupled with computational modeling allows predictions on the diversity of the human O-glycome and offers new opportunities to identify novel glycan biomarkers for human diseases. PMID:26619014

  19. Phylogeny, structure, function, biosynthesis and evolution of sulfated galactose-containing glycans.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H

    2016-03-01

    Glycans are ubiquitous components of all organisms. The specificity of glycan structures works in molecular recognition in multiple biological processes especially cell-cell and cell-matrix signaling events. These events are mostly driven by functional proteins whose activities are ultimately regulated by interactions with carbohydrate moieties of cell surface glycoconjugates. Galactose is a common composing monosaccharide in glycoconjugates. Sulfation at certain positions of the galactose residues does not only increase affinity for some binding proteins but also makes the structures of the controlling glycans more specific to molecular interactions. Here the phylogenetic distribution of glycans containing the sulfated galactose unit is examined across numerous multicellular organisms. Analysis includes autotrophs and heterotrophs from both terrestrial and marine environments. Information exists more regarding the marine species. Although future investigations in molecular biology must be still performed in order to assure certain hypotheses, empirical evidences based on structural biology of the sulfated galactose-containing glycans among different species particularly their backbone and sulfation patterns clearly indicate great specificity in terms of glycosyltransferase and sulfotransferase activity. This set of information suggests that evolution has shaped the biosynthetic machinery of these glycans somewhat related to their potential functions in the organisms. PMID:26712697

  20. Methylated glycans as conserved targets of animal and fungal innate defense

    PubMed Central

    Wohlschlager, Therese; Butschi, Alex; Grassi, Paola; Sutov, Grigorij; Gauss, Robert; Hauck, Dirk; Schmieder, Stefanie S.; Knobel, Martin; Titz, Alexander; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M.; Hengartner, Michael O.; Aebi, Markus; Künzler, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Effector proteins of innate immune systems recognize specific non-self epitopes. Tectonins are a family of β-propeller lectins conserved from bacteria to mammals that have been shown to bind bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We present experimental evidence that two Tectonins of fungal and animal origin have a specificity for O-methylated glycans. We show that Tectonin 2 of the mushroom Laccaria bicolor (Lb-Tec2) agglutinates Gram-negative bacteria and exerts toxicity toward the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting a role in fungal defense against bacteria and nematodes. Biochemical and genetic analysis of these interactions revealed that both bacterial agglutination and nematotoxicity of Lb-Tec2 depend on the recognition of methylated glycans, namely O-methylated mannose and fucose residues, as part of bacterial LPS and nematode cell-surface glycans. In addition, a C. elegans gene, termed samt-1, coding for a candidate membrane transport protein for the presumptive donor substrate of glycan methylation, S-adenosyl-methionine, from the cytoplasm to the Golgi was identified. Intriguingly, limulus lectin L6, a structurally related antibacterial protein of the Japanese horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus, showed properties identical to the mushroom lectin. These results suggest that O-methylated glycans constitute a conserved target of the fungal and animal innate immune system. The broad phylogenetic distribution of O-methylated glycans increases the spectrum of potential antagonists recognized by Tectonins, rendering this conserved protein family a universal defense armor. PMID:24879441

  1. Comprehensive analysis of glycosyltransferases in eukaryotic genomes for structural and functional characterization of glycans.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kosuke; Tokimatsu, Toshiaki; Kawano, Shin; Yoshizawa, Akiyasu C; Okuda, Shujiro; Goto, Susumu; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2009-05-12

    Glycosyltransferases comprise highly divergent groups of enzymes, which play a central role in the synthesis of complex glycans. Because the repertoire of glycosyltransferases in the genome determines the range of synthesizable glycans, and because the increasing amount of genome sequence data is now available, it is essential to examine these enzymes across organisms to explore possible structures and functions of the glycoconjugates. In this study, we systematically investigated 36 eukaryotic genomes and obtained 3426 glycosyltransferase homologs for biosynthesis of major glycans, classified into 53 families based on sequence similarity. The families were further grouped into six functional categories based on the biosynthetic pathways, which revealed characteristic patterns among organism groups in the degree of conservation and in the number of paralogs. The results also revealed a strong correlation between the number of glycosyltransferases and the number of coding genes in each genome. We then predicted the ability to synthesize major glycan structures including N-glycan precursors and GPI-anchors in each organism from the combination of the glycosyltransferase families. This indicates that not only parasitic protists but also some algae are likely to synthesize smaller structures than the structures known to be conserved among a wide range of eukaryotes. Finally we discuss the functions of two large families, sialyltransferases and beta 4-glycosyltransferases, by performing finer classifications into subfamilies. Our findings suggest that universality and diversity of glycans originate from two types of evolution of glycosyltransferase families, namely conserved families with few paralogs and diverged families with many paralogs.

  2. Plant-type N-glycans containing fucose and xylose in Bryophyta (mosses) and Tracheophyta (ferns).

    PubMed

    Mega, Tomohiro

    2007-12-01

    The presence of typical plant-type N-glycans (eg, M3FX, Gn2M3FX, and Le(a)2M3FX) in mosses, ferns, and other organisms was examined to determine which plant initially acquired glycosyltransferases to produce plant-type N-glycans during organic evolution. No M3FX-type N-glycan was detected in lichens (Cladonia humilis) or in any one of the three preland plants Enteromorpha prolifera, Ulva pertusa Kjellman, and Chara braunii Gmelin. In Bryophyta, M3FX-type N-glycan was detected at trace amounts in Anthocerotopsida (hornworts) and at certain amounts in Bryopsida (mosses), but not in Hepaticopsida (liverworts). Le(a)2M3FX was detected in some Bryopsida of relatively high M3FX content. Most Tracheophyta (ferns and higher plants) contained the three typical M3FX-type glycans as the main N-glycans in different ratios. These results suggest that organisms acquired xylosyltransferase and fucosyltransferase during the development of mosses from liverworts, and that later all plants retained both enzymes. Bryopsida have also obtained galactosyltransferase and fucosyltransferase to synthesize the Le(a) antigen.

  3. Control of T Cell-mediated autoimmunity by metabolite flux to N-glycan biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Grigorian, Ani; Lee, Sung-Uk; Tian, Wenqiang; Chen, I-Ju; Gao, Guoyan; Mendelsohn, Richard; Dennis, James W; Demetriou, Michael

    2007-07-01

    Autoimmunity is a complex trait disease where the environment influences susceptibility to disease by unclear mechanisms. T cell receptor clustering and signaling at the immune synapse, T cell proliferation, CTLA-4 endocytosis, T(H)1 differentiation, and autoimmunity are negatively regulated by beta1,6GlcNAc-branched N-glycans attached to cell surface glycoproteins. Beta1,6GlcNAc-branched N-glycan expression in T cells is dependent on metabolite supply to UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis (hexosamine pathway) and in turn to Golgi N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases Mgat1, -2, -4, and -5. In Jurkat T cells, beta1,6GlcNAc-branching in N-glycans is stimulated by metabolites supplying the hexosamine pathway including glucose, GlcNAc, acetoacetate, glutamine, ammonia, or uridine but not by control metabolites mannosamine, galactose, mannose, succinate, or pyruvate. Hexosamine supplementation in vitro and in vivo also increases beta1,6GlcNAc-branched N-glycans in naïve mouse T cells and suppresses T cell receptor signaling, T cell proliferation, CTLA-4 endocytosis, T(H)1 differentiation, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice. Our results indicate that metabolite flux through the hexosamine and N-glycan pathways conditionally regulates autoimmunity by modulating multiple T cell functionalities downstream of beta1,6GlcNAc-branched N-glycans. This suggests metabolic therapy as a potential treatment for autoimmune disease.

  4. Analysis of protein tyrosine phosphatase interactions with microarrayed phosphopeptide substrates using imaging mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Christopher J.; Hines, Harry B.; Ulrich, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays of peptide and recombinant protein libraries are routinely used for high-throughput studies of protein-protein interactions and enzymatic activities. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is currently applied as a method to localize analytes on thin tissue sections and other surfaces. Here, we have applied IMS as a label-free means to analyze protein-peptide interactions in a microarray-based phosphatase assay. This IMS strategy visualizes the entire microarray in one composite image by collecting a pre-defined raster of MALDI-TOF MS spectra over the surface of the chip. Examining the bacterial tyrosine phosphatase YopH, we used IMS as a label-free means to visualize enzyme binding and activity with a microarrayed phosphopeptide library printed on chips coated with either gold or indium-tin oxide. Further, we demonstrate that microarray-based IMS can be coupled with surface plasmon resonance imaging to add kinetic analyses to measured binding interactions. The method described here is within the capabilities of many modern MALDI-TOF instruments and has general utility for the label-free analysis of microarray assays. PMID:23906642

  5. Antibody microarray profiling of human prostate cancer sera: antibody screening and identification of potential biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeremy C; Zhou, Heping; Kwekel, Joshua; Cavallo, Robert; Burke, Jocelyn; Butler, E Brian; Teh, Bin S; Haab, Brian B

    2003-01-01

    We developed a practical strategy for serum protein profiling using antibody microarrays and applied the method to the identification of potential biomarkers in prostate cancer serum. Protein abundances from 33 prostate cancer and 20 control serum samples were compared to abundances from a common reference pool using a two-color fluorescence assay. Robotically spotted microarrays containing 184 unique antibodies were prepared on two different substrates: polyacrylamide based hydrogels on glass and poly-1-lysine coated glass with a photoreactive cross-linking layer. The hydrogel substrate yielded an average six-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio than the other substrate, and detection of protein binding was possible from a greater number of antibodies using the hydrogels. A statistical filter based on the correlation of data from "reverse-labeled" experiment sets accurately predicted the agreement between the microarray measurements and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay measurements, showing that this parameter can serve to screen for antibodies that are functional on microarrays. Having defined a set of reliable microarray measurements, we identified five proteins (von Willebrand Factor, immunoglobulinM, Alpha1-antichymotrypsin, Villin and immunoglobulinG) that had significantly different levels between the prostate cancer samples and the controls. These developments enable the immediate use of high-density antibody and protein microarrays in biomarker discovery studies. PMID:12548634

  6. Comparison of microarray preprocessing methods.

    PubMed

    Shakya, K; Ruskin, H J; Kerr, G; Crane, M; Becker, J

    2010-01-01

    Data preprocessing in microarray technology is a crucial initial step before data analysis is performed. Many preprocessing methods have been proposed but none has proved to be ideal to date. Frequently, datasets are limited by laboratory constraints so that the need is for guidelines on quality and robustness, to inform further experimentation while data are yet restricted. In this paper, we compared the performance of four popular methods, namely MAS5, Li & Wong pmonly (LWPM), Li & Wong subtractMM (LWMM), and Robust Multichip Average (RMA). The comparison is based on the analysis carried out on sets of laboratory-generated data from the Bioinformatics Lab, National Institute of Cellular Biotechnology (NICB), Dublin City University, Ireland. These experiments were designed to examine the effect of Bromodeoxyuridine (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, BrdU) treatment in deep lamellar keratoplasty (DLKP) cells. The methodology employed is to assess dispersion across the replicates and analyze the false discovery rate. From the dispersion analysis, we found that variability is reduced more effectively by LWPM and RMA methods. From the false positive analysis, and for both parametric and nonparametric approaches, LWMM is found to perform best. Based on a complementary q-value analysis, LWMM approach again is the strongest candidate. The indications are that, while LWMM is marginally less effective than LWPM and RMA in terms of variance reduction, it has considerably improved discrimination overall.

  7. AMIC@: All MIcroarray Clusterings @ once.

    PubMed

    Geraci, Filippo; Pellegrini, Marco; Renda, M Elena

    2008-07-01

    The AMIC@ Web Server offers a light-weight multi-method clustering engine for microarray gene-expression data. AMIC@ is a highly interactive tool that stresses user-friendliness and robustness by adopting AJAX technology, thus allowing an effective interleaved execution of different clustering algorithms and inspection of results. Among the salient features AMIC@ offers, there are: (i) automatic file format detection, (ii) suggestions on the number of clusters using a variant of the stability-based method of Tibshirani et al. (iii) intuitive visual inspection of the data via heatmaps and (iv) measurements of the clustering quality using cluster homogeneity. Large data sets can be processed efficiently by selecting algorithms (such as FPF-SB and k-Boost), specifically designed for this purpose. In case of very large data sets, the user can opt for a batch-mode use of the system by means of the Clustering wizard that runs all algorithms at once and delivers the results via email. AMIC@ is freely available and open to all users with no login requirement at the following URL http://bioalgo.iit.cnr.it/amica.

  8. Development, Characterization and Experimental Validation of a Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Gene Expression Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement. PMID:23110046

  9. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement. PMID:23110046

  10. Protein Microarrays: Novel Developments and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Berrade, Luis; Garcia, Angie E.

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarray technology possesses some of the greatest potential for providing direct information on protein function and potential drug targets. For example, functional protein microarrays are ideal tools suited for the mapping of biological pathways. They can be used to study most major types of interactions and enzymatic activities that take place in biochemical pathways and have been used for the analysis of simultaneous multiple biomolecular interactions involving protein-protein, protein-lipid, protein-DNA and protein-small molecule interactions. Because of this unique ability to analyze many kinds of molecular interactions en masse, the requirement of very small sample amount and the potential to be miniaturized and automated, protein microarrays are extremely well suited for protein profiling, drug discovery, drug target identification and clinical prognosis and diagnosis. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent developments in the production, applications and analysis of protein microarrays. PMID:21116694

  11. Quality Visualization of Microarray Datasets Using Circos

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Martin; Wiese, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Quality control and normalization is considered the most important step in the analysis of microarray data. At present there are various methods available for quality assessments of microarray datasets. However there seems to be no standard visualization routine, which also depicts individual microarray quality. Here we present a convenient method for visualizing the results of standard quality control tests using Circos plots. In these plots various quality measurements are drawn in a circular fashion, thus allowing for visualization of the quality and all outliers of each distinct array within a microarray dataset. The proposed method is intended for use with the Affymetrix Human Genome platform (i.e., GPL 96, GPL570 and GPL571). Circos quality measurement plots are a convenient way for the initial quality estimate of Affymetrix datasets that are stored in publicly available databases.

  12. Contributions to Statistical Problems Related to Microarray Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Feng

    2009-01-01

    Microarray is a high throughput technology to measure the gene expression. Analysis of microarray data brings many interesting and challenging problems. This thesis consists three studies related to microarray data. First, we propose a Bayesian model for microarray data and use Bayes Factors to identify differentially expressed genes. Second, we…

  13. The Impact of Photobleaching on Microarray Analysis.

    PubMed

    von der Haar, Marcel; Preuß, John-Alexander; von der Haar, Kathrin; Lindner, Patrick; Scheper, Thomas; Stahl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    DNA-Microarrays have become a potent technology for high-throughput analysis of genetic regulation. However, the wide dynamic range of signal intensities of fluorophore-based microarrays exceeds the dynamic range of a single array scan by far, thus limiting the key benefit of microarray technology: parallelization. The implementation of multi-scan techniques represents a promising approach to overcome these limitations. These techniques are, in turn, limited by the fluorophores' susceptibility to photobleaching when exposed to the scanner's laser light. In this paper the photobleaching characteristics of cyanine-3 and cyanine-5 as part of solid state DNA microarrays are studied. The effects of initial fluorophore intensity as well as laser scanner dependent variables such as the photomultiplier tube's voltage on bleaching and imaging are investigated. The resulting data is used to develop a model capable of simulating the expected degree of signal intensity reduction caused by photobleaching for each fluorophore individually, allowing for the removal of photobleaching-induced, systematic bias in multi-scan procedures. Single-scan applications also benefit as they rely on pre-scans to determine the optimal scanner settings. These findings constitute a step towards standardization of microarray experiments and analysis and may help to increase the lab-to-lab comparability of microarray experiment results. PMID:26378589

  14. Automated analytical microarrays: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Michael; Niessner, Reinhard

    2008-07-01

    Microarrays provide a powerful analytical tool for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes in a single experiment. The specific affinity reaction of nucleic acids (hybridization) and antibodies towards antigens is the most common bioanalytical method for generating multiplexed quantitative results. Nucleic acid-based analysis is restricted to the detection of cells and viruses. Antibodies are more universal biomolecular receptors that selectively bind small molecules such as pesticides, small toxins, and pharmaceuticals and to biopolymers (e.g. toxins, allergens) and complex biological structures like bacterial cells and viruses. By producing an appropriate antibody, the corresponding antigenic analyte can be detected on a multiplexed immunoanalytical microarray. Food and water analysis along with clinical diagnostics constitute potential application fields for multiplexed analysis. Diverse fluorescence, chemiluminescence, electrochemical, and label-free microarray readout systems have been developed in the last decade. Some of them are constructed as flow-through microarrays by combination with a fluidic system. Microarrays have the potential to become widely accepted as a system for analytical applications, provided that robust and validated results on fully automated platforms are successfully generated. This review gives an overview of the current research on microarrays with the focus on automated systems and quantitative multiplexed applications.

  15. Evaluation of Surface Chemistries for Antibody Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Seurynck-Servoss, Shannon L.; White, Amanda M.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Rodland, Karin D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2007-12-01

    Antibody microarrays are an emerging technology that promises to be a powerful tool for the detection of disease biomarkers. The current technology for protein microarrays has been primarily derived from DNA microarrays and is not fully characterized for use with proteins. For example, there are a myriad of surface chemistries that are commercially available for antibody microarrays, but no rigorous studies that compare these different surfaces. Therefore, we have used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to analyze 16 different commercially available slide types. Full standard curves were generated for 24 different assays. We found that this approach provides a rigorous and quantitative system for comparing the different slide types based on spot size and morphology, slide noise, spot background, lower limit of detection, and reproducibility. These studies demonstrate that the properties of the slide surface affect the activity of immobilized antibodies and the quality of data produced. Although many slide types can produce useful data, glass slides coated with poly-L-lysine or aminosilane, with or without activation with a crosslinker, consistently produce superior results in the ELISA microarray analyses we performed.

  16. The evolution of N-glycan-dependent endoplasmic reticulum quality control factors for glycoprotein folding and degradation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sulagna; Vishwanath, Prashanth; Cui, Jike; Kelleher, Daniel J; Gilmore, Reid; Robbins, Phillips W; Samuelson, John

    2007-07-10

    Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans) play important roles in the quality control (QC) of glycoprotein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and in ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of proteins by cytosolic proteasomes. A UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase glucosylates N-glycans of misfolded proteins, which are then bound and refolded by calreticulin and/or calnexin in association with a protein disulfide isomerase. Alternatively, an alpha-1,2-mannosidase (Mns1) and mannosidase-like proteins (ER degradation-enhancing alpha-mannosidase-like proteins 1, 2, and 3) are part of a process that results in the dislocation of misfolded glycoproteins into the cytosol, where proteins are degraded in the proteasome. Recently we found that numerous protists and fungi contain 0-11 sugars in their N-glycan precursors versus 14 sugars in those of animals, plants, fungi, and Dictyostelium. Our goal here was to determine what effect N-glycan precursor diversity has on N-glycan-dependent QC systems of glycoprotein folding and ERAD. N-glycan-dependent QC of folding (UDP-Glc:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase, calreticulin, and/or calnexin) was present and active in some but not all protists containing at least five mannose residues in their N-glycans and was absent in protists lacking Man. In contrast, N-glycan-dependent ERAD appeared to be absent from the majority of protists. However, Trypanosoma and Trichomonas genomes predicted ER degradation-enhancing alpha-mannosidase-like protein and Mns1 orthologs, respectively, each of which had alpha-mannosidase activity in vitro. Phylogenetic analyses suggested that the diversity of N-glycan-dependent QC of glycoprotein folding (and possibly that of ERAD) was best explained by secondary loss. We conclude that N-glycan precursor length has profound effects on N-glycan-dependent QC of glycoprotein folding and ERAD.

  17. Isolation of oligomannose-type glycans from bean glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Ye, J; Wold, F

    1993-02-15

    We have isolated individual oligosaccharyl-asparagine derivatives from the total soluble glycoproteins from kidney beens (Phaseolus vulgaris) and from lima beans (Phaseolus limensis). The protein/glycoprotein mixture was digested exhaustively by pronase, and the glycan-containing fractions were separated from free amino acids and peptides by gel filtration. The oligosaccharyl-asparagine derivatives were finally fractionated on Dowex 50 (C. C. Huang, H.E. Meyer, and R. Montgomery, Carbohydr. Res. 13, 127-137, 1970), and the individual fractions were characterized by mass spectrometry, NMR, and ion exchange chromatography. With the procedures described, only oligomannose derivatives were obtained from the beans. In the case of kidney beans, six different derivatives were observed and characterized, Man9GlcNAc2Asn, two positional isomers of Man8GlcNAc2Asn, two positional isomers of Man7GlcNAc2Asn, and Man6GlcNAc2Asn. Under identical conditions the lima beans yielded primarily the Man9GlcNAc2Asn derivative along with a small amount of the two Man8GlcNAc2Asn derivatives. The oligomannose structures can be isolated in reasonable quantities (2-20 mg) from about 200 g of dry beans. PMID:8465965

  18. Systems glycobiology: biochemical reaction networks regulating glycan structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Neelamegham, Sriram; Liu, Gang

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing use of bioinformatics based methods in the field of Glycobiology. These have been used largely to curate glycan structures, organize array-based experimental data and display existing knowledge of glycosylation-related pathways in silico. Although the cataloging of vast amounts of data is beneficial, it is often a challenge to gain meaningful mechanistic insight from this exercise alone. The development of specific analysis tools to query the database is necessary. If these queries can integrate existing knowledge of glycobiology, new insights may be gained. Such queries that couple biochemical knowledge and mathematics have been developed in the field of Systems Biology. The current review summarizes the current state of the art in the application of computational modeling in the field of Glycobiology. It provides (i) an overview of experimental and online resources that can be used to construct glycosylation reaction networks, (ii) mathematical methods to formulate the problem including a description of ordinary differential equation and logic-based reaction networks, (iii) optimization techniques that can be applied to fit experimental data for the purpose of model reconstruction and for evaluating unknown model parameters, (iv) post-simulation analysis methods that yield experimentally testable hypotheses and (v) a summary of available software tools that can be used by non-specialists to perform many of the above functions. PMID:21436236

  19. Assembly of ordered microsphere arrays: Platforms for microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wanling

    Microarrays are powerful tools in gene expression assessment, protein profiling, and protein function screening, as well as cell and tissue analysis. With thousands of small array spots assembled in an ordered array, these small devices makes it possible to screen for multiple targets in a fast, parallel, high-throughput manner. The well-developed technology of DNA microarrays, also called DNA chips, has proved successful in all kinds of biological experiments, including the human genome-sequencing project. The development of protein arrays has lagged behind that of DNA arrays mainly because of the greater complexity of proteins. Some parts of the microarray technology can be transplanted into the realm of protein arrays, while others cannot. The challenges from the complexity of protein targets demand more robust and powerful devices. Traditional planar arrays, in which proteins bind directly to a planar surface, have a drawback in that some proteins will be denatured or cluster together after immobilization. Microsphere-based microarrays represent a more advanced strategy. The functional proteins are first attached to microspheres; these microspheres are then immobilized in arrays on a planar surface. In this dissertation, two approaches to assembling arrays of microspheres will be discussed. The hydrodynamic approach uses surface micromachining and Deep Reactive Ion Etching techniques to form an array of channels through a silicon wafer. By drawing fluid containing the microspheres through the channels they become trapped in the channels and thereby immobilized. In the magnetic approach, permalloy films are deposited on a silicon substrate and subsequently patterned to form magnetic attachment sites. An external magnetic field is then applied and the magnetic microspheres then assemble on these sites. Both devices are able to immobilize microspheres in an ordered array, as opposed to coarsely grouping them in array spots. The assembled arrays are robust in that

  20. N-glycans of Human Protein C Inhibitor: Tissue-Specific Expression and Function

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Åke; Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Hreinsson, Julius; Wånggren, Kjell; Clark, Gary F.; Dell, Anne; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI) is a serpin type of serine protease inhibitor that is found in many tissues and fluids in human, including blood plasma, seminal plasma and urine. This inhibitor displays an unusually broad protease specificity compared with other serpins. Previous studies have shown that the N-glycan(s) and the NH2-terminus affect some blood-related functions of PCI. In this study, we have for the first time determined the N-glycan profile of seminal plasma PCI, by mass spectrometry. The N-glycan structures differed markedly compared with those of both blood-derived and urinary PCI, providing evidence that the N-glycans of PCI are expressed in a tissue-specific manner. The most abundant structure (m/z 2592.9) had a composition of Fuc3Hex5HexNAc4, consistent with a core fucosylated bi-antennary glycan with terminal Lewisx. A major serine protease in semen, prostate specific antigen (PSA), was used to evaluate the effects of N-glycans and the NH2-terminus on a PCI function related to the reproductive tract. Second-order rate constants for PSA inhibition by PCI were 4.3±0.2 and 4.1±0.5 M−1s−1 for the natural full-length PCI and a form lacking six amino acids at the NH2-terminus, respectively, whereas these constants were 4.8±0.1 and 29±7 M−1s−1 for the corresponding PNGase F-treated forms. The 7–8-fold higher rate constants obtained when both the N-glycans and the NH2-terminus had been removed suggest that these structures jointly affect the rate of PSA inhibition, presumably by together hindering conformational changes of PCI required to bind to the catalytic pocket of PSA. PMID:22205989

  1. N-glycans modulate the function of human corticosteroid-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Sumer-Bayraktar, Zeynep; Kolarich, Daniel; Campbell, Matthew P; Ali, Sinan; Packer, Nicolle H; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten

    2011-08-01

    Human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), a heavily glycosylated protein containing six N-linked glycosylation sites, transports cortisol and other corticosteroids in blood circulation. Here, we investigate the biological importance of the N-glycans of CBG derived from human serum by performing a structural and functional characterization of CBG N-glycosylation. Liquid chromatography-tandem MS-based glycoproteomics and glycomics combined with exoglycosidase treatment revealed 26 complex type N-glycoforms, all of which were terminated with α2,3-linked neuraminic acid (NeuAc) residues. The CBG N-glycans showed predominantly bi- and tri-antennary branching, but higher branching was also observed. N-glycans from all six N-glycosylation sites were identified with high site occupancies (70.5-99.5%) and glycoforms from all sites contained a relatively low degree of core-fucosylation (0-34.9%). CBG showed site-specific glycosylation and the site-to-site differences in core-fucosylation and branching could be in silico correlated with the accessibility to the individual glycosylation sites on the maturely folded protein. Deglycosylated and desialylated CBG analogs were generated to investigate the biological importance of CBG N-glycans. As a functional assay, MCF-7 cells were challenged with native and glycan-modified CBG and the amount of cAMP, which is produced as a quantitative response upon CBG binding to its cell surface receptor, was used to evaluate the CBG:receptor interaction. The removal of both CBG N-glycans and NeuAc residues increased the production of cAMP significantly. This confirms that N-glycans are involved in the CBG:receptor interaction and indicates that the modulation is performed by steric and/or electrostatic means through the terminal NeuAc residues.

  2. Symbiotic Human Gut Bacteria with Variable Metabolic Priorities for Host Mucosal Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Pudlo, Nicholas A.; Urs, Karthik; Kumar, Supriya Suresh; German, J. Bruce; Mills, David A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many symbiotic gut bacteria possess the ability to degrade multiple polysaccharides, thereby providing nutritional advantages to their hosts. Like microorganisms adapted to other complex nutrient environments, gut symbionts give different metabolic priorities to substrates present in mixtures. We investigated the responses of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a common human intestinal bacterium that metabolizes more than a dozen different polysaccharides, including the O-linked glycans that are abundant in secreted mucin. Experiments in which mucin glycans were presented simultaneously with other carbohydrates show that degradation of these host carbohydrates is consistently repressed in the presence of alternative substrates, even by B. thetaiotaomicron previously acclimated to growth in pure mucin glycans. Experiments with media containing systematically varied carbohydrate cues and genetic mutants reveal that transcriptional repression of genes involved in mucin glycan metabolism is imposed by simple sugars and, in one example that was tested, is mediated through a small intergenic region in a transcript-autonomous fashion. Repression of mucin glycan-responsive gene clusters in two other human gut bacteria, Bacteroides massiliensis and Bacteroides fragilis, exhibited variable and sometimes reciprocal responses compared to those of B. thetaiotaomicron, revealing that these symbionts vary in their preference for mucin glycans and that these differences occur at the level of controlling individual gene clusters. Our results reveal that sensing and metabolic triaging of glycans are complex processes that vary among species, underscoring the idea that these phenomena are likely to be hidden drivers of microbiota community dynamics and may dictate which microorganisms preferentially commit to various niches in a constantly changing nutritional environment. PMID:26556271

  3. Chromosomal Microarray versus Karyotyping for Prenatal Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wapner, Ronald J.; Martin, Christa Lese; Levy, Brynn; Ballif, Blake C.; Eng, Christine M.; Zachary, Julia M.; Savage, Melissa; Platt, Lawrence D.; Saltzman, Daniel; Grobman, William A.; Klugman, Susan; Scholl, Thomas; Simpson, Joe Leigh; McCall, Kimberly; Aggarwal, Vimla S.; Bunke, Brian; Nahum, Odelia; Patel, Ankita; Lamb, Allen N.; Thom, Elizabeth A.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Ledbetter, David H.; Shaffer, Lisa G.; Jackson, Laird

    2013-01-01

    Background Chromosomal microarray analysis has emerged as a primary diagnostic tool for the evaluation of developmental delay and structural malformations in children. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy, efficacy, and incremental yield of chromosomal microarray analysis as compared with karyotyping for routine prenatal diagnosis. Methods Samples from women undergoing prenatal diagnosis at 29 centers were sent to a central karyotyping laboratory. Each sample was split in two; standard karyotyping was performed on one portion and the other was sent to one of four laboratories for chromosomal microarray. Results We enrolled a total of 4406 women. Indications for prenatal diagnosis were advanced maternal age (46.6%), abnormal result on Down’s syndrome screening (18.8%), structural anomalies on ultrasonography (25.2%), and other indications (9.4%). In 4340 (98.8%) of the fetal samples, microarray analysis was successful; 87.9% of samples could be used without tissue culture. Microarray analysis of the 4282 nonmosaic samples identified all the aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements identified on karyotyping but did not identify balanced translocations and fetal triploidy. In samples with a normal karyotype, microarray analysis revealed clinically relevant deletions or duplications in 6.0% with a structural anomaly and in 1.7% of those whose indications were advanced maternal age or positive screening results. Conclusions In the context of prenatal diagnostic testing, chromosomal microarray analysis identified additional, clinically significant cytogenetic information as compared with karyotyping and was equally efficacious in identifying aneuploidies and unbalanced rearrangements but did not identify balanced translocations and triploidies. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01279733.) PMID:23215555

  4. Label-free detection of biomolecular interactions in microarray format using oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yung-Shin

    Microarrays of biological molecules are useful tools for discovery and functionality characterization in fundamental and applied research of genomics, proteomics, glycomics and cytomics. They provide a high-throughput platform that enables parallel studies of hundreds to tens of thousands of distinct biomolecular reactions. Characterization of binding reactions between surface-immobilized targets and solutions-phase analytes routinely involves fluorescence-based detection methods. However, labeling analytes inevitably changes innate properties of the molecules and in turn modifies analyte-target interactions in an often uncharacterized way. As a result, label-free microarray detection is desirable. In this dissertation, optical microscopes based on oblique-incidence reflectivity difference (OI-RD) technique are developed and used to detect biomolecular interactions in microarray format. OI-RD, a most sensitive form of optical elliposometry, measures the difference in reflectivity change (both magnitude and phase) between p- and s-polarized components of an optical beam. Such a difference is related to the thickness and dielectric constant of surface-immobilized biomolecules. Specially, I use these OI-RD microscopes to study different biomolecular interactions including (1) Effect of fluorescently labeling protein probes on kinetics of protein-ligand interactions; (2) Macromolecular scaffolds for immobilizing small molecule microarrays for detection of protein-ligand interactions; (3) Lectin-glyan and virus-glycan interactions; (4) Others applications such as protein-protein, DNA-DNA, DNA-protein, sugar-protein, and small molecule-protein interactions. These experimental results demonstrate that the OI-RD microscopes will serve as powerful tools in biosensing, high-throughput screening, and other applications in biophysics, biochemistry and biomedical engineering.

  5. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Reeja Maria; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G; Holgersson, Jan

    2015-08-12

    Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1), core 3 (B3GNT6), core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6), or extended core 1 (B3GNT3) chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galb3GlcNAc) or type 2 (Galb4GlcNAc) outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins.

  6. A Panel of Recombinant Mucins Carrying a Repertoire of Sialylated O-Glycans Based on Different Core Chains for Studies of Glycan Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Maria Cherian, Reeja; Jin, Chunsheng; Liu, Jining; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Holgersson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Sialylated glycans serve as key elements of receptors for many viruses, bacteria, and bacterial toxins. The microbial recognition and their binding specificity can be affected by the linkage of the terminal sugar residue, types of underlying sugar chains, and the nature of the entire glycoconjugate. Owing to the pathobiological significance of sialylated glycans, we have engineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to secrete mucin-type immunoglobulin-fused proteins carrying terminal α2,3- or α2,6-linked sialic acid on defined O-glycan core saccharide chains. Besides stably expressing P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1/mouse immunoglobulin G2b cDNA (PSGL-1/mIgG2b), CHO cells were stably transfected with plasmids encoding glycosyltransferases to synthesize core 2 (GCNT1), core 3 (B3GNT6), core 4 (GCNT1 and B3GNT6), or extended core 1 (B3GNT3) chains with or without the type 1 chain-encoding enzyme B3GALT5 and ST6GAL1. Western blot and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of core 1, 2, 3, 4, and extended core 1 chains carrying either type 1 (Galβ3GlcNAc) or type 2 (Galβ4GlcNAc) outer chains with or without α2,6-linked sialic acids. This panel of recombinant mucins carrying a repertoire of sialylated O-glycans will be important tools in studies aiming at determining the fine O-glycan binding specificity of sialic acid-specific microbial adhesins and mammalian lectins. PMID:26274979

  7. Imaging of N-Linked Glycans from Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Sections Using MALDI Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation is associated with most of the diseases. Direct imaging and profiling of N-glycans on tissue sections can reveal tissue-specific and/or disease-associated N-glycans, which not only could serve as molecular signatures for diagnosis but also shed light on the functional roles of these biomolecules. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a powerful tool that has been used to correlate peptides, proteins, lipids, and metabolites with their underlying histopathology in tissue sections. Here, we report an MSI technique for direct analysis of N-glycans from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. This technique consists of sectioning FFPE tissues, deparaffinization, and rehydration of the sections, denaturing tissue proteins, releasing N-linked glycans from proteins by printing peptide-N-glycosidase F over the sections, spray-coating the tissue with matrix, and analyzing N-glycans by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Brain sections from a C57BL/6 mouse were imaged using this technique at a resolution of 100 μm. Forty-two N-glycans were analyzed from the mouse brain section. The mass spectrometry images were used to study the relative abundance of oligomannose, nonfucosylated, and fucosylated complex N-glycans in different brain areas including isocortex, hippocampal formation, and brainstem and specific glycans associated with different areas of the brain were identified. Furthermore, glioblastoma tumor xenografts in a NOD/SCID mouse were imaged. Several glycans with differential expression in tumor versus normal brain tissues were identified. The MSI technique allows for imaging of N-glycans directly from FFPE sections. This method can potentially identify tissue-specific and/or disease-associated glycans coexpressed with other molecular signatures or within certain histological structures. PMID:25029481

  8. The N-glycans of Trichomonas vaginalis contain variable core and antennal modifications.

    PubMed

    Paschinger, Katharina; Hykollari, Alba; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Greenwell, Pamela; Leitsch, David; Walochnik, Julia; Wilson, Iain B H

    2012-02-01

    Trichomonad species are widespread unicellular flagellated parasites of vertebrates which interact with their hosts through carbohydrate-lectin interactions. In the past, some data have been accumulated regarding their lipo(phospho)glycans, a major glycoconjugate on their cell surfaces; on the other hand, other than biosynthetic aspects, few details about their N-linked oligosaccharides are known. In this study, we present both mass spectrometric and high-performance liquid chromatography data about the N-glycans of different strains of Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasite of the human reproductive tract. The major structure in all strains examined is a truncated oligomannose form (Man(5)GlcNAc(2)) with α1,2-mannose residues, compatible with a previous bioinformatic examination of the glycogenomic potential of T. vaginalis. In addition, dependent on the strain, N-glycans modified by pentose residues, phosphate or phosphoethanolamine and terminal N-acetyllactosamine (Galβ1,4GlcNAc) units were found. The modification of N-glycans by N-acetyllactosamine in at least some strains is shared with the lipo(phospho)glycan and may represent a further interaction partner for host galectins, thereby playing a role in binding of the parasite to host epithelia. On the other hand, the variation in glycosylation between strains may be the result of genetic diversity within this species. PMID:21983210

  9. N-Glycans influence the in vitro adhesive and invasive behaviour of three metastatic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bironaite, D; Nesland, J M; Dalen, H; Risberg, B; Bryne, M

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in cellular glycosylation may play a key role in metastatic behaviour of tumour cells. We studied three metastatic cell lines, LOX (malignant melanoma), FEMX (malignant melanoma) and MA-11 (mammary carcinoma). These cell lines have a very different metastatic behaviour in vivo, and different glycans have been postulated to be partly responsible for these differences. To further investigate the functional role of carbohydrates, these three cell lines have been treated with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of N-glycans and benzyl- alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine (benzyl-alpha-GalNAc; BnGalNAc), an inhibitor of mature O-linked glycans. Various in vitro adhesion and invasion assays were undertaken for functional studies. Tunicamycin significantly inhibited adhesion to laminin, but only slightly affected cell adhesion to collagen IV. The same compound significantly decreased cellular invasiveness through a Matrigel invasion chamber. Moreover, tunicamycin reduced homotypic aggregation of cells. BnGalNAc had generally little effect on cell behaviour in in vitro assay. The effects of the inhibitors were, however, to some extent cell line-specific. We conclude that N-glycans, but probably not mature O-glycans have important in vitro functions in cell adhesion to laminin, cell invasion through Matrigel and cellular aggregation in the studied cell lines. These results support the view that carbohydrates are functionally involved in several steps of the metastatic process. PMID:10754467

  10. Glycosylated proteins preserved over millennia: N-glycan analysis of Tyrolean Iceman, Scythian Princess and Warrior

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Sureyya; Kim, Bum Jin; Ro, Grace; Kim, Jae-Han; Bereuter, Thomas L.; Reiter, Christian; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Garrido, Daniel; Mills, David A.; Grimm, Rudolf; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; An, Hyun Joo

    2014-01-01

    An improved understanding of glycosylation will provide new insights into many biological processes. In the analysis of oligosaccharides from biological samples, a strict regime is typically followed to ensure sample integrity. However, the fate of glycans that have been exposed to environmental conditions over millennia has not yet been investigated. This is also true for understanding the evolution of the glycosylation machinery in humans as well as in any other biological systems. In this study, we examined the glycosylation of tissue samples derived from four mummies which have been naturally preserved: – the 5,300 year old “Iceman called Oetzi”, found in the Tyrolean Alps; the 2,400 year old “Scythian warrior” and “Scythian Princess”, found in the Altai Mountains; and a 4 year old apartment mummy, found in Vienna/Austria. The number of N-glycans that were identified varied both with the age and the preservation status of the mummies. More glycan structures were discovered in the contemporary sample, as expected, however it is significant that glycan still exists in the ancient tissue samples. This discovery clearly shows that glycans persist for thousands of years, and these samples provide a vital insight into ancient glycosylation, offering us a window into the distant past. PMID:24831691

  11. SugarBindDB, a resource of glycan-mediated host–pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mariethoz, Julien; Khatib, Khaled; Alocci, Davide; Campbell, Matthew P.; Karlsson, Niclas G.; Packer, Nicolle H.; Mullen, Elaine H.; Lisacek, Frederique

    2016-01-01

    The SugarBind Database (SugarBindDB) covers knowledge of glycan binding of human pathogen lectins and adhesins. It is a curated database; each glycan–protein binding pair is associated with at least one published reference. The core data element of SugarBindDB is a set of three inseparable components: the pathogenic agent, a lectin/adhesin and a glycan ligand. Each entity (agent, lectin or ligand) is described by a range of properties that are summarized in an entity-dedicated page. Several search, navigation and visualisation tools are implemented to investigate the functional role of glycans in pathogen binding. The database is cross-linked to protein and glycan-relaled resources such as UniProtKB and UniCarbKB. It is tightly bound to the latter via a substructure search tool that maps each ligand to full structures where it occurs. Thus, a glycan–lectin binding pair of SugarBindDB can lead to the identification of a glycan-mediated protein–protein interaction, that is, a lectin–glycoprotein interaction, via substructure search and the knowledge of site-specific glycosylation stored in UniCarbKB. SugarBindDB is accessible at: http://sugarbind.expasy.org. PMID:26578555

  12. Integrated glycoprotein immobilization method for glycopeptide and glycan analysis of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Mishra, Sumita; Chen, Lijun; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Chan, Daniel W; Chatterjee, Subroto; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins can have a major role in disease initiation and progression. Incredible efforts have recently been made to study the regulation of glycoproteins for disease prognosis and diagnosis. It is essential to elucidate glycans and intact glycoproteins to understand the role of glycosylation in diseases. Sialylated N-glycans play crucial roles in physiological and pathological processes; however, it is laborious to study sialylated glycoproteins due to the labile nature of sialic acid residues. In this study, an integrated platform is developed for the analysis of intact glycoproteins and glycans using a chemoenzymatic approach for immobilization and derivatization of sialic acids. N-Glycans, deglycosylated proteins, and intact glycoproteins from heart tissues of wild type (WT) and transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse models were analyzed. We identified 291 unique glycopeptides from 195 glycoproteins; the comparative studies between WT and TAC mice indicate the overexpression of extracellular proteins for heart matrix remodeling and the down-regulation of proteins associated with energy metabolism in cardiac hypertrophy. The integrated platform is a powerful tool for the analysis of glycans and glycoproteins in the discovery of potential cardiac hypertrophy biomarkers.

  13. Regulation of Notch signaling during T- and B-cell development by O-fucose glycans.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Pamela; Guidos, Cynthia J

    2009-07-01

    Notch signaling is required for the development of all T cells and marginal zone (MZ) B cells. Specific roles in T- and B-cell differentiation have been identified for different Notch receptors, the canonical Delta-like (Dll) and Jagged (Jag) Notch ligands, and downstream effectors of Notch signaling. Notch receptors and ligands are post-translationally modified by the addition of glycans to extracellular domain epidermal growth factor-like (EGF) repeats. The O-fucose glycans of Notch cell-autonomously modulate Notch-ligand interactions and the strength of Notch signaling. These glycans are initiated by protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1), and elongated by the transfer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to the fucose by beta1,3GlcNAc-transferases termed lunatic, manic, or radical fringe. This review discusses T- and B-cell development from progenitors deficient in O-fucose glycans. The combined data show that Lfng and Mfng regulate T-cell development by enhancing the interactions of Notch1 in T-cell progenitors with Dll4 on thymic epithelial cells. In the spleen, Lfng and Mfng cooperate to modify Notch2 in MZ B progenitors, enhancing their interaction with Dll1 on endothelial cells and regulating MZ B-cell production. Removal of O-fucose affects Notch signaling in myelopoiesis and lymphopoiesis, and the O-fucose glycan in the Notch1 ligand-binding domain is required for optimal T-cell development.

  14. Role of sulfated glycans in adherence of the microsporidian Encephalitozoon intestinalis to host cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hayman, J Russell; Southern, Timothy R; Nash, Theodore E

    2005-02-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular opportunistic protists that infect a wide variety of animals, including humans, via environmentally resistant spores. Infection requires that spores be in close proximity to host cells so that the hollow polar tube can pierce the cell membrane and inject the spore contents into the cell cytoplasm. Like other eukaryotic microbes, microsporidia may use specific mechanisms for adherence in order to achieve target cell proximity and increase the likelihood of successful infection. Our data show that Encephalitozoon intestinalis exploits sulfated glycans such as the cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in selection of and attachment to host cells. When exogenous sulfated glycans are used as inhibitors in spore adherence assays, E. intestinalis spore adherence is reduced by as much as 88%. However, there is no inhibition when nonsulfated glycans are used, suggesting that E. intestinalis spores utilize sulfated host cell glycans in adherence. These studies were confirmed by exposure of host cells to xylopyranoside, which limits host cell surface GAGs, and sodium chlorate, which decreases surface sulfation. Spore adherence studies with CHO mutant cell lines that are deficient in either surface GAGs or surface heparan sulfate also confirmed the necessity of sulfated glycans. Furthermore, when spore adherence is inhibited, host cell infection is reduced, indicating a direct association between spore adherence and infectivity. These data show that E. intestinalis specifically adheres to target cells by way of sulfated host cell surface GAGs and that this mechanism serves to enhance infectivity.

  15. Glycosylated proteins preserved over millennia: N-glycan analysis of Tyrolean Iceman, Scythian Princess and Warrior.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Sureyya; Kim, Bum Jin; Ro, Grace; Kim, Jae-Han; Bereuter, Thomas L; Reiter, Christian; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Garrido, Daniel; Mills, David A; Grimm, Rudolf; Lebrilla, Carlito B; An, Hyun Joo

    2014-05-16

    An improved understanding of glycosylation will provide new insights into many biological processes. In the analysis of oligosaccharides from biological samples, a strict regime is typically followed to ensure sample integrity. However, the fate of glycans that have been exposed to environmental conditions over millennia has not yet been investigated. This is also true for understanding the evolution of the glycosylation machinery in humans as well as in any other biological systems. In this study, we examined the glycosylation of tissue samples derived from four mummies which have been naturally preserved: - the 5,300 year old "Iceman called Oetzi", found in the Tyrolean Alps; the 2,400 year old "Scythian warrior" and "Scythian Princess", found in the Altai Mountains; and a 4 year old apartment mummy, found in Vienna/Austria. The number of N-glycans that were identified varied both with the age and the preservation status of the mummies. More glycan structures were discovered in the contemporary sample, as expected, however it is significant that glycan still exists in the ancient tissue samples. This discovery clearly shows that glycans persist for thousands of years, and these samples provide a vital insight into ancient glycosylation, offering us a window into the distant past.

  16. Comparisons of Caenorhabditis Fucosyltransferase Mutants Reveal a Multiplicity of Isomeric N-Glycan Structures.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shi; Jin, Chunsheng; Wilson, Iain B H; Paschinger, Katharina

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown a remarkable degree of plasticity in the N-glycome of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans; ablation of glycosylation-relevant genes can result in radically altered N-glycan profiles despite only minor biological phenotypic effects. Up to four fucose residues and five different linkages of fucose are known on the N-glycans of C. elegans. Due to the complexity in the wild type, we established three mutant strains defective in two core fucosyltransferases each (fut-1;fut-6, fut-1;fut-8, and fut-6;fut-8). Enzymatically released N-glycans were subject to HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS/MS, in combination with various treatments, to verify structural details. The N-glycome of the fut-1;fut-6 mutant was the most complex of the three double-mutant strains due to the extension of the core α1,6-fucose as well as the presence of fucose on the bisecting galactose. In contrast, maximally two fucoses were found on N-glycans of the fut-1;fut-8 and fut-6;fut-8 strains. The different locations and capping of fucose meant that up to 13 isomeric structures, many highly galactosylated, were determined for some single masses. These data not only show the high variability of the N-glycomic capacity of a "simple" nematode but also exemplify the need for multiple approaches to reveal individual glycan structures within complex invertebrate glycomes.

  17. Mass Spectrometric Quantification of N-Linked Glycans by Reference to Exogenous Standards.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Nickita; Porterfield, Mindy; Struwe, Weston B; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Rudd, Pauline M; Tiemeyer, Michael; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Environmental and metabolic processes shape the profile of glycoprotein glycans expressed by cells, whether in culture, developing tissues, or mature organisms. Quantitative characterization of glycomic changes associated with these conditions has been achieved historically by reductive coupling of oligosaccharides to various fluorophores following release from glycoprotein and subsequent HPLC or capillary electrophoretic separation. Such labeling-based approaches provide a robust means of quantifying glycan amount based on fluorescence yield. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, has generally been limited to relative quantification in which the contribution of the signal intensity for an individual glycan is expressed as a percent of the signal intensity summed over the total profile. Relative quantification has been valuable for highlighting changes in glycan expression between samples; sensitivity is high, and structural information can be derived by fragmentation. We have investigated whether MS-based glycomics is amenable to absolute quantification by referencing signal intensities to well-characterized oligosaccharide standards. We report the qualification of a set of N-linked oligosaccharide standards by NMR, HPLC, and MS. We also demonstrate the dynamic range, sensitivity, and recovery from complex biological matrices for these standards in their permethylated form. Our results indicate that absolute quantification for MS-based glycomic analysis is reproducible and robust utilizing currently available glycan standards. PMID:27432553

  18. Benchmark study of automatic annotation of MALDI-TOF N-glycan profiles.

    PubMed

    Brito, Alejandro E; Kletter, Doron; Singhal, Mudita; Bern, Marshall

    2015-11-01

    Human experts can annotate peaks in MALDI-TOF profiles of detached N-glycans with some degree of accuracy. Even though MALDI-TOF profiles give only intact masses without any fragmentation information, expert knowledge of the most common glycans and biosynthetic pathways in the biological system can point to a small set of most likely glycan structures at the "cartoon" level of detail. Cartoonist is a recently developed, fully automatic annotation tool for MALDI-TOF glycan profiles. Here we benchmark Cartoonist's automatic annotations against human expert annotations on human and mouse N-glycan data from the Consortium for Functional Glycomics. We find that Cartoonist and expert annotations largely agree, but the expert tends to annotate more specifically, meaning fewer suggested structures per peak, and Cartoonist more comprehensively, meaning more annotated peaks. On peaks for which both Cartoonist and the expert give unique cartoons, the two cartoons agree in over 90% of all cases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics.

  19. DNA microarray analyses in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, David W

    2006-01-01

    DNA microarrays were originally devised and described as a convenient technology for the global analysis of plant gene expression. Over the past decade, their use has expanded enormously to cover all kingdoms of living organisms. At the same time, the scope of applications of microarrays has increased beyond expression analyses, with plant genomics playing a leadership role in the on-going development of this technology. As the field has matured, the rate-limiting step has moved from that of the technical process of data generation to that of data analysis. We currently face major problems in dealing with the accumulating datasets, not simply with respect to how to archive, access, and process the huge amounts of data that have been and are being produced, but also in determining the relative quality of the different datasets. A major recognized concern is the appropriate use of statistical design in microarray experiments, without which the datasets are rendered useless. A vigorous area of current research involves the development of novel statistical tools specifically for microarray experiments. This article describes, in a necessarily selective manner, the types of platforms currently employed in microarray research and provides an overview of recent activities using these platforms in plant biology.

  20. Oligonucleotide microarrays in constitutional genetic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Keren, Boris; Le Caignec, Cedric

    2011-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays such as comparative genomic hybridization arrays and SNP microarrays enable the identification of genomic imbalances - also termed copy-number variants - with increasing resolution. This article will focus on the most significant applications of high-throughput oligonucleotide microarrays, both in genetic diagnosis and research. In genetic diagnosis, the method is becoming a standard tool for investigating patients with unexplained developmental delay/intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders and/or with multiple congenital anomalies. Oligonucleotide microarray have also been recently applied to the detection of genomic imbalances in prenatal diagnosis either to characterize a chromosomal rearrangement that has previously been identified by standard prenatal karyotyping or to detect a cryptic genomic imbalance in a fetus with ultrasound abnormalities and a normal standard prenatal karyotype. In research, oligonucleotide microarrays have been used for a wide range of applications, such as the identification of new genes responsible for monogenic disorders and the association of a copy-number variant as a predisposing factor to a common disease. Despite its widespread use, the interpretation of results is not always straightforward. We will discuss several unexpected results and ethical issues raised by these new methods.

  1. Advancing Microarray Assembly with Acoustic Dispensing Technology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, E. Y.; Diamond, S. L.

    2011-01-01

    In the assembly of microarrays and microarray-based chemical assays and enzymatic bioassays, most approaches use pins for contact spotting. Acoustic dispensing is a technology capable of nanoliter transfers by using acoustic energy to eject liquid sample from an open source well. Although typically used for well plate transfers, when applied to microarraying it avoids drawbacks of undesired physical contact with sample, difficulty in assembling multicomponent reactions on a chip by readdressing, a rigid mode of printing that lacks patterning capabilities, and time-consuming wash steps. We demonstrated the utility of acoustic dispensing by delivering human cathepsin L in a drop-on-drop fashion into individual 50-nanoliter, pre-spotted reaction volumes to activate enzyme reactions at targeted positions on a microarray. We generated variable-sized spots ranging from 200 to 750 μm (and higher), and handled the transfer of fluorescent bead suspensions with increasing source well concentrations of 0.1 to 10 ×108 beads/mL in a linear fashion. There are no tips that can clog and liquid dispensing CVs are generally below 5%. This platform expands the toolbox for generating analytical arrays and meets needs associated with spatially-addressed assembly of multicomponent microarrays on the nanoliter scale. PMID:19035650

  2. A Synthetic Kinome Microarray Data Generator

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farhad; Kusalik, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Cellular pathways involve the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins. Peptide microarrays called kinome arrays facilitate the measurement of the phosphorylation activity of hundreds of proteins in a single experiment. Analyzing the data from kinome microarrays is a multi-step process. Typically, various techniques are possible for a particular step, and it is necessary to compare and evaluate them. Such evaluations require data for which correct analysis results are known. Unfortunately, such kinome data is not readily available in the community. Further, there are no established techniques for creating artificial kinome datasets with known results and with the same characteristics as real kinome datasets. In this paper, a methodology for generating synthetic kinome array data is proposed. The methodology relies on actual intensity measurements from kinome microarray experiments and preserves their subtle characteristics. The utility of the methodology is demonstrated by evaluating methods for eliminating heterogeneous variance in kinome microarray data. Phosphorylation intensities from kinome microarrays often exhibit such heterogeneous variance and its presence can negatively impact downstream statistical techniques that rely on homogeneity of variance. It is shown that using the output from the proposed synthetic data generator, it is possible to critically compare two variance stabilization methods. PMID:27600233

  3. Structural Heterogeneity of Terminal Glycans in Campylobacter jejuni Lipooligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Semchenko, Evgeny A.; Day, Christopher J.; Moutin, Marc; Wilson, Jennifer C.; Tiralongo, Joe; Korolik, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Lipooligosaccharides of the gastrointestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni are regarded as a major virulence factor and are implicated in the production of cross-reactive antibodies against host gangliosides, which leads to the development of autoimmune neuropathies such as Guillain-Barré and Fisher Syndromes. C. jejuni strains are known to produce diverse LOS structures encoded by more than 19 types of LOS biosynthesis clusters. This study demonstrates that the final C. jejuni LOS structure cannot always be predicted from the genetic composition of the LOS biosynthesis cluster, as determined by novel lectin array analysis of the terminal LOS glycans. The differences were shown to be partially facilitated by the differential on/off status of three genes wlaN, cst and cj1144-45. The on/off status of these genes was also analysed in C. jejuni strains grown in vitro and in vivo, isolated directly from the host animal without passaging, using immunoseparation. Importantly, C. jejuni strains 331, 421 and 520 encoding cluster type C were shown to produce different LOS, mimicking asialo GM1, asialo GM2 and a heterogeneous mix of gangliosides and other glycoconjugates respectively. In addition, individual C. jejuni colonies were shown to consistently produce heterogeneous LOS structures, irrespective of the cluster type and the status of phase variable genes. Furthermore we describe C. jejuni strains (351 and 375) with LOS clusters that do not match any of the previously described LOS clusters, yet are able to produce LOS with asialo GM2-like mimicries. The LOS biosynthesis clusters of these strains are likely to contain genes that code for LOS biosynthesis machinery previously not identified, yet capable of synthesising LOS mimicking gangliosides. PMID:22815868

  4. Structural heterogeneity of terminal glycans in Campylobacter jejuni lipooligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Semchenko, Evgeny A; Day, Christopher J; Moutin, Marc; Wilson, Jennifer C; Tiralongo, Joe; Korolik, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Lipooligosaccharides of the gastrointestinal pathogen Campylobacter jejuni are regarded as a major virulence factor and are implicated in the production of cross-reactive antibodies against host gangliosides, which leads to the development of autoimmune neuropathies such as Guillain-Barré and Fisher Syndromes. C. jejuni strains are known to produce diverse LOS structures encoded by more than 19 types of LOS biosynthesis clusters. This study demonstrates that the final C. jejuni LOS structure cannot always be predicted from the genetic composition of the LOS biosynthesis cluster, as determined by novel lectin array analysis of the terminal LOS glycans. The differences were shown to be partially facilitated by the differential on/off status of three genes wlaN, cst and cj1144-45. The on/off status of these genes was also analysed in C. jejuni strains grown in vitro and in vivo, isolated directly from the host animal without passaging, using immunoseparation. Importantly, C. jejuni strains 331, 421 and 520 encoding cluster type C were shown to produce different LOS, mimicking asialo GM(1), asialo GM(2) and a heterogeneous mix of gangliosides and other glycoconjugates respectively. In addition, individual C. jejuni colonies were shown to consistently produce heterogeneous LOS structures, irrespective of the cluster type and the status of phase variable genes. Furthermore we describe C. jejuni strains (351 and 375) with LOS clusters that do not match any of the previously described LOS clusters, yet are able to produce LOS with asialo GM(2)-like mimicries. The LOS biosynthesis clusters of these strains are likely to contain genes that code for LOS biosynthesis machinery previously not identified, yet capable of synthesising LOS mimicking gangliosides. PMID:22815868

  5. The glycan keratan sulfate in inner ear crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Martin, D. S.; Li, Y. T.; Li, S. C.

    1995-01-01

    The otoconial matrix (OM) of chicks (Gallus domesticus) inner ear was analyzed. Histochemically the OM was reacted with phosphotungstic acid (PTA) and immunohistochemically with the monoclonal antibody antikeratan sulfate (antiKS). The OM was digested with the enzyme endo-beta-galactosidase (E beta Galase) or separated by 1D and 2D gel electrophoresis. PTA which reacts with glycoproteins precipitated the OM, suggesting that the OM contains glycoproteins. A central core in each crystal had no PTA staining, suggesting that the core lacked glycoproteins. Anti KS antibody stained the OM with increased density in older embryos as determined by color thresholding. E beta Galase, which cleaves the lactosamine repeating units in KS, decreased the immunostain by 30% in the OM and by 20% in the cartilage. The OM from the utricle, saccule and macula lagena contained similar molecular weight bands. Five dense bands in the OM were less dense in tissue and blood controls, suggesting that such bands are enriched in the OM. Isoelectric focusing of the OM showed a negatively charged high molecular weight smear not present in blood and faint in tissue controls. The high affinity of the OM for the cationic PTA stain, the strong immunohistochemical reaction of the OM with anti KS antibody and high molecular weight negative smear in 2D gels taken together suggest that: a) the OM contains large amounts of glycoproteins and glycans, one of which is keratan sulfate, because its immuno stain with antiKS antibody was decreased by the enzyme E beta Galase, b) the utricle, saccule and macula lagena may have similar composition, and c) the concentration of KS may increase gradually until complete mineralization of the OM is reached.

  6. Protein microarrays for parasite antigen discovery.

    PubMed

    Driguez, Patrick; Doolan, Denise L; Molina, Douglas M; Loukas, Alex; Trieu, Angela; Felgner, Phil L; McManus, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The host serological profile to a parasitic infection, such as schistosomiasis, can be used to define potential vaccine and diagnostic targets. Determining the host antibody response using traditional approaches is hindered by the large number of putative antigens in any parasite proteome. Parasite protein microarrays offer the potential for a high-throughput host antibody screen to simplify this task. In order to construct the array, parasite proteins are selected from available genomic sequence and protein databases using bioinformatic tools. Selected open reading frames are PCR amplified, incorporated into a vector for cell-free protein expression, and printed robotically onto glass slides. The protein microarrays can be probed with antisera from infected/immune animals or humans and the antibody reactivity measured with fluorophore labeled antibodies on a confocal laser microarray scanner to identify potential targets for diagnosis or therapeutic or prophylactic intervention. PMID:25388117

  7. Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

    2011-11-29

    DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to

  8. Analysis of High-Throughput ELISA Microarray Data

    SciTech Connect

    White, Amanda M.; Daly, Don S.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-02-23

    Our research group develops analytical methods and software for the high-throughput analysis of quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarrays. ELISA microarrays differ from DNA microarrays in several fundamental aspects and most algorithms for analysis of DNA microarray data are not applicable to ELISA microarrays. In this review, we provide an overview of the steps involved in ELISA microarray data analysis and how the statistically sound algorithms we have developed provide an integrated software suite to address the needs of each data-processing step. The algorithms discussed are available in a set of open-source software tools (http://www.pnl.gov/statistics/ProMAT).

  9. Species-Specific Dynamic Responses of Gut Bacteria to a Mammalian Glycan

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Varsha

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mammalian intestine provides nutrients to hundreds of bacterial species. Closely related species often harbor homologous nutrient utilization genes and cocolonize the gut, raising questions regarding the strategies mediating their stable coexistence. Here we reveal that related Bacteroides species that can utilize the mammalian glycan chondroitin sulfate (CS) have diverged in the manner in which they temporally regulate orthologous CS utilization genes. Whereas certain Bacteroides species display a transient surge in CS utilization transcripts upon exposure to CS, other species exhibit sustained activation of these genes. Remarkably, species-specific expression dynamics are retained even when the key players governing a particular response are replaced by those from a species with a dissimilar response. Bacteroides species exhibiting distinct expression behaviors in the presence of CS can be cocultured on CS. However, they vary in their responses to CS availability and to the composition of the bacterial community when CS is the sole carbon source. Our results indicate that diversity resulting from regulation of polysaccharide utilization genes may enable the coexistence of gut bacterial species using a given nutrient. IMPORTANCE Genes mediating a specific task are typically conserved in related microbes. For instance, gut Bacteroides species harbor orthologous nutrient breakdown genes and may face competition from one another for these nutrients. How, then, does the gut microbial composition maintain such remarkable stability over long durations? We establish that in the case of genes conferring the ability to utilize the nutrient chondroitin sulfate (CS), microbial species vary in how they temporally regulate these genes and exhibit subtle growth differences on the basis of CS availability and community composition. Similarly to how differential regulation of orthologous genes enables related species to access new environments, gut bacteria may

  10. Sialic Acid-Imprinted Fluorescent Core-Shell Particles for Selective Labeling of Cell Surface Glycans.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Sudhirkumar; El-Schich, Zahra; Malakpour, Atena; Wan, Wei; Dizeyi, Nishtman; Mohammadi, Reza; Rurack, Knut; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette; Sellergren, Börje

    2015-11-01

    The expression of cell surface glycans terminating with sialic acid (SA) residues has been found to correlate with various disease states there among cancer. We here report a novel strategy for specific fluorescence labeling of such motifs. This is based on sialic acid-imprinted core-shell nanoparticles equipped with nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD) fluorescent reporter groups allowing environmentally sensitive fluorescence detection at convenient excitation and emission wavelengths. Imprinting was achieved exploiting a hybrid approach combining reversible boronate ester formation between p-vinylphenylboronic acid and SA, the introduction of cationic amine functionalities, and the use of an NBD-appended urea-monomer as a binary hydrogen-bond donor targeting the SA carboxylic acid and OH functionalities. The monomers were grafted from 200 nm RAFT-modified silica core particles using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linker resulting in a shell thickness of ca. 10 nm. The particles displayed strong affinity for SA in methanol/water mixtures (K = 6.6 × 10(5) M(-1) in 2% water, 5.9 × 10(3) M(-1) in 98% water, B(max) ≈ 10 μmol g(-1)), whereas binding of the competitor glucuronic acid (GA) and other monosaccharides was considerably weaker (K (GA) = 1.8 × 10(3) M(-1) in 98% water). In cell imaging experiments, the particles selectively stained different cell lines in correlation with the SA expression level. This was further verified by enzymatic cleavage of SA and by staining using a FITC labeled SA selective lectin. PMID:26414878

  11. Myrosinases TGG1 and TGG2 from Arabidopsis thaliana contain exclusively oligomannosidic N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Liebminger, Eva; Grass, Josephine; Jez, Jakub; Neumann, Laura; Altmann, Friedrich; Strasser, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In all eukaryotes N-glycosylation is the most prevalent protein modification of secretory and membrane proteins. Although the N-glycosylation capacity and the individual steps of the N-glycan processing pathway have been well studied in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, little attention has been paid to the characterization of the glycosylation status of individual proteins. We report here the structural analysis of all N-glycans present on the endogenous thioglucoside glucohydrolases (myrosinases) TGG1 and TGG2 from A. thaliana. All nine glycosylation sites of TGG1 and all four glycosylation sites of TGG2 are occupied by oligomannosidic structures with Man5GlcNAc2 as the major glycoform. Analysis of the oligomannosidic isomers from wild-type plants and mannose trimming deficient mutants by liquid chromatography with porous graphitic carbon and mass spectrometry revealed that the N-glycans from both myrosinases are processed by Golgi-located α-mannosidases. PMID:23009876

  12. When Galectins Recognize Glycans: From Biochemistry to Physiology and Back Again

    PubMed Central

    Di Lella, Santiago; Sundblad, Victoria; Cerliani, Juan P.; Guardia, Carlos M.; Estrin, Dario A.; Vasta, Gerardo R.; Rabinovich, Gabriel A.

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, increasing efforts have been devoted to the study of galectins, a family of evolutionarily conserved glycan-binding proteins with multifunctional properties. Galectins function, either intracellularly or extracellularly, as key biological mediators capable of monitoring changes occurring on the cell surface during fundamental biological processes such as cellular communication, inflammation, development, and differentiation. Their highly conserved structures, exquisite carbohydrate specificity, and ability to modulate a broad spectrum of biological processes have captivated a wide range of scientists from a wide spectrum of disciplines, including biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, and physiology. However, in spite of enormous efforts to dissect the functions and properties of these glycan-binding proteins, limited information about how structural and biochemical aspects of these proteins can influence biological functions is available. In this review, we aim to integrate structural, biochemical, and functional aspects of this bewildering and ancient family of glycan-binding proteins and discuss their implications in physiologic and pathologic settings. PMID:21848324

  13. Impact of sialic acids on the molecular dynamic of bi-antennary and tri-antennary glycans

    PubMed Central

    Guillot, Alexandre; Dauchez, Manuel; Belloy, Nicolas; Jonquet, Jessica; Duca, Laurent; Romier, Beatrice; Maurice, Pascal; Debelle, Laurent; Martiny, Laurent; Durlach, Vincent; Baud, Stephanie; Blaise, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Sialic acids (SA) are monosaccharides that can be located at the terminal position of glycan chains on a wide range of proteins. The post-translational modifications, such as N-glycan chains, are fundamental to protein functions. Indeed, the hydrolysis of SA by specific enzymes such as neuraminidases can lead to drastic modifications of protein behavior. However, the relationship between desialylation of N-glycan chains and possible alterations of receptor function remains unexplored. Thus, the aim of the present study is to establish the impact of SA removal from N-glycan chains on their conformational behavior. We therefore undertook an in silico investigation using molecular dynamics to predict the structure of an isolated glycan chain. We performed, for the first time, 3 independent 500 ns simulations on bi-antennary and tri-antennary glycan chains displaying or lacking SA. We show that desialylation alters both the preferential conformation and the flexibility of the glycan chain. This study suggests that the behavior of glycan chains induced by presence or absence of SA may explain the changes in the protein function. PMID:27759083

  14. Isomer-Specific Analysis of Released N-Glycans by LC-ESI MS/MS with Porous Graphitized Carbon.

    PubMed

    Kolarich, Daniel; Windwarder, Markus; Alagesan, Kathirvel; Altmann, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    The combination of porous graphitized carbon (PGC) liquid chromatography (LC) with mass spectrometric (MS) detection probably constitutes the most elaborate single stage analysis for isomer-specific N-glycan analysis. Here, we describe sample preparation and analysis procedures for the identification of released N-glycans using PGC-LC-ESI-MS and MS/MS.

  15. LC-MS/MS Peptide Mapping with Automated Data Processing for Routine Profiling of N-Glycans in Immunoglobulins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Bhavana; Jiang, Xinzhao Grace; Chen, Louise; Zhang, Zhongqi

    2014-06-01

    Protein N-Glycan analysis is traditionally performed by high pH anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC), reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), or hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) on fluorescence-labeled glycans enzymatically released from the glycoprotein. These methods require time-consuming sample preparations and do not provide site-specific glycosylation information. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) peptide mapping is frequently used for protein structural characterization and, as a bonus, can potentially provide glycan profile on each individual glycosylation site. In this work, a recently developed glycopeptide fragmentation model was used for automated identification, based on their MS/MS, of N-glycopeptides from proteolytic digestion of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Experimental conditions were optimized to achieve accurate profiling of glycoforms. Glycan profiles obtained from LC-MS/MS peptide mapping were compared with those obtained from HPAEC, RPLC, and HILIC analyses of released glycans for several mAb molecules. Accuracy, reproducibility, and linearity of the LC-MS/MS peptide mapping method for glycan profiling were evaluated. The LC-MS/MS peptide mapping method with fully automated data analysis requires less sample preparation, provides site-specific information, and may serve as an alternative method for routine profiling of N-glycans on immunoglobulins as well as other glycoproteins with simple N-glycans.

  16. Photo-Generation of Carbohydrate Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Gregory T.; Wang, Denong; Turro, Nicholas J.; Koberstein, Jeffrey T.

    The unparalleled structural diversity of carbohydrates among biological molecules has been recognized for decades. Recent studies have highlighted carbohydrate signaling roles in many important biological processes, such as fertilization, embryonic development, cell differentiation and cellȁ4cell communication, blood coagulation, inflammation, chemotaxis, as well as host recognition and immune responses to microbial pathogens. In this chapter, we summarize recent progress in the establishment of carbohydrate-based microarrays and the application of these technologies in exploring the biological information content in carbohydrates. A newly established photochemical platform of carbohydrate microarrays serves as a model for a focused discussion.

  17. Protein Microarrays for the Detection of Biothreats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herr, Amy E.

    Although protein microarrays have proven to be an important tool in proteomics research, the technology is emerging as useful for public health and defense applications. Recent progress in the measurement and characterization of biothreat agents is reviewed in this chapter. Details concerning validation of various protein microarray formats, from contact-printed sandwich assays to supported lipid bilayers, are presented. The reviewed technologies have important implications for in vitro characterization of toxin-ligand interactions, serotyping of bacteria, screening of potential biothreat inhibitors, and as core components of biosensors, among others, research and engineering applications.

  18. Pineal Function: Impact of Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Klein, David C.; Bailey, Michael J.; Carter, David A.; Kim, Jong-so; Shi, Qiong; Ho, Anthony; Chik, Constance; Gaildrat, Pascaline; Morin, Fabrice; Ganguly, Surajit; Rath, Martin F.; Møller, Morten; Sugden, David; Rangel, Zoila G.; Munson, Peter J.; Weller, Joan L.; Coon, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Microarray analysis has provided a new understanding of pineal function by identifying genes that are highly expressed in this tissue relative to other tissues and also by identifying over 600 genes that are expressed on a 24-hour schedule. This effort has highlighted surprising similarity to the retina and has provided reason to explore new avenues of study including intracellular signaling, signal transduction, transcriptional cascades, thyroid/retinoic acid hormone signaling, metal biology, RNA splicing, and the role the pineal gland plays in the immune/inflammation response. The new foundation that microarray analysis has provided will broadly support future research on pineal function. PMID:19622385

  19. The use of microarrays in microbial ecology

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, G.L.; He, Z.; DeSantis, T.Z.; Brodie, E.L.; Zhou, J.

    2009-09-15

    Microarrays have proven to be a useful and high-throughput method to provide targeted DNA sequence information for up to many thousands of specific genetic regions in a single test. A microarray consists of multiple DNA oligonucleotide probes that, under high stringency conditions, hybridize only to specific complementary nucleic acid sequences (targets). A fluorescent signal indicates the presence and, in many cases, the abundance of genetic regions of interest. In this chapter we will look at how microarrays are used in microbial ecology, especially with the recent increase in microbial community DNA sequence data. Of particular interest to microbial ecologists, phylogenetic microarrays are used for the analysis of phylotypes in a community and functional gene arrays are used for the analysis of functional genes, and, by inference, phylotypes in environmental samples. A phylogenetic microarray that has been developed by the Andersen laboratory, the PhyloChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that targets the known diversity within the 16S rRNA gene to determine microbial community composition. Using multiple, confirmatory probes to increase the confidence of detection and a mismatch probe for every perfect match probe to minimize the effect of cross-hybridization by non-target regions, the PhyloChip is able to simultaneously identify any of thousands of taxa present in an environmental sample. The PhyloChip is shown to reveal greater diversity within a community than rRNA gene sequencing due to the placement of the entire gene product on the microarray compared with the analysis of up to thousands of individual molecules by traditional sequencing methods. A functional gene array that has been developed by the Zhou laboratory, the GeoChip, will be discussed as an example of a microarray that dynamically identifies functional activities of multiple members within a community. The recent version of GeoChip contains more than 24,000 50mer

  20. MicroRNA expression profiling using microarrays.

    PubMed

    Love, Cassandra; Dave, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs which are able to regulate gene expression at both the transcriptional and translational levels. There is a growing recognition of the role of microRNAs in nearly every tissue type and cellular process. Thus there is an increasing need for accurate quantitation of microRNA expression in a variety of tissues. Microarrays provide a robust method for the examination of microRNA expression. In this chapter, we describe detailed methods for the use of microarrays to measure microRNA expression and discuss methods for the analysis of microRNA expression data. PMID:23666707

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