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Sample records for glycera dibranchiata monomeric

  1. Anomalously slow cyanide binding to Glycera dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin component II: Implication for the equilibrium constant

    SciTech Connect

    Mintorovitch, J.; Satterlee, J.D. )

    1988-10-18

    In comparison to sperm whale metmyoglobin, metleghemoglobin {alpha}, methemoglobins, and heme peroxidases, the purified Glycera dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin component II exhibits anomalously slow cyanide ligation kinetics. For the component II monomer methemoglobin this reaction has been studied under pseudo-first-order conditions at pH 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0, employing 100-250-fold mole excesses of potassium cyanide at each pH. The analysis shows that the concentration-independent bimolecular rate constant is small in comparison to those of the other heme proteins. Furthermore, the results show that the dissociation rate is extremely slow. Separation of the bimolecular rate constant into contributions from k{sub CN{sup {minus}}} (the rate constant for CN{sup {minus}} binding) and from k{sub HCN} (the rate constant for HCN binding) shows that the former is approximately 90 times greater. These results indicate that cyanide ligation reactions are not instantaneous for this protein, which is important for those attempting to study the ligand-binding equilibria. From the results presented here the authors estimate that the actual equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub D}) for cyanide binding to this G. dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin has a numerical upper limit that is at least 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported before the kinetic results were known.

  2. Effect of mercury on taurine transport by the red blood cells of the marine polychaete, Glycera dibranchiata

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.W.; Preston, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of heavy metal exposure on the transport of the amino acid, /sup 14/C-taurine, by the hemoglobin containing coelomocytes (red blood cells) of the marine polychaete, Glycera dibranchiata. Glycera has been used previously in studies on heavy metal absorption. Glycera red cells (RBCs) were used for this study because they contain a high concentration of taurine (190 mM) which has been implicated as a major osmolyte in cellular volume regulation in marine invertebrates. Taurine also appears to participate in osmoregulation of mammalian heart and brain tissue. The coelomic fluid bathing Glycera RBCs typically contains taurine at considerably lower concentrations (0.2 mM). The standing gradients (intracellular conc./extracellular conc.) for amino acids ranges from 40:1 for lysine to 950:1 for taurine. Preliminary experiments demonstrated that the maintenance of the large standing gradient for taurine was apparently due to the presence of a specific Na and Cl dependent taurine transport system in these cells. The fact that Glycera RBCs actively maintain large taurine gradients suggests that this tissue should be an excellent one to use in analysis of the mechanisms of heavy metal interaction with taurine transport systems.

  3. Isoelectric focusing purity criteria and /sup 1/H NMR detectable spectroscopic heterogeneity in the major isolated monomer hemoglobins from Glycera dibranchiata

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.

    1987-12-01

    Three major monomeric hemoglobins have been isolated from the erythrocytes of Glycera dibranchiata. Their importance to structure-function studies of heme proteins lies in the fact that they have been shown to possess an exceptional amino acid substitution. In these proteins, the E-7 position is occupied by leucine rather than the more common distal histidine. This substitution alters the polarity of the heme ligand binding environment compared to myoglobin. Due to this, the G. dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins are attracting much attention. However, until now no purity criterion has been developed. Here the authors demonstrate that, for all of the Glycera momomer hemoglobins, multiple line patterns are shown on high-voltage isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels. Most of these lines are shown to be a consequence of heme-related phenomena and can be understood on the basis of changes in oxidation and ligation state of the heme iron. The multiple line pattern does not indicate significant impurities in the monomer hemoglobin preparation. The multiple line patterns on IEF gels disappear when gels of the apoproteins alone are focused. Single bands occur in this case for all of the monomer hemoglobins except component II, which displays two bands, one major and one minor. The minor band is found to be a modified apoprotein form. It is sensitive to apoprotein handling prior to focusing and depends upon whether the IEF gel is prefocused or not. From this analysis, IEF is shown to be a valuable purity criterion, and the purity of our monomer hemoglobin component II preparation is 97% one globin. The NMR results show that two types of spectroscopic heterogeneity are also present in component II, and these are unrelated to the protein purity.

  4. Assignment of selected hyperfine proton NMR resonances in the met forms of Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and comparisons with sperm whale metmyoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.; Pandey, R.K.; Leung, H.K.; Smith, K.M.

    1988-04-19

    This work indicates a high degree of purity for our preparations of all three of the primary Glycera dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins and details assignments of the heme methyl and vinyl protons in the hyperfine shift region of the ferric (aquo.) protein forms. The assignments were carried out by reconstituting the apoproteins of each component with selectively deuteriated hemes. The results indicate that even though the individual component preparations consist of essentially a single protein, the proton NMR spectra indicate spectroscopic heterogeneity. Evidence is presented for identification and classification of major and minor protein forms that are present in solutions of each component. Finally, in contrast to previous results, a detailed analysis of the proton hyperfine shift patterns of the major and minor forms of each component, in comparison to the major and minor forms of metmyoglobin, leads to the conclusions that the corresponding forms of the proteins from each species have strikingly similar heme-globin contacts and display nearly identical heme electronic structures and coordination numbers.

  5. A Polychaete's powerful punch: venom gland transcriptomics of Glycera reveals a complex cocktail of toxin homologs.

    PubMed

    von Reumont, Björn M; Campbell, Lahcen I; Richter, Sandy; Hering, Lars; Sykes, Dan; Hetmank, Jörg; Jenner, Ronald A; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2014-09-05

    Glycerids are marine annelids commonly known as bloodworms. Bloodworms have an eversible proboscis adorned with jaws connected to venom glands. Bloodworms prey on invertebrates, and it is known that the venom glands produce compounds that can induce toxic effects in animals. Yet, none of these putative toxins has been characterized on a molecular basis. Here we present the transcriptomic profiles of the venom glands of three species of bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, Glycera fallax and Glycera tridactyla, as well as the body tissue of G. tridactyla. The venom glands express a complex mixture of transcripts coding for putative toxin precursors. These transcripts represent 20 known toxin classes that have been convergently recruited into animal venoms, as well as transcripts potentially coding for Glycera-specific toxins. The toxins represent five functional categories: Pore-forming and membrane-disrupting toxins, neurotoxins, protease inhibitors, other enzymes, and CAP domain toxins. Many of the transcripts coding for putative Glycera toxins belong to classes that have been widely recruited into venoms, but some are homologs of toxins previously only known from the venoms of scorpaeniform fish and monotremes (stonustoxin-like toxin), turrid gastropods (turripeptide-like peptides), and sea anemones (gigantoxin I-like neurotoxin). This complex mixture of toxin homologs suggests that bloodworms employ venom while predating on macroscopic prey, casting doubt on the previously widespread opinion that G. dibranchiata is a detritivore. Our results further show that researchers should be aware that different assembly methods, as well as different methods of homology prediction, can influence the transcriptomic profiling of venom glands. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. A Polychaete’s Powerful Punch: Venom Gland Transcriptomics of Glycera Reveals a Complex Cocktail of Toxin Homologs

    PubMed Central

    von Reumont, Björn M.; Richter, Sandy; Hering, Lars; Sykes, Dan; Hetmank, Jörg; Jenner, Ronald A.; Bleidorn, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Glycerids are marine annelids commonly known as bloodworms. Bloodworms have an eversible proboscis adorned with jaws connected to venom glands. Bloodworms prey on invertebrates, and it is known that the venom glands produce compounds that can induce toxic effects in animals. Yet, none of these putative toxins has been characterized on a molecular basis. Here we present the transcriptomic profiles of the venom glands of three species of bloodworm, Glycera dibranchiata, Glycera fallax and Glycera tridactyla, as well as the body tissue of G. tridactyla. The venom glands express a complex mixture of transcripts coding for putative toxin precursors. These transcripts represent 20 known toxin classes that have been convergently recruited into animal venoms, as well as transcripts potentially coding for Glycera-specific toxins. The toxins represent five functional categories: Pore-forming and membrane-disrupting toxins, neurotoxins, protease inhibitors, other enzymes, and CAP domain toxins. Many of the transcripts coding for putative Glycera toxins belong to classes that have been widely recruited into venoms, but some are homologs of toxins previously only known from the venoms of scorpaeniform fish and monotremes (stonustoxin-like toxin), turrid gastropods (turripeptide-like peptides), and sea anemones (gigantoxin I-like neurotoxin). This complex mixture of toxin homologs suggests that bloodworms employ venom while predating on macroscopic prey, casting doubt on the previously widespread opinion that G. dibranchiata is a detritivore. Our results further show that researchers should be aware that different assembly methods, as well as different methods of homology prediction, can influence the transcriptomic profiling of venom glands. PMID:25193302

  7. A comparison of the geminate recombination kinetics of several monomeric heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Rohlfs, R J; Olson, J S; Gibson, Q H

    1988-02-05

    The geminate rate constants for CO, O2, NO, methyl, ethyl, n-propyl, and n-butyl isocyanide rebinding to soybean leghemoglobin and monomeric component II of Glycera dibranchiata hemoglobin were measured at pH 7, 20 degrees C using a dye laser with a 30-ns square-wave pulse. The results were compared to the corresponding parameters for sperm whale myoglobin and the isolated alpha and beta subunits of human hemoglobin (Olson, J.S., Rohlfs, R.J., and Gibson, Q.H. (1987) J. Biol. Chem., 262, 12930-12938). The rate-limiting step for O2, NO, and isonitrile binding to all five proteins is ligand migration up to the initial geminate state, and the rate of this process determines the overall bimolecular association rate constant for these ligands. In contrast, iron-ligand bond formation limits the overall bimolecular rate for CO binding. The distal pockets in leghemoglobin and in Glycera HbII are approximately 10 times more accessible kinetically to diatomic ligands than that in sperm whale myoglobin. This difference accounts for the much larger association rate constants (1-2 x 10(8) M-1 s-1) that are observed for O2 and NO binding to leghemoglobin and Glycera HbII. The rates of isonitrile migration through leghemoglobin are also very large and indicate a very fluid or open distal structure near the sixth coordination position. In contrast, there is a marked decrease in the rate of migration up to and away from the sixth coordination position in Glycera HbII with increasing ligand size. These results were also used to interpret previously published rate constants and quantum yields for the high (R) and low (T) affinity states of human hemoglobin. In contrast to the differences between the monomeric proteins, the differences between the CO-, O2-, and NO-binding parameters for R and T state hemoglobin appear to be due to a decrease in the geminate reactivity of the heme iron atom, with little or no change in the accessibility of the distal pocket.

  8. Glycerotoxin from Glycera convoluta stimulates neurosecretion by up-regulating N-type Ca2+ channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Meunier, Frédéric A.; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Molgó, Jordi; Zamponi, Gerald W.; Schiavo, Giampietro

    2002-01-01

    We report here the purification of glycerotoxin from the venom of Glycera convoluta, a novel 320 kDa protein capable of reversibly stimulating spontaneous and evoked neurotransmitter release at the frog neuromuscular junction. However, glycerotoxin is ineffective at the murine neuromuscular junction, which displays a different subtype of voltage- dependent Ca2+ channels. By sequential and selective inhibition of various types of Ca2+ channels, we found that glycerotoxin was acting via Cav2.2 (N-type). In neuroendocrine cells, it elicits a robust, albeit transient, influx of Ca2+ sensitive to the Cav2.2 blockers ω-conotoxin GVIA and MVIIA. Moreover, glycerotoxin triggers a Ca2+ transient in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells over-expressing Cav2.2 but not Cav2.1 (P/Q-type). Whole-cell patch–clamp analysis of Cav2.2 expressing HEK cells revealed an up-regulation of Ca2+ currents due to a leftward shift of the activation peak upon glycerotoxin addition. A direct interaction between Cav2.2 and this neurotoxin was revealed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Therefore, glycerotoxin is a unique addition to the arsenal of tools available to unravel the mechanism controlling Ca2+-regulated exocytosis via the specific activation of Cav2.2. PMID:12485994

  9. Dynamics of monomeric and hexameric helicases.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2016-04-01

    Helicases are a ubiquitous class of enzymes that use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to unwind nucleic acid (NA) duplex. According to the structures, helicases can be classified as the non-ring-shaped (or monomeric) and ring-shaped (or hexameric). To understand the NA unwinding mechanism, here we study theoretically the unwinding dynamics of both the monomeric and hexameric helicases based on our proposed model. Various available single-molecule experimental data on unwinding speed of both the monomeric and hexameric helicases versus the external force applied to the ends of the NA duplex to unzip the duplex or versus the stability of the NA duplex are consistently and quantitatively explained. We provide quantitative explanations of the experimental data showing that while the unwinding speeds of some monomeric helicases are insensitively dependent on the external force they are sensitively dependent on the stability of the NA duplex. The experimental data showing that wild-type Rep translocates along ssDNA with a lower speed than RepΔ2B (removal of the 2B subdomain of Rep) and that RepΔ2B monomer can unwind DNA whereas the wild-type monomer is unable to unwind DNA are also quantitatively explained. Our studies indicate that although the monomeric and hexameric helicases show very different features on the dependence of NA unwinding speed upon the external force, they use much similar active mechanisms to unwind NA duplex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A biochemical approach to assessment of effects of organic pollution on the metabolism of the non-opportunistic polychaete, Glycera alba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackstock, J.

    1980-03-01

    Loch Creran and Loch Eil, sea lochs in the west of Scotland, both receive discharges of particulate organic effluent from industrial installations. Glycera alba (Müller) is widely distributed in the sediments of both lochs, and assays of activities of enzymes associated with energy-yielding metabolism have been done on crude extracts of specimens collected from variously affected areas. Mean phosphofructokinase activities were low in extracts of G. alba collected some 400 m from the source of effluent from a seaweed processing factory, increased to a maximum at 900 m and declined slightly at 1150 m where the sediment is little affected by the effluent. Pyruvate kinase activities exhibited qualitatively similar changes of lesser magnitude and no differences in a-glycerophosphate or malate dehydrogenase activities were observed. In G. alba from Loch Eil a relationship was established between phosphofructokinase activity and Eh at 4 cm in the sediment and the maximum change in phosphofructokinase was found at low Eh, below -50 mV. The data are interpreted with reference to results from biological and environmental monitoring in Lochs Eil and Creran. It is suggested that the low phosphofructokinase activities in G. alba from the most affected areas of each loch may constitute a consistent biochemical response to effects of the organic inputs.

  11. Characterization of monomeric substates of ascorbate oxidase.

    PubMed

    Di Venere, Almerinda; Nicolai, Eleonora; Rosato, Nicola; Rossi, Antonello; Finazzi Agrò, Alessandro; Mei, Giampiero

    2011-05-01

    Ascorbate oxidase (AAO) is a large, multidomain, dimeric protein whose folding/unfolding pathway is characterized by a complex, multistep process. Here we used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to demonstrate the formation of partially folded monomers by pH-induced full dissociation into subunits. Hence, the structural features of monomeric AAO could be studied by fluorescence and CD spectroscopy. We found that the monomers keep their secondary structure, whereas subtle conformational changes in the tertiary structure become apparent. AAO dissociation has also been studied when unfolding the protein by high hydrostatic pressure at different pH values. A strong protein concentration dependence was observed at pH 8, whereas the enzyme was either monomeric or dimeric at pH 10 and 6, respectively. The calculated volume change associated with the unfolding of monomeric AAO, ΔV ∼ -55 mL·mol(-1), is in the range observed for most proteins of the same size. These findings demonstrate that partially folded monomeric species might populate the energy landscape of AAO and that the overall AAO stability is crucially controlled by a few quaternary interactions at the subunits' interface.

  12. Size separation of analytes using monomeric surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Wei, Wei

    2005-04-12

    A sieving medium for use in the separation of analytes in a sample containing at least one such analyte comprises a monomeric non-ionic surfactant of the of the general formula, B-A, wherein A is a hydrophilic moiety and B is a hydrophobic moiety, present in a solvent at a concentration forming a self-assembled micelle configuration under selected conditions and having an aggregation number providing an equivalent weight capable of effecting the size separation of the sample solution so as to resolve a target analyte(s) in a solution containing the same, the size separation taking place in a chromatography or electrophoresis separation system.

  13. Polarization of an organic monomeric glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karis, T. E.; Twieg, R. J.; Lundquist, P. M.; Castro, J. F.

    1997-12-01

    A methylene dihydropyridine with a high ground-state dipole moment was investigated to explore the possibility of using it to form an organic monomeric glass "electret" film. Measurements were done in a specially designed test cell. An electric field was applied to a 100-μm-thick film of dihydropyridine while cooling from a melt. The cell potential was recorded as a function of time to study the homocharge and polarization relaxations. The homocharge relaxation time was ≈900 s. The polarization relaxation time was ≈2×105 s in the vicinity of the glass transition temperature. The polarization is linear over a wide range of electric field strength.

  14. Sequestration and Transport of Lignin Monomeric Precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.J.; Miao, Y.-C.; Zhang, K.-W.

    2011-01-18

    Lignin is the second most abundant terrestrial biopolymer after cellulose. It is essential for the viability of vascular plants. Lignin precursors, the monolignols, are synthesized within the cytosol of the cell. Thereafter, these monomeric precursors are exported into the cell wall, where they are polymerized and integrated into the wall matrix. Accordingly, transport of monolignols across cell membranes is a critical step affecting deposition of lignin in the secondarily thickened cell wall. While the biosynthesis of monolignols is relatively well understood, our knowledge of sequestration and transport of these monomers is sketchy. In this article, we review different hypotheses on monolignol transport and summarize the recent progresses toward the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying monolignol sequestration and transport across membranes. Deciphering molecular mechanisms for lignin precursor transport will support a better biotechnological solution to manipulate plant lignification for more efficient agricultural and industrial applications of cell wall biomass.

  15. Occupational contact allergy to monomeric isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Suuronen, Katri; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Jolanki, Riitta

    2012-08-01

    The monomeric isocyanates diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI), 2,4-toluene diisocyanate (TDI), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) are used in polyurethane products and sometimes cause contact allergy. To describe patients with isocyanate contact allergy in an occupational dermatology clinic. Test files were screened for allergic reactions to isocyanates and 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane (MDA). Patients with allergic reactions to some of the allergens were analysed for occupation, exposure, concomitant reactions to other allergens, and diagnosis. Over a period of almost 13 years, 54 patients reacted to isocyanates (9 to IPDI, 12 to MDI, 6 to TDI, and 1 to HDI) or MDA (44 patients). The motor vehicle, electronics and paint industries, and painting and construction work, were among the most significant occupational fields. An in-house polymeric MDI (PMDI) test substance was superior to commercial MDI preparations. About half of the occupational cases related to MDI products were diagnosed by testing MDA. The most prominent cause of IPDI allergy comprised polyurethane paint hardeners. Some of the IPDI reactions could be explained by cross-allergy to isophoronediamine in epoxy products. Specific exposure to MDA was difficult to trace. MDA and PMDI test substances were significant in the diagnosis of MDI contact allergy. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. An engineered monomeric Zoanthus sp. yellow fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Hoi, Hiofan; Howe, Elizabeth S; Ding, Yidan; Zhang, Wei; Baird, Michelle A; Sell, Brittney R; Allen, John R; Davidson, Michael W; Campbell, Robert E

    2013-10-24

    Protein engineering has created a palette of monomeric fluorescent proteins (FPs), but there remains an ~30 nm spectral gap between the most red-shifted useful Aequorea victoria green FP (GFP) variants and the most blue-shifted useful Discosoma sp. red FP (RFP) variants. To fill this gap, we have engineered a monomeric version of the yellow FP (YFP) from Zoanthus sp. coral. Our preferred variant, designated as mPapaya1, displays excellent fluorescent brightness, good photostability, and retains its monomeric character both in vitro and in living cells in the context of protein chimeras. We demonstrate that mPapaya1 can serve as a good Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) acceptor when paired with an mTFP1 donor. mPapaya1 is a valuable addition to the palette of FP variants that are useful for multicolor imaging and FRET-based biosensing.

  17. How acidic are monomeric structural units of heparin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2013-12-01

    Density functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional have been used to letter the acidity of carboxyl, O-sulfo and N-sulfo groups in six basic monomeric structural units of heparin (1-OMe ΔUA-2S, 1-OMe GlcN-S6S, 1,4-DiOMe GlcA, 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S3S6S, 1,4-DiOMe IdoA-2S, and 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S6S). The predicted gas-phase acidity of the acidic functional groups in the monomeric structural units of heparin is: O-sulfo > N-sulfo > carboxyl. The computed pKa values provide the same order of acidity as was observed in water solution. This implies that hydration does not change ordering of acidity of major acidic groups of monomeric structural units of heparin.

  18. Purification and Functional Reconstitution of Monomeric μ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kuszak, Adam J.; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Anand, Jessica P.; Mosberg, Henry I.; Walter, Nils G.; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2009-01-01

    Despite extensive characterization of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), the biochemical properties of the isolated receptor remain unclear. In light of recent reports, we proposed that the monomeric form of MOR can activate G proteins and be subject to allosteric regulation. A μ-opioid receptor fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YMOR) was constructed and expressed in insect cells. YMOR binds ligands with high affinity, displays agonist-stimulated [35S]guanosine 5′-(γ-thio)triphosphate binding to Gαi, and is allosterically regulated by coupled Gi protein heterotrimer both in insect cell membranes and as purified protein reconstituted into a phospholipid bilayer in the form of high density lipoprotein particles. Single-particle imaging of fluorescently labeled receptor indicates that the reconstituted YMOR is monomeric. Moreover, single-molecule imaging of a Cy3-labeled agonist, [Lys7, Cys8]dermorphin, illustrates a novel method for studying G protein-coupled receptor-ligand binding and suggests that one molecule of agonist binds per monomeric YMOR. Together these data support the notion that oligomerization of the μ-opioid receptor is not required for agonist and antagonist binding and that the monomeric receptor is the minimal functional unit in regard to G protein activation and strong allosteric regulation of agonist binding by G proteins. PMID:19542234

  19. Monomeric Tartrate Resistant Acid Phosphatase Induces Insulin Sensitive Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lång, Pernilla; van Harmelen, Vanessa; Rydén, Mikael; Kaaman, Maria; Parini, Paolo; Carneheim, Claes; Cassady, A. Ian; Hume, David A.; Andersson, Göran; Arner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, which may link adipose inflammation to insulin resistance. However, the impact of inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) is an enzyme expressed by subsets of macrophages and osteoclasts that exists either as an enzymatically inactive monomer or as an active, proteolytically processed dimer. Principal Findings Using mice over expressing TRAP, we show that over-expression of monomeric, but not the dimeric form in adipose tissue leads to early onset spontaneous hyperplastic obesity i.e. many small fat cells. In vitro, recombinant monomeric, but not proteolytically processed TRAP induced proliferation and differentiation of mouse and human adipocyte precursor cells. In humans, monomeric TRAP was highly expressed in the adipose tissue of obese individuals. In both the mouse model and in the obese humans the source of TRAP in adipose tissue was macrophages. In addition, the obese TRAP over expressing mice exhibited signs of a low-grade inflammatory reaction in adipose tissue without evidence of abnormal adipocyte lipolysis, lipogenesis or insulin sensitivity. Conclusion Monomeric TRAP, most likely secreted from adipose tissue macrophages, induces hyperplastic obesity with normal adipocyte lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. PMID:18320034

  20. Homotropic cooperativity of monomeric cytochrome P450 3A4

    SciTech Connect

    Baas, Bradley J.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G.

    2010-11-16

    Mechanistic studies of mammalian cytochrome P450s are often obscured by the phase heterogeneity of solubilized preparations of membrane enzymes. The various protein-protein aggregation states of microsomes, detergent solubilized cytochrome or a family of aqueous multimeric complexes can effect measured substrate binding events as well as subsequent steps in the reaction cycle. In addition, these P450 monooxygenases are normally found in a membrane environment and the bilayer composition and dynamics can also effect these catalytic steps. Here, we describe the structural and functional characterization of a homogeneous monomeric population of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP 3A4) in a soluble nanoscale membrane bilayer, or Nanodisc [Nano Lett. 2 (2002) 853]. Cytochrome P450 3A4:Nanodisc assemblies were formed and purified to yield a 1:1 ratio of CYP 3A4 to Nanodisc. Solution small angle X-ray scattering was used to structurally characterize this monomeric CYP 3A4 in the membrane bilayer. The purified CYP 3A4:Nanodiscs showed a heretofore undescribed high level of homotropic cooperativity in the binding of testosterone. Soluble CYP 3A4:Nanodisc retains its known function and shows prototypic hydroxylation of testosterone when driven by hydrogen peroxide. This represents the first functional characterization of a true monomeric preparation of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase in a phospholipid bilayer and elucidates new properties of the monomeric form.

  1. Low-frequency spectroscopic analysis of monomeric and fibrillar lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Hidayatul A; Fischer, Bernd M; Bradley, Andrew P; Jones, Inke; Abbott, Derek; Middelberg, Anton P J; Falconer, Robert J

    2011-03-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to generate far-infrared and low-frequency spectral measurements of monomeric lysozyme and lysozyme fibrils. The formation of lysozyme fibrils was verified by the Thioflavin T assay and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was evident in the FT-IR spectra that between 150 and 350 cm(-1) the two spectra diverge, with the lysozyme fibrils showing higher absorbance intensity than the monomeric form. The broad absorption phenomenon is likely due to light scattered from the fibrillar architecture of lysozyme fibrils as supported by simulation of Rayleigh light scattering. The lack of discrete phonon-like peaks suggest that far-infrared spectroscopy cannot detect vibrational modes between the highly ordered hydrogen-bonded beta-pleated sheets of the lysozyme subunit.

  2. A bright monomeric green fluorescent protein derived from Branchiostoma lanceolatum

    PubMed Central

    Shaner, Nathan C.; Lambert, Gerard G.; Chammas, Andrew; Ni, Yuhui; Cranfill, Paula J.; Baird, Michelle A.; Sell, Brittney R.; Allen, John R.; Day, Richard N.; Israelsson, Maria; Davidson, Michael W.; Wang, Jiwu

    2013-01-01

    Despite the existence of fluorescent proteins spanning the entire visual spectrum, the bulk of modern imaging experiments continue to rely on variants of the green fluorescent protein derived from Aequorea victoria. Meanwhile, a great deal of recent effort has been devoted to engineering and improving red fluorescent proteins, and relatively little attention has been given to green and yellow variants. Here we report a novel monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein, mNeonGreen, which is derived from a tetrameric fluorescent protein from the cephalochordate Branchiostoma lanceolatum. This fluorescent protein is the brightest monomeric green or yellow fluorescent protein yet described, performs exceptionally well as a fusion tag for traditional imaging as well as stochastic single-molecule superresolution imaging, and is an excellent FRET acceptor for the newest generation of cyan fluorescent proteins. PMID:23524392

  3. Addition-type polyimides from solutions of monomeric reactants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, P.; Serafini, T. T.; Lightsey, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The monomeric reactants approach was used to fabricate addition-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites with improved mechanical properties and thermal stability characteristics over those of composites derived from addition-type amide acid prepolymers. A screening study of 24 different monomer combinations was performed. The results of a more extensive investigation of a selected number of monomer combinations showed that the combination providing the best thermomechanical properties was 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester/4,4'-methylenedianiline/3,3'4,4'-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid dimethyl ester at a molar ratio of 2/3.09/2.09.

  4. Thermally stable polyimides from solutions of monomeric reactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Lightsey, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    A method for preparing thermally stable resin-fiber-reinforced composites by using solutions of appropriate monomers is described. Solutions containing a dimethyl ester of an aryl tetracarboxylic acid, the monomethyl ester of nadic acid, and an aryl diamine were used to impregnate graphite fibers. Composites fabricated from these prepregs exhibited excellent thermo-oxidative stability and retention of mechanical properties at 315 C (600 F). These results compare favorably to those obtained from composites made from amide-acid prepolymers capped with reactive alicyclic rings. Monomeric solutions provide excellent shelf life and improved solubility compared to amide-acid prepolymer solutions.

  5. Addition-type polyimides from solutions of monomeric reactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, P.; Serafini, T. T.; Lightsey, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The monomeric reactants approach was used to fabricate addition-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites with improved mechanical properties and thermal stability characteristics over those of composites derived from addition-type amide acid prepolymers. A screening study of 24 different monomer combinations was performed. The results of a more extensive investigation of a selected number of monomer combinations showed that the combination providing the best thermomechanical properties was 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester/4,4'-methylenedianiline/3,3'4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dimethyl ester at a molar ratio of 2/3.09/2.09.

  6. Addition-type polyimides from solutions of monomeric reactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, P.; Serafini, T. T.; Lightsey, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The monomeric reactants approach was used to fabricate addition-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites with improved mechanical properties and thermal stability characteristics over those of composites derived from addition-type amide acid prepolymers. A screening study of 24 different monomer combinations was performed. The results of a more extensive investigation of a selected number of monomer combinations showed that the combination providing the best thermomechanical properties was 5-norbornene-2.3-dicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester/4,4(')-methylenedianiline/3,3(')4,4(')-benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid dimethyl ester at a molar ratio of 2/3.09/2.09.

  7. Hydration of monomeric metaphosphate anion in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Keesee, R.G.; Castleman, A.W. Jr. )

    1989-12-06

    Thermochemical data for the clustering of water molecules onto the monomeric metaphosphate anion PO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} in the gas phase are derived from a study by high-pressure mass spectrometry. Experimental details are described, and the enthalpy and entropy changes for the successive addition of the first four water (D{sub 2}O) molecules are reported. The results indicate that PO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} undergoes simple adduct formation up to the second hydration step, but the third hydration step involves an isomerization of the ion-water cluster into the dihydrate of the dihydrogen orthophosphate anion.

  8. A novel subfamily of monomeric inorganic pyrophosphatases in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-García, María R.; Losada, Manuel; Serrano, Aurelio

    2005-01-01

    Two sPPases (soluble inorganic pyrophosphatases, EC 3.6.1.1) have been isolated from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Both are monomeric proteins of organellar localization, the chloroplastic sPPase I [Cr (Ch. reinhardtii)-sPPase I, 30 kDa] is a major isoform and slightly larger protein than the mitochondrial sPPase II (Cr-sPPase II, 24 kDa). They are members of sPPase family I and are encoded by two different cDNAs, as demonstrated by peptide mass fingerprint analysis. Molecular phylogenetic analyses indicated that Cr-sPPase I is closely related to other eukaryotic sPPases, whereas Cr-sPPase II resembles its prokaryotic counterparts. Chloroplastic sPPase I may have replaced a cyanobacterial ancestor very early during plastid evolution. Cr-sPPase II orthologues are found in members of the green photosynthetic lineage, but not in animals or fungi. These two sPPases from photosynthetic eukaryotes are novel monomeric family I sPPases with different molecular phylogenies and cellular localizations. PMID:16313235

  9. Sensitivities of droplet size and stability in monomeric emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Fontenot, K.; Schork, F.J. )

    1993-02-01

    The stability of a monomeric emulsion is directly dependent on the size of the monomer droplets. The droplet diameter is in turn significantly influenced by a variety of parameters. Both size and stability are important when emulsions consisting of small droplets are polymerized. These parameters were studied for the monomer methyl methacrylate, although the monomers styrene and vinyl acetate were also considered. Conductance was developed as a predictive tool for providing a measurement of emulsion stability. These indications were verified by shelf life stabilities and droplet size measurements. The key parameters which affect size and stability were found to be cosurfactant concentration and monomer water solubility. Coalescence was found to play an important role in stability as well.

  10. Formation of Amyloid Fibers by Monomeric Light Chain Variable Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Brumshtein, Boris; Esswein, Shannon R.; Landau, Meytal; Ryan, Christopher M.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Phillips, Martin L.; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic light chain amyloidosis is a lethal disease characterized by excess immunoglobulin light chains and light chain fragments composed of variable domains, which aggregate into amyloid fibers. These fibers accumulate and damage organs. Some light chains induce formation of amyloid fibers, whereas others do not, making it unclear what distinguishes amyloid formers from non-formers. One mechanism by which sequence variation may reduce propensity to form amyloid fibers is by shifting the equilibrium toward an amyloid-resistant quaternary structure. Here we identify the monomeric form of the Mcg immunoglobulin light chain variable domain as the quaternary unit required for amyloid fiber assembly. Dimers of Mcg variable domains remain stable and soluble, yet become prone to assemble into amyloid fibers upon disassociation into monomers. PMID:25138218

  11. Monomeric Bistability and the Role of Autoloops in Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Ricard

    2009-01-01

    Genetic toggle switches are widespread in gene regulatory networks (GRN). Bistability, namely the ability to choose among two different stable states, is an essential feature of switching and memory devices. Cells have many regulatory circuits able to provide bistability that endow a cell with efficient and reliable switching between different physiological modes of operation. It is often assumed that negative feedbacks with cooperative binding (i.e. the formation of dimers or multimers) are a prerequisite for bistability. Here we analyze the relation between bistability in GRN under monomeric regulation and the role of autoloops under a deterministic setting. Using a simple geometric argument, we show analytically that bistability can also emerge without multimeric regulation, provided that at least one regulatory autoloop is present. PMID:19404388

  12. Light-induced structural changes in a monomeric bacteriophytochrome

    PubMed Central

    Takala, Heikki; Niebling, Stephan; Berntsson, Oskar; Björling, Alexander; Lehtivuori, Heli; Häkkänen, Heikki; Panman, Matthijs; Gustavsson, Emil; Hoernke, Maria; Newby, Gemma; Zontone, Federico; Wulff, Michael; Menzel, Andreas; Ihalainen, Janne A.; Westenhoff, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Phytochromes sense red light in plants and various microorganism. Light absorption causes structural changes within the protein, which alter its biochemical activity. Bacterial phytochromes are dimeric proteins, but the functional relevance of this arrangement remains unclear. Here, we use time-resolved X-ray scattering to reveal the solution structural change of a monomeric variant of the photosensory core module of the phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans. The data reveal two motions, a bend and a twist of the PHY domain with respect to the chromophore-binding domains. Infrared spectroscopy shows the refolding of the PHY tongue. We conclude that a monomer of the phytochrome photosensory core is sufficient to perform the light-induced structural changes. This implies that allosteric cooperation with the other monomer is not needed for structural activation. The dimeric arrangement may instead be intrinsic to the biochemical output domains of bacterial phytochromes. PMID:27679804

  13. Formation of amyloid fibers by monomeric light chain variable domains.

    PubMed

    Brumshtein, Boris; Esswein, Shannon R; Landau, Meytal; Ryan, Christopher M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Phillips, Martin L; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-10-03

    Systemic light chain amyloidosis is a lethal disease characterized by excess immunoglobulin light chains and light chain fragments composed of variable domains, which aggregate into amyloid fibers. These fibers accumulate and damage organs. Some light chains induce formation of amyloid fibers, whereas others do not, making it unclear what distinguishes amyloid formers from non-formers. One mechanism by which sequence variation may reduce propensity to form amyloid fibers is by shifting the equilibrium toward an amyloid-resistant quaternary structure. Here we identify the monomeric form of the Mcg immunoglobulin light chain variable domain as the quaternary unit required for amyloid fiber assembly. Dimers of Mcg variable domains remain stable and soluble, yet become prone to assemble into amyloid fibers upon disassociation into monomers. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Monomeric structure of the cardioprotective chemokine SDF-1/CXCL12

    PubMed Central

    Veldkamp, Christopher T; Ziarek, Joshua J; Su, Jidong; Basnet, Harihar; Lennertz, Richard; Weiner, Joshua J; Peterson, Francis C; Baker, John E; Volkman, Brian F

    2009-01-01

    The chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1/CXCL12) directs leukocyte migration, stem cell homing, and cancer metastasis through activation of CXCR4, which is also a coreceptor for T-tropic HIV-1. Recently, SDF-1 was shown to play a protective role after myocardial infarction, and the protein is a candidate for development of new anti-ischemic compounds. SDF-1 is monomeric at nanomolar concentrations but binding partners promote self-association at higher concentrations to form a typical CXC chemokine homodimer. Two NMR structures have been reported for the SDF-1 monomer, but only one matches the conformation observed in a series of dimeric crystal structures. In the other model, the C-terminal helix is tilted at an angle incompatible with SDF-1 dimerization. Using a rat heart explant model for ischemia/reperfusion injury, we found that dimeric SDF-1 exerts no cardioprotective effect, suggesting that the active species is monomeric. To resolve the discrepancy between existing models, we solved the NMR structure of the SDF-1 monomer in different solution conditions. Irrespective of pH and buffer composition, the C-terminal helix remains tilted at an angle with no evidence for the perpendicular arrangement. Furthermore, we find that phospholipid bicelles promote dimerization that necessarily shifts the helix to the perpendicular orientation, yielding dipolar couplings that are incompatible with the NOE distance constraints. We conclude that interactions with the alignment medium biased the previous structure, masking flexibility in the helix position that may be essential for the distinct functional properties of the SDF-1 monomer. PMID:19551879

  15. Highly neurotoxic monomeric α-helical prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Minghai; Ottenberg, Gregory; Sferrazza, Gian Franco; Lasmézas, Corinne Ida

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases are infectious and belong to the group of protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. In these diseases, neuronal dysfunction and death are caused by the neuronal toxicity of a particular misfolded form of their cognate protein. The ability to specifically target the toxic protein conformer or the neuronal death pathway would provide powerful therapeutic approaches to these diseases. The neurotoxic forms of the prion protein (PrP) have yet to be defined but there is evidence suggesting that at least some of them differ from infectious PrP (PrPSc). Herein, without making an assumption about size or conformation, we searched for toxic forms of recombinant PrP after dilution refolding, size fractionation, and systematic biological testing of all fractions. We found that the PrP species most neurotoxic in vitro and in vivo (toxic PrP, TPrP) is a monomeric, highly α-helical form of PrP. TPrP caused autophagy, apoptosis, and a molecular signature remarkably similar to that observed in the brains of prion-infected animals. Interestingly, highly α-helical intermediates have been described for other amyloidogenic proteins but their biological significance remains to be established. We provide unique experimental evidence that a monomeric α-helical form of an amyloidogenic protein represents a cytotoxic species. Although toxic PrP has yet to be purified from prion-infected brains, TPrP might be the equivalent of one highly neurotoxic PrP species generated during prion replication. Because TPrP is a misfolded, highly neurotoxic form of PrP reproducing several features of prion-induced neuronal death, it constitutes a useful model to study PrP-induced neurodegenerative mechanisms. PMID:22323583

  16. Dual allosteric activation mechanisms in monomeric human glucokinase.

    PubMed

    Whittington, A Carl; Larion, Mioara; Bowler, Joseph M; Ramsey, Kristen M; Brüschweiler, Rafael; Miller, Brian G

    2015-09-15

    Cooperativity in human glucokinase (GCK), the body's primary glucose sensor and a major determinant of glucose homeostatic diseases, is fundamentally different from textbook models of allostery because GCK is monomeric and contains only one glucose-binding site. Prior work has demonstrated that millisecond timescale order-disorder transitions within the enzyme's small domain govern cooperativity. Here, using limited proteolysis, we map the site of disorder in unliganded GCK to a 30-residue active-site loop that closes upon glucose binding. Positional randomization of the loop, coupled with genetic selection in a glucokinase-deficient bacterium, uncovers a hyperactive GCK variant with substantially reduced cooperativity. Biochemical and structural analysis of this loop variant and GCK variants associated with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia reveal two distinct mechanisms of enzyme activation. In α-type activation, glucose affinity is increased, the proteolytic susceptibility of the active site loop is suppressed and the (1)H-(13)C heteronuclear multiple quantum coherence (HMQC) spectrum of (13)C-Ile-labeled enzyme resembles the glucose-bound state. In β-type activation, glucose affinity is largely unchanged, proteolytic susceptibility of the loop is enhanced, and the (1)H-(13)C HMQC spectrum reveals no perturbation in ensemble structure. Leveraging both activation mechanisms, we engineer a fully noncooperative GCK variant, whose functional properties are indistinguishable from other hexokinase isozymes, and which displays a 100-fold increase in catalytic efficiency over wild-type GCK. This work elucidates specific structural features responsible for generating allostery in a monomeric enzyme and suggests a general strategy for engineering cooperativity into proteins that lack the structural framework typical of traditional allosteric systems.

  17. Holistic versus monomeric strategies for hydrological modelling of modified hydrosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbantis, I.; Efstratiadis, A.; Rozos, E.; Kopsiafti, M.; Koutsoyiannis, D.

    2010-10-01

    The modelling of modified basins that are inadequately measured constitutes a challenge for hydrological science. Often, models for such systems are detailed and hydraulics-based for only one part of the system while for other parts oversimplified models or rough assumptions are used. This is typically a bottom-up approach, which seeks to exploit knowledge of hydrological processes at the micro-scale at some components of the system. Also, it is a monomeric approach in two ways: first, essential interactions among system components may be poorly represented or even omitted; second, differences in the level of detail of process representation can lead to uncontrolled errors. Additionally, the calibration procedure merely accounts for the reproduction of the observed responses using typical fitting criteria. The paper aims to raise some critical issues, regarding the entire modelling approach for such hydrosystems. For this, two alternative modelling strategies are examined that reflect two modelling approaches or philosophies: a dominant bottom-up approach, which is also monomeric and very often, based on output information and a top-down and holistic approach based on generalized information. Critical options are examined, which codify the differences between the two strategies: the representation of surface, groundwater and water management processes, the schematization and parameterization concepts and the parameter estimation methodology. The first strategy is based on stand-alone models for surface and groundwater processes and for water management, which are employed sequentially. For each model, a different (detailed or coarse) parameterization is used, which is dictated by the hydrosystem schematization. The second strategy involves model integration for all processes, parsimonious parameterization and hybrid manual-automatic parameter optimization based on multiple objectives. A test case is examined in a hydrosystem in Greece with high complexities, such

  18. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Monomeric LHCII: Experiment and Theory

    PubMed Central

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J. Michael; van Grondelle, Rienk; Mančal, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    We derive approximate equations of motion for excited state dynamics of a multilevel open quantum system weakly interacting with light to describe fluorescence-detected single molecule spectra. Based on the Frenkel exciton theory, we construct a model for the chlorophyll part of the LHCII complex of higher plants and its interaction with previously proposed excitation quencher in the form of the lutein molecule Lut 1. The resulting description is valid over a broad range of timescales relevant for single molecule spectroscopy, i.e. from ps to minutes. Validity of these equations is demonstrated by comparing simulations of ensemble and single-molecule spectra of monomeric LHCII with experiments. Using a conformational change of the LHCII protein as a switching mechanism, the intensity and spectral time traces of individual LHCII complexes are simulated, and the experimental statistical distributions are reproduced. Based on our model, it is shown that with reasonable assumptions about its interaction with chlorophylls, Lut 1 can act as an efficient fluorescence quencher in LHCII. PMID:27189196

  19. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Monomeric LHCII: Experiment and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malý, Pavel; Gruber, J. Michael; van Grondelle, Rienk; Mančal, Tomáš

    2016-05-01

    We derive approximate equations of motion for excited state dynamics of a multilevel open quantum system weakly interacting with light to describe fluorescence-detected single molecule spectra. Based on the Frenkel exciton theory, we construct a model for the chlorophyll part of the LHCII complex of higher plants and its interaction with previously proposed excitation quencher in the form of the lutein molecule Lut 1. The resulting description is valid over a broad range of timescales relevant for single molecule spectroscopy, i.e. from ps to minutes. Validity of these equations is demonstrated by comparing simulations of ensemble and single-molecule spectra of monomeric LHCII with experiments. Using a conformational change of the LHCII protein as a switching mechanism, the intensity and spectral time traces of individual LHCII complexes are simulated, and the experimental statistical distributions are reproduced. Based on our model, it is shown that with reasonable assumptions about its interaction with chlorophylls, Lut 1 can act as an efficient fluorescence quencher in LHCII.

  20. Fundamental monomeric biomaterial diagnostics by radio frequency signal analysis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jae-Hoon; Shin, Kyeong-Sik; Kang, Shinill; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kang, Ji Yoon; Kim, Sinyoung; Jun, Seong Chan

    2016-08-15

    We present a new diagnostic technique of fundamental monomeric biomaterials that do not rely on any enzyme or chemical reaction. Instead, it only uses radio frequency (RF) signal analysis. The detection and classification of basic biomaterials, such as glucose and albumin, were demonstrated. The device was designed to generate a strong resonance response with glucose solution and fabricated by simple photolithography with PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) well. It even was used to detect the level of glucose in mixtures of glucose and albumin and in human serum, and it operated properly and identified the glucose concentration precisely. It has a detection limit about 100μM (1.8mg/dl), and a sensitivity about 58MHz per 1mM of glucose and exhibited a good linearity in human blood glucose level. In addition, the intrinsic electrical properties of biomaterials can be investigated by a de-embedding technique and an equivalent circuit analysis. The capacitance of glucose containing samples exhibited bell-shaped Gaussian dispersion spectra around 2.4GHz. The Albumin solution did not represent a clear dispersion spectra compared to glucose, and the magnitude of resistance and inductance of albumin was higher than that of other samples. Other parameters also represented distinguishable patterns to classify those biomaterials. It leads us to expect future usage of our technique as a pattern-recognizing biosensor. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Monomeric red fluorescent proteins with a large Stokes shift.

    PubMed

    Piatkevich, Kiryl D; Hulit, James; Subach, Oksana M; Wu, Bin; Abdulla, Arian; Segall, Jeffrey E; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2010-03-23

    Two-photon microscopy has advanced fluorescence imaging of cellular processes in living animals. Fluorescent proteins in the blue-green wavelength range are widely used in two-photon microscopy; however, the use of red fluorescent proteins is limited by the low power output of Ti-Sapphire lasers above 1,000 nm. To overcome this limitation we have developed two red fluorescent proteins, LSS-mKate1 and LSS-mKate2, which possess large Stokes shifts with excitation/emission maxima at 463/624 and 460/605 nm, respectively. These LSS-mKates are characterized by high pH stability, photostability, rapid chromophore maturation, and monomeric behavior. They lack absorbance in the green region, providing an additional red color to the commonly used red fluorescent proteins. Substantial overlap between the two-photon excitation spectra of the LSS-mKates and blue-green fluorophores enables multicolor imaging using a single laser. We applied this approach to a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer to intravitally study the motility and Golgi-nucleus alignment of tumor cells as a function of their distance from blood vessels. Our data indicate that within 40 mum the breast cancer cells show significant polarization towards vessels in living mice.

  2. The usefulness of monomeric periostin as a biomarker for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Kiminori; Sakamoto, Noriho; Takahashi, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Kushima, Hisako; Ishii, Hiroshi; Akasaka, Keiichi; Ono, Junya; Kamei, Ayami; Azuma, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Hisako; Yamaguchi, Yukie; Aihara, Michiko; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Ichiki, Masao; Sagara, Hironori; Kadota, Jun-ichi; Hanaoka, Masayuki; Hayashi, Shin-ichiro; Kohno, Shigeru; Hoshino, Tomoaki; Izuhara, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    The natural course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is variable. Predicting disease progression and survival in IPF is important for treatment. We previously demonstrated that serum periostin has the potential to be a prognostic biomarker for IPF. Our aim was to use monomeric periostin in a multicenter study to evaluate its efficacy in diagnosing IPF and predicting its progression. To do so, we developed a new periostin kit to detect only monomeric periostin. The subjects consisted of 60 IPF patients in a multicenter cohort study. We applied monomeric periostin, total periostin detected by a conventional kit, and the conventional biomarkers—KL-6, SP-D, and LDH—to diagnose IPF and to predict its short-term progression as estimated by short-term changes of %VC and % DL, CO. Moreover, we compared the fraction ratios of monomeric periostin to total periostin in IPF with those in other periostin-high diseases: atopic dermatitis, systemic scleroderma, and asthma. Monomeric periostin showed the greatest ability to identify IPF comparable with KL-6 and SP-D. Both monomeric and total periostin were well correlated with the decline of %VC and % DL, CO. Clustering of IPF patients into high and low periostin groups proved useful for predicting the short-term progression of IPF. Moreover, the relative ratio of monomeric periostin was higher in IPF than in other periostin-high diseases. Measuring monomeric periostin is useful for diagnosing IPF and predicting its short-term progression. Moreover, the ratio of monomeric periostin to total periostin is elevated in IPF compared to other periostin-high diseases. PMID:28355256

  3. Substrate-Induced Dimerization of Engineered Monomeric Variants of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Estrella, Priscilla; Portillo, Carmen; Cruces, María E; Jimenez-Sandoval, Pedro; Fattori, Juliana; Migliorini-Figueira, Ana C; Lopez-Hidalgo, Marisol; Diaz-Quezada, Corina; Lopez-Castillo, Margarita; Trasviña-Arenas, Carlos H; Sanchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime; Arroyo, Rossana; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G; Brieba, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    The dimeric nature of triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs) is maintained by an extensive surface area interface of more than 1600 Å2. TIMs from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvTIM) are held in their dimeric state by two mechanisms: a ball and socket interaction of residue 45 of one subunit that fits into the hydrophobic pocket of the complementary subunit and by swapping of loop 3 between subunits. TvTIMs differ from other TIMs in their unfolding energetics. In TvTIMs the energy necessary to unfold a monomer is greater than the energy necessary to dissociate the dimer. Herein we found that the character of residue I45 controls the dimer-monomer equilibrium in TvTIMs. Unfolding experiments employing monomeric and dimeric mutants led us to conclude that dimeric TvTIMs unfold following a four state model denaturation process whereas monomeric TvTIMs follow a three state model. In contrast to other monomeric TIMs, monomeric variants of TvTIM1 are stable and unexpectedly one of them (I45A) is only 29-fold less active than wild-type TvTIM1. The high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIMs contrast with the marginal catalytic activity of diverse monomeric TIMs variants. The stability of the monomeric variants of TvTIM1 and the use of cross-linking and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments permit us to understand the differences between the catalytic activities of TvTIMs and other marginally active monomeric TIMs. As TvTIMs do not unfold upon dimer dissociation, herein we found that the high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIM variants is explained by the formation of catalytic dimeric competent species assisted by substrate binding.

  4. Substrate-Induced Dimerization of Engineered Monomeric Variants of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Estrella, Priscilla; Portillo, Carmen; Cruces, María E.; Jimenez-Sandoval, Pedro; Fattori, Juliana; Migliorini-Figueira, Ana C.; Lopez-Hidalgo, Marisol; Diaz-Quezada, Corina; Lopez-Castillo, Margarita; Trasviña-Arenas, Carlos H.; Sanchez-Sandoval, Eugenia; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime; Arroyo, Rossana; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia G.; Brieba, Luis G.

    2015-01-01

    The dimeric nature of triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs) is maintained by an extensive surface area interface of more than 1600 Å2. TIMs from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvTIM) are held in their dimeric state by two mechanisms: a ball and socket interaction of residue 45 of one subunit that fits into the hydrophobic pocket of the complementary subunit and by swapping of loop 3 between subunits. TvTIMs differ from other TIMs in their unfolding energetics. In TvTIMs the energy necessary to unfold a monomer is greater than the energy necessary to dissociate the dimer. Herein we found that the character of residue I45 controls the dimer-monomer equilibrium in TvTIMs. Unfolding experiments employing monomeric and dimeric mutants led us to conclude that dimeric TvTIMs unfold following a four state model denaturation process whereas monomeric TvTIMs follow a three state model. In contrast to other monomeric TIMs, monomeric variants of TvTIM1 are stable and unexpectedly one of them (I45A) is only 29-fold less active than wild-type TvTIM1. The high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIMs contrast with the marginal catalytic activity of diverse monomeric TIMs variants. The stability of the monomeric variants of TvTIM1 and the use of cross-linking and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments permit us to understand the differences between the catalytic activities of TvTIMs and other marginally active monomeric TIMs. As TvTIMs do not unfold upon dimer dissociation, herein we found that the high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIM variants is explained by the formation of catalytic dimeric competent species assisted by substrate binding. PMID:26618356

  5. Trigger factor assists the refolding of heterodimeric but not monomeric luciferases.

    PubMed

    Melkina, O E; Goryanin, I I; Manukhov, I V; Baranova, A V; Kolb, V A; Svetlov, M S; Zavilgelsky, G B

    2014-01-01

    The refolding of thermally inactivated protein by ATP-independent trigger factor (TF) and ATP-dependent DnaKJE chaperones was comparatively analyzed. Heterodimeric (αβ) bacterial luciferases of Aliivibrio fischeri, Photobacterium leiognathi, and Vibrio harveyi as well as monomeric luciferases of Vibrio harveyi and Luciola mingrelica (firefly) were used as substrates. In the presence of TF, thermally inactivated heterodimeric bacterial luciferases refold, while monomeric luciferases do not refold. These observations were made both in vivo (Escherichia coli ΔdnaKJ containing plasmids with tig gene) and in vitro (purified TF). Unlike TF, the DnaKJE chaperone system refolds both monomeric and heterodimeric luciferases with equal efficiency.

  6. Crystal Structures of Monomeric Actin Bound to Cytochalasin D

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Usha B.; Joel, Peteranne B.; Wan, Qun; Lowey, Susan; Rould, Mark A.; Trybus, Kathleen M.

    2008-01-01

    The fungal toxin cytochalasin D (CD) interferes with the normal dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton by binding to the barbed end of actin filaments. Despite its widespread use as a tool for studying actin-mediated processes, the exact location and nature of its binding to actin has not been previously determined. Here we describe two crystal structures of an expressed monomeric actin in complex with CD, one obtained by soaking preformed actin crystals with CD, and the other by co-crystallization. The binding site for CD, in the hydrophobic cleft between actin subdomains 1 and 3, is the same in the two structures. Polar and hydrophobic contacts play an equally important role in CD binding, and six hydrogen bonds stabilize the actin-CD complex. Many unrelated actin-binding proteins and marine toxins target this cleft, and the hydrophobic pocket at the front end of the cleft (viewing actin with subdomain 2 in the upper right corner). CD differs in that it binds to the back half of the cleft. The ability of CD to induce actin dimer formation and actin-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis may be related to its unique binding site, and the necessity to fit its bulky macrocycle into this cleft. Contacts with residues lining this cleft appear to be crucial to capping and/or severing. The co-crystallized actin-CD structure also revealed changes in actin conformation. A rotation of ~6° of the smaller actin domain (subdomains 1 and 2) with respect to the larger domain (subdomains 3 and 4) results in small changes in crystal packing that allow the D-loop to adopt an extended loop structure, instead of being disordered as it is in most crystal structures of actin. We speculate that these changes represent a potential conformation that the actin monomer can adopt on the pathway to polymerization or in the filament. PMID:18938176

  7. Synthesis and crystal structure of a dinuclear, monomeric Mn(II) p-semiquinonato complex.

    PubMed

    Nakamori, Harutaka; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Yatabe, Takeshi; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Nakai, Hidetaka; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-11-07

    Herein, we report the first crystal structure of a monomeric p-semiquinonato d-block complex and its reactivity toward dioxygen, closely associated with a biological system of an oxygen evolving centre of photosystem II.

  8. Amphiphile dependency of the monomeric and dimeric forms of acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Ott, P; Brodbeck, U

    1984-08-08

    Human erythrocyte membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase was converted to a monomeric species by treatment of ghosts with 2-mercaptoethanol and iodoacetic acid. After solubilization with Triton X-100, the reduced and alkylated enzyme was partially purified by affinity chromatography and separated from residual dimeric enzyme by sucrose density gradient centrifugation in a zonal rotor. Monomeric and dimeric acetylcholinesterase showed full enzymatic activity in presence of Triton X-100 whereas in the absence of detergent, activity was decreased to approx. 20% and 15%, respectively. Preformed egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles fully sustained activity of the monomeric species whereas the dimer was only 80% active. The results suggest that a dimeric structure is not required for manifestation of amphiphile dependency of membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocytes. Furthermore, monomeric enzyme appears to be more easily inserted into phospholipid bilayers than the dimeric species.

  9. Monomerization of pyrimidine dimers in DNA by tryptophan-containing peptides: wavelength dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.; Griffin, K.P.

    1980-09-01

    Tryptophan-containing peptides and proteins can sensitize the monomerization of pyrimidine dimers in ultraviolet-irradiated DNA; photoreactivating enzymes catalyze the light-induced monomerization of pyrimidine dimers in DNA. It has recently been proposed that a variety of tryptophan-containing proteins and peptides might be confused with true photoreactivating enzymes both in vivo and in vitro. We have thus characterized the wavelengths required for the tryptophan-sensitized dimer monomerization to determine if this process is distinguishable from true enzymatic photoreactivation. We find that 313-nm radiation can monomerize pyrimidine dimers in DNA in the presence of the peptide lysyl-tryptophyl-lysine; however, 334- 365-, and 405-nm radiation are ineffective for fluences up to 1 MJ/m/sup 2/. In contrast, each of these wavelengths is capable of monomerizing dimers in the presence of photoreactivating enzymes. Indeed, 334 and 365 nm are always more effective than 313-nm radiation in the case of true enzymatic photoreactivation. The inability of wavelengths other than those near 300 nm to drive the tryptophan-mediated reaction efficiently is consistent with recently reported spectroscopic experiments. The extreme differences in the wavelength specificities for true enzymatic photoreactivation and tryptophan-sensitized monomerization mean that it is easy to differentiate experimentally between the two phenomena. Consideration of the spectral distributions of conventional sources of photoreactivating light indicate that it is extremely unlikely that any of them could contain significant intensities of the wavelengths required for efficient tryptophan-sensitized monomerization of pyrimidine dimers. We thus conclude that tryptophan-sensitized monomerization cannot account for the disappearance of pyrimidine dimers from DNA in cells or cell extracts exposed to photoreactivating light.

  10. Genome-wide characterization of monomeric transcriptional regulators in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lipeng; Chen, Zhenkang; Wang, Zhongwei; Hu, Yangbo; Chen, Shiyun

    2016-05-01

    Gene transcription catalysed by RNA polymerase is regulated by transcriptional regulators, which play central roles in the control of gene transcription in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In regulating gene transcription, many regulators form dimers that bind to DNA with repeated motifs. However, some regulators function as monomers, but their mechanisms of gene expression control are largely uncharacterized. Here we systematically characterized monomeric versus dimeric regulators in the tuberculosis causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Of the >160 transcriptional regulators annotated in M. tuberculosis, 154 transcriptional regulators were tested, 22 % probably act as monomers and most are annotated as hypothetical regulators. Notably, all members of the WhiB-like protein family are classified as monomers. To further investigate mechanisms of monomeric regulators, we analysed the actions of these WhiB proteins and found that the majority interact with the principal sigma factor σA, which is also a monomeric protein within the RNA polymerase holoenzyme. Taken together, our study for the first time globally classified monomeric regulators in M. tuberculosis and suggested a mechanism for monomeric regulators in controlling gene transcription through interacting with monomeric sigma factors.

  11. Design Function and Structure of a Monomeric CLC Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    L Robertson; L Kolmakova-Partensky; C Miller

    2011-12-31

    Channels and transporters of the ClC family cause the transmembrane movement of inorganic anions in service of a variety of biological tasks, from the unusual - the generation of the kilowatt pulses with which electric fish stun their prey - to the quotidian - the acidification of endosomes, vacuoles and lysosomes. The homodimeric architecture of ClC proteins, initially inferred from single-molecule studies of an elasmobranch Cl{sup -} channel and later confirmed by crystal structures of bacterial Cl{sup -}/H{sup +} antiporters, is apparently universal. Moreover, the basic machinery that enables ion movement through these proteins - the aqueous pores for anion diffusion in the channels and the ion-coupling chambers that coordinate Cl{sup -} and H{sup +} antiport in the transporters - are contained wholly within each subunit of the homodimer. The near-normal function of a bacterial ClC transporter straitjacketed by covalent crosslinks across the dimer interface and the behaviour of a concatemeric human homologue argue that the transport cycle resides within each subunit and does not require rigid-body rearrangements between subunits. However, this evidence is only inferential, and because examples are known in which quaternary rearrangements of extramembrane ClC domains that contribute to dimerization modulate transport activity, we cannot declare as definitive a 'parallel-pathways picture in which the homodimer consists of two single-subunit transporters operating independently. A strong prediction of such a view is that it should in principle be possible to obtain a monomeric ClC. Here we exploit the known structure of a ClC Cl{sup -}/H{sup +} exchanger, ClC-ec1 from Escherichia coli, to design mutants that destabilize the dimer interface while preserving both the structure and the transport function of individual subunits. The results demonstrate that the ClC subunit alone is the basic functional unit for transport and that cross-subunit interaction is not

  12. Effect of monomeric adiponectin on cardiac function and perfusion in anesthetized pig.

    PubMed

    Grossini, Elena; Prodam, Flavia; Walker, Gillian Elisabeth; Sigaudo, Lorenzo; Farruggio, Serena; Bellofatto, Kevin; Marotta, Patrizia; Molinari, Claudio; Mary, David; Bona, Gianni; Vacca, Giovanni

    2014-07-01

    Adiponectin, the most abundant adipokine released by adipose tissue, appears to play an important role in the regulation of vascular endothelial and cardiac function. To date, however, the physiological effects of human monomeric adiponectin on the coronary vasculature and myocardial systo-diastolic function, as well as on parasympathetic/sympathetic involvement and nitric oxide (NO) release, have not yet been investigated. Thus, we planned to determine the primary in vivo effects of human monomeric adiponectin on coronary blood flow and cardiac contractility/relaxation and the related role of autonomic nervous system, adiponectin receptors, and NO. In 30 anesthetized pigs, human monomeric adiponectin was infused into the left anterior descending coronary artery at constant heart rate and arterial blood pressure, and the effects on coronary blood flow, left ventricular systo-diastolic function, myocardial oxygen metabolism, and NO release were examined. The mechanisms of the observed hemodynamic responses were also analyzed by repeating the highest dose of human monomeric adiponectin infusion after autonomic nervous system and NO blockade, and after specific adiponectin 1 receptor antagonist administration. Intracoronary human monomeric adiponectin caused dose-related increases of coronary blood flow and cardiac function. Those effects were accompanied by increased coronary NO release and coronary adiponectin levels. Moreover, the vascular effects of the peptide were prevented by blockade of β2-adrenoceptors and NO synthase, whereas all effects of human monomeric adiponectin were prevented by adiponectin 1 receptor inhibitor. In conclusion, human monomeric adiponectin primarily increased coronary blood flow and cardiac systo-diastolic function through the involvement of specific receptors, β2-adrenoceptors, and NO release.

  13. Relative concordance of human immunodeficiency virus oligomeric and monomeric envelope in CCR5 coreceptor usage

    SciTech Connect

    Teeravechyan, Samaporn; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Essex, Max; Lee, Tun-Hou

    2008-01-20

    A major difference between binding and fusion assays commonly used to study the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope is the use of monomeric envelope for the former assay and oligomeric envelope for the latter. Due to discrepancies in their readouts for some mutants, envelope regions involved in CCR5 coreceptor usage were systematically studied to determine whether the discordance is due to inherent differences between the two assays or whether it genuinely reflects functional differences at each entry step. By adding the binding inhibitor TAK-779 to delay coreceptor binding kinetics in the fusion assay, the readouts were found comparable between the assays for the mutants analysed in this study. Our finding indicates that monomeric binding reflects oligomeric envelope-CCR5 interaction, thus discordant results between binding and fusion assays do not necessarily indicate differences in coreceptor usage by oligomeric envelope and monomeric gp120.

  14. Anthocyanins and their variation in red wines I. Monomeric anthocyanins and their color expression.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Liang, Na-Na; Mu, Lin; Pan, Qiu-Hong; Wang, Jun; Reeves, Malcolm J; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2012-02-07

    Originating in the grapes, monomeric anthocyanins in young red wines contribute the majority of color and the supposed beneficial health effects related to their consumption, and as such they are recognized as one of the most important groups of phenolic metabolites in red wines. In recent years, our increasing knowledge of the chemical complexity of the monomeric anthocyanins, their stability, together with the phenomena such as self-association and copigmentation that can stabilize and enhance their color has helped to explain their color representation in red wine making and aging. A series of new enological practices were developed to improve the anthocyanin extraction, as well as their color expression and maintenance. This paper summarizes the most recent advances in the studies of the monomeric anthocyanins in red wines, emphasizing their origin, occurrence, color enhancing effects, their degradation and the effect of various enological practices on them.

  15. Efficient Coupling of Transducin to Monomeric Rhodopsin in a Phospholipid Bilayer*s

    PubMed Central

    Whorton, Matthew R.; Jastrzebska, Beata; Park, Paul S.-H.; Fotiadis, Dimitrios; Engel, Andreas; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Sunahara, Roger K.

    2008-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane domain proteins that transduce extracellular signals across the plasma membrane and couple to the heterotrimeric family of G proteins. Like most intrinsic membrane proteins, GPCRs are capable of oligomerization, the function of which has only been established for a few different receptor systems. One challenge in understanding the function of oligomers relates to the inability to separate monomeric and oligomeric receptor complexes in membrane environments. Here we report the reconstitution of bovine rhodopsin, a GPCR expressed in the retina, into an apolipoprotein A-I phospholipid particle, derived from high density lipoprotein (HDL). We demonstrate that rhodopsin, when incorporated into these 10 nm reconstituted HDL (rHDL) particles, is monomeric and functional. Rhodopsin·rHDL maintains the appropriate spectral properties with respect to photoactivation and formation of the active form, metarhodopsin II. Additionally, the kinetics of metarhodopsin II decay is similar between rhodopsin in native membranes and rhodopsin in rHDL particles. Photoactivation of monomeric rhodopsin·rHDL also results in the rapid activation of transducin, at a rate that is comparable with that found in native rod outer segments and 20-fold faster than rhodopsin in detergent micelles. These data suggest that monomeric rhodopsin is the minimal functional unit in G protein activation and that oligomerization is not absolutely required for this process. PMID:18033822

  16. Monomeric Rhodopsin Is Sufficient for Normal Rhodopsin Kinase (GRK1) Phosphorylation and Arrestin-1 Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Bayburt, Timothy H.; Vishnivetskiy, Sergey A.; McLean, Mark A.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Huang, Chih-chin; Tesmer, John J. G.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Sligar, Stephen G.; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization has been observed in a wide variety of experimental contexts, but the functional significance of this phenomenon at different stages of the life cycle of class A GPCRs remains to be elucidated. Rhodopsin (Rh), a prototypical class A GPCR of visual transduction, is also capable of forming dimers and higher order oligomers. The recent demonstration that Rh monomer is sufficient to activate its cognate G protein, transducin, prompted us to test whether the same monomeric state is sufficient for rhodopsin phosphorylation and arrestin-1 binding. Here we show that monomeric active rhodopsin is phosphorylated by rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) as efficiently as rhodopsin in the native disc membrane. Monomeric phosphorylated light-activated Rh (P-Rh*) in nanodiscs binds arrestin-1 essentially as well as P-Rh* in native disc membranes. We also measured the affinity of arrestin-1 for P-Rh* in nanodiscs using a fluorescence-based assay and found that arrestin-1 interacts with monomeric P-Rh* with low nanomolar affinity and 1:1 stoichiometry, as previously determined in native disc membranes. Thus, similar to transducin activation, rhodopsin phosphorylation by GRK1 and high affinity arrestin-1 binding only requires a rhodopsin monomer. PMID:20966068

  17. Bright monomeric near-infrared fluorescent proteins as tags and biosensors for multiscale imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Baloban, Mikhail; Emelyanov, Alexander V.; Brenowitz, Michael; Guo, Peng; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2016-01-01

    Monomeric near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent proteins (FPs) are in high demand as protein tags and components of biosensors for deep-tissue imaging and multicolour microscopy. We report three bright and spectrally distinct monomeric NIR FPs, termed miRFPs, engineered from bacterial phytochrome, which can be used as easily as GFP-like FPs. miRFPs are 2–5-fold brighter in mammalian cells than other monomeric NIR FPs and perform well in protein fusions, allowing multicolour structured illumination microscopy. miRFPs enable development of several types of NIR biosensors, such as for protein–protein interactions, RNA detection, signalling cascades and cell fate. We demonstrate this by engineering the monomeric fluorescence complementation reporters, the IκBα reporter for NF-κB pathway and the cell cycle biosensor for detection of proliferation status of cells in culture and in animals. miRFPs allow non-invasive visualization and detection of biological processes at different scales, from super-resolution microscopy to in vivo imaging, using the same probes. PMID:27539380

  18. Method of analysis of polymerizable monomeric species in a complex mixture

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E

    2014-03-18

    Method of selective quantitation of a polymerizable monomeric species in a well spacer fluid, said method comprising the steps of adding at least one solvent having a refractive index of less than about 1.33 to a sample of the complex mixture to produce a solvent phase, and measuring the refractive index of the solvent phase.

  19. Structure-specific reactivity of alumina supported monomeric vanadium oxide species.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.; Ferguson, G. A.; Chang, L.; Zygmunt, S. A.; Stair, P. C.; Curtiss, L. A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) catalysts based on vanadium oxide are active for the production of alkenes, chemicals of great commercial importance. The current industrial practice for alkene production is based on energy-intensive, dehydrogenation reactions. UV resonance and visible Raman measurements, combined with density functional studies, are used to study for the first time the structure-reactivity relationships for alumina-supported monomeric vanadium oxide species. The relationship between the structure of three vanadium oxide monomeric surface species on a {theta}-alumina surface, and their reducibility by H{sub 2} was determined by following changes in the vanadia's UV Raman and resonance Raman spectra after reaction with H{sub 2} at temperatures from 450 to 650 C. The H{sub 2} reducibility sequence for the three monomeric species is bidentate > 'molecular' > tridentate. The reaction pathways for H{sub 2} reduction on the three vanadium oxide monomeric structures on a {theta}-alumina surface were investigated using density functional theory. Reduction by H{sub 2} begins with reaction at the V=O bond in all three species. However, the activation energy, Gibbs free energy change under reaction conditions, and the final V oxidation state are species-dependent. The calculated ordering of reactivity is consistent with the observed experimental ordering and provides an explanation for the ordering. The results suggest that synthesis strategies can be devised to obtain vanadium oxide structures with greatly enhanced activity for ODH resulting in more efficient catalysts.

  20. The magnitude of growth hormone elevation is related with the proportion of monomeric form in acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, R; Fonseca, E; Mercado, M; Galván, R E; Hernández, M; Zárate, A

    1995-01-01

    In acromegalic patients monomeric GH form constitutes the larger proportion of circulating GH; however, no data are available concerning the relation between total GH elevation and the predominance of GH forms. Therefore, we studied the relationship between the degree of GH elevation and the proportion of GH isoforms. Sera from 11 patients with active acromegaly were subjected to gel chromatography on Sephadex G-100 column and fractions were collected for RIA to measure GH. The monomeric form of GH was predominant and exhibited a lineal correlation (r = 0.76, p < 0.01) with the circulating GH, thus the higher elevation of GH, the major proportion of monomeric GH. IGF-1 changes correlate with changes in monomeric GH but no better than for total GH. There was a correlation observed (r = 0.65) between the proportion of low GH forms and the presence of hyperglycemia, although the physiological role of the lower molecular GH forms is still unknown. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that the relative proportion of GH molecular forms changes according to the magnitude of the elevation of total GH.

  1. Generation and Characterization of an IgG4 Monomeric Fc Platform

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Lu; Colazet, Magali; Rosenthal, Kim L.; Yu, Xiang-Qing; Bee, Jared S.; Ferguson, Andrew; Damschroder, Melissa M.; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.; Tsui, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The immunoglobulin Fc region is a homodimer consisted of two sets of CH2 and CH3 domains and has been exploited to generate two-arm protein fusions with high expression yields, simplified purification processes and extended serum half-life. However, attempts to generate one-arm fusion proteins with monomeric Fc, with one set of CH2 and CH3 domains, are often plagued with challenges such as weakened binding to FcRn or partial monomer formation. Here, we demonstrate the generation of a stable IgG4 Fc monomer with a unique combination of mutations at the CH3-CH3 interface using rational design combined with in vitro evolution methodologies. In addition to size-exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation, we used multi-angle light scattering (MALS) to show that the engineered Fc monomer exhibits excellent monodispersity. Furthermore, crystal structure analysis (PDB ID: 5HVW) reveals monomeric properties supported by disrupted interactions at the CH3-CH3 interface. Monomeric Fc fusions with Fab or scFv achieved FcRn binding and serum half-life comparable to wildtype IgG. These results demonstrate that this monomeric IgG4 Fc is a promising therapeutic platform to extend the serum half-life of proteins in a monovalent format. PMID:27479095

  2. Blue light-induced dimerization of monomeric aureochrome-1 enhances its affinity for the target sequence.

    PubMed

    Hisatomi, Osamu; Nakatani, Yoichi; Takeuchi, Ken; Takahashi, Fumio; Kataoka, Hironao

    2014-06-20

    Aureochrome-1 (AUREO1) is a blue light (BL) receptor that mediates the branching response in stramenopile alga, Vaucheria frigida. AUREO1 contains a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain in the central region and a light-oxygen-voltage sensing (LOV) domain at the C terminus, and has been suggested to function as a light-regulated transcription factor. We have previously reported that preparations of recombinant AUREO1 contained the complete coding sequence (full-length, FL) and N-terminal truncated protein (ZL) containing bZIP and LOV domains, and suggested that wild-type ZL (ZLwt2) was in a dimer form with intermolecular disulfide linkages at Cys(162) and Cys(182) (Hisatomi, O., Takeuchi, K., Zikihara, K., Ookubo, Y., Nakatani, Y., Takahashi, F., Tokutomi, S., and Kataoka, H. (2013) Plant Cell Physiol. 54, 93-106). In the present study, we report the photoreactions, oligomeric structures, and DNA binding of monomeric cysteine to serine-mutated ZL (ZLC2S), DTT-treated ZL (DTT-ZL), and FL (DTT-FL). Recombinant AUREO1 showed similar spectral properties and dark regeneration kinetics to those of dimeric ZLwt2. Dynamic light scattering and size exclusion chromatography revealed that ZLC2S and DTT-ZL were monomeric in the dark state. Dissociation of intermolecular disulfide bonds of ZLwt2 was in equilibrium with a midpoint oxidation-redox potential of approximately -245 ± 15 mV. BL induced the dimerization of monomeric ZL, which subsequently increased its affinity for the target sequence. Also, DTT-FL was monomeric in the dark state and underwent BL-induced dimerization, which led to formation of the FL2·DNA complex. Taken together, our results suggest that monomeric AUREO1 is present in vivo, with dimerization playing a key role in its role as a BL-regulated transcription factor. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Monomeric Alpha-Synuclein Exerts a Physiological Role on Brain ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Angelova, Plamena R.; Ninkina, Natalia N.; Gandhi, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded α-synuclein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, knowledge about a physiological role for the native, unfolded α-synuclein is limited. Using brains of mice lacking α-, β-, and γ-synuclein, we report that extracellular monomeric α-synuclein enters neurons and localizes to mitochondria, interacts with ATP synthase subunit α, and modulates ATP synthase function. Using a combination of biochemical, live-cell imaging and mitochondrial respiration analysis, we found that brain mitochondria of α-, β-, and γ-synuclein knock-out mice are uncoupled, as characterized by increased mitochondrial respiration and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. Furthermore, synuclein deficiency results in reduced ATP synthase efficiency and lower ATP levels. Exogenous application of low unfolded α-synuclein concentrations is able to increase the ATP synthase activity that rescues the mitochondrial phenotypes observed in synuclein deficiency. Overall, the data suggest that α-synuclein is a previously unrecognized physiological regulator of mitochondrial bioenergetics through its ability to interact with ATP synthase and increase its efficiency. This may be of particular importance in times of stress or PD mutations leading to energy depletion and neuronal cell toxicity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Misfolded α-synuclein aggregations in the form of Lewy bodies have been shown to be a pathological hallmark in histological staining of Parkinson's disease (PD) patient brains. It is known that misfolded α-synuclein is a key driver in PD pathogenesis, but the physiological role of unfolded monomeric α-synuclein remains unclear. Using neuronal cocultures and isolated brain mitochondria of α-, β-, and γ-synuclein knock-out mice and monomeric α-synuclein, this current study shows that α-synuclein in its unfolded monomeric form improves ATP synthase efficiency and mitochondrial function. The ability of monomeric α-synuclein to enhance

  4. Binding kinetics of monomeric and aggregated IgG to Kupffer cells and hepatocytes of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, J; González, E; Escanero, J F; Egido, J

    1984-01-01

    The binding kinetics of human monomeric IgG and stable heat-aggregated IgG (A-IgG) to Fc receptors of hepatocytes and Kupffer cells isolated from mice was studied. After injection of radiolabelled proteins the 60-70% of hepatic uptake was recovered in parenchymal cells (hepatocytes). In experiments in vitro the A-IgG bound in larger amounts to hepatocytes and Kupffer cells than monomeric IgG. The association rate constants of aggregates were somewhat higher for Kupffer cells than for hepatocytes whereas the percentage uptake of aggregates by Kupffer cells was only 5-15% of that of hepatocytes. The equilibrium constants of aggregates binding to both cells amounted to 0.4-1 X 10(8) M-1 for A-IgG compared with an equilibrium constant for monomeric IgG of 1-2 X 10(7)M-1. The maximum number of IgG and A-IgG molecules bound per cell was higher on hepatocytes (mean 14 X 10(6)) than on Kupffer cells (mean 2 X 10(5)) which is in agreement with the higher binding capacity of hepatocytes for these proteins observed in vivo and in vitro experiments. The ability to compete for receptor binding seemed to reside exclusively in the Fc portion of IgG since F(ab')2 fragments of IgG failed to inhibit labelled monomeric IgG or A-IgG. The receptor seems to be specific for IgG since unlabelled monomeric IgA demonstrated no binding inhibition of labelled IgG or A-IgG on hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. The overall results further suggest that hepatocytes might through Fc receptors play a collaborative role with the mononuclear phagocytic system in the clearance of circulating immune complexes. PMID:6237982

  5. Blue Light-induced Dimerization of Monomeric Aureochrome-1 Enhances Its Affinity for the Target Sequence*

    PubMed Central

    Hisatomi, Osamu; Nakatani, Yoichi; Takeuchi, Ken; Takahashi, Fumio; Kataoka, Hironao

    2014-01-01

    Aureochrome-1 (AUREO1) is a blue light (BL) receptor that mediates the branching response in stramenopile alga, Vaucheria frigida. AUREO1 contains a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain in the central region and a light-oxygen-voltage sensing (LOV) domain at the C terminus, and has been suggested to function as a light-regulated transcription factor. We have previously reported that preparations of recombinant AUREO1 contained the complete coding sequence (full-length, FL) and N-terminal truncated protein (ZL) containing bZIP and LOV domains, and suggested that wild-type ZL (ZLwt2) was in a dimer form with intermolecular disulfide linkages at Cys162 and Cys182 (Hisatomi, O., Takeuchi, K., Zikihara, K., Ookubo, Y., Nakatani, Y., Takahashi, F., Tokutomi, S., and Kataoka, H. (2013) Plant Cell Physiol. 54, 93–106). In the present study, we report the photoreactions, oligomeric structures, and DNA binding of monomeric cysteine to serine-mutated ZL (ZLC2S), DTT-treated ZL (DTT-ZL), and FL (DTT-FL). Recombinant AUREO1 showed similar spectral properties and dark regeneration kinetics to those of dimeric ZLwt2. Dynamic light scattering and size exclusion chromatography revealed that ZLC2S and DTT-ZL were monomeric in the dark state. Dissociation of intermolecular disulfide bonds of ZLwt2 was in equilibrium with a midpoint oxidation-redox potential of approximately −245 ± 15 mV. BL induced the dimerization of monomeric ZL, which subsequently increased its affinity for the target sequence. Also, DTT-FL was monomeric in the dark state and underwent BL-induced dimerization, which led to formation of the FL2·DNA complex. Taken together, our results suggest that monomeric AUREO1 is present in vivo, with dimerization playing a key role in its role as a BL-regulated transcription factor. PMID:24790107

  6. Differential Stability of Dimeric and Monomeric Cytochrome c Oxidase Exposed to Elevated Hydrostatic Pressure†

    PubMed Central

    Staničová, Jana; Sedlák, Erik; Musatov, Andrej; Robinson, Neal C.

    2007-01-01

    Detergent-solubilized dimeric and monomeric cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) have significantly different quaternary stability when exposed to 2−3 kbar of hydrostatic pressure. Dimeric, dodecyl maltoside-solubilized cytochrome c oxidase is very resistant to elevated hydrostatic pressure with almost no perturbation of its quaternary structure or functional activity after release of pressure. In contrast to the stability of dimeric CcO, 3 kbar of hydrostatic pressure triggers multiple structural and functional alterations within monomeric cytochrome c oxidase. The perturbations are either irreversible or slowly reversible since they persist after the release of high pressure. Therefore, standard biochemical analytical procedures could be used to quantify the pressure-induced changes after the release of hydrostatic pressure. The electron transport activity of monomeric cytochrome c oxidase decreases by as much as 60% after exposure to 3 kbar of hydrostatic pressure. The irreversible loss of activity occurs in a time- and pressure-dependent manner. Coincident with the activity loss is a sequential dissociation of four subunits as detected by sedimentation velocity, high-performance ion-exchange chromatography, and reversed-phase and SDS–PAGE subunit analysis. Subunits VIa and VIb are the first to dissociate followed by subunits III and VIIa. Removal of subunits VIa and VIb prior to pressurization makes the resulting 11-subunit form of CcO even more sensitive to elevated hydrostatic pressure than monomeric CcO containing all 13 subunits. However, dimeric CcO, in which the association of VIa and VIb is stabilized, is not susceptible to pressure-induced inactivation. We conclude that dissociation of subunit III and/or VIIa must be responsible for pressure-induced inactivation of CcO since VIa and VIb can be removed from monomeric CcO without significant activity loss. These results are the first to clearly demonstrate an important structural role for the dimeric form of

  7. Monomeric yeast PCNA mutants are defective in interacting with and stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Costin N; Shea, Kathleen A; Mehra, Rajendra; Prundeanu, Lucia; McAlear, Michael A

    2002-10-29

    Yeast PCNA is a homo-trimeric, ring-shaped DNA polymerase accessory protein that can encircle duplex DNA. The integrity of this multimeric sliding DNA clamp is maintained through the protein-protein interactions at the interfaces of adjacent subunits. To investigate the importance of trimer stability for PCNA function, we introduced single amino acid substitutions at residues (A112T, S135F) that map to opposite ends of the monomeric protein. Recombinant wild-type and mutant PCNAs were purified from E. coli, and they were tested for their properties in vitro. Unlike the stable wild-type PCNA trimers, the mutant PCNA proteins behaved as monomers when diluted to low nanomolar concentrations. In contrast to what has been reported for a monomeric form of the beta clamp in E. coli, the monomeric PCNAs were compromised in their ability to interact with their associated clamp loader, replication factor C (RFC). Similarly, monomeric PCNAs were not effective in stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC. The mutant PCNAs were able to form mixed trimers with wild-type subunits, although these mixed trimers were unstable when loaded onto DNA. They were able to function as weak DNA polymerase delta processivity factors in vitro, and when the monomeric PCNA-41 (A112T, S135F double mutant) allele was introduced as the sole source of PCNA in vivo, the cells were viable and healthy. These pol30-41 mutants were, however, sensitive to UV irradiation and to the DNA damaging agent methylmethane sulfonate, implying that DNA repair pathways have a distinct requirement for stable DNA clamps.

  8. Quantitative separation of monomeric U(IV) from UO2 in products of U(VI) reduction

    PubMed Central

    Alessi, Daniel S.; Uster, Benjamin; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena I.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Stubbs, Joanne E.; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2012-01-01

    The reduction of soluble hexavalent uranium to tetravalent uranium can be catalyzed by bacteria and minerals. The end-product of this reduction is often the mineral uraninite, which was long assumed to be the only product of U(VI) reduction. However, recent studies report the formation of other species including an adsorbed U(IV) species, operationally referred to as monomeric U(IV). The discovery of monomeric U(IV) is important because the species is likely to be more labile and more susceptible to reoxidation than uraninite. Because there is a need to distinguish between these two U(IV) species, we propose here a wet chemical method of differentiating monomeric U(IV) from uraninite in environmental samples. To calibrate the method, U(IV) was extracted from known mixtures of uraninite and monomeric U(IV) and testted using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Monomeric U(IV) was efficiently removed from biomass and Fe(II)-bearing phases by bicarbonate extraction, without affecting uraninite stability. After confirming that the method effectively separates monomeric U(IV) and uraninite, it is further evaluated for a system containing those reduced U species and adsorbed U(VI). The method provides a rapid complement, and in some cases alternative, to XAS analyses for quantifying monomeric U(IV), uraninite, and adsorbed U(VI) species in environmental samples. PMID:22540966

  9. Quantitative separation of monomeric U(IV) from UO2 in products of U(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Alessi, Daniel S; Uster, Benjamin; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena I; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Stubbs, Joanne E; Bargar, John R; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2012-06-05

    The reduction of soluble hexavalent uranium to tetravalent uranium can be catalyzed by bacteria and minerals. The end-product of this reduction is often the mineral uraninite, which was long assumed to be the only product of U(VI) reduction. However, recent studies report the formation of other species including an adsorbed U(IV) species, operationally referred to as monomeric U(IV). The discovery of monomeric U(IV) is important because the species is likely to be more labile and more susceptible to reoxidation than uraninite. Because there is a need to distinguish between these two U(IV) species, we propose here a wet chemical method of differentiating monomeric U(IV) from uraninite in environmental samples. To calibrate the method, U(IV) was extracted from known mixtures of uraninite and monomeric U(IV) and tested using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Monomeric U(IV) was efficiently removed from biomass and Fe(II)-bearing phases by bicarbonate extraction, without affecting uraninite stability. After confirming that the method effectively separates monomeric U(IV) and uraninite, it is further evaluated for a system containing those reduced U species and adsorbed U(VI). The method provides a rapid complement, and in some cases alternative, to XAS analyses for quantifying monomeric U(IV), uraninite, and adsorbed U(VI) species in environmental samples.

  10. Decoration of electrospun nanofibers with monomeric catechols to facilitate cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Suk; Messersmith, Phillip B; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2014-02-01

    Monomeric catechols are displayed on the surface of polymeric nanofibers by robust catechol-thiol interactions to enhance cell adhesion and migration. Dihydroxyphenyl propionic acid is chemically conjugated to primary amine groups of poly(ϵ-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-amine (PCL-PEG) nanofibers to display catechol moieties on the surface. At basic pH, catecholized nanofibers incorporate thiol groups at a five-fold higher rate than at acidic pH, while catechol-coated surfaces do not show any pH-dependent binding. Live/dead cell staining indicates that the catecholized nanofibers do not exert any cytotoxic effects. Also, NIH 3T3 cells cultured on the catecholized nanofibers show increased attachment and migration that is proportional to the amount of the immobilized catechol moieties on the surface. These results clearly indicate that 6 nmol of monomeric catechols on the surface of nanofiber can promote cell adhesion and migration by thiol-catehol interactions.

  11. Conversion of rice straw to monomeric phenols under supercritical methanol and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rawel; Srivastava, Vartika; Chaudhary, Kajal; Gupta, Piyush; Prakash, Aditya; Balagurumurthy, Bhavya; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction of rice straw has been carried out using various organic solvents (CH3OH, C2H5OH) at different temperatures (250, 280 and 300 °C) and residence times (15, 30 and 60 min) to understand the effect of solvent and various reaction parameters on product distribution. Maximum liquid product yield (47.52 wt%) was observed using ethanol at 300 °C and 15 min reaction time. FTIR and NMR ((1)H and (13)C) of liquid product indicate that lignin in rice straw was converted to various monomeric phenols. GC-MS of the liquid product showed the presence of various phenol and guaiacol derivatives. Main compounds observed in liquid product were phenol, 4-ethylphenol, 4-ethyl-2-methoxyphenol (4-ethylguaiacol), 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (syringol), 2-isopropyl-5-methylphenol (thymol). Powder XRD and SEM of bio-residue showed that rice straw was decomposed to low molecular weight monomeric phenols.

  12. Multistage modeling of protein dynamics with monomeric Myc oncoprotein as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaojiao; Dai, Jin; He, Jianfeng; Niemi, Antti J.; Ilieva, Nevena

    2017-03-01

    We propose to combine a mean-field approach with all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) into a multistage algorithm that can model protein folding and dynamics over very long time periods yet with atomic-level precision. As an example, we investigate an isolated monomeric Myc oncoprotein that has been implicated in carcinomas including those in colon, breast, and lungs. Under physiological conditions a monomeric Myc is presumed to be an example of intrinsically disordered proteins that pose a serious challenge to existing modeling techniques. We argue that a room-temperature monomeric Myc is in a dynamical state, it oscillates between different conformations that we identify. For this we adopt the C α backbone of Myc in a crystallographic heteromer as an initial ansatz for the monomeric structure. We construct a multisoliton of the pertinent Landau free energy to describe the C α profile with ultrahigh precision. We use Glauber dynamics to resolve how the multisoliton responds to repeated increases and decreases in ambient temperature. We confirm that the initial structure is unstable in isolation. We reveal a highly degenerate ground-state landscape, an attractive set towards which Glauber dynamics converges in the limit of vanishing ambient temperature. We analyze the thermal stability of this Glauber attractor using room-temperature molecular dynamics. We identify and scrutinize a particularly stable subset in which the two helical segments of the original multisoliton align in parallel next to each other. During the MD time evolution of a representative structure from this subset, we observe intermittent quasiparticle oscillations along the C-terminal α helix, some of which resemble a translating Davydov's Amide-I soliton. We propose that the presence of oscillatory motion is in line with the expected intrinsically disordered character of Myc.

  13. Monomeric IgG Is Neuroprotective via Enhancing Microglial Recycling Endocytosis and TNF-α

    PubMed Central

    Hulse, Raymond E.; Swenson, Wade G.; Kunkler, Phillip E.; White, David M.; Kraig, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    In brain, monomeric immunoglobin G (IgG) is regarded as quiescent and only poised to initiate potentially injurious inflammatory reactions via immune complex formation associated with phagocytosis and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production in response to disease. Using rat hippocampal slice and microglial cultures, here we show instead that physiological levels (i.e., 0.2−20 μg/ml) of monomeric IgG unassociated with disease triggered benign low-level proinflammatory signaling that was neuroprotective against CA1 area excitotoxicity and followed a U-shaped or hormetic dose–response. The data indicate that physiological IgG levels activated micro-glia by enhancing recycling endocytosis plus TNF-α release from these cells to produce the neuroprotection. Minocycline, known for its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects when given after disease onset, abrogated IgG-mediated neuroprotection and related microglial effects when given before injury. In contrast, E-prostanoid receptor subtype 2 (EP2) activation, which served as an exemplary paracrine stimulus like the one expected from neuronal activity, amplified IgG-mediated increased microglial recycling endocytosis and TNF-α production. Furthermore, like monomeric IgG these EP2 related effects took days to be effective, suggesting both were adaptive anabolic effects consistent with those seen from other long-term preconditioning stimuli requiring de novo protein synthesis. The data provide the first evidence that brain monomeric IgG at physiological levels can have signaling function via enhanced recycling endocytosis/TNF-α production from microglia unassociated with disease and that these IgG-mediated changes may be a means by which paracrine signaling from neuronal activity influences microglia to evoke neuroprotection. The data provide further support that low-level proinflammatory neural immune signaling unassociated with disease enhances brain function. PMID:19020014

  14. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia: are monomeric iron compounds suitable for parenteral administration?

    PubMed

    Gupta, A; Crumbliss, A L

    2000-11-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional problem worldwide, especially in the developing countries. Oral iron supplementation programs have failed because of noncompliance and gastrointestinal toxicity, thereby necessitating parenteral administration of iron. For parenteral administration, only iron-carbohydrate complexes are currently used, because monomeric iron salts release free iron, thereby causing oxidant injury. However, iron-carbohydrate complexes also have significant toxicity, and they are expensive. We have proposed the hypothesis that monomeric iron salts can be safely administered by the parenteral route if iron is tightly complexed to the ligand, thereby causing clinically insignificant release of free iron, and the kinetic properties of the compound allow rapid transfer of iron to plasma transferrin. A detailed analysis of the physicochemical and kinetic properties reveals that ferric iron complexed to pyrophosphate or acetohydroxamate anions may be suitable for parenteral administration. We have demonstrated that infusion of ferric pyrophosphate into the circulation via the dialysate is safe and effective in maintaining iron balance in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Parenteral administration of monomeric iron compounds is a promising approach to the treatment of iron deficiency in the general population and merits further investigation.

  15. First synthesis and structural determination of a monomeric, unsolvated lithium amide, LiNH(2).

    PubMed

    Grotjahn, D B; Sheridan, P M; Al Jihad, I; Ziurys, L M

    2001-06-13

    Alkali metal amides typically aggregate in solution and the solid phase, and even in the gas phase. In addition, even in the few known monomeric structures, the coordination number of the alkali metal is raised by binding of Lewis-basic solvent molecules, with concomitant changes in structure. In contrast, the simplest lithium amide LiNH(2) has never been made in a monomeric form, even though its structure has been theoretically predicted several times. Here, the first experimental structural data for a monomeric, unsolvated lithium amide are determined using a combination of gas-phase synthesis and millimeter/submillimeter-wave spectroscopy. All data point to a planar structure for LiNH(2). The r(o) structure of LiNH(2) has a Li-N distance of 1.736(3) A, an N-H distance of 1.022(3) A, and a H-N-H angle of 106.9(1) degrees. These results are compared with theoretical predictions for LiNH(2), and experimental data for oligomeric, solid-phase samples, which could not resolve the question of whether LiNH(2) is planar or not. In addition, comparisons are made with revised gas-phase and solid-phase data and calculated structures of NaNH(2).

  16. Antibodies probe for folded monomeric myosin in relaxed and contracted smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, A; Trybus, K M; Bowman, D S; Fay, F S

    1994-09-01

    Regulatory light chain phosphorylation is required for assembly of smooth and non-muscle myosins in vitro, but its effect on polymerization within the cell is not understood. Relaxed smooth muscle cells contain dephosphorylated thick filaments, but this does not exclude the presence of a pool of folded myosin monomers which could be recruited to assemble when phosphorylated, thus forming part of smooth muscle's activation pathway. To test this hypothesis, relaxed and contracted avian gizzard cryosections were labeled with a fluorescently conjugated monoclonal antibody specific for the folded monomeric conformation, or with an antibody against the tip of the tail whose epitope is accessible in the monomeric but not the filamentous state. Fluorescence intensity observed in the two physiological states was quantitated by digital imaging microscopy. Only trace amounts of folded monomeric myosin were detected in both the relaxed and contracted states. The amount of monomer also did not increase when alpha-toxin permeabilized gizzard was equilibrated in a solvent that disassembles filaments in vitro. Assembly/disassembly is therefore unlikely to play a major role in regulating the contraction/relaxation cycle in smooth muscle cells.

  17. Design of lambda Cro fold: solution structure of a monomeric variant of the de novo protein.

    PubMed

    Isogai, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yutaka; Ikeya, Teppei; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Ota, Motonori

    2005-12-09

    One of the classical DNA-binding proteins, bacteriophage lambda Cro, forms a homodimer with a unique fold of alpha-helices and beta-sheets. We have computationally designed an artificial sequence of 60 amino acid residues to stabilize the backbone tertiary structure of the lambda Cro dimer by simulated annealing using knowledge-based structure-sequence compatibility functions. The designed amino acid sequence has 25% identity with that of natural lambda Cro and preserves Phe58, which is important for formation of the stably folded structure of lambda Cro. The designed dimer protein and its monomeric variant, which was redesigned by the insertion of a beta-hairpin sequence at the C-terminal region to prevent dimerization, were synthesized and biochemically characterized to be well folded. The designed protein was monomeric under a wide range of protein concentrations and its solution structure was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The solved structure is similar to that of a monomeric variant of natural lambda Cro with a root-mean-square deviation of the polypeptide backbones at 2.1A and has a well-packed protein core. Thus, our knowledge-based functions provide approximate but essential relationships between amino acid sequences and protein structures, and are useful for finding novel sequences that are foldable into a given target structure.

  18. Thermodynamic Characterization of the Folding Coupled DNA Binding by the Monomeric Transcription Activator GCN4 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Cao, Wei; Cao, Aoneng; Lai, Luhua

    2003-01-01

    Dimerization is a widely believed critical requirement for the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 specifically recognizing its DNA target sites. Nonetheless, the binding of the monomeric GCN4 to DNA target sites AP-1 and ATF/CREB was recently detected by kinetic studies. Here, for the first time, we present a detailed description of the thermodynamics of a monomeric peptide GCN4-br, the basic region (226–252) of GCN4, binding to AP-1, and ATF/CREB. GCN4 specifically binds to AP-1 and ATF/CREB in the monomeric form as shown by our circular dichroism thermal unfolding measurements. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the binding process of GCN4-br with DNA is enthalpically driven, accompanied by an unfavorable entropy change. The temperature dependence of ΔH0 reveals negative changes in heat capacity ΔCp: ΔCp = −0.92 kJ · mol−1 K−1 and ΔCp = −0.95 kJ · mol−1 K−1 for GCN4-br binding to AP-1 and ATF/CREB, respectively, which is a striking manifestation of GCN4-br specifically recognizing DNA target sites. These thermodynamic characteristics may give new insight into the mechanism by which GCN4 protein binds to DNA target sites for its transcriptional regulation. PMID:12609888

  19. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Lin, Kuan-ting; Hebert, Vincent R.; Zhang, Jinwen; Wolcott, Michael P.; Quintero, Melissa; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer as well as its complex side chain structures, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) inclduing 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPCs yields obtained were 18% and 22% based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47%. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  20. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Lin, Kuan-Ting; Hebert, Vincent R; Zhang, Jinwen; Wolcott, Michael P; Quintero, Melissa; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-25

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  1. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Lin, Kuan-ting; Hebert, Vincent R.; Zhang, Jinwen; Wolcott, Michael P.; Quintero, Melissa; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  2. Functional equivalence of monomeric (shark) and dimeric (bovine) cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Bickar, D; Lehninger, A; Brunori, M; Bonaventura, J; Bonaventura, C

    1985-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase isolated from hammerhead shark red muscle is monomeric in relation to the dimeric form of isolated bovine cytochrome c oxidase but in other ways bears a close resemblance to the enzyme isolated from mammalian tissue [1, 2]. Comparative studies of shark and bovine cytochrome c oxidase were extended to address the degree of functional similarity between the monomeric (shark) and dimeric (bovine) enzymes in the kinetics of peroxide binding and in the extent to which the catalytic action of the enzymes in vesicles can establish a proton gradient. Although the kinetics of peroxide binding and the proton pumping processes are complex, the dimeric and monomeric forms are quite similar with respect to these functional attributes. The kinetic heterogeneity of the process of peroxide binding is expressed in the shark enzyme as well as in the bovine enzyme, and both types of enzymes in vesicles can generate transmembrane proton gradients. On this basis we conclude that the dimeric state of isolated cytochrome c oxidase from mammalian sources is not essential for its function in vitro.

  3. A unified model of nucleic acid unwinding by the ribosome and the hexameric and monomeric DNA helicases.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2015-09-07

    DNA helicases are enzymes that use the chemical energy to separate DNA duplex into their single-stranded forms. The ribosome, which catalyzes the translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) into proteins, can also unwind mRNA duplex. According to their structures, the DNA helicases can fall broadly into hexameric and monomeric forms. A puzzling issue for the monomeric helicases is that although they have similar structures, in vitro biochemical data showed convincingly that in the monomeric forms some have very weak DNA unwinding activities, some have relatively high unwinding activities while others have high unwinding activities. However, in the dimeric or oligomeric forms all of them have high unwinding activities. In addition, in the monomeric forms all of them can translocate efficiently along the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Here, we propose a model of the translocation along the ssDNA and DNA unwinding by the monomeric helicases, providing a consistent explanation of these in vitro experimental data. Moreover, by comparing the present model for the monomeric helicases with the model for the hexameric helicases and that for the ribosome which were proposed before, a unified model of nucleic acid unwinding by the three enzymes is proposed.

  4. Monomeric banana lectin at acidic pH overrules conformational stability of its native dimeric form.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed M; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Ahmad, Ejaz; Ashraf, Raghib; Bhushan, Bharat; Chaturvedi, Sumit K; Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Rizwan H

    2013-01-01

    Banana lectin (BL) is a homodimeric protein categorized among jacalin-related family of lectins. The effect of acidic pH was examined on conformational stability of BL by using circular dichroism, intrinsic fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-napthalene sulfonate (ANS) binding, size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). During acid denaturation of BL, the monomerization of native dimeric protein was found at pH 2.0. The elution profile from SEC showed two different peaks (59.65 ml & 87.98 ml) at pH 2.0 while single peak (61.45 ml) at pH 7.4. The hydrodynamic radii (R h) of native BL was 2.9 nm while at pH 2.0 two species were found with R h of 1.7 and 3.7 nm. Furthermore at, pH 2.0 the secondary structures of BL remained unaltered while tertiary structure was significantly disrupted with the exposure of hydrophobic clusters confirming the existence of molten globule like state. The unfolding of BL with different subunit status was further evaluated by urea and temperature mediated denaturation to check their stability. As inferred from high Cm and ΔG values, the monomeric form of BL offers more resistance towards chemical denaturation than the native dimeric form. Besides, dimeric BL exhibited a Tm of 77°C while no loss in secondary structures was observed in monomers even up to 95°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on monomeric subunit of lectins showing more stability against denaturants than its native dimeric state.

  5. Dihydroxyacetone phosphate, DHAP, in the crystalline state: monomeric and dimeric forms.

    PubMed

    Slepokura, Katarzyna; Lis, Tadeusz

    2010-02-26

    It was shown that dihydroxyacetone phosphate may exist in both monomeric DHAP (C(3)H(7)O(6)P) and dimeric DHAP-dimer (C(6)H(14)O(12)P(2)) form. Monomeric DHAP was obtained in the form of four crystalline salts: CaCl(DHAP) x 2.9H(2)O (7a), Ca(2)Cl(3)(DHAP) x 5H(2)O (7b), CaCl(DHAP) x 2H(2)O (7c), and CaBr(DHAP) x 5H(2)O (7d) by crystallization from aqueous solutions containing DHAP acid and CaCl(2) or CaBr(2), or by direct crystallization from a solution containing DHAP precursor and CaCl(2). At least one of the salts is stable and may be stored in the crystalline state at room temperature for several months. The dimeric form was obtained by slow saturation of free DHAP syrup with ammonia at -18 degrees C and isolated in the form of its hydrated diammonium salt (NH(4))(2)(DHAP-dimer) x 4H(2)O (8). The synthesis of the compounds, their crystallization, and crystal structures determined by X-ray crystallography are described. In all 7a-d monomeric DHAP exists in the monoanionic form in an extended (in-plane) cisoid conformation, with both hydroxyl and ester oxygen atoms being synperiplanar to the carbonyl O atom. The crucial structural feature is the coordination manner, in which the terminal phosphate oxygen atoms act as chelating as well as bridging atoms for the calcium cations. Additionally, the DHAP monoanions chelate another Ca(2+) by the alpha-hydroxycarbonyl moiety, in a manner observed previously in dihydroxyacetone (DHA) calcium chloride complexes. In dimeric 8 the anion is a trans isomer with the dioxane ring in a chair conformation with the hydroxyl groups in axial positions and the phosphomethyl group in an equatorial position.

  6. Comparison of the dynamics of the primary events of bacteriorhodopsin in its trimeric and monomeric states.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianping; Link, Stephan; Heyes, Colin D; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy in the visible region of the spectrum has been used to examine the ultrafast dynamics of the retinal excited state in both the native trimeric state and the monomeric state of bacteriorhodopsin (bR). It is found that the excited state lifetime (probed at 490 nm) increases only slightly upon the monomerization of bR. No significant kinetic difference is observed in the recovery process of the bR ground state probed at 570 nm nor in the fluorescent state observed at 850 nm. However, an increase in the relative amplitude of the slow component of bR excited state decay is observed in the monomer, which is due to the increase in the concentration of the 13-cis retinal isomer in the ground state of the light-adapted bR monomer. Our data indicate that when the protein packing around the retinal is changed upon bR monomerization, there is only a subtle change in the retinal potential surface, which is dependent on the charge distribution and the dipoles within the retinal-binding cavity. In addition, our results show that 40% of the excited state bR molecules return to the ground state on three different time scales: one-half-picosecond component during the relaxation of the excited state and the formation of the J intermediate, a 3-ps component as the J changes to the K intermediate where retinal photoisomerization occurs, and a subnanosecond component during the photocycle. PMID:12202380

  7. Biophysical characterization of a recombinant soluble interleukin 2 receptor (Tac). Evidence for a monomeric structure.

    PubMed

    Junghans, R P; Stone, A L; Lewis, M S

    1996-05-03

    The interleukin 2 receptor (IL2R) plays a prominent role in the biology of T cells, B cells, and NK cells during activation. Of the three chains described, the alpha-chain of the receptor (Tac; IL2R alpha; CD25) is the most subject to regulation and is shed from the surface of activated cells to generate a soluble form in serum and tissues. Conflicting results have been reported on the native structure of soluble Tac, suggesting variously a monomer, a dimer, or higher noncovalent forms, spawning different models for its mechanism of action. We similarly show a large M(r)(app) by HPLC sieving chromatography, suggesting a tetrameric form. However, stoichiometry-ordered size (SOS) analysis of antibody-antigen complexes indicated only a single epitope per Tac molecule, compatible with a monomeric form. This larger M(r)(app) also conflicted with prior in vivo data showing rapid filtration of soluble Tac through the renal glomerulus that was not expected of a larger complex. Using different solvents, denaturants, and columns in the chromatography suggested that the elevated M(r)(app) values were an artifact of solute-column interactions, termed "ionic exclusion", rather than reflecting larger native structures. Analytical ultracentrifugation using a new type of analysis specific to glycoproteins demonstrated monomeric masses under all salt conditions with no tendency to form dimers or higher aggregates. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no salt-dependent changes to suggest conformational alterations that might correlate with mobility changes on high pressure liquid chromatography. We conclude therefore that Tac is monomeric under physiologic conditions. Assessments of higher molecular weight for the purified soluble protein by other methods may be explained by the highly acidic nature of the molecule, which hampers matrix penetration with chromatographic media and by the high carbohydrate content and low partial specific volumes that accelerate the molecule

  8. The solution structure of the simian foamy virus protease reveals a monomeric protein.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Maximilian J; Wöhrl, Birgitta M; Rösch, Paul; Schweimer, Kristian

    2008-08-01

    In contrast to orthoretroviruses, foamy viruses (FVs) express their Pol polyprotein from a separate pol-specific transcript. Only the integrase domain is cleaved off, leading to a protease-reverse transcriptase (PR-RT) protein. We purified the separate PR domain (PRshort) of simian FV from macaques by expressing the recombinant gene in Escherichia coli. Sedimentation analyses and size exclusion chromatography indicate that PRshort is a stable monomer in solution. This allowed us to determine the structure of the PRshort monomer using 1426 experimental restraints derived from NMR spectroscopy. The superposition of 20 conformers resulted in a backbone atom rmsd of 0.55 A for residues Gln8-Leu93. Although the overall folds are similar, the macaque simian FV PRshort reveals significant differences in the dimerization interface relative to other retroviral PRs, such as HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) PR, which appear to be rather stable dimers. Especially the flap region and the N- and C-termini of PRshort are highly flexible. Neglecting these regions, the backbone atom rmsd drops to 0.32 A, highlighting the good definition of the central part of the protein. To exclude that the monomeric state of PRshort is due to cleaving off the RT, we purified the complete PR-RT and performed size exclusion chromatography. Our data show that PR-RT is also monomeric. We thus conclude adoption of a monomeric state of PR-RT to be a regulatory mechanism to inhibit PR activity before virus assembly in order to reduce packaging problems. Dimerization might therefore be triggered by additional viral or cellular factors.

  9. Production and characterization of monomeric C59N: A magnetic modification of fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fülöp, Ferenc; Simon, Ferenc; Rockenbauer, Antal; Korecz, László; Jánossy, András

    2001-11-01

    Solid solutions of C59N azafullerene in C60 with concentrations up to 10-4 were produced in an electric gas discharge tube and by a heat treatment of (C59N)2 dissolved in pure C60. The results on materials produced by the two methods are identical. C59N is a stable monomeric substituent molecule in crystalline C60 and may be heated to temperatures as high as 1300 K. The concentration of ESR active neutral C59N molecules at ambient temperatures depends on temperature history.

  10. Monomeric CH3: A Small, Stable Antibody Domain with Therapeutic Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Antibody domains are emerging as promising biopharmaceuticals because of their relatively small size compared to full-sized antibodies, which are too large to effectively penetrate tumors and bind to sterically restricted therapeutic targets. In an article published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Protein Interactions Group, Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, reported their design of a novel antibody domain, monomeric CH3 (mCH3).

  11. Isolation of monomeric photosystem II that retains the subunit PsbS.

    PubMed

    Haniewicz, Patrycja; De Sanctis, Daniele; Büchel, Claudia; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Loi, Maria Cecilia; Kieselbach, Thomas; Bochtler, Matthias; Piano, Dario

    2013-12-01

    Photosystem II has been purified from a transplastomic strain of Nicotiana tabacum according to two different protocols. Using the procedure described in Piano et al. (Photosynth Res 106:221-226, 2010) it was possible to isolate highly active PSII composed of monomers and dimers but depleted in their PsbS protein content. A "milder" procedure than the protocol reported by Fey et al. (Biochim Biophys Acta 1777:1501-1509, 2008) led to almost exclusively monomeric PSII complexes which in part still bind the PsbS protein. This finding might support a role for PSII monomers in higher plants.

  12. Monomeric CH3: A Small, Stable Antibody Domain with Therapeutic Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Antibody domains are emerging as promising biopharmaceuticals because of their relatively small size compared to full-sized antibodies, which are too large to effectively penetrate tumors and bind to sterically restricted therapeutic targets. In an article published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Protein Interactions Group, Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, reported their design of a novel antibody domain, monomeric CH3 (mCH3).

  13. Modeling spectral tuning in monomeric teal fluorescent protein mTFP1.

    PubMed

    Topol, Igor; Collins, Jack; Nemukhin, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    We present results of theoretical studies of the variants of the monomeric teal fluorescent protein from Clavularia coral (mTFP1) which present promising members from the GFP family. Predictions of quantum chemical approaches including density functional theory and semiempirical approximations are presented for the model systems which mimic the chromophores in different environments. We describe the excitation energy spectrum of the cyan mTFP1 fluorescent protein with the original chromophore and with chromophore mutants Tyr67His and Tyr67Trp. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling spectral tuning in monomeric teal fluorescent protein mTFP1

    PubMed Central

    Topol, Igor; Collins, Jack; Nemukhin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    We present results of theoretical studies of the variants of the monomeric teal fluorescent protein from Clavularia coral (mTFP1) which present promising members from the GFP family. Predictions of quantum chemical approaches including density functional theory and semiempirical approximations are presented for the model systems which mimic the chromophores in different environments. We describe the excitation energy spectrum of the cyan mTFP1 fluorescent protein with the original chromophore and with chromophore mutants Tyr67His and Tyr67Trp. PMID:20442006

  15. A monomeric photoconvertible fluorescent protein for imaging of dynamic protein localization.

    PubMed

    Hoi, Hiofan; Shaner, Nathan C; Davidson, Michael W; Cairo, Christopher W; Wang, Jiwu; Campbell, Robert E

    2010-09-03

    The use of green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (FPs) enables researchers to highlight a subcellular population of a fusion protein of interest and to image its dynamics in live cells. In an effort to enrich the arsenal of photoconvertible FPs and to overcome the limitations imposed by the oligomeric structure of natural photoconvertible FPs, we designed and optimized a new monomeric photoconvertible FP. Using monomeric versions of Clavularia sp. cyan FP as template, we employed sequence-alignment-guided design to create a chromophore environment analogous to that shared by known photoconvertible FPs. The designed gene was synthesized and, when expressed in Escherichia coli, found to produce green fluorescent colonies that gradually switched to red after exposure to white light. We subjected this first-generation FP [named mClavGR1 (monomeric Clavularia-derived green-to-red photoconvertible 1)] to a combination of random and targeted mutageneses and screened libraries for efficient photoconversion using a custom-built system for illuminating a 10-cm Petri plate with 405-nm light. Following more than 15 rounds of library creation and screening, we settled on an optimized version, known as mClavGR2, that has eight mutations relative to mClavGR1. Key improvements of mClavGR2 relative to mClavGR1 include a 1.4-fold brighter red species, 1.8-fold higher photoconversion contrast, and dramatically improved chromophore maturation in E. coli. The monomeric status of mClavGR2 has been demonstrated by gel-filtration chromatography and the functional expression of a variety of mClavGR2 chimeras in mammalian cells. Furthermore, we have exploited mClavGR2 to determine the diffusion kinetics of the membrane protein intercellular adhesion molecule 1 both when the membrane is in contact with a T-lymphocyte expressing leukocyte-function-associated antigen 1 and when it is not. These experiments clearly establish that mClavGR2 is well suited for rapid photoconversion of

  16. A Stable Monomeric SiO2 Complex with Donor-Acceptor Ligands.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Ricardo; Gau, David; Saouli, Jérémy; Baceiredo, Antoine; Saffon-Merceron, Nathalie; Branchadell, Vicenç; Kato, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-27

    Isolation of a monomeric SiO2 compound 3 as a stable donor-acceptor complex with two different ligands -a σ-donating ligand (pyridine, dimethylaminopyridine, N-heterocyclic carbene) and a donor-acceptor ligand (iminophosphorane)-is presented. The SiO2 complex 3 is soluble in ordinary organic solvents and is stable at room temperature in solution and in the solid state. Of particular interest, 3 remains reactive and can be used as a stable and soluble unimolecular SiO2 reagent.

  17. Solution structure of monomeric and trimeric photosystem I of Thermosynechococcus elongatus investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Golub, Maksym; Hejazi, Mahdi; Kölsch, Adrian; Lokstein, Heiko; Wieland, D C Florian; Zouni, Athina; Pieper, Jörg

    2017-03-03

    The structure of monomeric and trimeric photosystem I (PS I) of Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP1 (T. elongatus) was investigated by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The scattering data reveal that the protein-detergent complexes possess radii of gyration of 58 and 78 Å in the cases of monomeric and trimeric PS I, respectively. The results also show that the samples are monodisperse, virtually free of aggregation, and contain empty detergent micelles. The shape of the protein-detergent complexes can be well approximated by elliptical cylinders with a height of 78 Å. Monomeric PS I in buffer solution exhibits minor and major radii of the elliptical cylinder of about 50 and 85 Å, respectively. In the case of trimeric PS I, both radii are equal to about 110 Å. The latter model can be shown to accommodate three elliptical cylinders equal to those describing monomeric PS I. A structure reconstitution also reveals that the protein-detergent complexes are larger than their respective crystal structures. The reconstituted structures are larger by about 20 Å mainly in the region of the hydrophobic surfaces of the monomeric and trimeric PS I complexes. This seeming contradiction can be resolved by the addition of a detergent belt constituted by a monolayer of dodecyl-β-D-maltoside molecules. Assuming a closest possible packing, a number of roughly 1024 and 1472 detergent molecules can be determined for monomeric and trimeric PS I, respectively. Taking the monolayer of detergent molecules into account, the solution structure can be almost perfectly modeled by the crystal structures of monomeric and trimeric PS I.

  18. Identification of monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals, and purification and characterization of a monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, D S; Thøgersen, I B; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1993-01-01

    The alpha-macroglobulins are classified as broad-spectrum inhibitors because of their ability to entrap proteinases of different specificities and catalytic class. Tetrameric and dimeric alpha-macroglobulins have been identified in a wide variety of organisms including those as primitive as the mollusc Octopus vulgaris; however, monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors have been previously identified only in rodents. The monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors are believed to be analogous to the evolutionary precursor of the multimeric members of this family exemplified by the tetrameric human alpha 2-macroglobulin. Until now, monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors have only been identified in rodents and have therefore been considered an evolutionary anomaly. However, in this report we have utilized several sensitive assays to screen various plasmas and sera for the presence of monomeric alpha-macroglobulins, and our results suggest that monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors are present in organisms belonging to the avian, reptilian, amphibian and mammalian classes of the chordate phylum. This indicates that these proteins are more widespread than previously recognized and that their presence in rodents is not an anomaly. To demonstrate further that the identified proteins were indeed monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors, we purified the monomeric alpha-macroglobulin from the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. We conclude that this protein is a monomer of 180 kDa on the basis of its behaviour on (i) pore-limit gel electrophoresis, (ii) non-reducing and reducing SDS/PAGE and (iii) gel-filtration chromatography. In addition, we demonstrate that this protein is an alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor by virtue of (i) its ability to inhibit proteinases of different catalytic class, (ii) the presence of a putative internal beta-cysteinyl-gamma-glutamyl thioester and (iii) an inhibitory mechanism

  19. Identification of monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals, and purification and characterization of a monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, D S; Thøgersen, I B; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1993-02-15

    The alpha-macroglobulins are classified as broad-spectrum inhibitors because of their ability to entrap proteinases of different specificities and catalytic class. Tetrameric and dimeric alpha-macroglobulins have been identified in a wide variety of organisms including those as primitive as the mollusc Octopus vulgaris; however, monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors have been previously identified only in rodents. The monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors are believed to be analogous to the evolutionary precursor of the multimeric members of this family exemplified by the tetrameric human alpha 2-macroglobulin. Until now, monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors have only been identified in rodents and have therefore been considered an evolutionary anomaly. However, in this report we have utilized several sensitive assays to screen various plasmas and sera for the presence of monomeric alpha-macroglobulins, and our results suggest that monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors are present in organisms belonging to the avian, reptilian, amphibian and mammalian classes of the chordate phylum. This indicates that these proteins are more widespread than previously recognized and that their presence in rodents is not an anomaly. To demonstrate further that the identified proteins were indeed monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors, we purified the monomeric alpha-macroglobulin from the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana. We conclude that this protein is a monomer of 180 kDa on the basis of its behaviour on (i) pore-limit gel electrophoresis, (ii) non-reducing and reducing SDS/PAGE and (iii) gel-filtration chromatography. In addition, we demonstrate that this protein is an alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor by virtue of (i) its ability to inhibit proteinases of different catalytic class, (ii) the presence of a putative internal beta-cysteinyl-gamma-glutamyl thioester and (iii) an inhibitory mechanism

  20. Differential modulation of the genotoxicity of food carcinogens by naturally occurring monomeric and dimeric polyphenolics.

    PubMed

    Catterall, F; Souquet, J M; Cheynier, V; de Pascual-Teresa, S; Santos-Buelga, C; Clifford, M N; Ioannides, C

    2000-01-01

    Naturally occurring dimeric polyphenolics and their gallate esters were isolated from grape seeds, almond fruits, and apple skin, and their ability to modulate the mutagenicity of food carcinogens was studied in the Ames test, and compared to that of the monomeric green tea flavonols, (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin. Neither the monomeric nor the dimeric polyphenols and their galloylated derivatives influenced the mutagenic activity elicited by the indirectly acting food carcinogens benzo[a]pyrene and 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), in the presence of a hepatic activation system derived from Aroclor 1254-treated rats; the only exception was the B7 dimer, which, at concentrations above 1 microM, suppressed the mutagenicity of IQ. None of the polyphenolics modulated the mutagenic activity elicited by the directly acting carcinogen N'-methyl-N'-nitro-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). In contrast, all the dimeric polyphenols and the galloylated metabolites, at concentrations over 1 microM, potentiated the mutagenic activity induced by the indirectly acting carcinogen N-nitrosopyrrolidine, in the presence of an activation system derived from isoniazid-treated rats. In conclusion, dimeric polyphenols and galloylated derivatives of plant origin are unlikely to influence the initiation stage of the carcinogenicity of chemicals through mechanisms that involve inhibition of their cytochrome P450-mediated bioactivation or scavenging of the reactive, genotoxic intermediates. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Monomeric, Oligomeric and Polymeric Proteins in Huntington Disease and Other Diseases of Polyglutamine Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Hoffner, Guylaine; Djian, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease and other diseases of polyglutamine expansion are each caused by a different protein bearing an excessively long polyglutamine sequence and are associated with neuronal death. Although these diseases affect largely different brain regions, they all share a number of characteristics, and, therefore, are likely to possess a common mechanism. In all of the diseases, the causative protein is proteolyzed, becomes abnormally folded and accumulates in oligomers and larger aggregates. The aggregated and possibly the monomeric expanded polyglutamine are likely to play a critical role in the pathogenesis and there is increasing evidence that the secondary structure of the protein influences its toxicity. We describe here, with special attention to huntingtin, the mechanisms of polyglutamine aggregation and the modulation of aggregation by the sequences flanking the polyglutamine. We give a comprehensive picture of the characteristics of monomeric and aggregated polyglutamine, including morphology, composition, seeding ability, secondary structure, and toxicity. The structural heterogeneity of aggregated polyglutamine may explain why polyglutamine-containing aggregates could paradoxically be either toxic or neuroprotective. PMID:24961702

  2. Adsorption of cationic monomeric and gemini surfactants on montmorillonite and adsolubilization of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Nakajima, Erimi; Takamatsu, Yuichiro; Sharma, Suraj C; Torigoe, Kanjiro; Yoshimura, Tomokazu; Esumi, Kunio; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption of a cationic gemini surfactant (1,2-bis(dodecyldimethylammonio) ethane dibromide, 12-2-12) and the corresponding monomeric surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, DTAB) on montmorillonite has been characterized with a combination of adsorption isotherm, interlayer spacing and FT-IR spectroscopic data. Adsolubilization of vitamin E into the adsorbed surfactant layers has also been studied. The adsorption isotherm data reveal that the adsorption of the two surfactants is driven by the two factors: one is the cation exchange that occurs on the interlayer basal planes and the other is the hydrophobic interaction between hydrocarbon chains of the surfactants. Although the adsorbed amount measured in the saturation region (in mol g(-1)) is almost identical for the two surfactants, the conformation of the intercalated surfactant molecules differs significantly from each other. The adsorption of DTAB results in a lateral bilayer arrangement in the limited interlayer space, whereas 12-2-12 gives a normal bilayer arrangement in the expanded interlayer space. Adsolubilization of vitamin E takes place into the adsorbed surfactant layers, and interestingly, all the vitamin E molecules added in the montmorillonite suspensions are hybridized at lower surfactant concentrations due to the great specific surface area of the clay material. Since the maximum adsolubilization amount is usually obtained just below the critical micelle concentration, the gemini surfactant is deemed to be more efficient than the corresponding monomeric one to achieve the great adsolubilization amount.

  3. Enzymic Cross-Linkage of Monomeric Extensin Precursors in Vitro1

    PubMed Central

    Everdeen, Daniel S.; Kiefer, Stefanie; Willard, James J.; Muldoon, E. Patrick; Dey, Prakash M.; Li, Xiong-biao; Lamport, Derek T. A.

    1988-01-01

    Rapidly growing tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cell suspension cultures contain transiently high levels of cell surface, salt-elutable, monomeric precursors to the covalently cross-linked extensin network of the primary cell wall. Thus, we purified a highly soluble monomeric extensin substrate from rapidly growing cells, and devised a soluble in vitro cross-linking assay based on Superose-6 fast protein liquid chromatography separation, which resolved extensin monomers from the newly formed oligomers within 25 minutes. Salt elution of slowly growing (early stationary phase) cells yielded little or no extensin monomers but did give a highly active enzymic preparation that specifically cross-linked extensin monomers in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, judging from: (a) a decrease in the extensin monomer peak on fast protein liquid chromatography gel filtration, (b) appearance of oligomeric peaks, and (c) direct electron microscopical observation of the cross-linked oligomers. The cross-linking reaction had a broad pH optimum between 5.5 and 6.5. An approach to substrate saturation of the enzyme required extensin monomer concentrations of 20 to 40 milligrams per milliliter. Preincubation with catalase completely inhibited the cross-linking reaction, which was highly dependent on hydrogen peroxide and optimal at 15 to 50 micromolar. We therefore identified the cross-linking activity as extensin peroxidase. Images Fig. 6 PMID:16666195

  4. Pressure induced structural changes and gas diffusion pathways in monomeric fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandari, Yuba R.

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are extremely valuable biochemical markers which have found a wide range of applications in cellular and molecular biology research. The monomeric variants of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), known as mFruits, have been especially valuable for in vivo applications in mammalian cell imaging. Fluorescent proteins consist of a chromophore caged in the beta-barrel protein scaffold. The photophysical properties of an FP is determined by its chromophore structure and its interactions with the protein barrel. Application of hydrostatic pressure on FPs results in the modification of the chromophore environment which allows a systematic study of the role of the protein-chromophore interactions on photophysical properties of FPs. Using Molecular Dynamics (MD) computer simulations, I investigated the pressure induced structural changes in the monomeric variants mCherry, mStrawberry, and Citrine. The results explain the molecular basis for experimentally observed pressure responses among FP variants. It is found that the barrel flexibility, hydrogen bonding interactions and chromophore planarity of the FPs can be correlated to their contrasting photophysical properties at vaious pressures. I also investigated the oxygen diffusion pathways in mOrange and mOrange2 which exhibit marked differences in oxygen sensitivities as well as photostability. Such computational identifications of structural changes and oxygen diffusion pathways are important in guiding mutagenesis efforts to design fluorescent proteins with improved photophysical properties.

  5. A novel domain arrangement in a monomeric cyclodextrin-hydrolyzing enzyme from the hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Tae; Song, Hyung-Nam; Jung, Tae-Yang; Lee, Myoung-Hee; Park, Sung-Goo; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    PFTA (Pyrococcus furiosus thermostable amylase) is a hyperthermophilic amylase isolated from the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. This enzyme possesses characteristics of both α-amylase- and cyclodextrin (CD)-hydrolyzing enzymes, allowing it to degrade pullulan, CD and acarbose-activities that are absent in most α-amylases-without the transferring activity that is common in CD-hydrolyzing enzymes. The crystal structure of PFTA revealed a unique monomeric subunit with an extended N-terminal region and an N'-domain folded into its own active site-a significantly altered domain configuration relative to that of the conventional dimeric CD-hydrolyzing amylases in glycoside hydrolase family 13. The active site is formed by the interface of the N'-domain and the catalytic domain and exhibits a broad and wide-open geometry without the concave pocket that is commonly found in the active sites of maltogenic amylases. The mutation of a residue (Gly415 to Glu) located at the domain interface between the N'- and catalytic domains yielded an enzyme that produced a significantly higher purity maltoheptaose (G7) from β-CD, supporting the involvement of this interface in substrate recognition and indicating that this mutant enzyme is a suitable candidate for the production of pure G7. The unique configuration of the active site distinguishes this archaic monomeric enzyme from classical bacterial CD-hydrolyzing amylases and provides a molecular basis for its enzymatic characteristics and for its potential use in industrial applications.

  6. Thr-161 phosphorylation of monomeric Cdc2. Regulation by protein phosphatase 2C in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    De Smedt, Veronique; Poulhe, Robert; Cayla, Xavier; Dessauge, Frederic; Karaiskou, Anthi; Jessus, Catherine; Ozon, Rene

    2002-08-09

    Fully grown Xenopus oocyte is arrested at prophase I of meiosis. Re-entry into meiosis depends on the activation of MPF (M-phase promoting factor or cyclin B.Cdc2 complex), triggered by progesterone. The prophase-arrested oocyte contains a store of Cdc2. Most of the protein is present as a monomer whereas a minor fraction, called pre-MPF, is found to be associated with cyclin B. Activation of Cdc2 depends on two key events: cyclin binding and an activating phosphorylation on Thr-161 residue located in the T-loop. To get new insights into the regulation of Thr-161 phosphorylation of Cdc2, monomeric Cdc2 was isolated from prophase oocytes. Based on its activation upon cyclin addition and detection by an antibody directed specifically against Cdc2 phosphorylated on Thr-161, we show for the first time that the prophase oocyte contains a significant amount of monomeric Cdc2 phosphorylated on Thr-161. PP2C, a Mg2+-dependent phosphatase, negatively controls Thr-161 phosphorylation of Cdc2. The unexpected presence of a population of free Cdc2 already phosphorylated on Thr-161 could contribute to the generation of the Cdc2 kinase activity threshold required to initiate MPF amplification.

  7. Selective defunctionalization by TiO2 of monomeric phenolics from lignin pyrolysis into simple phenols.

    PubMed

    Mante, Ofei D; Rodriguez, Jose A; Babu, Suresh P

    2013-11-01

    This study is focused on defunctionalizing monomeric phenolics from lignin into simple phenols for applications such as phenol/formaldehyde resins, epoxidized novolacs, adhesives and binders. Towards this goal, Titanium dioxide (TiO2) was used to selectively remove hydroxyl, methoxy, carbonyl and carboxyl functionalities from the monomeric phenolic compounds from lignin to produce mainly phenol, cresols and xylenols. The results showed that anatase TiO2 was more selective and active compared to rutile TiO2. Catechols were found to be the most reactive phenolics and 4-ethylguaiacol the least reactive with anatase TiO2. An overall conversion of about 87% of the phenolics was achieved at 550°C with a catalyst-to-feed ratio of 5 w/w. Over 97% conversion of phenolics is achievable at moderate temperatures (550°C or ≤ 600°C) and a moderate catalyst-to-feed ratio of 6.5:1. The reactivity of catechols on TiO2 suggests that titania is a promising catalyst in the removal of hydroxyl moiety.

  8. Surface-localized glycine transporters 1 and 2 function as monomeric proteins in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Masahisa; Nicke, Annette; Gomeza, Jesus; Aschrafi, Armaz; Schmalzing, Günther; Betz, Heinrich

    2001-01-01

    Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporters form a superfamily of transmembrane proteins that share 12 membrane-spanning regions. To gain information about the quaternary structure of these transporter proteins, we heterologously expressed the glial glycine transporter GlyT1 and its neuronal homolog GlyT2 in Xenopus oocytes. By using metabolic labeling with [35S]methionine or surface labeling with a plasma membrane impermeable reagent followed by affinity purification, we separately analyzed the total cellular pools of newly synthesized GlyTs and its functional plasma membrane-bound fractions. Upon blue native gel electrophoresis, the surface-localized transporter proteins were found to exist exclusively in complex-glycosylated monomeric form, whereas a significant fraction of the intracellular GlyT1 and GlyT2 was core-glycosylated and oligomeric. In contrast, even after treatment with the crosslinker glutaraldehyde, surface GlyTs failed to migrate as oligomeric proteins. These results indicate that plasma membrane-bound GlyT1 and GlyT2 are monomeric proteins. Thus, Na+/Cl−-dependent neurotransmitter transporters do not require oligomerization for substrate translocation. PMID:11171971

  9. Generation of monomeric reversibly switchable red fluorescent proteins for far-field fluorescence nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Stiel, Andre C; Andresen, Martin; Bock, Hannes; Hilbert, Michael; Schilde, Jessica; Schönle, Andreas; Eggeling, Christian; Egner, Alexander; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2008-09-15

    Reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) are GFP-like proteins that may be repeatedly switched by irradiation with light from a fluorescent to a nonfluorescent state, and vice versa. They can be utilized as genetically encodable probes and bear large potential for a wide array of applications, in particular for new protein tracking schemes and subdiffraction resolution microscopy. However, the currently described monomeric RSFPs emit only blue-green or green fluorescence; the spectral window for their use is thus rather limited. Using a semirational engineering approach based on the crystal structure of the monomeric nonswitchable red fluorescent protein mCherry, we generated rsCherry and rsCherryRev. These two novel red fluorescent RSFPs exhibit fluorescence emission maxima at approximately 610 nm. They display antagonistic switching modes, i.e., in rsCherry irradiation with yellow light induces the off-to-on transition and blue light the on-to-off transition, whereas in rsCherryRev the effects of the switching wavelengths are reversed. We demonstrate time-lapse live-cell subdiffraction microscopy by imaging rsCherryRev targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum utilizing the switching and localization of single molecules.

  10. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (<500 nM) and high selectivity for thrombin (>150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  11. Nortriptyline inhibits aggregation and neurotoxicity of alpha-synuclein by enhancing reconfiguration of the monomeric form.

    PubMed

    Collier, Timothy J; Srivastava, Kinshuk R; Justman, Craig; Grammatopoulous, Tom; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Prokesch, Manuela; Havas, Daniel; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Liu, Fang; Jock, Kevin; de Oliveira, Patrícia; Stirtz, Georgia L; Dettmer, Ulf; Sortwell, Caryl E; Feany, Mel B; Lansbury, Peter; Lapidus, Lisa; Paumier, Katrina L

    2017-10-01

    The pathology of Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies is characterized by the formation of intracellular inclusions comprised primarily of misfolded, fibrillar α-synuclein (α-syn). One strategy to slow disease progression is to prevent the misfolding and aggregation of its native monomeric form. Here we present findings that support the contention that the tricyclic antidepressant compound nortriptyline (NOR) has disease-modifying potential for synucleinopathies. Findings from in vitro aggregation and kinetics assays support the view that NOR inhibits aggregation of α-syn by directly binding to the soluble, monomeric form, and by enhancing reconfiguration of the monomer, inhibits formation of toxic conformations of the protein. We go on to demonstrate that NOR inhibits the accumulation, aggregation and neurotoxicity of α-syn in multiple cell and animal models. These findings suggest that NOR, a compound with established safety and efficacy for treatment of depression, may slow progression of α-syn pathology by directly binding to soluble, native, α-syn, thereby inhibiting pathological aggregation and preserving its normal functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Unprecedented solvent induced inter-conversion between monomeric and dimeric silylene-zinc iodide adducts.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sandeep; Sangtani, Ekta; Dhawan, Diksha; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Ghosh, Debashree; Sen, Sakya S

    2017-08-29

    Usually, when a silylene reacts with a transition metal Lewis acid, it forms an adduct which could be either monomeric or dimeric. However, we present here that a silylene, [PhC(NtBu)2SiN(SiMe3)2] can form both monomeric [PhC(NtBu)2Si{N(SiMe3)2} → ZnI2]·THF (1) and dimeric [{PhC(NtBu)2}(N(SiMe3)2)SiZnI,(μ-I)]2 (2) adducts upon reaction with ZnI2. The formation of 1 and 2 relies upon the solvent used for the reaction or crystallization. When the crystallization is carried out in THF complex 1 is formed, however, when the reaction and crystallization are performed in acetonitrile complex 2 is obtained. Both 1 and 2 were structurally authenticated and the nature of the Si-Zn bond in these complexes was determined by quantum chemical calculations. In addition, a spontaneous inter-conversion between 1 and 2 just by changing the solvents has been also observed; a feature presently not known for silylene-transition metal Lewis adducts.

  13. Rouse-Bueche Theory and The Calculation of The Monomeric Friction Coefficient in a Filled System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinetti, Luca; Macosko, Christopher; Bates, Frank

    According to flexible chain theories of viscoelasticity, all relaxation and retardation times of a polymer melt (hence, any dynamic property such as the diffusion coefficient) depend on the monomeric friction coefficient, ζ0, i.e. the average drag force per monomer per unit velocity encountered by a Gaussian submolecule moving through its free-draining surroundings. Direct experimental access to ζ0 relies on the availability of a suitable polymer dynamics model. Thus far, no method has been suggested that is applicable to filled systems, such as filled rubbers or microphase-segregated A-B-A thermoplastic elastomers at temperatures where one of the blocks is glassy. Building upon the procedure proposed by Ferry for entangled and unfilled polymer melts, the Rouse-Bueche theory is applied to an undiluted triblock copolymer to extract ζ0 from the linear viscoelastic behavior in the rubber-glass transition region, and to estimate the size of Gaussian submolecules. At iso-free volume conditions, the so-obtained matrix monomeric friction factor is consistent with the corresponding value for the homopolymer melt. In addition, the characteristic Rouse dimensions are in good agreement with independent estimates based on the Kratky-Porod worm-like chain model. These results seem to validate the proposed approach for estimating ζ0 in a filled system. Although preliminary tested on a thermoplastic elastomer of the A-B-A type, the method may be extended and applied to filled homopolymers as well.

  14. Enzymic cross-linkage of monomeric extensin precursors in vitro. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    SciTech Connect

    Everdeen, D.S.; Kiefer, S.; Willard, J.J.; Muldoon, E.P.; Dey, P.M.; Li, Xiongbiao; Lamport, D.T.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Rapidly growing tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cell suspension cultures contain transiently high levels of cell surface, salt-elutable, monomeric precursors to the covalently cross-linked extensin network of the primary cell wall. Thus, the authors purified a highly soluble monomeric extensin substrate from rapidly growing cells, and devised a soluble in vitro cross-linking assay based on Superose-6 fast protein liquid chromatography separation, which resolved extensin monomers from the newly formed oligomers within 25 minutes. Salt elution of slowly growing (early stationary phase) cells yielded little or no extensin monomers but did give a highly active enzymic preparation that specifically cross-linked extensin monomers in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, judging from: (a) a decrease in the extensin monomer peak on fast protein liquid chromatography gel filtration, (b) appearance of oligomeric peaks, and (c) direct electron microscopical observation of the cross-linked oligomers. The cross-linking reaction had a broad pH optimum between 5.5 and 6.5. An approach to substrate saturation of the enzyme required extensin monomer concentrations of 20 to 40 milligrams per milliliter. Preincubation with catalase completely inhibited the cross-linking reaction, which was highly dependent on hydrogen peroxide and optimal at 15 to 50 micromolar. They therefore identified the cross-linking activity as extensin peroxidase.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a monomeric mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase with partially reconstituted enzymic activity.

    PubMed

    Banci, L; Bertini, I; Chiu, C Y; Mullenbach, G T; Viezzoli, M S

    1995-12-15

    A monomeric analog of human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (F50E/G51E SOD), previously characterized and found to have reduced enzymic activity, was here further modified by replacing Glu133 with Gln. This substitution does not dramatically affect the coordination geometry at the active site, but enhances enzymic activity, and also increases the affinity for anions at the active site. This behavior parallels earlier published results in which this point mutation was made in the dimeric wild-type enzyme. The analog described here has afforded for the first time a monomeric superoxide dismutase with substantial activity. This point mutation does not significantly influence the protein structure but interactions with anions, including superoxide, are altered with respect to the monomeric form. The present monomeric Glu133Gln mutant has partially restored enzymic activity. The diminished activity of the monomeric analogs is discussed in the light of possible minor structural changes and some of their characteristics are compared with those of naturally occurring mutants associated with various neurological diseases.

  16. Identification of Phe187 as a crucial dimerization determinant facilitates crystallization of a monomeric retroviral integrase core domain.

    PubMed

    Galilee, Meytal; Alian, Akram

    2014-10-07

    Retroviral DNA integration into the host genome is mediated by nucleoprotein assemblies containing tetramers of viral integrase (IN). Whereas the fully active form of IN comprises a dimer of dimers, the molecular basis of IN multimerization has not been fully characterized. IN has consistently been crystallized in an analogous dimeric form in all crystallographic structures and experimental evidence as to the level of similarity between IN monomeric and dimeric conformations is missing because of the lack of IN monomeric structures. Here we identify Phe187 as a critical dimerization determinant of IN from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a nonprimate lentivirus that causes AIDS in the natural host, and report, in addition to a canonical dimeric structure of the FIV IN core-domain, a monomeric structure revealing the preservation of the backbone structure between the two multimeric forms and suggest a role for Phe187 in "hinging" the flexible IN dimer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Lyophilization-induced protein denaturation in phosphate buffer systems: monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase.

    PubMed

    Pikal-Cleland, K A; Carpenter, J F

    2001-09-01

    During freezing in phosphate buffers, selective precipitation of a less soluble buffer component and subsequent pH shifts may induce protein denaturation. Previous reports indicate significantly more inactivation and secondary structural perturbation of monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) during freeze-thawing in sodium phosphate (NaP) buffer as compared with potassium phosphate (KP) buffer. This observation was attributed to the significant pH shifts (from 7.0 to as low as 3.8) observed during freezing in the NaP buffer (1). In the current study, we investigated the impact of the additional stress of dehydration after freezing on the recovery of active protein on reconstitution and the retention of the native structure in the dried state. Freeze-drying monomeric and tetrameric beta-gal in either NaP or KP buffer resulted in significant secondary structural perturbations, which were greatest for the NaP samples. However, similar recoveries of active monomeric protein were observed after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, indicating that most dehydration-induced unfolding was reversible on reconstitution of the freeze-dried protein. In contrast, the tetrameric protein was more susceptible to dehydration-induced denaturation as seen by the greater loss in activity after reconstitution of the freeze-dried samples relative to that measured after freeze-thawing. To ensure optimal protein stability during freeze-drying, the protein must be protected from both freezing and dehydration stresses. Although poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran are preferentially excluded solutes and should confer protection during freezing, they were unable to prevent lyophilization-induced denaturation. In addition, Tween did not foster maintenance of native protein during freeze-drying. However, sucrose, which hydrogen bonds to dried protein in the place of lost water, greatly reduced freezing- and drying-induced denaturation, as observed by the high retention of native

  18. α-SNAP Prevents Docking of the Acrosome during Sperm Exocytosis because It Sequesters Monomeric Syntaxin

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Facundo; Bustos, Matías A.; Zanetti, María N.; Ruete, María C.; Mayorga, Luis S.; Tomes, Claudia N.

    2011-01-01

    α-SNAP has an essential role in membrane fusion that consists of bridging cis SNARE complexes to NSF. α-SNAP stimulates NSF, which releases itself, α-SNAP, and individual SNAREs that subsequently re-engage in the trans arrays indispensable for fusion. α-SNAP also binds monomeric syntaxin and NSF disengages the α-SNAP/syntaxin dimer. Here, we examine why recombinant α-SNAP blocks secretion in permeabilized human sperm despite the fact that the endogenous protein is essential for membrane fusion. The only mammalian organism with a genetically modified α-SNAP is the hyh mouse strain, which bears a M105I point mutation; males are subfertile due to defective sperm exocytosis. We report here that recombinant α-SNAP-M105I has greater affinity for the cytosolic portion of immunoprecipitated syntaxin than the wild type protein and in consequence NSF is less efficient in releasing the mutant. α-SNAP-M105I is a more potent sperm exocytosis blocker than the wild type and requires higher concentrations of NSF to rescue its effect. Unlike other fusion scenarios where SNAREs are subjected to an assembly/disassembly cycle, the fusion machinery in sperm is tuned so that SNAREs progress uni-directionally from a cis configuration in resting cells to monomeric and subsequently trans arrays in cells challenged with exocytosis inducers. By means of functional and indirect immunofluorescense assays, we show that recombinant α-SNAPs — wild type and M105I — inhibit exocytosis because they bind monomeric syntaxin and prevent this SNARE from assembling with its cognates in trans. Sequestration of free syntaxin impedes docking of the acrosome to the plasma membrane assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The N-terminal deletion mutant α-SNAP-(160–295), unable to bind syntaxin, affects neither docking nor secretion. The implications of this study are twofold: our findings explain the fertility defect of hyh mice and indicate that assembly of SNAREs in trans complexes is

  19. Rationally designed mutations convert de novo amyloid-like fibrils into monomeric beta-sheet proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixun; Hecht, Michael H

    2002-03-05

    Amyloid fibrils are associated with a variety of neurodegenerative maladies including Alzheimer's disease and the prion diseases. The structures of amyloid fibrils are composed of beta-strands oriented orthogonal to the fibril axis ("cross beta" structure). We previously reported the design and characterization of a combinatorial library of de novo beta-sheet proteins that self-assemble into fibrillar structures resembling amyloid. The libraries were designed by using a "binary code" strategy, in which the locations of polar and nonpolar residues are specified explicitly, but the identities of these residues are not specified and are varied combinatorially. The initial libraries were designed to encode proteins containing amphiphilic beta-strands separated by reverse turns. Each beta-strand was designed to be seven residues long, with polar (open circle) and nonpolar (shaded circle) amino acids arranged with an alternating periodicity ([see text]). The initial design specified the identical polar/nonpolar pattern for all of the beta-strands; no strand was explicitly designated to form the edges of the resulting beta-sheets. With all beta-strands preferring to occupy interior (as opposed to edge) locations, intermolecular oligomerization was favored, and the proteins assembled into amyloid-like fibrils. To assess whether explicit design of edge-favoring strands might tip the balance in favor of monomeric beta-sheet proteins, we have now redesigned the first and/or last beta-strands of several sequences from the original library. In the redesigned beta-strands, the binary pattern is changed from [see text] (K denotes lysine). The presence of a lysine on the nonpolar face of a beta-strand should disfavor fibrillar structures because such structures would bury an uncompensated charge. The nonpolar right arrow lysine mutations, therefore, would be expected to favor monomeric structures in which the [see text] sequences form edge strands with the charged lysine side

  20. alpha(v)beta(3) Integrin-targeting radionuclide therapy and imaging with monomeric RGD peptide.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuma; Washiyama, Kohshin; Shikano, Naoto; Mori, Hirofumi; Amano, Ryohei; Kawai, Keiichi

    2008-08-01

    The alpha(v)beta(3) integrin plays a pivotal role in angiogenesis and tumor metastasis. Angiogenic blood vessels overexpress alpha(v)beta(3) integrin, as in tumor neovascularization, and alpha(v)beta(3) integrin expression in other microvascular beds and organs is limited. Therefore, alpha(v)beta(3) integrin is a suitable receptor for tumor-targeting imaging and therapy. Recently, tetrameric and dimeric RGD peptides have been developed to enhance specificity to alpha(v)beta(3) integrin. In comparison to the corresponding monomeric peptide, however, these peptides show high levels of accumulation in kidney and liver. The purpose of this study is to evaluate tumor-targeting properties and the therapeutic potential of 111In- and 90Y-labeled monomeric RGD peptides in BALB/c nude mice with SKOV-3 human ovarian carcinoma tumors. DOTA-c(RGDfK) was labeled with 111In or 90Y and purified by HPLC. A biodistribution study and scintigraphic images revealed the specific uptake to alpha(v)beta(3) integrin and the rapid clearance from normal tissues. These peptides were renally excreted. At 10 min after injection of tracers, 111In-DOTA-c(RGDfK) and 90Y-DOTA-c(RGDfK) showed high uptake in tumors (7.3 +/- 0.6% ID/g and 4.6 +/- 0.8% ID/g, respectively) and gradually decreased over time (2.3 +/- 0.4% ID/g and 1.5 +/- 0.5% ID/g at 24 hr, respectively). High tumor-to-blood and -muscle ratios were obtained from these peptides. In radionuclide therapeutic study, multiple-dose administration of 90Y-DOTA-c(RGDfK) (3 x 11.1 MBq) suppressed tumor growth in comparison to the control group and a single-dose administration (11.1 MBq). Monomeric RGD peptides, 111In-DOTA-c(RGDfK) and (90)Y-DOTA-c(RGDfK), could be promising tracers for alpha(v)beta(3) integrin-targeting imaging and radiotherapy.

  1. Molecular Titration Promotes Oscillations and Bistability in Minimal Network Models with Monomeric Regulators.

    PubMed

    Cuba Samaniego, Christian; Giordano, Giulia; Kim, Jongmin; Blanchini, Franco; Franco, Elisa

    2016-04-15

    Molecular titration is emerging as an important biochemical interaction mechanism within synthetic devices built with nucleic acids and the CRISPR/Cas system. We show that molecular titration in the context of feedback circuits is a suitable mechanism to enhance the emergence of oscillations and bistable behaviors. We consider biomolecular modules that can be inhibited or activated by input monomeric regulators; the regulators compete with constitutive titrating species to determine the activity of their target. By tuning the titration rate and the concentration of titrating species, it is possible to modulate the delay and convergence speed of the transient response, and the steepness and dead zone of the stationary response of the modules. These phenomena favor the occurrence of oscillations when modules are interconnected to create a negative feedback loop; bistability is favored in a positive feedback interconnection. Numerical simulations are supported by mathematical analysis showing that the capacity of the closed loop systems to exhibit oscillations or bistability is structural.

  2. The linked conservation of structure and function in a family of high diversity: the monomeric cupredoxins.

    PubMed

    Gough, Julian; Chothia, Cyrus

    2004-06-01

    The monomeric cupredoxins are a highly divergent family of copper binding electron transport proteins that function in photosynthesis and respiration. To determine how function and structure are conserved in the context of large sequence differences, we have carried out a detailed analysis of the cupredoxins of known structure and their sequence homologs. The common structure of the cupredoxins is formed by a sandwich of two beta sheets which support a copper binding site. The structure of the deeply buried core is intimately coupled to the binding site on the surface of the protein; in each protein the conserved regions form one continuous substructure that extends from the surface active site and through the center of the molecule. Residues around the active site are conserved for functional reasons, while those deeper in the structure will be conserved for structural reasons. Together the two sets support each other.

  3. Methionine oxidation of monomeric lambda repressor: the denatured state ensemble under nondenaturing conditions.

    PubMed

    Chugha, Preeti; Sage, Harvey J; Oas, Terrence G

    2006-03-01

    Although poorly understood, the properties of the denatured state ensemble are critical to the thermodynamics and the kinetics of protein folding. The most relevant conformations to cellular protein folding are the ones populated under physiological conditions. To avoid the problem of low expression that is seen with unstable variants, we used methionine oxidation to destabilize monomeric lambda repressor and predominantly populate the denatured state under nondenaturing buffer conditions. The denatured ensemble populated under these conditions comprises conformations that are compact. Analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity experiments indicate a small increase in Stokes radius over that of the native state. A significant degree of alpha-helical structure in these conformations is detected by far-UV circular dichroism, and some tertiary interactions are suggested by near-UV circular dichroism. The characteristics of the denatured state populated by methionine oxidation in nondenaturing buffer are very different from those found in chemical denaturant.

  4. [Polymeric chondroitin sulfate vs. monomeric glucosamine for the treatment of osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Menzel, E J

    2000-01-01

    Two potentially chondro-protective substances are compared with each other: polymeric chondroitin sulfate and monomeric glucosamine. Chondroitin-sulfate is characterized by tropism for cartilage, i.e. it is preferentially incorporated into cartilagenous tissue. This quality could be of interest in the SPECT-analysis of osteoarthritic knee joints. In contrast to the classic agents Ibuprofen and Indomethacin, the antiinflammatory action of chondroitin-sulfate is less prominent, but the drug does not show any toxic side effects. Glucosamine on the other hand is a multifunctional precursor of the glycosaminoglycan synthesis in general. It lacks the cartilage tropism of chondroitin-sulfate. Into what sort of a glycosaminoglycan glucosamine is eventually integrated, depends therefore on the nature of the cells participating in the biosynthesis.

  5. Extracellular monomeric tau protein is sufficient to initiate the spread of tau protein pathology.

    PubMed

    Michel, Claire H; Kumar, Satish; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Tunnacliffe, Alan; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Kaminski, Clemens F; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S

    2014-01-10

    Understanding the formation and propagation of aggregates of the Alzheimer disease-associated Tau protein in vivo is vital for the development of therapeutics for this devastating disorder. Using our recently developed live-cell aggregation sensor in neuron-like cells, we demonstrate that different variants of exogenous monomeric Tau, namely full-length Tau (hTau40) and the Tau-derived construct K18 comprising the repeat domain, initially accumulate in endosomal compartments, where they form fibrillar seeds that subsequently induce the aggregation of endogenous Tau. Using superresolution imaging, we confirm that fibrils consisting of endogenous and exogenous Tau are released from cells and demonstrate their potential to spread Tau pathology. Our data indicate a greater pathological risk and potential toxicity than hitherto suspected for extracellular soluble Tau.

  6. Monomeric Garnet, a far-red fluorescent protein for live-cell STED imaging.

    PubMed

    Hense, Anika; Prunsche, Benedikt; Gao, Peng; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G Ulrich

    2015-12-09

    The advancement of far-red emitting variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is crucially important for imaging live cells, tissues and organisms. Despite notable efforts, far-red marker proteins still need further optimization to match the performance of their green counterparts. Here we present mGarnet, a robust monomeric marker protein with far-red fluorescence peaking at 670 nm. Thanks to its large extinction coefficient of 95,000 M(-1)cm(-1), mGarnet can be efficiently excited with 640-nm light on the red edge of its 598-nm excitation band. A large Stokes shift allows essentially the entire fluorescence emission to be collected even with 640-nm excitation, counterbalancing the lower fluorescence quantum yield of mGarnet, 9.1%, that is typical of far-red FPs. We demonstrate an excellent performance as a live-cell fusion marker in STED microscopy, using 640 nm excitation and 780 nm depletion wavelengths.

  7. Hydro- and solvothermolysis of kraft lignin for maximizing production of monomeric aromatic chemicals.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-shik; Jae, Jungho; Ha, Jeong-Myeong; Suh, Dong Jin

    2016-03-01

    The hydro-/solvothermolysis of kraft lignin using water and ethanol as a solvent were investigated in this study. The effect of the water-to-ethanol ratio on the yields of monomeric aromatic chemicals (MACs) and the kinetic behavior of MACs was studied in a series of batch experiments. The yields of MACs other than catechol increased as the ratio of ethanol increased, and the content of the total MACs in bio-crude oil (BCO) reached 35% when the ratio of ethanol was 100% at a reaction temperature of 300 °C. The formation of phenol, guaiacol, and alkylguaiacols was enhanced in ethanol, while the formation of catechol was dominant in water. The formation of more substituted MACs such as vanillin, acetoguaiacone, and homovanillic acid was not affected by the solvent. The role of reaction parameters on the yields of MACs was elucidated, and the main reaction pathways in water and in ethanol were proposed.

  8. [Antirestriction activity of T7 Ocr protein in monomeric and dimeric forms].

    PubMed

    Zavil'gelskiĭ, G B; Kotova, V Iu

    2014-01-01

    The Ocr protein, encoded by 0.3 (ocr) gene of bacteriophage T7, belongs to the family of antirestriction proteins that specifically inhibit the type I restriction-modification systems. Native Ocr forms homodimer (Ocr)2 both in solution and in the crystalline state. The Ocr protein belongs to the family of mimicry proteins. F53D A57E and E53R V77D mutant proteins were obtained, which form monomers. It was shown that the values of the dissociation constants Kd for Ocr, Ocr F53D A57E and Ocr F53RV77D proteins with EcoKI enzyme differ in 1000 times: Kd (Ocr) = 10(-10) M, Kd (Ocr F53D A57E and Ocr F53R V77D) = 10(-7) M. Antimodification activity of the Ocr monomeric forms is significantly reduced. We have shown, that Ocr dimeric form has fundamental importance for high inhibitory activity.

  9. De novo design of monomeric beta-hairpin and beta-sheet peptides.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Santiveri, Clara M; Jiménez, M Angeles

    2006-01-01

    Since the first report in 1993 (JACS 115, 5887-5888) of a peptide able to form a monomeric beta-hairpin structure in aqueous solution, the design of peptides forming either beta-hairpins (two-stranded antiparallel beta-sheets) or three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheets has become a field of intense interest. These studies have yielded great insights into the principles governing the stability and folding of beta-hairpins and antiparallel beta-sheets. This chapter reviews briefly those principles and describes a protocol for the de novo design of beta-sheet-forming peptides based on them. Criteria to select appropriate turn and strand residues and to avoid aggregation are provided. Because nuclear magnetic resonance is the most appropriate technique to check the success of new designs, the nuclear magnetic resonance parameters characteristic of beta-hairpins and three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheets are given.

  10. Extracellular Monomeric Tau Protein Is Sufficient to Initiate the Spread of Tau Protein Pathology*

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Claire H.; Kumar, Satish; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Tunnacliffe, Alan; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Kaminski, Clemens F.; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the formation and propagation of aggregates of the Alzheimer disease-associated Tau protein in vivo is vital for the development of therapeutics for this devastating disorder. Using our recently developed live-cell aggregation sensor in neuron-like cells, we demonstrate that different variants of exogenous monomeric Tau, namely full-length Tau (hTau40) and the Tau-derived construct K18 comprising the repeat domain, initially accumulate in endosomal compartments, where they form fibrillar seeds that subsequently induce the aggregation of endogenous Tau. Using superresolution imaging, we confirm that fibrils consisting of endogenous and exogenous Tau are released from cells and demonstrate their potential to spread Tau pathology. Our data indicate a greater pathological risk and potential toxicity than hitherto suspected for extracellular soluble Tau. PMID:24235150

  11. Synthesis and structural characterization of functionalized dimeric aluminophosphonates and a monomeric gallophosphonate anion.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, D; Horchler, S; Krätzner, R; Varkey, S P; Pinkas, J; Roesky, H W; Usón, I; Noltemeyer, M; Schmidt, H G

    2001-05-21

    Reaction of t-BuP(O)(OSiMe(3))(OH) with Me(3)Al leads to the formation of [Me(2)Al(mu-O)(2)P(OSiMe(3))(t-Bu)](2) (1) whereas Me(2)AlCl reacts with Ph(2)P(O)(OH) to yield [(Cl)(Me)Al(mu-O)(2)PPh(2)](2) (2). These compounds represent the first examples of functionalized dimeric four-ring type aluminophosphonate systems. The double four-ring type gallophosphonate, namely, [t-BuPO(3)GaMe](4), reacts with n-Bu(4)NHF(2) under ambient conditions, resulting in the formation of a monomeric gallophosphonate [n-Bu(4)N][MeGa[t-BuPO(2)(OH)](3)] (3). These derivatives have been adequately characterized using various spectroscopic techniques and X-ray diffraction studies.

  12. Cloning of monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA integrated within cell DNA from a cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, T.; Kanda, T.; Furuno, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kawana, T.; Yoshiike, K.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have molecularly cloned and characterized monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA with flanking cell DNA sequences from a cervical carcinoma. Determination of nucleotide sequence around the junctions of human papillomavirus and cell DNAs revealed that at the site of integration within cell DNA the cloned viral DNA had a deletion between nucleotides 1284 and 4471 (numbering system from K. Seedorf, G. Kraemmer, M. Duerst, S. Suhai, and W.G. Roewkamp), which includes the greater part of E1 gene and the entire E2 gene. In the remaining part of the E1 gene, three guanines were found at the location where two guanines at nucleotides 1137 and 1138 have been recorded. This additional guanine shifted the reading frame and erased an interruption in the E1 gene. The data strongly suggest that, like other papillomaviruses, human papillomavirus type 16 has an uninterrupted E1 gene.

  13. Polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene binds specifically to functional recognition sites on a monomeric and a dimeric ubiquitin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanzoni, Serena; Ceccon, Alberto; Assfalg, Michael; Singh, Rajesh K.; Fushman, David; D'Onofrio, Mariapina

    2015-04-01

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which NPs interact with biomolecules. NPs associating with proteins may interfere with protein-protein interactions and affect cellular communication pathways, however the impact of NPs on biomolecular recognition remains poorly characterized. In this respect, particularly relevant is the study of NP-induced functional perturbations of proteins implicated in the regulation of key biochemical pathways. Ubiquitin (Ub) is a prototypical protein post-translational modifier playing a central role in numerous essential biological processes. To contribute to the understanding of the interactions between this universally distributed biomacromolecule and NPs, we investigated the adsorption of polyhydroxylated [60]fullerene on monomeric Ub and on a minimal polyubiquitin chain in vitro at atomic resolution. Site-resolved chemical shift and intensity perturbations of Ub's NMR signals, together with 15N spin relaxation rate changes, exchange saturation transfer effects, and fluorescence quenching data were consistent with the reversible formation of soluble aggregates incorporating fullerenol clusters. The specific interaction epitopes were identified, coincident with functional recognition sites in a monomeric and lysine48-linked dimeric Ub. Fullerenol appeared to target the open state of the dynamic structure of a dimeric Ub according to a conformational selection mechanism. Importantly, the protein-NP association prevented the enzyme-catalyzed synthesis of polyubiquitin chains. Our findings provide an experiment-based insight into protein/fullerenol recognition, with implications in functional biomolecular communication, including regulatory protein turnover, and for the opportunity of therapeutic intervention in Ub-dependent cellular pathways.The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biomedical applications requires an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which

  14. LRP1 Modulates APP Intraneuronal Transport and Processing in Its Monomeric and Dimeric State.

    PubMed

    Herr, Uta-Mareike; Strecker, Paul; Storck, Steffen E; Thomas, Carolin; Rabiej, Verena; Junker, Anne; Schilling, Sandra; Schmidt, Nadine; Dowds, C Marie; Eggert, Simone; Pietrzik, Claus U; Kins, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, LRP1, interacts with APP and affects its processing. This is assumed to be mostly caused by the impact of LRP1 on APP endocytosis. More recently, also an interaction of APP and LRP1 early in the secretory pathway was reported whereat retention of LRP1 in the ER leads to decreased APP cell surface levels and in turn, to reduced Aβ secretion. Here, we extended the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses by showing via live cell imaging analyses in primary neurons that LRP1 and APP are transported only partly in common (one third) but to a higher degree in distinct fast axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, co-expression of LRP1 and APP caused a change of APP transport velocities, indicating that LRP1 recruits APP to a specific type of fast axonal transport vesicles. In contrast lowered levels of LRP1 facilitated APP transport. We further show that monomeric and dimeric APP exhibit similar transport characteristics and that both are affected by LRP1 in a similar way, by slowing down APP anterograde transport and increasing its endocytosis rate. In line with this, a knockout of LRP1 in CHO cells and in primary neurons caused an increase of monomeric and dimeric APP surface localization and in turn accelerated shedding by meprin β and ADAM10. Notably, a choroid plexus specific LRP1 knockout caused a much higher secretion of sAPP dimers into the cerebrospinal fluid compared to sAPP monomers. Together, our data show that LRP1 functions as a sorting receptor for APP, regulating its cell surface localization and thereby its processing by ADAM10 and meprin β, with the latter exhibiting a preference for APP in its dimeric state.

  15. LRP1 Modulates APP Intraneuronal Transport and Processing in Its Monomeric and Dimeric State

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Uta-Mareike; Strecker, Paul; Storck, Steffen E.; Thomas, Carolin; Rabiej, Verena; Junker, Anne; Schilling, Sandra; Schmidt, Nadine; Dowds, C. Marie; Eggert, Simone; Pietrzik, Claus U.; Kins, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, LRP1, interacts with APP and affects its processing. This is assumed to be mostly caused by the impact of LRP1 on APP endocytosis. More recently, also an interaction of APP and LRP1 early in the secretory pathway was reported whereat retention of LRP1 in the ER leads to decreased APP cell surface levels and in turn, to reduced Aβ secretion. Here, we extended the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses by showing via live cell imaging analyses in primary neurons that LRP1 and APP are transported only partly in common (one third) but to a higher degree in distinct fast axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, co-expression of LRP1 and APP caused a change of APP transport velocities, indicating that LRP1 recruits APP to a specific type of fast axonal transport vesicles. In contrast lowered levels of LRP1 facilitated APP transport. We further show that monomeric and dimeric APP exhibit similar transport characteristics and that both are affected by LRP1 in a similar way, by slowing down APP anterograde transport and increasing its endocytosis rate. In line with this, a knockout of LRP1 in CHO cells and in primary neurons caused an increase of monomeric and dimeric APP surface localization and in turn accelerated shedding by meprin β and ADAM10. Notably, a choroid plexus specific LRP1 knockout caused a much higher secretion of sAPP dimers into the cerebrospinal fluid compared to sAPP monomers. Together, our data show that LRP1 functions as a sorting receptor for APP, regulating its cell surface localization and thereby its processing by ADAM10 and meprin β, with the latter exhibiting a preference for APP in its dimeric state. PMID:28496400

  16. Electron nuclear double resonance evidence supporting a monomeric nature for P700+ in spinach chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Pádraig J.; Babcock, Gerald T.

    1984-01-01

    Proton electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectra of P700+ in spinach chloroplasts and in photosystem I particles have been obtained and compared with the corresponding ENDOR spectrum of monomeric chlorophyl a+ (Chla+) cation radical. The hyperfine couplings for P700+ can be interpreted in terms of those expected for a monomer Chla+ radical. The reduction in α-carbon spin densities observed for the in vivo species when compared to the in vitro radical is attributed to differences in the composition of the ground-state orbital for the two systems. For P700+, a mixture of 75% D0/25% D1, in which D0 and D1 represent the ground-and first excited-state orbitals calculated by Petke et al. for Chla+ [Petke, J. D., Maggiora, G. M., Shipman, L. L. & Christoffersen, R. E. (1980) Photochem. Photobiol. 31, 243-257], gives good agreement between calculated and experimental spin-density reduction factors. Interaction of the pigment ion with its protein environment such as through ligation of the central Mg atom, hydrogen bonding to the 9-keto-carbonyl group, and electrostatic interactions with charged amino acid residues are proposed as factors responsible for the lowering in energy of the D1 level in vivo. Combined with similar previous proposals for P680+ of photosystem II, the data suggest that both primary donor cation radicals of green plant photosynthesis can be viewed as monomeric Chla+ species in which the D1 orbital makes a significant contribution to the spin-density distribution. PMID:16593417

  17. The use of low molecular weight protamine chemical chimera to enhance monomeric insulin intestinal absorption.

    PubMed

    He, Huining; Sheng, Jianyong; David, Allan E; Kwon, Young Min; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Yongzhuo; Wang, Jianxin; Yang, Victor C

    2013-10-01

    Although oral delivery of insulin offers a number of unmatched advantages, it nevertheless is beset by the poor permeability of insulin molecules through the epithelial cell membranes of the intestinal mucosal layer. We previously reported the development of low molecular weight protamine (LMWP) as a non-toxic yet potent cell-penetrating peptide, of which via covalent linkage was capable of translocating protein cargos through the membranes of almost all cell types. It is therefore hypothesized that LMWP could be practically employed as a safe and effective tool to deliver insulin across the intestinal mucosal membrane, thereby augmenting its absorption through the GI tract. However, formulating 1:1 monomeric insulin/LMWP conjugate presents a tall order of challenge, as the acidic insulin and basic LMWP would automatically form tight aggregates through electrostatic interactions. In this paper, we developed an innovative conjugation strategy to solve this problem, by using succinimidyl-[(N-maleimidopropionamido)-polyethyleneglycol] ester (NHS-PEG-MAL) as an intermediate cross-linker during the coupling process. Both SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy confirmed the formation of a homogenous, monomeric (1:1 ratio) insulin/LMWP conjugate without encountering the conventional problem of substrate aggregation. Cell culture studies demonstrated that transport of the Insulin-PEG-LMWP conjugate across the intestinal mucosal monolayer was augmented by almost five-folds compared to native insulin. Furthermore, results from the in situ loop absorption tests in rats showed that systemic pharmacological bioavailability of insulin was significantly enhanced after its conjugation with LMWP. Overall, the presented chemical conjugation with LMWP could offer a reliable and safe means to improve the intestinal permeability of therapeutic peptides/proteins, shedding light of the possibility for their effective oral delivery.

  18. Kinetics of carbon monoxide binding to monomeric hemoproteins. Role of the proximal histidine.

    PubMed

    Coletta, M; Ascenzi, P; Traylor, T G; Brunori, M

    1985-04-10

    The effect of pH on (i) the second-order rate constant for CO binding and (ii) the spectral properties of the deoxygenated derivative of several monomeric hemoproteins has been investigated in the pH range between 2.3 and 9.0. As in the case of 3-[1-imidazolyl]-propylamide monomethyl ester mesoheme, the rate constant for CO binding to sperm whale, horse, Dermochelys coriacea, Coryphaena hippurus, and Aplysia limacina myoglobins (the latter only in the presence of acetate/acetic acid mixture) increases, as the pH is lowered, to a value at least 1 order of magnitude higher than at pH 7.0. Such an effect is not observed in A. limacina myoglobin (in the absence of the acetate/acetic acid mixture) and Chironomus thummi thummi erythrocruorin. Moreover, the absorption spectrum, in the visible region, of the deoxy derivative of all these monomeric hemoproteins (with the exception of A. limacina myoglobin in the absence of the acetate/acetic acid mixture) undergoes a transition as the pH is lowered, an effect observed previously with 3-[1-imidazolyl]-propylamide monomethyl ester protoheme. On the basis of analogous spectroscopic and kinetic properties of chelated heme model compounds we attribute this behavior to the protonation of the N epsilon of the proximal imidazole involved in the bond with the iron atom. On the basis of this model the movement of the iron atom to the heme plane appears as a crucial step for CO binding, the activation free energy of the process amounting to approximately 2 kcal/mol.

  19. The Use of Low Molecular Weight Protamine Chemical Chimera to Enhance Monomeric Insulin Intestinal Absorption

    PubMed Central

    He, Huining; Sheng, Jianyong; David, Allan E.; Kwon, Young Min; Zhang, Jian; Huang, Yongzhuo; Wang, Jianxin; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Although oral delivery of insulin offers a number of unmatched advantages, it nevertheless is beset by the poor permeability of insulin molecules through the epithelial cell membranes of the intestinal mucosal layer. We previously reported the development of low molecular weight protamine (LMWP) as a nontoxic yet potent cell penetrating peptide, of which via covalent linkage was capable of translocating protein cargos through the membranes of almost all cell types. It is therefore hypothesized that LMWP could be practically employed as a safe and effective tool to deliver insulin across the intestinal mucosal membrane, thereby augmenting its absorption through the GI tract. However, formulating 1:1 monomeric insulin/LMWP conjugate presents a tall order of challenge, as the acidic insulin and basic LMWP would automatically form tight aggregates through electrostatic interactions. In this paper, we developed an innovative conjugation strategy to solve this problem, by using succinimidyl-[(N-maleimidopropionamido)-polyethyleneglycol] ester (NHS-PEG-MAL) as an intermediate cross-linker during the coupling process. Both SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy confirmed the formation of a homogeneous, monomeric (1:1 ratio) insulin/LMWP conjugate without encountering the conventional problem of substrate aggregation. Cell culture studies demonstrated that transport of the Insulin-PEG-LMWP conjugate across the intestinal mucosal monolayer was augmented by almost five folds compared to native insulin. Furthermore, results from the in situ loop absorption tests in rats showed that systemic pharmacological bioavailability of insulin was significantly enhanced after its conjugation with LMWP. Overall, the presented chemical conjugation with LMWP could offer a reliable and safe means to improve the intestinal permeability of therapeutic peptides/proteins, shedding light of the possibility for their effective oral delivery. PMID:23863452

  20. Early cytokine modulation after the rapid induction phase of sublingual immunotherapy with mite monomeric allergoids.

    PubMed

    Di Gioacchino, M; Perrone, A; Petrarca, C; Di Claudio, F; Mistrello, G; Falagiani, P; Dadorante, V; Verna, N; Braga, M; Ballone, E; Cavallucci, E

    2008-01-01

    The influence of different treatment schedules of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) in activating IL-10-producing T-cells, crucial in inducing allergen-specific tolerance, is not completely understood. The present work was designed to evaluate allergen driven interleukin release by mononuclear cells in the early phase of SLIT, after application of different induction schemes. Twenty mite-allergic patients were enrolled, 10 (group A) treated with a traditional 98 day induction scheme and 10 (group B) with a 16 day scheme with monomeric allergoid vaccine. At the end of the induction phase, the cumulative doses taken by group A and group B patients were equivalent to 50.5 and 50.3 microg of mite group 1 allergens, respectively. The release of Th1-, Th2- and Treg-related interleukins was assessed in culture supernatants of 5 microg/ml Der-p1-stimulated mononuclear cells, isolated before and after the induction phases. No relevant treatment-related side effects were observed. Interleukin release was similar in the two groups at the enrolment. Non-stimulated and Der p 1 stimulated release of studied cytokines was similar in the two groups at enrolment. Der p 1 stimulation significantly increased IL-10 release (p<0.0002) after treatment in group B patients, and this effect was higher (p=0.05) compared to group A patients. Furthermore, at the end of SLIT induction TNF-alpha, IL-4 and IFN-gamma production were reduced in group B patients (p<0.05, p=0.062 and p=0.060, respectively). The rapid induction scheme of sublingual immunotherapy induces an early immune suppression more effectively than the slower one. The rapid induction scheme should be the preferential way to start sublingual immunotherapy, particularly when monomeric allergoids are utilized.

  1. Efficacious redox-responsive gene delivery in serum by ferrocenylated monomeric and dimeric cationic cholesterols.

    PubMed

    Vulugundam, Gururaja; Kumar, Krishan; Kondaiah, Paturu; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2015-04-14

    Herein, we present the design and synthesis of new redox-active monomeric and dimeric (gemini) cationic lipids based on ferrocenylated cholesterol derivatives for gene delivery. The cationic cholesterols are shown to be transfection efficient after being formulated with the neutral helper lipid DOPE in the presence of serum (FBS). The redox activity of the resulting co-liposomes and their lipoplexes could be regulated using the alkanyl ferrocene moiety attached to the ammonium head groups of the cationic cholesterols. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurements were performed to characterize the co-liposomal aggregates and their complexes with pDNA. The transfection efficiency of lipoplexes could be tuned by changing the oxidation state of the ferrocene moiety. The gene transfection capability was assayed in terms of green fluorescence protein (GFP) expression using pEGFP-C3 plasmid DNA in three cell lines of different origins, namely Caco-2, HEK293T and HeLa, in the presence of serum. The vesicles possessing ferrocene in the reduced state induced an efficient transfection, even better than a commercial reagent Lipofectamine 2000 (Lipo 2000) as evidenced by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. All the co-liposomes containing the oxidized ferrocene displayed diminished levels of gene expression. Gene transfection events from the oxidized co-liposomes were further potentiated by introducing ascorbic acid (AA) as a reducing agent during lipoplex incubation with cells, leading to the resumption of transfection activity. Assessment of transfection capability of both reduced and oxidized co-liposomes was also undertaken following cellular internalization of labelled pDNA using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Overall, we demonstrate here controlled gene transfection activities using redox-driven, transfection efficient cationic monomeric and dimeric cholesterol lipids. Such systems could be used in gene

  2. Electron nuclear double resonance evidence supporting a monomeric nature for P700 in spinach chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    O'malley, P J; Babcock, G T

    1984-02-01

    Proton electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectra of P700(+) in spinach chloroplasts and in photosystem I particles have been obtained and compared with the corresponding ENDOR spectrum of monomeric chlorophyl a(+) (Chla(+)) cation radical. The hyperfine couplings for P700(+) can be interpreted in terms of those expected for a monomer Chla(+) radical. The reduction in alpha-carbon spin densities observed for the in vivo species when compared to the in vitro radical is attributed to differences in the composition of the ground-state orbital for the two systems. For P700(+), a mixture of 75% D(0)/25% D(1), in which D(0) and D(1) represent the ground-and first excited-state orbitals calculated by Petke et al. for Chla(+) [Petke, J. D., Maggiora, G. M., Shipman, L. L. & Christoffersen, R. E. (1980) Photochem. Photobiol. 31, 243-257], gives good agreement between calculated and experimental spin-density reduction factors. Interaction of the pigment ion with its protein environment such as through ligation of the central Mg atom, hydrogen bonding to the 9-keto-carbonyl group, and electrostatic interactions with charged amino acid residues are proposed as factors responsible for the lowering in energy of the D(1) level in vivo. Combined with similar previous proposals for P680(+) of photosystem II, the data suggest that both primary donor cation radicals of green plant photosynthesis can be viewed as monomeric Chla(+) species in which the D(1) orbital makes a significant contribution to the spin-density distribution.

  3. Monomerization of dimeric IgG of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) increases the antibody reactivity against intracellular antigens.

    PubMed

    Wymann, Sandra; Ghielmetti, Marco; Schaub, Alexander; Baumann, Michael J; Stadler, Beda M; Bolli, Reinhard; Miescher, Sylvia M

    2008-05-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) preparations are derived from pooled plasma from up to 60,000 healthy human donors and reflect the immunologic experience of the donor population. IVIg contains monomeric and dimeric IgG populations which are in a dynamic equilibrium depending on concentration, pH, temperature, donor pool size, time and stabilizers added in order to keep the portion of dimeric IgG below a certain level. In the present study, monomeric and dimeric fractions were isolated by size exclusion chromatography. The dimeric fractions, however, showed a dynamic instability and tended to dissociate. Both dimeric and monomeric IgG fractions were acid treated (pH 4) in order to dissociate the dimeric IgG. Western-blot analysis identified a sub-population of SDS resistant IgG dimers. Furthermore, the reactivities of the fractions were tested against a panel of self- and exo-antigens. There was a marked increase in activity of the dimeric compared to the monomeric IgG fraction against various intracellular self-antigens. Our data indicates that the increased reactivities of pH 4-treated fractions can mainly be attributed to dimer dissociation, as pH 4-treated monomers do not show significantly increased activities against a range of antigens.

  4. Quantification of the predominant monomeric catechins in baking chocolate standard reference material by LC/APCI-MS.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Bryant C; Sharpless, Katherine E

    2003-01-29

    Catechins are polyphenolic plant compounds (flavonoids) that may offer significant health benefits to humans. These benefits stem largely from their anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, and antimutagenic properties. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of flavonoid-containing foods is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Chocolate is a natural cocoa bean-based product that reportedly contains high levels of monomeric, oligomeric, and polymeric catechins. We have applied solid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry to the identification and determination of the predominant monomeric catechins, (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin, in a baking chocolate Standard Reference Material (NIST Standard Reference Material 2384). (+)-Catechin and (-)-epicatechin are detected and quantified in chocolate extracts on the basis of selected-ion monitoring of their protonated [M + H](+) molecular ions. Tryptophan methyl ester is used as an internal standard. The developed method has the capacity to accurately quantify as little as 0.1 microg/mL (0.01 mg of catechin/g of chocolate) of either catechin in chocolate extracts, and the method has additionally been used to certify (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin levels in the baking chocolate Standard Reference Material. This is the first reported use of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for the quantitative determination of monomeric catechins in chocolate and the only report certifying monomeric catechin levels in a food-based Standard Reference Material.

  5. Reverse micellar extraction of bovine serum albumin - a comparison between the effects of gemini surfactant and its corresponding monomeric surfactant.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Cai, Juan; Guo, Xia

    2013-01-15

    Gemini surfactant displayed distinct advantages over monomeric surfactant in the liquid-liquid reverse micellar extraction process. First, less amount of gemini surfactant than monomeric surfactant was needed for transferring almost complete bovine serum albumin (BSA) into organic phase from aqueous phase. Second, the loading capacity of gemini surfactant reverse micelle phase was much higher than that of the corresponding monomeric surfactant reverse micelle. Third, efficient backward extraction (75-92%) of BSA could be effected in a wide pH range from 4 to 9 with gemini surfactant reverse micelle while a pH of ca. 4.3 is prerequisite to the recovery of BSA from monomeric surfactant reverse micelle. So far, the reports about the effect of surfactant structure on protein extraction have been limited. This study indicates the important role of the spacer of gemini surfactant in protein extraction process and may provide more knowledge on how to optimise surfactant structure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color and antioxidant capacity of processed black raspberry products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6 mo of storage on total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of black raspberries that were individually quick-frozen (IQF), canned-in-syrup, canned-in-water, pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Tot...

  7. Reactivity studies on [Cp'FeI]2: monomeric amido, phenoxo, and alkyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Walter, Marc D; White, Peter S

    2012-11-05

    A series of monomeric mono(cyclopentadienyl) iron amido, phenoxo, and alkyl complexes were synthesized, and their structure and reactivity are presented. The iron(II) centers in these 14VE one-legged piano stool complexes are high spin (S = 2) in solid state and solution independent of solvent. The silylamide compound [Cp'FeN(SiMe(3))(2)] (2a, Cp' = 1,2,4-(Me(3)C)(3)C(5)H(2)) is an excellent starting material for the reaction with more acidic substrates such as phenols. Sterically encumbered phenols 2,6-(Me(3)C)(2)(4-R)C(6)H(2)OH (R = H, Me, and tBu) were investigated. In all cases monomeric iron phenoxo half-sandwich complexes [Cp'FeOR'] (4-R) are initially formed. Rearrangement of 4-R to the diamagnetic oxocyclohexadienyl complex [Cp'Fe(η(5)-O═C(6)H(2)R'(2)R")] (5-R) is observed for 2,6-(Me(3)C)(2)(4-R)C(6)H(2)OH (R = H and Me) and the Gibbs free enthalpy of activation (ΔG(‡)) was determined. In contrast this rearrangement is inhibited when the 4-position is blocked by a tBu group. Removing the steric bulk from the 2,6-positions leads to the formation of a μ-phenoxo dimer, [Cp'Fe(μ-OC(6)H(3)tBu(2)-3,5)](2) (5). Density functional theory (DFT) was used to further elucidate the structure-reactivity relationship in these molecules. The one-legged piano stool anilido complex [Cp'Fe(NHC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6)] (7) is not accessible via acid-base reaction between 2a and H(2)NC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6, but can be prepared by conventional salt metathesis reaction from [Cp'FeI](2) and [Li(NHC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6)(OEt(2))](2). In contrast, reaction of 2a with Ph(2)NH yields the bimetallic [Cp'Fe(N,C-κ(1),η(5)-C(6)H(5)NPh)Fe(N-κ(1)-NPh(2))Cp'] (8) which combines two iron centers in the same oxidation state (+2), but different spin-states (S = 0 and S = 2) which is reflected in very different Cp(cent)-Fe distances of 1.68 and 2.04 Å, respectively. A monomeric iron alkyl half-sandwich complex [Cp'FeCH(SiMe(3))(2)] (9) was prepared that exhibits no reactivity toward H(2), C

  8. Holistic versus monomeric strategies for hydrological modelling of human-modified hydrosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalbantis, I.; Efstratiadis, A.; Rozos, E.; Kopsiafti, M.; Koutsoyiannis, D.

    2011-03-01

    The modelling of human-modified basins that are inadequately measured constitutes a challenge for hydrological science. Often, models for such systems are detailed and hydraulics-based for only one part of the system while for other parts oversimplified models or rough assumptions are used. This is typically a bottom-up approach, which seeks to exploit knowledge of hydrological processes at the micro-scale at some components of the system. Also, it is a monomeric approach in two ways: first, essential interactions among system components may be poorly represented or even omitted; second, differences in the level of detail of process representation can lead to uncontrolled errors. Additionally, the calibration procedure merely accounts for the reproduction of the observed responses using typical fitting criteria. The paper aims to raise some critical issues, regarding the entire modelling approach for such hydrosystems. For this, two alternative modelling strategies are examined that reflect two modelling approaches or philosophies: a dominant bottom-up approach, which is also monomeric and, very often, based on output information, and a top-down and holistic approach based on generalized information. Critical options are examined, which codify the differences between the two strategies: the representation of surface, groundwater and water management processes, the schematization and parameterization concepts and the parameter estimation methodology. The first strategy is based on stand-alone models for surface and groundwater processes and for water management, which are employed sequentially. For each model, a different (detailed or coarse) parameterization is used, which is dictated by the hydrosystem schematization. The second strategy involves model integration for all processes, parsimonious parameterization and hybrid manual-automatic parameter optimization based on multiple objectives. A test case is examined in a hydrosystem in Greece with high complexities

  9. Monomeric and dimeric nickel complexes derived from a pincer ligand featuring a secondary amine donor moiety.

    PubMed

    Spasyuk, Denis M; Zargarian, Davit

    2010-07-05

    Reaction of NiBr(2)(CH(3)CN)(x) with the unsymmetrical pincer ligand m-(i-Pr(2)PO)(CH(2)NHBn)C(6)H(4) (Bn = CH(2)Ph) gives the complex (R,S)-kappa(P),kappa(C),kappa(N)-{2-(i-Pr(2)PO),6-(CH(2)NHBn)-C(6)H(3)}Ni(II)Br, 1, featuring an asymmetric secondary amine donor moiety. Deprotonation of the latter with methyl lithium gave a dark brown compound that could not be characterized directly, but fully characterized derivatives prepared from this compound indicate that it is the LiBr adduct of the 14-electron amido species [kappa(P),kappa(C),kappa(N)-{2-(i-Pr(2)PO),6-(CH(2)NBn)-C(6)H(3)}Ni], 2. Thus, 2.LiBr reacts with water to regenerate 1, while reaction with excess benzyl or allyl bromide gave the POCN-type pincer complexes 3 and 4, respectively, featuring tertiary amine donor moieties. On the other hand, heating 2.LiBr at 60 degrees C led to loss of LiBr and dimerization to generate the orange crystalline compound [mu(N);kappa(P),kappa(C),kappa(N)-{2-(i-Pr(2)PO),6-(CH(2)NBn)-C(6)H(3)}Ni](2), 5. Solid state structural studies show that 1, 3, and 4 are monomeric, square planar complexes involving one Ni-N interaction, whereas complex 5 is a C(2)-symmetric dimer involving four Ni-N interactions and a Ni(2)N(2) core featuring a short Ni-Ni distance (2.51 A). Preliminary reactivity tests have shown that 5 is stable toward weak nucleophiles such as acetonitrile but reacts with strong nucleophiles such as CO or 2,6-Me(2)(C(6)H(3))NC. Reactions with protic reagents showed that phthalimide appears to break the dimer to generate a monomeric species, whereas alcohols appear to leave the dimer intact, giving rise instead to adducts through N...H...O interactions. These ROH adducts of 5 were found to be active precatalysts for the alchoholysis of acrylonitrile with up to 2000 catalytic turnover numbers.

  10. Recombinant DNA derived monomeric insulin analogue: comparison with soluble human insulin in normal subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Vora, J. P.; Owens, D. R.; Dolben, J.; Atiea, J. A.; Dean, J. D.; Kang, S.; Burch, A.; Brange, J.

    1988-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare the rate of absorption from subcutaneous tissue and the resulting hypoglycaemic effect of iodine-125 labelled soluble human insulin and a monomeric insulin analogue derived by recombinant DNA technology. DESIGN--Single blind randomised comparison of equimolar doses of 125I labelled soluble human insulin and insulin analogue. SETTING--Study in normal people at a diabetes research unit and a university department of medical physics. SUBJECTS--Seven healthy male volunteers aged 20-39 not receiving any other drugs. INTERVENTIONS--After an overnight fast and a basal period of one hour two doses (0.05 and 0.1 U/kg) of 125I labelled soluble human insulin and insulin analogue were injected subcutaneously into the anterior abdominal wall on four separate days. END POINT--To find a fast acting insulin for meal related requirements in insulin dependent diabetics. MEASUREMENTS and main results--Residual radioactivity at the injection site was measured continuously for the first two hours after injection of the 125I labelled preparations and thereafter for five minutes simultaneously with blood sampling. Frequent venous blood samples were obtained over six hours for determination of plasma immunoreactive insulin, insulin analogue, glucose, and glucagon values. Time to 50% of initial radioactivity at the injection site for the insulin analogue compared with soluble insulin was 61 v 135 minutes (p less than 0.05) with 0.05 U/kg and 67 v 145 minutes (p less than 0.001) with 0.1 U/kg. Concentrations in plasma increased faster after the insulin analogue compared with soluble insulin, resulting in higher plasma concentrations between 10 and 150 minutes (0.001 less than p less than 0.05) after 0.05 U/kg and between 40 and 360 minutes (0.001 less than p less than 0.05) after 0.1 U/kg. The hypoglycaemic response to insulin analogue was a plasma glucose nadir at 60 minutes with both doses compared with 90 and 120 minutes with soluble insulin at 0.5 and 0.1 U

  11. Serum monomeric laminin-γ2 as a novel biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Oikawa, Ritsuko; Okuse, Chiaki; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Ikeda, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio; Otsubo, Takehito; Yoshimura, Toru; Yoshida, Eisaku; Nakagawa, Masatoshi; Koshikawa, Naohiko; Seiki, Motoharu

    2017-07-01

    The diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the early stages is important for successful clinical management. Laminin (Ln)-γ2 expression has been reported in various types of malignant carcinomas. We recently developed a highly sensitive method to measure serum monomeric Ln-γ2 levels using a fully automated chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA). Using our CLIA, we evaluated its diagnostic value in sera from patients with chronic liver disease (CLD) and patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) were also examined in these subjects. Median levels of Ln-γ2 were significantly higher in patients with HCC (173.2 pg/mL; range: 39.5-986 pg/mL) compared with patients with CLD (76.7 pg/mL; range: 38.7-215.9 pg/mL) and with healthy volunteers (41.1 pg/mL; range: 10.9-79.0 pg/mL). The optimal cutoff value for Ln-γ2 that allowed us to distinguish between HCC and nonmalignant CLD was 116.6 pg/mL. Elevated Ln-γ2 levels were observed in 0% of healthy volunteers, 17% of patients with CLD, and 63% of patients with HCC. The positivity rate in patients with HCC for the combination of Ln-γ2 and DCP was 89.5%, which was better than that for either of the two markers alone (63% and 68%, respectively). Among patients with early-stage HCC (T1 or T2), the positivity rates for monomeric Ln-γ2, AFP and DCP were 61%, 39% and 57%, respectively. Serum Ln-γ2 may be a potential biomarker for HCC surveillance. The combination of Ln-γ2 and DCP may be more sensitive for laboratory diagnosis of HCC than the combination of AFP and DCP. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  12. Influence of telopeptides on the structural and physical properties of polymeric and monomeric acid-soluble type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Róisín; Kirk, Steve; Tronci, Giuseppe; Yang, Xuebin; Wood, David

    2017-08-01

    Currently two factors hinder the use of collagen as building block of regenerative devices: the limited mechanical strength in aqueous environment, and potential antigenicity. Polymeric collagen is naturally found in the cross-linked state and is mechanically tougher than the monomeric, acid-soluble collagen ex vivo. The antigenicity of collagen, on the other hand, is mainly ascribed to inter-species variations in amino acid sequences of the non-helical terminal telopeptides. These telopeptides can be removed through enzymatic treatment to produce atelocollagen, although the effect of this cleavage on triple helix organization, amino acidic composition and thermal properties is often disregarded. Here, we compare the structural, chemical and physical properties of polymeric and monomeric type I collagen with and without telopeptides, in an effort to elucidate the influence of either mature covalent crosslinks or telopeptides. Circular dichroism (CD) was used to examine the triple helical conformation and quantify the denaturation temperature (Td) of both monomeric collagen (36.5°C) and monomeric atelocollagen (35.5°C). CD measurements were combined with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in order to gain insight into the triple helix-to-coil thermal transition and shrinkage temperature (Ts) of polymeric atelo collagen (44.8°C), polymeric collagen (62.7°C), monomeric atelo collagen (51.4°C) and monomeric collagen (66.5°C). Structural and thermal analysis was combined with high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine the content of specific collagen amino acidic residues used as markers for the presence of telopeptides and mature crosslinks. Hydroxylamine was used as the marker for polymeric collagen, and had a total content of 9.66% for both polymeric and polymeric atelo collagen; tyrosine was used as the marker for telopeptide cleavage, was expressed as 0.526% of the content of polymeric collagen and the partially-reduced content of 0.39% for

  13. Modulation of Basophils' Degranulation and Allergy-Related Enzymes by Monomeric and Dimeric Naphthoquinones

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Brígida R.; Sousa, Carla; Valentão, Patrícia; Oliveira, Jorge M. A.; Andrade, Paula B.

    2014-01-01

    Allergic disorders are characterized by an abnormal immune response towards non-infectious substances, being associated with life quality reduction and potential life-threatening reactions. The increasing prevalence of allergic disorders demands for new and effective anti-allergic treatments. Here we test the anti-allergic potential of monomeric (juglone, menadione, naphthazarin, plumbagin) and dimeric (diospyrin and diosquinone) naphthoquinones. Inhibition of RBL-2H3 rat basophils' degranulation by naphthoquinones was assessed using two complementary stimuli: IgE/antigen and calcium ionophore A23187. Additionally, we tested for the inhibition of leukotrienes production in IgE/antigen-stimulated cells, and studied hyaluronidase and lipoxidase inhibition by naphthoquinones in cell-free assays. Naphthazarin (0.1 µM) decreased degranulation induced by IgE/antigen but not A23187, suggesting a mechanism upstream of the calcium increase, unlike diospyrin (10 µM) that reduced degranulation in A23187-stimulated cells. Naphthoquinones were weak hyaluronidase inhibitors, but all inhibited soybean lipoxidase with the most lipophilic diospyrin, diosquinone and menadione being the most potent, thus suggesting a mechanism of competition with natural lipophilic substrates. Menadione was the only naphthoquinone reducing leukotriene C4 production, with a maximal effect at 5 µM. This work expands the current knowledge on the biological properties of naphthoquinones, highlighting naphthazarin, diospyrin and menadione as potential lead compounds for structural modification in the process of improving and developing novel anti-allergic drugs. PMID:24587235

  14. Backbone dynamics of the monomeric lambda repressor denatured state ensemble under nondenaturing conditions.

    PubMed

    Chugha, Preeti; Oas, Terrence G

    2007-02-06

    Oxidizing two native methionine residues predominantly populates the denatured state of monomeric lambda repressor (MetO-lambdaLS) under nondenaturing conditions. NMR was used to characterize the secondary structure and dynamics of MetO-lambdaLS in standard phosphate buffer. 13Calpha and 1Halpha chemical shift indices reveal a region of significant helicity between residues 9 and 29. This helical content is further supported by the observation of medium-range amide NOEs. The remaining residues do not exhibit significant helicity as determined by NMR. We determined 15N relaxation parameters for 64 of 85 residues at 600 and 800 MHz. There are two distinct regions of reduced flexibility, residues 8-32 in the N-terminal third and residues 50-83 in the C-terminal third. The middle third, residues 33-50, has greater flexibility. We have analyzed the amplitude of the backbone motions in terms of the physical properties of the amino acids and conclude that conformational restriction of the backbone MetO-lambdaLS is due to nascent helix formation in the region corresponding to native helix 1. The bulkiness of amino acid residues in the C-terminal third leads to the potential for hydrophobic interactions, which is suggested by chemical exchange detected by the difference in spectral density J(0) at the two static magnetic fields. The more flexible middle region is the result of a predominance of small side chains in this region.

  15. Mapping the dynamics and nanoscale organization of synaptic adhesion proteins using monomeric streptavidin

    PubMed Central

    Chamma, Ingrid; Letellier, Mathieu; Butler, Corey; Tessier, Béatrice; Lim, Kok-Hong; Gauthereau, Isabel; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Park, Sheldon; Sainlos, Matthieu; Thoumine, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The advent of super-resolution imaging (SRI) has created a need for optimized labelling strategies. We present a new method relying on fluorophore-conjugated monomeric streptavidin (mSA) to label membrane proteins carrying a short, enzymatically biotinylated tag, compatible with SRI techniques including uPAINT, STED and dSTORM. We demonstrate efficient and specific labelling of target proteins in confined intercellular and organotypic tissues, with reduced steric hindrance and no crosslinking compared with multivalent probes. We use mSA to decipher the dynamics and nanoscale organization of the synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin-1β, neuroligin-1 (Nlg1) and leucine-rich-repeat transmembrane protein 2 (LRRTM2) in a dual-colour configuration with GFP nanobody, and show that these proteins are diffusionally trapped at synapses where they form apposed trans-synaptic adhesive structures. Furthermore, Nlg1 is dynamic, disperse and sensitive to synaptic stimulation, whereas LRRTM2 is organized in compact and stable nanodomains. Thus, mSA is a versatile tool to image membrane proteins at high resolution in complex live environments, providing novel information about the nano-organization of biological structures. PMID:26979420

  16. Coordinatively polymeric and monomeric bismuth(III) complexes with pyridine carboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Anjaneyulu, O; Prasad, T K; Swamy, K C Kumara

    2010-02-28

    Three crystalline compounds, [Bi(2-O(2)C-C(5)H(4)N)(3)](n) (), {Bi[(2,6-O(2)C)(2)C(5)H(3)N)][(2-HO(2)C-6-O(2)C)C(5)H(3)N].H(2)O}(n) (3) and Bi(O(2)CC(9)H(6)N)(2)(O(3)N)(O(2)CC(9)H(6)NH).2H(2)O () have been prepared by simple reactions in aqueous medium using the readily available bismuth nitrate and the corresponding acids, picolinic acid, dipicolinic acid and quinaldic acid. While and are coordination polymers with bismuth in tricapped trigonal prismatic and dodecahedral environments, compound is a monomeric species with dodecahedral geometry at bismuth. Compound represents a second crystalline form of a recently reported structure with subtle differences in bond parameters, and highlights the flexibility in structural motifs during crystallization. Compound involves skeletons with dimeric [Bi(2)O(2)] and trimeric [BiOCOBiOBiOCO] moieties. In , while the N-protonated carboxylate forms a four-membered chelate ring with bismuth, the other two carboxylates form five-membered ring chelates with the nitrate accounting for the remaining two sites again as a chelate. TGA studies are consistent with the presence of non-coordinated water in and . Compounds and , although insoluble in most of the organic solvents and water, are readily soluble in dilute hydrochloric acid.

  17. L-selectin transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains are monomeric in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sankaranarayanan; Deng, Wei; Li, Renhao

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant protein termed CLS, which corresponds to the C-terminal portion of human L-selectin and contains its entire transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains (residues Ser473-Arg542), has been produced and its oligomeric state in detergents characterized. CLS migrates in the SDS polyacrylamide gel at a pace that is typically expected from a complex twice of its molecular weight. Additional studies revealed however that this is due to residues in the cytoplasmic domain, as mutations in this region or its deletion significantly increased the electrophoretic rate of CLS. Analytical ultracentrifugation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies indicated that CLS reconstituted in dodecylphosphocholine detergent micelles is monomeric. When the transmembrane domain of L-selectin is inserted into the inner membrane of Escherichia coli as a part of a chimeric protein in the TOXCAT assay, little oligomerization of the chimeric protein is observed. Overall, these results suggest that transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of L-selectin lack the propensity to self-associate in membranes, in contrast to the previously documented dimerization of the transmembrane domain of closely related P-selectin. This study will provide constraints for future investigations on the interaction of L-selectin and its associating proteins. PMID:21316337

  18. Dose-dependent clinical and immunological efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy with mite monomeric allergoid.

    PubMed

    Di Gioacchino, M; Cavallucci, E; Ballone, E; Cervone, M; Di Rocco, P; Piunti, E; Filardo, G S; Turi, M C; Mangifesta, R; Quecchia, C; Mistrello, G; Braga, M; Petrarca, C

    2012-01-01

    Sublingual immunotherapy with monomeric carbamylated allergoid (LAIS) is an effective and well tolerated treatment of respiratory allergy. The aim of the present study was to correlate the efficacy of two maintenance doses (1000 AU vs 3000 AU) of LAIS with the immunological modulation of allergen-driven Th1, Th2 and T regulatory cytokines produced in vitro by PBMCs, in patients suffering from mite allergic rhinitis. Forty-eight consecutive patients with mite allergic rhinitis were recruited. Patients were randomly assigned to group A (n=24) or group B (n=24), respectively receiving 1000 AU or 3000 AU weekly during one-year maintenance phase. Each patient was evaluated for rhinitis severity (ARIA protocol), and for drug consumption at the time of the inclusion and after 6 and 12 months of treatment. Patients were also asked to report the perceived severity of the disease and the tolerability of the treatment in a visual analogical scale (VAS). Before and at the end of the treatment allergen-driven release of cytokines by PBMCs in vitro was measured. After 1-year treatment, a statistically significant reduction of all clinical parameters was observed in all patients, associated with reduction of IL-4 and increase of INF-γ secreted in vitro by mite-challenged PBMCs. Notably, the group treated with the higher dose showed significantly better clinical and immunological results. The efficacy of LAIS is correlated to the immune modulation in a clear dose-dependent effect.

  19. Photoinactivation of multidrug resistant bacteria by monomeric methylene blue conjugated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shakir; Khan, Shahper N; Meena, Ramovatar; Dar, Ayaz M; Pal, Ruchita; Khan, Asad U

    2017-09-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) bacterial infections have become a severe threat to the community health due to a progressive rise in antibiotic resistance. Nanoparticle-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) is increasingly been adopted as a potential antimicrobial option, yet the cytotoxicity associated with PDT is quite unspecific. Herein, we show Concanavalin-A (ConA) directed dextran capped gold nanoparticles (GNPDEX-ConA) enhanced the efficacy and selectivity of methylene blue (MB) induced killing of multidrug resistant clinical isolates. Here, we show that our complex MB@GNPDEX-ConA is effective against range of MDR clinical isolates, including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae. In our treatment modality negligible dark toxicity suggests photochemically driven process with 97% killing of MDR bacteria. GNPDEX-ConA with monomeric form of MB departs maximum fluorescence decay time (τf: 1.7ns in HSA) and singlet oxygen (ΔΦ; 0.84) for improved activity in albumin rich infection sites. Further, the complex show least toxicity when tested against HEK293 mammalian cells. The principle component analysis (PCA) and confocal microscopy illustrates cytosolic (1)O2 mediated type-II PDT as mechanism of action. Hence, MB@GNPDEX-ConA mediated PDT is potential therapeutic approach against MDR infections and can be tailored to fight other infectious diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Generation of transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Wang, Wei; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Cui, Cheng-du; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Red fluorescent protein and its variants enable researchers to study gene expression, localization, and protein-protein interactions in vitro in real-time. Fluorophores with higher wavelengths are usually preferred since they efficiently penetrate tissues and produce less toxic emissions. A recently developed fluorescent protein marker, monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), is particularly useful because of its rapid maturation and minimal interference with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-derived markers. We generated a pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR construct and evaluated the ability of mRFP1 to function as a fluorescent marker in transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs. Transgenic embryos were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of nuclei isolated from ear fibroblasts expressing mRFP1. Embryos generated by SCNT developed into blastocysts in vitro (11.65%; 31/266). Thereafter, a total of 685 transgenic embryos were transferred into the oviducts of three recipients, two of which became pregnant. Of these, one recipient had six aborted fetuses, whereas the other recipient gave birth to four offspring. All offspring expressed the pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR gene as shown by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The transgenic pigs expressed mRFP1 in all organs and tissues at high levels. These results demonstrate that Wuzhishan miniature pigs can express mRFP1. To conclude, this transgenic animal represents an excellent model with widespread applications in medicine and agriculture.

  1. Phosducin and monomeric β-actin have common epitope recognized by anti-phosducin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Urszula; Adler, Grażyna

    2010-11-30

    Phosducin family proteins are regulators of cytoplasmic processes. The main function ascribed to phosducin is the binding and sequestration of the β subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. Phosducin-like protein 1, longer than phosducin by 37 amino-acids, is involved in chaperoning of newly synthesized proteins. β-Actin, a component of the cytoskeleton, participates in cell movement. There is no apparent evolutionary relationship between phosducin and β-actin nor structure similarity. Nevertheless we obtained the polyclonal antibodies named ap33, originally directed against a phosducin-derived peptide (SQSLEEDFEGQATHTGPK), that also recognized β-actin. The epitope on the β-actin molecule was characterized. It is a conformational epitope grouping some of the L-D-F-E-Q-A-T-K amino-acids found in the peptide originally used to obtain the antibodies. The main part of the epitope is localized on the actin-actin interface of polymerized actin, so it is accessible only on monomeric actin. The existence of a common epitope on the molecules of phosducin and β-actin may reflect a topological similarity of a small region of their surfaces. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Contribution of Monomeric Anthocyanins to the Color of Young Red Wine: Statistical and Experimental Approaches.

    PubMed

    Han, Fu Liang; Li, Zheng; Xu, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Monomeric anthocyanin contributions to young red wine color were investigated using partial least square regression (PLSR) and aqueous alcohol solutions in this study. Results showed that the correlation between the anthocyanin concentration and the solution color fitted in a quadratic regression rather than linear or cubic regression. Malvidin-3-O-glucoside was estimated to show the highest contribution to young red wine color according to its concentration in wine, whereas peonidin-3-O-glucoside in its concentration contributed the least. The PLSR suggested that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and peonidin-3-O-glucoside under the same concentration resulted in a stronger color of young red wine compared with malvidin-3-O-glucoside. These estimates were further confirmed by their color in aqueous alcohol solutions. These results suggested that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and peonidin-3-O-glucoside were primary anthocyanins to enhance young red wine color by increasing their concentrations. This study could provide an alternative approach to improve young red wine color by adjusting anthocyanin composition and concentration. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. A new bright green-emitting fluorescent protein: Engineered monomeric and dimeric forms

    PubMed Central

    Ilagan, Robielyn P.; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Gruber, David F.; Kao, Hung-Teh; Pieribone, Vincent A.; Regan, Lynne

    2010-01-01

    Summary Fluorescent proteins (FP) have become essential tools in molecular and biological applications. Here, we present a novel fluorescent protein isolated from warm water coral, Cyphastrea microphthalma. The protein, which we named VFP (vivid Verde FP), matures readily at 37 °C and emits bright green light. Further characterizations revealed that VFP has a tendency to form dimers. By creating a homology model of VFP, based on the structure of red fluorescent protein DsRed, we were able to make mutations that alter the protein’s oligomerization state. We present two proteins, mVFP and mVFP1, that are both exclusively monomeric, and one, dVFP, which is dimeric. We characterized the spectroscopic properties of VFP and its variants in comparison with enhance green fluorescent protein (EGFP), a widely use variant of GFP. All the VFP variants are at least twice as bright as EGFP. Finally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the VFP variants both in vitro and in vivo detection applications. PMID:20345907

  4. Identification and Characterization of a Misfolded Monomeric Serpin Formed at Physiological Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, M.C.; Powers, G.A.; Feil, S.C.; Hansen, G.; Parker, M.W.; Bottomley, S.P.

    2010-10-26

    The native serpin state is kinetically trapped. However, under mildly destabilizing conditions, the conformational landscape changes, and a number of nonnative conformations with increased stability can be readily formed. The ability to undergo structural change is due to intrinsic strain within the serpin's tertiary fold, which is utilized for proteinase inhibition but renders the protein susceptible to aberrant folding and self-association. The relationship between these various conformations is poorly understood. Antichymotrypsin (ACT) is an inhibitory serpin that readily forms a number of inactive conformations, induced via either environmental stress or interaction with proteinases. Here we have used a variety of biophysical and structural techniques to characterize the relationship between some of these conformations. Incubation of ACT at physiological temperature results in the formation of a range of conformations, including both polymer and misfolded monomer. The ability to populate these nonnative states and the native conformation reflects an energy landscape that is very sensitive to the solution conditions. X-ray crystallography reveals that the misfolded monomeric conformation is in the delta conformation. Further polymerization and seeding experiments show that the delta conformation is an end point in the misfolding pathway of ACT and not an on-pathway intermediate formed during polymerization. The observation that ACT readily forms this inactive conformation at physiological temperature and pH suggests that it may have a role in both health and disease.

  5. Design of monomeric water-soluble β-hairpin and β-sheet peptides.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, M Angeles

    2014-01-01

    Since the first report in 1993 (JACS 115, 5887-5888) of a peptide able to form a monomeric β-hairpin structure in aqueous solution, the design of peptides forming either β-hairpins (two-stranded antiparallel β-sheets) or three-stranded antiparallel β-sheets has become a field of growing interest and activity. These studies have yielded great insights into the principles governing the stability and folding of β-hairpins and antiparallel β-sheets. This chapter provides an overview of the reported β-hairpin/β-sheet peptides focussed on the applied design criteria, reviews briefly the factors contributing to β-hairpin/β-sheet stability, and describes a protocol for the de novo design of β-sheet-forming peptides based on them. Guidelines to select appropriate turn and strand residues and to avoid self-association are provided. The methods employed to check the success of new designed peptides are also summarized. Since NMR is the best technique to that end, NOEs and chemical shifts characteristic of β-hairpins and three-stranded antiparallel β-sheets are given.

  6. A de Novo-Designed Monomeric, Compact Three-Helix-Bundle Protein on a Carbohydrate Template.

    PubMed

    Malik, Leila; Nygaard, Jesper; Cristensen, Niels J; Madsen, Charlotte S; Rösner, Heike I; Kragelund, Birthe B; Hoiberg-Nielsen, Rasmus; Streicher, Werner W; Arleth, Lise; Thulstrup, Peter W; Jensen, Knud J

    2015-07-06

    De novo design and chemical synthesis of proteins and of other artificial structures that mimic them is a central strategy for understanding protein folding and for accessing proteins with new functions. We have previously described carbohydrates that act as templates for the assembly of artificial proteins, so-called carboproteins. The hypothesis is that the template preorganizes the secondary structure elements and directs the formation of a tertiary structure, thus achieving structural economy in the combination of peptide, linker, and template. We speculate that the structural information from the template could facilitate protein folding. Here we report the design and synthesis of three-helix-bundle carboproteins on deoxyhexopyranosides. The carboproteins were analyzed by CD, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and NMR spectroscopy, and this revealed the formation of the first compact and folded monomeric carboprotein, distinctly different from a molten globule. En route to this carboprotein we observed a clear effect originating from the template on protein folding. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Expanded Monomeric Intermediate upon Cold and Heat Unfolding of Phosphofructokinase-2 from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Baez, Mauricio; Wilson, Christian A.M.; Ramírez-Sarmiento, César A.; Guixé, Victoria; Babul, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Folding studies have been focused mainly on small, single-domain proteins or isolated single domains of larger proteins. However, most of the proteins present in biological systems are composed of multiple domains, and to date, the principles that underlie its folding remain elusive. The unfolding of Pfk-2 induced by GdnHCl has been described by highly cooperative three-state equilibrium (N2↔2I↔2U). This is characterized by a strong coupling between the subunits’ tertiary structure and the integrity of the dimer interface because “I” represents an unstructured and expanded monomeric intermediate. Here we report that cold and heat unfolding of Pfk-2 resembles the N2↔2I step of chemically induced unfolding. Moreover, cold unfolding appears to be as cooperative as that induced chemically and even more so than its heat-unfolding counterpart. Because Pfk-2 is a large homodimer of 66 kDa with a complex topology consisting of well-defined domains, these results are somewhat unexpected considering that cold unfolding has been described as a special kind of perturbation that decouples the cooperative unfolding of several proteins. PMID:23200052

  8. Structural and functional characterization of the monomeric U-box domain from E4B†

    PubMed Central

    Nordquist, Kyle A.; Dimitrova, Yoana N.; Brzovic, Peter S.; Ridenour, Whitney B.; Munro, Kim A.; Soss, Sarah E.; Caprioli, Richard M.; Klevit, Rachel E.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2009-01-01

    Substantial evidence has accumulated indicating a significant role for oligomerization in the function of E3 ubiquitin ligases. Among the many characterized E3 ligases, the yeast U-box protein Ufd2 and its mammalian homolog E4B appear to be unique in functioning as monomers. An E4B U-box domain construct (E4BU) has been sub-cloned, over-expressed in E. Coli and purified, which enabled determination of a high resolution NMR solution structure and detailed biophysical analysis. E4BU is a stable monomeric protein that folds into the same structure observed for other structurally characterized U-box domains, all of which are homodimers. Multiple sequence alignment combined with comparative structural analysis reveals substitutions in the sequence that inhibit dimerization. The interaction between E4BU and the E2 conjugating enzyme UbcH5c has been mapped using NMR and this data has been used to generate a structural model for the complex. The E2 binding site is found to be similar to that observed for dimeric U-box and RING domain E3 ligases. Despite the inability to dimerize, E4BU was found to be active in a standard autoubiquitination assay. The structure of E4BU and its ability to function as a monomer are discussed in light of the ubiquitous observation of U-box and RING domain oligomerization. PMID:20017557

  9. Structure-based design of novel naproxen derivatives targeting monomeric nucleoprotein of Influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Tarus, Bogdan; Bertrand, Hélène; Zedda, Gloria; Di Primo, Carmelo; Quideau, Stéphane; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2015-01-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) binds the viral RNA genome as oligomers assembled with the polymerase in a ribonucleoprotein complex required for transcription and replication of influenza A virus. Novel antiviral candidates targeting the nucleoprotein either induced higher order oligomers or reduced NP oligomerization by targeting the oligomerization loop and blocking its insertion into adjacent nucleoprotein subunit. In this study, we used a different structure-based approach to stabilize monomers of the nucleoprotein by drugs binding in its RNA-binding groove. We recently identified naproxen as a drug competing with RNA binding to NP with antiinflammatory and antiviral effects against influenza A virus. Here, we designed novel derivatives of naproxen by fragment extension for improved binding to NP. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that among these derivatives, naproxen A and C0 were most promising. Their chemical synthesis is described. Both derivatives markedly stabilized NP monomer against thermal denaturation. Naproxen C0 bound tighter to NP than naproxen at a binding site predicted by MD simulations and shown by competition experiments using wt NP or single-point mutants as determined by surface plasmon resonance. MD simulations suggested that impeded oligomerization and stabilization of monomeric NP is likely to be achieved by drugs binding in the RNA grove and inducing close to their binding site conformational changes of key residues hosting the oligomerization loop as observed for the naproxen derivatives. Naproxen C0 is a potential antiviral candidate blocking influenza nucleoprotein function. PMID:25333630

  10. Structure-based design of novel naproxen derivatives targeting monomeric nucleoprotein of Influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Tarus, Bogdan; Bertrand, Hélène; Zedda, Gloria; Di Primo, Carmelo; Quideau, Stéphane; Slama-Schwok, Anny

    2015-09-01

    The nucleoprotein (NP) binds the viral RNA genome as oligomers assembled with the polymerase in a ribonucleoprotein complex required for transcription and replication of influenza A virus. Novel antiviral candidates targeting the nucleoprotein either induced higher order oligomers or reduced NP oligomerization by targeting the oligomerization loop and blocking its insertion into adjacent nucleoprotein subunit. In this study, we used a different structure-based approach to stabilize monomers of the nucleoprotein by drugs binding in its RNA-binding groove. We recently identified naproxen as a drug competing with RNA binding to NP with antiinflammatory and antiviral effects against influenza A virus. Here, we designed novel derivatives of naproxen by fragment extension for improved binding to NP. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that among these derivatives, naproxen A and C0 were most promising. Their chemical synthesis is described. Both derivatives markedly stabilized NP monomer against thermal denaturation. Naproxen C0 bound tighter to NP than naproxen at a binding site predicted by MD simulations and shown by competition experiments using wt NP or single-point mutants as determined by surface plasmon resonance. MD simulations suggested that impeded oligomerization and stabilization of monomeric NP is likely to be achieved by drugs binding in the RNA grove and inducing close to their binding site conformational changes of key residues hosting the oligomerization loop as observed for the naproxen derivatives. Naproxen C0 is a potential antiviral candidate blocking influenza nucleoprotein function.

  11. SuperNova, a monomeric photosensitizing fluorescent protein for chromophore-assisted light inactivation.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kiwamu; Matsuda, Tomoki; Sakai, Naoki; Fu, Donald; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Kotera, Ippei; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Horiuchi, Masataka; Fukui, Kiichi; Ayabe, Tokiyoshi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nagai, Takeharu

    2013-01-01

    Chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) is a powerful technique for acute perturbation of biomolecules in a spatio-temporally defined manner in living specimen with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Whereas a chemical photosensitizer including fluorescein must be added to specimens exogenously and cannot be restricted to particular cells or sub-cellular compartments, a genetically-encoded photosensitizer, KillerRed, can be controlled in its expression by tissue specific promoters or subcellular localization tags. Despite of this superiority, KillerRed hasn't yet become a versatile tool because its dimerization tendency prevents fusion with proteins of interest. Here, we report the development of monomeric variant of KillerRed (SuperNova) by direct evolution using random mutagenesis. In contrast to KillerRed, SuperNova in fusion with target proteins shows proper localization. Furthermore, unlike KillerRed, SuperNova expression alone doesn't perturb mitotic cell division. Supernova retains the ability to generate ROS, and hence promote CALI-based functional analysis of target proteins overcoming the major drawbacks of KillerRed.

  12. Structural and thermodynamic consequences of b heme binding for monomeric apoglobins and other apoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Landfried, Daniel A.; Vuletich, David A.; Pond, Matthew P.; Lecomte, Juliette T.J.

    2007-01-01

    The binding of a cofactor to a protein matrix often involves a reorganization of the polypeptide structure. b Hemoproteins provide multiple examples of this behavior. In this minireview, selected monomeric and single b heme proteins endowed with distinct topological properties are inspected for the extent of induced refolding upon heme binding. To complement the data reported in the literature, original results are presented on a two-on-two globin of cyanobacterial origin (Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 GlbN) and on the heme-containing module of FixL, an oxygen-sensing protein with the mixed α/β topology of PAS domains. GlbN had a stable apoprotein that was further stabilized and locally refolded by heme binding; in contrast, apoFixLH presented features of a molten globule. Sequence analyses (helicity, disorder, and polarity) and solvent accessibility calculations were performed to identify trends in the architecture of b hemoproteins. In several cases, the primary structure appeared biased toward a partially disordered binding pocket in the absence of the cofactor. PMID:17550789

  13. Monomeric Garnet, a far-red fluorescent protein for live-cell STED imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hense, Anika; Prunsche, Benedikt; Gao, Peng; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Nienhaus, Karin; Ulrich Nienhaus, G.

    2015-01-01

    The advancement of far-red emitting variants of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is crucially important for imaging live cells, tissues and organisms. Despite notable efforts, far-red marker proteins still need further optimization to match the performance of their green counterparts. Here we present mGarnet, a robust monomeric marker protein with far-red fluorescence peaking at 670 nm. Thanks to its large extinction coefficient of 95,000 M−1cm−1, mGarnet can be efficiently excited with 640-nm light on the red edge of its 598-nm excitation band. A large Stokes shift allows essentially the entire fluorescence emission to be collected even with 640-nm excitation, counterbalancing the lower fluorescence quantum yield of mGarnet, 9.1%, that is typical of far-red FPs. We demonstrate an excellent performance as a live-cell fusion marker in STED microscopy, using 640 nm excitation and 780 nm depletion wavelengths. PMID:26648024

  14. An Intrinsically Disordered Motif Mediates Diverse Actions of Monomeric C-reactive Protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yun; Wang, Jing; Meng, Fan; Jia, Zhe-Kun; Su, Yang; Bai, Qi-Feng; Lv, Ling-Ling; Ma, Fu-Rong; Potempa, Lawrence A; Yan, Yong-Bin; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Most proinflammatory actions of C-reactive protein (CRP) are only expressed following dissociation of its native pentameric assembly into monomeric form (mCRP). However, little is known about what underlies the greatly enhanced activities of mCRP. Here we show that a single sequence motif, i.e. cholesterol binding sequence (CBS; a.a. 35-47), is responsible for mediating the interactions of mCRP with diverse ligands. The binding of mCRP to lipoprotein component ApoB, to complement component C1q, to extracellular matrix components fibronectin and collagen, to blood coagulation component fibrinogen, and to membrane lipid component cholesterol, are all found to be markedly inhibited by the synthetic CBS peptide but not by other CRP sequences tested. Likewise, mutating CBS in mCRP also greatly impairs these interactions. Functional experiments further reveal that CBS peptide significantly reduces the effects of mCRP on activation of endothelial cells in vitro and on acute induction of IL-6 in mice. The potency and specificity of CBS are critically determined by the N-terminal residues Cys-36, Leu-37, and His-38; while the versatility of CBS appears to originate from its intrinsically disordered conformation polymorphism. Together, these data unexpectedly identify CBS as the major recognition site of mCRP and suggest that this motif may be exploited to tune the proinflammatory actions of mCRP.

  15. Escherichia coli RecQ is a rapid, efficient, and monomeric helicase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xing-Dong; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xie, Ping; Hu, Jin-Shan; Wang, Peng-Ye; Xi, Xu Guang

    2006-05-05

    RecQ family helicases play a key role in chromosome maintenance. Despite extensive biochemical, biophysical, and structural studies, the mechanism by which helicase unwinds double-stranded DNA remains to be elucidated. Using a wide array of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we have previously shown that the Escherichia coli RecQ helicase functions as a monomer. In this study, we have further characterized the kinetic mechanism of the RecQ-catalyzed unwinding of duplex DNA using the fluorometric stopped-flow method based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Our results show that RecQ helicase binds preferentially to 3'-flanking duplex DNA. Under the pre-steady-state conditions, the burst amplitude reveals a 1:1 ratio between RecQ and DNA substrate, suggesting that an active monomeric form of RecQ helicase is involved in the catalysis. Under the single-turnover conditions, the RecQ-catalyzed unwinding is independent of the 3'-tail length, indicating that functional interactions between RecQ molecules are not implicated in the DNA unwinding. It was further determined that RecQ unwinds DNA rapidly with a step size of 4 bp and a rate of approximately 21 steps/s. These kinetic results not only further support our previous conclusion that E. coli RecQ functions as a monomer but also suggest that some of the Superfamily 2 helicases may function through an "inchworm" mechanism.

  16. Energetic and conformational features linked to the monomeric and dimeric states of bovine BLG.

    PubMed

    Bello, Martiniano; Fragoso-Vázquez, M Jonathan; Correa Basurto, José

    2016-11-01

    Bovine β-lactoglobulin (BLG) belong to the lipocalin family. This is a group of proteins involved in the binding and transporting of hydrophobic molecules. Experimental and theoretical reports have stated its complex structural behavior in solution, with coupled effects between homodimerization and ligand recognition. Nonetheless, structural evidence at the atomic level about the cause of this coupled effect has not been reported to date. To address this issue microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were combined with the molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM/GBSA) approach, clustering analysis and principal component analysis (PCA), to explore the conformational complexity of BLG protein-protein self-association and palmitic acid (PLM) or dodecyl sulfate (SDS) ligand recognition in the monomeric and dimeric state. MD simulations, coupled to the MM/GBSA method, revealed that dimerization exerts contrasting effects on the ligand-binding capacity of BLG. Protein dimerization decreases PLM affinity, promoting dimer association. For SDS the dimeric state increases affinity, enhancing dimer dissociation. MD simulations based on PCA revealed that while few differences in the conformational subspace are observed between the free and bound monomer and dimer coupling for PLM, substantial changes are observed between the free and bound monomer and dimer coupling for SDS.

  17. Chaperone activity and structure of monomeric polypeptide binding domains of GroEL

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, Ralph; Buckle, Ashley M.; Perrett, Sarah; Johnson, Christopher M.; Corrales, Fernando J.; Golbik, Ralph; Fersht, Alan R.

    1996-01-01

    The chaperonin GroEL is a large complex composed of 14 identical 57-kDa subunits that requires ATP and GroES for some of its activities. We find that a monomeric polypeptide corresponding to residues 191 to 345 has the activity of the tetradecamer both in facilitating the refolding of rhodanese and cyclophilin A in the absence of ATP and in catalyzing the unfolding of native barnase. Its crystal structure, solved at 2.5 Å resolution, shows a well-ordered domain with the same fold as in intact GroEL. We have thus isolated the active site of the complex allosteric molecular chaperone, which functions as a “minichaperone.” This has mechanistic implications: the presence of a central cavity in the GroEL complex is not essential for those representative activities in vitro, and neither are the allosteric properties. The function of the allosteric behavior on the binding of GroES and ATP must be to regulate the affinity of the protein for its various substrates in vivo, where the cavity may also be required for special functions. PMID:8986757

  18. Isolation of monomeric and dimeric secreted MD-2. Endotoxin.sCD14 and Toll-like receptor 4 ectodomain selectively react with the monomeric form of secreted MD-2.

    PubMed

    Teghanemt, Athmane; Widstrom, Richard L; Gioannini, Theresa L; Weiss, Jerrold P

    2008-08-08

    Potent cell activation by endotoxin requires sequential protein-endotoxin and protein-protein interactions involving lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, CD14, MD-2, and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). MD-2 plays an essential role by bridging endotoxin (E) recognition initiated by lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and CD14 to TLR4 activation by presenting endotoxin as a monomeric E.MD-2 complex that directly and potently activates TLR4. Secreted MD-2 (sMD-2) exists as a mixture of monomers and multimers. Published data suggest that only MD-2 monomer can interact with endotoxin and TLR4 and support cell activation, but the apparent instability of MD-2 has thwarted efforts to more fully separate and characterize the individual species of sMD-2. We have taken advantage of the much greater stability of sMD-2 in insect culture medium to fully separate sMD-2 monomer from dimer by gel sieving chromatography. At low nanomolar concentrations, the sMD-2 monomer, but not dimer, reacted with a monomeric complex of E.sCD14 to form monomeric E.MD-2 and activate HEK293/TLR4 cells. The monomer, but not dimer, also reacted with the ectodomain of TLR4 with an affinity comparable with the picomolar affinity of E.MD-2. These findings demonstrate directly that the monomeric form of sMD-2 is the active species both for reaction with E.CD14 and TLR4, as needed for potent endotoxin-induced TLR4 activation.

  19. Detection of dsRNA-binding domains in RNA helicase A and Drosophila maleless: implications for monomeric RNA helicases.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, T J; Thompson, J D

    1994-01-01

    Searches with dsRNA-binding domain profiles detected two copies of the domain in each of RNA helicase A, Drosophila maleless and C. elegans ORF T20G5-11 (of unknown function). RNA helicase A is unusual in being one of the few characterised DEAD/DExH helicases that are active as monomers. Other monomeric DEAD/DExH RNA helicases (p68, NPH-II) have domains that match another RNA-binding motif, the RGG repeat. The DEAD/DExH domain appears to be insufficient on its own to promote helicase activity and additional RNA-binding capacity must be supplied either as domains adjacent to the DEAD/DExH-box or by bound partners as in the eIF-4AB dimer. The presence or absence of extra RNA-binding domains should allow classification of DEAD/DExH proteins as monomeric or multimeric helicases. Images PMID:8041617

  20. Neurodevelopmental Expression Profile of Dimeric and Monomeric Group 1 mGluRs: Relevance to Schizophrenia Pathogenesis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Jeremy S.; Fernandez, Francesca; Matosin, Natalie; Andrews, Jessica L.; Huang, Xu-Feng; Ooi, Lezanne; Newell, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1/mGluR5) play an integral role in neurodevelopment and are implicated in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. mGluR1 and mGluR5 are expressed as homodimers, which is important for their functionality and pharmacology. We examined the protein expression of dimeric and monomeric mGluR1α and mGluR5 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus throughout development (juvenile/adolescence/adulthood) and in the perinatal phencyclidine (PCP) model of schizophrenia. Under control conditions, mGluR1α dimer expression increased between juvenile and adolescence (209–328%), while monomeric levels remained consistent. Dimeric mGluR5 was steadily expressed across all time points; monomeric mGluR5 was present in juveniles, dramatically declining at adolescence and adulthood (−97–99%). The mGluR regulators, Homer 1b/c and Norbin, significantly increased with age in the PFC and hippocampus. Perinatal PCP treatment significantly increased juvenile dimeric mGluR5 levels in the PFC and hippocampus (37–50%) but decreased hippocampal mGluR1α (−50–56%). Perinatal PCP treatment also reduced mGluR1α dimer levels in the PFC at adulthood (−31%). These results suggest that Group 1 mGluRs have distinct dimeric and monomeric neurodevelopmental patterns, which may impact their pharmacological profiles at specific ages. Perinatal PCP treatment disrupted the early expression of Group 1 mGluRs which may underlie neurodevelopmental alterations observed in this model. PMID:27721389

  1. Monomeric malonate precursors for the MOCVD of HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films.

    PubMed

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Milanov, Andrian; Parala, Harish; Winter, Manuela; Fischer, Roland A; Devi, Anjana

    2009-01-28

    New Hf and Zr malonate complexes have been synthesized by the reaction of metal amides with different malonate ligands (L = dimethyl malonate (Hdmml), diethyl malonate (Hdeml), di-tert-butyl malonate (Hdbml) and bis(trimethylsilyl) malonate (Hbsml)). Homoleptic eight-coordinated monomeric compounds of the type ML4 were obtained for Hf with all the malonate ligands employed. In contrast, for Zr only Hdmml and Hdeml yielded the eight-coordinated monomeric compounds of the type ML4, while using the bulky Hdbml and Hbsml ligands resulted into mixed alkoxo-malonato six-coordinated compounds of the type [ML2(OR)2]. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of all the compounds are presented and discussed, and they are found to be monomeric. The complexes are solids and in solution, they retain their monomeric nature as evidenced by NMR measurements. Compared to the classical beta-diketonate complexes, [M(acac)4] and [M(thd)4] (M = Hf, Zr; acac: acetylacetonate; thd: tetramethylheptadione), the new malonate compounds are more volatile, decompose at lower temperatures and have lower melting points. In particular, the homoleptic diethyl malonate complexes of Hf and Zr melt at temperatures as low as 62 degrees C. In addition, the compounds are very stable in air and can be sublimed quantitatively. The promising thermal properties makes these compounds interesting for metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This was demonstrated by depositing HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films successfully with two representative Hf and Zr complexes.

  2. Monomerization of viral entry inhibitor griffithsin elucidates the relationship between multivalent binding to carbohydrates and anti-HIV activity

    SciTech Connect

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R.; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B.; Dauter, Zbigniew; O'Keefe, Barry R.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-10-28

    Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer.

  3. Monomerization of viral entry inhibitor griffithsin elucidates the relationship between multivalent binding to carbohydrates and anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B; Dauter, Zbigniew; O'Keefe, Barry R; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-08

    Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer.

  4. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of processed blackberry products.

    PubMed

    Hager, Tiffany J; Howard, Luke R; Prior, Ronald L

    2008-02-13

    Blackberries are a rich source of polyphenolics, particularly anthocyanins, that may contribute to the reduced risk of chronic disease; however, as with most berries, the fresh fruit are only seasonally available. With most of the blackberries consumed as frozen or in thermally processed forms after long-term storage, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of processing and 6 months of storage on the anthocyanins and antioxidant capacity of blackberries that were individually quick-frozen (IQF), canned-in-syrup, canned-in-water, pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC FL) and photochemiluminescence (PCL) were determined postprocessing (1 day) and after 1, 3, and 6 months of storage. Processing resulted in increases in polymeric color values (up to 7%) and losses in monomeric anthocyanins (up to 65%). For most products, processing also resulted in losses in antioxidant capacity (by ORAC FL and PCL). Storage at 25 degrees C of all processed products resulted in dramatic losses in monomeric anthocyanins with as much as 75% losses of anthocyanins throughout storage, which coincided with marked increases of percent polymeric color values of these products over 6 months of storage. There were no changes in ORAC FL or PCL for processed products throughout long-term storage. No significant changes in antioxidant capacity or anthocyanin content were observed in IQF fruit during long-term storage at -20 degrees C.

  5. pH effects on the binding of oxygen to non-vertebrate monomeric hemoglobins. A linked function model.

    PubMed

    Saroff, Harry A

    2004-07-07

    Monomeric invertabrate hemoglobins with high oxygen affinity usually contain a tyrosine in the distal region of the heme. This feature has stimulated investigations revealing that one of the properties resulting from the presence of the distal tyrosines is a decreased off rate on the binding of oxygen, thus developing the high affinity. Despite that fact that the pK value of the tyrosine group differs significantly from the groups it replaces little attention has been paid to the pH dependence of the binding of oxygen to the high affinity hemoglobins. Such a pH dependence has been reported on two of the monomeric hemoglobins with relatively low oxygen affinity and one monomeric hemoglobin of intermediate affinity. The pH data of these hemoglobins has been analysed with a linked function model involving the hydrogen ion. pK values required for the low-affinity hemoglobins vary from 4.5 to 7.5. When applied to the high-affinity hemoglobins, the linked function model provides reasonable values for the binding parameters. These pK values vary from 3.0 to 9.0.

  6. Monomeric ß-amyloid interacts with type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptors to provide energy supply to neurons

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrida, Maria L.; Tomasello, Marianna F.; Pandini, Giuseppe; Caraci, Filippo; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Busceti, Carla; Di Pietro, Paola; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Attanasio, Francesco; Chiechio, Santina; Bagnoli, Silvia; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Vigneri, Riccardo; Rizzarelli, Enrico; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Copani, Agata

    2015-01-01

    ß-amyloid (Aß1−42) is produced by proteolytic cleavage of the transmembrane type-1 protein, amyloid precursor protein. Under pathological conditions, Aß1−42self-aggregates into oligomers, which cause synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss, and are considered the culprit of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, Aß1−42 is mainly monomeric at physiological concentrations, and the precise role of monomeric Aß1−42 in neuronal function is largely unknown. We report that the monomer of Aß1−42 activates type-1 insulin-like growth factor receptors and enhances glucose uptake in neurons and peripheral cells by promoting the translocation of the Glut3 glucose transporter from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In neurons, activity-dependent glucose uptake was blunted after blocking endogenous Aß production, and re-established in the presence of cerebrospinal fluid Aß. APP-null neurons failed to enhance depolarization-stimulated glucose uptake unless exogenous monomeric Aß1−42 was added. These data suggest that Aß1−42 monomers were critical for maintaining neuronal glucose homeostasis. Accordingly, exogenous Aß1−42 monomers were able to rescue the low levels of glucose consumption observed in brain slices from AD mutant mice. PMID:26300732

  7. Identification of Synaptosomal Proteins Binding to Monomeric and Oligomeric α-Synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Betzer, Cristine; Movius, A. James; Shi, Min; Gai, Wei-Ping; Zhang, Jing; Jensen, Poul Henning

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric α-synuclein (αSN) species are abundant in nerve terminals where they are hypothesized to play a physiological role related to synaptic vesicle turn-over. In Parkinson’s disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy body (DLB), αSN accumulates as aggregated soluble oligomers in terminals, axons and the somatodendritic compartment and insoluble filaments in Lewy inclusions and Lewy neurites. The autosomal dominant heritability associated to mutations in the αSN gene suggest a gain of function associated to aggregated αSN. We have conducted a proteomic screen to identify the αSN interactome in brain synaptosomes. Porcine brain synaptosomes were fractionated, solubilized in non-denaturing detergent and subjected to co-immunoprecipitation using purified recombinant human αSN monomers or oligomers as bait. The isolated αSN binding proteins were identified with LC-LTQ-orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry and quantified by peak area using Windows client application, Skyline Targeted Proteomic Environment. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001462. To quantify the preferential binding an average fold increase was calculated by comparing binding to monomer and oligomer. We identified 10 proteins preferentially binding monomer, and 76 binding preferentially to oligomer and a group of 92 proteins not displaying any preferred conformation of αSN. The proteomic data were validated by immunoprecipitation in both human and porcine brain extracts using antibodies against monomer αSN interactors: Abl interactor 1, and myelin proteolipid protein, and oligomer interactors: glutamate decarboxylase 2, synapsin 1, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and VAMP-2. We demonstrate the existence of αSN conformation selective ligands and present lists of proteins, whose identity and functions will be useful for modeling normal and pathological αSN dependent processes. PMID:25659148

  8. Purification and biochemical characterization of a monomeric form of papaya mosaic potexvirus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Lecours, Katia; Tremblay, Marie-Hélène; Gagné, Marie-Eve Laliberté; Gagné, Stéphane M; Leclerc, Denis

    2006-05-01

    Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is a flexuous rod shape virus made of 1400 subunits that assemble around a plus sense genomic RNA. The structure determination of PapMV and of flexuous viruses in general is a major challenge for both NMR and X-ray crystallography. In this report, we present the characterization of a truncated version of the PapMV coat protein (CP) that is suitable for NMR study. The deletion of the N-terminal 26 amino acids of the PapMV CP (CP27-215) generates a monomer that can be expressed to high level and easily purified for production of an adequate NMR sample. The RNA gel shift assay showed that CP27-215 lost its ability to bind RNA in vitro, suggesting that the multimerization of the subunit is important for this function. The fusion of a 6x His tag at the C-terminus improved the solubility of the monomer and allowed its concentration to 0.2 mM. The CD spectra of the truncated and the wild-type proteins were similar, suggesting that both proteins are well ordered and have a similar secondary structure. CP27-215 was 15N labeled for NMR studies and a 2D 1H-15N-HSQC spectrum confirmed the presence of a well-ordered structure and the monomeric form of the protein. These results show that CP27-215 is amenable to a complete and exhaustive NMR study that should lead to the first three-dimensional structure determination of a flexuous rod shape virus.

  9. Monomeric C-reactive protein modulates classic complement activation on necrotic cells.

    PubMed

    Mihlan, Michael; Blom, Anna M; Kupreishvili, Koba; Lauer, Nadine; Stelzner, Kristin; Bergström, Frida; Niessen, Hans W M; Zipfel, Peter F

    2011-12-01

    The acute-phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) recruits C1q to the surface of damaged cells and thereby initiates complement activation. However, CRP also recruits complement inhibitors, such as C4b-binding protein (C4bp) and factor H, which both block complement progression at the level of C3 and inhibits inflammation. To define how CRP modulates the classic complement pathway, we studied the interaction of CRP with the classic pathway inhibitor C4bp. Monomeric CRP (mCRP), but not pentameric CRP (pCRP), binds C4bp and enhances degradation of C4b and C3b. Both C1q, the initiator, and C4bp, the inhibitor of the classic pathway, compete for mCRP binding, and this competition adjusts the local balance of activation and inhibition. After attachment of pCRP to the surface of necrotic rat myocytes, generation of mCRP was demonstrated over a period of 18 h. Similarly, a biological role for mCRP, C1q, and C4bp in the disease setting of acute myocardial infarction was revealed. In this inflamed tissue, mCRP, pCRP, C4bp, C1q, and C4d were detected in acetone-fixed and in unfixed tissue. Protein levels were enhanced 6 h to 5 d after infarction. Thus, mCRP bound to damaged cardiomyocytes recruits C1q to activate and also C4bp to control the classic complement pathway.

  10. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jácome, Rodrigo; Becerra, Arturo; Ponce de León, Samuel; Lazcano, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, “fingertips” that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection. PMID:26397100

  11. Remarkably Robust Monomeric Alkylperoxyzinc Compounds from Tris(oxazolinyl)boratozinc Alkyls and O 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Debabrata; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D.

    2012-08-08

    Metal alkylperoxides are remarkable, highly effective, yet often thermally unstable, oxidants that may react through a number of possible pathways including O–O homolytic cleavage, M–O homolytic cleavage, nucleophilic O-atom transfer, and electrophilic O-atom transfer. Here we describe a series of zinc alkyl compounds of the type ToMZnR (ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate; R = Et, n-C3H7, i-C3H7, t-Bu) that react with O2 at 25 °C to form isolable monomeric alkylperoxides ToMZnOOR in quantitative yield. The series of zinc alkylperoxides is crystallographically characterized, and the structures show systematic variations in the Zn–O–O angle and O–O distances. The observed rate law for the reaction of ToMZnEt (2) and O2 is consistent with a radical chain mechanism, where the rate-limiting SH2 step involves the interaction of •OOR and ToMZnR. In contrast, ToMZnH and ToMZnMe are unchanged even to 120 °C under 100 psi of O2 and in the presence of active radical chains (e.g., •OOEt). This class of zinc alkylperoxides is unusually thermally robust, in that the compounds are unchanged after heating at 120 °C in solution for several days. Yet, these compounds are reactive as oxidants with phosphines. Additionally, an unusual alkylperoxy group transfer to organosilanes affords ToMZnH and ROOSiR3'.

  12. Monomeric and gemini surfactants as antimicrobial agents - influence on environmental and reference strains.

    PubMed

    Koziróg, Anna; Brycki, Bogumił

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) belong to surfactant commonly used both, in the household and in different branches of industry, primarily in the process of cleaning and disinfection. They have several positive features inter alia effectively limiting the development of microorganisms on many surfaces. In the present work, two compounds were used as biocides: hexamethylene-1,6-bis-(N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecylammonium bromide) that belongs to the gemini surfactant (GS), and its single analogue - dodecyl(trimethyl)ammonium bromide (DTAB). Two fold dilution method was used to determine the minimum concentration of compounds (MIC) which inhibit the growth of bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538 and an environmental strain), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 85327 and an environmental strain), and yeast Candida albicans (ATCC 11509 and an environmental strain). The viability of cells in liquid cultures with addition of these substances at ¼ MIC, ½ MIC and MIC concentrations were also determined. The obtained results show that DTAB inhibits the growth of bacteria at the concentration of 0.126-1.010 µM/ml, and gemini surfactant is active at 0.036-0.029 µM/ml. Therefore, GS is active at more than 17-70-fold lower concentrations than its monomeric analogue. Strains isolated from natural environment are less sensitive upon testing biocides than the references strains. Both compounds at the MIC value reduced the number of cells of all strains. The use of too low concentration of biocides can limit the growth of microorganisms, but often only for a short period of time in case of special environmental strains. Later on, they can adapt to adverse environmental conditions and begin to evolve defence mechanisms.

  13. Hepatic and kidney uptake of soluble monomeric and polymeric IgA aggregates.

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, J; González, E; Rivera, F; Escanero, J F; Egido, J

    1984-01-01

    To investigate the handling of IgA by the mononuclear phagocytic system and by hepatocytes of mice, soluble, similar sized, heat-aggregated monomeric (A-mIgA) and polymeric IgA (ApIgA) were used as akin to IgA immune complexes. The half-life of the clearance from circulation decreased from 2.5 hr to 4.2 min and from 22 min to 1.8 min after aggregation of mIgA and pIgA, respectively. Tissue localization experiments indicated that the liver was the organ predominantly involved in the uptake and catabolism of the proteins injected. The rate of the liver catabolism and/or elimination of aggregated polymeric IgA was the slowest up to 24 hr of injection. Aggregated pIgA was deposited in the kidney in larger amounts than aggregated mIgA. The participation of hepatocytes and nonparenchymal liver cells was determined after isolation and purification of these cells. The four substances injected, pIgA, A-pIgA, mIgA and A-mIgA, were predominantly localized in nonparenchymal cells when the uptake was expressed per volume of cells, due to their lower protein content. However, when the results were expressed cell to cell there was a high ratio of IgA aggregates associated with hepatocytes to nonparenchymal cells. It seems probable, therefore, that hepatocytes are almost exclusively responsible for clearance of IgA aggregates from blood. PMID:6715019

  14. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAGAYA, Masaki; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; MAEHARA, Miki; HAYASHIDA, Gota; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; SAKAI, Rieko; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36–37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum. PMID:25739316

  15. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal a monomeric state of the bacterial lipocalin Blc.

    PubMed

    Schiefner, André; Chatwell, Lorenz; Breustedt, Daniel A; Skerra, Arne

    2010-12-01

    The first bacterial member of the lipocalin protein family, Blc, was identified in Escherichia coli as an outer membrane lipoprotein that is expressed under conditions of environmental stress. Previous crystallographic studies in space group P2₁2₁2₁ with two molecules per asymmetric unit, supported by static light-scattering experiments in solution, indicated that Blc may form a functional homodimer with lysophospholipid binding activity. Here, a new crystal structure of recombinant Blc in space group I4₁22 with one molecule in the asymmetric unit is described. The crystal packing differs considerably from that observed previously, which was determined using an N-terminally extended version of Blc dubbed `Blc-X'. In particular, the characteristic large interface region that was previously described as being responsible for stable dimer formation is absent in the I4₁22 crystal structure. Thus, the dimerization behaviour of Blc-X was most likely to be caused by the additional N-terminal peptide segment resulting from the cloning strategy employed. In contrast, we used a native-like N-terminus for Blc with just the lipid-anchored first Cys residue replaced by Ala. The fully monomeric status of this recombinant version of Blc in solution was confirmed by size-exclusion chromatography as well as analytical ultracentrifugation. Consequently, these data shed new light on the previously postulated lipid-binding mechanism and biological role of Blc. Beyond this, our findings illustrate that cloning artefacts, which frequently result from recombinant protein production for structural studies, must be considered with special caution when interpreting oligomerization and/or conformational effects.

  16. Interactions of cationic trimeric, gemini and monomeric surfactants with trianionic curcumin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meina; Wu, Chunxian; Tang, Yongqiang; Fan, Yaxun; Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin

    2014-05-21

    Interactions of trianionic curcumin (Cur(3-)) with a series of cationic surfactants, monomeric surfactant dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), dimeric surfactant hexamethylene-1,6-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (12-6-12) and trimeric surfactant tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD), have been investigated in aqueous solution of pH 13.0. Surface tension and spectral measurements indicate that the cationic surfactants display a similar surfactant concentration dependent interaction process with Cur(3-), involving three interaction stages. At first the three cationic surfactants electrostatically bind on Cur(3-) to form the surfactant-Cur(3-) complex. Then the bound and unbound cationic surfactants with Cur(3-) aggregate into surfactant-Cur(3-) mixed micelles through hydrophobic interactions above the critical micelle concentration of the surfactants (CMCC) in the presence of Cur(3-). Finally excess unbound surfactants self-assemble into micelles like those without Cur(3-). For all the three surfactants, the addition of Cur(3-) only decreases the critical micelle concentration of 12-6-12 but does not affect the critical micelle concentration of DTAB and DTAD. As the oligomeric degree of surfactants increases, the intermolecular interaction of the cationic surfactants with Cur(3-) increases and the surfactant amount needed for Cur(3-) encapsulation decreases. Compared with 12-6-12, either the weaker interaction of DTAB with Cur(3-) or stronger interaction of DTAD with Cur(3-) limits the stability or solubility of Cur(3-) in surfactant micelles. Therefore, gemini surfactant 12-6-12 is the best choice to effectively suppress Cur(3-) degradation at very low concentrations. Isothermal titration microcalorimetry, surface tension and (1)H NMR results reveal that 12-6-12 and Cur(3-) form a (12-6-12)2-Cur(3-) complex and start to form micelles at extremely decreased concentrations, where either 12-6-12 or Cur(3-) works as a bridge

  17. Active monomeric and dimeric forms of Pseudomonas putida glyoxalase I: evidence for 3D domain swapping.

    PubMed

    Saint-Jean, A P; Phillips, K R; Creighton, D J; Stone, M J

    1998-07-21

    3D domain swapping of proteins involves the interconversion of a monomer containing a single domain-domain interface and a 2-fold symmetrical dimer containing two equivalent intermolecular interfaces. Human glyoxalase I has the structure of a domain-swapped dimer [Cameron, A. D., Olin, B., Ridderström, M., Mannervik, B., and Jones, T. A. (1997) EMBO J. 16, 3386-3395] but Pseudomonas putida glyoxalase I has been reported to be monomeric [Rhee, H.-I., Murata, K., and Kimura, A. (1986) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 141, 993-999]. We show here that recombinant P. putida glyoxalase I is an active dimer (kcat approximately 500 +/- 100 s-1; KM approximately 0.4 +/- 0.2 mM) with two zinc ions per dimer. The zinc is required for structure and function. However, treatment of the dimer with glutathione yields an active monomer (kcat approximately 115 +/- 40 s-1; KM approximately 1.4 +/- 0.4 mM) containing a single zinc ion. The monomer is metastable and slowly reverts to the active dimer in the absence of glutathione. Thus, glyoxalase I appears to be a novel example of a single protein able to exist in two alternative domain-swapped forms. It is unique among domain-swapped proteins in that the active site and an essential metal binding site are apparently disassembled and reassembled by the process of domain swapping. Furthermore, it is the only example to date in which 3D domain swapping can be regulated by a small organic ligand.

  18. Crystal Structure of a Monomeric Thiolase-Like Protein Type 1 (TLP1) from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Janardan, Neelanjana; Harijan, Rajesh K.; Wierenga, Rikkert K.; Murthy, Mathur R. N.

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of the Mycobacterium smegmatis genome suggests that it codes for several thiolases and thiolase-like proteins. Thiolases are an important family of enzymes that are involved in fatty acid metabolism. They occur as either dimers or tetramers. Thiolases catalyze the Claisen condensation of two acetyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the synthetic direction and the thiolytic cleavage of 3-ketoacyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the degradative direction. Some of the M. smegmatis genes have been annotated as thiolases of the poorly characterized SCP2-thiolase subfamily. The mammalian SCP2-thiolase consists of an N-terminal thiolase domain followed by an additional C-terminal domain called sterol carrier protein-2 or SCP2. The M. smegmatis protein selected in the present study, referred to here as the thiolase-like protein type 1 (MsTLP1), has been biochemically and structurally characterized. Unlike classical thiolases, MsTLP1 is a monomer in solution. Its structure has been determined at 2.7 Å resolution by the single wavelength anomalous dispersion method. The structure of the protomer confirms that the N-terminal domain has the thiolase fold. An extra C-terminal domain is indeed observed. Interestingly, it consists of six β-strands forming an anti-parallel β-barrel which is completely different from the expected SCP2-fold. Detailed sequence and structural comparisons with thiolases show that the residues known to be essential for catalysis are not conserved in MsTLP1. Consistent with this observation, activity measurements show that MsTLP1 does not catalyze the thiolase reaction. This is the first structural report of a monomeric thiolase-like protein from any organism. These studies show that MsTLP1 belongs to a new group of thiolase related proteins of unknown function. PMID:22844533

  19. In vivo Differential Brain Clearance and Catabolism of Monomeric and Oligomeric Alzheimer's Aβ protein

    PubMed Central

    McIntee, Farron L.; Giannoni, Patrizia; Blais, Steven; Sommer, George; Neubert, Thomas A.; Rostagno, Agueda; Ghiso, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) is the major constituent of the brain deposits found in parenchymal plaques and cerebral blood vessels of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several lines of investigation support the notion that synaptic pathology, one of the strongest correlates to cognitive impairment, is related to the progressive accumulation of neurotoxic Aβ oligomers. Since the process of oligomerization/fibrillization is concentration-dependent, it is highly reliant on the homeostatic mechanisms that regulate the steady state levels of Aβ influencing the delicate balance between rate of synthesis, dynamics of aggregation, and clearance kinetics. Emerging new data suggest that reduced Aβ clearance, particularly in the aging brain, plays a critical role in the process of amyloid formation and AD pathogenesis. Using well-defined monomeric and low molecular mass oligomeric Aβ1-40 species stereotaxically injected into the brain of C57BL/6 wild-type mice in combination with biochemical and mass spectrometric analyses in CSF, our data clearly demonstrate that Aβ physiologic removal is extremely fast and involves local proteolytic degradation leading to the generation of heterogeneous C-terminally cleaved proteolytic products, while providing clear indication of the detrimental role of oligomerization for brain Aβ efflux. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy studies provide insight into the cellular pathways involved in the brain removal and cellular uptake of Aβ. The findings indicate that clearance from brain interstitial fluid follows local and systemic paths and that in addition to the blood-brain barrier, local enzymatic degradation and the bulk flow transport through the choroid plexus into the CSF play significant roles. Our studies highlight the diverse factors influencing brain clearance and the participation of various routes of elimination opening up new research opportunities for the understanding of altered mechanisms triggering AD pathology and for the

  20. In vivo Differential Brain Clearance and Catabolism of Monomeric and Oligomeric Alzheimer's Aβ protein.

    PubMed

    McIntee, Farron L; Giannoni, Patrizia; Blais, Steven; Sommer, George; Neubert, Thomas A; Rostagno, Agueda; Ghiso, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) is the major constituent of the brain deposits found in parenchymal plaques and cerebral blood vessels of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several lines of investigation support the notion that synaptic pathology, one of the strongest correlates to cognitive impairment, is related to the progressive accumulation of neurotoxic Aβ oligomers. Since the process of oligomerization/fibrillization is concentration-dependent, it is highly reliant on the homeostatic mechanisms that regulate the steady state levels of Aβ influencing the delicate balance between rate of synthesis, dynamics of aggregation, and clearance kinetics. Emerging new data suggest that reduced Aβ clearance, particularly in the aging brain, plays a critical role in the process of amyloid formation and AD pathogenesis. Using well-defined monomeric and low molecular mass oligomeric Aβ1-40 species stereotaxically injected into the brain of C57BL/6 wild-type mice in combination with biochemical and mass spectrometric analyses in CSF, our data clearly demonstrate that Aβ physiologic removal is extremely fast and involves local proteolytic degradation leading to the generation of heterogeneous C-terminally cleaved proteolytic products, while providing clear indication of the detrimental role of oligomerization for brain Aβ efflux. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy studies provide insight into the cellular pathways involved in the brain removal and cellular uptake of Aβ. The findings indicate that clearance from brain interstitial fluid follows local and systemic paths and that in addition to the blood-brain barrier, local enzymatic degradation and the bulk flow transport through the choroid plexus into the CSF play significant roles. Our studies highlight the diverse factors influencing brain clearance and the participation of various routes of elimination opening up new research opportunities for the understanding of altered mechanisms triggering AD pathology and for the

  1. The Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Protein (LRAP) is Primarily Monomeric and Unstructured in Physiological Solution

    PubMed Central

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Philo, John S.; Maluf, Nasib Karl; Krueger, Susan; Buchko, Garry W.; Lin, Genyao; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2015-01-01

    Amelogenin proteins are critical to the formation of enamel in teeth and may have roles in controlling growth and regulating microstructures of the intricately woven hydroxyapatite (HAP). Leucine-rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) is a 59-residue splice variant of amelogenin and contains the N- and C-terminal charged regions of the full-length protein thought to control crystal growth. Although the quaternary structure of full-length amelogenin in solution has been well studied and can consist of self-assemblies of monomers called nanospheres, there is limited information on the quaternary structure of LRAP. Here, sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation (SV) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) were used to study the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP at various pH values, ionic strengths, and concentrations. We found that the monomer is the dominant species of phosphorylated LRAP (LRAP(+P)) over a range of solution conditions (pH 2.7 to 4.1, pH 4.5 to 8, 50 mmol/L(mM) to 200 mM NaCl, 0.065 to 2 mg/mL). The monomer is also the dominant species for unphosphorylated LRAP (LRAP(−P)) at pH 7.4 and for LRAP(+P) in the presence of 2.5 mM calcium at pH 7.4. LRAP aggregates in a narrow pH range near the isoelectric point of pH 4.1. SV and SANS show that the LRAP monomer has a radius of ~2.0 nm and an asymmetric structure, and solution NMR studies indicate that the monomer is largely unstructured. This work provides new insights into the secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure of LRAP in solution and provides evidence that the monomeric species may be an important functional form of some amelogenins. PMID:25449314

  2. Structural Characterization of Mutations at the Oxygen Activation Site in Monomeric Sarcosine Oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Schuman Jorns, Marilyn; Chen, Zhi-wei; Mathews, F. Scott

    2010-04-30

    Oxygen reduction and sarcosine oxidation in monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) occur at separate sites above the si- and re-faces, respectively, of the flavin ring. Mutagenesis studies implicate Lys265 as the oxygen activation site. Substitution of Lys265 with a neutral (Met, Gln, or Ala) or basic (Arg) residue results in an {approx}10{sup 4}- or 250-fold decrease, respectively, in the reaction rate. The overall structure of MSOX and residue conformation in the sarcosine binding cavity are unaffected by replacement of Lys265 with Met or Arg. The side chain of Met265 exhibits the same configuration in each molecule of Lys265Met crystals and is nearly congruent with Lys265 in wild-type MSOX. The side chain of Arg265 is, however, dramatically shifted (4-5 {angstrom}) compared with Lys265, points in the opposite direction, and exhibits significant conformational variability between molecules of the same crystal. The major species in solutions of Lys265Arg is likely to contain a 'flipped-out' Arg265 and exhibit negligible oxygen activation, similar to Lys265Met. The 400-fold higher oxygen reactivity observed with Lys265Arg is attributed to a minor (<1%) 'flipped-in' Arg265 conformer whose oxygen reactivity is similar to that of wild-type MSOX. A structural water (WAT1), found above the si-face of the flavin ring in all previously determined MSOX structures, is part of an apparent proton relay system that extends from FAD N(5) to bulk solvent. WAT1 is strikingly absent in Lys265Met and Lys265Arg, a feature that may account for the apparent kinetic stabilization of a reductive half-reaction intermediate that is detectable with the mutants but not wild-type MSOX.

  3. Molecular analysis of the monomeric GTP-binding proteins of oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Burcelin, R; Rodriguez-Gabin, A G; Charron, M J; Almazan, G; Larocca, J N

    1997-10-15

    Vesicle transport plays an important role in the formation of myelin. Transport of proteins, including proteolipid protein and myelin associated glycoprotein, from their site of synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum in the perikaryon of the oligodendrocytes, to myelin, takes place via carrier vesicles. The mechanisms that regulate vesicle transport in oligodendrocytes are largely unknown. The presence of monomeric GTP-binding proteins in myelin and oligodendrocytes suggested the hypothesis that these proteins participate in the regulation of vesicle transport. In an attempt to identify the Rab and Rho GTP-binding proteins present in oligodendrocytes, a cDNA library specific for these proteins was generated using a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approach. Twelve different clones containing sequences that coded for members of the Rab and Rho families of GTP-binding proteins were isolated. This group includes Rab1, -1b, -2, -5b, -5c, -7, -8, -12, -14, -23 and Rho A. One additional clone revealed a novel cDNA sequence. Analysis of the effector loop motif indicated that this sequence encodes for a member of the Rab family. We refer to this new sequence as Rab0. Comparison of Rab0 with the most similar rat Rab sequences, Rab 14 and Rab 22, and with a recently cloned human Rab22b, showed a 71%, 72% and 94% identity, respectively. By RT-PCR analysis the Rab0 mRNA was found to be mainly expressed in oligodendrocytes and to a lesser extent in oligodendrocyte precursors, astrocytes and microglia. Moreover, the highest levels of Rab0 mRNA were observed in areas of the brain that are heavily myelinated. Rab0 mRNA was also detected in other tissues such as kidney, liver, skeletal muscle. These data provide initial evidence regarding signal transduction pathways that regulate intracellular transport in oligodendrocytes.

  4. Soluble monomeric acetylcholinesterase from mouse: expression, purification, and crystallization in complex with fasciculin.

    PubMed Central

    Marchot, P.; Ravelli, R. B.; Raves, M. L.; Bourne, Y.; Vellom, D. C.; Kanter, J.; Camp, S.; Sussman, J. L.; Taylor, P.

    1996-01-01

    A soluble, monomeric form of acetylcholinesterase from mouse (mAChE), truncated at its carboxyl-terminal end, was generated from a cDNA encoding the glycophospholipid-linked form of the mouse enzyme by insertion of an early stop codon at position 549. Insertion of the cDNA behind a cytomegalovirus promoter and selection by aminoglycoside resistance in transfected HEK cells yielded clones secreting large quantities of mAChE into the medium. The enzyme sediments as a soluble monomer at 4.8 S. High levels of expression coupled with a one-step purification by affinity chromatography have allowed us to undertake a crystallographic study of the fasciculin-mAChE complex. Complexes of two distinct fasciculins, Fas1-mAChE and Fas2-mAChE, were formed prior to the crystallization and were characterized thoroughly. Single hexagonal crystals, up to 0.6 mm x 0.5 mm x 0.5 mm, grew spontaneously from ammonium sulfate solutions buffered in the pH 7.0 range. They were found by electrophoretic migration to consist entirely of the complex and diffracted to 2.8 A resolution. Analysis of initial X-ray data collected on Fas2-mAChE crystals identified the space group as P6(1)22 or P6(5)22 with unit cell dimensions a = b = 75.5 A, c = 556 A, giving a Vm value of 3.1 A3/Da (or 60% of solvent), consistent with a single molecule of Fas2-AChE complex (72 kDa) per asymmetric unit. The complex Fas1-mAChE crystallizes in the same space group with identical cell dimensions. PMID:8845756

  5. Inhibition of two monomeric butyrylcholinesterases from rabbit liver by chlorpromazine and other drugs.

    PubMed

    Rush, R S; Main, A R; Kilpatrick, B F; Faulkner, G D

    1981-03-01

    A new form of cholinesterases has been discovered in rabbit liver; the new enzymes are monomeric butyrylcholinesterases (EC 3.1.1.8), mBuChE I and mBuChE II. These enzymes are inhibited reversibly by chlorpromazine in the pharmacologically active concentration range and they exhibit mixed competitive-noncompetitive inhibition patterns. The apparent competitive inhibition constants, Ki with chlorpromazine, are 1.8 x 10(-6) M for mBuChE I and 7.6 x 10(-6) M for mBuChE II, whereas the noncompetitive inhibition constant is 1.1 x 10(-5) M for mBuChE II as determined by spectrophotometric assay with n-butyrylthiocholine iodide substrate. Although inhibition of mBuChE I also exhibited noncompetitive behavior, a binding constant could not be determined. Human serum oligometric butyrylcholinesterase (oBuChE) was employed as a control cholinesterase and also demonstrated mixed inhibition kinetics. The competitive inhibition constant for the oBuChE was 5.5 x 10(-7) M in the low substrate region, whereas the apparent noncompetitive binding constant was 1.6 x 10(-5) M in the activated higher substrate region with n-butyrylthiocholine iodide as the substrate and chlorpromazine as the reversible inhibitor. The presence of a noncompetitive binding component indicates the presence of an operative modifier or allosteric site binding the inhibitor on both mBuChEs and the oBuChE. The inhibition constants were calculated assuming that the enzymes followed simple Michaelian kinetics.

  6. Monomeric gremlin is a novel vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Grillo, Elisabetta; Ravelli, Cosetta; Corsini, Michela; Ballmer-Hofer, Kurt; Zammataro, Luca; Oreste, Pasqua; Zoppetti, Giorgio; Tobia, Chiara; Ronca, Roberto; Presta, Marco; Mitola, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in various physiological and pathological conditions, including inflammation and tumor growth. The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist gremlin has been identified as a novel pro-angiogenic factor. Gremlin promotes neovascular responses via a BMP-independent activation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 (VEGFR2). BMP antagonists may act as covalent or non-covalent homodimers or in a monomeric form, while VEGFRs ligands are usually dimeric. However, the oligomeric state of gremlin and its role in modulating the biological activity of the protein remain to be elucidated. Here we show that gremlin is expressed in vitro and in vivo both as a monomer and as a covalently linked homodimer. Mutagenesis of amino acid residue Cys141 prevents gremlin dimerization leading to the formation of gremlinC141A monomers. GremlinC141A monomer retains a BMP antagonist activity similar to the wild-type dimer, but is devoid of a significant angiogenic capacity. Notably, we found that gremlinC141A mutant engages VEGFR2 in a non-productive manner, thus acting as receptor antagonist. Accordingly, both gremlinC141A and wild-type monomers inhibit angiogenesis driven by dimeric gremlin or VEGF-A165. Moreover, by acting as a VEGFR2 antagonist, gremlinC141A inhibits the angiogenic and tumorigenic potential of murine breast and prostate cancer cells in vivo. In conclusion, our data show that gremlin exists in multiple forms endowed with specific bioactivities and provide new insights into the molecular bases of gremlin dimerization. Furthermore, we propose gremlin monomer as a new inhibitor of VEGFR2 signalling during tumor growth. PMID:27174917

  7. Total allowable concentrations of monomeric inorganic aluminum and hydrated aluminum silicates in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Willhite, Calvin C; Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J

    2012-05-01

    Maximum contaminant levels are used to control potential health hazards posed by chemicals in drinking water, but no primary national or international limits for aluminum (Al) have been adopted. Given the differences in toxicological profiles, the present evaluation derives total allowable concentrations for certain water-soluble inorganic Al compounds (including chloride, hydroxide, oxide, phosphate and sulfate) and for the hydrated Al silicates (including attapulgite, bentonite/montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite) in drinking water. The chemistry, toxicology and clinical experience with Al materials are extensive and depend upon the particular physical and chemical form. In general, the water solubility of the monomeric Al materials depends on pH and their water solubility and gastrointestinal bioavailability are much greater than that of the hydrated Al silicates. Other than Al-containing antacids and buffered aspirin, food is the primary source of Al exposure for most healthy people. Systemic uptake of Al after ingestion of the monomeric salts is somewhat greater from drinking water (0.28%) than from food (0.1%). Once absorbed, Al accumulates in bone, brain, liver and kidney, with bone as the major site for Al deposition in humans. Oral Al hydroxide is used routinely to bind phosphate salts in the gut to control hyperphosphatemia in people with compromised renal function. Signs of chronic Al toxicity in the musculoskeletal system include a vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia (deranged membranous bone formation characterized by accumulation of the osteoid matrix and reduced mineralization, reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, decreased lamellar and osteoid bands with elevated Al concentrations) presenting as bone pain and proximal myopathy. Aluminum-induced bone disease can progress to stress fractures of the ribs, femur, vertebrae, humerus and metatarsals. Serum Al ≥100 µg/L has a 75-88% positive predictive value for Al bone disease. Chronic Al

  8. The leucine-rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) is primarily monomeric and unstructured in physiological solution

    DOE PAGES

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Philo, John S.; Maluf, Nasib Karl; ...

    2014-10-25

    Amelogenin proteins are critical to the formation of enamel in teeth and may have roles in promoting nucleation, controlling growth, and regulating microstructures of the intricately woven hydroxyapatite (HAP). Leucine-rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) is a 59-residue splice variant of amelogenin and contains the N- and C-terminal charged regions of the full-length protein thought to control crystal growth. Although the quaternary structure of full-length amelogenin in solution has been well studied and can consist of self-assemblies of monomers called nanospheres, the quaternary structure of LRAP is not as well studied. Here, analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity (SV) and small angle neutron scatteringmore » (SANS) were used to study the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP over a range of pH values, ionic strengths, and concentrations. SV has advantages over other techniques in accurately quantifying protein speciation in polydisperse solutions. We found that the monomer was the dominant species of phosphorylated LRAP (LRAP(+P)) over a range of solution conditions (pH 2.7 to 4.1, pH 4.5 to 8, 50 mmol/L( mM) to 200 mM NaCl, 0.065 to 2 mg/mL). The monomer was also the dominant species for unphosphorylated LRAP (LRAP(-P)) at pH 7.4 and LRAP(+P) in the presence of 2.5 mM calcium at pH 7.4. LRAP aggregated in a narrow pH range near the isoelectric point (pH 4.1). We conclude that LRAP does not form nanospheres under physiological solution conditions. Both SV and SANS showed that the LRAP monomer has a radius of ~2.0 nm and adopts an extended structure which solution NMR studies show is intrinsically disordered. This work provides new insights into the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP and further evidence that the monomeric species is an important functional form of amelogenins« less

  9. The leucine-rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) is primarily monomeric and unstructured in physiological solution

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Philo, John S.; Maluf, Nasib Karl; Krueger, Susan; Buchko, Garry W.; Lin, Genyao; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2014-10-25

    Amelogenin proteins are critical to the formation of enamel in teeth and may have roles in promoting nucleation, controlling growth, and regulating microstructures of the intricately woven hydroxyapatite (HAP). Leucine-rich amelogenin protein (LRAP) is a 59-residue splice variant of amelogenin and contains the N- and C-terminal charged regions of the full-length protein thought to control crystal growth. Although the quaternary structure of full-length amelogenin in solution has been well studied and can consist of self-assemblies of monomers called nanospheres, the quaternary structure of LRAP is not as well studied. Here, analytical ultracentrifugation sedimentation velocity (SV) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) were used to study the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP over a range of pH values, ionic strengths, and concentrations. SV has advantages over other techniques in accurately quantifying protein speciation in polydisperse solutions. We found that the monomer was the dominant species of phosphorylated LRAP (LRAP(+P)) over a range of solution conditions (pH 2.7 to 4.1, pH 4.5 to 8, 50 mmol/L( mM) to 200 mM NaCl, 0.065 to 2 mg/mL). The monomer was also the dominant species for unphosphorylated LRAP (LRAP(-P)) at pH 7.4 and LRAP(+P) in the presence of 2.5 mM calcium at pH 7.4. LRAP aggregated in a narrow pH range near the isoelectric point (pH 4.1). We conclude that LRAP does not form nanospheres under physiological solution conditions. Both SV and SANS showed that the LRAP monomer has a radius of ~2.0 nm and adopts an extended structure which solution NMR studies show is intrinsically disordered. This work provides new insights into the tertiary and quaternary structure of LRAP and further evidence that the monomeric species is an important functional form of amelogenins

  10. Kinetics of O2 Entry and Exit in Monomeric Sarcosine Oxidase via Markovian Milestoning Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Anthony; Yu, Tang-Qing; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric; Abrams, Cameron F

    2016-06-14

    The flavoenzyme monomeric sarcosine oxidase (MSOX) catalyzes a complex set of reactions currently lacking a consensus mechanism. A key question that arises in weighing competing mechanistic models of MSOX function is to what extent ingress of O2 from the solvent (and its egress after an unsuccessful oxidation attempt) limits the overall catalytic rate. To address this question, we have applied to the MSOX/O2 system the relatively new simulation method of Markovian milestoning molecular dynamics simulations, which, as we recently showed [ Yu et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015 , 137 , 3041 ], accurately predicted the entry and exit kinetics of CO in myoglobin. We show that the mechanism of O2 entry and exit, in terms of which possible solvent-to-active-site channels contribute to the flow of O2, is sensitive to the presence of the substrate-mimicking competitive inhibitor 2-furoate in the substrate site. The second-order O2 entry rate constants were computed to be 8.1 × 10(6) and 3.1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) for bound and apo MSOX, respectively, both of which moderately exceed the experimentally determined second-order rate constant of (2.83 ± 0.07) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for flavin oxidation by O2 in MSOX. This suggests that the rate of flavin oxidation by O2 is likely not strongly limited by diffusion from the solvent to the active site. The first-order exit rate constants were computed to be 10(7) s(-1) and 7.2 × 10(6) s(-1) for the apo and bound states, respectively. The predicted faster entry and slower exit of O2 for the bound state indicate a longer residence time within MSOX, increasing the likelihood of collisions with the flavin isoalloxazine ring, a step required for reduction of molecular O2 and subsequent reoxidation of the flavin. This is also indirectly supported by previous experimental evidence favoring the so-called modified ping-pong mechanism, the distinguishing feature of which is an intermediate complex involving O2, the flavin, and the oxidized

  11. Use of the quartz crystal microbalance to determine the monomeric friction coefficient of polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtold, Mary M.

    1995-01-01

    When a thin film of polymer is coated on to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the QCM can be used to detect the rate of increase in weight of the polymer film as the volatile penetrant diffuses into the polymer. From this rate information the diffusion coefficient of the penetrant into the polymer can be computed. Calculations requiring this diffusion coefficient lead to values which approximate the monomeric friction coefficient of the polymer. This project has been concerned with the trial of crystal oscillating circuits suitable for driving polymer coated crystals in an atmosphere of penetrant. For these studies done at room temperature, natural rubber was used as an easily applied polymer that is readily penetrated by toluene vapors, qualities anticipated with polyimides when they are tested at T(g) in the presence of toluene. Three quartz crystal oscillator circuits were tested. The simplest circuit used +/- 5 volt dc and had a transistor to transistor logic (TTL) inverter chip that provides a 180 deg phase shift via a feed back loop. This oscillator circuit was stable but would not drive the crystal when the crystal was coated with polymer and subjected to toluene vapors. Removal of a variable resistor from this circuit increased stability but did not otherwise increase performance. Another driver circuit tested contained a two stage differential input, differential output, wide band video amplifier and also contain a feed back loop. The circuit voltage could not be varied and operated at +/- 5 volts dc; this circuit was also stable but failed to oscillate the polymer coated crystal in an atmosphere saturated with toluene vapors. The third oscillator circuit was of similar construction and relied on the same video amplifier but allowed operation with variable voltage. This circuit would drive the crystal when the crystal was submerged in liquid toluene and when the crystal was coated with polymer and immersed in toluene vapors. The frequency readings

  12. Use of the quartz crystal microbalance to determine the monomeric friction coefficient of polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bechtold, Mary M.

    1995-01-01

    When a thin film of polymer is coated on to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the QCM can be used to detect the rate of increase in weight of the polymer film as the volatile penetrant diffuses into the polymer. From this rate information the diffusion coefficient of the penetrant into the polymer can be computed. Calculations requiring this diffusion coefficient lead to values which approximate the monomeric friction coefficient of the polymer. This project has been concerned with the trial of crystal oscillating circuits suitable for driving polymer coated crystals in an atmosphere of penetrant. For these studies done at room temperature, natural rubber was used as an easily applied polymer that is readily penetrated by toluene vapors, qualities anticipated with polyimides when they are tested at T(g) in the presence of toluene. Three quartz crystal oscillator circuits were tested. The simplest circuit used +/- 5 volt dc and had a transistor to transistor logic (TTL) inverter chip that provides a 180 deg phase shift via a feed back loop. This oscillator circuit was stable but would not drive the crystal when the crystal was coated with polymer and subjected to toluene vapors. Removal of a variable resistor from this circuit increased stability but did not otherwise increase performance. Another driver circuit tested contained a two stage differential input, differential output, wide band video amplifier and also contain a feed back loop. The circuit voltage could not be varied and operated at +/- 5 volts dc; this circuit was also stable but failed to oscillate the polymer coated crystal in an atmosphere saturated with toluene vapors. The third oscillator circuit was of similar construction and relied on the same video amplifier but allowed operation with variable voltage. This circuit would drive the crystal when the crystal was submerged in liquid toluene and when the crystal was coated with polymer and immersed in toluene vapors. The frequency readings

  13. The Folding Unit of Phosphofructokinase-2 as Defined by the Biophysical Properties of a Monomeric Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Sarmiento, César A.; Baez, Mauricio; Zamora, Ricardo A.; Balasubramaniam, Deepa; Babul, Jorge; Komives, Elizabeth A.; Guixé, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    by monomerizing mutations. PMID:25954892

  14. Femtosecond and Picosecond Dynamics of Recombinant Bacteriorhodopsin Primary Reactions Compared to the Native Protein in Trimeric and Monomeric Forms.

    PubMed

    Smitienko, O A; Nekrasova, O V; Kudriavtsev, A V; Yakovleva, M A; Shelaev, I V; Gostev, F E; Dolgikh, D A; Kolchugina, I B; Nadtochenko, V A; Kirpichnikov, M P; Feldman, T B; Ostrovsky, M A

    2017-04-01

    Photochemical reaction dynamics of the primary events in recombinant bacteriorhodopsin (bRrec) was studied by femtosecond laser absorption spectroscopy with 25-fs time resolution. bRrec was produced in an Escherichia coli expression system. Since bRrec was prepared in a DMPC-CHAPS micelle system in the monomeric form, its comparison with trimeric and monomeric forms of the native bacteriorhodopsin (bRtrim and bRmon, respectively) was carried out. We found that bRrec intermediate I (excited state of bR) was formed in the range of 100 fs, as in the case of bRtrim and bRmon. Further processes, namely the decay of the excited state I and the formation of intermediates J and K of bRrec, occurred more slowly compared to bRtrim, but similarly to bRmon. The lifetime of intermediate I, judging from the signal of ΔAESA(470-480 nm), was 0.68 ps (78%) and 4.4 ps (22%) for bRrec, 0.52 ps (73%) and 1.7 ps (27%) for bRmon, and 0.45 ps (90%) and 1.75 ps (10%) for bRtrim. The formation time of intermediate K, judging from the signal of ΔAGSA(625-635 nm), was 13.5 ps for bRrec, 9.8 ps for bRmon, and 4.3 ps for bRtrim. In addition, there was a decrease in the photoreaction efficiency of bRrec and bRmon as seen by a decrease in absorbance in the differential spectrum of the intermediate K by ~14%. Since photochemical properties of bRrec are similar to those of the monomeric form of the native protein, bRrec and its mutants can be considered as a basis for further studies of the mechanism of bacteriorhodopsin functioning.

  15. Synthesis of monomeric and dimeric steroids containing [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines.

    PubMed

    Arenas-González, Ailed; Mendez-Delgado, Luis Antonio; Merino-Montiel, Penélope; Padrón, José M; Montiel-Smith, Sara; Vega-Báez, José Luis; Meza-Reyes, Socorro

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of several monomeric and dimeric steroidal [1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines (TPs) derived from steroids are described. These derivatives were prepared from α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds through a Claisen Schmidt condensation and rearrangement of the spiro moiety followed by a cycloaddition with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole. The antiproliferative activity of compounds 7, 13-15 was tested against human cancer cells; several IG50 values were below 10μM.

  16. Two-dimensional crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with bound cytochrome c in reconstituted lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Osuda, Yukiho; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Maeda, Shintaro; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Gerle, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase utilizes electrons provided by cytochrome c for the active vectorial transport of protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane through the reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Direct structural evidence on the transient cytochrome c oxidase-cytochrome c complex thus far, however, remains elusive and its physiological relevant oligomeric form is unclear. Here, we report on the 2D crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with tightly bound cytochrome c at a molar ratio of 1:1 in reconstituted lipid membranes at the basic pH of 8.5 and low ionic strength.

  17. High-sensitivity capillary electrophoresis of double-stranded DNA fragments using monomeric and dimeric fluorescent intercalating dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, H.; Clark, S.M.; Benson, S.C.; Rye, H.S.; Glazer, A.N.; Mathies, R.A. )

    1994-07-01

    Fluorescence-detected capillary electrophoresis separations of [phi]X174/HaeIII DNA restriction fragments have been performed using monomeric and dimeric intercalating dyes. Replaceable hydroxyethyl cellulose solutions were used as the separation medium. Confocal fluorescence detection was performed following 488-nm laser excitation. The limits of DNA detection for on-column staining with monomeric dyes (ethidium bromide, two propidium dye derivatives, oxazole yellow, thiazole orange, and a polycationic thiazole orange derivative) were determined. The thiazole orange dyes provide the most sensitive detection with limiting sensitivities of 2-4 amol of DNA base pairs per band, and detection of the 603-bp fragment was successful, injecting from [phi]X174/HaeIII samples containing only 1-2 fg of this fragment per microliter. Separations of preformed DNA-dimeric dye complexes were also performed. The breadth of the bands observed in separations of preformed DNA-dimeric dye complexes is due to the presence of DNA fragments with different numbers of bound dye molecules that can be resolved as closely spaced subbands in many of our separations. The quality of these DNA-dye complex separations can be dramatically improved by performing the electrophoresis with 9-aminoacridine (9AA) in the column and running buffers. 43 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Conditions for homogeneous preparation of stable monomeric and oligomeric forms of activated Vip3A toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Kunthic, Thittaya; Surya, Wahyu; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Torres, Jaume; Boonserm, Panadda

    2016-07-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal proteins like Vip3A have been used for crop protection and to delay resistance to existing insecticidal Cry toxins. However, little is known about Vip3A's behavior or its mechanism of action, and a structural model is required. Herein, in an effort to facilitate future crystallization and functional studies, we have used the orthogonal biophysical techniques of light scattering and sedimentation to analyze the aggregation behavior and stability of trypsin-activated Vip3A toxin in solution. Both scattering and sedimentation data suggest that at pH 10 the toxin is monomeric and adopts an elongated shape, but after overnight incubation aggregation was observed at all pH values tested (5-12). The narrowest size distribution was observed at pH 7, but it was consistent with large oligomers of ~50 nm on average. The addition of β-D-glucopyranoside (OG) helped in achieving preparations that were stable and with a narrower particle size distribution. In this case, scattering was consistent with a 4-nm monomeric globular Vip3A form. After OG dialysis, 40-nm particles were detected, with a molecular weight consistent with homotetramers. Therefore, OG is proposed as the detergent of choice to obtain a Vip3A crystal for structural studies, either before (monomers) or after dialysis (tetramers).

  19. Creating a monomeric endonuclease TALE-I-SceI with high specificity and low genotoxicity in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jianfei; Chen, He; Luo, Ling; Lai, Yongrong; Xie, Wei; Kee, Kehkooi

    2015-01-01

    To correct a DNA mutation in the human genome for gene therapy, homology-directed repair (HDR) needs to be specific and have the lowest off-target effects to protect the human genome from deleterious mutations. Zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and CRISPR-CAS9 systems have been engineered and used extensively to recognize and modify specific DNA sequences. Although TALEN and CRISPR/CAS9 could induce high levels of HDR in human cells, their genotoxicity was significantly higher. Here, we report the creation of a monomeric endonuclease that can recognize at least 33 bp by fusing the DNA-recognizing domain of TALEN (TALE) to a re-engineered homing endonuclease I-SceI. After sequentially re-engineering I-SceI to recognize 18 bp of the human β-globin sequence, the re-engineered I-SceI induced HDR in human cells. When the re-engineered I-SceI was fused to TALE (TALE-ISVB2), the chimeric endonuclease induced the same HDR rate at the human β-globin gene locus as that induced by TALEN, but significantly reduced genotoxicity. We further demonstrated that TALE-ISVB2 specifically targeted at the β-globin sequence in human hematopoietic stem cells. Therefore, this monomeric endonuclease has the potential to be used in therapeutic gene targeting in human cells. PMID:25541197

  20. Enantioselective desymmetrization of meso-epoxides with anilines catalyzed by polymeric and monomeric Ti(IV) salen complexes.

    PubMed

    Kureshy, Rukhsana I; Kumar, Manish; Agrawal, Santosh; Khan, Noor-Ul H; Dangi, Balchand; Abdi, Sayed H R; Bajaj, Hari C

    2011-01-01

    The active catalysts for the enantioselective ring opening (ARO) of meso-stilbene oxide, cis-butene oxide, cyclohexene oxide, cyclopentene oxide, and cyclooctene oxide with various substituted anilines were generated in situ by the reaction of Ti(O(i)Pr)(4) with poly-[(R,R)-N,N'-bis-{3-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-5-methylene salicylidene} cyclohexane-1,2-diamine]-1 and (1R,2R)-N,N'-bis[3,5-di(tert-butyl)salicylidene] cyclohexane-1,2-diamine-2. These catalysts in the presence of nonracemic imine as an additive provided β-amino alcohol in excellent yield (99%) and chiral purity (enantiomeric excess (ee) up to 99%) for the ARO of meso-stilbene oxide with aniline. The same protocol was less effective for the ARO of cyclic epoxides; however, when triphenylphosphine was used as an additive, there was a significant improvement in catalyst performance for the ARO of cyclohexene oxide (yield, 85-90%; ee, 63-67%). Both in situ generated polymeric and monomeric catalysts performed in a similar manner except that the polymeric catalyst Ti(IV)-1 was more active and recycled several times with retention of enantioselectivity when compared with the monomeric catalyst Ti(IV)-2, which was nonrecyclable.

  1. Three-dimensional structure of the 3'X-tail of hepatitis C virus RNA in monomeric and dimeric states.

    PubMed

    Cantero-Camacho, Ángel; Fan, Lixin; Wang, Yun-Xing; Gallego, José

    2017-09-01

    The 3'X domain is a 98-nt region located at the 3' end of hepatitis C virus genomic RNA that plays essential functions in the viral life cycle. It contains an absolutely conserved, 16-base palindromic sequence that promotes viral RNA dimerization, overlapped with a 7-nt tract implicated in a distal contact with a nearby functional sequence. Using small angle X-ray scattering measurements combined with model building guided by NMR spectroscopy, we have studied the stoichiometry, structure, and flexibility of domain 3'X and two smaller subdomain sequences as a function of ionic strength, and obtained a three-dimensional view of the full-length domain in its monomeric and dimeric states. In the monomeric form, the 3'X domain adopted an elongated conformation containing two SL1' and SL2' double-helical stems stabilized by coaxial stacking. This structure was significantly less flexible than that of isolated subdomain SL2' monomers. At higher ionic strength, the 3'X scattering envelope nearly doubled its size, reflecting the formation of extended homodimers containing an antiparallel SL2' duplex flanked by coaxially stacked SL1' helices. Formation of these dimers could initialize and/or regulate the packaging of viral RNA genomes into virions. © 2017 Cantero-Camacho et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of processed black raspberry products.

    PubMed

    Hager, A; Howard, L R; Prior, R L; Brownmiller, C

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6 mo of storage on total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of black raspberries that were individually quick-frozen (IQF), canned-in-syrup, canned-in-water, pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and ORAC(FL) were determined 1 d postprocessing and after 1, 3, and 6 mo of storage. Thermal processing resulted in marked losses in total anthocyanins ranging from 37% in puree to 69% to 73% in nonclarified and clarified juices, respectively, but only the juices showed substantial losses (38% to 41%) in ORAC(FL). Storage at 25 degrees C of all thermally processed products resulted in dramatic losses in total anthocyanins ranging from 49% in canned-in-syrup to 75% in clarified juices. This coincided with marked increases in percent polymeric color values of these products over the 6-mo storage. ORAC(FL) values showed little change during storage, indicating that the formation of polymers compensated for the loss of antioxidant capacity due to anthocyanin degradation. Total anthocyanins and ORACFL of IQF berries were well retained during long-term storage at -20 degrees C.

  3. Structural analysis of the bright monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen obtained by directed evolution.

    PubMed

    Clavel, Damien; Gotthard, Guillaume; von Stetten, David; De Sanctis, Daniele; Pasquier, Hélène; Lambert, Gerard G; Shaner, Nathan C; Royant, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, genes coding for homologues of the autofluorescent protein GFP had only been identified in marine organisms from the phyla Cnidaria and Arthropoda. New fluorescent-protein genes have now been found in the phylum Chordata, coding for particularly bright oligomeric fluorescent proteins such as the tetrameric yellow fluorescent protein lanYFP from Branchiostoma lanceolatum. A successful monomerization attempt led to the development of the bright yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen. The structures of lanYFP and mNeonGreen have been determined and compared in order to rationalize the directed evolution process leading from a bright, tetrameric to a still bright, monomeric fluorescent protein. An unusual discolouration of crystals of mNeonGreen was observed after X-ray data collection, which was investigated using a combination of X-ray crystallography and UV-visible absorption and Raman spectroscopies, revealing the effects of specific radiation damage in the chromophore cavity. It is shown that X-rays rapidly lead to the protonation of the phenolate O atom of the chromophore and to the loss of its planarity at the methylene bridge.

  4. Clarification and pasteurisation effects on monomeric anthocyanins and percent polymeric colour of black carrot (Daucus carota L.) juice.

    PubMed

    Türkyılmaz, Meltem; Yemiş, Oktay; Ozkan, Mehmet

    2012-09-15

    Black carrots (BCs) are a rich source of stable anthocyanins (ACNs). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of clarification and pasteurisation on ACNs of black carrot juice (BCJ). Monomeric ACNs, ACN profile and percent polymeric colour were determined during processing of BCJ. While depectinisation and bentonite treatments resulted in 7% and 20% increases in monomeric ACN content of BCJ, respectively, gelatine-kieselsol treatment and pasteurisation resulted in 10% and 3-16% reduction. Percent polymeric colour decreased after clarification, but substantially increased in samples subjected to heat. ACNs of BCJ samples were identified by HPLC-MS. Unclarified BCJ contained cyanidin-3-galactoside-xyloside-glucoside-ferulic acid as the major ACN, followed by cyanidin-3-galactoside-xyloside-glucoside-coumaric acid, and cyanidin-3-galactoside-xyloside-glucoside. After depectinisation, two more ACNs (cyanidin-3-galactoside-xyloside and cyanidin-3-galactoside-xyloside-glucoside-sinapic acid) were also identified. These results indicated that depectinisation and bentonite treatment had positive effect on the colour of BCJ, while gelatin-kieselsol treatment and pasteurisation had negative effect.

  5. Engineering a monomeric Fc domain modality by N-glycosylation for the half-life extension of biotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ishino, Tetsuya; Wang, Mengmeng; Mosyak, Lidia; Tam, Amy; Duan, Weili; Svenson, Kristine; Joyce, Alison; O'Hara, Denise M; Lin, Laura; Somers, William S; Kriz, Ronald

    2013-06-07

    Human IgG is a bivalent molecule that has two identical Fab domains connected by a dimeric Fc domain. For therapeutic purposes, however, the bivalency of IgG and Fc fusion proteins could cause undesired properties. We therefore engineered the conversion of the natural dimeric Fc domain to a highly soluble monomer by introducing two Asn-linked glycans onto the hydrophobic C(H)3-C(H)3 dimer interface. The monomeric Fc (monoFc) maintained the binding affinity for neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in a pH-dependent manner. We solved the crystal structure of monoFc, which explains how the carbohydrates can stabilize the protein surface and provides the rationale for molecular recognition between monoFc and FcRn. The monoFc prolonged the in vivo half-life of an antibody Fab domain, and a tandem repeat of the monoFc further prolonged the half-life. This monoFc modality can be used to improve the pharmacokinetics of monomeric therapeutic proteins with an option to modulate the degree of half-life extension.

  6. Determination of monomeric composition in polyhydroxyalkanoates by liquid chromatography coupled with on-line mass spectrometry and off-line nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Ge, Liya; Tan, Giin-Yu Amy; Wang, Lin; Chen, Chia-Lung; Li, Ling; Tan, Swee Ngin; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are commercially-valuable biocompatible and biodegradable polymers with many potential medical, pharmaceutical and other industrial applications. The analysis of PHA monomeric composition is especially challenging due to the broad chemical diversity of PHA monomers and lack of analytical standards to represent the chemically-diverse PHA monomer constituents. In this study, a novel strategy based on on-line liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and off-line liquid chromatography-nuclear magnetic resonance (LC-NMR) was established to quantify seven PHA monomers with available standards and used to elucidate the structures of unknown PHA monomers. The strategy was successfully applied for the determination of monomeric composition in bacterial PHAs isolated from Pseudomonads cultivated on different carbon sources after hydrolysis. The results of this work demonstrated that the newly-developed strategy was efficient, repeatable, and could have good potential to be employed for detailed analysis of PHA monomeric composition.

  7. Mixed oligomers and monomeric amyloid-β disrupts endothelial cells integrity and reduces monomeric amyloid-β transport across hCMEC/D3 cell line as an in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

    PubMed

    Qosa, Hisham; LeVine, Harry; Keller, Jeffrey N; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2014-09-01

    Senile amyloid plaques are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the severity of clinical symptoms of AD is weakly correlated with the plaque load. AD symptoms severity is reported to be more strongly correlated with the level of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ) assemblies. Formation of soluble Aβ assemblies is stimulated by monomeric Aβ accumulation in the brain, which has been related to its faulty cerebral clearance. Studies tend to focus on the neurotoxicity of specific Aβ species. There are relatively few studies investigating toxic effects of Aβ on the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We hypothesized that a soluble Aβ pool more closely resembling the in vivo situation composed of a mixture of Aβ40 monomer and Aβ42 oligomer would exert higher toxicity against hCMEC/D3 cells as an in vitro BBB model than either component alone. We observed that, in addition to a disruptive effect on the endothelial cells integrity due to enhancement of the paracellular permeability of the hCMEC/D3 monolayer, the Aβ mixture significantly decreased monomeric Aβ transport across the cell culture model. Consistent with its effect on Aβ transport, Aβ mixture treatment for 24h resulted in LRP1 down-regulation and RAGE up-regulation in hCMEC/D3 cells. The individual Aβ species separately failed to alter Aβ clearance or the cell-based BBB model integrity. Our study offers, for the first time, evidence that a mixture of soluble Aβ species, at nanomolar concentrations, disrupts endothelial cells integrity and its own transport across an in vitro model of the BBB.

  8. Investigation of pulmonary function among employees exposed to low levels of monomeric isocyanates and solvents at an automobile finishings plant.

    PubMed

    Schweigert, Michael; Sax, Sol; House, Ron; Henderson, Bruce

    2002-11-01

    There have been reports in the literature of decrements in pulmonary function associated with long-term, low-level monomeric isocyanate exposure combined with solvent exposure. This cross-sectional study examines the relationship between these exposures and pulmonary function in an automobile paint and coating (finishes) plant. A job exposure matrix was developed for isocyanate and solvent exposure; years in a work task were used as a surrogate for exposure. Recent pulmonary function tests were used as the outcome variables; specifically the difference between predicted and actual FEV1 and FVC. The results of the analysis demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between combined isocyanate and solvent exposure and decline in pulmonary function. There was a statistically significant negative correlation between solvent exposure and FEV1 and FVC.

  9. Evidence of stable monomeric species in the unfolding of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase from Photobacterium leiognathi.

    PubMed

    Malvezzi-Campeggi, F; Stroppolo, M E; Mei, G; Rosato, N; Desideri, A

    1999-10-15

    The equilibrium unfolding process of Photobacterium leiognathi Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase has been quantitatively monitored through circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy, upon increasing the guanidinium hydrochloride concentration. The study has been undertaken for both the holo- and the copper-free derivative to work out the role of copper in protein stability. In both cases the unfolding was reversible. The denaturation curve derived from CD and fluorescence spectroscopy was not coincident, suggesting that the denaturation process occurs through a three-state model with formation of an intermediate monomeric species. The occurrence of an intermediate species has been unambiguously demonstrated following CD and steady-state fluorescence spectra of the enzyme at various concentrations in presence of a fixed amounts of guanidinium hydrochloride.

  10. Combinatorial compatibility as habit-controlling factor in lysozyme crystallization I. Monomeric and tetrameric F faces derived graph-theoretically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, C. S.; Bennema, P.

    1997-03-01

    A series of two articles discusses possible morphological evidence for oligomerization of growth units in the crystallization of tetragonal lysozyme, based on a rigorous graph-theoretic derivation of the F faces. In the first study (Part I), the growth layers are derived as valid networks satisfying the conditions of F slices in the context of the PBC theory using the graph-theoretic method implemented in program FFACE [C.S. Strom, Z. Krist. 172 (1985) 11]. The analysis is performed in monomeric and alternative tetrameric and octameric formulations of the unit cell, assuming tetramer formation according to the strongest bonds. F (flat) slices with thickness Rdhkl ( {1}/{2} < R ≤ 1 ) are predicted theoretically in the forms 1 1 0, 0 1 1, 1 1 1. The relevant energies are established in the broken bond model. The relation between possible oligomeric specifications of the unit cell and combinatorially feasible F slice compositions in these orientations is explored.

  11. The neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y2 receptors are largely dimeric in the kidney, but monomeric in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Parker, S L; Parker, M S; Estes, A M; Wong, Y Y; Sah, R; Sweatman, T; Park, E A; Balasubramaniam, A; Sallee, F R

    2008-01-01

    The neuropeptide Y(NPY) Y2 receptors are detected largely as dimers in the clonal expressions in CHO cells and in particulates from rabbit kidney cortex. However, in two areas of the forebrain (rat or rabbit piriform cortex and hypothalamus), these receptors are found mainly as monomers. Evidence is presented that this difference relates to large levels of G proteins containing the Gi alpha -subunit in the forebrain areas. The predominant monomeric status of these Y2 receptors should also be physiologically linked to large synaptic inputs of the agonist NPY. The rabbit kidney and the human CHO cell-expressed Y2 dimers are converted by agonists to monomers in vitro at a similar rate in the presence of divalent cations.

  12. Reaction Kinetics of Monomeric Anthocyanin Conversion to Polymeric Pigments and Their Significance to Color in Interspecific Hybrid Wines.

    PubMed

    Burtch, Claire E; Mansfield, Anna Katharine; Manns, David C

    2017-02-15

    The color stability of red wines produced from interspecific hybrid grapes, which is partially dependent on anthocyanin diglucosides, is not well understood. In this study, the rate of decrease of monomeric anthocyanins as they polymerized to polymeric pigments due to the presence of excess catechin and acetaldehyde was measured in model wine using HPLC. Colorimetry was used to measure L*, a*, and b* values, hue angle, and change in color (ΔE). Concentrations of individual diglucosides decreased more slowly than monoglucosides. When monoglucosides and diglucosides were combined, the reaction rate of monoglucosides was slower than that of monoglucosides alone. Hue angles described transitions from red to red-orange, orange, or orange-yellow as anthocyanin-specific changes occurred. The evolution in color represents dynamic reactions between anthocyanins, catechin, and acetaldehyde. Consequently, wines containing high concentrations of diglucosides, such as those produced from interspecific hybrid grapes, will form less polymeric pigment than wines containing primarily monoglucosides.

  13. Axially chiral monomeric and dimeric square planar Pd(II) complexes and their application to chiral tectonics.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hisako; Morimoto, Kazuya; Mori, Yukie; Shinagawa, Yuji; Kitazawa, Takafumi; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2013-06-07

    Mononuclear and dinuclear square planar palladium(II) complexes (denoted by [(hfac)Pd(II)(L-LH)] and [(hfac)Pd(II)(L-L)Pd(II)(hfac)], respectively) were synthesized. Here hfac(-), HL-L(-) and L-L(2-) denote hexafluoroacetylacetonato, monoprotonated and non-protonated bis-β-diketonato ligands, respectively. Three bis-β-diketones were used as HL-LH: 1,2-diacetyl-1,2-dibenzoylethane (denoted by dabeH2), 1,2-diacetyl-1,2-bis(3-methylbutanoyl)ethane (baetH2) and 1,2-diacetyl-1,2-propanoylethane (dpeH2). Both the monomeric and dimeric Pd(II) complexes were chiral due to the orthogonal twisting of the two non-symmetric diketonato moieties in HL-L(-) and L-L(2-), respectively. Optical resolution of [(hfac)Pd(II)(dabe)Pd(II)(hfac)] was achieved chromatographically on a chiral column to obtain a pair of optical antipodes which were stable against racemization. As for the other complexes, resolution was possible only after replacing hfac(-) with a bulky ligand such as dibenzoylmethanato (dbm(-)). Although a dinuclear complex with a symmetric bis-β-diketonato ligand, [(hfac)Pd(II)(taet)Pd(II)(hfac)] (taet(2-) = 1,1,2,2-tetraacetylethanato), was achiral, the replacement of the terminal ligands with non-symmetric β-diketonates yielded an axially chiral complex such as [(phacac)Pd(II)(taet)Pd(II)(phacac)], wherein phacac(-) denotes 1-phenyl-1,3-butanedionato. The UV and CD spectra of the Pd(II) complexes were analyzed with the help of the TDDFT calculations. The chiral monomeric species, [(dbm)Pd(II)(R- or S-baetH)], formed a heterometallic tetranuclear complex, [Fe(III){(dbm)Pd(II)(R- or S-baet)}3], in methanol solution.

  14. Serum levels of autoantibodies against monomeric C-reactive protein are correlated with disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sjöwall, Christopher; Bengtsson, Anders A; Sturfelt, Gunnar; Skogh, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the relation between IgG autoantibodies against human C-reactive protein (anti-CRP) and disease activity measures in serial serum samples from 10 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), of whom four had active kidney involvement during the study period. The presence of anti-CRP was analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cut-off for positive anti-CRP test was set at the 95th centile of 100 healthy blood donor sera. Specificity of the anti-CRP antibody binding was evaluated by preincubating patient sera with either native or monomeric CRP. Disease activity was determined by the SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI), serum levels of CRP, anti-DNA antibodies, complement components and blood cell counts. Of 50 serum samples, 20 (40%) contained antibodies reactive with monomeric CRP, and 7 of 10 patients were positive on at least one occasion during the study. All patients with active lupus nephritis were positive for anti-CRP at flare. Frequent correlations between anti-CRP levels and disease activity measures were observed in anti-CRP-positive individuals. Accumulated anti-CRP data from all patients were positively correlated with SLEDAI scores and anti-DNA antibody levels, whereas significant inverse relationships were noted for complement factors C1q, C3 and C4, and for lymphocyte counts. This study confirms the high prevalence of anti-CRP autoantibodies in SLE and that the antibody levels are correlated with clinical and laboratory disease activity measures. This indicates that anti-CRP antibodies might have biological functions of pathogenetic interest in SLE. Further prospective clinical studies and experimental studies on effects mediated by anti-CRP antibodies are warranted. PMID:15059271

  15. Monomerization alters the dynamics of the lid region in Campylobacter jejuni CstII: an MD simulation study.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Pradeep Kumar; Srivastava, Alka; Rao, K Krishnamurthy; Balaji, Petety V

    2016-01-01

    CstII, a bifunctional (α2,3/8) sialyltransferase from Campylobacter jejuni, is a homotetramer. It has been reported that mutation of the interface residues Phe121 (F121D) or Tyr125 (Y125Q) leads to monomerization and partial loss of enzyme activity, without any change in the secondary or tertiary structures. MD simulations of both tetramer and monomer, with and without bound donor substrate, were performed for the two mutants and WT to understand the reasons for partial loss of activity due to monomerization since the active site is located within each monomer. RMSF values were found to correlate with the crystallographic B-factor values indicating that the simulations are able to capture the flexibility of the molecule effectively. There were no gross changes in either the secondary or tertiary structure of the proteins during MD simulations. However, interface is destabilized by the mutations, and more importantly the flexibility of the lid region (Gly152-Lys190) is affected. The lid region accesses three major conformations named as open, intermediate, and closed conformations. In both Y121Q and F121D mutants, the closed conformation is accessed predominantly. In this conformation, the catalytic base His188 is also displaced. Normal mode analysis also revealed differences in the lid movement in tetramer and monomer. This provides a possible explanation for the partial loss of enzyme activity in both interface mutants. The lid region controls the traffic of substrates and products in and out of the active site, and the dynamics of this region is regulated by tetramerization. Thus, this study provides valuable insights into the role of loop dynamics in enzyme activity of CstII.

  16. G-actin guides p53 nuclear transport: potential contribution of monomeric actin in altered localization of mutant p53

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Taniya; Guha, Deblina; Manna, Argha; Panda, Abir Kumar; Bhat, Jyotsna; Chatterjee, Subhrangsu; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2016-01-01

    p53 preserves genomic integrity by restricting anomaly at the gene level. Till date, limited information is available for cytosol to nuclear shuttling of p53; except microtubule-based trafficking route, which utilizes minus-end directed motor dynein. The present study suggests that monomeric actin (G-actin) guides p53 traffic towards the nucleus. Histidine-tag pull-down assay using purified p53(1–393)-His and G-actin confirms direct physical association between p53 and monomeric G-actin. Co-immunoprecipitation data supports the same. Confocal imaging explores intense perinuclear colocalization between p53 and G-actin. To address atomistic details of the complex, constraint-based docked model of p53:G-actin complex was generated based on crystal structures. MD simulation reveals that p53 DNA-binding domain arrests very well the G-actin protein. Docking benchmark studies have been carried out for a known crystal structure, 1YCS (complex between p53DBD and BP2), which validates the docking protocol we adopted. Co-immunoprecipitation study using “hot-spot” p53 mutants suggested reduced G-actin association with cancer-associated p53 conformational mutants (R175H and R249S). Considering these findings, we hypothesized that point mutation in p53 structure, which diminishes p53:G-actin complexation results in mutant p53 altered subcellular localization. Our model suggests p53Arg249 form polar-contact with Arg357 of G-actin, which upon mutation, destabilizes p53:G-actin interaction and results in cytoplasmic retention of p53R249S. PMID:27601274

  17. Hydrogen sulfide induces oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in a sulfide-tolerant marine invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Predmore, Benjamin L; Stein, Jenny R; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Julian, David

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide acts as an environmental toxin across a range of concentrations and as a cellular signaling molecule at very low concentrations. Despite its toxicity, many animals, including the mudflat polychaete Glycera dibranchiata, are periodically or continuously exposed to sulfide in their environment. We tested the hypothesis that a broad range of ecologically relevant sulfide concentrations induces oxidative stress and oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in G. dibranchiata. Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (0-3 mmol L(-1) for 1 h) showed dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress (as 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence) and superoxide production (as dihydroethidine fluorescence). Coelomocytes exposed in vitro to sulfide (up to 0.73 mmol L(-1) for 2 h) also acquired increased oxidative damage to RNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) and DNA (detected as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine). Worms exposed in vivo to sulfide (0-10 mmol L(-1) for 24 h) acquired elevated oxidative damage to RNA and DNA in both coelomocytes and body wall tissue. While the consequences of RNA and DNA oxidative damage are poorly understood, oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine bases preferentially bind thymine, causing G-T transversions and potentially causing heritable point mutations. This suggests that sulfide can be an environmental mutagen in sulfide-tolerant invertebrates.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of decameric and monomeric forms of C49S mutant thioredoxin-dependent AhpC from Helicobacter pylori

    SciTech Connect

    Supangat; Seo, Kyung Hye; Furqoni, Ahmad; Kwon, Young-Chul; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kon Ho

    2008-05-01

    Decameric and monomeric forms of recombinant C49S mutant AhpC from H. pylori have been crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 and 2.25 Å, respectively. Cys49Ser mutant Helicobacter pylori alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (C49S HpAhpC) was purified under reducing conditions in monomeric and decameric forms. The monomeric form was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 245.8, b = 140.7, c = 189.5 Å, β = 127°, and contained 20 molecules in the asymmetric unit. A crystal of the decameric form was obtained by the microbatch crystallization method and diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. It belonged to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 257.5, b = 417.5, c = 95.6 Å. The structure of the monomeric form of C49S HpAhpC has been solved by the molecular-replacement method.

  19. Urea Unfolding Study of E. coli Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase and Its Monomeric Variants Proves the Role of C-Terminal Domain in Stability

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Baisakhi; Banerjee, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    E. coli alanyl-tRNA exists as a dimer in its native form and the C-terminal coiled-coil part plays an important role in the dimerization process. The truncated N-terminal containing the first 700 amino acids (1–700) forms a monomeric variant possessing similar aminoacylation activity like wild type. A point mutation in the C-terminal domain (G674D) also produces a monomeric variant with a fivefold reduced aminoacylation activity compared to the wild type enzyme. Urea induced denaturation of these monomeric mutants along with another alaRS variant (N461 alaRS) was studied together with the full-length enzyme using various spectroscopic techniques such as intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid binding, near- and far-UV circular dichroism, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Aminoacylation activity assay after refolding from denatured state revealed that the monomeric mutants studied here were unable to regain their activity, whereas the dimeric full-length alaRS gets back similar activity as the native enzyme. This study indicates that dimerization is one of the key regulatory factors that is important in the proper folding and stability of E. coli alaRS. PMID:26617997

  20. Determination of Abraham model solute descriptors for the monomeric and dimeric forms of trans-cinnamic acid using measured solubilities from the Open Notebook Science Challenge.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Jean-Claude; Abraham, Michael H; Acree, William E; Lang, Andrew Sid; Beck, Samantha N; Bulger, David A; Clark, Elizabeth A; Condron, Lacey N; Costa, Stephanie T; Curtin, Evan M; Kurtu, Sozit B; Mangir, Mark I; McBride, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Calculating Abraham descriptors from solubility values requires that the solute have the same form when dissolved in all solvents. However, carboxylic acids can form dimers when dissolved in non-polar solvents. For such compounds Abraham descriptors can be calculated for both the monomeric and dimeric forms by treating the polar and non-polar systems separately. We illustrate the method of how this can be done by calculating the Abraham descriptors for both the monomeric and dimeric forms of trans-cinnamic acid, the first time that descriptors for a carboxylic acid dimer have been obtained. Abraham descriptors were calculated for the monomeric form of trans-cinnamic acid using experimental solubility measurements in polar solvents from the Open Notebook Science Challenge together with a number of water-solvent partition coefficients from the literature. Similarly, experimental solubility measurements in non-polar solvents were used to determine Abraham descriptors for the trans-cinnamic acid dimer. Abraham descriptors were calculated for both the monomeric and dimeric forms of trans-cinnamic acid. This allows for the prediction of further solubilities of trans-cinnamic acid in both polar and non-polar solvents with an error of about 0.10 log units. Graphical abstractMolar concentration of trans-cinnamic acid in various polar and non-polar solvents.

  1. Solution structure determination of monomeric human IgA2 by X-ray and neutron scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and constrained modelling: a comparison with monomeric human IgA1.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Patricia B; Whitty, Patrick W; Robertson, Alexis; Eaton, Julian T; Almogren, Adel; Kerr, Michael A; Woof, Jenny M; Perkins, Stephen J

    2004-05-14

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the most abundant human immunoglobulin, mediates immune protection at mucosal surfaces as well as in plasma. It exists as two subclasses IgA1 and IgA2, and IgA2 is found in at least two allotypic forms, IgA2m(1) or IgA2m(2). Compared to IgA1, IgA2 has a much shorter hinge region, which joins the two Fab and one Fc fragments. In order to assess its solution structure, monomeric recombinant IgA2m(1) was studied by X-ray and neutron scattering. Its Guinier X-ray radius of gyration R(G) is 5.18 nm and its neutron R(G) is 5.03 nm, both of which are significantly smaller than those for monomeric IgA1 at 6.1-6.2 nm. The distance distribution function P(r)for IgA2m(1) showed a broad peak with a subpeak and gave a maximum dimension of 17 nm, in contrast to the P(r) curve for IgA1, which showed two distinct peaks and a maximum dimension of 21 nm. The sedimentation coefficients of IgA1 and IgA2m(1) were 6.2S and 6.4S, respectively. These data show that the solution structure of IgA2m(1) is significantly more compact than IgA1. The complete monomeric IgA2m(1) structure was modelled using molecular dynamics to generate random IgA2 hinge structures, to which homology models for the Fab and Fc fragments were connected to generate 10,000 full models. A total of 104 compact best-fit IgA2m(1) models gave good curve fits. These best-fit models were modified by linking the two Fab light chains with a disulphide bridge that is found in IgA2m(1), and subjecting these to energy refinement to optimise this linkage. The averaged solution structure of the arrangement of the Fab and Fc fragments in IgA2m(1) was found to be predominantly T-shaped and flexible, but also included Y-shaped structures. The IgA2 models show full steric access to the two FcalphaRI-binding sites at the Calpha2-Calpha3 interdomain region in the Fc fragment. Since previous scattering modelling had shown that IgA1 also possessed a flexible T-shaped solution structure, such a T-shape may be

  2. Functional Alteration of a Dimeric Insecticidal Lectin to a Monomeric Antifungal Protein Correlated to Its Oligomeric Status

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Nilanjana; Ghosh, Prithwi; Das, Kalipada; Das, Sampa

    2011-01-01

    Background Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) is a 25-kDa homodimeric, insecticidal, mannose binding lectin whose subunits are assembled by the C-terminal exchange process. An attempt was made to convert dimeric ASAL into a monomeric form to correlate the relevance of quaternary association of subunits and their functional specificity. Using SWISS-MODEL program a stable monomer was designed by altering five amino acid residues near the C-terminus of ASAL. Methodology/Principal Findings By introduction of 5 site-specific mutations (-DNSNN-), a β turn was incorporated between the 11th and 12th β strands of subunits of ASAL, resulting in a stable monomeric mutant ASAL (mASAL). mASAL was cloned and subsequently purified from a pMAL-c2X system. CD spectroscopic analysis confirmed the conservation of secondary structure in mASAL. Mannose binding assay confirmed that molecular mannose binds efficiently to both mASAL and ASAL. In contrast to ASAL, the hemagglutination activity of purified mASAL against rabbit erythrocytes was lost. An artificial diet bioassay of Lipaphis erysimi with mASAL displayed an insignificant level of insecticidal activity compared to ASAL. Fascinatingly, mASAL exhibited strong antifungal activity against the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria brassicicola in a disc diffusion assay. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of mASAL might be associated with the alteration of the membrane permeability of the fungus. Furthermore, a ligand blot assay of the membrane subproteome of R. solani with mASAL detected a glycoprotein receptor having interaction with mASAL. Conclusions/Significance Conversion of ASAL into a stable monomer resulted in antifungal activity. From an evolutionary aspect, these data implied that variable quaternary organization of lectins might be the outcome of defense-related adaptations to diverse situations in plants. Incorporation of mASAL into agronomically

  3. Zinc and mechanical prowess in the jaws of Nereis, a marine worm

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenegger, Helga C.; Schoberl, Thomas; Ruokolainen, Janne T.; Cross, Julie O.; Heald, Steve M.; Birkedal, Henrik; Waite, J. Herbert; Stucky, Galen

    2003-08-05

    Higher animals typically rely on calcification to harden certain tissues such as bones and teeth. Some notable exceptions can be found in invertebrates: The fangs, teeth, and mandibles of diverse arthropod species have been reported to contain high levels of zinc. Considerable quantities of zinc also occur in the jaws of the marine polychaete worm Nereis sp. High copper levels in the polychaete worm Glycera dibranchiata recently were attributed to a copper-based biomineral reinforcing the jaws. In the present article, we attempt to unravel the role of zinc in Nereis limbata jaws, using a combination of position-resolved state-of-the-art techniques. It is shown that the local hardness and stiffness of the jaws correlate with the local zinc concentration, pointing toward a structural role for zinc. Zinc always is detected in tight correlation with chlorine, suggesting the presence of a zinc– chlorine compound. No crystalline inorganic phase was found, however, and results from x-ray absorption spectroscopy further exclude the presence of simple inorganic zinc– chlorine compounds in amorphous form. The correlation of local histidine levels in the protein matrix and zinc concentration leads us to hypothesize a direct coordination of zinc and chlorine to the protein. A comparison of the role of the transition metals zinc and copper in the jaws of two polychaete worm species Nereis and Glycera, respectively, is presented.

  4. Zinc and mechanical prowess in the jaws of Nereis, a marine worm

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenegger, Helga C.; Schoberl, Thomas; Ruokolainen, Janne T.; Cross, Julie O.; Heald, Steve M.; Birkedal, Henrik; Waite, J. Herbert; Stucky, Galen

    2003-08-05

    Higher animals typically rely on calcification to harden certain tissues such as bones and teeth. Some notable exceptions can be found in invertebrates: The fangs, teeth, and mandibles of diverse arthropod species have been reported to contain high levels of zinc. Considerable quantities of zinc also occur in the jaws of the marine polychaete worm Nereis sp. High copper levels in the polychaete worm Glycera dibranchiata recently were attributed to a copper-based biomineral reinforcing the jaws. In the present article, we attempt to unravel the role of zinc in Nereis limbata jaws, using a combination of position-resolved state-of-the-art techniques. It is shown that the local hardness and stiffness of the jaws correlate with the local zinc concentration, pointing toward a structural role for zinc. Zinc always is detected in tight correlation with chlorine, suggesting the presence of a zinc-chlorine compound. No crystalline inorganic phase was found, however, and results from x-ray absorption spectroscopy further exclude the presence of simple inorganic zinc-chlorine compounds in amorphous form. The correlation of local histidine levels in the protein matrix and zinc concentration leads us to hypothesize a direct coordination of zinc and chlorine to the protein. A comparison of the role of the transition metals zinc and copper in the jaws of two polychaete worm species Nereis and Glycera, respectively, is presented.

  5. The solution structure of a monomeric, reduced form of human copper,zinc superoxide dismutase bearing the same charge as the native protein.

    PubMed

    Banci, L; Bertini, I; Del Conte, R; Fadin, R; Mangani, S; Viezzoli, M S

    1999-12-01

    The solution structure of a mutated (Phe50Glu, Gly51Glu, Val148Lys, Ile151Lys), reduced, monomeric form of human copper,zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD; 153 amino acids) has been determined through 2237 meaningful nuclear Overhauser enhancements, out of 2492, and 43 dihedral angle constraints. A characteristic of this mutant is that of having the same overall charge as the dimeric protein, but an activity of only 20% with respect to wild-type SOD. This protein, at variance with a previously characterized monomeric form (Phe50Glu, Gly51Glu, Glu133Gln), does not contain mutations in the active site. Therefore, its characterization allows us to understand the structural changes independently induced by the monomerization and by the active site mutation. The family of 36 conformers, which have a target function with respect to the experimental constraints lower than 1.5 A2, has RMSD values with respect to the average structure of 0.94 +/- 0.14 A2 and 1.50 +/- 0.14 A2 for the backbone and the heavy atoms, respectively. The overall folding, which includes the classical eight-stranded Greek-key beta-barrel and a short alpha-helix, is very close to that of the previously characterized monomeric mutant E133QM2SOD and to that of wild-type SOD. The region involved in the subunit-subunit interactions in the dimeric protein is confirmed to be disordered in the monomeric species. It is also observed that a sizable rearrangement of the charged groups of the electrostatic loop and of Arg143 takes place in the monomeric species. The width of the active site channel, both at its entrance and at the bottleneck of the active site, is discussed in the light of the influence on the enzymatic activity and the latter with respect to the overall charge. It is also confirmed that the NH proton of His63 shields the Cu(I) from the bulk solvent, thus supporting the suggestion that superoxide may interact with the reduced metal ion in an outer-sphere fashion.

  6. Monomeric nature of dengue virus NS3 helicase and thermodynamic analysis of the interaction with single-stranded RNA

    PubMed Central

    Gebhard, Leopoldo G.; Incicco, J. Jeremías; Smal, Clara; Gallo, Mariana; Gamarnik, Andrea V.; Kaufman, Sergio B.

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein formed by a superfamily-2 RNA helicase linked to a protease domain. In this work, we report results from in vitro experiments designed to determine the oligomeric state of dengue virus NS3 helicase (NS3h) and to characterize fundamental properties of the interaction with single-stranded (ss)RNA. Pulsed field gradient-NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the effective hydrodynamic radius of NS3h, which was constant over a wide range of protein concentrations in the absence and presence of ssRNA. Size exclusion chromatography-static light scattering experiments showed that NS3h eluted as a monomeric molecule even in the presence of ssRNA. Binding of NS3h to ssRNA was studied by quantitative fluorescence titrations using fluorescein-labeled and unlabeled ssRNA oligonucleotides of different lengths, and the effect of the fluorescein label on the interaction parameters was also analyzed. Experimental results were well described by a statistical thermodynamic model based on the theory of non-specific interactions of large ligands to a one-dimensional lattice. We found that binding of NS3h to ssRNA oligonucleotides and to poly(A) is characterized by minimum and occluded binding site sizes both of 10 nucleotides and by a weak positive cooperativity between adjacent proteins. PMID:25223789

  7. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  8. Preparation of monomeric and polymeric β-cyclodextrin functionalized monoliths for rapid isolation and purification of puerarin from Radix puerariae.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yongqin; Hughes, Timothy C; Hao, Xiaojuan; Mei, Danping; Tan, Tianwei

    2011-08-01

    Monomeric and epichlorohydrin polymerized β-CD functionalized monoliths were prepared for the rapid isolation and purification of the isoflavonoid puerarin, a well-known traditional Chinese drug, from a crude extract of Radix puerariae (root of the plant Pueraria lobata). Two copolymers poly(isocyanatoethyl methacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) (poly(IEM-co-MMA-co-EDMA)) and poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-EDMA) (poly(GMA-co-EDMA)) were developed as facile, highly reactive and versatile monolithic matrix. SEM characterization demonstrated that the modified monoliths had homogenous porous structure and morphology. The success of the chemical modification of the monolithic matrix was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), solid-state (13) C NMR and elemental analysis. It was demonstrated that polymeric β-CD modified monoliths had better separation and selectivity for puerarin, recovering puerarin with a purity of 96% (m%) and a yield of 93% (m%). Compared with poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-EDMA), poly(isocyanatoethyl methacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate-co-EDMA) monolithic matrix had higher reactivity, which significantly improved the β-CD ligand density and thus the selectivity of the monoliths. Puerarin with a purity of 96% (m%) and with a yield of 89% (m%) was recovered on the monolith.

  9. Live baculovirus acts as a strong B and T cell adjuvant for monomeric and oligomeric protein antigens.

    PubMed

    Heinimäki, Suvi; Tamminen, Kirsi; Malm, Maria; Vesikari, Timo; Blazevic, Vesna

    2017-11-01

    Recombinant proteins produced by baculovirus (BV) expression systems contain residual BV after crude purification. We studied adjuvant effect of BV on antibody and T cell responses against two model antigens, monomeric ovalbumin (OVA) protein and oligomeric norovirus (NoV) virus-like particles (VLPs). BALB/c mice were immunized intradermally with OVA alone or OVA formulated with live or inactivated BV, and VLP formulations comprised of chromatographically purified NoV GII.4 VLPs alone or mixed with BV, or of crude purified VLPs containing BV impurities from expression system. Live BV improved immunogenicity of NoV VLPs, sparing VLP dose up to 10-fold. Moreover, soluble OVA protein induced IgG2a antibodies and T cell response only when co-administered with live BV. BV adjuvant effect was completely abrogated by removal or inactivation of BV. These findings support the usage of crude purified proteins containing residual BV as vaccine antigens. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS – which was released from scaffolds quickly – significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA. PMID:28256634

  11. Solution structure of a hydrocarbon stapled peptide inhibitor in complex with monomeric C-terminal domain of HIV-1 capsid.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Shibani; Zhang, Hongtao; Debnath, Asim K; Cowburn, David

    2008-06-13

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid protein plays a critical role in virus core particle assembly and is an important target for novel therapeutic strategies. In a previous study, we characterized the binding affinity of a hydrocarbon stapled helical peptide, NYAD-1, for the capsid protein (K(d) approximately 1 mum) and demonstrated its ability to penetrate the cell membrane (Zhang, H., Zhao, Q., Bhattacharya, S., Waheed, A. A., Tong, X., Hong, A., Heck, S., Goger, M., Cowburn, D., Freed, E. O., and Debnath, A. K. (2008) J. Mol. Biol. 378, 565-580). In cell-based assays, NYAD-1 colocalized with the Gag polyprotein during traffic to the plasma membrane and disrupted the formation of mature and immature virus particles in vitro systems. Here, we complement the cellular and biochemical data with structural characterization of the interactions between the capsid and a soluble peptide analogue, NYAD-13. Solution NMR methods were used to determine a high resolution structure of the complex between the inhibitor and a monomeric form of the C-terminal domain of the capsid protein (mCA-CTD). The intermolecular interactions are mediated by the packing of hydrophobic side chains at the buried interface and unperturbed by the presence of the olefinic chain on the solvent-exposed surface of the peptide. The results of the structural analysis provide valuable insight into the determinants for high affinity and selective inhibitors for HIV-1 particle assembly.

  12. Outer membrane protein A of E. coli folds into detergent micelles, but not in the presence of monomeric detergent.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschmidt, J. H.; Wiener, M. C.; Tamm, L. K.

    1999-01-01

    Outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of Escherichia coli is a beta-barrel membrane protein that unfolds in 8 M urea to a random coil. OmpA refolds upon urea dilution in the presence of certain detergents or lipids. To examine the minimal requirements for secondary and tertiary structure formation in beta-barrel membrane proteins, folding of OmpA was studied as a function of the hydrophobic chain length, the chemical structure of the polar headgroup, and the concentration of a large array of amphiphiles. OmpA folded in the presence of detergents only above a critical minimal chain length of the apolar chain as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy and a SDS-PAGE assay that measures tertiary structure formation. Details of the chemical structure of the polar headgroup were unimportant for folding. The minimal chain length required for folding correlated with the critical micelle concentration in each detergent series. Therefore, OmpA requires preformed detergent micelles for folding and does not adsorb monomeric detergent to its perimeter after folding. Formation of secondary and tertiary structure is thermodynamically coupled and strictly dependent on the interaction with aggregated amphiphiles. PMID:10548052

  13. The full-length cell-cell fusogen EFF-1 is monomeric and upright on the membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Vasishtan, Daven; Siebert, C. Alistair; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-05-01

    Fusogens are membrane proteins that remodel lipid bilayers to facilitate membrane merging. Although several fusogen ectodomain structures have been solved, structural information on full-length, natively membrane-anchored fusogens is scarce. Here we present the electron cryo microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction of the Caenorhabditis elegans epithelial fusion failure 1 (EFF-1) protein natively anchored in cell-derived membrane vesicles. This reveals a membrane protruding, asymmetric, elongated monomer. Flexible fitting of a protomer of the EFF-1 crystal structure, which is homologous to viral class-II fusion proteins, shows that EFF-1 has a hairpin monomeric conformation before fusion. These structural insights, when combined with our observations of membrane-merging intermediates between vesicles, enable us to propose a model for EFF-1 mediated fusion. This process, involving identical proteins on both membranes to be fused, follows a mechanism that shares features of SNARE-mediated fusion while using the structural building blocks of the unilaterally acting class-II viral fusion proteins.

  14. Engineering of a monomeric and low-glycosylated form of human butyrylcholinesterase: expression, purification, characterization and crystallization.

    PubMed

    Nachon, Florian; Nicolet, Yvain; Viguié, Nathalie; Masson, Patrick; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C; Lockridge, Oksana

    2002-01-01

    Human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; EC 3.1.1.8) is of particular interest because it hydrolyzes or scavenges a wide range of toxic compounds including cocaine, organophosphorus pesticides and nerve agents. The relative contribution of each N-linked glycan for the solubility, the stability and the secretion of the enzyme was investigated. A recombinant monomeric BChE lacking four out of nine N-glycosylation sites and the C-terminal oligomerization domain was stably expressed as a monomer in CHO cells. The purified recombinant BChE showed catalytic properties similar to those of the native enzyme. Tetragonal crystals suitable for X-ray crystallography studies were obtained; they were improved by recrystallization and found to diffract to 2.0 A resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals belong to the tetragonal space group I422 with unit cell dimensions a = b = 154.7 A, c = 124.9 A, giving a Vm of 2.73 A3 per Da (estimated 60% solvent) for a single molecule of recombinant BChE in the asymmetric unit. The crystal structure of butyrylcholinesterase will help elucidate unsolved issues concerning cholinesterase mechanisms in general.

  15. Age-dependent preferential dense-core vesicle exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells revealed by newly developed monomeric fluorescent timer protein.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Karasawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Although it is evident that only a few secretory vesicles accumulating in neuroendocrine cells are qualified to fuse with the plasma membrane and release their contents to the extracellular space, the molecular mechanisms that regulate their exocytosis are poorly understood. For example, it has been controversial whether secretory vesicles are exocytosed randomly or preferentially according to their age. Using a newly developed protein-based fluorescent timer, monomeric Kusabira Green Orange (mK-GO), which changes color with a predictable time course, here we show that small GTPase Rab27A effectors regulate age-dependent exocytosis of secretory vesicles in PC12 cells. When the vesicles were labeled with mK-GO-tagged neuropeptide Y or tissue-type plasminogen activator, punctate structures with green or red fluorescence were observed. Application of high [K(+)] stimulation induced exocytosis of new (green) fluorescent secretory vesicles but not of old (red) vesicles. Overexpression or depletion of rabphilin and synaptotagmin-like protein4-a (Slp4-a), which regulate exocytosis positively and negatively, respectively, disturbed the age-dependent exocytosis of the secretory vesicles in different manners. Our results suggest that coordinate functions of the two effectors of Rab27A, rabphilin and Slp4-a, are required for regulated secretory pathway.

  16. Local and global structure of the monomeric subunit of the potassium channel KcsA probed by NMR.

    PubMed

    Chill, Jordan H; Louis, John M; Delaglio, Frank; Bax, Ad

    2007-12-01

    KcsA is a homotetrameric 68-kDa membrane-associated potassium channel which selectively gates the flux of potassium ions across the membrane. The channel is known to undergo a pH-dependent open-to-closed transition. Here we describe an NMR study of the monomeric subunit of the channel (KcsAM), solubilized in SDS micelles. Chemical shift, solvent exchange, backbone 15N relaxation and residual dipolar coupling (RDC) data show the TM1 helix to remain intact, but the TM2 helix contains a distinct kink, which is subject to concentration-independent but pH-dependent conformational exchange on a microsecond time scale. The kink region, centered at G99, was previously implicated in the gating of the tetrameric KcsA channel. An RDC-based model of KcsAM at acidic pH orients TM1 and the two helical segments of the kinked TM2 in a configuration reminiscent of the open conformation of the channel. Thus, the transition between states appears to be an inherent capability of the monomer, with the tetrameric assembly exerting a modulatory effect upon the transition which gives the channel its physiological gating profile.

  17. Interaction of wheat monomeric and dimeric protein inhibitors with alpha-amylase from yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor L. larva).

    PubMed

    Buonocore, V; Gramenzi, F; Pace, W; Petrucci, T; Poerio, E; Silano, V

    1980-06-01

    The highly purified alpha-amylase from Tenebrio molitor L. larva (yellow mealworm) reversibly combines with two closely related homogeneous glycoprotein inhibitors, one dimeric (termed 'inhibitor 0.19') and one monomeric (termed 'inhibitor 0.28'), from wheat flour. As established by means of difference spectroscopy and kinetic studies, molar combining ratios for the amylase--inhibitor-0.19 and amylase-inhibitor-0.28 complexes were 1:1 and 1:2 respectively. Two amylase--inhibitor-0.19 complexes with slightly different retention volumes on Bio-Gel P-300 and only one amylase--inhibitor-0.28 complex were observed. Dissociation constants of the amylase--inhibitor-0.19 and amylase--inhibitor-0.28 complexes were 0.85 nM and 0.13 nM respectively. A strong tendency of both complexes to precipitate under an ultracentrifugal field was observed; the minimum molecular weight calculated for the two complexes under such conditions was approx. 95 000. The two complexes showed difference spectra indicating involvement of structurally related or identical tryptophyl side chains in the binding of inhibitors 0.28 and 0.19 to the amylase. A model summarizing the main features of the inhibition of the insect amylase by the two wheat protein inhibitors is proposed.

  18. Rational design of a monomeric and photostable far-red fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Gustafson, William Clay; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Signor, Luca; Marzocca, Fanny; Borel, Franck; Klassen, Matthew P; Makhijani, Kalpana; Royant, Antoine; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Weiss, William A; Guo, Su; Shu, Xiaokun

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for cell and molecular biology. Here based on structural analysis, a blue-shifted mutant of a recently engineered monomeric infrared fluorescent protein (mIFP) has been rationally designed. This variant, named iBlueberry, bears a single mutation that shifts both excitation and emission spectra by approximately 40 nm. Furthermore, iBlueberry is four times more photostable than mIFP, rendering it more advantageous for imaging protein dynamics. By tagging iBlueberry to centrin, it has been demonstrated that the fusion protein labels the centrosome in the developing zebrafish embryo. Together with GFP-labeled nucleus and tdTomato-labeled plasma membrane, time-lapse imaging to visualize the dynamics of centrosomes in radial glia neural progenitors in the intact zebrafish brain has been demonstrated. It is further shown that iBlueberry can be used together with mIFP in two-color protein labeling in living cells and in two-color tumor labeling in mice.

  19. DNA-directed oligomerization of the monomeric Ner repressor from the Mu-like bacteriophage D108.

    PubMed

    Kukolj, G; Tolias, P P; Autexier, C; DuBow, M S

    1989-10-01

    We have purified the 8.6 kd ner gene product (a lambda Cro-like protein which negatively regulates transcription from two divergent and overlapping promoters) from the Mu-like transposable bacteriophage D108. Chemical and enzymatic protection experiments show the D108 ner-operator to contain two perfect 11 bp (5'-CCG-TGAGCTAC-3') inverted repeats separated by an 8 bp AT-rich region. Ner makes base-specific contacts in the major groove spanning the 11 bp repeats and also interacts with regions flanking these sites such that its operator comprises five turns of the DNA helix. Furthermore, gel filtration chromatography and dimethyl suberimidate crosslinking experiments indicate that D108 Ner (at concentrations exceeding 5 microM) is a monomer in solution, yet crosslinks as a dimer when bound to its operator site. As a small (73 amino acids) monomeric protein, Ner does not display strong homology with any known DNA-binding proteins. By virtue of the interactions with its operator it appears to bind DNA in a markedly different manner from other known prokaryotic repressors thus adding to the growing catalog of protein motifs used for specific binding to DNA.

  20. Gas-phase synthesis and structure of monomeric ZnOH: a model species for metalloenzymes and catalytic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zack, Lindsay N; Sun, Ming; Bucchino, Matthew P; Clouthier, Dennis J; Ziurys, Lucy M

    2012-02-16

    Monomeric ZnOH has been studied for the first time using millimeter and microwave gas-phase spectroscopy. ZnOH is important in surface processes and at the active site of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase. In the millimeter-wave direct-absorption experiments, ZnOH was synthesized by reacting zinc vapor, produced in a Broida-type oven, with water. In the Fourier-transform microwave measurements, ZnOH was produced in a supersonic jet expansion of CH(3)OH and zinc vapor, created by laser ablation. Multiple rotational transitions of six ZnOH isotopologues in their X(2)A' ground states were measured over the frequency range of 22-482 GHz, and splittings due to fine and hyperfine structure were resolved. An asymmetric top pattern was observed in the spectra, showing that ZnOH is bent, indicative of covalent bonding. From these data, spectroscopic constants and an accurate structure were determined. The Zn-O bond length was found to be similar to that in carbonic anhydrase and other model enzyme systems.

  1. Age-dependent Preferential Dense-Core Vesicle Exocytosis in Neuroendocrine Cells Revealed by Newly Developed Monomeric Fluorescent Timer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Karasawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2010-01-01

    Although it is evident that only a few secretory vesicles accumulating in neuroendocrine cells are qualified to fuse with the plasma membrane and release their contents to the extracellular space, the molecular mechanisms that regulate their exocytosis are poorly understood. For example, it has been controversial whether secretory vesicles are exocytosed randomly or preferentially according to their age. Using a newly developed protein-based fluorescent timer, monomeric Kusabira Green Orange (mK-GO), which changes color with a predictable time course, here we show that small GTPase Rab27A effectors regulate age-dependent exocytosis of secretory vesicles in PC12 cells. When the vesicles were labeled with mK-GO–tagged neuropeptide Y or tissue-type plasminogen activator, punctate structures with green or red fluorescence were observed. Application of high [K+] stimulation induced exocytosis of new (green) fluorescent secretory vesicles but not of old (red) vesicles. Overexpression or depletion of rabphilin and synaptotagmin-like protein4-a (Slp4-a), which regulate exocytosis positively and negatively, respectively, disturbed the age-dependent exocytosis of the secretory vesicles in different manners. Our results suggest that coordinate functions of the two effectors of Rab27A, rabphilin and Slp4-a, are required for regulated secretory pathway. PMID:19889833

  2. A comparative experimental and quantum chemical study on monomeric and dimeric structures of 3,5-dibromoanthranilic acid.

    PubMed

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Cinar, Mehmet

    2012-10-01

    This study presents the structural and spectroscopic characterization of 3,5-dibromoanthranilic acid with help of experimental techniques (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV, NMR) and quantum chemical calculations. The vibrational spectra of title compound were recorded in solid state with FT-IR and FT-Raman in the range of 4000-400 and 4000-50 cm(-1), respectively. The vibrational frequencies were also computed using B3LYP method of DFT with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The fundamental assignments were done on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanical (SQM) method. The (1)H, (13)C and DEPT NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO solution and calculated by gauge-invariant atomic orbitals (GIAO) method. The UV absorption spectra of the compound were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm in ethanol, water and DMSO solutions. Solvent effects were calculated using time-dependent density functional theory and CIS method. The ground state geometrical structure of compound was predicted by B3LYP method and compared with the crystallographic structure of similar compounds. All calculations were made for monomeric and dimeric structure of compound. Moreover, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) and thermodynamic properties were performed. Mulliken atomic charges of neutral and anionic form of the molecule were computed and compared with anthranilic acid.

  3. A monomeric membrane peptide that lives in three worlds: in solution, attached to, and inserted across lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Reshetnyak, Yana K; Segala, Michael; Andreev, Oleg A; Engelman, Donald M

    2007-10-01

    The membrane peptide pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP) lives in three worlds, being soluble in aqueous solution at pH 7.4, binding to the surface of lipid bilayers, and inserting as a transbilayer helix at low pH. With low pH driving the process, pHLIP can translocate cargo molecules attached to its C-terminus via a disulfide and release them in the cytoplasm of a cell. Here we examine a key aspect of the mechanism, showing that pHLIP is monomeric in each of its three major states: soluble in water near neutral pH (state I), bound to the surface of a membrane near neutral pH (state II), and inserted across the membrane as an alpha-helix at low pH (state III). The peptide does not induce fusion or membrane leakage. The unique properties of pHLIP made it attractive for the biophysical investigation of membrane protein folding in vitro and for the development of a novel class of delivery peptides for the transport of therapeutic and diagnostic agents to acidic tissue sites associated with various pathological processes in vivo.

  4. A Monomeric Membrane Peptide that Lives in Three Worlds: In Solution, Attached to, and Inserted across Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Segala, Michael; Andreev, Oleg A.; Engelman, Donald M.

    2007-01-01

    The membrane peptide pH (low) insertion peptide (pHLIP) lives in three worlds, being soluble in aqueous solution at pH 7.4, binding to the surface of lipid bilayers, and inserting as a transbilayer helix at low pH. With low pH driving the process, pHLIP can translocate cargo molecules attached to its C-terminus via a disulfide and release them in the cytoplasm of a cell. Here we examine a key aspect of the mechanism, showing that pHLIP is monomeric in each of its three major states: soluble in water near neutral pH (state I), bound to the surface of a membrane near neutral pH (state II), and inserted across the membrane as an α-helix at low pH (state III). The peptide does not induce fusion or membrane leakage. The unique properties of pHLIP made it attractive for the biophysical investigation of membrane protein folding in vitro and for the development of a novel class of delivery peptides for the transport of therapeutic and diagnostic agents to acidic tissue sites associated with various pathological processes in vivo. PMID:17557792

  5. Relationship between population of the fibril-prone conformation in the monomeric state and oligomer formation times of peptides: insights from all-atom simulations.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hoang Bao; Kouza, Maksim; Zung, Hoang; Li, Mai Suan

    2010-04-28

    Despite much progress in understanding the aggregation process of biomolecules, the factors that govern its rates have not been fully understood. This problem is of particular importance since many conformational diseases such as Alzheimer, Parkinson, and type-II diabetes are associated with the protein oligomerization. Having performed all-atom simulations with explicit water and various force fields for two short peptides KFFE and NNQQ, we show that their oligomer formation times are strongly correlated with the population of the fibril-prone conformation in the monomeric state. The larger the population the faster the aggregation process. Our result not only suggests that this quantity plays a key role in the self-assembly of polypeptide chains but also opens a new way to understand the fibrillogenesis of biomolecules at the monomeric level. The nature of oligomer ordering of NNQQ is studied in detail.

  6. [Hemoglobins, XXXVII. The primary structure of a monomeric insect hemoglobin (Erythrocruorin), component CTT IIIa of Chironomus thummi thummi. An anomalous Heme complex: E7 Gln, E11 Ile].

    PubMed

    Steer, W; Braunitzer, G

    1981-01-01

    The primary structure of the monomeric hemoglobin CTT IIIa of the midge larva of Chironomus thummi thummi is presented. Cyanogenbromide peptides and tryptic peptides were used for sequence analysis. The primary structure was established with a small number of large peptides. The complete sequencing of the cyanogen bromide peptides was enabled by the C-terminal fixation of arginine. The primary structure of CTT IIIa is compared to the beta-chains of human and to the monomeric component CTT III: CTT IIIa possesses a "tail" of 9 amino acids on the N-terminus, and shows only a small number of identical residues compared to the number that other CTT hemoglobins share with each other. Also the heme complex is unusual: E7 Gln and E11 Ile.

  7. Analysis of by-product formation and sugar monomerization in sugarcane bagasse pretreated at pilot plant scale: differences between autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment.

    PubMed

    van der Pol, Edwin; Bakker, Rob; van Zeeland, Alniek; Sanchez Garcia, David; Punt, Arjen; Eggink, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is an interesting feedstock for the biobased economy since a large fraction is polymerized sugars. Autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment conditions combined with enzyme hydrolysis were used on lignocellulose rich bagasse to acquire monomeric. By-products found after pretreatment included acetic, glycolic and coumaric acid in concentrations up to 40, 21 and 2.5 g/kg dry weight bagasse respectively. Alkaline pretreated material contained up to 45 g/kg bagasse DW of sodium. Acid and autohydrolysis pretreatment results in a furan formation of 14 g/kg and 25 g/kg DW bagasse respectively. Enzyme monomerization efficiencies of pretreated solid material after 72 h were 81% for acid pretreatment, 77% for autohydrolysis and 57% for alkaline pretreatment. Solid material was washed with superheated water to decrease the amount of by-products. Washing decreased organic acid, phenol and furan concentrations in solid material by at least 60%, without a major sugar loss.

  8. Monomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein exert opposite effects on the catalytic cycle that promotes the proliferation of Aβ42 aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Sean; Habchi, Johnny; Lattanzi, Veronica; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2017-01-01

    The coaggregation of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) and α-synuclein is commonly observed in a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The complex interplay between Aβ and α-synuclein has led to seemingly contradictory results on whether α-synuclein promotes or inhibits Aβ aggregation. Here, we show how these conflicts can be rationalized and resolved by demonstrating that different structural forms of α-synuclein exert different effects on Aβ aggregation. Our results demonstrate that whereas monomeric α-synuclein blocks the autocatalytic proliferation of Aβ42 (the 42-residue form of Aβ) fibrils, fibrillar α-synuclein catalyses the heterogeneous nucleation of Aβ42 aggregates. It is thus the specific balance between the concentrations of monomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein that determines the outcome of the Aβ42 aggregation reaction. PMID:28698377

  9. Neutralizing Antibodies from the Sera of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Individuals Bind to Monomeric gp120 and Oligomeric gp140

    PubMed Central

    Stamatos, Nicholas M.; Mascola, John R.; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S.; Louder, Mark K.; Frampton, Lynn M.; Birx, Deborah L.; VanCott, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    Antibodies that neutralize primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) appear during HIV-1 infection but are difficult to elicit by immunization with current vaccine products comprised of monomeric forms of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120. The limited neutralizing antibody response generated by gp120 vaccine products could be due to the absence or inaccessibility of the relevant epitopes. To determine whether neutralizing antibodies from HIV-1-infected patients bind to epitopes accessible on monomeric gp120 and/or oligomeric gp140 (ogp140), purified total immunoglobulin from the sera of two HIV-1-infected patients as well as pooled HIV immune globulin were selectively depleted of antibodies which bound to immobilized gp120 or ogp140. After passage of each immunoglobulin preparation through the respective columns, antibody titers against gp120 and ogp140 were specifically reduced at least 128-fold. The gp120- and gp140-depleted antibody fraction from each serum displayed reduced neutralization activity against three primary and two T-cell line-adapted (TCLA) HIV-1 isolates. Significant residual neutralizing activity, however, persisted in the depleted sera, indicating additional neutralizing antibody specificities. gp120- and ogp140-specific antibodies eluted from each column neutralized both primary and TCLA viruses. These data demonstrate the presence and accessibility of epitopes on both monomeric gp120 and ogp140 that are specific for antibodies that are capable of neutralizing primary isolates of HIV-1. Thus, the difficulties associated with eliciting neutralizing antibodies by using current monomeric gp120 subunit vaccines may be related less to improper protein structure and more to ineffective immunogen formulation and/or presentation. PMID:9811699

  10. Monomerization of the viral entry inhibitor griffithsin yields insights into the relationship between multivalent binding to high mannose oligosaccharides and antiviral activity

    PubMed Central

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R.; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B.; Dauter, Zbigniew; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer. PMID:20826337

  11. Controls on inorganic monomeric aluminum release from soils after a clearcut in southeastern New York State, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, M. R.; Murdoch, P. S.; Burns, D. A.; Lawrence, G. B.

    2004-12-01

    A 24 ha catchment in the Catskill Mountains of southeastern New York was clearcut during the winter of 1996-97. Soil water from the O-, upper B-, and lower B horizons was examined for interactions between inorganic monomeric aluminum (Alim) and nitrate (NO3-), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), pH, and base cations to discern how Alim was released from soils to stream water after the disturbance. Alim at concentrations greater than 2 μ moles l-1 can be toxic to some fish species and can inhibit the uptake of calcium by tree roots thereby decreasing tree tolerance to stress. Alim was strongly correlated with NO3- in upper and lower B-horizon soil water (r2 = 0.67 and 0.68 respectively), but the relation was much weaker in O-horizon soil water (r2 = 0.40). O-horizon soil water had the lowest pH values despite having lower NO3- concentrations than were measured in the B-horizon; high DOC concentrations in O-horizon soil water suggest that the acidity was partly due to organic acids. The O-horizon also had higher exchangeable base cations than the B-horizon that buffered the inorganic acidity produced by NO3- after the clearcut. The high organic content of the O-horizon also allowed for organic complexation of Al as indicated by the strong correlation between DOC and organic monomeric Al (r2 = 0.67). Alim concentrations were much higher and DOC concentrations were much lower in B-horizon soil water than in the O-horizon and in the B-horizon the high Alim concentrations persisted for a year longer after the clearcut. Alim concentrations in groundwater seeps were consistently low because mineral dissolution of base cations provided a high buffering capacity; as a result water with high NO3- concentration was buffered by base cations rather than by Alim. In contrast, B-horizon soil water, which had low buffering capacity and low DOC concentration, contributed large amounts of Alim to stream water, especially at NO3- concentrations above 100 μ moles l-1, an apparent

  12. Occurrence and speciation of polymeric chromium(III), monomeric chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ligang; Cai, Yong; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-08-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in aqueous solution for a relative long period of time. However, the occurrence of polymeric Cr(III) has not been reported in environmental media due partially to the lack of method for speciating polymeric Cr. We observed an unknown Cr species during the course of study on speciation of Cr in the leachates of chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. Efforts were made to identify structure of the unknown Cr species. Considering the forms of Cr existed in the CCA-treated woods, we mainly focused our efforts to determine if the unknown species were polymeric Cr(III), complex of Cr/As or complex of Cr with dissolved organic matter (DOM). In order to evaluate whether polymeric Cr(III) largely exist in wood leachates, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS was used) for simultaneous speciation of monomeric Cr(III), polymeric Cr(III), and Cr(VI). In addition to wood leachates where polymeric Cr (III) ranged from 39.1 to 67.4%, occurrence of the unknown Cr species in other environmental matrices, including surface waters, tap and waste waters, was also investigated. It was found that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in environmental samples containing μg/L level of Cr, at a level up to 60% of total Cr, suggesting that polymeric Cr(III) could significantly exist in natural environments. Failure in quantifying polymeric Cr(III) would lead to the underestimation of total Cr and bias in Cr speciation. The environmental implication of the presence of polymeric Cr(III) species in the environment deserves further study.

  13. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes bearing 'terminal monomeric unit' for the fabrication of epinephrine imprinted polymer-based electrochemical sensor.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bhim Bali; Prasad, Amrita; Tiwari, Mahavir Prasad; Madhuri, Rashmi

    2013-07-15

    Carbon-nanotubes play a pivotal role in molecularly imprinted polymer technology for inculcating conducting property, high surface to volume ratio, and maximum porosity in the film texture. Contrary to the non-covalent heterogeneous dispersion of pure (unmodified) multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the imprinted polymer film, the homogeneous distribution of their functionalized derivative was found more effective to augment the sensitivity of the measurement. This could be made feasible using multiwalled carbon nanotubes bearing terminal monomeric unit (termed as "CNT-mer") for the polymerization (one CNT-mer in each repeating unit). In this work, the CNT-mer entails a N-hydroxyphenyl maleimide functionality to be utilized in the chain propagation with simultaneous imprinting of epinephrine in the polymeric network. This system, when casted on the tip of a pencil graphite electrode, responded a highly sensitive and selective response for epinephrine, prevalent in aqueous and real samples at ultratrace level (linear range 0.09-5.90 ng mL(-1), limit of detection 0.02 ng mL(-1), S/N=3), without any cross-reactivity and matrix effects. The proposed sensor is advantageous in obtaining enhanced differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetric current vis-a-vis the corresponding imprinted sensor modified with randomly dispersed flocculated multiwalled carbon nanotubes bundles. While the latter might restrict the interlayer diffusion of analyte in the film, the former sensor facilitated high diffusivity with the channelized electron transport to respond higher current. The CNT-mer dispersed sensor was found to be stable and rugged against mechanical stress and can be used, after regeneration, for more than hundred consecutive experiments in clinical settings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Human monomeric antibody fragments to TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 that display potent in vitro agonism

    PubMed Central

    Main, Sarah; Newton, Philip; Chodorge, Matthieu; Cadwallader, Karen; Humphreys, Robin; Albert, Vivian; Vaughan, Tristan J; Minter, Ralph R; Edwards, Bryan M

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis through the TRAIL receptor pathway can be induced via agonistic IgG to either TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2. Here we describe the use of phage display to isolate a substantive panel of fully human anti-TRAIL receptor single chain Fv fragments (scFvs); 234 and 269 different scFvs specific for TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2 respectively. In addition, 134 different scFvs that were cross-reactive for both receptors were isolated. To facilitate screening of all 637 scFvs for potential agonistic activity in vitro, a novel high-throughput surrogate apoptosis assay was developed. Ten TRAIL-R1 specific scFv and 6 TRAIL-R2 specific scFv were shown to inhibit growth of tumor cells in vitro in the absence of any cross-linking agents. These scFv were all highly specific for either TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2, potently inhibited tumor cell proliferation, and were antagonists of TRAIL binding. Moreover, further characterization of TRAIL-R1 agonistic scFv demonstrated significant anti-tumor activity when expressed and purified as a monomeric Fab fragment. Thus, scFv and Fab fragments, in addition to whole IgG, can be agonistic and induce tumor cell death through specific binding to either TRAIL-R1 or TRAIL-R2. These potent agonistic scFv were all isolated directly from the starting phage antibody library and demonstrated significant tumor cell killing properties without any requirement for affinity maturation. Some of these selected scFv have been converted to IgG format and are being studied extensively in clinical trials to investigate their potential utility as human monoclonal antibody therapeutics for the treatment of human cancer. PMID:20068388

  15. Monomeric Ti(iv)-based complexes incorporating luminescent nitrogen ligands: synthesis, structural characterization, emission spectroscopy and cytotoxic activities.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Georges; Orvain, Christophe; Fang, Lu; Barloy, Laurent; Chaumont, Alain; Gaiddon, Christian; Henry, Marc; Kyritsakas, Nathalie; Mobian, Pierre

    2016-11-29

    This manuscript describes the synthesis of a series of neutral titanium(iv) monomeric complexes constructed around a TiO4N2 core. The two nitrogen atoms that compose the coordination sphere of the metallic center belong to 2,2'-bipyrimidine ligands homo-disubstituted in the 4 and 4' positions by methyl (2a), phenylvinyl (2b), naphthylvinyl (2c) or anthrylvinyl (2d) groups. The crystal structures of these complexes named [Ti(1)2(2a)], [Ti(1)2(2b)], [Ti(1)2(2c)] and [Ti(1)2(2d)] (where 1 is a 2,2'-biphenolato ligand substituted in the 6 and 6' positions by phenyl groups) are reported. The hydrolytic stability of the four complexes is evaluated by monitoring the evolution of the free 2a-d signals by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. For the conditions tested (6 mM, DMSO-d6/D2O: 8/1), a rather good stability with t1/2 ranging from 180 to 300 min is determined for the complexes. In the presence of an acid (DCl), the hydrolysis of [Ti(1)2(2a)] is faster than without an acid. The cytotoxic activity against gastric cancer cells of the titanium-based compounds and the free disubstituted 2,2'-bipyrimidine ligands is tested, showing IC50 ranging from 6.2 ± 1.2 μM to 274 ± 56 μM. The fluorescence studies of the ligands 2a-d, and the complexes [Ti(1)2(2a-d)] reveal an important fluorescence loss of the ligands 2c and 2d upon coordination with the Ti(1)2 fragment. Frontier orbitals obtained by DFT calculations permit us to explain this fluorescence quenching.

  16. Aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of a beta-clam protein proceeds through a monomeric nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2005-05-17

    Mechanistic understanding of protein aggregation, leading either to structured amyloid fibrils or to amorphous inclusion body-like deposits, should facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic intervention strategies for the devastating amyloid-based diseases. Here we focus on the in vitro aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of the beta-clam protein, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I (P39A CRABP I), which forms inclusion bodies when expressed in Escherichia coli. Aggregation was monitored by observing the fluorescence of a fluorescein-based biarsenical dye (FlAsH) that ligates to a tetra-Cys motif, here incorporated into a flexible Omega-loop. The fluorescence signal of FlAsH on the tetra-Cys-containing P39A CRABP I is sensitive to whether this protein is native or unfolded, and was used in combination with other techniques to follow aggregate formation. The aggregation time course is compatible with a nucleation-dependent polymerization model, and detailed kinetic analysis showed that the energetically unfavorable nucleus is monomeric. A similar conclusion was reached previously for poly(Gln) species [Chen, S., Ferrone, F. A., and Wetzel, R. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 11884-11889] and points to an unfavorable equilibrium between the misfolded intermediate and the bulk pool of monomers as causative in aggregation. The P39A mutation, which removes a helix-stop signal, may slow closure of the beta-barrel in P39A CRABP I relative to the wild type, leaving it vulnerable to aggregation. Wide-angle X-ray scattering showed that the amorphous aggregates formed by the aggregation-prone intermediates of P39A CRABP I contain predominantly beta-strands structured in a lamellar fashion with 10.03 A spacing between adjacent beta-sheets.

  17. Retinoids Stimulate Periosteal Bone Resorption by Enhancing the Protein RANKL, a Response Inhibited by Monomeric Glucocorticoid Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Conaway, H. Herschel; Pirhayati, Amir; Persson, Emma; Pettersson, Ulrika; Svensson, Olle; Lindholm, Catharina; Henning, Petra; Tuckermann, Jan; Lerner, Ulf H.

    2011-01-01

    Increased vitamin A (retinol) intake has been suggested to increase bone fragility. In the present study, we investigated effects of retinoids on bone resorption in cultured neonatal mouse calvarial bones and their interaction with glucocorticoids (GC). All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), retinol, retinalaldehyde, and 9-cis-retinoic acid stimulated release of 45Ca from calvarial bones. The resorptive effect of ATRA was characterized by mRNA expression of genes associated with osteoclast differentiation, enhanced osteoclast number, and bone matrix degradation. In addition, the RANKL/OPG ratio was increased by ATRA, release of 45Ca stimulated by ATRA was blocked by exogenous OPG, and mRNA expression of genes associated with bone formation was decreased by ATRA. All retinoid acid receptors (RARα/β/γ) were expressed in calvarial bones. Agonists with affinity to all receptor subtypes or specifically to RARα enhanced the release of 45Ca and mRNA expression of Rankl, whereas agonists with affinity to RARβ/γ or RARγ had no effects. Stimulation of Rankl mRNA by ATRA was competitively inhibited by the RARα antagonist GR110. Exposure of calvarial bones to GC inhibited the stimulatory effects of ATRA on 45Ca release and Rankl mRNA and protein expression. This inhibitory effect was reversed by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist RU 486. Increased Rankl mRNA stimulated by ATRA was also blocked by GC in calvarial bones from mice with a GR mutation that blocks dimerization (GRdim mice). The data suggest that ATRA enhances periosteal bone resorption by increasing the RANKL/OPG ratio via RARα receptors, a response that can be inhibited by monomeric GR. PMID:21715325

  18. Stability, structural and functional properties of a monomeric, calcium–loaded adenylate cyclase toxin, CyaA, from Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Cannella, Sara E.; Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Davi, Marilyne; Malosse, Christian; Sotomayor Pérez, Ana Cristina; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin, CyaA, which invades eukaryotic cells and alters their physiology by cAMP overproduction. Calcium is an essential cofactor of CyaA, as it is the case for most members of the Repeat-in-ToXins (RTX) family. We show that the calcium-bound, monomeric form of CyaA, hCyaAm, conserves its permeabilization and haemolytic activities, even in a fully calcium-free environment. In contrast, hCyaAm requires sub-millimolar calcium in solution for cell invasion, indicating that free calcium in solution is involved in the CyaA toxin translocation process. We further report the first in solution structural characterization of hCyaAm, as deduced from SAXS, mass spectrometry and hydrodynamic studies. We show that hCyaAm adopts a compact and stable state that can transiently conserve its conformation even in a fully calcium-free environment. Our results therefore suggest that in hCyaAm, the C-terminal RTX-domain is stabilized in a high-affinity calcium-binding state by the N-terminal domains while, conversely, calcium binding to the C-terminal RTX-domain strongly stabilizes the N-terminal regions. Hence, the different regions of hCyaAm appear tightly connected, leading to stabilization effects between domains. The hysteretic behaviour of CyaA in response to calcium is likely shared by other RTX cytolysins. PMID:28186111

  19. Quantification and Statistical Modeling—Part I: Breathing-Zone Concentrations of Monomeric and Polymeric 1,6-Hexamethylene Diisocyanate

    PubMed Central

    Fent, Kenneth W.; Gaines, Linda G. Trelles; Thomasen, Jennifer M.; Flack, Sheila L.; Ding, Kai; Herring, Amy H.; Whittaker, Stephen G.; Nylander-French, Leena A.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a repeated exposure-assessment survey for task-based breathing-zone concentrations (BZCs) of monomeric and polymeric 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) during spray painting on 47 automotive spray painters from North Carolina and Washington State. We report here the use of linear mixed modeling to identify the primary determinants of the measured BZCs. Both one-stage (N = 98 paint tasks) and two-stage (N = 198 paint tasks) filter sampling was used to measure concentrations of HDI, uretidone, biuret, and isocyanurate. The geometric mean (GM) level of isocyanurate (1410 μg m−3) was higher than all other analytes (i.e. GM < 7.85 μg m−3). The mixed models were unique to each analyte and included factors such as analyte-specific paint concentration, airflow in the paint booth, and sampler type. The effect of sampler type was corroborated by side-by-side one- and two-stage personal air sampling (N = 16 paint tasks). According to paired t-tests, significantly higher concentrations of HDI (P = 0.0363) and isocyanurate (P = 0.0035) were measured using one-stage samplers. Marginal R2 statistics were calculated for each model; significant fixed effects were able to describe 25, 52, 54, and 20% of the variability in BZCs of HDI, uretidone, biuret, and isocyanurate, respectively. Mixed models developed in this study characterize the processes governing individual polyisocyanate BZCs. In addition, the mixed models identify ways to reduce polyisocyanate BZCs and, hence, protect painters from potential adverse health effects. PMID:19622637

  20. Emergence of Alternative Structures in Amyloid Beta 1-42 Monomeric Landscape by N-terminal Hexapeptide Amyloid Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Srirupa; Das, Payel

    2017-08-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by deposition of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides into senile plaques in the brain. While most familial mutations are associated with early-onset AD, recent studies report the AD-protective nature of two genetic human Aβ variants, i.e. A2T and A2V, in the heterozygous state. The mixture of A2V Aβ1-6 (Aβ6) hexapeptide and WT Aβ1-42 (Αβ42) is also found neuroprotective. Motivated by these findings, in this study we investigate the effects of WT, A2V, and A2T Aβ6 hexapeptide binding on the monomeric WT Aβ42 landscape. For this purpose, we have performed extensive atomistic Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics simulations, elucidating preferential binding of Aβ42 with the A2V and A2T hexapeptides compared to WT Aβ6. A notable reorganization of the Aβ42 landscape is revealed due to hexapeptide association, as manifested by lowering of transient interactions between the central and C-terminal hydrophobic patches. Concurrently, Aβ6-bound Aβ42 monomer exhibits alternative structural features that are strongly dependent on the hexapeptide sequence. For example, a central helix is more frequently populated within the A2T-bound monomer, while A2V-bound Aβ42 is often enhanced in overall disorder. Taken together, the present simulations offer novel molecular insights onto the effect of the N-terminal hexapeptide binding on the Aβ42 monomer structure, which might help in explaining their reported amyloid inhibition properties.

  1. High-level secretion of recombinant monomeric murine and human single-chain Fv antibodies from Drosophila S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Gilmartin, Allissia A; Lamp, Benjamin; Rümenapf, Till; Persson, Mats A A; Rey, Félix A; Krey, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFvs) antibodies are small polypeptides (∼26 kD) containing the heavy (V(H)) and light (V(L)) immunoglobulin domains of a parent antibody connected by a flexible linker. In addition to being frequently used in diagnostics and therapy for an increasing number of human diseases, scFvs are important tools for structural biology as crystallization chaperones. Although scFvs can be expressed in many different organisms, the expression level of an scFv strongly depends on its particular amino acid sequence. We report here a system allowing for easy and efficient cloning of (i) scFvs selected by phage display and (ii) individual heavy and light chain sequences from hybridoma cDNA into expression plasmids engineered for secretion of the recombinant fragment produced in Drosophila S2 cells. We validated the method by producing five scFvs derived from human and murine parent antibodies directed against various antigens. The production yields varied between 5 and 12 mg monomeric scFv per liter of supernatant, indicating a relative independence on the individual sequences. The recombinant scFvs bound their cognate antigen with high affinity, comparable with the parent antibodies. The suitability of the produced recombinant fragments for structural studies was demonstrated by crystallization and structure determination of one of the produced scFvs, derived from a broadly neutralizing antibody against the major glycoprotein E2 of the hepatitis C virus. Structural comparison with the Protein Data Bank revealed the typical spatial organization of V(H) and V(L) domains, further validating the here-reported expression system.

  2. Quantification and Statistical Modeling—Part II: Dermal Concentrations of Monomeric and Polymeric 1,6-Hexamethylene Diisocyanate

    PubMed Central

    Fent, Kenneth W.; Trelles Gaines, Linda G.; Thomasen, Jennifer M.; Flack, Sheila L.; Ding, Kai; Herring, Amy H.; Whittaker, Stephen G.; Nylander-French, Leena A.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a quantitative dermal and inhalation exposure assessment of monomeric and polymeric 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanates (HDI) in 47 automotive spray painters from North Carolina and Washington State. We report here the use of linear mixed modeling (LMM) to identify the primary determinants of dermal exposure. Dermal concentrations of HDI, uretidone, biuret, and isocyanurate were significantly higher in 15 painters who did not wear coveralls or gloves (N = 51 paint tasks) than in 32 painters who did wear coveralls and gloves (N = 192 paint tasks) during spray painting. Regardless of whether protective clothing was worn, isocyanurate was the predominant species measured in the skin [geometric mean (GM) = 33.8 ng mm−3], with a 95% detection rate. Other polyisocyanates (GM ≤ 0.17 ng mm−3) were detected in skin during <23% of the paint tasks. According to marginal R2 statistics, mixed models generated in this study described no <36% of the variability in dermal concentrations of the different polyisocyanates measured in painters who did not wear protective clothing. These models also described 55% of the variability in dermal concentrations of isocyanurate measured in all painters (N = 288 paint tasks). The product of analyte-specific breathing-zone concentration (BZC) and paint time was the most significant variable in all the models. Through LMM, a better understanding of the exposure pathways governing individual polyisocyanate exposures may be achieved. In particular, we were able to establish a link between BZC and dermal concentration, which may be useful for exposure reconstruction and quantitatively characterizing the protective effect of coveralls and gloves. This information can be used to reduce dermal exposures and better protect automotive spray painters from potential adverse health effects. PMID:19635734

  3. Monomeric IgG2a promotes maturation of bone-marrow macrophages and expression of the mannose receptor.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, S; Blum, J S; Stenson, W F; MacDermott, R P; Stahl, P D; Teitelbaum, S L; Perkins, S L

    1991-03-01

    The macrophage mannose receptor, a 172-kDa lineage-specific glycoprotein, partakes in nonopsonin-mediated phagocytosis by recognition of terminal mannose residues on targeted particles. Because appearance of the receptor progresses with monocyte/macrophage differentiation, its expression is indicative of the maturational state of the cell. Monomeric IgG2a and IgG2b up-regulate mannose-receptor surface expression and biosynthesis by murine bone-marrow macrophage precursors as much as 7- to 12-fold in a dose-dependent manner. IgG2a accelerates macrophage mannose-receptor expression by several days during in vitro bone-marrow differentiation; however, treated and control cells ultimately express equivalent levels of receptor. Moreover, the effect is independent of cell cycle or ambient levels of colony-stimulating factor 1. The coinduction of another maturation-dependent lineage-specific antigen, F4/80, and the fact that macrophage precursors respond to IgG2a only within the first day of culture, indicate that the targeted cell is an early myelomonocytic precursor, responsive only during a short, early developmental window. The effect is specific for immunoglobulin molecules of the IgG2a and IgG2b subclasses and probably involves an Fc gamma-receptor signal-transduction pathway but not macrophage priming or activation. Most importantly, a paracrine mechanism of immunoglobulin-mediated bone-marrow macrophage differentiation is suggested by experiments in which basal levels of mannose-receptor expression are reduced by continual removal of B-cell-generated IgG from marrow cultures. Thus, IgG2a and IgG2b prompt mannose-receptor synthesis and bone-marrow macrophage differentiation and may, therefore, play a role in the regulation of macrophage differentiation in host defense.

  4. Monomeric C-reactive protein and Notch-3 co-operatively increase angiogenesis through PI3K signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Boras, Emhamed; Slevin, Mark; Alexander, M Yvonne; Aljohi, Ali; Gilmore, William; Ashworth, Jason; Krupinski, Jerzy; Potempa, Lawrence A; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Elobeid, Adila; Matou-Nasri, Sabine

    2014-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is the most acute-phase reactant serum protein of inflammation and a strong predictor of cardiovascular disease. Its expression is associated with atherosclerotic plaque instability and the formation of immature micro-vessels. We have previously shown that CRP upregulates endothelial-derived Notch-3, a key receptor involved in vascular development, remodelling and maturation. In this study, we investigated the links between the bioactive monomeric CRP (mCRP) and Notch-3 signalling in angiogenesis. We used in vitro (cell counting, wound-healing and tubulogenesis assays) and in vivo (chorioallantoic membrane) angiogenic assays and Western blotting to study the angiogenic signalling pathways induced by mCRP and Notch-3 activator chimera protein (Notch-3/Fc). Our results showed an additive effect on angiogenesis of mCRP stimulatory effect combined with Notch-3/Fc promoting bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) proliferation, migration, tube formation in Matrigel(TM) with up-regulation of phospho-Akt expression. The pharmacological blockade of PI3K/Akt survival pathway by LY294002 fully inhibited in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis induced by mCRP/Notch-3/Fc combination while blocking Notch signalling by gamma-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) partially inhibited mCRP/Notch-3/Fc-induced angiogenesis. Using a BAEC vascular smooth muscle cell co-culture sprouting angiogenesis assay and transmission electron microscopy, we showed that activation of both mCRP and Notch-3 signalling induced the formation of thicker sprouts which were shown later by Western blotting to be associated with an up-regulation of N-cadherin expression and a down-regulation of VE-cadherin expression. Thus, mCRP combined with Notch-3 activator promote angiogenesis through the PI3K/Akt pathway and their therapeutic combination has potential to promote and stabilize vessel formation whilst reducing the risk of haemorrhage from unstable plaques. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  5. Monomeric C-reactive protein-a key molecule driving development of Alzheimer’s disease associated with brain ischaemia?

    PubMed Central

    Slevin, M.; Matou, S.; Zeinolabediny, Y.; Corpas, R.; Weston, R.; Liu, D.; Boras, E.; Di Napoli, M.; Petcu, E.; Sarroca, S.; Popa-Wagner, A.; Love, S.; Font, M. A.; Potempa, L. A.; Al-baradie, R.; Sanfeliu, C.; Revilla, S.; Badimon, L.; Krupinski, J.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) increases dramatically in patients with ischaemic stroke. Monomeric C-reactive protein (mCRP) appears in the ECM of ischaemic tissue after stroke, associating with microvasculature, neurons and AD-plaques, Aβ, also, being able to dissociate native-CRP into inflammatory, mCRP in vivo. Here, mCRP injected into the hippocampal region of mice was retained within the retrosplenial tract of the dorsal 3rd ventrical and surrounding major vessels. Mice developed behavioural/cognitive deficits within 1 month, concomitant with mCRP staining within abnormal looking neurons expressing p-tau and in beta-amyloid 1-42-plaque positive regions. mCRP co-localised with CD105 in microvessels suggesting angiogenesis. Phospho-arrays/Western blotting identified signalling activation in endothelial cells and neurons through p-IRS-1, p-Tau and p-ERK1/2-which was blocked following pre-incubation with mCRP-antibody. mCRP increased vascular monolayer permeability and gap junctions, increased NCAM expression and produced haemorrhagic angiogenesis in mouse matrigel implants. mCRP induced tau244–372 aggregation and assembly in vitro. IHC study of human AD/stroke patients revealed co-localization of mCRP with Aβ plaques, tau-like fibrils and IRS-1/P-Tau positive neurons and high mCRP-levels spreading from infarcted core regions matched reduced expression of Aβ/Tau. mCRP may be responsible for promoting dementia after ischaemia and mCRP clearance could inform therapeutic avenues to reduce the risk of future dementia. PMID:26335098

  6. Occurrence and Speciation of Polymeric Chromium(III), Monomeric Chromium(III) and Chromium(VI) in Environmental Samples

    PubMed Central

    HU, LIGANG; CAI, YONG; JIANG, GUIBIN

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in aqueous solution for a relative long period of time. However, the occurrence of polymeric Cr(III) has not been reported in environmental media due partially to the lack of method for speciating polymeric Cr. We observed an unknown Cr species during the course of study on speciation of Cr in the leachates of chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. Efforts were made to identify structure of the unknown Cr species. Considering the forms of Cr existed in the CCA-treated woods, we mainly focused our efforts to determine if the unknown species were polymeric Cr(III), complex of Cr/As or complex of Cr with dissolved organic matter (DOM). In order to evaluate whether polymeric Cr(III) largely exist in wood leachates, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS was used) for simultaneous speciation of monomeric Cr(III), polymeric Cr(III), and Cr(VI). In addition to wood leachates where polymeric Cr (III) ranged from 39.1 to 67.4 %, occurrence of the unknown Cr species in other environmental matrices, including surface waters, tap and waste waters, was also investigated. It was found that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in environmental samples containing μg/L level of Cr, at a level up to 60% of total Cr, suggesting that polymeric Cr(III) could significantly exist in natural environments. Failure in quantifying polymeric Cr(III) would lead to the underestimation of total Cr and bias in Cr speciation. The environmental implication of the presence of polymeric Cr(III) species in the environment deserves further study. PMID:27156211

  7. Importance of the substrate-binding loop region of human monomeric carbonyl reductases in catalysis and coenzyme binding.

    PubMed

    Miura, Takeshi; Nishinaka, Toru; Terada, Tomoyuki

    2009-08-12

    Monomeric carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1) and 3 (CBR3) are members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, and metabolize endogenous and xenobiotic compounds using NADPH as a coenzyme. CBR3 exhibits a higher K(m) value toward NADPH and more limited carbonyl reductase activities than CBR1, although they are highly homologous to each other in amino acid sequence levels. In the present study, we investigated the origin of the different properties of the enzymes by analyses using several chimeric enzymes. Harr-plot analysis of the amino acid sequences was conducted and as a result, two low-identity regions between human CBR1 and CBR3 were found: these were designated as the N-terminal low-identity region (LirN) and the C-terminal low-identity region (LirC; the substrate-binding region). We genetically constructed chimeric enzymes while focusing on these regions. Chimeric CBR1 possessing LirN of CBR3 (CBR1LirN3) exhibited CBR1-like activities but a low coenzyme affinity probably due to a structural alteration in a micro domain, whereas chimeric CBR1 including LirC of CBR3 (CBR1LirC3) was enzymatically similar to CBR3. Furthermore, CBR3LirC1 was similar to CBR1 in both enzymatic activities and coenzyme binding. These results suggested that LirC, i.e., the substrate-binding loop region, is the origin of the difference between human CBR1 and CBR3 in both catalytic and coenzyme-binding properties.

  8. Active site properties of monomeric triosephosphate isomerase (monoTIM) as deduced from mutational and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Schliebs, W; Thanki, N; Eritja, R; Wierenga, R

    1996-02-01

    MonoTIM is a stable monomeric variant of the dimeric trypanosomal enzyme triose phosphate isomerase (TIM) with less, but significant, catalytic activity. It is known that in TIM, three residues, Lys 13 (loop 1), His 95 (loop 4), and Glu 167 (loop 6) are the crucial catalytic residues. In the wild-type TIM dimer, loop 1 and loop 4 are very rigid because of tight interactions with residues of the other subunit. Previous structural studies indicate that Lys 13 and His 95 have much increased conformational flexibility in monoTIM. Using site-directed mutagenesis, it is shown here that Lys 13 and His 95 are nevertheless essential for optimal catalysis by monoTIM: monoTIM-K13A is completely inactive, although it can still bind substrate analogues, and monoTIM-H95A is 50 times less active. The best inhibitors of wild-type TIM are phosphoglycolohydroxamate (PGH) and 2-phosphoglycolate (2PG), with KI values of 8 microM and 26 microM, respectively. The affinity of the monoTIM active site for PGH has been reduced approximately 60-fold, whereas for 2PG, only a twofold weakening of affinity is observed. The mode of binding, as determined by protein crystallographic analysis of these substrate analogues, shows that, in particular, 2PG interacts with Lys 13 and His 95 in a way similar but not identical to that observed for the wild-type enzyme. This crystallographic analysis also shows that Glu 167 has the same interactions with the substrate analogues as in the wild type. The data presented suggest that, despite the absence of the second subunit, monoTIM catalyzes the interconversion of D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate via the same mechanism as in the wild type.

  9. Production of Monomeric Aromatic Compounds from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Lignin by Chemical and Enzymatic Methods.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ling; Hassan, Osman; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof; Badri, Khairiah

    2015-01-01

    In this study, oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFBF) was pretreated with alkali, and lignin was extracted for further degradation into lower molecular weight phenolic compounds using enzymes and chemical means. Efficiency of monomeric aromatic compounds production from OPEFBF lignin via chemical (nitrobenzene versus oxygen) and enzymatic [cutinase versus manganese peroxidase (MnP)] approaches was investigated. The effects of sodium hydroxide concentration (2, 5, and 10% wt.) and reaction time (30, 90, and 180 minutes) on the yield of aromatic compounds were studied. The results obtained indicated that nitrobenzene oxidation produced the highest yield (333.17 ± 49.44 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 5.67 ± 0.25 ppm p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 25.57 ± 1.64 ppm vanillic acid, 168.68 ± 23.23 ppm vanillin, 75.44 ± 6.71 ppm syringic acid, 815.26 ± 41.77 ppm syringaldehyde, 15.21 ± 2.19 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 44.75 ± 3.40 ppm ferulic acid), among the tested methods. High sodium hydroxide concentration (10% wt.) was needed to promote efficient nitrobenzene oxidation. However, less severe oxidation condition was preferred to preserve the hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid). Cutinase-catalyzed hydrolysis was found to be more efficient than MnP-catalyzed oxidation in the production of aromatic compounds. By hydrolyzed 8% wt. of lignin with 0.625 mL cutinase g(-1) lignin at pH 8 and 55°C for 24 hours, about 642.83 ± 14.45 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 70.19 ± 3.31 ppm syringaldehyde, 22.80 ± 1.04 ppm vanillin, 27.06 ± 1.20 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 50.19 ± 2.23 ppm ferulic acid were produced.

  10. The Tooth Enamel Protein, Porcine Amelogenin, Is an Intrinsically Disordered Protein with an Extended Molecular Configuration in the Monomeric Form†

    PubMed Central

    Delak, Katya; Harcup, Craig; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Sun, Zhi; Fan, Yuwwei; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Evans, John Spencer

    2009-01-01

    Amelogenins make up a class of proteins associated with the formation of mineralized enamel in vertebrates, possess highly conserved N- and C-terminal sequence regions, and represent an interesting model protein system for understanding biomineralization and protein assembly. Using bioinformatics, we report here the identification of molecular traits that classify 12 amelogenin proteins as members of the intrinsically disordered or unstructured protein family (IDPs), a group of proteins that normally exist as unfolded species but are capable of transformation to a folded state as part of their overall function. Using biophysical techniques (CD and NMR), we follow up on our bioinformatics studies and confirm that one of the amelogenins, recombinant porcine rP172, exists in an extended, unfolded state in the monomeric form. This protein exhibits evidence of conformational exchange between two states, and this exchange may be mediated by Pro residues in the sequence. Although the protein is globally unfolded, we detect the presence of local residual secondary structure [α-helix, extended β-strand, turn/loop, and polyproline type II (PPII)] that may serve several functional roles within the enamel matrix. The extended, labile conformation of rP172 amelogenin is compatible with the known functions of amelogenin in enamel biomineralization, i.e., self-assembly, associations with other enamel matrix proteins and with calcium phosphate biominerals, and interaction with cell receptors. It is likely that the labile structure of this protein facilitates interactions of amelogenin with other macromolecules or with minerals for achievement of internal protein stabilization. PMID:19236004

  11. PrxQ B from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a monomeric, thioredoxin-dependent and highly efficient fatty acid hydroperoxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Aníbal M; Vazquez, Diego S; Zeida, Ari; Hugo, Martín; Piñeyro, M Dolores; De Armas, María Inés; Estrin, Darío; Radi, Rafael; Santos, Javier; Trujillo, Madia

    2016-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) is the intracellular bacterium responsible for tuberculosis disease (TD). Inside the phagosomes of activated macrophages, M. tuberculosis is exposed to cytotoxic hydroperoxides such as hydrogen peroxide, fatty acid hydroperoxides and peroxynitrite. Thus, the characterization of the bacterial antioxidant systems could facilitate novel drug developments. In this work, we characterized the product of the gene Rv1608c from M. tuberculosis, which according to sequence homology had been annotated as a putative peroxiredoxin of the peroxiredoxin Q subfamily (PrxQ B from M. tuberculosis or MtPrxQ B). The protein has been reported to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth in cholesterol-rich medium. We demonstrated the M. tuberculosis thioredoxin B/C-dependent peroxidase activity of MtPrxQ B, which acted as a two-cysteine peroxiredoxin that could function, although less efficiently, using a one-cysteine mechanism. Through steady-state and competition kinetic analysis, we proved that the net forward rate constant of MtPrxQ B reaction was 3 orders of magnitude faster for fatty acid hydroperoxides than for hydrogen peroxide (3×10(6)vs 6×10(3)M(-)(1)s(-)(1), respectively), while the rate constant of peroxynitrite reduction was (0.6-1.4) ×10(6)M(-)(1)s(-)(1) at pH 7.4. The enzyme lacked activity towards cholesterol hydroperoxides solubilized in sodium deoxycholate. Both thioredoxin B and C rapidly reduced the oxidized form of MtPrxQ B, with rates constants of 0.5×10(6) and 1×10(6)M(-)(1)s(-)(1), respectively. Our data indicated that MtPrxQ B is monomeric in solution both under reduced and oxidized states. In spite of the similar hydrodynamic behavior the reduced and oxidized forms of the protein showed important structural differences that were reflected in the protein circular dichroism spectra. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Production of Monomeric Aromatic Compounds from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Lignin by Chemical and Enzymatic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Pei-Ling; Hassan, Osman; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof; Badri, Khairiah

    2015-01-01

    In this study, oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFBF) was pretreated with alkali, and lignin was extracted for further degradation into lower molecular weight phenolic compounds using enzymes and chemical means. Efficiency of monomeric aromatic compounds production from OPEFBF lignin via chemical (nitrobenzene versus oxygen) and enzymatic [cutinase versus manganese peroxidase (MnP)] approaches was investigated. The effects of sodium hydroxide concentration (2, 5, and 10% wt.) and reaction time (30, 90, and 180 minutes) on the yield of aromatic compounds were studied. The results obtained indicated that nitrobenzene oxidation produced the highest yield (333.17 ± 49.44 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 5.67 ± 0.25 ppm p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 25.57 ± 1.64 ppm vanillic acid, 168.68 ± 23.23 ppm vanillin, 75.44 ± 6.71 ppm syringic acid, 815.26 ± 41.77 ppm syringaldehyde, 15.21 ± 2.19 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 44.75 ± 3.40 ppm ferulic acid), among the tested methods. High sodium hydroxide concentration (10% wt.) was needed to promote efficient nitrobenzene oxidation. However, less severe oxidation condition was preferred to preserve the hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid). Cutinase-catalyzed hydrolysis was found to be more efficient than MnP-catalyzed oxidation in the production of aromatic compounds. By hydrolyzed 8% wt. of lignin with 0.625 mL cutinase g−1 lignin at pH 8 and 55°C for 24 hours, about 642.83 ± 14.45 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 70.19 ± 3.31 ppm syringaldehyde, 22.80 ± 1.04 ppm vanillin, 27.06 ± 1.20 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 50.19 ± 2.23 ppm ferulic acid were produced. PMID:26798644

  13. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  14. Stable divalent germanium, tin and lead amino(ether)-phenolate monomeric complexes: structural features, inclusion heterobimetallic complexes, and ROP catalysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingfang; Roşca, Sorin-Claudiu; Poirier, Valentin; Sinbandhit, Sourisak; Dorcet, Vincent; Roisnel, Thierry; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann

    2014-03-21

    Stable germanium(II) and lead(II) amido complexes {LO(i)}M(N(SiMe3)2) (M = Ge(II), Pb(II)) bearing amino(ether)phenolate ligands are readily available using the proteo-ligands {LO(i)}H of general formula 2-CH2NR2-4,6-tBu2-C6H2OH (i = 1, NR2 = N((CH2)2OCH3)2; i = 2, NR2 = NEt2; i = 3, NR2 = aza-15-crown-5) and M(N(SiMe3)2)2 precursors. The molecular structures of these germylenes and plumbylenes, as well as those of {LO(3)}GeCl, {LO(3)}SnCl and of the congeneric {LO(4)}Sn(II)(N(SiMe3)2) where NR2 = aza-12-crown-4, have been determined crystallographically. All complexes are monomeric, with 3-coordinate metal centres. The phenolate systematically acts as a N^O(phenolate) bidentate ligand, with no interactions between the metal and the O(side-arm) atoms in these cases (for {LO(1)}(-), {LO(3)}(-) and {LO(4)}(-)) where they could potentially arise. For each family, the lone pair of electrons essentially features ns(2) character, and there is little, if any, hybridization of the valence orbitals. Heterobimetallic complexes {LO(3)}M(N(SiMe3)2)·LiOTf, where the Li(+) cation sits inside the tethered crown-ether, were prepared by reaction of {LO(3)}M(N(SiMe3)2) and LiOTf (M = Ge(II), Sn(II)). The inclusion of Li(+) (featuring a close contact with the triflate anion) in the macrocycle bears no influence on the coordination sphere of the divalent tetrel element. In association with iPrOH, the amido germylenes, stannylenes and plumbylenes catalyse the controlled polymerisation of L- and racemic lactide. The activity increases linearly according to Ge(II) ≪ Sn(II) ≪ Pb(II). The simple germylenes generate very sluggish catalysts, but the activity is significantly boosted if the heterobimetallic complex {LO(3)}Ge(N(SiMe3)2)·LiOTf is used instead. On the other hand, with 10-25 equiv. of iPrOH, the plumbylenes afford highly active binary catalysts, converting 1000 or 5000 equiv. of monomer at 60 °C within 3 or 45 min, respectively, in a controlled fashion.

  15. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies against monomeric dengue virus non-structural glycoprotein 1 (NS1).

    PubMed

    Gelanew, Tesfaye; Poole-Smith, B Katherine; Hunsperger, Elizabeth

    2015-09-15

    Dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural-1 (NS1) glycoprotein is useful for diagnosis of DENV infections in the first 8 days of illness with any of the four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4). However, NS1 diagnostics are less sensitive for secondary DENV infections so the utility of NS1 diagnostics in dengue endemic countries where there is predominantly secondary infections is being questioned. Heat-mediated immunecomplex dissociation (ICD) prior to testing serum samples can significantly improve NS1 test sensitivity in secondary infections but requires monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reactive to heat-denatured NS1. In order to incorporate a simple heat-mediated ICD step, a crucial step was to develop new MAbs with high affinity and specificity to heat-denatured DENV NS1 protein. In the present study, six new MAbs were isolated from BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant monomeric NS1 of DENV-1 and DENV-2. Characterization using three different methods: indirect ELISA, fixed cell ELISA and western blot revealed that all six MAbs are serotype-cross-reactive and capable of recognizing dimeric and hexameric isoforms as well as heat-denatured NS1 from all four DENV serotypes. No cross-reactivity to NS1 of West Nile virus and Yellow fever virus was observed on western blot and indirect ELISA. Five of the six MAbs mapped to the DENV NS1 region of 105-119 amino acids. The remaining MAb mapped to DENV NS1 region of 25-39 amino acids. These two NS1 regions were found to be highly conserved among all four DENV serotypes by sequences analysis and database comparison. These MAbs were used to develop an NS1 capture ELISA and tested using a small panel of clinical specimens. The results from the NS1 capture ELISA indicated at least a three-fold increase in NS1 antigen detection in heat-denatured samples compared to untreated specimens. Furthermore, artificial immunecomplexed results also demonstrated the binding efficiency of these MAbs to heat denatured NS1. Taken together

  16. Directed evolution of a monomeric, bright and photostable version of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: structural characterization and applications in fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Al, Hui-wang; Henderson, J. Nathan; Remington, S. James; Campbell, Robert E.

    2008-05-07

    The arsenal of engineered variants of the GFP [green FP (fluorescent protein)] from Aequorea jellyfish provides researchers with a powerful set of tools for use in biochemical and cell biology research. The recent discovery of diverse FPs in Anthozoa coral species has provided protein engineers with an abundance of alternative progenitor FPs from which improved variants that complement or supersede existing Aequorea GFP variants could be derived. Here, we report the engineering of the first monomeric version of the tetrameric CFP (cyan FP) cFP484 from Clavularia coral. Starting from a designed synthetic gene library with mammalian codon preferences, we identified dimeric cFP484 variants with fluorescent brightness significantly greater than the wild-type protein. Following incorporation of dimer-breaking mutations and extensive directed evolution with selection for blue-shifted emission, high fluorescent brightness and photostability, we arrived at an optimized variant that we have named mTFP1 [monomeric TFP1 (teal FP 1)]. The new mTFP1 is one of the brightest and most photostable FPs reported to date. In addition, the fluorescence is insensitive to physiologically relevant pH changes and the fluorescence lifetime decay is best fitted as a single exponential. The 1.19 {angstrom} crystal structure (1 {angstrom}=0.1 nm) of mTFP1 confirms the monomeric structure and reveals an unusually distorted chromophore conformation. As we experimentally demonstrate, the high quantum yield of mTFP1 (0.85) makes it particularly suitable as a replacement for ECFP (enhanced CFP) or Cerulean as a FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) donor to either a yellow or orange FP acceptor.

  17. Directed evolution of a monomeric, bright and photostable version of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: structural characterization and applications in fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Hui-wang; Henderson, J. Nathan; Remington, S. James; Campbell, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    The arsenal of engineered variants of the GFP [green FP (fluorescent protein)] from Aequorea jellyfish provides researchers with a powerful set of tools for use in biochemical and cell biology research. The recent discovery of diverse FPs in Anthozoa coral species has provided protein engineers with an abundance of alternative progenitor FPs from which improved variants that complement or supersede existing Aequorea GFP variants could be derived. Here, we report the engineering of the first monomeric version of the tetrameric CFP (cyan FP) cFP484 from Clavularia coral. Starting from a designed synthetic gene library with mammalian codon preferences, we identified dimeric cFP484 variants with fluorescent brightness significantly greater than the wild-type protein. Following incorporation of dimer-breaking mutations and extensive directed evolution with selection for blue-shifted emission, high fluorescent brightness and photostability, we arrived at an optimized variant that we have named mTFP1 [monomeric TFP1 (teal FP 1)]. The new mTFP1 is one of the brightest and most photostable FPs reported to date. In addition, the fluorescence is insensitive to physiologically relevant pH changes and the fluorescence lifetime decay is best fitted as a single exponential. The 1.19 Å crystal structure (1 Å=0.1 nm) of mTFP1 confirms the monomeric structure and reveals an unusually distorted chromophore conformation. As we experimentally demonstrate, the high quantum yield of mTFP1 (0.85) makes it particularly suitable as a replacement for ECFP (enhanced CFP) or Cerulean as a FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) donor to either a yellow or orange FP acceptor. PMID:16859491

  18. Exploring the conformational and binding properties of unphosphorylated/phosphorylated monomeric and trimeric Bcl-2 through docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Zacarías-Lara, Oscar J; Correa-Basurto, José; Bello, Martiniano

    2016-07-01

    B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2) is commonly associated with the progression and preservation of cancer and certain lymphomas; therefore, it is considered as a biological target against cancer. Nevertheless, evidence of all its structural binding sites has been hidden because of the lack of a complete Bcl-2 model, given the presence of a flexible loop domain (FLD), which is responsible for its complex behavior. FLD region has been implicated in phosphorylation, homotrimerization, and heterodimerization associated with Bcl-2 antiapoptotic function. In this contribution, homology modeling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the microsecond (µs) time-scale and docking calculations were combined to explore the conformational complexity of unphosphorylated/phosphorylated monomeric and trimeric Bcl-2 systems. Conformational ensembles generated through MD simulations allowed for identifying the most populated unphosphorylated/phosphorylated monomeric conformations, which were used as starting models to obtain trimeric complexes through protein-protein docking calculations, also submitted to µs MD simulations. Principal component analysis showed that FLD represents the main contributor to total Bcl-2 mobility, and is affected by phosphorylation and oligomerization. Subsequently, based on the most representative unphosphorylated/phosphorylated monomeric and trimeric Bcl-2 conformations, docking studies were initiated to identify the ligand binding site of several known Bcl-2 inhibitors to explain their influence in homo-complex formation and phosphorylation. Docking studies showed that the different conformational states experienced by FLD, such as phosphorylation and oligomerization, play an essential role in the ability to make homo and hetero-complexes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 393-413, 2016.

  19. Unique fluorophores in the dimeric archaeal histones hMfB and hPyA1 reveal the impact of nonnative structure in a monomeric kinetic intermediate.

    PubMed

    Stump, Matthew R; Gloss, Lisa M

    2008-02-01

    Homodimeric archaeal histones and heterodimeric eukaryotic histones share a conserved structure but fold through different kinetic mechanisms, with a correlation between faster folding/association rates and the population of kinetic intermediates. Wild-type hMfB (from Methanothermus fervidus) has no intrinsic fluorophores; Met35, which is Tyr in hyperthermophilic archaeal histones such as hPyA1 (from Pyrococcus strain GB-3A), was mutated to Tyr and Trp. Two Tyr-to-Trp mutants of hPyA1 were also characterized. All fluorophores were introduced into the long, central alpha-helix of the histone fold. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) indicated that the fluorophores did not significantly alter the helical content of the histones. The equilibrium unfolding transitions of the histone variants were two-state, reversible processes, with DeltaG degrees (H2O) values within 1 kcal/mol of the wild-type dimers. The hPyA1 Trp variants fold by two-state kinetic mechanisms like wild-type hPyA1, but with increased folding and unfolding rates, suggesting that the mutated residues (Tyr-32 and Tyr-36) contribute to transition state structure. Like wild-type hMfB, M35Y and M35W hMfB fold by a three-state mechanism, with a stopped-flow CD burst-phase monomeric intermediate. The M35 mutants populate monomeric intermediates with increased secondary structure and stability but exhibit decreased folding rates; this suggests that nonnative interactions occur from burial of the hydrophobic Tyr and Trp residues in this kinetic intermediate. These results implicate the long central helix as a key component of the structure in the kinetic monomeric intermediates of hMfB as well as the dimerization transition state in the folding of hPyA1.

  20. GacA is essential for Group A S treptococcus and defines a new class of monomeric dTDP‐4‐dehydrorhamnose reductases (RmlD)

    PubMed Central

    van der Beek, Samantha L.; Le Breton, Yoann; Ferenbach, Andrew T.; Chapman, Robert N.; van Aalten, Daan M. F.; Navratilova, Iva; Boons, Geert‐Jan; McIver, Kevin S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The sugar nucleotide dTDP‐L‐rhamnose is critical for the biosynthesis of the Group A Carbohydrate, the molecular signature and virulence determinant of the human pathogen Group A S treptococcus (GAS). The final step of the four‐step dTDP‐L‐rhamnose biosynthesis pathway is catalyzed by dTDP‐4‐dehydrorhamnose reductases (RmlD). RmlD from the Gram‐negative bacterium S almonella is the only structurally characterized family member and requires metal‐dependent homo‐dimerization for enzymatic activity. Using a biochemical and structural biology approach, we demonstrate that the only RmlD homologue from GAS, previously renamed GacA, functions in a novel monomeric manner. Sequence analysis of 213 Gram‐negative and Gram‐positive RmlD homologues predicts that enzymes from all Gram‐positive species lack a dimerization motif and function as monomers. The enzymatic function of GacA was confirmed through heterologous expression of gac A in a S. mutans rml D knockout, which restored attenuated growth and aberrant cell division. Finally, analysis of a saturated mutant GAS library using Tn‐sequencing and generation of a conditional‐expression mutant identified gac A as an essential gene for GAS. In conclusion, GacA is an essential monomeric enzyme in GAS and representative of monomeric RmlD enzymes in Gram‐positive bacteria and a subset of Gram‐negative bacteria. These results will help future screens for novel inhibitors of dTDP‐L‐rhamnose biosynthesis. PMID:26278404

  1. Directed evolution of a monomeric, bright and photostable version of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: structural characterization and applications in fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hui-wang; Henderson, J Nathan; Remington, S James; Campbell, Robert E

    2006-12-15

    The arsenal of engineered variants of the GFP [green FP (fluorescent protein)] from Aequorea jellyfish provides researchers with a powerful set of tools for use in biochemical and cell biology research. The recent discovery of diverse FPs in Anthozoa coral species has provided protein engineers with an abundance of alternative progenitor FPs from which improved variants that complement or supersede existing Aequorea GFP variants could be derived. Here, we report the engineering of the first monomeric version of the tetrameric CFP (cyan FP) cFP484 from Clavularia coral. Starting from a designed synthetic gene library with mammalian codon preferences, we identified dimeric cFP484 variants with fluorescent brightness significantly greater than the wild-type protein. Following incorporation of dimer-breaking mutations and extensive directed evolution with selection for blue-shifted emission, high fluorescent brightness and photostability, we arrived at an optimized variant that we have named mTFP1 [monomeric TFP1 (teal FP 1)]. The new mTFP1 is one of the brightest and most photostable FPs reported to date. In addition, the fluorescence is insensitive to physiologically relevant pH changes and the fluorescence lifetime decay is best fitted as a single exponential. The 1.19 A crystal structure (1 A=0.1 nm) of mTFP1 confirms the monomeric structure and reveals an unusually distorted chromophore conformation. As we experimentally demonstrate, the high quantum yield of mTFP1 (0.85) makes it particularly suitable as a replacement for ECFP (enhanced CFP) or Cerulean as a FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) donor to either a yellow or orange FP acceptor.

  2. Interference of α-Synuclein Uptake by Monomeric β-Amyloid1-40 and Potential Core Acting Site of the Interference.

    PubMed

    Chan, Daniel K Y; Braidy, Nady; Xu, Ying Hua; Chataway, Tim; Guo, Feng; Guillemin, Gilles J; Teo, Charlie; Gai, Wei Ping

    2016-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests an important role of alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). The inter-neuronal spread of α-Syn via exocytosis and endocytosis has been proposed as an explanation for the neuropathological findings of PD in sub-clinical and clinical phases. Therefore, interfering the uptake of α-Syn by neurons may be an important step in slowing or modifying the propagation of the disease. The purposes of our study were to investigate if the uptake of α-Syn fibrils can be specifically interfered with monomeric β-Amyloid1-40 (Aβ40) and to characterise the core acting site of interference. Using a radioisotope-labelled uptake assay, we found an 80 % uptake reduction of α-Syn fibrils in neurons interfered with monomeric Aβ40, but not β-Amyloid1-42 (Aβ42) as compared to controls. This finding was further confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with α-Syn uptake reduced from about 80 % (Aβ42) to about 20 % (Aβ40) relative to controls. To define the region of Aβ40 peptide capable of the interference, we explored shorter peptides with less amino acid residues from both the C-terminus and N-terminus. We found that the interference effect was preserved if amino acid residue was trimmed to position 11 (from N-terminus) and 36 (from C-terminus), but dropped off significantly if residues were trimmed beyond these positions. We therefore deduced that the "core acting site" lies between amino acid residue positions 12-36. These findings suggest α-Syn uptake can be interfered with monomeric Aβ40 and that the core acting site of interference might lie between amino acid residue positions 12-36.

  3. Purification and Protective Efficacy of Monomeric and Modified Yersina pestis Capsular F1-V Antigen Fusion Proteins for Vaccination Against Plague

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-31

    exclusion, and reducing agent clearance; (3) recovery and purification of monomeric F1-VC424S-MN under atmospher- ic oxygen conditions; (4...cells pellets were collected by centrifugation at 10,000g for 20 min and stored at 70 C. Recovery of F1-VMN For F1-VMN, combined wet cell paste from...SDS–PAGE analysis of F1-VC424S expression for whole broth soluble and insoluble fractions before () and after (+) IPTG induction. Lane M—protein

  4. Chromophore-chromophore and chromophore-protein interactions in monomeric light-harvesting complex II of green plants studied by spectral hole burning and fluorescence line narrowing.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Jörg; Rätsep, Margus; Irrgang, Klaus-Dieter; Freiberg, Arvi

    2009-08-06

    Persistent nonphotochemical hole burning and delta-FLN spectra obtained at 4.5 K are reported for monomeric chlorophyll (Chl) a/b light-harvesting complexes of photosystem II (LHC II) of green plants. The hole burned spectra of monomeric LHC II appear to be similar to those obtained before for trimeric LHC II (Pieper et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1999, 103, 2412). They are composed of three main features: (i) a homogeneously broadened zero-phonon hole coincident with the burn wavelength, (ii) an intense, broad hole in the vicinity of approximately 680 nm as a result of efficient excitation energy transfer to a low-energy trap state, and (iii) a satellite hole at approximately 649 nm which is correlated with the low-energy 680 nm hole. Zero-phonon hole action spectroscopy reveals that the low-energy absorption band is located at 679.6 nm and possesses a width of approximately 110 cm(-1) which is predominantly due to inhomogeneous broadening at 4.5 K. The electron-phonon coupling of the above-mentioned low-energy state(s) is weak with a Huang-Rhys factor S in the order of 0.6 and a peak phonon frequency (omega(m)) of approximately 22 cm(-1) within a broad and strongly asymmetric one-phonon profile. The resulting Stokes shift 2S omega(m) of approximately 26.4 cm(-1) readily explains the position of the fluorescence origin band at 680.8 nm. Thus, we conclude that the 679.6 nm state(s) is (are) the fluorescent state(s) of monomeric LHC II at 4.5 K. The absorption intensity of the lowest Q(y) state is shown to roughly correspond to that of one out of the eight Chl a molecules bound in the monomeric subunit. In addition, the satellite hole structure produced by hole burning within the 679.6 nm state is weak with only one shallow satellite hole observed in the Chl b spectral range at 648.8 nm. These results suggest that the 679.6 nm state is widely localized on a Chl a molecule, which may belong to a Chl a/b heterodimer. These characteristics are different from those expected

  5. Monomeric organoantimony(III) sulphide and selenide with terminal Sb-E bond (E = S, Se). Synthesis, structure and theoretical consideration.

    PubMed

    Šimon, Petr; Jambor, Roman; Růžička, Aleš; Lyčka, Antonín; De Proft, Frank; Dostál, Libor

    2012-05-07

    NCN chelated monomeric chalcogenides, LSbE (E = S (1), Se (2), L = 2,6-bis[N-(2',6'-dimethylphenyl)ketimino]phenyl), were synthesized and characterized with the help of elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The terminal Sb-E (E = S, Se) bonds in 1 and 2 were subjected to theoretical investigation and the results are compared with the hypothetical molecules, PhSb=E (E = S, Se, Te), and earlier reported analogues.

  6. Synthesis, Radical Reactivity, and Thermochemistry of Monomeric Cu(II) Alkoxide Complexes Relevant to Cu/Radical Alcohol Oxidation Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Thomas R; Capitao, Dany; Kaminsky, Werner; Qian, Zhaoshen; Mayer, James M

    2016-06-06

    Two new monomeric Cu(II) alkoxide complexes were prepared and fully characterized as models for intermediates in copper/radical mediated alcohol oxidation catalysis: Tp(tBuR)Cu(II)OCH2CF3 with Tp(tBu) = hydro-tris(3-tert-butyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate 1 or Tp(tBuMe) = hydro-tris(3-tert-butyl-5-methyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate 2. These complexes were made as models for potential intermediates in enzymatic and synthetic catalytic cycles for alcohol oxidation. However, the alkoxide ligands are not readily oxidized by loss of H; instead, these complexes were found to be hydrogen atom acceptors. They oxidize the hydroxylamine TEMPOH, 2,4,6-tri-t-butylphenol, and 1,4-cyclohexadiene to the nitroxyl radical, phenoxyl radical, and benzene, with formation of HOCH2CF3 (TFE) and the Cu(I) complexes Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)-MeCN in dichloromethane/1% MeCN or 1/2 [Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2 in toluene. On the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics arguments, these reactions likely proceed through concerted proton-electron transfer mechanisms. Thermochemical analyses give lower limits for the "effective bond dissociation free energies (BDFE)" of the O-H bonds in 1/2[Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2 + TFE and upper limits for the free energies associated with alkoxide oxidations via hydrogen atom transfer (effective alkoxide α-C-H BDFEs). These values are summations of the free energies of multiple chemical steps, which include the energetically favorable formation of 1/2[Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2. The effective alkoxide α-C-H bonds are very weak, BDFE ≤ 38 ± 4 kcal mol(-1) for 1 and ≤44 ± 5 kcal mol(-1) for 2 (gas-phase estimates), because C-H homolysis is thermodynamically coupled to one electron transfer to Cu(II) as well as the favorable formation of the 1/2[Tp(tBuR)Cu(I)]2 dimer. Treating 1 with the H atom acceptor (t)Bu3ArO(•) did not result in the expected alkoxide oxidation to an aldehyde, but rather net 2,2,2-trifluoroethoxyl radical transfer occurred to generate an unusual 2-substituted dienone-ether product. Treating 2

  7. The haem pigment of the oral anaerobes Prevotella nigrescens and Prevotella intermedia is composed of iron(III) protoporphyrin IX in the monomeric form.

    PubMed

    Smalley, John W; Silver, Jack; Birss, Andrew J; Withnall, Robert; Titler, Philip J

    2003-07-01

    The haem pigment of Porphyromonas gingivalis is composed of micro -oxo bishaem, [Fe(III)PPIX](2)O, but the nature of that generated by Prevotella species has not been established. Mössbauer, Raman and UV-visible spectrophotometry were used to characterize the haem pigment of Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens. Mössbauer and Raman spectroscopy revealed the major haem species to be monomeric iron protoporphyrin IX, Fe(III)PPIX.OH (haematin). The terminal growth pH of both species on blood agar was between 5.8 and 6.0, which favours the formation and maintenance of monomeric Fe(III)PPIX.OH. Incubation of Pr. nigrescens and Pr. intermedia with oxyhaemoglobin at pH 6.5 resulted in formation of aquomethaemoglobin which was degraded to generate Fe(III)PPIX.OH which in turn became cell-associated, whilst incubation at pH 7.5 resulted in formation of [Fe(III)PPIX](2)O. It is concluded that both Prevotella species degrade oxyhaemoglobin to form [Fe(III)PPIX](2)O as an intermediate, which is converted to Fe(III)PPIX.OH through a depression in pH. The low pH encourages cell-surface deposition of insoluble Fe(III)PPIX.OH which would act as a barrier against oxygen and reactive oxygen species, and also protect against H(2)O(2) through its inherent catalase activity.

  8. Binding of the monomeric form of C-reactive protein to enzymatically-modified low-density lipoprotein: effects of phosphoethanolamine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Suresh, Madathilparambil V.; Hammond, David J.; Rusiñol, Antonio E.; Potempa, Lawrence A.; Agrawal, Alok

    2009-01-01

    Background The 5 subunits of native pentameric C-reactive protein (CRP) are dissociated to generate monomeric form of CRP (mCRP) in some in vitro conditions, both physiological and non-physiological, and also in vivo. Many bioactivities of mCRP generated by urea-treatment of CRP and of mCRP generated by mutating the primary structure of CRP have been reported. The bioactivities of mCRP generated by spontaneous dissociation of CRP are largely unexplored. Methods We purified mCRP generated by spontaneous dissociation of CRP and investigated the binding of mCRP to enzymatically-modified low-density lipoprotein (E-LDL). Results mCRP was approximately 60 times more potent than CRP in binding to E-LDL. In the presence of the small-molecule compound phosphoethanolamine (PEt), at 37°C, the binding of mCRP to E-LDL was enhanced <2-fold, while the binding of CRP to E-LDL was enhanced >10-fold. In contrast, PEt inhibited the binding of both CRP and mCRP to pneumococcal C-polysaccharide, another phosphocholine-containing ligand to which CRP and mCRP were found to bind. We have not investigated yet whether PEt alters the structure of CRP at 37°C. Conclusions Combined data suggest that the targeting of CRP with the aim to monomerize CRP in vivo may be an effective approach to capture modified forms of LDL. PMID:19545552

  9. Elucidation of stability determinants of cold-adapted monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase from a psychrophilic bacterium, Colwellia maris, by construction of chimeric enzymes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Seiya; Yasutake, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Isao; Takada, Yasuhiro

    2005-04-01

    To elucidate determinants of differences in thermostability between mesophilic and psychrophilic monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) from Azotobacter vinelandii (AvIDH) and Colwellia maris (CmIDH), respectively, chimeric enzymes derived from the two IDHs were constructed based on the recently resolved three-dimensional structure of AvIDH, and several characteristics of the two wild-type and six chimeric IDHs were examined. These characteristics were then compared with those of dimeric IDH from Escherichia coli (EcIDH). All recombinant enzymes with a (His)(6)-tag attached to the N-terminal were overexpressed in the E. coli cells and purified by Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography. The catalytic activity (k(cat)) and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) of the wild-type AvIDH and CmIDH were higher than those of EcIDH, implying that an improved catalytic rate more than compensates for the loss of a catalytic site in the former two IDHs due to monomerization. Analyses of the thermostability and kinetic parameters of the chimeric enzymes indicated that region 2, corresponding to domain II, and particularly region 3 located in the C-terminal part of domain I, are involved in the thermolability of CmIDH, and that the corresponding two regions of AvIDH are important for exhibiting higher catalytic activity and affinity for isocitrate than CmIDH. The relationships between the stability, catalytic activity and structural characteristics of AvIDH and CmIDH are discussed.

  10. Cloning of the gene and characterization of the enzymatic properties of the monomeric alkaline phosphatase (PhoX) from Pasteurella multocida strain X-73.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin-Ru; Shien, Jui-Hung; Shieh, Happy K; Hu, Chung-Chi; Gong, Shuen-Rong; Chen, Ling-Yun; Chang, Poa-Chun

    2007-02-01

    We have identified a new phoX gene encoding the monomeric alkaline phosphatase from Pasteurella multocida X-73. This gene was not found in the published genome sequence of Pasteurella multocida pm70. Characterization of the recombinant PhoX of Pasteurella multocida X-73 showed that it is a monomeric enzyme, activated by Ca(2+) and possibly secreted by the Tat pathway. These features distinguish phosphatases of the PhoX family from those of the PhoA family. All proteins of the PhoX family were found to contain a conserved motif that shares significant sequence homology with the calcium-binding site of a phosphotriesterase known as diisopropylfluorophosphatase. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that D527 of PhoX might be the ligand bound to the catalytic calcium. This is the first report on identification of homologous sequences between PhoX and the phosphotriesterase and on the potential calcium-binding site of PhoX.

  11. Simulation of the chromatographic separation process in HPLC employing suspended-state NMR spectroscopy - comparison of interaction behavior for monomeric and hydride-modified C18 stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Yeman, Helen; Nicholson, Tim; Matyska, Maria T; Pesek, Joseph J; Albert, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The interactions of different analytes with monomeric and hydride-modified stationary phases have been investigated employing suspended-state NMR spectroscopy. The suspended-state high-resolution/magic-angle-spinning (1)H-NMR spectrum of an analyte in the presence of C(18) SP material shows a splitting into two sets of signals for the analyte molecule. One state reflects a closer interaction between analyte and C(18) -modified surface that results in an upfield shift and broader signal half-widths. This phenomenon suggests that the analyte exists in two environments. We report a systematic approach upon the investigation on the interaction in the interface of analyte, mobile phase, and modified silica through synthesis of differently modified silica with a gradual increase in surface coverage. The determination of the signal half-widths and chemical shifts revealed a relationship between the modification technique of the C(18) SPs and the chromatographic and NMR spectroscopic behavior. Increasing ligand density results in higher shielding of the NMR signals for the analyte in the "adsorbed" state. The measurement of spin-lattice relaxation times T(1) of the analyte molecule correlate NMR parameter together with separation behavior in HPLC. Furthermore, suspended-state and solid-state NMR measurements revealed different alkyl chain mobilities for the monomeric and hydride-modified SPs. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Simulations of monomeric amyloid β-peptide (1-40) with varying solution conditions and oxidation state of Met35: implications for aggregation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anne M; Lemkul, Justin A; Schaum, Nicholas; Bevan, David R

    2014-03-01

    The amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is a 40-42 residue peptide that is the principal toxic species in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The oxidation of methionine-35 (Met35) to the sulfoxide form (Met35(ox)) has been identified as potential modulator of Aβ aggregation. The role Met35(ox) plays in Aβ neurotoxicity differs among experimental studies, which may be due to inconsistent solution conditions (pH, buffer, temperature). We applied atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations as a means to probe the dynamics of the monomeric 40-residue alloform of Aβ (Aβ40) containing Met35 or Met35(ox) in an effort to resolve the conflicting experimental results. We found that Met35 oxidation decreases the β-strand content of the C-terminal hydrophobic region (residues 29-40), with a specific effect on the secondary structure of residues 33-35, thus potentially impeding aggregation. Further, there is an important interplay between oxidation state and solution conditions, with pH and salt concentration augmenting the effects of oxidation. The results presented here serve to rationalize the conflicting results seen in experimental studies and provide a fundamental biophysical characterization of monomeric Aβ40 dynamics in both reduced and oxidized forms, providing insight into the biochemical mechanism of Aβ40 and oxidative stress related to AD.

  13. ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N backbone resonance assignments of the monomeric human M-ficolin fibrinogen-like domain secreted by Brevibacillus choshinensis.

    PubMed

    Tanio, Michikazu; Kusunoki, Hideki; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2014-04-01

    M-ficolin, which forms trimer-based multimers, is a pathogen-recognition protein in the innate immune system, and it binds to ligands through its fibrinogen-like (FBG) domain. As the first step toward the elucidation of the molecular basis for pathogen-recognition by the M-ficolin multimers, we assigned the backbone resonances of the monomeric mutant of the M-ficolin FBG domain, recombinantly expressed by Brevibacillus choshinensis. Like the wild-type trimeric FBG domain, the monomeric FBG domain also requires His251, His284 and His297 for the ligand-binding activity, as judged by mutational analyses using zonal affinity chromatography. The secondary structure predicted by the backbone resonance assignments is similar to that of the trimeric FBG domain in the crystal, indicating that the monomeric FBG domain is folded correctly to perform its function.

  14. Investigation of monomeric and oligomeric wine stilbenoids in red wines by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moss, Ryan; Mao, Qinyong; Taylor, Dennis; Saucier, Cédric

    2013-08-30

    Stilbenoids are secondary plant metabolites responsible for the protection of multiple plant species including grape vine from bacterial and fungal infection. Red wine has been shown to be a major source of these compounds in the human diet, where they display an array of health benefits. Providing a more complete profile of the stilbenoids present in red wine, this study detects 41 stilbenoid compounds, 23 of which have never before been detected in red wine. Red wine extracts were scanned using an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatograph coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass analyzer. Multiple targeted MS/MS precursor ion scan experiments were performed using electrospray ionization operated in negative mode. Precursor ion masses were scanned for the monomeric and oligomeric stilbenoids, as well as modifications such as O-glycosylation, methoxylation and oxidation products of these compounds. Accurate mass precursor and characteristic product ions afforded partial structural elucidation and assignment of these compounds. A total of 41 (both known and novel) stilbenoids were detected in extracted red wine. In addition to the well-known monomeric stilbenes, several resveratrol-resveratrol homodimers (m/z 453.1344), resveratrol-piceatannol heterodimers (m/z 469.1293) and piceatannol-piceatannol homodimers (m/z 485.1236) were detected. Modified dimers of resveratrol including O-glycosylated (m/z 615.1872), methoxylated (m/z 485.1606) and oxidized (m/z 471.1449) dimers were also detected. Multiple trimers of resveratrol (m/z 679.1978) were detected for the first time in red wine, as well as some known and some novel stilbenoid tetramers (m/z 905.2604). In summary, 41 stilbenoids were detected in red wine, 23 for the first time. Both monomeric and oligomeric stilbenoids were partially identified and assigned by their accurate mass precursor ions and characteristic stilbenoid fragmentation patterns. Knowledge gained from these experiments contributes to

  15. A role of valency of concanavalin A and its chemically modified derivatives in lymphocyte activation. Monovalent monomeric concanavalin A derivative can stimulate lymphocyte blastoid transformation.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Takaku, F; Hayashi, M; Tanaka, I; Abe, Y; Nagai, Y; Ishii, S

    1983-06-25

    A concanavalin A (ConA) derivative of a monovalent monomeric nature, including a monomeric molecular weight at pH 7.4, significantly induces lymphocyte blastoid transformation. The derivative was recently obtained by Tanaka, I., Abe, Y., Hamada, T., Yonemitsu, O., and Ishii, S. ((1981) J. Biochem. (Tokyo) 89, 1643-1646) by a novel procedure of photochemically induced alkylation of tryptophan residues of native tetravalent ConA using a high pressure mercury lamp in the presence of chloroacetamide followed by two steps of column chromatography. This monovalent monomeric ConA (Mm-ConA) was demonstrated to be almost equally potent in producing the maximal response of lymphocytes when compared with native tetrameric ConA, although Mm-ConA was required at about 70 times as high as the concentration of native ConA on a weight basis to attain the maximal response of lymphocyte activation. The binding potency of the former to lymphocytes was about two-thirds as potent as that of the latter. Mm-ConA failed to agglutinate sheep erythrocytes at concentrations 1800-fold higher than native tetravalent ConA, but showed a weak but definite agglutinating activity against guinea pig erythrocytes at a relatively high concentration (approximately 80 micrograms/ml). Cell cluster formation was observed in lymphocyte cultures for 24 to 48 h with Mm-ConA where DNA replication in stimulated lymphocytes was observable. No significant difference was observed between sizes of cell clusters formed in the presence of Mm-ConA and of native tetravalent ConA at this phase of lymphocyte activation. The present results suggest that the multivalency of ConA with respect to sugar-binding sites may not be a stringent requirement for lymphocyte activation, and that another binding site for cell membrane, which has been suggested to exist in the ConA protomer and to be hydrophobic (membranophilic), may play a subsidiary but important role in triggering lymphocyte blastoid transformation as well as

  16. Monomeric and Dimeric Oxidomolybdenum(V and VI) Complexes, Cytotoxicity, and DNA Interaction Studies: Molybdenum Assisted C═N Bond Cleavage of Salophen Ligands.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Sudarshana; Pasayat, Sagarika; Panda, Alok K; Dash, Subhashree P; Roy, Satabdi; Biswas, Ashis; Varma, Mokshada E; Joshi, Bimba N; Garribba, Eugenio; Kausar, Chahat; Patra, Samir Kumar; Kaminsky, Werner; Crochet, Aurélien; Dinda, Rupam

    2017-09-18

    Four novel dimeric bis-μ-imido bridged metal-metal bonded oxidomolybdenum(V) complexes [Mo(V)2O2L'2(1-4)] (1-4) (where L'(1-4) are rearranged ligands formed in situ from H2L(1-4)) and a new mononuclear dioxidomolybdenum(VI) complex [Mo(VI)O2L(5)] (5) synthesized from salen type N2O2 ligands are reported. This rare series of imido-bridged complexes (1-4) have been furnished from rearranged H3L'(1-4) ligands, containing an aromatic diimine (o-phenylenediamine) "linker", where Mo assisted hydrolysis followed by -C═N bond cleavage of one of the arms of the ligand H2L(1-4) took place. A monomeric molybdenum(V) intermediate species [Mo(V)O(HL'(1-4))(OEt)] (Id(1-4)) was generated in situ. The concomitant deprotonation and dimerization of two molybdenum(V) intermediate species (Id(1-4)) ultimately resulted in the formation of a bis-μ-imido bridge between the two molybdenum centers of [Mo(V)2O2L'2(1-4)] (1-4). The mechanism of formation of 1-4 has been discussed, and one of the rare intermediate monomeric molybdenum(V) species Id(4) has been isolated in the solid state and characterized. The monomeric dioxidomolybdenum(VI) complex [Mo(VI)O2L(5)] (5) was prepared from the ligand H2L(5) where the aromatic "linker" was replaced by an aliphatic diimine (1,2-diaminopropane). All the ligands and complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-vis spectroscopy, NMR, ESI-MS, and cyclic voltammetry, and the structural features of 1, 2, 4, and 5 have been solved by X-ray crystallography. The DNA binding and cleavage activity of 1-5 have been explored. The complexes interact with CT-DNA by the groove binding mode, and the binding constants range between 10(3) and 10(4) M(-1). Fairly good photoinduced cleavage of pUC19 supercoiled plasmid DNA was exhibited by all the complexes, with 4 showing the most promising photoinduced DNA cleavage activity of ∼93%. Moreover, in vitro cytotoxic activity of all the complexes was evaluated by MTT assay, which reveals that the

  17. Evaluating the effect of wood ultrastructural changes from mechanical treatment on kinetics of monomeric sugars and chemicals production in acid bisulfite treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yalan; Wang, Jinwu; Wolcott, Michael P

    2017-02-01

    Currently, various chemical-mechanical treatments were widely used in biofuel production to achieve high total sugar yields. However, the interaction between two treatments was scarcely investigated. In this study, we employed a ball milling process to create ultrastructural changes for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) micronized wood powders. The 0, 30, and 60min ball milled wood powders resulted in a crystallinity index of 0.41, 0.21, and 0.10 respectively. It was found that the ultrastructural changes accelerate monomeric sugars production without influencing the yield of sugar degradation products. The optimal acid bisulfite treatment time was substantially decreased from 120min to 40min as the cellulose crystallinity decreased. Meanwhile, total sugar yield increased from 65% to 92% and had a linear relation with a decrease of the cellulose crystallinity.

  18. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of total monomeric anthocyanin (TMA) and total phenolic content (TPC) from eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) peel.

    PubMed

    Dranca, Florina; Oroian, Mircea

    2016-07-01

    The present study describes the extraction of total monomeric anthocyanin (TMA) and total phenolic content (TPC) from eggplant peel using ultrasonic treatments and methanol and 2-propanol as extraction solvents. The extraction yields were optimized by varying the solvent concentration, ultrasonic frequency, temperature and time of ultrasonic treatment. Box-Behnken design was used to investigate the effect of process variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction. The results showed that for TPC extraction the optimal condition were obtained with a methanol concentration of 76.6%, 33.88 kHz ultrasonic frequency, a temperature of 69.4 °C and 57.5 min extraction time. For TMA the optimal condition were the following: 54.4% methanol concentration, 37 kHz, 55.1 °C and process time of 44.85 min. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Small Molecules Detected by Second-Harmonic Generation Modulate the Conformation of Monomeric α-Synuclein and Reduce Its Aggregation in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Moree, Ben; Yin, Guowei; Lázaro, Diana F.; Munari, Francesca; Strohäker, Timo; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Zweckstetter, Markus; Salafsky, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are structurally dynamic molecules that perform specialized functions through unique conformational changes accessible in physiological environments. An ability to specifically and selectively control protein function via conformational modulation is an important goal for development of novel therapeutics and studies of protein mechanism in biological networks and disease. Here we applied a second-harmonic generation-based technique for studying protein conformation in solution and in real time to the intrinsically disordered, Parkinson disease related protein α-synuclein. From a fragment library, we identified small molecule modulators that bind to monomeric α-synuclein in vitro and significantly reduce α-synuclein aggregation in a neuronal cell culture model. Our results indicate that the conformation of α-synuclein is linked to the aggregation of protein in cells. They also provide support for a therapeutic strategy of targeting specific conformations of the protein to suppress or control its aggregation. PMID:26396193

  20. Plant small monomeric G-proteins (RAC/ROPs) of barley are common elements of susceptibility to fungal leaf pathogens, cell expansion and stomata development.

    PubMed

    Pathuri, Indira Priyadarshini; Eichmann, Ruth; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2009-02-01

    Small monomeric RAC/ROP GTPases act as molecular switches in signal transduction processes of plant development and stress responses. They emerged as crucial players in plant-pathogen interactions either by supporting susceptibility or resistance. In a recent publication, we showed that constitutively activated (CA) mutants of different barley (Hordeum vulgare) RAC/ROPs regulate susceptibility to barley fungal leaf pathogens of different life style in a contrasting way. This illustrates the distinctive signalling roles of RAC/ROPs for different plant-pathogen combinations. We also reported the involvement of RAC/ROPs in plant epidermis development in a monocotyledonous plant. Here we further discuss a failure of CA HvRAC/ROP-expressing barley to normally develop stomata.

  1. Plant small monomeric G-proteins (RAC/ROPs) of barley are common elements of susceptibility to fungal leaf pathogens, cell expansion and stomata development

    PubMed Central

    Pathuri, Indira Priyadarshini; Eichmann, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Small monomeric RAC/ROP GTPases act as molecular switches in signal transduction processes of plant development and stress responses. They emerged as crucial players in plant-pathogen interactions either by supporting susceptibility or resistance. In a recent publication, we showed that constitutively activated (CA) mutants of different barley (Hordeum vulgare) RAC/ROPs regulate susceptibility to barley fungal leaf pathogens of different life style in a contrasting way. This illustrates the distinctive signalling roles of RAC/ROPs for different plant-pathogen combinations. We also reported the involvement of RAC/ROPs in plant epidermis development in a monocotyledonous plant. Here we further discuss a failure of CA HvRAC/ROP-expressing barley to normally develop stomata. PMID:19649182

  2. Hydrolyzable tannins of tamaricaceous plants. V. Structures of monomeric-trimeric tannins and cytotoxicity of macrocyclic-type tannins isolated from Tamarix nilotica (1).

    PubMed

    Orabi, Mohamed A A; Taniguchi, Shoko; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Morio; Yoshida, Takashi; Hatano, Tsutomu

    2013-05-24

    Three new ellagitannin monomers, nilotinins M5-M7 (1-3), a dimer, nilotinin D10 (4), and a trimer, nilotinin T1 (5), together with three known dimers, hirtellin D (7) and tamarixinins B (8) and C (9), and a trimer, hirtellin T2 (6), were isolated from Tamarix nilotica dried leaves. The structures of the tannins were elucidated by intensive spectroscopic methods and chemical conversions into known tannins. The new trimer (5) is a unique macrocyclic type whose monomeric units are linked together by an isodehydrodigalloyl and two dehydrodigalloyl moieties. Additionally, dimeric and trimeric macrocyclic-type tannins isolated from T. nilotica in this study were assessed for possible cytotoxic activity against four human tumor cell lines. Tumor-selective cytotoxicities of the tested compounds were higher than those of synthetic and natural potent cytotoxic compounds, including polyphenols, and comparable with those of 5-fluorouracil and melphalan.

  3. Purified monomeric ligand.MD-2 complexes reveal molecular and structural requirements for activation and antagonism of TLR4 by Gram-negative bacterial endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Gioannini, Theresa L; Teghanemt, Athmane; Zhang, DeSheng; Esparza, Gregory; Yu, Liping; Weiss, Jerrold

    2014-08-01

    A major focus of work in our laboratory concerns the molecular mechanisms and structural bases of Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin recognition by host (e.g., human) endotoxin-recognition proteins that mediate and/or regulate activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Here, we review studies of wild-type and variant monomeric endotoxin.MD-2 complexes first produced and characterized in our laboratories. These purified complexes have provided unique experimental reagents, revealing both quantitative and qualitative determinants of TLR4 activation and antagonism. This review is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Theresa L. Gioannini (1949-2014) who played a central role in many of the studies and discoveries that are reviewed.

  4. Ligand Exchange Reactions of a Monomeric Zirconium Carbonate Complex with Carboxylic Acids Studied by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, UV Absorption and Raman Spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Fumiyuki; Fujiwara, Kazuhiko; Kikuchi, Tomomi; Tanno, Takenori; Nakajima, Yasushi; Toyoda, Yasunori; Ogawa, Nobuaki

    2017-01-01

    Ligand exchange reactions of a monomeric zirconium carbonate complex with carboxylic acids were studied by means of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), UV absorption spectrophotometry and Raman spectrometry. Three carboxylic acids, gluconic acid, and L-tartaric acid and citric acid, which are mono-, di- and tri-carboxylic acids, respectively, were employed in this study. These three carboxylic acids gave different spectral signatures and concentration dependences, respectively. In the gluconic acid system, the peaks on Fourier transform of EXAFS spectrum and Raman spectrum caused by carbonate ion coordinating to zirconium atom were obviously decreased with increasing gluconic acid concentration compared to the other two carboxylic acid systems. This indicates the high association ability of gluconic acid to zirconium, which was revealed by UV spectrophotometric analysis.

  5. Determination of total monomeric anthocyanin pigment content of fruit juices, beverages, natural colorants, and wines by the pH differential method: collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungmin; Durst, Robert W; Wrolstad, Ronald E

    2005-01-01

    This collaborative study was conducted to determine the total monomeric anthocyanin concentration by the pH differential method, which is a rapid and simple spectrophotometric method based on the anthocyanin structural transformation that occurs with a change in pH (colored at pH 1.0 and colorless at pH 4.5). Eleven collaborators representing commercial laboratories, academic institutions, and government laboratories participated. Seven Youden pair materials representing fruit juices, beverages, natural colorants, and wines were tested. The repeatability relative standard deviation (RSDr) varied from 1.06 to 4.16%. The reproducibility relative standard deviation (RSDR) ranged from 2.69 to 10.12%. The HorRat values were < or = 1.33 for all materials. The Study Director recommends that the method be adopted Official First Action.

  6. Zn-bis-glutathionate is the best co-substrate of the monomeric phytochelatin synthase from the photosynthetic heavy metal-hyperaccumulator Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    García-García, Jorge D; Girard, Lourdes; Hernández, Georgina; Saavedra, Emma; Pardo, Juan P; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Encalada, Rusely; Reyes-Prieto, Adrián; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    The phytochelatin synthase from photosynthetic Euglena gracilis (EgPCS) was analyzed at the transcriptional, kinetic, functional, and phylogenetic levels. Recombinant EgPCS was a monomeric enzyme able to synthesize, in the presence of Zn(2+) or Cd(2+), phytochelatin2-phytochelatin4 (PC2-PC4) using GSH or S-methyl-GS (S-methyl-glutathione), but not γ-glutamylcysteine or PC2 as a substrate. Kinetic analysis of EgPCS firmly established a two-substrate reaction mechanism for PC2 synthesis with Km values of 14-22 mM for GSH and 1.6-2.5 μM for metal-bis-glutathionate (Me-GS2). EgPCS showed the highest Vmax and catalytic efficiency with Zn-(GS)2, and was inactivated by peroxides. The EgPCS N-terminal domain showed high similarity to that of other PCSases, in which the typical catalytic core (Cys-70, His-179 and Asp-197) was identified. In contrast, the C-terminal domain showed no similarity to other PCSases. An EgPCS mutant comprising only the N-terminal 235 amino acid residues was inactive, suggesting that the C-terminal domain is essential for activity/stability. EgPCS transcription in Euglena cells was not modified by Cd(2+), whereas its heterologous expression in ycf-1 yeast cells provided resistance to Cd(2+) stress. Phylogenetic analysis of the N-terminal domain showed that EgPCS is distant from plants and other photosynthetic organisms, suggesting that it evolved independently. Although EgPCS showed typical features of PCSases (constitutive expression; conserved N-terminal domain; kinetic mechanism), it also exhibited distinct characteristics such as preference for Zn-(GS)2 over Cd-(GS)2 as a co-substrate, a monomeric structure, and ability to solely synthesize short-chain PCs, which may be involved in conferring enhanced heavy-metal resistance.

  7. Assessment of the effect of type of dairy product and of chocolate matrix on the oral absorption of monomeric chocolate flavanols in a small animal model.

    PubMed

    Gossai, D; Lau-Cam, C A

    2009-03-01

    This study has examined the effects of type of dairy product (whole milk, skim milk, heavy cream) and chocolate matrix (baking, dark, dairy milk, white) on the oral absorption of the chocolate flavanols (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin in a small animal model. In the study, each flavanol compound, as a solution in water or a dairy product or as a chocolate dispersion in water, was administered intragastrically to male Sprague-Dawley rats in an amount equal to or equivalent to 350 mg/kg. In each instance, blood samples were collected over a 5 h period, and used to measure plasma total catechin concentrations by HPLC after enzymatic hydrolysis of flavanol conjugates. Pharmacokinetic data were evaluated using a one compartment approach. Whole milk and heavy cream, and to a much lesser extent skim milk, lowered the oral absorption of both (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin and altered the AUC, C(max), k(a), k(e) and t1/2 values in direct proportion to their fat, but not to their protein, content. In addition, the t(max) for solutions of (-)-epicatechin in water and skim milk occurred 2 h earlier than from solutions in whole milk and heavy cream. Similarly, dispersions of baking chocolate in water and in whole milk yielded plasma levels of monomeric catechins that were, respectively, about equal to and much lower than those from aqueous solutions of authentic flavanols. A determining role for a chocolate matrix (dark, dairy milk or white chocolate) on the oral absorption of its constitutive monomeric flavanols was suggested by the apparent variability in plasma total catechins levels that existed among them both before and after their spiking with equal amounts of exogenous (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin. Such a variability could reflect differences among different chocolates in terms of their physical properties, matrix components, and matrix characteristics imposed by the manufacturing process used for each type of chocolate. In all the experiments, (+)-catechin

  8. Resolution of two native monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, Philippa J.L.; McKinzie, Audra A.; Codd, Rachel

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Two monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina. {yields} Sequence of napA from napEDABC-type operon and napA from NapDAGHB-type operon. {yields} Isolation of NAP as NapA or NapAB correlated with NapA P47E amino acid substitution. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90 kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90 kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90 kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  9. Irreversible aggregation of the Fc fragment derived from polymeric but not monomeric serum IgA1--implications in IgA-mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Almogren, Adel; Kerr, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    IgA is by far the most abundant immunoglobulin in humans. It is found in serum and in secretions (SIgA). Unlike any other class of immunoglobulin, each form of IgA occurs naturally in different polymerisation states. In serum, the predominant form of IgA is IgA1 of which around 90% is monomeric and 10% is dimeric or polymeric. The proportion of dimeric/polymeric IgA increases in a number of important diseases, such as IgA nephropathy and in chronic liver disease. In both, there is evidence that further aggregation of dimeric/polymeric IgA is the cause of the characteristic tissue deposition. To investigate the effect of role of IgA polymerisation on the structure and function of IgA, we purified different molecular forms of IgA1 from myeloma serum (monomer, dimer and trimer) and SIgA1 from colostrum. Structural features of these different IgA1 forms were examined following proteolysis using Neisseria gonorrhoeae IgA1 type 2 protease and Streptococcus pneumoniae IgA1 protease. These IgA1 proteases cleave IgA1 at the hinge region and produce Fcalpha and Fab fragments. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the Fcalpha fragments of serum dimeric and trimeric but not monomeric IgA1 aggregated to form multimers resistant to disruption in SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions. Size exclusion chromatography under native conditions of cleaved serum dimeric IgA1 demonstrated that aggregation occurs because of structural changes in the IgA per se and was not an effect of the SDS-PAGE system. In the same assay, SIgA1 (dimeric) did not aggregate after digestion. The results suggest an important, previously unrecognised, property of dimeric/polymeric serum IgA1, which might explain its propensity to aggregate and deposit in tissues.

  10. Monomeric C-phycocyanin at room temperature and 77 K. Resolution of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the individual chromophores and the energy-transfer rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA ); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. )

    1993-09-23

    At both room temperature (RT) and 77 K, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the three individual chromophore types ([alpha][sub 84], [beta][sub 84], and [beta][sub 155]) found in monomeric C-phycocyanin ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]), isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, were resolved along with the rates of energy transfer between the chromophores. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the [beta][sub 155] chromophore, was useful in effecting this resolution. At RT, the single broad peak in the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) was resolved into its three-component spectra by comparing the steady-state absorption spectra of the isolated wild-type [alpha] subunit of PC ([alpha][sup PC]) (containing only the [alpha][sub 84] chromophore) with those of the monomeric PCs isolated from the mutant strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) and the wild-type strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]). At 77 K, the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) splits into two peaks. This partial resolution at 77 K of the chromophore spectra of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) when compared with the 77 K absorption spectra of [alpha][sup PC], [beta][sup PC], and ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) provided a confirmation of our RT assignments of the chromophore absorption spectra. 38 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Salt anions promote the conversion of HypF-N into amyloid-like oligomers and modulate the structure of the oligomers and the monomeric precursor state.

    PubMed

    Campioni, Silvia; Mannini, Benedetta; López-Alonso, Jorge P; Shalova, Irina N; Penco, Amanda; Mulvihill, Estefania; Laurents, Douglas V; Relini, Annalisa; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2012-12-07

    An understanding of the solution factors contributing to the rate of aggregation of a protein into amyloid oligomers, to the modulation of the conformational state populated prior to aggregation and to the structure/morphology of the resulting oligomers is one of the goals of present research in this field. We have studied the influence of six different salts on the conversion of the N-terminal domain of Escherichiacoli HypF (HypF-N) into amyloid-like oligomers under conditions of acidic pH. Our results show that salts having different anions (NaCl, NaClO(4), NaI, Na(2)SO(4)) accelerate oligomerization with an efficacy that follows the electroselectivity series of the anions (SO(4)(2-)≥ ClO(4)(-)>I(-)>Cl(-)). By contrast, salts with different cations (NaCl, LiCl, KCl) have similar effects. We also investigated the effect of salts on the structure of the final and initial states of HypF-N aggregation. The electroselectivity series does not apply to the effect of anions on the structure of the oligomers. By contrast, it applies to their effect on the content of secondary structure and on the exposure of hydrophobic clusters of the monomeric precursor state. The results therefore indicate that the binding of anions to the positively charged residues of HypF-N at low pH is the mechanism by which salts modulate the rate of oligomerization and the structure of the monomeric precursor state but not the structure of the resulting oligomers. Overall, the data contribute to rationalize the effect of salts on amyloid-like oligomer formation and to explain the role of charged biological macromolecules in protein aggregation processes.

  12. Crystal Structure of a Monomeric Form of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Endonuclease Nsp15 Suggests a Role for Hexamerization As An Allosteric Switch

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, J.S.; Saikatendu, K.S.; Subramanian, V.; Neuman, B.W.; Buchmeier, M.J.; Stevens, R.C.; Kuhn, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-09

    Mature nonstructural protein-15 (nsp15) from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) contains a novel uridylate-specific Mn{sup 2+}-dependent endoribonuclease (NendoU). Structure studies of the full-length form of the obligate hexameric enzyme from two CoVs, SARS-CoV and murine hepatitis virus, and its monomeric homologue, XendoU from Xenopus laevis, combined with mutagenesis studies have implicated several residues in enzymatic activity and the N-terminal domain as the major determinant of hexamerization. However, the tight link between hexamerization and enzyme activity in NendoUs has remained an enigma. Here, we report the structure of a trimmed, monomeric form of SARS-CoV nsp15 (residues 28 to 335) determined to a resolution of 2.9 Angstroms. The catalytic loop (residues 234 to 249) with its two reactive histidines (His 234 and His 249) is dramatically flipped by {approx}120 degrees into the active site cleft. Furthermore, the catalytic nucleophile Lys 289 points in a diametrically opposite direction, a consequence of an outward displacement of the supporting loop (residues 276 to 295). In the full-length hexameric forms, these two loops are packed against each other and are stabilized by intimate intersubunit interactions. Our results support the hypothesis that absence of an adjacent monomer due to deletion of the hexamerization domain is the most likely cause for disruption of the active site, offering a structural basis for why only the hexameric form of this enzyme is active.

  13. X-ray and cryo-EM structures of monomeric and filamentous actin-like protein MamK reveal changes associated with polymerization

    PubMed Central

    He, Shaoda; Savva, Christos G.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce iron-rich magnetic nanoparticles that are enclosed by membrane invaginations to form magnetosomes so they are able to sense and act upon Earth’s magnetic field. In Magnetospirillum and other magnetotactic bacteria, to combine their magnetic moments, magnetosomes align along filaments formed by a bacterial actin homolog, MamK. Here, we present the crystal structure of a nonpolymerizing mutant of MamK from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 at 1.8-Å resolution, revealing its close similarity to actin and MreB. The crystals contain AMPPNP-bound monomeric MamK in two different conformations. To investigate conformational changes associated with polymerization, we used unmodified MamK protein and cryo-EM with helical 3D reconstruction in RELION to obtain a density map and a fully refined atomic model of MamK in filamentous form at 3.6-Å resolution. The filament is parallel (polar) double-helical, with a rise of 52.2 Å and a twist of 23.8°. As shown previously and unusually for actin-like filaments, the MamK subunits from each of the two strands are juxtaposed, creating an additional twofold axis along the filament. Compared with monomeric MamK, ADP-bound MamK in the filament undergoes a conformational change, rotating domains I and II against each other to further close the interdomain cleft between subdomains IB and IIB. The domain movement causes several loops to close around the nucleotide-binding pocket. Glu-143, a key residue for catalysis coordinating the magnesium ion, moves closer, presumably switching nucleotide hydrolysis upon polymerization—one of the hallmarks of cytomotive filaments of the actin type. PMID:27821762

  14. X-ray and cryo-EM structures of monomeric and filamentous actin-like protein MamK reveal changes associated with polymerization.

    PubMed

    Löwe, Jan; He, Shaoda; Scheres, Sjors H W; Savva, Christos G

    2016-11-22

    Magnetotactic bacteria produce iron-rich magnetic nanoparticles that are enclosed by membrane invaginations to form magnetosomes so they are able to sense and act upon Earth's magnetic field. In Magnetospirillum and other magnetotactic bacteria, to combine their magnetic moments, magnetosomes align along filaments formed by a bacterial actin homolog, MamK. Here, we present the crystal structure of a nonpolymerizing mutant of MamK from Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 at 1.8-Å resolution, revealing its close similarity to actin and MreB. The crystals contain AMPPNP-bound monomeric MamK in two different conformations. To investigate conformational changes associated with polymerization, we used unmodified MamK protein and cryo-EM with helical 3D reconstruction in RELION to obtain a density map and a fully refined atomic model of MamK in filamentous form at 3.6-Å resolution. The filament is parallel (polar) double-helical, with a rise of 52.2 Å and a twist of 23.8°. As shown previously and unusually for actin-like filaments, the MamK subunits from each of the two strands are juxtaposed, creating an additional twofold axis along the filament. Compared with monomeric MamK, ADP-bound MamK in the filament undergoes a conformational change, rotating domains I and II against each other to further close the interdomain cleft between subdomains IB and IIB. The domain movement causes several loops to close around the nucleotide-binding pocket. Glu-143, a key residue for catalysis coordinating the magnesium ion, moves closer, presumably switching nucleotide hydrolysis upon polymerization-one of the hallmarks of cytomotive filaments of the actin type.

  15. Understanding the Effect of Monomeric Iridium(III/IV) Aquo Complexes on the Photoelectrochemistry of IrO(x)·nH2O-Catalyzed Water-Splitting Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Vargas-Barbosa, Nella M; Strayer, Megan E; McCool, Nicholas S; Pandelia, Maria-Erini; Saunders, Timothy P; Swierk, John R; Callejas, Juan F; Jensen, Lasse; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2015-07-15

    Soluble, monomeric Ir(III/IV) complexes strongly affect the photoelectrochemical performance of IrO(x)·nH2O-catalyzed photoanodes for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The synthesis of IrO(x)·nH2O colloids by alkaline hydrolysis of Ir(III) or Ir(IV) salts proceeds through monomeric intermediates that were characterized using electrochemical and spectroscopic methods and modeled in TDDFT calculations. In air-saturated solutions, the monomers exist in a mixture of Ir(III) and Ir(IV) oxidation states, where the most likely formulations at pH 13 are [Ir(OH)5(H2O)](2-) and [Ir(OH)6](2-), respectively. These monomeric anions strongly adsorb onto IrO(x)·nH2O colloids but can be removed by precipitation of the colloids with isopropanol. The monomeric anions strongly adsorb onto TiO2, and they promote the adsorption of ligand-free IrO(x)·nH2O colloids onto mesoporous titania photoanodes. However, the reversible adsorption/desorption of electroactive monomers effectively short-circuits the photoanode redox cycle and thus dramatically degrades the photoelectrochemical performance of the cell. The growth of a dense TiO2 barrier layer prevents access of soluble monomeric anions to the interface between the oxide semiconductor and the electrode back contact (a fluorinated tin oxide transparent conductor) and leads to improved photoanode performance. Purified IrO(x)·nH2O colloids, which contain no adsorbed monomer, give improved performance at the same electrodes. These results explain earlier observations that IrO(x)·nH2O catalysts can dramatically degrade the performance of metal oxide photoanodes for the OER reaction.

  16. The Escherichia coli P and Type 1 Pilus Assembly Chaperones PapD and FimC Are Monomeric in Solution.

    PubMed

    Sarowar, Samema; Hu, Olivia J; Werneburg, Glenn T; Thanassi, David G; Li, Huilin

    2016-09-01

    The chaperone/usher pathway is used by Gram-negative bacteria to assemble adhesive surface structures known as pili or fimbriae. Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli use this pathway to assemble P and type 1 pili, which facilitate colonization of the kidney and bladder, respectively. Pilus assembly requires a periplasmic chaperone and outer membrane protein termed the usher. The chaperone allows folding of pilus subunits and escorts the subunits to the usher for polymerization into pili and secretion to the cell surface. Based on previous structures of mutant versions of the P pilus chaperone PapD, it was suggested that the chaperone dimerizes in the periplasm as a self-capping mechanism. Such dimerization is counterintuitive because the chaperone G1 strand, important for chaperone-subunit interaction, is buried at the dimer interface. Here, we show that the wild-type PapD chaperone also forms a dimer in the crystal lattice; however, the dimer interface is different from the previously solved structures. In contrast to the crystal structures, we found that both PapD and the type 1 pilus chaperone, FimC, are monomeric in solution. Our findings indicate that pilus chaperones do not sequester their G1 β-strand by forming a dimer. Instead, the chaperones may expose their G1 strand for facile interaction with pilus subunits. We also found that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, is flexible in solution while in complex with its chaperone, whereas the P pilus adhesin, PapGII, is rigid. Our study clarifies a crucial step in pilus biogenesis and reveals pilus-specific differences that may relate to biological function. Pili are critical virulence factors for many bacterial pathogens. Uropathogenic E. coli relies on P and type 1 pili assembled by the chaperone/usher pathway to adhere to the urinary tract and establish infection. Studying pilus assembly is important for understanding mechanisms of protein secretion, as well as for identifying points for therapeutic

  17. The solution structures of native and patient monomeric human IgA1 reveal asymmetric extended structures: implications for function and IgAN disease

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Gar Kay; Wright, David W.; Vennard, Owen L.; Rayner, Lucy E.; Pang, Melisa; Yeo, See Cheng; Gor, Jayesh; Molyneux, Karen; Barratt, Jonathan; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Native IgA1, for which no crystal structure is known, contains an O-galactosylated 23-residue hinge region that joins its Fab and Fc regions. IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a leading cause of chronic kidney disease in developed countries. Because IgA1 in IgAN often has a poorly O-galactosylated hinge region, the solution structures of monomeric IgA1 from a healthy subject and three IgAN patients with four different O-galactosylation levels were studied. Analytical ultracentrifugation showed that all four IgA1 samples were monomeric with similar sedimentation coefficients, s020,w. X-ray scattering showed that the radius of gyration (Rg) slightly increased with IgA1 concentration, indicating self-association, although their distance distribution curves, P(r), were unchanged with concentration. Neutron scattering indicated similar Rg values and P(r) curves, although IgA1 showed a propensity to aggregate in heavy water buffer. A new atomistic modelling procedure based on comparisons with 177000 conformationally-randomized IgA1 structures with the individual experimental scattering curves revealed similar extended Y-shaped solution structures for all four differentially-glycosylated IgA1 molecules. The final models indicated that the N-glycans at Asn263 were folded back against the Fc surface, the C-terminal tailpiece conformations were undefined and hinge O-galactosylation had little effect on the solution structure. The solution structures for full-length IgA1 showed extended hinges and the Fab and Fc regions were positioned asymmetrically to provide ample space for the functionally-important binding of two FcαR receptors to its Fc region. Whereas no link between O-galactosylation and the IgA1 solution structure was detected, an increase in IgA1 aggregation with reduced O-galactosylation may relate to IgAN. PMID:26268558

  18. The Escherichia coli P and Type 1 Pilus Assembly Chaperones PapD and FimC Are Monomeric in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Sarowar, Samema; Hu, Olivia J.; Werneburg, Glenn T.; Thanassi, David G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chaperone/usher pathway is used by Gram-negative bacteria to assemble adhesive surface structures known as pili or fimbriae. Uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli use this pathway to assemble P and type 1 pili, which facilitate colonization of the kidney and bladder, respectively. Pilus assembly requires a periplasmic chaperone and outer membrane protein termed the usher. The chaperone allows folding of pilus subunits and escorts the subunits to the usher for polymerization into pili and secretion to the cell surface. Based on previous structures of mutant versions of the P pilus chaperone PapD, it was suggested that the chaperone dimerizes in the periplasm as a self-capping mechanism. Such dimerization is counterintuitive because the chaperone G1 strand, important for chaperone-subunit interaction, is buried at the dimer interface. Here, we show that the wild-type PapD chaperone also forms a dimer in the crystal lattice; however, the dimer interface is different from the previously solved structures. In contrast to the crystal structures, we found that both PapD and the type 1 pilus chaperone, FimC, are monomeric in solution. Our findings indicate that pilus chaperones do not sequester their G1 β-strand by forming a dimer. Instead, the chaperones may expose their G1 strand for facile interaction with pilus subunits. We also found that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, is flexible in solution while in complex with its chaperone, whereas the P pilus adhesin, PapGII, is rigid. Our study clarifies a crucial step in pilus biogenesis and reveals pilus-specific differences that may relate to biological function. IMPORTANCE Pili are critical virulence factors for many bacterial pathogens. Uropathogenic E. coli relies on P and type 1 pili assembled by the chaperone/usher pathway to adhere to the urinary tract and establish infection. Studying pilus assembly is important for understanding mechanisms of protein secretion, as well as for identifying points for

  19. Folded-back solution structure of monomeric factor H of human complement by synchrotron X-ray and neutron scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and constrained molecular modelling.

    PubMed

    Aslam, M; Perkins, S J

    2001-06-22

    Factor H (FH) is a regulatory cofactor for the protease factor I in the breakdown of C3b in the complement system of immune defence, and binds to heparin and other polyanionic substrates. FH is composed of 20 short consensus/complement repeat (SCR) domains, for which the overall arrangement in solution is unknown. As previous studies had shown that FH can form monomeric or dimeric structures, X-ray and neutron scattering was accordingly performed with FH in the concentration range between 0.7 and 14 mg ml(-1). The radius of gyration of FH was determined to be 11.1-11.3 nm by both methods, and the radii of gyration of the cross-section were 4.4 nm and 1.7 nm. The distance distribution function P(r) showed that the overall length of FH was 38 nm. The neutron data showed that FH was monomeric with a molecular mass of 165,000(+/-17,000) Da. Analytical ultracentrifugation data confirmed this, where sedimentation equilibrium curve fits gave a mean molecular mass of 155,000(+/-3,000) Da. Sedimentation velocity experiments using the g*(s) derivative method showed that FH was monodisperse and had a sedimentation coefficient of 5.3(+/-0.1) S. In order to construct a full model of FH for scattering curve and sedimentation coefficient fits, homology models were constructed for 17 of the 20 SCR domains using knowledge of the NMR structures for FH SCR-5, SCR-15 and SCR-16, and vaccinia coat protein SCR-3 and SCR-4. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to generate a large conformational library for each of the 19 SCR-SCR linker peptides. Peptides from these libraries were combined with the 20 SCR structures in order to generate stereochemically complete models for the FH structure. Using an automated constrained fit procedure, the analysis of 16,752 possible FH models showed that only those models in which the 20 SCR domains were bent back upon themselves were able to account for the scattering and sedimentation data. The best-fit models showed that FH had an overall length

  20. Lewis base complexes of AlH3: structural determination of monomeric and polymeric adducts by X-ray crystallography and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Terry D; Munroe, Keelie T; Decken, Andreas; McGrady, G Sean

    2013-05-21

    The AlH3 adducts of TMEDA (Me2NCH2CH2NMe2), DIOX (O(CH2CH2)2O), TEA (Et3N), BDMA (PhNMe2), and TMPDA (Me2NCH2CH2CH2NMe2) have each been characterised by single-crystal X-ray diffraction at low temperature, by (1)H, (14)N and (27)Al NMR and FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy, and by DFT calculations and elemental analysis. Hence, AlH3·TMEDA and AlH3·DIOX are both shown to adopt a polymeric structure, with the bidentate ligand bridging two Al centres, each of which adopts a trigonal bipyramidal (TBP) arrangement with equatorial hydride moieties. The 1 : 2 adduct AlH3·2BDMA is monomeric but the geometry at the Al centre resembles closely that of the polymeric TMEDA and DIOX complexes. AlH3·TEA alone adopts a monomeric structure in which the Al centre is tetrahedrally coordinated by three hydride and one amine ligand. The Al-L bond distance of 2.0240(17) Å for AlH3·TEA is the shortest of all the complexes in this study, and AlH3·TEA also possesses the shortest Al-H bonds. AlH3·DIOX has the shortest Al-L bond distance of the polymeric species (2.107(14) Å) on account of the higher electronegativity of the oxygen donor. The structure of AlH3·TMEDA was determined at low temperature (monoclinic space group P2(1)/c), and salient features are compared to the previous room temperature study, for which a highly disordered orthorhombic space group (P2(1)2(1)2(1)) was reported. The polymeric structures appear to be stabilised by a number of intermolecular interactions and unconventional hydrogen bonds; these are most pronounced for AlH3·DIOX, whose chains are connected by highly directional C-H···H-Al bonding with an H···H distance of 2.32(6) Å.

  1. The Escherichia coli P and Type 1 Pilus Assembly Chaperones PapD and FimC Are Monomeric in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Sarowar, Samema; Hu, Olivia J.; Werneburg, Glenn T.; Thanassi, David G.; Li, Huilin; Christie, P. J.

    2016-06-27

    ABSTRACT

    The chaperone/usher pathway is used by Gram-negative bacteria to assemble adhesive surface structures known as pili or fimbriae. Uropathogenic strains ofEscherichia coliuse this pathway to assemble P and type 1 pili, which facilitate colonization of the kidney and bladder, respectively. Pilus assembly requires a periplasmic chaperone and outer membrane protein termed the usher. The chaperone allows folding of pilus subunits and escorts the subunits to the usher for polymerization into pili and secretion to the cell surface. Based on previous structures of mutant versions of the P pilus chaperone PapD, it was suggested that the chaperone dimerizes in the periplasm as a self-capping mechanism. Such dimerization is counterintuitive because the chaperone G1 strand, important for chaperone-subunit interaction, is buried at the dimer interface. Here, we show that the wild-type PapD chaperone also forms a dimer in the crystal lattice; however, the dimer interface is different from the previously solved structures. In contrast to the crystal structures, we found that both PapD and the type 1 pilus chaperone, FimC, are monomeric in solution. Our findings indicate that pilus chaperones do not sequester their G1 β-strand by forming a dimer. Instead, the chaperones may expose their G1 strand for facile interaction with pilus subunits. We also found that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, is flexible in solution while in complex with its chaperone, whereas the P pilus adhesin, PapGII, is rigid. Our study clarifies a crucial step in pilus biogenesis and reveals pilus-specific differences that may relate to biological function.

    IMPORTANCEPili are critical virulence factors for many bacterial pathogens. UropathogenicE. colirelies on P and type 1 pili assembled by the chaperone/usher pathway to adhere to the urinary

  2. Complement factor H binding of monomeric C-reactive protein downregulates proinflammatory activity and is impaired with at risk polymorphic CFH variants

    PubMed Central

    Molins, Blanca; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Adán, Alfredo; Antón, Rosa; Arostegui, Juan I.; Yagüe, Jordi; Dick, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and immune-mediated processes are pivotal to the pathogenic progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Although plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been shown to be associated with an increased risk for AMD, the pathophysiological importance of the prototypical acute-phase reactant in the etiology of the disease is unknown, and data regarding the exact role of CRP in ocular inflammation are limited. In this study, we provide mechanistic insight into how CRP contributes to the development of AMD. In particular, we show that monomeric CRP (mCRP) but not the pentameric form (pCRP) upregulates IL-8 and CCL2 levels in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Further, we show that complement factor H (FH) binds mCRP to dampen its proinflammatory activity. FH from AMD patients carrying the “risk” His402 polymorphism displays impaired binding to mCRP, and therefore proinflammatory effects of mCRP remain unrestrained. PMID:26961257

  3. The monomeric and dimeric mannose-binding proteins from the Orchidaceae species Listera ovata and Epipactis helleborine: sequence homologies and differences in biological activities.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, E J; Balzarini, J; Smeets, K; Van Leuven, F; Peumans, W J

    1994-08-01

    The Orchidaceae species Listera ovata and Epipactis helleborine contain two types of mannose-binding proteins. Using a combination of affinity chromatography on mannose-Sepharose-4B and ion exchange chromatography on a Mono-S column eight different mannose-binding proteins were isolated from the leaves of Listera ovata. Whereas seven of these mannose-binding proteins have agglutination activity and occur as dimers composed of lectin subunits of 11-13 kDa, the eighth mannose-binding protein is a monomer of 14 kDa devoid of agglutination activity. Moreover, the monomeric mannose-binding protein does not react with an antiserum raised against the dimeric lectin and, in contrast to the lectins, is completely inactive when tested for antiretroviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2. Mannose-binding proteins with similar properties were also found in the leaves of Epipactis helleborine. However, in contrast to Listera only one lectin was found in Epipactis. Despite the obvious differences in molecular structure and biological activities molecular cloning of different mannose-binding proteins from Listera and Epipactis has shown that these proteins are related and some parts of the sequences show a high degree of sequence homology indicating that they have been conserved through evolution.

  4. Degenerate sequence recognition by the monomeric restriction enzyme: single mutation converts BcnI into a strand-specific nicking endonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Kostiuk, Georgij; Sasnauskas, Giedrius; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2011-01-01

    Unlike orthodox Type II restriction endonucleases that are homodimers and interact with the palindromic 4–8-bp DNA sequences, BcnI is a monomer which has a single active site but cuts both DNA strands within the 5′-CC↓CGG-3′/3′-GGG↓CC-5′ target site (‘↓’ designates the cleavage position). Therefore, after cutting the first strand, the BcnI monomer must re-bind to the target site in the opposite orientation; but in this case, it runs into a different central base because of the broken symmetry of the recognition site. Crystal-structure analysis shows that to accept both the C:G and G:C base pairs at the center of its target site, BcnI employs two symmetrically positioned histidines H77 and H219 that presumably change their protonation state depending on the binding mode. We show here that a single mutation of BcnI H77 or H219 residues restricts the cleavage activity of the enzyme to either the 5′-CCCGG-3′ or the 5′-CCGGG-3′ strand, thereby converting BcnI into a strand-specific nicking endonuclease. This is a novel approach for engineering of monomeric restriction enzymes into strand-specific nucleases. PMID:21227928

  5. The Caenorhabditis elegans pericentriolar material components SPD-2 and SPD-5 are monomeric in the cytoplasm before incorporation into the PCM matrix

    PubMed Central

    Wueseke, Oliver; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Hein, Marco Y.; Zinke, Andrea; Viscardi, Valeria; Woodruff, Jeffrey B.; Oegema, Karen; Mann, Matthias; Andersen, Jens S.; Hyman, Anthony A.

    2014-01-01

    Centrosomes are the main microtubule-organizing centers in animal cells. Centrosomes consist of a pair of centrioles surrounded by a matrix of pericentriolar material (PCM) that assembles from cytoplasmic components. In Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, interactions between the coiled-coil proteins SPD-5 and SPD-2 and the kinase PLK-1 are critical for PCM assembly. However, it is not known whether these interactions promote the formation of cytoplasmic complexes that are added to the PCM or whether the components interact only during incorporation into the PCM matrix. Here we address this problem by using a combination of live-cell fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and hydrodynamic techniques to investigate the native state of PCM components in the cytoplasm. We show that SPD-2 is monomeric, and neither SPD-2 nor SPD-5 exists in complex with PLK-1. SPD-5 exists mostly as a monomer but also forms complexes with the PP2A-regulatory proteins RSA-1 and RSA-2, which are required for microtubule organization at centrosomes. These results suggest that the interactions between SPD-2, SPD-5, and PLK-1 do not result in formation of cytoplasmic complexes, but instead occur in the context of PCM assembly. PMID:25103243

  6. Interaction of chemokine receptor CXCR4 in monomeric and dimeric state with its endogenous ligand CXCL12: coarse-grained simulations identify differences.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Pasquale; Basdevant, Nathalie; Bernadat, Guillaume; Bachelerie, Françoise; Ha-Duong, Tâp

    2017-02-01

    Despite the recent resolutions of the crystal structure of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in complex with small antagonists or viral chemokine, a description at the molecular level of the interactions between the full-length CXCR4 and its endogenous ligand, the chemokine CXCL12, in relationship with the receptor recognition and activation, is not yet completely elucidated. Moreover, since CXCR4 is able to form dimers, the question of whether the CXCR4-CXCL12 complex has a 1:1 or 2:1 preferential stoichiometry is still an open question. We present here results of coarse-grained protein-protein docking and molecular dynamics simulations of CXCL12 in association with CXCR4 in monomeric and dimeric states. Our proposed models for the 1:1 and 2:1 CXCR4-CXCL12 quaternary structures are consistent with recognition and activation motifs of both partners provided by the available site-directed mutagenesis data. Notably, we observed that in the 2:1 complex, the chemokine N-terminus makes more steady contacts with the receptor residues critical for binding and activation than in the 1:1 structure, suggesting that the 2:1 stoichiometry would favor the receptor signaling activity with respect to the 1:1 association.

  7. Analysis of the amino acid residues involved in the thermal properties of the monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenases of the psychrophilic bacterium Colwellia maris and the mesophilic bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Takayuki; Takada, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Cold-adapted monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase of a psychrophilic bacterium, Colwellia maris, (CmIDH) showed a high degree of amino acid sequential identity (69.5%) to a mesophilic nitrogen-fixing bacterium, Azotobacter vinelandii, (AvIDH). In this study, three Ala residues of CmIDH and the corresponding Pro residues of AvIDH were exchanged by site-directed mutagenesis, and several properties of single, double, and triple mutants of the two enzymes were investigated. The mutated CmIDHs, which replaced Ala719 with Pro, showed increased activity and elevation of the optimum temperature and thermostability for activity. In contrast, mutants of AvIDH, in which Pro717 was replaced by Ala, decreased the thermostability for activity. These results indicate that Ala719 of CmIDH and Pro717 of AvIDH are involved in thermostability. On the other hand, mutated CmIDH, in which Ala710 was replaced by Pro, and the corresponding AvIDH mutant, which replaced Pro708 with Ala, showed higher and lower specific activity than the corresponding wild-type enzymes, suggesting that Pro708 of AvIDH is involved in its high catalytic ability. Furthermore, the exchange mutations between Ala740 in CmIDH and the corresponding Pro738 in AvIDH resulted in decreased and increased thermostability for CmIDH and AvIDH activity respectively, suggesting that the native Ala740 and Pro738 residues make the enzymes thermostable and thermolabile.

  8. The monomeric GIY-YIG homing endonuclease I-BmoI uses a molecular anchor and a flexible tether to sequentially nick DNA.

    PubMed

    Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Wolfs, Jason M; Edgell, David R

    2013-05-01

    The GIY-YIG nuclease domain is found within protein scaffolds that participate in diverse cellular pathways and contains a single active site that hydrolyzes DNA by a one-metal ion mechanism. GIY-YIG homing endonucleases (GIY-HEs) are two-domain proteins with N-terminal GIY-YIG nuclease domains connected to C-terminal DNA-binding and they are thought to function as monomers. Using I-BmoI as a model GIY-HE, we test mechanisms by which the single active site is used to generate a double-strand break. We show that I-BmoI is partially disordered in the absence of substrate, and that the GIY-YIG domain alone has weak affinity for DNA. Significantly, we show that I-BmoI functions as a monomer at all steps of the reaction pathway and does not transiently dimerize or use sequential transesterification reactions to cleave substrate. Our results are consistent with the I-BmoI DNA-binding domain acting as a molecular anchor to tether the GIY-YIG domain to substrate, permitting rotation of the GIY-YIG domain to sequentially nick each DNA strand. These data highlight the mechanistic differences between monomeric GIY-HEs and dimeric or tetrameric GIY-YIG restriction enzymes, and they have implications for the use of the GIY-YIG domain in genome-editing applications.

  9. Novel DDR Processing of Corn Stover Achieves High Monomeric Sugar Concentrations from Enzymatic Hydrolysis (230 g/L) and High Ethanol Concentration (10% v/v) During Fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaowen; Jennings, Ed; Shekiro, Joe; Kuhn, Erik M.; O'Brien, Marykate; Wang, Wei; Schell, Daniel J.; Himmel, Mike; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2015-04-03

    Distilling and purifying ethanol, butanol, and other products from second and later generation lignocellulosic biorefineries adds significant capital and operating cost for biofuels production. The energy costs associated with distillation affects plant gate and life cycle analysis costs. Lower titers in fermentation due to lower sugar concentrations from pretreatment increase both energy and production costs. In addition, higher titers decrease the volumes required for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation vessels. Therefore, increasing biofuels titers has been a research focus in renewable biofuels production for several decades. In this work, we achieved over 200 g/L of monomeric sugars after high solids enzymatic hydrolysis using the novel deacetylation and disc refining (DDR) process on corn stover. The high sugar concentrations and low chemical inhibitor concentrations from the DDR process allowed ethanol titers as high as 82 g/L in 22 hours, which translates into approximately 10 vol% ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time that 10 vol% ethanol in fermentation derived from corn stover without any sugar concentration or purification steps has been reported. Techno-economic analysis shows the higher titer ethanol achieved from the DDR process could significantly reduce the minimum ethanol selling price from cellulosic biomass.

  10. Danio rerio αE-catenin Is a Monomeric F-actin Binding Protein with Distinct Properties from Mus musculus αE-catenin*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Phillip W.; Pokutta, Sabine; Ghosh, Agnidipta; Almo, Steven C.; Weis, William I.; Nelson, W. James; Kwiatkowski, Adam V.

    2013-01-01

    It is unknown whether homologs of the cadherin·catenin complex have conserved structures and functions across the Metazoa. Mammalian αE-catenin is an allosterically regulated actin-binding protein that binds the cadherin·β-catenin complex as a monomer and whose dimerization potentiates F-actin association. We tested whether these functional properties are conserved in another vertebrate, the zebrafish Danio rerio. Here we show, despite 90% sequence identity, that Danio rerio and Mus musculus αE-catenin have striking functional differences. We demonstrate that D. rerio αE-catenin is monomeric by size exclusion chromatography, native PAGE, and small angle x-ray scattering. D. rerio αE-catenin binds F-actin in cosedimentation assays as a monomer and as an α/β-catenin heterodimer complex. D. rerio αE-catenin also bundles F-actin, as shown by negative stained transmission electron microscopy, and does not inhibit Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin nucleation in bulk polymerization assays. Thus, core properties of α-catenin function, F-actin and β-catenin binding, are conserved between mouse and zebrafish. We speculate that unique regulatory properties have evolved to match specific developmental requirements. PMID:23788645

  11. Danio rerio αE-catenin is a monomeric F-actin binding protein with distinct properties from Mus musculus αE-catenin.

    PubMed

    Miller, Phillip W; Pokutta, Sabine; Ghosh, Agnidipta; Almo, Steven C; Weis, William I; Nelson, W James; Kwiatkowski, Adam V

    2013-08-02

    It is unknown whether homologs of the cadherin·catenin complex have conserved structures and functions across the Metazoa. Mammalian αE-catenin is an allosterically regulated actin-binding protein that binds the cadherin·β-catenin complex as a monomer and whose dimerization potentiates F-actin association. We tested whether these functional properties are conserved in another vertebrate, the zebrafish Danio rerio. Here we show, despite 90% sequence identity, that Danio rerio and Mus musculus αE-catenin have striking functional differences. We demonstrate that D. rerio αE-catenin is monomeric by size exclusion chromatography, native PAGE, and small angle x-ray scattering. D. rerio αE-catenin binds F-actin in cosedimentation assays as a monomer and as an α/β-catenin heterodimer complex. D. rerio αE-catenin also bundles F-actin, as shown by negative stained transmission electron microscopy, and does not inhibit Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin nucleation in bulk polymerization assays. Thus, core properties of α-catenin function, F-actin and β-catenin binding, are conserved between mouse and zebrafish. We speculate that unique regulatory properties have evolved to match specific developmental requirements.

  12. Monomeric L-amino acid oxidase-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in Rhizoctonia solani Reveals a novel antagonistic mechanism of Trichoderma harzianum ETS 323.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chia-Ann; Cheng, Chi-Hua; Lee, Jeng-Woei; Lo, Chaur-Tsuen; Liu, Shu-Ying; Peng, Kou-Cheng

    2012-03-14

    The monomeric L-amino acid oxidase (mTh-LAAO) of Trichoderma harzianum ETS 323 has been suggested to antagonize Rhizoctonia solani by an unknown mechanism. Here, the mTh-LAAO-treated R. solani exhibited hyphal lysis and apoptotic characteristics such as DNA fragmentation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondrial membrane potential depolarization. This hyphal lysis was suppressed by the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis inhibitor oligomycin while accompanied by reduction of ROS accumulation. This result suggested that mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in R. solani was involved in mTh-LAAO-induced growth inhibition, which was supported by the evidence of cytocheome c release and activation of caspases 9 and 3. Furthermore, the data indicated that the mTh-LAAO-induced fungal cell death was also closely interrelated with the interaction of mTh-LAAO with R. solani hyphal cell wall proteins. These results illuminate the biological function and mechanism underlying the antagonistic action of T. harzianum mTh-LAAO against fungal pathogens.

  13. Mammalian class I myosin, Myo1b, is monomeric and cross-links actin filaments as determined by hydrodynamic studies and electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Walter F; Walker, Matt L; Trinick, John A; Coluccio, Lynne M

    2005-01-01

    The class I myosin, Myo1b, is a calmodulin- and actin-associated molecular motor widely expressed in mammalian tissues. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies indicate that Myo1b purified from rat liver has a Stokes radius of 6.7 nm and a sedimentation coefficient, s(20,w), of 7.0 S with a predicted molar mass of 213 kg/mol. These results indicate that Myo1b is monomeric and consists primarily of a splice variant having five associated calmodulins. Molecular modeling based on the analytical ultracentrifugation studies are supported by electron microscopy studies that depict Myo1b as a single-headed, tadpole-shaped molecule with outer dimensions of 27.9 x 4.0 nm. Above a certain Myo1b/actin ratio, Myo1b bundles actin filaments presumably by virtue of a second actin-binding site. These studies provide new information regarding the oligomeric state and morphology of Myo1b and support a model in which Myo1b cross-links actin through a cryptic actin-binding site.

  14. Association of Tenebrio molitor L. alpha-amylase with two protein inhibitors--one monomeric, one dimeric--from wheat flour. Differential scanning calorimetric comparison of heat stabilities.

    PubMed

    Silano, V; Zahnley, J C

    1978-03-28

    Thermal stabilization resulting from protein . protein association between two protein inhibitors (coded as 0.19, a dimer, and 0.28, a monomer) from wheat flour and the alpha-amylase from Tenebrio molitor L. (yellow mealworm) larvae was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (heating rate 10 degrees C/min). Thermograms (plots of heat flow vs. temperature) for the two inhibitors showed broad endothermic peaks with the same extrema (denaturation temperatures) at 93 degrees C, and equal, small enthalpies of denaturation (2 cal/g). The amylase produced a sharp endotherm at 70.5 degrees C, but a larger enthalpy change on denaturation (6 cal/g). The amylase . inhibitor complexes differed in thermal stability, but both showed significant stabilization relative to free enzyme. The complex formed with monomeric inhibitor 0.28 showed a higher denaturation temperature (85.0 degrees C) than that formed with dimeric inhibitor 0.19 (80.5 degrees C). This order of stabilization agrees with the relative affinities of the inhibitors for the amylase. These thermograms are consistent with previous results which indicated that 1 mol of amylase binds 1 mol of inhibitor 0.19.

  15. The sigma-1 receptors are present in monomeric and oligomeric forms in living cells in the presence and absence of ligands

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Deo R.; Biener, Gabriel; Yang, Jay; Oliver, Julie A.; Ruoho, Arnold; Raicu, Valerică

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a 223-amino-acid membrane protein that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane of some mammalian cells. The S1R is regulated by various synthetic molecules including (+)-pentazocine, cocaine and haloperidol and endogenous molecules such as sphingosine, dimethyltryptamine and dehydroepiandrosterone. Ligand-regulated protein chaperone functions linked to oxidative stress and neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and neuropathic pain have been attributed to the S1R. Several client proteins that interact with S1R have been identified including various types of ion channels and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). When S1R constructs containing C-terminal monomeric GFP2 and YFP fusions were co-expressed in COS-7 cells and subjected to FRET spectrometry analysis, monomers, dimers and higher oligomeric forms of S1R were identified under non-liganded conditions. In the presence of the prototypic S1R agonist, (+)-pentazocine, however, monomers and dimers were the prevailing forms of S1R. The prototypic antagonist, haloperidol, on the other hand, favoured higher order S1R oligomers. These data, in sum, indicate that heterologously expressed S1Rs occur in vivo in COS-7 cells in multiple oligomeric forms and that S1R ligands alter these oligomeric structures. We suggest that the S1R oligomerization states may regulate its function(s). PMID:25510962

  16. Midori-ishi Cyan/monomeric Kusabira-Orange-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for characterization of various E3 ligases.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Ryota; Kim, Minsoo; Lee, Jihye; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-06-01

    Many bacterial pathogens hijack the host ubiquitin system for their own benefit by delivering effectors with ubiquitin ligase (E3) into host cells via the type III secretion system. Therefore, screening for small compounds that selectively inhibit bacterial but not mammalian E3 ligases is a promising strategy for identifying molecules that could substitute for antibiotics. To facilitate high-throughput screening for bacterial E3 ligase inhibitors, we developed a MiCy/mKO (Midori-ishi Cyan/monomeric Kusabira-Orange)-based FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) assay and validated it on Shigella IpaH E3 ligase effectors. We showed the feasibility of using the MiCy/mKO-based FRET assay to identify the most appropriate ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) and determine the lysine specificity of a given E3, both hallmarks of E3 activity. Furthermore, we showed the usefulness of the FRET assay in characterizing mammalian E3 ligases, such as TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and mouse double minute 2 homologue (MDM2). In addition, we confirmed the feasibility of determining the efficiency of inhibition of E3 ligase activity using inhibitors of E1 ubiquitin-activating enzymes, such as UBE1-41, by measuring the IC50 . Based on these results, we concluded that the MiCy/mKO-based FRET assay is useful for characterizing E3 enzyme activity, as well as for high-throughput E3 inhibitor screening.

  17. Biochemical studies of a soxF-encoded monomeric flavoprotein purified from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum that stimulates in vitro thiosulfate oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takuro; Furusawa, Toshinari; Shiga, Michiko; Seo, Daisuke; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Inoue, Kazuhito

    2010-01-01

    In the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum, three sulfur oxidizing enzyme system (Sox) proteins, SoxAXK, SoxYZ, and SoxB (the core TOMES, thiosulfate oxidizing multi-enzyme system) are essential to in vitro thiosulfate oxidation. We purified monomeric flavoprotein SoxF from this bacterium, which had sulfide dehydrogenase activity. SoxF enhanced the thiosulfate oxidation activity of the purified core TOMES with various cytochromes as electron acceptors to different degrees without any change in the affinity for thiosulfate. The apparent reaction rates with 50 microM- C. tepidum cytochrome c-554 were slightly higher than with horse-heart cytochrome c, and the addition of 0.5 microM- SoxF increased the rate by 92%. The rates with 50 microM- horse-heart cytochrome c and 50 muM- horse-heart cytochrome c plus 0.5 muM- cytochrome c-554 were increased by SoxF by 31% and 120% respectively. We conclude that SoxF mediates electron transfer between the components of core TOMES and externally added cytochromes.

  18. Chiral monomeric and homochiral dimeric copper(II) complexes of a new chiral ligand, N-(1,2-bis(2-pyridyl)ethyl)pyridine-2-carboxamide: an example of molecular self-recognition.

    PubMed

    Rowland, John M; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Mascharak, Pradip K

    2002-03-25

    Reaction of Cu(ClO(4))(2) x 6H(2)O with a racemic mixture of the novel chiral ligand N-(1,2-bis(2-pyridyl)ethyl)pyridine-2-carboxamide (PEAH) affords only the homochiral dimeric copper(II) complexes [Cu(2)((R)()PEA)(2)](ClO(4))(2) and [Cu(2)((S)()PEA)(2)](ClO(4))(2) in a 1:1 ratio. The phenomenon of molecular self-recognition is also observed when a racemic mixture of the monomeric copper(II) complex [Cu((R(S))()PEA)(Cl)(H(2)O)] is converted into the homochiral dimeric species [Cu(2)((R(S))()PEA)(2)](ClO(4))(2) via reaction with Ag(+) ion. This is the first report of direct conversion of a racemic mixture of a chiral monomeric copper(II) complex to a mixture of the homochiral dimers.

  19. A monomeric thallium(I) amide in the solid state: synthesis and structure of TlN(Me)ArMes2 (ArMes2 = C6H3-2,6-Mes2).

    PubMed

    Wright, Robert J; Brynda, Marcin; Power, Philip P

    2005-05-16

    Reaction of TlCl and [LiN(Me)Ar(Mes)2](2) [Ar(Mes)2 = C(6)H(3)-2,6-(C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-Me(3))(2)] in Et(2)O generated the thallium amide, TlN(Me)Ar(Mes)2 (1). X-ray data showed that it has a monomeric structure with an average Tl-N distance of 2.364(3) Angstroms. There was also a Tl-arene approach [Tl-centroid = 3.026(2) Angstroms (avg)] to a flanking mesityl ring from the terphenyl substituent. DFT calculations showed that this interaction is weak and supported essentially one coordination for thallium. The electronic spectrum of 1 is hypsochromically shifted in comparison to the monomeric TlAr(Trip)2 (Trip = C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-Pr(i)(3)).

  20. Bohr-effect and pH-dependence of electron spin resonance spectra of a cobalt-substituted monomeric insect haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Gersonde, K; Twilfer, H; Overkamp, M

    1982-01-01

    The monomeric haemoglobin IV from Chironomus thummi thummi (CTT IV) exhibits an alkaline Bohr-effect and therefore it is an allosteric protein. By substitution of the haem iron for cobalt the O2 half-saturation pressure, measured at 25 degrees C, increases 250-fold. The Bohr-effect is not affected by the replacement of the central atom. The parameters of the Bohr-effect of cobalt CTT IV for 25 degrees C are: inflection point of the Bohr-effect curve at pH 7.1, number of Bohr protons -- deltalog p1/2 (O2)/deltapH = 0.36 mol H+/mol O2 and amplitude of the Bohr-effect curve deltalogp1/2 (O2) = 0.84. The substitution of protoporphyrin for mesoporphyrin causes a 10 nm blue-shift of the visible absorption maxima in both, the native and the cobalt-substituted forms of CTT IV. Furthermore, the replacement of vinyl groups by ethyl groups at position 2 and 4 of the porphyrin system leads to an increase of O2 affinities at 25 degrees C which follows the order: proto less than meso less than deutero for iron and cobalt CTT IV, respectively. Again, the Bohr-effect is not affected by the replacement of protoporphyrin for mesoporphyrin or deuteroporphyrin. The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of both, deoxy cobalt proto- and deoxy cobalt meso-CTT IV, are independent of pH. The stronger electron-withdrawing effect by protoporphyrin is reflected by the decrease of the cobalt hyperfine constants coinciding with gparallel = 2.035 and by the low-field shift of gparallel. The ESR spectra of oxy cobalt proto- and oxy cobalt meso-CTT IV are dependent of pH. The cobalt hyperfine constants coinciding with gparallel - 2.078 increase during transition from low to high pH. The pH-induced ESR spectral changes correlate with the alkaline Bohr-effect. Therefore, the two O2 affinity states can be assigned to the low-pH and high-pH ESR spectral species. The low-pH form (low-affinity state) is characterized by a smaller, the high-pH form (high-affinity state) by a larger cobalt hyperfine

  1. The photophysics of monomeric bacteriochlorophylls c and d and their derivatives: properties of the triplet state and singlet oxygen photogeneration and quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnovsky, A. A. Jr; Cheng, P.; Blankenship, R. E.; Moore, T. A.; Gust, D.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of pigment triplet-triplet absorption, pigment phosphorescence and photosensitized singlet oxygen luminescence were carried out on solutions containing monomeric bacteriochlorophylls (Bchl) c and d, isolated from green photosynthetic bacteria, and their magnesium-free and farnesyl-free analogs. The energies of the pigment triplet states fell in the range 1.29-1.34 eV. The triplet lifetimes in aerobic solutions were 200-250 ns; they increased to 280 +/- 70 microseconds after nitrogen purging in liquid solutions and to 0.7-2.1 ms in a solid matrix at ambient or liquid nitrogen temperatures. Rate constants for quenching of the pigment triplet state by oxygen were (2.0-2.5) x 10(9) M-1 s-1, which is close to 1/9 of the rate constant for diffusion-controlled reactions. This quenching was accompanied by singlet oxygen formation. The quantum yields for the triplet state formation and singlet oxygen production were 55-75% in air-saturated solutions. Singlet oxygen quenching by ground-state pigment molecules was observed. Quenching was the most efficient for magnesium-containing pigments, kq = (0.31-1.2) x 10(9) M-1 s-1. It is caused mainly by a physical process of singlet oxygen (1O2) deactivation. Thus, Bchl c and d and their derivatives, as well as chlorophyll and Bchl a, combine a high efficiency of singlet oxygen production with the ability to protect photochemical and photobiological systems against damage by singlet oxygen.

  2. Resolution of two native monomeric 90kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Philippa J L; McKinzie, Audra A; Codd, Rachel

    2010-07-16

    The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  3. Differences in the structural stability and cooperativity between monomeric variants of natural and de novo Cro proteins revealed by high-pressure Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Hiroshi; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Kato, Minoru

    2012-05-01

    It is widely accepted that pressure affects the structure and dynamics of proteins; however, the underlying mechanism remains unresolved. Our previous studies have investigated the effects of pressure on fundamental secondary structural elements using model peptides, because these peptides represent a basis for understanding the effects of pressure on more complex structures. This study targeted monomeric variants of naturally occurring bacteriophage λ Cro (natural Cro) and de novo designed λ Cro (SN4m), which are α + β proteins. The sequence of SN4m is 75% different from that of natural Cro, but the structures are almost identical. Consequently, a comparison of the folding properties of these proteins is of interest. Pressure- and temperature-variable Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analyses revealed that the α-helices and β-sheets of natural Cro are cooperatively and reversibly unfolded by pressure and temperature, whereas those of SN4m are not cooperatively unfolded by pressure; i.e., the α-helices of SN4m unfold at significantly higher pressures than the β-sheets and irreversibly unfold with increases in temperature. The higher unfolding pressure for the α-helices of SN4m indicates the presence of an intermediate structure of SN4m that does not retain β-sheet structure but does preserve the α-helices. These results demonstrate that the α-helices of natural Cro are stabilized by global tertiary contacts among the α-helices and the β-sheets, whereas the α-helices of SN4m are stabilized by local tertiary contacts between the α-helices.

  4. Validation and Characterization of a Novel Peptide That Binds Monomeric and Aggregated β-Amyloid and Inhibits the Formation of Neurotoxic Oligomers*

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Renae K.; Verdile, Giuseppe; Wijaya, Linda K.; Morici, Michael; Taddei, Kevin; Gupta, Veer B.; Pedrini, Steve; Jin, Liang; Nicolazzo, Joseph A.; Knock, Erin; Fraser, Paul E.; Martins, Ralph N.

    2016-01-01

    Although the formation of β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD), the soluble oligomers rather than the mature amyloid fibrils most likely contribute to Aβ toxicity and neurodegeneration. Thus, the discovery of agents targeting soluble Aβ oligomers is highly desirable for early diagnosis prior to the manifestation of a clinical AD phenotype and also more effective therapies. We have previously reported that a novel 15-amino acid peptide (15-mer), isolated via phage display screening, targeted Aβ and attenuated its neurotoxicity (Taddei, K., Laws, S. M., Verdile, G., Munns, S., D'Costa, K., Harvey, A. R., Martins, I. J., Hill, F., Levy, E., Shaw, J. E., and Martins, R. N. (2010) Neurobiol. Aging 31, 203–214). The aim of the current study was to generate and biochemically characterize analogues of this peptide with improved stability and therapeutic potential. We demonstrated that a stable analogue of the 15-amino acid peptide (15M S.A.) retained the activity and potency of the parent peptide and demonstrated improved proteolytic resistance in vitro (stable to t = 300 min, c.f. t = 30 min for the parent peptide). This candidate reduced the formation of soluble Aβ42 oligomers, with the concurrent generation of non-toxic, insoluble aggregates measuring up to 25–30 nm diameter as determined by atomic force microscopy. The 15M S.A. candidate directly interacted with oligomeric Aβ42, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance/Biacore analysis, with an affinity in the low micromolar range. Furthermore, this peptide bound fibrillar Aβ42 and also stained plaques ex vivo in brain tissue from AD model mice. Given its multifaceted ability to target monomeric and aggregated Aβ42 species, this candidate holds promise for novel preclinical AD imaging and therapeutic strategies. PMID:26538562

  5. No need to be HAMLET or BAMLET to interact with histones: binding of monomeric alpha-lactalbumin to histones and basic poly-amino acids.

    PubMed

    Permyakov, Serge E; Pershikova, Irina V; Khokhlova, Tatyana I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2004-05-18

    The ability of a specific complex of human alpha-lactalbumin with oleic acid (HAMLET) to induce cell death with selectivity for tumor and undifferentiated cells was shown recently to be mediated by interaction of HAMLET with histone proteins irreversibly disrupting chromatin structure [Duringer, C., et al. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 42131-42135]. Here we show that monomeric alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) in the absence of fatty acids is also able to bind efficiently to the primary target of HAMLET, histone HIII, regardless of Ca(2+) content. Thus, the modification of alpha-LA by oleic acid is not required for binding to histones. We suggest that interaction of negatively charged alpha-LA with the basic histone stabilizes apo-alpha-LA and destabilizes the Ca(2+)-bound protein due to compensation for excess negative charge of alpha-LA's Ca(2+)-binding loop by positively charged residues of the histone. Spectrofluorimetric curves of titration of alpha-LA by histone H3 were well approximated by a scheme of cooperative binding of four alpha-LA molecules per molecule of histone, with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 1.0 microM. Such a stoichiometry of binding implies that the binding process is not site-specific with respect to histone and likely is driven by just electrostatic interactions. Co-incubation of positively charged poly-amino acids (poly-Lys and poly-Arg) with alpha-LA resulted in effects which were similar to those caused by histone HIII, confirming the electrostatic nature of the alpha-LA-histone interaction. In all cases that were studied, the binding was accompanied by aggregation. The data indicate that alpha-lactalbumin can be used as a basis for the design of antitumor agents, acting through disorganization of chromatin structure due to interaction between alpha-LA and histone proteins.

  6. A functional interaction between gp41 and gp120 is observed for monomeric but not oligomeric, uncleaved HIV-1 Env gp140.

    PubMed

    Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K

    2013-11-01

    The envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the sole antigenic feature on the surface of HIV and the target for the humoral immune system. Soluble, uncleaved gp140 Env constructs truncated at the transmembrane domain are being investigated intensively as potential vaccine immunogens by many groups, and understanding their structural properties is essential. We used hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry and small-angle X-ray scattering to probe structural order in a panel of commonly used gp140 constructs and matched gp120 monomers. We observed that oligomeric forms of uncleaved gp140, generally presumed to be trimeric, contain a protease-resistant form of gp41 akin to the postfusion, helical bundle conformation and appear to lack specific interactions between gp120 and gp41. In contrast, the monomeric form of gp140 shows significant stabilization of the gp120 inner domain imparted by the gp41 region, demonstrating excellent agreement with past mutagenesis studies. Moreover, the gp140 monomers respond to CD4 binding in manner that is consistent with the initial stages of Env activation: CD4 binding induces structural ordering throughout gp120 while loosening its association with gp41. The results indicate that uncleaved gp140 oligomers do not represent an authentic prefusion form of Env, whereas gp140 monomers isolated from the same glycoprotein preparations in many ways exhibit function and internal structural order that are consistent with expectations for certain aspects of native Env. gp140 monomers may thus be a useful reagent for advancing structural and functional studies.

  7. AtSPX1 affects the AtPHR1 -DNA binding equilibrium by binding monomeric AtPHR1 in solution.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wanjun; Manfield, Iain W; Muench, Stephen P; Baker, Alison

    2017-09-08

    Phosphorus is an essential macronutrient for plant growth, and is deficient in about 50% of agricultural soils. The transcription factor Phosphate Starvation Response 1 (PHR1) plays a central role in regulating the expression of a subset of Phosphate Starvation Induced (PSI) genes through binding to a cis acting DNA element termed P1BS. In Arabidopsis and rice, activity of AtPHR1/OsPHR2 is regulated in part by their downstream target SPX proteins through protein-protein interaction. Here we provide kinetic and affinity data for interaction between AtPHR1 and P1BS sites. Using SPR, a tandem P1BS sequence showed ~50-fold higher affinity for MBPAtdPHR1 (a fusion protein comprising the DNA binding domain and coiled-coiled domain of AtPHR1 fused to maltose binding protein) than a single site. The affinity difference was largely reflected in a much slower dissociation rate from the 2x P1BS binding site, suggesting an important role for protein cooperativity. Injection of AtSPX1 in the presence of phosphate or inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) failed to alter the MBPAtdPHR1-P1BS dissociation rate, while pre-mixing of these two proteins in the presence of either 5 mM Pi or 500 µM InsP6 resulted in a much lower DNA binding signal from MBPAtdPHR1. These data suggest that in the Pi restored condition, AtSPX1 can bind to monomeric AtPHR1 in solution and therefore regulate PSI gene expression by tuning the AtPHR1-DNA binding equilibrium. This Pi-dependent regulation of AtPHR1-DNA binding equilibrium also generates a negative feedback loop on the expression of AtSPX1 itself, providing a tight control of PSI gene expression. ©2017 The Author(s).

  8. X-ray Crystal Structures of Monomeric and Dimeric Peptide Inhibitors in Complex with the Human Neonatal Fc Receptor, FcRn

    SciTech Connect

    Mezo, Adam R.; Sridhar, Vandana; Badger, John; Sakorafas, Paul; Nienaber, Vicki

    2010-10-28

    The neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn, is responsible for the long half-life of IgG molecules in vivo and is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. A family of peptides comprising the consensus motif GHFGGXY, where X is preferably a hydrophobic amino acid, was shown previously to inhibit the human IgG:human FcRn protein-protein interaction (Mezo, A. R., McDonnell, K. A., Tan Hehir, C. A., Low, S. C., Palombella, V. J., Stattel, J. M., Kamphaus, G. D., Fraley, C., Zhang, Y., Dumont, J. A., and Bitonti, A. J. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 105, 2337-2342). Herein, the x-ray crystal structure of a representative monomeric peptide in complex with human FcRn was solved to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure shows that the peptide binds to human FcRn at the same general binding site as does the Fc domain of IgG. The data correlate well with structure-activity relationship data relating to how the peptide family binds to human FcRn. In addition, the x-ray crystal structure of a representative dimeric peptide in complex with human FcRn shows how the bivalent ligand can bridge two FcRn molecules, which may be relevant to the mechanism by which the dimeric peptides inhibit FcRn and increase IgG catabolism in vivo. Modeling of the peptide:FcRn structure as compared with available structural data on Fc and FcRn suggest that the His-6 and Phe-7 (peptide) partially mimic the interaction of His-310 and Ile-253 (Fc) in binding to FcRn, but using a different backbone topology.

  9. Monomeric TonB and the Ton box are required for the Formation of a High-Affinity Transporter-TonB Complex†

    PubMed Central

    Freed, Daniel M.; Lukasik, Stephen M.; Sikora, Arthur; Mokdad, Audrey; Cafiso, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The energy-dependent uptake of trace nutrients by Gram-negative bacteria involves the coupling of an outer membrane transport protein to the transperiplasmic protein TonB. In the present study, a soluble construct of Escherichia coli TonB (residues 33–239) was used to determine the affinity of TonB to the outer membrane transporters BtuB, FecA and FhuA. Using fluorescence anisotropy, TonB(33–239) was found to bind with high-affinity (tens of nM) to both BtuB and FhuA; however, no high-affinity binding was observed to FecA. In BtuB, the high affinity binding of TonB(33–239) was eliminated by mutations in the Ton box, which yield transport-defective protein, or by the addition of a Colicin E3 fragment, which stabilizes the Ton box in a folded state. These results indicate that transport requires a high-affinity transporter-TonB interaction that is mediated by the Ton box. Characterization of TonB(33–239) using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) demonstrates that a significant population of TonB(33–239) exists as a dimer; moreover, interspin distances are in approximate agreement with interlocked dimers observed previously by crystallography for shorter TonB fragments. When bound to the outer membrane transporter, DEER shows that the TonB(33–239) dimer is converted to a monomeric form, suggesting that a dimer-monomer conversion takes place at the outer membrane during the TonB-dependent transport cycle. PMID:23517233

  10. Monomeric TonB and the Ton box are required for the formation of a high-affinity transporter-TonB complex.

    PubMed

    Freed, Daniel M; Lukasik, Stephen M; Sikora, Arthur; Mokdad, Audrey; Cafiso, David S

    2013-04-16

    The energy-dependent uptake of trace nutrients by Gram-negative bacteria involves the coupling of an outer membrane transport protein to the transperiplasmic protein TonB. In this study, a soluble construct of Escherichia coli TonB (residues 33-239) was used to determine the affinity of TonB for outer membrane transporters BtuB, FecA, and FhuA. Using fluorescence anisotropy, TonB(33-239) was found to bind with high affinity (tens of nanomolar) to both BtuB and FhuA; however, no high-affinity binding to FecA was observed. In BtuB, the high-affinity binding of TonB(33-239) was eliminated by mutations in the Ton box, which yield transport-defective protein, or by the addition of a Colicin E3 fragment, which stabilizes the Ton box in a folded state. These results indicate that transport requires a high-affinity transporter-TonB interaction that is mediated by the Ton box. Characterization of TonB(33-239) using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) demonstrates that a significant population of TonB(33-239) exists as a dimer; moreover, interspin distances are in approximate agreement with interlocked dimers observed previously by crystallography for shorter TonB fragments. When the TonB(33-239) dimer is bound to the outer membrane transporter, DEER shows that the TonB(33-239) dimer is converted to a monomeric form, suggesting that a dimer-monomer conversion takes place at the outer membrane during the TonB-dependent transport cycle.

  11. Monomeric IgG1 Fc molecules displaying unique Fc receptor interactions that are exploitable to treat inflammation-mediated diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianlei; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Chen, Weizao; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2014-01-01

    The IgG1 Fc is a dimeric protein that mediates important antibody effector functions by interacting with Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) and the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). Here, we report the discovery of a monomeric IgG1 Fc (mFc) that bound to FcγRI with very high affinity, but not to FcγRIIIa, in contrast to wild-type (dimeric) Fc. The binding of mFc to FcRn was the same as that of dimeric Fc. To test whether the high-affinity binding to FcγRI can be used for targeting of toxins, a fusion protein of mFc with a 38 kDa Pseudomonas exotoxin A fragment (PE38), was generated. This fusion protein killed FcγRI-positive macrophage-like U937 cells but not FcγRI-negative cells, and mFc or PE38 alone had no killing activity. The lack of binding to FcγRIIIa resulted in the absence of Fc-mediated cytotoxicity of a scFv-mFc fusion protein targeting mesothelin. The pharmacokinetics of mFc in mice was very similar to that of dimeric Fc. The mFc's unique FcγRs binding pattern and related functionality, combined with its small size, monovalency and the preservation of FcRn binding which results in relatively long half-life in vivo, suggests that mFc has great potential as a component of therapeutics targeting inflammation mediated by activated macrophages overexpressing FcγRI and related diseases, including cancer. PMID:25517305

  12. Oligomer formation of the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP: reaction rates and equilibrium constants indicate a monomeric state at physiological concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Martin; Allan, Martin G; Zaehringer, Franziska; Schirmer, Tilman; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2012-01-18

    Cyclic diguanosine-monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial signaling molecule that triggers a switch from motile to sessile bacterial lifestyles. This mechanism is of considerable pharmaceutical interest, since it is related to bacterial virulence, biofilm formation, and persistence of infection. Previously, c-di-GMP has been reported to display a rich polymorphism of various oligomeric forms at millimolar concentrations, which differ in base stacking and G-quartet interactions. Here, we have analyzed the equilibrium and exchange kinetics between these various forms by NMR spectroscopy. We find that the association of the monomer into a dimeric form is in fast exchange (monomeric. This finding has important implications for the understanding of c-di-GMP recognition by protein receptors. In contrast to the monomer/dimer exchange, formation and dissociation of higher oligomers occurs on a time scale of several hours to days. The time course can be described quantitatively by a simple kinetic model where tetramers are intermediates of octamer formation. The extremely slow oligomer dissociation may generate severe artifacts in biological experiments when c-di-GMP is diluted from concentrated stock solution. We present a simple method to quantify c-di-GMP monomers and oligomers from UV spectra and a procedure to dissolve the unwanted oligomers by an annealing step.

  13. Monomeric Immunoglobulin A from Plasma Inhibits Human Th17 Responses In Vitro Independent of FcαRI and DC-SIGN

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Chaitrali; Das, Mrinmoy; Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Sharma, Meenu; Wymann, Sandra; Jordi, Monika; Vonarburg, Cédric; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2017-01-01

    Circulating immunoglobulins including immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM play a critical role in the immune homeostasis by modulating functions of immune cells. These functions are mediated in part by natural antibodies. However, despite being second most abundant antibody in the circulation, the immunoregulatory function of IgA is relatively unexplored. As Th17 cells are the key mediators of a variety of autoimmune, inflammatory, and allergic diseases, we investigated the ability of monomeric IgA (mIgA) isolated from pooled plasma of healthy donors to modulate human Th17 cells. We show that mIgA inhibits differentiation and amplification of human Th17 cells and the production of their effector cytokine IL-17A. mIgA also suppresses IFN-γ responses under these experimental conditions. Suppressive effect of mIgA on Th17 responses is associated with reciprocal expansion of FoxP3-positive regulatory T cells. The effect of mIgA on Th17 cells is dependent on F(ab′)2 fragments and independent of FcαRI (CD89) and DC-SIGN. Mechanistically, the modulatory effect of mIgA on Th17 cells implicates suppression of phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Furthermore, mIgA binds to CD4+ T cells and recognizes in a dose-dependent manner the receptors for cytokines (IL-6Rα and IL-1RI) that mediate Th17 responses. Our findings thus reveal novel anti-inflammatory functions of IgA and suggest potential therapeutic utility of mIgA in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that implicate Th17 cells. PMID:28352269

  14. [Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of berberine and jateorhizine in Coptidis Rhizoma powder and their monomeric compounds in type 2 diabetic rats].

    PubMed

    Wei, Shi-chao; Xu, Li-jun; Zou, Xin; Li, Jing-bin; Jiang, Shu-jun; Xu, Xiao-hu; Huang, Rui; Lu, Fu-er

    2015-11-01

    This article focused on a comparative analysis on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of berberine (BER) and jateorhizine(JAT) in Coptidis Rhizoma powder (HL-P) and their monomeric compounds (BER + JAT, BJ) in type 2 diabetic (T2D) rats to explore the beneficial. effect of HL-P in the treatment of T2D. The T2D rats were treated with HL-P, BER, JAT and BJ, respectively for 63 d. The pharmacokinetic parameters, dynamic changes in blood glucose level and blood lipid values were measured. The results showed that, compared with other corresponding group, t(max), T(½ka) of BER and JAT in HL-P group were reduced, while C(max), AUC(inf), AUC(last), V(L)/F were significantly increased; compared with model group, blood glucose levels were decreased significantly in HL-P group since the 18th day, while those in BER or BJ group were reduced since the 36th day, however, blood glucose levels showed no obvious changes in JAT group; compared with model group, FFA values in all treatment group were decreased significantly. Moreover, TG, HDL and LDL value in HL-P group, LDL value in BER group and HDL value in BJ group were improved significantly. The above results showed that Coptidis Rhizoma powder showed excellent pharmacokinetic characteristics and excellent activity of lowering blood glucose and lipid. It provided a scientific basis for oral application of Coptidis Rhizoma powder in the treatment of T2D.

  15. Coordination geometry of monomeric, dimeric and polymeric organotin(IV) compounds constructed from 5-bromopyridine-2-carboxylic acid and mono-, di- or tri-organotin precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Min; Yin, Han-Dong; Zhang, Yan-Wei; Jiang, Jin; Li, Chuan

    2013-03-01

    Reactions of mono-, di-, tri-alkyltin chlorides or oxide with 5-bromopyridine-2-carboxylic acid result in five new organotin(IV) compounds, [MeSn(O2CC5NH3Br)Cl2(H2O)]·(C2H5)2O (1), [(n-Bu)Sn(O2CC5NH3Br)Cl2(H2O)]·(C2H5)2O (2), {[(n-Bu)2Sn(O2CC5NH3Br)]2O}2 (3) [(n-Bu)3Sn(O2CC5NH3Br)]n (4) and [Ph3Sn(O2CC5NH3Br)]n (5), which have been characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, element analysis, IR, 1H, 13C and 119Sn NMR. Three different coordination modes for the ligand are demonstrated in this group of compounds: (1) bidentate mode with the pyridyl nitrogen atom and carboxyl oxygen atom for mono-alkyltin compounds 1 and 2, in which six-coordinated tin center is also bound with two chlorine ions and one water molecule; (2) compound 3 is a tetranuclear centrosymmetric dimer with a central Sn2O2 four-membered ring. The four tin atoms are linked by two bridging carboxyl groups while the remaining two act as monodentate ligands to the endo- and exo-cyclic tin atoms; (3) for tri-alkyltin compounds 4 and 5, the bidentate bridging carboxylic group coordinates with two different tin atoms through the Snsbnd Osbnd Cdbnd O → Sn bond, and the carboxylate bridge propagates 1D polymeric chains, typical for five coordinate tin. However, in compounds 3-5, the pyridyl nitrogen atoms do not participate in the coordination. For triorganotin(IV) polymers 4 and 5, the solution studies show the collapse of the intermolecular interactions observed in the solid state to yield monomeric species.

  16. Dissociation of pentameric to monomeric C-reactive protein localizes and aggravates inflammation: in vivo proof of a powerful proinflammatory mechanism and a new anti-inflammatory strategy.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Jan R; Habersberger, Jonathon; Braig, David; Schmidt, Yvonne; Goerendt, Kurt; Maurer, Valentin; Bannasch, Holger; Scheichl, Amelie; Woollard, Kevin J; von Dobschütz, Ernst; Kolodgie, Frank; Virmani, Renu; Stark, G Bjoern; Peter, Karlheinz; Eisenhardt, Steffen U

    2014-07-01

    The relevance of the dissociation of circulating pentameric C-reactive protein (pCRP) to its monomeric subunits (mCRP) is poorly understood. We investigated the role of conformational C-reactive protein changes in vivo. We identified mCRP in inflamed human striated muscle, human atherosclerotic plaque, and infarcted myocardium (rat and human) and its colocalization with inflammatory cells, which suggests a general causal role of mCRP in inflammation. This was confirmed in rat intravital microscopy of lipopolysaccharide-induced cremasteric muscle inflammation. Intravenous pCRP administration significantly enhanced leukocyte rolling, adhesion, and transmigration via localized dissociation to mCRP in inflamed but not noninflamed cremaster muscle. This was confirmed in a rat model of myocardial infarction. Mechanistically, this process was dependent on exposure of lysophosphatidylcholine on activated cell membranes, which is generated after phospholipase A2 activation. These membrane changes could be visualized intravitally on endothelial cells, as could the colocalized mCRP generation. Blocking of phospholipase A2 abrogated C-reactive protein dissociation and thereby blunted the proinflammatory effects of C-reactive protein. Identifying the dissociation process as a therapeutic target, we stabilized pCRP using 1,6-bis(phosphocholine)-hexane, which prevented dissociation in vitro and in vivo and consequently inhibited the generation and proinflammatory activity of mCRP; notably, it also inhibited mCRP deposition and inflammation in rat myocardial infarction. These results provide in vivo evidence for a novel mechanism that localizes and aggravates inflammation via phospholipase A2-dependent dissociation of circulating pCRP to mCRP. mCRP is proposed as a pathogenic factor in atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction. Most importantly, the inhibition of pCRP dissociation represents a promising, novel anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategy. © 2014 American Heart

  17. The photophysics of monomeric bacteriochlorophylls c and d and their derivatives: properties of the triplet state and singlet oxygen photogeneration and quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnovsky, A. A. Jr; Cheng, P.; Blankenship, R. E.; Moore, T. A.; Gust, D.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of pigment triplet-triplet absorption, pigment phosphorescence and photosensitized singlet oxygen luminescence were carried out on solutions containing monomeric bacteriochlorophylls (Bchl) c and d, isolated from green photosynthetic bacteria, and their magnesium-free and farnesyl-free analogs. The energies of the pigment triplet states fell in the range 1.29-1.34 eV. The triplet lifetimes in aerobic solutions were 200-250 ns; they increased to 280 +/- 70 microseconds after nitrogen purging in liquid solutions and to 0.7-2.1 ms in a solid matrix at ambient or liquid nitrogen temperatures. Rate constants for quenching of the pigment triplet state by oxygen were (2.0-2.5) x 10(9) M-1 s-1, which is close to 1/9 of the rate constant for diffusion-controlled reactions. This quenching was accompanied by singlet oxygen formation. The quantum yields for the triplet state formation and singlet oxygen production were 55-75% in air-saturated solutions. Singlet oxygen quenching by ground-state pigment molecules was observed. Quenching was the most efficient for magnesium-containing pigments, kq = (0.31-1.2) x 10(9) M-1 s-1. It is caused mainly by a physical process of singlet oxygen (1O2) deactivation. Thus, Bchl c and d and their derivatives, as well as chlorophyll and Bchl a, combine a high efficiency of singlet oxygen production with the ability to protect photochemical and photobiological systems against damage by singlet oxygen.

  18. Purification of 3 monomeric monocot mannose-binding lectins and their evaluation for antipoxviral activity: potential applications in multiple viral diseases caused by enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Amandeep; Kamboj, Sukhdev Singh; Singh, Jatinder; Singh, Rajinder; Abrahams, Melissa; Kotwal, Girish J; Saxena, A K

    2007-02-01

    Three monomeric monocot lectins from Zephyranthes carinata, Zephyranthes candida, and Gloriosa superba with carbohydrate specificity towards mannose derivatives and (or) oligomannose have been isolated and purified from their storage tissues. The lectins were purified by anion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephacyl and by gel filtration chromatography on Biogel P-200 followed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The purified lectins, Z. carinata, Z. candida, and G. superba had molecular masses of 12, 11.5, and 12.5 kDa, respectively, as determined by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, indicating that they are monomers. In a hapten inhibition assay, methyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside inhibited agglutination of both Z. candida and Z. carinata; the latter was also inhibited by Man(alpha1-2)Man and Man(alpha1-3)Man. Gloriosa superba showed inhibition only with Man(alpha1-4)Man of all of the sugars and glycoproteins tested. All purified lectins agglutinated red blood cells from rabbit, whereas G. superba was also reactive towards erythrocytes from guinea pig. All of the lectins were nonglycosylated and did not require metal ions for their activity. They were labile above 60 degrees C and were affected by denaturing agents such as urea, thiourea, and guanidine-HCl. The lectins were virtually nonmitogenic, like other members of Amaryllidaceae and Liliaceae. Of the 3 lectins, G. superba was found to be highly toxic to the BSC-1 cell line (African green monkey kidney epithelial cells), while both of the Zephyranthes species showed significant in vitro inhibition of poxvirus replication in BSC-1 cells without any toxic effects to the cells. In addition, Z. candida also exhibited significant anticancer activity against SNB-78, a CNS human cancer cell line.

  19. Analysis of heat-induced disassembly process of three different monomeric forms of the major light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex of photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajie; Liu, Cheng; Yang, Chunhong

    2012-03-01

    The temperature-dependent disassembly process of three monomeric isoforms, namely Lhcb1, Lhcb2, and Lhcb3, of the major light-harvesting chlorophyll (Chl) a/b complexes of photosystem II (LHCIIb) were characterized by observing the changes of absorption spectra, circular dichroism (CD), and dissociation processes of the bound pigments to the in vitro reconstituted complexes subjected to high temperatures. Our results suggest that the three isoforms of LHCIIb undergo conformational rearrangements, structural changes, and dissociations of the bound pigments when the ambient temperature increases from 20 to 90°C. The conformation of the complexes changed sensitively to the changing temperatures because the absorption peaks in the Soret region (436 and 471 nm) and the Qy region (650-660 and 680 nm) decreased immediately upon elevating the ambient temperatures. Analyzing temperature-dependent denaturing and pigment dissociation process, we can divide the disassembly process into three stages: The first stage, appeared from 20°C to around 50-60°C, was characterized by the diminishment of the absorption around 650-660 and 680 nm, accompanied by the blue-shift of the peak at 471 nm and disappearance of the absorbance at 436 nm, which is related to changes in the transition energy of the Chl b cluster, and the red-most Chl a cluster in the LHCIIb. The second stage, beginning at about 50-60°C, was signified by the diminishment of the CD signal between (+)483 nm and (-)490 nm, which implied the disturbance of dipole-dipole interaction of pigments, and the onset of the pigment dissociation. The last stage, beginning at about 70-80°C, indicates the complete dissociation of the pigments from the complex. The physiological aspects of the three stages in the denaturing process are also discussed.

  20. The Monomeric Pentacyanocobaltate (II) Anion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosha, Donnati M. S.

    1982-01-01

    Laboratory procedures, background information, and discussion of experimental results are provided for the preparation of Thallium (I) Pentacyanocobaltate (II). The preparation of this pale green salt is carried out in an aqueous medium. (Author/JN)

  1. Effects of Hydration on Mechanical Properties of a Highly Sclerotized Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Dana N.; Pontin, Michael G.; Waite, J. Herbert; Zok, Frank W.

    2008-01-01

    The jaws of the bloodworm Glycera dibranchiata consist principally of protein and melanin scaffolds with small amounts of unmineralized copper (Cu) and mineralized atacamite (Cu2Cl(OH)3) fibers in distinct regions. Remarkably, when tested in air, the regions containing unmineralized Cu are the hardest, stiffest, and most abrasion resistant. To establish the functions of jaw constituents in physiologically relevant environments, this study examines the effects of hydration on their response to indentation, scratching, and wear. Although all jaw regions are degraded by the presence of water, the ones containing unmineralized Cu are affected least. Notably, scratch depths in the bulk and the atacamite-containing regions double when wet, whereas the corresponding increase in the regions with unmineralized Cu is ∼20%. The results support the view that Cu ions are involved in the formation of intermolecular coordination complexes, creating a cross-linked molecular network that is both mechanically robust and resistant to water ingress. Hydration effects are greatest during wear testing, rates of material removal in water being about three times those in air. The mechanism underlying accelerated wear is suspected to involve coupled effects of near-surface damage and enhanced water ingress, resulting in increased plasticization and susceptibility to plastic plowing. PMID:18192350

  2. Purification and protective efficacy of monomeric and modified Yersinia pestis capsular F1-V antigen fusion proteins for vaccination against plague

    PubMed Central

    Goodin, Jeremy L.; Nellis, David F.; Powell, Bradford S.; Vyas, Vinay V.; Enama, Jeffrey T.; Wang, Lena C.; Clark, Patrick K.; Giardina, Steven L.; Adamovicz, Jeffery. J.; Michiel, Dennis F.

    2009-01-01

    The F1-V vaccine antigen, protective against Yersinia pestis, exhibits a strong tendency to multimerize that affects larger-scale manufacture and characterization. In this work, the sole F1-V cysteine was replaced with serine by site-directed mutagenesis for characterization of F1-V non-covalent multimer interactions and protective potency without participation by disulfide-linkages. F1-V and F1-VC424S proteins were over-expressed in Escherichia coli, recovered using mechanical lysis/pH-modulation and purified from urea-solubilized soft inclusion bodies, using successive ion-exchange, ceramic hydroxyapatite, and size-exclusion chromatography. This purification method resulted in up to 2 mg per gram of cell paste of 95% pure, mono-disperse protein having ≤ 0.5 endotoxin units per mg by a kinetic chromogenic limulus amoebocyte lysate reactivity assay. Both F1-V and F1-VC424S were monomeric at pH 10.0 and progressively self-associated as pH conditions decreased to pH 6.0. Solution additives were screened for their ability to inhibit F1-V self-association at pH 6.5. An L-arginine buffer provided the greatest stabilizing effect. Conversion to >500-kDa multimers occurred between pH 6.0 and 5.0. Conditions for efficient F1-V adsorption to the cGMP-compatible Alhydrogel® adjuvant were optimized. Side-by-side evaluation for protective potency against subcutaneous plague infection in mice was conducted for F1-VC424S monomer; cysteine-capped F1-V monomer; cysteine-capped F1-V multimer; and a F1-V standard reported previously. After a two-dose vaccination with 2 × 20 µg of F1-V, respectively, 100, 80, 80, and 70% of injected mice survived a subcutaneous lethal plague challenge with 108 LD50 Y. pestis CO92. Thus, vaccination with F1-V monomer and multimeric forms resulted in significant, and essentially equivalent, protection. PMID:17293124

  3. Purification and protective efficacy of monomeric and modified Yersinia pestis capsular F1-V antigen fusion proteins for vaccination against plague.

    PubMed

    Goodin, Jeremy L; Nellis, David F; Powell, Bradford S; Vyas, Vinay V; Enama, Jeffrey T; Wang, Lena C; Clark, Patrick K; Giardina, Steven L; Adamovicz, Jeffery J; Michiel, Dennis F

    2007-05-01

    The F1-V vaccine antigen, protective against Yersinia pestis, exhibits a strong tendency to multimerize that affects larger-scale manufacture and characterization. In this work, the sole F1-V cysteine was replaced with serine by site-directed mutagenesis for characterization of F1-V non-covalent multimer interactions and protective potency without participation by disulfide-linkages. F1-V and F1-V(C424S) proteins were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, recovered using mechanical lysis/pH-modulation and purified from urea-solubilized soft inclusion bodies, using successive ion-exchange, ceramic hydroxyapatite, and size-exclusion chromatography. This purification method resulted in up to 2mg/g of cell paste of 95% pure, mono-disperse protein having < or =0.5 endotoxin units per mg by a kinetic chromogenic limulus amoebocyte lysate reactivity assay. Both F1-V and F1-V(C424S) were monomeric at pH 10.0 and progressively self-associated as pH conditions decreased to pH 6.0. Solution additives were screened for their ability to inhibit F1-V self-association at pH 6.5. An L-arginine buffer provided the greatest stabilizing effect. Conversion to >500-kDa multimers occurred between pH 6.0 and 5.0. Conditions for efficient F1-V adsorption to the cGMP-compatible alhydrogel adjuvant were optimized. Side-by-side evaluation for protective potency against subcutaneous plague infection in mice was conducted for F1-V(C424S) monomer; cysteine-capped F1-V monomer; cysteine-capped F1-V multimer; and a F1-V standard reported previously. After a two-dose vaccination with 2 x 20 microg of F1-V, respectively, 100%, 80%, 80%, and 70% of injected mice survived a subcutaneous lethal plague challenge with 10(8) LD(50)Y. pestis CO92. Thus, vaccination with F1-V monomer and multimeric forms resulted in significant, and essentially equivalent, protection.

  4. Different Products of the Reduction of (N),C,N-Chelated Antimony(III) Compounds: Competitive Formation of Monomeric Stibinidenes versus 1H-2,1-Benzazastiboles.

    PubMed

    Vránová, Iva; Alonso, Mercedes; Jambor, Roman; Růžička, Aleš; Turek, Jan; Dostál, Libor

    2017-02-16

    The reduction of N,C,N-chelated antimony(III) chlorides [C6 H3 -2,6-(CH=NR)2 ]SbCl2 (R=Ph (1), tBu (2), Dip (3); Dip=2,6-iPr2 C6 H3 ) with an appropriate amount of KC8 or Li[AlH4 ] resulted in the formation of rare examples of monomeric stibinidenes [C6 H3 -2,6-(CH=NR)2 ]Sb (R=Ph (4), tBu (5), Dip (6)). Similarly, the reduction of compounds 1 or 2 by two equivalents of K[B(sBu)3 H] led to the stibinidenes 4 and 5. In contrast, the analogous reaction of compound 3 resulted in the formation of an unprecedented stibinidene [C6 H3 -2-(CH=NR)-6-(CH2 NHR)]Sb (7) (R=Dip), in which the hydrogen atoms that come from the K[B(sBu)3 H] are incorporated into the ligand backbone. To gain further insight into this intriguing reactivity with K[B(sBu)3 H] and to assess the influence of the substitution at both the antimony atom and pendant substituents, we prepared compounds [C6 H3 -2-(CH=NDip)]Sb(Ph)Cl (8) and [C6 H2 -2-(CH=NDip)-4,6-(tBu)2 ]SbCl2 (9). The treatment of compound 8 with K[B(sBu)3 H] smoothly led to the 1-Ph-2-Dip-1H-2,1-benzazastibole (11), whereas the reaction of compound 9 with K[B(sBu)3 H] resulted in either tBu-substituted 1-Cl-2-Dip-1H-2,1-benzazastibole (13) or the formation of unprecedented Sb-Sb dimer bis(2-Dip-1H-2,1-benzazastibole) (12) depending on the reaction stoichiometry. The miscellaneous reactivity of antimony(III) precursors with reducing agents together with the structure and bonding of the resulting products has also been investigated from a theoretical point of view.

  5. Glyceriformia Fauchald, 1977 (Annelida: "Polychaeta") from Lizard Island, Great Barrier Reef, Australia.

    PubMed

    Böggemann, Markus

    2015-09-18

    Eight species of Glyceridae (Glycera brevicirris, Glycera cf. lapidum, Glycera onomichiensis, Glycera sagittariae, Glycera tesselata, Glycera tridactyla, Glycerella magellanica, Hemipodia cf. simplex) and six species of Goniadidae (Goniada antipoda, Goniada cf. brunnea, Goniada echinulata, Goniada emerita, Goniada grahami, Goniada paucidens) have been collected during several expeditions to the vicinity of Lizard Island (Australia, Queensland). An identification key to the Glyceriformia that inhabit the region is presented. Detailed and illustrated morphological descriptions are given for all investigated species.

  6. Relaxin-like factor (RLF)/insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) is secreted from testicular Leydig cells as a monomeric protein comprising three domains B–C–A with full biological activity in boars

    PubMed Central

    Minagawa, Itaru; Fukuda, Masafumi; Ishige, Hisako; Kohriki, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masatoshi; Park, Enoch Y.; Kawarasaki, Tatsuo; Kohsaka, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    RLF (relaxin-like factor), also known as INSL3 (insulin-like peptide 3), is a novel member of the relaxin/insulin gene family that is expressed in testicular Leydig cells. Despite the implicated role of RLF/INSL3 in testis development, its native conformation remains unknown. In the present paper we demonstrate for the first time that boar testicular RLF/INSL3 is isolated as a monomeric structure with full biological activity. Using a series of chromatography steps, the native RLF/INSL3 was highly purified as a single peak in reverse-phase HPLC. MS/MS (tandem MS) analysis of the trypsinized sample provided 66% sequence coverage and revealed a distinct monomeric structure consisting of the B-, C- and A-domains deduced previously from the RLF/INSL3 cDNA. Moreover, the N-terminal peptide was four amino acid residues longer than predicted previously. MS analysis of the intact molecule and PMF (peptide mass fingerprinting) analysis at 100% sequence coverage confirmed this structure and indicated the existence of three site-specific disulfide bonds. RLF/INSL3 retained full bioactivity in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells expressing RXFP2 (relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2), the receptor for RLF/INSL3. Furthermore, RLF/INSL3 was found to be secreted from Leydig cells into testicular venous blood. Collectively, these results indicate that boar RLF/INSL3 is secreted from testicular Leydig cells as a B–C–A monomeric structure with full biological activity. PMID:21899516

  7. Down-regulation of cell surface insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1 phosphorylation by inhibitor of 90-kDa heat-shock protein family: endoplasmic reticulum retention of monomeric insulin receptor precursor with calnexin in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Tomokazu; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Shiraishi, Seiji; Yokoo, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Minami, Shin-Ichi; Onitsuka, Toshio; Wada, Akihiko

    2002-10-01

    Treatment (>/=6 h) of cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells with geldanamycin (GA) or herbimycin A (HA), an inhibitor of the 90-kDa heat-shock protein (Hsp90) family, decreased cell surface (125)I-insulin binding. The effect of GA was concentration (EC(50) = 84 nM)- and time (t(1/2) = 8.5 h)-dependent; GA (1 microM for 24 h) lowered the B(max) value of (125)I-insulin binding by 80%, without changing the K(d) value. Western blot analysis showed that GA (>/=3 h) lowered insulin receptor (IR) level by 83% (t(1/2) = 7.4 h; EC(50) = 74 nM), while raising IR precursor level by 100% (t(1/2) = 7.9 h; EC(50) = 300 nM). Pulse-label followed by reducing and nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that monomeric IR precursor (~190 kDa) developed into the homodimeric IR precursor (approximately 380 kDa) and the mature alpha(2)beta(2) IR (~410 kDa) in nontreated cells, but not in GA-treated cells; in GA-treated cells, the homodimerization-incompetent form of monomeric IR precursor was degraded via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation. Immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot analysis showed that IR precursor was associated with calnexin (CNX) to a greater extent in GA-treated cells, compared with nontreated cells. GA had no effect on IR mRNA levels and internalization rate of cell surface IRs. In GA-treated cells, insulin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) was attenuated by 77%, with no change in IRS-1 level. Thus, inhibition of the Hsp90 family by GA or HA interrupts homodimerization of monomeric IR precursor in the ER and increases retention of monomeric IR precursor with CNX; this event retards cell surface expression of IR and attenuates insulin-induced activation of IRS-1.

  8. Hue-shifted monomeric variants of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: identification of the molecular determinants of color and applications in fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hui-wang; Olenych, Scott G; Wong, Peter; Davidson, Michael W; Campbell, Robert E

    2008-03-06

    In the 15 years that have passed since the cloning of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP), the expanding set of fluorescent protein (FP) variants has become entrenched as an indispensable toolkit for cell biology research. One of the latest additions to the toolkit is monomeric teal FP (mTFP1), a bright and photostable FP derived from Clavularia cyan FP. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the blue-shifted fluorescence emission we undertook a mutagenesis-based study of residues in the immediate environment of the chromophore. We also employed site-directed and random mutagenesis in combination with library screening to create new hues of mTFP1-derived variants with wavelength-shifted excitation and emission spectra. Our results demonstrate that the protein-chromophore interactions responsible for blue-shifting the absorbance and emission maxima of mTFP1 operate independently of the chromophore structure. This conclusion is supported by the observation that the Tyr67Trp and Tyr67His mutants of mTFP1 retain a blue-shifted fluorescence emission relative to their avGFP counterparts (that is, Tyr66Trp and Tyr66His). Based on previous work with close homologs, His197 and His163 are likely to be the residues with the greatest contribution towards blue-shifting the fluorescence emission. Indeed we have identified the substitutions His163Met and Thr73Ala that abolish or disrupt the interactions of these residues with the chromophore. The mTFP1-Thr73Ala/His163Met double mutant has an emission peak that is 23 nm red-shifted from that of mTFP1 itself. Directed evolution of this double mutant resulted in the development of mWasabi, a new green fluorescing protein that offers certain advantages over enhanced avGFP (EGFP). To assess the usefulness of mTFP1 and mWasabi in live cell imaging applications, we constructed and imaged more than 20 different fusion proteins. Based on the results of our mutagenesis study, we conclude that the two histidine

  9. Hue-shifted monomeric variants of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: identification of the molecular determinants of color and applications in fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ai, Hui-wang; Olenych, Scott G; Wong, Peter; Davidson, Michael W; Campbell, Robert E

    2008-01-01

    Background In the 15 years that have passed since the cloning of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP), the expanding set of fluorescent protein (FP) variants has become entrenched as an indispensable toolkit for cell biology research. One of the latest additions to the toolkit is monomeric teal FP (mTFP1), a bright and photostable FP derived from Clavularia cyan FP. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the blue-shifted fluorescence emission we undertook a mutagenesis-based study of residues in the immediate environment of the chromophore. We also employed site-directed and random mutagenesis in combination with library screening to create new hues of mTFP1-derived variants with wavelength-shifted excitation and emission spectra. Results Our results demonstrate that the protein-chromophore interactions responsible for blue-shifting the absorbance and emission maxima of mTFP1 operate independently of the chromophore structure. This conclusion is supported by the observation that the Tyr67Trp and Tyr67His mutants of mTFP1 retain a blue-shifted fluorescence emission relative to their avGFP counterparts (that is, Tyr66Trp and Tyr66His). Based on previous work with close homologs, His197 and His163 are likely to be the residues with the greatest contribution towards blue-shifting the fluorescence emission. Indeed we have identified the substitutions His163Met and Thr73Ala that abolish or disrupt the interactions of these residues with the chromophore. The mTFP1-Thr73Ala/His163Met double mutant has an emission peak that is 23 nm red-shifted from that of mTFP1 itself. Directed evolution of this double mutant resulted in the development of mWasabi, a new green fluorescing protein that offers certain advantages over enhanced avGFP (EGFP). To assess the usefulness of mTFP1 and mWasabi in live cell imaging applications, we constructed and imaged more than 20 different fusion proteins. Conclusion Based on the results of our mutagenesis study, we conclude

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a monomeric mutant of Azami-Green (mAG), an Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein-like green-emitting fluorescent protein from the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, Tatsuki; Yamamura, Akihiro; Kameda, Yasuhiro; Hayakawa, Kou; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2009-12-01

    Monomeric Azami-Green (mAG) from the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis is the first monomeric green-emitting fluorescent protein that is not a derivative of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP). mAG and avGFP are 27% identical in amino-acid sequence. Diffraction-quality crystals of recombinant mAG were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant. The mAG crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.20 A resolution on beamline AR-NW12A at the Photon Factory (Tsukuba, Japan). The crystal belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.78, b = 51.72, c = 52.89 A, alpha = 90.96, beta = 103.41, gamma = 101.79 degrees. The Matthews coefficient (V(M) = 2.10 A(3) Da(-1)) indicated that the crystal contained two mAG molecules per asymmetric unit.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a monomeric mutant of Azami-Green (mAG), an Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein-like green-emitting fluorescent protein from the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis

    PubMed Central

    Ebisawa, Tatsuki; Yamamura, Akihiro; Kameda, Yasuhiro; Hayakawa, Kou; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    Monomeric Azami-Green (mAG) from the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis is the first monomeric green-emitting fluorescent protein that is not a derivative of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP). mAG and avGFP are 27% identical in amino-acid sequence. Diffraction-quality crystals of recombinant mAG were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant. The mAG crystal diffracted X-rays to 2.20 Å resolution on beamline AR-NW12A at the Photon Factory (Tsukuba, Japan). The crystal belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 41.78, b = 51.72, c = 52.89 Å, α = 90.96, β = 103.41, γ = 101.79°. The Matthews coefficient (V M = 2.10 Å3 Da−1) indicated that the crystal contained two mAG molecules per asymmetric unit. PMID:20054132

  12. SAXS data based global shape analysis of trigger factor (TF) proteins from E. coli, V. cholerae, and P. frigidicola: resolving the debate on the nature of monomeric and dimeric forms.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Yogendra S; Dhoke, Reema R; Badmalia, Maulik; Sagar, Amin; Ashish

    2015-05-21

    Dimerization of bacterial chaperone trigger factor (TF) is an inherent protein concentration based property which available biophysical characterization and crystal structures have kept debatable. We acquired small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) intensity data from different TF homologues from Escherichia coli (ECTF), Vibrio cholerae (VCTF), and Psychrobacter frigidicola (PFTF) while varying each protein concentration. We found that ECTF and VCTF adopt a compact dimeric shape at higher concentrations which did not resemble the "back-to-back" conformation reported earlier for ECTF from crystallography (PDB ID: 1W26 ). In contrast, PFTF remained monomeric throughout the concentration range 2-90 μM displaying a multimodal open extended conformation. OLIGOMER analysis showed that both the ECTF and VCTF remained completely monomeric at lower concentrations (2-11 μM), while, at higher concentrations (60-90 μM), they adopted a dimeric form. Interestingly, the equilibrium existed in the medium concentration range (>11 and <60 μM), which correlates with the physiological concentration (40-50 μM) of TF in cell cytoplasm. Additionally, circular dichroism data revealed that solution structures of ECTF and VCTF contain predominantly α-helical content, while PFTF contains 310-helical content.

  13. Oligomeric cocoa procyanidins possess enhanced bioactivity compared to monomeric and polymeric cocoa procyanidins for preventing the development of obesity, insulin resistance, and impaired glucose tolerance during high-fat feeding.

    PubMed

    Dorenkott, Melanie R; Griffin, Laura E; Goodrich, Katheryn M; Thompson-Witrick, Katherine A; Fundaro, Gabrielle; Ye, Liyun; Stevens, Joseph R; Ali, Mostafa; O'Keefe, Sean F; Hulver, Matthew W; Neilson, Andrew P

    2014-03-12

    There is interest in the potential of cocoa flavanols, including monomers and procyanidins, to prevent obesity and type-2 diabetes. Fermentation and processing of cocoa beans influence the qualitative and quantitative profiles of individual cocoa constituents. Little is known regarding how different cocoa flavanols contribute to inhibition of obesity and type-2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to compare the impacts of long-term dietary exposure to cocoa flavanol monomers, oligomers, and polymers on the effects of high-fat feeding. Mice were fed a high-fat diet supplemented with either a cocoa flavanol extract or a flavanol fraction enriched with monomeric, oligomeric, or polymeric procyanidins for 12 weeks. The oligomer-rich fraction proved to be most effective in preventing weight gain, fat mass, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance in this model. This is the first long-term feeding study to examine the relative activities of cocoa constituents on diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

  14. A Novel Monomeric Tin(II) Phosphate, [N(C 2H 5NH 3) 3] 3+[Sn(PO 4)(HPO 4)] 3-·4H 2O, Connected through Hydrogen Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyappan, S.; Cheetham, A. K.; Natarajan, Srinivasan; Rao, C. N. R.

    1998-08-01

    The tin(II) phosphate, [N(C 2H 5NH 3) 3] 3+[Sn(PO 4)(HPO 4)] 3-4H 2O, contains monomeric Sn 2(PO 4) 2(HPO 4) 2units which form a hydrogen-bonded network with the TREN amine (TREN=N(C 2H 5NH 3) 3+3); triclinic, space group P1 (no. 2), a=9.579(1), b=10.507(1), c=10.976(1) Å; α=72.93(1)°, β=78.03(1)°, γ=69.82(1)°, V=984.2(1) Å 3, Z=2. The Sn 2P 2O 4core of this unit is a common structural feature of open-framework tin phosphates and may play a role as a building block for this class of materials.

  15. A comparative immunogenicity study in rabbits of disulfide-stabilized, proteolytically cleaved, soluble trimeric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp140, trimeric cleavage-defective gp140 and monomeric gp120

    SciTech Connect

    Beddows, Simon; Franti, Michael; Dey, Antu K.; Kirschner, Marc; Iyer, Sai Prasad N.; Fisch, Danielle C.; Ketas, Thomas; Yuste, Eloisa; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Klasse, Per Johan; Maddon, Paul J.; Olson, William C.; Moore, John P. . E-mail: jpm2003@med.cornell.edu

    2007-04-10

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex, a homotrimer containing gp120 surface glycoprotein and gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein subunits, mediates the binding and fusion of the virus with susceptible target cells. The Env complex is the target for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) and is the basis for vaccines intended to induce NAbs. Early generation vaccines based on monomeric gp120 subunits did not confer protection from infection; one alternative approach is therefore to make and evaluate soluble forms of the trimeric Env complex. We have directly compared the immunogenicity in rabbits of two forms of soluble trimeric Env and monomeric gp120 based on the sequence of HIV-1{sub JR-FL}. Both protein-only and DNA-prime, protein-boost immunization formats were evaluated, DNA-priming having little or no influence on the outcome. One form of trimeric Env was made by disrupting the gp120-gp41 cleavage site by mutagenesis (gp140{sub UNC}), the other contains an intramolecular disulfide bond to stabilize the cleaved gp120 and gp41 moieties (SOSIP.R6 gp140). Among the three immunogens, SOSIP.R6 gp140 most frequently elicited neutralizing antibodies against the homologous, neutralization-resistant strain, HIV-1{sub JR-FL}. All three proteins induced NAbs against more sensitive strains, but the breadth of activity against heterologous primary isolates was limited. When antibodies able to neutralize HIV-1{sub JR-FL} were detected, antigen depletion studies showed they were not directed at the V3 region but were targeted at other, undefined gp120 and also non-gp120 epitopes.

  16. Intercluster compound between a tetrakis{triphenylphosphinegold(I)}oxonium cation and a keggin polyoxometalate (POM): formation during the course of carboxylate elimination of a monomeric triphenylphosphinegold(I) carboxylate in the presence of POMs.

    PubMed

    Nomiya, Kenji; Yoshida, Takuya; Sakai, Yoshitaka; Nanba, Arisa; Tsuruta, Shinichiro

    2010-09-20

    The preparation and structural characterization of a novel intercluster compound, [{Au(PPh(3))}(4)(μ(4)-O)](3)[α-PW(12)O(40)](2)·4EtOH (1), constructed between a tetrakis{triphenylphosphinegold(I)}oxonium cation and a saturated α-Keggin polyoxometalate (POM) are described. The tetragold(I) cluster oxonium cation was formed during the course of carboxylate elimination of a monomeric phosphinegold(I) carboxylate complex, i.e., [Au((R,S)-pyrrld)(PPh(3))] [(R,S)-Hpyrrld = (R,S)-2-pyrrolidone-5-carboxylic acid], in the presence of the free acid form of a Keggin POM, H(3)[α-PW(12)O(40)]·7H(2)O. The liquid-liquid diffusion between the upper water/EtOH phase containing the Keggin POM and the lower CH(2)Cl(2) phase containing the monomeric gold(I) complex gave a pure crystalline sample of 1 in good yield (42.1%, 0.242 g scale). Complex 1 was formed by ionic interaction between the tetragold(I) cluster cation and the Keggin POM anion. As a matter of fact, the POM anion in 1 can be exchanged with the BF(4)(-) anion using an anion-exchange resin (Amberlyst A-27) in BF(4)(-) form. By using other Keggin POMs, such as H(4)[α-SiW(12)O(40)]·10H(2)O and H(3)[α-PMo(12)O(40)]·14H(2)O, the same tetragold(I) cluster cation was also formed, i.e., in the forms of [{Au(PPh(3))}(4)(μ(4)-O)](2)[α-SiW(12)O(40)]·2H(2)O (2) and [{Au(PPh(3))}(4)(μ(4)-O)](3)[α-PMo(12)O(40)](2)·3EtOH (3). Compounds 1-3, as dimethyl sulfoxide-soluble, EtOH- and Et(2)O-insoluble dark-yellowish white solids, were characterized by complete elemental analysis, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses, Fourier transform IR, X-ray crystallography, and solid-state (CPMAS (31)P and (29)Si) and solution ((31)P{(1)H} and (1)H) NMR spectroscopy. The molecular structures of 1 and 2 were successfully determined. The tetragold(I) cluster cation was composed of four PPh(3)Au(I) units bridged by a central μ(4)-oxygen atom in the geometry of a trigonal pyramid or distorted tetrahedron.

  17. Low-affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonRII)-mediated activation of human monocytes by both monomeric IgE and IgE/anti-IgE immune complex.

    PubMed

    Ezeamuzie, Charles I; Al-Attiyah, Raja'a; Shihab, Puthiyaveetil K; Al-Radwan, Reem

    2009-08-01

    Monocytes and macrophages of individuals with allergic diseases express increased levels of the low-affinity IgE receptors (FcepsilonRII or CD23) on their surfaces. The cross-linking of CD23-bound IgE antibody by allergen activates the cells to release inflammatory mediators. In mast cells, the binding of IgE to the high-affinity IgE receptors (FcepsilonRI) has recently been shown to activate these cells independent of allergen. It has not been determined if such is true of the binding of IgE to the low-affinity receptors. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to determine whether monomeric IgE alone can activate CD23-bearing human monocytes and how this may relate to the activation by IgE/anti-IgE immune complex. Purified monocytes, cultured for 48 h with IL-4 to up-regulate CD23 were sensitized with human myeloma IgE and further cultured for 24 h with or without anti-human IgE antibody. The release of cytokines TNF-alpha and MIP-1alpha (as an index of activation) was determined by enzyme immunoassay. Results showed that in IL-4-treated/CD23-bearing monocytes, sensitization with IgE alone caused a release of TNF-alpha and MIP-1alpha. The addition of anti-IgE antibody to cross-link the bound IgE resulted in the enhancement of the response. Such activation by monomeric IgE and IgE/anti-IgE immune complex was blocked with an anti-CD23 antibody, confirming the specific involvement of CD23 molecules. Neither of the activation modalities elevated intracellular cAMP, contrary to previous report. These results show for the first time, that in CD23-bearing monocytes, IgE sensitization alone can activate monocytes, and that ligation of such IgE by anti-IgE antibody only enhances the response. These observations have implications for the understanding of the pathophysiology of IgE-dependent inflammation accompanying many allergic diseases.

  18. Monomeric, trimeric, and tetrameric transition metal complexes (Mn, Fe, Co) containing N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-aminoethanol/-ate: preparation, crystal structure, molecular magnetism and oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jong Won; Rowthu, Sankara Rao; Hyun, Min Young; Song, Young Joo; Kim, Cheal; Kim, Bong Gon; Min, Kil Sik

    2011-06-07

    The reaction of N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-2-aminoethanol (bpaeOH), NaSCN/NaN(3), and metal (M) ions [M = Mn(II), Fe(II/III), Co(II)] in MeOH, leads to the isolation of a series of monomeric, trimeric, and tetrameric metal complexes, namely [Mn(bpaeOH)(NCS)(2)] (1), [Mn(bpaeO)(N(3))(2)] (2), [Fe(bpaeOH)(NCS)(2)] (3), [Fe(4)(bpaeO)(2)(CH(3)O)(2)(N(3))(8)] (4), [Co(bpaeOH)(NCS)(2)] (5), and [Co(3)(bpaeO)(2)(NO(3))(N(3))(4)](NO(3)) (6). These compounds have been investigated by single crystal X-ray diffractometry and magnetochemistry. In complex 1 the Mn(II) is bonded to one bpaeOH and two thiocyanate ions, while in complex 2 it is coordinated to a deprotonated bpaeO(-) and two azide ions. The oxidation states of manganese ions are 2+ for 1 and 3+ for 2, respectively, indicating that the different oxidation states depend on the type of binding anions. The structures of monomeric iron(II) and cobalt(II) complexes 3 and 5 with two thiocyanate ions are isomorphous to that of 1. Compounds 1, 2, 3, and 5 exhibit high-spin states in the temperature range 5 to 300 K. 4 contains two different iron(III) ions in an asymmetric unit, one is coordinated to a deprotonated bpaeO(-), an azide ion, and a methoxy group, and the other is bonded to three azide ions and two oxygens from bpaeO(-) and a methoxy group. Two independent iron(III) ions in 4 form a tetranuclear complex by symmetry. 4 displays both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic couplings (J = 9.8 and -14.3 cm(-1)) between the iron(III) ions. 6 is a mixed-valence trinuclear cobalt complex, which is formulated as Co(III)(S = 0)-Co(II)(S = 3/2)-Co(III)(S = 0). The effective magnetic moment at room temperature corresponds to the high-spin cobalt(II) ion (∼4.27 μ(B)). Interestingly, 6 showed efficient catalytic activities toward various olefins and alcohols with modest to excellent yields, and it has been proposed that a high-valent Co(V)-oxo species might be responsible for oxygen atom transfer in the olefin epoxidation and

  19. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine.

    PubMed

    Cai, Chenggu; Jiang, Hua; Li, Lei; Liu, Tianming; Song, Xuejie; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2) and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3). Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species.

  20. Adsorption mechanism and collapse propensities of the full-length, monomeric Aβ(1-42) on the surface of a single-walled carbon nanotube: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Jana, Asis K; Sengupta, Neelanjana

    2012-04-18

    Though nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes have gained recent attention in biology and medicine, there are few studies at the single-molecule level that explore their interactions with disease-causing proteins. Using atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations, we have investigated the interactions of the monomeric Aβ(1-42) peptide with a single-walled carbon nanotube of small diameter. Starting with peptide-nanotube complexes that delineate the interactions of different segments of the peptide, we find rapid convergence in the peptide's adsorption behavior on the nanotube surface, manifested in its arrested movement, the convergence of peptide-nanotube contact areas and approach distances, and in increased peptide wrapping around the nanotube. In systems where the N-terminal domain is initially distal from nanotube, the adsorption phenomena are initiated by interactions arising from the central hydrophobic core, and precipitated by those arising from the N-terminal residues. Our simulations and free energy calculations together demonstrate that the presence of the nanotube increases the energetic favorability of the open state. We note that the observation of peptide localization could be leveraged for site-specific drug delivery, while the decreased propensity of collapse appears promising for altering kinetics of the peptide's self-assembly.

  1. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Chenggu; Jiang, Hua; Li, Lei; Liu, Tianming; Song, Xuejie; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2) and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3). Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species. PMID:27479072

  2. DMR (deacetylation and mechanical refining) processing of corn stover achieves high monomeric sugar concentrations (230 g L-1) during enzymatic hydrolysis and high ethanol concentrations (>10% v/v) during fermentation without hydrolysate purification or concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiaowen; Kuhn, Erik; Jennings, Edward W.; Nelson, Robert; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Min; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2016-04-01

    Distilling and purifying ethanol and other products from second generation lignocellulosic biorefineries adds significant capital and operating costs to biofuel production. The energy usage associated with distillation negatively affects plant gate costs and causes environmental and life-cycle impacts, and the lower titers in fermentation caused by lower sugar concentrations from pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis increase energy and water usage and ethanol production costs. In addition, lower ethanol titers increase the volumes required for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation vessels increase capital expenditure (CAPEX). Therefore, increasing biofuel titers has been a research focus in renewable biofuel production for several decades. In this work, we achieved approximately 230 g L-1 of monomeric sugars after high solid enzymatic hydrolysis using deacetylation and mechanical refining (DMR) processed corn stover substrates produced at the 100 kg per day scale. The high sugar concentrations and low chemical inhibitor concentrations achieved by the DMR process allowed fermentation to ethanol with titers as high as 86 g L-1, which translates into approximately 10.9% v/v ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time that titers greater than 10% v/v ethanol in fermentations derived from corn stover without any sugar concentration or purification steps have been reported. As a result, the potential cost savings from high sugar and ethanol titers achieved by the DMR process are also reported using TEA analysis.

  3. Stereospecific approach to the synthesis of ring-A oxygenated sarpagine indole alkaloids. Total synthesis of the dimeric indole alkaloid P-(+)-dispegatrine and six other monomeric indole alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Edwankar, Chitra R; Edwankar, Rahul V; Namjoshi, Ojas A; Liao, Xuebin; Cook, James M

    2013-07-05

    The first regio- and stereocontrolled total synthesis of the bisphenolic, bisquaternary alkaloid (+)-dispegatrine (1) has been accomplished in an overall yield of 8.3% (12 reaction vessels) from 5-methoxy-d-tryptophan ethyl ester (17). A crucial late-stage thallium(III) mediated intermolecular oxidative dehydrodimerization was employed in the formation of the C9-C9' biaryl axis in 1. The complete stereocontrol observed in this key biaryl coupling step is due to the asymmetric induction by the natural sarpagine configuration of the monomer lochnerine (6) and was confirmed by both the Suzuki and the oxidative dehydrodimerization model studies on the tetrahydro β-carboline (35). The axial chirality of the lochnerine dimer (40) and in turn dispegatrine (1) was established by X-ray crystallography and was determined to be P(S). Additionally, the first total synthesis of the monomeric indole alkaloids (+)-spegatrine (2), (+)-10-methoxyvellosimine (5), (+)-lochnerine (6), lochvinerine (7), (+)-sarpagine (8), and (+)-lochneram (11) were also achieved via the common pentacyclic intermediate 16.

  4. Crystal structure and photoluminescence properties of a new monomeric copper(II) complex: bis(3-{[(3-hydroxypropyl)imino]methyl}-4-nitrophenolato-κ(3)O,N,O')copper(II).

    PubMed

    Kocak, Cagdas; Oylumluoglu, Gorkem; Donmez, Adem; Coban, M Burak; Erkarslan, Ugur; Aygun, Muhittin; Kara, Hulya

    2017-05-01

    Copper(II)-Schiff base complexes have attracted extensive interest due to their structural, electronic, magnetic and luminescence properties. The title novel monomeric Cu(II) complex, [Cu(C10H11N2O4)2], has been synthesized by the reaction of 3-{[(3-hydroxypropyl)imino]methyl}-4-nitrophenol (H2L) and copper(II) acetate monohydrate in methanol, and was characterized by elemental analysis, UV and IR spectroscopies, single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and a photoluminescence study. The Cu(II) atom is located on a centre of inversion and is coordinated by two imine N atoms, two phenoxy O atoms in a mutual trans disposition and two hydroxy O atoms in axial positions, forming an elongated octahedral geometry. In the crystal, intermolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules to form a one-dimensional chain structure and π-π contacts also connect the molecules to form a three-dimensional structure. The solid-state photoluminescence properties of the complex and free H2L have been investigated at room temperature in the visible region. When the complex and H2L are excited under UV light at 349 nm, the complex displays a strong green emission at 520 nm and H2L displays a blue emission at 480 nm.

  5. DMR (deacetylation and mechanical refining) processing of corn stover achieves high monomeric sugar concentrations (230 g L-1) during enzymatic hydrolysis and high ethanol concentrations (>10% v/v) during fermentation without hydrolysate purification or concentration

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Xiaowen; Kuhn, Erik; Jennings, Edward W.; ...

    2016-04-01

    Distilling and purifying ethanol and other products from second generation lignocellulosic biorefineries adds significant capital and operating costs to biofuel production. The energy usage associated with distillation negatively affects plant gate costs and causes environmental and life-cycle impacts, and the lower titers in fermentation caused by lower sugar concentrations from pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis increase energy and water usage and ethanol production costs. In addition, lower ethanol titers increase the volumes required for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation vessels increase capital expenditure (CAPEX). Therefore, increasing biofuel titers has been a research focus in renewable biofuel production for several decades. In thismore » work, we achieved approximately 230 g L-1 of monomeric sugars after high solid enzymatic hydrolysis using deacetylation and mechanical refining (DMR) processed corn stover substrates produced at the 100 kg per day scale. The high sugar concentrations and low chemical inhibitor concentrations achieved by the DMR process allowed fermentation to ethanol with titers as high as 86 g L-1, which translates into approximately 10.9% v/v ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time that titers greater than 10% v/v ethanol in fermentations derived from corn stover without any sugar concentration or purification steps have been reported. As a result, the potential cost savings from high sugar and ethanol titers achieved by the DMR process are also reported using TEA analysis.« less

  6. Hydrogen-bonded adducts of ferrocene-1,1'-diylbis(diphenylmethanol): monomeric and polymeric adducts with 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene and 1,6-diaminohexane.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Choudhury M; Ferguson, George; Lough, Alan J; Glidewell, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    In the adduct ferrocene-1,1'-diylbis(diphenylmethanol)-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene (1/1), [Fe(C18H15O)2]*C12H10N2, there is an intramolecular O-H...O hydrogen bond in the ferrocenediol component and a single O-H...N hydrogen bond linking the diol to the diamine, which is disordered over two sets of sites, so forming a finite monomeric adduct. In the adduct ferrocene-1,1'-diylbis(diphenylmethanol)-1,6-diaminohexane (2/1), 2[Fe(C18H15O)2]*C6H16N2, the amine lies across a centre of inversion in space group P-1. There is an intramolecular O-H...O hydrogen bond in the ferrocenediol, and the molecular components are linked by O-H.N and N-H.O hydrogen bonds, one of each type, into a C3(3)(13)[R6(6)(12)] chain of rings.

  7. Development of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and Their Mapping by Monomeric gp120 in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Humans and Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIVSF162P3N-Infected Macaques.

    PubMed

    Jia, Manxue; Lu, Hong; Markowitz, Martin; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Wu, Xueling

    2016-04-01

    To improve our understanding of the similarities and differences between neutralizing antibodies elicited by simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected rhesus macaques and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected humans, we examined the plasma of 13 viremic macaques infected with SHIVSF162P3Nand 85 HIV-1-infected humans with known times of infection. We identified 5 macaques (38%) from 1 to 2 years postinfection (p.i.) with broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against tier 2 HIV-1. In comparison, only 2 out of 42 (5%) human plasma samples collected in a similar time frame of 1 to 3 years p.i. exhibited comparable neutralizing breadths and potencies, with the number increasing to 7 out of 21 (30%) after 3 years p.i. Plasma mapping with monomeric gp120 identified only 2 out of 9 humans and 2 out of 4 macaques that contained gp120-reactive neutralizing antibodies, indicating distinct specificities in these plasma samples, with most of them recognizing the envelope trimer (including gp41) rather than the gp120 monomer. Indeed, a total of 20 gp120-directed monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) isolated from a human subject (AD358) and a Chinese rhesus macaque (GB40) displayed no or limited neutralizing activity against tier 2 strains. These isolated MAbs, mapped to the CD4-binding site, the V3 loop, the inner domain, and the C5 region of gp120, revealed genetic similarity between the human and macaque immunoglobulin genes used to encode some V3-directed MAbs. These results also support the use of envelope trimer probes for efficient isolation of HIV-1 bnAbs. HIV-1 vaccine research can benefit from understanding the development of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) in rhesus macaques, commonly used to assess vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. Here, we examined 85 HIV-1-infected humans and 13 SHIVSF162P3N-infected macaques for bnAbs and found that, similar to HIV-1-infected humans, bnAbs in SHIV-infected macaques are also rare, but their development

  8. Influence of osmolarity of contrast medium and saline flush on computed tomography angiography: comparison of monomeric and dimeric iodinated contrast media with different iodine concentrations at an identical iodine delivery rate.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Miori; Doi, Shoko; Shimizu, Junichiro; Lee, Ki-Ja; Iwasaki, Toshiroh; Miyake, Yoh-Ichi; Yamada, Kazutaka

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the influence of osmolarity of iodinated contrast media and saline flush on the contrast effect in thoracic computed tomography angiography (CTA) at an identical iodine delivery rate (IDR). Seven beagles were used in a cross-over experiment. The contrast media used were iohexol 350 mgI/ml (IOH350; osmolarity 844 mmol/kg) and iodixanol 320 mgI/ml (IDX320; osmolarity 290 mmol/kg). Each contrast medium was administered to groups with and without saline flush at 40.0 mgI/kg/s for all experiments. Dynamic CT scanning was performed at the ninth thoracic vertebra level. The peak value, area under the curve (AUC), and time to peak (TTP) were calculated from the time attenuation curves of the pulmonary artery and aorta. There was no significant difference between IOH350 and IDX320 with or without saline flush in the peak values for the pulmonary artery and aorta. AUC was significantly higher in groups with saline flush for both contrast media and arteries (p<0.05) with no significant difference between contrast media. TTP was significantly longer in groups with saline flush than without saline flush for both contrast media and arteries (p<0.05), with no significant difference between contrast media. There were no significant differences in the contrast effects of monomeric IOH350 and dimeric IDX320 in thoracic CTA when used at an identical IDR. Moreover, saline flush prolonged the peak duration at 600 mgI/kg. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis and reaction of monomeric germanium(II) and lead(II) dimethylamide and the synthesis of germanium(II) hydrazide by cleavage of one N-H bond of hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Jana, Anukul; Roesky, Herbert W; Schulzke, Carola; Samuel, Prinson P; Döring, Alexander

    2010-06-21

    The beta-diketiminate substituted germanium(II) and lead(II) dimethylamides, LGeNMe(2) (1) and LPbNMe(2) (2), [L = CH{(CMe)(2)(2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)N)(2)}] have been synthesized by the reaction of LiNMe(2) with LGeCl and LPbCl respectively. Reaction of compound 1 with an equivalent amount of elemental sulfur leads to the germanium analogue of thioamide, LGe(S)NMe(2) (3). 2 reacts with 2-benzoyl pyridine (PhCOPy-2) to form the lead(II) alkoxide LPbOC(NMe(2))Ph(2-Py) (4) by nucleophilic addition of "NMe(2)" to the carbon oxygen double bond. The reaction of stable N-heterocyclic germylene L(1)Ge [L(1) = CH{(C=CH(2))(CMe)(2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)N)(2)}] with hydrazine yields the germanium(II) substituted hydrazide LGeNHNH(2) (5) by cleavage of one N-H bond of hydrazine. Finally, attempts to isolate lead(II) hydride LPbH from the reaction of 2 with phenylsilane (PhSiH(3)) failed, and instead LPbN(2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3)){C(CH(3))CHC(CH(3))=N(2,6-iPr(2)C(6)H(3))} (6) was obtained in very low yield. We are able to prove this only by single crystal X-ray structural analysis. Compounds 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 were characterized by microanalysis, electron impact (EI) mass spectrometry, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore compounds 1, 2, 5, and 6 were characterized by single crystal X-ray structural analysis, with the result that they are exhibiting monomeric structures in the solid state with trigonal-pyramidal environment at the metal center and a stereochemically active lone pair.

  10. In situ XAS and IR studies on Cu:SAPO-5 and Cu:SAPO-11: the contributory role of monomeric linear copper(i) species in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx by propene.

    PubMed

    Mathisen, Karina; Stockenhuber, Michael; Nicholson, David G

    2009-07-14

    Cu:SAPO-5 and Cu:SAPO-11 were prepared by conventional and hydrothermal ion exchange. Copper incorporation is increased six-fold by hydrothermal ion exchange relative to conventional methods. In all cases, the amount of copper taken up by SAPO-11 is superior to uptake in SAPO-5. Copper is divalent and in tetragonally-distorted octahedral environments in the as-prepared samples independent of the method of incorporation for both systems. The local structures about the metal and the valence states associated with the different steps in the selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) in the presence of propene (SCR-HC) have been investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). For both the Cu:SAPO-5 and Cu:SAPO-11 systems, heating in helium partially autoreduces copper(ii) to copper(i). Following activation in oxygen, propene causes further reduction to copper(i) in all four samples as shown by the evolution of an intense pre-edge diagnostic feature. XANES analysis reveal this to be characteristic of monomeric linear two coordinate copper(i) species. This is a prime example of a pre-edge peak with such a high intensity being observed in the solid state. This is supported by IR where peaks attributed to bidentate copper were observed for Cu:SAPO-11/HT. For all four samples NO(x) partially reoxidises the copper(i) formed in the helium and propene steps. Ion exchanged Cu:SAPO-5 and Cu:SAPO-11 exhibit low activity in reducing NO(x) by propene in an oxygen rich environment. The role of the copper ion during NO adsorption was studied using in situ infra red spectroscopy. The activity of copper exchanged materials is governed by both the degree of reducibility of copper(ii) and the ease of reversing the valence states with the structural characteristics of the parent materials playing a crucial role.

  11. Adsorption properties of p-methyl red monomeric-to-pentameric dye aggregates on anatase (101) titania surfaces: first-principles calculations of dye/TiO₂ photoanode interfaces for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M

    2014-09-24

    The optical and electronic properties of dye aggregates of p-methyl red on a TiO2 anatase (101) surface were modeled as a function of aggregation order (monomer to pentameric dye) via first-principles calculations. A progressive red-shifting and intensity increase toward the visible region in UV-vis absorption spectra is observed from monomeric-to-tetrameric dyes, with each molecule in a given aggregate binding to one of the four possible TiO2 (101) adsorption sites. The pentamer exhibits a blue-shifted peak wavelength in the UV-vis absorption spectra and less absorption intensity in the visible region in comparison; a corresponding manifestation of H-aggregation occurs since one of these five molecules cannot occupy an adsorption site. This finding is consistent with experiment. Calculated density of states (DOS) and partial DOS spectra reveal similar dye···TiO2 nanocomposite conduction band characteristics but different valence band features. Associated molecular orbital distributions reveal dye-to-TiO2 interfacial charge transfer in all five differing aggregate orders; meanwhile, the level of intramolecular charge transfer in the dye becomes progressively localized around its azo- and electron-donating groups, up to the tetrameric dye/TiO2 species. Dye adsorption energies and dye coverage levels are calculated and compared with experiment. Overall, the findings of this case study serve to aid the molecular design of azo dyes toward better performing DSSC devices wherein they are incorporated. In addition, they provide a helpful example reference for understanding the effects of dye aggregation on the adsorbate···TiO2 interfacial optical and electronic properties.

  12. Adsorption properties of p-methyl red monomeric-to-pentameric dye aggregates on anatase (101) titania surfaces: first principles calculations of dye/TiO{sub 2} photoanode interfaces for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2014-08-29

    The optical and electronic properties of dye aggregates of p-methyl red on a TiO2 anatase (101) surface were modeled as a function of aggregation order (monomer to pentameric dye) via first principles calculations. A progressive red-shifting and intensity increase toward the visible region in UV/vis absorption spectra is observed from monomeric-to-tetrameric dyes, with each molecule in a given aggregate binding to one of the four possible TiO2 (101) adsorption sites. The pentamer exhibits a blue-shifted peak wave- length in the UV/vis absorption spectra and less absorption intensity in the visible region in comparison; a corresponding manifestation of H-aggregation occurs since one of these five molecules cannot occupy an adsorption site. This finding is consistent with experiment. Calculated density of states (DOS) and partial DOS spectra reveal similar dye…TiO2 nanocomposite conduction band characteristics but different valence band features. Associated molecular orbital distributions reveal dye-to-TiO2 interfacial charge transfer in all five differing aggregate orders; meanwhile, the level of intramolecular charge transfer in the dye becomes progressively localized around its azo- and electron-donating groups, up to the tetrameric dye/TiO2 species. Dye adsorption energies and dye coverage levels are calculated and compared with experiment. Overall, the findings of this case study serve to aid the molecular design of azo dyes towards better performing DSSC devices wherein they are incorporated. In addition, they provide a helpful example reference for understanding the effects of dye aggregation on the adsorbate…TiO2 interfacial optical and electronic properties.

  13. Fluorescent visualisation of the hypothalamic oxytocin neurones activated by cholecystokinin-8 in rats expressing c-fos-enhanced green fluorescent protein and oxytocin-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 fusion transgenes.

    PubMed

    Katoh, A; Shoguchi, K; Matsuoka, H; Yoshimura, M; Ohkubo, J-I; Matsuura, T; Maruyama, T; Ishikura, T; Aritomi, T; Fujihara, H; Hashimoto, H; Suzuki, H; Murphy, D; Ueta, Y

    2014-05-01

    The up-regulation of c-fos gene expression is widely used as a marker of neuronal activation elicited by various stimuli. Anatomically precise observation of c-fos gene products can be achieved at the RNA level by in situ hybridisation or at the protein level by immunocytochemistry. Both of these methods are time and labour intensive. We have developed a novel transgenic rat system that enables the trivial visualisation of c-fos expression using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) tag. These rats express a transgene consisting of c-fos gene regulatory sequences that drive the expression of a c-fos-eGFP fusion protein. In c-fos-eGFP transgenic rats, robust nuclear eGFP fluorescence was observed in osmosensitive brain regions 90 min after i.p. administration of hypertonic saline. Nuclear eGFP fluorescence was also observed in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) 90 min after i.p. administration of cholecystokinin (CCK)-8, which selectively activates oxytocin (OXT)-secreting neurones in the hypothalamus. In double transgenic rats that express c-fos-eGFP and an OXT-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) fusion gene, almost all mRFP1-positive neurones in the SON and PVN expressed nuclear eGFP fluorescence 90 min after i.p. administration of CCK-8. It is possible that not only a plane image, but also three-dimensional reconstruction image may identify cytoplasmic vesicles in an activated neurone at the same time.

  14. The synthesis and crystal structure of 2-(chloro­selan­yl)pyridine 1-oxide: the first monomeric organoselenenyl chloride stabilized by an intra­molecular secondary Se⋯O inter­action

    PubMed Central

    Askerov, Rizvan K.; Matsulevich, Zhanna V.; Borisova, Galina N.; Zalepkina, Svetlana A.; Smirnov, Vasiliy F.; Grishina, Maria M.; Dorovatovskii, Pavel V.; Borisov, Alexander V.; Khrustalev, Victor N.

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, C5H4ClNOSe, is the product of the reaction of sulfuryl chloride and 2-selanyl-1-pyridine 1-oxide in di­chloro­methane. The mol­ecule has an almost planar geometry (r.m.s. deviation = 0.012 Å), and its mol­ecular structure is stabilized by an intra­molecular secondary Se⋯O inter­action of 2.353 (3) Å, closing a four-membered N—C—Se⋯O ring. The title compound represents the first monomeric organoselenenyl chloride stabilized intra­molecularly by an inter­action of this type. The non-valent attractive Se⋯O inter­action results in a substantial distortion of the geometry of the ipso-carbon atom. The endo-cyclic N—C—Se [102.1 (3)°] and exo-cyclic C—C—Se [136.9 (3)°] bond angles deviate significantly from the ideal value of 120° for an sp 2-hybridized carbon atom, the former bond angle being much smaller than the latter. In the crystal, mol­ecules are linked by C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, forming zigzag chains propagating along [010]. The chains, which stack along the a-axis direction, are linked by offset π–π inter­actions [inter­centroid distance = 3.960 (3) Å], forming corrugated sheets parallel to the ab plane. PMID:27980851

  15. Hydrogen for fluorine exchange in C6F6 and C6F5H by monomeric [1,3,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH: experimental and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Maron, Laurent; Werkema, Evan L; Perrin, Lionel; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard A

    2005-01-12

    The net reaction of monomeric Cp'(2)CeH [Cp' = 1,3,4-(Me(3)C)(3)(C(5)H(2))] in C(6)D(6) with C(6)F(6) is Cp'(2)CeF, H(2), and tetrafluorobenzyne. The pentafluorophenylmetallocene, Cp'(2)Ce(C(6)F(5)), is formed as an intermediate that decomposes slowly to Cp'(2)CeF and C(6)F(4) (tetrafluorobenzyne), and the latter is trapped by the solvent C(6)D(6) as a [2+4] cycloadduct. In C(6)F(5)H, the final products are also Cp'(2)CeF and H(2), which are formed from the intermediates Cp'(2)Ce(C(6)F(5)) and Cp'(2)Ce(2,3,5,6-C(6)F(4)H) and from an unidentified metallocene of cerium and the [2+4] cycloadducts of tetra- and trifluorobenzyne with C(6)D(6). The hydride, fluoride, and pentafluorophenylmetallocenes are isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography. DFT(B3PW91) calculations have been used to explore the pathways leading to the observed products of the exergonic reactions. A key step is a H/F exchange reaction which transforms C(6)F(6) and the cerium hydride into C(6)F(5)H and Cp'(2)CeF. This reaction starts by an eta(1)-F-C(6)F(5) interaction, which serves as a hook. The reaction proceeds via a sigma bond metathesis where the fluorine ortho to the hook migrates toward H with a relatively low activation energy. All products observed experimentally are accommodated by pathways that involve C-F and C-H bond cleavages.

  16. Water-Soluble Fe(II)−H2O Complex with a Weak O−H Bond Transfers a Hydrogen Atom via an Observable Monomeric Fe(III)−OH

    PubMed Central

    Brines, Lisa M.; Coggins, Michael K.; Poon, Penny Chaau Yan; Toledo, Santiago; Kaminsky, Werner; Kirk, Martin L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the metal ion properties that favor O−H bond formation versus cleavage should facilitate the development of catalysts tailored to promote a specific reaction, e.g., C−H activation or H2O oxidation. The first step in H2O oxidation involves the endothermic cleavage of a strong O−H bond (BDFE = 122.7 kcal/mol), promoted by binding the H2O to a metal ion, and by coupling electron transfer to proton transfer (PCET). This study focuses on details regarding how a metal ion’s electronic structure and ligand environment can tune the energetics of M(HO−H) bond cleavage. The synthesis and characterization of an Fe(II)−H2O complex, 1, that undergoes PCET in H2O to afford a rare example of a monomeric Fe(III)−OH, 7, is described. High-spin 7 is also reproducibly generated via the addition of H2O to {[FeIII(OMe2N4(tren))]2-(µ-O)}2+ (8). The O−H bond BDFE of Fe(II)−H2O (1) (68.6 kcal/mol) is calculated using linear fits to its Pourbaix diagram and shown to be 54.1 kcal/mol less than that of H2O and 10.9 kcal/mol less than that of [Fe(II)(H2O)6]2+. The O−H bond of 1 is noticeably weaker than the majority of reported Mn+(HxO−H) (M = Mn, Fe; n+ = 2+, 3+; x = 0, 1) complexes. Consistent with their relative BDFEs, Fe(II)−H2O (1) is found to donate a H atom to TEMPO•, whereas the majority of previously reported Mn+−O(H) complexes, including [MnIII(SMe2N4(tren))(OH)]+ (2), have been shown to abstract H atoms from TEMPOH. Factors responsible for the weaker O−H bond of 1, such as differences in the electron-donating properties of the ligand, metal ion Lewis acidity, and electronic structure, are discussed. PMID:25611075

  17. Electrophysiological effects of kainic acid on vasopressin-enhanced green fluorescent protein and oxytocin-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 neurones isolated from the supraoptic nucleus in transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, J; Ohbuchi, T; Yoshimura, M; Maruyama, T; Ishikura, T; Matsuura, T; Suzuki, H; Ueta, Y

    2014-01-01

    The supraoptic nucleus (SON) contains two types of magnocellular neurosecretory cells: arginine vasopressin (AVP)-producing and oxytocin (OXT)-producing cells. We recently generated and characterised two transgenic rat lines: one expressing an AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and the other expressing an OXT-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1). These transgenic rats enable the visualisation of AVP or OXT neurones in the SON. In the present study, we compared the electrophysiological responses of AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones to glutamic acid in SON primary cultures. Glutamate mediates fast synaptic transmission through three classes of ionotrophic receptors: the NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors. We investigated the contributions of the three classes of ionotrophic receptors in glutamate-induced currents. Three different antagonists were used, each predominantly selective for one of the classes of ionotrophic receptor. Next, we focused on the kainate receptors (KARs). We examined the electrophysiological effects of kainic acid (KA) on AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones. In current clamp mode, KA induced depolarisation and increased firing rates. These KA-induced responses were inhibited by the non-NMDA ionotrophic receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3(1H4H)-dione in both AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones. In voltage clamp mode, the application of KA evoked inward currents in a dose-dependent manner. The KA-induced currents were significantly larger in OXT-mRFP1 neurones than in AVP-eGFP neurones. This significant difference in KA-induced currents was abolished by the GluK1-containing KAR antagonist UBP302. At high concentrations (250-500 μm), the specific GluK1-containing KAR agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA) induced significantly larger currents in OXT-mRFP1 neurones than in AVP-eGFP neurones. Furthermore, the difference between the AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones in the ATPA currents

  18. Monomeric Alanes: Synthesis, Structure, and Thermolysis of MesAl(H)N(SiMe(3))(2) and a One-Pot Synthetic Route to Mes(2)AlH (Mes = -C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-t-Bu(3)).

    PubMed

    Wehmschulte, Rudolf J.; Power, Philip P.

    1998-05-04

    The reaction of (MesAlH(2))(2) (Mes = -C(6)H(2)-2,4,6-t-Bu(3)) with HN(SiMe(3))(2) affords the monomeric amidoarylalane MesAl(H)N(SiMe(3))(2), 1. This product can also be synthesized by the reaction of [MesAlH(2)](2) with LiN(SiMe(3))(2), which, in addition, yields the byproducts LiAlH(2){N(SiMe(3))(2)}(2), 3, and MesH. Thermolysis of 1 at 175-180 degrees C affords three different the related and the imide [MesAlN(SiMe(3))](n)(), 5. In addition, the previously reported monomeric alane Mes(2)AlH was synthesized in ca. 70% yield by a one-pot reaction between LiMes (generated in situ) and AlH(3).NMe(3). All products were spectroscopically characterized, and the structure of 1 was determined by X-ray crystallography. The Al-N distance (1.819(2) Å) in 1 is relatively long. However, it has a substantial, 18.5 kcal mol(-)(1), Al-N rotation barrier which is attributed to steric congestion rather than Al-N pi bonding.

  19. The role of steric constraints in the formation of rare aqua bridged coordination polymers: Synthesis, characterization and X-ray structures of polymeric, [Cu(2-chlorobenzoate)2(β-picoline)2(μ-H2O)]n and monomeric, [Cu(2-chlorobenzoate)2(γ-picoline)2(H2O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Santosh; Sharma, Raj Pal; Venugopalan, Paloth; Aree, Thammarat; Ferretti, Valeria

    2015-07-01

    Reaction of hydrated copper(II) 2-chloro-benzoate with β-/γ-picoline in methanol: water mixture (4:1 v/v) yielded polymeric [Cu(2-chlorobenzoate)2(β-picoline)2(μ-H2O)]n; 1 and monomeric [Cu(2-chlorobenzoate)2(γ-picoline)2(H2O)]; 2. The newly synthesized complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy, TGA and single crystal X-ray structure determination. X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that both complexes crystallize in the monoclinic crystal system with space group and unit cell dimensions: C2/c; a = 51.71 Å, b = 10.58 Å, c = 10.02 Å and β = 100.5° for 1 and P21/c; a = 11.81 Å, b = 16.33 Å, c = 13.79 Å and β = 90.77° for 2. Whereas in 1 the presence of constituent and mediating water molecules running along a-axis gives rise to 1-dimensional zig-zag polymer chains, in complex 2, the presence of square pyramidal arrangement of ligands around copper(II) center results in monomeric structure. Various non-covalent interactions like Osbnd H⋯O, Csbnd H⋯O and Csbnd H⋯л have been observed to play a decisive role in the stabilization of crystal lattices in both complexes.

  20. Thermally stable polyimides from solutions of monomeric reactants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delvigs, P.; Lightsey, G. R.; Serafini, T. T.

    1971-01-01

    Monomer solutions have high solubility and low solution viscosity. Since monomers are shipped in powder form and reaction to polyimide-acid prepolymer is omitted, the cost is low and handling is easy.

  1. Kinetics of Reactions of Monomeric Nitrosomethane Induced by Flash Photolysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozubek, H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the kinetics of dimerization of nitrosamine induced by a flash of light is measured. The experiment can be performed with a commercial ultraviolet-VIS spetrophotometer with easy to make modifications. The experiment demonstrates a flash photolysis system not always available in university chemistry laboratories.…

  2. Structure of the novel monomeric glyoxalase I from Zea mays

    PubMed Central

    Turra, Gino L.; Agostini, Romina B.; Fauguel, Carolina M.; Presello, Daniel A.; Andreo, Carlos S.; González, Javier M.; Campos-Bermudez, Valeria A.

    2015-01-01

    The glyoxalase system is ubiquitous among all forms of life owing to its central role in relieving the cell from the accumulation of methylglyoxal, a toxic metabolic byproduct. In higher plants, this system is upregulated under diverse metabolic stress conditions, such as in the defence response to infection by pathogenic microorganisms. Despite their proven fundamental role in metabolic stresses, plant glyoxalases have been poorly studied. In this work, glyoxalase I from Zea mays has been characterized both biochemically and structurally, thus reporting the first atomic model of a glyoxalase I available from plants. The results indicate that this enzyme comprises a single polypeptide with two structurally similar domains, giving rise to two lateral concavities, one of which harbours a functional nickel(II)-binding active site. The putative function of the remaining cryptic active site remains to be determined. PMID:26457425

  3. Monomeric and dimeric hydrolysable tannins of Tamarix nilotica.

    PubMed

    Orabi, Mohamed A A; Taniguchi, Shoko; Hatano, Tsutomu

    2009-07-01

    An ellagitannin monomer, nilotinin M1 (1), and three dimers, nilotinins D1 (2), D2 (3), and D3 (4), were isolated from leaves of Tamarix nilotica (Ehrenb.) Bunge. Structures were elucidated based on analysis of spectroscopic data and chemical correlations with known compounds. In addition, six known tannins, hirtellin A (5) (dimer), remurin A (6), remurin B (7), 1,3-di-O-galloyl-4,6-O-(S)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-beta-D-glucose (8), gemin D (9), and hippomanin A (10) (monomers), were isolated for the first time from this plant species. The reported (13)C NMR assignments of the dehydrodigalloyl moiety and glucose cores of 5 are revised, and the (13)C NMR spectroscopic data for 6 and 7 are also reported for the first time.

  4. Self-organization of actin networks by a monomeric myosin

    PubMed Central

    Saczko-Brack, Dario; Warchol, Ewa; Rogez, Benoit; Kröss, Markus; Heissler, Sarah M.; Sellers, James R.; Batters, Christopher; Veigel, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of actomyosin networks lies at the center of many types of cellular motility, including cell polarization and collective cell migration during development and morphogenesis. Myosin-IXa is critically involved in these processes. Using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we resolved actin bundles assembled by myosin-IXa. Electron microscopic data revealed that the bundles consisted of highly ordered lattices with parallel actin polarity. The myosin-IXa motor domains aligned across the network, forming cross-links at a repeat distance of precisely 36 nm, matching the helical repeat of actin. Single-particle image processing resolved three distinct conformations of myosin-IXa in the absence of nucleotide. Using cross-correlation of a modeled actomyosin crystal structure, we identified sites of additional mass, which can only be accounted for by the large insert in loop 2 exclusively found in the motor domain of class IX myosins. We show that the large insert in loop 2 binds calmodulin and creates two coordinated actin-binding sites that constrain the actomyosin interactions generating the actin lattices. The actin lattices introduce orientated tracks at specific sites in the cell, which might install platforms allowing Rho-GTPase–activating protein (RhoGAP) activity to be focused at a definite locus. In addition, the lattices might introduce a myosin-related, force-sensing mechanism into the cytoskeleton in cell polarization and collective cell migration. PMID:27956608

  5. Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyanate (monomeric MDI) and polymeric MDI (PMDI)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW of METHYLENE DIPHENYL DIISOCYANATE ( MDI ) ( CAS No . 101 - 68 - 8 and 9016 - 87 - 9 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) February 1998 U.S . ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON , DC TABLE OF CONTENTS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW

  6. Ischemic Monomeric Neuropathy in a Woman with Sickle Cell Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Laura; Linpower, Lisa; Tsitsikas, Dimitris A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited haemoglobinopathy that can affect multiple organs and systems. The most common neurological complication in sickle cell disease is stroke and silent cerebral infarcts. Peripheral nervous system involvement has been described but is exceedingly rare. Herein, we describe the case of a young woman who presented with acute flaccid paralysis and sensory loss of the left lower extremity in the context of a painful vasoocclusive crisis which resolved rapidly after receiving an emergency automated red cell exchange transfusion. PMID:27994894

  7. Monomeric Acanthamoeba myosins I support movement in vitro.

    PubMed

    Albanesi, J P; Fujisaki, H; Hammer, J A; Korn, E D; Jones, R; Sheetz, M P

    1985-07-25

    Acanthamoeba myosins IA and IB were found to have molecular weights of 159,000 and 150,000 and Stokes radii of 6.2 and 5.9 nm, respectively. Both enzymes have frictional ratios of 1.7. Myosin IA consists of 22% alpha-helix, 32% beta-structure, and 46% unordered structure, while myosin IB is 16% alpha-helix, 46% beta-structure, and 38% unordered. Both myosins remain monomolecular under conditions in which other myosins form filaments. Beads coated with myosin IA or IB move unidirectionally on actin cables of Nitella. Movement requires ATP and phosphorylation of the myosin I heavy chain which is also required for actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activity. Movement is inhibited by myosin I antiserum that inhibits actin-activated ATPase activity. These studies establish that these nonfilamentous, monomolecular myosins with single heavy chains of 130,000 and 125,000 daltons (IA and IB, respectively) can support actin-dependent movement analogous to that supported by filamentous myosins.

  8. Soft tissue tumors induced by monomeric {sup 239}Pu

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.D.; Angus, W.; Taylor, G.N.; Miller, S.C.

    1995-10-01

    Individual records of soft tissue tumor occurrence (lifetime incidence) among 236 beagles injected with {sup 239}Pu citrate as young adults and 131 comparable control beagles given no radioactivity enabled us to analyze the possible effects on soft tissue tumor induction resulting from internal exposure to {sup 239}Pu. A significant trend was identified in the proportion of animals having malignant liver tumors with increasing radiation dose from {sup 239}. There was also a significant difference in the relative numbers of both malignant liver tumors (18.1 expected, 66 observed). Malignant tumors of the mouth, pancreas, and skin were more frequent among controls than among the dogs given {sup 239}Pu as well as tumors (malignant plus benign) of the mouth, pancreas, testis, and vagina. For all other tumor sites or types, there was no significant difference for both malignant and all (malignant plus benign) tumors. Mammary tumor occurrence appeared not to be associated with {sup 239}Pu incorporation. We conclude that the only soft-tissue neoplasia induced by the intake of {sup 239}Pu directly into blood is probably a liver tumor. 20 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. Structure of the novel monomeric glyoxalase I from Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Turra, Gino L; Agostini, Romina B; Fauguel, Carolina M; Presello, Daniel A; Andreo, Carlos S; González, Javier M; Campos-Bermudez, Valeria A

    2015-10-01

    The glyoxalase system is ubiquitous among all forms of life owing to its central role in relieving the cell from the accumulation of methylglyoxal, a toxic metabolic byproduct. In higher plants, this system is upregulated under diverse metabolic stress conditions, such as in the defence response to infection by pathogenic microorganisms. Despite their proven fundamental role in metabolic stresses, plant glyoxalases have been poorly studied. In this work, glyoxalase I from Zea mays has been characterized both biochemically and structurally, thus reporting the first atomic model of a glyoxalase I available from plants. The results indicate that this enzyme comprises a single polypeptide with two structurally similar domains, giving rise to two lateral concavities, one of which harbours a functional nickel(II)-binding active site. The putative function of the remaining cryptic active site remains to be determined.

  10. Direct Spectroscopic Observation of Large Quenching of First Order Orbital Angular Momentum with Bending in Monomeric, Two-Coordinate Fe(II) Primary Amido Complexes and the Profound Magnetic Effects of the Absence of Jahn- and Renner-Teller Distortions in Rigorously Linear Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, W. Alexander; Stich, Troy A.; Brynda, Marcin; Yeagle, Gregory J.; Fettinger, James C.; De Hont, Raymond; Reiff, William M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Britt, R. David; Power, Philip P.

    2009-01-01

    The monomeric iron(II) amido derivatives Fe{N(H)Ar*}2 (1), Ar* = C6H3-2,6-(C6H2-2,4,6-Pri3)2, and Fe{N(H)Ar#}2 (2), Ar# = C6H3-2,6-(C6H2-2,4,6-Me3)2, were synthesized and studied in order to determine the effects of geometric changes on their unusual magnetic properties. The compounds, which are the first stable homoleptic primary amides of iron(II), were obtained by the transamination of Fe{N(SiMe3)2}2, with HN(SiMe3)2 elimination, by the primary amines H2NAr* or H2NAr#. X-ray crystallography shows that they have either strictly linear (1) or bent (2, N–Fe–N = 140.9(2)°) iron coordination. Variable temperature magnetization and applied magnetic field Mössbauer spectroscopy studies reveal a very large dependence of the magnetic properties on the metal coordination geometry. At ambient temperature, the linear 1 displayed an effective magnetic moment in the range 7.0 to 7.50 μB, consistent with essentially free ion magnetism. There is a very high internal orbital field component, HL ≈ 170 T which is only exceeded by a HL ≈ 203 T of Fe{C(SiMe3)3}2. In contrast, the strongly bent 2 displays a significantly lower μeff value in the range 5.25 to 5.80 μB at ambient temperature and a much lower orbital field HL value of 116 T. The data for the two amido complexes demonstrate a very large quenching of the orbital magnetic moment upon bending the linear geometry. In addition, a strong correlation of HL with overall formal symmetry is confirmed. ESR spectroscopy supports the existence of large orbital magnetic moments in 1 and 2, and DFT calculations provide good agreement with the physical data. PMID:19670870

  11. Efficient secretion of a folded protein domain by a monomeric bacterial autotransporter.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Kristen M; Barnard, Travis J; Peterson, Janine H; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Bernstein, Harris D

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial autotransporters are proteins that contain a small C-terminal 'beta domain' that facilitates translocation of a large N-terminal 'passenger domain' across the outer membrane (OM) by an unknown mechanism. Here we used EspP, an autotransporter produced by Escherichia coli 0157:H7, as a model protein to gain insight into the transport reaction. Initially we found that the passenger domain of a truncated version of EspP (EspPDelta1-851) was translocated efficiently across the OM. Blue Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, analytical ultracentrifugation and other biochemical methods showed that EspPDelta1-851 behaves as a compact monomer and strongly suggest that the channel formed by the beta domain is too narrow to accommodate folded polypeptides. Surprisingly, we found that a folded protein domain fused to the N-terminus of EspPDelta1-851 was efficiently translocated across the OM. Further analysis revealed that the passenger domain of wild-type EspP also folds at least partially in the periplasm. To reconcile these data, we propose that the EspP beta domain functions primarily to target and anchor the protein and that an external factor transports the passenger domain across the OM.

  12. The Monomeric GTPase Rab35 Regulates Phagocytic Cup Formation and Phagosomal Maturation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kuldeep; Datta, Sunando

    2017-03-24

    One of the hallmarks of amoebic colitis is the detection of Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) trophozoites with ingested erythrocytes. Therefore, erythrophagocytosis is traditionally considered as one of the most important criteria to identify the pathogenic behavior of the amoebic trophozoites. Phagocytosis is an essential process for the proliferation and virulence of this parasite. Phagocytic cargo, upon internalization, follows a defined trafficking route to amoebic lysosomal degradation machinery. Here, we demonstrated the role of EhRab35 in the early and late phases of erythrophagocytosis by the amoeba. EhRab35 showed large vacuolar as well as punctate vesicular localization. The spatiotemporal dynamics of vacuolar EhRab35 and its exchange with soluble cytosolic pool were monitored by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. Using extensive microscopy and biochemical methods, we demonstrated that upon incubation with RBCs EhRab35 is recruited to the site of phagocytic cups as well as to the nascent phagosomes that harbor Gal/GalNAc lectin and actin. Overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of EhRab35 reduced phagocytic cup formation and thereby reduced RBC internalization, suggesting a potential role of the Rab GTPase in the cup formation. Furthermore, we also performed a phagosomal maturation assay and observed that the activated form of EhRab35 significantly increased the rate of RBC degradation. Interestingly, this mutant also significantly enhanced the number of acidic compartments in the trophozoites. Taken together, our results suggest that EhRab35 is involved in the initial stage of phagocytosis as well as in the phagolysosomal biogenesis in E. histolytica and thus contributes to the pathogenicity of the parasite. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Immobilization of homogeneous monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ species for reliable SPR measurements.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Daniel; Glück, Julian M; Brener, Oleksandr; Oesterhelt, Filipp; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Willbold, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence that the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this context, a detailed quantitative description of the interactions with different Aβ species is essential for characterization of physiological and artificial ligands. However, the high aggregation propensity of Aβ in concert with its susceptibility to structural changes due to even slight changes in solution conditions has impeded surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies with homogeneous Aβ conformer species. Here, we have adapted the experimental procedures to state-of-the-art techniques and established novel approaches to reliably overcome the aforementioned challenges. We show that the application of density gradient centrifugation (DGC) for sample purification and the use of a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of a monoclonal antibody directed against the amino-terminus of Aβ allows reliable SPR measurements and quality control of the immobilized Aβ aggregate species at any step throughout the experiment.

  14. Synthesis of Monomeric Fe(II) and Ru(II) Complexes of Tetradentate Phosphines

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Barun; Ellern, Arkady; Pestovsky, Oleg; Sadow, Aaron; Bakac, Andreja

    2011-03-07

    rac-Bis[{l_brace}(diphenylphosphino)ethyl{r_brace}-phenylphosphino]methane (DPPEPM) reacts with iron(II) and ruthenium(II) halides to generate complexes with folded DPPEPM coordination. The paramagnetic, five-coordinate Fe(DPPEPM)Cl{sub 2} (1) in CD{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} features a tridentate binding mode as established by {sup 31}P{l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace} NMR spectroscopy. Crystal structure analysis of the analogous bromo complex, Fe(DPPEPM)Br{sub 2} (2) revealed a pseudo-octahedral, cis-{alpha} geometry at iron with DPPEPM coordinated in a tetradentate fashion. However, in CD{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solution, the coordination of DPPEPM in 2 is similar to that of 1 in that one of the external phosphorus atoms is dissociated resulting in a mixture of three tridentate complexes. The chloro ruthenium complex cis-Ru({kappa}{sup 4}-DPPEPM)Cl{sub 2} (3) is obtained from rac-DPPEPM and either [RuCl{sub 2}(COD)]{sub 2} [COD = 1,5-cyclooctadiene] or RuCl{sub 2}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 4}. The structure of 3 in both the solid state and in CD{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} solution features a folded {kappa}{sup 4}-DPPEPM. This binding mode was also observed in cis-[Fe({kappa}{sup 4}-DPPEPM)(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 2}](CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}){sub 2} (4). Addition of an excess of CO to a methanolic solution of 1 results in the replacement of one of the chloride ions by CO to yield cis-[Fe({kappa}{sup 4}-DPPEPM)Cl(CO)](Cl) (5). The same reaction in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} produces a mixture of 5 and [Fe({kappa}{sup 3}-DPPEPM)Cl{sub 2}(CO)] (6) in which one of the internal phosphines has been substituted by CO. Complexes 2, 3, 4, and 5 appear to be the first structurally characterized monometallic complexes of {kappa}{sup 4}-DPPEPM.

  15. New monomeric stilbenoids from peanut (Arachis hypogaea) seeds challenged by an Aspergillus flavus strain

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two new stilbene derivatives have been isolated from peanut seeds challenged by an Aspergillus flavus strain, along with chiricanine B that has not been reported from peanuts, as well as a stilbenoid that has been known as a synthetic product. The structures of these new putative phytoalexins were d...

  16. A simplified method for monomeric carbohydrate analysis of corn stover biomass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Constituent determination of biomass for theoretical ethanol yield (TEY) estimation requires the removal of non-structural carbohydrates prior to analysis to prevent interference with the analytical procedure. According to the accepted U.S. Dept. of Energy-National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)...

  17. Purification and properties of a monomeric lactate dehydrogenase from yak Hypoderma sinense larva.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Jin, Suyu; Huang, Lin; Liu, Haohao; Huang, Zhihong; Lin, Yaqiu; Zheng, Yucai

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to study the characteristics of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from Hypoderma sinense larva. H. sinense larvae were collected from yak (Bos grunniens) and identified by a PCR-RFLP method. Analysis of LDH activity showed that the total LDH activity in H. sinense larva was negatively correlated with the length of larva. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the extracts of H. sinense larvae revealed one band of LDH, which was then purified by affinity chromatography and gel filtration. This enzyme showed an approximately 36 kDa band on SDS-gel under both reducing and non-reducing conditions, in addition, size exclusion chromatography analysis showed that its molecular weight was smaller than bovine serum albumin (67 kDa), indicating that it contains only one subunit. Michaelis constants (Km) values assay revealed that LDH from H. sinense larva showed significantly lower Km for lactate than other animals. LDH of H. sinense larva was stable at 60 °C for 15 min, and also exhibited high catalytic efficiency in a wide range of pH. HgCl₂ at the concentration of 0.1mM significantly decreased the activity of LDH from H. sinense larva but not at the concentration of 0.01 mM. The results of the present study demonstrate that LDH from H. sinense larva is a thermal stable and pH insensitive enzyme suitable for catalyzing both forward and reverse reactions.

  18. Who is Mr. HAMLET? Interaction of human alpha-lactalbumin with monomeric oleic acid.

    PubMed

    Knyazeva, Ekaterina L; Grishchenko, Valery M; Fadeev, Roman S; Akatov, Vladimir S; Permyakov, Sergei E; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2008-12-09

    A specific state of the human milk Ca(2+) binding protein alpha-lactalbumin (hLA) complexed with oleic acid (OA) prepared using an OA-pretreated ion-exchange column (HAMLET) triggers several cell death pathways in various tumor cells. The possibility of preparing a hLA-OA complex with structural and cytotoxic properties similar to those of the HAMLET but under solution conditions has been explored. The complex was formed by titration of hLA by OA at pH 8.3 up to OA critical micelle concentration. We have shown that complex formation strongly depends on calcium, ionic strength, and temperature; the optimal conditions were established. The spectrofluorimetrically estimated number of OA molecules irreversibly bound per hLA molecule (after dialysis of the OA-loaded preparation against water followed by lyophilization) depends upon temperature: 2.9 at 17 degrees C (native apo-hLA; resulting complex referred to as LA-OA-17 state) and 9 at 45 degrees C (thermally unfolded apo-hLA; LA-OA-45). Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence measurements revealed substantially decreased thermal stability of Ca(2+)-free forms of HAMLET, LA-OA-45, and OA-saturated protein. The irreversibly bound OA does not affect the Ca(2+) association constant of the protein. Phase plot analysis of fluorimetric and CD data indicates that the OA binding process involves several hLA intermediates. The effective pseudoequilibrium OA association constants for Ca(2+)-free hLA were estimated. The far-UV CD spectra of Ca(2+)-free hLA show that all OA-bound forms of the protein are characterized by elevated content of alpha-helical structure. The various hLA-OA complexes possess similar cytotoxic activities against human epidermoid larynx carcinoma cells. Overall, the LA-OA-45 complex possesses physicochemical, structural, and cytotoxic properties closely resembling those of HAMLET. The fact that the HAMLET-like complex can be formed in aqueous solution makes the process of its preparation more transparent and controllable, opening up opportunities for formation of active complexes with specific properties.

  19. Functional Characterization of Monomeric GTPase Rab1 in the Secretory Pathway of Leishmania*

    PubMed Central

    Bahl, Surbhi; Parashar, Smriti; Malhotra, Himanshu; Raje, Manoj; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania secretes a large number of its effectors to the extracellular milieu. However, regulation of the secretory pathway in Leishmania is not well characterized. Here, we report the cloning, expression, and characterization of the Rab1 homologue from Leishmania. We have found that LdRab1 localizes in Golgi in Leishmania. To understand the role of LdRab1 in the secretory pathway of Leishmania, we have generated transgenic parasites overexpressing GFP-LdRab1:WT, GFP-LdRab1:Q67L (a GTPase-deficient dominant positive mutant of Rab1), and GFP-LdRab1:S22N (a GDP-locked dominant negative mutant of Rab1). Surprisingly, our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N does not disrupt the trafficking and localization of hemoglobin receptor in Leishmania. To determine whether the Rab1-dependent secretory pathway is conserved in parasites, we have analyzed the role of LdRab1 in the secretion of secretory acid phosphatase and Ldgp63 in Leishmania. Our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N significantly inhibits the secretion of secretory acid phosphatase by Leishmania. We have also found that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N retains RFP-Ldgp63 in Golgi and blocks the secretion of Ldgp63, whereas the trafficking of RFP-Ldgp63 in GFP-LdRab1:WT-expressing cells is unaltered in comparison with control cells. Taken together, our results have shown that the Rab1-regulated secretory pathway is well conserved, and hemoglobin receptor trafficking follows an Rab1-independent secretory pathway in Leishmania. PMID:26499792

  20. Synthesis of N-Substituted Silaneamines: Monomeric Precursors of Silicon Carbide-Nitride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Silanetriamines are prepared by the condensation of methyl or phenyl trichlorosilane with a primary amine. The amines used were methyl, n-propyl, n-butyl and allyl. The silaneamines were prepared by adding the chlorosilane to a solution of the amine in either petroleum ether or toluene. The compounds were purified by distillation and characterized by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  1. Full-length structure of a monomeric histidine kinase reveals basis for sensory regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Ko, Wen-huang; Tomchick, Diana R.; Correa, Fernando; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2014-12-02

    Although histidine kinases (HKs) are critical sensors of external stimuli in prokaryotes, the mechanisms by which their sensor domains control enzymatic activity remain unclear. In this paper, we report the full-length structure of a blue light-activated HK from Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594 (EL346) and the results of biochemical and biophysical studies that explain how it is activated by light. Contrary to the standard view that signaling occurs within HK dimers, EL346 functions as a monomer. Its structure reveals that the light–oxygen–voltage (LOV) sensor domain both controls kinase activity and prevents dimerization by binding one side of a dimerization/histidine phosphotransfer-like (DHpL) domain. The DHpL domain also contacts the catalytic/ATP-binding (CA) domain, keeping EL346 in an inhibited conformation in the dark. Upon light stimulation, interdomain interactions weaken to facilitate activation. Our data suggest that the LOV domain controls kinase activity by affecting the stability of the DHpL/CA interface, releasing the CA domain from an inhibited conformation upon photoactivation. Finally, we suggest parallels between EL346 and dimeric HKs, with sensor-induced movements in the DHp similarly remodeling the DHp/CA interface as part of activation.

  2. Direct single-molecule measurements of phycocyanobilin photophysics in monomeric C-phycocyanin

    DOE PAGES

    Squires, Allison H.; Moerner, W. E.

    2017-08-28

    Phycobilisomes are highly organized pigment-protein antenna complexes found in the photosynthetic apparatus of cyanobacteria and rhodophyta that harvest solar energy and transport it to the reaction center. A detailed bottom-up model of pigment organization and energy transfer in phycobilisomes is essential to understanding photosynthesis in these organisms, and informing rational design of artificial light-harvesting systems. Particularly, heterogeneous photophysical behaviors of these proteins, which cannot be predicted de novo, may play an essential role in rapid light adaptation and photoprotection. Furthermore, the delicate architecture of these pigment-protein scaffolds sensitizes them to external perturbations, e.g: surface attachment, which can be avoided bymore » study in free solution or in vivo. We present the first single-molecule characterization of C-phycocyanin (C-PC), a three-pigment biliprotein that self-assembles to form the mid-antenna rods of cyanobacterial phycobilisomes. Using the Anti-Brownian Electrokinetic (ABEL) trap to counteract Brownian motion of single particles in real-time, we directly monitor the changing photophysical states of individual C-PC monomers from Spirulina platensis in free solution by simultaneous readout of their brightness, fluorescence anisotropy, fluorescence lifetime, and emission spectra. These include single-chromophore emission states for each of the three covalently bound phycocyanobilins, providing the first direct measurement of the spectra and photophysics of these chemically identical molecules in their native protein environment. We also further show that a simple Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET) network model accurately predicts the observed photophysical states of C-PC, and suggests highly variable quenching behavior of one of the chromophores, which should inform future studies of higher-order complexes.« less

  3. Comparative stability of dimeric and monomeric pigments extracted from sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis.

    PubMed

    Shikov, Alexander N; Ossipov, Vladimir I; Karonen, Maarit; Pozharitskaya, Olga N; Krishtopina, Anna S; Makarov, Valery G

    2017-08-01

    Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and UPLC-DAD-MS were used for analysis of stability of ethanol solutions of ethylidene-6,6'-bis(2,3,7-trihydroxynaphthazarin) (ENZ), spinochrome dimer (SDM) and spinochrome D (SD) that were isolated from Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. In the freshly prepared solution, the concentration of ENZ at pH 6.0 was at 6 fold less comparing to pH 1.6. The increase of pH up to 4.0 resulted to increase of SD concentration and to decrease of SDM concentration. After 48 h storage, both dimers showed the highest stability at pH 1.6, while the elevation of the pH solution up to 6.0 activates degradation of SDM and ENZ at 1.3 and 3.6 fold correspondingly. The concentration of SD after 48 h storage at the pH 1.6 was at two-fold less comparing to the initial concentration, and at the pH 6.0 - at 4 fold less. This study contributes to increasing the knowledge on the stability of the spinochrome pigments.

  4. High-titer production of monomeric hydroxyvalerates from levulinic acid in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Martin, Collin H; Prather, Kristala L Jones

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyacids represent an important class of compounds that see application in the production of polyesters, biodegradable plastics and antibiotics, and that serve as useful chiral synthetic building blocks for other fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. An economical, high-titer method for the production of 4-hydroxyvalerate (4HV) and 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) from the inexpensive and renewable carbon source levulinic acid was developed. These hydroxyvalerates were produced by periodically feeding levulinate to Pseudomonas putida KT2440 expressing a recombinant thioesterase II (tesB) gene from Escherichia coli K12. The titer of 4HV in shake flask culture reached 13.9+/-1.2 g L(-1) from P. putida tesB(+) cultured at 32 degrees C in LB medium periodically supplemented with glucose and levulinate. The highest 3HV titer obtained was 5.3+/-0.1 g L(-1) in M9 minimal medium supplemented with glucose and levulinate.

  5. New Monomeric Stilbenoids from Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) Seeds Challenged by an Aspergillus flavus Strain.

    PubMed

    Sobolev, Victor S; Krausert, Nicole M; Gloer, James B

    2016-01-27

    Two new stilbene derivatives have been isolated from peanut seeds challenged by an Aspergillus flavus strain, along with chiricanine B, which has not been previously reported from peanuts, as well as a stilbenoid reported previously only as a synthetic product. The structures of these new putative phytoalexins were determined by analysis of (1)H and (13)C NMR, HRESIMS, MS(n), and UV data. The new stilbenoids were named arahypin-13 (21), arahypin-14 (22), and arahypin-15 (23). Together with other known bioactive peanut stilbenoids that were also produced in the challenged seeds, these new compounds may play a defensive role against invasive fungi.

  6. Characterization of molybdenum monomeric oxide species supported on hydroxylated silica: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Guesmi, Hazar; Gryboś, Robert; Handzlik, Jarosław; Tielens, Frederik

    2014-09-14

    Periodic DFT calculations have been performed on molybdenum(VI) oxide species supported on the hydroxylated amorphous silica surface. The Mo grafting site has been investigated systematically for the type of silanol (geminate, vicinal, isolated or in a nest) accessible on the surface, as well as its effect on H-bond formation and stabilization, with the Mo-oxide species. Different grafting geometries, combined with different degrees of hydration of the Mo species are investigated using atomistic thermodynamics. The most stable Mo(VI) oxide species resulting from these calculations are confronted with experiment. Finally, calculated vibrational frequencies confirm the experimental evidence of the dominant presence of di grafted di-oxo Mo(VI) species on silica up to 700 K.

  7. Monomeric and oligomeric flavan-3-ols and antioxidant activity of leaves from different Laurus sp.

    PubMed

    Vinha, Ana F; Guido, Luís F; Costa, Anabela S G; Alves, Rita C; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P

    2015-06-01

    The phenolic profile and antioxidant activity of three endemic Laurus sp. from Portugal were analysed. Dried leaves of L. nobilis L., L. azorica (Seub.) Franco, and L. novocanariensis Rivas Mart., Lousã, Fern. Prieto, E. Días, J. C. Costa & C. Aguiar, collected in the mainland and in the Azores and Madeira archipelagos, respectively, were used to prepare different extracts (aqueous, ethanolic and hydroalcoholic). They were studied regarding their DPPH˙ scavenging activity, total phenolic and flavonoid contents, and the main phenolic compounds were identified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS. Total flavonoid contents were 30.1, 46.3, and 36.7 mg of epicatechin equivalents per g of sample (dry weight) for L. nobilis, L. azorica and L. novocanariensis, respectively. Epicatechin was the major compound, representing ∼12.1% of total flavan-3-ols in L. nobilis, ∼25.6% in L. azorica, and ∼19.9% in L. novocanariensis. Although all samples presented a similar phenolic profile, significant differences were observed in their total contents and antioxidant activity.

  8. Functional Characterization of Monomeric GTPase Rab1 in the Secretory Pathway of Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Surbhi; Parashar, Smriti; Malhotra, Himanshu; Raje, Manoj; Mukhopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-12-11

    Leishmania secretes a large number of its effectors to the extracellular milieu. However, regulation of the secretory pathway in Leishmania is not well characterized. Here, we report the cloning, expression, and characterization of the Rab1 homologue from Leishmania. We have found that LdRab1 localizes in Golgi in Leishmania. To understand the role of LdRab1 in the secretory pathway of Leishmania, we have generated transgenic parasites overexpressing GFP-LdRab1:WT, GFP-LdRab1:Q67L (a GTPase-deficient dominant positive mutant of Rab1), and GFP-LdRab1:S22N (a GDP-locked dominant negative mutant of Rab1). Surprisingly, our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N does not disrupt the trafficking and localization of hemoglobin receptor in Leishmania. To determine whether the Rab1-dependent secretory pathway is conserved in parasites, we have analyzed the role of LdRab1 in the secretion of secretory acid phosphatase and Ldgp63 in Leishmania. Our results have shown that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N significantly inhibits the secretion of secretory acid phosphatase by Leishmania. We have also found that overexpression of GFP-LdRab1:Q67L or GFP-LdRab1:S22N retains RFP-Ldgp63 in Golgi and blocks the secretion of Ldgp63, whereas the trafficking of RFP-Ldgp63 in GFP-LdRab1:WT-expressing cells is unaltered in comparison with control cells. Taken together, our results have shown that the Rab1-regulated secretory pathway is well conserved, and hemoglobin receptor trafficking follows an Rab1-independent secretory pathway in Leishmania. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Monomeric square-planar cobalt(II) acetylacetonate: mystery or mistake?

    PubMed

    Vreshch, Volodimir D; Yang, Jen-Hsien; Zhang, Haitao; Filatov, Alexander S; Dikarev, Evgeny V

    2010-09-20

    No evidence was found for the existence of a previously reported mononuclear square-planar form of unsolvated cobalt(II) acetylacetonate, Co(acac)(2), in all samples that have been obtained by using a variety of preparative techniques and crystallization conditions. It was confirmed that the structure of tetramer Co(4)(acac)(8), reported back in 1964 by Cotton and Elder, is correct, the synthesis is reproducible, and the bulk material corresponds to single-crystal data. Additionally, the title compound can be isolated in tetranuclear form by reducing cobalt(III) acetylacetonate with cobalt metal in solvent-free conditions or by crystallization from a hexanes solution. At the same time, from noncoordinating halogenated solvents, Co(acac)(2) crystallizes as a trinuclear core molecule, in which all Co atoms also exhibit octahedral coordination. From coordinating solvents such as ethanol, cobalt(II) acetylacetonate was found to appear in the form of its bis-adduct Co(acac)(2)(EtOH)(2). On the basis of observations made in this work and the details presented in the original paper, we suggest that the reported mononuclear structure of square-planar acetylacetonate should likely contain copper instead of cobalt.

  10. The coupling between translation and rotation for monomeric water in noble gas matrices.

    PubMed

    Ceponkus, J; Uvdal, P; Nelander, B

    2013-06-28

    The rotation of water in noble gas matrices has been studied. It is shown that the rotation-translation coupling model of Friedmann and Kimel predicts rotation line spacings, which are close to the experimental observations for H2O, D2O, and HDO, when gas phase rotation constants are used. The model gives intensity estimates in reasonable agreement with the observations for the local oscillator bands, which accompany the rotation spectrum. It also predicts the intensity variations in the bending region of H2O between neon, argon, and krypton matrices.

  11. Engineering an Enhanced, Thermostable, Monomeric Bacterial Luciferase Gene As a Reporter in Plant Protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future. PMID:25271765

  12. Engineering an enhanced, thermostable, monomeric bacterial luciferase gene as a reporter in plant protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Cui, Boyu; Zhang, Lifeng; Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future.

  13. Binary Toxin Subunits of Lysinibacillus sphaericus Are Monomeric and Form Heterodimers after In Vitro Activation

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Yeu Khai; Torres, Jaume; Boonserm, Panadda

    2016-01-01

    The binary toxin from Lysinibacillus sphaericus has been successfully used for controlling mosquito-transmitted diseases. An activation step shortens both subunits BinA and BinB before their interaction with membranes and internalization in midgut cells, but the precise role of this activation step is unknown. Herein, we show conclusively using three orthogonal biophysical techniques that protoxin subunits form only monomers in aqueous solution. However, in vitro activated toxins readily form heterodimers. This oligomeric state did not change after incubation of these heterodimers with detergent. These results are consistent with the evidence that maximal toxicity in mosquito larvae is achieved when the two subunits, BinA and BinB, are in a 1:1 molar ratio, and directly link proteolytic activation to heterodimerization. Formation of a heterodimer must thus be necessary for subsequent steps, e.g., interaction with membranes, or with a suitable receptor in susceptible mosquito species. Lastly, despite existing similarities between BinB C-terminal domain with domains 3 and 4 of pore-forming aerolysin, no aerolysin-like SDS-resistant heptameric oligomers were observed when the activated Bin subunits were incubated in the presence of detergents or lipidic membranes. PMID:27341696

  14. Synthesis of N-Substituted Silaneamines: Monomeric Precursors of Silicon Carbide-Nitride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crouse, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Silanetriamines are prepared by the condensation of methyl or phenyl trichlorosilane with a primary amine. The amines used were methyl, n-propyl, n-butyl and allyl. The silaneamines were prepared by adding the chlorosilane to a solution of the amine in either petroleum ether or toluene. The compounds were purified by distillation and characterized by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  15. Cassava starch maltodextrinization/monomerization through thermopressurized aqueous phosphoric acid hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Fontana, J D; Passos, M; Baron, M; Mendes, S V; Ramos, L P

    2001-01-01

    Kinetic conditions were established for the depolymerization of cassava starch for the production of maltodextrins and glucose syrups. Thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography analyses corroborated that the proper H3PO4 strength and thermopressurization range (e.g., 142-170 degrees C; 2.8-6.8 atm) can be successfully explored for such hydrolytic purposes of native starch granules. Because phosphoric acid can be advantageously maintained in the hydrolysate and generates, after controlled neutralization with ammonia, the strategic nutrient triplet for industrial fermentations (C, P, N), this pretreatment strategy can be easily recognized as a recommended technology for hydrolysis and upgrading of starch and other plant polysaccharides. Compared to the classic catalysts, the mandatory desalting step (chloride removal by expensive anion-exchange resin or sulfate precipitation as the calcium-insoluble salt) can be avoided. Furthermore, properly diluted phosphoric acid is well known as an allowable additive in several popular soft drinks such as colas since its acidic feeling in the mouth is compatible and synergistic with both natural and artificial sweeteners. Glycosyrups from phosphorolyzed cassava starch have also been upgraded to high-value single-cell protein such as the pigmented yeast biomass of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma), whose astaxanthin (diketo-dihydroxy-beta-carotene) content may reach 0.5-1.0 mg/g of dry yeast cell. This can be used as an ideal complement for animal feeding as well as a natural staining for both fish farming (meat) and poultry (eggs).

  16. Full-length structure of a monomeric histidine kinase reveals basis for sensory regulation.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Cancel, Giomar; Ko, Wen-huang; Tomchick, Diana R; Correa, Fernando; Gardner, Kevin H

    2014-12-16

    Although histidine kinases (HKs) are critical sensors of external stimuli in prokaryotes, the mechanisms by which their sensor domains control enzymatic activity remain unclear. Here, we report the full-length structure of a blue light-activated HK from Erythrobacter litoralis HTCC2594 (EL346) and the results of biochemical and biophysical studies that explain how it is activated by light. Contrary to the standard view that signaling occurs within HK dimers, EL346 functions as a monomer. Its structure reveals that the light-oxygen-voltage (LOV) sensor domain both controls kinase activity and prevents dimerization by binding one side of a dimerization/histidine phosphotransfer-like (DHpL) domain. The DHpL domain also contacts the catalytic/ATP-binding (CA) domain, keeping EL346 in an inhibited conformation in the dark. Upon light stimulation, interdomain interactions weaken to facilitate activation. Our data suggest that the LOV domain controls kinase activity by affecting the stability of the DHpL/CA interface, releasing the CA domain from an inhibited conformation upon photoactivation. We suggest parallels between EL346 and dimeric HKs, with sensor-induced movements in the DHp similarly remodeling the DHp/CA interface as part of activation.

  17. EPR study of monomeric and dimeric vanadyl ions in SbVO5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Typek, J.; Guskos, N.; Buchowski, D.; Wabia, M.; Filipek, E.

    A new compound, SbVO5 , formed in the V-Sb-O system, has been synthesized and investigated using the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. SbVO5 has been prepared by two methods: by heating equimolar mixtures of V2O5 and alpha-Sb2O4 in air and by oxidation of the known phase (SbVO4.5) of rutile type obtained in pure argon at temperatures between 550 degreesC and 650 degreesC. At room temperature only a weak EPR signal from the powder sample of SbVO5 was detected corroborating the absence of bulk V(IV) ions in the structure. Comparison with the CuSO4 reference sample revealed that only 0.02% vanadium ions are EPR active. Intense EPR spectra obtained in the low temperature range, below 100 K, showed a well resolved hyperfine structure typical of isolated vanadium ions in axial symmetry, present as VO2+ species, and a broad line attributed to V4+-O-V5+ bonds. The hyperfine structure lines could be analyzed by an axial spin Hamiltonian with g parallel to =1.9311, g perpendicular to =1.9425 and A parallel to =181x10(-4) cm(-1) , A perpendicular to =54x10(-4) cm(-1) . The spectrum recorded at the lowest obtainable temperature T=3.65 K contains yet another component which is typical of a triplet state indicating the presence of two interacting VO2+ nuclei with spin 1/2 giving a singlet S=0 and a triplet S=1 state. The appearance of a low-field line (Bsimilar to1600 Gs at gapproximate to4) is another diagnostic for the presence of dimeric species and is attributed to the forbidden DeltaM(S) =+/-2 transition.

  18. Membrane-tethered monomeric neurexin LNS-domain triggers synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Ozgun; Südhof, Thomas C

    2013-09-04

    Neurexins are presynaptic cell-adhesion molecules that bind to postsynaptic cell-adhesion molecules such as neuroligins and leucine-rich repeat transmembrane proteins (LRRTMs). When neuroligins or LRRTMs are expressed in a nonneuronal cell, cocultured neurons avidly form heterologous synapses onto that cell. Here we show that knockdown of all neurexins in cultured hippocampal mouse neurons did not impair synapse formation between neurons, but blocked heterologous synapse formation induced by neuroligin-1 or LRRTM2. Rescue experiments demonstrated that all neurexins tested restored heterologous synapse formation in neurexin-deficient neurons. Neurexin-deficient neurons exhibited a decrease in the levels of the PDZ-domain protein CASK (a calcium/calmodulin-activated serine/threonine kinase), which binds to neurexins, and mutation of the PDZ-domain binding sequence of neurexin-3β blocked its transport to the neuronal surface and impaired heterologous synapse formation. However, replacement of the C-terminal neurexin sequence with an unrelated PDZ-domain binding sequence that does not bind to CASK fully restored surface transport and heterologous synapse formation in neurexin-deficient neurons, suggesting that no particular PDZ-domain protein is essential for neurexin surface transport or heterologous synapse formation. Further mutagenesis revealed, moreover, that the entire neurexin cytoplasmic tail was dispensable for heterologous synapse formation in neurexin-deficient neurons, as long as the neurexin protein was transported to the neuronal cell surface. Furthermore, the single LNS-domain (for laminin/neurexin/sex hormone-binding globulin-domain) of neurexin-1β or neurexin-3β, when tethered to the presynaptic plasma membrane by a glycosylinositolphosphate anchor, was sufficient for rescuing heterologous synapse formation in neurexin-deficient neurons. Our data suggest that neurexins mediate heterologous synapse formation via an extracellular interaction with presynaptic and postsynaptic ligands without the need for signal transduction by the neurexin cytoplasmic tail.

  19. Oxygen kinetic isotope effects upon catalytic water oxidation by a monomeric ruthenium complex.

    PubMed

    Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M; Roth, Justine P

    2012-04-16

    Oxygen isotope fractionation is applied for the first time to probe the catalytic oxidation of water using a widely studied ruthenium complex, [Ru(II)(tpy)(bpy)(H(2)O)](ClO(4))(2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; tpy = 2,2';6",2"-terpyridine). Competitive oxygen-18 kinetic isotope effects ((18)O KIEs) derived from the ratio of (16,16)O(2) to (16,18)O(2) formed from natural-abundance water vary from 1.0132 ± 0.0005 to 1.0312 ± 0.0004. Experiments were conducted with cerium(IV) salts at low pH and a photogenerated ruthenium(III) tris(bipyridine) complex at neutral pH as the oxidants. The results are interpreted within the context of catalytic mechanisms using an adiabatic formalism to ensure the highest barriers for electron-transfer and proton-coupled electron-transfer steps. In view of these contributions, O-O bond formation is predicted to be irreversible and turnover-limiting. The reaction with the largest (18)O KIE exhibits the greatest degree of O-O coupling in the transition state. Smaller (18)O KIEs are observed due to multiple rate-limiting steps or transition-state structures which do not involve significant O-O motion. These findings provide benchmarks for systematizing mechanisms of O-O bond formation, the critical step in water oxidation by natural and synthetic catalysts. In addition, the measurements introduce a new tool for calibrating computational studies using relevant experimental data.

  20. Monomeric Chiral and Achiral Basket-Handle Porphyrins: Synthesis, Structural Features, and Arrested Tautomerism.

    PubMed

    Gehrold, Andreas C; Bruhn, Torsten; Schneider, Heidi; Radius, Udo; Bringmann, Gerhard

    2015-12-18

    Chiral and achiral basket-handle porphyrins (BHPs) with different p-xylene straps and peripheral solubilizing groups were synthesized using a previously established synthetic approach. Subsequent modification, functionalization, and metalation of the tetrapyrrolic macrocycle yielded more than 80 BHPs. The chiral representatives were resolved into their enantiomers, whose absolute configurations were determined by comparison of their ECD spectra with other experimental or quantum chemically calculated spectra. NMR studies and coupled-cluster calculations proved that the free base BHPs, although highly symmetric, exhibited the phenomenon of "arrested tautomerism". Comparison of the solid-state structures of three metalated BHPs offered detailed insight into their three-dimensional shape. Finally, directly linked dimeric porphyrins with a BHP subunit were synthesized from functionalized BHPs to prove their value as synthetic building blocks.

  1. Single-dose monomeric HA subunit vaccine generates full protection from influenza challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mallajosyula, Jyothi K; Hiatt, Ernie; Hume, Steve; Johnson, Ashley; Jeevan, Trushar; Chikwamba, Rachel; Pogue, Gregory P; Bratcher, Barry; Haydon, Hugh; Webby, Richard J; McCormick, Alison A

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are an efficient strategy to meet the demands of a possible influenza pandemic, because of rapid and scalable production. However, vaccines made from recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) subunit protein are often of low potency, requiring high dose or boosting to generate a sustained immune response. We have improved the immunogenicity of a plant-made HA vaccine by chemical conjugation to the surface of the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) which is non infectious in mammals. We have previously shown that TMV is taken up by mammalian dendritic cells and is a highly effective antigen carrier. In this work, we tested several TMV-HA conjugation chemistries, and compared immunogenicity in mice as measured by anti-HA IgG titers and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI). Importantly, pre-existing immunity to TMV did not reduce initial or boosted titers. Further optimization included dosing with and without alum or oil-in water adjuvants. Surprisingly, we were able to stimulate potent immunogenicity and HAI titers with a single 15µg dose of HA as a TMV conjugate. We then evaluated the efficacy of the TMV-HA vaccine in a lethal virus challenge in mice. Our results show that a single dose of the TMV-HA conjugate vaccine is sufficient to generate 50% survival, or 100% survival with adjuvant, compared with 10% survival after vaccination with a commercially available H1N1 vaccine. TMV-HA is an effective dose-sparing influenza vaccine, using a single-step process to rapidly generate large quantities of highly effective flu vaccine from an otherwise low potency HA subunit protein. PMID:24378714

  2. Single-dose monomeric HA subunit vaccine generates full protection from influenza challenge.

    PubMed

    Mallajosyula, Jyothi K; Hiatt, Ernie; Hume, Steve; Johnson, Ashley; Jeevan, Trushar; Chikwamba, Rachel; Pogue, Gregory P; Bratcher, Barry; Haydon, Hugh; Webby, Richard J; McCormick, Alison A

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are an efficient strategy to meet the demands of a possible influenza pandemic, because of rapid and scalable production. However, vaccines made from recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) subunit protein are often of low potency, requiring high dose or boosting to generate a sustained immune response. We have improved the immunogenicity of a plant-made HA vaccine by chemical conjugation to the surface of the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) which is non infectious in mammals. We have previously shown that TMV is taken up by mammalian dendritic cells and is a highly effective antigen carrier. In this work, we tested several TMV-HA conjugation chemistries, and compared immunogenicity in mice as measured by anti-HA IgG titers and hemagglutination inhibition (HAI). Importantly, pre-existing immunity to TMV did not reduce initial or boosted titers. Further optimization included dosing with and without alum or oil-in water adjuvants. Surprisingly, we were able to stimulate potent immunogenicity and HAI titers with a single 15 µg dose of HA as a TMV conjugate. We then evaluated the efficacy of the TMV-HA vaccine in a lethal virus challenge in mice. Our results show that a single dose of the TMV-HA conjugate vaccine is sufficient to generate 50% survival, or 100% survival with adjuvant, compared with 10% survival after vaccination with a commercially available H1N1 vaccine. TMV-HA is an effective dose-sparing influenza vaccine, using a single-step process to rapidly generate large quantities of highly effective flu vaccine from an otherwise low potency HA subunit protein.

  3. Monomeric S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from plants provides an alternative to putrescine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Eric M; Ekstrom, Jennifer L; Pegg, Anthony E; Ealick, Steven E

    2002-12-10

    S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase has been implicated in cell growth and differentiation and is synthesized as a proenzyme, which undergoes autocatalytic cleavage to generate an active site pyruvoyl group. In mammals, S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase is active as a dimer in which each protomer contains one alpha subunit and one beta subunit. In many higher organisms, autocatalysis and decarboxylation are stimulated by putrescine, which binds in a buried site containing numerous negatively charged residues. In contrast, plant S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylases are fully active in the absence of putrescine, with rapid autocatalysis that is not stimulated by putrescine. We have determined the structure of the S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase from potato, Solanum tuberosum, to 2.3 A resolution. Unlike the previously determined human enzyme structure, the potato enzyme is a monomer in the crystal structure. Ultracentrifugation studies show that the potato enzyme is also a monomer under physiological conditions, with a weak self-association constant of 6.5 x 10(4) M(-)(1) for the monomer-dimer association. Although the potato enzyme contains most of the buried charged residues that make up the putrescine binding site in the human enzyme, there is no evidence for a putrescine binding site in the potato enzyme. Instead, several amino acid substitutions, including Leu13/Arg18, Phe111/Arg114, Asp174/Val181, and Phe285/His294 (human/potato), provide side chains that mimic the role of putrescine in the human enzyme. In the potato enzyme, the positively charged residues form an extensive network of hydrogen bonds bridging a cluster of highly conserved negatively charged residues and the active site, including interactions with the catalytic residues Glu16 and His249. The results explain the constitutively high activity of plant S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylases in the absence of putrescine and are consistent with previously proposed models for how putrescine together with the buried, negatively charged site regulates enzyme activity.

  4. Monomerization of Cytosolic Mature Smac Attenuates Interaction with IAPs and Potentiation of Caspase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Stephen P.; Smith, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    The four residues at the amino-terminus of mature Smac/DIABLO are an IAP binding motif (IBM). Upon exit from mitochondria, mature Smac interacts with inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs), abrogating caspase inhibition. We used the ubiquitin fusion model to express mature Smac in the cytosol. Transiently expressed mature Smac56-239 (called Smac56) and Smac60-239 (called Smac60), which lacks the IBM, interacted with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). However, stable expression produced wild type Smac56 that failed to homodimerize, interact with XIAP, and potentiate caspase activation. Cytosolic Smac60 retained these functions. Cytosolic Smac56 apparently becomes posttranslationally modified at the dimer interface region, which obliterated the epitope for a monoclonal antibody. Cytosolic Smacδ, which has the IBM but lacks amino acids 62–105, homodimerized and weakly interacted with XIAP, but failed to potentiate apoptosis. These findings suggest that the IBM of Smac is a recognition point for a posttranslational modification(s) that blocks homodimerization and IAP interaction, and that amino acids 62–105 are required for the proapoptotic