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Sample records for glycerol phase formed

  1. Glycerol prevents dehydration in lipid cubic phases.

    PubMed

    Richardson, S J; Staniec, P A; Newby, G E; Rawle, J L; Slaughter, A R; Terrill, N J; Elliott, J M; Squires, A M

    2015-07-21

    Lipid cubic phase samples dry out and undergo phase transitions when exposed to air. We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that adding glycerol controllably lowers the humidity at which cubic phases form. These results broaden the potential applications of cubic phases and open up the potential of a new humidity-responsive nanomaterial.

  2. Ethanolysis of rapeseed oil - distribution of ethyl esters, glycerides and glycerol between ester and glycerol phases.

    PubMed

    Cernoch, Michal; Hájek, Martin; Skopal, Frantisek

    2010-04-01

    The distribution of ethyl esters, triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, and glycerol between the ester and glycerol phase was investigated after the ethanolysis of rapeseed oil at various reaction conditions. The determination of these substances in the ester and glycerol phases was carried out by the GC method. The amount of ethyl esters in the glycerol phase was unexpectedly high and therefore the possibility of the reduction of this amount was investigated. The distribution coefficients and the weight distributions of each investigated substance were calculated and compared mutually. The distribution coefficients between the ester and glycerol phase increase in this sequence: glycerol, monoglycerides, diglycerides, ethyl esters, and triglycerides. Soaps and monoglycerides in the reaction mixture cause a worse separation of ethyl esters from the reaction mixture. The existence of a non-separable reaction mixture was observed also, and its composition was determined. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fast dynamics of glass-forming glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuttke, J.; Petry, W.; Coddens, G.; Fujara, F.

    1995-10-01

    The vibrational and relaxational dynamics of glycerol has been measured by incoherent neutron scattering for energy transfers from some 10 μeV to several 10 meV, and for temperatures from 4 to 413 K. On heating towards and above the glass transition, scattering from low-frequency vibrations shows an unspectacular increase that is consistent with ultrasonic data. We propose using the vibrational density of states for calculating the Fourier transformed time correlation function S(q,t) without the cutoff usually imposed by the kinematics of neutron scattering. For high temperatures and low frequencies, structural relaxation is well described by the empirical Kohlrausch law. There is no extended crossover region between vibrations and structural relaxation.

  4. Glycerol effects on the formation and rheology of hexagonal phase and related gel emulsion.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad Mydul; Aramaki, Kenji

    2009-08-15

    We have investigated the effects of glycerol on the formation and rheology of hexagonal phase (H(1)) and related O/H(1) gel emulsion in the water/C(12)EO(8)/dodecane system at 25 degrees C. It has been found that the aqueous solution of C(12)EO(8) forms H(1) phase, which could solubilize some amounts of dodecane. Beyond the solubilization limit, oil is separated and a two-phase region or H(1)+O phase appeared. Due to high viscosity of the H(1) phase, allows forming O/H(1) gel emulsion at the H(1)+O region. Rheological measurements (without glycerol) have shown that the rheogram of the H(1) phase does not change drastically with the addition of oil but the system is shifted to longer relaxation time. Simultaneously, the values of the absolute value(eta(*)) are found to increase with the addition of oil, which has been described with the neighboring micellar interaction. The rheogram of the O/H(1) gel emulsion shows gel type nature (G'>G'') but the viscosity monotonically decreases with increasing oil content, which could be due to the lower volume fraction of the continuous phase (H(1) phase). Addition of glycerol has brought an order-order transition or the microstructural transition from H(1)-lamellar (L(alpha)) phase, which is manifested from rheology and SAXS measurements. Viscosity of the O/H(1) gel emulsion also decreases with increasing glycerol content. Digital images show the physical appearance of the gel emulsion changes from turbid to transparent, which is depended on the glycerol concentration (since glycerol matches the refractive index of the H(1) phase and dodecane). Structural parameters of the H(1) phase have been evaluated with the help of Bohlin's model and found that the coordination number of the H(1) phase depends not only the oil and glycerol concentrations but also temperature.

  5. Lyotropic mesophases formed by solutions of sodium strearate in glycerol and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingbing; Joshi, Leela; Satyendra Kumar, Satyendra; Yaravoy, Yury; Teanoosh, Moaddel

    2004-03-01

    Solutions of sodium stearate in concentrations ranging from 1 to 20 wt %, in glycerol and glycerol + water exhibit two phases between room temperature and 100 °C for all mixtures. In the high temperature phase, the solutions flow easily while they form a gel phase with unique elastic properties in the low temperature phase. Small angle neutron and x-ray scattering measurements performed on partially deutrated samples reveal structural details of these solutions. The high temperature phase is found to be an isotropic dispersion of micellar aggregates, the lower temperature phase possesses more complex structure. These results augmented with results from differential scanning calorimetry, NMR proton relaxation and other techniques will be presented. Supported by Unilever Research, USA.

  6. Crystal structure of substrate free form of glycerol dehydratase

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Der-Ing; Dotson, Garry; Turner, Jr., Ivan; Reiss, Lisa; Emptage, Mark

    2010-03-08

    Glycerol dehydratase (GDH) and diol dehydratase (DDH) are highly homologous isofunctional enzymes that catalyze the elimination of water from glycerol and 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PD) to the corresponding aldehyde via a coenzyme B{sub 12}-dependent radical mechanism. The crystal structure of substrate free form of GDH in complex with cobalamin and K{sup +} has been determined at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. Its overall fold and the subunit assembly closely resemble those of DDH. Comparison of this structure and the DDH structure, available only in substrate bound form, shows the expected change of the coordination of the essential K{sup +} from hexacoordinate to heptacoordinate with the displacement of a single coordinated water by the substrate diol. In addition, there appears to be an increase in the rigidity of the K{sup +} coordination (as measured by lower B values) upon the binding of the substrate. Structural analysis of the locations of conserved residues among various GDH and DDH sequences has aided in identification of residues potentially important for substrate preference or specificity of protein-protein interactions.

  7. Excess wing in glass-forming glycerol and LiCl-glycerol mixtures detected by neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Arend, N.; Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.; Stingaciu, L.; Jalarvo, N.; Mamontov, E.; Ohl, M.

    2015-01-22

    The relaxational dynamics in glass-forming glycerol and glycerol mixed with LiCl is investigated using different neutron scattering techniques. The performed neutron spin echo experiments, which extend up to relatively long relaxation time scales of the order of 10 ns, should allow for the detection of contributions from the so-called excess wing. This phenomenon, whose microscopic origin is controversially discussed, arises in a variety of glass formers and, until now, was almost exclusively investigated by dielectric spectroscopy and light scattering. In conclusion, we show here that the relaxational process causing the excess wing can also be detected by neutron scattering, which directly couples to density fluctuations.

  8. Crystallization and transformation of polymorphic forms of trioleoyl glycerol and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-rac-linoleoyl glycerol.

    PubMed

    Bayés-García, Laura; Calvet, Teresa; Cuevas-Diarte, Miquel Àngel; Ueno, Satoru; Sato, Kiyotaka

    2013-08-08

    This study examined the influence of different thermal treatments on the crystallization and transformation of trioleoyl glycerol (OOO) and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-rac-linoleoyl glycerol (OOL). Two triacylglycerol (TAG) samples were cooled at 0.5-15 °C·min(-1) and heated at 2 and 15 °C·min(-1). The polymorphic characteristics of the two TAGs were analyzed in situ using differential scanning calorimetry, Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction. Multiple polymorphic forms were identified in OOO (α, β'2, β'1, β2, and β1) and OOL (α, β'2, and β'1). Larger quantities of more stable forms (e.g., β2 and β1 of OOO and β'1 of OOL) were obtained when the samples were slowly cooled and heated. In contrast, less stable polymorphs were obtained with increased cooling and heating rates. Polymorphic transformations occurred in either solid-state or melt-mediation and were influenced by heating rates. The results were analyzed by considering the activation energies for crystallization and transformation of stable and less stable polymorphic forms in comparison with previous studies on 1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycerol and 1, 3-dioleoyl-2-palmitoyl-glycerol.

  9. Excess wing in glass-forming glycerol and LiCl-glycerol mixtures detected by neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Gupta, S.; Arend, N.; Lunkenheimer, P.; ...

    2015-01-22

    The relaxational dynamics in glass-forming glycerol and glycerol mixed with LiCl is investigated using different neutron scattering techniques. The performed neutron spin echo experiments, which extend up to relatively long relaxation time scales of the order of 10 ns, should allow for the detection of contributions from the so-called excess wing. This phenomenon, whose microscopic origin is controversially discussed, arises in a variety of glass formers and, until now, was almost exclusively investigated by dielectric spectroscopy and light scattering. In conclusion, we show here that the relaxational process causing the excess wing can also be detected by neutron scattering, whichmore » directly couples to density fluctuations.« less

  10. Protein phase behavior and crystallization: Effect of glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedgwick, H.; Cameron, J. E.; Poon, W. C. K.; Egelhaaf, S. U.

    2007-09-01

    Glycerol is widely used as an additive to stabilize proteins in aqueous solution. We have studied the effect of up to 40wt% glycerol on the crystallization of lysozyme from brine. As the glycerol concentration increased, progressively larger amounts of salt were needed to crystallize the protein. Like previous authors, we interpret this as evidence for glycerol changing the interaction between lysozyme molecules. We quantitatively model the interprotein interaction using a Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential. We find that the effect of glycerol can be entirely accounted for by the way it modifies the dielectric constant and refractive index of the solvent. Quantifying the interprotein interaction by the second virial coefficient, B2, we find a universal crystallization boundary for all glycerol concentrations.

  11. Protein phase behavior and crystallization: effect of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, H; Cameron, J E; Poon, W C K; Egelhaaf, S U

    2007-09-28

    Glycerol is widely used as an additive to stabilize proteins in aqueous solution. We have studied the effect of up to 40 wt % glycerol on the crystallization of lysozyme from brine. As the glycerol concentration increased, progressively larger amounts of salt were needed to crystallize the protein. Like previous authors, we interpret this as evidence for glycerol changing the interaction between lysozyme molecules. We quantitatively model the interprotein interaction using a Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential. We find that the effect of glycerol can be entirely accounted for by the way it modifies the dielectric constant and refractive index of the solvent. Quantifying the interprotein interaction by the second virial coefficient, B(2), we find a universal crystallization boundary for all glycerol concentrations.

  12. Thermal behaviour of cubic phases rich in 1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol in the ternary system. 1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol/n-octyl-beta-D-glucoside/water.

    PubMed

    Persson, Gerd; Edlund, Håkan; Lindblom, Göran

    2003-01-01

    Using synchrotron X-ray diffraction the thermal behaviour was studied of the cubic phases in the 1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol (MO)/n-octyl-beta-d-glucopyranoside (OG)/2H2O system with 58 or 45 wt % MO concentration and varying OG/2H2O contents. These MO contents correspond to a Pn3m cubic single-phase or a Pn3m cubic phase in excess water on the binary MO/water axis of the ternary phase diagram. The cubic liquid crystalline phases are stable with small fractions of OG, while higher OG concentrations trigger a cubic-to-lamellar phase transition. Moreover, with increasing OG concentration the initial Pn3m structure is completely converted to an Ia3d structure prior to the Lalpha phase being formed. Upon heating this effect is reversed, resulting in an Ia3d-to-Pn3m phase transition. For some samples additional peaks were observed in the diffractograms upon heating, resulting from the metastability notoriously shown by bicontinuous cubic phases. This judgement is supported by the fact that upon cooling these peaks were absent. Remarkably, both the Ia3d and the Pn3m cubic structures could be in equilibrium with excess water in this ternary system. A comparison is made with previous results on n-dodecyl-beta-d-maltoside (DM), showing that cubic phases with OG have higher thermal and compositional stability than with DM.

  13. Liquid crystalline phases and their dispersions in aqueous mixtures of glycerol monooleate and glyceryl monooleyl ether.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Georgeta; Barauskas, Justas; Nylander, Tommy; Tiberg, Fredrik

    2007-01-16

    The aqueous phase behavior of mixtures of 1-glycerol monooleate (GMO) and its ether analogue, 1-glyceryl monooleyl ether (GME) has been investigated by a combination of polarized microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and NMR techniques. Three phase diagrams of the ternary GMO/GME/water system have been constructed at 25, 40, and 55 degrees C. The results demonstrate that the increasing amount of GME favors the formation of the reversed phases, evidenced by the transformation of the lamellar and bicontinuous cubic liquid crystalline phases of the binary GMO/water system into reversed micellar or reversed hexagonal phases. For a particular liquid crystalline phase, increasing the GME content has no effect on the structural characteristics and hydration properties, thus suggesting ideal mixing with GMO. Investigations of dispersed nanoparticle samples using shear and a polymeric stabilizer, Pluronic F127, show the possibility of forming two different kinds of bicontinuous cubic phase nanoparticles by simply changing the GMO/GME ratio. Also NMR self-diffusion measurements confirm that the block copolymer, Pluronic F127, used to facilitate dispersion formation, is associated with nanoparticles and provides steric stabilization.

  14. The puzzling first-order phase transition in water–glycerol mixtures

    DOE PAGES

    Popov, Ivan; Greenbaum; Sokolov, Alexei P.; ...

    2015-06-05

    Over the last decade, discussions on a possible liquid-liquid transition (LLT) have strongly intensified. The LLT proposed by several authors focused mostly on explaining the anomalous properties of water in a deeply supercooled state. However, there have been no direct experimental observations yet of LLT in bulk water in the so-called 'no man's land', where water exists only in the crystalline states. Recently, a novel experimental strategy to detect LLT in water has been employed using water-glycerol (W-G) mixtures, because glycerol can generate a strong hindrance for water crystallization. As a result, the observed first-order phase transition at a concentrationmore » of glycerol around c(g) approximate to 20 mol% was ascribed to the LLT. Here we show unambiguously that the first order phase transition in W-G mixtures is caused by the ice formation. We provide additional dielectric measurements, applying specific annealing temperature protocols in order to reinforce this conclusion. We also provide an explanation, why such a phase transition occurs only in the narrow glycerol concentration range. These results clearly demonstrate the danger of analysis of phase-separating liquids to gain better insights into water dynamics. These liquids have complex phase behavior that is affected by temperature, phase stability and segregation, viscosity and nucleation, and finally by crystallization, that might lead to significant misinterpretations.« less

  15. The puzzling first-order phase transition in water–glycerol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Ivan; Greenbaum , Anna; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Feldman, Yuri

    2015-06-05

    Over the last decade, discussions on a possible liquid-liquid transition (LLT) have strongly intensified. The LLT proposed by several authors focused mostly on explaining the anomalous properties of water in a deeply supercooled state. However, there have been no direct experimental observations yet of LLT in bulk water in the so-called 'no man's land', where water exists only in the crystalline states. Recently, a novel experimental strategy to detect LLT in water has been employed using water-glycerol (W-G) mixtures, because glycerol can generate a strong hindrance for water crystallization. As a result, the observed first-order phase transition at a concentration of glycerol around c(g) approximate to 20 mol% was ascribed to the LLT. Here we show unambiguously that the first order phase transition in W-G mixtures is caused by the ice formation. We provide additional dielectric measurements, applying specific annealing temperature protocols in order to reinforce this conclusion. We also provide an explanation, why such a phase transition occurs only in the narrow glycerol concentration range. These results clearly demonstrate the danger of analysis of phase-separating liquids to gain better insights into water dynamics. These liquids have complex phase behavior that is affected by temperature, phase stability and segregation, viscosity and nucleation, and finally by crystallization, that might lead to significant misinterpretations.

  16. Effect of glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide on the phase behavior of lysozyme: Theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gögelein, Christoph; Wagner, Dana; Cardinaux, Frédéric; Nägele, Gerhard; Egelhaaf, Stefan U.

    2012-01-01

    Salt, glycerol, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) are used to modify the properties of protein solutions. We experimentally determined the effect of these additives on the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions. Upon the addition of glycerol and DMSO, the fluid-solid transition and the gas-liquid coexistence curve (binodal) shift to lower temperatures and the gap between them increases. The experimentally observed trends are consistent with our theoretical predictions based on the thermodynamic perturbation theory and the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek model for the lysozyme-lysozyme pair interactions. The values of the parameters describing the interactions, namely the refractive indices, dielectric constants, Hamaker constant and cut-off length, are extracted from literature or are experimentally determined by independent experiments, including static light scattering, to determine the second virial coefficient. We observe that both, glycerol and DMSO, render the potential more repulsive, while sodium chloride reduces the repulsion.

  17. Aqueous phase reforming of glycerol over Ni-based catalysts for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Cho, Su Hyun; Moon, Dong Ju

    2011-08-01

    Aqueous phase reforming of glycerol over Ni-based catalysts for hydrogen production was carried out at 225 degrees C, 23 bar and LHSV = 4 h(-1). The Ni-based catalyst was prepared by an incipient wetness impregnation method. The catalysts before and after the reaction were characterized by N2 physisorption, CO chemisorption, XRD, TPR, SEM and TEM techniques. It was found that Ni(20 wt%)-Co(3 wt%)/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst showed higher glycerol conversion and hydrogen selectivity than Ni(20 wt%)/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst. There are no major changes in Ni particles after the reaction over Ni-Co/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst. The results suggest that the Ni-Co/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst can be applied to the hydrogen production system using APR of glycerol.

  18. Glycerol Uptake Is Important for L-Form Formation and Persistence in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jian; He, Lili; Shi, Wanliang; Xu, Xiaogang; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    S. aureus is a significant human pathogen and has previously been shown to form cell wall deficient forms or L-forms in vitro and in vivo during infection. Despite many previous studies on S. aureus L-forms, the mechanisms of L-form formation in this organism remain unknown. Here we established the L-form model in S. aureus and constructed a transposon mutant library to identify genes involved in L-form formation. Screening of the library for mutants defective in L-form formation identified glpF involved in glycerol uptake being important for L-form formation in S. aureus. Consistent with this observation, glpF was found to be highly expressed in L-form S. aureus but hardly expressed in normal walled form. In addition, glpF mutant was found to be defective in antibiotic persistence. The defect in L-form formation and antibiotic persistence of the glpF mutant could be complemented by the wild type glpF gene. These findings provide new insight into the mechanisms of L-form formation and persistence in S. aureus and may have implications for development of new drugs targeting persisters for improved treatment. PMID:25251561

  19. The binary phase behavior of 1,3-dilauroyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycerol and 1,2-dilauroyl-3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Laziz; Boodhoo, Marc V; Kutek, Tomas; Filip, Vladimir; Narine, Suresh S

    2010-06-01

    The binary phase behavior of purified 1,3-dilauroyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (LSL) and 1,2-dilauroyl-3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (LLS) was investigated at a slow (0.1 degrees C/min) and a relatively fast (3.0 degrees C/min) cooling rate in terms of melting and crystallization, polymorphism, solid fat content (SFC), hardness and microstructure. Much of the behavior of the system is explained by its polymorphism and the influence of thermal processing. The alpha-form and the beta'-form of a double chain length structure were detected in the mixtures cooled at 3.0 degrees C/min, whereas only the beta'-form was detected in those cooled at 0.1 degrees C/min. X-ray diffraction data as well as thermodynamic data propose that the most stable phases are promoted by the symmetrical LSL. The measured trends in structural characteristics, thermal properties, SFC, relative hardness and microstructure delimit three groups of mixtures which imply a competition between the stabilizing effect of LSL and disordering introduced by kinetic effects: (a) LLS-rich mixtures with LSL molar fractions (X(LSL)) less than 0.3, (b) mixtures with X(LSL) clustered around 0.5 and (c) LSL-rich mixtures with X(LSL)>or=0.7. The balance between ordering and kinetic effects determines the polymorphism of the mixtures, which in turn determines the behavior of the LSL/LLS system. The kinetic phase diagram of the LSL/LLS binary system constructed using heating differential scanning calorimetry thermograms displayed a singularity at the 0.5(LSL) molar fraction which delimits two distinct behaviors: eutectic behavior in one region and monotectic behavior in the other. The molecular interactions, as depicted by a non-ideality parameter of mixing obtained from a thermodynamic model based on the Hildebrand equation, suggests an almost ideal mixing behavior and a moderate tendency to the formation of unlike-pairs in the liquid state. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Borrelia burgdorferi Requires Glycerol for Maximum Fitness During The Tick Phase of the Enzootic Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Christopher J.; Iyer, Radha; Petzke, Mary M.; Caimano, Melissa J.; Radolf, Justin D.; Schwartz, Ira

    2011-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the spirochetal agent of Lyme disease, is a vector-borne pathogen that cycles between a mammalian host and tick vector. This complex life cycle requires that the spirochete modulate its gene expression program to facilitate growth and maintenance in these diverse milieus. B. burgdorferi contains an operon that is predicted to encode proteins that would mediate the uptake and conversion of glycerol to dihydroxyacetone phosphate. Previous studies indicated that expression of the operon is elevated at 23°C and is repressed in the presence of the alternative sigma factor RpoS, suggesting that glycerol utilization may play an important role during the tick phase. This possibility was further explored in the current study by expression analysis and mutagenesis of glpD, a gene predicted to encode glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Transcript levels for glpD were significantly lower in mouse joints relative to their levels in ticks. Expression of GlpD protein was repressed in an RpoS-dependent manner during growth of spirochetes within dialysis membrane chambers implanted in rat peritoneal cavities. In medium supplemented with glycerol as the principal carbohydrate, wild-type B. burgdorferi grew to a significantly higher cell density than glpD mutant spirochetes during growth in vitro at 25°C. glpD mutant spirochetes were fully infectious in mice by either needle or tick inoculation. In contrast, glpD mutants grew to significantly lower densities than wild-type B. burgdorferi in nymphal ticks and displayed a replication defect in feeding nymphs. The findings suggest that B. burgdorferi undergoes a switch in carbohydrate utilization during the mammal to tick transition. Further, the results demonstrate that the ability to utilize glycerol as a carbohydrate source for glycolysis during the tick phase of the infectious cycle is critical for maximal B. burgdorferi fitness. PMID:21750672

  1. Effect of water structure on gelation of agar in glycerol solutions and phase diagram of agar organogels.

    PubMed

    Boral, Shilpi; Bohidar, H B

    2012-06-21

    A comprehensive study of hydration of polyanionic agar molecules in its solution and gel phase in glycerol-water binary solvent is reported. Raman spectroscopy results predict differential water structure arrangement for glycerol-water binary solvent, 0.02% (w/v) agar in glycerol solution and 0.3% (w/v) agar organogel. The 3200 cm(-1) Raman band pertaining to ice-like structure of water was found to increase in gel phase alike in glycerol-water solvent while it decreased in agar solutions with increase in glycerol concentration. In contrast, the partially structured water corresponding to the component 3310 cm(-1) of Raman spectra increased in agar solution, and decreased in gel phase similar to glycerol-water solvent case. We have explained these observations based on a simple model where the available oxygen to hydrogen atom ratio in a given solvent-polymer system uniquely defines hydration in solution and gel phases. The gelation concentration was found to increase from 0.18 (for water) to 0.22% (w/v) (50% v/v glycerol solution) as the glycerol concentration was raised. Correspondingly, the gelation temperature, T(g), showed a decline from 40 to 20 °C, and the gel melting temperature, T(m), revealed a reduction from 81 to 65 °C in the same glycerol concentration regime. Two distinctive features are evident here: (i) presence of glycerol as a cosolvent does not favor the gelation of agar as compared to water and (ii) agar organogels are softer than their hydrogels. A unique 3D phase diagram for the agar organogel is proposed. Circular dichroism data confirmed that the agar molecules retained their biological activity in these solvents. Thus, it is shown that thermo-mechanical properties of these organogels could be systematically tuned and adapted as per application requirement.

  2. Phase-transition properties of glycerol-dipalmitate lipid bilayers investigated using molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Laner, Monika; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2015-06-01

    The phase- and phase-transition properties of glycerol-dipalmitate (GDP) bilayer patches are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. This permits to characterize the influence of introducing a second aliphatic lipid tail by comparison to previously reported simulations of glycerol-1-monopalmitate (GMP). To this purpose, a set of 67 simulations (up to 300ns duration) of 2×8×8GDP bilayer patches are performed, considering the two GDP isomers glycerol-1,3-dipalmitate (13GDP) and glycerol-1,2-dipalmitate (12GDP; racemic), two hydration levels (12GDP only), and temperatures in the range 250-370K. In agreement with experiment, the GDP simulations reveal an increase in the main transition temperature by about 25K relative to GMP, and the occurrence of non-bilayer phases at high temperatures (inverted-cylinder or stacked phases). Structurally, the GDP system tends to evidence a tighter packing of the chains, a reduced extent of tilting, increased order parameters and a reduced fluidity. These differences are easily interpreted in terms of two key changes in molecular properties when going from GMP to GDP: (i) the reduction of the headgroup polarity and hydration (from two free hydroxyl groups to a single one); (ii) the increase in the effective tail cross-section relative to the (hydrated) headgroup cross-section, conferring to GDP a particular wedge shape. These two effects contribute to the relative instability of the liquid-crystalline phase, the stability being recovered in nature when the diglyceride headgroup is functionalized by a bulky or/and polar substituent.

  3. The binary phase behavior of 1, 3-dipalmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycerol and 1, 2-dipalmitoyl-3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed

    Boodhoo, M V; Bouzidi, L; Narine, S S

    2009-07-01

    The binary phase behavior of purified 1, 3-dipalmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (PSP) and 1, 2-dipalmitoyl-3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (PPS) was investigated at a very slow (0.1 degrees C/min) and a relatively fast (3.0 degrees C/min) cooling rate. Mixtures with molar fractions of 0.1 increments were studied in terms of melting and crystallization, polymorphism, solid fat content (SFC), hardness and microstructure. Only the alpha-form of a double chain length (DCL) structure was detected for all mixtures in both experiments. The kinetic phase diagram, constructed using heating DSC thermograms, displayed two distinct behaviors separated by a singularity at the 0.5(PSP) composition: a eutectic in the X(PSP)< or =0.5 and a monotectic in the X(PSP)< or =0.5 concentration region. The singularity was attributed to the formation of a 1:1 (mol:mol) molecular compound. Apart from the segment from 0.0(PSP) to the eutectic point, X(E), the simulation of the liquidus line using a model based on the Hildebrand equation suggested that the molecular interactions are strong and tend to favor the formation of unlike pairs in the liquid state and that the miscibility is not significantly dependent on cooling rate. The kinetic effects are manifest in all measured properties, particularly dramatically in the X(PSP)< or =X(E) concentration region. An analysis of induction time as measured by pulse nuclear magnetic resonance (pNMR) showed that PPS retards crystal growth, an effect which can explain the peculiarity of this concentration region. At both cooling rates, fit of the SFC (%) versus time curves to a modified form of the Avrami model revealed two common growth modes for all the mixtures. The polarized light microscope (PLM) of the PSP-PPS mixtures revealed networks made of spherulitic crystallites of size, growth direction and boundaries that are varied and sensitive to composition and cooling rate. The change in the microstructure and final SFC (%), particularly noticeable at

  4. Vapor Phase Dehydration of Glycerol to Acrolein Over SBA-15 Supported Vanadium Substituted Phosphomolybdic Acid Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Viswanadham, Balaga; Srikanth, Amirineni; Kumar, Vanama Pavan; Chary, Komandur V R

    2015-07-01

    Vapor phase dehydration of glycerol to acrolein was investigated over heteropolyacid (HPA) catalysts containing vanadium substituted phosphomolybdic acid (H4PMo11VO40) supported on mesoporous SBA-15. A series of HPA catalysts with HPA loadings varying from 10-50 wt% were prepared by impregnation method on SBA-15 support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, temperature-programmed desorption of NH3, pyridine adsorbed FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, pore size distribution and specific surface area measurements. The nature of acidic sites was examined by pyridine adsorbed FT-IR spectroscopy. XRD results suggest that the active phase containing HPA was highly dispersed at lower loadings on the support. FT-IR and Raman spectra results confirm that the presence of primary Keggin ion structure of HPA on the support and it was not affected during the preparation of catalysts. Pore size distribution results reveal that all the samples show unimodel pore size distribution with well depicted mesoporous structure. NH3-TPD results suggest that the acidity of catalysts increased with increase of HPA loading. The findings of acidity measurements by FT-IR spectra of pyridine adsorption reveals that the catalysts consist both the Brønsted and Lewis acidic sites and the amount of Brønsted acidic sites are increasing with HPA loading. SBA-15 supported vanadium substituted phosphomolybdic acid catalysts are found to be highly active during the dehydration reaction and exhibited 100% conversion of glycerol (10 wt% of glycerol) and the acrolein selectivity was appreciably changed with HPA active phase loading. The catalytic functionalities during glycerol dehydration are well correlated with surface acidity of the catalysts.

  5. Aqueous Phase Reforming of Glycerol for Hydrogen Production Over Pt-Re Supported on Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    King, David L.; Zhang, Liang; Xia, Guanguang; Karim, Ayman M.; Heldebrant, David J.; Wang, Xianqin; Peterson, Thomas H.; Wang, Yong

    2010-03-02

    Hydrogen production from the aqueous phase reforming of glycerol over several 3%Pt-Re/C catalysts (1-4.5% Re) has been studied in the absence and presence of base, and the results compared with a Re-free 3%Pt/C catalyst. Although the Pt/C catalyst is very selective toward the production of hydrogen, catalytic activity is low. Addition of Re significantly increases the conversion of glycerol, at some loss of hydrogen selectivity to light hydrocarbons and water-soluble oxygenates. Addition of 1%KOH to the feedstock increases the selectivity of the Pt-Re/C catalysts toward hydrogen, but selectivity toward aqueous phase oxygenates also increases except for 3%Pt-3%Re/C, where it remains constant. The increase in hydrogen selectivity with base addition arises primarily from reducing the selectivity toward methane and higher alkanes, products that consume H2. For comparison, KOH addition to the glycerol feed with the Re-free 3%Pt/C catalyst provides an increase in glycerol conversion but results in a decline in both H2 and alkanes relative to aqueous phase oxygenates. This indicates that alternative pathways have been enabled by base addition. The highest hydrogen productivity among the catalysts tested is achieved with a 3%Pt-3%Re/C catalyst with added KOH base, but this hydrogen productivity declines with time on stream. The observed product distributions as well as deactivation with base can be understood in terms of the different reaction pathways that become emphasized depending on catalyst composition and pH.

  6. Liquid-liquid transition without macroscopic phase separation in a water-glycerol mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Ken-Ichiro; Tanaka, Hajime

    2012-05-01

    The existence of more than two liquid states in a single-component substance and the ensuing liquid-liquid transitions (LLTs) has attracted considerable attention because of its counterintuitive nature and its importance in the fundamental understanding of the liquid state. Here we report direct experimental evidence for a genuine (isocompositional) LLT without macroscopic phase separation in an aqueous solution of glycerol. We show that liquid I transforms into liquid II by way of two types of kinetics: nucleation and growth, and spinodal decomposition. Although liquid II is metastable against crystallization, we could access both its static and dynamical properties experimentally. We find that liquids I and II differ in density, refractive index, structure, hydrogen bonding state, glass transition temperature and fragility, and that the transition between the two liquids is mainly driven by the local structuring of water rather than of glycerol, suggesting a link to a plausible LLT inpure water.

  7. L (+)-lactic acid production by pellet-form Rhizopus oryzae NRRL 395 on biodiesel crude glycerol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Given its availability and low price, glycerol derived from biodiesel industry has become an ideal feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals. A solution to reduce the negative environmental problems and the cost of biodiesel is to use crude glycerol as carbon source for microbial growth media in order to produce valuable organic chemicals. In the present paper, crude glycerol was used as carbon substrate for production of L (+)-lactic acid using pelletized fungus R. oryzae NRRL 395 on batch fermentation. More, the experiments were conducted on media supplemented with inorganic nutrients and lucerne green juice. Results Crude and pure glycerols were first used to produce the highest biomass yield of R. oryzae NRRL 395. An enhanced lactic acid production then followed up using fed-batch fermentation with crude glycerol, inorganic nutrients and lucerne green juice. The optimal crude glycerol concentration for cultivating R. oryzae NRRL 395 was 75 g l-1, which resulted in a fungal biomass yield of 0.72 g g-1 in trial without lucerne green juice addition and 0.83 g g-1 in trial with lucerne green juice. The glycerol consumption rate was 1.04 g l-1 h-1 after 48 h in trial with crude glycerol 75 g l-1 while in trial with crude glycerol 10 g l-1 the lowest rate of 0.12 g l-1 h-1 was registered. The highest L (+)-lactic acid yield (3.72 g g-1) was obtained at the crude glycerol concentration of 75 g l-1 and LGJ 25 g l-1, and the concentration of lactic acid was approximately 48 g l-1. Conclusions This work introduced sustainable opportunities for L (+)-lactic acid production via R. oryzae NRRL 395 fermentation on biodiesel crude glycerol media. The results showed good fungal growth on crude glycerol at 75 g l-1 concentration with lucerne green juice supplementation of 25 g l-1. Lucerne green juice provided a good source of nutrients for crude glycerol fermentation, without needs for supplementation with inorganic nutrients

  8. L (+)-lactic acid production by pellet-form Rhizopus oryzae NRRL 395 on biodiesel crude glycerol.

    PubMed

    Vodnar, Dan C; Dulf, Francisc V; Pop, Oana L; Socaciu, Carmen

    2013-10-10

    Given its availability and low price, glycerol derived from biodiesel industry has become an ideal feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals. A solution to reduce the negative environmental problems and the cost of biodiesel is to use crude glycerol as carbon source for microbial growth media in order to produce valuable organic chemicals. In the present paper, crude glycerol was used as carbon substrate for production of L (+)-lactic acid using pelletized fungus R. oryzae NRRL 395 on batch fermentation. More, the experiments were conducted on media supplemented with inorganic nutrients and lucerne green juice. Crude and pure glycerols were first used to produce the highest biomass yield of R. oryzae NRRL 395. An enhanced lactic acid production then followed up using fed-batch fermentation with crude glycerol, inorganic nutrients and lucerne green juice. The optimal crude glycerol concentration for cultivating R. oryzae NRRL 395 was 75 g l(-1), which resulted in a fungal biomass yield of 0.72 g g(-1) in trial without lucerne green juice addition and 0.83 g g(-1) in trial with lucerne green juice. The glycerol consumption rate was 1.04 g l(-1) h(-1) after 48 h in trial with crude glycerol 75 g l(-1) while in trial with crude glycerol 10 g l(-1) the lowest rate of 0.12 g l(-1) h(-1) was registered. The highest L (+)-lactic acid yield (3.72 g g(-1)) was obtained at the crude glycerol concentration of 75 g l(-1) and LGJ 25 g l(-1), and the concentration of lactic acid was approximately 48 g l(-1). This work introduced sustainable opportunities for L (+)-lactic acid production via R. oryzae NRRL 395 fermentation on biodiesel crude glycerol media. The results showed good fungal growth on crude glycerol at 75 g l(-1) concentration with lucerne green juice supplementation of 25 g l(-1). Lucerne green juice provided a good source of nutrients for crude glycerol fermentation, without needs for supplementation with inorganic nutrients. Crude glycerol and lucerne

  9. Effects of glycerol co-solvent on the rate and form of polymer gel dose response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jirasek, A.; Hilts, M.; Berman, A.; McAuley, K. B.

    2009-02-01

    A factor currently limiting the clinical utility of x-ray CT polymer gel dosimetry is the overall low dose sensitivity (and hence low dose resolution) of the system. Hence, active research remains in the investigation of polymer gel formulations with increased CT dose response. An ideal polymer gel dosimeter will exhibit a sensitive CT response which is linear over a suitable dose range, making clinical implementation reasonably straightforward. This study reports on the variations in rate and form of the CT dose response of irradiated polymer gels manufactured with glycerol, which is a co-solvent that permits dissolution of additional bisacrylamide above its water solubility limit (3% by weight). This study focuses on situations where the concentration of bisacrylamide is kept at or below its water solubility limit so that the influence of the co-solvent on the dose response can be explored separately from the effects of increased cross-linker concentration. CT imaging and Raman spectroscopy are used to construct dose-response curves for irradiated gels varying in (i) initial total monomer (%T) and (ii) initial co-solvent concentration. Results indicate that: (i) for a fixed glycerol concentration, gel response increases linearly with %T. Furthermore, the functional form of the dose response remains constant, in agreement with a previous model of polymer formation. (ii) Polymer gels with constant %T and increasing co-solvent concentrations also show enhanced CT response. In addition, the functional form of the response is altered in these gels as co-solvent concentration is increased. Raman data indicate that the fraction of bis-acrylamide incorporated into polymerization, as opposed to cyclization, increases as co-solvent concentration increases. The changes in functional form indicate varying polymer yields (per unit dose), akin to relative fractional monomer/cross-linker (i.e. %C) changes in earlier studies. These results are put into context of the model of

  10. No effect of menstrual cycle phase on glycerol or palmitate kinetics during 90 min of moderate exercise.

    PubMed

    Horton, Tracy J; Miller, Emily K; Bourret, Kristen

    2006-03-01

    The systemic flux of glycerol and palmitate [a representative nonesterified free fatty acid (NEFA)] was assessed in three different phases of the menstrual cycle at rest and during moderate-intensity exercise. It was hypothesized that circulating glycerol and NEFA turnover would be greatest in the midfollicular (MF) phase of the menstrual cycle, when estrogen is elevated but progesterone low, followed by the midluteal phase (ML; high estrogen and progesterone), and lowest in the early follicular (EF) phase of the menstrual cycle (low estrogen and progesterone). Subjects included moderately active, eumenorrheic, healthy women. Testing occurred after 3 days of diet control and after an overnight fast (12-13 h). Resting and exercise (50% maximal oxygen uptake, 90 min) measurements of tracer-determined glycerol and palmitate kinetics were made. There was a significant increase in both glycerol and palmitate turnover from rest to exercise in all phases of the menstrual cycle (P<0.0001). No significant differences, however, were observed between cycle phases in the systemic flux of glycerol or palmitate, at rest or during exercise. Maximal peripheral lipolysis during exercise, as represented by glycerol rate of appearance at 90 min, equaled 8.45+/-0.96, 8.35+/-1.12, and 7.71+/-0.96 micromol.kg-1.min-1 in the EF, MF, and ML phases, respectively. Circulating free fatty acid utilization also peaked at 90 min of exercise, as indicated by the palmitate rate of disappearance (3.31+/-0.35, 3.17+/-0.39, and 3.47+/-0.26 micromol.kg-1.min-1) in the EF, MF, and ML phases, respectively. In conclusion, systemic rates of glycerol and NEFA turnover (as represented by palmitate flux) were not significantly affected by the cyclic fluctuations in estrogen and progesterone that occur throughout the normal menstrual cycle, either at rest or during 90 min of moderate exercise.

  11. Hydration of gelatin molecules in glycerol-water solvent and phase diagram of gelatin organogels.

    PubMed

    Sanwlani, Shilpa; Kumar, Pradip; Bohidar, H B

    2011-06-09

    We present a systematic investigation of hydration and gelation of the polypeptide gelatin in water-glycerol mixed solvent (glycerol solutions). Raman spectroscopy results indicated enhancement in water structure in glycerol solutions and the depletion of glycerol density close to hydration sheath of the protein molecule. Gelation concentration (c(g)) was observed to decrease from 1.92 to 1.15% (w/v) while the gelation temperature (T(g)) was observed to increase from 31.4 to 40.7 °C with increase in glycerol concentration. Data on hand established the formation of organogels having interconnected networks, and the universal gelation mechanism could be described through an anomalous percolation model. The viscosity of sol diverged as η ∼ (1 - c(g)/c)(-k) as c(g) was approached from below (c < c(g)), while the elastic storage modulus grew as G' ∼ (c/c(g) - 1)(t) (for c > c(g)). It is important to note that values determined for critical exponents k and t were universal; that is, they did not depend on the microscopic details. The measured values were k = 0.38 ± 0.10 and t = 0.92 ± 0.17 whereas the percolation model predicts k = 0.7-1.3 and t = 1.9. Isothermal frequency sweep studies showed power-law dependence of gel storage modulus (G') and loss modulus (G'') on oscillation frequency ω given as G'(ω) ∼ ω(n') and G''(ω) ∼ ω(n''), and consistent with percolation model prediction it was found that n' ≈ n'' ≈ δ ≈ 0.73 close to gelation concentration. We propose a unique 3D phase diagram for the gelatin organogels. Circular dichroism data revealed that the gelatin molecules retained their biological activity in these solvents. Thus, it is shown that the thermomechanical properties of these organogels could be systematically tuned and customized as per application requirement.

  12. Phase behavior of binary mixture systems of saturated-unsaturated mixed-acid triacylglycerols: effects of glycerol structures and chain-chain interactions.

    PubMed

    Bayés-García, Laura; Calvet, Teresa; Cuevas-Diarte, Miquel Àngel; Ueno, Satoru; Sato, Kiyotaka

    2015-03-26

    We systematically examined the phase behavior of binary mixtures of mixed-acid triacylglycerols (TAGs) containing palmitic and oleic acid moieties 1,3-dioleoyl-2-palmitoyl-glycerol (OPO), 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-oleoyl-rac-glycerol (PPO), and 1,2-dioleoyl-3-palmitoyl-rac-glycerol (OOP), which are widely present in natural fats and are employed in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction methods were applied to observe the mixing behavior of PPO/OPO, OOP/OPO, and PPO/OOP under metastable and stable conditions. The results led to three conclusions: (1) Eutectic behavior was observed in PPO/OPO. (2) Molecular compound (MC) crystals were formed in the mixtures of OOP/OPO and PPO/OOP. (3) However, the MC crystals occurred only under metastable conditions and tended to separate into component TAGs to form eutectic mixture systems after 17 months of incubation. These results were contrary to those of previous studies on 1,3-dipalmitoyl-2-oleoyl glycerol (POP)/OPO and POP/PPO in which the MC crystals were thermodynamically stable. We determined that specific molecular interactions may cause this different phase behavior (stability of POP/OPO and POP/PPO MC crystals and metastability of OOP/OPO and PPO/OOP MC crystals). All results confirm the significant effects of molecular structures of glycerol groups, interactions of fatty acid chains, and polymorphism of the component TAGs on the mixing behavior of mixed-acid TAGs.

  13. Green acetylation of solketal and glycerol formal by heterogeneous acid catalysts to form a biodiesel fuel additive.

    PubMed

    Dodson, Jennifer R; Leite, Thays d C M; Pontes, Nathália S; Peres Pinto, Bianca; Mota, Claudio J A

    2014-09-01

    A glut of glycerol has formed from the increased production of biodiesel, with the potential to integrate the supply chain by using glycerol additives to improve biodiesel properties. Acetylated acetals show interesting cold flow and viscosity effects. Herein, a solventless heterogeneously catalyzed process for the acetylation of both solketal and glycerol formal to new products is demonstrated. The process is optimized by studying the effect of acetylating reagent (acetic acid and acetic anhydride), reagent molar ratios, and a variety of commercial solid acid catalysts (Amberlyst-15, zeolite Beta, K-10 Montmorillonite, and niobium phosphate) on the conversion and selectivities. High conversions (72-95%) and selectivities (86-99%) to the desired products results from using acetic anhydride as the acetylation reagent and a 1:1 molar ratio with all catalysts. Overall, there is a complex interplay between the solid catalyst, reagent ratio, and acetylating agent on the conversion, selectivities, and byproducts formed. The variations are discussed and explained in terms of reactivity, thermodynamics, and reaction mechanisms. An alternative and efficient approach to the formation of 100% triacetin involves the ring-opening, acid-catalyzed acetylation from solketal or glycerol formal with excesses of acetic anhydride.

  14. Biodegradable fibrous scaffolds with tunable properties formed from photo-cross-linkable poly(glycerol sebacate).

    PubMed

    Ifkovits, Jamie L; Devlin, Jeffrey J; Eng, George; Martens, Timothy P; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Burdick, Jason A

    2009-09-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that the architecture and mechanical properties of scaffolds, particularly with respect to mimicking features of natural tissues, are important for tissue engineering applications. Acrylated poly(glycerol sebacate) (Acr-PGS) is a material that can be cross-linked upon exposure to ultraviolet light, leading to networks with tunable mechanical and degradation properties through simple changes during Acr-PGS synthesis. For example, the number of acrylate functional groups on the macromer dictates the concentration of cross-links formed in the resulting network. Three macromers were synthesized that form networks that vary dramatically with respect to their tensile modulus ( approximately 30 kPa to 6.6 MPa) and degradation behavior ( approximately 20-100% mass loss at 12 weeks) based on the extent of acrylation ( approximately 1-24%). These macromers were processed into biodegradable fibrous scaffolds using electrospinning, with gelatin as a carrier polymer to facilitate fiber formation and cell adhesion. The resulting scaffolds were also diverse with respect to their mechanics (tensile modulus ranging from approximately 60 kPa to 1 MPa) and degradation ( approximately 45-70% mass loss by 12 weeks). Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation on all fibrous scaffolds was indistinguishable from those of controls. The scaffolds showed similar diversity when implanted on the surface of hearts in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction and demonstrated a dependence on the scaffold thickness and chemistry in the host response. In summary, these diverse scaffolds with tailorable chemical, structural, mechanical, and degradation properties are potentially useful for the engineering of a wide range of soft tissues.

  15. Aqueous phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol to bio-propylene glycol over Pt-Sn catalysts.

    PubMed

    Barbelli, Maria L; Santori, Gerardo F; Nichio, Nora N

    2012-05-01

    PtSn supported on SiO(2) obtained via surface organometallic chemistry techniques catalyzes hydrogenolysis of glycerol to obtain bio-propylene glycol (PG). Bimetallic catalysts with Sn contents between 0.1% and 1% wt were carefully prepared by selective hydrogenolysis of Sn(n-C(4)H(9))(4) on Pt. TEM, TPR, H(2) and CO chemisorptions, and XPS studies have shown that tin selective deposition on the metallic phase is obtained. At 200°C under N(2) or H(2) pressure, the presence of tin increases drastically: both the selectivity and the activity of the glycerol conversion into PG. During 2h batch runs; it could be observed that PtSn catalysts with Sn/Pt ratio=0.2 showed the best performance (PG selectivity=59% and 83% under N(2) and H(2) pressure respectively). The increase in activity and selectivity could be explained by the presence of Sn(+n) species "acid Lewis sites" which would facilitate the C-OH adsorption and its subsequent C-O cleavage favoring the propylene glycol production.

  16. A comparative study of the effects of dimethylsulfoxide and glycerol on the bicontinuous cubic structure of hydrated monoolein and its phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Abe, Satoru; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2007-06-01

    Both dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol act cryoprotectants for biological systems and materials. Knowledge of molecular interactions of DMSO and glycerol with biological lipids is important for understanding of their cryoprotecitive mechanisms. In this study, the phase behavior and structures of hydrated monoolein were investigated in the presence of DMSO or glycerol, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and simultaneous X-ray diffraction/DSC measurements. Based on the results obtained by this study, partial phase diagrams were constructed as a function of DMSO or glycerol concentrations and temperature. DMSO and glycerol hardly affect the enthalpy value for melting temperature of lamellar crystal phase of monoolein and the structure. On the other hand, DMSO and glycerol greatly affect the phase transformations associated with bicontinuous cubic phases of monoolein and the cubic phase structures. DMSO expands Im3m/Pn3m cubic phase co-existence region in the phase diagram and increases the lattice constant of the Pn3m monoolein cubic phase. Glycerol shows opposite effects. The present study suggests that different mechanisms act in the cryopreservation by DMSO and glycerol.

  17. Theoretical evidence of charge transfer interaction between SO₂ and deep eutectic solvents formed by choline chloride and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongping; Chang, Yonghui; Zhu, Wenshuai; Wang, Changwei; Wang, Chao; Yin, Sheng; Zhang, Ming; Li, Huaming

    2015-11-21

    The nature of the interaction between deep eutectic solvents (DESs), formed by ChCl and glycerol, and SO2 has been systematically investigated using the M06-2X density functional combined with cluster models. Block-localized wave function energy decomposition (BLW-ED) analysis shows that the interaction between SO2 and DESs is dominated by a charge transfer interaction. After this interaction, the SO2 molecule becomes negatively charged, whereas the ChCl-glycerol molecule is positively charged, which is the result of Lewis acid-base interaction. The current result affords a theoretical proof that it is highly useful and efficient to manipulate the Lewis acidity of absorbents for SO2 capture. Moreover, hydrogen bonding as well as electrostatic interactions may also contribute to the stability of the complex. Structure analysis shows that solvent molecules will adjust their geometries to interact with SO2. In addition, the structure of SO2 is barely changed after interaction. The interaction energy between different cluster models and SO2 ranges from -6.8 to -14.4 kcal mol(-1). It is found that the interaction energy is very sensitive to the solvent structure. The moderate interaction between ChCl-glycerol and SO2 is consistent with the concept that highly efficient solvents for SO2 absorption should not only be solvable but also regenerable.

  18. Thermotropic phase properties of 1,2-di-O-tetradecyl-3-O-(3-O-methyl- beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed Central

    Trouard, T P; Mannock, D A; Lindblom, G; Rilfors, L; Akiyama, M; McElhaney, R N

    1994-01-01

    The hydration properties and the phase structure of 1,2-di-O-tetradecyl-3-O(3-O-methyl-beta-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol (3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG) in water have been studied via differential scanning calorimetry, 1H-NMR and 2H-NMR spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Results indicate that this lipid forms a crystalline (Lc) phase up to temperatures of 60-70 degrees C, where a transition through a metastable reversed hexagonal (Hll) phase to a reversed micellar solution (L2) phase occurs. Experiments were carried out at water concentrations in a range from 0 to 35 wt%, which indicate that all phases are poorly hydrated, taking up < 5 mol water/mol lipid. The absence of a lamellar liquid crystalline (L alpha) phase and the low levels of hydration measured in the discernible phases suggest that the methylation of the saccharide moiety alters the hydrogen bonding properties of the headgroup in such a way that the 3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG headgroup cannot achieve the same level of hydration as the unmethylated form. Thus, in spite of the small increase in steric bulk resulting from methylation, there is an increase in the tendency of 3-O-Me-beta-D-GlcDAIG to form nonlamellar structures. A similar phase behavior has previously been observed for the Acholeplasma laidlawii A membrane lipid 1,2-diacyl-3-O-(6-O-acyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol in water (Lindblom et al. 1993. J. Biol. Chem. 268:16198-16207). The phase behavior of the two lipids suggests that hydrophobic substitution of a hydroxyl group in the sugar ring of the glucopyranosylglycerols has a very strong effect on their physicochemical properties, i.e., headgroup hydration and the formation of different lipid aggregate structures. PMID:7811919

  19. Quasi-homogeneous oxidation of glycerol by unsupported gold nanoparticles in the liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Skrzyńska, Elżbieta; Ftouni, Jamal; Girardon, Jean-Sébastien; Capron, Mickaël; Jalowiecki-Duhamel, Louise; Paul, Jean-François; Dumeignil, Franck

    2012-10-01

    A quasi-homogeneous solution of gold nanoparticles prepared by the Turkevich method was used as an unconventional catalyst in the oxidation of glycerol (GLY) in the liquid phase. The highest obtained conversion was 100 % after 3 h of reaction at 100 °C under an oxygen atmosphere (5 bar). The main products were glyceric, glycolic, formic, tartronic, and oxalic acid with selectivities of 28, 36, 25, 9, and 2 %, respectively. Traces of hydroxypyruvic and acetic acid were also detected (combined selectivities below 1 %). To elucidate the reaction mechanism and specify the role of gold nanoparticles in the oxidation process, a series of experiments under various reaction conditions were carried out. The effect of reaction temperature, oxygen pressure, gold concentration, and GLY/base molar ratio was investigated. All catalytic results were systematically compared to the corresponding noncatalytic base-induced transformations (blank tests). Such an approach allowed us to separate and clarify the respective driving parameters for the transformation of GLY (presence of a base and activity of the gold catalyst). The reaction mechanism comprised a series of oxidation and C-C cleavage reactions, whereas additional oxidation-reduction reactions (of the Cannizzaro type) could also occur in the presence of the base. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Glycerol upgrading over zeolites by batch-reactor liquid-phase oligomerization: heterogeneous versus homogeneous reaction.

    PubMed

    Krisnandi, Yuni K; Eckelt, Reinhard; Schneider, Matthias; Martin, Andreas; Richter, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Glycerol upgrading to diglycerols in the presence of basic (Na+ or Cs+) ion-exchanged (FAU or BEA) zeolite catalysts was studied in a liquid-phase batch rector at 260 degrees C under normal pressure. Homogeneous NaHCO3 and CsHCO3 catalysts were studied for comparison. All the catalysts, including NaHCO3 and CsHCO3, displayed the same conversion-selectivity relationship. The selectivity to linear diglycerols decreased at higher conversions/reaction times owing to the consecutive formation of higher oligomers, with preferential further conversion of alpha,alpha'-diglycerol. The maximum yield of linear diglycerols was limited to about 30 %. The activities of the zeolites followed the order X>Y>Beta, independent of the alkali ion present. Catalysis by the zeolites starts with an induction period attributed to a slow leaching of alkaline cations from the zeolite. Thereafter, the reaction is characterized by a progressive loss of the microporous structure of the zeolite and increasing overlap of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis, where, primarily, the activity depends on the cation content of the zeolite.

  1. Catalytic Functionalities of Nano Ruthenium/gamma-Al2O3 Catalysts for the Vapour Phase Hydrogenolysis of Glycerol.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vanama Pavan; Priya, Samudrala Shanthi; Harikrishna, Yengaidas; Kumar, Ashish; Chary, Komandur V R

    2016-02-01

    A series of Ruthenium catalysts with different Ru contents supported on gamma-alumina were prepared by deposition-precipitation method. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), trans- mission electron microscopy (TEM), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), CO-chemisorption, surface area and pore-size distribution (PSD) measurements. The catalytic activities were evaluated for the vapour phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol to propanediols. The pore size distribution (PSD) results suggest that Ru loadings considerably affect the pore volume, pore diameter and surface area. The particle size measured from CO-chemisorption and TEM analysis are well correlated to the activity results during the hydrogenolysis reaction. The catalytic properties of Ru/gamma-Al2O3 catalysts were evaluated for the first time over vapour phase hydrogenolysis of glycerol to propanediols.

  2. Promotional Effect of Hydroxyl on the Aqueous Phase Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide and Glycerol over Supported Au Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchie,W.; Murayama, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Gold particles supported on carbon and titania were explored as catalysts for oxidation of CO or glycerol by O{sub 2} at room temperature in liquid-phase water. Although Au/carbon catalysts were not active for vapor phase CO oxidation at room temperature, a turnover frequency of 5 s{sup -1} could be achieved with comparable CO concentration in aqueous solution containing 1 M NaOH. The turnover frequency on Au/carbon was a strong function of pH, decreasing by about a factor of 50 when the pH decreased from 14 to 0.3. Evidently, a catalytic oxidation route that was not available in the vapor phase is enabled by operation in the liquid water at high pH. Since Au/titania is active for vapor phase CO oxidation, the role of water, and therefore hydroxyl concentration, is not as significant as that for Au/carbon. Hydrogen peroxide is also produced during CO oxidation over Au in liquid water and increasing the hydroxyl concentration enhances its formation rate. For glycerol oxidation to glyceric acid (C{sub 3}) and glycolic acid (C{sub 2}) with O{sub 2} (1-10 atm) at 308-333 K over supported Au particles, high pH is required for catalysis to occur. Similar to CO oxidation in liquid water, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is also produced during glycerol oxidation at high pH. The formation of the C-C cleavage product glycolic acid is attributed to peroxide in the reaction.

  3. Effect of methanol on the phase-transition properties of glycerol-monopalmitate lipid bilayers investigated using molecular dynamics simulations: in quest of the biphasic effect.

    PubMed

    Laner, Monika; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2015-02-01

    The effect of methanol on the phase and phase-transition properties of a 2×8×8 glycerol-1-monopalmitate bilayer patch is investigated using a series of 239 molecular dynamics simulations on the 180 ns timescale, considering methanol concentrations cM and temperatures T in the ranges 0-12.3M and 302-338 K, respectively. The results in the form of hysteresis-corrected transition temperatures Tm are compatible with the expected features of the biphasic effect, with a reversal concentration crev of about 5.2 M. Below this concentration, the main transition is between the liquid crystal (LC) and gel (GL) phases, and Tm decreases upon increasing cM. Above this concentration, the interdigitated (ID) phase is the stable ordered phase instead, and Tm slightly increases upon increasing T up to about 10 M. The analysis of the structural and dynamical properties also reveals very different sensitivities and responses of the three phases to changes in cM. In particular, the properties of the GL phase are insensitive to cM, whereas those of the LC and ID phases are altered via an increase of the area per lipid. For the LC phase, increasing cM promotes disorder and fluidity. For the ID phase, in contrast, increasing cM up to about 10 M slightly increases the ordering and rigidity. Two side issues are also addressed, concerning: (i) the occurrence tilt-precession motions in the GL and ID phases; (ii) the influence of the pressure coupling scheme employed in the simulations, semi- or fully-anisotropic, on the simulation results.

  4. Liquid dynamics in partially crystalline glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz, Alejandro; Niss, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    We present a dielectric study on the dynamics of supercooled glycerol during crystallization. We explore the transformation into a solid phase in real time by monitoring the temporal evolution of the amplitude of the dielectric signal. Neither the initial nucleation nor the crystal growth influences the liquid dynamics visibly. For one of the samples studied, a tiny fraction of glycerol remained in the disordered state after the end of the transition. We examined the nature of the α relaxation in this frustrated crystal and find that it is virtually identical to the bulk dynamics. In addition, we have found no evidence that supercooled glycerol transforms into a peculiar phase in which either a new solid amorphous state or nano-crystals dispersed in a liquid matrix are formed.

  5. Stabilizer effects on the synthesis of gold-containing microparticles. Application to the liquid phase oxidation of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Gil, Sonia; Jiménez-Borja, Carmen; Martin-Campo, J; Romero, Amaya; Valverde, José Luis; Sánchez-Silva, Luz

    2014-10-01

    Gold-containing poly(urea-formaldehyde) microparticles were prepared by the in situ polymerization method using a series of stabilization agents with different chemical nature. The effects of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC) on the morphology, the particle size of encapsulated gold, the gold particle size distribution and the encapsulation efficiency were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and atomic absorption analyses. The chemical nature of stabilizer had a marked influence on both the encapsulated gold particle size and the encapsulation efficiency. Both gold particle size and gold encapsulation efficiency increased when decreasing the stabilizer polarity number. All the microparticles here prepared were tested in the liquid phase selective oxidation of glycerol. The glycerol conversion increased and the glyceric acid selectivity decreased when decreasing gold particle sizes. Results showed that use of stabilizers with hydrophobic surfaces enhanced the selectivity to C3 products in the resulting catalysts. On the other hand, the use of stabilizers with hydrophilic surfaces increased the C-C bond cleavage products in the resulting catalysts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Aqueous Phase Glycerol Reforming by PtMo Bimetallic Nano-Particle Catalyst: Product Selectivity and Structural Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Stach E. A.; Dietrich, P.J.; Lobo-Lapidus, R.J.; Wu, T.; Sumer, A.; Akatay, M.C.; Fingland, B.R.; Guo, N.; Dumesic, J.A.; Marshall, C.L.; Jellinek, J.; Delgass, W.N.; Ribeiro, F.H.; Miller, J.T.

    2012-03-01

    A carbon supported PtMo aqueous phase reforming catalyst for producing hydrogen from glycerol was characterized by analysis of the reaction products and pathway, TEM, XPS and XAS spectroscopy. Operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) indicates the catalyst consists of bimetallic nano-particles with a Pt rich core and a Mo rich surface. XAS of adsorbed CO indicates that approximately 25% of the surface atoms are Pt. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that there is unreduced and partially reduced Mo oxide (MoO{sub 3} and MoO{sub 2}), and Pt-rich PtMo bimetallic nano-particles. The average size measured by transmission electron microscopy of the fresh PtMo nano-particles is about 2 nm, which increases in size to 5 nm after 30 days of glycerol reforming at 31 bar and 503 K. The catalyst structure differs from the most energetically stable structure predicted by density functional theory (DFT) calculations for metallic Pt and Mo atoms. However, DFT indicates that for nano-particles composed of metallic Pt and Mo oxide, the Mo oxide is at the particle surface. Subsequent reduction would lead to the experimentally observed structure. The aqueous phase reforming reaction products and intermediates are consistent with both C-C and C-OH bond cleavage to generate H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} or the side product CH{sub 4}. While the H{sub 2} selectivity at low conversion is about 75%, cleavage of C-OH bonds leads to liquid products with saturated carbon atoms. At high conversions (to gas), these will produced additional CH{sub 4} reducing the H{sub 2} yield and selectivity.

  7. Glycerol production of various strains of saccharomyces

    SciTech Connect

    Radler, F.; Schuetz, H.

    1982-01-01

    The quantity of glycerol as principal by-product of the alcoholic fermentation depends to a large extent on the yeast strain. Different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to form amounts of glycerol varying between 4.2 to 10.4 g/L. The formation of glycerol is regarded as a result of the competition between alcohol dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that compete for the reduced coenzyme NADH/sub 2/. High and low glycerol forming yeast strains showed large differences in the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and only small variation in the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase. The total amount of glycerol formed was also influenced by amino acids. In thiamine deficient media a decrease in glycerol formation was observed. Experiments indicate a correlation between the formation of acetaldehyde and glycerol and the production of cell mass that may be of practical interest. (Refs. 12).

  8. Contribution of hydrogenase 2 to stationary phase H2 production by Escherichia coli during fermentation of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Trchounian, Karen; Soboh, Basem; Sawers, R Gary; Trchounian, Armen

    2013-05-01

    Escherichia coli has four hydrogenases (Hyd), three genes of which are encoded by the hya, hyb, and hyc operons. The proton-reducing and hydrogen-oxidizing activities of Hyd-2 (hyb) were analyzed in whole cells grown to stationary phase and cell extracts, respectively, during glycerol fermentation using novel double mutants. H2 production rate at pH 7.5 was decreased by ~3.5- and ~7-fold in hya and hyc (HDK 103) or hyb and hyc (HDK 203) operon double mutants, respectively, compared with the wild type. At pH 6.5, H2 production decreased by ~2- and ~5-fold in HDK103 and HDK203, respectively, compared with the wild type. At pH 5.5, H2 production was reduced by ~4.5-fold in the mutants compared with the wild type. The total hydrogen-oxidizing activity was shown to depend on the pH of the growth medium in agreement with previous findings and was significantly reduced in the HDK103 or HDK203 mutants. At pH 7.5, Hyd-2 activity was 0.26 U (mg protein)(-1) and Hyd-1 activity was 0.1 U (mg protein)(-1). As the pH of the growth medium decreased to 6.5, Hyd-2 activity was 0.16 U (mg protein)(-1), and Hyd-1 was absent. Surprisingly, at pH 5.5, there was an increase in Hyd-2 activity (0.33 U mg protein)(-1) but not in that of Hyd-1. These findings show a major contribution of Hyd-2 to H2 production during glycerol fermentation that resulted from altered metabolism which surprisingly influenced proton reduction.

  9. Electrochemical valorisation of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Simões, Mário; Baranton, Stève; Coutanceau, Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The worldwide glycerol stocks are increasing; to make the biodiesel industry sustainable economically, this chemical could be used as a secondary primary raw material. Electric energy or hydrogen and added-value-chemical cogeneration becomes more and more an important research topic for increasing economical and industrial interests towards electrochemical technologies. Studies on glycerol electrooxidation for fuel or electrolysis cell applications are scarce. The valorisation of glycerol is generally performed by organic chemistry reactions forming, for example, esters, glycerol carbonates, ethers, acetals or ketals. Glycerol oxidation is made up of complex pathway reactions that can produce a large number of useful intermediates or valuable fine chemicals with presently limited market impact due to expensive production processes. Many of these chemical oxidation routes lead to significant amounts of undesired by-products, and enzymatic processes are limited. Converse to classical heterogeneous processes, electrocatalytic oxidation processes can be tuned by controlling the nature, composition and structure of the electrocatalyts as well as the electrode potential. Such control may lead to very high selectivity and activity, avoiding or limiting product separation steps. The coupling of glycerol oxidation to produce chemicals with the oxygen reduction reaction in a fuel cell or water reduction reaction in an electrolysis cell on Pt-free catalysts results either in coproduction of electrical energy or hydrogen for energy storage. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Spray Forming Aluminum - Final Report (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect

    D. D. Leon

    1999-07-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Industrial Technology (DOE) has an objective to increase energy efficient and enhance competitiveness of American metals industries. To support this objective, ALCOA Inc. entered into a cooperative program to develop spray forming technology for aluminum. This Phase II of the DOE Spray Forming Program would translate bench scale spray forming technology into a cost effective world class process for commercialization. Developments under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC07-94ID13238 occurred during two time periods due to budgetary constraints; April 1994 through September 1996 and October 1997 and December 1998. During these periods, ALCOA Inc developed a linear spray forming nozzle and specific support processes capable of scale-up for commercial production of aluminum sheet alloy products. Emphasis was given to alloys 3003 and 6111, both being commercially significant alloys used in the automotive industry. The report reviews research performed in the following areas: Nozzel Development, Fabrication, Deposition, Metal Characterization, Computer Simulation and Economics. With the formation of a Holding Company, all intellectual property developed in Phases I and II of the Project have been documented under separate cover for licensing to domestic producers.

  11. Correlation of Pt-Re Surface Properties with Reaction Pathways for the Aqueous-Phase Reforming of Glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Liang; Karim, Ayman M.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wei, Zhehao; King, D. L.; Wang, Yong

    2012-01-17

    The surface properties of Pt-Re catalytic nano-particles supported on carbon following exposure to a hydrogen reducing environment and subsequent hydrothermal conditions have been studied using in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ammonia temperature programmed desorption (TPD). These properties have been correlated with the catalyst selectivity for the aqueous phase reforming of glycerol. We show that Pt in reduced Pt-Re/C becomes electron deficient, and a fraction of the Re becomes oxidized when the catalyst is subsequently exposed to hydrothermal reaction conditions. Oxidation of Pt-Re generates surface acidity, which drastically affects the reaction pathways. The acid site concentration, but not acid site strength, increases with Re loading. This acidity increase with Re addition favors C-O over C-C cleavage, which results in higher selectivity to liquid products and alkanes at the expense of hydrogen production. We propose a model for the Pt-Re active site and the origin of acidity enhanced by the addition of Re.

  12. Renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from biodiesel waste glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Zichun; Williams, Paul T.; Huang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we introduce a novel and commercially viable method to recover renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from waste glycerol produced in the biodiesel process. Gas-phase catalytic reforming converts glycerol to clean hydrogen fuel and by replacing the problematical coke formed on the catalyst with high value carbon nanotubes, added value can be realised. Additional benefits of around 2.8 kg CNTs from the reforming of 1 tonne of glycerol and the production of 500 Nm3 H2 could have a considerable impact on the economics of glycerol utilization. Thereby, the contribution of this research will be a significant step forward in solving a current major technical and economic challenge faced by the biofuels industry. PMID:24067754

  13. Renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from biodiesel waste glycerol.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunfei; Wang, Zichun; Williams, Paul T; Huang, Jun

    2013-09-25

    In this report, we introduce a novel and commercially viable method to recover renewable hydrogen and carbon nanotubes from waste glycerol produced in the biodiesel process. Gas-phase catalytic reforming converts glycerol to clean hydrogen fuel and by replacing the problematical coke formed on the catalyst with high value carbon nanotubes, added value can be realised. Additional benefits of around 2.8 kg CNTs from the reforming of 1 tonne of glycerol and the production of 500 Nm(3) H2 could have a considerable impact on the economics of glycerol utilization. Thereby, the contribution of this research will be a significant step forward in solving a current major technical and economic challenge faced by the biofuels industry.

  14. Smectic Phase Formed by DNA Dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamonczyk, Miroslaw; Gleeson, James; Jakli, Antal; Sprunt, Samuel; Dhont, Jan; Stiakakis, Emmanuel

    The rapidly expanding bio market is driving the development and characterization of new multifunctional materials. In particular, nucleic acids are under intense study for gene therapy, drug delivery and other bio-safe applications [1,2,3]. DNA is well-known to form a cholesteric nematic liquid crystal in its native form; however, much recent research has focused on self-assembly and mesomorphic behavior in concentrated solutions of short DNA helices [4]. Our work focuses on DNA dimers, consisting of 48 base-pair double-stranded helices connected by a 5 to 20 base flexible single strand, and suspended in a natural buffer. Depending on temperature, concentration and length of the flexible spacer, polarizing optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering reveal cholesteric nematic and, remarkably, smectic liquid crystalline phases. A model for smectic phase formation in this system will be presented. 1] J.-L. Lim et al., Int. J. of. Pharm. 490 (2015) 2652] D.-H. Kim et al., Nature Biotech. 23 (2005) 2223] K. Liu et al., Chem. Eur. J. 21 (2015) 48984] M. Nakata et al., Science 318 (2007) 1276 NSF DMR 1307674.

  15. Properties of low moisture composite materials consisting of oil droplets dispersed in a protein-carbohydrate-glycerol matrix: effect of continuous phase composition.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yeun Suk; Corradini, Maria G; McClements, D Julian; Desrochers, Julia

    2006-01-25

    The influence of continuous phase composition on the properties of low moisture (<3% water) composite materials consisting of oil droplets dispersed in a protein-carbohydrate-glycerol matrix was investigated. These composites were produced by blending canola oil (62.3%), whey protein concentrate (1.7%, WPC), and corn syrup and glycerol together (36.0% combined) using a high speed mixer equipped with a whisk. The polyol composition was varied by changing the ratio of corn syrup to glycerol in the system while keeping the total concentration of these two polyol components constant. Some composites were analyzed directly after preparation ("unbaked"), while others were analyzed after heating at 176 degrees C for 10 min to simulate baking of a food product ("baked"). The "lightness" of the composites was greater before baking (higher L value), but the color intensity of the composites was greater after baking (higher b value), which was attributed to Maillard browning reactions. The brownness of the baked composites increased with increasing corn syrup concentration, which was attributed to Maillard browning reactions. Squeezing flow viscometry indicated that the consistency and yield stress of the composites increased with baking, which was attributed to whey protein unfolding and aggregation. These rheological parameters also increased with increasing corn syrup concentration, which was attributed to its influence on the continuous phase rheology and on the interactions between the whey proteins. This study shows that the continuous phase composition and thermal history of low moisture composite materials have a large impact on their final physicochemical properties.

  16. Outlook on the phase equilibria of the innovative system of "protected glycerol": 1,4-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane-2-methanol and alternative solvents.

    PubMed

    Melo, Catarina I; Rodrigues, Ana I; Bogel-Łukasik, Rafał; Bogel-Łukasik, Ewa

    2012-02-23

    Fundamental data on 1,4-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane-2-methanol are scarce. This work presents the foremost systematic data on the solubility of 1,4-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane-2-methanol in sustainable solvents such as water and ionic liquids accompanied by the interpretation of interactions occurring in such binary systems. 1,4-Dioxaspiro[4.5]decane-2-methanol, here called protected glycerol, has been synthesized in order to protect the two hydroxyl groups of glycerol, thus avoiding the formation of side products in a specific process. A series of imidazolium salts accompanied by pyridinium, phosphonium, and ammonium ones with various types of counterions were used in this study. The liquid-liquid and solid-liquid equilibrium measurements in binary systems were carried out by using a dynamic method at atmospheric pressure over the temperature range from 273.00 to 378.30 K or below the boiling point of the solvent. Among all tested sustainable solvents, protected glycerol exhibited limited solubility, with only a few of them in the temperature range studied. The majority of the examined ionic liquids, either hydrophilic or hydrophobic, showed complete miscibility with this monohydroxyol. The Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of solute and solvents showing a miscibility gap and of their mixtures were performed to obtain insight into major inter- and intramolecular interactions in the investigated systems. Furthermore, the differential scanning calorimetry was used for the first time to determine the melting point, the enthalpy of melting, and the temperature and enthalpy of the solid-solid phase transition of 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride [Amim][Cl]. The results for the solubility of protected glycerol in sustainable solvents can be used to design future alternative reactions, such as telomerization with protected glycerol in ionic liquids for more specific building blocks and extraction/or separation that involves these mixtures.

  17. GPS phase scintillation correlated with auroral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Azeem, S. I.; Crowley, G.; Santana, J.; Reynolds, A.

    2013-12-01

    The disruption of radio wave propagation due to rapid changes in electron density caused by auroral precipitation has been observed for several decades. In a few cases the disruption of GPS signals has been attributed to distinct auroral arcs [Kintner, 2007; Garner, 2011], but surprisingly there has been no systematic study of the characteristics of the auroral forms that cause GPS scintillation. In the Fall of 2012 ASTRA deployed four CASES GPS receivers at UAF observatories in Alaska (Kaktovik, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat and Gakona) specifically to address the effects of auroral activity on the high latitude ionosphere. We have initiated an analysis that compares the phase scintillation, recorded at high cadence, with filtered digital all-sky camera data to determine the auroral morphology and electron precipitation parameters that cause scintillation. From correlation studies from a single site (Poker Flat), we find that scintillation is well correlated with discrete arcs that have high particle energy flux (power per unit area), and not as well correlated with pulsating forms which typically have high characteristic energy, but lower energy flux . This indicates that the scintillation is correlated with the magnitude of the change in total electron density as expected. We will also report on ongoing work where we correlate the scintillation from the Fort Yukon receiver with the all-sky images at Poker Flat to determine the altitude that produces the greatest disturbance. These studies are aimed at a model that can predict the expected local disturbance to navigation due to auroral activity.

  18. Production, structural characterization and gel forming property of a new exopolysaccharide produced by Agrobacterium HX1126 using glycerol or d-mannitol as substrate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongmei; Gu, Qiuya; Ofosu, Fred Kwame; Yu, Xiaobin

    2016-01-20

    A strain Agrobacterium HX1126 was isolated from soil sample near the canal in Wuxi. Glycerol was used as carbon source for the production of a new exopolysaccharide which was named PGHX. PGHX composed mainly of galactose, with lower amounts of arabinose and aminogalactose. It was found that this strain could use d-mannitol as carbon source to produce PGHX too. A method for the preparation of crude PGHX was proposed and the crude PGHX can be formed in a gel formation when 30 g/L was put into the boiling water for 10 min, with an achieved gel strength of 957 g/cm(2). The concentration of proteins in the crude product was considered to be an important parameter which directly influence the gel forming property. The highest production of PGHX (24.9 g/L) was obtained under the nitrogen depletion condition. The structure of the product was confirmed by NMR and FTIR.

  19. Effect of the cosolutes trehalose and methanol on the equilibrium and phase-transition properties of glycerol-monopalmitate lipid bilayers investigated using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Laner, Monika; Horta, Bruno A C; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2014-11-01

    The influence of the cosolutes trehalose and methanol on the structural, dynamic and thermodynamic properties of a glycerol-1-monopalmitate (GMP) bilayer and on its main transition temperature [Formula: see text] is investigated using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations (600 ns) of a GMP bilayer patch (2 × 8 × 8 lipids) at different temperatures in the range of 302 to 338 K and considering three different cosolute concentrations. Depending on the environment and temperature, these simulations present no or a single GL[Formula: see text]LC, LC[Formula: see text]GL or LC[Formula: see text]ID transition, where LC, GL and ID are the liquid crystal, gel and interdigitated phases, respectively. The trehalose molecules form a coating layer at the bilayer surface, promote the hydrogen-bonded bridging of the lipid headgroups, preserve the interaction of the headgroups with trapped water and induce a slight lateral expansion of the bilayer in the LC phase, observations that may have implications for the phenomenon of anhydrobiosis. However, this cosolute does not affect [Formula: see text] and its dependence on hydration in the concentration range considered. On the other hand, methanol molecules intercalate between the lipid headgroups, promote a lateral expansion of the bilayer in the LC phase and induce a concentration dependent decrease of [Formula: see text], observations that may have implications for the phenomenon of anesthesia. The occurrence of an ID phase in the presence of this cosolute may be viewed as an extreme consequence of lateral expansion. The analysis of the simulations also suggests the existence of two basic conservation principles: (1) the hydrogen-bond saturation principle rests on the observation that for all species present in the different systems, the total numbers of hydrogen-bonds per molecule is essentially constant, the only factor of variability being their distribution among different partners; (2) the densest packing principle

  20. Catalytic Gas-Phase Glycerol Processing over SiO2-, Cu-, Ni- and Fe- Supported Au Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kapkowski, Maciej; Siudyga, Tomasz; Sitko, Rafal; Lelątko, Józef; Szade, Jacek; Balin, Katarzyna; Klimontko, Joanna; Bartczak, Piotr; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated different metal pairings of Au nanoparticles (NPs) as potential catalysts for glycerol dehydration for the first time. All of the systems preferred the formation of hydroxyacetone (HYNE). Although the bimetallics that were tested, i.e., Au NPs supported on Ni, Fe and Cu appeared to be more active than the Au/SiO2 system, only Cu supported Au NPs gave high conversion (ca. 63%) and selectivity (ca. 70%) to HYNE. PMID:26580400

  1. Catalytic Gas-Phase Glycerol Processing over SiO2-, Cu-, Ni- and Fe- Supported Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kapkowski, Maciej; Siudyga, Tomasz; Sitko, Rafal; Lelątko, Józef; Szade, Jacek; Balin, Katarzyna; Klimontko, Joanna; Bartczak, Piotr; Polanski, Jaroslaw

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated different metal pairings of Au nanoparticles (NPs) as potential catalysts for glycerol dehydration for the first time. All of the systems preferred the formation of hydroxyacetone (HYNE). Although the bimetallics that were tested, i.e., Au NPs supported on Ni, Fe and Cu appeared to be more active than the Au/SiO2 system, only Cu supported Au NPs gave high conversion (ca. 63%) and selectivity (ca. 70%) to HYNE.

  2. Continuous enzymatic biodiesel production from coconut oil in two-stage packed-bed reactor incorporating an extracting column to remove glycerol formed as by-product.

    PubMed

    Costa E Silva, William; Freitas, Larissa; Oliveira, Pedro C; de Castro, Heizir F

    2016-10-01

    The transesterification of coconut oil with ethanol catalyzed by Burkholderia cepacia lipase immobilized on polysiloxane-polyvinyl alcohol was performed in a continuous flow. The experimental design consisted of a two-stage packed-bed reactor incorporating a column with cationic resin (Lewatit GF 202) to remove the glycerol formed as by-product and the reactor performance was quantified for three different flow rates corresponding to space-times from 10 to 14 h. The influence of space-time on the ethyl ester (FAEE) concentrations, yields and productivities was determined. The reactor operation was demonstrated for space-time of 14 h attaining FAEE concentrations of 58.5 ± 0.87 wt%, FAEE yields of 97.3 ± 1.9 % and productivities of 41.6  ± 1.0 mgester g medium (-1)  h(-1). Biodiesel purified samples showed average kinematic viscosity values of 5.5 ± 0.3 mm(2) s(-1) that meet the criteria established by the American National Standard ASTM (D6751). The immobilized lipase was found to be stable regarding its morphological and catalytic characteristics, showing half-life time (t 1/2) around 1540 h. The continuous packed-bed reactor connected in series with simultaneous glycerol removal has a great potential to attain high level of transesterification yields, raising biodiesel productivity.

  3. Ammonia control in children with urea cycle disorders (UCDs); Phase 2 comparison of sodium phenylbutyrate and glycerol phenylbutyrate☆

    PubMed Central

    Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Diaz, G.A.; Merritt, J.L.; Feigenbaum, A.; Jomphe, C.; Marier, J.F.; Beliveau, M.; Mauney, J.; Dickinson, K.; Martinez, A.; Mokhtarani, M.; Scharschmidt, B.; Rhead, W.

    2016-01-01

    Twenty four hour ammonia profiles and correlates of drug effect were examined in a phase 2 comparison of sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA) and glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB or HPN-100), an investigational drug being developed for urea cycle disorders (UCDs). Study Design Protocol HPN-100-005 involved open label fixed-sequence switch-over from the prescribed NaPBA dose to a PBA-equimolar GPB dose with controlled diet. After 7 days on NaPBA or GPB, subjects underwent 24-hour blood sampling for ammonia and drug metabolite levels as well as measurement of 24-hour urinary phenyacetylglutamine (PAGN). Adverse events (AEs), safety labs and triplicate ECGs were monitored. Results Eleven subjects (9 OTC, 1 ASS, 1 ASL) enrolled and completed the switch-over from NaPBA (mean dose=12.4 g/d or 322 mg/kg/d; range=198–476 mg/kg/d) to GPB (mean dose=10.8 mL or 0.284 mL/kg/d or 313 mg/kg/d; range = 192–449 mg/kg/d). Possibly-related AEs were reported in 2 subjects on NaPBA and 4 subjects on GPB. All were mild, except for one moderate AE of vomiting on GPB related to an intercurrent illness. No clinically significant laboratory or ECG changes were observed. Ammonia was lowest after overnight fast, peaked postprandially in the afternoon to early evening and varied widely over 24 h with occasional values >100 μmol/L without symptoms. Ammonia values were ~25% lower on GPB vs. NaPBA (p ≥ 0.1 for ITT and p<0.05 for per protocol population). The upper 95% confidence interval for the difference between ammonia on GPB vs. NaPBA in the ITT population (95% CI 0.575, 1.061; p = 0.102) was less than the predefined non-inferiority margin of 1.25 and less than 1.0 in the pre-defined per-protocol population (95% CI 0.516, 0.958; p<0.05). No statistically significant differences were observed in plasma phenylacetic acid and PAGN exposure during dosing with GPB vs. NaPBA, and the percentage of orally administered PBA excreted as PAGN (66% for GPB vs. 69% for NaPBA) was very similar. GPB and Na

  4. Enzymatic production of glycerol acetate from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seokhyeon; Park, Chulhwan

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we report the enzymatic production of glycerol acetate from glycerol and methyl acetate. Lipases are essential for the catalysis of this reaction. To find the optimum conditions for glycerol acetate production, sequential experiments were designed. Type of lipase, lipase concentration, molar ratio of reactants, reaction temperature and solvents were investigated for the optimum conversion of glycerol to glycerol acetate. As the result of lipase screening, Novozym 435 (Immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B) was turned out to be the optimal lipase for the reaction. Under the optimal conditions (2.5 g/L of Novozym 435, 1:40 molar ratio of glycerol to methyl acetate, 40 °C and tert-butanol as the solvent), glycerol acetate production was achieved in 95.00% conversion.

  5. Analysis of "solution effects" injury. Equations for calculating phase diagram information for the ternary systems NaCl-dimethylsulfoxide-water and NaCl-glycerol-water.

    PubMed Central

    Fahy, G M

    1980-01-01

    Slowly frozen cells are said to be subject to solution effects injury. An understanding of the mechanism of solution effects injury depends upon an understanding of the compositional changes brought about in the extracellular solution during the freezing process. To facilitate analysis of the mechanisms of freezing injury during slow cooling, empirical equations have been developed which permit a description of these changes in composition for the NaCl-dimethylsulfoxide-water ternary system and for the NaCl-glycerol-water ternary system. The equations describe the region of the phase diagram in which compositional changes are brought about only as a result of the precipitation of ice. The present phase diagram equations may be rearranged to give expression for composition variables such as water content, salt concentration, unfrozen fraction of the solution, etc., which may be employed in the analysis of the relationship between solution composition and solution effects injury. PMID:7260303

  6. Biosynthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol by lipase in dimethyl carbonate as the solvent.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Hwa; Park, Chang-Ho; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2010-11-01

    Glycerol carbonate was synthesized from renewable glycerol and dimethyl carbonate using lipase in solvent-free reaction system in which excess dimethyl carbonate played as the reaction medium. A variety of lipases have been tested for their abilities to catalyze transesterification reaction, and Candida antartica lipase B and Novozyme 435 exhibited higher catalytic activities. The silica-coated glycerol with a 1:1 ratio was supplied to prevent two-phase formation between hydrophobic dimethyl carbonate and hydrophilic glycerol. Glycerol carbonate was successfully synthesized with more than 90% conversion from dimethyl carbonate and glycerol with a molar ratio of 10 using Novozyme 435-catalyzed transesterification at 70 °C. The Novozyme 435 [5% (w/w) and 20% (w/w)] and silica gel were more than four times recycled with good stability in a repeated batch operation for the solvent-free synthesis of glycerol carbonate.

  7. Glycerol derivatives of cutin and suberin monomers: synthesis and self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Douliez, Jean-Paul; Barrault, Joël; Jerome, François; Heredia, Antonio; Navailles, Laurence; Nallet, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    Glycerol derivatives of cutin and suberin monomers were synthesized by acid catalysis. Their dispersion in an aqueous solution was examined by phase contrast microscopy, neutron scattering, and solid state NMR. It is shown that the phase behavior strongly depends on the nature of the derivatives forming either lumps of aggregated membranes or well dispersed membranes.

  8. Ferroelectric Smectic Phase Formed by Achiral Straight Core Mesogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannarius, Ralf; Li, Jianjun; Weissflog, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    We report electro-optic experiments in liquid crystalline freestanding films of achiral hockey stick shaped mesogens with a straight aromatic core. The material forms two smectic mesophases. In the higher temperature phase, a spontaneous polarization exists in the smectic layer plane and the films show polar switching in electric fields. It is the first example of a ferroelectric phase formed by nearly rodlike achiral mesogens. Mirror symmetry of the phase is spontaneously broken. We propose a molecular configuration similar to a synclinic ferroelectric (CSPF) high temperature phase and an anticlinic, probably antiferroelectric (CAPA) low temperature phase.

  9. Sub-Tg features of glasses formed by cooling glycerol under pressure - Additional incompatibility of vibrational with configurational states in the depressurized, high density glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Ove; Johari, G. P.

    2016-11-01

    The vibrational state of a glass is naturally incompatible with its configurational state, which makes the glass structurally unstable. When a glass is kept at constant temperature, both the vibrational and configurational states of a glass change with time until it becomes metastable (equilibrium) liquid and the two states become compatible. The process, known as structural relaxation, occurs at a progressively higher rate during heating, and the properties of a glass change accordingly. We add to this incompatibility by depressurizing a glass that had been formed by cooling a liquid under a high pressure, p, and then investigate the effects of the added incompatibility by studying thermal conductivity, κ , and the heat capacity per unit volume ρ Cp of the depressurized glass. We use glycerol for the purpose and study first the changes in the features of κ and of ρ Cp during glass formation on cooling under a set of different p. We then partially depressurize the glass and study the effect of the p-induced instability on the features of κ and ρ Cp as the glass is isobarically heated to the liquid state. At a given low p, the glass configuration that was formed by cooling at high-p had a higher κ than the glass configuration that was formed by cooling at a low p. The difference is more when the glass is formed at a higher p and/or is depressurized to a lower p. On heating at a low p, its κ decreases before its glass-liquid transition range is reached. The effect is the opposite of the increase in κ observed on heating a glass at the same p under which it was formed. It is caused by thermally assisted loss of the added incompatibility of configurational and vibrational states of a high-p formed glass kept at low p. If a glass formed under a low-p is pressurized and then heated under high p, it would show the opposite effect, i.e., its κ would first increase to its high p value before its glass-to-liquid transition range.

  10. Glycerol citrate polyesters produced through microwave heating

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The influence of various heating methods without catalysis to prepare copolyesters from citric acid:glycerol blends were studied. In the presence of short term microwave treatments, i.e., 60 sec at 1200 W, blends of glycerol and citric acid invariably formed solid amorphous copolyesters. Fourier tra...

  11. Efficient hydrogen production from ethanol and glycerol by vapour-phase reforming processes with new cobalt-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Evandro Brum; de la Piscina, Pilar Ramírez; Homs, Narcís

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biohydrogen production from biofuel-reforming processes using new multi-component bulk-type cobalt-based catalysts. The addition of different components to improve the catalytic performance was studied. Monometallic cobalt catalyst and catalysts containing Ru (ca. 1%) and/or Na (ca. 0.5%) were characterized and tested in the 623-673 K temperature range in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) with a steam/carbon ratio (S/C) of 3. The catalysts showed a high performance for hydrogen production and, except for H(2) and CO(2), only small amounts of by-products were obtained, depending on the temperature and the catalyst used. The catalyst containing both Ru and Na (Co-Ru(Na)) showed the best catalytic behavior in ESR. It operated stably for at least 12 days under cycles of oxidative steam reforming of glycerol/ethanol mixtures (S/C=2) and activation under O(2).

  12. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, Charles W.

    1993-01-01

    Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are 1) the fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, 2) spatial beam forming, and 3) optical beam splitting techniques. Two novel optical beam forming approaches, i.e., the spatial beam forming with a 'smart pixel' spatial light modulator (SLM) and the optical beam splitting approaches are conceived with integrated quasi-optical components. Also presented are the transmit and receive array architectures with the new SLM.

  13. Assemblages: Functional units formed by cellular phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    The partitioning of intracellular space beyond membrane-bound organelles can be achieved with collections of proteins that are multivalent or contain low-complexity, intrinsically disordered regions. These proteins can undergo a physical phase change to form functional granules or other entities within the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm that collectively we term “assemblage.” Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) play an important role in forming a subset of cellular assemblages by promoting phase separation. Recent work points to an involvement of assemblages in disease states, indicating that intrinsic disorder and phase transitions should be considered in the development of therapeutics. PMID:25179628

  14. Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

  15. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  16. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  17. Optical beam forming techniques for phased array antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chandler, C.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional phased array antennas using waveguide or coax for signal distribution are impractical for large scale implementation on satellites or spacecraft because they exhibit prohibitively large system size, heavy weight, high attenuation loss, limited bandwidth, sensitivity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) temperature drifts and phase instability. However, optical beam forming systems are smaller, lighter, and more flexible. Three optical beam forming techniques are identified as applicable to large spaceborne phased array antennas. They are (1) the optical fiber replacement of conventional RF phased array distribution and control components, (2) spatial beam forming, and (3) optical beam splitting with integrated quasi-optical components. The optical fiber replacement and the spatial beam forming approaches were pursued by many organizations. Two new optical beam forming architectures are presented. Both architectures involve monolithic integration of the antenna radiating elements with quasi-optical grid detector arrays. The advantages of the grid detector array in the optical process are the higher power handling capability and the dynamic range. One architecture involves a modified version of the original spatial beam forming approach. The basic difference is the spatial light modulator (SLM) device for controlling the aperture field distribution. The original liquid crystal light valve SLM is replaced by an optical shuffling SLM, which was demonstrated for the 'smart pixel' technology. The advantages are the capability of generating the agile beams of a phased array antenna and to provide simultaneous transmit and receive functions. The second architecture considered is the optical beam splitting approach. This architecture involves an alternative amplitude control for each antenna element with an optical beam power divider comprised of mirrors and beam splitters. It also implements the quasi-optical grid phase shifter for phase control and grid

  18. Dielectric and specific heat relaxations in vapor deposited glycerol.

    PubMed

    Kasina, A; Putzeys, T; Wübbenhorst, M

    2015-12-28

    Recently [S. Capponi, S. Napolitano, and M. Wübbenhorst, Nat. Commun. 3, 1233 (2012)], vapor deposited glasses of glycerol have been found to recover their super-cooled liquid state via a metastable, ordered liquid (MROL) state characterized by a tremendously enhanced dielectric strength along with a slow-down of the relaxation rate of the structural relaxation. To study the calorimetric signature of this phenomenon, we have implemented a chip-based, differential AC calorimeter in an organic molecular beam deposition setup, which allows the simultaneous measurement of dielectric relaxations via interdigitated comb electrodes and specific heat relaxation spectra during deposition and as function of the temperature. Heating of the as-deposited glass just above the bulk Tg and subsequent cooling/reheating revealed a step-wise increase in cp by in total 9%, indicating unambiguously that glycerol, through slow vapour deposition, forms a thermodynamically stable glass, which has a specific heat as low as that of crystalline glycerol. Moreover, these glasses were found to show excellent kinetic stability as well as evidenced by both a high onset-temperature and quasi-isothermal recovery measurements at -75 °C. The second goal of the study was to elucidate the impact of the MROL state on the specific heat and its relaxation to the super-cooled state. Conversion of "MROL glycerol" to its "normal" (ordinary liquid, OL) state revealed a second, small (∼2%) increase of the glassy cp, a little gain (<10%) in the relaxed specific heat, and no signs of deviations of τcal from that of normal "bulk" glycerol. These findings altogether suggest that the MROL state in glycerol comprises largely bulk-type glycerol that coexist with a minor volume fraction (<10%) of PVD-induced structural anomalies with a crystal-like calorimetric signature. Based on the new calorimetric findings, we have proposed a new physical picture that assumes the existence of rigid polar clusters (RPCs

  19. Dielectric and specific heat relaxations in vapor deposited glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasina, A.; Putzeys, T.; Wübbenhorst, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently [S. Capponi, S. Napolitano, and M. Wübbenhorst, Nat. Commun. 3, 1233 (2012)], vapor deposited glasses of glycerol have been found to recover their super-cooled liquid state via a metastable, ordered liquid (MROL) state characterized by a tremendously enhanced dielectric strength along with a slow-down of the relaxation rate of the structural relaxation. To study the calorimetric signature of this phenomenon, we have implemented a chip-based, differential AC calorimeter in an organic molecular beam deposition setup, which allows the simultaneous measurement of dielectric relaxations via interdigitated comb electrodes and specific heat relaxation spectra during deposition and as function of the temperature. Heating of the as-deposited glass just above the bulk Tg and subsequent cooling/reheating revealed a step-wise increase in cp by in total 9%, indicating unambiguously that glycerol, through slow vapour deposition, forms a thermodynamically stable glass, which has a specific heat as low as that of crystalline glycerol. Moreover, these glasses were found to show excellent kinetic stability as well as evidenced by both a high onset-temperature and quasi-isothermal recovery measurements at -75 °C. The second goal of the study was to elucidate the impact of the MROL state on the specific heat and its relaxation to the super-cooled state. Conversion of "MROL glycerol" to its "normal" (ordinary liquid, OL) state revealed a second, small (˜2%) increase of the glassy cp, a little gain (<10%) in the relaxed specific heat, and no signs of deviations of τcal from that of normal "bulk" glycerol. These findings altogether suggest that the MROL state in glycerol comprises largely bulk-type glycerol that coexist with a minor volume fraction (<10%) of PVD-induced structural anomalies with a crystal-like calorimetric signature. Based on the new calorimetric findings, we have proposed a new physical picture that assumes the existence of rigid polar clusters (RPCs) and

  20. Studies of phase transitions in the aripiprazole solid dosage form.

    PubMed

    Łaszcz, Marta; Witkowska, Anna

    2016-01-05

    Studies of the phase transitions in an active substance contained in a solid dosage form are very complicated but essential, especially if an active substance is classified as a BCS Class IV drug. The purpose of this work was the development of sensitive methods for the detection of the phase transitions in the aripiprazole tablets containing initially its form III. Aripiprazole exhibits polymorphism and pseudopolymorphism. Powder diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry methods were developed for the detection of the polymorphic transition between forms III and I as well as the phase transition of form III into aripiprazole monohydrate in tablets. The study involved the initial 10 mg and 30 mg tablets, as well as those stored in Al/Al blisters, a triplex blister pack and HDPE bottles (with and without desiccant) under accelerated and long term conditions. The polymorphic transition was not observed in the initial and stored tablets but it was visible on the DSC curve of the Abilify(®) 10 mg reference tablets. The formation of the monohydrate was observed in the diffractograms and Raman spectra in the tablets stored under accelerated conditions. The monohydrate phase was not detected in the tablets stored in the Al/Al blisters under long term conditions. The results showed that the Al/Al blisters can be recommended as the packaging of the aripiprazole tablets containing form III.

  1. Computational analysis of the potential energy surfaces of glycerol in the gas and aqueous phases: effects of level of theory, basis set, and solvation on strongly intramolecularly hydrogen-bonded systems.

    PubMed

    Callam, C S; Singer, S J; Lowary, T L; Hadad, C M

    2001-11-28

    The 126 possible conformations of 1,2,3-propanetriol (glycerol) have been studied by ab initio molecular orbital and density functional theory calculations in the gas and aqueous phases at multiple levels of theory and basis sets. The partial potential energy surface for glycerol as well as an analysis of the conformational properties and hydrogen-bonding trends in both phases have been obtained. In the gas phase at the G2(MP2) and CBS-QB3 levels of theory, the important, low-energy conformers are structures 100 and 95. In the aqueous phase at the SM5.42/HF/6-31G* level of theory, the lowest energy conformers are structures 95 and 46. Boltzmann distributions have been determined from these high-level calculations, and good agreement is observed when these distributions are compared to the available experimental data. These calculations indicate that the enthalpic and entropic contributions to the Gibbs free energy are important for an accurate determination of the conformational and energetic preferences of glycerol. Different levels of theory and basis sets were used in order to understand the effects of nonbonded interactions (i.e., intramolecular hydrogen bonding). The efficiency of basis set and level of theory in dealing with the issue of intramolecular hydrogen bonding and reproducing the correct energetic and geometrical trends is discussed, especially with relevance to practical computational methods for larger polyhydroxylated compounds, such as oligosaccharides.

  2. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate and alginate from glycerol by Azotobacter vinelandii under nitrogen-free conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yoneyama, Fuminori; Yamamoto, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is an interesting feedstock for biomaterials such as biofuels and bioplastics because of its abundance as a by-product during biodiesel production. Here we demonstrate glycerol metabolism in the nitrogen-fixing species Azotobacter vinelandii through metabolomics and nitrogen-free bacterial production of biopolymers, such as poly-d-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and alginate, from glycerol. Glycerol-3-phosphate was accumulated in A. vinelandii cells grown on glycerol to the exponential phase, and its level drastically decreased in the cells grown to the stationary growth phase. A. vinelandii also overexpressed the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene when it was grown on glycerol. These results indicate that glycerol was first converted to glycerol-3-phosphate by glycerol kinase. Other molecules with industrial interests, such as lactic acid and amino acids including γ-aminobutyric acid, have also been accumulated in the bacterial cells grown on glycerol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that glycerol-grown A. vinelandii stored PHB within the cells. The PHB production level reached 33% per dry cell weight in nitrogen-free glycerol medium. When grown on glycerol, alginate-overproducing mutants generated through chemical mutagenesis produced 2-fold the amount of alginate from glycerol than the parental wild-type strain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial production of biopolymers from glycerol without addition of any nitrogen source. PMID:25880041

  3. Production of polyhydroxybutyrate and alginate from glycerol by Azotobacter vinelandii under nitrogen-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Fuminori; Yamamoto, Mayumi; Hashimoto, Wataru; Murata, Kousaku

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is an interesting feedstock for biomaterials such as biofuels and bioplastics because of its abundance as a by-product during biodiesel production. Here we demonstrate glycerol metabolism in the nitrogen-fixing species Azotobacter vinelandii through metabolomics and nitrogen-free bacterial production of biopolymers, such as poly-d-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and alginate, from glycerol. Glycerol-3-phosphate was accumulated in A. vinelandii cells grown on glycerol to the exponential phase, and its level drastically decreased in the cells grown to the stationary growth phase. A. vinelandii also overexpressed the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene when it was grown on glycerol. These results indicate that glycerol was first converted to glycerol-3-phosphate by glycerol kinase. Other molecules with industrial interests, such as lactic acid and amino acids including γ-aminobutyric acid, have also been accumulated in the bacterial cells grown on glycerol. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that glycerol-grown A. vinelandii stored PHB within the cells. The PHB production level reached 33% per dry cell weight in nitrogen-free glycerol medium. When grown on glycerol, alginate-overproducing mutants generated through chemical mutagenesis produced 2-fold the amount of alginate from glycerol than the parental wild-type strain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on bacterial production of biopolymers from glycerol without addition of any nitrogen source.

  4. Triblock polyphiles through click chemistry: self-assembled thermotropic cubic phases formed by micellar and monolayer vesicular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiaoping; Kong, Leiyang; Dai, Heng; Cheng, Xiaohong; Liu, Feng; Tschierske, Carsten

    2013-11-25

    Three series of triblock polyphiles consisting of a rigid 4-phenyl-1,2,3-triazole or 1,4-diphenyl-1,2,3-triazole core with three lipophilic and flexible alkoxyl chains at one end and a polar glycerol group at the opposite end were synthesized by copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne click reactions. Their mesophase behavior was studied by polarizing optical microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and XRD. Depending on alkyl chain length and core length, a transition from hexagonal columnar to Pm3n-type cubic phases was observed. In the cubic phases, the molecules are organized as spherical objects. Remarkably, compounds with a longer core unit have a higher tendency to form these cubic phases, and their stability is strongly enhanced over those of the compounds with a shorter core, despite longer cores having a smaller cone angle and therefore being expected to disfavor the formation of spherical objects. There is a large difference in the number of molecules involved in the spherical aggregates formed by compounds with long and short cores. Whereas the aggregates in the cubic phases of the compounds with short rod units are small and could be regarded as micellar, the long-core compounds form much larger aggregates which are regarded as a kind of monolayer vesicular aggregate.

  5. Formed platelet combustor liner construction feasibility, phase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, W. A.; Janke, D. E.

    1992-09-01

    Environments generated in high pressure liquid rocket engines impose severe requirements on regeneratively cooled combustor liners. Liners fabricated for use in high chamber pressures using conventional processes suffer from limitations that can impair operational cycle life and can adversely affect wall compatibility. Chamber liners fabricated using formed platelet technology provide an alternative to conventional regeneratively cooled liners (an alternative that has many attractive benefits). A formed platelet liner is made from a stacked assembly of platelets with channel features. The assembly is diffusion bonded into a flat panel and then three-dimensionally formed into a section of a chamber. Platelet technology permits the liner to have very precisely controlled and thin hot gas walls and therefore increased heat transfer efficiency. Further cooling efficiencies can be obtained through enhanced design flexibility. These advantages translate into increased cycle life and enhanced wall compatibility. The increased heat transfer efficiency can alternately be used to increase engine performance or turbopump life as a result of pressure drop reductions within the regeneratively cooled liner. Other benefits can be obtained by varying the materials of construction within the platelet liner to enhance material compatibility with operating environment or with adjoining components. Manufacturing cost savings are an additional benefit of a formed platelet liner. This is because of reduced touch labor and reduced schedule when compared to conventional methods of manufacture. The formed platelet technology is not only compatible with current state-of-the art combustion chamber structural support and manifolding schemes, it is also an enabling technology that allows the use of other high performance and potentially low cost methods of construction for the entire combustion chamber assembly. The contract under which this report is submitted contains three phases: (1) phase

  6. Formed platelet combustor liner construction feasibility, phase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, W. A.; Janke, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Environments generated in high pressure liquid rocket engines impose severe requirements on regeneratively cooled combustor liners. Liners fabricated for use in high chamber pressures using conventional processes suffer from limitations that can impair operational cycle life and can adversely affect wall compatibility. Chamber liners fabricated using formed platelet technology provide an alternative to conventional regeneratively cooled liners (an alternative that has many attractive benefits). A formed platelet liner is made from a stacked assembly of platelets with channel features. The assembly is diffusion bonded into a flat panel and then three-dimensionally formed into a section of a chamber. Platelet technology permits the liner to have very precisely controlled and thin hot gas walls and therefore increased heat transfer efficiency. Further cooling efficiencies can be obtained through enhanced design flexibility. These advantages translate into increased cycle life and enhanced wall compatibility. The increased heat transfer efficiency can alternately be used to increase engine performance or turbopump life as a result of pressure drop reductions within the regeneratively cooled liner. Other benefits can be obtained by varying the materials of construction within the platelet liner to enhance material compatibility with operating environment or with adjoining components. Manufacturing cost savings are an additional benefit of a formed platelet liner. This is because of reduced touch labor and reduced schedule when compared to conventional methods of manufacture. The formed platelet technology is not only compatible with current state-of-the art combustion chamber structural support and manifolding schemes, it is also an enabling technology that allows the use of other high performance and potentially low cost methods of construction for the entire combustion chamber assembly. The contract under which this report is submitted contains three phases: (1) phase

  7. Phases formed during rapid quenching of liquid carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basharin, A. Yu.; Dozhdikov, V. S.; Dubinchuk, V. T.; Kirillin, A. V.; Lysenko, I. Yu.; Turchaninov, M. A.

    2009-05-01

    Pulsed laser action upon a sample of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) in a gasostat filled with helium at a pressure above that corresponding to the triple point of carbon, followed by rapid quenching of the liquid phase at a rate of about 106 K/s leads to the formation of a crater with a periodic spatial structure at the surface. The composition and structure of nongraphite carbon phases in the near-surface region of the crater have been studied using the Raman scattering spectroscopy, electron microdiffraction, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. It is established that rapidly quenched carbon possesses predominantly a hybrid structure of glassy carbon formed as a result of the high-temperature treatment, with inclusions of crystalline carbyne, chaoite, and a hybrid cubic phase of ultradense carbon (C8). The hybrid phases of glassy carbon and C8 had not been reported until now as possible products of solidification of liquid carbon.

  8. Synthesis of prebiotic glycerol in interstellar ices.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Ralf I; Maity, Surajit; Jones, Brant M

    2015-01-02

    Contemporary mechanisms for the spontaneous formation of glycerol have not been able to explain its existence on early Earth. The exogenous origin and delivery of organic molecules to early Earth presents an alternative route to their terrestrial in situ formation since biorelevant molecules like amino acids, carboxylic acids, and alkylphosphonic acids have been recovered from carbonaceous chondrites. Reported herein is the first in situ identification of glycerol, the key building block of all cellular membranes, formed by exposure of methanol-based - interstellar model ices to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons. These results provide compelling evidence that the radiation-induced formation of glycerol in low-temperature interstellar model ices is facile. Synthesized on interstellar grains and eventually incorporated into the "building material" of solar systems, biorelevant molecules such as glycerol could have been dispensed to habitable planets such as early Earth by comets and meteorites.

  9. Glycine phases formed from frozen aqueous solutions: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surovtsev, N. V.; Adichtchev, S. V.; Malinovsky, V. K.; Ogienko, A. G.; Drebushchak, V. A.; Manakov, A. Yu.; Ancharov, A. I.; Yunoshev, A. S.; Boldyreva, E. V.

    2012-08-01

    Glycine phases formed when aqueous solutions were frozen and subsequently heated under different conditions were studied by Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Crystallization of ice Ih was observed in all the cases. On cooling at the rates of 0.5 K/min and 5 K/min, glassy glycine was formed as an intermediate phase which lived about 1 min or less only, and then transformed into β-polymorph of glycine. Quench cooling of glycine solutions (15% w/w) in liquid nitrogen resulted in the formation of a mixture of crystalline water ice Ih and a glassy glycine, which could be preserved at cryogenic temperatures (80 K) for an indefinitely long time. This mixture remained also quite stable for some time after heating above the cryogenic temperature. Subsequent heating under various conditions resulted in the transformation of the glycine glass into an unknown crystalline phase (glycine "X-phase") at 209-216 K, which at 218-226 K transformed into β-polymorph of glycine. The "X-phase" was characterized by Raman spectroscopy; it could be obtained in noticeable amounts using a special preparation technique and tentatively characterized by x-ray powder diffraction (P2, a = 6.648 Å, b = 25.867 Å, c = 5.610 Å, β = 113.12°); the formation of "X-phase" from the glycine glassy phase and its transformation into β-polymorph were followed by DSC. Raman scattering technique with its power for unambiguous identification of the crystalline and glassy polymorphs without limitation on the crystallite size helped us to follow the phase transformations during quenching, heating, and annealing. The experimental findings are considered in relation to the problem of control of glycine polymorphism on crystallization.

  10. Glycerol combustion and emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the growing capacity in biodiesel production and the resulting glut of the glycerol by-product, there is increasing interest in finding alternative uses for crude glycerol. One option may be to burn it locally for combined process heat and power, replacing fossil fuels and i...

  11. Glycerol combustion and emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the growing capacity in biodiesel production and the resulting glut of the glycerol by-product, there is increasing interest in finding alternative uses for crude glycerol. One option may be to burn it locally for combined process heat and power, replacing fossil fuels and i...

  12. Improvement of shikimic acid production in Escherichia coli with growth phase-dependent regulation in the biosynthetic pathway from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Yi; Hung, Wen-Pin; Tsai, Shu-Hsien

    2017-02-01

    Shikimic acid is an important metabolic intermediate with various applications. This paper presents a novel control strategy for the construction of shikimic acid producing strains, without completely blocking the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways. Growth phase-dependent expression and gene deletion was performed to regulate the aroK gene expression in the shikimic acid producing Escherichia coli strain, SK4/rpsM. In this strain, the aroL and aroK genes were deleted, and the aroB, aroG*, ppsA, and tktA genes were overexpressed. The relative amount of shikimic acid that accumulated in SK4/rpsM was 1.28-fold higher than that in SK4/pLac. Furthermore, a novel shikimic acid production pathway, combining the expression of the dehydroquinate dehydratase-shikimate dehydrogenase (DHQ-SDH) enzyme from woody plants, was constructed in E. coli strains. The results demonstrated that a growth phase-dependent control of the aroK gene leads to higher SA accumulation (5.33 g/L) in SK5/pSK6. This novel design can achieve higher shikimic acid production by using the same amount of medium used by the current methods and can also be widely used for modifying other metabolic pathways.

  13. Continual production of glycerol from carbon dioxide by Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    PubMed

    Chow, Yvonne Y S; Goh, Serena J M; Su, Ziheng; Ng, Daphne H P; Lim, Chan Yuen; Lim, Natalie Y N; Lin, Huixin; Fang, Lei; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2013-05-01

    Microalgae have high photosynthetic efficiencies and produce many valuable compounds from carbon dioxide. The Dunaliella genus accumulates glycerol, yet no commercial process currently exists for glycerol production from this microalga. Here it was found that in addition to intracellular accumulation, Dunaliella tertiolecta also releases glycerol into the external medium continuously, forming a large and stable carbon pool. The process is not affected by nutrient starvation or onset of cell death. Carbon dioxide was fixed at a constant rate, the bulk of it being channelled to extracellular glycerol (82%), resulting in enhanced photosynthetic carbon assimilation of 5 times that used for biomass production. The final extracellular glycerol concentration was 34 times the maximum concentration of intracellular glycerol; the latter declined further during cell death. Findings from this work will assist in the development of a bioconversion process to produce glycerol using D. tertiolecta without the need for cell harvest or disruption. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gas Phase Hydration of Methyl Glyoxal to Form the Gemdiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Axson, Jessica L.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-06-01

    Methylglyoxal is a known oxidation product of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Earth's atmosphere. While the gas phase chemistry of methylglyoxal is fairly well understood, its modeled concentration and role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) continues to be controversial. The gas phase hydration of methylglyoxal to form a gemdiol has not been widely considered for water-restricted environments such as the atmosphere. However, this process may have important consequences for the atmospheric processing of VOCs. We will report on spectroscopic work done in the Vaida laboratory studying the hydration of methylglyoxal and discuss the implications for understanding the atmospheric processing and fate of methylglyoxal and similar molecules.

  15. Hydration of Gas-Phase Ions Formed by Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cruz, Sandra E.; Klassen, John S.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    The hydration of gas-phase ions produced by electrospray ionization was investigated. Evidence that the hydrated ions are formed by two mechanisms is presented. First, solvent condensation during the expansion inside the electrospray source clearly occurs. Second, some solvent evaporation from more extensively solvated ions or droplets is apparent. To the extent that these highly solvated ions have solution-phase structures, then the final isolated gas-phase structure of the ion will be determined by the solvent evaporation process. This process was investigated for hydrated gramicidin S in a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. Unimolecular dissociation rate constants of isolated gramicidin S ions with between 2 and 14 associated water molecules were measured. These rate constants increased from 16 to 230 s−1 with increasing hydration, with smaller values corresponding to magic numbers. PMID:10497808

  16. Phase change thermal storage materials with crust forming stabilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Telkes, M.

    1980-02-05

    A body for the storage of heat or for the storage of coolness is, in its solid phase, a conglomerate of a mass of crystalline particles of a salt-hydrate, and a rigid cellular support structure in the form of a crust formed by a chemical reaction with the surfaces of the crystalline particles. By way of example , strontium nitrate is reacted with uniformly sized crystalline particles of sodium sulfate decahydrate to form an integral support crust structure of the compound strontium sulfate, which compound is insoluble in water. When the crystalline particles are transformed to the liquid phase, the liquid is confined within the cells of the support structure. The body is enclosed in a moisture impermeable skin to prevent evaporation of the water of crystallization in the liquid phase. Several methods of fabricating such a body are disclosed, including the mixing of the crystalline particles with a solution of soluble strontium nitrate in sufficient quantity to provide the desired supporting crust structure, pouring that mixture into a suitable mold, and providing the desired moisture impervious skin for the cast.

  17. Mathematical modeling of glycerol biotransformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova-Krumova, Petya; Yankova, Sofia; Ilieva, Biliana

    2013-12-01

    A method for mathematical modeling of glycerol biotransformation by Klebsiella oxytoca is presented. Glycerol is a renewable resource for it is formed as a by-product during biodiesel production. Because of its large volume production, it seems to be a good idea to develop a technology that converts this waste into products of high value (1, 3-Propanediol; 2, 3-Butanediol). The kinetic model of this process consists of many equations and parameters. The minimization of the least square function will be used for model parameters identification. In cases of parameters identification in multiparameter models the minimization of the least square function is very difficult because it is multiextremal. This is the main problem in the multiextremal function minimization which will be solved on the base a hierarchical approach, using a polynomial approximation of the experimental data.

  18. Synthesis and mass spectrometry of 1-acyl and 3-acyl-sn-glycerol carbonates.

    PubMed

    Oehlenschläger, J; Gercken, G

    1978-08-01

    sn-Glycerol-1,2-carbonate was prepared fromD-serine,sn-glycerol-2,3-carbonate fromL-serine, via 1-0- or 3-0-benzyl-sn-glycerol, respectively.sn-Glycerol-2,3-carbonate was also prepared fromD-mannitol orD-serine following thesn-glycerol-3-β,β,β-trichloroethylcarbonate route.sn-Glycerol-1,2-carbonate andsn-glycerol-2,3-carbonate were acylated with saturated and unsaturated fatty acid chlorides to form 3-acyl-sn-glycerol-1,2-carbonates and 1-acyl-sn-glycerol-2,3-carbonates, respectively. The mass spectra of the enantiomeric monoacyl-sn-glycerol carbonates showed molecular ions and acyl cations (RCO(+)) of high intensity. The heterocyclic dioxolan-2-one ring was remarkably stable during electron impact.

  19. Chemistry in a Forming Protoplanetary Disk: Main Accretion Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Haruaki; Tsukamoto, Yusuke; Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the chemistry in a radiation-hydrodynamics model of a star-forming core that evolves from a cold (∼10 K) prestellar core to the main accretion phase in ∼105 years. A rotationally supported gravitationally unstable disk is formed around a protostar. We extract the temporal variation of physical parameters in ∼1.5 × 103 SPH particles that end up in the disk, and perform post-processing calculations of the gas-grain chemistry adopting a three-phase model. Inside the disk, the SPH particles migrate both inward and outward. Since a significant fraction of volatiles such as CO can be trapped in the water-dominant ice in the three-phase model, the ice mantle composition depends not only on the current position in the disk, but also on whether the dust grain has ever experienced higher temperatures than the water sublimation temperature. Stable molecules such as H2O, CH4, NH3, and CH3OH are already abundant at the onset of gravitational collapse and are simply sublimated as the fluid parcels migrate inside the water snow line. On the other hand, various molecules such as carbon chains and complex organic molecules (COMs) are formed in the disk. The COMs abundance sensitively depends on the outcomes of photodissociation and diffusion rates of photofragments in bulk ice mantle. As for S-bearing species, H2S ice is abundant in the collapse phase. In the warm regions in the disk, H2S is sublimated to be destroyed, while SO, H2CS, OCS, and SO2 become abundant.

  20. Glycerol monooleate-blood interactions.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Emma M; Faxälv, Lars; Weissenrieder, Anna; Askendal, Agneta; Lindahl, Tomas L; Tengvall, Pentti

    2009-01-01

    In the present study the initial blood compatibility of glycerol monooleate (GMO)-coated surfaces was evaluated after deposition to surfaces and in bulk. The model surface was silica onto which multiple layers of fibrinogen or human serum albumin (HSA) was immobilized. The protein-coated surfaces were subsequently dip-coated in GMO in ethanol and used for blood plasma and whole blood experiments. The characterization methods included null ellipsometry, scanning electron microscopy, imaging of coagulation, hemolysis test and whole blood coagulation time by free oscillation rheometry. The results showed a GMO film thickness of approximately 350 A (approximately 4 microg/cm(2)) upon dip-coating in ethanolic solution. A major part of the deposited layer detached in aqueous solutions, especially during shear conditions. The coagulation time on GMO was significantly prolonged compared to that on HSA coated silica. Whole blood tests showed that GMO is a very weak hemolytic agent. Deposited GMO detached easily from surfaces upon rinsing or shearing, although a stable layer with undefined phase structure and a thickness of 50-70 A remained on HSA and fibrinogen precoated surfaces. This indicates that GMO has stronger adhesive forces to its substrate compared to the cohesive forces acting within the bulk GMO. The ability of GMO to detach from itself and tentatively form micelles or lipid bilayers when subjected to flowing blood may be of use in extravascular applications. It is concluded that GMO results in weak blood activation, and the material may in spite of this be suitable in selected biomaterial applications, especially as a biosealant and in colloidal dispersions.

  1. Glycerol uptake is by passive diffusion in the heart but by facilitated transport in RBCs at high glycerol levels in cold acclimated rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax).

    PubMed

    Clow, Kathy A; Driedzic, William R

    2012-04-15

    Rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax) is a small fish that accumulates glycerol at low winter seawater temperatures. In laboratory-held fish, glycerol concentration typically reaches 225 mM in plasma and in all cells. Glycerol uptake by the heart and red blood cells (RBCs) was assessed by tracking [(14)C(U)]glycerol into the acid-soluble pool. In fish acclimated to 9-10°C a decrease in perfusion/incubation temperature from 8 to 1°C resulted in a decrease in glycerol uptake with a Q(10) of 3.2 in heart and 2.4 in RBCs. Acclimation to ∼1.5°C did not result in an adaptive enhancement of glycerol uptake as rates were unchanged in heart and RBCs. Glycerol uptake at 1°C was by passive diffusion in heart as evidenced by a linear relationship between glycerol uptake and extracellular glycerol concentration and a lack of inhibition by phloretin. In contrast, in RBCs, glycerol uptake with respect to glycerol concentration showed two linear relationships with a transition point around 50 mM extracellular glycerol. The slope of the second phase was much steeper and eliminated with the inclusion of phloretin. In RBCs from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), a related species that does not accumulate glycerol, glycerol uptake showed only a single linear curve and was not inhibited by phloretin. The data imply a strong facilitated component to glycerol uptake in rainbow smelt RBCs at high glycerol concentrations. We propose this is related to cyclic changes in RBC glycerol content involving a loss of glycerol at the gill and a reaccumulation during passage through the liver.

  2. Photorefractive phased array antenna beam-forming processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarto, Anthony W.; Wagner, Kelvin H.; Weverka, Robert T.; Blair, Steven M.; Weaver, Samuel P.

    1996-11-01

    A high bandwidth, large degree-of-freedom photorefractive phased-array antenna beam-forming processor which uses 3D dynamic volume holograms in photorefractive crystals to time integrate the adaptive weights to perform beam steering and jammer-cancellation signal-processing tasks is described. The processor calculates the angle-of-arrival of a desired signal of interest and steers the antenna pattern in the direction of this desired signal by forming a dynamic holographic grating proportional to the correlation between the incoming signal of interest from the antenna array and the temporal waveform of the desired signal. Experimental results of main-beam formation and measured array-functions are presented in holographic index grating and the resulting processor output.

  3. Biosynthesis of 1,3-propanediol from recombinant E. coli by optimization process using pure and crude glycerol as a sole carbon source under two-phase fermentation system.

    PubMed

    Rujananon, Rosarin; Prasertsan, Poonsuk; Phongdara, Amornrat

    2014-04-01

    The environmental and nutritional condition for 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) production by the novel recombinant E. coli BP41Y3 expressing fusion protein were first optimized using conventional approach. The optimum environmental conditions were: initial pH at 8.0, incubation at 37 °C without shaking and agitation. Among ten nutrient variables, fumarate, (NH₄)₂HPO₄ and peptone were selected to study on their interaction effect using the response surface methodology. The optimum medium contained modified Riesenberg medium (containing pure glycerol as a sole carbon source) supplemented with 63.65 mM fumarate, 3.80 g/L (NH₄)₂HPO₄ and 1.12 g/L peptone, giving the maximum 1,3-PD production of 2.43 g/L. This was 3.5-fold higher than the original medium (0.7 g/L). Two-phase cultivation system was conducted and the effect of pH control (at 6.5, 7.0 and 8.0) was investigated under anaerobic condition by comparing with the no pH control condition. The cultivation system without pH control (initial pH of 8.0) gave the maximum values of 1.65 g/L 1,3-PD, the 1,3-PD production rate of 0.13 g/L h and the yield of 0.31 mol 1,3-PD/mol crude glycerol. Hence, using crude glycerol as a sole carbon source resulted in 32 % lower 1,3-PD production from this recombinant strain that may be due to the presence of various impurities in the crude glycerol of biodiesel plant. In addition, succinic acid was found to be a major product during fermentation by giving the maximum concentration of 11.92 g/L after 24 h anaerobic cultivation.

  4. Minerals form a continuum phase in mature cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yu; Toroian, Damon; Price, Paul A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2011-05-01

    Bone is a hierarchically structured composite consisting of a protein phase (type I collagen) and a mineral phase (carbonated apatite). The objective of this study was to investigate the hierarchical structure of mineral in mature bone. A method to completely deproteinize bone without altering the original structure is developed, and the completion is confirmed by protein analysis techniques. Stereoscopy and field emission electron microscopy are used to examine the structural features from submillimeter- to micrometer- to nanometer-length scales of bovine femur cancellous bone. Stereoscopic images of fully deproteinized and demineralized bovine femur cancellous bone samples show that fine trabecular architecture is unaltered and the microstructural features are preserved, indicating the structural integrity of mineral and protein constituents. SEM revealed that bone minerals are fused together and form a sheet-like structure in a coherent manner with collagen fibrils. Well-organized pore systems are observed at varying hierarchical levels. Mineral sheets are peeled off and folded after compressive deformation, implying strong connection between individual crystallites. Results were compared with commercially available heat-deproteinized bone (Bio-Oss(®)), and evidence showed consistency in bone mineral structure. A two-phase interpenetrating composite model of mature bone is proposed and discussed.

  5. Glycerol-induced hyperhydration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedesel, Marvin L.; Lyons, Timothy P.; Mcnamara, M. Colleen

    1991-01-01

    Maintenance of euhydration is essential for maximum work performance. Environments which induce hypohydration reduce plasma volume and cardiovascular performance progressively declines as does work capacity. Hyperhydration prior to exposure to dehydrating environments appears to be a potential countermeasure to the debilitating effects of hypohydration. The extravascular fluid space, being the largest fluid compartment in the body, is the most logical space by which significant hyperhydration can be accomplished. Volume and osmotic receptors in the vascular space result in physiological responses which counteract hyperhydration. Our hypothesis is that glycerol-induced hyperhydration (GIH) can accomplish extravascular fluid expansion because of the high solubility of glycerol in lipid and aqueous media. A hypertonic solution of glycerol is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, results in mild increases in plasma osmolality and is distributed to 65 percent of the body mass. A large volume of water ingested within minutes after glycerol intake results in increased total body water because of the osmotic action and distribution of glycerol. The resulting expanded extravascular fluid space can act as a reservoir to maintain plasma volume during exposure to dehydrating environments. The fluid shifts associated with exposure to microgravity result in increased urine production and is another example of an environment which induces hypohydration. Our goal is to demonstrate that GIH will facilitate maintenance of euhydration and cardiovascular performance during space flight and upon return to a 1 g environment.

  6. Effect of glycerol on formation, stability, and properties of vitamin-E enriched nanoemulsions produced using spontaneous emulsification.

    PubMed

    Saberi, Amir Hossein; Fang, Yuan; McClements, David Julian

    2013-12-01

    Oil-in-water nanoemulsions are finding increasing use as delivery systems to encapsulate lipophilic bioactive components in functional food, personal care, and pharmaceutical products. We investigated the influence of a water-soluble cosolvent (glycerol) on the formation, stability, and properties of vitamin E acetate-loaded nanoemulsions (VE-NEs) prepared by spontaneous emulsification. VE-NEs were formed by titration of a mixture of vitamin E acetate, carrier oil (MCT) and non-ionic surfactant (Tween 80) into an aqueous glycerol solution with continuous mixing. Cosolvent concentration had an appreciable effect on the particle size produced, with the smallest mean droplet diameters (d<50 nm) being formed at 40 and 50 wt% glycerol. Nanoemulsions (d<100 nm) containing 10% vitamin E acetate could be produced at relatively low surfactant concentrations (5%) using these high glycerol levels. The turbidity of the NEs decreased at high glycerol concentrations due to the reduction in droplet size and refractive index contrast. The long-term stability of the VE-NEs was strongly influenced by glycerol concentration and storage temperature. VE-NEs containing 40% glycerol were relatively stable to droplet growth when stored at 5 and 20°C, but a rapid increase in droplet size and turbidity occurred during storage at 37°C. Temperature scanning experiments (20-80-20°C) indicated that a steep and irreversible increase in turbidity occurred during heating, which was around 70°C in the absence of glycerol and 60°C in the presence of 40% glycerol. Droplet instability was attributed to an increase in the rate of Ostwald ripening and/or coalescence as the temperature was increased, associated with dehydration of the non-ionic surfactant head-group leading to a reduction in phase inversion temperature. Dilution (100×) of VE-NEs containing glycerol with water considerably improved their stability to droplet growth, especially at high storage temperatures. This study provides

  7. High Energy Rate Forming Induced Phase Transition in Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, T.; Kuzsella, L.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the effects of explosion hardening on the microstructure and the hardness of austenitic stainless steel have been studied. The optimum explosion hardening technology of austenitic stainless steel was researched. In case of the explosive hardening used new idea means indirect hardening setup. Austenitic stainless steels have high plasticity and can be cold formed easily. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Upon the explosion impact, the deformation mechanism indicates a plastic deformation and this deformation induces a phase transformation (martensite). The explosion hardening enhances the mechanical properties of the material, includes the wear resistance and hardness [1]. In case of indirect hardening as function of the setup parameters specifically the flayer plate position the hardening increased differently. It was find a relationship between the explosion hardening setup and the hardening level.

  8. Method for forming single phase, single crystalline 2122 BCSCO superconductor thin films by liquid phase epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, Raghvendra K. (Inventor); Raina, Kanwal (Inventor); Solayappan, Narayanan (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A substantially single phase, single crystalline, highly epitaxial film of Bi.sub.2 CaSr.sub.2 Cu.sub.2 O.sub.8 superconductor which has a T.sub.c (zero resistance) of 83 K is provided on a lattice-matched substrate with no intergrowth. This film is produced by a Liquid Phase Epitaxy method which includes the steps of forming a dilute supercooled molten solution of a single phase superconducting mixture of oxides of Bi, Ca, Sr, and Cu having an atomic ratio of about 2:1:2:2 in a nonreactive flux such as KCl, introducing the substrate, e.g., NdGaO.sub.3, into the molten solution at 850.degree. C., cooling the solution from 850.degree. C. to 830.degree. C. to grow the film and rapidly cooling the substrate to room temperature to maintain the desired single phase, single crystalline film structure.

  9. Oxidation of Alumina-Forming MAX Phases in Turbine Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James; Garg, Anita; Harder, Bryan; Nesbitt, James; Gabb, Timothy; Gray, SImon

    2017-01-01

    Protective coatings for high temperature turbine components are based on YSZ thermal barriers and oxidation resistant, alumina-forming NiAl or NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Ti2AlC and Cr2AlC MAX phases are thus of special interest because of good oxidation resistance and CTE that can match Al2O3 and YSZ. Their alumina scales grow according to cubic kinetics due to grain growth in the scale, with initial heating dominated by fast TiO2 growth. Protective cubic kinetics are also found in high pressure burner rig tests of MAXthal 211 Ti2AlC, but with reduced rates due to volatile TiO(OH)2 formation in water vapor. YSZ-coatings on bulk Ti2AlC exhibit remarkable durability up to 1300C in furnace tests and at least a 25x life advantage compared to superalloys. At another extreme, Cr2AlC is resistant to low temperature Na2SO4 hot corrosion and exhibits thermal cycling stability bonded to a superalloy disk material. Accordingly, sputtered Cr2AlC coatings on disk specimens prevented hot corrosion detriments on LCF. Breakaway oxidation (Ti2AlC), scale spallation (Cr2AlC), interdiffusion, and processing as coatings still present serious challenges. However the basic properties of MAX phases provide some unusual opportunities for use in high temperature turbines.

  10. Phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Xu, Zhiguang; Cai, Zengxiao; Guo, Qipeng

    2015-06-28

    Herein, we report the phase inversion of ionomer-stabilized emulsions to form high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) induced by salt concentration and pH changes. The ionomers are sulfonated polystyrenes (SPSs) with different sulfonation degrees. The emulsion types were determined by conductivity measurements, confocal microscopy and optical microscopy, and the formation of HIPE organogels was verified by the tube-inversion method and rheological measurements. SPSs with high sulfonation degrees (water-soluble) and low sulfonation degrees (water-insoluble) can stabilize oil-in-water emulsions; these emulsions were transformed into water-in-oil HIPEs by varying salt concentrations and/or changing the pH. SPS, with a sulfonation degree of 11.6%, is the most efficient, and as low as 0.2 (w/v)% of the organic phase is enough to stabilize the HIPEs. Phase inversion of the oil-in-water emulsions occurred to form water-in-oil HIPEs by increasing the salt concentration in the aqueous phase. Two phase inversion points from oil-in-water emulsions to water-in-oil HIPEs were observed at pH 1 and 13. Moreover, synergetic effects between the salt concentration and pH changes occurred upon the inversion of the emulsion type. The organic phase can be a variety of organic solvents, including toluene, xylene, chloroform, dichloroethane, dichloromethane and anisole, as well as monomers such as styrene, butyl acrylate, methyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. Poly(HIPEs) were successfully prepared by the polymerization of monomers as the continuous phase in the ionomer-stabilized HIPEs.

  11. Synthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and urea with gold-based catalysts.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Ceri; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose A; Ab Rahim, Mohd Hasbi; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Jenkins, Robert L; Carley, Albert F; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J; Knight, David W; Hutchings, Graham J

    2011-04-21

    The reaction of glycerol with urea to form glycerol carbonate is mostly reported in the patent literature and to date there have been very few fundamental studies of the reaction mechanism. Furthermore, most previous studies have involved homogeneous catalysts whereas the identification of heterogeneous catalysts for this reaction would be highly beneficial. This is a very attractive reaction that utilises two inexpensive and readily available raw materials in a chemical cycle that overall, results in the chemical fixation of CO(2). This reaction also provides a route to up-grade waste glycerol produced in large quantities during the production of biodiesel. Previous reports are largely based on the utilisation of high concentrations of metal sulfates or oxides, which suffer from low intrinsic activity and selectivity. We have identified heterogeneous catalysts based on gallium, zinc, and gold supported on a range of oxides and the zeolite ZSM-5, which facilitate this reaction. The addition of each component to ZSM-5 leads to an increase in the reaction yield towards glycerol carbonate, but supported gold catalysts display the highest activity. For gold-based catalysts, MgO is the support of choice. Catalysts have been characterised by XRD, TEM, STEM and XPS, and the reaction has been studied with time-on-line analysis of products via a combination of FT-IR spectroscopy, HPLC, (13)C NMR and GC-MS analysis to evaluate the reaction pathway. Our proposed mechanism suggests that glycerol carbonate forms via the cyclization of a 2,3-dihydroxypropyl carbamate and that a subsequent reaction of glycerol carbonate with urea yields the carbamate of glycerol carbonate. Stability and reactivity studies indicate that consecutive reactions of glycerol carbonate can limit the selectivity achieved and reaction conditions can be selected to avoid this. The effect of the catalyst in the proposed mechanism is discussed.

  12. Re-evaluation of glycerol utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: characterization of an isolate that grows on glycerol without supporting supplements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycerol has attracted attention as a carbon source for microbial production processes due to the large amounts of crude glycerol waste resulting from biodiesel production. The current knowledge about the genetics and physiology of glycerol uptake and catabolism in the versatile industrial biotechnology production host Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been mainly based on auxotrophic laboratory strains, and carried out in the presence of growth-supporting supplements such as amino acids and nucleic bases. The latter may have resulted in ambiguous conclusions concerning glycerol growth in this species. The purpose of this study was to re-evaluate growth of S. cerevisiae in synthetic glycerol medium without the addition of supplements. Results Initial experiments showed that prototrophic versions of the laboratory strains CEN.PK, W303, and S288c did not exhibit any growth in synthetic glycerol medium without supporting supplements. However, a screening of 52 S. cerevisiae isolates for growth in the same medium revealed a high intraspecies diversity. Within this group significant variation with respect to the lag phase and maximum specific growth rate was observed. A haploid segregant of one good glycerol grower (CBS 6412-13A) was selected for detailed analysis. Single deletions of the genes encoding for the glycerol/H+ symporter (STL1), the glycerol kinase (GUT1), and the mitochondrial FAD+-dependent glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GUT2) abolished glycerol growth in this strain, implying that it uses the same glycerol utilization pathway as previously identified in auxotrophic laboratory strains. Segregant analysis of a cross between CBS 6412-13A and CEN.PK113-1A revealed that the glycerol growth phenotype is a quantitative trait. Genetic linkage and reciprocal hemizygosity analysis demonstrated that GUT1 CBS 6412-13A is one of the multiple genetic loci contributing to the glycerol growth phenotype. Conclusion The S. cerevisiae intraspecies diversity

  13. Unilamellar DMPC Vesicles in Aqueous Glycerol: Preferential Interactions and Thermochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Glycerol is accumulated in response to environmental stresses in a diverse range of organisms. Understanding of favorable in vivo effects of this solute requires insight into its interactions with biological macromolecules, and one access to this information is the quantification of so-called preferential interactions in glycerol-biopolymer solutions. For model membrane systems, preferential interactions have been discussed, but not directly measured. Hence, we have applied a new differential vapor pressure equipment to quantify the isoosmotic preferential binding parameter, Γμ1, for systems of unilamellar vesicles of DMPC in aqueous glycerol. It is found that Γμ1 decreases linearly with the glycerol concentration with a slope of −0.14 ± 0.014 per molal. This implies that glycerol is preferentially excluded from the membrane-solvent interface. Calorimetric investigations of the same systems showed that the glycerol-DMPC interactions are weakly endothermic, and the temperature of the main phase transition increases slightly (0.16°C per molal) with the glycerol concentration. The results are discussed with respect to a molecular picture which takes into account both the partitioning of glycerol into the membrane and the preferential exclusion from the hydration layer, and it is concluded that the latter effect contributes about four times stronger than the former to the net interaction. PMID:12524287

  14. Unilamellar DMPC vesicles in aqueous glycerol: preferential interactions and thermochemistry.

    PubMed

    Westh, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Glycerol is accumulated in response to environmental stresses in a diverse range of organisms. Understanding of favorable in vivo effects of this solute requires insight into its interactions with biological macromolecules, and one access to this information is the quantification of so-called preferential interactions in glycerol-biopolymer solutions. For model membrane systems, preferential interactions have been discussed, but not directly measured. Hence, we have applied a new differential vapor pressure equipment to quantify the isoosmotic preferential binding parameter, Gamma( micro 1), for systems of unilamellar vesicles of DMPC in aqueous glycerol. It is found that Gamma( micro 1) decreases linearly with the glycerol concentration with a slope of -0.14 +/- 0.014 per molal. This implies that glycerol is preferentially excluded from the membrane-solvent interface. Calorimetric investigations of the same systems showed that the glycerol-DMPC interactions are weakly endothermic, and the temperature of the main phase transition increases slightly (0.16 degrees C per molal) with the glycerol concentration. The results are discussed with respect to a molecular picture which takes into account both the partitioning of glycerol into the membrane and the preferential exclusion from the hydration layer, and it is concluded that the latter effect contributes about four times stronger than the former to the net interaction.

  15. A form of two-phase sampling utilizing regression analysis

    Treesearch

    Michael A. Fiery; John R. Brooks

    2007-01-01

    A two-phase sampling technique was introduced and tested on several horizontal point sampling inventories of hardwood tracts located in northern West Virginia and western Maryland. In this sampling procedure species and dbh are recorded for all “in-trees” on all sample points. Sawlog merchantable height was recorded on a subsample of intensively measured (second phase...

  16. In Situ X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies on the Effect of pH on Pt Electronic Density during Aqueous Phase Reforming of Glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Ayman M.; Howard, Christopher J.; Roberts, Benjamin Q.; Kovarik, Libor; Zhang, Liang; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

    2012-10-30

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) results on correlating the Pt local coordination and electronic structure with the Pt/C catalyst activity and selectivity during aqueous reforming of glycerol at different pH are reported. The results show that both low and high pH favor C-O cleavage over that of C-C. However, the selectivity towards C-O bond cleavage was higher under the acidic conditions. XANES measurements under reaction conditions showed that low pH increased the Pt electron density while the effect of basic conditions was minimal. ΔXANES was used to estimate the coverage of adsorbates under reaction conditions and the results suggest a change in the adsorbates coverage by the acidic conditions, resulting in higher electron density on Pt

  17. Catalytic synthesis of hydroxymethyl-2-oxazolidinones from glycerol or glycerol carbonate and urea.

    PubMed

    Dibenedetto, Angela; Nocito, Francesco; Angelini, Antonella; Papai, Imre; Aresta, Michele; Mancuso, Raffaella

    2013-02-01

    Oxazolidinones have been synthesized by reacting glycerol carbonate or glycerol with urea in the presence of γ-Zr phosphate as a catalyst. The conversion yield of the polyol or its carbonate depends on the temperature. Below 408 K the selectivity is 100 % with a conversion of up to 25 %, whereas increasing the temperature means that conversion yield grows, but the selectivity decreases, which makes the separation process more difficult. Starting from glycerol carbonate, two isomers, 6 and 6', are formed with a quasi 1:1 molar ratio because urea can attack the carbonate moiety on both sides of the carboxylic CO moiety. From glycerol the formation of the 6' isomer is preferred: the ratio of 6'/6 is close to 7. The oxazolidinones formed act as templates because they interact through hydrogen bonding with glycerol. The intensity of the interaction depends on the 6 or 6' isomer: DFT calculations showed that the energy was 22.6 kcal mol(-1) for 6-oxazolidinone and 25.7 kcal mol(-1) for 6'-oxazolidinone. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. O/W nano-emulsion formation using an isothermal low-energy emulsification method in a mixture of polyglycerol polyricinoleate and hexaglycerol monolaurate with glycerol system.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, Satoshi; Nishimura, Takahisa; Gohtani, Shoichi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated how phase behavior changes by replacing water with glycerol in water/mixture of polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) and hexaglycerol monolaurate (HGML) /vegetable oil system, and studied the effect of glycerol on o/w nano-emulsion formation using an isothermal low-energy method. In the phase behavior study, the liquid crystalline phase (Lc) + the sponge phase (L3) expanded toward lower surfactant concentration when water was replaced with glycerol in a system containing surfactant HLP (a mixture of PGPR and HGML). O/W nano-emulsions were formed by emulsification of samples in a region of Lc + L3. In the glycerol/surfactant HLP/vegetable oil system, replacing water with glycerol was responsible for the expansion of a region containing Lc + L3 toward lower surfactant concentration, and as a result, in the glycerol/surfactant HLP/vegetable oil system, the region where o/w nano-emulsions or o/w emulsions could be prepared using an isothermal low-energy emulsification method was wide, and the droplet diameter of the prepared o/w emulsions was also smaller than that in the water/surfactant HLP/vegetable oil system. Therefore, glycerol was confirmed to facilitate the preparation of nano-emulsions from a system of surfactant HLP. Moreover, in this study, we could prepare o/w nano-emulsions with a simple one-step addition of water at room temperature without using a stirrer. Thus, the present technique is highly valuable for applications in several industries.

  19. Phase equilibria in model surfactants forming Langmuir monolayers.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, E; Santana, A; Cruz, A; López, G E

    2007-12-14

    The study of Langmuir monolayers has generated the attention of researchers because of their unique properties and their not well understood phase equilibrium. These monolayers exhibit interesting phase diagrams where the unusual liquid-liquid equilibrium can be observed for a single component monolayer. Monte Carlo computer simulations in the virtual Gibbs ensemble were used to obtain the phase diagram of Langmuir monolayers. The liquid-vapor and liquid-liquid phase equilibria were considered by constructing the Cailletet-Mathias phase diagrams. By using the Ising model and the rectilinear approximations the identification of the critical properties for both equilibria was determined. These critical parameters were calculated as a function of the strength of the interaction between the surfactant molecules and the aqueous subphase. As a result, we have identified the coexistence between a liquid expanded state (LES)-vapor and the liquid condensed state-LES, in agreement with experimental and theoretical evidence in the literature. We obtained a clear separation of phases and a strong dependence on the strength of the solvent used. Namely, as the interaction between the solvent and the head of the surfactant increases, the critical properties also increase. Equilibrium states were characterized by computing thermodynamic quantities as a function of temperature and solvent strength.

  20. Relationships between molecular structure and kinetic and thermodynamic controls in lipid systems. Part III. Crystallization and phase behavior of 1-palmitoyl-2,3-stearoyl-sn-glycerol (PSS) and tristearoylglycerol (SSS) binary system.

    PubMed

    Bouzidi, Laziz; Narine, Suresh S

    2012-01-01

    The phase behavior of 1-palmitoyl-2,3-distearoyl-sn-glycerol (PSS)/tristearoylglycerol (SSS) binary system was investigated in terms of polymorphism, crystallization and melting behavior, microstructure and solid fat content (SFC) using widely different constant cooling rates. Kinetic phase diagrams were experimentally determined from the DSC heating thermograms and analyzed using a thermodynamic model to account for non-ideality of mixing. The kinetic phase diagram presented a typical eutectic behavior with a eutectic point at the 0.5(PSS) mixture with a probable precipitation line from 0.5(PSS) to 1.0(PSS), regardless of the rate at which the sample was cooled. The eutectic temperature decreased only slightly with increasing cooling rate. PSS has a strong effect on the physical properties of the PSS-SSS mixtures. In fact, the overall phase behavior of the PSS-SSS binary system was determined, for a very large part, by the asymmetrical TAG. Moreover, PSS is a key driver of the high stability observed in crystal growth, polymorphism and phase development. Levels as low as 10% PSS, when cooled slowly, and 30% when cooled rapidly, were found to be sufficient to suppress the effect of thermal processing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of impurities in biodiesel-derived crude glycerol on the fermentation by Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013.

    PubMed

    Venkataramanan, Keerthi P; Boatman, Judy J; Kurniawan, Yogi; Taconi, Katherine A; Bothun, Geoffrey D; Scholz, Carmen

    2012-02-01

    During the production of biodiesel, crude glycerol is produced as a byproduct at 10% (w/w). Clostridium pasteurianum has the inherent potential to grow on glycerol and produce 1,3-propanediol and butanol as the major products. Growth and product yields on crude glycerol were reported to be slower and lower, respectively, in comparison to the results obtained from pure glycerol. In this study, we analyzed the effect of each impurity present in the biodiesel-derived crude glycerol on the growth and metabolism of glycerol by C. pasteurianum. The crude glycerol contains methanol, salts (in the form of potassium chloride or sulfate), and fatty acids that were not transesterified. Salt and methanol were found to have no negative effects on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria on glycerol. The fatty acid with a higher degree of unsaturation, linoleic acid, was found to have strong inhibitory effect on the utilization of glycerol by the bacteria. The fatty acid with lower or no degrees of unsaturation such as stearic and oleic acid were found to be less detrimental to substrate utilization. The removal of fatty acids from crude glycerol by acid precipitation resulted in a fermentation behavior that is comparable to the one on pure glycerol. These results show that the fatty acids in the crude glycerol have a negative effect by directly affecting the utilization of glycerol as the carbon source, and hence their removal from crude glycerol is an essential step towards the utilization of crude glycerol.

  2. Dynamic phase coexistence in glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Pastore, Raffaele; Coniglio, Antonio; Ciamarra, Massimo Pica

    2015-07-09

    One of the most controversial hypotheses for explaining the heterogeneous dynamics of glasses postulates the temporary coexistence of two phases characterized by a high and by a low diffusivity. In this scenario, two phases with different diffusivities coexist for a time of the order of the relaxation time and mix afterwards. Unfortunately, it is difficult to measure the single-particle diffusivities to test this hypothesis. Indeed, although the non-Gaussian shape of the van-Hove distribution suggests the transient existence of a diffusivity distribution, it is not possible to infer from this quantity whether two or more dynamical phases coexist. Here we provide the first direct observation of the dynamical coexistence of two phases with different diffusivities, by showing that in the deeply supercooled regime the distribution of the single-particle diffusivities acquires a transient bimodal shape. We relate this distribution to the heterogeneity of the dynamics and to the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation, and we show that the coexistence of two dynamical phases occurs up to a timescale growing faster than the relaxation time on cooling, for some of the considered models. Our work offers a basis for rationalizing the dynamics of supercooled liquids and for relating their structural and dynamical properties.

  3. Toxic and osmotic effects of glycerol on human granulocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, W.J.; Mazur, P.

    1984-11-01

    Human granulocytes are damaged by exposure to concentrations of glycerol as low as 0.5 M. We therefore investigated the addition of glycerol to granulocytes and its subsequent dilution under various conditions to try to distinguish between toxic and harmful osmotic effects of glycerol. The lesion caused by glycerol at 0/sup 0/C was expressed as a loss of plasma membrane integrity (as visualized by fluorescein diacetate) only after incubation (greater than or equal to1 h) at 37/sup 0/C. This damage was not ameliorated when osmotic stress was lessened by reducing the rates of addition and dilution of glycerol to keep the computed cell volume within 80-170% of isotonic cell volume. However, when osmotic stress was reduced further by increasing the temperature of addition and dilution of glycerol from 0/sup 0/ to 22/sup 0/C, the tolerance of the cells to 1 M glycerol increased somewhat. Reducing exposure to glycerol to 3 min or less at 0/sup 0/C greatly increased survival, but this time was too short to allow glycerol to equilibrate intracellularly. Finally, the presence of extra impermeant solute (NaCl or sucrose) in the medium to reduce the equilibrium cell volume to 60% of isotonic cell volume enabled granulocytes to survive 30-min exposure to 1 M glycerol at 0/sup 0/C, but cells had to remain shrunken during the 37/sup 0/C incubation to prevent the loss of membrane integrity. Suspensions that contained damaged granulocytes formed aggregates when incubated at 37/sup 0/C, and these aggregates were responsible for a major fraction of the observed loss in viability.

  4. Anaerobic glycerol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Modig, Tobias; Granath, Katarina; Adler, Lennart; Lidén, Gunnar

    2007-05-01

    Glycerol formation is vital for reoxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form; NADH) under anaerobic conditions and for the hyperosmotic stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, relatively few studies have been made on hyperosmotic stress under anaerobic conditions. To study the combined effect of salt stress and anaerobic conditions, industrial and laboratory strains of S. cerevisiae were grown anaerobically on glucose in batch-cultures containing 40 g/l NaCl. The time needed for complete glucose conversion increased considerably, and the specific growth rates decreased by 80-90% when the cells were subjected to the hyperosmotic conditions. This was accompanied by an increased yield of glycerol and other by-products and reduced biomass yield in all strains. The slowest fermenting strain doubled its glycerol yield (from 0.072 to 0.148 g/g glucose) and a nearly fivefold increase in acetate formation was seen. In more tolerant strains, a lower increase was seen in the glycerol and in the acetate, succinate and pyruvate yields. Additionally, the NADH-producing pathway from acetaldehyde to acetate was analysed by overexpressing the stress-induced gene ALD3. However, this had no or very marginal effect on the acetate and glycerol yields. In the control experiments, the production of NADH from known sources well matched the glycerol formation. This was not the case for the salt stress experiments in which the production of NADH from known sources was insufficient to explain the formed glycerol.

  5. Dielectric and specific heat relaxations in vapor deposited glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Kasina, A. E-mail: wubbenhorst@fys.kuleuven.be; Putzeys, T.; Wübbenhorst, M. E-mail: wubbenhorst@fys.kuleuven.be

    2015-12-28

    Recently [S. Capponi, S. Napolitano, and M. Wübbenhorst, Nat. Commun. 3, 1233 (2012)], vapor deposited glasses of glycerol have been found to recover their super-cooled liquid state via a metastable, ordered liquid (MROL) state characterized by a tremendously enhanced dielectric strength along with a slow-down of the relaxation rate of the structural relaxation. To study the calorimetric signature of this phenomenon, we have implemented a chip-based, differential AC calorimeter in an organic molecular beam deposition setup, which allows the simultaneous measurement of dielectric relaxations via interdigitated comb electrodes and specific heat relaxation spectra during deposition and as function of the temperature. Heating of the as-deposited glass just above the bulk T{sub g} and subsequent cooling/reheating revealed a step-wise increase in c{sub p} by in total 9%, indicating unambiguously that glycerol, through slow vapour deposition, forms a thermodynamically stable glass, which has a specific heat as low as that of crystalline glycerol. Moreover, these glasses were found to show excellent kinetic stability as well as evidenced by both a high onset-temperature and quasi-isothermal recovery measurements at −75 °C. The second goal of the study was to elucidate the impact of the MROL state on the specific heat and its relaxation to the super-cooled state. Conversion of “MROL glycerol” to its “normal” (ordinary liquid, OL) state revealed a second, small (∼2%) increase of the glassy c{sub p}, a little gain (<10%) in the relaxed specific heat, and no signs of deviations of τ{sub cal} from that of normal “bulk” glycerol. These findings altogether suggest that the MROL state in glycerol comprises largely bulk-type glycerol that coexist with a minor volume fraction (<10%) of PVD-induced structural anomalies with a crystal-like calorimetric signature. Based on the new calorimetric findings, we have proposed a new physical picture that assumes the

  6. Crystallization and Characterization of Galdieria sulphuraria RUBISCO in Two Crystal Forms: Structural Phase Transition Observed in P21 Crystal Form

    PubMed Central

    Baranowski, Michael; Stec, Boguslaw

    2007-01-01

    We have isolated ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCO) from the red algae Galdieria Sulphuraria. The protein crystallized in two different crystal forms, the I422 crystal form being obtained from high salt and the P21 crystal form being obtained from lower concentration of salt and PEG. We report here the crystallization, preliminary stages of structure determination and the detection of the structural phase transition in the P21 crystal form of G. sulphuraria RUBISCO. This red algae enzyme belongs to the hexadecameric class (L8S8) with an approximate molecular weight 0.6MDa. The phase transition in G. sulphuraria RUBISCO leads from two hexadecamers to a single hexadecamer per asymmetric unit. The preservation of diffraction power in a phase transition for such a large macromolecule is rare.

  7. Electrohydraulic forming of dual phase steels; numerical and experimental work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassannejadasl, Amir; Green, Daniel E.; Golovashchenko, Sergey F.

    2013-12-01

    Electrohydraulic Forming (EHF) is a high velocity forming process, in which the strain-rate in the sheet metal can reach very high values depending on the prescribed input energy, the chamber geometry, the die geometry, instrumentation efficiency and the mechanical properties of the sheet material. In EHF, a high voltage discharge between electrodes that are submerged in a water-filled chamber generates a plasma channel that leads to propagation of a shockwave through the water that forms the sheet, with or without a die, in less than a millisecond. EHF generates a complex pressure pulse history that is extremely challenging to simulate. In this work, three-dimensional finite element simulations of DP590 sheet were completed in free-forming (EHFF) and die-forming (EHDF) conditions using ABAQUS/Explicit and a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian elements. The Johnson-Cook constitutive plasticity model was selected and the parameters were calibrated based on uniaxial tensile test data at different strain-rates. A comprehensive numerical study was carried out with a view to understanding the differences between EHFF and EHDF in terms of the history of the deformation profile of the specimen, the strain-rate history, the loading path and through-thickness stresses. Higher strain-rates and more complex strain-paths were predicted in EHDF compared to EHFF due to dynamic sheet/die interaction. Good correlation between the experimental and numerical results demonstrated the ability of numerical models to accurately predict the history of the deformation profile in both EHDF and EHFF conditions.

  8. Optimizing aerobic conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde.

    PubMed Central

    Slininger, P J; Bothast, R J

    1985-01-01

    When cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae NRRL B-199 (ATCC 8724) were grown aerobically on a rich glycerol medium and then suspended in buffer supplemented with semicarbazide and glycerol, aerobic conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) ensued. Depending on conditions, 0.38 to 0.67 g of 3-HPA were formed per gram of glycerol consumed. This means that up to 83.8% of the carbon invested as glycerol could potentially be recovered as the target product, 3-HPA. Production of 3-HPA was sensitive to the age of cells harvested for resuspension and was nonexistent if cells were cultivated on glucose instead of glycerol as the sole carbon source. Compared with 24- and 72-h cells, 48-h cells produced 3-HPA at the highest rate and with the greatest yield. The cell biomass concentration present during the fermentation was never particularly critical to the 3-HPA yield, but initial fermentation rates and 3-HPA accumulation displayed a linear dependence on biomass concentration that faded when biomass exceeded 3 g/liter. Fermentation performance was a function of temperature, and an optimum initial specific 3-HPA productivity occurred at 32 degrees C, although the overall 3-HPA yield increased continuously within the 25 to 37 degrees C range studied. The pH optimum based on fermentation rate was different from that based on overall yield; 8 versus 7, respectively. Initial glycerol concentrations in the 20 to 50 g/liter range optimized initial 3-HPA productivity and yield. PMID:3911907

  9. Phase transformation considerations during process development and manufacture of solid oral dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Geoff G Z; Law, Devalina; Schmitt, Eric A; Qiu, Yihong

    2004-02-23

    The quality and performance of a solid oral dosage form depends on the choice of the solid phase, the formulation design, and the manufacturing process. The potential for process-induced solid phase transformations must be evaluated during design and development of formulations and manufacturing processes. This article briefly reviews the basic principles of polymorphism, defines the classes of phase transformation and the underlying transformation mechanisms, and discusses respective kinetic factors. The potential phase transformations associated with common unit operations employed in manufacturing solid oral dosage forms are highlighted. Specific examples are given to illustrate the importance of solid phases, and process-induced phase transitions in formulation and process development.

  10. Alumina-Forming MAX Phases in Turbine Material Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Harder, Bryan J.; Garg, Arnita; Nesbitt, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Coatings for high temperature turbine components are based on low conductivity YSZ thermal barriers and protective NiAl, NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Good oxidation hot corrosion resistance, intermediate CTE, and strain tolerance of Ti2AlC and Cr2AlC MAX phases are thus of special interest. Their alumina scale growth follows a cubic law in accord with FeCrAlY alloys, with oxygen grain boundary diffusivity: Dgb 1.8 x 10-10 exp(-375 kJmole) m3s. Protective cubic kinetics are also found in high pressure burner rig (6 atm., 25 ms) and TGA tests of MAXthal 211Ti2AlC. The initial portion (0.1 hr) is dominated by fast TiO2 growth (with little evidence of scale volatility in high pressure water vapor, as found for SiO2 scales). Bulk Ti2AlC and Cr2AlC substrates show promise as potential bond coats for YSZ TBCs in 1000-1200 C furnace life (500 h) tests. Cr2AlC is proving to be very resistant to 700-900 C Na2SO4 hot corrosion and is of interest for disk alloys. Preliminary diffusion bonded Cr2AlC-superalloy hybrid couples have survived 1000 hr interrupted furnace tests at 800C with no indication of cracking or debonding. Diffusion zones of -NiAl+Cr7C3 were produced in these above 1000 C, but did not grow to any great extent after 1000 hr at 800 C. Processing as coatings presents challenges, however the basic properties of MAX phases provide novel opportunities for high temperature turbine components.

  11. Glycerol extracting dealcoholization for the biodiesel separation process.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianchu; Sha, Yong; Zhang, Yun; Yuan, Yunlong; Wu, Housheng

    2011-04-01

    By means of utilizing sunflower oil and Jatropha oil as raw oil respectively, the biodiesel transesterification production and the multi-stage extracting separation were carried out experimentally. Results indicate that dealcoholized crude glycerol can be utilized as the extracting agent to achieve effective separation of methanol from the methyl ester phase, and the glycerol content in the dealcoholized methyl esters is as low as 0.02 wt.%. For the biodiesel separation process utilizing glycerol extracting dealcoholization, its technical and equipment information were acquired through the rigorous process simulation in contrast to the traditional biodiesel distillation separation process, and results show that its energy consumption decrease about 35% in contrast to that of the distillation separation process. The glycerol extracting dealcoholization has sufficient feasibility and superiority for the biodiesel separation process.

  12. Glass polymorphism in glycerol-water mixtures: II. Experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-04-28

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol-water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0-1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol-water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s(-1)-10 K h(-1)) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χ(g). Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χg ≥ 0.20), ice (χ(g) ≤ 0.32), and/or "distorted ice" (0 < χ(g) ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χ(g) ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol-water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χ(g) ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χ(g) < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χ(g) ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χ(g) < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χ(g) ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χ(g) ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χ(g) ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol-water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex "phase" behavior

  13. Kinetics of phase transformation in glass forming systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chandra S.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to (1) develop computer models for realistic simulations of nucleation and crystal growth in glasses, which would also have the flexibility to accomodate the different variables related to sample characteristics and experimental conditions, and (2) design and perform nucleation and crystallization experiments using calorimetric measurements, such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to verify these models. The variables related to sample characteristics mentioned in (1) above include size of the glass particles, nucleating agents, and the relative concentration of the surface and internal nuclei. A change in any of these variables changes the mode of the transformation (crystallization) kinetics. A variation in experimental conditions includes isothermal and nonisothermal DSC/DTA measurements. This research would lead to develop improved, more realistic methods for analysis of the DSC/DTA peak profiles to determine the kinetic parameters for nucleation and crystal growth as well as to assess the relative merits and demerits of the thermoanalytical models presently used to study the phase transformation in glasses.

  14. Vibrational properties of bioprotectant mixtures of trehalose and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Magazù, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica; Parker, Stewart F

    2011-09-22

    In this work vibrational spectra of mixtures of two glass-forming bioprotectant systems, i.e., trehalose and glycerol, are collected at very low temperature by using the indirect geometry time-of-flight (t.o.f.) TOSCA spectrometer at the ISIS Pulse Neutron Facility (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxford, U.K.). The main aim of this work is to investigate, through inelastic neutron scattering (INS), the vibrational behavior of trehalose and its mixtures with glycerol at different concentration values in order to characterize the changes induced by glycerol on the trehalose hydrogen bonded network. The obtained experimental findings, which are discussed and interpreted in the framework of previous INS, quasi elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and molecular simulation data obtained on trehalose/glycerol mixtures at different concentration and temperature values, will be linked to the different mixtures bioprotectant effectiveness.

  15. Structure and polymorphism of saturated monoacid 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Kodali, D.R.; Fahey, D.A.; Small, D.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerols (1,2-DGs) are the predominant naturally occurring isomer found in cell membranes, lipid droplets, and lipoproteins. They are involved in the metabolism of monoacylglycerols, triacylglycerols, and phospholipids. The authors have undertaken a study of the physical properties of a homologous series of synthetic optically active diacylglycerols. Stereospecific 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerols were synthesized with saturated fatty acyl chains of 12, 16, 18, 22, and 24 carbons in length. Their polymorphic behavior was examined by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffraction. The solvent-crystallized form for all the 1,2-DGs packs in the orthorhombic perpendicular subcell ({beta}{prime}) and melts with a single sharp endotherm to an isotropic liquid. On quenching, the C{sub 12}, C{sub 16} and C{sub 18} compounds pack in a hexagonal subcell ({alpha}), whereas the C{sub 22} and C{sub 24} pack in a pseudohexagonal subcell (sub-{alpha}). The sub-{alpha} phase reversibly converts to the {alpha} phase. The long spacings of these compounds in both the {alpha} and {beta}{prime} phases increase with chain length. In the {alpha} and {beta}{prime} phases, the acyl chain tilts were found to be 90{degree} and 62{degree} from the basal methyl plane. The polymorphic behavior of 1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol is quite different from that of the corresponding monoacid saturated 1,3-diacylglycerols which form two {beta} phases with triclinic parallel subcells.

  16. Regulation of glycerol metabolism in Enterobacter aerogenes NBRC12010 under electrochemical conditions.

    PubMed

    Hatayama, Kouta; Yagishita, Tatsuo

    2009-06-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes NBRC12010 was able to ferment glycerol to ethanol and hydrogen gas. Fermentation of glycerol ceased in the stationary phase of growth, and it was activated by electrochemical reactions using thionine as an electron transfer mediator from bacterial cells to an electrode. Using resting cells of E. aerogenes NBRC12010 in only citrate buffer solution, the cells did not consume glycerol at all, but they could metabolize glucose. These results suggest that the regulation of glycerol metabolism occurred at enzymatic steps before glycolysis. In E. aerogenes NBRC12010, glycerol was metabolized via glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) and then dehydroxyacetone kinase. The GDH-catalyzed reaction mainly depended on the ratio of NAD(+)/NADH. At a NAD(+)/NADH ratio of nearly 1 or less, it was substantially suppressed and glycerol metabolism stopped. When the ratio was higher than 1, GDH was activated and glycerol was metabolized. Thus, the reaction of glycerol metabolism depended on the balance of cellular NAD(+)/NADH. Exogenous NADH was oxidized to NAD(+) by electrochemical reactions with thionine. We proposed the activation mechanism of glycerol metabolism under electrochemical conditions.

  17. Optimizing aerobic conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Slininger, P.J.; Bothast, R.J.

    1985-12-01

    Chemical oxidation of 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) leads to acrylic acid, an industrially important polymerizable monomer currently derived from petroleum. As the availability of petroleum declines, 3-HPA may become attractive as a product to be obtained through fermentation of glycerol, a renewable resource. When cells of Klebsiella pneumoniae NRRL B-199 (ATCC 8724) were grown aerobically on a rich glycerol medium and then suspended in buffer supplemented with semicarbazide and glycerol, aerobic conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) ensued. Depending on conditions, 0.38 to 0.67 g of 3-HPA were formed per gram of glycerol consumed. This means that up to 83.8% of the carbon invested as glycerol could potentially be recovered as the target product, 3-HPA. Production of 3-HPA was sensitive to the age of cells harvested for resuspension and was nonexistent if cells were cultivated on glucose instead of glycerol as the sole carbon source. Compared with 24- and 72-h cells, 48-h cells produced 3-HPA at the highest rate and with the greatest yield. The cell biomass concentration present during the fermentation was never particularly critical to the 3-HPA yield, but initial fermentation rates and 3-HPA accumulation displayed a linear dependence on biomass concentration that faded when biomass exceeded 3 g/liter. Fermentation performance was a function of temperature, and an optimum initial specific 3-HPA productivity occurred at 32/sup 0/C, although the overall 3-HPA yield increased continuously within the 25 to 37/sup 0/C range studied. The pH optimum based on fermentation rate was different from that based on overall yield; 8 versus 7, respectively. Initial glycerol concentrations in the 20 to 50 g/liter range optimized initial 3-HPA productivity and yield.

  18. Phase Modulator with Terahertz Optical Bandwidth Formed by Multi-Layered Dielectric Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S. (Inventor); Fork, Richard L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An optical phase modulator includes a bandpass multilayer stack, formed by a plurality of dielectric layers, preferably of GaAs and AlAs, and having a transmission function related to the refractive index of the layers of the stack, for receiving an optical input signal to be phase modulated. A phase modulator device produces a nonmechanical change in the refractive index of each layer of the stack by, e.g., the injection of free carrier, to provide shifting of the transmission function so as to produce phase modulation of the optical input signal and to thereby produce a phase modulated output signal.

  19. Stability of an icosahedral incommensurate phase formed in an immiscible alloy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, L. J.; Liu, B. X.; Li, H.-D.

    1990-05-01

    A stability study of the icosahedral incommensurate Fe60Cu40 phase formed directly by ion mixing at room temperature indicates that this metastable phase is unstable against thermal annealing to 300+/-25 °C, but annealing to the higher temperature (800+/-25 °C) reestablished the icosahedral order. The changes of the magnetic properties associated with the icosahedral phase formation are also presented.

  20. Characterization of crude glycerol from biodiesel plants.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengjun; Luo, Xiaolan; Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo

    2012-06-13

    Characterization of crude glycerol is very important to its value-added conversion. In this study, the physical and chemical properties of five biodiesel-derived crude glycerol samples were determined. Three methods, including iodometric-periodic acid method, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and gas chromatography (GC), were shown to be suitable for the determination of glycerol content in crude glycerol. The compositional analysis of crude glycerol was successfully achieved by crude glycerol fractionation and characterization of the obtained fractions (aqueous and organic) using titrimetric, HPLC, and GC analyses. The aqueous fraction consisted mainly of glycerol, methanol, and water, while the organic fraction contained fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs), free fatty acids (FFAs), and glycerides. Despite the wide variations in the proportion of their components, all raw crude glycerol samples were shown to contain glycerol, soap, methanol, FAMEs, water, glycerides, FFAs, and ash.

  1. Supercooling and vitrification of aqueous glycerol solutions at normal and high pressures.

    PubMed

    Miyata, K; Hayakawa, S; Kajiwara, K; Kanno, H

    2012-10-01

    The supercooling and vitrification of aqueous glycerol solutions was studied at high pressures. Homogeneous ice nucleation temperatures (T(H)) were obtained for aqueous glycerol solutions of R=50, 30, 20, 12, and 10 (R: moles of water/moles of glycerol) up to 300MPa. The R=20 glycerol solution formed a glass above 200MPa at a cooling rate of 200°C/min, indicating that pressure enhances glass-formation of aqueous glycerol solutions. The (dT(g)/dP) values were obtained for vitrified aqueous glycerol solutions of R=3, 5, 10, and 20. These data can be used for the development of cryo-preservation liquids for living cells at high pressures.

  2. Electron beam irradiation of maltodextrin and cinnamyl alcohol mixtures: influence of glycerol on cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Khandal, Dhriti; Aggarwal, Manjeet; Suri, Gunjan; Coqueret, Xavier

    2015-03-06

    The influence of glycerol on the electron beam-induced changes in maltodextrins-cinnamyl alcohol (CA) blends is examined with respect to its influence on the degree of chain scission, grafting, and cross-linking. The study is relevant to radiation-induced polysaccharide modification, specifically in the perspective of using blended starch as a thermoplastic material, where glycerol is commonly used as a plasticizer. In the absence of CA, glycerol protects maltodextrin from chromophore formation onto the main chain, but also induces more chain scission. The presence of CA provides efficient radiation-protection against scission. Glycerol is shown to affect the interaction between maltodextrin and CA, most likely in the form of an inclusion complex when glycerol is absent. The global behavior under radiation is therefore governed by the physical interactions between the blend constituents rather than on the role of glycerol role as a plasticizer, or as an OH˙ radical scavenger.

  3. Hygroscopicity of Mixed Glycerol/Mg(NO3)2/Water Droplets Affected by the Interaction between Magnesium Ions and Glycerol Molecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Ma, Jia-Bi; Zhou, Qiang; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2015-04-30

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually complex mixtures of inorganic and organic components, which can influence the hygroscopicities of each other. In this research, we applied confocal Raman technology combined with optical microscopy to investigate the relationship between the hygroscopic behavior and the molecular interactions of mixed glycerol/Mg(NO3)2/water droplets. Raman spectra provide detailed structural information about the interactions between glycerol molecules and Mg(2+) ions, as well as information about the interactions between glycerol and NO3(-) ions through electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding. The change of the CH2 stretching band of glycerol molecules in mixed droplets suggests that the backbone structures of glycerol mainly transform from αα to γγ in the dehumidifying process, and the additional Mg(2+) ions strongly influence the structure of glycerol molecules. Because the existence of glycerol suppresses the crystallization of Mg(NO3)2·6H2O in the dehumidifying process, Mg(NO3)2 molecules in mixed droplets form an amorphous state rather than forming crystals of Mg(NO3)2·6H2O when the relative humidity is lower than 17.8%. Moreover, in mixed droplets, the molar ratio of NO3(-) to glycerol is higher in the center than in the outer region.

  4. Phase diagram of one-patch colloids forming tubes and lamellae.

    PubMed

    Preisler, Zdenek; Vissers, Teun; Smallenburg, Frank; Munaò, Gianmarco; Sciortino, Francesco

    2013-08-15

    We numerically calculate the equilibrium phase diagram of one-patch particles with 30% patch coverage. It has been previously shown that in the fluid phase these particles organize into extremely long tubelike aggregates (G. Munaò et al. Soft Matter 2013, 9, 2652). Here, we demonstrate by means of free-energy calculations that such a disordered tube phase, despite forming spontaneously from the fluid phase below a density-dependent temperature, is always metastable against a lamellar crystal. We also show that a crystal of infinitely long packed tubes is thermodynamically stable, but only at high pressure. The full phase diagram of the model, beside the fluid phase, displays four different stable crystals. A gas-liquid critical point, and hence a liquid phase, is not detected.

  5. Phase demodulation method from a single fringe pattern based on correlation with a polynomial form.

    PubMed

    Robin, Eric; Valle, Valéry; Brémand, Fabrice

    2005-12-01

    The method presented extracts the demodulated phase from only one fringe pattern. Locally, this method approaches the fringe pattern morphology with the help of a mathematical model. The degree of similarity between the mathematical model and the real fringe is estimated by minimizing a correlation function. To use an optimization process, we have chosen a polynomial form such as a mathematical model. However, the use of a polynomial form induces an identification procedure with the purpose of retrieving the demodulated phase. This method, polynomial modulated phase correlation, is tested on several examples. Its performance, in terms of speed and precision, is presented on very noised fringe patterns.

  6. Structural-phase states and wear resistance of surface formed on steel by surfacing

    SciTech Connect

    Kapralov, Evgenie V.; Raykov, Sergey V.; Vaschuk, Ekaterina S.; Budovskikh, Evgenie A. Gromov, Victor E.; Ivanov, Yuri F.

    2014-11-14

    Investigations of elementary and phase structure, state of defect structure and tribological characteristics of a surfacing, formed on a low carbon low-alloy steel by a welding method were carried out. It was revealed that a surfacing, formed on a steel surface is accompanied by the multilayer formation, and increases the wear resistance of the layer surfacing as determined.

  7. Evolution of Secondary Phases Formed upon Solidification of a Ni-Based Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Qiang; Liu, Feng; Wang, Lei; Chen, Changfeng

    2013-07-01

    The solidification of UNS N08028 alloy subjected to different cooling rates was studied, where primary austenite dendrites occur predominantly and different amounts of sigma phase form in the interdendritic regions. The solidification path and elemental segregation upon solidification were simulated using the CALPHAD method, where THERMO-CALC software packages and two classical segregation models were employed to predict the real process. It is thus revealed that the interdendritic sigma phase is formed via eutectic reaction at the last stage of solidification. On this basis, an analytical model was developed to predict the evolution of nonequilibrium eutectic phase, while the isolated morphology of sigma phase can be described using divorced eutectic theory. Size, fraction, and morphology of the sigma phase were quantitatively studied by a series of experiments; the results are in good agreement with the model prediction.

  8. Obtaining the wavefront phase maps of free form surfaces: using the least squares algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos-Mendoza, B.; Aguirre-Aguirre, D.; Granados-Agustín, F.; Cornejo-Rodríguez, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work is presented the validation of the least squares algorithm proposed by Morgan (1982) and Greivenkamp (1984), to obtain the wavefront phase maps of a free form surface. The validation was made by simulating the synthetic interferograms of a free form surface using a Bessel function, each interferogram was simulated with a phase-shifting of π/20. This algorithm is applied to the experimental interferograms that are obtained in a Twyman-Green interferometer where the phase shifting is achieved by using a SLM (Spatial Light Modulator) that is placed in one of its arms; the phase shifts are achieved by displaying all the gray levels from 0 to 255 in the SLM. The phase shifts that are performed in this experimental setup are lower than π/4, therefore the conventional algorithms cannot be applied.

  9. The role of energetic processing on solid-phase chemistry in star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, M. E.; Urso, R. G.; Kaňuchová, Z.; Scirè, C.; Accolla, M.; Baratta, G. A.; Strazzulla, G.

    2016-05-01

    It is generally accepted that complex molecules observed in star forming regions are formed in the solid phase on icy grain mantles and are released to the gas-phase after desorption of icy mantles. Most of our knowledge on the physical and chemical properties of ices in star forming regions is based on the comparison between observations and laboratory experiments performed at low temperature (10-100 K). Here we present some recent laboratory experiments which show the formation of (complex) molecular species after ion bombardment of simple ices.

  10. Phase inversion of slug flow on step surface to form high viscosity droplets in microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, Jia; Li, Zhongnan; Li, Jiang; Chen, Haosheng

    2017-05-01

    Slug flow is a typical two phase flow in which droplets are lubricated by an immiscible continuous phase in a microchannel. The step surface is found to break the lubrication film and induce a phase inversion of the slug flow. The reduction in the film thickness by the step is quantitatively calculated and measured, and the critical droplet length for the breakup of the film is also revealed. This step-induced phase inversion is demonstrated to form high-in-low-viscosity emulsion droplets from a low-in-high-viscosity slug flow.

  11. Pilot Plant Glycerol Production with a Slow-Feed Osmophilic Yeast Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Button, D. K.; Garver, J. C.; Hajny, G. J.

    1966-01-01

    A slow feed batch fermentation is described for the production of glycerol from sugar. The conversion efficiency was approximately 1 mole of glycerol produced per mole of glucose utilized after the cell growth phase. The glycerol production phase was extended several-fold by periodic glucose addition. The yeast cell count remained constant during this time as limited by phosphate, a deficiency required for an efficient glycerol fermentation. A small amount of phosphate was supplied during the extended fermentation, maintaining an active culture, by the normal autolysis of spent cells. Interfering or inhibitory by-products did not accumulate, and the osmophilic yeasts are tolerant of high glycerol concentrations. These factors combined to allow a particularly efficient fermentation well suited to product enrichment by supplying large quantities of substrate over an extended period. PMID:6006420

  12. A New, More Stable Polymorphic Form of Otilonium Bromide: Solubility, Crystal Structure, and Phase Transformation.

    PubMed

    Vega, Daniel R; Halac, Emilia; Segovia, Luciano; Baggio, Ricardo

    2016-10-01

    A new polymorphic form of otilonium bromide is presented (Form I), and a thorough analysis of its crystal and molecular structure is performed. The compound suffers a temperature-driven first-order phase transition at about 396 K, which transforms it into the polymorph reported by Dapporto P and Sega A (Acta Cryst. 1986;C42:474-478) (Form II). Through thermal analysis and solubility experiments the relative stability of both crystal modifications were determined, confirming that at room temperature this new Form I is the more stable one, Form II existing just in a metastable state.

  13. The Lifetimes of Phases in High-mass Star-forming Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara; Bally, John; Svoboda, Brian

    2017-02-01

    High-mass stars form within star clusters from dense, molecular regions (DMRs), but is the process of cluster formation slow and hydrostatic or quick and dynamic? We link the physical properties of high-mass star-forming regions with their evolutionary stage in a systematic way, using Herschel and Spitzer data. In order to produce a robust estimate of the relative lifetimes of these regions, we compare the fraction of DMRs above a column density associated with high-mass star formation, N(H2) > 0.4–2.5 × 1022 cm‑2, in the “starless” (no signature of stars ≳10 {M}ȯ forming) and star-forming phases in a 2° × 2° region of the Galactic Plane centered at ℓ = 30°. Of regions capable of forming high-mass stars on ∼1 pc scales, the starless (or embedded beyond detection) phase occupies about 60%–70% of the DMR lifetime, and the star-forming phase occupies about 30%–40%. These relative lifetimes are robust over a wide range of thresholds. We outline a method by which relative lifetimes can be anchored to absolute lifetimes from large-scale surveys of methanol masers and UCHII regions. A simplistic application of this method estimates the absolute lifetime of the starless phase to be 0.2–1.7 Myr (about 0.6–4.1 fiducial cloud free-fall times) and the star-forming phase to be 0.1–0.7 Myr (about 0.4–2.4 free-fall times), but these are highly uncertain. This work uniquely investigates the star-forming nature of high column density gas pixel by pixel, and our results demonstrate that the majority of high column density gas is in a starless or embedded phase.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation study of the effect of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether hydroxylation on membrane thermostability.

    PubMed

    Huguet, Carme; Fietz, Susanne; Rosell-Melé, Antoni; Daura, Xavier; Costenaro, Lionel

    2017-02-16

    Archaeal tetraether membrane lipids span the whole membrane width and present two C40 isoprenoid chains bound by two glycerol groups (or one glycerol and calditol). These lipids confer stability and maintain the membrane fluidity in mesophile to extremophile environments, making them very attractive for biotechnological applications. The isoprenoid lipid composition in archaeal membranes varies with temperature, which has placed these lipids in the focus of paleo-climatological studies for over a decade. Non-hydroxylated isoprenoid archaeal lipids are typically used as paleo-thermometry proxies, but recently identified hydroxylated (OH) derivatives have also been proposed as temperature proxies. The relative abundance of hydroxylated lipids increases at lower temperatures, but the physiological function of the OH moiety remains unknown. Here we present molecular dynamics simulations of membranes formed by the acyclic glycerol-dialkyl-glycerol-tetraether caldarchaeol (GDGT-0), the most widespread archaeal core lipid, and its mono-hydroxylated variant (OH-GDGT-0) to better understand the physico-chemical properties conferred to the membrane by this additional moiety. The molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the additional OH group forms hydrogen bonds mainly with the sugar moieties of neighbouring lipids and with water molecules, effectively increasing the size of the polar headgroups. The hydroxylation also introduces local disorder that propagates along the entire alkyl chains, resulting in a slightly more fluid membrane. These changes would help to maintain trans-membrane transport in cold environments, explaining why the relative abundance of hydroxylated Archaea lipids increases at lower temperatures. The in silico approach aids to understand the underlying physiological mechanisms behind the hydroxylated lipid based paleo-thermometer recently proposed.

  15. Glycerol inhibition of ruminal lipolysis in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Supplemental glycerol inhibits rumen lipolysis, a prerequisite for rumen biohydrogenation, which is responsible for the saturation of dietary fatty acids consumed by ruminant animals. Feeding excess glycerol, however, adversely affects dry matter digestibility. To more clearly define the effect of...

  16. Striped Phase of 3-Hexylthiophene Self-Assembled Monolayers on Au(1 11) Formed by Vapor Phase Deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngwoo; Kang, Hungu; Tsunoi, Azuho; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Hara, Masahiko; Noh, Jaegeun

    2016-03-01

    The formation and surface structure of 3-hexylthiophene (HTP) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) prepared by solution and ambient-pressure vapor deposition at room temperature (RT) for 24 h were examined by means of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). STM imaging revealed that HTP SAMs formed by solution deposition have a disordered phase, whereas those formed by vapor deposition exhibit a striped phase with a unidirectional orientation. The distance between the rows in the striped phase was measured to be 1.3 ± 0.1 nm, and the hexyl molecular backbones of HTP in the SAMs on Au(111) are oriented parallel to the Au(111) surface with the head-to-head orientation. From this STM observation, we suggest that the formation of this striped phase in HTP SAMs prepared by vapor deposition were mainly driven by the optimization of van der Waals interactions between the hexyl chains on the surface. CV measurements also demonstrated that HTP SAMs show a high blocking efficiency for electron transfer reactions between electrolytes and the gold electrode, suggesting the formation of SAMs on Au(111) from the vapor phase. Our results obtained here will be very useful for understanding the formation and structure of HTP SAMs on Au(111) surfaces and how they are influenced by deposition method.

  17. Modulation of glycerol and ethanol yields during alcoholic fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains overexpressed or disrupted for GPD1 encoding glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Michnick, S; Roustan, J L; Remize, F; Barre, P; Dequin, S

    1997-07-01

    The possibility of the diversion of carbon flux from ethanol towards glycerol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation was investigated. Variations in the glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) level and similar trends for alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), pyruvate decarboxylase and glycerol-3-phosphatase were found when low and high glycerol-forming wine yeast strains were compared. GPDH is thus a limiting enzyme for glycerol production. Wine yeast strains with modulated GPD1 (encoding one of the two GPDH isoenzymes) expression were constructed and characterized during fermentation on glucose-rich medium. Engineered strains fermented glucose with a strongly modified [glycerol] : [ethanol] ratio. gpd1delta mutants exhibited a 50% decrease in glycerol production and increased ethanol yield. Overexpression of GPD1 on synthetic must (200 g/l glucose) resulted in a substantial increase in glycerol production ( x 4) at the expense of ethanol. Acetaldehyde accumulated through the competitive regeneration of NADH via GPDH. Accumulation of by-products such as pyruvate, acetate, acetoin, 2,3 butane-diol and succinate was observed, with a marked increase in acetoin production.

  18. Transport of glycerol by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Tsay, S S; Brown, K K; Gaudy, E T

    1971-10-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the transport of glycerol was shown to be genetically controlled and to be dependent on induction by glycerol. Accumulation of (14)C-glycerol was almost completely absent in uninduced cells and in a transport-negative mutant. Kinetic studies with induced cells suggested that glycerol may be transported by two systems with different affinities for glycerol. Osmotically shocked cells did not transport glycerol, and the supernatant fluid from shocked cells contained glycerol-binding activity demonstrable by equilibrium dialysis. The binding protein was not glycerol kinase. Binding activity was absent in shock fluids from the transport-negative mutant and from uninduced cells. The glycerol-binding protein was partially purified by precipitation with ammonium sulfate. Mild heat treatment completely eliminated the binding activity of shock fluid and of the partially purified protein. Sodium azide and N-ethylmaleimide inhibited both transport by whole cells and binding of glycerol by shock fluid. It is concluded that transport of glycerol by P. aeruginosa involves a binding protein responsible for recognition of glycerol and may occur by facilitated diffusion or active transport. A requirement for energy has not been demonstrated.

  19. Production of glycerol by Hansenula anomala

    SciTech Connect

    Parekh, S.R.; Pandey, N.K.

    1985-07-01

    Production of glycerol by Hansenula anomala in molasses-corn steep liquor based media was studied. The accumulation and yield of glycerol was dependent on the medium composition and aeration rate; pH control did not affect the yield. Intermittent addition of sugar during fermentation resulted in significant increase in production of glycerol. 13 references.

  20. On the polymorphism of benzocaine; a low-temperature structural phase transition for form (II).

    PubMed

    Chan, Eric J; Rae, A David; Welberry, T Richard

    2009-08-01

    A low-temperature structural phase transition has been observed for form (II) of benzocaine (BZC). Lowering the temperature doubles the b-axis repeat and changes the space group from P2(1)2(1)2(1) to P112(1) with gamma now 99.37 degrees. The structure is twinned, the twin rule corresponding to a 2(1) screw rotation parallel to a. The phase transition is associated with a sequential displacement parallel to a of zigzag bi-layers of ribbons perpendicular to b*. No similar phase transition was observed for form (I) and this was attributed to the different packing symmetries of the two room-temperature polymorphic forms.

  1. Esterification of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate in non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ilham, Zul; Saka, Shiro

    2016-01-01

    Conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production to glycerol carbonate was studied by esterification with dimethyl carbonate in a non-catalytic supercritical condition. It was found that in a non-catalytic supercritical condition, glycerol at higher purity gave higher yield of glycerol carbonate at 98 wt% after reaction at 300 °C/20-40 MPa/15 min. The yield of glycerol carbonate was observed to increase with molar ratio, temperature, pressure and time until a certain equilibrium limit. The existence of impurities such as water and remnants of alkaline catalyst in crude glycerol will direct the reaction to produce glycidol. Although impurities might not be desirable, the non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate could be an alternative method for conversion of glycerol from biodiesel production to value-added glycerol carbonate.Graphical abstractPlausible reaction scheme for conversion of glycerol to glycerol carbonate in non-catalytic supercritical dimethyl carbonate.

  2. Synthesis and Properties of Nanoparticle Forms Saponite Clay, Cancrinite Zeolite and Phase Mixtures Thereof

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hua

    2010-01-01

    The low-temperature synthesis (90°C) of nanoparticle forms of a pure phase smectic clay (saponite) and zeolite (cancrinite) is reported, along with phase mixtures thereof. A synthesis gel corresponding to the Si:Al:Mg unit cell composition of saponite (3.6:0.40:3.0) and a NaOH/Si ratio of 1.39 affords the pure phase clay with disordered nanolayer stacking. Progressive increases in the NaOH/Si ratio up to a value of 8.33 results in the co-crystallization of first garronite and then cancrinite zeolites with nanolath morphology. The resulting phase mixtures exhibit a compound particulate structure of intertwined saponite nanolayers and cancrinite nanolaths that cannot be formed through physical mixing of the pure phase end members. Under magnesium-free conditions, pure phase cancrinite nanocrystals are formed. The Si/Al ratio of the reaction mixture affects the particle morphology as well as the chemical composition of the cancrinite zeolite. Ordinarily, cancrinite crystallizes with a Si/Al ratio of 1.0, but a silicon-rich form of the zeolite (Si/Al=1.25) is crystallized at low temperature from a silica rich synthesis gel, as evidenced by 29Si NMR spectroscopy and XEDS-TEM. Owing to the exceptionally high external surface areas of the pure phase clay (875 m2/g) and zeolite end members (8.9 - 40 m2/g), as well as their unique mixed phase composites (124 - 329 m2/g), these synthetic derivatives are promising model nanoparticles for studies of the bioavailability of poly-aromatic hydrocarbons immobilized in silicate bearing sediments and soils. PMID:21709774

  3. Synthesis and Properties of Nanoparticle Forms Saponite Clay, Cancrinite Zeolite and Phase Mixtures Thereof.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hua; Pinnavaia, Thomas J

    2010-09-01

    The low-temperature synthesis (90°C) of nanoparticle forms of a pure phase smectic clay (saponite) and zeolite (cancrinite) is reported, along with phase mixtures thereof. A synthesis gel corresponding to the Si:Al:Mg unit cell composition of saponite (3.6:0.40:3.0) and a NaOH/Si ratio of 1.39 affords the pure phase clay with disordered nanolayer stacking. Progressive increases in the NaOH/Si ratio up to a value of 8.33 results in the co-crystallization of first garronite and then cancrinite zeolites with nanolath morphology. The resulting phase mixtures exhibit a compound particulate structure of intertwined saponite nanolayers and cancrinite nanolaths that cannot be formed through physical mixing of the pure phase end members. Under magnesium-free conditions, pure phase cancrinite nanocrystals are formed. The Si/Al ratio of the reaction mixture affects the particle morphology as well as the chemical composition of the cancrinite zeolite. Ordinarily, cancrinite crystallizes with a Si/Al ratio of 1.0, but a silicon-rich form of the zeolite (Si/Al=1.25) is crystallized at low temperature from a silica rich synthesis gel, as evidenced by (29)Si NMR spectroscopy and XEDS-TEM. Owing to the exceptionally high external surface areas of the pure phase clay (875 m(2)/g) and zeolite end members (8.9 - 40 m(2)/g), as well as their unique mixed phase composites (124 - 329 m(2)/g), these synthetic derivatives are promising model nanoparticles for studies of the bioavailability of poly-aromatic hydrocarbons immobilized in silicate bearing sediments and soils.

  4. Final waste forms project: Performance criteria for phase I treatability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliam, T.M.; Hutchins, D.A.; Chodak, P. III

    1994-06-01

    This document defines the product performance criteria to be used in Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project. In Phase I, treatability studies will be performed to provide {open_quotes}proof-of-principle{close_quotes} data to establish the viability of stabilization/solidification (S/S) technologies. This information is required by March 1995. In Phase II, further treatability studies, some at the pilot scale, will be performed to provide sufficient data to allow treatment alternatives identified in Phase I to be more fully developed and evaluated, as well as to reduce performance uncertainties for those methods chosen to treat a specific waste. Three main factors influence the development and selection of an optimum waste form formulation and hence affect selection of performance criteria. These factors are regulatory, process-specific, and site-specific waste form standards or requirements. Clearly, the optimum waste form formulation will require consideration of performance criteria constraints from each of the three categories. Phase I will focus only on the regulatory criteria. These criteria may be considered the minimum criteria for an acceptable waste form. In other words, a S/S technology is considered viable only if it meet applicable regulatory criteria. The criteria to be utilized in the Phase I treatability studies were primarily taken from Environmental Protection Agency regulations addressed in 40 CFR 260 through 265 and 268; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations addressed in 10 CFR 61. Thus the majority of the identified criteria are independent of waste form matrix composition (i.e., applicable to cement, glass, organic binders etc.).

  5. Microstructural Characterization of U Coprecipitated Phases Formed in Bentonic-Granitic Groundwater and Under Anoxic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Quinones, Javier; Iglesias, Eduardo; Cobo, Jose M.; Martinez Esparza, Aurora; Gomez de Salazar, Jose Maria

    2007-07-01

    For improving the accuracy of the performance assessment studies related to the spent fuel safety under storage conditions, it is necessary to develop a new matrix alteration model. These models must be based on laboratory experiences and they should be capable of extrapolating storage environmental conditions. The most recent models developed include the oxidation and dissolution process of the spent fuel matrix, but the influence of a possible process of secondary phase formation over the spent fuel surface was not yet taken into account. This is a key process that could produce a reduction of the matrix dissolution rate/radiation shielding behaviour; however, the surface precipitation of the secondary phase could induce a localized corrosion process, in which case the dissolution rate of the spent fuel would be increased. This paper is focussed on microstructural characterization of secondary phases formed in co-precipitation experiments performed under anoxic conditions in granitic-bentonitic simulated groundwater. In order to simulate the influence of the container material, the co-precipitation experiments were performed in the absence and presence of iron powder. The solid phases formed were characterized using the following techniques: XRD; SEM-EDX, and TEM-EDX. The XRD diffraction pattern showed that under anoxic conditions, a mixture of phases were obtained (sodium and potassium uranate and schoepite), whereas uranate phases were detected when only iron was present. The characterization study indicates that the U secondary phase formed (under reducing conditions and in the presence of iron powder) growth from the iron surface. The crystal size of the secondary phase is independent of the presence of iron powder (and it is always less than 3 {mu}m). Furthermore, the microstructural study showed the growing of U phases over iron powder. (authors)

  6. Random lasing from cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres dispersed in glycerol.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Luo, Dan; Chen, Rui

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate random lasing from a scattering system formed by a cholesteric liquid crystal dispersed in glycerol. Strong scattering of light is produced from the interference between the cholesteric liquid crystal microsphere and glycerol and leads to random lasing. The optical properties of random lasing, such as intensity, threshold, and the temperature effect on lasing emission are demonstrated. The random laser is distinguished from the band-edge laser generated within the cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres by analyzing the positions of the photonic band-edge of the cholesteric liquid crystal and the photoluminescence of the doped laser dye. The random laser from cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres in glycerol possesses a simple fabrication process, small volume, and low threshold, which enable it to be used in speckle-free imaging, target identification, biomedicine, document coding, and other photonic devices.

  7. Effect of chirality on monoacylglycerol ester monolayer characteristics: 3-monostearoyl-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed

    Vollhardt, D; Brezesinski, G

    2017-03-08

    The effect of chirality on the thermodynamic behavior, the morphological features, and the 2D lattice structures of 3-monostearoyl-sn-glycerol monolayers is studied. The present study focusses on the influence of the alkyl chain length on the chiral discrimination. Surface pressure-area (π-A) isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), and particularly, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) are the experimental basis of the presented results. The π-A isotherms of the enantiomeric 3-monostearoyl-sn-glycerol monolayers measured between 25 and 38 °C resemble those of the racemic 1-monostearoyl-rac-glycerol monolayers, thus indicating small energetic differences between the enantiomeric and the racemic forms. The absolute ΔS values increase as the temperature decreases and thus, the ordering of the condensed phase increases at lower temperatures. The extrapolation to zero ΔS provides a critical temperature Tc of 42.1 °C (315.3 K), above which the monolayer cannot be compressed into the condensed state. Despite the great tendency of the 3-monostearoyl-sn-glycerol domains to develop irregular deviations in shape and inner texture, regular domains similar to those of the racemic monoacylglycerol esters are also formed. GIXD measurements performed over a large range of lateral pressures at four different temperatures (5, 10, 15 and 20 °C) indicate the dominance of the chiral nature. Contour plots with three clearly separated diffraction signals are observable in a large pressure range which is shifted to higher lateral pressures with increasing temperature. The comparison with the contour plots of the homologous 3-monopalmitoyl-sn-glycerol monolayers reveals the stronger dominance of the chiral nature with increasing alkyl chain length and thus, demonstrates the stronger influence of the lattice symmetry. The lattice data obtained by fitting the contour plots with 3 or 2 peaks demonstrate the resemblance to orthorhombic structures with NN tilted molecules at

  8. Retention of neptunium in uranyl alteration phases formed during spent fuel corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.C.; Finch, R.J.; Finn, P.A.; Bates, J.K.

    1997-09-01

    Uranyl oxide hydrate phases are known to form during contact of oxide spent nuclear fuel with water under oxidizing conditions; however, less is known about the fate of fission and neutron capture products during this alteration. We describe, for the first time, evidence that neptunium can become incorporated into the uranyl secondary phase, dehydrated schoepite (UO{sub 3}.8H{sub 2}O). Based on the long term durability of natural schoepite, the retention of neptunium in this alteration phase may be significant during spent fuel corrosion in an unsaturated geologic repository.

  9. Aqueous Two-Phase Systems formed by Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polysaccharides and Acetonitrile

    PubMed Central

    de Brito Cardoso, Gustavo; Souza, Isabela Nascimento; Pereira, Matheus M.; Freire, Mara G.; Soares, Cleide Mara Faria; Lima, Álvaro Silva

    2015-01-01

    In this work, it is shown that novel aqueous two-phase systems can be formed by the combination of acetonitrile and polysaccharides, namely dextran. Several ternary phase diagrams were determined at 25 °C for the systems composed of water + acetonitrile + dextran. The effect of the dextran molecular weight (6,000, 40,000 and 100,000 g.mol−1) was ascertained toward their ability to undergo liquid-liquid demixing. An increase in the dextran molecular weight favors the phase separation. Furthermore, the effect of temperature (25, 35 and 45 °C) was evaluated for the system constituted by the dextran of higher molecular weight. Lower temperatures are favorable for phase separation since lower amounts of dextran and acetonitrile are required for the creation of aqueous two-phase systems. In general, acetonitrile is enriched in the top phase while dextran is majorly concentrated in the bottom phase. The applicability of this new type of two-phase systems as liquid-liquid extraction approaches was also evaluated by the study of the partition behavior of a well-known antioxidant – vanillin - and used here as a model biomolecule. The optimized conditions led to an extraction efficiency of vanillin of 95% at the acetonitrile-rich phase. PMID:25729320

  10. Aqueous Two-Phase Systems formed by Biocompatible and Biodegradable Polysaccharides and Acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    de Brito Cardoso, Gustavo; Souza, Isabela Nascimento; Pereira, Matheus M; Freire, Mara G; Soares, Cleide Mara Faria; Lima, Álvaro Silva

    2014-11-05

    In this work, it is shown that novel aqueous two-phase systems can be formed by the combination of acetonitrile and polysaccharides, namely dextran. Several ternary phase diagrams were determined at 25 °C for the systems composed of water + acetonitrile + dextran. The effect of the dextran molecular weight (6,000, 40,000 and 100,000 g.mol(-1)) was ascertained toward their ability to undergo liquid-liquid demixing. An increase in the dextran molecular weight favors the phase separation. Furthermore, the effect of temperature (25, 35 and 45 °C) was evaluated for the system constituted by the dextran of higher molecular weight. Lower temperatures are favorable for phase separation since lower amounts of dextran and acetonitrile are required for the creation of aqueous two-phase systems. In general, acetonitrile is enriched in the top phase while dextran is majorly concentrated in the bottom phase. The applicability of this new type of two-phase systems as liquid-liquid extraction approaches was also evaluated by the study of the partition behavior of a well-known antioxidant - vanillin - and used here as a model biomolecule. The optimized conditions led to an extraction efficiency of vanillin of 95% at the acetonitrile-rich phase.

  11. Graphene/phase change material nanocomposites: light-driven, reversible electrical resistivity regulation via form-stable phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunming; Mi, Hongyi; Zheng, Qifeng; Ma, Zhenqiang; Gong, Shaoqin

    2015-02-04

    Innovative photoresponsive materials are needed to address the complexity of optical control systems. Here, we report a new type of photoresponsive nanomaterial composed of graphene and a form-stable phase change material (PCM) that exhibited a 3 orders of magnitude change in electrical resistivity upon light illumination while retaining its overall original solid form at the macroscopic level. This dramatic change in electrical resistivity also occurred reversibly through the on/off control of light illumination. This was attributed to the reversible phase transition (i.e., melting/recrystallization) behavior of the microscopic crystalline domains present in the form-stable PCM. The reversible phase transition observed in the graphene/PCM nanocomposite was induced by a reversible temperature change through the on/off control of light illumination because graphene can effectively absorb light energy and convert it to thermal energy. In addition, this graphene/PCM nanocomposite also possessed excellent mechanical properties. Such photoresponsive materials have many potential applications, including flexible electronics.

  12. Interfacial reaction using particle-immobilized reagents in a fluidized reactor. Determination of glycerol in biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Shishov, Andrey; Zabrodin, Andrey; Moskvin, Leonid; Andruch, Vasil; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-03-31

    A novel fluidized beads strategy for utilization of particle-immobilized reagents in flow analysis was developed in this study. The performance of the suggested strategy was demonstrated by the determination of glycerol in biodiesel. This analytical task was used as a proof-of-concept example. The method is based on on-line extraction of glycerol from biodiesel into aqueous stationary phase of extraction-chromatographic column, followed by elution and spectrophotometric determination in the form of copper glycerate formed in a fluidized reactor of stepwise injection system. The floating of cation exchange resin Dowex(®) 50WX4, saturated with Cu(II) ions in liquid phase, was accomplished by air-bubbling. The linear range was from 100 to 1000 mg kg(-1), and the limit of detection, calculated as 3s of a blank test (n = 5), was found to be 30 mg kg(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of biodiesel and biodiesel-blend (B 20) samples.

  13. Beam Forming HF Radar Beam Pattern Measurements and Phase Offset Calibration Using a UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahl, D.; Voulgaris, G.

    2016-12-01

    It has been shown that measuring antenna patterns for direction finding radars improves surface current measurements. For beam forming radars, the beam pattern of the receive array is assumed to be similar to that derived using theoretical calculations. However, local environmental conditions may lead to deviations (i.e., larger sidelobes and beamwidth) from this idealized beam pattern. This becomes particularly important for wave measurements that are sensitive to interference from sidelobes. Common techniques for beam forming HF radar phase calibration include "cross calibration", using a secondary beam forming site as the signal source, or calibration using a ship. The former method is limited to only one direction; on straight coastlines this is often at a large angle from the radar bore site where the beam width and uncertainty in phase calibration might be large. The latter technique requires chartering a ship with an appropriate reflector or transmitter, or the identification of ships of opportunity. Recent advances in UAV technology combined with an easement of FAA restrictions (Part 107) allows phase calibrations and beam pattern measurements to be completed on an HF radar site using a small transmitter attached to a UAV. This presentation describes the use of a UAV and the development of a method for beam forming phase calibration and beam pattern measurements. This method uses the UAV as a moving signal source to provide true sidelobe and beamwidth measurements. Results are shown from a calibration carried out at a beam forming (WERA) radar site (8.3 MHz) located in Georgetown, SC and are compared with results from a cross calibration. Phase calibrations acquired by the UAV showed a dependence on azimuthal angle from the radar bore site. Also, the beam patterns obtained were found to be narrower than those derived using the stationary source method. The effect of the new phase values derived using this method on the accuracy of radial velocities will be

  14. Ammonia control and neurocognitive outcome among urea cycle disorder patients treated with glycerol phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Diaz, George A; Krivitzky, Lauren S; Mokhtarani, Masoud; Rhead, William; Bartley, James; Feigenbaum, Annette; Longo, Nicola; Berquist, William; Berry, Susan A; Gallagher, Renata; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Bartholomew, Dennis; Harding, Cary O; Cederbaum, Stephen; McCandless, Shawn E; Smith, Wendy; Vockley, Gerald; Bart, Stephen A; Korson, Mark S; Kronn, David; Zori, Roberto; Merritt, J Lawrence; C S Nagamani, Sandesh; Mauney, Joseph; Lemons, Cynthia; Dickinson, Klara; Moors, Tristen L; Coakley, Dion F; Scharschmidt, Bruce F; Lee, Brendan

    2013-06-01

    Glycerol phenylbutyrate is under development for treatment of urea cycle disorders (UCDs), rare inherited metabolic disorders manifested by hyperammonemia and neurological impairment. We report the results of a pivotal Phase 3, randomized, double-blind, crossover trial comparing ammonia control, assessed as 24-hour area under the curve (NH3 -AUC0-24hr ), and pharmacokinetics during treatment with glycerol phenylbutyrate versus sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA) in adult UCD patients and the combined results of four studies involving short- and long-term glycerol phenylbutyrate treatment of UCD patients ages 6 and above. Glycerol phenylbutyrate was noninferior to NaPBA with respect to ammonia control in the pivotal study, with mean (standard deviation, SD) NH3 -AUC0-24hr of 866 (661) versus 977 (865) μmol·h/L for glycerol phenylbutyrate and NaPBA, respectively. Among 65 adult and pediatric patients completing three similarly designed short-term comparisons of glycerol phenylbutyrate versus NaPBA, NH3 -AUC0-24hr was directionally lower on glycerol phenylbutyrate in each study, similar among all subgroups, and significantly lower (P < 0.05) in the pooled analysis, as was plasma glutamine. The 24-hour ammonia profiles were consistent with the slow-release behavior of glycerol phenylbutyrate and better overnight ammonia control. During 12 months of open-label glycerol phenylbutyrate treatment, average ammonia was normal in adult and pediatric patients and executive function among pediatric patients, including behavioral regulation, goal setting, planning, and self-monitoring, was significantly improved. Glycerol phenylbutyrate exhibits favorable pharmacokinetics and ammonia control relative to NaPBA in UCD patients, and long-term glycerol phenylbutyrate treatment in pediatric UCD patients was associated with improved executive function (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00551200, NCT00947544, NCT00992459, NCT00947297). (HEPATOLOGY 2012). Copyright © 2012 American Association for the

  15. Process for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase of catalytically active material

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Dale L.; Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei

    1995-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase reaction product of catalytically active material comprising one or more alkali metals, one or more alkaline earth metals, and one or more Group VIII transition metals. The process comprises reacting together one or more alkali metal oxides and/or salts, one or more alkaline earth metal oxides and/or salts, one or more Group VIII transition metal oxides and/or salts, capable of forming a catalytically active reaction product, in the optional presence of an additional source of oxygen, using a laser beam to ablate from a target such metal compound reactants in the form of a vapor in a deposition chamber, resulting in the deposition, on a heated substrate in the chamber, of the desired oxide phase reaction product. The resulting product may be formed in variable, but reproducible, stoichiometric ratios. The homogeneous oxide solid phase product is useful as a catalyst, and can be produced in many physical forms, including thin films, particulate forms, coatings on catalyst support structures, and coatings on structures used in reaction apparatus in which the reaction product of the invention will serve as a catalyst.

  16. Glycerol, a metabolic end product of Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Steinbüchel, A; Müller, M

    1986-07-01

    Glycerol was demonstrated as an end product of anaerobic glucose metabolism in Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus, produced in addition to acetate, H2, CO2, and lactate or succinate. In T. vaginalis strain C-1, glycerol amounted to 16% of the fermentation products and was formed at an average rate of 38 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1. Corresponding figures for T. foetus strain KV1 were 7% and 4.8 nmol min-1 (mg protein)-1. The amounts of glycerol detected compensated almost exactly for the deficits in fermentation products recognized earlier, thus complete redox balances can now be provided for both organisms. The metronidazole-resistant T. foetus strain KV1-1MR-100 excreted only negligible amounts of glycerol and carried out an ethanol-CO2 fermentation. Aerobiosis hardly affected glycerol formation in T. vaginalis strains C-1 and NYH 286, but almost completely abolished it in T. foetus strain KV1. An NADP-dependent glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and a Mg2+-dependent glycerol 3-phosphatase were detected in the cytosol of both species. The phosphatase is distinct from the particle-bound nonspecific acid phosphatase. Glycerol kinase activity was not detected in either organism. Enhanced pCO2 did not affect the ratio of fermentation products in T. vaginalis strain C-1, but significantly increased the amount of succinate, and decreased the amounts of acetate, H2, and CO2, formed by T. foetus.

  17. Dietary tools to modulate glycogen storage in gilthead seabream muscle: glycerol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tomé S; Matos, Elisabete; Cordeiro, Odete D; Colen, Rita; Wulff, Tune; Sampaio, Eduardo; Sousa, Vera; Valente, Luisa M P; Gonçalves, Amparo; Silva, Joana M G; Bandarra, Narcisa; Nunes, Maria Leonor; Dinis, Maria Teresa; Dias, Jorge; Jessen, Flemming; Rodrigues, Pedro M

    2012-10-24

    The quality and shelf life of fish meat products depend on the skeletal muscle's energetic state at slaughter, as meat decomposition processes can be exacerbated by energy depletion. In this study, we tested dietary glycerol as a way of replenishing muscle glycogen reserves of farmed gilthead seabream. Two diets were tested in duplicate (n = 42/tank). Results show 5% inclusion of crude glycerol in gilthead seabream diets induces increased muscle glycogen, ATP levels and firmness, with no deleterious effects in terms of growth, proximate composition, fatty acid profile, oxidative state, and organoleptic properties (aroma and color). Proteomic analysis showed a low impact of glycerol-supplementation on muscle metabolism, with most changes probably reflecting increased stress coping capacity in glycerol-fed fish. This suggests inclusion of crude glycerol in gilthead seabream diets (particularly in the finishing phase) seems like a viable strategy to increase glycogen deposition in muscle without negatively impacting fish welfare and quality.

  18. Characterization of phases formed between U-Pu-Mo fuels and Fe-12Cr cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Miller, Brandon D.; Papesch, Cynthia A.; Cole, James I.

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to high temperatures and irradiation can lead to interaction between fuel and cladding constituents, inter-diffusion, and formation of brittle or low-melting phases. Therefore, understanding of fuel-cladding interaction (FCCI) is critical for evaluation of fuel performance in a reactor environment. In this contribution, phases formed between U-22Pu-4Mo and U-25Pu-15Mo (in wt%) fuel alloys and Fe-12Cr cladding were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM/TEM) techniques. Phases formed within FCCI layers in both alloys were identified by implementing selective area diffraction pattern analysis as Cr0.3Mo0.7 (Im-3m), Fe2U (Fd-3m), UCrFe (Fd-3m), and Fe2Pu (Fd-3m). Phases formed at the end of the FCCI layer in the U-22Pu-4Mo alloy included UCrFe (Fd-3m), Fe2U (Fd-3m), and Cr2FeO4 (Fd-3m) while in the U-25Pu-15Mo alloy the phases were consistent with Cr0.49Fe0.51 (P42/mnm), Cr0.8Fe0.2 (Im-3m), and UCrFe (Fd-3m).

  19. Stability of intermediate phases forming on interaction of silicon and germanium with phosphorus and arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Ugai, Ya.A.; Goncharov, E.G.; Sokolov, L.I.; Pshestanchik, V.R.

    1987-12-01

    By comparing the comparative stability of the intermediate phases in the systems Si(Ge)-P(As) we showed that for the compounds formed by adjacent components in the periodic system the determining factors in the interaction are the electronic configuration and the relative difference of the covalent radii.

  20. 77 FR 38061 - Mobility Fund Phase I Auction Supplemental Short-Form Instructions and Other Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Phase I Auction for completing FCC Form 180, announce the availability of certain updated files and..., please provide the appropriate FCC document number, for example, DA 12-947. The Supplemental Filing... site: http://wireless.fcc.gov/auctions/901/ or by using the search function for AU Docket No. 12-25...

  1. Looking for phase-space structures in star-forming regions: an MST-based methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Emilio J.; González, Marta

    2016-03-01

    We present a method for analysing the phase space of star-forming regions. In particular we are searching for clumpy structures in the 3D sub-space formed by two position coordinates and radial velocity. The aim of the method is the detection of kinematic segregated radial velocity groups, that is, radial velocity intervals whose associated stars are spatially concentrated. To this end we define a kinematic segregation index, tilde{Λ }(RV), based on the Minimum Spanning Tree graph algorithm, which is estimated for a set of radial velocity intervals in the region. When tilde{Λ }(RV) is significantly greater than 1 we consider that this bin represents a grouping in the phase space. We split a star-forming region into radial velocity bins and calculate the kinematic segregation index for each bin, and then we obtain the spectrum of kinematic groupings, which enables a quick visualization of the kinematic behaviour of the region under study. We carried out numerical models of different configurations in the sub-space of the phase space formed by the coordinates and the that various case studies illustrate. The analysis of the test cases demonstrates the potential of the new methodology for detecting different kind of groupings in phase space.

  2. Improved glycerol utilization by a triacylglycerol-producing Rhodococcus opacus strain for renewable fuels.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kazuhiko; Radek, Andreas; Plassmeier, Jens K; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol generated during renewable fuel production processes is potentially an attractive substrate for the production of value-added materials by fermentation. An engineered strain MITXM-61 of the oleaginous bacterium Rhodococcus opacus produces large amounts of intracellular triacylglycerols (TAGs) for lipid-based biofuels on high concentrations of glucose and xylose. However, on glycerol medium, MITXM-61 does not produce TAGs and grows poorly. The aim of the present work was to construct a TAG-producing R. opacus strain capable of high-cell-density cultivation at high glycerol concentrations. An adaptive evolution strategy was applied to improve the conversion of glycerol to TAGs in R. opacus MITXM-61. An evolved strain, MITGM-173, grown on a defined medium with 16 g L(-1) glycerol, produced 2.3 g L(-1) of TAGs, corresponding to 40.4% of the cell dry weight (CDW) and 0.144 g g(-1) of TAG yield per glycerol consumed. MITGM-173 was able to grow on high concentrations (greater than 150 g L(-1)) of glycerol. Cultivated in a medium containing an initial concentration of 20 g L(-1) glycerol, 40 g L(-1) glucose, and 40 g L(-1) xylose, MITGM-173 was capable of simultaneously consuming the mixed substrates and yielding 13.6 g L(-1) of TAGs, representing 51.2% of the CDM. In addition, when 20 g L(-1) glycerol was pulse-loaded into the culture with 40 g L(-1) glucose and 40 g L(-1) xylose at the stationary growth phase, MITGM-173 produced 14.3 g L(-1) of TAGs corresponding to 51.1% of the CDW although residual glycerol in the culture was observed. The addition of 20 g L(-1) glycerol in the glucose/xylose mix resulted in a TAG yield per glycerol consumed of 0.170 g g(-1) on the initial addition and 0.279 g g(-1) on the pulse addition of glycerol. We have generated a TAG-producing R. opacus MITGM-173 strain that shows significantly improved glycerol utilization in comparison to the parental strain. The present study demonstrates that the

  3. TEM examination of phases formed between U-Pu-Zr fuel and Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Miller, Brandon D.; Papesch, Cynthia A.; Cole, James I.

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to high temperatures and irradiation results in interaction and interdiffusion between fuel and cladding constituents that can lead to formation of undesirable brittle or low-melting point phases. A diffusion couple study has been conducted to understand fuel-cladding interaction occurring between U-22Pu-4Zr (in wt%) fuel and pure Fe at elevated temperatures. The phases formed within fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) layer have been characterized in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). The phases formed within FCCI layer have been identified as Fe2U (Fd-3m), FeU6 (I4/mcm), Fe2Zr (Fd-3m), FeZr2 (I4/mcm), Fe2Pu (Fd-3m), UZr2 (P6/mmm), β-Zr (Im-3m), and ZrO2 (Fm-3m).

  4. Good's buffers as novel phase-forming components of ionic-liquid-based aqueous biphasic systems.

    PubMed

    Luís, Andreia; Dinis, Teresa B V; Passos, Helena; Taha, Mohamed; Freire, Mara G

    2015-09-15

    Aiming at the development of self-buffering and benign extraction/separation processes, this work reports a novel class of aqueous biphasic systems (ABS) composed of ionic liquids (ILs) and organic biological buffers (Good's buffers, GBs). A large array of ILs and GBs was investigated, revealing than only the more hydrophobic and fluorinated ILs are able to form ABS. For these systems, the phase diagrams, tie-lines, tie-line lengths, and critical points were determined at 25 °C. The ABS were then evaluated as alternative liquid-liquid extraction strategies for two amino acids (L-phenylalanine and L-tryptophan). The single-step extraction efficiencies for the GB-rich phase range between 22.4 and 100.0 % (complete extraction). Contrarily to the most conventional IL-salt ABS, in most of the systems investigated, the amino acids preferentially migrate for the most biocompatible and hydrophilic GB-rich phase. Remarkably, in two of the studied ABS, L-phenylalanine completely partitions to the GB-rich phase while L-tryptophan shows a preferential affinity for the opposite phase. These results show that the extraction efficiencies of similar amino acids can be tailored by the design of the chemical structures of the phase-forming components, creating thus new possibilities for the use of IL-based ABS in biotechnological separations.

  5. Ruminal fermentation of propylene glycol and glycerol.

    PubMed

    Trabue, Steven; Scoggin, Kenwood; Tjandrakusuma, Siska; Rasmussen, Mark A; Reilly, Peter J

    2007-08-22

    Bovine rumen fluid was fermented anaerobically with 25 mM R-propylene glycol, S-propylene glycol, or glycerol added. After 24 h, all of the propylene glycol enantiomers and approximately 80% of the glycerol were metabolized. Acetate, propionate, butyrate, valerate, and caproate concentrations, in decreasing order, all increased with incubation time. Addition of any of the three substrates somewhat decreased acetate formation, while addition of either propylene glycol increased propionate formation but decreased that of butyrate. R- and S-propylene glycol did not differ significantly in either their rates of disappearance or the products formed when they were added to the fermentation medium. Fermentations of rumen fluid containing propylene glycol emitted the sulfur-containing gases 1-propanethiol, 1-(methylthio)propane, methylthiirane, 2,4-dimethylthiophene, 1-(methylthio)-1-propanethiol, dipropyl disulfide, 1-(propylthio)-1-propanethiol, dipropyl trisulfide, 3,5-diethyl-1,2,4-trithiolane, 2-ethyl-1,3-dithiane, and 2,4,6-triethyl-1,3,5-trithiane. Metabolic pathways that yield each of these gases are proposed. The sulfur-containing gases produced during propylene glycol fermentation in the rumen may contribute to the toxic effects seen in cattle when high doses are administered for therapeutic purposes.

  6. Thermal performance study of form-stable composite phase change material with polyacrylic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Shin Yiing; Munusamy, Yamuna; Ong, Kok Seng; Chee, Swee Yong; Sanmuggam, Shimalaa

    2017-04-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is one of the most popular and widely used as thermal energy storage material because it is able to absorb and release a large amount of latent heat during a phase change process over a narrow temperature range. In this work, the form-stable composite PCM was prepared by blending of PMMA and myristic acid in different weight percentage. PMMA was used as a supporting material while myristic acid was used as PCM. Theoretically, PCM can be encapsulated in the support material after blending. However, a small amount of liquid PCMs can leak out from supporting material due to the volume change in phase change process. Therefore, a form-stable composite PCM with polyacrylic coating was studied. Leakage test was carried out to determine the leakage percentage of the form-stable composite PCM. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to characterize the chemical compatibility of the form-stable PCM composite while differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to study the melting, freezing point and the latent heat of melting and freezing for the form-stable composite PCM.

  7. Discovery of a Frank-Kasper sigma phase in sphere-forming block copolymer melts.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangwoo; Bluemle, Michael J; Bates, Frank S

    2010-10-15

    Sphere-forming block copolymers are known to self-assemble into body-centered cubic crystals near the order-disorder transition temperature. Small-angle x-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments on diblock and tetrablock copolymer melts have revealed an equilibrium phase characterized by a large tetragonal unit cell containing 30 microphase-separated spheres. This structure, referred to as the sigma (σ) phase by Frank and Kasper more than 50 years ago, nucleates and grows from the body-centered cubic phase similar to its occurrence in metal alloys and is a crystal approximant to dodecagonal quasicrystals. Formation of the σ phase in undiluted linear block copolymers (and certain branched dendrimers) appears to be mediated by macromolecular packing frustration, an entropic contribution to the interparticle interactions that control the sphere-packing geometry.

  8. Model membranes prepared with ceramide EOS, cholesterol and free fatty acids form a unique lamellar phase.

    PubMed

    Groen, Daniel; Gooris, Gert S; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2010-03-16

    The lipid matrix present in the human stratum corneum (the thin, uppermost layer of the skin) is considered to play a crucial role in the skin barrier function. The lipid matrix consists of ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. The 13 nm lamellar phase present in the lipid matrix of the stratum corneum is very characteristic and plays an important role in the skin barrier function. One subclass of ceramides with a linoleic acid linked to a very long acyl (referred to as EOS) plays a crucial role in the formation of the 13 nm lamellar phase. In this article, we focus on the lipid phase behavior of EOS mixed with cholesterol or with cholesterol and free fatty acids. Our studies reveal that an equimolar ratio of EOS, cholesterol, and free fatty acids forms a lamellar phase with a very long repeat distance of approximately 14.7 nm. This phase exhibits exceptional behavior in that in the thermotropic response the fatty acid chains and the ceramide chains undergo an order-disorder transition in different temperature ranges while part of the hydrocarbon chains of ceramides and fatty acids are mixing in the orthorhombic lattice. On the basis of these observations, a molecular model for the 14.7 nm phase has been proposed in which the lipids are organized in a lamellar phase with three different lipid layers in a symmetric unit cell.

  9. Lipase-catalyzed simultaneous biosynthesis of biodiesel and glycerol carbonate from corn oil in dimethyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Min, Ji Young; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2011-09-01

    Biodiesel [fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs)] and glycerol carbonate were synthesized from corn oil and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) via transesterification using lipase (Novozyme 435) in solvent-free reaction in which excess DMC was used as the substrate and reaction medium. Glycerol carbonate was also simultaneously formed from DMC and glycerol. Conversions of FAMEs and glycerol carbonate were examined in batch reactions. The FAMEs and glycerol carbonate reached 94 and 62.5% from oil and DMC (molar ratio of 1:10) with 0.2% (v/v) water and 10% (w/w) Novozyme 435 (based on oil weight) at 60 °C. When Novozyme 435 was washed with acetone after each reaction, more than 80% activity still remained after seven recycling.

  10. The role of glycerol in the pathogenic lifestyle of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Foster, Andrew J; Ryder, Lauren S; Kershaw, Michael J; Talbot, Nicholas J

    2017-03-01

    The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae elaborates a specialized cell called an appressorium, which is used to breach the tough outer cuticle of a rice leaf, enabling the fungus entry to host plant cells. The appressorium generates enormous turgor by accumulating glycerol to very high concentrations within the cell. Glycerol accumulation and melanization of the appressorium cell wall collectively drive turgor-mediated penetration of the rice leaf. In this review, we discuss the potential metabolic sources of glycerol in the rice blast fungus and how appressorium turgor is focused as physical force at the base of the infection cell, leading to the formation of a rigid penetration peg. We review recent studies of M. oryzae and other relevant appressorium-forming fungi which shed light on how glycerol is synthesized and how appressorium turgor is regulated. Finally, we provide some questions to guide avenues of future research that will be important in fully understanding the role of glycerol in rice blast disease.

  11. Impact of oxygen limitation on glycerol-based biopolymer production by bacterial enrichments.

    PubMed

    Moralejo-Gárate, Helena; Kleerebezem, Robbert; Mosquera-Corral, Anuska; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2013-03-01

    The increasing production of bioethanol and biodiesel has resulted in the generation of a massive amount of crude glycerol, inducing the need for effective valorization of these waste streams. One of the valorization options could be through conversion of crude glycerol into a biopolymer using microbial community engineering in a feast-famine process. A complicating factor in the production of biopolymers from glycerol encountered in previous works is that two different types of polymers can be formed; polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) and polyglucose. Here we describe the effect of limiting the oxygen supply rate on the polymer distribution with the aim of defining the conditions that favour the conversion of glycerol in one single polymer. The decrease of oxygen supply rate during the biopolymer maximization step did not influence glycerol partitioning among PHA and polyglucose, but oxygen limitation during the community enrichment step favoured polyglucose storage over PHA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Polyurethane foams based on crude glycerol-derived biopolyols: One-pot preparation of biopolyols with branched fatty acid ester chains and its effects on foam formation and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Cong; Luo, Xiaolan; Li, Tao; Tong, Xinjie; Li, Yebo

    2014-01-01

    Environmentally friendly biopolyols have been produced with crude glycerol as the sole feedstock using a one-pot thermochemical conversion process without the addition of extra catalysts and reagents. Structural features of these biopolyols were characterized by rheology analysis. Rigid polyurethane (PU) foams were obtained from these crude glycerol-based biopolyols and the foaming mechanism was explored. Investigations revealed that partial carbonyl groups hydrogen-bonded with NeH were replaced by aromatic rings after the introduction of branched fatty acid ester chains in the “urea rich” phase, and that distinct microphases had formed in the foams. Studies showed that branched fatty acid ester chains in the biopolyols played an important role in reducing the degree of microphase separation and stabilizing bubbles during foaming processes. PU foams with thermal conductivity comparable to commercial products made from petroleum-based polyols were obtained. These studies show the potential for development of PU foams based on crude glycerol, a renewable resource.

  13. Glycerol and bioglycerol conversion in supercritical water for hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Yu-Wu, Q M; Weiss-Hortala, E; Barna, R; Boucard, H; Bulza, S

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic transesterification of vegetable oils leads to biodiesel and an alkaline feed (bioglycerol and organic residues, such as esters, alcohols. . .). The conversion ofbioglycerol into valuable organic molecules represents a sustainable industrial process leading to the valorization of a renewable organic resource. The physicochemical properties in the supercritical domain (T > 374 degrees C, P > 22.1 MPa) transform water into a solvent for organics and a reactant favouring radical reactions. In this context, the conversion ofbioglycerol in supercritical water (SCW) into platform molecules and/or high energetic gases (hydrogen, hydrocarbons) could represent an interesting valorization process. The reported research results concern the conversion of bioglycerol compared to pure glycerol. The experiments have been done in batch autoclaves (5 ml and 500 ml stirred). Solutions of pure (5 or 10 wt%) and crude (3.5 wt%) glycerol have been processed with or without catalyst (K2CO3 1.5 wt%) in the range of 450-600 degrees C. The molecular formula of bioglycerol was determined as C4.3H9.7O1.8Na0.1Si0.08. Glycerol was partially decomposed in the batch systems during the heating (42% before reaching 420 degrees C) and some intermediates (propanediol, ethylene glycol . . .) were quantified, leading to a proposition of a reaction pathway. Acrolein, a valuable platform molecule, was mainly produced in the absence of catalyst. No solid phase was recovered after SCW conversion of pure and bioglycerol in batch reactors. The optimal parameters for gasification were 600 degrees C, 25 MPa for bioglycerol and 525 degrees C, 25 MPa, for pure glycerol. In these operating conditions, 1 kg of pure or bioglycerol leads to 15 and, respectively, 10 mol of hydrogen. Supercritical water gasification of crude glycerol favoured the generation of light hydrocarbons, while pure glycerol promoted H2 production. SCW conversion of glycerol (pure and crude) allows to obtain simultaneously energetic

  14. Phase Transformation from Smectic to Crystalline a-Form in Isotactic Polypropylene during Heating Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Gang; Hsiao, Benjamin S.; Srinivas, Srivatsan

    2000-03-01

    The phase transformation during heating of a quenched smectic isotactic polypropylene (iPP) sample was followed by simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques with synchrotron radiation and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. DSC thermogram showed a small endotherm at ca. 61^oC (peak temp.) followed by an exotherm at ca. 96^oC (peak temp.). This exotherm represented the phase transformation from the smectic state to the crystal a-form, which began at 82^oC (onset temp.). The final melting endotherm of the monoclinic a-form occurred at 162^oC (peak temp.). The SAXS invariant after normalization by thermal expansion factor during heating process conformed the even of phase transformation from smectic state to monoclinic state due to the improved scattering contrast. The significant increase of long period (11 nm to 24 nm) and crystal thickness (8 nm to 18 nm) from the correlation function analysis during heating also indicated that melting and recrystallization processes occurred during the phase transformation. WAXD results provided the direct evident of phase transformation in the crystal lamellae, starting at 82^oC.

  15. Sequential spectrofluorimetric determination of free and total glycerol in biodiesel in a multicommuted flow system.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sidnei G; Morales-Rubio, Angel; de La Guardia, Miguel; Rocha, Fábio R P

    2011-07-01

    A new procedure for spectrofluorimetric determination of free and total glycerol in biodiesel samples is presented. It is based on the oxidation of glycerol by periodate, forming formaldehyde, which reacts with acetylacetone, producing the luminescent 3,5-diacetyl-1,4-dihydrolutidine. A flow system with solenoid micro-pumps is proposed for solution handling. Free glycerol was extracted off-line from biodiesel samples with water, and total glycerol was converted to free glycerol by saponification with sodium ethylate under sonication. For free glycerol, a linear response was observed from 5 to 70 mg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.5 mg L(-1), which corresponds to 2 mg kg(-1) in biodiesel. The coefficient of variation was 0.9% (20 mg L(-1), n = 10). For total glycerol, samples were diluted on-line, and the linear response range was 25 to 300 mg L(-1). The detection limit was 1.4 mg L(-1) (2.8 mg kg(-1) in biodiesel) with a coefficient of variation of 1.4% (200 mg L(-1), n = 10). The sampling rate was ca. 35 samples h(-1) and the procedure was applied to determination of free and total glycerol in biodiesel samples from soybean, cottonseed, and castor beans.

  16. Quantitative analysis of aggregation in dilute solutions of effectively rigid biomacromolecules via the combination of oscillatory flow birefringence and viscoelasticity measurements: example study of aggregation of bovine fibrinogen in aqueous glycerol, and detection of a large aggregate formed on addition of guanidine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Miller, J W; Nestler, F H M; Schrag, J L

    2004-12-20

    Oscillatory flow birefringence (OFB) properties have been measured for dilute solutions of bovine fibrinogen in 65-68% aqueous glycerol with the Miller-Schrag Thin Fluid Layer (TFL) apparatus employing either titanium or stainless steel surfaces in contact with the solutions. The shearing frequency range was 1 to 2500 Hz, the concentrations ranged from 4 to 8 mg/ml, and measurement temperatures were 9.9, 10.0, and 15.8 degrees C. The data showed evidence of significant amounts of aggregation that apparently is caused by the presence of glycerol; contributions from the various aggregates were readily detected since the staggered half-overlap aggregation in this system results in substantial differences in the rotational relaxation times of the various effectively rigid aggregates. The combination of oscillatory flow birefringence and viscoelasticity (VE) data provided sensitive and precise characterization of aggregation in these example systems; all aggregates exhibited the expected positive optical anisotropy. The length of unaggregated fibrinogen in solution was found to be that obtained via electron microscopy. Addition of guanidine hydrochloride to hopefully reduce aggregation did so but also resulted in formation of a very large (2800 to 3500 A), apparently nearly monodisperse, negatively birefringent aggregate, suggesting that this new species might be formed by lateral aggregation.

  17. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163, (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a singlepiece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment are the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  18. Spin Forming Aluminum Crew Module (CM) Metallic Aft Pressure Vessel Bulkhead (APVBH) - Phase II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.; Torres, Pablo D.; McGill, Preston B.; Tayon, Wesley A.; Bennett, Jay E.; Murphy, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    The principal focus of this project was to assist the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Program in developing a spin forming fabrication process for manufacture of the Orion crew module (CM) aft pressure vessel bulkhead. The spin forming process will enable a single piece aluminum (Al) alloy 2219 aft bulkhead resulting in the elimination of the current multiple piece welded construction, simplify CM fabrication, and lead to an enhanced design. Phase I (NASA TM-2014-218163 (1)) of this assessment explored spin forming the single-piece CM forward pressure vessel bulkhead. The Orion MPCV Program and Lockheed Martin (LM) recently made two critical decisions relative to the NESC Phase I work scope: (1) LM selected the spin forming process to manufacture a single-piece aft bulkhead for the Orion CM, and (2) the aft bulkhead will be manufactured from Al 2219. Based on the Program's new emphasis related to the spin forming process, the NESC was asked to conduct a Phase II assessment to assist in the LM manufacture of the aft bulkhead and to conduct a feasibility study into spin forming the Orion CM cone. This activity was approved on June 19, 2013. Dr. Robert Piascik, NASA Technical Fellow for Materials at the Langley Research Center (LaRC), was selected to lead this assessment. The project plan was approved by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Review Board (NRB) on July 18, 2013. The primary stakeholders for this assessment were the NASA and LM MPCV Program offices. Additional benefactors are commercial launch providers developing CM concepts.

  19. Influence of Cooling Rate on Phase Formationin Spray-Formed H13 Tool Steel

    SciTech Connect

    K. M. Mchugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia

    2006-04-01

    Spray forming is an effective way to process many tool steels into near-net-shape molds, dies and related tooling. The general approach involves depositing atomized droplets onto a refractory pattern in order to image the pattern’s features. The pattern is removed and the die is fitted into a standard holding fixture. This approach results in significant cost and lead-time savings compared to conventional machining, Spray-formed dies perform well in many industrial forming operations, oftentimes exhibiting extended die life over conventional dies. Care must be exercised when spray forming tool steel dies to minimize porosity and control the nature and distribution of phases and residual stresses. Selection of post-deposition heat treatment is important to tailor the die’s properties (hardness, strength, impact energy, etc.) for a particular application. This paper examines how the cooling rate and other processing parameters during spray processing and heat treatment of H13 tool steel influence phase formation. Results of case studies on spray-formed die performance in forging, extrusion and die casting, conducted by industry during production runs, will be described.

  20. Do DC-Chol/DOPE-DNA complexes really form an inverted hexagonal phase?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Caminiti, Ruggero

    2005-08-01

    Using synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, we have found that cationic liposomes made of the monovalent cationic lipid, 3-[ N-( N, N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl]cholesterol (DC-Chol) and the neutral lipid dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) condense DNA molecules forming complexes (DC-Chol/DOPE-DNA) which are not assembled in an inverted hexagonal structure as recently reported, but, conversely, form a well-ordered lamellar liquid-crystalline phase with distinct regimes of DNA packing density.

  1. Self-Forming Interlocking Interfaces on the Immiscible Polymer Bilayers via Gelation-Mediated Phase Separation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaozhuang; Ma, Guoqiang; Zhao, Huaixia; Cui, Jiaxi

    2017-09-01

    Gelation-mediated phase separation is applied to prepare immiscible polymer bilayer films with an interlocking interface structure. Polymer systems consisting of copolymer of urea and polydimethylsiloxane and epoxy are selected to demonstrate the feasibility. When the epoxy fraction exceeds 25 wt%, well-defined bilayer structures self-form by a one-pot casting method in which the phase separation state is fixed by an evaporation-induced gelation. Microscopy studies of the resulting bilayers clearly reveal that interlocking structures form during the bilayer films construct. The interlocking structures lead to an enhanced interfacial adhesion and higher fracture energy. The current strategy might offer a facile way to in situ create an interlocking interface between immiscible polymer systems. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. The Production Phase for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) Modular Coil Winding Forms

    SciTech Connect

    Heitzenroeder, P.; Brown, T.; Neilson, G.; Malinowski, F.; Sutton, L.; Nelson, B.; Williamson, D.; Horton, N.; Goddard, B.; Edwards, J.; Bowling, K.; Hatzilias, K.

    2005-10-20

    The production phase for the NCSX modular coil winding forms has been underway for approximately one year as of this date. This is the culmination of R&D efforts performed in 2001-4. The R&D efforts included limited manufacturing studies while NCSX was in its conceptual design phase followed by more detailed manufacturing studies by two teams which included the fabrication of full scale prototypes. This provided the foundation necessary for the production parts to be produced under a firm price and schedule contract that was issued in September 2004. This paper will describe the winding forms, the production team and team management, details of the production process, and the achievements for the first year.

  3. Elements of style: consent form language and the therapeutic misconception in phase 1 gene transfer trials.

    PubMed

    Kimmelman, Jonathan; Levenstadt, Aaron

    2005-04-01

    The therapeutic misconception arises wherever human subjects misinterpret the primary purpose of a clinical trial as therapeutic. Such misconceptions are particularly prevalent in trials involving severely ill subjects or novel and well-publicized investigational agents. In order to identify possible sources of the therapeutic misconception in gene transfer trials, 286 phase 1 human gene transfer consent documents were analyzed for their description of purpose, alternatives, and their use of the term gene transfer. We report that 20% of trials fail to explain their purpose as safety and dosage, only 41% of oncology trials identify comfort care as an alternative to participation, and that the term gene therapy is used with twice the frequency of the term gene transfer. Trends and coherence in consent form language were analyzed as well. Our results indicate that consent forms used in gene transfer phase 1 trials often contain language that promotes, or does little to deter, therapeutic misconceptions.

  4. Interference of some aqueous two-phase system phase-forming components in protein determination by the Bradford method.

    PubMed

    Silvério, Sara C; Moreira, Sérgio; Milagres, Adriane M F; Macedo, Eugénia A; Teixeira, José A; Mussatto, Solange I

    2012-02-15

    The interference of some specific aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) phase-forming components in bovine serum albumin (BSA) determination by the Bradford method was investigated. For this purpose, calibration curves were obtained for BSA in the presence of different concentrations of salts and polymers. A total of 19 salts [Na₂SO₄, (NH₄)₂SO₄, MgSO₄, LiSO₄, Na₂HPO₄, sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0), NaH₂PO₄, K₂HPO₄, potassium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0), KH₂PO₄, C₆H₈O₇, Na₃C₆H₅O₇, KCHO₂, NaCHO₂, NaCO₃, NaHCO₃, C₂H₄O₂, sodium acetate buffer (pH 4.5), and NaC₂H₃O₂] and 7 polymers [PEG 4000, PEG 8000, PEG 20000, UCON 3900, Ficoll 70000, PES 100000, and PVP 40000] were tested, and each calibration curve was compared with the one obtained for BSA in water. Some concentrations of salts and polymers had considerable effect in the BSA calibration curve. Carbonate salts were responsible for the highest salt interference, whereas citric and acetic acids did not produce interference even in the maximum concentration level tested (5 wt%). Among the polymers, UCON gave the highest interference, whereas Ficoll did not produce interference when used in concentrations up to 10 wt%. It was concluded that a convenient dilution of the samples prior to the protein quantification is needed to ensure no significant interference from ATPS phase-forming constituents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrahedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Krishnan, S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The local atomic structures of undercooled liquid metals are presumed to be icosahedral; this order is incompatible with translational periodicity, constituting a barrier to the nucleation of the crystal phase. The extended atomic structure of the icosahedral quasicrystal (i-phase) is similar to that presumed in the undercooled liquid. Therefore, a comparison of the maximum undercooling in alloys that form the i-phase with those that form crystal phases provides a probe of the liquid structure.

  6. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrahedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Gangopadhyay, A. K.; Lee, G. W.; Hyers, R. W.; Rogers, J. R.; Robinson, M. B.; Rathz, T. J.; Krishnan, S.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The local atomic structures of undercooled liquid metals are presumed to be icosahedral; this order is incompatible with translational periodicity, constituting a barrier to the nucleation of the crystal phase. The extended atomic structure of the icosahedral quasicrystal (i-phase) is similar to that presumed in the undercooled liquid. Therefore, a comparison of the maximum undercooling in alloys that form the i-phase with those that form crystal phases provides a probe of the liquid structure.

  7. Phase-space structures and stellar populations in the star-forming region NGC 2264

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Marta; Alfaro, Emilio J.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we analyse the structure of a subspace of the phase space of the star-forming region NGC 2264 using the spectrum of kinematic groupings (SKG). We show that the SKG can be used to process a collection of star data to find substructure at different scales. We have found structure associated with the NGC 2264 region and also with the background area. In the NGC 2264 region, a hierarchical analysis shows substructure compatible with that found in previous specific studies of the area but with an objective, compact methodology that allows us to homogeneously compare the structure of different clusters and star-forming regions. Moreover, this structure is compatible with the different ages of the main NGC 2264 star-forming populations. The structure found in the field can be roughly associated with giant stars far in the background, dynamically decoupled from NGC 2264, which could be related either with the Outer Arm or Monoceros Ring. The results in this paper confirm the relationship between structure in the radial velocity phase-space subspace and different kinds of populations, defined by other variables not necessarily analysed with the SKG, such as age or distance, showing the importance of detecting phase-space substructure in order to trace stellar populations in the broadest sense of the word.

  8. The role of micronutrients and strategies for optimized continual glycerol production from carbon dioxide by Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    PubMed

    Chow, Yvonne; Tu, Wang Yung; Wang, David; Ng, Daphne H P; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2015-10-01

    The microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta synthesizes intracellular glycerol as an osmoticum to counteract external osmotic pressure in high saline environments. The species has recently been found to release and accumulate extracellular glycerol, making it a suitable candidate for sustainable industrial glycerol production if a sufficiently high product titre yield can be achieved. While macronutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus are essential and well understood, this study seeks to understand the influence of the micronutrient profile on glycerol production. The effects of metallic elements calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, cobalt, copper, and iron, as well as boron, on glycerol production as well as cell growth were quantified. The relationship between cell density and glycerol productivity was also determined. Statistically, manganese recorded the highest improvement in glycerol production as well as cell growth. Further experiments showed that manganese availability was associated with higher superoxide dismutase formation, thus suggesting that glycerol production is negatively affected by oxidative stress and the manganese bound form of this enzyme is required in order to counteract reactive oxygen species in the cells. A minimum concentration of 8.25 × 10(-5)  g L(-1) manganese was sufficient to overcome this problem and achieve 10 g L(-1) extracellular glycerol, compared to 4 g L(-1) without the addition of manganese. Unlike cell growth, extracellular glycerol production was found to be negatively affected by the amount of calcium present in the normal growth medium, most likely due to the lower cell permeability at high calcium concentrations. The inhibitory effects of iron also affected extracellular glycerol production more significantly than cell growth and several antagonistic interaction effects between various micronutrients were observed. This study indicates how the optimization of these small amounts of nutrients in a two

  9. Glycerol-3-phosphatase of Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Steffen N; Meiswinkel, Tobias M; Panhorst, Maren; Youn, Jung-Won; Wiefel, Lars; Wendisch, Volker F

    2012-06-15

    Formation of glycerol as by-product of amino acid production by Corynebacterium glutamicum has been observed under certain conditions, but the enzyme(s) involved in its synthesis from glycerol-3-phosphate were not known. It was shown here that cg1700 encodes an enzyme active as a glycerol-3-phosphatase (GPP) hydrolyzing glycerol-3-phosphate to inorganic phosphate and glycerol. GPP was found to be active as a homodimer. The enzyme preferred conditions of neutral pH and requires Mg²⁺ or Mn²⁺ for its activity. GPP dephosphorylated both L- and D-glycerol-3-phosphate with a preference for the D-enantiomer. The maximal activity of GPP was estimated to be 31.1 and 1.7 U mg⁻¹ with K(M) values of 3.8 and 2.9 mM for DL- and L-glycerol-3-phosphate, respectively. For physiological analysis a gpp deletion mutant was constructed and shown to lack the ability to produce detectable glycerol concentrations. Vice versa, gpp overexpression increased glycerol accumulation during growth in fructose minimal medium. It has been demonstrated previously that intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate is growth inhibitory as shown for a recombinant C. glutamicum strain overproducing glycerokinase and glycerol facilitator genes from E. coli in media containing glycerol. In this strain, overexpression of gpp restored growth in the presence of glycerol as intracellular glycerol-3-phosphate concentrations were reduced to wild-type levels. In C. glutamicum wild type, GPP was shown to be involved in utilization of DL-glycerol-3-phosphate as source of phosphorus, since growth with DL-glycerol-3-phosphate as sole phosphorus source was reduced in the gpp deletion strain whereas it was accelerated upon gpp overexpression. As GPP homologues were found to be encoded in the genomes of many other bacteria, the gpp homologues of Escherichia coli (b2293) and Bacillus subtilis (BSU09240, BSU34970) as well as gpp1 from the plant Arabidosis thaliana were overexpressed in E. coli MG1655 and

  10. Enhancing biological phosphorus removal with glycerol.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Q; Sparling, R; Lagasse, P; Lee, Y M; Taniguchi, D; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2010-01-01

    An enhanced biological phosphorus removal process (EBPR) was successfully operated in presence of acetate. When glycerol was substituted for acetate in the feed the EBPR process failed. Subsequently waste activated sludge (WAS) from the reactor was removed to an off-line fermenter. The same amount of glycerol was added to the WAS fermenter which led to significant volatile fatty acids (VFA) production. By supplying the system with the VFA-enriched supernatant of the fermentate, biological phosphorus removal was enhanced. It was concluded that, if glycerol was to be used as an external carbon source in EBPR, the effective approach was to ferment glycerol with waste activated sludge.

  11. Calibrating the glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraether temperature signal in speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Alison J.; Schouten, Stefan

    2013-05-01

    Palaeotemperature proxies based on glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) lipids have been established for marine and lacustrine environments, but there has been relatively little study of their application in speleothems. In this study we analyse the GDGT content of 33 speleothem samples from 16 different sites around the globe, and test whether proxies based on isoprenoid tetraethers (TEX86) or branched tetraethers (MBT/CBT) are correlated with measured surface and cave mean annual air temperature (MAT). The results show that the TEX86 has a strong relationship with measured temperature (r2 = 0.78, standard error of the estimate 2.3 °C, when calibrated with surface MAT). Furthermore, the MBT/CBT also showed a significant relationship with temperature (r2 = 0.73, standard error of the estimate 2.7 °C, when calibrated with surface MAT). Some issues remain requiring future work, in particular the development of a larger calibration sample set with measured cave temperature data, and the investigation of controls other than temperature on GDGT distribution, but overall the results indicate that GDGT based proxies derived from speleothems may be highly viable new methods for reconstructing continental palaeotemperatures.

  12. Effects of acidified aqueous glycerol and glycerol carbonate pretreatment of rice husk on the enzymatic digestibility, structural characteristics, and bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Majid; Villaflores, Oliver B; Ordono, Emma E; Caparanga, Alvin R

    2017-03-01

    Rice husk as an abundant biomass was used in this study, and it contained 30.1% glucan and 13.5% xylan, 22.4% lignin. The pretreated rice husk with glycerol carbonate and acidified aqueous glycerol (10% water) at 90°C and 130°C for 60min had the maximum yield of glucan digestibility which was 78.2% and 69.7% respectively, using cellulase for 72h. The simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was conducted anaerobically at 37°C with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, 5% w/v glucan and 10FPU/g glucan of cellulase. 11.58 and 8.84g/L was the highest ethanol concentration after 3days of incubation form pretreated rice husk with glycerol carbonate and acidified aqueous glycerol respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mapping and cloning of gldA, the structural gene of the Escherichia coli glycerol dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Truniger, V; Boos, W

    1994-01-01

    gldA, the structural gene for the NAD(+)-dependent glycerol dehydrogenase, was mapped at 89.2 min on the Escherichia coli linkage map, cotransducible with, but not adjacent to, the glpFKX operon encoding the proteins for the uptake and phosphorylation of glycerol. gldA was cloned, and its position on the physical map of E. coli was determined. The expression of gldA was induced by hydroxyacetone under stationary-phase growth conditions. Images PMID:8132480

  14. Esters of oligo-(glycerol carbonate-glycerol): New biobased oligomeric surfactants.

    PubMed

    Holmiere, Sébastien; Valentin, Romain; Maréchal, Philippe; Mouloungui, Zéphirin

    2017-02-01

    Glycerol carbonate is one of the most potentially multifunction glycerol-derived compounds. Glycerol is an important by-product of the oleochemical industry. The oligomerization of glycerol carbonate, assisted by the glycerol, results in the production of polyhydroxylated oligomers rich in linear carbonate groups. The polar moieties of these oligomers (Mw<1000Da) were supplied by glycerol and glycerol carbonate rather than ethylene oxide as in most commercial surfactants. The insertion of linear carbonate groups into the glycerol-based skeleton rendered the oligomers amphiphilic, resulting in a decrease in air/water surface tension to 57mN/m. We improved the physical and chemical properties of the oligomers, by altering the type of acylation reaction and the nature of the acyl donor. The polar head is constituted of homo-oligomers and hetero-oligomers. Homo-oligomers are oligoglycerol and/or oligocarbonate, hetero-oligomers are oligo(glycerol-glycerol carbonate). Coprah oligoesters had the best surfactant properties (CMC<1mg/mL, πcmc<30mN/m), outperforming molecules of fossil origin, such as ethylene glycol monododecyl ether, glycol ethers and fatty acid esters of sorbitan polyethoxylates. The self-assembling properties of oligocarbonate esters were highlighted by their ability to stabilize inverse and multiple emulsions. The oligo-(glycerol carbonate-glycerol ether) with relatively low molecular weights showed properties of relatively high-molecular weight molecules, and constitute a viable "green" alternative to ethoxylated surfactants.

  15. Hopf normal form with SN symmetry and reduction to systems of nonlinearly coupled phase oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwin, Peter; Rodrigues, Ana

    2016-06-01

    Coupled oscillator models where N oscillators are identical and symmetrically coupled to all others with full permutation symmetry SN are found in a variety of applications. Much, but not all, work on phase descriptions of such systems consider the special case of pairwise coupling between oscillators. In this paper, we show this is restrictive-and we characterize generic multi-way interactions between oscillators that are typically present, except at the very lowest order near a Hopf bifurcation where the oscillations emerge. We examine a network of identical weakly coupled dynamical systems that are close to a supercritical Hopf bifurcation by considering two parameters, ɛ (the strength of coupling) and λ (an unfolding parameter for the Hopf bifurcation). For small enough λ > 0 there is an attractor that is the product of N stable limit cycles; this persists as a normally hyperbolic invariant torus for sufficiently small ɛ > 0. Using equivariant normal form theory, we derive a generic normal form for a system of coupled phase oscillators with SN symmetry. For fixed N and taking the limit 0 < ɛ ≪ λ ≪ 1, we show that the attracting dynamics of the system on the torus can be well approximated by a coupled phase oscillator system that, to lowest order, is the well-known Kuramoto-Sakaguchi system of coupled oscillators. The next order of approximation generically includes terms with up to four interacting phases, regardless of N. Using a normalization that maintains nontrivial interactions in the limit N → ∞, we show that the additional terms can lead to new phenomena in terms of coexistence of two-cluster states with the same phase difference but different cluster size.

  16. Nonsedimentable Microvesicles from Senescing Bean Cotyledons Contain Gel Phase-Forming Phospholipid Degradation Products 1

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Kening; Paliyath, Gopinadhan; Thompson, John E.

    1991-01-01

    A mixture of liquid-crystalline and gel-phase lipid domains is detectable by wide angle x-ray diffraction in smooth microsomal membranes isolated from senescent 7-day-old cotyledons, whereas corresponding membranes from young 2-day-old cotyledons are exclusively liquid-crystalline. The gel-phase domains in the senescent membranes comprise phospholipid degradation products including diacylglycerols, free fatty acids, long-chain aldehydes, and long-chain hydrocarbons. The same complement of phospholipid degradation products is also present in nonsedimentable microvesicles isolated from senescent 7-day-old cotyledons by filtration of a 250,000g, 12-hour supernatant through a 300,000 dalton cut-off filter. The phospholipid degradation products in the microvesicles form gel-phase lipid domains when reconstituted into phospholipid liposomes. Nonsedimentable microvesicles of a similar size, which are again enriched in the same gel-phase-forming phospholipid degradation products, are also generated in vitro from smooth microsomal membranes isolated from 2-day-old cotyledons when Ca2+ is added to activate membrane-associated lipolytic enzymes. The Ca2+-treated membranes do not contain detectable gel-phase domains, suggesting that the phospholipid degradation products are completely removed by microvesiculation. The observations collectively indicate that these nonsedimentable microvesicles serve as a vehicle for moving phospholipid degradation products out of membrane bilayers into the cytosol. As noted previously (Yao K, Paliyath G, Humphrey RW, Hallett FR, Thompson JE [1991] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 88: 2269-2273), the term “deteriosome” connotes this putative function and would serve to distinguish these microvesicles from other cytoplasmic microvesicles unrelated to deterioration. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7 PMID:16668427

  17. EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE AND GLYCEROL ON THE HYDROGEN-BOND DYNAMICS OF WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Ghattyvenkatakrishna, Pavan K; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    The effect of glycerol, water and glycerol-water binary mixtures on the structure and dynamics of biomolecules has been well studied. However, the effect of varying glycerol concentration and temperature on the dynamics of water has not received due attention. We have studied the effect of concentration and temperature on the hydrogen bonded network formed by water molecules. A strong correlation between the relaxation time of the network and average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecules was found. The radial distribution function of water oxygens and hydrogens clarifies the effect of concentration on the structure and clustering of water.

  18. Systematic Engineering of Escherichia coli for d-Lactate Production from Crude Glycerol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zei Wen; Saini, Mukesh; Lin, Li-Jen; Chiang, Chung-Jen; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2015-11-04

    Crude glycerol resulting from biodiesel production is an abundant and renewable resource. However, the impurities in crude glycerol usually make microbial fermentation problematic. This issue was addressed by systematic engineering of Escherichia coli for the production of d-lactate from crude glycerol. First, mgsA and the synthetic pathways of undesired products were eliminated in E. coli, rendering the strain capable of homofermentative production of optically pure d-lactate. To direct carbon flux toward d-lactate, the resulting strain was endowed with an enhanced expression of glpD-glpK in the glycerol catabolism and of a heterologous gene encoding d-lactate dehydrogenase. Moreover, the strain was evolved to improve its utilization of cruder glycerol and subsequently equipped with the FocA channel to export intracellular d-lactate. Finally, the fed-batch fermentation with two-phase culturing was carried out with a bioreactor. As a result, the engineered strain enabled production of 105 g/L d-lactate (99.9% optical purity) from 121 g/L crude glycerol at 40 h. The result indicates the feasibility of our approach to engineering E. coli for the crude glycerol-based fermentation.

  19. Selective Oxidation of Glycerol over Carbon-Supported AuPd Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchie,W.; Murayama, M.; Davis, R.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon-supported AuPd bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated as catalysts in the aqueous-phase selective oxidation of glycerol. The bimetallic catalysts were synthesized by two different methods. The first method involved the deposition of Au onto the surface of 3-nm supported Pd particles by catalytic reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} in aqueous solution by H{sub 2}. The second method used the formation of a AuPd sol that was subsequently deposited onto a carbon support. Characterization of the catalysts using analytical transmission electron microscopy, H{sub 2} titration, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Au L{sub III} and Pd K-edges confirmed that the first synthesis method successfully deposited Au onto the Pd particles. Results from the AuPd sol catalyst also revealed that Au was preferentially located on the surface. Measurement of glycerol oxidation rates (0.3 M glycerol, 0.6 M NaOH, 10 atm O{sub 2}, 333 K) in a semibatch reactor gave a turnover frequency (TOF) of 17 s{sup -1} for monometallic Au and 1 s{sup -1} for monometallic Pd, with Pd exhibiting a higher selectivity to glyceric acid. Although the activity of the bimetallic AuPd catalysts depended on the amount of Au present, none of them had a TOF greater than that of the monometallic Au catalyst. However, the AuPd catalysts had higher selectivity to glyceric acid compared with the monometallic Au. Because a physical mixture of monometallic Au and Pd catalysts also gave higher selectivity to glyceric acid, the Pd is proposed to catalyze the decomposition of the side product H{sub 2}O{sub 2} that is also formed over the Au but is detrimental to the selectivity toward glyceric acid.

  20. Chemical characterization of the main products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanovski, Z.; Čusak, A.; Grgić, I.; Claeys, M.

    2014-08-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e., burning) of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed atmospherically in the gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the main products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by solid-phase extraction and then purified with semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state proton, carbon-13 and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((-)ESI-MS/MS). The NMR and product ion (MS2) spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG), 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG), and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG). Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia) by means of HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of ultraviolet and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  1. Current status of amorphous formulation and other special dosage forms as formulations for early clinical phases.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kohsaku

    2009-09-01

    Although most chemists in the pharmaceutical industry have a good understanding on favorable physicochemical properties for drug candidates, formulators must still deal with many challenging candidates. On the other hand, formulators are not allowed to spend much time on formulation development for early phases of the clinical studies. Thus, it is basically difficult to apply special dosage form technologies to the candidates for the first-in-human formulations. Despite the availability of numerous reviews on oral special dosage forms, information on their applicability as the early phase formulation has been limited. This article describes quick review on the oral special dosage forms that may be applied to the early clinical formulations, followed by discussion focused on the amorphous formulations, which still has relatively many issues to be proved for the general use. The major problems that inhibit the use of the amorphous formulation are difficulty in the manufacturing and the poor chemical/physical stability. Notably, the poor physical stability can be critical, because of not the poor stability itself but the difficulty in the timely evaluation in the preclinical developmental timeframes. Research directions of the amorphous formulations are suggested to utilize this promising technology without disturbing the preclinical developmental timelines.

  2. Energy recovery from waste glycerol by utilizing thermal water vapor plasma.

    PubMed

    Tamošiūnas, Andrius; Valatkevičius, Pranas; Gimžauskaitė, Dovilė; Jeguirim, Mejdi; Mėčius, Vladas; Aikas, Mindaugas

    2017-04-01

    Glycerol, considered as a waste feedstock resulting from biodiesel production, has received much attention in recent years due to its properties, which offer to recover energy. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a thermal water vapor plasma for waste (crude) glycerol conversion to synthesis gas, or syngas (H2 + CO). In parallel of crude glycerol, a pure glycerol (99.5%) was used as a reference material in order to compare the concentrations of the formed product gas. A direct current (DC) arc plasma torch stabilized by a mixture of argon/water vapor was utilized for the effective glycerol conversion to hydrogen-rich synthesis gas. It was found that after waste glycerol treatment, the main reaction products were gases with corresponding concentrations of H2 50.7%, CO 23.53%, CO2 11.45%, and CH4 3.82%, and traces of C2H2 and C2H6, which concentrations were below 0.5%. The comparable concentrations of the formed gas products were obtained after pure glycerol conversion-H2 46.4%, CO 26.25%, CO2 11.3%, and CH4 4.7%. The use of thermal water vapor plasma producing synthesis gas is an effective method to recover energy from both crude and pure glycerol. The performance of the glycerol conversion system was defined in terms of the produced gas yield, the carbon conversion efficiency, the cold gas efficiency, and the specific energy requirements.

  3. Toward glycerol biorefinery: metabolic engineering for the production of biofuels and chemicals from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Liu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    As an inevitable by-product of the biofuel industry, glycerol is becoming an attractive feedstock for biorefinery due to its abundance, low price and high degree of reduction. Converting crude glycerol into value-added products is important to increase the economic viability of the biofuel industry. Metabolic engineering of industrial strains to improve its performance and to enlarge the product spectrum of glycerol biotransformation process is highly important toward glycerol biorefinery. This review focuses on recent metabolic engineering efforts as well as challenges involved in the utilization of glycerol as feedstock for the production of fuels and chemicals, especially for the production of diols, organic acids and biofuels.

  4. Improvement of glass-forming ability and phase separation in Cu Ti-rich

    SciTech Connect

    Park, E S; Chang, H J; Kim, D H

    2010-01-01

    Present study reports improvement of glass-forming ability (GFA) and phase separation in Cu Ti-rich Cu Ti Zr Ni Si bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) by tailoring the constituent elements. The MA of metalloid element, Sn having relatively large negative enthalpy of mixing can lead to improve GFA (up to 8mm in diameter) as well as thermal stability (up toTx = 48K) by optimizing the substitution element. And the addition of elements having relatively large positive enthalpy of mixing (partial substitution of Zr or Ti with Y) can lead to the liquid state phase separation in Cu Ti Sn Zr Ni Si BMG, although the addition lead to drastic deterioration of the GFA.

  5. Corrosion properties of S-phase layers formed on medical grade austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Buhagiar, Joseph; Dong, Hanshan

    2012-02-01

    The corrosion properties of S-phase surface layers formed in AISI 316LVM (ASTM F138) and High-N (ASTM F1586) medical grade austenitic stainless steels by plasma surface alloying with nitrogen (at 430°C), carbon (at 500°C) and both carbon and nitrogen (at 430°C) has been investigated. The corrosion behaviour of the S-phase layers in Ringer's solutions was evaluated using potentiodynamic and immersion corrosion tests. The corrosion damage was evaluated using microscopy, hardness testing, inductive coupled plasma mass spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The experimental results have demonstrated that low-temperature nitriding, carburising and carbonitriding can improve the localised corrosion resistance of both industrial and medical grade austenitic stainless steels as long as the threshold sensitisation temperature is not reached. Carburising at 500°C has proved to be the best hardening treatment with the least effect on the corrosion resistance of the parent alloy.

  6. Ultraviolet Study of the Gas Phase Hydration of Methylglyoxal to Form the Gemdiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Hansen, Anne S.; Møller, Kristian H.; Axson, Jessica L.; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.; Vaida, Veronica

    2017-06-01

    Methylglyoxal is a known oxidation product of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Earth's atmosphere. While the gas phase chemistry of methylglyoxal is fairly well understood, its modeled concentration and role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) continues to be controversial. The gas phase hydration of methylglyoxal to form a gemdiol has been shown to occur in infrared studies but has not been widely considered for water-restricted environments such as the atmosphere. However, this process may have important consequences for the atmospheric processing or VOCs. We have recorded UV spectroscopic measurements following the hydration of methylglyoxal and have compared these measurements to calculated spectra of the electronic transitions of methylglyoxal and methylglyoxal diol. We will report on these measurements and discuss the implications for understanding the atmospheric processing and fate of methylglyoxal and similar molecules

  7. Aggregation of banana pyrophosphate fructose 6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase by glycerol.

    PubMed

    Surendranathan, K K; Kanulkar, S U; Nair, P M

    1996-12-01

    Addition of glycerol during purification of banana (Musaceae, Musa cavendishii) pyrophosphate fructose 6-phosphate 1-phosphotransferase [(PFP), EC 2.7.1.90] initiated molecular aggregation of the enzyme. The aggregation process was dependent on the glycerol concentration. The native enzyme (66 kDa molecular mass) showed enhanced activity at 3% (V/V) or less of glycerol concentration. Glycerol concentration between 4 and 5% (V/V) affected a gradual and sequential aggregation of native form of the enzyme. These aggregated forms had molecular masses of 135, 200 and 270 kDa. The 135 and 200 kDa forms were stable for about 72 hrs and prolonged storage over 2 weeks resulted in the formation of the 270 kDa form. Concentration over 5% could reduce the time required for aggregation. Fru2.6 bis P activated the enzyme over ten fold, but did not help in the aggregation process. Studies on the role of glycerol on PFP specific activity suggested a difference in the activation process compared to that by Fru2.6bis P. Replacement of Hepes buffer by Tris increased the Fru2.6 bis P requirement for maximum activation by around 10 fold. Removal of glycerol from the buffer media resulted in almost complete inactivation of the enzyme.

  8. Physical-Chemical Basis of the Protection of Slowly Frozen Human Erythrocytes by Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Rall, W. F.; Mazur, Peter; Souzu, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    One theory of freezing damage suggests that slowly cooled cells are killed by being exposed to increasing concentrations of electrolytes as the suspending medium freezes. A corollary to this view is that protective additives such as glycerol protect cells by acting colligatively to reduce the electrolyte concentration at any subzero temperature. Recently published phase-diagram data for the ternary system glycerol-NaCl-water by M. L. Shepard et al. (Cryobiology, 13:9-23, 1976), in combination with the data on human red cell survival vs. subzero temperature presented here and in the companion study of Souzu and Mazur (Biophys. J., 23:89-100), permit a precise test of this theory. Appropriate liquidus phase-diagram information for the solutions used in the red cell freezing experiments was obtained by interpolation of the liquidus data of Shepard and his co-workers. The results of phase-diagram analysis of red cell survival indicate that the correlation between the temperature that yields 50% hemolysis (LT50) and the electrolyte concentration attained at that temperature in various concentrations of glycerol is poor. With increasing concentrations of glycerol, the cells were killed at progressively lower concentrations of NaCl. For example, the LT50 for cells frozen in the absence of glycerol corresponds to a NaCl concentration of 12 weight percent (2.4 molal), while for cells frozen in 1.75 M glycerol in buffered saline the LT50 corresponds to 3.0 weight percent NaCl (1.3 molal). The data, in combination with other findings, lead to two conclusions: (a) The protection from glycerol is due to its colligative ability to reduce the concentration of sodium chloride in the external medium, but (b) the protection is less than that expected from colligative effects; apparently glycerol itself can also be a source of damage, probably because it renders the red cells susceptible to osmotic shock during thawing. PMID:667300

  9. Alkyl-bis(imidazolium) salts: a new amphiphile platform that forms thermotropic and non-aqueous lyotropic bicontinuous cubic phases

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, LA; Schenkel, MR; Wiesenauer, BR; Gin, DL

    2013-01-01

    New ionic amphiphiles with a hexyl-bridged bis(imidazolium) headgroup; Br-, BF4-, or Tf2N- anions; and a long n-alkyl tail can form thermotropic bicontinuous cubic liquid crystal phases in neat form and/or lyotropic bicontinuous cubic phases with several non-aqueous solvents or water.

  10. Chemical Characterization of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed from Atmospheric Aqueous-phase Reactions of Phenolic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Phenolic compounds, which are released in significant amounts from biomass burning, may undergo fast aqueous-phase reactions to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Understanding the aqueous-phase reaction mechanisms of these compounds and the composition of their reaction products is thus important for constraining SOA sources and predicting organic aerosol properties in models. In this study, we investigate the aqueous-phase reactions of three phenols (phenol, guaiacol and syringol) with two oxidants - excited triplet states (3C*) of non-phenolic aromatic carbonyls and hydroxyl radical (OH). By employing four analytical methods including high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry, total organic carbon analysis, ion chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we thoroughly characterize the chemical compositions of the low volatility reaction products of phenols and propose formation mechanisms based on this information. Our results indicate that phenolic SOA is highly oxygenated, with O/C ratios in the range of 0.83-1.03, and that the SOA of phenol is usually more oxidized than those of guaiacol and syringol. Among the three precursors, syringol generates the largest fraction of higher molecular weight (MW) products. For the same precursor, the SOA formed via reaction with 3C* is less oxidized than that formed via reaction with OH. In addition, oxidation by 3C* enhances the formation of higher MW species, including phenolic dimers, higher oligomers and hydroxylated products, compared to reactions initiated by OH, which appear to favor the formation of organic acids. However, our results indicate that the yields of small organic acids (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate) are low for both reaction pathways, together accounting for less than 5% of total SOA mass.

  11. Thermal and physical characterization of glycerol polyesters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glycerol polyesters were prepared by the condensation of glycerol and adipic acid, azelaic acid, sebacic acid, or suberic acids. After 48 hours at 125 deg C the polymers were clear and flexible. Samples of the reaction mixtures were analyzed by modulated differential scanning calorimetry to identi...

  12. From ether to acid: A plausible degradation pathway of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Lei; Birgel, Daniel; Elling, Felix J.; Sutton, Paul A.; Lipp, Julius S.; Zhu, Rong; Zhang, Chuanlun; Könneke, Martin; Peckmann, Jörn; Rowland, Steven J.; Summons, Roger E.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are ubiquitous microbial lipids with extensive demonstrated and potential roles as paleoenvironmental proxies. Despite the great attention they receive, comparatively little is known regarding their diagenetic fate. Putative degradation products of GDGTs, identified as hydroxyl and carboxyl derivatives, were detected in lipid extracts of marine sediment, seep carbonate, hot spring sediment and cells of the marine thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus. The distribution of GDGT degradation products in environmental samples suggests that both biotic and abiotic processes act as sinks for GDGTs. More than a hundred newly recognized degradation products afford a view of the stepwise degradation of GDGT via (1) ether bond hydrolysis yielding hydroxyl isoprenoids, namely, GDGTol (glycerol dialkyl glycerol triether alcohol), GMGD (glycerol monobiphytanyl glycerol diether), GDD (glycerol dibiphytanol diether), GMM (glycerol monobiphytanol monoether) and bpdiol (biphytanic diol); (2) oxidation of isoprenoidal alcohols into corresponding carboxyl derivatives and (3) chain shortening to yield C39 and smaller isoprenoids. This plausible GDGT degradation pathway from glycerol ethers to isoprenoidal fatty acids provides the link to commonly detected head-to-head linked long chain isoprenoidal hydrocarbons in petroleum and sediment samples. The problematic C80 to C82 tetraacids that cause naphthenate deposits in some oil production facilities can be generated from H-shaped glycerol monoalkyl glycerol tetraethers (GMGTs) following the same process, as indicated by the distribution of related derivatives in hydrothermally influenced sediments.

  13. Long-Chain Glycerol Diether and Polyol Dialkyl Glycerol Triether Lipids of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    PubMed Central

    Langworthy, Thomas A.; Mayberry, William R.; Smith, Paul F.

    1974-01-01

    Cells of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius contain about 2.5% total lipid on a dry-weight basis. Total lipid was found to contain 10.5% neutral lipid, 67.6% glycolipid, and 21.7% polar lipid. The lipids contained C40H80 isopranol glycerol diethers. Almost no fatty acids were present. The glycolipids were composed of about equal amounts of the glycerol diether analogue of glucosyl galactosyl diglyceride and a glucosyl polyol glycerol diether. The latter compound contained an unidentified polyol attached by an ether bond to the glycerol diether. The polar lipids contained a small amount of sulfolipid, which appeared to be the monosulfate derivative of glucosyl polyol glycerol diether. About 40% of the lipid phosphorus was found in the diether analogue of phosphatidyl inositol. The remaining lipid phosphorus was accounted for by approximately equal amounts of two inositol monophosphate-containing phosphoglycolipids, inositolphosphoryl glucosyl galactosyl glycerol diether and inositolphosphoryl glucosyl polyol glycerol diether. Images PMID:4407015

  14. Long-chain glycerol diether and polyol dialkyl glycerol triether lipids of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Langworthy, T A; Mayberry, W R; Smith, P F

    1974-07-01

    Cells of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius contain about 2.5% total lipid on a dry-weight basis. Total lipid was found to contain 10.5% neutral lipid, 67.6% glycolipid, and 21.7% polar lipid. The lipids contained C(40)H(80) isopranol glycerol diethers. Almost no fatty acids were present. The glycolipids were composed of about equal amounts of the glycerol diether analogue of glucosyl galactosyl diglyceride and a glucosyl polyol glycerol diether. The latter compound contained an unidentified polyol attached by an ether bond to the glycerol diether. The polar lipids contained a small amount of sulfolipid, which appeared to be the monosulfate derivative of glucosyl polyol glycerol diether. About 40% of the lipid phosphorus was found in the diether analogue of phosphatidyl inositol. The remaining lipid phosphorus was accounted for by approximately equal amounts of two inositol monophosphate-containing phosphoglycolipids, inositolphosphoryl glucosyl galactosyl glycerol diether and inositolphosphoryl glucosyl polyol glycerol diether.

  15. Production of fumaric acid from biodiesel-derived crude glycerol by Rhizopus arrhizus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuqing; Nie, Kaili; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Shihong; Wang, Meng; Deng, Li; Wang, Fang; Tan, Tianwei

    2014-07-01

    This work investigated the capability of Rhizopus arrhizus to assimilate biodiesel-derived crude glycerol and convert it into fumaric acid. After optimizing the initial glycerol concentration, spore inoculum and yeast extract concentration, smaller pellets (0.7 mm) and higher biomass (3.11 g/L) were obtained when R. arrhizus grew on crude glycerol. It was found that crude glycerol was more suitable than glucose for smaller R. arrhizus pellet forming. When 80 g/L crude glycerol was used as carbon source, the fumaric acid production of 4.37 g/L was obtained at 192 h. With a highest concentration of 22.81 g/L achieved in the co-fermentation of crude glycerol (40 g/L) and glucose (40 g/L) at 144 h, the fumaric acid production was enhanced by 553.6%, compared to the fermentation using glycerol (80 g/L) as sole carbon source. Moreover, the production cost of fumaric acid in co-fermentation was reduced by approximately 14% compared to glucose fermentation.

  16. Microbial recycling of glycerol to biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Zhu, Zhi; Wang, Weihua; Lu, Xuefeng

    2013-12-01

    The sustainable supply of lipids is the bottleneck for current biodiesel production. Here microbial recycling of glycerol, byproduct of biodiesel production to biodiesel in engineered Escherichia coli strains was reported. The KC3 strain with capability of producing fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) from glucose was used as a starting strain to optimize fermentation conditions when using glycerol as sole carbon source. The YL15 strain overexpressing double copies of atfA gene displayed 1.7-fold increase of FAEE productivity compared to the KC3 strain. The titer of FAEE in YL15 strain reached to 813 mg L(-1) in minimum medium using glycerol as sole carbon source under optimized fermentation conditions. The titer of glycerol-based FAEE production can be significantly increased by both genetic modifications and fermentation optimization. Microbial recycling of glycerol to biodiesel expands carbon sources for biodiesel production.

  17. Glycerol esters as fuel economy additives

    SciTech Connect

    Brewster, P.W.; Smith, C.R.; Gowland, F.W.

    1987-07-28

    A lubricating oil composition formulated is described for use as a crankcase lubricating oil composition for gasoline or diesel engines consisting essentially of a major amount of a mineral oil of a lubricating viscosity which has incorporated about 0.20 weight percent of a glycerol partial ester. The partial ester is a mixture of glycerol monooleate and glycerol dioleate. The mixture has a weight ratio of 3 parts of glycerol monooleate to 2 parts of glycerol dioleate the ester providing a fuel economy improvement of about 1 to 3 percent when the lubricating oil composition is employed in the crankcase of the engine. An ashless dispersant, a metal detergent additive, a zinc dihdyrocarbyl dithiophosphate anti-wear additive and an antioxidant. The dispersant, detergent, anti-wear additive and antioxidant are present in conventional amounts to provide their normal attendant functions.

  18. Multi-scale Characterization of Hyperplasticity and Failure in Dual Phase Steels Subject to Electrohydraulic Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samei, Javad

    In this research, three commercial dual phase steel sheets, i.e. DP500, DP780 and DP980, were formed under quasi-static and high strain rate conditions using the Nakazima test and Electrohydraulic Forming (EHF), respectively. In EHF, as a result of a high-voltage electrical discharge between two electrodes in a water chamber, a shock wave was produced which travelled through the water and formed the sheet into the final shape. When a 34° conical die was used in EHF, significant formability improvement, known as hyperplasticity, was achieved in the specimens compared to the specimens formed in the Nakazima test. In this research, hyperplasticity as well as failure in the specimens were characterized at different scales of observation. Quantitative metallography showed relative deformation improvement of around 20% in ferrite and 100% in martensite when formed under EHF. Dislocations in ferrite and deformation twinning in martensite were found to be responsible for the significant improvements of deformation in the constituents under EHF. As a mechanism of failure, voids were found to nucleate in the ferrite/martensite interface due to decohesion. However, under EHF, the significant deformation improvement of martensite enhanced the plastic compatibility between ferrite and martensite. Consequently, the strain gradient across the ferrite/martensite interface, i.e. decohesion, was reduced and nucleation and growth of the interfacial voids was suppressed. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of the voids showed that void growth in the specimens formed under EHF was slower than in the specimens formed in the Nakazima test. The reason was attributed to impact of the sheet against the die that generates significant compressive and shear stresses which act against void growth. Therefore, under EHF, coalescence of the voids to form micro-cracks was postponed to higher levels of strains which resulted in suppression of failure. Fractography of the specimens showed ductile

  19. A multidomain enzyme, with glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities, is involved in a chloroplastic pathway for glycerol synthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Morales-Sánchez, Daniela; Kim, Yeongho; Terng, Ee Leng; Peterson, Laura; Cerutti, Heriberto

    2017-03-08

    Understanding the unique features of algal metabolism may be necessary to realize the full potential of algae as feedstock for the production of biofuels and biomaterials. Under nitrogen deprivation, the green alga C. reinhardtii showed substantial triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation and up-regulation of a gene, GPD2, encoding a multidomain enzyme with a putative phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) motif fused to glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) domains. Canonical GPD enzymes catalyze the synthesis of glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) by reduction of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP). G3P forms the backbone of TAGs and membrane glycerolipids and it can be dephosphorylated to yield glycerol, an osmotic stabilizer and compatible solute under hypertonic stress. Recombinant Chlamydomonas GPD2 showed both reductase and phosphatase activities in vitro and it can work as a bifunctional enzyme capable of synthesizing glycerol directly from DHAP. In addition, GPD2 and a gene encoding glycerol kinase were up-regulated in Chlamydomonas cells exposed to high salinity. RNA-mediated silencing of GPD2 revealed that the multidomain enzyme was required for TAG accumulation under nitrogen deprivation and for glycerol synthesis under high salinity. Moreover, a GPD2-mCherry fusion protein was found to localize to the chloroplast, supporting the existence of a GPD2-dependent plastid pathway for the rapid synthesis of glycerol in response to hyperosmotic stress. We hypothesize that the reductase and phosphatase activities of PSP-GPD multidomain enzymes may be modulated by post-translational modifications/mechanisms, allowing them to synthesize primarily G3P or glycerol depending on environmental conditions and/or metabolic demands in algal species of the core Chlorophytes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Metabolic Engineering of a Glycerol-Oxidative Pathway in Lactobacillus panis PM1 for Utilization of Bioethanol Thin Stillage: Potential To Produce Platform Chemicals from Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Sun; Korber, Darren R.

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus panis PM1 has the ability to produce 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) from thin stillage (TS), which is the major waste material after bioethanol production, and is therefore of significance. However, the fact that L. panis PM1 cannot use glycerol as a sole carbon source presents a considerable problem in terms of utilization of this strain in a wide range of industrial applications. Accordingly, L. panis PM1 was genetically engineered to directly utilize TS as a fermentable substrate for the production of valuable platform chemicals without the need for exogenous nutrient supplementation (e.g., sugars and nitrogen sources). An artificial glycerol-oxidative pathway, comprised of glycerol facilitator, glycerol kinase, glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, triosephosphate isomerase, and NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase genes of Escherichia coli, was introduced into L. panis PM1 in order to directly utilize glycerol for the production of energy for growth and value-added chemicals. A pH 6.5 culture converted glycerol to mainly lactic acid (85.43 mM), whereas a significant amount of 1,3-propanediol (59.96 mM) was formed at pH 7.5. Regardless of the pH, ethanol (82.16 to 83.22 mM) was produced from TS fermentations, confirming that the artificial pathway metabolized glycerol for energy production and converted it into lactic acid or 1,3-PDO and ethanol in a pH-dependent manner. This study demonstrates the cost-effective conversion of TS to value-added chemicals by the engineered PM1 strain cultured under industrial conditions. Thus, application of this strain or these research findings can contribute to reduced costs of bioethanol production. PMID:25281374

  1. Crenarchaeol: the characteristic core glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether membrane lipid of cosmopolitan pelagic crenarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Schouten, Stefan; Hopmans, Ellen C; van Duin, Adri C T; Geenevasen, Jan A J

    2002-10-01

    The basic structure and stereochemistry of the characteristic glycerol dibiphytanyl glycerol tetraether (GDGT) membrane lipid of cosmopolitan pelagic crenarchaeota has been identified by high field two-dimensional (2D)-NMR techniques. It contains one cyclohexane and four cyclopentane rings formed by internal cyclisation of the biphytanyl chains. Its structure is similar to that of GDGTs biosynthesized by (hyper)thermophilic crenarchaeota apart from the cyclohexane ring. These findings are consistent with the close phylogenetic relationship of (hyper)thermophilic and pelagic crenarchaeota based 16S rRNA. The latter group inherited the biosynthetic capabilities for a membrane composed of cyclopentane ring-containing GDGTs from the (hyper)thermophilic crenarchaeota. However, to cope with the much lower temperature of the ocean, a small but key step in their evolution was the adjustment of the membrane fluidity by making a kink in one of the bicyclic biphytanyl chains by the formation of a cyclohexane ring. This prevents the dense packing characteristic for the cyclopentane ring-containing GDGTs membrane lipids used by hyperthermophilic crenarchaeota to adjust their membrane fluidity to high temperatures.

  2. Physical behavior of the hydrophobic core of membranes: properties of 1-stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycerol.

    PubMed

    Di, L; Small, D M

    1995-12-26

    Phospholipids containing a saturated fatty acid in the primary position and an unsaturated fatty acid in the secondary position are a major structural part of biological membranes. The mixed-chain hydrophobic core of the membranes is the diacylglycerol part. To better understand the core properties of membranes we have studied the physical behavior of 1-stearoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycerol (SLDG) by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in the dry and hydrated states. Dry SLDG has four polymorphic phases: alpha (transition temperature, 11.6 degrees C; delta H = 7.5 kcal/mol); sub-alpha 1 (3.0 degrees C; 0.6 kcal/mol); sub-alpha 2(-1.0 degrees C; 0.5 kcal/mol); and beta' (16.1 degrees C; 15.4 kcal/mol). The alpha, sub-alpha 1, and sub-alpha 2 phases are metastable with a probable extended bilayer structure (d001 approximately 59.5 A). The chain packing of the alpha phase is hexagonal, while sub-alpha 1 and sub-alpha 2 have pseudohexagonal chain packing. The beta' phase has a tilted bilayer structure (46.9 A) with strong wide-angle diffractions, suggesting elements of orthorhombic perpendicular packing. Compared to saturated 1,2-diacylglycerols, SLDG packs much less efficiently, but, when compared to 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycerol, it appears to pack somewhat more efficiently. Thus polyunsaturated linoleate chains appear to pack marginally more effectively with the saturated stearate chains than do monounsaturated chains. SLDG hydrates with 0.5 mol of H2O, which prevents the beta' phase from forming. Only one hydrated alpha phase (alpha w) and two hydrated sub-alpha (sub-alpha w1, sub-alpha w2) phases are formed. These phases are similar in structure to the nonhydrated alpha phases, but the bilayer period is increased by about 2 A (d001 approximately 61.5 A). This causes minor changes in polymorphism, including lower melting temperatures and enthalpy. A comparison of diacylglycerols to phosphatidylcholines with the same chains shows that the

  3. Influence of heat shock on glycerol production in alcohol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Berovic, Marin; Pivec, Aleksandra; Kosmerl, Tatjana; Wondra, Mojmir; Celan, Stefan

    2007-02-01

    The influence of single and double heat shocks induced during the exponential growth phase of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation of cultivar Sauvignon Blanc grape must was examined. Rapid temperature changes from 18 degrees C to 34 degrees C have been applied. The effect of the duration of exposure to a high temperature has been analyzed. By the applications of a single heat shock and a double heat shock, up to 8.2 g l(-1) and 11.0 g l(-1) glycerol have been produced, respectively. To prevent the evaporation of fine wine bouquet compounds during the temperature changes, reflux coolers on the top of bioreactors have been employed. By using this method, glycerol production was increased by up to 65%.

  4. Solid-state NMR identification and quantification of newly formed aluminosilicate phases in weathered kaolinite systems.

    PubMed

    Crosson, Garry S; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary Kay; O'Day, Peggy A; Mueller, Karl T

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3-, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH approximately 13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10(-3), 10(-4), and 10(-5) molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10(-5) m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10(-3) m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and

  5. Solid-State NMR Identification and Quantification of Newly Formed Aluminosilicate Phases in Weathered Kaolinite Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Crosson, Garry S.; Choi, Sunkyung; Chorover, Jon; Amistadi, Mary K.; O'Day, Peggy A.; Mueller, Karl T.

    2006-01-19

    The weathering of a specimen kaolinite clay was studied over the course of 369 d via solid-state 29Si magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and high-field 27Al MAS NMR. The chosen baseline solution conditions (0.05 mol kg-1 of Al, 2 mol kg-1 of Na+, 1 mol kg-1 of NO3 -, 1 mol kg-1 of OH-, and pH ~13.8) approximate those of solutions leaking from waste tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, WA. Nonradioactive Cs and Sr cations were added to this synthetic tank waste leachate (STWL) solution at concentrations of 10-3, 10-4, and 10-5 molal (m) to represent their radionuclide counterparts. The transformations of silicon- and aluminum-containing solid phase species were monitored quantitatively by using NMR spectroscopy, with the resulting spectra directly reporting the influence of the initial Cs and Sr on formation and transformation of the neo-formed solids. At the lowest concentration of Cs and Sr employed (10-5 m in each cation) peaks consistent with the formation of zeolite-like minerals were detected via 29Si and 27Al MAS NMR as early as 33 d. At concentrations of 10-3 m in each cation, new silicon species are not detected until 93 d, although neophases containing four-coordinate aluminum were detectable at earlier reaction times via 27Al MAS NMR. At the highest magnetic field strengths employed in this NMR study, deconvolutions of resonances detected in the tetrahedral region of the 27Al MAS spectra yielded multiple components, indicating the existence of at least four new aluminum-containing phases. Two of these phases are identified as sodalite and cancrinite through comparison with diffuse-reflectance infrared (DRIFT) spectra and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) results, while a third phase may correlate with a previously detected aluminum-rich chabazite phase. All measurable solid reaction products have been quantified via their 27Al MAS resonances acquired at high magnetic field strengths (17.6 T), and the quantitative

  6. A structural study of lamellar phases formed by nucleoside-functionalized lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, D.; Fratini, E.; Dante, S.; Hauss, T.; Baglioni, P.

    We report a neutron-scattering investigation of lamellar phases formed by novel phospholipids bearing nucleosides at the polar-head-group region. These nucleolipids can interact through stacking and H-bond interactions, following a pattern that resembles base-base coupling in natural nucleic acids (DNA, RNA), i.e. they have similar recognition properties. Bilayer stacks formed of DPP-adenosine, DPP-uridine and their 1:1 mixture were investigated after equilibration in a 98% relative humidity atmosphere. The DPP-adenosine spectrum can be accounted for (in analogy to DPPC) by a lamellar phase with a smectic period of about 60 Å. DPP-uridine displays a not so straightforward behavior that we have tentatively ascribed to the coexistence of lamellae with different smectic periods. In the 1:1 mixture the lamellar mesophase of DPP-uridine is retained, suggesting a specific interaction of the uridine polar-head group with the adenosine moiety of DPP-adenosine. It should be stressed that this behavior can be considered as an indication of the recognition process occurring at the polar-head-group region of the mixed phospholiponucleoside membrane.

  7. Direct phase-sensitive identification of a d-form factor density wave in underdoped cuprates

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kazuhiro; Hamidian, Mohammad H.; Edkins, Stephen D.; Kim, Chung Koo; Kohsaka, Yuhki; Azuma, Masaki; Takano, Mikio; Takagi, Hidenori; Eisaki, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shin-ichi; Allais, Andrea; Lawler, Michael J.; Kim, Eun-Ah; Sachdev, Subir; Davis, J. C. Séamus

    2014-01-01

    The identity of the fundamental broken symmetry (if any) in the underdoped cuprates is unresolved. However, evidence has been accumulating that this state may be an unconventional density wave. Here we carry out site-specific measurements within each CuO2 unit cell, segregating the results into three separate electronic structure images containing only the Cu sites [Cu(r)] and only the x/y axis O sites [Ox(r) and Oy(r)]. Phase-resolved Fourier analysis reveals directly that the modulations in the Ox(r) and Oy(r) sublattice images consistently exhibit a relative phase of π. We confirm this discovery on two highly distinct cuprate compounds, ruling out tunnel matrix-element and materials-specific systematics. These observations demonstrate by direct sublattice phase-resolved visualization that the density wave found in underdoped cuprates consists of modulations of the intraunit-cell states that exhibit a predominantly d-symmetry form factor. PMID:24989503

  8. Ecotoxicology of Glycerol Monolaurate nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Leonardo Q S; Santos, Cayane G; de Almeida Vaucher, Rodrigo; Raffin, Renata P; da Silva, Aleksandro S; Baretta, Dilmar; Maccari, Ana Paula; Giombelli, Laura Caroline D D; Volpato, Andreia; Arruda, Jessyka; de Ávila Scheeren, Cecília; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Santos, Roberto C V

    2017-05-01

    Glycerol Monolaurate (GML) is a compound with known antimicrobial potential, however it is not much used due to its low solubility in water and high melting point. The nanoencapsulation of some drugs offers several advantages such as improved stability and solubility in water. The present study aimed to produce, characterize, and evaluate the ecotoxicity of GML nanocapsules. The nanocapsules were produced and presented a mean diameter of 210nm, polydispersity index of 0.044, and zeta potential of -23.4mV. The electron microscopy images showed the nanometric size and spherical shape. The assay in soil showed that GML has a high toxicity while the GML nanocapsules showed decreased toxic effects. Nanostructuration also protected the Rhamdia quelen against the toxic effects of GML. Concluding, the formulation shows positive results and is useful to predict the success of development besides not damaging the soil.

  9. 3-Hydroxypropionaldehyde guided glycerol feeding strategy in aerobic 1,3-propanediol production by Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jian; Lin, Rihui; Zheng, Zongming; Sun, Yan; Liu, Dehua

    2008-12-01

    3-Hydroxypropionaldehyde (3-HPA) is a toxic intermediary metabolite in the biological route of 1,3-propanediol biosynthesis from glycerol. 3-HPA accumulated in culture medium would arouse an irreversible cessation of the fermentation process. The role of substrate (glycerol) on 3-HPA accumulation in aerobic fermentation was investigated in this paper. 1,3-Propanediol oxidoreductase and glycerol dehydratase, two key enzyme catalyzing reactions of 3-HPA formation and consumption, were sensitive to high concentration of 3-HPA. When the concentration of 3-HPA increased to a higher level in medium (ac 10 mmol/L), the activity of 1,3-propanediol oxidoreductase in cell decreased correspondingly, which led to decrease of the 3-HPA conversion rate, then the 3-HPA concentration increasing was accelerated furthermore. 3-HPA accumulation in culture medium was triggered by this positive feedback mechanism. In the cell exponential growth phase, the reaction catalyzed by 1,3-propanediol oxidoreductase was the rate limiting step in 1,3-propanediol production. The level of 3-HPA in culture medium could be controlled by the substrate (glycerol) concentration, and lower level of glycerol could avoid 3-HPA accumulating to a high, lethal concentration. In fed batch fermentation, under the condition of initial glycerol concentration 30 g/L, and keeping glycerol concentration lower than 7-8 g/L in cell exponential growth phase, 3-HPA accumulation could not be incurred. Based on this result, a glycerol feeding strategy was set up in fed batch fermentation. Under the optimized condition, 50.1 g/L of 1,3-propanediol was produced in 24 h, and 73.1 g/L of final 1,3-propanediol concentration was obtained in 54 h.

  10. Close-form expression of one-tap normalized LMS carrier phase recovery in optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianhua; Jacobsen, Gunnar; Popov, Sergei; Li, Jie; Liu, Tiegen; Zhang, Yimo

    2016-10-01

    The performance of long-haul high speed coherent optical fiber communication systems is significantly degraded by the laser phase noise and the equalization enhanced phase noise (EEPN). In this paper, the analysis of the one-tap normalized least-mean-square (LMS) carrier phase recovery (CPR) is carried out and the close-form expression is investigated for quadrature phase shift keying (QPSK) coherent optical fiber communication systems, in compensating both laser phase noise and equalization enhanced phase noise. Numerical simulations have also been implemented to verify the theoretical analysis. It is found that the one-tap normalized least-mean-square algorithm gives the same analytical expression for predicting CPR bit-error-rate (BER) floors as the traditional differential carrier phase recovery, when both the laser phase noise and the equalization enhanced phase noise are taken into account.

  11. Glycerol in micellar confinement with tunable rigidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lannert, Michael; Müller, Allyn; Gouirand, Emmanuel; Talluto, Vincenzo; Rosenstihl, Markus; Walther, Thomas; Stühn, Bernd; Blochowicz, Thomas; Vogel, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the glassy dynamics of glycerol in the confinement of a microemulsion system, which is stable on cooling down to the glass transition of its components. By changing the composition, we vary the viscosity of the matrix, while keeping the confining geometry intact, as is demonstrated by small angle X-ray scattering. By means of 2H NMR, differential scanning calorimetry, and triplet solvation dynamics we, thus, probe the dynamics of glycerol in confinements of varying rigidity. 2H NMR results show that, at higher temperatures, the dynamics of confined glycerol is unchanged compared to bulk behavior, while the reorientation of glycerol molecules becomes significantly faster than in the bulk in the deeply supercooled regime. However, comparison of different 2H NMR findings with data from calorimetry and solvation dynamics reveals that this acceleration is not due to the changed structural relaxation of glycerol, but rather due to the rotational motion of essentially rigid glycerol droplets or of aggregates of such droplets in a more fluid matrix. Thus, independent of the matrix mobility, the glycerol dynamics remains unchanged except for the smallest droplets, where an increase of Tg and, thus, a slowdown of the structural relaxation is observed even in a fluid matrix.

  12. Two potential fish glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Raymond, James A

    2015-06-01

    Winter-acclimated rainbow smelt (Osmerus mordax Mitchill) produce high levels of glycerol as an antifreeze. A common pathway to glycerol involves the enzyme glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), but no GPP has yet been identified in fish or any other animal. Here, two phosphatases assembled from existing EST libraries (from winter-acclimated smelt and cold-acclimated smelt hepatocytes) were found to resemble a glycerol-associated phosphatase from a glycerol-producing alga, Dunaliella salina, and a recently discovered GPP from a bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recombinant proteins were generated and were found to have GPP activity on the order of a few μMol Pi/mg enzyme/min. The two enzymes have acidic pH optima (~5.5) similar to that previously determined for GPP activity in liver tissue, with about 1/3 of their peak activities at neutral pH. The two enzymes appear to account for the GPP activity of smelt liver, but due to their reduced activities at neutral pH, their contributions to glycerol production in vivo remain unclear. Similar enzymes may be active in a glycerol-producing insect, Dendroctonus ponderosae.

  13. Tolerance of human corneal endothelium to glycerol.

    PubMed

    Brunette, I; Nelson, L R; Bourne, W M

    1989-12-01

    As an initial step in the development of a method for corneal cryopreservation by vitrification, we attempted to establish the maximum concentration of glycerol to which human corneal endothelium could be exposed at 4 degrees C for 15 min without damage. Damage was defined as an increase in mean endothelial cell size or the inability to maintain corneal thickness for 1 week after exposure to glycerol. Using a system for long-term corneal perfusion, we perfused 24 paired human corneas with glycerol at 4 degrees C. The concentration of glycerol increased at a rate of 20% (w/v) (2.2 M) per hour until the desired maximum concentration was reached for that cornea, stabilized for 15 min, and then decreased at the same rate. The corneas were then perfused at 37 degrees C with Dulbecco's medium at a rate of 5 microliters/min under 18 mm Hg intracameral pressure for 7 days with daily measurements of corneal thickness. Endothelial morphology was examined by specular microscopy and by scanning electron microscopy. After 7 days of perfusion at 37 degrees C, there was a statistically significant direct relationship between the maximum concentration of glycerol to which the experimental eyes had been exposed and the increase in mean endothelial cell size. The mean endothelial cell size increased in corneas exposed to glycerol concentrations of 40, 50, and 60% (w/v), but did not differ significantly from baseline measurements in the corneas exposed to 30% glycerol or less. Thus, there was no detectable damage to human corneas exposed to 30% (w/v) (3.3 M) glycerol in this system. Tolerance of higher concentrations may be achieved by changes in the rates of addition and removal of glycerol or in the composition of the perfusate.

  14. Zeolitic Core@Shell Adsorbents for the Selective Removal of Free Glycerol from Crude Biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Masoumifard, Nima; Arnal, Pablo M; Kaliaguine, Serge; Kleitz, Freddy

    2015-06-22

    Selective adsorption of free glycerol from crude biodiesel was investigated by using mesoporous silica spheres coated with a thin shell of microporous silicalite-1. A polycrystalline silicalite-1 shell was formed upon first covering the external surfaces of various core templates with discrete silicalite-1 nanocrystals, and this was followed by short hydrothermal treatment to ensure shell uniformity. Batch glycerol adsorption experiments were conducted to evaluate the ability of the sorbents to remove free glycerol selectively from crude biodiesel mixtures at various temperatures, also in comparison to that of conventional sorbents, for example, bare mesoporous silica gel spheres and zeolites. The silicalite-1 shell provided a microporous membrane that hindered the diffusion of fatty acid methyl esters into the mesopores of the composite sorbent, whereas the large pore volume of the mesoporous core enabled multilayer glycerol adsorption; this ultimately substantially enhanced the performance in terms of purification yield and adsorption capacity.

  15. Insect glycerol transporters evolved by functional co-option and gene replacement.

    PubMed

    Finn, Roderick Nigel; Chauvigné, François; Stavang, Jon Anders; Belles, Xavier; Cerdà, Joan

    2015-07-17

    Transmembrane glycerol transport is typically facilitated by aquaglyceroporins in Prokaryota and Eukaryota. In holometabolan insects however, aquaglyceroporins are absent, yet several species possess polyol permeable aquaporins. It thus remains unknown how glycerol transport evolved in the Holometabola. By combining phylogenetic and functional studies, here we show that a more efficient form of glycerol transporter related to the water-selective channel AQP4 specifically evolved and multiplied in the insect lineage, resulting in the replacement of the ancestral branch of aquaglyceroporins in holometabolan insects. To recapitulate this evolutionary process, we generate specific mutants in distantly related insect aquaporins and human AQP4 and show that a single mutation in the selectivity filter converted a water-selective channel into a glycerol transporter at the root of the crown clade of hexapod insects. Integration of phanerozoic climate models suggests that these events were associated with the emergence of complete metamorphosis and the unparalleled radiation of insects.

  16. Insect glycerol transporters evolved by functional co-option and gene replacement

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Roderick Nigel; Chauvigné, François; Stavang, Jon Anders; Belles, Xavier; Cerdà, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane glycerol transport is typically facilitated by aquaglyceroporins in Prokaryota and Eukaryota. In holometabolan insects however, aquaglyceroporins are absent, yet several species possess polyol permeable aquaporins. It thus remains unknown how glycerol transport evolved in the Holometabola. By combining phylogenetic and functional studies, here we show that a more efficient form of glycerol transporter related to the water-selective channel AQP4 specifically evolved and multiplied in the insect lineage, resulting in the replacement of the ancestral branch of aquaglyceroporins in holometabolan insects. To recapitulate this evolutionary process, we generate specific mutants in distantly related insect aquaporins and human AQP4 and show that a single mutation in the selectivity filter converted a water-selective channel into a glycerol transporter at the root of the crown clade of hexapod insects. Integration of phanerozoic climate models suggests that these events were associated with the emergence of complete metamorphosis and the unparalleled radiation of insects. PMID:26183829

  17. Cyanamide mediated synthesis under plausible primitive earth conditions. VI - The synthesis of glycerol and glycerophosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epps, D. E.; Nooner, D. W.; Eichberg, J.; Sherwood, E.; Oro, J.

    1979-01-01

    The formation of glycerol occurs when a solution of DL-glyceraldehyde is heated in the presence of hydrogen sulfide at room temperature. DL-glyceraldehyde and dihydroxyacetone treated with hydrazine, as well as DL-glyceraldehyde incubated with formaldehyde are also partially converted to glycerol. The yields of the above reactions are from approximately 1% to about 3%. The formation of glycerophosphates occurs when glycerol is heated with ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and either urea or cyanamide. The yield of glycerophosphates is about 30%, most of which is sn-glycero-1(3)-phosphate. These findings indicate that glycerol and sn-glycero-3-phosphate, which are moieties of glycerolipids, could have been formed under conditions which may have prevailed on the primitive earth.

  18. Controllable superlubricity of glycerol solution via environment humidity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Liu, Yuhong; Zhang, Shaohua; Luo, Jianbin

    2013-09-24

    The effect of humidity on the lubrication property of glycerol solution between steel surfaces has been investigated in this paper. A stable superlubricity with a friction coefficient about 0.006 has been found under the relative humidity between around 40% RH and 50% RH. Especially, it is noted that the lubrication state can be switched between superlubricity and nonsuperlubricity by adjusting humidity, which is attributed to the humidity-dependent hydrogen-bonding pattern in the solution. The mechanism of such superlubricity is attributed to the hydrated layer of water between the surface layers, which is formed by hydrogen-bonded glycerol and water molecules and strong enough to bear load, absorbed on each side of the solid surfaces. The work has potential applications, providing a simple and environment-friendly way to accomplish controllable superlubrication between steel pairs, which are commonly used in industry.

  19. The Potential of Amorphous Solid Secondary Organic Aerosol to Form Mixed-Phase and Cirrus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopf, D. A.; Wang, B.; Lambe, A. T.; Massoli, P.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation by heterogeneous nucleation, which results in cirrus and mixed-phase cloud formation, is one of the least understood processes affecting the global radiation budget, the hydrological cycle, and water vapor distribution. It is commonly assumed that inorganic particles such as mineral dust and solid ammonium sulfate represent important atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). However, a growing body of evidence suggests that secondary organic aerosols (SOA), which are ubiquitous in the atmosphere, exist in a solid (glassy) state. This implies that SOA may also play a role in ice cloud formation by acting as IN, but has not previously been experimentally verified. Here, we report observations of water uptake and ice nucleation via condensation, immersion, and deposition modes initiated by amorphous SOA particles at temperatures from T = 200 - 250 K and relative humidity (RH) from subsaturation conditions up to water saturation. SOA particles with oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios ranging from 0.3 to 1.0 are generated from gas-phase OH oxidation of naphthalene in a flow reactor. At T > 230 K, water uptake at subsaturation conditions is correlated with SOA oxidation level (O/C ratio). This initial water uptake is followed by a moisture-induced phase transition and subsequent immersion freezing. At T < 230 K, the SOA forms ice via deposition nucleation at RH with respect to ice 10-15% below the homogeneous ice nucleation limit, with no apparent dependence on oxidation level. The SOA glass transition temperature (Tg) is estimated as a function of RH, temperature, and SOA oxidation level from corresponding measurements of particle density, hygroscopicity, and bounced fraction, the latter indicating particle phase state. Above Tg, water uptake and immersion freezing is observed when the particles are liquid or semi-solid. Below Tg, deposition ice nucleation is observed when the particles are solid. The data show that particle phase and viscosity govern the

  20. Separation properties of saccharides on a hydrophilic stationary phase having hydration layer formed zwitterionic copolymer.

    PubMed

    Kamichatani, Waka; Inoue, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    A novel water-holding adsorbent bonded with a zwitterionic polymer, diallylamine-maleic acid copolymer, was developed. With this adsorbent, hydrophilic solutes are partitioned by a hydration layer that forms on the zwitterions, as a main separating force. When the adsorbent was used to separate saccharides by normal-phase partition chromatography, the saccharides eluted in the order, mono-, di- and trisaccharide. The elution profile for mono- and di-saccharides was similar but not identical to that on anion exchange columns. This indicated that the adsorbent exhibited a complex retention behavior by the existence of both anion and cation exchange moieties in the functional polymer. Selecting Na(+) as a counter-ion of the maleate moiety enhanced the retention of saccharide. When used in an high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system with gradient elution, the adsorbent enabled the simultaneous analysis of mono-, di- and oligosaccharides.

  1. Can Pearlite form Outside of the Hultgren Extrapolation of the Ae3 and Acm Phase Boundaries?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Capdevila, C.; Hackenberg, R. E.

    2016-02-01

    It is usually assumed that ferrous pearlite can form only when the average austenite carbon concentration C 0 lies between the extrapolated Ae3 ( γ/ α) and Acm ( γ/ θ) phase boundaries (the "Hultgren extrapolation"). This "mutual supersaturation" criterion for cooperative lamellar nucleation and growth is critically examined from a historical perspective and in light of recent experiments on coarse-grained hypoeutectoid steels which show pearlite formation outside the Hultgren extrapolation. This criterion, at least as interpreted in terms of the average austenite composition, is shown to be unnecessarily restrictive. The carbon fluxes evaluated from Brandt's solution are sufficient to allow pearlite growth both inside and outside the Hultgren Extrapolation. As for the feasibility of the nucleation events leading to pearlite, the only criterion is that there are some local regions of austenite inside the Hultgren Extrapolation, even if the average austenite composition is outside.

  2. Single-electron transport in InAs nanowire quantum dots formed by crystal phase engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Malin; Namazi, Luna; Lehmann, Sebastian; Leijnse, Martin; Dick, Kimberly A.; Thelander, Claes

    2016-05-01

    We report electrical characterization of quantum dots formed by introducing pairs of thin wurtzite (WZ) segments in zinc blende (ZB) InAs nanowires. Regular Coulomb oscillations are observed over a wide gate voltage span, indicating that WZ segments create significant barriers for electron transport. We find a direct correlation of transport properties with quantum dot length and corresponding growth time of the enclosed ZB segment. The correlation is made possible by using a method to extract lengths of nanowire crystal phase segments directly from scanning electron microscopy images, and with support from transmission electron microscope images of typical nanowires. From experiments on controlled filling of nearly empty dots with electrons, up to the point where Coulomb oscillations can no longer be resolved, we estimate a lower bound for the ZB-WZ conduction-band offset of 95 meV.

  3. Absorption mechanism of DHP107, an oral paclitaxel formulation that forms a hydrated lipidic sponge phase

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Yura; Chung, Hye Jin; Hong, Jung Wan; Yun, Cheol-Won; Chung, Hesson

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a most widely used anticancer drug with low oral bioavailability, thus it is currently administered via intravenous infusion. DHP107 is a lipid-based paclitaxel formulation that can be administered as an oral solution. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of paclitaxel absorption after oral administration of DHP107 in mice and rats by changing the dosing interval, and evaluated the influence of bile excretion. DHP107 was orally administered to mice at various dosing intervals (2, 4, 8, 12, 24 h) to examine how residual DHP107 affected paclitaxel absorption during subsequent administration. Studies with small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) showed that DHP107 formed a lipidic sponge phase after hydration. The AUC values after the second dose were smaller than those after the first dose, which was correlated to the induction of expression of P-gp and CYP in the livers and small intestines from 2 h to 7 d after the first dose. The smaller AUC value observed after the second dose was also attributed to the intestinal adhesion of residual formulation. The adhered DHP107 may have been removed by ingested food, thus resulting in a higher AUC. In ex vivo and in vivo mucoadhesion studies, the formulation adhered to the villi for up to 24 h, and the amount of DHP107 that adhered was approximately half that of monoolein. The paclitaxel absorption after administration of DHP107 was not affected by bile in the cholecystectomy mice. The dosing interval and food intake affect the oral absorption of paclitaxel from DHP107, which forms a mucoadhesive sponge phase after hydration. Bile excretion does not affect the absorption of paclitaxel from DHP107 in vivo. PMID:27867185

  4. Absorption mechanism of DHP107, an oral paclitaxel formulation that forms a hydrated lipidic sponge phase.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yura; Chung, Hye Jin; Hong, Jung Wan; Yun, Cheol-Won; Chung, Hesson

    2017-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a most widely used anticancer drug with low oral bioavailability, thus it is currently administered via intravenous infusion. DHP107 is a lipid-based paclitaxel formulation that can be administered as an oral solution. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of paclitaxel absorption after oral administration of DHP107 in mice and rats by changing the dosing interval, and evaluated the influence of bile excretion. DHP107 was orally administered to mice at various dosing intervals (2, 4, 8, 12, 24 h) to examine how residual DHP107 affected paclitaxel absorption during subsequent administration. Studies with small-angle X-ray diffraction (SAXS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) showed that DHP107 formed a lipidic sponge phase after hydration. The AUC values after the second dose were smaller than those after the first dose, which was correlated to the induction of expression of P-gp and CYP in the livers and small intestines from 2 h to 7 d after the first dose. The smaller AUC value observed after the second dose was also attributed to the intestinal adhesion of residual formulation. The adhered DHP107 may have been removed by ingested food, thus resulting in a higher AUC. In ex vivo and in vivo mucoadhesion studies, the formulation adhered to the villi for up to 24 h, and the amount of DHP107 that adhered was approximately half that of monoolein. The paclitaxel absorption after administration of DHP107 was not affected by bile in the cholecystectomy mice. The dosing interval and food intake affect the oral absorption of paclitaxel from DHP107, which forms a mucoadhesive sponge phase after hydration. Bile excretion does not affect the absorption of paclitaxel from DHP107 in vivo.

  5. Communication: Contrasting effects of glycerol and DMSO on lipid membrane surface hydration dynamics and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Alex M.; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Han, Songi

    2016-07-01

    Glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) are commonly used cryoprotectants in cellular systems, but due to the challenges of measuring the properties of surface-bound solvent, fundamental questions remain regarding the concentration, interactions, and conformation of these solutes at lipid membrane surfaces. We measured the surface water diffusivity at gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer surfaces in aqueous solutions containing ≤7.5 mol. % of DMSO or glycerol using Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization. We found that glycerol similarly affects the diffusivity of water near the bilayer surface and that in the bulk solution (within 20%), while DMSO substantially increases the diffusivity of surface water relative to bulk water. We compare these measurements of water dynamics with those of equilibrium forces between DPPC bilayers in the same solvent mixtures. DMSO greatly decreases the range and magnitude of the repulsive forces between the bilayers, whereas glycerol increases it. We propose that the differences in hydrogen bonding capability of the two solutes leads DMSO to dehydrate the lipid head groups, while glycerol affects surface hydration only as much as it affects the bulk water properties. The results suggest that the mechanism of the two most common cryoprotectants must be fundamentally different: in the case of DMSO by decoupling the solvent from the lipid surface, and in the case of glycerol by altering the hydrogen bond structure and intermolecular cohesion of the global solvent, as manifested by increased solvent viscosity.

  6. Role of CgHOG1 in Stress Responses and Glycerol Overproduction of Candida glycerinogenes.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hao; Zhuge, Bin; Zong, Hong; Lu, Xinyao; Fang, Huiying; Zhuge, Jian

    2016-12-01

    Candida glycerinogenes, the glycerol producer with excellent multi-stress tolerances, is considered to be a potential biotechnological host used in the production of glycerol and its derivatives under extreme fermentation conditions. In this study, to evaluate the multiple roles of mitogen-activated protein kinase CgHOG1, we constructed a gene disruption system in the diploid C. glycerinogenes to obtain CgHOG1 null mutant. Pseudohyphae generation of the CgHOG1 mutant under non-inducing condition indicated a repressor role in morphological transitions. Disruption of CgHOG1 resulted in increased sensitivities to osmotic, acetic acid, and oxidative stress but not involved in thermotolerance. In the CgHOG1 mutant, NaCl shock failed to stimulate the accumulation of intracellular glycerol and was fatal. In addition, the CgHOG1 mutant displayed a significant prolonged growth lag phase in YPD medium with no decrease in glycerol production, whereas the mutant cannot grow under hyperosmotic condition with no detectable glycerol in broth. These results suggested that CgHOG1 plays important roles in morphogenesis and multi-stress tolerance. The growth and glycerol overproduction under osmotic stress are heavily dependent on CgHOG1 kinase.

  7. Communication: Contrasting effects of glycerol and DMSO on lipid membrane surface hydration dynamics and forces.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Alex M; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Han, Songi

    2016-07-28

    Glycerol and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) are commonly used cryoprotectants in cellular systems, but due to the challenges of measuring the properties of surface-bound solvent, fundamental questions remain regarding the concentration, interactions, and conformation of these solutes at lipid membrane surfaces. We measured the surface water diffusivity at gel-phase dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer surfaces in aqueous solutions containing ≤7.5 mol. % of DMSO or glycerol using Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization. We found that glycerol similarly affects the diffusivity of water near the bilayer surface and that in the bulk solution (within 20%), while DMSO substantially increases the diffusivity of surface water relative to bulk water. We compare these measurements of water dynamics with those of equilibrium forces between DPPC bilayers in the same solvent mixtures. DMSO greatly decreases the range and magnitude of the repulsive forces between the bilayers, whereas glycerol increases it. We propose that the differences in hydrogen bonding capability of the two solutes leads DMSO to dehydrate the lipid head groups, while glycerol affects surface hydration only as much as it affects the bulk water properties. The results suggest that the mechanism of the two most common cryoprotectants must be fundamentally different: in the case of DMSO by decoupling the solvent from the lipid surface, and in the case of glycerol by altering the hydrogen bond structure and intermolecular cohesion of the global solvent, as manifested by increased solvent viscosity.

  8. Crystallographic Stability of Metastable Phase Formed by Containerless Processing in REFeO3 (RE: Rare-Earth Element)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuribayashi, Kazuhiko; Kumar, M. S. Vijaya

    2012-01-01

    Undercooling a melt often facilitates a metastable phase to nucleate preferentially. Although the classical nucleation theory shows that the most critical factor for forming a metastable phase is the interface free energy, the crystallographic stability is also indispensable for the phase to be frozen at ambient temperature. In compound materials such as oxides, authors have suggested that the decisive factors for forming a critical nucleus are not only the free energy difference but also the difference of the entropy of fusion between stable and metastable phases. In the present study, using REFeO3 (RE: rare-earth element) as a model material, we investigate the formation of a metastable phase from undercooled melts with respect to the competitive nucleation and crystallographical stabilities of both phases.

  9. Depletion Interactions: Effects of Added Homopolymer on Ordered Phases Formed by Spherical Block Copolymer Micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Sayeed; Lodge, Timothy P.

    2008-12-09

    Three distinct poly(styrene-b-isoprene) (SI) diblock copolymers with molecular weights of 16-16, 38-14, and 50-13 kDa for styrene and isoprene, respectively, formed spherical micelles when dissolved in diethyl phthalate (DEP). Since DEP is a styrene-selective solvent, micelles with polyisoprene in the core and polystyrene in the corona were formed. At block copolymer concentrations of 20%, 16%, and 14% in DEP, the spherical micelles of SI(16-16), SI(38-14), and SI(50-13) pack onto a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice, a mixture of FCC and body-centered cubic (BCC) lattices, and a BCC lattice, respectively. Polystyrene homopolymers with molecular weights of 4, 48, and 180 kDa were added to these ordered solutions. The following general trends were observed: the FCC phase tended to disorder, and samples that originally behaved like soft solids exhibited liquidlike flow behavior. The effect increased strongly with both the molecular weight and concentration of homopolymer in the solution. Furthermore, the BCC lattice tended to be displaced by the FCC lattice, or to disorder, when homopolymer was added. These results can be explained by invoking depletion interactions, which have been studied extensively in colloid/polymer mixtures. However, the phenomenon differs in certain details from colloidal systems because the addition of homopolymer can also influence the aggregation number of the micelles, which in turn affects the lattice packing of the micelles.

  10. Isomers and conformational barriers of gas phase nicotine, nornicotine and their protonated forms

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Tomoki; Farone, William A.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2014-07-17

    We report extensive conformational searches of the neutral nicotine, nornicotine and their protonated analogs that are based on ab-initio second order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) electronic structure calculations. Initial searches were performed with the 6-31G(d,p) and the energetics of the most important structures were further refined from geometry optimizations with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. Based on the calculated free energies at T=298 K for the gas phase molecules, neutral nicotine has two dominant trans conformers, whereas neutral nornicotine is a mixture of several conformers. For nicotine, the protonation on both the pyridine and the pyrrolidine sites is energetically competitive, whereas nornicotine prefers protonation on the pyridine nitrogen. The protonated form of nicotine is mainly a mixture of two pyridine-protonated trans conformers and two pyrrolidine-protonated trans conformers, whereas the protonated form of nornicotine is a mixture of four pyridine-protonated trans conformers. Nornicotine is conformationally more flexible than nicotine, however it is less protonated at the biologically important pyrrolidine nitrogen site. The lowest energy isomers for each case were found to interconvert via low (< 6 kcal/mol) rotational barriers around the pyridine-pyrrolidine bond.

  11. Removal of pyridine from liquid and gas phase by copper forms of natural and synthetic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Reháková, Mária; Fortunová, Lubica; Bastl, Zdeněk; Nagyová, Stanislava; Dolinská, Silvia; Jorík, Vladimír; Jóna, Eugen

    2011-02-15

    Zeoadsorbents on the basis of copper forms of synthetic zeolite ZSM5 and natural zeolite of the clinoptilolite type (CT) have been studied taking into account their environmental application in removing harmful pyridine (py) from liquid and gas phase. Sorption of pyridine by copper forms of zeolites (Cu-ZSM5 and Cu-CT) has been studied by CHN, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffractometry, FTIR spectroscopy, thermal analysis (TG, DTA and DTG) and analysis of the surface areas and the pore volumes by low-temperature adsorption of nitrogen. The results of thermal analyses of Cu-ZSM5, Cu-(py)(x)ZSM5, Cu-CT and Cu-(py)(x)CT zeolitic products with different composition (x depends on the experimental conditions of sorption of pyridine) clearly confirmed their different thermal properties as well as the sorption of pyridine. In the zeolitic pyridine containing samples the main part of the pyridine release process occurs at considerably higher temperatures than is the boiling point of pyridine, which proves strong bond and irreversibility of py-zeolite interaction. FTIR spectra of Cu-(py)(x)zeolite samples showed well resolved bands of pyridine. The results of thermal analysis and FTIR spectroscopy are in a good agreement with the results of other used methods.

  12. Efficient green methanol synthesis from glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Muhammad H.; Dummer, Nicholas F.; Knight, David W.; Jenkins, Robert L.; Howard, Mark; Moulijn, Jacob; Taylor, Stuart H.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2015-12-01

    The production of biodiesel from the transesterification of plant-derived triglycerides with methanol has been commercialized extensively. Impure glycerol is obtained as a by-product at roughly one-tenth the mass of the biodiesel. Utilization of this crude glycerol is important in improving the viability of the overall process. Here we show that crude glycerol can be reacted with water over very simple basic or redox oxide catalysts to produce methanol in high yields, together with other useful chemicals, in a one-step low-pressure process. Our discovery opens up the possibility of recycling the crude glycerol produced during biodiesel manufacture. Furthermore, we show that molecules containing at least two hydroxyl groups can be converted into methanol, which demonstrates some aspects of the generality of this new chemistry.

  13. Efficient green methanol synthesis from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Haider, Muhammad H; Dummer, Nicholas F; Knight, David W; Jenkins, Robert L; Howard, Mark; Moulijn, Jacob; Taylor, Stuart H; Hutchings, Graham J

    2015-12-01

    The production of biodiesel from the transesterification of plant-derived triglycerides with methanol has been commercialized extensively. Impure glycerol is obtained as a by-product at roughly one-tenth the mass of the biodiesel. Utilization of this crude glycerol is important in improving the viability of the overall process. Here we show that crude glycerol can be reacted with water over very simple basic or redox oxide catalysts to produce methanol in high yields, together with other useful chemicals, in a one-step low-pressure process. Our discovery opens up the possibility of recycling the crude glycerol produced during biodiesel manufacture. Furthermore, we show that molecules containing at least two hydroxyl groups can be converted into methanol, which demonstrates some aspects of the generality of this new chemistry.

  14. Crude Glycerol as Cost-Effective Fuel for Combined Heat and Power to Replace Fossil Fuels, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, William L

    2012-10-31

    The primary objectives of this work can be summed into two major categories. Firstly, the fundamentals of the combustion of glycerol (in both a refined and unrefined form) were to be investigated, with emphasis of the development of a system capable of reliably and repeatedly combusting glycerol as well as an analysis of the emissions produced during glycerol combustion. Focus was placed on quantifying common emissions in comparison to more traditional fuels and this work showed that the burner developed was able to completely combust glycerol within a relatively wide range of operating conditions. Additionally, focus was placed on examining specific emissions in more detail, namely interesting NOx emissions observed in initial trials, acrolein and other volatile organic emissions, and particulate and ash emissions. This work showed that the combustion of crude glycerol could result in significantly reduced NOx emissions as a function of the high fuel bound oxygen content within the glycerol fuel. It also showed that when burned properly, the combustion of crude glycerol did not result in excessive emissions of acrolein or any other VOC compared to the combustion from more traditional fuels. Lastly however, this work has shown that in any practical application in which glycerol is being burned, it will be necessary to explore ash mitigation techniques due to the very high particulate matter concentrations produced during glycerol combustion. These emissions are comparable to unfiltered coal combustion and are directly tied to the biodiesel production method. The second focus of this work was directed to developing a commercialization strategy for the use of glycerol as a fuel replacement. This strategy has identified a 30 month plan for the scaling up of the laboratory scale burner into a pre-pilot scale system. Additionally, financing options were explored and an assessment was made of the economics of replacing a traditional fuel (namely natural gas) with crude

  15. Insoluble and flexible silk films containing glycerol.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shenzhou; Wang, Xiaoqin; Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaohui; Kluge, Jonathan A; Uppal, Neha; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-11

    We directly prepared insoluble silk films by blending with glycerol and avoiding the use of organic solvents. The ability to blend a plasticizer like glycerol with a hydrophobic protein like silk and achieve stable material systems above a critical threshold of glycerol is an important new finding with importance for green chemistry approaches to new and more flexible silk-based biomaterials. The aqueous solubility, biocompatibility, and well-documented use of glycerol as a plasticizer with other biopolymers prompted its inclusion in silk fibroin solutions to assess impact on silk film behavior. Processing was performed in water rather than organic solvents to enhance the potential biocompatibility of these biomaterials. The films exhibited modified morphologies that could be controlled on the basis of the blend composition and also exhibited altered mechanical properties, such as improved elongation at break, when compared with pure silk fibroin films. Mechanistically, glycerol appears to replace water in silk fibroin chain hydration, resulting in the initial stabilization of helical structures in the films, as opposed to random coil or beta-sheet structures. The use of glycerol in combination with silk fibroin in materials processing expands the functional features attainable with this fibrous protein, and in particular, in the formation of more flexible films with potential utility in a range of biomaterial and device applications.

  16. Stability conditions and mechanism of cream soaps: role of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Sagitani, Hiromichi

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acids, fatty acid potassium soaps, glycerol and water are essential ingredients in the production of stable cream soaps. In this study, the behavior of these components in solution was investigated to elucidate the stability conditions and mechanism of cream soaps. It was determined that the cream soaps were a dispersion of 1:1 acid soap (1:1 molar ratio of potassium soap/fatty acid) crystals in the lamellar gel phase, which has confirmed from the phase behavior diagrams and small angle X-ray scattering data. Glycerol was crucial ingredient in the formation of the lamellar gel phase. The cleansing process of the cream soaps was also evaluated using the same diagrams. The structure of the continuous phase in cream soaps changed from lamellar gel to a micellar aqueous solution upon the addition of water. This structural change during the washing process is important in producing the foaming activity of acid soaps to wash away dirt or excess fats from the skin surface.

  17. Effect of fermentation parameters on bio-alcohols production from glycerol using immobilized Clostridium pasteurianum: an optimization study.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Swati; Goyal, Arun; Moholkar, Vijayanand S

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of effect of fermentation parameters for conversion of glycerol (in both pure and crude form) into three value-added products, namely, ethanol, butanol, and 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO), by immobilized Clostridium pasteurianum and thereby addresses the statistical optimization of this process. The analysis of effect of different process parameters such as agitation rate, fermentation temperature, medium pH, and initial glycerol concentration indicated that medium pH was the most critical factor for total alcohols production in case of pure glycerol as fermentation substrate. On the other hand, initial glycerol concentration was the most significant factor for fermentation with crude glycerol. An interesting observation was that the optimized set of fermentation parameters was found to be independent of the type of glycerol (either pure or crude) used. At optimum conditions of agitation rate (200 rpm), initial glycerol concentration (25 g/L), fermentation temperature (30°C), and medium pH (7.0), the total alcohols production was almost equal in anaerobic shake flasks and 2-L bioreactor. This essentially means that at optimum process parameters, the scale of operation does not affect the output of the process. The immobilized cells could be reused for multiple cycles for both pure and crude glycerol fermentation.

  18. Structure of olefin-imidacloprid and gas-phase fragmentation chemistry of its protonated form.

    PubMed

    Fusetto, Roberto; White, Jonathan M; Hutton, Craig A; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2016-02-07

    One of the major insect metabolites of the widely used neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid, 1 (1-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)methyl]-N-nitro-1H-imidazol-2-amine), is the olefin 2. To better understand how the structure of olefin 2 relates to the gas-phase fragmentation of its protonated form, 2H(+), X-ray crystallography, tandem mass spectrometry experiments and DFT calculations were carried out. Olefin 2 was found to be in a tautomeric form where the proton is on the N(1) position of the imidazole ring and forms a hydrogen bond to one of the oxygen atoms of the coplanar nitroamine group. Under conditions of low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) in a linear ion trap, 2H(+), formed via electrospray ionization (ESI), fragments via a major loss of water, together with minor competing losses of HNO2 and NO2•.This contrasts with 1H+, which mainly undergoes bond homolysis via NO2• loss. Thus, installation of the double bond in 2 plays a key role in facilitating the loss of water. DFT calculations, carried out using the B3LYP/6-311G++(d,p) level of theory, revealed that loss of water was energetically more favourable compared to HNO2 and NO2• loss. Three multistep, energetically accessible mechanisms were identified for loss of water from 2H(+), and these have the following barriers: (I) direct proton transfer from N(5) of the pyridine to O(1) on the NO2 group (119 kJ mol(-1)); (II) rotation of the N(2)-N(4) bond (117 kJ mol(-1)); (III) 1,3-intramolecular proton transfer between the two oxygen atoms of the NO2 group (145 kJ mol(-1)). Given that the lowest barrier for the losses of HNO2 and NO2• is 156 kJ mol(-1), it is likely that all three water loss mechanisms occur concurrently.

  19. Chemical mechanical planarization of copper/polyimide damascene structure with glycerol-based slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permana, David

    This thesis describes the results of an investigation of the Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) of copper and polyimide films with glycerol-based (high viscosity) slurry. A physical planarization model of the polyimide CMP carried out with high viscosity slurry has been developed, with the removal mechanism was primarily being mechanical abrasion. The high viscosity slurry minimizes the impact between the abrasive and polyimide film, thus reducing scratching and damage. However, the scratch density is also strongly dependent on the pad, with soft pads leading to less scratching. The use of BTAH in forming a passivating film on copper surface during CMP was proven to be effective. The effect of glycerol on the passivation of copper was found to be insignificant. The addition of glycerol in the slurry results in a unique CMP removal rate behavior for both copper and polyimide. The removal rate increases with increasing glycerol concentration and reaches a maximum value at 30 vol% glycerol due to particle aggregation and decreases at higher glycerol concentrations due to reduction in the frictional forces between the abrasive particles and the film surface. The possibility of implementing the unique removal rate behavior on the planarization of copper/polyimide damascene structure was also investigated. Dual-step polish process was designed by utilizing the high removal rate with the slurry containing 30 vol% of glycerol, followed by the slurry containing 50 vol% glycerol for over-polish step process. The high viscosity slurry was to protect the soft polymer film as the metal film is abraded away. It was also found that high viscosity slurry induces lower dishing and erosion on the pattern structure.

  20. Structure-phase states and wear resistance of deposition surface formed on steel by electric arc method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raikov, S. V.; Kapralov, E. V.; Vashchuk, E. S.; Budovskikh, E. A.; Gromov, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Sosnin, K. V.

    2015-01-01

    Investigations of elementary and phase structure, state of defect structure and tribological characteristics of deposition, formed on a low carbon low-alloy steel by a welding method were carried out. It was revealed that deposition, formed on a steel surface is accompanied by the multilayer formation, and increase of wear resistance of the layer deposition as determined.

  1. Glass polymorphism in glycerol-water mixtures: I. A computer simulation study.

    PubMed

    Jahn, David A; Wong, Jessina; Bachler, Johannes; Loerting, Thomas; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2016-04-28

    We perform out-of-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of water-glycerol mixtures in the glass state. Specifically, we study the transformations between low-density (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) forms of these mixtures induced by compression/decompression at constant temperature. Our MD simulations reproduce qualitatively the density changes observed in experiments. Specifically, the LDA-HDA transformation becomes (i) smoother and (ii) the hysteresis in a compression/decompression cycle decreases as T and/or glycerol content increase. This is surprising given the fast compression/decompression rates (relative to experiments) accessible in MD simulations. We study mixtures with glycerol molar concentration χ(g) = 0-13% and find that, for the present mixture models and rates, the LDA-HDA transformation is detectable up to χ(g) ≈ 5%. As the concentration increases, the density of the starting glass (i.e., LDA at approximately χ(g) ≤ 5%) rapidly increases while, instead, the density of HDA remains practically constant. Accordingly, the LDA state and hence glass polymorphism become inaccessible for glassy mixtures with approximately χ(g) > 5%. We present an analysis of the molecular-level changes underlying the LDA-HDA transformation. As observed in pure glassy water, during the LDA-to-HDA transformation, water molecules within the mixture approach each other, moving from the second to the first hydration shell and filling the first interstitial shell of water molecules. Interestingly, similar changes also occur around glycerol OH groups. It follows that glycerol OH groups contribute to the density increase during the LDA-HDA transformation. An analysis of the hydrogen bond (HB)-network of the mixtures shows that the LDA-HDA transformation is accompanied by minor changes in the number of HBs of water and glycerol. Instead, large changes in glycerol and water coordination numbers occur. We also perform a detailed analysis of the effects that

  2. Organic solvents vapor pressure and relative humidity effects on the phase transition rate of α and β forms of tegafur.

    PubMed

    Petkune, Sanita; Bobrovs, Raitis; Actiņš, Andris

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the relative humidity (RH) and solvent vapor pressure effects on the phase transition dynamics between tegafur polymorphic forms that do not form hydrates and solvates. The commercially available α and β modifications of 5-fluoro-1-(tetrahydro-2-furyl)-uracil, known as the antitumor agent tegafur, were used as model materials for this study. While investigating the phase transitions of α and β tegafur under various partial pressures of methanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, and water vapor, it was determined that the phase transition rate increased in the presence of solvent vapors, even though no solvates were formed. By increasing the relative air humidity from 20% to 80%, the phase transition rate constant of α and β tegafur was increased about 60 times. After increasing the partial pressure of methanol, n-propanol, or n-butanol vapor, the phase transition rate constant did not change, but the extent of phase transformation was increased. In the homologous row of n-alcohols, the phase transition rate constant decreased with increasing carbon chain length. The dependence of phase transformation extent versus the RH corresponded to the polymolecular adsorption isotherm with a possible capillary condensation effect.

  3. Oblique shock structures formed during the ablation phase of aluminium wire array z-pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swadling, G. F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Niasse, N.; Chittenden, J. P.; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Burdiak, G.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Bland, S. N.; De Grouchy, P.; Khoory, E.; Pickworth, L.; Skidmore, J.; Suttle, L.

    2013-02-01

    A series of experiments has been conducted in order to investigate the azimuthal structures formed by the interactions of cylindrically converging plasma flows during the ablation phase of aluminium wire array Z pinch implosions. These experiments were carried out using the 1.4 MA, 240 ns MAGPIE generator at Imperial College London. The main diagnostic used in this study was a two-colour, end-on, Mach-Zehnder imaging interferometer, sensitive to the axially integrated electron density of the plasma. The data collected in these experiments reveal the strongly collisional dynamics of the aluminium ablation streams. The structure of the flows is dominated by a dense network of oblique shock fronts, formed by supersonic collisions between adjacent ablation streams. An estimate for the range of the flow Mach number (M = 6.2-9.2) has been made based on an analysis of the observed shock geometry. Combining this measurement with previously published Thomson Scattering measurements of the plasma flow velocity by Harvey-Thompson et al. [Physics of Plasmas 19, 056303 (2012)] allowed us to place limits on the range of the Z¯Te of the plasma. The detailed and quantitative nature of the dataset lends itself well as a source for model validation and code verification exercises, as the exact shock geometry is sensitive to many of the plasma parameters. Comparison of electron density data produced through numerical modelling with the Gorgon 3D MHD code demonstrates that the code is able to reproduce the collisional dynamics observed in aluminium arrays reasonably well.

  4. Structural Properties, Order–Disorder Phenomena, and Phase Stability of Orotic Acid Crystal Forms

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Orotic acid (OTA) is reported to exist in the anhydrous (AH), monohydrate (Hy1), and dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvate (SDMSO) forms. In this study we investigate the (de)hydration/desolvation behavior, aiming at an understanding of the elusive structural features of anhydrous OTA by a combination of experimental and computational techniques, namely, thermal analytical methods, gravimetric moisture (de)sorption studies, water activity measurements, X-ray powder diffraction, spectroscopy (vibrational, solid-state NMR), crystal energy landscape, and chemical shift calculations. The Hy1 is a highly stable hydrate, which dissociates above 135 °C and loses only a small part of the water when stored over desiccants (25 °C) for more than one year. In Hy1, orotic acid and water molecules are linked by strong hydrogen bonds in nearly perfectly planar arranged stacked layers. The layers are spaced by 3.1 Å and not linked via hydrogen bonds. Upon dehydration the X-ray powder diffraction and solid-state NMR peaks become broader, indicating some disorder in the anhydrous form. The Hy1 stacking reflection (122) is maintained, suggesting that the OTA molecules are still arranged in stacked layers in the dehydration product. Desolvation of SDMSO, a nonlayer structure, results in the same AH phase as observed upon dehydrating Hy1. Depending on the desolvation conditions, different levels of order–disorder of layers present in anhydrous OTA are observed, which is also suggested by the computed low energy crystal structures. These structures provide models for stacking faults as intergrowth of different layers is possible. The variability in anhydrate crystals is of practical concern as it affects the moisture dependent stability of AH with respect to hydration. PMID:26741914

  5. Intracellular glycerol influences resistance to freeze stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: analysis of a quadruple mutant in glycerol dehydrogenase genes and glycerol-enriched cells.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shingo; Sato, Machiko; Yokoigawa, Kumio; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    Glycerol is well known as a cryoprotectant similar to trehalose. However, there is little information about the effects of intracellular glycerol on the freeze-thaw stress tolerance of yeast. Through analysis of a quadruple-knockout mutant of glycerol dehydrogenase genes (ara1 Delta gcy1 Delta gre3 Delta ypr1 Delta) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we revealed that the decrease in glycerol dehydrogenase activity led to increased levels of intracellular glycerol. We also found that this mutant showed higher tolerance to freeze stress than wild type strain W303-1A. Furthermore, we demonstrated that intracellular-glycerol-enriched cells cultured in glycerol medium acquire tolerance to freeze stress and retain high leavening ability in dough even after frozen storage for 7 days. These results suggest the possibility of using intracellular-glycerol-enriched cells to develop better frozen dough.

  6. Cubic phase-forming dry powders for controlled drug delivery on mucosal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Moebus, K; Siepmann, J; Bodmeier, R

    2012-01-30

    The purpose of this study was to prepare and physicochemically characterize protein-loaded, glycerol monooleate (GMO)-based dry powder systems, which can be used for the controlled mucosal delivery of macromolecules (e.g., nasal, buccal, pulmonary). Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-loaded powders were prepared by spray-drying, freeze-drying and/or spray-freezing using different types of carrier materials, including mannitol, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP 25) and polyethylene glycols (PEGs). The systems were characterized by optical and polarized light microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, gel electrophoresis and diffusion studies. The type of carrier material strongly affected the resulting particle size and shape. The presence of GMO effectively slowed down BSA release. Importantly, broad ranges of release patterns could be achieved by varying the type of preparation method and composition of the dry powders. In all cases, the primary structure of the BSA remained intact. GMO, which is a wax solid at room temperature, has been successfully converted into dry powder formulations that offer potential for the controlled mucosal delivery of proteins.

  7. Biomass Pretreatment using Ionic Liquid and Glycerol Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynam, Joan Goerss

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a renewable, sustainable resource that can replace or supplement fossil fuels use for liquid fuels and chemicals. However, its recalcitrant structure including interwoven cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin biomacromolecules is challenging to deconstruct. Pretreating biomass so that it can be converted to useful liquids dominates process economics. Many pretreatment methods exist, but most require hazardous chemicals or processing conditions. Many ionic liquids (ILs), salts molten below 100°C, can be used to deconstruct lignocellulosic biomass and are less hazardous than the volatile organic compounds typically used. While effective, relatively safe, and recyclable, ILs are expensive. To reduce costs, dilution with other safe compounds is desirable, if there is no impact on deconstruction efficiency. Glycerol, a food additive, is inexpensive and becoming even more so since it is a by-product of the burgeoning biodiesel industry. Use of glycerol as an additive or diluent for ILs is extensively evaluated in this work. Rice hulls are an abundant biomass, with over 100 million tons produced per year, but with little practical use. The IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium formate ([C2mim][O2CH] or EMIM Form) when mixed with an equal amount of glycerol has been shown to be effective in pretreating rice hulls. Ambient pressure, a pretreatment temperature of 110°C, and a reaction time of three hours produced rice hulls that could be enzymatically hydrolyzed to give reasonably good glucose and xylose yields considering the recalcitrance of this silica-armored biomass. The IL [C2mim][O2CH] was also effective when mixed with an equal amount of glycerol to pretreat loblolly pine, a fast-growing softwood. Loblolly pine was pretreated at 140°C for three hours to produce a solid rich in cellulose and hemicelluloses, while a lignin-rich product could be precipitated from the IL. Similar products were obtained from pretreatment with a mixture of 75% 1

  8. Metastability and polymorphism in the gel and fluid bilayer phases of dilauroylphosphatidylethanolamine. Two crystalline forms in excess water.

    PubMed

    Seddon, J M; Harlos, K; Marsh, D

    1983-03-25

    The phase behavior of 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DLPE) in excess water has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and x-ray diffraction. In addition to the usual gel phase L beta of lamellar periodicity 5.07 nm and the fluid bilayer phase L alpha of periodicity 4.5 nm, two distinct crystalline forms may also be spontaneously adopted. The L beta phase is only produced by cooling from L alpha and is metastable, relaxing to one of the crystalline forms on incubation. One crystalline polymorph, designated beta 2, has a lamellar periodicity of 4.55 nm and corresponds to the structure of DLPE crystallized from a variety of organic solvents. The other crystalline polymorph, designated beta 1, has a lamellar periodicity of 3.78 nm, which implies that in this form the hydrocarbon chains are tilted at approximately 40 degrees to the bilayer normal. The beta 2 polymorph is obtained on dispersing crystalline DLPE directly in water at T less than 43 degrees C, on incubation in the L alpha phase at 30 degrees C less than T less than 43 degrees C, or on heating the beta 1 form slowly to T greater than 35 degrees C. The beta 1 polymorph is obtained on incubating the L beta phase at T less than 30 degrees C. By calorimetry, the L beta phase undergoes an endothermic transition (delta H = 15.5 kJ X mol-1 (3.7 kcal X mol-1)) at 30.6 degrees C to the fluid bilayer phase L alpha. The beta 1 phase undergoes an endothermic transition (delta H congruent to 50 kJ X mol-1 (12 kcal X mol-1)) to L alpha at 35 degrees C. The beta 2 phase undergoes an endothermic transition (delta H = 57 kJ X mol-1 (13.7 kcal X mol-1)) to L alpha at 43 degrees C.

  9. Synthesis of Glycerol Carbonate by Transesterification of Glycerol with Urea Over Zn/Al Mixed Oxide.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Young Bok; Baek, Jae Ho; Kim, Yangdo; Lee, Man Sig

    2015-01-01

    Reactions of glycerol carbonate using glycerol and urea have been carried out previously using ZnSO4 and ZnO catalysts, and high yields have been reported using ZnSO4 as catalyst. However, this salt is soluble in glycerol, and recycling of catalyst is difficult after the reaction. In this study, we prepared a mixed metal oxide catalyst using Zn and Al, and this catalyst consisted of a mixture of ZnO and ZnAl2O4. We confirmed the conversion of glycerol and the yield of glycerol carbonate of the amount of Al. As a result, we obtained a yield of 82.3% and a conversion of 82.7%. In addition we obtained high yield in recycling of catalyst. The yield of the glycerol carbonate increases with an increase of acid and base site of catalysts and the highest catalytic activity was obtained when acid/base ratio was approx. 1. From this result, we may conclude that the acid and base site density and ratio of catalysts were very important parameters in the synthesis of glycerol carbonate from urea and glycerol.

  10. Feruloyl glycerol and 1,3-diferuloyl glycerol antioxidant behavior in phospholipid vesicles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Enzymatically synthesized feruloyl¬-sn¬-glycerol (FG) and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol (F2G) were both found to partition and incorporate well into 1,2-dioleoylphosphocholine vesicles. Incorporation resulted in vesicles that were as or slightly more stable than the unloaded ones. FG and F2G both demon...

  11. An approximate form of the Rayleigh reflection loss and its phase: application to reverberation calculation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Chris H

    2010-07-01

    A useful approximation to the Rayleigh reflection coefficient for two half-spaces composed of water over sediment is derived. This exhibits dependence on angle that may deviate considerably from linear in the interval between grazing and critical. It shows that the non-linearity can be expressed as a separate function that multiplies the linear loss coefficient. This non-linearity term depends only on sediment density and does not depend on sediment sound speed or volume absorption. The non-linearity term tends to unity, i.e., the reflection loss becomes effectively linear, when the density ratio is about 1.27. The reflection phase in the same approximation leads to the well-known "effective depth" and "lateral shift." A class of closed-form reverberation (and signal-to-reverberation) expressions has already been developed [C. H. Harrison, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 114, 2744-2756 (2003); C. H. Harrison, J. Comput. Acoust. 13, 317-340 (2005); C. H. Harrison, IEEE J. Ocean. Eng. 30, 660-675 (2005)]. The findings of this paper enable one to convert these reverberation expressions from simple linear loss to more general reflecting environments. Correction curves are calculated in terms of sediment density. These curves are applied to a test case taken from a recent ONR-funded Reverberation Workshop.

  12. Silicon carbonate phase formed from carbon dioxide and silica under pressure

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Mario; Gorelli, Federico; Haines, Julien; Cambon, Olivier; Levelut, Claire; Garbarino, Gaston

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of nonmolecular carbon dioxide under high-pressure conditions shows that there are remarkable analogies between this important substance and other group IV oxides. A natural and long-standing question is whether compounds between CO2 and SiO2 are possible. Under ambient conditions, CO2 and SiO2 are thermodynamically stable and do not react with each other. We show that reactions occur at high pressures indicating that silica can behave in a manner similar to ionic metal oxides that form carbonates at room pressure. A silicon carbonate phase was synthesized by reacting silicalite, a microporous SiO2 zeolite, and molecular CO2 that fills the pores, in diamond anvil cells at 18–26 GPa and 600–980 K; the compound was then temperature quenched. The material was characterized by Raman and IR spectroscopy, and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The experiments reveal unique oxide chemistry at high pressures and the potential for synthesis of a class of previously uncharacterized materials. There are also potential implications for CO2 segregation in planetary interiors and for CO2 storage. PMID:21518903

  13. Purification and properties of two different dihydroxyacetone reductases in Gluconobacter suboxydans grown on glycerol.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Osao; Ano, Yoshitaka; Shinagawa, Emiko; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2008-08-01

    It is well known that in oxidative fermentation microbial growth is improved by the addition of glycerol. In a wild strain, glycerol was converted rapidly to dihydroxyacetone (DHA) quantitatively in the early growth phase by the action of quinoprotein glycerol dehydrogenase (GLDH), and then DHA was incorporated into the cells by the early stationary phase. Two DHA reductases (DHARs), NADH-dependent (NADH-DHAR) (EC 1.1.1.6) and NADPH-dependent (NADPH-DHAR) (EC 1.1.1.156), were detected in the same cytoplasm of Gluconobacter suboxydans IFO 3255. The former appeared to be inducible and labile in nature while the latter was constitutive and stable. The two DHARs were separated each other and were finally purified to crystalline enzymes. This report might be the first one dealing with NADPH-DHAR that has been crystallized. The two DHARs were specific only to DHA reduction to glycerol and thus contributed to cytoplasmic DHA metabolism, resulting in an improved biomass yield with the addition of glycerol.

  14. Glycerol elicits energy taxis of Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Zhulin, I B; Rowsell, E H; Johnson, M S; Taylor, B L

    1997-05-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium show positive chemotaxis to glycerol, a chemical previously reported to be a repellent for E. coli. The threshold of the attractant response in both species was 10(-6) M glycerol. Glycerol chemotaxis was energy dependent and coincident with an increase in membrane potential. Metabolism of glycerol was required for chemotaxis, and when lactate was present to maintain energy production in the absence of glycerol, the increases in membrane potential and chemotactic response upon addition of glycerol were abolished. Methylation of a chemotaxis receptor was not required for positive glycerol chemotaxis in E. coli or S. typhimurium but is involved in the negative chemotaxis of E. coli to high concentrations of glycerol. We propose that positive chemotaxis to glycerol in E. coli and S. typhimurium is an example of energy taxis mediated via a signal transduction pathway that responds to changes in the cellular energy level.

  15. Population pharmacokinetic modeling and dosing simulations of nitrogen-scavenging compounds: disposition of glycerol phenylbutyrate and sodium phenylbutyrate in adult and pediatric patients with urea cycle disorders.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Jon P R; Mokhtarani, M; Diaz, G A; Rhead, W; Lichter-Konecki, U; Berry, S A; Lemons, C; Dickinson, K; Coakley, D; Lee, B; Scharschmidt, B F

    2013-07-01

    Sodium phenylbutyrate and glycerol phenylbutyrate mediate waste nitrogen excretion in the form of urinary phenylacetylglutamine (PAGN) in patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs); rare genetic disorders characterized by impaired urea synthesis and hyperammonemia. Sodium phenylbutyrate is approved for UCD treatment; the development of glycerol phenylbutyrate afforded the opportunity to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of both compounds. A population PK model was developed using data from four Phase II/III trials that collectively enrolled patients ages 2 months to 72 years. Dose simulations were performed with particular attention to phenylacetic acid (PAA), which has been associated with adverse events in non-UCD populations. The final model described metabolite levels in plasma and urine for both drugs and was characterized by (a) partial presystemic metabolism of phenylbutyric acid (PBA) to PAA and/or PAGN, (b) slower PBA absorption and greater presystemic conversion with glycerol phenylbutyrate, (c) similar systemic disposition with saturable conversion of PAA to PAGN for both drugs, and (d) body surface area (BSA) as a significant covariate accounting for age-related PK differences. Dose simulations demonstrated similar PAA exposure following mole-equivalent PBA dosing of both drugs and greater PAA exposure in younger patients based on BSA.

  16. Physiological and genetic differences amongst Rhodococcus species for using glycerol as a source for growth and triacylglycerol production.

    PubMed

    Herrero, O Marisa; Moncalián, Gabriel; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2016-02-01

    We analysed the ability of five different rhodococcal species to grow and produce triacylglycerols (TAGs) from glycerol, the main byproduct of biodiesel production. Rhodococcus fascians and Rhodococcus erythropolis grew fast on glycerol, whereas Rhodococcus opacus and Rhodococcus jostii exhibited a prolonged lag phase of several days before growing. Rhodococcus equi only exhibited poor growth on glycerol. R. erythropolis DSMZ 43060 and R. fascians F7 produced 3.9-4.3 g cell biomass l(-1) and 28.4-44.6% cellular dry weight (CDW) of TAGs after 6 days of incubation; whereas R. opacus PD630 and R. jostii RHA1 produced 2.5-3.8 g cell biomass l(-1) and 28.3-38.4% CDW of TAGs after 17 days of growth on glycerol. Genomic analyses revealed two different sets of genes for glycerol uptake and degradation (here named clusters 1 and 2) amongst rhodococci. Those species that possessed cluster 1 (glpFK1D1) (R. fascians and R. erythropolis) exhibited fast growth and lipid accumulation, whereas those that possessed cluster 2 (glpK2D2) (R. opacus, R. jostii and R. equi) exhibited delayed growth and lipid accumulation during cultivation on glycerol. Three glycerol-negative strains were complemented for their ability to grow and produce TAGs by heterologous expression of glpK2 from R. opacus PD630. In addition, we significantly reduced the extension of the lag phase and improved glycerol assimilation and oil production of R. opacus PD630 when expressing glpK1D1 from R. fascians. The results demonstrated that rhodococci are a flexible and amenable biological system for further biotechnological applications based on the reutilization of glycerol.

  17. Benzocaine polymorphism: pressure-temperature phase diagram involving forms II and III.

    PubMed

    Gana, Inès; Barrio, Maria; Do, Bernard; Tamarit, Josep-Lluís; Céolin, René; Rietveld, Ivo B

    2013-11-18

    Understanding the phase behavior of an active pharmaceutical ingredient in a drug formulation is required to avoid the occurrence of sudden phase changes resulting in decrease of bioavailability in a marketed product. Benzocaine is known to possess three crystalline polymorphs, but their stability hierarchy has so far not been determined. A topological method and direct calorimetric measurements under pressure have been used to construct the topological pressure-temperature diagram of the phase relationships between the solid phases II and III, the liquid, and the vapor phase. In the process, the transition temperature between solid phases III and II and its enthalpy change have been determined. Solid phase II, which has the highest melting point, is the more stable phase under ambient conditions in this phase diagram. Surprisingly, solid phase I has not been observed during the study, even though the scarce literature data on its thermal behavior appear to indicate that it might be the most stable one of the three solid phases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H2. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al2O3. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H2, CH4, CO, CO2. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H2O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  19. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Monica Mihet, Maria Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  20. Self-assembling behavior of glycerol monoundecenoate in water.

    PubMed

    Nyame Mendendy Boussambe, Gildas; Valentin, Romain; Fabre, Jean-François; Navailles, Laurence; Nallet, Frédéric; Gaillard, Cedric; Mouloungui, Zephirin

    2017-03-14

    Self-assembling properties of glycerol esters in water are well known. Still, few data on glyc-erol monoesters of undecylenic acid are available. The aim of this study was to highlight the behavior of the glycerol monoundecenoate (GM-C11:1) in different, diluted and concentrated states. Self-assembling properties in water and upon solid inorganic surfaces were investigated in diluted state with surface tension experiments, AFM and Cryo-TEM studies. In concen-trated state, the gelling properties in presence of water were investigated by polarized light microscopy, DSC and SAXS experiments. GM-C11:1 at 100 mg/L self-assembles at the liq-uid/air interfaces as aggregates of about 20 nm in diameter, organized into concentric forms. These aggregates were spherical globules composed of several molecules of GM-C11:1. At higher concentrations (1000 mg/L and 104 mg/L), GM-C11:1 was able to coat uniformly liq-uid/air and liquid/solid interfaces. In bulk GM-C11:1 form spontaneously aggregates and ves-icles. In more concentrated state, GM-C11:1 assembles into lamellar Lβ and Lα form in water. By cross-referencing SAXS and DSC findings, we were able to distinguish between interla-mellar water molecules strongly bound to GM-C11:1 and other molecules remaining unbound and considered as "mobile" water. The percentage of water strongly bound was proportional to the percentage of GM-C11:1 in the system. In this case, GM-C11:1 appears to be an effec-tive molecule for surface treatments for which water retention is important.

  1. Optical BEAMTAP Beam-Forming and Jammer-Nulling System for Broadband Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriehn, Gregory; Kiruluta, Andrew; Silveira, Paulo E. X.; Weaver, Sam; Kraut, Shawn; Wagner, Kelvin; Weverka, R. Ted; Griffiths, Lloyd

    2000-01-01

    We present an approach to receive-mode broadband beam forming and jammer nulling for large adaptive antenna arrays as well as its efficient and compact optical implementation. This broadband efficient adaptive method for true-time-delay array processing (BEAMTAP) algorithm decreases the number of tapped delay lines required for processing an N -element phased-array antenna from N to only 2, producing an enormous savings in delay-line hardware (especially for large broadband arrays) while still providing the full NM degrees of freedom of a conventional N -element time-delay-and-sum beam former that requires N tapped delay lines with M taps each. This allows the system to adapt fully and optimally to an arbitrarily complex spatiotemporal signal environment that can contain broadband signals of interest, as well as interference sources and narrow-band and broadband jammers all of which can arrive from arbitrary angles onto an arbitrarily shaped array thus enabling a variety of applications in radar, sonar, and communication. This algorithm is an excellent match with the capabilities of radio frequency (rf) photonic systems, as it uses a coherent optically modulated fiber-optic feed network, gratings in a photorefractive crystal as adaptive weights, a traveling-wave detector for generating time delay, and an acousto-optic device to control weight adaptation. Because the number of available adaptive coefficients in a photorefractive crystal is as large as 10 9 , these photonic systems can adaptively control arbitrarily large one- or two-dimensional antenna arrays that are well beyond the capabilities of conventional rf and real-time digital signal processing techniques or alternative photonic techniques.

  2. Optical BEAMTAP beam-forming and jammer-nulling system for broadband phased-array antennas.

    PubMed

    Kriehn, G; Kiruluta, A; Silveira, P E; Weaver, S; Kraut, S; Wagner, K; Weverka, R T; Griffiths, L

    2000-01-10

    We present an approach to receive-mode broadband beam forming and jammer nulling for large adaptive antenna arrays as well as its efficient and compact optical implementation. This broadband efficient adaptive method for true-time-delay array processing (BEAMTAP) algorithm decreases the number of tapped delay lines required for processing an N-element phased-array antenna from N to only 2, producing an enormous savings in delay-line hardware (especially for large broadband arrays) while still providing the full NM degrees of freedom of a conventional N-element time-delay-and-sum beam former that requires N tapped delay lines with M taps each. This allows the system to adapt fully and optimally to an arbitrarily complex spatiotemporal signal environment that can contain broadband signals of interest, as well as interference sources and narrow-band and broadband jammers--all of which can arrive from arbitrary angles onto an arbitrarily shaped array--thus enabling a variety of applications in radar, sonar, and communication. This algorithm is an excellent match with the capabilities of radio frequency (rf) photonic systems, as it uses a coherent optically modulated fiber-optic feed network, gratings in a photorefractive crystal as adaptive weights, a traveling-wave detector for generating time delay, and an acousto-optic device to control weight adaptation. Because the number of available adaptive coefficients in a photorefractive crystal is as large as 10(9), these photonic systems can adaptively control arbitrarily large one- or two-dimensional antenna arrays that are well beyond the capabilities of conventional rf and real-time digital signal processing techniques or alternative photonic techniques.

  3. Mössbauer study of oxide phase distributions in rust formed on steel constructions near the Black Sea in Sochi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, V. P.; Lauer, Yu. A.; Goloborodko, P. G.; Polyakov, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    The phase composition of the intermediate oxide layers formed on elements of steel structures at different positions relative to the sea water of the Black Sea near Sochi are investigated. The differences of the phase composition of these oxide layers are shown, depending on the location of the design details in relation to the sea and the abundancies of certain types of oxides in the studied layers are discussed.

  4. From symmetric glycerol derivatives to dissymmetric chlorohydrins.

    PubMed

    Solarte, Carmen; Escribà, Marc; Eras, Jordi; Villorbina, Gemma; Canela, Ramon; Balcells, Mercè

    2011-03-02

    The anticipated worldwide increase in biodiesel production will result in an accumulation of glycerol for which there are insufficient conventional uses. The surplus of this by-product has increased rapidly during the last decade, prompting a search for new glycerol applications. We describe here the synthesis of dissymmetric chlorohydrin esters from symmetric 1,3-dichloro-2-propyl esters obtained from glycerol. We studied the influence of two solvents: 1,4-dioxane and 1-butanol and two bases: sodium carbonate and 1-butylimidazole, on the synthesis of dissymmetric chlorohydrin esters. In addition, we studied the influence of other bases (potassium and lithium carbonates) in the reaction using 1,4-dioxane as the solvent. The highest yield was obtained using 1,4-dioxane and sodium carbonate.

  5. Evaluation of intermediate phases formed on the bonding interface of hot pressed Cu/Al clad materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwang Seok; Lee, Sangmok; Lee, Jong-Sup; Kim, Yong-Bae; Lee, Geun-An; Lee, Sang-Pill; Bae, Dong-Su

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to identify the properties of intermediate phases formed on the bonding interface of hot pressed Cu/Al clad materials by transmission electron microscopy and nano-indentation analyses. Cu/Al clad materials were fabricated by hot pressing under 200 MPa at 250 °C for 1 h and then heat treated at 400 °C for 1 h. Nano-indentation measurement was conducted to evaluate the nanohardness and modulus of the intermediate phases formed between the Cu/Al interfaces. A 3-tier diffusion layer was observed at the Cu/Al interfaces. Knoop microhardness values at the bonding interface were 7 to 11 times that of the Cu and Al matrix metals. The intermediate phases formed at the bonding interface were Al4Cu9, AlCu, and Al2Cu. A mapping analysis confirmed that the Al and Cu particles moved via mutual diffusion toward the intermediate phases formed at the bonding interface. The nanohardness values of η2-AlCu and γ1-Al4Cu9 were 4 to 7 times that of the Cu and Al matrix metals. Nanohardness and Knoop microhardness measurement curves exhibited similar tendencies. The rigidity values of the respective intermediate phases can be arranged in descending order as follows: γ1-Al4Cu9 > η2-AlCu > θ-Al2Cu.

  6. Mulled coal: A beneficiated coal form for use as a fuel or fuel intermediate. Phase 3, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Energy International Corporation (El) was awarded a contract to evaluate a new concept for utilization of the fine coal wetcake produced by many of the physical beneficiation processes now under development. EI proposed development of a stabilized wetcake with properties that would facilitate storage, handling, transport, and subsequent conversion of the material into Coal-Water Fuel (CWF) at the point of use. The effort was performed in three phases. Phase I established the technical feasibility of stabilizing the fine coal ``wetcake`` in a form that can be readily handled and converted into a desired fuel form at the combustion site. The preferred form of stabilized ``wetcake`` was a granular free flowing material with the moisture encapsulated with the fine coal particles. The product was termed Mulled Coal. Phase I results indicated that the Mulled Coal was not only suitable as a CWF intermediate, but also had potential as a solid fuel. Phase II demonstrated the utilization of the Mulled Coal process to store and move fine coal products as a stable ``wetcake.`` Tasks in this phase tested components of the various systems required for storage, handling and combustion of the fine coals. Phase III expanded the technology by: 1. Evaluating Mulled Coal from representative coals from all producing regions in the US. 2. Development of bench-scale tests. 3. Design, construction, and operation of a 1 ton/hr continuous processing unit. 4. Evaluation of the effects of beneficiation. and 5. Developing an estimate of capital and operating costs for commercial units.

  7. Direct visualization of β phase causing intergranular forms of corrosion in Al–Mg alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Young-Ki Allen, Todd

    2013-06-15

    For a more effective examination of microstructure in Al–Mg alloys, a new etching solution has been developed; dissolved ammonium persulfate in water. It is demonstrated how β phase (Al{sub 3}Mg{sub 2}) in Al–Mg alloys respond to this solution using samples of a binary Al–Mg alloy and a commercial 5083 aluminum alloy. Nanometer sized β phase is clearly visualized for the first time using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) instead of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is anticipated that direct and unambiguous visualization of β phase will greatly augment intergranular corrosion research in 5xxx series aluminum alloys. - Highlights: • Nanometer sized β phase in Al-10% Mg is first clearly visualized with SEM. • Nanometer sized β phase in wrought alloy 5083 is first clearly visualized with SEM. • Grain boundary decorating β phase and isolated sponge-like β phase are shown. • This phase is confirmed to be β phase using composition analysis.

  8. The cephalic phase insulin response to nutritive and low-calorie sweeteners in solid and beverage form.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Jaapna; Lee, Janice Y; Mattes, Richard D

    2017-09-09

    The purpose of the study was to examine the role of the cephalic phase insulin response (CPIR) following exposure to nutritive and low-calorie sweeteners in solid and beverage form in overweight and obese adults. In addition, the role of learning on the CPIR to nutritive and low-calorie sweetener exposure was tested. Sixty-four overweight and obese adults (age: 18-50years, BMI: 24-37kg/m(2), body fat percentage>25% for men and >32% for women) were sham-fed (at 2-minute intervals for 14min) a randomly assigned test load comprised of a nutritive (sucrose) or low-calorie sweetener (sucralose) in beverage or solid form in phase 1 of the study. A 2-3ml blood sample was collected before and 2, 6, 10, 14, 61, 91 and 121min after oral exposure for serum insulin and glucose analysis. During phase 2, participants underwent a 2-week training period to facilitate associative learning between the sensory properties of test loads and their post-ingestive effects. In phase 3, participants were retested for their cephalic phase responses as in phase 1. Participants were classified as responders if they demonstrated a positive insulin response (rise of serum insulin above baseline i.e. Δ insulin) 2min post-stimulus in phase 1. Among responders exposed to the same sweetener in Phases 1 and 3, the proportion of participants that displayed a rise of insulin with oral exposure to sucralose was significantly greater when the stimulus was in the solid form compared to the beverage form. Sucralose and sucrose exposure elicited similarly significant increases in serum insulin 2min after exposure and significant decreases after 2min in responders in both food forms. The solid food form elicited greater CPIR over 2, 6 and 10min than the beverage form. There was no effect of learning on insulin responses after training. The results indicate the presence of a significant CPIR in a subset of individuals with overweight or obesity after oral exposure to sucralose, especially when present in

  9. Bioconversion of glycerol to ethanol by a mutant Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Res; Shahbazi, A; Wang, L; Ibrahim, S; Worku, M; Schimmel, K

    2012-03-29

    The main objective of this research is to develop, by adaptive evolution, mutant strains of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 that are capable of withstanding high glycerol concentration as well as resisting ethanol-inhibition. The mutant will be used for high ethanol fermentation from glycerol feedstock. Ethanol production from pure (P-) and recovered (R-) glycerol using the stock was evaluated. A six-tube-subculture-generations method was used for developing the mutant. This involved subculturing the organism six consecutive times in tubes containing the same glycerol and ethanol concentrations at the same culture conditions. Then, the glycerol and/or ethanol concentration was increased and the six subculture generations were repeated. A strain capable of growing in 200 g/L glycerol and 30 g/L ethanol was obtained. The ability of this mutant, vis-à-vis the original strain, in utilizing glycerol in a high glycerol containing medium, with the concomitant ethanol yield, was assessed. Tryptic soy broth without dextrose (TSB) was used as the fermentation medium. Fermentation products were analyzed using HPLC.In a 20 g/L glycerol TSB, E. aerogenes ATCC 13048 converted 18.5 g/L P-glycerol and 17.8 g/L R-glycerol into 12 and 12.8 g/L ethanol, respectively. In a 50 g/L P-glycerol TSB, it utilized only 15.6 g/L glycerol; but the new strain used up 39 g/L, yielding 20 g/L ethanol after 120 h, an equivalence of 1.02 mol ethanol/mol-glycerol. This is the highest ethanol yield reported from glycerol bioconversion. The result of this P-glycerol fermentation can be duplicated using the R-glycerol from biodiesel production.

  10. Replacing corn with glycerol in diets for transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, E R; Schmelz-Roberts, N S; White, H M; Doane, P H; Donkin, S S

    2011-02-01

    Expansion of the biofuels industry has increased the availability of glycerol as an alternative feed for dairy cows. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of glycerol on feed intake, milk production, rumen volatile fatty acids, and metabolic parameters in transition dairy cows. Multiparous Holstein cows were fed diets containing either high-moisture corn (n=11) or glycerol (n=12) from -28 to +56 d relative to calving. Glycerol was included at 11.5 and 10.8% of the ration dry matter for the pre- and postpartum diets, respectively. Prepartum feed intake was not changed by glycerol feeding (14.9 vs. 14.6 kg/d, control vs. glycerol) nor did postpartum feed intake differ (19.8 vs. 20.7 kg/d, control vs. glycerol). Overall milk yield did not differ (35.8 vs. 37 kg/d, control vs. glycerol) and milk composition, milk urea nitrogen, somatic cells, and energy balance were not different with glycerol feeding. Blood glucose content was decreased in cows fed glycerol during the prepartum period (59.1 vs. 53.4 mg/dL), and β-hydroxybutyrate concentration was increased (0.58 vs. 0.82 mmol/L, control vs. glycerol). Concentrations of blood nonesterified fatty acids did not differ between the treatment groups, and no response to glycerol for blood metabolites during the postpartum period was observed. Total rumen volatile fatty acid concentrations (mmol/L) did not differ between treatments, but proportions of rumen propionate and butyrate were greater for cows fed glycerol (22.7 vs. 28.6% of propionate, control vs. glycerol; and 11.5 vs. 15.3% of butyrate, control vs. glycerol) at the expense of acetate (61.4 vs. 51.5%, control vs. glycerol). These data indicate that glycerol is a suitable replacement for corn grain in diets for transition dairy cows.

  11. Using thermodynamic integration to simulate the free-energy of bicontinuous phases formed by block copolymer/homopolymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Poornima; Martinez-Veracoechea, Francisco; Escobedo, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    AB diblock copolymers can co-assemble with A-type homopolymers to form different bicontinuous phases whose 3D connectivity of both A and B domains is of interest for potential applications in nanolithography, photovoltaic cells and drug delivery. In this work, we use particle-based simulations to study the vicinity of a triple point where three bicontinuous phases (gyroid, double diamond and plumber's nightmare) were predicted to coexist by Self Consistent Field Theory. A key roadblock is that bicontinuous morphologies are highly sensitive to the commensurability of the simulation box size and the a-priori unknown unit cell size. Accurate estimation of free energies is thus crucial to the determination of the stable morphology. In this work, we apply thermodynamic integration over a constructed reversible path to calculate the free energies of these bicontinuous phases relative to a disordered phase and compare the predicted phase stability to results from alternative methods.

  12. Biorefinery for Glycerol Rich Biodiesel Industry Waste.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vipin Chandra; Prakash, Jyotsana; Koul, Shikha

    2016-06-01

    The biodiesel industry has the potential to meet the fuel requirements in the future. A few inherent lacunae of this bioprocess are the effluent, which is 10 % of the actual product, and the fact that it is 85 % glycerol along with a few impurities. Biological treatments of wastes have been known as a dependable and economical direction of overseeing them and bring some value added products as well. A novel eco-biotechnological strategy employs metabolically diverse bacteria, which ensures higher reproducibility and economics. In this article, we have opined, which organisms and what bioproducts should be the focus, while exploiting glycerol as feed.

  13. Suppressed Release of Clarithromycin from Tablets by Crystalline Phase Transition of Metastable Polymorph Form I.

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Sadahiro; Watanabe, Narumi; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Mizoguchi, Midori; Iwamura, Takeru; Itai, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    The pharmaceutical properties of clarithromycin (CAM) tablets containing the metastable form I of crystalline CAM were investigated. Although the dissolution rate of form I was higher than that of stable form II, the release of CAM from form I tablet was delayed. Disintegration test and liquid penetration test showed that the disintegration of the tablet delayed because of the slow penetration of an external solution into form I tablet. Investigation by scanning electron microscopy revealed that the surface of form I tablet was covered with fine needle-shaped crystals following an exposure to the external solution. These crystals were identified as form IV crystals by powder X-ray diffraction. The phenomenon that CAM releases from tablet was inhibited by fine crystals spontaneously formed on the tablet surface could be applied to the design of sustained-release formulation systems with high CAM contents by minimizing the amount of functional excipients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Vertical phase separation in bulk heterojunction solar cells formed by in situ polymerization of fulleride

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lipei; Xing, Xing; Zheng, Lingling; Chen, Zhijian; Xiao, Lixin; Qu, Bo; Gong, Qihuang

    2014-01-01

    Vertical phase separation of the donor and the acceptor in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells is crucial to improve the exciton dissociation and charge transport efficiencies. This is because whilst the exciton diffusion length is limited, the organic film must be thick enough to absorb sufficient light. However, it is still a challenge to control the phase separation of a binary blend in a bulk heterojunction device architecture. Here we report the realization of vertical phase separation induced by in situ photo-polymerization of the acrylate-based fulleride. The power conversion efficiency of the devices with vertical phase separation increased by 20%. By optimising the device architecture, the power conversion efficiency of the single junction device reached 8.47%. We believe that in situ photo-polymerization of acrylate-based fulleride is a universal and controllable way to realise vertical phase separation in organic blends. PMID:24861168

  15. Effects of intravenous infusion of glycerol on blood parameters and urinary glycerol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Okano, Masato; Nishitani, Yasunori; Dohi, Michiko; Kageyama, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    In sports, the oral intake and intravenous administration of glycerol as a potential masking agent have been prohibited. The effect of glycerol on blood parameters was investigated by comparing the intravenous administration of glycerol (20g/200mL) with that of an electrolyte (8g glucose/200mL) as a comparator (n=7, fixed-dose-rate i.v. infusion, 200mL in 1h). This study was also designed to evaluate whether the urinary concentrations reached the positivity threshold after the intravenous infusion of glycerol. Significant decreases of the haemoglobin (HGB, g/dL), haematocrit (HCT, %) and OFF-h Score (OFF-score) values were observed after the infusion of glycerol (P<0.05 at 1-6h). The differences in the HGB, HCT and OFF-score between pre- and post-administration were -0.49±0.23g/dL (2h), -1.54±0.73% (2h) and -3.89±3.66 (2h), respectively. Glycerol infusion significantly increased the plasma volume by 12.1% (1h), 6.3% (2h) and 5.7% (3h) compared with the initial values. The infusion of the comparator also increased the plasma volume by 9.6% (1h), 5.8% (2h) and 4.9% (3h) compared with the values before infusion. There were no significant differences in the change of the plasma volume between the intravenous infusions of glycerol and the glucose-based electrolyte (as the comparator) (P≥0.05). This finding might indicate that glycerol itself only exhibited limited effects on the expansion of plasma. After administration of glycerol, the urinary glycerol concentrations increased from 0.0013±0.0004mg/mL to 6.86±2.86mg/mL at 1h and 6.45±3.08mg/mL at 2h. The intravenous infusion of glycerol can most likely be detected using the current urine analysis; however, the dependence of the concentration of urinary glycerol on the urine volume should be considered.

  16. Structural Characterizations of Glycerol Kinase: Unraveling Phosphorylation-Induced Long-Range Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Kettering, Regina; Saxl, Ruth; Bourand, Alexa; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Joly, Nathalie; Briozzo, Pierre; Deutscher, Josef

    2009-09-11

    Glycerol metabolism provides a central link between sugar and fatty acid catabolism. In most bacteria, glycerol kinase plays a crucial role in regulating channel/facilitator-dependent uptake of glycerol into the cell. In the firmicute Enterococcus casseliflavus, this enzyme's activity is enhanced by phosphorylation of the histidine residue (His232) located in its activation loop, approximately 25 A from its catalytic cleft. We reported earlier that some mutations of His232 altered enzyme activities; we present here the crystal structures of these mutant GlpK enzymes. The structure of a mutant enzyme with enhanced enzymatic activity, His232Arg, reveals that residues at the catalytic cleft are more optimally aligned to bind ATP and mediate phosphoryl transfer. Specifically, the position of Arg18 in His232Arg shifts by approximately 1 A when compared to its position in wild-type (WT), His232Ala, and His232Glu enzymes. This new conformation of Arg18 is more optimally positioned at the presumed gamma-phosphate location of ATP, close to the glycerol substrate. In addition to structural changes exhibited at the active site, the conformational stability of the activation loop is decreased, as reflected by an approximately 35% increase in B factors ('thermal factors') in a mutant enzyme displaying diminished activity, His232Glu. Correlating conformational changes to alteration of enzymatic activities in the mutant enzymes identifies distinct localized regions that can have profound effects on intramolecular signal transduction. Alterations in pairwise interactions across the dimer interface can communicate phosphorylation states over 25 A from the activation loop to the catalytic cleft, positioning Arg18 to form favorable interactions at the beta,gamma-bridging position with ATP. This would offset loss of the hydrogen bonds at the gamma-phosphate of ATP during phosphoryl transfer to glycerol, suggesting that appropriate alignment of the second substrate of glycerol kinase

  17. Design and control of glycerol-tert-butyl alcohol etherification process.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Elena; Bildea, Costin Sorin; Bozga, Grigore

    2012-01-01

    Design, economics, and plantwide control of a glycerol-tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) etherification plant are presented. The reaction takes place in liquid phase, in a plug flow reactor, using Amberlyst 15 as a catalyst. The products' separation is achieved by two distillation columns where high-purity ethers are obtained and a section involving extractive distillation with 1,4-butanediol as solvent, which separates TBA from the TBA/water azeotrope. Details of design performed in AspenPlus and an economic evaluation of the process are given. Three plantwide control structures are examined using a mass balance model of the plant. The preferred control structure fixes the fresh glycerol flow rate and the ratio glycerol + monoether : TBA at reactor-inlet. The stability and robustness in the operation are checked by rigorous dynamic simulation in AspenDynamics.

  18. Design and Control of Glycerol-tert-Butyl Alcohol Etherification Process

    PubMed Central

    Vlad, Elena; Bozga, Grigore

    2012-01-01

    Design, economics, and plantwide control of a glycerol-tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) etherification plant are presented. The reaction takes place in liquid phase, in a plug flow reactor, using Amberlyst 15 as a catalyst. The products' separation is achieved by two distillation columns where high-purity ethers are obtained and a section involving extractive distillation with 1,4-butanediol as solvent, which separates TBA from the TBA/water azeotrope. Details of design performed in AspenPlus and an economic evaluation of the process are given. Three plantwide control structures are examined using a mass balance model of the plant. The preferred control structure fixes the fresh glycerol flow rate and the ratio glycerol + monoether : TBA at reactor-inlet. The stability and robustness in the operation are checked by rigorous dynamic simulation in AspenDynamics. PMID:23365512

  19. Genetic construction of recombinant Pseudomonas chlororaphis for improved glycerol utilization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study is to improve by genetic engineering the glycerol metabolic capability of Pseudomonas chlororaphis which is capable of producing commercially valuable biodegradable poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) and biosurfactant rhamnolipids (RLs). In the study, glycerol uptake facilitat...

  20. Evidence for direct binding of glycerol to photosystem I.

    PubMed

    Hussels, Martin; Brecht, Marc

    2011-08-04

    The interaction between glycerol and photosystem I (PSI) was investigated using low temperature single-molecule spectroscopy. PSI complexes were dissolved in three different solutions: in buffer solution, in 66% glycerol/buffer solution, and in 66% glycerol/buffer solution that was afterwards diluted by buffer; the final glycerol concentration was <1‰. Mean fluorescence spectra and intercomplex heterogeneity of PSI complexes in 66% glycerol/buffer solution and in the re-diluted solution show high similarity, but differ from complexes in buffer solution indicating that the glycerol concentration is not the determining factor modifying the spectral properties. However, the exposure of PSI to a high glycerol concentration during sample preparation affects PSI and the effect is maintained if glycerol is removed from the solution.

  1. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin, gum rosin, or tall oil rosin may be safely... or steam stripping. (b) It is used to adjust the density of citrus oils used in the preparation of...

  2. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin... purified by countercurrent steam distillation or steam stripping. (b) It is used to adjust the density of...

  3. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin... purified by countercurrent steam distillation or steam stripping. (b) It is used to adjust the density of...

  4. Glycerol production by fermentation: a fed-batch approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vijaikishore, P.; Karanth, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    In this investigation the bioconversion of glycerol from glucose was studied in a laboratory fermentor using an alkaline medium with a fed batch mode of carbon source addition yielding 30% glycerol concentration in the final broth. (Refs. 9).

  5. Disruption of the membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase-encoding gene improved glycerol use and dihydroxyacetone productivity in Gluconobacter oxydans.

    PubMed

    Habe, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Morita, Tomotake; Kitamoto, Dai; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Sakaki, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) production from glycerol by Gluconobacter oxydans is an industrial form of fermentation, but some problems exist related to microbial DHA production. For example, glycerol inhibits DHA production and affects its biological activity. G. oxydans produces both DHA and glyceric acid (GA) from glycerol simultaneously, and membrane-bound glycerol dehydrogenase and membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenases are involved in the two reactions, respectively. We discovered that the G. oxydans mutant DeltaadhA, in which the membrane-bound alcohol dehydrogenase-encoding gene (adhA) was disrupted, significantly improved its ability to grow in a higher concentration of glycerol and to produce DHA compared to a wild-type strain. DeltaadhA grew on 220 g/l of initial glycerol and produced 125 g/l of DHA during a 3-d incubation, whereas the wild-type did not. Resting DeltaadhA cells converted 230 g/l of glycerol aqueous solution to 139.7 g/l of DHA during a 3-d incubation. The inhibitory effect of glycerate sodium salt on DeltaadhA was investigated. An increase in the glycerate concentration at the beginning of growth resulted in decreases in both growth and DHA production.

  6. Glycerol Hypersensitivity in a Drosophila Model for Glycerol Kinase Deficiency Is Affected by Mutations in Eye Pigmentation Genes

    PubMed Central

    Wightman, Patrick J.; Jackson, George R.; Dipple, Katrina M.

    2012-01-01

    Glycerol kinase plays a critical role in metabolism by converting glycerol to glycerol 3-phosphate in an ATP dependent reaction. In humans, glycerol kinase deficiency results in a wide range of phenotypic variability; patients can have severe metabolic and CNS abnormalities, while others possess hyperglycerolemia and glyceroluria with no other apparent phenotype. In an effort to help understand the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the phenotypic variation, we have created a Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency by RNAi targeting of dGyk (CG18374) and dGK (CG7995). As expected, RNAi flies have reduced glycerol kinase RNA expression, reduced phosphorylation activity and elevated glycerol levels. Further investigation revealed these flies to be hypersensitive to fly food supplemented with glycerol. Due to the hygroscopic nature of glycerol, we predict glycerol hypersensitivity is a result of greater susceptibility to desiccation, suggesting glycerol kinase to play an important role in desiccation resistance in insects. To evaluate a role for genetic modifier loci in determining severity of the glycerol hypersensitivity observed in knockdown flies, we performed a preliminary screen of lethal transposon insertion mutant flies using a glycerol hypersensitive survivorship assay. We demonstrate that this type of screen can identify both enhancer and suppressor genetic loci of glycerol hypersensitivity. Furthermore, we found that the glycerol hypersensitivity phenotype can be enhanced or suppressed by null mutations in eye pigmentation genes. Taken together, our data suggest proteins encoded by eye pigmentation genes play an important role in desiccation resistance and that eye pigmentation genes are strong modifiers of the glycerol hypersensitive phenotype identified in our Drosophila model for glycerol kinase deficiency. PMID:22427807

  7. Synthesis and characteristics of form-stable n-octadecane/expanded graphite composite phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Xu; Fang, Gui-Yin

    2010-09-01

    N-octadecane/expanded graphite composite phase-change materials were prepared by absorbing liquid n-octadecane into the expanded graphite. The n-octadecane was used as the phase-change material for thermal energy storage, and the expanded graphite acted as the supporting material. Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermal diffusivity measurement were used to determine the chemical structure, crystalline phase, microstructure and thermal diffusivity of the composite phase-change materials, respectively. The thermal properties and thermal stability were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The DSC results indicated that the composite phase-change materials exhibited the same phase-transition characteristics as the n-octadecane and their latent heat increased with the n-octadecane content in composite phase-change materials. The SEM results showed that the n-octadecane was well absorbed in the porous network of the expanded graphite, and there was no leakage of the n-octadecane from the composites even when it was in the molten state.

  8. Phase-separation perspective on dynamic heterogeneities in glass-forming liquids.

    PubMed

    Cammarota, C; Cavagna, A; Giardina, I; Gradenigo, G; Grigera, T S; Parisi, G; Verrocchio, P

    2010-07-30

    We study dynamic heterogeneities in a model glass former whose overlap with a reference configuration is constrained to a fixed value. We find that the system phase separates into regions of small and large overlap, indicating that a nonzero surface tension plays an important role in the formation of dynamical heterogeneities. We calculate an appropriate thermodynamic potential and find evidence of a Maxwell construction consistent with a spinodal decomposition of two phases. Our results suggest that even in standard, unconstrained systems dynamic heterogeneities are the expression of an ephemeral phase-separating regime ruled by a finite surface tension.

  9. Theta Frequency Stimulation Induces a Local Form of Late Phase LTP in the CA1 Region of the Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yan-You; Kandel, Eric R.

    2005-01-01

    The late phase of LTP (L-LTP) is typically induced by repeated high-frequency stimulation. This form of LTP requires activation of transcription and translation and results in the cell-wide distribution of gene products that can be captured by other marked synapses. Here we report that theta frequency stimulation (5 Hz, 30 sec) applied to the…

  10. Theta Frequency Stimulation Induces a Local Form of Late Phase LTP in the CA1 Region of the Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yan-You; Kandel, Eric R.

    2005-01-01

    The late phase of LTP (L-LTP) is typically induced by repeated high-frequency stimulation. This form of LTP requires activation of transcription and translation and results in the cell-wide distribution of gene products that can be captured by other marked synapses. Here we report that theta frequency stimulation (5 Hz, 30 sec) applied to the…

  11. Phase transformation of Mg-calcite to aragonite in active-forming hot spring travertines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Heather F.; Zhou, Wuzong; Guo, Li

    2015-08-01

    A travertine specimen collected from the western part of Yunnan Province of China was subjected to microstructural analysis by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. A new formation mechanism was proposed whereby polycrystalline rhombohedral particles of magnesium-containing calcite underwent a phase transformation into sheaf-like clusters of aragonite microrods. It is proposed that a high concentration of magnesium ions and embedded biological matter poisoned the growth of calcite and therefore instigated the phase transformation of the core of the rhombohedral calcite particles to an aragonite phase with a higher crystallinity. The single crystalline aragonite microrods with a higher density than the Mg-calcite nanocrystallites grew at the expense of the latter to generate sheaf-like clusters. This newly discovered formation mechanism is expected to enhance previous knowledge on this geologically important phase transformation from a morphology point of view.

  12. Reversed-phase liquid chromatographic determination of cromolyn sodium in drug substance and select dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Ng, L L

    1994-01-01

    This study, presented as a technical communication, describes a reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method for select commercial formulations, namely, inhalation solution, nasal solution, capsule and inhalation aerosol. Miscellaneous validation parameters are also discussed.

  13. Prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria for the alcohol + glycerol systems using UNIFAC and modified UNIFAC (Dortmund)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartanto, Dhoni; Mustain, Asalil; Nugroho, Febry Dwi

    2017-03-01

    The vapor-liquid equilibria for eight systems of alcohols + glycerol at 101.325 kPa have been predicted in this study using UNIFAC and Modified UNIFAC (Dortmund) group contribution methods. The investigated alcohols were methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, 1-butanol, 2-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol and 2-methyl-2-propanol. In order to study the accuracy of both contribution methods, the predicted data obtained from both approaches were compared to the experimental data from the literature. The prediction accuracy using modified UNIFAC (Dortmund) give better results compared to the UNIFAC method for (ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol and 1-butanol) + glycerol but UNIFAC method show better accuracy for methanol + glycerol system. In addition, the influences of carbon chain length on the phase behaviours of alcohol + glycerol systems were also discussed as well.

  14. Hydrogenolysis of Glycerol to Propylene Glycol on Nanosized Cu-Zn-Al Catalysts Prepared Using Microwave Process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Won; Ha, Sang Ho; Moon, Myung Jun; Lim, Kwon Taek; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Sun Do; Lee, Man Sig; Hong, Seong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Cu-Zn-Al catalysts were prepared using microwave-assisted process and co-precipitation methods. The prepared catalysts were characterized by XRD, BET, XPS and TPD of ammonia and their catalytic activity for the hydrogenolysis of glycerol to propylene glycol was also examined. The XRD patterns of Cu/Zn/Al mixed catalysts show CuO and ZnO crystalline phase regardless of preparation method. The highest glycerol hydrogenolysis conversion is obtained with the catalyst having a Cu/Zn/Al ratio of 2:2:1. Hydrogen pre-reduction of catalysts significantly enhanced both glycerol conversions and selectivity to propylene glycol. The glycerol conversion increased with an increase of reaction temperature. However, the selectivity to propylene glycol increased with an increase of temperature, and then declined to 30.5% at 523 K.

  15. High-resolution liquid-crystal phase grating formed by fringing fields from interdigitated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, R G; Kulick, J H; Nordin, G P; Jarem, J M; Kowel, S T; Friends, M; Leslie, T M

    1994-05-01

    We report the formation of thin anisotropic phase gratings in a nematic liquid-crystalline film by use of lateral (fringing) electric fields induced by transparent interdigitated electrodes. These gratings yield high diffraction efficiency (>30%) with a strong dependence on the readout beam incidence angle. In addition, the formation of a defect wall is observed that has a significant effect on the diffraction properties of the phase grating.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Temperature Controlled Solid Phase Forming Process of Polymeric Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haipeng; Hu, Ping; Fu, Zhengchun; Yan, Yue; Zhang, Guanli

    2005-08-01

    In this paper, a new forming process of polymeric plate called stretch-forming was simulated by adopting the thermo-elasto-visco-plastic large deformation finite element formulation based on Updated Lagrangian method. Some details of this forming process were also studied. It was shown that temperature has important effect on the forming process. Slide contact was assumed in the simulation. Friction force was ignored due to good lubrication. The adopted algorithm is verified by analyzing a thermoforming problem provided in a NUMIFORM'98 paper and comparing simulation results with experimental measures in that paper.

  17. 21 CFR 172.735 - Glycerol ester of rosin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Glycerol ester of rosin. 172.735 Section 172.735 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... CONSUMPTION Other Specific Usage Additives § 172.735 Glycerol ester of rosin. Glycerol ester of wood rosin...

  18. Digestable and Metabolizable Energy of Crude Glycerol in Growing Pigs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The apparent DE and ME value of crude glycerol for growing pigs was determined in a series of 5 experiments using crude glycerol (86.95% glycerol) from a biodiesel production facility with soybean oil used as the initial feedstock (AG Processing Inc., Sergeant Bluff, IA). Dietary treatments were 0, ...

  19. 1,2-Isopropylidene glycerol carbonate: preparation, characterization, and hydrolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The utilization of excess glycerol supplies derived from the burgeoning biodiesel industry is of major importance to the oleochemical industry as the economic viability of the biodiesel and oleochemical industries are closely linked to glycerol prices. Carbonate compounds based on glycerol, such as...

  20. Determining Atmospheric Pressure with a Eudiometer and Glycerol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Jed; Rohald, Kate; Sutton, Atasha

    2010-01-01

    We consider a volume of air trapped over a glycerol column in a eudiometer. We demonstrate that there is an approximately linear relationship between the volume of trapped air and the height of the glycerol column. Simply by moving the eudiometer up and down, we cause the glycerol-column height and trapped-air volume to vary. The plot of volume…

  1. Determining Atmospheric Pressure with a Eudiometer and Glycerol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Jed; Rohald, Kate; Sutton, Atasha

    2010-01-01

    We consider a volume of air trapped over a glycerol column in a eudiometer. We demonstrate that there is an approximately linear relationship between the volume of trapped air and the height of the glycerol column. Simply by moving the eudiometer up and down, we cause the glycerol-column height and trapped-air volume to vary. The plot of volume…

  2. Conversion of glycerol to hydrogen rich gas.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen H; Kannangara, G S Kamali

    2013-12-21

    Presently there is a glut of glycerol as the by-product of biofuel production and it will grow as production increases. The conundrum is how we can consume this material and convert it into a more useful product. One potential route is to reform glycerol to hydrogen rich gas including synthesis gas (CO + H2) and hydrogen. However, there is recent literature on various reforming techniques which may have a bearing on the efficiency of such a process. Hence in this review reforming of glycerol at room temperature (normally photo-catalytic), catalysis at moderate and high temperature and a non-catalytic pyrolysis process are presented. The high temperature processes allow the generation of synthesis gas with the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratios being suitable for synthesis of dimethyl ether, methanol and for the Fischer-Tropsch process using established catalysts. Efficient conversion of synthesis gas to hydrogen involves additional catalysts that assist the water gas shift reaction, or involves in situ capture of carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Reforming at reduced temperatures including photo-reforming offers the opportunity of producing synthesis gas or hydrogen using single catalysts. Together, these processes will assist in overcoming the worldwide glut of glycerol, increasing the competitiveness of the biofuel production and reducing our dependency on the fossil based, hydrogen rich gas.

  3. Synthesis of glycerol mono-laurate from lauric acid and glycerol for food antibacterial additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setianto, W. B.; Wibowo, T. Y.; Yohanes, H.; Illaningtyas, F.; Anggoro, D. D.

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis of glycerol mono-laurate (GML) has been performed using esterification reaction of glycerol and lauric acid. The reaction was performed at the condition of temperature of 120-140 °C within 7 hour, variation of molar ratio of glycerol - lauric acid, and was using heterogeneous catalyst of zeolist Y. Without catalyst dealumination the maximum acid conversion was 78%, with GML contained in the sample was 38.6%, and it was obtained at the reaction condition of 140 oC, 15wt% catalyst, and 8:1 molar ratio of glycerol - lauric acid. At the same condition, using dealuminated catalyst, the maximum acid conversion was increased up to 98%, with GML contained in the sample was 50.4%. The GML antibacterial activity was examined. It was observed that the GML has antibacterial activity against gram positive bacterial such as B. cereus and S. aureus.

  4. An efficient palladium catalyst system for the oxidative carbonylation of glycerol to glycerol carbonate.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianglin; Gu, Yanlong; Guan, Zhenhong; Li, Jinjin; Mo, Wanling; Li, Tao; Li, Guangxing

    2011-12-16

    Glycerol carbonate can be readily synthesized from the oxidative carbonylation of glycerol catalyzed by PdCl(2)(phen) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline) with the aid of CuI. High conversion (95 %) and selectivity (98 %) are achieved and the turnover frequency (TOF) reaches 455 h(-1). Furthermore, a new zeolite-Y-confined Pd catalyst, PdCl(2)(phen)@Y, has been successfully prepared by a ''flexible ligand'' method. The structure and composition of the heterogeneous catalyst have been characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy, elemental analysis, N(2) sorption, XRD, FTIR, solid-state NMR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This catalyst exhibits a comparable activity to its homogeneous counterpart and could be reused five times without significant decrease in activity. This is the most efficient heterogeneous system for synthesizing glycerol carbonate by the oxidative carbonylation of glycerol to date. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Rapid monitoring of glycerol in fermentation growth media: Facilitating crude glycerol bioprocess development.

    PubMed

    Abad, Sergi; Pérez, Xavier; Planas, Antoni; Turon, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    Recently, the need for crude glycerol valorisation from the biodiesel industry has generated many studies for practical and economic applications. Amongst them, fermentations based on glycerol media for the production of high value metabolites are prominent applications. This has generated a need to develop analytical techniques which allow fast and simple glycerol monitoring during fermentation. The methodology should be fast and inexpensive to be adopted in research, as well as in industrial applications. In this study three different methods were analysed and compared: two common methodologies based on liquid chromatography and enzymatic kits, and the new method based on a DotBlot assay coupled with image analysis. The new methodology is faster and cheaper than the other conventional methods, with comparable performance. Good linearity, precision and accuracy were achieved in the lower range (10 or 15 g/L to depletion), the most common range of glycerol concentrations to monitor fermentations in terms of growth kinetics.

  6. Metastable Phases of Dross Particles Formed in a Molten Zinc Bath and Prediction of Soluble Aluminum During Galvannealing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, Doo-Jin; Hong, Moon-Hi; Huh, Yoon; Park, Joo Hyun; Chae, Hong-Kook; Park, Seok-Ho; Choun, Si-Youl

    2012-06-01

    The morphology, chemistry, and crystallographic characteristics of metastable dross particles were identified. These particles are formed during the initial stage of precipitation. The particles had aluminum concentrations of 15 to 80 mass pct, with values that decreased gradually as particle size increased. These metastable dross particles were a mixture of the crystalline phase of FeZn10, which is called the "delta phase," and the high-aluminum amorphous phase, which covered the surface of the crystalline phase. The new "meta Q" concept was proposed to predict the amount of soluble aluminum in the zinc bath by considering nucleation kinetics and particle growth. The results calculated using the "meta Q" concept were compared with the values measured by the aluminum sensor, which were taken during the same period at the commercial galvanizing line. The mean of the absolute values of the differences between the calculated and measured values was 9.7 ppm.

  7. Studies of Nucleation, Growth, Specific Heat, and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrahedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, K. F.; Croat, T. K.; Gangopadhyay, A.; Holland-Moritz, D.; Hyers, Robert W.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Robinson, Michael B.; Rogers, Jan R.

    2001-01-01

    Undercooling experiments and thermal physical property measurements of metallic alloys on the International Space Station (ISS) are planned. This recently-funded research focuses on fundamental issues of the formation and structure of highly-ordered non-crystallographic phases (quasicrystals) and related crystal phases (crystal approximants), and the connections between the atomic structures of these phases and those of liquids and glasses. It extends studies made previously by us of the composition dependence of crystal nucleation processes in silicate and metallic glasses, to the case of nucleation from the liquid phase. Motivating results from rf-levitation and drop-tube measurements of the undercooling of Ti/Zr-based liquids that form quasicrystals and crystal approximants are discussed. Preliminary measurements by electrostatic levitation (ESL) are presented.

  8. Enhanced Product Recovery from Glycerol Fermentation into 3-Carbon Compounds in a Bioelectrochemical System Combined with In Situ Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Roume, Hugo; Arends, Jan B. A.; Ameril, Camar P.; Patil, Sunil A.; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-01-01

    Given the large amount of crude glycerol formed as a by-product in the biodiesel industries and the concomitant decrease in its overall market price, there is a need to add extra value to this biorefinery side stream. Upgrading can be achieved by new biotechnologies dealing with recovery and conversion of glycerol present in wastewaters into value-added products, aiming at a zero-waste policy and developing an economically viable process. In microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), the mixed microbial community growing on the cathode can convert glycerol reductively to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO). However, the product yield is rather limited in BESs compared with classic fermentation processes, and the synthesis of side-products, resulting from oxidation of glycerol, such as organic acids, represents a major burden for recovery of 1,3-PDO. Here, we show that the use of an enriched mixed-microbial community of glycerol degraders and in situ extraction of organic acids positively impacts 1,3-PDO yield and allows additional recovery of propionate from glycerol. We report the highest production yield achieved (0.72 mol1,3-PDO mol−1glycerol) in electricity-driven 1,3-PDO biosynthesis from raw glycerol, which is very close to the 1,3-PDO yield reported thus far for a mixed-microbial culture-based glycerol fermentation process. We also present a combined approach for 1,3-PDO production and propionate extraction in a single three chamber reactor system, which leads to recovery of additional 3-carbon compounds in BESs. This opens up further opportunities for an economical upgrading of biodiesel refinery side or waste streams. PMID:27725929

  9. Comparing lactate and glycerol as a single-electron donor for sulfate reduction in fluidized bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Bertolino, Sueli M; Melgaço, Lucas A; Sá, Renata G; Leão, Versiane A

    2014-09-01

    Among the greatest challenges to the full implementation of biological sulfate reduction are the cost and availability of the electron source. With the development of the biofuel industry, new organic substrates have become available. Therefore, this work sought to compare the performance of a sulfidogenic process utilizing either lactate or glycerol as the substrate for sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) growth. Although sulfate reduction is energetically more favorable with lactate, glycerol is a less expensive alternative because excess production is forecasted with the worldwide development of the biodiesel industry. Continuous experiments were performed in a fluidized bed (FB) reactor containing activated carbon as a carrier for a mixed bacterial population composed of sulfate-reducing and fermentative bacteria. During the lactate-fed phases, incomplete oxidation of lactate to acetate by SRB was the dominant metabolic pathway resulting in as much as 90 % sulfate reduction and high acetate concentrations (2.7 g L(-1)). Conversely, in the glycerol-fed phases, glycerol degradation resulted from syntrophic cooperation between sulfate-reducing and fermentative bacteria that produce butyrate along with acetate (1.0 g L(-1)) as oxidation products. To our knowledge, this is the first report of butyrate formation during sulfate reduction in a glycerol-fed continuous-flow reactor. Sulfate concentrations were reduced by about 90 % (from 2,000 to 100-300 mg L(-1)) when glycerol was being fed to the reactor. Since the FB reactor was able to stand a change from lactate to glycerol, this reactor is recommended as the preferred option should glycerol be selected as a cost-effective alternative to lactate for continuous sulfate reduction.

  10. Competitive inhibition of AQP7-mediated glycerol transport by glycerol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Katano, Takahiro; Ito, Yuko; Ohta, Kinya; Yasujima, Tomoya; Inoue, Katsuhisa; Yuasa, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Aquaporin 7 (AQP7) is an aquaglyceroporin that has recently been found to operate as a facilitative carrier rather than a channel for glycerol, although its primary function is as a water channel. To probe into its substrate specificity, we examined the inhibitory effect of a series of acyl glycerol derivatives on glycerol transport mediated by human AQP7 stably expressed in Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells. According to kinetic analyses, AQP7-mediated glycerol transport was found to be competitively inhibited by monoacetin, monobutyrin and diacetin. Therefore, it may be possible that they all could be recognized as substrates by AQP7. The inhibition constant (Ki) of monoacetin (134 µM) was smaller than that of diacetin (420 µM), but greater than the Michaelis constant for glycerol (11.8 µM). Considering another finding that inhibition by triacetin was insignificant, it is likely that a decrease in the number of hydroxyl groups in the glycerol molecule by acetyl derivatization leads to a decrease in affinity for AQP7. The Ki of monobutyrin (80 µM) was, on the other hand, comparable with that of monoacetin, suggesting that the extension of the acyl chain by two hydrocarbon units does not have an impact on affinity for AQP7.

  11. Glycerol and glycerol carbonate as ultraviscous solvents for mixture analysis by NMR.

    PubMed

    Lameiras, Pedro; Boudesocque, Leslie; Mouloungui, Zéphirin; Renault, Jean-Hugues; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Lippens, Guy; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    NMR of weakly polar analytes in an apolar ultraviscous solvent has recently been proposed for mixture analysis as a pertinent alternative to the DOSY experiment. The present article reports the first use of glycerol and glycerol carbonate as polar solvents for the NMR analysis of a model mixture of dipeptides. This work demonstrates the high potentiality of these solvents for the analysis of mixtures made of polar and potentially bioactive compounds. Medium-sized molecules slowly reorient in glycerol and glycerol carbonate under particular temperature conditions, so that solute resonances may show spin diffusion in NOESY spectra, thus opening the way to mixture analysis. Glycerol and glycerol carbonate have turned out to be ultraviscous solvents of choice for the individualization of four structurally close mixed dipeptides: Leu-Val, Leu-Tyr, Gly-Tyr and Ala-Tyr by means of 1D and 2D NOESY experiments. Selective sample excitation and signal detection were implemented to eliminate the intense proton signals of the non-deuterated solvents. Moreover, the recording of a multiplet selective 2D NOESY-TOCSY has shown that the analytical power of NMR in highly viscous solvents is not limited to the extraction of mixture component 1D subspectra but may also yield some supplementary information about atom connectivity within components. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Glycerol-3-phosphate is a critical mobile inducer of systemic immunity in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) is an important metabolite that contributes to the growth and disease-related physiologies of prokaryotes, plants, animals and humans alike. Here we show that G3P serves as the inducer of an important form of broad-spectrum immunity in plants, termed systemic acquired resi...

  13. Effects of swelling on the viscoelastic properties of polyester films made from glycerol and glutaric acid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Viscoelastic properties have been determined for poly(glycerol-co-glutaric acid) films synthesized from Lewis acid-catalyzed polyesterifications. The polymers were prepared by synthesizing polymer gels that were subsequently cured at 125 degrees C to form polymer films. The polymers were evaluated ...

  14. Antioxidant behavior of 1-feruloyl-sn-glycerol and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol in phospholipid liposomes 1

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    1-Feruloyl-sn-glycerol (FG) and 1,3-diferuloyl-sn-glycerol (DFG) are two natural plant compounds that may be useful in cosmeceutical, food, and skin care applications because of excellent antioxidant properties. FG and DFG enzymatically synthesized through esterification of glycerol and soybean oil...

  15. Multiple-access phased array antenna simulator for a digital beam-forming system investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Yu, John; Walton, Joanne C.; Perl, Thomas D.; Andro, Monty; Alexovich, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Future versions of data relay satellite systems are currently being planned by NASA. Being given consideration for implementation are on-board digital beamforming techniques which will allow multiple users to simultaneously access a single S-band phased array antenna system. To investigate the potential performance of such a system, a laboratory simulator has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center. This paper describes the system simulator, and in particular, the requirements, design and performance of a key subsystem, the phased array antenna simulator, which provides realistic inputs to the digital processor including multiple signals, noise, and nonlinearities.

  16. Multiple-access phased array antenna simulator for a digital beam forming system investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Yu, John; Walton, Joanne C.; Perl, Thomas D.; Andro, Monty; Alexovich, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Future versions of data relay satellite systems are currently being planned by NASA. Being given consideration for implementation are on-board digital beamforming techniques which will allow multiple users to simultaneously access a single S-band phased array antenna system. To investigate the potential performance of such a system, a laboratory simulator has been developed at NASA's Lewis Research Center. This paper describes the system simulator, and in particular, the requirements, design, and performance of a key subsystem, the phased array antenna simulator, which provides realistic inputs to the digital processor including multiple signals, noise, and nonlinearities.

  17. Interest of a chemometric approach in understanding the retention behaviour of three columns in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography: application to the separation of glycerol carbonate, glycerol and urea.

    PubMed

    Fourdinier, Marion; Bostyn, Stéphane; Delépée, Raphaël; Fauduet, Henri

    2010-06-15

    A chemometric approach was used to study the retention behaviour of glycerol, urea and glycerol carbonate in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). First, a simplex method was developed to optimize the sensitivity of an evaporative light scattering detector. A mixture design was then applied to model retention factors as a function of the mobile phase content in acetonitrile, water and methanol on three columns: Atlantis HILIC Silica, ZIC-HILIC and Monochrom diol. Atlantis HILIC Silica exhibits predominantly hydrophobic interactions, while retention on the other two columns is mainly ruled by hydrophilic interactions. Finally, a desirability function is applied on the resolution factors. The use of this function enables the compositions of eluent phases to be determined in order to achieve separation between the three chemicals. Monochrom diol proved to be the most efficient column.

  18. Swelling equilibrium of dentin adhesive polymers formed on the water-adhesive phase boundary: Experiments and micromechanical model

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Ye, Qiang; Singh, Viraj; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    During their application to the wet, oral environment, dentin adhesives can experience phase separation and composition change which can compromise the quality of the hybrid layer formed at the dentin-adhesive interface. The chemical composition of polymer phases formed in the hybrid layer can be represented using a ternary water-adhesive phase diagram. In this paper, these polymer phases have been characterized using a suite of mechanical tests and swelling experiments. The experimental results were evaluated using granular micromechanics based model that incorporates poro-mechanical effects and polymer-solvent thermodynamics. The variation of the model parameters and model-predicted polymer properties has been studied as a function of composition along the phase boundary. The resulting structure-property correlations provide insight into interactions occurring at the molecular level in the saturated polymer system. These correlations can be used for modeling the mechanical behavior of hybrid layer, and are expected to aid in the design and improvement of water-compatible dentin adhesive polymers. PMID:24076070

  19. Unsaturated glycerol monoethers as novel skin penetration enhancers.

    PubMed

    Loftsson, T; Petersen, D S; Le Goffic, F; Olafsson, J H

    1997-06-01

    A mixture of glycerol monoethers was extracted from the liver oil of deep sea shark (Centroporus squamosus). It consisted mainly of monoethers of glycerol and linear monounsaturated octadecanol, and glycerol and linear monounsaturated hexadecanol. Only about 11% of the extract consisted of glycerol monoethers derived from linear saturated fatty alcohols. The glycerol monoether extract was somewhat less effective as skin penetration enhancer than oleic acid and other potent fatty acid penetration enhancers, but it was still a very effective enhancer in the hairless mouse skin model used in this study.

  20. Long N-acyl fatty acids on sphingolipids are responsible for miscibility with phospholipids to form liquid-ordered phase.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Peter J

    2009-10-01

    The structure and thermotropic phase behaviour of aqueous dispersions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and glucosylceramide rich in C-24 fatty acyl residues was investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction methods. Binary mixtures comprised of molar ratios 2.5:100, 6.5:100, 12.6:100, 25:100, 40:100 and 50:100, glucolipid:phospholipid were examined in heating and cooling scans of 2 degrees /min between 25 and 85 degrees C. Small-angle reflections indicated coexisting lamellar structures over the entire temperature range investigated. Reversible thermotropic changes were observed in one lamellar structure that is consistent with transitions between gel, ripple and fluid lamellar phases of pure phospholipid. The temperature of these transitions, however, were progressively shifted up by about 5 degrees C in the mixture containing the highest proportion of glucolipid and coincided with a published endothermic peak observed in this mixture. A higher-temperature endotherm was associated with molecular rearrangements on transition of the gel phase phospholipid to the fluid phase. This rearrangement was associated with the appearance of identifiable transient intermediate structures in the small-angle scattering region. The glucolipid formed stoichiometric mixtures with the phospholipid at all temperatures investigated and there was no evidence of phase separation of pure glucolipid. Analysis of the wide-angle scattering profiles during an initial heating scan of a binary mixture comprised of 40:60 glucolipid:phospholipid was consistent with a phase transition of pure phospholipid at about 43 degrees C coexisting with a liquid-ordered phase formed from the two lipids. This was confirmed by analysis of the small-angle scattering peaks of this mixture recorded at 25 and 65 degrees C which showed that a glucolipid-rich phase coexisted with almost pure bilayers of phospholipid at both temperatures. The glucolipid-rich phase consisted of 45:55 mole ratio glucolipid

  1. Automatic segmentation of phase-correlated CT scans through nonrigid image registration using geometrically regularized free-form deformation.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Raj; Lei, Peng; Castro-Pareja, Carlos R; Plishker, William L; D'Souza, Warren D

    2007-07-01

    Conventional radiotherapy is planned using free-breathing computed tomography (CT), ignoring the motion and deformation of the anatomy from respiration. New breath-hold-synchronized, gated, and four-dimensional (4D) CT acquisition strategies are enabling radiotherapy planning utilizing a set of CT scans belonging to different phases of the breathing cycle. Such 4D treatment planning relies on the availability of tumor and organ contours in all phases. The current practice of manual segmentation is impractical for 4D CT, because it is time consuming and tedious. A viable solution is registration-based segmentation, through which contours provided by an expert for a particular phase are propagated to all other phases while accounting for phase-to-phase motion and anatomical deformation. Deformable image registration is central to this task, and a free-form deformation-based nonrigid image registration algorithm will be presented. Compared with the original algorithm, this version uses novel, computationally simpler geometric constraints to preserve the topology of the dense control-point grid used to represent free-form deformation and prevent tissue fold-over. Using mean squared difference as an image similarity criterion, the inhale phase is registered to the exhale phase of lung CT scans of five patients and of characteristically low-contrast abdominal CT scans of four patients. In addition, using expert contours for the inhale phase, the corresponding contours were automatically generated for the exhale phase. The accuracy of the segmentation (and hence deformable image registration) was judged by comparing automatically segmented contours with expert contours traced directly in the exhale phase scan using three metrics: volume overlap index, root mean square distance, and Hausdorff distance. The accuracy of the segmentation (in terms of radial distance mismatch) was approximately 2 mm in the thorax and 3 mm in the abdomen, which compares favorably to the

  2. Reconnaissance des Formes a L'aide du Filtre de Phase D'harmoniques Circulaires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Luc

    Cette these porte sur l'etude d'une nouvelle generation de filtres fabriques a partir de la phase du filtre d'harmoniques circulaires (FHC). Il s'agit du FHC de phase (FHCP), du FHC de phase binaire (FHCPB) et du FHC binaire (FHCB) qui, tout en etant invariants par rapport a la position et a l'orientation des cibles, offrent une meilleure capacite de discrimination que le FHC. Nous presentons egalement le FHC de covariance (FHCC) et ses derives de phase, lesquels permettent d'accroi tre davantage la capacite de discrimination du FHC dans les cas ou les objets composants la scene sont tres semblables. La performance de chacun des filtres est evaluee au moyen de simulations sur ordinateur avant d'etre mesuree sur un correlateur optique. Le FHC, FHCP, FHCC et FHCCP sont encodes dans un hologramme genere par ordinateur tandis que les filtres binaires sont affiches sur un televiseur a cristaux liquides. Enfin, nous termions ce manuscrit en presentant le FHCB multiplexe qui permet de correler, en une seule operation, un objet et plusieurs FHC de differents ordres.

  3. Phase transition between A and B forms of DNA: a free-energy perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Devashish

    2010-03-01

    We study the structural transition from B form of DNA to A form of DNA using group theoretic methods. The transition is not of the order-disorder type and hence to construct a Landau kind of theory for the transition we define a higher symmetry and relevant order parameters. We also discuss the issue of all the conformations, observed experimentally during the course of transition, being fundamentally different or not.

  4. Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels Strengthened by Laves Phase and MC Carbide Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Brady, Michael P; Lu, Zhao Ping; Liu, Chain T; Takeyama, Masao; Maziasz, Philip J; Pint, Bruce A

    2007-01-01

    Creep strengthening of Al-modified austenitic stainless steels by MC carbides or Fe{sub 2}Nb Laves phase was explored. Fe-20Cr-15Ni-(0-8)Al and Fe-15Cr-20Ni-5Al base alloys (at. pct) with small additions of Nb, Mo, W, Ti, V, C, and B were cast, thermally-processed, and aged. On exposure from 650 C to 800 C in air and in air with 10 pct water vapor, the alloys exhibited continuous protective Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale formation at an Al level of only 5 at. pct (2.4 wt pct). Matrices of the Fe-20Cr-15Ni-5Al base alloys consisted of {gamma} (fcc) + {alpha} (bcc) dual phase due to the strong {alpha}-Fe stabilizing effect of the Al addition and exhibited poor creep resistance. However, adjustment of composition to the Fe-15Cr-20Ni-5Al base resulted in alloys that were single-phase {gamma}-Fe and still capable of alumina scale formation. Alloys that relied solely on Fe{sub 2}Nb Laves phase precipitates for strengthening exhibited relatively low creep resistance, while alloys that also contained MC carbide precipitates exhibited creep resistance comparable to that of commercially available heat-resistant austenitic stainless steels. Phase equilibria studies indicated that NbC precipitates in combination with Fe{sub 2}Nb were of limited benefit to creep resistance due to the solution limit of NbC within the {gamma}-Fe matrix of the alloys studied. However, when combined with other MC-type strengtheners, such as V{sub 4}C{sub 3} or TiC, higher levels of creep resistance were obtained.

  5. Use of molecular dynamics to assess the biophysiological role of hydroxyl groups in glycerol dyalkyl glycerol teraethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Carme; Costenaro, Lionel; Fietz, Susanne; Daura, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    The cell membrane of some Archaea is constituted by lipids that span the whole membrane width and contain two alkyl chains bound by two glycerol groups (glycerol dyalkyl glycerol teraethers or GDGTs). These lipids confer stability to the membrane in mesophile to extremophile environments. Besides the more frequently studied isoprenoid archaeal lipids, both mono- and dihydroxy-GDGTs (OH-GDGT) have been recently reported to occur in marine sediments (1). OH-GDGTs contain up to two cyclopentane moieties and have been identified in both core and intact forms. In 2013, a correlation between OH-GDGTs and temperature was reported, with higher relative OH-GDGT abundances at high latitudes (2,3). The physiological function of the hydroxyl group in a GDGT is not yet known, but given the field results, it could be linked to an adaptation of the membrane to changes in temperature. For hydroxydiether lipid cores in methanogenic bacteria, it has been postulated that the hydroxyl group may alter the cell membrane properties: either extending the polar head group region or creating a hydrophilic pocket (4). It has also been suggested that the hydroxylation of the biphytany (l) moiety may result in enhanced membrane rigidity (1). To improve our understanding of the effect of the hydroxylation on physical properties of membranes, we performed molecular-dynamics simulations of GDGT membranes presenting and lacking these additional OH groups. This is an approach with a great development potential in the archaea lipid field, especially in relation to proxy validation. Our results indicate that the addition of an OH increases the membrane fluidity, thus providing an advantage in cold environments. We also observe a widening of the polar head group area, which could enhance transport. 1. Liu et al. 2012, GCA 2. Huguet et al. 2013, Org. Geochem 3. Fietz et al. 2013 4. Sprott et al. 1990. J. Biol. Chem. 265, 13735-13740.

  6. Tricontinuous Cubic Nanostructure and Pore Size Patterning in Mesostructured Silica Films Templated with Glycerol Monooleate.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Darren R; Garcia, Fred L; Kaehr, Bryan; Khripin, Constantine Y; Collord, Andrew D; Baca, Helen K; Tate, Michael P; Hillhouse, Hugh W; Strzalka, Joseph W; Jiang, Zhang; Wang, Jin; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2011-04-26

    The fabrication of nanostructured films possessing tricontinuous minimal surface mesophases with well-defined framework and pore connectivity remains a difficult task. As a new route to these structures, we introduce glycerol monooleate (GMO) as a template for evaporation-induced self-assembly. As deposited, a nanostructured double gyroid phase is formed, as indicated by analysis of grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering data. Removal of GMO by UV/O(3) treatment or acid extraction induces a phase change to a nanoporous body-centered structure which we tentatively identify as based on the IW-P surface. To improve film quality, we add a co-surfactant to the GMO in a mass ratio of 1:10; when this co-surfactant is cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we find an unusually large pore size (8-12 nm) in acid extracted films, while UV/O(3) treated films yield pores of only ca. 4 nm. Using this pore size dependence on film processing procedure, we create a simple method for patterning pore size in nanoporous films, demonstrating spatially-defined size-selective molecular adsorption.

  7. Tricontinuous Cubic Nanostructure and Pore Size Patterning in Mesostructured Silica Films Templated with Glycerol Monooleate

    PubMed Central

    Dunphy, Darren R.; Garcia, Fred L.; Kaehr, Bryan; Khripin, Constantine Y.; Collord, Andrew D.; Baca, Helen K.; Tate, Michael P.; Hillhouse, Hugh W.; Strzalka, Joseph W.; Jiang, Zhang; Wang, Jin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication of nanostructured films possessing tricontinuous minimal surface mesophases with well-defined framework and pore connectivity remains a difficult task. As a new route to these structures, we introduce glycerol monooleate (GMO) as a template for evaporation-induced self-assembly. As deposited, a nanostructured double gyroid phase is formed, as indicated by analysis of grazing-incidence small-angle x-ray scattering data. Removal of GMO by UV/O3 treatment or acid extraction induces a phase change to a nanoporous body-centered structure which we tentatively identify as based on the IW-P surface. To improve film quality, we add a co-surfactant to the GMO in a mass ratio of 1:10; when this co-surfactant is cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, we find an unusually large pore size (8-12 nm) in acid extracted films, while UV/O3 treated films yield pores of only ca. 4 nm. Using this pore size dependence on film processing procedure, we create a simple method for patterning pore size in nanoporous films, demonstrating spatially-defined size-selective molecular adsorption. PMID:21572556

  8. In the Bottlebrush Garden: The Structural Aspects of Coordination Polymer Phases formed in Lanthanide Extraction with Alkyl Phosphoric Acids.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Ross J; Demars, Thomas; Liu, Guokui; Niklas, Jens; Poluektov, Oleg G; Shkrob, Ilya A

    2015-09-03

    Coordination polymers (CPs) of metal ions are central to a large variety of applications, such as catalysis and separations. These polymers frequently occur as amorphous solids that segregate from solution. The structural aspects of this segregation remain elusive due to the dearth of the spectroscopic techniques and computational approaches suitable for probing such systems. Therefore, there is a lacking of understanding of how the molecular building blocks give rise to the mesoscale architectures that characterize CP materials. In this study we revisit a CP phase formed in the extraction of trivalent lanthanide ions by diesters of the phosphoric acid, such as the bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP). This is a well-known system with practical importance in strategic metals refining and nuclear fuel reprocessing. A CP phase, referred to as a "third phase", has been known to form in these systems for half a century, yet the structure of the amorphous solid is still a point of contention, illustrating the difficulties faced in characterizing such materials. In this study, we follow a deductive approach to solving the molecular structure of amorphous CP phases, using semiempirical calculations to set up an array of physically plausible models and then deploying a suite of experimental techniques, including optical, magnetic resonance, and X-ray spectroscopies, to consecutively eliminate all but one model. We demonstrate that the "third phase" consists of hexagonally packed linear chains in which the lanthanide ions are connected by three O-P-O bridges, with the modifying groups protruding outward, as in a bottlebrush. The tendency to yield linear polynuclear oligomers that is apparent in this system may also be present in other systems yielding the "third phase", demonstrating how molecular geometry directs polymeric assembly in hybrid materials. We show that the packing of bridging molecules is central to directing the structure of CP phases and that by

  9. An improved glycerol biosensor with an Au-FeS-NAD-glycerol-dehydrogenase anode.

    PubMed

    Mahadevan, Aishwarya; Fernando, Sandun

    2017-06-15

    An improved glycerol biosensor was developed via direct attachment of NAD(+)-glycerol dehydrogenase coenzyme-apoenzyme complex onto supporting gold electrodes, using novel inorganic iron (II) sulfide (FeS)-based single molecular wires. Sensing performance factors, i.e., sensitivity, a detection limit and response time of the FeS and conventional pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ)-based biosensor were evaluated by dynamic constant potential amperometry at 1.3V under non-buffered conditions. For glycerol concentrations ranging from 1 to 25mM, a 77% increase in sensitivity and a 53% decrease in detection limit were observed for the FeS-based biosensor when compared to the conventional PQQ-based counterpart. The electrochemical behavior of the FeS-based glycerol biosensor was analyzed at different concentrations of glycerol, accompanied by an investigation into the effects of applied potential and scan rate on the current response. Effects of enzyme stimulants ((NH4)2SO4 and MnCl2·4H2O) concentrations and buffers/pH (potassium phosphate buffer pH 6-8, Tris buffer pH 8-10) on the current responses generated by the FeS-based glycerol biosensor were also studied. The optimal detection conditions were 0.03M (NH4)2SO4 and 0.3µm MnCl2·4H2O in non-buffered aqueous electrolyte under stirring whereas under non-stirring, Tris buffer at pH 10 with 0.03M (NH4)2SO4 and 30µm MnCl2·4H2O were found to be optimal detection conditions. Interference by glucose, fructose, ethanol, and acetic acid in glycerol detection was studied. The observations indicated a promising enhancement in glycerol detection using the novel FeS-based glycerol sensing electrode compared to the conventional PQQ-based one. These findings support the premise that FeS-based bioanodes are capable of biosensing glycerol successfully and may be applicable for other enzymatic biosensors.

  10. Glycerol stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Cellular responses and evolved adaptations.

    PubMed

    Mattenberger, Florian; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Hallsworth, John E; Fares, Mario A

    2017-03-01

    Glycerol synthesis is key to central metabolism and stress biology in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yet the cellular adjustments needed to respond and adapt to glycerol stress are little understood. Here, we determined impacts of acute and chronic exposures to glycerol stress in S. cerevisiae. Glycerol stress can result from an increase of glycerol concentration in the medium due to the S. cerevisiae fermenting activity or other metabolic activities. Acute glycerol-stress led to a 50% decline in growth rate and altered transcription of more than 40% of genes. The increased genetic diversity in S. cerevisiae population, which had evolved in the standard nutrient medium for hundreds of generations, led to an increase in growth rate and altered transcriptome when such population was transferred to stressful media containing a high concentration of glycerol; 0.41 M (0.990 water activity). Evolution of S. cerevisiae populations during a 10-day period in the glycerol-containing medium led to transcriptome changes and readjustments to improve control of glycerol flux across the membrane, regulation of cell cycle, and more robust stress response; and a remarkable increase of growth rate under glycerol stress. Most of the observed regulatory changes arose in duplicated genes. These findings elucidate the physiological mechanisms, which underlie glycerol-stress response, and longer-term adaptations, in S. cerevisiae; they also have implications for enigmatic aspects of the ecology of this otherwise well-characterized yeast.

  11. Matched-filtering generalized phase contrast using LCoS pico-projectors for beam-forming.

    PubMed

    Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-04-23

    We report on a new beam-forming system for generating high intensity programmable optical spikes using so-called matched-filtering Generalized Phase Contrast (mGPC) applying two consumer handheld pico-projectors. Such a system presents a low-cost alternative for optical trapping and manipulation, optical lattices and other beam-shaping applications usually implemented with high-end spatial light modulators. Portable pico-projectors based on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices are used as binary phase-only spatial light modulators by carefully setting the appropriate polarization of the laser illumination. The devices are subsequently placed into the object and Fourier plane of a standard 4f-setup according to the mGPC spatial filtering configuration. Having a reconfigurable spatial phase filter, instead of a fixed and fabricated one, allows the beam shaper to adapt to different input phase patterns suited for different requirements. Despite imperfections in these consumer pico-projectors, the mGPC approach tolerates phase aberrations that would have otherwise been hard to overcome by standard phase projection.

  12. Effect of glycerol on the interactions and solubility of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Farnum, M; Zukoski, C

    1999-01-01

    The effects of additives used to stabilize protein structure during crystallization on protein solution phase behavior are poorly understood. Here we investigate the effect of glycerol and ionic strength on the solubility and strength of interactions of the bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. These two variables are found to have opposite effects on the intermolecular forces; attractions increase with [NaCl], whereas repulsions increase with glycerol concentration. These changes are mirrored in bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor solubility where the typical salting out behavior for NaCl is observed with higher solubility found in buffers containing glycerol. The increased repulsions induced by glycerol can be explained by a number of possible mechanisms, all of which require small changes in the protein or the solvent in its immediate vicinity. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor follows the same general phase behavior as other globular macromolecules where a robust correlation between protein solution second virial coefficient and solubility has been developed. This study extends previous reports of this correlation to solution conditions involving nonelectrolyte additives. PMID:10233086

  13. Social climber attachment in forming networks produces a phase transition in a measure of connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Dane; Larremore, Daniel B.

    2012-09-01

    The formation and fragmentation of networks are typically studied using percolation theory, but most previous research has been restricted to studying a phase transition in cluster size, examining the emergence of a giant component. This approach does not study the effects of evolving network structure on dynamics that occur at the nodes, such as the synchronization of oscillators and the spread of information, epidemics, and neuronal excitations. We introduce and analyze an alternative link-formation rule, called social climber (SC) attachment, that may be combined with arbitrary percolation models to produce a phase transition using the largest eigenvalue of the network adjacency matrix as the order parameter. This eigenvalue is significant in the analyses of many network-coupled dynamical systems in which it measures the quality of global coupling and is hence a natural measure of connectivity. We highlight the important self-organized properties of SC attachment and discuss implications for controlling dynamics on networks.

  14. Phase Transition of a Structure II Cubic Clathrate Hydrate to a Tetragonal Form.

    PubMed

    Takeya, Satoshi; Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Ohmura, Ryo; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John A

    2016-08-01

    The crystal structure and phase transition of cubic structure II (sII) binary clathrate hydrates of methane (CH4 ) and propanol are reported from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. The deformation of host water cages at the cubic-tetragonal phase transition of 2-propanol+CH4 hydrate, but not 1-propanol+CH4 hydrate, was observed below about 110 K. It is shown that the deformation of the host water cages of 2-propanol+CH4 hydrate can be explained by the restriction of the motion of 2-propanol within the 5(12) 6(4) host water cages. This result provides a low-temperature structure due to a temperature-induced symmetry-lowering transition of clathrate hydrate. This is the first example of a cubic structure of the common clathrate hydrate families at a fixed composition.

  15. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrehedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    By investigating the properties of quasicrystals and quasicrystal-forming liquid alloys, we may determine the role of ordering of the liquid phase in the formation of quasicrystals, leading to a better fundamental understanding of both the quasicrystal and the liquid. A quasicrystal is solid characterized by a symmetric but non-periodic arrangement of atoms, usually in the form of an icosahedron (12 atoms, 20 triangular faces). It is theorized that the short-range order in liquids takes this same form. The degree of ordering depends on the temperature of the liquid, and affects many of the liquid s properties, including specific heat, viscosity, and electrical resistivity. The MSFC role in this project includes solidification studies, phase diagram determination, and thermophysical property measurements on the liquid quasicrystal-forming alloys, all by electrostatic levitation (ESL). The viscosity of liquid quasicrystal-forming alloys is measured by the oscillating drop method, both in the stable and undercooled liquid state. The specific heat of solid, undercooled liquid, and stable liquid are measured by the radiative cooling rate of the droplets.

  16. Studies of Nucleation and Growth, Specific Heat and Viscosity of Undercooled Melts of Quasicrystals and Polytetrehedral-Phase-Forming Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    By investigating the properties of quasicrystals and quasicrystal-forming liquid alloys, we may determine the role of ordering of the liquid phase in the formation of quasicrystals, leading to a better fundamental understanding of both the quasicrystal and the liquid. A quasicrystal is solid characterized by a symmetric but non-periodic arrangement of atoms, usually in the form of an icosahedron (12 atoms, 20 triangular faces). It is theorized that the short-range order in liquids takes this same form. The degree of ordering depends on the temperature of the liquid, and affects many of the liquid s properties, including specific heat, viscosity, and electrical resistivity. The MSFC role in this project includes solidification studies, phase diagram determination, and thermophysical property measurements on the liquid quasicrystal-forming alloys, all by electrostatic levitation (ESL). The viscosity of liquid quasicrystal-forming alloys is measured by the oscillating drop method, both in the stable and undercooled liquid state. The specific heat of solid, undercooled liquid, and stable liquid are measured by the radiative cooling rate of the droplets.

  17. Comparison of glycerol and water hydration regimens on tennis-related performance.

    PubMed

    Magal, Meir; Webster, Michael J; Sistrunk, Lucille E; Whitehead, Malcolm T; Evans, Ronald K; Boyd, Joseph C

    2003-01-01

    To compare glycerol and water hyperhydration and rehydration on tennis related skill and agility performance. Eleven male subjects completed two counter-balanced, double-blind trials. Each trial consisted of three phases: 1). hyperhydration with or without glycerol (1.0 g.kg/(-1)) over 150 min, 2). 120 min of exercise-induced dehydration (EID), and 3) rehydration with or without glycerol (0.5 g.kg(-1)) over 90 min. After each phase, subjects performed 5- and 10-m sprint tests, a repeated-effort agility test, and tennis skill tests. Glycerol (G) hyperhydration significantly increased fluid retention by approximately 900 mL over the placebo (P) (Pphase, PV was significantly greater in the G trial than in the P trial, and the G trial resulted in a significantly greater fluid retention of approximately 700 mL over the P trial ( Pglycerol hydration regimen provided a better hydration status than the placebo hydration regimen, no performance benefits were observed.

  18. Dielectric spectroscopy study of myoglobin in glycerol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soham; Richert, Ranko

    2014-02-01

    Due to the interest in protein dynamics, there are numerous dielectric relaxation studies of proteins in water and in glass-forming aqueous solvents such as glycerol-water mixtures. In the regime of low frequencies, the inevitable dc-conductivity of such systems limits the resolution of dynamics that are slow compared with the solvent relaxation. Solutions of myoglobin in glycerol/water mixtures of various compositions are measured by dielectric spectroscopy in the frequency range from 10mHz to 10MHz. The resolution of low frequency modes is improved by two approaches: electrical 'cleaning' and the analysis of the derivative of the real component of permittivity, which shows no direct signature of dc-conductivity. Effects of internal interfacial polarization are also addressed by measuring the same solvents in confinement as well as mixed with glass beads. We find two processes, the structural relaxation of the solvent and the slower rotational mode of the protein, with no indication at even lower frequencies of a dielectric signature of fluctuations associated with protein dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Protease activation in glycerol-based deep eutectic solvents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hua; Baker, Gary A.; Holmes, Shaletha

    2011-01-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) consisting of mixtures of a choline salt (chloride or acetate form) and glycerol are prepared as easily accessible, biodegradable, and inexpensive alternatives to conventional aprotic cation-anion paired ionic liquids. These DES systems display excellent fluidity coupled with thermal stability to nearly 200 °C. In this work, the transesterification activities of cross-linked proteases (subtilisin and α-chymotrypsin), immobilized on chitosan, were individually examined in these novel DESs. In the 1:2 molar ratio mixture of choline chloride/glycerol containing 3% (v/v) water, cross-linked subtilisin exhibited an excellent activity (2.9 μmo l min−1 g−1) in conjunction with a selectivity of 98% in the transesterification reaction of N-acetyl-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester with 1-propanol. These highly encouraging results advocate more extensive exploration of DESs in protease-mediated biotransformations of additional polar substrates and use of DESs in biocatalysis more generally. PMID:21909232

  20. Unfolding of the myosin head by purealin in glycerol.

    PubMed

    Takito, Jiro; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi; Nakamura, Masanori; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Nonomura, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-11

    Purealin is a small bioactive compound obtained from the marine sponge. The compound modulates various types of ATPase activity of myosin from skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, and smooth muscle. To elucidate the structural basis of these effects of purealin on myosin ATPases, we examined the effect of purealin on the conformation of skeletal muscle myosin in aqueous solution and in glycerol. Analysis of the circular dichroism spectrum of subfragment 1, a single-headed fragment of myosin, revealed that in 10% glycerol purealin decreased the β-sheet content of S1, but in aqueous solution it had little effect on the secondary structure of S1. A myosin monomer conforms to two pear-like globular heads attached to a long tail. Electron microscopy observations with rotary shadowing revealed that purealin unfolded each globular head to an extended single strand. The tips of the unfolded strand bound each other and formed a ring in one molecule. These results suggest that binding of purealin affects the critical parameters of myosin folding.

  1. Method of varying a characteristic of an optical vertical cavity structure formed by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    DOEpatents

    Hou, Hong Q.; Coltrin, Michael E.; Choquette, Kent D.

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming an array of vertical cavity optical resonant structures wherein the structures in the array have different detection or emission wavelengths. The process uses selective area growth (SAG) in conjunction with annular masks of differing dimensions to control the thickness and chemical composition of the materials in the optical cavities in conjunction with a metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) process to build these arrays.

  2. Value-adding conversion and volume reduction of sewage sludge by anaerobic co-digestion with crude glycerol.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Kensuke; Kimura, Chie; Fujimoto, You; Tokumoto, Hayato

    2017-05-01

    In this study, conversion of sewage sludge to biogas by anaerobic co-digestion with crude glycerol was examined. When 0.126g/L crude glycerol was added to the reactor, only methane was produced. Upon addition of 5.04g/L crude glycerol, hydrogen production occurred, and a significant amount of 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) was generated in the liquid phase. On day 6, the dry weight was largely composed of organic acids (48%) and 1,3-PDO (17%), which are water-soluble. Degradation of 1,3-PDO was very slow, which is advantageous for recovery. Crude glycerol, which contains alkaline substances, promoted organic matter degradation by microorganisms, which possibly affected biogas and 1,3-PDO production. Addition of 0.630-2.52g/L glycerol initially led to hydrogen production, followed by methane production a few days later, which stabilized within 1week. In conclusion, adjustment of the crude glycerol concentration allows controllable conversion to value-added products for co-digestion.

  3. Simple determination of ranitidine in dosage forms by in-phase selective AC polarography.

    PubMed

    Squella, J A; Zuñiga, L A; Lemus, I; Nuñez-Vergara, L J

    1988-01-01

    A new AC polarographic method for the determination of pharmaceutical forms of ranitidine is proposed, based on the electroactivity of the ranitidine nitro group. Individual and composite assays as well as recovery studies are described. Results show adequate precision and accuracy. Sample preparation is easy and no excipient separation is required.

  4. Stabilization of NaCl-containing cuttings wastes in cement concrete by in situ formed mineral phases.

    PubMed

    Filippov, Lev; Thomas, Fabien; Filippova, Inna; Yvon, Jacques; Morillon-Jeanmaire, Anne

    2009-11-15

    Disposal of NaCl-containing cuttings is a major environmental concern due to the high solubility of chlorides. The present work aims at reducing the solubility of chloride by encapsulation in low permeability matrix as well as lowering its solubility by trapping into low-solubility phases. Both the studied materials were cuttings from an oil-based mud in oil drillings containing about 50% of halite, and cuttings in water-based mud from gas drilling containing 90% of halite. A reduction in the amount of dissolved salt from 41 to 19% according to normalized leaching tests was obtained by addition of potassium ortho-phosphate in the mortar formula of oil-based cuttings, while the aluminium dihydrogeno-phosphate is even more efficient for the stabilization of water-based cuttings with a NaCl content of 90%. Addition of ortho-phosphate leads to form a continuous and weakly soluble network in the cement matrix, which reduces the release of salt. The formed mineralogical phases were apatite and hydrocalumite. These phases encapsulate the salt grains within a network, thus lowering its interaction with water or/and trap chloride into low-solubility phases. The tested approaches allow to develop a confinement process of NaCl-containing waste of various compositions that can be applied to wastes, whatever the salt content and the nature of the drilling fluids (water or oil).

  5. Organic and inorganic speciation of particulate matter formed during different combustion phases in an improved cookstove.

    PubMed

    Leavey, Anna; Patel, Sameer; Martinez, Raul; Mitroo, Dhruv; Fortenberry, Claire; Walker, Michael; Williams, Brent; Biswas, Pratim

    2017-10-01

    Residential solid fuel combustion in cookstoves has established health impacts including bladder and lung cancers, cataracts, low birth weight, and pneumonia. The chemical composition of particulate matter (PM) from 4 commonly-used solid fuels (coal, dung, ambient/dry applewood, and oakwood pellets), emitted from a gasifier cookstove, as well as propane, were examined. Temporal changes between the different cookstove burn-phases were also explored. Normalized concentrations of non-refractory PM1, total organics, chloride, ammonium, nitrate, sulfate, and 41 particle-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured using a High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and a Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (TAG), respectively. Coal demonstrated the highest fraction of organic matter in its particulate emission composition (98%), followed by dung (94%). Coal and dung also demonstrated the highest numbers and concentrations of PAHs. While dry applewood emitted ten times lower organic matter compared to ambient applewood, a higher fraction of these organics was composed of PAHs, especially the more toxic ones such as benzo(a)pyrene (9.63ng/L versus 0.04ng/L), and benzo(b)fluoranthene (31.32ng/L versus 0.19ng/L). Data from the AMS demonstrated no clear trends for any of the combustion fuels over the different combustion phases unlike the previously reported trends observed for the physical characteristics. Of the solid fuels, pellets demonstrated the lowest emissions. Emissions from propane were below the quantification limit of the instruments. This work highlights the benefits of incorporating additional metrics into the cookstove evaluation process, thus enriching the existing PM data inventory. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Forming NCO– in Dense Molecular Clouds: Possible Gas-Phase Chemical Paths From Quantum Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The existence of NCO– anions in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been suggested and searched for over the years but without any formal definitive sighting of that molecule. We discuss in this work the possible formation of either NCO– directly or of NCO neutral as a precursor to NCO– formation by electron attachment. We follow simple, gas-phase chemical reactions for which the general features are obtained from accurate quantum calculations. The results are shedding some additional light on the likely presence of this anion in the ISM environment, drawing further information from the specific features of the considered reactions on the additional chemical options that exist for its formation. PMID:26696323

  7. Bio-transformation of Glycerol to 3-Hydroxypropionic Acid Using Resting Cells of Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Gopi Gopal; Nehru, Ganesh; Suppuram, Pandiaraj; Balasubramaniyam, Sowmiya; Gulab, Brajesh Raman; Subramanian, Ramalingam

    2015-10-01

    Lactobacillus reuteri grown in MRS broth containing 20 mM glycerol exhibits 3.7-fold up-regulation of 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) pathway genes during the stationary phase. Concomitantly, the resting cells prepared from stationary phase show enhancement in bio-conversion of glycerol, and the maximum specific productivity (q p) is found to be 0.17 g 3-HP per g CDW per hour. The regulatory elements such as catabolite repression site in the up-stream of 3-HP pathway genes are presumed for the augmentation of glycerol bio-conversion selectively in stationary phase. However, in the repression mutant, the maximum q p of 3-HP persisted in the stationary phase-derived resting cells indicating the role of further regulatory features. In the production stage, the external 3-HP concentration of 35 mM inhibits 3-HP synthesis. In addition, it has also moderated 1,3-propanediol formation, as it is a redox bio-catalysis involving NAD(+)/NADH ratio of 6.5. Repeated batch bio-transformation has been used to overcome product inhibition, and the total yield (Ypx) of 3-HP from the stationary phase-derived biomass is 3.3 times higher than that from the non-repeated mode. With the use of appropriate gene expression condition and repeated transfer of biomass, 3-HP produced in this study can be used for low-volume, high-value applications.

  8. A one-pot glycerol-based additive-blended ethyl biodiesel production: a green process.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Fabio G; Macedo, Alexandra; Archilha, Marcos Vinicios L R; Wendler, Edison P; Dos Santos, Alcindo A

    2013-09-01

    N-methyl-2-pyrrolidonium methyl sulfonate, a Brønsted acid ionic liquid, promoted the transesterification of soybean oil with ethanol giving a high quality fatty acid ethyl ester. At the end of the reaction, after distillation of excess of ethanol, spontaneous phase separation took place. While the clear upper phase corresponded to the ethyl ester, the lower phase was composed of a mixture of glycerol byproduct and the catalyst. By addition of a stoichiometric amount of appropriated reagents to the resulting mixture, a new ionic liquid-catalyzed process allows the conversion of the glycerol into less polar derivatives, and consequent migration to the ethyl esters phase. This work demonstrated that emulsion, phase separation and contamination problems were completely avoided and the glycerol could be incorporated into the biodiesel as additives in a single step. The whole process involves two renewable starting materials, ethanol and vegetable oil, allowing a total green additive-blended biodiesel production process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrasound assisted enzyme catalyzed synthesis of glycerol carbonate from glycerol and dimethyl carbonate.

    PubMed

    Waghmare, Govind V; Vetal, Mangesh D; Rathod, Virendra K

    2015-01-01

    The present work illustrates the transesterification of glycerol to glycerol carbonate (GlyC) from dimethyl carbonate (DMC) using commercial immobilized lipase (Novozym 435) under ultrasonic irradiation. The experiments were performed in a batch reactor placed in an ultrasonic water bath using a sequence of experimental protocol to evaluate the effects of temperature, molar ratios of substrates, enzyme loading, duty cycle and ultrasound power on the conversion of glycerol to GlyC. It has been found that ultrasound-assisted lipase-catalyzed transesterification of glycerol would be a potential alternative to conventional alkali-catalyzed method, as high conversion (99.75%) was obtained at mild operating conditions: molar ratio of DMC to glycerol 3:1, catalyst amount of 13% (w/w), lower power input (100W), duty cycle 50% and temperature (60°C) in a relatively short reaction time (4h) using Novozym 435 as catalyst. Ultrasound reduces the reaction time up to 4h as compared to conventional stirring method (14h) catalyzed by Novozym 435. The repeated use of the catalyst under the optimum experimental condition resulted in decay in both enzyme activity and product conversion.

  10. Optical diffractometry of highly anisotropic holographic gratings formed by liquid crystal and polymer phase separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakiuchida, Hiroshi; Tazawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Ogiwara, Akifumi

    2012-12-01

    Optical diffractometry is proposed as a practical method of quantitatively analyzing the microscopic structural origins of a wide range of highly efficient and linearly polarized optical diffraction grating produced from holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal. The structure is organized by a spatially periodical distribution of submicrometer-scale liquid crystal (LC) droplets in a polymer matrix. Six independent Bragg diffraction spectra were obtained at two orthogonal polarization states at temperatures below, at, and above the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition point. These spectra were simultaneously analyzed by employing anisotropic diffraction theory under the restraint of a simple and widely useful structural model constructed on the basis of the previously reported microscopic observations. The refractive indices of spatially periodic LC- and polymer-rich phases were analyzed using Cauchy's equation as a function of optical wavelength. The present diffractometry was demonstrated for a variety of holographic structures, and the structural parameters were discussed such as the filling ratio of LC droplets to polymer matrix, the orientational order in the droplets, and the thermo-optic properties in the LC droplets. Furthermore, the higher order Bragg diffractions were measured and discussed. The proposed method was examined in consistency by comparisons with polarizing optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  11. Optical diffractometry of highly anisotropic holographic gratings formed by liquid crystal and polymer phase separation.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchida, Hiroshi; Tazawa, Masato; Yoshimura, Kazuki; Ogiwara, Akifumi

    2012-12-01

    Optical diffractometry is proposed as a practical method of quantitatively analyzing the microscopic structural origins of a wide range of highly efficient and linearly polarized optical diffraction grating produced from holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal. The structure is organized by a spatially periodical distribution of submicrometer-scale liquid crystal (LC) droplets in a polymer matrix. Six independent Bragg diffraction spectra were obtained at two orthogonal polarization states at temperatures below, at, and above the nematic-to-isotropic phase transition point. These spectra were simultaneously analyzed by employing anisotropic diffraction theory under the restraint of a simple and widely useful structural model constructed on the basis of the previously reported microscopic observations. The refractive indices of spatially periodic LC- and polymer-rich phases were analyzed using Cauchy's equation as a function of optical wavelength. The present diffractometry was demonstrated for a variety of holographic structures, and the structural parameters were discussed such as the filling ratio of LC droplets to polymer matrix, the orientational order in the droplets, and the thermo-optic properties in the LC droplets. Furthermore, the higher order Bragg diffractions were measured and discussed. The proposed method was examined in consistency by comparisons with polarizing optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  12. New milarite/osumilite-type phase formed during ancient glazing of an Egyptian scarab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artioli, G.; Angelini, I.; Nestola, F.

    2013-02-01

    A scarab found in grave 25 of the Monte Prama necropolis, near Cabras, Oristano, Sardinia, is of special importance for the archaeological interpretation and dating of this important archaeological site. The object has been misinterpreted in the past as composed by bone: recent archaeometric analyses showed that it is a glazed steatite of Egyptian origin and that the altered surface contains interesting phases crystallized during the high-temperature interaction of the Mg-rich talc core with the alkali-rich glass used for glazing. A novel single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of one of the phases indicates that it is a new compound having the milarite-osumilite structure type, with a peculiar composition close to (Na1.52K0.12□0.36)(Mg3)(Mg1.72Cu0.16Fe0.12)(Si11.4Al0.6)O30, not reported for naturally occurring minerals. The structural and crystal chemical features of the compound, together with the known high-temperature stability of the series, allow a complete interpretation of the glazing process and conditions, based on direct application of the glaze on the steatite core with subsequent treatment at temperatures above 1000 °C.

  13. Phase and Structural States Formed in Titanium Nickelide Subsurface Layers Exposed to High-Current Pulsed Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyman, A. A.; Meisner, L. L.; Lotkov, A. I.; Semin, V. O.

    2015-06-01

    The behavior of the non-equilibrium states formed in the subsurface layers of a titanium nickelide-based alloy exposed to electron beams operated in the pulsed surface layer melting mode is investigated experimentally. Using methods of an x-ray diffraction analysis, and optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopies, an 8-10 μm thick surface layer is shown to exhibit В2 phase-based structure undergoing inhomogeneous lattice microstrain. The core layer located at a depth of 10-20 μm below the irradiated surface contains a small amount (up to 5 vol.%) of a phase with В19' martensite structure along with a slightly distorted lattice and unmelted Ti2Ni phase particles. Electron beam treatment brings about changes in the chemical composition of the surface-modified layer which becomes enriched in titanium owing to the dissolution of the Ti2Ni phase particles therein. Transmission electron microscopy has not revealed martensite phases in the modified layer. The electron beam exposure of the titanium nickelide surface is assumed to give rise to nonequilibrium highly distorted bcc structure.

  14. Forming operation in Ge-rich GexSbyTez phase change memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, Elisabetta; Zuliani, Paola; Borghi, Massimo; Annunziata, Roberto

    2017-07-01

    Optimized Ge-rich GexSbyTez materials with improved crystallization temperature have been proven to guarantee code integrity after soldering thermal profile and data retention in extended temperature range for automotive application. Together with higher crystallization temperature, these materials show also peculiar characteristics of the crystalline state with respect to conventional GST (Ge2Sb2Te5). In particular integrated memory cell shows a very high virgin resistance and needs an electrical activation as last operation of the fabrication process. In this paper we investigate for the first time the role of this electrical activation we named forming operation. In particular we show that the level of the maximum current flowing into the cell at the first electrical activation (forming level) has an impact on cell programmability. An explanation of this behavior based on physical analysis is provided suggesting that it is related to the modulation of cell thermal efficiency. Finally it is shown how forming level can be used in order to optimize cell reliability with respect to requested specifications for high temperature data retention (HTDR) and endurance.

  15. The structural-phase state of iron-carbon coatings formed by the ultradispersed particles

    SciTech Connect

    Manakova, Irina A. Ozernoy, Alexey N. Tuleushev, Yuriy Zh. Vereshchak, Mikhail F. Volodin, Valeriy N. Zhakanbayev, Yeldar A.

    2014-10-27

    The methods of nuclear gamma-resonance spectroscopy, elemental microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction were used to study nanoscale coatings. The samples were prepared by magnetron sputtering of carbon and iron particles. They alternately were deposited on monocrystalline silicon or polycrystalline corundum substrate moving relative to the plasma flows in the form of sublayers with a thickness of less than 0.6 nm up to the total thickness of 150-500 nm. Solid solutions with the carbon concentrations of up to 7.5, 12.0, 17.6, and 23.9 at% were produced by co-precipitation of ultradispersed particles of iron and carbon. Using method of conversion electron Mössbauer spectroscopy, we detected the anisotropy of orientation of magnetic moments of iron atoms due to texturing of the formed coatings. The deviation of the crystallite orientation from the average value depends on the degree of carbonization. At 550°C, the pearlite eutectic α‐Fe(C)+Fe{sub 3}C is formed from the amorphous structure without formation of intermediate carbides. The relative content of cementite correlates with the amount of carbon in the coating. The formation of the solid solutions-alloys directly during the deposition process confirms the theory of thermal-fluctuation melting of small particles.

  16. Biological Conversion of Glycerol to Ethanol by Enterobacter aerogenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwachukwu, Raymond E. S.

    In a search to turn the economically and environmentally non-valuable "waste" streams of biodiesel production into a profitable byproduct, a mutant strain of Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 13048 was developed by six-tube subculturing technique. This technique is based on the principle of adaptive evolution, and involved subculturing the bacterium in a tryptic soy broth without dextrose (TSB) containing specific glycerol and ethanol concentration for six consecutive times. Then, the six consecutive subculturing was repeated in a fresh TSB of higher glycerol and ethanol concentrations. A new mutant strain, E. aerogenes S012, which could withstand a combination of 200 g/l glycerol and 30 g/l ethanol concentrations, was developed. The wild and mutant strains were used for the fermentation of pure (P-) and recovered (R-) glycerol. Taguchi and full factorial methods of design of experiments were used to screen and optimize the important process factors that influence the microbial production of ethanol. A statistically sound regression model was used to establish the mathematical relationship between the process variables and ethanol production. Temperature of 38°C, agitation speed of 200 rpm, pH of 6.3-6.6, and microaerobic condition were the optimum process conditions. Different pretreatment methods to recover glycerol from the crude glycerol and the subsequent fermentation method showed that direct acidification using 85% H3PO4 was the best. The R-glycerol contained 51% pure glycerol and 21% methanol. The wild strain, E. aerogenes ATCC 13048, produced only 12 g/l and 12.8 g/l ethanol from 20 g/l P- and R-glycerol respectively, and could not utilize higher glycerol concentrations. The mutant, E. aerogenes S012, produced ethanol amount and yield of 43 g/l and 1.12 mol/mol-glycerol from P-glycerol, respectively within 96 h. It also produced ethanol amount and yield of 26.8 g/l and 1.07 mol/mol-glycerol, respectively, from R-glycerol within the same duration. In a

  17. Mycelial forms of Coccidioides spp. in the parasitic phase associated to pulmonary coccidioidomycosis with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Hernández, B; Martínez-Rivera, M A; Palma Cortés, G; Tapia-Díaz, A; Manjarrez Zavala, M E

    2008-09-01

    Pulmonary coccidioidomycosis shares characteristics with other pulmonary pathologies. In tissue, spherules containing endospores are markers of Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii infection. Mycelial forms presenting without classical parasitic structures are often misdiagnosed. The study was performed at the National Institute of Respiratory Diseases (INER) of Mexico between September 1991 and June 2005 and analyzed the association between cases, controls, and risk factors, including co-morbidity. A case was defined as any patient who presented mycelial forms and a control as any patient who presented only spherules or no parasitic forms. All patients (n = 44) with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis were diagnosed by culture, histopathology, cytology, and immunology. Type 2 diabetic patients with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis were four times more likely than non-diabetics to develop parasitic mycelial forms (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.85-20.10; P < 0.01). We formulated a comprehensive definition based on the results as follows: patients with pulmonary coccidioidomycosis with an evolution longer than 8 months, cough, hemoptysis, radiological evidence of a cavitary lesion, and type 2 diabetes mellitus, develop parasitic mycelial forms of Coccidioides spp. Based on microscopic images of patient specimens, we propose incorporating mycelial forms into the parasitic phase of Coccidioides spp. in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and chronic and cavitary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis.

  18. Analysis of organic gas phase compounds formed by hydrothermal liquefaction of Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles.

    PubMed

    Madsen, René B; Christensen, Per S; Houlberg, Kasper; Lappa, Elpiniki; Mørup, Anders J; Klemmer, Maika; Olsen, Eva M; Jensen, Mads M; Becker, Jacob; Iversen, Bo B; Glasius, Marianne

    2015-09-01

    This work provides a comprehensive characterization of the gas phase from hydrothermal liquefaction of Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles (DDGS) collected during a 24-h continuous experiment. The gas consisted mainly of CO2, CO, H2, CH4 and C2H6 accounting for 96 v/v% while further analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed additionally 62 compounds of which 54 were tentatively identified. These products included methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, various olefins and several aromatic compounds. The composition provided clear indication of the steady state of the system. Apart from CO2, olefins were the most abundant compound class and could provide a source of revenue.

  19. Activation of Methane by the Pyridine Radical Cation and its Substituted Forms in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guohua; Stewart, Hamish; Liu, Zeyu; Wang, Yongcheng; Stace, Anthony J.

    2015-08-01

    We present an experimental study of methane activation by pyridine cation and its substituents in the gas phase. Mass spectrometric experiments in an ion trap demonstrate that pyridine cation and some of its substituent cations are able to react with methane. The deuterated methane experiment has confirmed that the hydrogen atom in the ionic product of reaction does come from methane. The collected information about kinetic isotope effects has been used to distinguish the nature of the bond activation as a hydrogen abstraction. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the substituent groups on the pyridine ring can crucially influence their reactivity in methane bond activation processes. Density functional calculation (DFT) was employed to study the electronic structures of the complex and reaction mechanism of CH4+C5H5N+. The calculations confirmed the hypothesis from the experimental observation, namely, the reaction is rapid with no energy barrier.

  20. Use of different stationary phases for separation of isoniazid, its metabolites and vitamin B6 forms.

    PubMed

    Pasáková, Ivana; Gladziszová, Marcela; Charvátová, Jana; Stariat, Ján; Klimeš, Jiří; Kovaříková, Petra

    2011-06-01

    The ability of different stationary phases developed for the analysis of polar compounds (ZIC-HILIC, ZIC-pHILIC and Zorbax SB-Aq) to separate isoniazid, its metabolites (acetylisonazid, pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone, pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone 5-phosphate), pyridoxine, pyridoxal and pyridoxal 5-phosphate under MS compatible conditions was systematically investigated using HPLC-UV. The mobile phase strength, pH and buffer concentration were modified to assess their impact on the retention of these compounds. The best available separation of the compounds was achieved using 1 mM ammonium formate (pH≈6) and ACN (20:80, v/v) on ZIC-HILIC and employing 5 mM ammonium formate (pH 3.0) and ACN (40:60, v/v) on ZIC-pHILIC. A gradient profile using 0.5 mM ammonium formate (pH≈6) and MeOH (0-12 min: 10% MeOH, 12-15 min: 10-50% MeOH, 15-35 min: 50% MeOH, 35.0-35.2 min: 50-10% MeOH, 35.2-45.0 min: 10% MeOH) provided the best separation of the compounds on Zorbax SB-Aq. Subsequent LC-MS analysis demonstrated that ZIC-HILIC is useful for the analysis of pyridoxine, pyridoxal and pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone. However, the chromatographic conditions developed for the analysis of the compounds on Zorbax SB-Aq are capable of achieving the best separation of all compounds in this study with the higher sensitivity for most of the analytes. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Codon-Optimized NADH Oxidase Gene Expression and Gene Fusion with Glycerol Dehydrogenase for Bienzyme System with Cofactor Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Shizhen

    2015-01-01

    NADH oxidases (NOXs) play an important role in maintaining balance of NAD+/NADH by catalyzing cofactors regeneration. The expression of nox gene from Lactobacillus brevis in Escherichia coli BL21 (BL21 (DE3)) was studied. Two strategies, the high AT-content in the region adjacent to the initiation codon and codon usage of the whole gene sequence consistent with the host, obtained the NOX activity of 59.9 U/mg and 73.3 U/mg (crude enzyme), with enhanced expression level of 2.0 and 2.5-folds, respectively. Purified NOX activity was 213.8 U/mg. Gene fusion of glycerol dehydrogenase (GDH) and NOX formed bifuctional multi-enzymes for bioconversion of glycerol coupled with coenzyme regeneration. Kinetic parameters of the GDH-NOX for each substrate, glycerol and NADH, were calculated as Vmax(Glycerol) 20 μM/min, Km(Glycerol) 19.4 mM, Vmax (NADH) 12.5 μM/min and Km (NADH) 51.3 μM, respectively, which indicated the potential application of GDH-NOX for quick glycerol analysis and dioxyacetone biosynthesis. PMID:26115038

  2. Control of grass inflorescence form by the fine-tuning of meristem phase change.

    PubMed

    Kyozuka, Junko; Tokunaga, Hiroki; Yoshida, Akiko

    2014-02-01

    The grass inflorescence is interesting from the points of view of development and evolution. In the grass family, flowers are produced on small branches called spikelets. The recent isolation of regulators of spikelet meristem (SM) identity has shed new light on development and the evolution of the gene networks involved. The timing of SM specification is mediated by the combinatorial functions of these regulators, and determines the grass inflorescence form. Furthermore, tight links between meristem cell proliferation, maintenance of meristem indeterminacy, and suppression of the spikelet identity are being uncovered. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Oxidation behavior of cubic phases formed by alloying Al3Ti with Cr and Mn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, L. J.; Nic, J. P.; Mikkola, D. E.; Smialek, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Gravimetric, SEM, and XRD data are presented which document the significant improvement obtainable in the oxidation resistance of Al3Ti-containing alloys through additions of Cr. The L1(2) Al(67)Cr(8)Ti25 alloy exhibited excellent cyclic oxidation resistance at 1473 K, with the primary oxide formed being the ideally protective alpha-Al2O3. The Al(67)Mn(8)Ti(25) alloy also tested for comparison exhibited poor cyclic oxidation resistance, with substantial occurrence of TiO2 in the protective scales. Catastrophic oxidation was also encountered in the quaternary alloy Al(67)Mn(8)Ti(22)V(3).

  4. Sundstrand’s Precision Metal Forming Cell. Industrial Modernization Incentive Program (IMIP). Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    SPS personnel, etc. A request for quote was sent to eight laser manufacturers and laser machine builders. They are: S.E. Huffman Corp. Rofin Sinar...Projected Cost Savings 7-8 $ $ $ ITEM 1991 1992 TOTAL * FLOW FORM LATHE 675,000 1,575,000 2.250,000 * CO2 LASER UNIT 75,000 675,000 750.000 HYDRAULIC...6 4.5 TEST VALIDATION/QUALIFICATION ........................... 4-15 5.0 LASER TECHNOLOGY ............................................... 5-1 5.1

  5. Oxidation behavior of cubic phases formed by alloying Al3Ti with Cr and Mn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parfitt, L. J.; Nic, J. P.; Mikkola, D. E.; Smialek, J. L.

    1991-01-01

    Gravimetric, SEM, and XRD data are presented which document the significant improvement obtainable in the oxidation resistance of Al3Ti-containing alloys through additions of Cr. The L1(2) Al(67)Cr(8)Ti25 alloy exhibited excellent cyclic oxidation resistance at 1473 K, with the primary oxide formed being the ideally protective alpha-Al2O3. The Al(67)Mn(8)Ti(25) alloy also tested for comparison exhibited poor cyclic oxidation resistance, with substantial occurrence of TiO2 in the protective scales. Catastrophic oxidation was also encountered in the quaternary alloy Al(67)Mn(8)Ti(22)V(3).

  6. Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II

    SciTech Connect

    Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-26

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

  7. Form factors of the isovector scalar current and the [Formula: see text] scattering phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Albaladejo, M; Moussallam, B

    A model for S-wave [Formula: see text] scattering is proposed which could be realistic in an energy range from threshold up to above 1 GeV, where inelasticity is dominated by the [Formula: see text] channel. The T-matrix, satisfying two-channel unitarity, is given in a form which matches the chiral expansion results at order [Formula: see text] exactly for the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] amplitudes and approximately for [Formula: see text]. It contains six phenomenological parameters. Asymptotic conditions are imposed which ensure a minimal solution of the Muskhelishvili-Omnès problem, thus allowing one to compute the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] form factor matrix elements of the [Formula: see text] scalar current from the T-matrix. The phenomenological parameters are determined such as to reproduce the experimental properties of the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] resonances, as well as the chiral results of the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] scalar radii, which are predicted to be remarkably small at [Formula: see text]. This T-matrix model could be used for a unified treatment of the [Formula: see text] final-state interaction problem in processes such as [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], or the [Formula: see text] initial-state interaction in [Formula: see text].

  8. New Insights on the Creeping Phase of the Vajont Landslide form Rotary-Shear Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, F.; Spagnuolo, E.; Di Felice, F.; Di Toro, G.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that 1963 catastrophic Vajont landslide (NE Italy) was preceded by a creeping phase monitored over three years before the collapse and that water played a significant role in the instability of the rock sequence. However, the transition from the creeping phase to instability still remains elusive. Here we report experiments carried out in a rotary-shear friction apparatus (SHIVA at INGV, Rome, Italy) on smectite-rich gouges collected from the landslide surface (60-70% smectite, 20-30% calcite and minor quartz). Experiments were performed under shear stress controlled conditions at normal stress σnof 3-5 MPa in the presence of water (20% weight), and at room humidity. During the experiments, the shear stress τ was increased by a constant value Δτ and maintained for a fixed time Δt before applying the following shear stress step. When frictional instability was achieved, the machine started to rotate at an imposed velocity. In the first set of experiments, the initial τ (0.05 MPa) was increased by steps of Δτ = 0.25 MPa with Δt of 150 seconds. In the room humidity material, a series of spontaneous slip bursts occurred at τ = 2.5 MPa (at σn = 5MPa) until the shear stress reached 3.0 MPa. At this point, a large stress drop occurred with concomitant dilation. In the wet material, instability took place at τ= 0.3 MPa (at σn= 3 MPa). After forcing τ down, the material re-strengthened. A second main instability occurred when τ was restored to 0.3 MPa, with expulsion of water drops accompanied by an episode of dilation. At this point, the material spontaneously re-strengthened with a stick-slip behavior similar to that observed at room humidity conditions. In the second set of experiments, Δτ was reduced to 0.05 MPa and Δt increased up to 360 seconds producing a general enhancement of the shear stress required to generate unstable sliding. Instability took place at very high τ (3.12 MPa at σn= 3 MPa) at room-humidity conditions, and at

  9. Crystal form and phase structure of poly(vinylidene fluoride)/polyamide 11/clay nanocomposites by high-shear processing.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjin; Iwakura, Yuko; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2008-04-01

    Polyamide 11 (PA11)/clay, Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF)/clay and PVDF/PA11/clay nanocomposites were prepared by melt processing using a high shear extruder. Two types of organoclay with different modified alkyl tails and different polarities were used for PA11 and PVDF nanocomposites. PA11 nanocomposites derived from an organoclay having one alkyl tail show a well-exfoliated morphology but no crystal form transformation, whereas those derived from an organoclay having two alkyl tails give a little worse clay dispersion with the clear alpha to gamma crystal form transition with the addition of the clay. In contrast, the PVDF composites derived from the two organoclays result in a poor dispersion. In addition, PVDF/PA11 blend nanocomposites with a novel morphology have been fabricated using the high-shear extruder. It was found that the clay platelets were selectively dispersed in the PA11 phase with the size of larger than 200 nm, while no clay platelets were located in the PVDF phase and in the PA11 nanodomains with the size of smaller than 200 nm. Moreover, the addition of organoclay shows significant effects on the phase structure of PVDF/PA11 blends.

  10. Review of crystalline structures of some selected homologous series of rod-like molecules capable of forming liquid crystalline phases.

    PubMed

    Zugenmaier, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The crystal structures of four homologous series of rod-like molecules are reviewed, two of which form hydrogen bonds and two with a symmetric chemical constitution. Many of the compounds investigated turn into liquid crystalline phases upon temperature increase. It is of valuable interest to know possible conformations and possible packing arrangements as prerequisites to model liquid crystalline structures. The hydrogen bonds of homologous series of pure 4-(ω-hydroxyalkyloxy)-4'-hydroxybiphenyl (HnHBP, n the alkyloxy tail length) are realized through head to tail arrangements of the hydroxyl groups and crystallize except one compound in chiral space groups without the molecules containing any asymmetric carbon. The hydrogen bonds of the homologous series of 4-substituted benzoic acids with various lengths of the tail provide dimers through strong polar bonding of adjacent carboxyl groups and thus provide the stiff part of a mesogenic unit prerequisite for liquid crystalline phases. The homologous series of dialkanoyloxybiphenyls (BP-n, n = 1, 19), of which nine compounds could be crystallized, show liquid crystalline behavior for longer alkane chain lengths, despite the high mobility of the alkane chain ends already detectable in the crystal phase. A single molecule, half a molecule or two half molecules form the asymmetric unit in a centrosymmetric space group. The homologous series of 1,4-terephthalidene-bis-N-(4'-n-alkylaniline) (TBAA-n) exhibit a large variety of packing arrangements in the crystalline state, with or without relying on the symmetry center within the molecules.

  11. Fluorescence probe studies of mixed micellar and lyotropic phases formed between an anionic bile salt and a cationic detergent

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.; McGown, L.B. )

    1994-01-27

    Fluorescent probes, including pyrene, benzo[ghi]perylene (BgP), and perylene, were used to study organized media formed between the anionic trihydroxy bile salt sodium taurocholate (NaTC) and the cationic detergent octyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), over a wide concentration range that includes micellar and lyotropic phases. Solutions of the individual amphiphiles were studied as well. The location of a probe in the mixed micelles was found to depend on the solubility and size of the probe. The microenvironment of pyrene is dominated by NaTC in the mixed micelles, whereas the larger and less soluble perylene and BgP probes interact more favorably with the hydrophobic tails of the CTAB molecules. The photophysical responses of the probes reflect their different locations, providing different perspectives on the transitions in micellar structure. Bromide counterion at the micellar surfaces was found to be an important factor in the photophysical responses, along with accessibility to bulk solution. A scheme for mixed micellization is proposed that extends from large excesses of one amphiphile to large excesses of the other, over a wide range of total amphiphile concentration. Interestingly, the lyotropic phases formed between NaTC and CTAB have high bulk viscosity, but the probe microenvironment is less viscous than in the mixed micellar phases. 43 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Chemical characterization of the early evolutionary phases of high-mass star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerner, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The formation of high-mass stars is a very complex process and up to date no comprehensive theory about it exists. This thesis studies the early stages of high-mass star-forming regions and employs astrochemistry as a tool to probe their different physical conditions. We split the evolutionary sequence into four observationally motivated stages that are based on a classification proposed in the literature. The sequence is characterized by an increase of the temperatures and densities that strongly influences the chemistry in the different stages. We observed a sample of 59 high-mass star-forming regions that cover the whole sequence and statistically characterized the chemical compositions of the different stages. We determined average column densities of 18 different molecular species and found generally increasing abundances with stage. We fitted them for each stage with a 1D model, such that the result of the best fit to the previous stage was used as new input for the following. This is a unique approach and allowed us to infer physical properties like the temperature and density structure and yielded a typical chemical lifetime for the high-mass star-formation process of 1e5 years. The 18 analyzed molecular species also included four deuterated molecules whose chemistry is particularly sensitive to thermal history and thus is a promising tool to infer chemical ages. We found decreasing trends of the D/H ratios with evolutionary stage for 3 of the 4 molecular species and that the D/H ratio depends more on the fraction of warm and cold gas than on the total amount of gas. That indicates different chemical pathways for the different molecules and confirms the potential use of deuterated species as chemical age indicators. In addition, we mapped a low-mass star forming region in order to study the cosmic ray ionization rate, which is an important parameter in chemical models. While in chemical models it is commonly fixed, we found that it ! strongly varies with

  13. Reduction of glycerol production to improve ethanol yield in an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae using glycerol as a substrate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyung Ok; Kim, Seung Wook; Han, Sung Ok

    2010-10-15

    Ethanol plays an important role in substituting the increasingly limited oil as the high-value, renewable fuel. In our previous studies, we successfully established the conversion of glycerol to ethanol by overexpression of pGcyaDak with pGup1Cas in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to increasing ethanol production using glycerol as substrate, we minimized the synthesis of glycerol, which is the main by-product in ethanol fermentation processing. The glycerol production pathway was impaired by deletion of the genes FPS1 and GPD2. Strains deleted for both FPS1 and GPD2 reduce glycerol production and become highly sensitive to osmotic stress. We provide osmotic protection in YPH499fps1Δgpd2Δ by overexpression of Gup1. In this study, S. cerevisiae using glycerol as substrate was modified through one-step gene disruption for redirection of glycerol carbon flux into ethanol by the deletion of two glycerol production genes, FPS1 and GPD2. The overall ethanol production in the modified strain YPH499fps1Δgpd2Δ (pGcyaDak, pGupCas) was about 4.4 gl⁻¹. These results demonstrate the possibility of providing protection against osmotic stress while simultaneously increasing ethanol and reducing glycerol production in S. cerevisiae strains using glycerol as a carbon source.

  14. Chemical characterization of the main secondary organic aerosol (SOA) products formed through aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanovski, Z.; Čusak, A.; Grgić, I.; Claeys, M.

    2014-04-01

    Guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol) and its derivatives can be emitted into the atmosphere by thermal degradation (i.e. burning) of wood lignins. Due to its volatility, guaiacol is predominantly distributed in the atmospheric gaseous phase. Recent studies have shown the importance of aqueous-phase reactions in addition to the dominant gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of guaiacol, in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. The main objectives of the present study were to chemically characterize the low-volatility SOA products of the aqueous-phase photonitration of guaiacol and examine their possible presence in urban atmospheric aerosols. The aqueous-phase reactions were carried out under simulated sunlight and in the presence of H2O2 and nitrite. The formed guaiacol reaction products were concentrated by using solid-phase extraction (SPE) and then purified by means of semi-preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The fractionated individual compounds were isolated as pure solids and further analyzed with liquid-state 1H, 13C and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and direct infusion negative ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry ((-)ESI-MS/MS). The NMR and product ion (MS2) spectra were used for unambiguous product structure elucidation. The main products of guaiacol photonitration are 4-nitroguaiacol (4NG), 6-nitroguaiacol (6NG), and 4,6-dinitroguaiacol (4,6DNG). Using the isolated compounds as standards, 4NG and 4,6DNG were unambiguously identified in winter PM10 aerosols from the city of Ljubljana (Slovenia) by means of HPLC/(-)ESI-MS/MS. Owing to the strong absorption of UV and visible light, 4,6DNG could be an important constituent of atmospheric "brown" carbon, especially in regions affected by biomass burning.

  15. Scattering from phase-separated vesicles. I. An analytical form factor for multiple static domains

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Anghel, Vinicius N. P.; Katsaras, John

    2015-08-18

    This is the first in a series of studies considering elastic scattering from laterally heterogeneous lipid vesicles containing multiple domains. Unique among biophysical tools, small-angle neutron scattering can in principle give detailed information about the size, shape and spatial arrangement of domains. A general theory for scattering from laterally heterogeneous vesicles is presented, and the analytical form factor for static domains with arbitrary spatial configuration is derived, including a simplification for uniformly sized round domains. The validity of the model, including series truncation effects, is assessed by comparison with simulated data obtained from a Monte Carlo method. Several aspects of the analytical solution for scattering intensity are discussed in the context of small-angle neutron scattering data, including the effect of varying domain size and number, as well as solvent contrast. Finally, the analysis indicates that effects of domain formation are most pronounced when the vesicle's average scattering length density matches that of the surrounding solvent.

  16. Spray forming -- Aluminum: Third annual report (Phase 2). Technical progress -- Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Kozarek, R.L.

    1998-04-20

    Commercial production of aluminum sheet and plate by spray atomization and deposition is a potentially attractive manufacturing alternative to conventional ingot metallurgy/hot-milling and to continuous casting processes because of reduced energy requirements and reduced cost. To realize the full potential of the technology, the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa), under contract by the US Department of Energy, is investigating currently available state-of-the-art atomization devices to develop nozzle design concepts whose spray characteristics are tailored for continuous sheet production. This third technical progress report will summarize research and development work conducted during the period 1997 October through 1998 March. Included are the latest optimization work on the Alcoa III nozzle, results of spray forming runs with 6111 aluminum alloy and preliminary rolling trials of 6111 deposits.

  17. Stability and isomerization of complexes formed by metal ions and cytosine isomers in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Ai, Hongqi; Liu, Jingjing; Chan, Kwaichow

    2013-08-01

    We present a systematic study of the stability of the formation of complexes produced by four metal ions (M(+/2+)) and 14 cytosine isomers (Cn). This work predicts theoretically that predominant product complexes are associated with higher-energy C4M(+/2+) and C5M(+/2+) rather than the most stable C1M(+/2+). The prediction resolves successfully several experimental facts puzzling two research groups. Meanwhile, in-depth studies further reveal that direct isomerization of C1↔C4 is almost impossible, and also that the isomerization induced by either metalation or hydration, or by a combination of the two unfavorable. It is the single water molecule locating between the H1(-N1) and O2 of the cytosine that plays the dual roles of being a bridge and an activator that consequently improves the isomerization greatly. Moreover, the cooperation of divalent metal ion and such a monohydration actually leads to an energy-free C1←C4 isomerization in the gas phase. Henceforth, we are able to propose schemes inhibiting the free C1←C4 isomerization, based purely on extended hydration at the divalent metal ion.

  18. Vitamin E-enriched nanoemulsions formed by emulsion phase inversion: factors influencing droplet size and stability.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Sinja; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, David Julian

    2013-07-15

    There is considerable interest in using nanoemulsions as delivery systems for lipophilic bioactive ingredients, such as oil-soluble vitamins. Nanoemulsions can be fabricated using either high-energy or low-energy methods, but the latter offer advantages in terms of low cost, higher energy efficiency, and simplicity of implementation. In this study, the emulsion phase inversion (EPI) method was used to produce food-grade nanoemulsions enriched with vitamin E acetate. The EPI method simply involves titrating water into a mixture containing oil and surfactant, which initially leads to the formation of a water-in-oil emulsion that then inverts into an oil-in-water emulsion. Oil composition, surfactant type, and surfactant-to-oil ratio (SOR) were all found to influence the particle size distribution of the systems produced. Nanoemulsions with a mean particle diameter of 40 nm could be produced at a final system composition of 2 wt% MCT, 8 wt%vitamin E acetate, and 20 wt% Tween 80. The EPI method was shown to be unsuitable for producing nanoemulsions from label-friendly surfactants, such as Quillaja saponin, whey protein, casein, and sucrose monoesters. The EPI method was more effective at producing nanoemulsions at high SOR than microfluidization, but much less effective at low SOR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Formation of dAMP-glycerol and dAMP-Tris Derivatives by Thermococcus kodakaraensis DNA Primase*

    PubMed Central

    Chemnitz Galal, Wiebke; Pan, Miao; Giulian, Gary; Yuan, Wei; Li, Shuwei; Edwards, James L.; Marino, John P.; Kelman, Zvi; Hurwitz, Jerard

    2012-01-01

    In the presence of dATP, glycerol, and Tris buffer, the DNA primase isolated from Thermococcus kodakaraensis catalyzed the formation of dAMP and two products that were identified as dAMP-glycerol and dAMP-Tris. These products were formed by the T. kodakaraensis p41 catalytic subunit alone and the T. kodakaraensis p41-p46 complex in the absence of a DNA template. They were not formed with preparations containing the catalytically inactive p41 subunit. Similar glycerol and Tris derivatives as well as dNMPs were also formed with dGTP, dCTP, or dTTP. The mechanism contributing to the formation of these products and its implications in the initiation reaction catalyzed by the T. kodakaraensis primase are discussed. PMID:22427647

  20. Glycerol production by Oenococcus oeni during sequential and simultaneous cultures with wine yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Ale, Cesar E; Farías, Marta E; Strasser de Saad, Ana M; Pasteris, Sergio E

    2014-07-01

    Growth and fermentation patterns of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kloeckera apiculata, and Oenococcus oeni strains cultured in grape juice medium were studied. In pure, sequential and simultaneous cultures, the strains reached the stationary growth phase between 2 and 3 days. Pure and mixed K. apiculata and S. cerevisiae cultures used mainly glucose, producing ethanol, organic acids, and 4.0 and 0.1 mM glycerol, respectively. In sequential cultures, O. oeni achieved about 1 log unit at 3 days using mainly fructose and L-malic acid. Highest sugars consumption was detected in K. apiculata supernatants, lactic acid being the major end-product. 8.0 mM glycerol was found in 6-day culture supernatants. In simultaneous cultures, total sugars and L-malic acid were used at 3 days and 98% of ethanol and glycerol were detected. This study represents the first report of the population dynamics and metabolic behavior of yeasts and O. oeni in sequential and simultaneous cultures and contributes to the selection of indigenous strains to design starter cultures for winemaking, also considering the inclusion of K. apiculata. The sequential inoculation of yeasts and O. oeni would enhance glycerol production, which confers desirable organoleptic characteristics to wines, while organic acids levels would not affect their sensory profile. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Improvement of mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion of agri-food waste by addition of glycerol.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Antonio; Siles, Jose A; Chica, Arturo F; Martin, M Angeles

    2014-07-01

    Anaerobic co-digestion is a promising alternative to manage agri-food waste rather than landfilling, composting or incineration. But improvement of methane yield and biodegradability is often required to optimize its economic viability. Biomethanization of agri-food solid waste presents the disadvantage of a slow hydrolytic phase, which might be enhanced by adding a readily digestible substrate such as glycerol. In this study, strawberry extrudate, fish waste and crude glycerol derived from biodiesel manufacturing are mixed at a proportion of 54:5:41, in VS (VS, total volatile solids), respectively. The mesophilic anaerobic co-digestion at lab-scale of the mixture was stable at loads lower than 1.85 g VS/L, reaching a methane yield coefficient of 308 L CH4/kg VS (0 °C, 1 atm) and a biodegradability of 96.7%, in VS. Moreover, the treatment capacity of strawberry and fish waste was increased 16% at adding the crude glycerol. An economic assessment was also carried out in order to evaluate the applicability of the proposed process. Even in a pessimistic scenario, the net balance was found to be positive. The glycerol adding implied a net saving in a range from 25.5 to 42.1 €/t if compared to landfill disposal.

  2. Effect of glycerol concentration on edible film production from cress seed carbohydrate gum.

    PubMed

    Jouki, Mohammad; Khazaei, Naimeh; Ghasemlou, Mehran; Hadinezhad, Mehri

    2013-07-01

    In this study an edible film plasticized with glycerol was successfully prepared from cress seed gum (CSG). The physical, optical, water vapor permeability (WVP) and mechanical properties of CSG films incorporated with three levels of glycerol (25%, 35%, and 50% w/w) as plasticizer were determined. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis was used to determine the glass transition temperature. WVP of the films was found to increase as the glycerol content increased from 25% to 50% w/w in the formulation, resulted in improvement of films flexibility and significantly lower tensile strength and higher elongation at break. The color measurement values showed that increasing the glycerol concentration in polymer matrix caused the b and L values increased while ΔE value decreased. The electron scanning micrograph indicated smooth and uniform surface morphology without signs of phase separation between the film components. The results of the present study demonstrated that CSG can promisingly be used in producing edible films with improved quality characteristics.

  3. Relationship between the phase diagram, the glass-forming ability, and the fragility of a water/salt mixture.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Mika; Tanaka, Hajime

    2011-12-08

    Water is known to be an exceptionally poor glass former, which is a significant drawback in the low-temperature storage of food and biomatter. This is one of the characteristic features of water, but its link to the thermodynamic and kinetic anomalies of water remains elusive. Recently, we showed that the glass-forming ability and the fragility of a water/salt mixture are closely related to its equilibrium phase diagram [Kobayashi, M.; Tanaka, H. Phys. Rev. Lett.2011, 106, 125703]. Here we propose that frustration between local and global orderings controls both the glass-forming ability and fragility on the basis of experimental evidence. Relying on the same role of salt and pressure, which commonly breaks tetrahedral order, we apply this idea to pure water under pressure. This scenario not only explains unusual behavior of water-type liquids such as water, Si, and Ge but also provides a general explanation on the link between the equilibrium phase diagram, the glass-forming ability, and the fragility of various materials including oxides, chalcogenides, and metallic glasses.

  4. SweepSAR: Beam-forming on Receive Using a Reflector-Phased Array Feed Combination for Spaceborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Krieger, G.; Rosen, P.; Younis, M.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Huber, S.; Jordan, R.; Moreira, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an alternative approach is described that is suited for longer wavelength SARs in particular, employing a large, deployable reflector antenna and a much simpler phased array feed. To illuminate a wide swath, a substantial fraction of the phased array feed is excited on transmit to sub-illuminate the reflector. Shorter transmit pulses are required than for conventional SAR. On receive, a much smaller portion of the phased array feed is used to collect the return echo, so that a greater portion of the reflector antenna area is used. The locus of the portion of the phased array used on receive is adjusted using an analog beam steering network, to 'sweep' the receive beam(s) across the illuminated swath, tracking the return echo. This is similar in some respects to the whiskbroom approach to optical sensors, hence the name: SweepSAR.SweepSAR has advantages over conventional SAR in that it requires less transmit power, and if the receive beam is narrow enough, it is relatively immune to range ambiguities. Compared to direct radiating arrays with digital beam- forming, it is much simpler to implement, uses currently available technologies, is better suited for longer wavelength systems, and does not require extremely high data rates or onboard processing.

  5. SweepSAR: Beam-forming on Receive Using a Reflector-Phased Array Feed Combination for Spaceborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Krieger, G.; Rosen, P.; Younis, M.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Huber, S.; Jordan, R.; Moreira, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an alternative approach is described that is suited for longer wavelength SARs in particular, employing a large, deployable reflector antenna and a much simpler phased array feed. To illuminate a wide swath, a substantial fraction of the phased array feed is excited on transmit to sub-illuminate the reflector. Shorter transmit pulses are required than for conventional SAR. On receive, a much smaller portion of the phased array feed is used to collect the return echo, so that a greater portion of the reflector antenna area is used. The locus of the portion of the phased array used on receive is adjusted using an analog beam steering network, to 'sweep' the receive beam(s) across the illuminated swath, tracking the return echo. This is similar in some respects to the whiskbroom approach to optical sensors, hence the name: SweepSAR.SweepSAR has advantages over conventional SAR in that it requires less transmit power, and if the receive beam is narrow enough, it is relatively immune to range ambiguities. Compared to direct radiating arrays with digital beam- forming, it is much simpler to implement, uses currently available technologies, is better suited for longer wavelength systems, and does not require extremely high data rates or onboard processing.

  6. Effect of Alloying Additions on Phase Equilibria and Creep Resistance of Alumina-Forming Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Santella, M. L.; Brady, M. P.; Bei, H.; Maziasz, P. J.

    2009-08-01

    The high-temperature creep properties of a series of alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels based on Fe-20Ni-(12-14)Cr-(2.5-4)Al-(0.2-3.3)Nb-0.1C (weight percent) were studied. Computational thermodynamics were used to aid in the interpretation of data on microstructural stability, phase equilibria, and creep resistance. Phases of MC (M: mainly Nb), M23C6 (M: mainly Cr), B2 [ β-(Ni,Fe)Al], and Laves [Fe2(Mo,Nb)] were observed after creep-rupture testing at 750 °C and 170 MPa; this was generally consistent with the thermodynamic calculations. The creep resistance increased with increasing Nb additions up to 1 wt pct in the 2.5 and 3 Al wt pct alloy series, due to the stabilization of nanoscale MC particles relative to M23C6. Additions of Nb greater than 1 wt pct decreased creep resistance in the alloy series due to stabilization of the Laves phase and increased amounts of undissolved, coarse MC, which effectively reduced the precipitation of nanoscale MC particles. The additions of Al also increased the creep resistance moderately due to the increase in the volume fraction of B2 phase precipitates. Calculations suggested that optimum creep resistance would be achieved at approximately 1.5 wt pct Nb in the 4 wt pct Al alloy series.

  7. Effect of alloying additions on phase equilibria and creep resistance of alumina-forming austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Santella, Michael L; Brady, Michael P; Bei, Hongbin; Maziasz, Philip J

    2009-01-01

    The high-temperature creep properties of a series of alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) stainless steels based on Fe-20Ni-(12-14)Cr-(2.5-4)Al-(0.2-3.3)Nb-0.1C (weight percent) were studied. Computational thermodynamics were used to aid in the interpretation of data on microstructural stability, phase equilibria, and creep resistance. Phases of MC (M: mainly Nb), M{sub 23}C{sub 6} (M: mainly Cr), B2 [{beta}-(Ni,Fe)Al], and Laves [Fe{sub 2}(Mo,Nb)] were observed after creep-rupture testing at 750 C and 170 MPa; this was generally consistent with the thermodynamic calculations. The creep resistance increased with increasing Nb additions up to 1 wt pct in the 2.5 and 3 Al wt pct alloy series, due to the stabilization of nanoscale MC particles relative to M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. Additions of Nb greater than 1 wt pct decreased creep resistance in the alloy series due to stabilization of the Laves phase and increased amounts of undissolved, coarse MC, which effectively reduced the precipitation of nanoscale MC particles. The additions of Al also increased the creep resistance moderately due to the increase in the volume fraction of B2 phase precipitates. Calculations suggested that optimum creep resistance would be achieved at approximately 1.5 wt pct Nb in the 4 wt pct Al alloy series.

  8. Glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Scoffield, Jessica; Silo-Suh, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes persistent infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Airway sputum contains various host-derived nutrients that can be utilized by P. aeruginosa, including phosphotidylcholine, a major component of host cell membranes. Phosphotidylcholine can be degraded by P. aeruginosa to glycerol and fatty acids to increase the availability of glycerol in the CF lung. In this study, we explored the role that glycerol metabolism plays in biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa. We report that glycerol metabolism promotes biofilm formation by both a chronic CF isolate (FRD1) and a wound isolate (PAO1) of P. aeruginosa. Moreover, loss of the GlpR regulator, which represses the expression of genes involved in glycerol metabolism, enhances biofilm formation in FRD1 through the upregulation of Pel polysaccharide. Taken together, our results suggest that glycerol metabolism may be a key factor that contributes to P. aeruginosa persistence by promoting biofilm formation.

  9. Stationary phase and mature infectious forms of Legionella pneumophila produce distinct viable but non-culturable cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Bana, Badii H; Haddad, Moreen T; Garduño, Rafael A

    2014-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterial parasite of freshwater protozoa and an accidental waterborne human pathogen. L. pneumophila is highly pleomorphic showing several forms that differentiate within its developmental cycle. In water, L. pneumophila produces viable but non-culturable cells (VBNCCs), which remain largely uncharacterized. We produced VBNCCs from two developmental forms of L. pneumophila [stationary phase forms (SPFs) and mature infectious forms (MIFs)] in two water microcosms [double-deionized (dd) and tap water] at 45°C. In contrast with SPFs, MIFs upheld a robust ultrastructure and high viability in the two water microcosms. In dd-water, MIFs and SPFs lost their culturability faster than in tap water and did not consume their poly-β-hydroxybutyrate inclusions. Resuscitation in Acanthamoeba castellani was only possible for VBNCCs produced from SPFs in tap water. Addition of salts to dd-water prolonged L. pneumophila culturability to tap water levels, suggesting that L. pneumophila requires ions to maintain its readiness to resume growth. VBNCCs resisted detergent lysis and digestion in the ciliate Tetrahymena, except for VBNCCs produced from SPFs in dd-water. L. pneumophila VBNCCs thus show distinct traits according to its originating developmental form and the surrounding water microcosm.

  10. Gas versus solid-phase deuterated chemistry: HDCO and D2CO in massive star-forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahorecz, S.; Jimenez-Serra, I.; Testi, L.; Immer, K.; Fontani, F.; Caselli, P.; Wang, K.; Toth, L. V.

    2017-06-01

    Context. The formation of deuterated molecules is favoured at low temperatures and high densities. Therefore, the deuteration fraction (Dfrac) is expected to be enhanced in cold, dense prestellar cores and to decrease after protostellar birth. Previous studies have shown that the deuterated forms of species such as N2H+ (formed in the gas phase) and CH3OH (formed on grain surfaces) can be used as evolutionary indicators and to constrain their dominant formation processes and timescales. Aims: Formaldehyde (H2CO) and its deuterated forms can be produced both in the gas phase and on grain surfaces. However, the relative importance of these two chemical pathways is unclear. Comparison of the deuteration fraction of H2CO with respect to that of N2H+, NH3, and CH3OH can help us to understand its formation processes and timescales. Methods: With the new SEPIA Band 5 receiver on APEX, we have observed the J = 3 → 2 rotational lines of HDCO and D2CO at 193 GHz and 175 GHz toward three massive star-forming regions hosting objects at different evolutionary stages: two high-mass starless cores (HMSC), two high-mass protostellar objects (HMPOs), and one ultracompact HII region (UC HII). By using previously obtained H2CO J = 3 → 2 data, the deuteration fractions HDCO/H2CO and D2CO/HDCO are estimated. Results: Our observations show that singly deuterated H2CO is detected toward all sources and that the deuteration fraction of H2CO increases from the HMSC to the HMPO phase and then sharply decreases in the latest evolutionary stage (UCHII). The doubly deuterated form of H2CO is detected only in the earlier evolutionary stages, with D2CO/H2CO showing a pattern that is qualitatively consistent with the pattern of HDCO/H2CO, within current uncertainties. Conclusions: Our initial results show that H2CO may display a similar Dfrac pattern as that of CH3OH in massive young stellar objects. This finding suggests that solid-state reactions dominate its formation.

  11. Development and validation of a reversed-phase HPLC method for the determination of ezetimibe in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Sistla, R; Tata, V S S K; Kashyap, Y V; Chandrasekar, D; Diwan, P V

    2005-09-15

    Ezetimibe belongs to a group of selective and very effective 2-azetidione cholesterol absorption inhibitors that act on the level of cholesterol entry into enterocytes. A rapid, specific reversed-phase HPLC method has been developed for assaying ezetimibe in pharmaceutical dosage forms. The assay involved an isocratic elution of ezetimibe in a Kromasil 100 C18 column using a mobile phase composition of water (pH 6.8, 0.05%, w/v 1-heptane sulfonic acid) and acetonitrile (30:70, v/v). The flow rate was 0.5 ml/min and the analyte monitored at 232 nm. The assay method was found to be linear from 0.5 to 50 microg/ml. All the validation parameters were within the acceptance range. The developed method was successfully applied to estimate the amount of ezetimibe in tablets.

  12. Generation and Characterization of a Distonic Biradical Anion Formed from an Enediynone Prodrug in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Linan; Bekele, Tefsit; Lipton, Mark A.; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2013-04-01

    A negatively charged biradical intermediate was successfully generated in the gas phase via cyclization of the deprotonated bicyclo[8.3.0]trideca-12-ene-2,7-diyn-1-one precursor. The inherent negative charge of this biradical allows its characterization via collision-activated dissociation and reactions with a variety of neutral substrates in an FT-ICR mass spectrometer. Although the biradical is unreactive toward reagents that usually react rapidly with positively charged biradicals, such as dimethyl disulfide, it reacts with the halogen-containing substrates carbon tetrachloride, carbon tetrabromide, and bromotrichloromethane via bromine or chlorine atom abstraction, which supports its biradical structure. The results presented in this study indicate that cyclizations commonly used in solution to form biradical intermediates from enediyne compounds may also occur in the gas phase. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Impact of Intragranular Substructure Parameters on the Forming Limit Diagrams of Single-Phase B.C.C. Steels

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Gérald; Abed-Meraim, Farid; Berveiller, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    An advanced elastic-plastic self-consistent polycrystalline model, accounting for intragranular microstructure development and evolution, is coupled with a bifurcation-based localization criterion and applied to the numerical investigation of the impact of microstructural patterns on ductility of single-phase steels. The proposed multiscale model, taking into account essential microstructural aspects, such as initial and induced textures, dislocation densities, and softening mechanisms, allows us to emphasize the relationship between intragranular microstructure of B.C.C. steels and their ductility. A qualitative study in terms of forming limit diagrams for various dislocation networks, during monotonic loading tests, is conducted in order to analyze the impact of intragranular substructure parameters on the formability of single-phase B.C.C. steels. PMID:28788385

  14. Electron beam-formed ferromagnetic defects on MoS2 surface along 1 T phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Wook; Park, Youngsin; Hwang, Young Hun; Jekal, Soyoung; Kang, Manil; Lee, Wang G.; Yang, Woochul; Lee, Gun-Do; Hong, Soon Cheol

    2016-01-01

    1 T phase incorporation into 2H-MoS2 via an optimal electron irradiation leads to induce a weak ferromagnetic state at room temperature, together with the improved transport property. In addition to the 1T-like defects, the electron irradiation on the cleaved MoS2 surface forms the concentric circle-type defects that are caused by the 2 H/1 T phase transition and the vacancies of the nearby S atoms of the Mo atoms. The electron irradiation-reduced bandgap is promising in vanishing the Schottky barrier to attaining spintronics device. The simple method to control and improve the magnetic and electrical properties on the MoS2 surface provides suitable ways for the low-dimensional device applications. PMID:27974834

  15. Electron beam-formed ferromagnetic defects on MoS2 surface along 1 T phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Sang Wook; Park, Youngsin; Hwang, Young Hun; Jekal, Soyoung; Kang, Manil; Lee, Wang G.; Yang, Woochul; Lee, Gun-Do; Hong, Soon Cheol

    2016-12-01

    1 T phase incorporation into 2H-MoS2 via an optimal electron irradiation leads to induce a weak ferromagnetic state at room temperature, together with the improved transport property. In addition to the 1T-like defects, the electron irradiation on the cleaved MoS2 surface forms the concentric circle-type defects that are caused by the 2 H/1 T phase transition and the vacancies of the nearby S atoms of the Mo atoms. The electron irradiation-reduced bandgap is promising in vanishing the Schottky barrier to attaining spintronics device. The simple method to control and improve the magnetic and electrical properties on the MoS2 surface provides suitable ways for the low-dimensional device applications.

  16. A new closed form method for design of variable bandwidth linear phase FIR filter using Bernstein multiwavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suman, S.; Kumar, A.; Singh, G. K.

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a new method for the design of variable bandwidth linear-phase finite impulse response filters using Bernstein polynomial Multiwavelets is proposed. In this method, approximation has been achieved by linearly combining the fixed coefficient linear phase filters with Bernstein multiwavelets, which are used to tune bandwidth of the filter. Optimisation has been achieved by minimising the mean square error between the desired and actual filter response which leads to a system of linear equations. The matrix elements can be expressed in form of Toeplitz-plus-Hankel matrix, which reduces the computational complexity. The simulation results illustrate significant improvement in errors in passband (ep), and stopband (es) as compared to earlier published work.

  17. Solution and film properties of sodium caseinate/glycerol and sodium caseinate/polyethylene glycol edible coating systems.

    PubMed

    Siew, D C; Heilmann, C; Easteal, A J; Cooney, R P

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effects of plasticizer hydrogen bonding capability and chain length on the molecular structure of sodium caseinate (NaCAS), in NaCAS/glycerol and NaCAS/polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG) systems. Both solution and film phases were investigated. Glycerol and PEG reduced the viscosity of aqueous NaCAS, with the latter having a greater effect. This was explained in terms of protein/plasticizer aggregate size and changes to the conformation of the caseinate chain. In the film phase, glycerol caused more pronounced changes to the film tensile strength compared with PEG. However, the effect of glycerol on film water vapor permeability was smaller. These observations are attributed to the differences in plasticizer size and hydrogen bonding strength that controls the protein-plasticizer and protein-protein interactions in the films. Glass transition calculations from the tensile strength data indicate that the distribution of bonding interactions is more homogeneous in NaCAS/PEG films than in NaCAS/glycerol films.

  18. Effect of Ambient Temperature on the Toxicity of Palmitoyl Glycerol.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-25

    consumed or its rate of absorption. Similarly, there were no differences between those fed the palmitoyl glycerol diet with or without safflower oil...level. circulating neurotensin in mice fed the palmitoyl glycerol diet wit" or with safflower oil by radioimmunoassay. We found no differe between...involvement, we injected prostaglandin E2 intracisternally into mice fed palmitoyl glycerol with or without safflower oil. This hormone had no effect on

  19. Mechanism for increased hepatic glycerol synthesis in the citrin/mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase double-knockout mouse: Urine glycerol and glycerol 3-phosphate as potential diagnostic markers of human citrin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Fujimoto, Yuki; Rikimaru, Shizuka; Ushikai, Miharu; Kuroda, Eishi; Kawabe, Kenji; Takano, Katsura; Asakawa, Akihiro; Inui, Akio; Eto, Kazuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Sinasac, David S; Okano, Yoshiyuki; Yazaki, Masahide; Ikeda, Shu-Ichi; Zhang, Chunhua; Song, Yuan-Zong; Sakamoto, Osamu; Kure, Shigeo; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Endo, Fumio; Horiuchi, Masahisa; Nakamura, Yoichi; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Saheki, Takeyori

    2015-09-01

    The mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate carrier isoform 2 (citrin) and mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (mGPD) double-knockout mouse has been a useful model of human citrin deficiency. One of the most prominent findings has been markedly increased hepatic glycerol 3-phosphate (G3P) following oral administration of a sucrose solution. We aimed to investigate whether this change is detectable outside of the liver, and to explore the mechanism underlying the increased hepatic G3P in these mice. We measured G3P and its metabolite glycerol in plasma and urine of the mice under various conditions. Glycerol synthesis from fructose was also studied using the liver perfusion system. The citrin/mGPD double-knockout mice showed increased urine G3P and glycerol under normal, fed conditions. We also found increased plasma glycerol under fasted conditions, while oral administration of different carbohydrates or ethanol led to substantially increased plasma glycerol. Fructose infusion to the perfused liver of the double-knockout mice augmented hepatic glycerol synthesis, and was accompanied by a concomitant increase in the lactate/pyruvate (L/P) ratio. Co-infusion of either pyruvate or phenazine methosulfate, a cytosolic oxidant, with fructose corrected the high L/P ratio, leading to reduced glycerol synthesis. Overall, these findings suggest that hepatic glycerol synthesis is cytosolic NADH/NAD(+) ratio-dependent and reveal a likely regulatory mechanism for hepatic glycerol synthesis following a high carbohydrate load in citrin-deficient patients. Therefore, urine G3P and glycerol may represent potential diagnostic markers for human citrin deficiency. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fungal biotransformation of crude glycerol into malic acid.

    PubMed

    West, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Malic acid production from the biodiesel coproduct crude glycerol by Aspergillus niger ATCC 9142, ATCC 10577 and ATCC 12846 was observed to occur with the highest malic acid level acid being produced by A. niger ATCC 12846. Fungal biomass production from crude glycerol was similar, but ATCC 10577 produced the highest biomass. Fungal biotransformation of crude glycerol into the commercially valuable organic acid malic acid appeared feasible.

  1. Stability and photochemistry of ClO dimers formed at low temperature in the gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. A.; Hayman, G. D.

    1988-01-01

    The recent observations of elevated concentrations of the ClO radical in the austral spring over Antarctica have implicated catalytic destruction by chlorine in the large depletions seen in the total ozone column. One of the chemical theories consistent with an elevated concentration of the ClO is a cycle involving the formation of the ClO dimer through the association reaction: ClO + ClO = Cl2O2 and the photolysis of the dimer to give the active Cl species necessary for O3 depletion. Here, researchers report experimental studies designed to characterize the dimer of ClO formed by the association reaction at low temperatures. ClO was produced by static photolysis of several different precursor systems: Cl sub 2 + O sub 3; Cl sub 2 O sub 2; OClO + Cl sub 2 O spectroscopy in the U.V. region, which allowed the time dependence of Cl sub 2, Cl sub 2 O, ClO, OClO, O sub 3 and other absorbing molecules to be determined.

  2. Soft-core particles freezing to form a quasicrystal and a crystal-liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Archer, A J; Rucklidge, A M; Knobloch, E

    2015-07-01

    Systems of soft-core particles interacting via a two-scale potential are studied. The potential is responsible for peaks in the structure factor of the liquid state at two different but comparable length scales and a similar bimodal structure is evident in the dispersion relation. Dynamical density functional theory in two dimensions is used to identify two unusual states of this system: a crystal-liquid state, in which the majority of the particles are located on lattice sites but a minority remains free and so behaves like a liquid, and a 12-fold quasicrystalline state. Both are present even for deeply quenched liquids and are found in a regime in which the liquid is unstable with respect to modulations on the smaller scale only. As a result, the system initially evolves towards a small-scale crystal state; this state is not a minimum of the free energy, however, and so the system subsequently attempts to reorganize to generate the lower-energy larger-scale crystals. This dynamical process generates a disordered state with quasicrystalline domains and takes place even when this large scale is linearly stable, i.e., it is a nonlinear process. With controlled initial conditions, a perfect quasicrystal can form. The results are corroborated using Brownian dynamics simulations.

  3. Early Phases Of Galaxy Assembly Revealed By Young Star-Forming Dwarfs At Z 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorín, Ricardo; VUDS Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    Studying lower-redshift analogs of the first galaxies is essential to scrutinize the details of galaxy formation and cosmic reionization, paving the way for a better interpretation of observations of primeval galaxies with the James Webb Space Telescope. In this talk I will present a thorough study of a recently discovered population of small, sub-L* star-forming galaxies at redshift z 2-4 that exhibit all the rest-frame properties expected for early galaxies in their first epoch of assembling and chemical enrichment. Selected by their strong nebular emission in the UV (including emission lines such as CIII]1908, CIV1550 and OIII]1664) from thousands of galaxies in the VIMOS Ultra Deep Survey, these young low mass systems are extremely metal-deficient galaxies that are likely experiencing their first significant starburst episode. I will discuss their rest-frame properties, hard radiations fields, strong Lyman-alpha emission, HST morphologies and strongly sub-solar chemical abundances. Finally, I will compare their properties with that of galaxies observed at the edge of the reionization epoch, which pose interesting prospects for JWST studies.

  4. Scattering from phase-separated vesicles. I. An analytical form factor for multiple static domains

    DOE PAGES

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Anghel, Vinicius N. P.; Katsaras, John

    2015-08-18

    This is the first in a series of studies considering elastic scattering from laterally heterogeneous lipid vesicles containing multiple domains. Unique among biophysical tools, small-angle neutron scattering can in principle give detailed information about the size, shape and spatial arrangement of domains. A general theory for scattering from laterally heterogeneous vesicles is presented, and the analytical form factor for static domains with arbitrary spatial configuration is derived, including a simplification for uniformly sized round domains. The validity of the model, including series truncation effects, is assessed by comparison with simulated data obtained from a Monte Carlo method. Several aspects ofmore » the analytical solution for scattering intensity are discussed in the context of small-angle neutron scattering data, including the effect of varying domain size and number, as well as solvent contrast. Finally, the analysis indicates that effects of domain formation are most pronounced when the vesicle's average scattering length density matches that of the surrounding solvent.« less

  5. Phase space analysis and contribution of participant-spectator matter towards fragments formed in heavy-ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Sukhjit

    2016-05-06

    We study the contribution of participant and spectator matter towards different kinds of fragments. We find higher contribution of spectator matter towards heavier fragments compared to lighter fragments. We also notice that heavier IMFs preserve the time correlations. The nucleons emerging as lighter IMFs however, are well separated in the phase space at the start of the reaction and form the cluster at later times. The neutron-richness of the reacting partners is found to have negligible effect on the participant-spectator matter.

  6. EVALUATION OF THOR MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR THE DOE ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES PHASE 2 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.; Jantzen, C.

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. The Supplemental Treatment chosen will immobilize that portion of the retrieved LAW that is not sent to the WTP's LAW Vitrification facility into a solidified waste form. The solidified waste will then be disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). In addition, the WTP LAW Vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as Cs-137, I-129, Tc-99, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap. The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to recycle it to the supplemental LAW treatment to avoid a large steady state accumulation in the pretreatment-vitrification loop. Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which LAW and/or WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates

  7. Fermentation of xylose to glycerol by Rhizopus javanicus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.; Yang, C.W.; Tsao, G.T.

    1995-12-31

    Glycerol production from xylose fermentation using Rhizopus javanicus (ATCC 22581) has been investigated in shake flasks. The medium composition (xylose concentration, nitrogen sources), aeration rate, and temperature have been found to affect the accumulation and yield of glycerol. Some of these effects are explained in terms of the critical parameters, osmotic pressure, and dissolved oxygen levels in the medium. Relatively high glycerol yields and concentrations have been obtained at high sugar concentration with high level of aeration at room temperature. The addition of polyethylene glycol or sulfite can improve the yield and accumulation of glycerol.

  8. Fermentation of crude glycerol from biodiesel production by Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Torbjørn Olshøj; Kvist, Thomas; Mikkelsen, Marie Just; Christensen, Peter Vittrup; Westermann, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Clostridium pasteurianum can utilize glycerol as the sole carbon source for the production of butanol and 1,3-propanediol. Crude glycerol derived from biodiesel production has been shown to be toxic to the organism even in low concentrations. By examination of different pretreatments we found that storage combined with activated stone carbon addition facilitated the utilization of crude glycerol. A pH-controlled reactor with in situ removal of butanol by gas stripping was used to evaluate the performance. The fermentation pattern on pretreated crude glycerol was quite similar to that on technical grade glycerol. C. pasteurianum was able to utilize 111 g/l crude glycerol. The average consumption rate was 2.49 g/l/h and maximum consumption rate was 4.08 g/l/h. At the maximal glycerol consumption rate butanol was produced at 1.3 g/l/h. These rates are higher than those previously reported for fermentations on technical grade glycerol by the same strain. A process including pretreatment and subsequent fermentation of the crude glycerol could be usable for industrial production of butanol by C. pasteurianum.

  9. Photosynthetic production of glycerol by a recombinant cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Savakis, Philipp; Tan, Xiaoming; Du, Wei; Branco dos Santos, Filipe; Lu, Xuefeng; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2015-02-10

    Cyanobacteria are prokaryotic organisms capable of oxygenic photosynthesis. Glycerol is an important commodity chemical. Introduction of phosphoglycerol phosphatase 2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae into the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 resulted in a mutant strain that produced a considerable amount of glycerol from light, water and COPhotosynthetic production . Mild salt stress (200 mM NaCl) on the cells led to an increase of the extracellular glycerol concentration of more than 20%. Under these conditions the mutant accumulated glycerol to an extracellular concentration of 14.3 mM after 17 days of culturing.

  10. Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers preserved in stalagmites: a new continental palaeothermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, A. J.; Schouten, S.

    2010-12-01

    The ability to recover reliable temperature records is central to palaeoclimatic research, informing our understanding of the past and our models of the future. However, there is a need for new quantitative terrestrial temperature proxies. Here we present a novel palaeothermometer, combining molecular temperature proxies with the strong dating control and established environmental records provided by stalagmites. The results show good correlations between known and calculated temperatures, suggesting that the approach has considerable potential as a climatic proxy. Glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are microbial membrane lipids, which vary in structure with temperature and pH [1]. In the terrestrial realm, the focus is on bacterially derived GDGTs, which have been used to measure terrestrial organic matter input to aquatic deposits via the BIT index [2], and developed into a temperature related index (MBT/CBT) in soils and near-shore marine sediments (MBT/CBT), based upon the degree of branching and cyclicisation of the carbon skeleton [3]. Stalagmites form an ideal archive for terrestrial climate records, as they are stable, can be easily dated, and contain a number of environmental proxies (stable isotopes, trace elements, organic matter etc). Attempts have been made to develop inorganic temperature proxies in stalagmites, most recently using isotopic analysis of fluid inclusions. However, the use of organic temperature proxies in this context is largely unstudied. Thirty-eight stalagmite or stalactite samples from twenty-one sites around the world were analysed for their GDGT content. Calcite samples were cleaned and decalcified with HCl, and lipids extracted into dichloromethane via liquid-liquid extraction. Each extract was then prepared and analysed via HPLC-MS following Weijers et al. [3]. The results show low but usable levels of GDGTs in all but one sample. Peak size measurements were made for all recognised compounds associated with BIT and

  11. Limitations of the mass isotopomer distribution analysis of glucose to study gluconeogenesis. Substrate cycling between glycerol and triose phosphates in liver.

    PubMed

    Previs, S F; Fernandez, C A; Yang, D; Soloviev, M V; David, F; Brunengraber, H

    1995-08-25

    Mass isotopomer distribution analysis allows studying the synthesis of polymeric biomolecules from 15N, 13C-, or 2H-labeled monomeric units in the presence of unlabeled polymer. The mass isotopomer distribution of the polymer allows calculation of (i) the enrichment of the monomer and (ii) the dilution of the newly synthesized polymer by unlabeled polymer. We tested the conditions of validity of mass isotopomer distribution analysis of glucose labeled from [U-13C3]lactate, [U-13C3]glycerol, and [2-13C]glycerol to calculate the fraction of glucose production derived from gluconeogenesis. Experiments were conducted in perfused rat livers, live rats, and live monkeys. In all cases, [13C]glycerol yielded labeling patterns of glucose that are incompatible with glucose being formed from a single pool of triose phosphates of constant enrichment. We show evidence that variations in the enrichment of triose phosphates result from (i) the large fractional decrease in physiological glycerol concentration in a single pass through the liver and (ii) the release of unlabeled glycerol by the liver, presumably via lipase activity. This zonation of glycerol metabolism in liver results in the calculation of artifactually low contributions of gluconeogenesis to glucose production when the latter is labeled from [13C]glycerol. In contrast, [U-13C3]lactate appears to be a suitable tracer for mass isotopomer distribution analysis of gluconeogenesis in vivo, but not in the perfused liver. In other perfusion experiments with [2H5]glycerol, we showed that the rat liver releases glycerol molecules containing one to four 2H atoms. This indicates the operation of a substrate cycle between extracellular glycerol and liver triose phosphates, where 2H is lost in the reversible reactions catalyzed by alpha-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, triose-phosphate isomerase, and glycolytic enzymes. This substrate cycle presumably involves alpha-glycerophosphate hydrolysis.

  12. Utilization of algal sugars and glycerol for enhanced cephalosporin C production by Acremonium chrysogenum M35.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Yoo, H Y; Yang, X; Kim, D S; Lee, J H; Lee, S K; Han, S O; Kim, S W

    2017-01-01

    In our previous study, glycerol was utilized as an additional carbon source for the production of cephalosporin C (CPC) by Acremonium chrysogenum M35. In this study, algal sugars extracted from the third-generation biomass were utilized in the CPC production for the first time. The CPC production improved about twofold when using the algal sugars as the carbon source. The complex medium including algal sugars and glycerol was utilized, and 7·3 g l(-1) CPC production was achieved in a 250-ml shaking flask. To determine the important variables for the CPC production, Plackett-Burman design was carried out and 6·18 g l(-1) of CPC was estimated under the numerically optimized conditions. Under the optimized conditions, the CPC production was performed in a 5-l scale bioreactor, affording CPC production at a rate of 7·1 g l(-1) . Moreover, 6·7 g l(-1) CPC was produced using crude glycerol as the substrate. Microalgae are the biomass containing various components, such as carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. In this study, carbon sources contained in microalgae were obtained by acid extraction, and cephalosporin C (CPC), a β-lactam antibiotic intermediate, was produced by using Acremonium chrysogenum M35. In addition, the increase of CPC production was not distinct for A. chrysogenum M35 with algal sugars as the only carbon source; therefore, glycerol was added, increasing the CPC production. Thus, cheap residues such as algal sugars form microalgal and glycerol form biodiesel process could be used as the alternative sources for the production of various products. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. The effect of glycerol on the activity of beta-glucosidase from Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat.

    PubMed Central

    Umezurike, G M

    1988-01-01

    1. In the activity of the high-Mr beta-glucosidase A (beta-D-glucoside glucohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.21) obtained from culture filtrates of Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat. on o-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside as substrate, both Vmax. and Km increased non-linearly with increasing concentration of glycerol, and the Vmax./Km(app.) ratio decreased non-linearly with increasing concentration of glycerol. 2. No increase in rate was observed with phenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside as substrate in the presence of up to 250 mM-glycerol, indicating that glucosylation is rate-limiting with this substrate. 3. With o-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside, p-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside and phenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside as substrates, kappa cat. values of 793.7 s-1, 62.8 s-1 and 5.4 s-1 respectively were calculated. 4. With o-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside and phenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside as substrate, alpha-deuterium kinetic isotope effects of 1.9 +/- 0.03 and 1.01 +/- 0.01 respectively were found; in the presence of 200 mM-glycerol the values were 1.21 +/- 0.03 and 1.02 +/- 0.01 respectively. 5. In the presence of a large excess of o-nitrophenyl beta-D-glucopyranoside [( S] = 35.7 Km), the amount of o-nitrophenol and also of the transglucosylation product formed by beta-glucosidase action increased non-linearly, whereas that of glucose formed decreased non-linearly with increasing glycerol concentration. 6. All these results were found to fit the data calculated from rate equations derived on the basis of the proposed mechanism of enzyme action involving two ion-pair intermediates and a covalent alpha-D-glucosyl-enzyme in the reaction sequence [Umezurike (1987) Biochem. J. 241, 455-462]. PMID:3140799

  14. Acid-catalyzed dehydration of fructose and inulin with glycerol or glycerol carbonate as renewably sourced co-solvent.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Maud; Brissonnet, Yoan; Guélou, Erwan; De Oliveira Vigier, Karine; Barrault, Joël; Jérôme, François

    2010-11-22

    Ionic liquids (ILs) can be partially substituted by glycerol or glycerol carbonate as cheap, safe, and renewably sourced co-solvents in the acid-catalyzed dehydration of fructose and inulin to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). In the particular case of glycerol, we found that HMF can be conveniently extracted from the IL/glycerol (65:35) mixture with methylisobutylketone, limiting the reactivity of glycerol with HMF and allowing the recovery of HMF with a high purity (95 %). Influences of the fructose content, temperature, and the nature of the ionic liquid are also discussed. The possible use of industrial-grade glycerin is also investigated. We demonstrate that by using glycerol carbonate, up to 90 wt % of the IL can be successfully substituted, decreasing the environmental costs of traditional IL-based processes.

  15. Epoxy-Based Organogels for Thermally Reversible Light Scattering Films and Form-Stable Phase Change Materials.

    PubMed

    Puig, Julieta; Dell' Erba, Ignacio E; Schroeder, Walter F; Hoppe, Cristina E; Williams, Roberto J J

    2017-03-29

    Alkyl chains of β-hydroxyesters synthesized by the capping of terminal epoxy groups of diglycidylether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) with palmitic (C16), stearic (C18), or behenic (C22) fatty acids self-assemble forming a crystalline phase. Above a particular concentration solutions of these esters in a variety of solvents led to supramolecular (physical) gels below the crystallization temperature of alkyl chains. A form-stable phase change material (FS-PCM) was obtained by blending the ester derived from behenic acid with eicosane. A blend containing 20 wt % ester was stable as a gel up to 53 °C and exhibited a heat storage capacity of 161 J/g, absorbed during the melting of eicosane at 37 °C. Thermally reversible light scattering (TRLS) films were obtained by visible-light photopolymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate-ester blends (50 wt %) in the gel state at room temperature. The reaction was very fast and not inhibited by oxygen. TRLS films consisted of a cross-linked methacrylic network interpenetrated by the supramolecular network formed by the esters. Above the melting temperature of crystallites formed by alkyl chains, the film was transparent due to the matching between refractive indices of the methacrylic network and the amorphous ester. Below the crystallization temperature, the film was opaque because of light dispersion produced by the organic crystallites uniformly dispersed in the material. Of high significance for application was the fact that the contrast ratio did not depend on heating and cooling rates.

  16. Sequential injection kinetic flow assay for monitoring glycerol in a sugar fermentation process by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Karina B Hueso; Tóth, Ildikó V; Souto, M Renata S; Mendes, Filipa; De María, Cándido García; Vasconcelos, Isabel; Rangel, António O S S

    2010-03-01

    A sequential injection system to monitor glycerol in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation process was developed. The method relies on the rate of formation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide in its reduced form (NADH, measured spectrophotometrically at 340 nm) from the reaction of glycerol with NAD(+) cofactor, catalysed by the enzyme glycerol dehydrogenase present in solution. This procedure enables the determination of glycerol between 0.046 and 0.46 g/l, (corresponding to yeast fermentation samples with concentrations up to 50 g/l) with good repeatability (relative standard deviation for n = 10 lower than 2.2% for three different samples) at a sampling frequency of 25/h. The detection and quantification limits using a miniaturised spectrophotometer were 0.13 and 0.44 mM, respectively. Reagent consumption was of 0.45 mumol NAD(+) and 1.8 microg enzyme per assay, and the waste production was 2.8 ml per determination. Results obtained for samples were in agreement with those obtained with a high-performance liquid chromatography method.

  17. Effect of pressure on the α relaxation in glycerol and xylitol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paluch, M.; Casalini, R.; Hensel-Bielowka, S.; Roland, C. M.

    2002-06-01

    The effect of pressure on the dielectric relaxation of two polyhydroxy alcohols is examined by analysis of existing data on glycerol, together with new measurements on xylitol. The fragility, or Tg-normalized temperature dependence, changes with pressure for low pressures, but becomes invariant above 1 GPa. When compared at temperatures for which the α-relaxation times are equal, there is no effect of pressure (<1 GPa) on the shape of the α dispersion at higher temperatures. However, nearer Tg, pressure broadens the α peak, consistent with the expected correlation of fragility with the breadth of the relaxation function. We also observe that the α-relaxation peaks for both glycerol and xylitol show an excess intensity at higher frequencies. For xylitol, unlike for glycerol, at lower temperatures this wing disjoins to form a separate peak. For both glass formers, elevated pressure causes the excess wing to become more separated from the peak maximum; that is, the properties of the primary and excess intensities are not correlated. This implies that the excess wing in glycerol is also a distinct secondary process, although it cannot be resolved from the primary peak.

  18. Superlubricity mechanism of diamond-like carbon with glycerol. Coupling of experimental and simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBarros Bouchet, M. I.; Matta, C.; Le-Mogne, Th; Martin, J. Michel; Zhang, Q.; Goddard, W., III; Kano, M.; Mabuchi, Y.; Ye, J.

    2007-11-01

    We report a unique tribological system that produces superlubricity under boundary lubrication conditions with extremely little wear. This system is a thin coating of hydrogen-free amorphous Diamond-Like-Carbon (denoted as ta-C) at 353 K in a ta-C/ta-C friction pair lubricated with pure glycerol. To understand the mechanism of friction vanishing we performed ToF-SIMS experiments using deuterated glycerol and 13C glycerol. This was complemented by first-principles-based computer simulations using the ReaxFF reactive force field to create an atomistic model of ta-C. These simulations show that DLC with the experimental density of 3.24 g/cc leads to an atomistic structure consisting of a 3D percolating network of tetrahedral (sp3) carbons accounting for 71.5% of the total, in excellent agreement with the 70% deduced from our Auger spectroscopy and XANES experiments. The simulations show that the remaining carbons (with sp2 and sp1 character) attach in short chains of length 1 to 7. In sliding simulations including glycerol molecules, the surface atoms react readily to form a very smooth carbon surface containing OH-terminated groups. This agrees with our SIMS experiments. The simulations find that the OH atoms are mostly bound to surface sp1 atoms leading to very flexible elastic response to sliding. Both simulations and experiments suggest that the origin of the superlubricity arises from the formation of this OH-terminated surface.

  19. Immobilised cells of Pachysolen tannophilus yeast for ethanol production from crude glycerol.

    PubMed

    Stepanov, Nikolay; Efremenko, Elena

    2017-01-25

    Screening among naturally occurring yeast strains of Pachysolen spp. that are capable of producing ethanol from glycerol under aerobic conditions identified the most active culture, P. tannophilus Y -475. Conversion of glycerol by this producer immobilised in poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogel resulted in a 90% yield of ethanol relative to the theoretical limit. The maximum rate of alcohol accumulation was 0.64±0.01gL(-1)h(-1) at a 25gL(-1) concentration of glycerol in the culture medium. We demonstrated the efficacy of reusing immobilised cells (for a minimum of 16 working cycles for batch mode of crude glycerol conversion to ethanol) and the possibility of long-term (for a minimum of 140h) use of the cells in continuous mode with a maximum process productivity of 0.63±0.02gL(-1)h(-1), while the medium dilution rate in the reactor was 0.062±0.001h(-1). Reduction of metabolic activity did not exceed 5-7% relative to baseline. Immobilised cells were demonstrated to withstand long-term storage in frozen form for at least 2 years while retaining high metabolic activity.

  20. Rotation of ultrasonically levitated glycerol drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, A.; Leung, E. W.; Trinh, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic levitation is used to suspend single millimeter-size glycerol drops in a rectangular chamber. Audio-frequency laterally standing waves set up in the chamber are used to torque the suspended drops. The shape evolution of the drop under the combined effect of centrifugal forces and the acoustic radiation stress, along with its angular velocity are monitored, using video imaging and light scattering techniques. The results show good qualitative agreement with the theoretically predicted shape evolution as a function of angular velocity.

  1. Reduced glycerol incorporation into phospholipids contributes to impaired intra-erythrocytic growth of glycerol kinase knockout Plasmodium falciparum parasites.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, Kubendran; Coetzer, Theresa L

    2013-11-01

    Malaria is a devastating disease and Plasmodium falciparum is the most lethal parasite infecting humans. Understanding the biology of this parasite is vital in identifying potential novel drug targets. During every 48-hour intra-erythrocytic asexual replication cycle, a single parasite can produce up to 32 progeny. This extensive proliferation implies that parasites require substantial amounts of lipid precursors for membrane biogenesis. Glycerol kinase is a highly conserved enzyme that functions at the interface of lipid synthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. P. falciparum glycerol kinase catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of glycerol to glycerol-3-phosphate, a major phospholipid precursor. The P. falciparum glycerol kinase gene was disrupted using double crossover homologous DNA recombination to generate a knockout parasite line. Southern hybridization and mRNA analysis were used to verify gene disruption. Parasite growth rates were monitored by flow cytometry. Radiolabelling studies were used to assess incorporation of glycerol into parasite phospholipids. Disruption of the P. falciparum glycerol kinase gene produced viable parasites, but their growth was significantly reduced to 56.5±1.8% when compared to wild type parasites. (14)C-glycerol incorporation into the major phospholipids of the parasite membrane, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, was 48.4±10.8% and 53.1±5.7% relative to an equivalent number of wild type parasites. P. falciparum glycerol kinase is required for optimal intra-erythrocytic asexual parasite development. Exogenous glycerol may be used as an alternative carbon source for P. falciparum phospholipid biogenesis, despite the lack of glycerol kinase to generate glycerol-3-phosphate. These studies provide new insight into glycerolipid metabolism in P. falciparum. © 2013.

  2. Synchrotron X-ray investigations into the lamellar gel phase formed in pharmaceutical creams prepared with cetrimide and fatty alcohols.

    PubMed

    Eccleston, G M; Behan-Martin, M K; Jones, G R; Towns-Andrews, E

    2000-08-10

    Semisolid liquid paraffin-in-water emulsions (aqueous creams) prepared from cetrimide/fatty alcohol mixed emulsifiers, and ternary systems formed by dispersing the mixed emulsifier in controlled percentages of water were examined as they aged using a combination of low and high angle X-ray diffraction measurements (Daresbury Laboratory Synchrotron Radiation Source). The results were correlated with the rheological properties measured in earlier studies. The cationic emulsifying wax showed phenomenal swelling in water. The reflection that incorporates interlamellar water increased continuously from 74 A at 28% water to over 500 A at 93% water. The trend was not influenced by the method of incorporation of the components and swollen lamellar phase was also identified in the corresponding emulsion. The swelling, which was due to electrostatic repulsion, was suppressed by salt and was reduced when the surfactant counterion was changed from Br(-) to Cl(-). Changes in rheological properties on storage and in the presence of salt were correlated with changes in water layer thickness. High angle diffraction confirmed that the hydrocarbon bilayers were in the hexagonal alpha-crystalline mode of packing. Ternary systems and creams prepared from pure alcohols, although initially semisolid, were rheologically unstable and broke down. Low angle X-ray study into the kinetics of structure breakdown showed that the swollen lamellar gel phase formed initially swells even further on storage before separating.

  3. Effects of glycerol on enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol production using sugarcane bagasse pretreated by acidified glycerol solution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhanying; Wong, Heng H; Albertson, Peter L; Harrison, Mark D; Doherty, William O S; O'Hara, Ian M

    2015-09-01

    In this study, for the first time the effects of glycerol on enzymatic hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation were investigated. Enzymatic hydrolysis was inhibited slightly with 2.0 wt% glycerol, leading to reduction in glucan digestibility from 84.9% without glycerol to 82.9% (72 h). With 5.0 wt% and 10.0 wt% glycerol, glucan digestibility was reduced by 4.5% and 11.0%, respectively. However, glycerol did not irreversibly inhibit cellulase enzymes. Ethanol fermentation was not affected by glycerol up to 5.0 wt%, but was inhibited slightly at 10.0 wt% glycerol, resulting in reduction in ethanol yield from 86.0% in the absence of glycerol to 83.7% (20 h). Based on the results of laboratory and pilot-scale experiments, it was estimated that 0.142 kg ethanol can be produced from 1.0 kg dry bagasse (a glucan content of 38.0%) after pretreatment with acidified glycerol solution.

  4. Bent LC molecules with a 60° central core that can form B7 and B2 phases (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Junji

    2015-10-01

    We synthesized small-angle bent-core liquid-crystalline (LC) molecules based on a 1,2-bis(phenylethylene) benzene central core, containing seven aromatic rings and alkoxy tails with carbon numbers of 12, 16 and 18. This ortho-bistolane central core offers a 60° bend angle. Irrespective of this unusually small angle, these molecules can form banana smectic phases with a ferroelectric B7-antiferroelectric B2 phase sequence upon cooling as clarified from the micoscopic, X-ray and opto-electric observations. This indicates that despite of the low bend angle of 60°, these are able to be still packed into a layer with the polar bent direction parallel to the layer like ordinal banana molecules. The present result is striking since it had been believed that banana phases can only be stabilized when the bending angle is in the range from 110-140°, providing additional insight into the nature of banana-shaped molecules.

  5. Effects of glycerol intake and body tilt on otoacoustic emissions reflect labyrinthine pressure changes in Menière's disease.

    PubMed

    Mom, Thierry; Gilain, Laurent; Avan, Paul

    2009-04-01

    It is known that by influencing stapes stiffness thus the ear's impedance, changes in intracranial and intralabyrinthine pressure induce a characteristic phase shift in otoacoustic emissions (OAE) around 1 kHz in human ears. Thus, if the regulation of pressure in intralabyrinthine compartments were abnormal in Menière patients, OAEs might help detect it. Body tilt, which acts on intracranial pressure, and administration of an osmotically active substance provide two simple ways of manipulating intralabyrinthine pressure. Here, 14 patients with typical signs of an attack of unilateral endolymphatic hydrops were submitted to postural changes and a glycerol test. Their OAEs initially collected in upright position served as references, then OAEs were measured in supine position, and back to the upright posture one and 3h after glycerol intake. Twenty control subjects were also tested for body tilt. The main effect of body tilt and glycerol was a phase rotation of OAEs peaking around 1 kHz. Its frequency dependence matched the one due to a pressure-related change in stapes or basilar membrane stiffness predicted by the ear model of Zwislocki (1962). The average glycerol-induced phase shifts were similar in size in Menière vs. asymptomatic ear and audiometric thresholds were stable after glycerol intake in line with the model predicting little change in the magnitude of the transfer function. These data support a simple conductive pressure-related mechanism explaining the action of glycerol on inner ear responses. The fact that the mean postural shift was three times larger in Menière than asymptomatic and control ears suggests an additional effect in allegedly hydropic ears.

  6. Glycerol, ethylene glycol and propanediol elicit pimaricin biosynthesis in the PI-factor-defective strain Streptomyces natalensis npi287 and increase polyene production in several wild-type actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Recio, Eliseo; Aparicio, Jesús F; Rumbero, Angel; Martín, Juan F

    2006-10-01

    Production of pimaricin by Streptomyces natalensis ATCC 27448 is elicited by the PI-factor, an autoinducer secreted by the producer strain during the rapid growth phase. Exogenous PI-factor restored pimaricin production in a mutant strain npi287 defective in PI-factor biosynthesis. During purification of the PI-factor, a second pimaricin-inducing fraction different from PI-factor was isolated from the culture broth of wild-type S. natalensis ATCC 27448. After purification by HPLC and analysis by MS and NMR, this active fraction was shown to contain glycerol and lactic acid. Pure glycerol restored pimaricin production in liquid cultures of the autoinducer-defective npi287 mutant. A similar effect was exerted by ethylene glycol, 1,2-propanediol and 1,3-propanediol but not by higher polyalcohols or by glycerol acetate or glycerol lactate esters. Glycerol stimulated (30-270 %) the production of six different polyene macrolide antibiotics by their respective producer strains. Addition of glycerol to the inducer-defective npi287 strain restored pimaricin production but did not result in extracellular or intracellular accumulation of PI-factor. Exogenously added PI-factor was internalized by the cells in the presence of glycerol, and a mixture of both PI-factor and glycerol produced a slightly higher inducing effect on pimaricin production than PI-factor alone. In summary, glycerol, ethylene glycol and propanediol exert a bypass of the PI-factor inducing effect on pimaricin biosynthesis.

  7. Structure of glycerol dehydrogenase from Serratia.

    PubMed

    Musille, Paul; Ortlund, Eric

    2014-02-01

    The 1.90 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of glycerol dehydrogenase derived from contaminating bacteria present during routine Escherichia coli protein expression is presented. This off-target enzyme showed intrinsic affinity for Ni(2+)-Sepharose, migrated at the expected molecular mass for the target protein during gel filtration and was crystallized before it was realised that contamination had occurred. In this study, it is shown that liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) can efficiently identify the protein composition of crystals in a crystallization experiment as part of a structure-determination pipeline for an unknown protein. The high-resolution X-ray data enabled sequencing directly from the electron-density maps, allowing the source of contamination to be placed within the Serratia genus. Incorporating additional protein-identity checks, such as tandem LC-MS/MS, earlier in the protein expression, purification and crystallization workflow may have prevented the unintentional structure determination of this metabolic enzyme, which represents the first enterobacterial glycerol dehydrogenase reported to date.

  8. Prediction of the long-term performance of crystalline nuclear waste form phases from studies of mineral analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Lumpkin, G.R.; Smith, K.L.; Blackford, M.G.

    1994-12-31

    This investigation outlines the use of natural analogues as a means of assessing the long-term performance of actinide host phases in crystalline nuclear waste forms. We employed several analytical techniques to study the mineral zirconolite, an important actinide host phase in Synroc and tailored ceramics. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Natural zirconolite experiences a crystalline to aperiodic transformation at doses of approximately 10{sup 15} to 10{sup 16} {alpha}/ma (0.08-1.0 dpa), consistent with the results of accelerated damage testing on synthetic zirconolite. (2) Damage microstructures are consistent with the accumulation and overlap of alpha-recoil collision cascades, resulting in aperiodic domains which increase in volume as a function of dose. (3) There is evidence for long-term annealing of alpha-recoil damage in zirconolite at a rate 2-5 times slower than in the structurally related mineral pyrochlore. (4) Analysis of data from the only documented natural zirconolites to show hydrothermal alteration [resulting from F- and P-rich aqueous fluids at T = 500-600{degrees}C and P = 2 kb, Giere and Williams (14)], suggests that Th and U were released to the fluid phase. (5) The effects of low temperature alteration of radiation damaged zirconolite by a Si-rich ground water or fluid phase were identified in the oldest (2.5 x 10{sup 9} yr) sample in our research collection. Alteration involved incorporation of Si along microfractures at the expense of Ca, Ti, and Fe, but Tb and U remained immobile. In this same sample, there is evidence for migration of at least 50% of the radiogenic Pb from both unaltered and altered areas of zirconolite. Most of the Pb may have been retained within the sample as fine precipitates of galena (PbS).

  9. The role of GlpR repressor in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 growth and PHA production from glycerol.

    PubMed

    Escapa, I F; del Cerro, C; García, J L; Prieto, M A

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has evolved a tightly regulated system for metabolizing glycerol implying a prolonged growth lag-phase. We have learnt that this fact can be avoided by the addition of small amounts of some growth precursors. The addition of 1 mM octanoic acid as co-feeder completely eliminated the lag-phase, resulting in an improvement, in terms of invested time, of both growth and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) accumulation. To investigate this phenomenon, we have followed co-metabolic approaches combined with mutations of the specific and global regulatory networks that connect glycerol catabolism and PHA synthesis. By using mutant strains in metabolic genes from the PHA and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycles, we have demonstrated that the co-feeding effect is independent of PHA accumulation, but driven on active glyoxylate shunt and Entner-Doudoroff (ED) routes. These findings suggested that the effect of octanoate on glycerol metabolism could rely, either on a global activation of the cell energy state, or on the generation of specific metabolites or cofactors needed for the activation of glycerol metabolism. Our results addressed GlpR as the key factor controlling the efficient utilization of glycerol as growth precursor in P. putida KT2440. Accordingly, a glpR knockout mutant of P. putida KT2440 showed an elimination of the lag-phase when cultured on glycerol in the absence of co-feeder. Besides, the production of PHA in this strain was increased near twofold, resulting in a higher final yield in terms of PHA accumulation. The repressor activity of the GlpR protein over the glp genes in the absence of glycerol was finally demonstrated by qRT-PCR. This work contributed to unravel the physiological causes of the long lag-phase produced by glycerol in the model strain P. putida KT2440 that hinders its use as carbon source in biotechnological applications for generating valuable products. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. The influence of using sonicator type to produce alcohol in the glycerol degradation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalla, Ruslan; Sumarno, S.; Mahfud., M.

    2017-05-01

    The last few years the energy crisis happens everywhere, not least in Indonesia. One reason is the need for fossil energy is increasing with the increasing population, in addition to the depletion of oil reserves on the Earth Indonesia. Therefore it takes a plant-based alternative energy, one of which is biodiesel. The transesterification process will produce primary products such as methyl ester and byproducts / waste in the form of about 10-15 % glycerol so that glycerol is quite abundant. This research aims to study the effect of the sonicator type (vibrating horn and cleaning bath) as well as the effect of γ-Al2O3 catalyst on the degradation of glycerol. The production process was conducted in a batch reactor equipped with an ultrasonic wave generator. Operating conditions of this study was the atmospheric pressure with mass ratio of glycerol water 1:10. The research variables were sonication temperature of 30 and 40 ° C, sonication time of 10, 30, 50, 70 and 90 minutes with and without the catalyst. Products of degradation were analyzed by Gas Chromatography (GC). The results showed that, the products of degradation product (methanol and allyl alcohol) using a sonicator vibrating horn type were greater compared to using cleaning bath type sonicator. The glycerol conversion was 63.21 % at sonication time of 90 minutes, a temperature of 40 °C using γ-Al2O3 catalyst. While the greatest product yield was 18.17 % methanol at sonication time of 90 minutes, a temperature of 40 °C with the use of vibrating horn sonicator type, with the addition of γ-Al2O3 catalyst.

  11. Effect of glycerol on intracellular virus survival: implications for the clinical use of glycerol-preserved cadaver skin.

    PubMed

    Marshall, L; Ghosh, M M; Boyce, S G; MacNeil, S; Freedlander, E; Kudesia, G

    1995-08-01

    Glycerol has long been used for the preservation of skin allografts. The antimicrobial activity of glycerol has not been fully documented. This paper reports the results of an investigation of a model studying the effect of glycerol on the inactivation of intracellular viruses. Two viruses--herpes simplex type I (HSV-1) and poliovirus--were cultured within human dermal fibroblasts. These intracellular viruses were incubated with 50 per cent, 85 per cent and 98 per cent glycerol at 4 degrees C and 20 degrees C for 4 weeks. Each week, the cultures in glycerol and controls in fibroblast maintenance medium were assayed for virus infectivity by examining the ability of harvested viruses to infect further fibroblasts. At 4 degrees C, 85 per cent glycerol could not fully inactivate intracellular HSV-I or poliovirus even after 4 weeks; 98 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (after 3 weeks) but could not fully inactivate intracellular poliovirus after 4 weeks. At 20 degrees C, 85 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (within 1 week) but could not fully inactivate intracellular poliovirus after 4 weeks; 98 per cent glycerol inactivated intracellular HSV-I (within 1 week) and inactivated intracellular poliovirus (after 2 weeks). It is suggested that, on the basis of this study, glycerol can reduce intracellular virus infectivity but that its effects are very dependent on concentration, time and temperature such that we would recommend that allograft skin be exposed to 98 per cent glycerol for a minimum of at least 4 weeks at a minimum temperature of 20 degrees C before clinical use.

  12. Thermal and Structural Properties of Silk Biomaterials Plasticized by Glycerol.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joseph E; Davidowski, Stephen K; Xu, Dian; Cebe, Peggy; Onofrei, David; Holland, Gregory P; Kaplan, David L

    2016-12-12

    The molecular interactions of silk materials plasticized using glycerol were studied, as these materials provide options for biodegradable and flexible protein-based systems. Plasticizer interactions with silk were analyzed by thermal, spectroscopic, and solid-state NMR analyses. Spectroscopic analysis implied that glycerol was hydrogen bonded to the peptide matrix, but may be displaced with polar solvents. Solid-state NMR indicated that glycerol induced β-sheet formation in the dried silk materials, but not to the extent of methanol treatment. Fast scanning calorimetry suggested that β-sheet crystal formation in silk-glycerol films appeared to be less organized than in the methanol treated silk films. We propose that glycerol may be simultaneously inducing and interfering with β-sheet formation in silk materials, causing some improper folding that results in less-organized silk II structures even after the glycerol is removed. This difference, along with trace residual glycerol, allows glycerol extracted silk materials to retain more flexibility than methanol processed versions.

  13. Functional Characterization of Yersinia pestis Aerobic Glycerol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Willias, Stephan P.; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L.

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Orientalis isolates have lost the capacity to ferment glycerol. Herein we provide experimental validation that a 93 bp in-frame deletion within the glpD gene encoding the glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase present in all biovar Orientalis strains is sufficient to disrupt aerobic glycerol fermentation. Furthermore, the inability to ferment glycerol is often insured by a variety of additional mutations within the glpFKX operon which prevents glycerol internalization and conversion to glycerol-3-phosphate. The physiological impact of functional glpFKX in the presence of dysfunctional glpD was assessed. Results demonstrate no change in growth kinetics at 26°C and 37°C. Mutants deficient in glpD displayed decreased intracellular accumulation of glycerol-3-phosphate, a characterized inhibitor of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) activation. Since CRP is rigorously involved in global regulation Y. pestis virulence, we tested a possible influence of a single glpD mutation on virulence. Nonetheless, subcutaneous and intranasal murine challenge was not impacted by glycerol metabolism. As quantified by crystal violet assay, biofilm formation of the glpD-deficient KIM6+ mutant was mildly repressed; whereas, chromosomal restoration of glpD in CO92 resulted in a significant increase in biofilm formation. PMID:25220241

  14. Biodegradation of Glycerol Trinitrate and Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate by Agrobacterium radiobacter

    PubMed Central

    White, G. F.; Snape, J. R.; Nicklin, S.

    1996-01-01

    Bacteria capable of metabolizing highly explosive and vasodilatory glycerol trinitrate (GTN) were isolated under aerobic and nitrogen-limiting conditions from soil, river water, and activated sewage sludge. One of these strains (from sewage sludge) chosen for further study was identified as Agrobacterium radiobacter subgroup B. A combination of high-pressure liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses of the culture medium during the growth of A. radiobacter on basal salts-glycerol-GTN medium showed the sequential conversion of GTN to glycerol dinitrates and glycerol mononitrates. Isomeric glycerol 1,2-dinitrate and glycerol 1,3-dinitrate were produced simultaneously and concomitantly with the disappearance of GTN, with significant regioselectivity for the production of the 1,3-dinitrate. Dinitrates were further degraded to glycerol 1- and 2-mononitrates, but mononitrates were not biodegraded. Cells were also capable of metabolizing pentaerythritol tetranitrate, probably to its trinitrate and dinitrate analogs. Extracts of broth-grown cells contained an enzyme which in the presence of added NADH converted GTN stoichiometrically to nitrite and the mixture of glycerol dinitrates. The specific activity of this enzyme was increased 160-fold by growth on GTN as the sole source of nitrogen. PMID:16535244

  15. 40 CFR 721.10323 - Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10323 Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acid ester (PMN P-03-248) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10323 - Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10323 Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acid ester (PMN P-03-248) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10323 - Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10323 Glycerol fatty acid ester (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acid ester (PMN P-03-248) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new...

  18. Synthesis and applications of {sup 13}C glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Stocking, E.; Khalsa, O.; Martinez, R.A.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Due in part to the use of labeled glycerol for the {sup 13}C enrichment of biomolecules, we are currently developing new synthetic routes to various isotopomers of glycerol. Judging from our experience, traditional methods of glycerol synthesis are not easily adapted for isotopic enrichment and/or have poor overall yields (12 to 15%). Furthermore, the use of glycerol for enrichment can be prohibitively expensive and its availability is limited by the level of demand. We are presently developing a short de novo synthesis of glycerol from carbon dioxide ({approximately}53% overall yield for four steps) and are examining the feasibility of synthesizing site-specific {sup 13}C-labeled glycerol and dihydroxyacetone (DHA) from labeled methanol and carbon dioxide. One application of {sup 13}C glycerol we have examined is enzymatic conversion of glycerol to glyceraldehyde-3-monophosphate or dihydroxyacetone monophosphate (DHAP) with yields ranging from 25 to 50% (as determined by NMR spectroscopy). We are also pursuing the chemical conversion of {sup 13}C-labeled DHA to DHAP. We are especially interested in {sup 13}C-labeled DHAP because we are investigating its use as a chemo-enzymatic precursor for both labeled 2-deoxyribose and 2-deoxyribonucleic acids.

  19. Fabrication of a glycerol from CO2 reaction system, supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The fabrication, installation, and testing of a glycerol hydrogenation and a CO2 hydrogenation - CH4 partial oxidation units are reported. The glycerol system proved to be operational while the CO2 system was installed but not bought on operational steam.

  20. The Acrylation of Glycerol: a Precursor to Functionalized Lipids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Didecanoylacryloylglycerol was synthesized from decanoic and acrylic acids and glycerol using K2O as catalyst. This reaction was carried out in hexane in a closed stainless steel reactor at 200°C for 5h. The reactants were added in a 1:3:4 glycerol:decanoic acid:acrylic acid molar ratio. The resu...

  1. Quantitative determination of free glycerol and myo-inositol from plasma and tissue by high-performance liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Frieler, Ryan A.; Mitteness, Dane J.; Golovko, Mikhail Y.; Gienger, Heidi M.; Rosenberger, Thad A.

    2009-01-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic method that accurately measures glycerol and myo-inositol from plasma and tissue is described. The method incorporates a pre-column derivatization reaction using aqueous extracts with benzoyl chloride as a modifying agent. The benzoylated derivatives are isolated by HPLC using reversed-phase gradient chromatography and quantified via absorbance detection at 231 nm. The benzoylated derivatives of glycerol and myo-inositol are well resolved from` other know carbohydrates, internal standard and other contaminants encountered within samples and during incubation. The benzoylation of these analytes reach a maximum between 3.5 and 6 h of incubation and are stable for at least 24 days at 4° C. The limit of quantization (LOQ) of glycerol was equal to 2.5 nmol/ml plasma and 6.4 nmol/g tissue and the LOQ of myo-inositol was 1.8 nmol/mL plasma and 3.6 nmol/g tissue. Incubation of known standards and samples with benzoyl chloride at 40° C for 4 h showed fully benzoylated products as determined by mass spectral analysis. Calibration curves were linear between 2.7 and 174 nmol for glycerol and 1.4 to 89 nmol for myo-inositol. Comparison of tissue and plasma concentrations of glycerol and myo-inositol found using this method are in good agreement with other reported values using other techniques. PMID:19783233

  2. Selective hydrogenolysis of glycerol to propylene glycol on Cu-ZnO composite catalysts: structural requirements and reaction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Yichi; Liu, Haichao

    2010-05-03

    Cu-ZnO catalysts were prepared by homogeneous coprecipitation with varying Cu/Zn atomic ratios (0.4-2:1). The catalysts were examined in selective hydrogenolysis of glycerol to propylene glycol. Although propylene glycol selectivities remained essentially constant (over 93%) on the different Cu-ZnO catalysts, the turnover frequencies changed markedly with the Cu/Zn ratio, and reached the greatest value at the ratio of 1:1. Such activity dependence on the Cu/Zn ratio was in parallel with the change in the interaction between Cu and ZnO and in the Cu microstrain, as a consequence of the effects on the crystalline phases of hydroxycarbonate precursors for the Cu-ZnO catalysts, reflecting the structural requirements for glycerol hydrogenolysis. The hydrogenolysis mechanism was also examined and apparently involves kinetically relevant glycerol dehydrogenation to glyceraldehyde on Cu-ZnO and subsequent glyceraldehyde dehydration and hydrogenation to propylene glycol. The mechanism is consistent with the observed superior activities of the more strained Cu particles, and the higher propylene glycol selectivities obtained at higher glycerol and hydrogen concentrations. These findings provide a rationale for the design of more effective Cu-based catalysts in selective hydrogenolysis of glycerol and other biomass-derived polyols, for example, by synthesis of highly strained Cu particles strongly interacting with ZnO or other oxide supports.

  3. Theoretical and Computational Studies of Condensed-Phase Phenomena: The Origin of Biological Homochirality, and the Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Network-Forming Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Francesco

    This dissertation describes theoretical and computational studies of the origin of biological homochirality, and the existence of a liquid-liquid phase transition in pure-component network-forming fluids. A common theme throughout these studies is the use of sophisticated computer simulation and statistical mechanics techniques to study complex condensed-phase phenomena. In the first part of this dissertation, we use an elementary lattice model with molecular degrees of freedom, and satisfying microscopic reversibility, to investigate the effect of reaction reversibility on the evolution of stochastic symmetry breaking via autocatalysis and mutual inhibition in a closed system. We identify conditions under which the system's evolution towards racemic equilibrium becomes extremely slow, allowing for long-time persistence of a symmetry-broken state. We also identify a "monomer purification" mechanism, due to which a nearly homochiral state can persist for long times, even in the presence of significant reverse reaction rates. Order of magnitude estimates show that with reasonable physical parameters a symmetry broken state could persist over geologically-relevant time scales. In the second part of this dissertation, we study a chiral-symmetry breaking mechanism known as Viedma ripening. We develop a Monte Carlo model to gain further insights into the mechanisms capable of reproducing key experimental signatures associated with this phenomenon. We also provide a comprehensive investigation of how the model parameters impact the system's overall behavior. It is shown that size-dependent crystal solubility alone is insufficient to reproduce most experimental signatures, and that some form of a solid-phase chiral feedback mechanism (e.g., agglomeration) must be invoked in our model. In the third part of this dissertation, we perform rigorous free energy calculations to investigate the possibility of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in the Stillinger-Weber (SW

  4. Glycerol, an underestimated flavor precursor in the Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Smarrito-Menozzi, Candice; Matthey-Doret, Walter; Devaud-Goumoens, Stéphanie; Viton, Florian

    2013-10-30

    The objective of the present work was to investigate in depth the role of glycerol in Maillard reactions and its potential to act as an active flavor precursor. Reactions using isotopically labeled compounds (various reducing sugars, proline, and glycerol) unambiguously demonstrated that, in addition to its role of solvent, glycerol actively contributes to the formation of proline-specific compounds in Maillard model systems. Additionally, rhamnose and fucose/proline/glycerol systems generated the 2-propionyl-1(3),4,5,6-tetrahydropyridines, known for their roasty, popcorn aroma. Their formation from such systems is unprecedented. The results presented here have direct implications for flavor generation during thermal processing of foods containing glycerol, which is a ubiquitous food ingredient and an underestimated flavor precursor.

  5. Conserved family of glycerol kinase loci in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Martinez Agosto, Julian A.; McCabe, Edward R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Glycerol kinase (GK) is an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of glycerol 3-phosphate from ATP and glycerol, the rate-limiting step in glycerol utilization. We analyzed the genome of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster and identified five GK orthologs, including two loci with sequence homology to the mammalian Xp21 GK protein. Using a combination of sequence analysis and evolutionary comparisons of orthologs between species, we characterized functional domains in the protein required for GK activity. Our findings include additional conserved domains that suggest novel nuclear and mitochondrial functions for glycerol kinase in apoptosis and transcriptional regulation. Investigation of GK function in Drosophila will inform us about the role of this enzyme in development and will provide us with a tool to examine genetic modifiers of human metabolic disorders. PMID:16545593

  6. Microbial conversion of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, A.P.; Biebl, H.; Deckwer, W.D.

    1996-10-01

    Glycerol is a byproduct from the soap and detergent industry and possibly from future biodiesel plants. The conversion of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (PD) is of industrial interest due to the potential use of PD for the synthesis of polyesters. We have been studying the microbial conversion of glycerol to PD with work ranging from strain isolation, medium optimization, pathway analysis, product formation kinetics and growth modeling, downstream processing and reactor scale-up (up to 2000 1). PD yields of nearly 100% of the theoretical maximum (0.72 mol/mol glycerol) and final product concentrations of about 65 g/l were achieved with both Klebsiella pneumoniae and Clostridium butyricum. In addition to summarizing our experimental results the advances of bioconversion of glycerol will be reviewed in this presentation, with emphasis on discussing further research and development needs in this area. Results of process engineering and cost analysis will also be presented.

  7. Distribution of Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraethers in Soils from Two Environmental Transects in the U.S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirghangi, S. S.; Pagani, M.; Hren, M. T.; Tipple, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    Glycerol Dialkyl Glycerol Tetraethers (GDGT) of both archaeal and bacterial origins form the basis of new temperature proxies applicable to soils, lake and marine sediments. In soils, branched GDGTs are prevalent and the abundance of methyl or cyclic groups in these compounds has been calibrated to mean-annual temperatures using MBT and CBT indices. However, soil pH is also known to be an important variable controlling the distribution of branched GDGTs. The factors influencing soil pH include bedrock type, vegetation, soil microbial activity, precipitation amount, drainage etc. For this study, we evaluate the distribution of branched GDGTs from two soil transects in the United States: a dry, western transect that covers four western states, and a wet, east-coast transect from Maine to Georgia in order to assess the effect of precipitation on the distribution of soil GDGTs. Our results show distinctly different GDGT distributions across climatic regions, with dry western soils predominantly characterized by crenarchaeal isoprenoidal GDGTs and moist-temperate east-coast transect soils expressing mostly branched GDGTs. Predominance of isoprenoidal GDGTs in the western soils is related to the degree of aeration which in turn is related to precipitation amount. We also observe a substantial increase in the offset between measured mean-annual temperatures (MAT) and MBT/CBT-based MAT below an annual precipitation of 700-800mm per year. These data suggest that while soil tetraethers work well as a temperature proxy in moist-temperate regimes, they do not produce reliable measurements of temperature in sediments sourced from areas with less than 700-800mm per year precipitation.

  8. Impact of glycerol and nitrogen concentration on Enterobacter A47 growth and exopolysaccharide production.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristiana A V; Marques, Rodolfo; Ferreira, A