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Sample records for glycine-spacers influence functional

  1. Influence Function Learning in Information Diffusion Networks

    PubMed Central

    Du, Nan; Liang, Yingyu; Balcan, Maria-Florina; Song, Le

    2015-01-01

    Can we learn the influence of a set of people in a social network from cascades of information diffusion? This question is often addressed by a two-stage approach: first learn a diffusion model, and then calculate the influence based on the learned model. Thus, the success of this approach relies heavily on the correctness of the diffusion model which is hard to verify for real world data. In this paper, we exploit the insight that the influence functions in many diffusion models are coverage functions, and propose a novel parameterization of such functions using a convex combination of random basis functions. Moreover, we propose an efficient maximum likelihood based algorithm to learn such functions directly from cascade data, and hence bypass the need to specify a particular diffusion model in advance. We provide both theoretical and empirical analysis for our approach, showing that the proposed approach can provably learn the influence function with low sample complexity, be robust to the unknown diffusion models, and significantly outperform existing approaches in both synthetic and real world data. PMID:25973445

  2. Neonatal thyroid function: influence of perinatal factors.

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, R C; Carpenter, L M; O'Grady, C M

    1985-01-01

    Indices of thyroid function were measured in 229 healthy term neonates at birth and at 5, 10, and 15 days of age. Results were analysed to assess whether maternal diabetes mellitus, toxaemia of pregnancy, intrapartum fetal distress, duration of labour, method of delivery, asphyxia at birth, race, sex, birthweight, birth length, head circumference, or method of feeding influenced any index. Thyroxine, the free thyroxine index, and free thyroxine concentrations at birth correlated with birthweight. Method of delivery influenced mean thyroxine and free thyroxine index values at birth and at age 5 days. Mean values of triiodothyronine, reverse triiodothyronine, thyroxine binding globulin, and thyroid stimulating hormone were not affected by any of the perinatal factors studied. Birthweight and perhaps method of delivery should be taken into account when interpreting neonatal thyroxine parameters but determination of thyroid stimulating hormone as a screen for congenital hypothyroidism in healthy term neonates circumvents these considerations. PMID:3977386

  3. Non-Gaussian influence functional for quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allinger, Kurt; Carmeli, Benny; Chandler, David

    1986-02-01

    We consider the quantum paths (in Euclidean time) through a space of N multiparticle states, and we derive the influence functional for a subset of m primary states in this space. The influence functional results from integrating out the occupation of the N-m nonprimary or bath states holding fixed the time-dependent occupation path through the primary states. The division into bath states and primary states is completely general in principle, though in practice, physical considerations will guide the choice of partitioning. The exact influence functional is nonlocal in time and very complicated in form. We argue, however, by a variational calculation that a simplified approximate functional can be constructed which is very accurate. Unlike the standard Gaussian influence functionals which are inapplicable for processes involving the large amplitude fluctuations of charge transfer and fermionic exchange, the influence functionals described herein are appropriate for models of these processes.

  4. The Feynman-Vernon Influence Functional Approach in QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, Alexander; Shleenkov, Mark

    2016-10-01

    In the path integral approach we describe evolution of interacting electromagnetic and fermionic fields by the use of density matrix formalism. The equation for density matrix and transitions probability for fermionic field is obtained as average of electromagnetic field influence functional. We obtain a formula for electromagnetic field influence functional calculating for its various initial and final state. We derive electromagnetic field influence functional when its initial and final states are vacuum. We present Lagrangian for relativistic fermionic field under influence of electromagnetic field vacuum.

  5. Do Geographically Isolated Wetlands Influence Landscape Functions?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landscape functions such as flow generation, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity support depend on the exchange of solutes, particles, energy, and organisms between elements in hydrological and habitat networks. Wetlands are important network elements, providing hyd...

  6. Do geographically isolated wetlands influence landscape functions?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, Matthew J.; Creed, Irena F.; Alexander, Laurie C.; Basu, Nandita; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Craft, Christopher; D’Amico, Ellen; DeKeyser, Edward S.; Fowler, Laurie; Golden, Heather E.; Jawitz, James W.; Kalla, Peter; Kirkman, L. Katherine; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan; Leibowitz, Scott G.; Lewis, David Bruce; Marton, John; McLaughlin, Daniel L.; Mushet, David M.; Raanan-Kiperwas, Hadas; Rains, Mark C.; Smith, Lora; Walls, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), those surrounded by uplands, exchange materials, energy, and organisms with other elements in hydrological and habitat networks, contributing to landscape functions, such as flow generation, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity support. GIWs constitute most of the wetlands in many North American landscapes, provide a disproportionately large fraction of wetland edges where many functions are enhanced, and form complexes with other water bodies to create spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the timing, flow paths, and magnitude of network connectivity. These attributes signal a critical role for GIWs in sustaining a portfolio of landscape functions, but legal protections remain weak despite preferential loss from many landscapes. GIWs lack persistent surface water connections, but this condition does not imply the absence of hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological exchanges with nearby and downstream waters. Although hydrological and biogeochemical connectivity is often episodic or slow (e.g., via groundwater), hydrologic continuity and limited evaporative solute enrichment suggest both flow generation and solute and sediment retention. Similarly, whereas biological connectivity usually requires overland dispersal, numerous organisms, including many rare or threatened species, use both GIWs and downstream waters at different times or life stages, suggesting that GIWs are critical elements of landscape habitat mosaics. Indeed, weaker hydrologic connectivity with downstream waters and constrained biological connectivity with other landscape elements are precisely what enhances some GIW functions and enables others. Based on analysis of wetland geography and synthesis of wetland functions, we argue that sustaining landscape functions requires conserving the entire continuum of wetland connectivity, including GIWs.

  7. Do geographically isolated wetlands influence landscape functions?

    PubMed

    Cohen, Matthew J; Creed, Irena F; Alexander, Laurie; Basu, Nandita B; Calhoun, Aram J K; Craft, Christopher; D'Amico, Ellen; DeKeyser, Edward; Fowler, Laurie; Golden, Heather E; Jawitz, James W; Kalla, Peter; Kirkman, L Katherine; Lane, Charles R; Lang, Megan; Leibowitz, Scott G; Lewis, David Bruce; Marton, John; McLaughlin, Daniel L; Mushet, David M; Raanan-Kiperwas, Hadas; Rains, Mark C; Smith, Lora; Walls, Susan C

    2016-02-23

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), those surrounded by uplands, exchange materials, energy, and organisms with other elements in hydrological and habitat networks, contributing to landscape functions, such as flow generation, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity support. GIWs constitute most of the wetlands in many North American landscapes, provide a disproportionately large fraction of wetland edges where many functions are enhanced, and form complexes with other water bodies to create spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the timing, flow paths, and magnitude of network connectivity. These attributes signal a critical role for GIWs in sustaining a portfolio of landscape functions, but legal protections remain weak despite preferential loss from many landscapes. GIWs lack persistent surface water connections, but this condition does not imply the absence of hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological exchanges with nearby and downstream waters. Although hydrological and biogeochemical connectivity is often episodic or slow (e.g., via groundwater), hydrologic continuity and limited evaporative solute enrichment suggest both flow generation and solute and sediment retention. Similarly, whereas biological connectivity usually requires overland dispersal, numerous organisms, including many rare or threatened species, use both GIWs and downstream waters at different times or life stages, suggesting that GIWs are critical elements of landscape habitat mosaics. Indeed, weaker hydrologic connectivity with downstream waters and constrained biological connectivity with other landscape elements are precisely what enhances some GIW functions and enables others. Based on analysis of wetland geography and synthesis of wetland functions, we argue that sustaining landscape functions requires conserving the entire continuum of wetland connectivity, including GIWs.

  8. Do geographically isolated wetlands influence landscape functions?

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew J.; Creed, Irena F.; Alexander, Laurie; Basu, Nandita B.; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Craft, Christopher; D’Amico, Ellen; DeKeyser, Edward; Fowler, Laurie; Golden, Heather E.; Jawitz, James W.; Kalla, Peter; Kirkman, L. Katherine; Lane, Charles R.; Lang, Megan; Leibowitz, Scott G.; Lewis, David Bruce; Marton, John; McLaughlin, Daniel L.; Mushet, David M.; Raanan-Kiperwas, Hadas; Rains, Mark C.; Smith, Lora; Walls, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIWs), those surrounded by uplands, exchange materials, energy, and organisms with other elements in hydrological and habitat networks, contributing to landscape functions, such as flow generation, nutrient and sediment retention, and biodiversity support. GIWs constitute most of the wetlands in many North American landscapes, provide a disproportionately large fraction of wetland edges where many functions are enhanced, and form complexes with other water bodies to create spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the timing, flow paths, and magnitude of network connectivity. These attributes signal a critical role for GIWs in sustaining a portfolio of landscape functions, but legal protections remain weak despite preferential loss from many landscapes. GIWs lack persistent surface water connections, but this condition does not imply the absence of hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological exchanges with nearby and downstream waters. Although hydrological and biogeochemical connectivity is often episodic or slow (e.g., via groundwater), hydrologic continuity and limited evaporative solute enrichment suggest both flow generation and solute and sediment retention. Similarly, whereas biological connectivity usually requires overland dispersal, numerous organisms, including many rare or threatened species, use both GIWs and downstream waters at different times or life stages, suggesting that GIWs are critical elements of landscape habitat mosaics. Indeed, weaker hydrologic connectivity with downstream waters and constrained biological connectivity with other landscape elements are precisely what enhances some GIW functions and enables others. Based on analysis of wetland geography and synthesis of wetland functions, we argue that sustaining landscape functions requires conserving the entire continuum of wetland connectivity, including GIWs. PMID:26858425

  9. Global network influences on local functional connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Adam C.; Morais, Michael J.; Willis, Cory M.; Smith, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    A central neuroscientific pursuit is understanding neuronal interactions that support computations underlying cognition and behavior. Although neurons interact across disparate scales – from cortical columns to whole-brain networks – research has been restricted to one scale at a time. We measured local interactions through multi-neuronal recordings while accessing global networks using scalp EEG in rhesus macaques. We measured spike count correlation, an index of functional connectivity with computational relevance, and EEG oscillations, which have been linked to various cognitive functions. We found a surprising non-monotonic relationship between EEG oscillation amplitude and spike count correlation, contrary to the intuitive expectation of a direct relationship. With a widely-used network model we replicated these findings by incorporating a private signal targeting inhibitory neurons, a common mechanism proposed for gain modulation. Finally, we report that spike count correlation explains nonlinearities in the relationship between EEG oscillations and response time in a spatial selective attention task. PMID:25799040

  10. Influence of epididymitis on reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Durglishvili, G; Galdava, G

    2013-02-01

    In our study 54 patients were diagnosed epididymitis caused by STI and in 6 (11.1%) cases inflammatory process spread on seminal vesicles which negatively affected the state of male reproductive function. After having unilateral epididymitis pathospermia developed in 76% of cases and infertility - in 55.6%. In patients who had unilateral acute epididymitis, infertility caused by urethritis of chlamidial aetiology developed in 70.4% of cases, infertility caused by urethritis of mycoplasmatic (ureaplasma) genesis - in 62.9% of cases and infertility caused by gonorrheal urethritis - in 29.6% of cases. At this moment following alterations of ejaculate are revealed: volume reduction, decrease in spermatozoid number, reduction of ability to move, increase in teratomatous forms, spermagglutination, etc. The best way for prevention of pathospermia and infertility is using modern and adequate treatment methods directed to maximally effective suppression of acute inflammatory process in epididymis and then restoration of its functions.

  11. Comments on a model influence functional for quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, David; Carmeli, Benny; Chandler, David

    1988-02-01

    We continue the study of a model non-Gaussian influence functional proposed by Allinger, Carmeli, and Chandler [J. Chem. Phys. 84, 1724 (1986)] to approximate the exact influence functional resulting from integrating out all quantum states but those of primary interest. The premise of this work is that the influence of many secondary states on a single primary state can be closely approximated by the influence of a degenerate level of states with equal coupling to the primary state. The degeneracy reflects the fluctuations possible among the secondary states and in fact can be associated with the partition function of the exact secondary states. The new calculations presented herein emphasize the importance of entropic-like effects properly described by this degeneracy, and for the models we examine, our basic premise is shown to be correct.

  12. Psychoneuroimmunology: psychological influences on immune function and health.

    PubMed

    Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K; McGuire, Lynanne; Robles, Theodore F; Glaser, Ronald

    2002-06-01

    This review focuses on human psychoneuroimmunology studies published in the past decade. Issues discussed include the routes through which psychological factors influence immune function, how a stressor's duration may influence the changes observed, individual difference variables, the ability of interventions to modulate immune function, and the health consequences of psychosocially mediated immune dysregulation. The importance of negative affect and supportive personal relationships are highlighted. Recent data suggest that immune dysregulation may be one core mechanism for a spectrum of conditions associated with aging, including cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, arthritis, Type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and frailty and functional decline; production of proinflammatory cytokines that influence these and other conditions can be stimulated directly by negative emotions and indirectly by prolonged infection.

  13. Influence functions of a thin shallow meniscus-shaped mirror.

    PubMed

    Arnold, L

    1997-04-01

    Thin shallow spherical shell theory is used to derive the general influence function, owing to uniform and/or discrete (actuators) loads, for a thin shallow meniscus-shaped mirror of uniform thickness with a central hole and supported at discrete points. Small elastic deformations are considered. No symmetry on the load distribution constrains the model. Explicit analytical expressions of the set of equations are given for calculating the influence functions. Results agree with the finite element analysis (FEA) to within 1%. When the FEA requires megabytes of RAM memory, the analytical method needs only kilobytes and typically runs 30 times faster. This is a crucial advantage for the iterative optimization of mirror supports such as large passive or active meniscus-shaped primary mirror supports or Cassegrain/Gregorian adaptive secondary actuator configurations. References are given on estimating the shear effects (thick mirror), the thickness variation effect, and the influence of the size of the support pads.

  14. Influence of low-level laser radiation on kidney functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koultchavenia, Ekaterina V.

    1998-12-01

    Most of all renal diseases are accompanied by lowering of kidney functions. That makes the quality of the treatment worse. On an example 69 patients receiving Low-Level Laser Therapy (LLLT), the influence of the laser radiation on a contracting system of blood, on current of an active and inactive tubercular inflammation and on partial functions of kidneys were investigated. Is established, that LLLT does not render influence to a contracting system; promotes stopping of unspecific and moderate peaking of a specific inflammation of kidneys. Is proved, that after a rate of laserotherapy the improving of a blood micricirculation in kidney occurs in 57.9% of patients; a secretion - in 63.1% of the patients; a stimulation of urodynamic is fixed in 79% of cases. Magnification of diuresis, improving filtration and concentration functions of kidneys also is marked.

  15. The LIM protein LIMD1 influences osteoblast differentiation and function

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, Hilary F.; Bai Shuting; Longmore, Gregory D.

    2008-09-10

    The balance between bone resorption and bone formation involves the coordinated activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Communication between these two cell types is essential for maintenance of normal bone homeostasis; however, the mechanisms regulating this cross talk are not completely understood. Many factors that mediate differentiation and function of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts have been identified. The LIM protein Limd1 has been implicated in the regulation of stress osteoclastogenesis through an interaction with the p62/sequestosome protein. Here we show that Limd1 also influences osteoblast progenitor numbers, differentiation, and function. Limd1{sup -/-} calvarial osteoblasts display increased mineralization and accelerated differentiation. While no significant differences in osteoblast number or function were detected in vivo, bone marrow stromal cells isolated from Limd1{sup -/-} mice contain significantly more osteoblast progenitors compared to wild type controls when cultured ex vivo. Furthermore, we observed a significant increase in nuclear {beta}-catenin staining in differentiating Limd1{sup -/-} calvarial osteoblasts suggesting that Limd1 is a negative regulator of canonical Wnt signaling in osteoblasts. These results demonstrate that Limd1 influences not only stress osteoclastogenesis but also osteoblast function and osteoblast progenitor commitment. Together, these data identify Limd1 as a novel regulator of both bone osetoclast and bone osteoblast development and function.

  16. Influence of hypokinesis on physiological functions in fowl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nvota, J.; Lamosova, D.; Tesarova, D.; Cierna, V.; Vyboh, P.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of hypokinesis and postincubation stress (which are characteristic for modern techniques of poultry cage keeping) on the endocrine functions, metabolic reactions, body weight growth and proteosynthesis in the muscle of cocks was investigated. The stress due to hypokinesis was observed in growing cocks housed in metallic cages in which they could hardly turn around. The findings obtained indicate that a 35-day hypokinesis did not exert any more significant influence both on physiological functions and body weight growth as well as on proteosynthesis in the muscle of cocks under study; however, it speeded up the protein metabolism in the muscle. The postincubation stress modified significantly the hypokinesis effect. Findings recorded in birds differed considerably from findings obtained in laboratory mammals, in which the hypokinesis induced significant changes in endocrine functions, body weight decrease and proteosynthesis disorders. A good tolerance of hypokinesis by fowl can be interpreted not only by the phylogenetic remoteness of the compared species but also by the domestication.

  17. Influence of persistent monodominance on functional diversity and functional community assembly in African tropical forests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearsley, Elizabeth; Verbeeck, Hans; Hufkens, Koen; Beeckman, Hans; Steppe, Kathy; Boeckx, Pascal; Huygens, Dries

    2015-04-01

    Lowland tropical rainforest are taxonomically diverse and complex systems, although not all tropical communities are equally diverse. Naturally occuring monodominant patches of Gilbertiodendron dewevrei are commonly found across Central Africa alongside higher diversity forests. Nevertheless, a low taxonomical diversity does not necessarily indicate an equivalently low functional diverse system. We investigate the functional diversity and functional community assembly of mixed and monodominant tropical forests in a central region of the Congo Basin in D. R. Congo using 15 leaf and wood traits covering 95% of all species within each community. This unique dataset allows us to investigate differences in functional diversity and ecosystem functioning between mixed and monodominant forest types. Functional richness, functional divergence and functional evenness are three functional diversity measures providing different aspects of functional diversity. The largest difference between the two forest types was found for functional richness, with a lower functional richness in the monodominant forest indicating a higher amount of niche space filled in the mixed forest. The mixed forest also had a higher species richness and Simpson diversity index, indicating that the higher species richness increases the functional niche space. Subsequently, we identified whole community trait shifts within the monodominant forest compared to the mixed forest. The dominance of Gilbertiodendron dewevrei, for which a distinct niche is found for most traits, presented a significant influence on the entire (trait) community expressing fundamental differences in ecosystem functioning. More detailed investigation of species unique within the monodominant forest and species occurring in both forest types provide more insight into the influence of Gilbertiodendron dewevrei. Both the unique and the shared species showed significant shifts in leaf nutrients, specific leaf area and water use

  18. The influence of gravity on structure and function of animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    1984-01-01

    Gravity is the only environmental parameter that has remained constant during the period of evolution of living matter on earth. Thus, it must have been a major force in shaping living things. The influence of gravitational loading on evolution of the vertebrate skeleton is well recognized, and scale effects have been studied. This paper, however, considers in addition four pivotal events in early evolution that would seem to have been significant for the later success and diversifcation of animal life. These are evolution of the cytoskeleton, cell motility (flagellae and cilia), gravity detecting devices (accelerometers), and biomineralization. All are functionally calcium dependent in eukaryotes and all occurred or were foreshadowed in prokaryotes. A major question is why calcium was selected as an ion of great importance to the structure and function of living matter; another is whether gravity played a role in its selection.

  19. Influence of Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Cancer on Pulmonary Function

    SciTech Connect

    Tada, Akihiro Hiraki, Takao; Iguchi, Toshihiro; Gobara, Hideo; Mimura, Hidefumi; Toyooka, Shinichi; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tsuda, Toshihide; Mitsuhashi, Toshiharu; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate altered pulmonary function retrospectively after RFA. Methods: This retrospective study comprised 41 ablation sessions for 39 patients (22 men and 17 women; mean age, 64.8 years). Vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) at 1 and 3 months after RFA were compared with the baseline (i.e., values before RFA). To evaluate the factors that influenced impaired pulmonary function, univariate analysis was performed by using multiple variables. If two or more variables were indicated as statistically significant by univariate analysis, these variables were subjected to multivariate analysis to identify independent factors. Results: The mean VC and FEV{sub 1} before RFA and 1 and 3 months after RFA were 3.04 and 2.24 l, 2.79 and 2.11 l, and 2.85 and 2.13 l, respectively. The values at 1 and 3 months were significantly lower than the baseline. Severe pleuritis after RFA was identified as the independent factor influencing impaired VC at 1 month (P = 0.003). For impaired FEV{sub 1} at 1 month, only severe pleuritis (P = 0.01) was statistically significant by univariate analysis. At 3 months, severe pleuritis (VC, P = 0.019; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.003) and an ablated parenchymal volume {>=}20 cm{sup 3} (VC, P = 0.047; FEV{sub 1}, P = 0.038) were independent factors for impaired VC and FEV{sub 1}. Conclusions: Pulmonary function decreased after RFA. RFA-induced severe pleuritis and ablation of a large volume of marginal parenchyma were associated with impaired pulmonary function.

  20. Basis Function Approximation of Transonic Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley W.; Pak, Chan-gi

    2011-01-01

    A technique for approximating the modal aerodynamic influence coefficients matrices by using basis functions has been developed and validated. An application of the resulting approximated modal aerodynamic influence coefficients matrix for a flutter analysis in transonic speed regime has been demonstrated. This methodology can be applied to the unsteady subsonic, transonic, and supersonic aerodynamics. The method requires the unsteady aerodynamics in frequency-domain. The flutter solution can be found by the classic methods, such as rational function approximation, k, p-k, p, root-locus et cetera. The unsteady aeroelastic analysis for design optimization using unsteady transonic aerodynamic approximation is being demonstrated using the ZAERO flutter solver (ZONA Technology Incorporated, Scottsdale, Arizona). The technique presented has been shown to offer consistent flutter speed prediction on an aerostructures test wing 2 configuration with negligible loss in precision in transonic speed regime. These results may have practical significance in the analysis of aircraft aeroelastic calculation and could lead to a more efficient design optimization cycle.

  1. Impairments that Influence Physical Function among Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carmen L.; Gawade, Prasad L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2015-01-01

    Children treated for cancer are at increased risk of developing chronic health conditions, some of which may manifest during or soon after treatment while others emerge many years after therapy. These health problems may limit physical performance and functional capacity, interfering with participation in work, social, and recreational activities. In this review, we discuss treatment-induced impairments in the endocrine, musculoskeletal, neurological, and cardiopulmonary systems and their influence on mobility and physical function. We found that cranial radiation at a young age was associated with a broad range of chronic conditions including obesity, short stature, low bone mineral density and neuromotor impairments. Anthracyclines and chest radiation are associated with both short and long-term cardiotoxicity. Although numerous chronic conditions are documented among individuals treated for childhood cancer, the impact of these conditions on mobility and function are not well characterized, with most studies limited to survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors. Moving forward, further research assessing the impact of chronic conditions on participation in work and social activities is required. Moreover, interventions to prevent or ameliorate the loss of physical function among children treated for cancer are likely to become an important area of survivorship research. PMID:25692094

  2. Calculated spanwise lift distributions, influence functions, and influence coefficients for unswept wings in subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diederich, Franklin W; Zlotnick, Martin

    1955-01-01

    Spanwise lift distributions have been calculated for nineteen unswept wings with various aspect ratios and taper ratios and with a variety of angle-of-attack or twist distributions, including flap and aileron deflections, by means of the Weissinger method with eight control points on the semispan. Also calculated were aerodynamic influence coefficients which pertain to a certain definite set of stations along the span, and several methods are presented for calculating aerodynamic influence functions and coefficients for stations other than those stipulated. The information presented in this report can be used in the analysis of untwisted wings or wings with known twist distributions, as well as in aeroelastic calculations involving initially unknown twist distributions.

  3. Influence of nutrient delivery on gut structure and function.

    PubMed

    Bragg, L E; Thompson, J S; Rikkers, L F

    1991-01-01

    Food is an important stimulus for the growth of gastrointestinal mucosa. Gut structure is influenced by the route of nutrient administration, dietary composition and the availability of specific nutrients. The alterations in intestinal structure and function that occur when enteral nutrition is withheld suggests that the ingestion of food results in physiologic responses that are responsible for the maintenance of gut mass during the fed state. The mechanism of mucosal suppression that occurs during starvation, stress, and total parenteral nutrition is not completely understood but may involve the absence of luminal substrates, decreased pancreaticobiliary secretions and alterations in the endocrine or paracrine events that normally accompany eating, digestion, and absorption. Enterocytes prefer glutamine and ketone bodies as oxidative fuels, whereas colonocytes utilize short chain fatty acids. Although enteral delivery of nutrients is the preferred route for maintenance of intestinal mass, provision of specific nutrients and hormonal stimulation during parenteral alimentation has been shown to be important in maintaining mucosal structure and function. If not adequately maintained, the intestine becomes susceptible to a variety of injuries which may result in impaired ability to digest and absorb nutrients and loss of mucosal barrier function.

  4. [Correcting influence of music on the students' functional state].

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, É S; Minasian, S M; Abraamian, É T; Adamian, Ts I

    2013-01-01

    The influence of listening to classical music on integral indices of the activity of the regulatory mechanisms of the heart rhythm in students after teaching load was tested with the method of variational pulsometry accordingly to R.M Baevsky procedure. Registration and analysis of ECG was realized on Pentium 4 in three experimental situations: before the start of lessons (norm), after lessons, after listening to the music. Two types of response of students 'functional state to the teaching load: sympathetic and parasympathetic have been established. After teaching load music therapy session was found to led to the shift of levels of all examined indices of heart rhythm toward the original data (norm), most expressed in students with a sympathetic response type.

  5. Influence of intraocular lens subsurface nanoglistenings on functional visual acuity

    PubMed Central

    Miyata, Kazunori; Hayashidera, Takeshi; Iida, Masaharu; Takada, Keita; Minami, Keiichiro; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the influence of intraocular lens subsurface nanoglistenings (SSNGs) on functional visual acuity (FVA), thirty-nine eyes of 29 patients were examined in this study. The SSNG group comprised 19 eyes of 14 patients (75.7± 5.4 years, mean ± standard deviation), and the control group comprised 20 eyes of 15 patients (73.6 ± 6.5 years). The SSNGs were diagnosed on the basis of the typical whitish IOL appearance upon slit-lamp examination and results of densitometry regarding surface light scattering using Scheimpflug images. The FVA measurement system (AS-28; Kowa, Aichi, Japan) was used to examine changes in continuous visual acuity (VA) over time, and visual function parameters such as FVA, visual maintenance ratio (VMR), maximum VA, minimum VA, standard deviation of VA, and number of blinks were assessed. The results were compared between the SSNG and control groups, and correlations of FVA parameters with the intensity of surface light scattering, time after surgery, and age were also evaluated. There were significant differences in VMR (P = 0.035) and standard deviation of VAs (P = 0.031) between the two groups, although no significant differences were found in baseline VA, FVA, maximum VA, minimum VA, and number of blinks. None of the FVA parameters showed any significant correlations with the intensity of surface light scattering, time after surgery, or age. There is a possibility that VA is unstable during a continuous gazing task in patients with SSNGs. PMID:28328997

  6. Basis Function Approximation of Transonic Aerodynamic Influence Coefficient Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wesley Waisang; Pak, Chan-Gi

    2010-01-01

    A technique for approximating the modal aerodynamic influence coefficients [AIC] matrices by using basis functions has been developed and validated. An application of the resulting approximated modal AIC matrix for a flutter analysis in transonic speed regime has been demonstrated. This methodology can be applied to the unsteady subsonic, transonic and supersonic aerodynamics. The method requires the unsteady aerodynamics in frequency-domain. The flutter solution can be found by the classic methods, such as rational function approximation, k, p-k, p, root-locus et cetera. The unsteady aeroelastic analysis for design optimization using unsteady transonic aerodynamic approximation is being demonstrated using the ZAERO(TradeMark) flutter solver (ZONA Technology Incorporated, Scottsdale, Arizona). The technique presented has been shown to offer consistent flutter speed prediction on an aerostructures test wing [ATW] 2 configuration with negligible loss in precision in transonic speed regime. These results may have practical significance in the analysis of aircraft aeroelastic calculation and could lead to a more efficient design optimization cycle

  7. Influence of gold nanoparticles on platelets functional activity in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, George G.; Ivanov, Alexey N.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Terentyuk, George S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolay G.

    2008-02-01

    Now in the leading biomedical centers of the world approved new technology of laser photothermal destruction of cancer cells using plasmon gold nanoparticles. Investigations of influence of gold nanoparticles on white rat platelets aggregative activity in vitro have been made. Platelet aggregation was investigated in platelet rich plasma (PRP) with help of laser analyzer 230 LA <>, Russia). Aggregation inductor was ADP solution in terminal concentration 2.5 micromole (<>, Russia). Gold nanoshells soluted in salt solution were used for experiments. Samples of PRP were incubated with 50 or 100 μl gold nanoshells solution in 5 minute, after that we made definition ADP induced platelet aggregation. We found out increase platelet function activity after incubation with nanoparticles solution which shown in maximum ADP-induced aggregation degree increase. Increase platelet function activity during intravenous nanoshells injection can be cause of thrombosis on patients. That's why before clinical application of cancer cell destruction based on laser photothermal used with plasmon gold nanoparticles careful investigations of thrombosis process and detail analyze of physiological blood parameters are very necessary.

  8. Influence of smoking on audiological characteristics of hearing function.

    PubMed

    Gegenava, Kh A; Japaridze, Sh V; Kevanishvile, Z Sh; Lomidze, L S; Khechenashvili, T R

    2015-02-01

    Cigarette smoking and related diseases are global problem of health. Discussion regarding influence of smoking on hearing function has been continued about 20 years. The aim of our study was estimation of relation between smoking and development of cochlear neuritis. Research was conducted at Ltd. National Centre of ENT - Japaridze-Kevanishvili clinic and Ltd.Audiology National Center. The data were collected from September 2011 to December 2013. Cross- sectional observational study was carried out. 600 persons (mean age - 45.4±10.4) were enrolled in the research. After filling the informed consent persons were divided into two groups: smokers (300 smokers, apparently healthy persons, mean age 44.3±10.6 years) and control group (300 healthy non-smoker persons, mean age 46.5±10.2 years). All persons completed a questionnaire, which includes questions about smoking status too. The inclusion criterion in smokers group was a smoking habit during 5 years at least 10 cigarettes per day. Otoscopy and Acoustic impedance test (timpanometry, reflexometry, testing for Eustachian tube conductivity) were used for verification of outer and middle-ear normality. Pure Tone Audiometry was performed for hearing measure and identifies hearing nerve condition. Obtained results were statistically treated by the student's t-distribution. For minimal level of significance was taken p<0,05. In smokers group hearing loss was proved in 31.33% (94 persons) and in control group - in 17.34% (52 persons). Hearing-loss vs. normal-hearing ratio amounted hence to 0.46 (P<0.01) in the smokers group and to 0.21 (P<0.01) in the nonsmokers'. Hearing loss in smokers may be provided by different pathological mechanisms.

  9. Dietary fatty acids influence sperm quality and function.

    PubMed

    Ferramosca, A; Moscatelli, N; Di Giacomo, M; Zara, V

    2017-03-23

    Recently, obesity has been linked to male infertility. In animal models the administration of a high-fat diet caused a reduction in sperm quality, by impairing gamete energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible effect of dietary fatty acids supplementation in the modulation of sperm energy metabolism and, in turn, in the improvement of sperm quality in rats fed a high-fat diet. Sexually mature male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups and fed for 4 weeks a standard diet (control group), a high-fat diet (enriched in 35% of fat and 15% sucrose), a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% olive oil (a source of monounsaturated fatty acids) or a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% krill oil (a source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids). Liver and adipose tissue weight, plasma glucose, insulin and lipid concentrations were determined. Activities of enzymes involved in sperm energetic metabolism were evaluated by spectrophotometric assays. Sperm mitochondrial respiratory efficiency was also assayed. The obtained results suggest that olive oil partially counteracts the negative effects of a high-fat diet on sperm quality, by increasing gamete motility, by reducing oxidative stress and slightly improving mitochondrial respiration efficiency. On the other hand, krill oil determines an increase in sperm concentration and motility, an increase in the activities of lactate dehydrogenase, Krebs cycle enzymes and respiratory chain complexes; a parallel increase in the cellular levels of ATP and a reduction in oxidative damage were also observed. These results suggest that dietary fatty acids are able to positively influence sperm quality and function.

  10. A meta-analysis of zooplankton functional traits influencing ecosystem function.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Marie-Pier; Beisner, Beatrix E; Maranger, Roxane

    2016-04-01

    The use of functional traits to characterize community composition has been proposed as a more effective way to link community structure to ecosystem functioning. Organismal morphology, body stoichiometry, and physiology can be readily linked to large-scale ecosystem processes through functional traits that inform on interspecific and species-environment interactions; yet such effect traits are still poorly included in trait-based approaches. Given their key trophic position in aquatic ecosystems, individual zooplankton affect energy fluxes and elemental processing. We compiled a large database of zooplankton traits contributing to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycling and examined the effect of classification and habitat (marine vs. freshwater) on trait relationships. Respiration and nutrient excretion rates followed mass-dependent scaling in both habitats, with exponents ranging from 0.70 to 0.90. Our analyses revealed surprising differences in allometry and respiration between habitats, with freshwater species having lower length-specific mass and three times higher mass-specific respiration rates. These differences in traits point to implications for ecological strategies as well as overall carbon storage and fluxes based on habitat type. Our synthesis quantifies multiple trait relationships and links organisms to ecosystem processes they influence, enabling a more complete integration of aquatic community ecology and biogeochemistry through the promising use of effect traits.

  11. Factors Influencing Vocational Teacher's Use of Online Functionalities in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Robertson (2006b) surveyed Australian vocational teachers to propose that the criteria of newness, complexity, compatibility and locus of control are influential in shaping the frequency of online functionality use. The current paper tests and further refines this proposition by comparing the likelihood that online functionalities will be used at…

  12. APOE genotype influences functional status among elderly without dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Albert, S.M.; Jacobs, D.M.; Stern, Y.

    1995-12-18

    The presence of apolipoprotein-{epsilon}4 (APOE-{epsilon}4) significantly increases the risk of Alzheimer`s disease (AD). The association between APOE-{epsilon}4 status and functional abilities was explored further in a multicultural sample of community-dwelling, nondemented elders. The sample was limited to cognitively-intact, community-dwelling elders, who were free of stroke or other neurologic disability. In 218 elders who met research criteria, the presence of APOE-{epsilon}4 was associated with poorer functional status, apart from the effects of neuropsychological performance, gender, age, and education (OR = 2.5, 95% CI: 1.3, 4.9). In 158 subjects without an APOE-{epsilon}4 allele, 50% reported no functional limitation; in the 60 subjects with an {epsilon}4 allele, only 28% reported no functional limitation (P < .01). The relationship was not explained by the distribution of co-morbidities. The association between poorer function and the presence of an APOE-{epsilon}4 allele was evident in each ethnic group. In path analyses, the presence of an APOE-{epsilon}4 allele was associated with decreased functional ability in non-demented elders not simply through an association with poorer cognitive status, but also independently. These results suggest that the APOE-{epsilon}4 genotype is associated with functional deficit in people with normal neuropsychological profiles. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Immune Influence on Adult Neural Stem Cell Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Carpentier, Pamela A.; Palmer, Theo D.

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) lie at the heart of central nervous system development and repair, and deficiency or dysregulation of NSCs or their progeny can have significant consequences at any stage of life. Immune signaling is emerging as one of the influential variables that define resident NSC behavior. Perturbations in local immune signaling accompany virtually every injury or disease state and signaling cascades that mediate immune activation, resolution, or chronic persistence influence resident stem and progenitor cells. Some aspects of immune signaling are beneficial, promoting intrinsic plasticity and cell replacement, while others appear to inhibit the very type of regenerative response that might restore or replace neural networks lost in injury or disease. Here we review known and speculative roles that immune signaling plays in the postnatal and adult brain, focusing on how environments encountered in disease or injury may influence the activity and fate of endogenous or transplanted NSCs. PMID:19840551

  14. Influence of experimental hypokinesia on gastric secretory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, O. O.; Vavryshchuk, V. I.; Rozvodovskyy, V. I.; Proshcheruk, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    The gastric secretory function of rats was studied in 4, 8, 16 and 30 day hypokinesia. Inhibition of both the gastric juice secretory and acid producing functions was found. The greatest inhibition was observed on day 8 of limited mobility. By days 16 and 30 of the experiment, a tendency of the gastric secretory activity to return to normal was observed, although it remained reduced.

  15. Influence of fatigue on construction workers’ physical and cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, M.; Murphy, L. A.; Fang, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite scientific evidence linking workers’ fatigue to occupational safety (due to impaired physical or cognitive function), little is known about this relationship in construction workers. Aims To assess the association between construction workers’ reported fatigue and their perceived difficulties with physical and cognitive functions. Methods Using data from a convenience sample of US construction workers participating in the 2010–11 National Health Interview Survey two multivariate weighted logistic regression models were built to predict difficulty with physical and with cognitive functions associated with workers’ reported fatigue, while controlling for age, smoking status, alcohol consumption status, sleep hygiene, psychological distress and arthritis status. Results Of 606 construction workers surveyed, 49% reported being ‘tired some days’ in the past 3 months and 10% reported ‘tired most days or every day’. Compared with those feeling ‘never tired’, workers who felt ‘tired some days’ were significantly more likely to report difficulty with physical function (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.03; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.17–3.51) and cognitive function (AOR = 2.27; 95% CI 1.06–4.88) after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusions Our results suggest an association between reported fatigue and experiencing difficulties with physical and cognitive functions in construction workers. PMID:25701835

  16. Direct and indirect influences of executive functions on mathematics achievement.

    PubMed

    Cragg, Lucy; Keeble, Sarah; Richardson, Sophie; Roome, Hannah E; Gilmore, Camilla

    2017-05-01

    Achievement in mathematics is predicted by an individual's domain-specific factual knowledge, procedural skill and conceptual understanding as well as domain-general executive function skills. In this study we investigated the extent to which executive function skills contribute to these three components of mathematical knowledge, whether this mediates the relationship between executive functions and overall mathematics achievement, and if these relationships change with age. Two hundred and ninety-three participants aged between 8 and 25years completed a large battery of mathematics and executive function tests. Domain-specific skills partially mediated the relationship between executive functions and mathematics achievement: Inhibitory control within the numerical domain was associated with factual knowledge and procedural skill, which in turn was associated with mathematical achievement. Working memory contributed to mathematics achievement indirectly through factual knowledge, procedural skill and, to a lesser extent, conceptual understanding. There remained a substantial direct pathway between working memory and mathematics achievement however, which may reflect the role of working memory in identifying and constructing problem representations. These relationships were remarkably stable from 8years through to young adulthood. Our findings help to refine existing multi-component frameworks of mathematics and understand the mechanisms by which executive functions support mathematics achievement.

  17. Avian ecosystem functions are influenced by small mammal ecosystem engineering

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Birds are important mobile link species that contribute to landscape-scale patterns by means of pollination, seed dispersal, and predation. Birds are often associated with habitats modified by small mammal ecosystem engineers. We investigated whether birds prefer to forage on degu (Octodon degus) runways by comparing their foraging effort across sites with a range of runway densities, including sites without runways. We measured granivory by granivorous and omnivorous birds at Rinconada de Maipú, central Chile. As a measure of potential bird foraging on insects, we sampled invertebrate prey richness and abundance across the same sites. We then quantified an index of plot-scale functional diversity due to avian foraging at the patch scale. Results We recorded that birds found food sources sooner and ate more at sites with higher densities of degu runways, cururo mounds, trees, and fewer shrubs. These sites also had higher invertebrate prey richness but lower invertebrate prey abundance. This implies that omnivorous birds, and possibly insectivorous birds, forage for invertebrates in the same plots with high degu runway densities where granivory takes place. In an exploratory analysis we also found that plot-scale functional diversity for four avian ecosystem functions were moderately to weakly correllated to expected ecosystem function outcomes at the plot scale. Conclusions Degu ecosystem engineering affects the behavior of avian mobile link species and is thus correlated with ecosystem functioning at relatively small spatial scales. PMID:24359802

  18. Influence of processing on functionality of milk and dairy proteins.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Mary Ann; Udabage, Punsandani

    2007-01-01

    The inherent physical functionality of dairy ingredients makes them useful in a range of food applications. These functionalities include their solubility, water binding, viscosity, gelation, heat stability, renneting, foaming, and emulsifying properties. The suitability of dairy ingredients for an application can be further tailored by altering the structure of the proteins using appropriate processes. The processes discussed include physical modification (heat treatment, acidification, addition of mineral slats, homogenization, and shear), enzymatic modification (renneting, hydrolysis, and transglutamination), and chemical modification (use of chemical agents and the Maillard reaction). Emerging food processes (high pressure and ultrasound) are also discussed. The challenges for using dairy ingredients for the delivery of nutrients and bioactive components, while maintaining physical functionality, are also highlighted. There is a need for continued research into the fundamental aspects of milk proteins and their responses to various stresses for further differentiation of milk products and for the delivery of ingredients with consistent quality for target applications.

  19. The influence of the choice of the oceanic phase function on imaging under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braesicke, K.; Repasi, E.

    2015-05-01

    There is a large diversity of phase functions for the computer simulation of light under water. Some papers look at the influence of these phase functions on the results of computer simulations of the remote sensing reflectance. We study the influence of these phase functions on the computer simulation of the resulting image of a target illuminated by a laser. For these simulations we are only interested in those parts of the light that reach the camera position. Therefor we investigate the influence of the phase function on the image. We use a Monte Carlo Simulator with several Fournier-Forand, Henyey-Greenstein phase functions. The resulting signals at the receiver of these simulations are compared to a simulation with a Petzold function that is based on measurements of the phase function.

  20. Influence of dietary protein on renal function in dogs.

    PubMed

    Bovée, K C

    1991-11-01

    Two previously published studies in dogs with reduced renal function are reviewed. In the first study, renal function and biochemical responses to dietary changes were studied in four dogs with stable chronic renal failure. The objective was to determine if dogs with moderate stable failure adjust to diets with varied protein and electrolyte content. These dogs were found to have the capacity to adapt to a wide range of dietary protein and electrolyte intake. The only exception was found in dogs fed a reduced-protein diet, which failed to appropriately adjust renal tubular excretion of sodium and phosphate. The only advantage of reduced dietary protein in this study was a reduction in blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Disadvantages of reduced-protein diets were reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and renal plasma flow. In the second study, the hypothesis that large amounts of dietary protein sustain renal hyperfunction and produce progressive glomerulosclerosis in dogs as previously reported in rats was tested. Results failed to find a pattern of deterioration of renal function over 4 y. Light microscopic changes and electron microscopy also failed to find glomerular injury similar to that reported in rodents. These results do not support the hypothesis that feeding a high protein diet had a significant adverse effect on renal function or morphology.

  1. Transforming Water: Social Influence Moderates Psychological, Physiological, and Functional Response to a Placebo Product

    PubMed Central

    Crum, Alia J.; Phillips, Damon J.; Goyer, J. Parker; Akinola, Modupe; Higgins, E. Tory

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how social influence can alter physiological, psychological, and functional responses to a placebo product and how such responses influence the ultimate endorsement of the product. Participants consumed a product, “AquaCharge Energy Water,” falsely-labeled as containing 200 mg of caffeine but which was actually plain spring water, in one of three conditions: a no social influence condition, a disconfirming social influence condition, and a confirming social influence condition. Results demonstrated that the effect of the product labeling on physiological alertness (systolic blood pressure), psychological alertness (self-reported alertness), functional alertness (cognitive interference), and product endorsement was moderated by social influence: participants experienced more subjective, physiological and functional alertness and stronger product endorsement when they consumed the product in the confirming social influence condition than when they consumed the product in the disconfirming social influence condition. These results suggest that social influence can alter subjective, physiological, and functional responses to a faux product, in this case transforming the effects of plain water. PMID:27875567

  2. The influence of fish oil on neurological development and function.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ouf, Noran M; Jan, Mohammed M

    2014-01-01

    Fish oil originates from fish tissue rich in omega-3 fatty acids. These include eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Healthy individuals are advised to consume foods rich in fish oil at least twice a week. However, such intake varies depending on cultural or personal preference, and socio-economic status. Many families and patients with chronic neurological conditions consume supplements containing omega-3 fatty acids. We are frequently requested to give advice and recommendations on using such agents to help improve neurological developmental and cognitive functions. The objective of this review is to discuss the available literature supporting the role of fish oils on brain development and function. There is a growing body of literature suggesting a potential benefit of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids; however it is still unclear if there are response variations according to the developmental stage, age, and dose.

  3. Influence of cigarette smoking on human autonomic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedermaier, O. N.; Smith, M. L.; Beightol, L. A.; Zukowska-Grojec, Z.; Goldstein, D. S.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although cigarette smoking is known to lead to widespread augmentation of sympathetic nervous system activity, little is known about the effects of smoking on directly measured human sympathetic activity and its reflex control. METHODS AND RESULTS. We studied the acute effects of smoking two research-grade cigarettes on muscle sympathetic nerve activity and on arterial baroreflex-mediated changes of sympathetic and vagal neural cardiovascular outflows in eight healthy habitual smokers. Measurements were made during frequency-controlled breathing, graded Valsalva maneuvers, and carotid baroreceptor stimulation with ramped sequences of neck pressure and suction. Smoking provoked the following changes: Arterial pressure increased significantly, and RR intervals, RR interval spectral power at the respiratory frequency, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased. Plasma nicotine levels increased significantly, but plasma epinephrine, norepinephrine, and neuropeptide Y levels did not change. Peak sympathetic nerve activity during and systolic pressure overshoots after Valsalva straining increased significantly in proportion to increases of plasma nicotine levels. The average carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex relation shifted rightward and downward on arterial pressure and RR interval axes; average gain, operational point, and response range did not change. CONCLUSIONS. In habitual smokers, smoking acutely reduces baseline levels of vagal-cardiac nerve activity and completely resets vagally mediated arterial baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses. Smoking also reduces muscle sympathetic nerve activity but augments increases of sympathetic activity triggered by brief arterial pressure reductions. This pattern of autonomic changes is likely to influence smokers' responses to acute arterial pressure reductions importantly.

  4. Some factors influencing salivary function when treating with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mira, J.G.; Wescott, W.B.; Starcke, E.N.; Shannon, I.L.

    1981-04-01

    Salivary flow rate was studied in 29 patients treated with external irradiation to head and neck areas. Resting saliva samples were collected before, during the radiotherapy course and follow-up. Several parameters were investigated: field arrangement, amount of salivary glands irradiated, dose to these glands, initial FR, its recovery during and after irradiation, and influence of therapy interruption in FR. It was found that the level of the upper border of the field is a critical factor when using parallel-opposed lateral fields to the upper neck area and lateral face. More than 50% of the parotids have to be outside the fields to prevent severe dryness. Neck fields which do not encompass salivary glands do not decrease salivary secretion. There is some relation between the initial FR and the dose necessary to produce dryness: patients with high initial salivary FR require higher doses. FR recovery occurs during weekend interruptions before xerostomia develops. Interruptions of therapy for more than two weeks during the radiotherapy course prior to development of dryness might decrease late xerostomia, at least in patients with high initial FR. Objective recovery of the FR has not been observed after treatment in spite of the subjective improvement in the sensation of dryness of some patients.

  5. Loss-of-function variants influence the human serum metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bing; Li, Alexander H.; Metcalf, Ginger A.; Muzny, Donna M.; Morrison, Alanna C.; White, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The metabolome is a collection of small molecules resulting from multiple cellular and biological processes that can act as biomarkers of disease, and African-Americans exhibit high levels of genetic diversity. Exome sequencing of a sample of deeply phenotyped African-Americans allowed us to analyze the effects of annotated loss-of-function (LoF) mutations on 308 serum metabolites measured by untargeted liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. In an independent sample, we identified and replicated four genes harboring six LoF mutations that significantly affected five metabolites. These sites were related to a 19 to 45% difference in geometric mean metabolite levels, with an average effect size of 25%. We show that some of the affected metabolites are risk predictors or diagnostic biomarkers of disease and, using the principle of Mendelian randomization, are in the causal pathway of disease. For example, LoF mutations in SLCO1B1 elevate the levels of hexadecanedioate, a fatty acid significantly associated with increased blood pressure levels and risk of incident heart failure in both African-Americans and an independent sample of European-Americans. We show that SLCO1B1 LoF mutations significantly increase the risk of incident heart failure, thus implicating the metabolite in the causal pathway of disease. These results reveal new avenues into gene function and the understanding of disease etiology by integrating -omic technologies into a deeply phenotyped population study. PMID:27602404

  6. Probiotic modulation of dendritic cell function is influenced by ageing.

    PubMed

    You, Jialu; Dong, Honglin; Mann, Elizabeth R; Knight, Stella C; Yaqoob, Parveen

    2014-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are critical for the generation of T-cell responses. DC function may be modulated by probiotics, which confer health benefits in immunocompromised individuals, such as the elderly. This study investigated the effects of four probiotics, Bifidobacterium longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486, B. longum SP 07/3, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (L.GG) and L. casei Shirota (LcS), on DC function in an allogeneic mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR) model, using DCs and T-cells from young and older donors in different combinations. All four probiotics enhanced expression of CD40, CD80 and CCR7 on both young and older DCs, but enhanced cytokine production (TGF-β, TNF-α) by old DCs only. LcS induced IL-12 and IFNγ production by DC to a greater degree than other strains, while B. longum bv. infantis CCUG 52486 favoured IL-10 production. Stimulation of young T cells in an allogeneic MLR with DC was enhanced by probiotic pretreatment of old DCs, which demonstrated greater activation (CD25) than untreated controls. However, pretreatment of young or old DCs with LPS or probiotics failed to enhance the proliferation of T-cells derived from older donors. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that ageing increases the responsiveness of DCs to probiotics, but this is not sufficient to overcome the impact of immunosenescence in the MLR.

  7. Influence of stearic acid on postprandial lipemia and hemostatic function.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Thomas A B; Berry, Sarah E E

    2005-12-01

    It has been suggested that fats rich in stearic acid may result in exaggerated postprandial lipemia and have adverse effects on hemostatic function. The effects of test meals containing different saturated and monounsaturated FA were compared in healthy subjects in a series of studies to investigate this hypothesis. Stearic acid, when present as cocoa butter, resulted in similar postprandial lipemia and factor VII activation compared with a meal containing high-oleic sunflower oil. Stearic acid when presented as shea butter or as randomized stearate-rich TAG resulted in decreased postprandial lipemia and decreased postprandial activation of factor VII. Stearic acid-rich test meals did not result in impaired fibrinolytic activity compared with either a low-fat meal or a meal high in oleate. The difference in responses between the different stearic acid-rich fats appears to be due to varying solid fat contents of the fats at 37 degrees C.

  8. Fish otolith mass asymmetry: morphometry and influence on acoustic functionality.

    PubMed

    Lychakov, D V; Rebane, Y T

    2005-03-01

    The role of the fish otolith mass asymmetry in acoustic functionality is studied. The saccular, lagenar and utricular otoliths are weighted in two species of the Black Sea rays, 15 species of the Black Sea teleost fish and guppy fish. The dimensionless otolith mass asymmetry chi is calculated as ratio of the difference between masses of the right and left paired otoliths to average otolith mass. In the most fish studied the otolith mass asymmetry is within the range of -0.2 < chi < +0.2 (< 20%). We do not find specific fish species with extremely large or extremely small otolith asymmetry. The large otoliths do not belong solely to any particular side, left or right. The heavier otoliths of different otolithic organs can be located in different labyrinths. No relationship has been found between the magnitude of the otolith mass asymmetry and the length (mass, age) of the animal. The suggested fluctuation model of the otolith growth can interpret these results. The model supposes that the otolith growth rate varies slightly hither and thither during lifetime of the individual fish. Therefore, the sign of the relative otolith mass asymmetry can change several times in the process of the individual fish growth but within the range outlined above. Mathematical modeling shows that acoustic functionality (sensitivity, temporal processing, sound localization) of the fish can be disturbed by the otolith mass asymmetry. But this is valid only for the fish with largest otolith masses, characteristic of the bottom and littoral fish, and with highest otolith asymmetry. For most fish the values of otolith mass asymmetry is well below critical values. Thus, the most fish get around the troubles related to the otolith mass asymmetry. We suggest that a specific physicochemical mechanism of the paired otolith growth that maintains the otolith mass asymmetry at the lowest possible level should exist. However, the principle and details of this mechanism are still far from being

  9. Influence of local vibration on finger functions of forest workers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Nakamura, K; Sato, K; Tanaka, K

    1997-07-01

    We physically examined of forest workers in the northern part of Fukushima District, Japan. The main purpose of this study was to survey the state of finger functions, especially the differences between the functions of right and left fingers of forest workers. This physical examination was conducted in winter. The items of the physical examination were hand grip strength, finger skin temperature, vibration sensation threshold, nail pressure test of the finger. Subjects were classified into A and B groups on the base of the results of the physical examination. A group is normal or slight disorder, and B group is disorder or illness. Hand grip strength was measured five times at five-second intervals. The decrease ratio of the left hand grip strength was greater than that of the right hand grip strength. Although there were significant differences among each finger of A and B groups, there were no big differences in the skin temperatures of the fingers in each group. Vibration sensation threshold was measured for II, III and IV fingers. The vibration sensation threshold of the index finger was the most sensitive and that of IV finger was the least sensitive. The vibration sensation threshold of the right fingers was more sensitive than that of the left fingers. The reaction times of the nail pressure test of the right fingers were generally faster than those of the left fingers. Forestry workers in Japan become elderly. There are big differences among the physical reactions or strengths of elderly people. Standard values for the measuring items for ageing are needed.

  10. A quantum algorithm for approximating the influences of Boolean functions and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongwei; Yang, Li

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the influences of variables on a Boolean function based on the quantum Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm. A previous paper (Floess et al. in Math Struct Comput Sci 23:386, 2013) has proved that if an -variable Boolean function does not depend on an input variable , using the Bernstein-Vazirani circuit for will always output that has a 0 in the th position. We generalize this result and show that, after running this algorithm once, the probability of getting a 1 in each position is equal to the dependence degree of on the variable , i.e., the influence of on . Based on this, we give an approximation algorithm to evaluate the influence of any variable on a Boolean function. Next, as an application, we use it to study the Boolean functions with juntas and construct probabilistic quantum algorithms to learn certain Boolean functions. Compared with the deterministic algorithms given by Floess et al., our probabilistic algorithms are faster.

  11. The influence of atypical antipsychotic drugs on sexual function

    PubMed Central

    Just, Marek J

    2015-01-01

    Human sexuality is contingent upon many biological and psychological factors. Such factors include sexual drive (libido), physiological arousal (lubrication/erection), orgasm, and ejaculation, as well as maintaining normal menstrual cycle. The assessment of sexual dysfunction can be difficult due to the intimate nature of the problem and patients’ unwillingness to discuss it. Also, the problem of dysfunction is often overlooked by doctors. Atypical antipsychotic treatment is a key component of mental disorders’ treatment algorithms recommended by the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence, the American Psychiatric Association, and the British Society for Psychopharmacology. The relationship between atypical antipsychotic drugs and sexual dysfunction is mediated in part by antipsychotic blockade of pituitary dopamine D2 receptors increasing prolactin secretion, although direct correlations have not been established between raised prolactin levels and clinical symptoms. Variety of mechanisms are likely to contribute to antipsychotic-related sexual dysfunction, including hyperprolactinemia, sedation, and antagonism of a number of neurotransmitter receptors (α-adrenergic, dopaminergic, histaminic, and muscarinic). Maintaining normal sexual function in people treated for mental disorders can affect their quality of life, mood, self-esteem, attitude toward taking medication, and compliance during therapy. PMID:26185449

  12. Influence of metallothionein-1 localization on its function.

    PubMed Central

    Levadoux-Martin, M; Hesketh, J E; Beattie, J H; Wallace, H M

    2001-01-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) have a major role to play in metal metabolism, and may also protect DNA against oxidative damage. MT protein has been found localized in the nucleus during S-phase. The mRNA encoding the MT-1 isoform has a perinuclear localization, and is associated with the cytoskeleton; this targeting, due to signals within the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR), facilitates nuclear localization of MT-1 during S-phase [Levadoux, Mahon, Beattie, Wallace and Hesketh (1999) J. Biol. Chem. 274, 34961-34966]. Using cells transfected with MT gene constructs differing in their 3'-UTRs, the role of MT protein in the nucleus has been studied. Chinese hamster ovary cells were transfected with either the full MT gene (MTMT cells) or with the MT 5'-UTR and coding region linked to the 3'-UTR of glutathione peroxidase (MTGSH cells). Cell survival following exposure to oxidative stress and chemical agents was higher in cells expressing the native MT gene than in cells where MT localization was disrupted, or in untransfected cells. Also, MTMT cells showed less DNA damage than MTGSH cells in response to either hydrogen peroxide or mutagen. After exposure to UV light or mutagen, MTMT cells showed less apoptosis than MTGSH cells, as assessed by DNA fragmentation and flow cytometry. The data indicate that the perinuclear localization of MT mRNA is important for the function of MT in a protective role against DNA damage and apoptosis induced by external stress. PMID:11284736

  13. Differential Light Chain Assembly Influences Outer Arm Dynein Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    DiBella, Linda M.; Gorbatyuk, Oksana; Sakato, Miho; Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Witman, George B.; King, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    Tctex1 and Tctex2 were originally described as potential distorters/sterility factors in the non-Mendelian transmission of t-haplotypes in mice. These proteins have since been identified as subunits of cytoplasmic and/or axonemal dyneins. Within the Chlamydomonas flagellum, Tctex1 is a subunit of inner arm I1. We have now identified a second Tctex1-related protein (here termed LC9) in Chlamydomonas. LC9 copurifies with outer arm dynein in sucrose density gradients and is missing only in those strains completely lacking this motor. Zero-length cross-linking of purified outer arm dynein indicates that LC9 interacts directly with both the IC1 and IC2 intermediate chains. Immunoblot analysis revealed that LC2, LC6, and LC9 are missing in an IC2 mutant strain (oda6-r88) that can assemble outer arms but exhibits significantly reduced flagellar beat frequency. This defect is unlikely to be due to lack of LC6, because an LC6 null mutant (oda13) exhibits only a minor swimming abnormality. Using an LC2 null mutant (oda12-1), we find that although some outer arm dynein components assemble in the absence of LC2, they are nonfunctional. In contrast, dyneins from oda6-r88, which also lack LC2, retain some activity. Furthermore, we observed a synthetic assembly defect in an oda6-r88 oda12-1 double mutant. These data suggest that LC2, LC6, and LC9 have different roles in outer arm assembly and are required for wild-type motor function in the Chlamydomonas flagellum. PMID:16195342

  14. The influence of Sm-153 therapy on bone marrow function

    PubMed Central

    Małkowski, Bogdan; Dudek, Anna; Wędrowski, Mateusz; Szefer, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Studies about possible risks connected with β-emitterradiotherapy concentrate mainly on potential myelotoxicity. Results of previously published analysis based on white blood cells (WBC) and platelet (PLT) counts – before and after radionuclide treatment – are quite varied. The aim of our study was to present the greatest possible impact of Samarium-153 on bone marrow function in clinical practice. Material and methods The study included the blood test results of 175 patients with bone metastases treated with Sm-153 in the years 2012–2014. We compared levels of WBC, PLT, red blood cells (RBC), and haemoglobin (HGB) from two blood tests – one performed directly before the therapy and the other 2–6 weeks after isotope injection. Results and conclusions The study showed decreased mean level of WBC in a control test performed after therapy in comparison to output results at about 27.1%. In our study 1.1% of patients developed the third-grade toxicity in CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events). Mean decrease of PLT was about 18%. Three patients (1.7% of all) result qualified as third-grade toxicity in a control test, one as fourth-grade. Analysis of RBC level showed 5.7% reduction of output values. The same calculation was seen for HGB – 5.1%. The greatest but acceptable decrease in haematological parameters was observed in WBC and PLT. Analysis of changes in WBC and PLT level showed them to be similar or smaller than was proven in previously published studies. PMID:28373820

  15. Factors influencing reticulophagocytic function in insulin-treated diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, S.; Charlesworth, J.A.; Pussell, B.A.; Campbell, L.V.; Kotowicz, M.A.

    1984-09-01

    The splenic component of reticulophagocytic function (RPF) was examined in 29 insulin-treated diabetic subjects (13 type I and 16 type II) by measurement of clearance of altered, radiolabeled, autologous erythrocytes. Double-isotope studies were performed with cells altered by: (1) preincubation with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and (2) coating with IgG antibody to the Rhesus (Rh) D antigen, labeled with 99mTc and 51Cr, respectively. HLA typing for the A, B, and DR loci was performed in those patients showing a defect in the clearance of IgG-coated cells. Values for half-life (t1/2) were correlated with the incidence of diabetic complications, levels of HbA1, and circulating immune complexes (CIC). Two patterns of abnormal clearance were observed: first, an isolated defect of IgG-coated cell clearance in 7 patients (3 had the HLA B8/DR3 haplotype) and second, abnormal removal of both types of cell in a further 7 patients (3 had B8/DR3). There was no correlation between half-lives as measured by the two methods, although exclusion of the patients with a defect of IgG-coated cell clearance alone yielded a highly significant correlation for the remaining 15 Rh-positive patients (P less than 0.01). Abnormalities of IgG-coated cell clearance were more frequent in patients with HbA1 greater than 9% (P less than 0.02), while t1/2 of NEM-altered cells was significantly greater in patients with CIC (P less than 0.05). There was no correlation between t1/2 and the incidence of peripheral complications.

  16. Effects of functional diversity loss on ecosystem functions are influenced by compensation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qingmin; Tian, Dashuan; Naeem, Shahid; Auerswald, Karl; Elser, James J; Bai, Yongfei; Huang, Jianhui; Wang, Qibing; Wang, Hong; Wu, Jianguo; Han, Xingguo

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the impacts of biodiversity loss on ecosystem functioning and services has been a central issue in ecology. Experiments in synthetic communities suggest that biodiversity loss may erode a set of ecosystem functions, but studies in natural communities indicate that the effects of biodiversity loss are usually weak and that multiple functions can be sustained by relatively few species. Yet, the mechanisms by which natural ecosystems are able to maintain multiple functions in the face of diversity loss remain poorly understood. With a long-term and large-scale removal experiment in the Inner Mongolian grassland, here we showed that losses of plant functional groups (PFGs) can reduce multiple ecosystem functions, including biomass production, soil NO3 -N use, net ecosystem carbon exchange, gross ecosystem productivity, and ecosystem respiration, but the magnitudes of these effects depended largely on which PFGs were removed. Removing the two dominant PFGs (perennial rhizomatous grasses and perennial bunchgrasses) simultaneously resulted in dramatic declines in all examined functions, but such declines were circumvented when either dominant PFG was present. We identify the major mechanism for this as a compensation effect by which each dominant PFG can mitigate the losses of others. This study provides evidence that compensation ensuing from PFG losses can mitigate their negative consequence, and thus natural communities may be more resilient to biodiversity loss than currently thought if the remaining PFGs have strong compensation capabilities. On the other hand, ecosystems without well-developed compensatory functional diversity may be much more vulnerable to biodiversity loss.

  17. The impact of objective function selection on the influence of individual data points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, David; Thyer, Mark; Westra, Seth; McInerney, David

    2016-04-01

    Across the field of hydrology practitioners apply a range of objective functions which are selected based upon the intended model application and suitability of the objective function assumptions to the data in question. Despite most objective functions providing fundamentally different calibration results there are currently limited methods for comparison of alternatives. Influence diagnostics quantify the impact of individual data points on model performance, parameters and predictions. The goal of this study is to use compare four commonly applied objective functions in hydrology using influence diagnostics to provide insights on how objective function selection changes the influence of individual data points on model calibration. The specific aims are to: 1) explore the impact on magnitude of influence of objective functions, 2) investigate similarities between influential points identified by objective functions and, 3) categorise flows that are influential under objective functions. We use case-deletion influence diagnostics to examine four objective functions: Standard Least Squares (SLS), Weighted Least Squares (WLS), Log transformed flows (LOG) and the Kling-Gupta Efficiency (KGE). We apply these objective functions to six scenarios: two conceptual hydrological models (GR4J and IHACRES) across three catchment case studies with varying runoff coefficients (0.14 to 0.57). We quantify influence using the case-deletion relative change in flow metrics: mean flow prediction, maximum flow prediction, and the 10th percentile low flow prediction. The results show that when using objective functions SLS and KGE influential data points have larger magnitude influence (maximum of 10% change in the flow metrics across all data points for both objective functions) than heteroscedastic WLS and LOG (WLS maximum of 8% and LOG maximum of 6% change in the flow metrics). SLS and KGE identify similar influential points (75% of the most influential points are common to both

  18. Kinematics, influence functions and field quantities for disturbance propagation from moving disturbance sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, A.

    1984-01-01

    A unified method is presented for deriving the influence functions of moving singularities which determine the field quantities in aerodynamics and aeroacoustics. The moving singularities comprise volume and surface distributions having arbitrary orientations in space and to the trajectory. Hence one generally valid formula for the influence functions which reveal some universal relationships and remarkable properties in the disturbance fields. The derivations used are completely consistent with the physical processes in the propagation field, such that treatment renders new descriptions for some standard concepts. The treatment is uniformly valid for subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers.

  19. Influence of social cognition on daily functioning in schizophrenia: study of incremental validity and mediational effects.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Domínguez, Sara; Penadés, Rafael; Segura, Bàrbara; González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Catalán, Rosa

    2015-02-28

    While the role of impaired neurocognition in accounting for functional outcome in schizophrenia is generally established, the influence of social cognition on this relationship is far from clear. This study aims to explore in depth the nature of the relationship between neurocognition, social cognition and daily functioning in people with schizophrenia. Twenty-one individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia and 15 controls completed the assessment of symptom severity, neuropsychological status, social cognition (Theory of Mind and affect processing) and other functional measures. A statistical mediation model based on hierarchical regression analyses was used to establish the mediation path with significant variables. Social cognition played a mediating role between neurocognition and functioning, accounting for significant trends in incremental variance in specific functional indexes (interpersonal behavior and employment/occupation). Consequently, this study adds to the evidence underlining the importance of targeting not only social cognitive or neurocognitive functions but to combine both interventions to reveal the best daily functioning results in schizophrenia patients.

  20. The influence of depression on processing speed and executive function in nondemented subjects aged 75.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, Susanne; Zehetmayer, Sonja; Hinterberger, Margareta; Kudrnovsky-Moser, Stephan; Weissgram, Silvia; Tragl, Karl Heinz; Fischer, Peter

    2011-09-01

    Neuropsychological deficits are commonly found to be part of depression in old age and might simultaneously represent early symptoms of dementia. We investigated the influence of depression on processing speed and executive function in subjects who did not develop dementia during the following 5 years to examine whether these neuropsychological dysfunctions are due to depression or are influenced by other causes (e.g., education, cerebral comorbidity). A total of 287 subjects aged 75 (mean: 75.76) were available for analyses. Processing speed was measured by the Trail Making Test-A, Executive Function by the Trail Making Test-B and Verbal Fluency. DSM-IV-criteria were used for diagnosing depression. Cerebral comorbidity (e.g., stroke, Parkinson's disease), sex, education, antidepressant, and/or benzodiazepine medication, and a history of depression were taken into account as covariates. Univariate analyses and multiple regression analyses were calculated. Higher education was strongly related to better performance in all three psychometric tests. Cerebral comorbidity significantly slowed TMT-A performance and reduced Verbal Fluency scores. In multiple regression analysis depression showed only a minor, slowing influence on TMT-A and TMT-B performance. Depression only had a minor influence on processing speed and executive function in this sample of nondemented subjects. By comparison, the influence of education and cerebral comorbidity was seen to be stronger.

  1. The Influence of Acculturation on Family Functioning among Hispanic Americans in a Bicultural Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Jorge I; Hosch, Harmon M.

    It has been observed that the process of acculturation is a potential source of stress. The population of El Paso-Ciudad Juarez border region of Texas and Mexico can be considered as highly vulnerable to the influence of acculturative stress on family functioning. An empirical study was conducted to investigate the relationship between…

  2. Influence of multi-scale hydrologic controls on river network connectivity and riparian function

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ecological functions of rivers and streams and their associated riparian zones are strongly influenced by surface and subsurface hydrologic routing of water within river basins and river networks. Hydrologic attributes of the riparian area for a given stream reach are typica...

  3. Manual Signing in Adults with Intellectual Disability: Influence of Sign Characteristics on Functional Sign Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meuris, Kristien; Maes, Bea; De Meyer, Anne-Marie; Zink, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of sign characteristics in a key word signing (KWS) system on the functional use of those signs by adults with intellectual disability (ID). Method: All 507 signs from a Flemish KWS system were characterized in terms of phonological, iconic, and referential characteristics.…

  4. Factors influencing the caffeine test for cytochrome P 448-dependent liver function.

    PubMed

    Joeres, R; Klinker, H; Huesler, H; Epping, J; Hofstetter, G; Drost, D; Reuss, H; Zilly, W; Richter, E

    1987-01-01

    Liver functions in patients with liver disease can be estimated by caffeine clearance. Our data, however, demonstrate the additional influence of factors other than liver disease on the caffeine test. Smoking enhances caffeine clearance in both healthy volunteers and patients with severe hepatic disorders, whereas co-medication with mexiletine strongly inhibits caffeine elimination.

  5. Influence of Rice Development on the Function of Bacterial Blight Resistance Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease resistance genes most commonly used in breeding programs are single, dominant, resistance (R) genes with relative effectiveness influenced by plant developmental stage. Knowing the developmental stages at which an R gene is functional is important for disease management. In rice, resistanc...

  6. Verbal Memory Abilities in Severe Childhood Psychiatric Disorders and the Influence of Attention and Executive Functions.

    PubMed

    Kavanaugh, Brian C; Gaudet, Charles E; Dupont-Frechette, Jennifer A; Tellock, Perrin P; Maher, Isolde D; Haisley, Lauren D; Holler, Karen A

    2016-04-28

    Despite prior adult research regarding the influence of executive functions on memory performance, there has been inconsistent prior research on the role of executive functions on memory performance in children, particularly those children with severe psychiatric disorders. A medical chart review was conducted for 76 children (ages 6-12 years) who received a neuropsychological evaluation during children's psychiatric inpatient program hospitalization. A series of hierarchical regression analyses investigated the role of attention/executive and non-executive functions in verbal memory performance (immediate recall, delayed recall, and delayed recognition). Demographic and verbal measures were entered into blocks 1 and 2 for all analyses, followed by attention and executive functions (i.e., attention span, sustained attention, verbal fluency, cognitive flexibility, inhibitory control, and planning/organization). Nearly 15% of the participants displayed memory impairment. Results of regression analyses indicated attention/executive dysfunction severity predicted overall memory performance. Attention span predicted performance on all three memory conditions. Planning/organization accounted for unique variance in immediate recall condition while inhibitory control accounted for unique variance in delayed recall condition. These results indicate that verbal memory problems frequently occur in severe childhood psychiatric disorders. Further, planning/organization deficits may influence immediate recall, while inhibitory control deficits may influence delayed recall. Alternatively, delayed recognition memory may be the most resistant to the negative influence of executive deficits on verbal memory performance in childhood psychiatric disorders.

  7. The Influence of Sex Hormones on Functional Cerebral Asymmetries in Postmenopausal Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ulrike; Erdmann, Gisela

    2008-01-01

    Studies investigating changes in functional cerebral asymmetries (FCAs) with hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle in young women have led to controversial hypotheses about an influence of estrogen (E) and/or progesterone (P) on FCAs. Based on methodical, but also on principal problems in deriving conclusions about hormone effects from…

  8. Circadian rhythms in myocardial metabolism and contractile function; influence of workload and oleate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multiple extra-cardiac stimuli, such as workload and circulating nutrients (e.g., fatty acids), known to influence myocardial metabolism and contractile function exhibit marked circadian rhythms. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the rat heart exhibits circadian rhythms in its ...

  9. The Influence of Frontal Lobe Tumors and Surgical Treatment on Advanced Cognitive Functions.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shengyu; Wang, Yinyan; Jiang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Brain cognitive functions affect patient quality of life. The frontal lobe plays a crucial role in advanced cognitive functions, including executive function, meta-cognition, decision-making, memory, emotion, and language. Therefore, frontal tumors can lead to serious cognitive impairments. Currently, neurosurgical treatment is the primary method to treat brain tumors; however, the effects of the surgical treatments are difficult to predict or control. The treatment may both resolve the effects of the tumor to improve cognitive function or cause permanent disabilities resulting from damage to healthy functional brain tissue. Previous studies have focused on the influence of frontal lesions and surgical treatments on patient cognitive function. Here, we review cognitive impairment caused by frontal lobe brain tumors.

  10. Maternal and offspring pools of osteocalcin influence brain development and functions.

    PubMed

    Oury, Franck; Khrimian, Lori; Denny, Christine A; Gardin, Antoine; Chamouni, Alexandre; Goeden, Nick; Huang, Yung-yu; Lee, Hojoon; Srinivas, Prashanth; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Suyama, Shigetomo; Langer, Thomas; Mann, John J; Horvath, Tamas L; Bonnin, Alexandre; Karsenty, Gerard

    2013-09-26

    The powerful regulation of bone mass exerted by the brain suggests the existence of bone-derived signals modulating this regulation or other functions of the brain. We show here that the osteoblast-derived hormone osteocalcin crosses the blood-brain barrier, binds to neurons of the brainstem, midbrain, and hippocampus, enhances the synthesis of monoamine neurotransmitters, inhibits GABA synthesis, prevents anxiety and depression, and favors learning and memory independently of its metabolic functions. In addition to these postnatal functions, maternal osteocalcin crosses the placenta during pregnancy and prevents neuronal apoptosis before embryos synthesize this hormone. As a result, the severity of the neuroanatomical defects and learning and memory deficits of Osteocalcin(-/-) mice is determined by the maternal genotype, and delivering osteocalcin to pregnant Osteocalcin(-/-) mothers rescues these abnormalities in their Osteocalcin(-/-) progeny. This study reveals that the skeleton via osteocalcin influences cognition and contributes to the maternal influence on fetal brain development.

  11. The Combined Influence of Psychological Factors on Biomarkers of Renal Functioning in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gholson, Georica K.; Mwendwa, Denée T.; Wright, Regina Sims; Callender, Clive O.; Campbell, Alfonso L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective African Americans are disproportionately affected by chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent research has documented that psychological factors have a significant influence on the progression and treatment of CKD. However, extant evidence exists that has examined the link between psychological factors and renal function in African Americans. The purpose of the study was to determine if psychological factors were associated with several biomarkers of renal functioning in this group. Participants 129 African American participants, with a mean age of 44.4 years (SD512.25). Design and Setting Data were analyzed from a cross-sectional study entitled Stress and Psychoneuroimmunological Factors in Renal Health and Disease. Main Predictor Measures Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Cook Medley Scale, and Perceived Stress Scale-10. Main Outcome Measures Systolic blood pressure, as well as blood and urine samples, were collected and served as biomarkers of renal functioning. Results Our findings indicated that psychological factors were not associated with renal functioning. Age, sex, and systolic blood pressure emerged as significant predictors of renal functioning. Conclusions Depressive symptomatology, perceived stress, and hostility did not influence renal functioning in this sample. This unexpected finding may be attributed to the fact that this sample population was not elevated on depressive symptoms, perceived stress, or hostility. Elevated levels of these psychological factors, as well as other psychological factors associatd with the CKD, may be more influential on renal functioning in African Americans. PMID:26118136

  12. Sex influences the effect of a lifelong increase in serotonin transporter function on cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Neil; Ferrington, Linda; Olverman, Henry J; Harmar, Anthony J; Kelly, Paul A T

    2009-08-01

    Polymorphic variation in the human serotonin transporter (SERT; 5-HTT) gene resulting in a lifelong increase in SERT expression is associated with reduced anxiety and a reduced risk of affective disorder. Evidence also suggests that sex influences the effect of this polymorphism on affective functioning. Here we use novel transgenic mice overexpressing human SERT (hSERT OVR) to investigate the possible influence of sex on the alterations in SERT protein expression and cerebral function that occur in response to increased SERT gene transcription. SERT binding levels were significantly increased in the brain of hSERT OVR mice in a region-dependent manner. The increased SERT binding in hSERT OVR mice was more pronounced in female than in male mice. Cerebral metabolism, as reflected by a quantitative index of local cerebral glucose utilization (iLCMRglu), was significantly decreased in many brain regions in hSERT OVR female as compared with wild-type female mice, whereas there was no evidence for a significant effect in any region in males. The ability of hSERT overexpression to modify cerebral metabolism was significantly greater in females than in males. This effect was particularly pronounced in the medial striatum, globus pallidus, somatosensory cortex, mamillary body, and ventrolateral thalamus. Overall, these findings demonstrate that the influence of a lifelong increase in SERT gene transcription on cerebral function is greater in females than in males and may relate, in part, to the influence of sex on genetically driven increases in SERT protein expression.

  13. Ecosystem Services Transcend Boundaries: Estuaries Provide Resource Subsidies and Influence Functional Diversity in Coastal Benthic Communities

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Candida; Thrush, Simon F.; Lohrer, Andrew M.; Hewitt, Judi E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Estuaries are highly productive ecosystems that can export organic matter to coastal seas (the ‘outwelling hypothesis’). However the role of this food resource subsidy on coastal ecosystem functioning has not been examined. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the influence of estuarine primary production as a resource subsidy and the influence of estuaries on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in coastal mollusk-dominated sediment communities. Stable isotope values (δ13C, δ15N) demonstrated that estuarine primary production was exported to the adjacent coast and contributed to secondary production up to 4 km from the estuary mouth. Further, isotope signatures of suspension feeding bivalves on the adjacent coast (Dosinia subrosea) closely mirrored the isotope values of the dominant bivalves inside the estuaries (Austrovenus stutchburyi), indicating utilization of similar organic matter sources. However, the food subsidies varied between estuaries; with estuarine suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM) dominant at Tairua estuary, while seagrass and fringing vegetation detritus was proportionately more important at Whangapoua estuary, with lesser contributions of estuarine SPOM. Distance from the estuary mouth and the size and density of large bivalves (Dosinia spp.) had a significant influence on the composition of biological traits in the coastal macrobenthic communities, signaling the potential influence of these spatial subsidies on ecosystem functioning. Conclusions/Significance Our study demonstrated that the locations where ecosystem services like productivity are generated are not necessarily where the services are utilized. Further, we identified indirect positive effects of the nutrient subsidies on biodiversity (the estuarine subsidies influenced the bivalves, which in turn affected the diversity and functional trait composition of the coastal sediment macrofaunal communities). These findings highlight the importance of

  14. Factors that influence physical function and emotional well-being among Medicare-Medicaid enrollees.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kathy D; Pepper, Ginette A; Caserta, Michael; Wong, Bob; Brunker, Cherie P; Morris, Diana L; Burant, Christopher J; Hazelett, Susan; Kropp, Denise; Allen, Kyle R

    2015-01-01

    Dually enrolled Medicare-Medicaid older adults are a vulnerable population. We tested House's Conceptual Framework for Understanding Social Inequalities in Health and Aging in Medicare-Medicaid enrollees by examining the extent to which disparities indicators, which included race, age, gender, neighborhood poverty, education, income, exercise (e.g., walking), and physical activity (e.g., housework) influence physical function and emotional well-being. This secondary analysis included 337 Black (31%) and White (69%) older Medicare-Medicaid enrollees. Using path analysis, we determined that race, neighborhood poverty, education, and income did not influence physical function or emotional well-being. However, physical activity (e.g., housework) was associated with an increased self-report of physical function and emotional well-being of β = .23, p < .001; β = .17, p < .01, respectively. Future studies of factors that influence physical function and emotional well-being in this population should take into account health status indicators such as allostatic load, comorbidity, and perceived racism/discrimination.

  15. Sleep inertia, sleep homeostatic, and circadian influences on higher-order cognitive functions

    PubMed Central

    Ronda, Joseph M.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sleep inertia, sleep homeostatic, and circadian processes modulate cognition, including reaction time, memory, mood, and alertness. How these processes influence higher-order cognitive functions is not well known. Six participants completed a 73-daylong study that included two 14-daylong 28h forced desynchrony protocols, to examine separate and interacting influences of sleep inertia, sleep homeostasis, and circadian phase on higher-order cognitive functions of inhibitory control and selective visual attention. Cognitive performance for most measures was impaired immediately after scheduled awakening and improved over the first ~2-4h of wakefulness (sleep inertia); worsened thereafter until scheduled bedtime (sleep homeostasis); and was worst at ~60° and best at ~240° (circadian modulation, with worst and best phases corresponding to ~9AM and ~9PM respectively, in individuals with a habitual waketime of 7AM). The relative influences of sleep inertia, sleep homeostasis, and circadian phase depended on the specific higher-order cognitive function task examined. Inhibitory control appeared to be modulated most strongly by circadian phase, whereas selective visual attention for a spatial-configuration search task was modulated most strongly by sleep inertia. These findings demonstrate that some higher-order cognitive processes are differentially sensitive to different sleep-wake regulatory processes. Differential modulation of cognitive functions by different sleep-wake regulatory processes has important implications for understanding mechanisms contributing to performance impairments during adverse circadian phases, sleep deprivation, and/or upon awakening from sleep. PMID:25773686

  16. Factors Influencing Self-Assessment of Cognition and Functioning in Schizophrenia: Implications For Treatment Studies

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Dante; Strassnig, Martin; Sabbag, Samir; Gould, Felicia; Twamley, Elizabeth W.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Harvey, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Awareness of illness is a major factor in schizophrenia and extends into unawareness of cognitive and functional deficits. This unawareness of functional limitations has been shown to be influenced by several different predictive factors, including greater impairment and less severe depression. As treatment efforts are aimed at reducing cognitive deficits, discovery of the most efficient assessment strategies for detection of cognitive and functional changes is critical. In this study, we collected systematic assessments from high contact clinicians focusing on their impressions of the cognitive deficits and everyday functioning in a sample of 169 community dwelling patients with schizophrenia. The patients provided self-report on those same rating scales, as well as self-reporting their depression and performing an assessment of cognitive performance and functional skills. There was essentially no correlation between patients' self reports of their cognitive performance and functional skills and either clinician ratings of these skills or the results of the performance-based assessments. In contrast, clinician reports of cognitive impairments and everyday functioning were correlated with objective performance data. Depression on the part of patients was associated with ratings of functioning that were both more impaired and more congruent with clinician impressions, while overall patients reported less impairment than clinicians. These results underscore the limitations of self reported cognitive functioning even with structured rating scales. Concurrently, clinicians provided ratings of cognitive performance that were related to scores on objective tests, even though they were unaware of the results of those assessments. PMID:25104226

  17. Genetic and environmental influences on word recognition and spelling deficits as a function of age.

    PubMed

    Friend, Angela; DeFries, John C; Wadsworth, Sally J; Olson, Richard K

    2007-05-01

    Previous twin studies have suggested a possible developmental dissociation between genetic influences on word recognition and spelling deficits, wherein genetic influence declined across age for word recognition, and increased for spelling recognition. The present study included two measures of word recognition (timed, untimed) and two measures of spelling (recognition, production) in younger and older twins. The heritability estimates for the two word recognition measures were .65 (timed) and .64 (untimed) in the younger group and .65 and .58 respectively in the older group. For spelling, the corresponding estimates were .57 (recognition) and .51 (production) in the younger group and .65 and .67 in the older group. Although these age group differences were not significant, the pattern of decline in heritability across age for reading and increase for spelling conformed to that predicted by the developmental dissociation hypothesis. However, the tests for an interaction between genetic influences on word recognition and spelling deficits as a function of age were not significant.

  18. How hormones influence composition and physiological function of the brain-blood barrier.

    PubMed

    Hampl, R; Bičíková, M; Sosvorová, L

    2015-01-01

    Hormones exert many actions in the brain. Their access and effects in the brain are regulated by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Hormones as other substances may enter the brain and vice versa either by paracellular way requiring breaching tight junctions stitching the endothelial cells composing the BBB, or by passage through the cells (transcellular way). Hormones influence both ways through their receptors, both membrane and intracellular, present on/in the BBB. In the review the main examples are outlined how hormones influence the expression and function of proteins forming the tight junctions, as well as how they regulate expression and function of major protein transporters mediating transport of various substances including hormone themselves.

  19. Modeling of edge effect in subaperture tool influence functions of computer controlled optical surfacing.

    PubMed

    Wan, Songlin; Zhang, Xiangchao; He, Xiaoying; Xu, Min

    2016-12-20

    Computer controlled optical surfacing requires an accurate tool influence function (TIF) for reliable path planning and deterministic fabrication. Near the edge of the workpieces, the TIF has a nonlinear removal behavior, which will cause a severe edge-roll phenomenon. In the present paper, a new edge pressure model is developed based on the finite element analysis results. The model is represented as the product of a basic pressure function and a correcting function. The basic pressure distribution is calculated according to the surface shape of the polishing pad, and the correcting function is used to compensate the errors caused by the edge effect. Practical experimental results demonstrate that the new model can accurately predict the edge TIFs with different overhang ratios. The relative error of the new edge model can be reduced to 15%.

  20. Leptin and the brain: influences on brain development, cognitive functioning and psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Farr, Olivia M; Tsoukas, Michael A; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2015-01-01

    Receptors of leptin, the prototypical adipokine, are expressed throughout the cortex and several other areas of the brain. Although typically studied for its role in energy intake and expenditure, leptin plays a critical role in many other neurocognitive processes and interacts with various other hormones and neurotransmitters to perform these functions. Here, we review the literature on how leptin influences brain development, neural degradation, Alzheimer's disease, psychiatric disorders, and more complicated cognitive functioning and feeding behaviors. We also discuss modulators of leptin and the leptin receptor as they relate to normal cognitive functioning and may mediate some of the actions of leptin in the brain. Although we are beginning to better understand the critical role leptin plays in normal cognitive functioning, there is much to be discovered.

  1. The influence of espresso coffee on neurocognitive function in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bragança, M; Marinho, M; Marques, J; Moreira, R; Palha, A; Marques-Teixeira, J; Esteves, M

    2016-09-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of coffee intake on cognitive function in persons living with HIV (PLWH). 130 PLWH with CD4 > 200 cells/mm(3), undetectable viral load, treated with HAART were included. A structured interview was applied and relevant clinical and laboratory data were assessed, including coffee intake. For neuropsychological assessment, the HIV Neurobehavioral Research Center Battery was chosen. Univariate nonparametric statistics and multivariate regression model were used. A significant association between espresso coffee use and a better cognitive function was verified in five of the eight psychometric measurements. In the multivariate analysis, after variable adjustment, linear regression analysis showed that coffee intake was a positive predictor for attention/working memory, executive functions and Global Deficit Score. Although the mechanisms behind the influence of caffeine on cognitive functioning are controversial, regular espresso coffee intake may have favourable effects on cognitive deterioration caused by HIV.

  2. Organizational factors influencing inter-professional team functioning in primary care networks.

    PubMed

    Hepp, Shelanne; Misfeldt, Renee; Lait, Jana; Armitage, Gail D; Suter, Esther

    2014-01-01

    This study examined organizational factors influencing the functioning of inter-professional teams in select primary care networks (PCNs) in Alberta. Seven PCNs participated, each identifying two teams to be interviewed. The study used an exploratory qualitative approach to collect information from 118 physicians, managers and other clinical and non-clinical staff. Organizational factors affecting these teams included leadership and workplace culture, physical infrastructure, information technology infrastructure, organizational supports and employment models. The authors offer organizational strategies that enhance inter-professional team functioning based on interviewee recommendations and the existing literature. Further research is needed to link the strategies to measureable outcomes.

  3. Finite-difference models of ordinary differential equations - Influence of denominator functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mickens, Ronald E.; Smith, Arthur

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence on the solutions of finite-difference schemes of using a variety of denominator functions in the discrete modeling of the derivative for any ordinary differential equation. The results obtained are a consequence of using a generalized definition of the first derivative. A particular example of the linear decay equation is used to illustrate in detail the various solution possibilities that can occur.

  4. Influence of Body Composition on Lung Function and Respiratory Muscle Strength in Children With Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Costa Junior, Dirceu; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana S.; Araujo, Poliane N.; Barbalho-Moulin, Marcela C.; Alves, Viviane C.; Gomes, Evelim L. F. D.; Costa, Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity affects lung function and respiratory muscle strength. The aim of the present study was to assess lung function and respiratory muscle strength in children with obesity and determine the influence of body composition on these variables. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 75 children (40 with obesity and 35 within the ideal weight range) aged 6 - 10 years. Body mass index, z score, waist circumference, body composition (tetrapolar bioimpedance), respiratory muscle strength and lung function (spirometry) were evaluated. Results Children with obesity exhibited larger quantities of both lean and fat mass in comparison to those in the ideal weight range. No significant differences were found between groups regarding the respective reference values for respiratory muscle strength. Male children with obesity demonstrated significantly lower lung function values (forced expiratory volume in the first second % (FEV1%) and FEV1/forced vital capacity % (FVC%) : 93.76 ± 9.78 and 92.29 ± 3.8, respectively) in comparison to males in the ideal weight range (99.87 ± 9.72 and 96.31 ± 4.82, respectively). The regression models demonstrated that the spirometric variables were influenced by all body composition variables. Conclusion Children with obesity demonstrated a reduction in lung volume and capacity. Thus, anthropometric and body composition characteristics may be predictive factors for altered lung function. PMID:26767078

  5. Exposure to neonicotinoids influences the motor function of adult worker honeybees.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sally M; Willis, Sarah J; Wright, Geraldine A

    2014-10-01

    Systemic pesticides such as neonicotinoids are commonly used on flowering crops visited by pollinators, and their use has been implicated in the decline of insect pollinator populations in Europe and North America. Several studies show that neonicotinoids affect navigation and learning in bees but few studies have examined whether these substances influence their basic motor function. Here, we investigated how prolonged exposure to sublethal doses of four neonicotinoid pesticides (imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, clothianidin, dinotefuran) and the plant toxin, nicotine, affect basic motor function and postural control in foraging-age worker honeybees. We used doses of 10 nM for each neonicotinoid: field-relevant doses that we determined to be sublethal and willingly consumed by bees. The neonicotinoids were placed in food solutions given to bees for 24 h. After the exposure period, bees were more likely to lose postural control during the motor function assay and fail to right themselves if exposed to imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, clothianidin. Bees exposed to thiamethoxam and nicotine also spent more time grooming. Other behaviours (walking, sitting and flying) were not significantly affected. Expression of changes in motor function after exposure to imidacloprid was dose-dependent and affected all measured behaviours. Our data illustrate that 24 h exposure to sublethal doses of neonicotinoid pesticides has a subtle influence on bee behaviour that is likely to affect normal function in a field setting.

  6. Influence of acidification and eutrophication on physiological functions of Conticribra weissflogii and Prorocentrum donghaiense.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feng-Ying; Tu, Teng-Xiu; Liu, Feng-Jiao; Huang, Xu-Guang; Li, Shun-Xing

    2016-12-01

    Eutrophication and acidification have been the most concerned environmental problems in coastal ecosystem. However, their combined effect on coastal ecosystem function was unknown. Both diatom (Conticribra weissflogii) and dinoflagellate (Prorocentrum donghaiense) are used as coastal algal model. Seven parameters were determined for physiological function assessment, including cell density, chlorophyll a (Chl a), protein, malonaldehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase, carbonic anhydrase (CA), and nitrate reductase (NR). The influence of nitrate (N) and phosphate (P) on MDA and CA in C. weissflogii was significant, and that on Chl a and protein in P. donghaiense were also significant. However, the influence of acidification on physiological functions was not significant. The effect of acidification could be intensified by coastal eutrophication. More importantly, the coexist influence of acidification and eutrophication on CA, NR and protein in C. weissflogii and MDA in P. donghaiense was significant. Both NR activity and Chl a content in P. donghaiense were positively correlated to N and P concentration when pH were 7.9 and 7.8, respectively. With simultaneous worsening of acidification and eutrophication, the cell growth of P. Donghaiense was accelerated more obviously than C. weissflogii, i.e., dinoflagellate was more adaptable than diatom, thus algal species distribution and abundance could be changed.

  7. Genetic and Environmental Influences on Motor Function: A Magnetoencephalographic Study of Twins

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Toshihiko; Hirata, Masayuki; Sugata, Hisato; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Onishi, Mai; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Omura, Kayoko; Honda, Chika; Hayakawa, Kazuo; Yorifuji, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of genetic and environmental influences on cerebral motor function, we determined similarities and differences of movement-related cortical fields (MRCFs) in middle-aged and elderly monozygotic (MZ) twins. MRCFs were measured using a 160-channel magnetoencephalogram system when MZ twins were instructed to repeat lifting of the right index finger. We compared latency, amplitude, dipole location, and dipole intensity of movement-evoked field 1 (MEF1) between 16 MZ twins and 16 pairs of genetically unrelated pairs. Differences in latency and dipole location between MZ twins were significantly less than those between unrelated age-matched pairs. However, amplitude and dipole intensity were not significantly different. These results suggest that the latency and dipole location of MEF1 are determined early in life by genetic and early common environmental factors, whereas amplitude and dipole intensity are influenced by long-term environmental factors. Improved understanding of genetic and environmental factors that influence cerebral motor function may contribute to evaluation and improvement for individual motor function. PMID:24994981

  8. Influence of different geographical factors on carbon sink functions in the Pearl River Delta.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Dong, Yuxiang; Yang, Ren

    2017-12-01

    This study analyzed carbon fixation across different land use types in the Pearl River Delta to identify the influence of different geographical factors on carbon fixation ability. The methodology was based on interpreting land use data from TM imagery, MODIS13Q1 data, and climate data, using the improved CASA and GeogDetector models. The results show that: (1) From 2000 to 2013, the total carbon sink increased slightly, from 15.58 × 10(6) t to 17.52 × 10(6) t, being spatially low at the center and increasing outwards; (2) Proxy variables (topography and landform characteristics), influencing urbanization, significantly affect the carbon sink function of the Pearl River Delta region. The proportion of urban and other construction land showed increasing effect on the regional carbon sink each year. However, the spatial structure of land in the study area changed from complex to simple, with enhanced stability; consequently, the influence of landscape characteristics (landscape dominance and landscape perimeter area fractal dimension) on the regional carbon sink gradually decreased; (3) The influence of the same factors differed with different land use types. Slope and altitude were found to have the greatest influence on the carbon sink of cultivated land, while landscape perimeter area fractal dimension more significantly affected the forest carbon sink.

  9. Evaluation of Early and Late Effects into the Acute Spinal Cord Injury of an Injectable Functionalized Self-Assembling Scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Cigognini, Daniela; Satta, Alessandro; Colleoni, Bianca; Silva, Diego; Donegà, Matteo; Antonini, Stefania; Gelain, Fabrizio

    2011-01-01

    The complex physiopathological events occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI) make this devastating trauma still incurable. Self-assembling peptides (SAPs) are nanomaterials displaying some appealing properties for application in regenerative medicine because they mimic the structure of the extra-cellular matrix (ECM), are reabsorbable, allow biofunctionalizations and can be injected directly into the lesion. In this study we evaluated the putative neurorigenerative properties of RADA16-4G-BMHP1 SAP, proved to enhance in vitro neural stem cells survival and differentiation. This SAP (RADA16-I) has been functionalized with a bone marrow homing motif (BMHP1) and optimized via the insertion of a 4-glycine-spacer that ameliorates scaffold stability and exposure of the biomotifs. We injected the scaffold immediately after contusion in the rat spinal cord, then we evaluated the early effects by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and the late effects by histological analysis. Locomotor recovery over 8 weeks was assessed using Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) test. Gene expression analysis showed that at 7 days after lesion the functionalized SAP induced a general upregulation of GAP-43, trophic factors and ECM remodelling proteins, whereas 3 days after SCI no remarkable changes were observed. Hystological analysis revealed that 8 weeks after SCI our scaffold increased cellular infiltration, basement membrane deposition and axon regeneration/sprouting within the cyst. Moreover the functionalized SAP showed to be compatible with the surrounding nervous tissue and to at least partially fill the cavities. Finally SAP injection resulted in a statistically significant improvement of both hindlimbs' motor performance and forelimbs-hindlimbs coordination. Altogether, these results indicate that RADA16-4G-BMHP1 induced favourable reparative processes, such as matrix remodelling, and provided a physical and trophic support to nervous tissue ingrowth. Thus this biomaterial, eventually

  10. Do Economic Recessions During Early and Mid-Adulthood Influence Cognitive Function in Older Age?

    PubMed Central

    Leist, Anja K.; Hessel, Philipp; Avendano, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Background Fluctuations in the national economy shape labour market opportunities and outcomes, which in turn may influence the accumulation of cognitive reserve. This study examines whether economic recessions experienced in early and mid-adulthood are associated with later-life cognitive function. Method Data came from 12,020 respondents in 11 countries participating in the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Cognitive assessments in 2004/5 and 2006/7 were linked to complete work histories retrospectively collected in 2008/9, and to historical annual data on fluctuations in Gross Domestic Product (GDP) per capita for each country. Controlling for confounders, we assessed whether recessions experienced at ages 25-34, 35-44 and 45-49 were associated with cognitive function at ages 50-74. Results Among men, each additional recession at ages 45-49 was associated with worse cognitive function at ages 50-74 (b = -0.06, Confidence Interval [CI] -0.11, -0.01). Among women, each additional recession at ages 25-44 was associated with worse cognitive function at ages 50-74 (b25-34 = -0.03, CI -0.04, -0.01; b35-44= -0.02, CI -0.04, -0.00). Among men, recessions at ages 45-49 influenced risk of being laid-off, whereas among women, recessions at ages 25-44 led to working part-time and higher likelihood of downward occupational mobility, which were all predictors of worse later-life cognitive function. Conclusions Recessions at ages 45-49 among men and 25-44 among women are associated with later-life cognitive function, possibly via more unfavourable labour market trajectories. If replicated in future studies, findings may indicate that policies that ameliorate the impact of recessions on labour market outcomes may promote later-life cognitive function. PMID:24258197

  11. The influence of resources on perceived functional limitations among women with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Clingerman, Evelyn; Stuifbergen, Alexa; Becker, Heather

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this longitudinal investigation was to identify the effects of external resources (i.e., education, marriage, employment, social support, economic status) on the trajectory of perceived functional limitation among women with multiple sclerosis (MS). We hypothesized that these resources would have a long-term influence upon MS-related functional limitation. As part of a longitudinal study of health promotion and quality of life among persons with MS, we tested hypothesized relationships using data obtained at five time points, using repeated-measures MANOVA. We found that functional limitation scores increased over time for all participants. In general, women who were unemployed as a result of MS consistently had higher functional limitation scores, and employed women consistently had lower functional limitation scores. Women with lower social support scores consistently perceived greater functional limitation than those with higher social support scores. Women with lower perceived-economic-adequacy scores consistently had higher functional limitation scores than women with higher perceived-economic-adequacy scores. Nurses and other healthcare professionals are in an optimum position to observe and assess the resources of women with MS. They can use presence, listening, and observational skills to identify verbal and nonverbal cues of resource depletion. In addition, they can act as advocates for women with MS and speak out on policy issues and legislation at the local and national levels. Healthcare professionals can thus influence the presence of resources for those who are particularly vulnerable to resource loss, so they can participate successfully in work, recreational, and home environments.

  12. [Respective influence of occupational and personal factors on respiratory function in dairy farmers].

    PubMed

    Choma, D; Westeel, V; Dubiez, A; Gora, D; Meyer, V; Pernet, D; Polio, J C; Madroszyk, A; Gibey, R; Laplante, J J; Depierre, A; Dalphin, J C

    1998-12-01

    Occupational and individual factors influencing respiratory function were analysed in a sample of dairy farmers. The study protocol included a medical questionnaire, an occupational questionnaire, spirometry and allergological tests (skin prick tests for a panel of inhalant allergens, serum total IgE level and Phadiatop (CAP System). Two hundred and forty-five farmers were studied (140 men, 105 women with an average age of 45.9 (11.3) years, 35 were smokers, 27 ex-smokers and 183 non-smokers). A multiple linear regression model was used to analyse the correlations between respiratory function and the different independent variables. There was a statistically significant negative correlations between smoking (expressed in pack-years) and all the respiratory function parameters (p < 0.01). Respiratory function was significantly impaired in farmers working on traditional farms (p < 0.05 for VC and for FEV1), and the respiratory function values increased proportionally with the modernisation of the farms (notably using an artificial barn drying system for hay and a ventilation system for the cow byres). No significant relationship between respiratory function and quantitative indicators of exposure (size of farm, amount of livestock, quantity of hay handled during professional lifetime) or indicators of IgE-mediated allergy was observed. In conclusion, this study suggests that traditional work conditions in farms which have little mechanisation are, along with tobacco, the determining factors for the respiratory function impairment in dairy farmers.

  13. Relationship between involvement and functional milk desserts intention to purchase. Influence on attitude towards packaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ares, Gastón; Besio, Mariángela; Giménez, Ana; Deliza, Rosires

    2010-10-01

    Consumers perceive functional foods as member of the particular food category to which they belong. In this context, apart from health and sensory characteristics, non-sensory factors such as packaging might have a key role on determining consumers' purchase decisions regarding functional foods. The aims of the present work were to study the influence of different package attributes on consumer willingness to purchase regular and functional chocolate milk desserts; and to assess if the influence of these attributes was affected by consumers' level of involvement with the product. A conjoint analysis task was carried out with 107 regular milk desserts consumers, who were asked to score their willingness to purchase of 16 milk dessert package concepts varying in five features of the package, and to complete a personal involvement inventory questionnaire. Consumers' level of involvement with the product affected their interest in the evaluated products and their reaction towards the considered conjoint variables, suggesting that it could be a useful segmentation tool during food development. Package colour and the presence of a picture on the label were the variables with the highest relative importance, regardless of consumers' involvement with the product. The importance of these variables was higher than the type of dessert indicating that packaging may play an important role in consumers' perception and purchase intention of functional foods.

  14. Irradiating of Bulk Soybeans: Influence on Their Functional and Sensory Properties for Soyfood Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chia, Chiew-Ling; Wilson, Lester A.; Boylston, Terri; Perchonok, Michele; French, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Soybeans were chosen for lunar and planetary missions, where soybeans will be supplied in bulk or grown locally, due to their nutritive value and ability to produce oil and protein for further food applications. However, soybeans must be processed into foods prior to consumption. Radiation that soybeans would be exposed to during bulk storage prior to and during a Mars mission may influence their germination and functional properties. The influence of radiation includes the affect of surface pasteurization to ensure the astronauts safety from food-borne illnesses (HACCP, CCP), and the affect of the amount of radiation the soybeans receive during a Mars mission. Decreases in the amount of natural antioxidants free radical formation, and oxidation-induced changes in the soybean will influence the nutritional value, texture, color, and aroma of soyfoods. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of pasteurization and sterilization surface radiation on whole soybeans using gamma and electron beam radiation. The influence of 0, 1, 5, 10, and 30kGy on microbial load, germination rate, ease of processing, and quality of soymilk and tofu were determined. Surface radiation of whole dry soybeans using electron beam or gamma rays from 1-30kGy did provide microbial safety for the astronauts. However, the lower dose levels had surviving yeasts and molds. These doses caused oxidative changes that resulted in soymilk and tofu with rancid aromas. GC-MS of the aroma compounds using SPME Headspace confirmed the presence of lipid oxidation compounds. Soybean germination ability was reduced as radiation dosage increased. While lower doses may reduce these problems, the ability to insure microbial safety of bulk soybeans will be lost. Counter measures could include vacuum packaging, nitrogen flushing, added antioxidants, and radiating under freezing conditions. Doses below 1kGy need to be investigated further to determine the influence of the radiation encountered

  15. Genetic influence on exercise-induced changes in physical function among mobility-limited older adults

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Fang-Chi; Brinkley, Tina E.; Carter, Christy S.; Church, Timothy S.; Dodson, John A.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; McDermott, Mary M.; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Yank, Veronica; Johnson, Julie A.; Pahor, Marco

    2014-01-01

    To date, physical exercise is the only intervention consistently demonstrated to attenuate age-related declines in physical function. However, variability exists in seniors' responsiveness to training. One potential source of variability is the insertion (I allele) or deletion (D allele) of a 287 bp fragment in intron 16 of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene. This polymorphism is known to influence a variety of physiological adaptions to exercise. However, evidence is inconclusive regarding the influence of this polymorphism on older adults' functional responses to exercise. This study aimed to evaluate the association of ACE I/D genotypes with changes in physical function among Caucasian older adults (n = 283) following 12 mo of either structured, multimodal physical activity or health education. Measures of physical function included usual-paced gait speed and performance on the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). After checking Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, we used using linear regression to evaluate the genotype*treatment interaction for each outcome. Covariates included clinic site, body mass index, age, sex, baseline score, comorbidity, and use of angiotensin receptor blockers or ACE inhibitors. Genotype frequencies [II (19.4%), ID (42.4%), DD (38.2%)] were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (P > 0.05). The genotype*treatment interaction was statistically significant for both gait speed (P = 0.002) and SPPB (P = 0.020). Exercise improved gait speed by 0.06 ± 0.01 m/sec and SPPB score by 0.72 ± 0.16 points among those with at least one D allele (ID/DD carriers), but function was not improved among II carriers. Thus, ACE I/D genotype appears to play a role in modulating functional responses to exercise training in seniors. PMID:24423970

  16. The influence of creatine supplementation on the cognitive functioning of vegetarians and omnivores.

    PubMed

    Benton, David; Donohoe, Rachel

    2011-04-01

    Creatine when combined with P forms phosphocreatine that acts as a reserve of high-energy phosphate. Creatine is found mostly in meat, fish and other animal products, and the levels of muscle creatine are known to be lower in vegetarians. Creatine supplementation influences brain functioning as indicated by imaging studies and the measurement of oxygenated Hb. Given the key role played by creatine in the provision of energy, the influence of its supplementation on cognitive functioning was examined, contrasting the effect in omnivores and vegetarians. Young adult females (n 128) were separated into those who were and were not vegetarian. Randomly and under a double-blind procedure, subjects consumed either a placebo or 20 g of creatine supplement for 5 d. Creatine supplementation did not influence measures of verbal fluency and vigilance. However, in vegetarians rather than in those who consume meat, creatine supplementation resulted in better memory. Irrespective of dietary style, the supplementation of creatine decreased the variability in the responses to a choice reaction-time task.

  17. Shifting species interaction in soil microbial community and its influence on ecosystem functions modulating.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Colica, Giovanni; Wu, Pei-pei; Li, Dunhai; Rossi, Federico; De Philippis, Roberto; Liu, Yongding

    2013-04-01

    The supportive and negative evidence for the stress gradient hypothesis (SGH) led to an ongoing debate among ecologists and called for new empirical and theoretical work. In this study, we took various biological soil crust (BSCs) samples along a spatial gradient with four environmental stress levels to examine the fitness of SGH in microbial interactions and evaluate its influence on biodiversity-function relationships in BSCs. A new assessment method of species interactions within hard-cultured invisible soil community was employed, directly based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprint images. The results showed that biotic interactions in soil phototroph community dramatically shifted from facilitation to dominant competition with the improvement of microhabitats. It offered new evidence, which presented a different perspective on the hypothesis that the relative importance of facilitation and competition varies inversely along the gradient of abiotic stress. The path analysis indicated that influence of biotic interactions (r = 0.19, p < 0.05) on ecosystem functions is lower than other community properties (r = 0.62, p < 0.001), including soil moisture, crust coverage, and biodiversity. Furthermore, the correlation between species interactions and community properties was non-significant with low negative influence (r = -0.27, p > 0.05). We demonstrate that the inversion of biotic interaction as a response to the gradient of abiotic stresses existed not only in the visible plant community but also in the soil microbial community.

  18. Manipulation of Ovarian Function Significantly Influenced Sarcopenia in Postreproductive-Age Mice

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Rhett L.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, transplantation of ovaries from young cycling mice into old postreproductive-age mice increased life span. We anticipated that the same factors that increased life span could also influence health span. Female CBA/J mice received new (60 d) ovaries at 12 and 17 months of age and were evaluated at 16 and 25 months of age, respectively. There were no significant differences in body weight among any age or treatment group. The percentage of fat mass was significantly increased at 13 and 16 months of age but was reduced by ovarian transplantation in 16-month-old mice. The percentages of lean body mass and total body water were significantly reduced in 13-month-old control mice but were restored in 16- and 25-month-old recipient mice by ovarian transplantation to the levels found in six-month-old control mice. In summary, we have shown that skeletal muscle mass, which is negatively influenced by aging, can be positively influenced or restored by reestablishment of active ovarian function in aged female mice. These findings provide strong incentive for further investigation of the positive influence of young ovaries on restoration of health in postreproductive females. PMID:27747096

  19. Factors influencing sexual function of middle-aged married Korean women

    PubMed Central

    Jee, YoungJu; Kim, YoungHae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the status of women’s sexual function and relevant factors given the fact that women’s health is crucial to the national health, and in particular that women’s sexual health has a significant impact on their overall health. [Subjects and Methods] This study surveyed 353 women living in South Korea’s P and K metropolitan regions from July 2012 to August 10, 2013. The Female Sexual Functional Index (FSFI), the Sexual Attitude Scale (SAS), sexual knowledge and questionnaires were used. [Results] Two groups based on FSFI scores above and below a cutoff value of 25 were compared with each other, and significant differences were found in age, male friends, menstrual status, sex status, and frequency of sex, experience of forced sex, personal health, husband’s health and sexual knowledge. Male friends, sex status, experience of forced sex, husband’s healths and sexual knowledge explained women’s sexual function. [Conclusion] The finding that women’s sexual function is associated with multiple factors suggests an intervention program for improving women’s sexual function should be developed to reflect the factors influencing the target groups’ sexual function. PMID:25931738

  20. Influencing Factors Analysis of Facial Nerve Function after the Microsurgical Resection of Acoustic Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, WenMing; Cheng, HongWei; Wang, XiaoJie; Feng, ChunGuo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore and analyze the influencing factors of facial nerve function retainment after microsurgery resection of acoustic neurinoma. Methods Retrospective analysis of our hospital 105 acoustic neuroma cases from October, 2006 to January 2012, in the group all patients were treated with suboccipital sigmoid sinus approach to acoustic neuroma microsurgery resection. We adopted researching individual patient data, outpatient review and telephone followed up and the House-Brackmann grading system to evaluate and analyze the facial nerve function. Results Among 105 patients in this study group, complete surgical resection rate was 80.9% (85/105), subtotal resection rate was 14.3% (15/105), and partial resection rate 4.8% (5/105). The rate of facial nerve retainment on neuroanatomy was 95.3% (100/105) and the mortality rate was 2.1% (2/105). Facial nerve function when the patient is discharged from the hospital, also known as immediate facial nerve function which was graded in House-Brackmann: excellent facial nerve function (House-Brackmann I–II level) cases accounted for 75.2% (79/105), facial nerve function III–IV level cases accounted for 22.9% (24/105), and V–VI cases accounted for 1.9% (2/105). Patients were followed up for more than one year, with excellent facial nerve function retention rate (H-B I–II level) was 74.4% (58/78). Conclusion Acoustic neuroma patients after surgery, the long-term (≥1 year) facial nerve function excellent retaining rate was closely related with surgical proficiency, post-operative immediate facial nerve function, diameter of tumor and whether to use electrophysiological monitoring techniques; while there was no significant correlation with the patient’s age, surgical approach, whether to stripping the internal auditory canal, whether there was cystic degeneration, tumor recurrence, whether to merge with obstructive hydrocephalus and the length of the duration of symptoms. PMID:28264236

  1. The influence of gravity on the structure and functions of plant material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. H.

    Growth process generate plant form and relate to most physiological functions. The Earth's gravity force affects plant growth in both obvious and subtle ways. It is a major environmental influence on morphology and physiology of plants. Gravity is less important as an agent for plant stress than as an environmental signal to guide growth. The plant's bioaccelerometers are remarkably sensitive, especially in hypogravity. Simulation (clinostat) studies and experiments in satellite laboratories are needed to understand the sensing, transduction, and response characteristics of g related mechanisms. By examining how plants alter growth processes to accomplish developmental or physiological ``objectives'' we may find it pragmatically desirable to ask ourselves how we might design a plant to achieve such responses to environmental influences. Examples of this design engineering approach for gravity related effects are described as an aid to experimentation.

  2. Adults' Descriptions of a Situation Can Influence Children's Appraisal, Feelings, and Subsequent Psychological Functions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Li; Lim, Zhao M T

    2016-09-01

    This study examined how an adult's descriptions of a situation could influence children's appraisal, feelings, and subsequent psychological functions. After baseline measures, 81 middle-class Singaporean kindergarten children (Mage  = 5.6 years, SD = 0.6) were exposed to an ambiguous accident and provided with positive, negative, or no descriptions of the accident. Children's appraisal of the experience, feelings of pleasantness, motivation to play a new game, confidence in playing the new game well, and performance on the new game were measured. The results revealed that the descriptions of the accident influenced children's appraisal, feelings of pleasantness, motivation to play a new game, confidence in playing the new game well, and performance on the new game.

  3. Study on active lap tool influence function in grinding 1.8 m primary mirror.

    PubMed

    Haitao, Liu; Zhige, Zeng; Fan, Wu; Bin, Fan; Yongjian, Wan

    2013-11-01

    We present a theoretical modeling method to predict the ring tool influence function (TIF) based on the computer-controlled active lap process. The gap on the lap-grinding layer is considered, and its influence on the ring TIF is analyzed too. The relationship between the shape of the ring TIF and the lap-workpiece rotation speed ratio is discussed in this paper. The recipe for calculating dwell time for axisymmetric fabrication is discussed. The grinding process of a 1.8 m primary mirror is improved based on these results. The grinding process is accomplished after 30 circles of grinding, and the surface shape error is from PV 82 μm RMS 16.4 μm reduced to PV 13.5 μm RMS 2.5 μm.

  4. Belongingness as a core personality trait: how social exclusion influences social functioning and personality expression.

    PubMed

    DeWall, C Nathan; Deckman, Timothy; Pond, Richard S; Bonser, Ian

    2011-12-01

    People have a fundamental need for positive and lasting relationships. This need to belong is rooted in evolutionary history and gave rise to the development of traits that enable individuals to gain acceptance and to avoid rejection. Because belongingness is a core component of human functioning, social exclusion should influence many cognitive, emotional, and behavioral outcomes and personality expression. This article summarizes recent evidence that social exclusion causes an assortment of outcomes, many of which depend on whether the excluded can gain acceptance or forestall possible distress. It highlights common overlap in physical and social pain systems and how a physical painkiller can reduce the pain of social exclusion. Finally, it shows how social exclusion moderates the effects of traits on cognition, emotion, and behavior. To appreciate personality processes in social contexts, scientists should consider how people respond to social exclusion and how the need to belong influences personality expression.

  5. The influence of gravity on the structure and functions of plant material.

    PubMed

    Brown, A H

    1984-01-01

    Growth process generate plant form and relate to most physiological functions. The Earth's gravity force affects plant growth in both obvious and subtle ways. It is a major environmental influence on morphology and physiology of plants. Gravity is less important as an agent for plant stress than as an environmental signal to guide growth. The plant's bioaccelerometers are remarkably sensitive, especially in hypogravity. Simulation (clinostat) studies and experiments in satellite laboratories are needed to understand the sensing, transduction, and response characteristics of g related mechanisms. By examining how plants alter growth processes to accomplish developmental or physiological "objectives" we may find it pragmatically desirable to ask ourselves how we might design a plant to achieve such responses to environmental influences. Examples of this design engineering approach for gravity related effects are described as an aid to experimentation.

  6. Seafloor heterogeneity influences the biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships in the deep sea

    PubMed Central

    Zeppilli, Daniela; Pusceddu, Antonio; Trincardi, Fabio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical ecology predicts that heterogeneous habitats allow more species to co-exist in a given area. In the deep sea, biodiversity is positively linked with ecosystem functioning, suggesting that deep-seabed heterogeneity could influence ecosystem functions and the relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF). To shed light on the BEF relationships in a heterogeneous deep seabed, we investigated variations in meiofaunal biodiversity, biomass and ecosystem efficiency within and among different seabed morphologies (e.g., furrows, erosional troughs, sediment waves and other depositional structures, landslide scars and deposits) in a narrow geo-morphologically articulated sector of the Adriatic Sea. We show that distinct seafloor morphologies are characterized by highly diverse nematode assemblages, whereas areas sharing similar seabed morphologies host similar nematode assemblages. BEF relationships are consistently positive across the entire region, but different seabed morphologies are characterised by different slope coefficients of the relationship. Our results suggest that seafloor heterogeneity, allowing diversified assemblages across different habitats, increases diversity and influence ecosystem processes at the regional scale, and BEF relationships at smaller spatial scales. We conclude that high-resolution seabed mapping and a detailed analysis of the species distribution at the habitat scale are crucial for improving management of goods and services delivered by deep-sea ecosystems. PMID:27211908

  7. Maternal and offspring pools of osteocalcin influence brain development and functions

    PubMed Central

    Oury, Franck; Khrimian, Lori; Denny, Christine. A.; Gardin, Antoine; Chamouni, Alexandre; Goeden, Nick; Huang, Yung-yu; Lee, Hojoon; Srinivas, Prashanth; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Suyama, Shigetomo; Langer, Thomas; Mann, John. J.; Horvath, Tamas. L.; Bonnin, Alexandre; Karsenty, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    The powerful regulation of bone mass exerted by the brain suggests the existence of bone-derived signals modulating this regulation or other functions of the brain. We show here that the osteoblast-derived hormone osteocalcin crosses the blood-brain barrier, binds to neurons of the brainstem, midbrain and hippocampus, enhances the synthesis of monoamine neurotransmitters, inhibits GABA synthesis, prevents anxiety and depression and favors learning and memory independently of its metabolic functions. In addition to these post-natal functions, maternal osteocalcin crosses the placenta during pregnancy and prevents neuronal apoptosis before embryos synthesize this hormone. As a result the severity of the neuro-anatomical defects and learning and memory deficits of Osteocalcin−/− mice is determined by the maternal genotype, and delivering osteocalcin to pregnant Osteocalcin−/− mothers rescues these abnormalities in their Osteocalcin−/− progeny. This study reveals that the skeleton via osteocalcin influences cognition and contributes to the maternal influence on fetal brain development. PMID:24074871

  8. Seafloor heterogeneity influences the biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships in the deep sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeppilli, Daniela; Pusceddu, Antonio; Trincardi, Fabio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical ecology predicts that heterogeneous habitats allow more species to co-exist in a given area. In the deep sea, biodiversity is positively linked with ecosystem functioning, suggesting that deep-seabed heterogeneity could influence ecosystem functions and the relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF). To shed light on the BEF relationships in a heterogeneous deep seabed, we investigated variations in meiofaunal biodiversity, biomass and ecosystem efficiency within and among different seabed morphologies (e.g., furrows, erosional troughs, sediment waves and other depositional structures, landslide scars and deposits) in a narrow geo-morphologically articulated sector of the Adriatic Sea. We show that distinct seafloor morphologies are characterized by highly diverse nematode assemblages, whereas areas sharing similar seabed morphologies host similar nematode assemblages. BEF relationships are consistently positive across the entire region, but different seabed morphologies are characterised by different slope coefficients of the relationship. Our results suggest that seafloor heterogeneity, allowing diversified assemblages across different habitats, increases diversity and influence ecosystem processes at the regional scale, and BEF relationships at smaller spatial scales. We conclude that high-resolution seabed mapping and a detailed analysis of the species distribution at the habitat scale are crucial for improving management of goods and services delivered by deep-sea ecosystems.

  9. Whole-body vibration does not influence knee joint neuromuscular function or proprioception.

    PubMed

    Hannah, R; Minshull, C; Folland, J P

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the acute effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) on knee joint position sense and indices of neuromuscular function, specifically strength, electromechanical delay and the rate of force development. Electromyography and electrically evoked contractions were used to investigate neural and contractile responses to WBV. Fourteen healthy males completed two treatment conditions on separate occasions: (1) 5 × 1 min of unilateral isometric squat exercise on a synchronous vibrating platform [30 Hz, 4 mm peak-to-peak amplitude] (WBV) and (2) a control condition (CON) of the same exercise without WBV. Knee joint position sense (joint angle replication task) and quadriceps neuromuscular function were assessed pre-, immediately-post and 1 h post-exercise. During maximum voluntary knee extensions, the peak force (PF(V)), electromechanical delay (EMD(V)), rate of force development (RFD(V)) and EMG of the quadriceps were measured. Twitch contractions of the knee extensors were electrically evoked to assess EMD(E) and RFD(E). The results showed no influence of WBV on knee joint position, EMD(V), PF(V) and RFD(V) during the initial 50, 100 or 150 ms of contraction. Similarly, electrically evoked neuromuscular function and neural activation remained unchanged following the vibration exercise. A single session of unilateral WBV did not influence any indices of thigh muscle neuromuscular performance or knee joint proprioception.

  10. Seafloor heterogeneity influences the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships in the deep sea.

    PubMed

    Zeppilli, Daniela; Pusceddu, Antonio; Trincardi, Fabio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2016-05-23

    Theoretical ecology predicts that heterogeneous habitats allow more species to co-exist in a given area. In the deep sea, biodiversity is positively linked with ecosystem functioning, suggesting that deep-seabed heterogeneity could influence ecosystem functions and the relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF). To shed light on the BEF relationships in a heterogeneous deep seabed, we investigated variations in meiofaunal biodiversity, biomass and ecosystem efficiency within and among different seabed morphologies (e.g., furrows, erosional troughs, sediment waves and other depositional structures, landslide scars and deposits) in a narrow geo-morphologically articulated sector of the Adriatic Sea. We show that distinct seafloor morphologies are characterized by highly diverse nematode assemblages, whereas areas sharing similar seabed morphologies host similar nematode assemblages. BEF relationships are consistently positive across the entire region, but different seabed morphologies are characterised by different slope coefficients of the relationship. Our results suggest that seafloor heterogeneity, allowing diversified assemblages across different habitats, increases diversity and influence ecosystem processes at the regional scale, and BEF relationships at smaller spatial scales. We conclude that high-resolution seabed mapping and a detailed analysis of the species distribution at the habitat scale are crucial for improving management of goods and services delivered by deep-sea ecosystems.

  11. [Influence of fungi-feeding nematodes on soil functional stability under heat or copper stress].

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi; Chen, Xiao-Yun; Li, Hui-Xin; Hu, Feng; Liu, Man-Qiang

    2009-02-01

    In a microcosm experiment, the effects of the interaction between soil fungi-feeding nematodes and microorganisms on the soil functional stability under persistent stress of CuSO4 or transient stress of heating to 40 degrees C for 18 h were studied, with the short-term decomposition of barley leaf powder as a representative of soil function. The results showed that whether the stress existed or not, inoculation of fungi-feeding nematodes could enhance soil basal respiration, an overall indicator of soil microbial activity. Under copper stress, the soil basal respiration after the inoculation increased significantly during the period from the 8th day to the end of the experiment (P < 0.05); while under heat stress, the promotion effect of the inoculation was only significant at the 8th day of the experiment, suggesting that the influence of fungi-feeding nematodes on soil microorganisms varied with stress type. Under the two stresses, inoculation of fungi-feeding nematodes had no influence on the resistance of soil function but could promote its recovery, and the soil fungal biomass in the late period of the experiment was lower in the treatment of inoculation than in CK, indicating that under stress condition, fungi-feeding nematodes depressed the growth and development of soil fungi, and possibly, indirectly promoted bacterial development.

  12. Influence of strain on the structural instabilities and functional properties of complex oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatt, Alison J.

    Complex oxides display a tremendous array of functional properties, ranging from ferroelectricity to giant magnetoresistance to superconductivity. Epitaxial strain in thin films of these materials provides a tool to further manipulate the available functionalities and presents an attractive avenue for material design. Arising from mismatch between films and substrate lattice parameters, strain can have profound effects on material properties by altering the energy balance between competing structural instabilities. Here we use density functional calculations to address the influence of strain on ABO 3 perovskite oxides, examining the impact on structural instabilities and focusing on regions in which strain induces phase transition phenomena. The density functional approach gives us access to the atomic-level details of a material's response to strain, enabling us to disentangle competing instabilities and differentiate between the ionic, electronic and lattice responses. In particular, we seek to illuminate the coupling of strain to distortion modes involving rigid rotations of the BO6 octahedral units. These octahedral rotations are known to drive or prohibit a number of strain-induced phenomena in functional oxides, but the details of their coupling to strain were not previously well understood. We develop our topic through investigations on four perovskite systems. We first study a layered superlattice of La(Al,Fe,Cr)O3, to distinguish the effect of misfit strain from the symmetry constraint imposed by heterostructuring. We then focus on the influence of strain in a series of single-phase perovskites of increasing complexity. In the simple dielectric LaAlO3, we isolate the strain-rotation coupling, develop a model for the dependence of rotations on bi-axial and uni-axial strain, and characterize a previously unidentified strain-induced phase transition. Next, we address strain in a polar material, multiferroic BiFeO3, to investigate recent experimental reports

  13. Hygiene and other early childhood influences on the subsequent function of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Rook, Graham A W; Lowry, Christopher A; Raison, Charles L

    2015-08-18

    The immune system influences brain development and function. Hygiene and other early childhood influences impact the subsequent function of the immune system during adulthood, with consequences for vulnerability to neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders. Inflammatory events during pregnancy can act directly to cause developmental problems in the central nervous system (CNS) that have been implicated in schizophrenia and autism. The immune system also acts indirectly by "farming" the intestinal microbiota, which then influences brain development and function via the multiple pathways that constitute the gut-brain axis. The gut microbiota also regulates the immune system. Regulation of the immune system is crucial because inflammatory states in pregnancy need to be limited, and throughout life inflammation needs to be terminated completely when not required; for example, persistently raised levels of background inflammation during adulthood (in the presence or absence of a clinically apparent inflammatory stimulus) correlate with an increased risk of depression. A number of factors in the perinatal period, notably immigration from rural low-income to rich developed settings, caesarean delivery, breastfeeding and antibiotic abuse have profound effects on the microbiota and on immunoregulation during early life that persist into adulthood. Many aspects of the modern western environment deprive the infant of the immunoregulatory organisms with which humans co-evolved, while encouraging exposure to non-immunoregulatory organisms, associated with more recently evolved "crowd" infections. Finally, there are complex interactions between perinatal psychosocial stressors, the microbiota, and the immune system that have significant additional effects on both physical and psychiatric wellbeing in subsequent adulthood. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Neuroimmunology in Health And Disease.

  14. Motor programme activating therapy influences adaptive brain functions in multiple sclerosis: clinical and MRI study.

    PubMed

    Rasova, Kamila; Prochazkova, Marie; Tintera, Jaroslav; Ibrahim, Ibrahim; Zimova, Denisa; Stetkarova, Ivana

    2015-03-01

    There is still little scientific evidence for the efficacy of neurofacilitation approaches and their possible influence on brain plasticity and adaptability. In this study, the outcome of a new kind of neurofacilitation approach, motor programme activating therapy (MPAT), was evaluated on the basis of a set of clinical functions and with MRI. Eighteen patients were examined four times with standardized clinical tests and diffusion tensor imaging to monitor changes without therapy, immediately after therapy and 1 month after therapy. Moreover, the strength of effective connectivity was analysed before and after therapy. Patients underwent a 1-h session of MPAT twice a week for 2 months. The data were analysed by nonparametric tests of association and were subsequently statistically evaluated. The therapy led to significant improvement in clinical functions, significant increment of fractional anisotropy and significant decrement of mean diffusivity, and decrement of effective connectivity at supplementary motor areas was observed immediately after the therapy. Changes in clinical functions and diffusion tensor images persisted 1 month after completing the programme. No statistically significant changes in clinical functions and no differences in MRI-diffusion tensor images were observed without physiotherapy. Positive immediate and long-term effects of MPAT on clinical and brain functions, as well as brain microstructure, were confirmed.

  15. The influence of shift work on cognitive functions and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Pınar Güzel; Selvi, Yavuz; Özkol, Halil; Aydın, Adem; Tülüce, Yasin; Boysan, Murat; Beşiroğlu, Lütfullah

    2013-12-30

    Shift work influences health, performance, activity, and social relationships, and it causes impairment in cognitive functions. In this study, we investigated the effects of shift work on participants' cognitive functions in terms of memory, attention, and learning, and we measured the effects on oxidative stress. Additionally, we investigated whether there were significant relationships between cognitive functions and whole blood oxidant/antioxidant status of participants. A total of 90 health care workers participated in the study, of whom 45 subjects were night-shift workers. Neuropsychological tests were administered to the participants to assess cognitive function, and blood samples were taken to detect total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status at 08:00. Differences in anxiety, depression, and chronotype characteristics between shift work groups were not significant. Shift workers achieved significantly lower scores on verbal memory, attention-concentration, and the digit span forward sub-scales of the Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R), as well as on the immediate memory and total learning sub-scales of the Auditory Verbal Learning Test (AVLT). Oxidative stress parameters were significantly associated with some types of cognitive function, including attention-concentration, recognition, and long-term memory. These findings suggest that night shift work may result in significantly poorer cognitive performance, particularly working memory.

  16. IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    Depla, Marion; Pelletier, Sandy; Bédard, Nathalie; Brunaud, Camille; Bruneau, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Polymorphisms in the type III interferon IFN‐λ3 and the killer cell immunoglobulin‐like receptor (KIR) genes controlling the activity of natural killer (NK) cells can predict spontaneous resolution of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We hypothesized that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism may modulate NK cell function during acute HCV. Methods We monitored the plasma levels of type III IFNs in relation to the phenotype and the function of NK cells in a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) during acute HCV infection with different outcomes. Results Early acute HCV was associated with high variability in type III IFNs plasma levels and the favorable IFN‐λ3 CC genotype was associated with higher viral loads. Reduced expression of Natural Killer Group Protein 2A (NKG2A) was associated with lower IFN‐λ3 plasma levels and the CC genotype. IFN‐γ production by NK cells was higher in individuals with the CC genotype during acute infection but this did not prevent viral persistence. IFN‐λ3 plasma levels did not correlate with function of NK cells and IFN‐λ3 prestimulation did not affect NK cell activation and function. Conclusions These results suggest that IFN‐λ3 polymorphism indirectly influences NK cell phenotype and function during acute HCV but other factors may act in concert to determine the outcome of the infection. PMID:27621819

  17. Reciprocal influence of connexins and apical junction proteins on their expressions and functions

    PubMed Central

    Derangeon, Mickaël; Spray, David C.; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Sarrouilhe, Denis; Hervé, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Membranes of adjacent cells form intercellular junctional complexes to mechanically anchor neighbour cells (anchoring junctions), to seal the paracellular space and to prevent diffusion of integral proteins within the plasma membrane (tight junctions) and to allow cell-to-cell diffusion of small ions and molecules (gap junctions). These different types of specialised plasma membrane microdomains, sharing common adaptor molecules, particularly zonula occludens proteins, frequently present intermingled relationships where the different proteins co-assemble into macromolecular complexes and their expressions are co-ordinately regulated. Proteins forming gap junction channels (connexins, particularly) and proteins fulfilling cell attachment or forming tight junction strands mutually influence expression and functions of one another. PMID:19046940

  18. Influence of the local-spin-density correlation functional on the stability of bcc ferromagnetic iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, D.; Clougherty, D. P.; MacLaren, J. M.; Albers, R. C.; Wang, C. S.

    1991-10-01

    The influence of local-spin-dependent correlation effects on the predicted stable ground-state phase of iron is reexamined with use of general-potential linearized augmented-plane-wave calculations. Differences in the form of the Vosko-Wilk-Nusair (VWN) local-spin-density functional used in previous studies are noted, since in previous studies significant additional approximations were made with respect to those of Vosko, Wilk, and Nusan [Can. J. Phys. 58, 1200 (1980)] and of MacLaren, Clougherty, and Albers [Phys. Rev. B 42, 3205 (1990)]. While the results of previous linear muffin-tin orbital calculations using the VWN functional predict a bcc ferromagnetic ground state, the present calculations show that the VWN spin-correlation effects fail to stabilize a bcc ground state. Considerable sensitivity to the form of the spin interpolation is found.

  19. Influence of nanotopography on periodontal ligament stem cell functions and cell sheet based periodontal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hui; Li, Bei; Zhao, Lingzhou; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration is an important part of regenerative medicine, with great clinical significance; however, the effects of nanotopography on the functions of periodontal ligament (PDL) stem cells (PDLSCs) and on PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration have never been explored. Titania nanotubes (NTs) layered on titanium (Ti) provide a good platform to study this. In the current study, the influence of NTs of different tube size on the functions of PDLSCs was observed. Afterward, an ectopic implantation model using a Ti/cell sheets/hydroxyapatite (HA) complex was applied to study the effect of the NTs on cell sheet based periodontal regeneration. The NTs were able to enhance the initial PDLSC adhesion and spread, as well as collagen secretion. With the Ti/cell sheets/HA complex model, it was demonstrated that the PDLSC sheets were capable of regenerating the PDL tissue, when combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets and HA, without the need for extra soluble chemical cues. Simultaneously, the NTs improved the periodontal regeneration result of the ectopically implanted Ti/cell sheets/HA complex, giving rise to functionally aligned collagen fiber bundles. Specifically, much denser collagen fibers, with abundant blood vessels as well as cementum-like tissue on the Ti surface, which well-resembled the structure of natural PDL, were observed in the NT5 and NT10 sample groups. Our study provides the first evidence that the nanotopographical cues obviously influence the functions of PDLSCs and improve the PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration size dependently, which provides new insight to the periodontal regeneration. The Ti/cell sheets/HA complex may constitute a good model to predict the effect of biomaterials on periodontal regeneration. PMID:26150714

  20. The Influence of Texting Language on Grammar and Executive Functions in Primary School Children

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Chantal N.; van Witteloostuijn, Merel; Vasić, Nada; Avrutin, Sergey; Blom, Elma

    2016-01-01

    When sending text messages on their mobile phone to friends, children often use a special type of register, which is called textese. This register allows the omission of words and the use of textisms: instances of non-standard written language such as 4ever (forever). Previous studies have shown that textese has a positive effect on children’s literacy abilities. In addition, it is possible that children’s grammar system is affected by textese as well, as grammar rules are often transgressed in this register. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of textese influences children’s grammar performance, and whether this effect is specific to grammar or language in general. Additionally, studies have not yet investigated the influence of textese on children’s cognitive abilities. Consequently, the secondary aim of this study was to find out whether textese affects children’s executive functions. To investigate this, 55 children between 10 and 13 years old were tested on a receptive vocabulary and grammar performance (sentence repetition) task and various tasks measuring executive functioning. In addition, text messages were elicited and the number of omissions and textisms in children’s messages were calculated. Regression analyses showed that omissions were a significant predictor of children’s grammar performance after various other variables were controlled for: the more words children omitted in their text messages, the better their performance on the grammar task. Although textisms correlated (marginally) significantly with vocabulary, grammar and selective attention scores and omissions marginally significantly with vocabulary scores, no other significant effects were obtained for measures of textese in the regression analyses: neither for the language outcomes, nor for the executive function tasks. Hence, our results show that textese is positively related to children’s grammar performance. On the other hand, use

  1. Trafficking-Competent KCNQ1 Variably Influences the Function of HERG Long QT Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Kenshi; Shuai, Wen; Sakamoto, Yuichiro; Higashida, Haruhiro; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Kupershmidt, Sabina

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in the KCNQ1 and HERG genes cause the Long QT Syndromes, LQTS1 and LQTS2, due to reductions in the cardiac repolarizing IKs and IKr currents, respectively. It was previously reported that KCNQ1 co-expression modulates HERG function by enhancing membrane expression of HERG, and that the two proteins co-immunoprecipitate, and co-localize in myocytes. In vivo studies in genetically modified rabbits also support a HERG-KCNQ1 interaction. Objective We sought to determine whether KCNQ1 influences the current characteristics of HERG genetic variants. Methods Expression of HERG and KCNQ1 wild type (WT) and mutant channels in heterologous systems, combined with whole cell patch clamp analysis and biochemistry. Results Supporting the notion that KCNQ1 needs to be trafficking competent to influence HERG function, we found that although the tail current density of HERG expressed in CHO cells was approximately doubled by WT KCNQ1 co-expression, it was not altered in the presence of the trafficking-defective KCNQ1T587M variant. Activation and deactivation kinetics of HERG variants were not altered. The HERGM124T variant, previously shown to be mildly impaired functionally, was restored to WT levels by KCNQ1-WT but not KCNQ1T587M co-expression. The tail current densities of the severely trafficking-impaired HERGG601S and HERGF805C variants were only slightly improved by KCNQ1 co-expression. The trafficking competent, but incompletely processed HERGN598Q, and a mutation in the selectivity filter, HERGG628S, were not improved by KCNQ1 co-expression. Conclusions These findings suggest a functional co-dependence of HERG on KCNQ1 during channel biogenesis. Moreover, KCNQ1 variably modulates LQTS2 mutations with distinct underlying pathologies. PMID:20348026

  2. The Influence of Texting Language on Grammar and Executive Functions in Primary School Children.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Chantal N; van Witteloostuijn, Merel; Vasić, Nada; Avrutin, Sergey; Blom, Elma

    2016-01-01

    When sending text messages on their mobile phone to friends, children often use a special type of register, which is called textese. This register allows the omission of words and the use of textisms: instances of non-standard written language such as 4ever (forever). Previous studies have shown that textese has a positive effect on children's literacy abilities. In addition, it is possible that children's grammar system is affected by textese as well, as grammar rules are often transgressed in this register. Therefore, the main aim of this study was to investigate whether the use of textese influences children's grammar performance, and whether this effect is specific to grammar or language in general. Additionally, studies have not yet investigated the influence of textese on children's cognitive abilities. Consequently, the secondary aim of this study was to find out whether textese affects children's executive functions. To investigate this, 55 children between 10 and 13 years old were tested on a receptive vocabulary and grammar performance (sentence repetition) task and various tasks measuring executive functioning. In addition, text messages were elicited and the number of omissions and textisms in children's messages were calculated. Regression analyses showed that omissions were a significant predictor of children's grammar performance after various other variables were controlled for: the more words children omitted in their text messages, the better their performance on the grammar task. Although textisms correlated (marginally) significantly with vocabulary, grammar and selective attention scores and omissions marginally significantly with vocabulary scores, no other significant effects were obtained for measures of textese in the regression analyses: neither for the language outcomes, nor for the executive function tasks. Hence, our results show that textese is positively related to children's grammar performance. On the other hand, use of textese does

  3. The influence of gut function on lymphoid cell populations in the intestinal mucosa of lambs.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, J D; Morris, B

    1983-01-01

    The number and type of lymphoid cells in the intestinal mucosa of lambs change during the first weeks after birth. The influence of gut function on these changes was examined by comparing the evolution of lymphoid cell populations in normal ileum with that in lengths of ileum which had been isolated surgically from the functional intestinal tract of the lamb before birth. The isolated lengths of ileum had a normal blood and nerve supply and they remained healthy throughout a period of at least 2 years, although they did not have a normal histological development. In comparison with normal ileum, the villi of the isolated ileal segments were much smaller and there were many fewer intraepithelial lymphocytes; the lamina propria had significantly fewer lymphocytes than the functional ileum and only a few plasma cells. When isolated ileal segments were reconnected into the intestinal tract after having been isolated from it for 1-3 months, the histology of the mucosa reverted to that of the normal gut, with the same number and types of lymphoid cells. Radiolabelled lymphoblasts collected from intestinal lymph and injected intravenously accumulated to only a small extent in isolated segments of ileum compared with either the normal or the reconnected segments of ileum. This suggested that the paucity of lymphocytes in the mucosa of the isolated segments was due to a reduced extravasation of these cells there. The influence which the gut contents exert on the lymphoid cell population in the mucosa is probably associated with antigenic stimulation but may also be related to other factors concerned in the normal digestive functions of the gut. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:6862523

  4. Robotic assessment of the influence of age on upper-limb sensorimotor function

    PubMed Central

    LLinares, Ana; Badesa, Francisco Javier; Morales, Ricardo; Garcia-Aracil, Nicolas; Sabater, JM; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This paper examines the influence of age on several attributes of sensorimotor performance while performing a reaching task. Our hypothesis, based on previous studies, is that aged persons will show differences in one or more of the attributes of sensorimotor performance. Patients and methods Fifty-one subjects (aged 20–80 years) with no known neuromotor disorders of the upper limbs participated in the study. Subjects were asked to grasp the end-effector of a pneumatic robotic device with two degrees of freedom in order to reach peripheral targets (1.0 cm radius), “quickly and accurately”, from a centrally located target (1.0 cm radius). Subjects began each trial by holding the hand within the central target for 2000 milliseconds. Afterwards, a peripheral target was illuminated. Then participants were given 3000 milliseconds to complete the movement. When a target was reached, the participant had to return to the central target in order to start a new trial. A total of 64 trials were completed and each peripheral target was illuminated in a random block design. Results Subjects were divided into three groups according to age: group 1 (age 20–40 years), group 2 (age 41–60 years), and group 3 (age 61–80 years). The Kruskal–Wallis test showed significant differences (P < 0.05) between groups, except for the variables postural speed in the dominant arm, and postural speed and initial deviation in the non-dominant arm (P > 0.05). These results suggest that age introduces significant differences in upper-limb motor function. Conclusion Our findings show that there are objective differences in sensorimotor function due to age, and that these differences are greater for the dominant arm. Therefore for the assessment of upper-limb function, we should take into account the influence of age. Moreover, these results suggest that robotic systems can provide a new and effective approach in the assessment of sensorimotor function. PMID:23885170

  5. Influence of nanotopography on periodontal ligament stem cell functions and cell sheet based periodontal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Li, Bei; Zhao, Lingzhou; Jin, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal regeneration is an important part of regenerative medicine, with great clinical significance; however, the effects of nanotopography on the functions of periodontal ligament (PDL) stem cells (PDLSCs) and on PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration have never been explored. Titania nanotubes (NTs) layered on titanium (Ti) provide a good platform to study this. In the current study, the influence of NTs of different tube size on the functions of PDLSCs was observed. Afterward, an ectopic implantation model using a Ti/cell sheets/hydroxyapatite (HA) complex was applied to study the effect of the NTs on cell sheet based periodontal regeneration. The NTs were able to enhance the initial PDLSC adhesion and spread, as well as collagen secretion. With the Ti/cell sheets/HA complex model, it was demonstrated that the PDLSC sheets were capable of regenerating the PDL tissue, when combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) sheets and HA, without the need for extra soluble chemical cues. Simultaneously, the NTs improved the periodontal regeneration result of the ectopically implanted Ti/cell sheets/HA complex, giving rise to functionally aligned collagen fiber bundles. Specifically, much denser collagen fibers, with abundant blood vessels as well as cementum-like tissue on the Ti surface, which well-resembled the structure of natural PDL, were observed in the NT5 and NT10 sample groups. Our study provides the first evidence that the nanotopographical cues obviously influence the functions of PDLSCs and improve the PDLSC sheet based periodontal regeneration size dependently, which provides new insight to the periodontal regeneration. The Ti/cell sheets/HA complex may constitute a good model to predict the effect of biomaterials on periodontal regeneration.

  6. Endocannabinoid Signaling in Motivation, Reward, and Addiction: Influences on Mesocorticolimbic Dopamine Function.

    PubMed

    Sagheddu, Claudia; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Pistis, Marco; Melis, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system has been conserved in the animal kingdom for 500 million years, and this system influences many critical behavioral processes including associative learning, reward signaling, goal-directed behavior, motor skill learning, and action-habit transformation. Additionally, the neurotransmitter dopamine has long been recognized to play a critical role in the processing of natural rewards, as well as of motivation that regulates approach and avoidance behavior. This motivational role of dopamine neurons is also based upon the evidence provided by several studies investigating disorders of dopamine pathways such as drug addiction and Parkinson's disease. From an evolutionary point of view, individuals engage in behaviors aimed at maximizing and minimizing positive and aversive consequences, respectively. Accordingly, those with the greatest fitness have a better potential to survival. Hence, deviations from fitness can be viewed as a part of the evolutionary process by means of natural selection. Given the long evolutionary history of both the endocannabinoid and dopaminergic systems, it is plausible that they must serve as fundamental and basic modulators of physiological functions and needs. Notably, endocannabinoids regulate dopamine neuronal activity and its influence on behavioral output. The goal of this chapter is to examine the endocannabinoid influence on dopamine signaling specifically related to (i) those behavioral processes that allow us to successfully adapt to ever-changing environments (i.e., reward signaling and motivational processes) and (ii) derangements from behavioral flexibility that underpin drug addiction.

  7. Plant functional coexistence and influence on the eco-hydrologic response of semiarid hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanjalili, Mohammadjafar; Saco, Patricia M.; Willgoose, Garry

    2016-04-01

    Through its influence on rainfall-runoff and erosion-deposition processes, vegetation remarkably regulates different aspects of landscape processes. Here, the influence of different plant functional dynamics on the coexistence of different species in arid and semi-arid regions with banded vegetation patterns is investigated. Simulations capture the coevolution and coexistence of two different species interacting with hydrology in hillslopes with gentle slopes. The dynamic vegetation model simulates the dynamics of overland runoff, soil moisture, facilitation mechanisms (evaporation reduction through shading and enhanced infiltration by vegetation), local and non-local seed dispersal, competition through water uptake and changes in the biomass of the two species. Here for simplicity the two species are assumed to use water from the same soil depth. Results of the coexistence of the two species capture differences in facilitation-competition interactions caused by specific types of vegetation with varying hydrologic traits. The results illustrate that the dominance of facilitation or competition feedbacks which determine either the coexistence of the two species or survival of only one of them strongly depends on the characteristics and hydrologic traits of the coexisting species and the severity of water stresses. We therefore argue that our results should stimulate further research into the role of interspecific and intraspecific feedbacks between different plant species and specifically the influence of the resulting vegetation community on landform evolution processes.

  8. Group management influences reproductive function of the male cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Koester, Diana C; Freeman, Elizabeth W; Wildt, David E; Terrell, Kimberly A; Franklin, Ashley D; Meeks, Karen; Crosier, Adrienne E

    2015-09-21

    Although the free-ranging cheetah is generally socially solitary, as many as 60% of males live in same-sex (usually sibling) coalitions. Under ex situ conditions, the cheetah experiences low reproductive success with only ~18% of males having ever produced young. Most male cheetahs (85%) are managed in captivity in coalitions, but with no data on the influence of social grouping on reproductive parameters. We examined the influence of singleton versus coalition management on various male cheetah physiological traits, including ejaculate quality and gonadal and adrenal hormone metabolite concentrations. We also assessed behaviour within coalitions for evidence of social hierarchy through initiation of interactions with group mates and relatedness to physiological traits. Ejaculate quality (including total motile and structurally normal spermatozoa per ejaculate) and androgen concentration profiles were higher (P < 0.05) in coalition compared with singleton males. These results support the conclusion that testis function in the cheetah, specifically related to the development of normal, motile spermatozoa and androgen production, is influenced by management with same-sex conspecifics. The findings have implications for ex situ conservation breeding programs by suggesting that reproductive quality can be enhanced through group maintenance of cheetah males.

  9. M1 ipRGCs Influence Visual Function through Retrograde Signaling in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Prigge, Cameron L.; Yeh, Po-Ting; Liou, Nan-Fu; Lee, Chi-Chan; You, Shih-Feng; Liu, Lei-Lei; McNeill, David S.; Chew, Kylie S.; Hattar, Samer

    2016-01-01

    Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs, with five subtypes named M1–M5) are a unique subclass of RGCs with axons that project directly to many brain nuclei involved in non-image-forming functions such as circadian photoentrainment and the pupillary light reflex. Recent evidence suggests that melanopsin-based signals also influence image-forming visual function, including light adaptation, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. Intriguingly, a small population of M1 ipRGCs have intraretinal axon collaterals that project toward the outer retina. Using genetic mouse models, we provide three lines of evidence showing that these axon collaterals make connections with upstream dopaminergic amacrine cells (DACs): (1) ipRGC signaling to DACs is blocked by tetrodotoxin both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that ipRGC-to-DAC transmission requires voltage-gated Na+ channels; (2) this transmission is partly dependent on N-type Ca2+ channels, which are possibly expressed in the axon collateral terminals of ipRGCs; and (3) fluorescence microscopy reveals that ipRGC axon collaterals make putative presynaptic contact with DACs. We further demonstrate that elimination of M1 ipRGCs attenuates light adaptation, as evidenced by an impaired electroretinogram b-wave from cones, whereas a dopamine receptor agonist can potentiate the cone-driven b-wave of retinas lacking M1 ipRGCs. Together, the results strongly suggest that ipRGCs transmit luminance signals retrogradely to the outer retina through the dopaminergic system and in turn influence retinal light adaptation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) comprise a third class of retinal photoreceptors that are known to mediate physiological responses such as circadian photoentrainment. However, investigation into whether and how ipRGCs contribute to vision has just begun. Here, we provide convergent anatomical and

  10. How emotional abilities modulate the influence of early life stress on hippocampal functioning.

    PubMed

    Aust, Sabine; Alkan Härtwig, Elif; Koelsch, Stefan; Heekeren, Hauke R; Heuser, Isabella; Bajbouj, Malek

    2014-07-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is known to have considerable influence on brain development, mental health and affective functioning. Previous investigations have shown that alexithymia, a prevalent personality trait associated with difficulties experiencing and verbalizing emotions, is particularly related to ELS. The aim of the present study was to investigate how neural correlates of emotional experiences in alexithymia are altered in the presence and absence of ELS. Therefore, 50 healthy individuals with different levels of alexithymia were matched regarding ELS and investigated with respect to neural correlates of audio-visually induced emotional experiences via functional magnetic resonance imaging. The main finding was that ELS modulated hippocampal responses to pleasant (>neutral) stimuli in high-alexithymic individuals, whereas there was no such modulation in low-alexithymic individuals matched for ELS. Behavioral and psychophysiological results followed a similar pattern. When considered independent of ELS, alexithymia was associated with decreased responses in insula (pleasant > neutral) and temporal pole (unpleasant > neutral). Our results show that the influence of ELS on emotional brain responses seems to be modulated by an individual's degree of alexithymia. Potentially, protective and adverse effects of emotional abilities on brain responses to emotional experiences are discussed.

  11. Non-linear controls influence functions in an aircraft dynamics simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Hubbard, James E., Jr.; Motter, Mark A.

    2006-03-01

    In the development and testing of novel structural and controls concepts, such as morphing aircraft wings, appropriate models are needed for proper system characterization. In most instances, available system models do not provide the required additional degrees of freedom for morphing structures but may be modified to some extent to achieve a compatible system. The objective of this study is to apply wind tunnel data collected for an Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV), that implements trailing edge morphing, to create a non-linear dynamics simulator, using well defined rigid body equations of motion, where the aircraft stability derivatives change with control deflection. An analysis of this wind tunnel data, using data extraction algorithms, was performed to determine the reference aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for the aircraft. Further, non-linear influence functions were obtained for each of the aircraft's control surfaces, including the sixteen trailing edge flap segments. These non-linear controls influence functions are applied to the aircraft dynamics to produce deflection-dependent aircraft stability derivatives in a non-linear dynamics simulator. Time domain analysis of the aircraft motion, trajectory, and state histories can be performed using these nonlinear dynamics and may be visualized using a 3-dimensional aircraft model. Linear system models can be extracted to facilitate frequency domain analysis of the system and for control law development. The results of this study are useful in similar projects where trailing edge morphing is employed and will be instrumental in the University of Maryland's continuing study of active wing load control.

  12. How emotional abilities modulate the influence of early life stress on hippocampal functioning

    PubMed Central

    Alkan Härtwig, Elif; Koelsch, Stefan; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Heuser, Isabella; Bajbouj, Malek

    2014-01-01

    Early life stress (ELS) is known to have considerable influence on brain development, mental health and affective functioning. Previous investigations have shown that alexithymia, a prevalent personality trait associated with difficulties experiencing and verbalizing emotions, is particularly related to ELS. The aim of the present study was to investigate how neural correlates of emotional experiences in alexithymia are altered in the presence and absence of ELS. Therefore, 50 healthy individuals with different levels of alexithymia were matched regarding ELS and investigated with respect to neural correlates of audio-visually induced emotional experiences via functional magnetic resonance imaging. The main finding was that ELS modulated hippocampal responses to pleasant (>neutral) stimuli in high-alexithymic individuals, whereas there was no such modulation in low-alexithymic individuals matched for ELS. Behavioral and psychophysiological results followed a similar pattern. When considered independent of ELS, alexithymia was associated with decreased responses in insula (pleasant > neutral) and temporal pole (unpleasant > neutral). Our results show that the influence of ELS on emotional brain responses seems to be modulated by an individual’s degree of alexithymia. Potentially, protective and adverse effects of emotional abilities on brain responses to emotional experiences are discussed. PMID:23685776

  13. Biology of Bone Tissue: Structure, Function, and Factors That Influence Bone Cells.

    PubMed

    Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Sasso, Gisela Rodrigues da Silva; Sasso-Cerri, Estela; Simões, Manuel Jesus; Cerri, Paulo Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue is continuously remodeled through the concerted actions of bone cells, which include bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, whereas osteocytes act as mechanosensors and orchestrators of the bone remodeling process. This process is under the control of local (e.g., growth factors and cytokines) and systemic (e.g., calcitonin and estrogens) factors that all together contribute for bone homeostasis. An imbalance between bone resorption and formation can result in bone diseases including osteoporosis. Recently, it has been recognized that, during bone remodeling, there are an intricate communication among bone cells. For instance, the coupling from bone resorption to bone formation is achieved by interaction between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Moreover, osteocytes produce factors that influence osteoblast and osteoclast activities, whereas osteocyte apoptosis is followed by osteoclastic bone resorption. The increasing knowledge about the structure and functions of bone cells contributed to a better understanding of bone biology. It has been suggested that there is a complex communication between bone cells and other organs, indicating the dynamic nature of bone tissue. In this review, we discuss the current data about the structure and functions of bone cells and the factors that influence bone remodeling.

  14. Cognitive, Parent and Teacher Rating Measures of Executive Functioning: Shared and Unique Influences on School Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, Marielle C.; Ziermans, Tim B.; Spruijt, Andrea M.; Swaab, Hanna

    2017-01-01

    Very little is known about the relative influence of cognitive performance-based executive functioning (EF) measures and behavioral EF ratings in explaining differences in children's school achievement. This study examined the shared and unique influence of these different EF measures on math and spelling outcome for a sample of 84 first and second graders. Parents and teachers completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), and children were tested with computer-based performance tests from the Amsterdam Neuropsychological Tasks (ANT). Mixed-model hierarchical regression analyses, including intelligence level and age, showed that cognitive performance and teacher's ratings of working memory and shifting concurrently explained differences in spelling. However, teacher's behavioral EF ratings did not explain any additional variance in math outcome above cognitive EF performance. Parent's behavioral EF ratings did not add any unique information for either outcome measure. This study provides support for the ecological validity of performance- and teacher rating-based EF measures, and shows that both measures could have a complementary role in identifying EF processes underlying spelling achievement problems. The early identification of strengths and weaknesses of a child's working memory and shifting capabilities, might help teachers to broaden their range of remedial intervention options to optimize school achievement. PMID:28194121

  15. ECM proteins in a microporous scaffold influence hepatocyte morphology, function, and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Kim, Myung Hee; Shirahama, Hitomi; Lee, Jae Ho; Ng, Soon Seng; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-11-29

    It is well known that a three-dimensional (3D) culture environment and the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins facilitate hepatocyte viability and maintenance of the liver-specific phenotype in vitro. However, it is not clear whether specific ECM components such as collagen or fibronectin differentially regulate such processes, especially in 3D scaffolds. In this study, a series of ECM-functionalized inverted colloidal crystal (ICC) microporous scaffolds were fabricated and their influence on Huh-7.5 cell proliferation, morphology, hepatic-specific functions, and patterns of gene expression were compared. Both collagen and fibronectin promoted albumin production and liver-specific gene expression of Huh-7.5 cells, compared with the bare ICC scaffold. Interestingly, cells in the fibronectin-functionalized scaffold exhibited different aggregation patterns to those in the collagen-functionalized scaffold, a variation that could be related to the distinct mRNA expression levels of cell adhesion-related genes. Based on these results, we can conclude that different ECM proteins, such as fibronectin and collagen, indeed play distinct roles in the phenotypic regulation of cells cultured in a 3D environment.

  16. Influence of genetic and environmental factors on oral diseases and function in aged twins.

    PubMed

    Kurushima, Y; Ikebe, K; Matsuda, K; Enoki, K; Ogata, S; Yamashita, M; Murakami, S; Hayakawa, K; Maeda, Y

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to quantify the genetic and environmental contributions to oral disease and function in twins. Participants were middle-aged and old twins, 116 monozygotic and 16 dizygotic pairs whose mean age was 66·1 ± 10·3 (SD) years. Number of teeth, percentage of decayed, filled and missing teeth and periodontal status were recorded as indicators of oral disease. The widths of upper and lower dental arch served as indicators of morphological figures. Furthermore, stimulated salivary flow rate, occlusal force and masticatory performance were measured as indicators of oral function. Univariate genetic analysis with monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs was conducted to detect the fittest structural equation model of each outcome. Both number of teeth and periodontal status fitted the model composed of common environmental factor and unique environmental factor. Decayed, filled and missing teeth, morphological figures and measurements of oral function fitted the model composed of additive genetic factor and unique environmental factor. The model fitting of each measurement suggested that periodontal disease was mainly affected by environmental factors, while morphological figures and oral functions were influenced by both genetic and environmental factors.

  17. ECM proteins in a microporous scaffold influence hepatocyte morphology, function, and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Kim, Myung Hee; Shirahama, Hitomi; Lee, Jae Ho; Ng, Soon Seng; Glenn, Jeffrey S.; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that a three-dimensional (3D) culture environment and the presence of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins facilitate hepatocyte viability and maintenance of the liver-specific phenotype in vitro. However, it is not clear whether specific ECM components such as collagen or fibronectin differentially regulate such processes, especially in 3D scaffolds. In this study, a series of ECM-functionalized inverted colloidal crystal (ICC) microporous scaffolds were fabricated and their influence on Huh-7.5 cell proliferation, morphology, hepatic-specific functions, and patterns of gene expression were compared. Both collagen and fibronectin promoted albumin production and liver-specific gene expression of Huh-7.5 cells, compared with the bare ICC scaffold. Interestingly, cells in the fibronectin-functionalized scaffold exhibited different aggregation patterns to those in the collagen-functionalized scaffold, a variation that could be related to the distinct mRNA expression levels of cell adhesion-related genes. Based on these results, we can conclude that different ECM proteins, such as fibronectin and collagen, indeed play distinct roles in the phenotypic regulation of cells cultured in a 3D environment. PMID:27897167

  18. Influence of a quality improvement learning collaborative program on team functioning in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kotecha, Jyoti; Brown, Judith Belle; Han, Han; Harris, Stewart B; Green, Michael; Russell, Grant; Roberts, Sharon; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Fournie, Meghan; Thind, Amardeep; Reichert, Sonja M; Birtwhistle, Richard

    2015-09-01

    Quality improvement (QI) programs are frequently implemented to support primary healthcare (PHC) team development and to improve care outcomes. In Ontario, Canada, the Quality Improvement and Innovation Partnership (QIIP) offered a learning collaborative (LC) program to support the development of interdisciplinary team function and improve chronic disease management, disease prevention, and access to care. A qualitative study using a phenomenological approach was conducted as part of a mixed-method evaluation to explore the influence of the program on team functioning in participating PHC teams. A purposive sampling strategy was used to identify PHC teams (n = 10), from which participants of different professional roles were selected through a purposeful recruitment process to reflect maximum variation of team roles. Additionally, QI coaches working with the interview participants and the LC administrators were also interviewed. Data were collected through semistructured telephone interviews that were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was conducted through an iterative and interpretive approach. The shared experience of participating in the program appeared to improve team functioning. Participants described increased trust and respect for each other's clinical and administrative roles and were inspired by learning about different approaches to interdisciplinary care. This appeared to enhance collegial relationships, collapse professional silos, improve communication, and increase interdisciplinary collaboration. Teamwork involves more than just physically grouping healthcare providers from multiple disciplines and mandating them to work together. The LC program provided opportunities for participants to learn how to work collaboratively, and participation in the LC program appeared to enhance team functioning.

  19. Influence of Functionalization of Nanocontainers on Self-Healing Anticorrosive Coatings.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaoliang; Schenderlein, Matthias; Huang, Xing; Brownbill, Nick J; Blanc, Frédéric; Shchukin, Dmitry

    2015-10-21

    Feedback coating based on pH-induced release of inhibitor from organosilyl-functionalized containers is considered as a compelling candidate to achieve smart self-healing corrosion protection. Four key factors that determine the overall coating performance include (1) the uptake and release capacity of containers, (2) prevention of the premature leakage, (3) compatibility of containers in coating matrix, and (4) cost and procedure simplicity consideration. The critical influence introduced by organosilyl-functionalization of containers is systematically demonstrated by investigating MCM-41 silica nanoparticles modified with ethylenediamine (en), en-4-oxobutanoic acid salt (en-COO(-)), and en-triacetate (en-(COO(-))3) with higher and lower organic contents. The properties of the modified silica nanoparticles as containers were mainly characterized by solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, N2 sorption, thermogravimetric analysis, small-angle X-ray scattering, dynamic light scattering, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Finally, the self-healing ability and anticorrosive performances of hybrid coatings were examined through scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). We found that en-(COO(-))3-type functionalization with content of only 0.23 mmol/g performed the best as a candidate for establishing pH-induced release system because the resulting capped and loaded (C-L) functionalized silica nanocontainers (FSNs) exhibit high loading (26 wt %) and release (80%) capacities for inhibitor, prevention of premature leakage (less than 2%), good dispersibility in coating matrix, and cost effectiveness.

  20. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  1. Resource identity modifies the influence of predation risk on ecosystem function.

    PubMed

    Trussell, Geoffrey C; Ewanchuk, Patrick J; Matassa, Catherine M

    2008-10-01

    It is well established that predators can scare as well as consume their prey. In many systems, the fear of being eaten causes trait-mediated cascades whose strength can rival or exceed that of more widely recognized density-mediated cascades transmitted by predators that consume their prey. Despite this progress it is only beginning to be understood how the influence of predation risk is shaped by environmental context and whether it can exert an important influence on ecosystem-level processes. This study used a factorial mesocosm experiment that manipulated basal-resource identity (either barnacles, Semibalanus balanoides, or mussels, Mytilus edulis) to determine how resources modify the influence of predation risk, cascade strength, and the efficiency of energy transfer in two, tritrophic, rocky-shore food chains containing the predatory green crab (Carcinus maenas) and an intermediate consumer (the snail, Nucella lapillus). The effect of predation risk and the strength of trait-mediated cascades (both in absolute and relative terms) were much stronger in the barnacle than in the mussel food chain. Moreover, predation risk strongly diminished the efficiency of energy transfer in the barnacle food chain but had no significant effect in the mussel food chain. The influence of resource identity on indirect-effect strength and energy transfer was likely caused by differences in how each resource shapes the degree of risk perceived by prey. We suggest that our understanding of the connection between trophic dynamics and ecosystem functioning will improve considerably once the effects of predation risk on individual behavior and physiology are considered.

  2. Dopaminergic influences on executive function and impulsive behaviour in impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Leroi, Iracema; Barraclough, Michelle; McKie, Shane; Hinvest, Neal; Evans, Jonathan; Elliott, Rebecca; McDonald, Kathryn

    2013-09-01

    The development of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD) may arise from an interaction among cognitive impairment, impulsive responding and dopaminergic state. Dopaminergic state may be influenced by pharmacologic or genotypic (catechol-O-methyltransferase; COMT) factors. We sought to investigate this interaction further by comparing those with (n = 35) and without (n = 55) ICDs on delay-discounting in different pharmacologic conditions (ON or OFF dopaminergic medication) and on response inhibition as well as aspects of executive functioning in the ON state. We then undertook an exploratory sub-group analysis of these same tasks when the overall PD group was divided into different allelic variants of COMT (val/val vs. met/met). A healthy control group (HC; n = 20) was also included. We found that in those with PD and ICDs, 'cognitive flexibility' (set shifting, verbal fluency, and attention) in the ON medication state was not impaired compared with those without ICDs. In contrast, our working memory, or 'cognitive focus', task was impaired in both PD groups compared with the HC group when ON. During the delay-discounting task, the PD with ICDs group expressed greater impulsive choice compared with the PD group without ICDs, when in the ON, but not the OFF, medication state. However, no group difference on the response inhibition task was seen when ON. Finally, the met homozygous group performed differently on tests of executive function compared with the val homozygous group. We concluded that the disparity in levels of impairment among different domains of executive function and impulsive decision-making distinguishes those with ICD in PD from those without ICD, and may in part be affected by dopaminergic status. Both pharmacologic and genotypic influences on dopaminergic state may be important in ICD.

  3. Algal exudates and stream organic matter influence the structure and function of denitrifying bacterial communities.

    PubMed

    Kalscheur, Kathryn N; Rojas, Miguel; Peterson, Christopher G; Kelly, John J; Gray, Kimberly A

    2012-11-01

    Within aquatic ecosystems, periphytic biofilms can be hot spots of denitrification, and previous work has suggested that algal taxa within periphyton can influence the species composition and activity of resident denitrifying bacteria. This study tested the hypothesis that algal species composition within biofilms influences the structure and function of associated denitrifying bacterial communities through the composition of organic exudates. A mixed population of bacteria was incubated with organic carbon isolated from one of seven algal species or from one of two streams that differed in anthropogenic inputs. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) revealed differences in the organic composition of algal exudates and stream waters, which, in turn, selected for distinct bacterial communities. Organic carbon source had a significant effect on potential denitrification rates (DNP) of the communities, with organics isolated from a stream with high anthropogenic inputs resulting in a bacterial community with the highest DNP. There was no correlation between DNP and numbers of denitrifiers (based on nirS copy numbers), but there was a strong relationship between the species composition of denitrifier communities (as indicated by tag pyrosequencing of nosZ genes) and DNP. Specifically, the relative abundance of Pseudomonas stutzeri-like nosZ sequences across treatments correlated significantly with DNP, and bacterial communities incubated with organic carbon from the stream with high anthropogenic inputs had the highest relative abundance of P. stutzeri-like nosZ sequences. These results demonstrate a significant relationship between bacterial community composition and function and provide evidence of the potential impacts of anthropogenic inputs on the structure and function of stream microbial communities.

  4. Downregulation of FoxC2 Increased Susceptibility to Experimental Colitis: Influence of Lymphatic Drainage Function?

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Felix; Potepalov, Sergey; Shehzahdi, Romana; Bernas, Michael; Witte, Marlys; Abreo, Fleurette; Traylor, James; Orr, Wayne A.; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although inflammation-induced expansion of the intestinal lymphatic vasculature (lymphangiogenesis) is known to be a crucial event in limiting inflammatory processes, through clearance of interstitial fluid and immune cells, considerably less is known about the impact of an impaired lymphatic clearance function (as seen in inflammatory bowel diseases) on this cascade. We aimed to investigate whether the impaired intestinal lymphatic drainage function observed in FoxC2(+/−) mice would influence the course of disease in a model of experimental colitis. Methods: Acute dextran sodium sulfate colitis was induced in wild-type and haploinsufficient FoxC2(+/−) mice, and survival, disease activity, colonic histopathological injury, neutrophil, T-cell, and macrophage infiltration were evaluated. Functional and structural changes in the intestinal lymphatic vessel network were analyzed, including submucosal edema, vessel morphology, and lymphatic vessel density. Results: We found that FoxC2 downregulation in FoxC2(+/−) mice significantly increased the severity and susceptibility to experimental colitis, as displayed by lower survival rates, increased disease activity, greater histopathological injury, and elevated colonic neutrophil, T-cell, and macrophage infiltration. These findings were accompanied by structural (dilated torturous lymphatic vessels) and functional (greater submucosal edema, higher immune cell burden) changes in the intestinal lymphatic vasculature. Conclusions: These results indicate that sufficient lymphatic clearance plays a crucial role in limiting the initiation and perpetuation of experimental colitis and those disturbances in the integrity of the intestinal lymphatic vessel network could intensify intestinal inflammation. Future therapies might be able to exploit these processes to restore and maintain adequate lymphatic clearance function in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25822012

  5. Influence of Immobilization Time on Functional Outcome in Radial Neck Fractures in Children.

    PubMed

    Badoi, Adina; Frech-Dörfler, Martina; Häcker, Frank-Martin; Mayr, Johannes

    2016-12-01

    Background Radial neck fractures represent 20 to 30% of elbow fractures in children. Incorrect treatment can lead to significant permanent functional impairment. Posttraumatic avascular necrosis may cause a deformity of the radial head and neck. Deformation of the radial head and neck can be more severe after open rather than closed reduction or orthopedic treatment without reduction. The aim of our study was to analyze the influence of immobilization time on functional outcome. Patients and Methods Retrospective, descriptive study of all children who had been treated for a radial neck fracture between 1999 and 2013 at the University Children's Hospital Basel. Patients were allocated to two groups (group 1: patients treated between 1999 and 2008, group 2: patients treated between 2009 and 2013). The fractures were classified according to the classification of Metaizeau. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients who reached the full range of elbow motion at the end of the treatment period or the last follow-up. Secondary endpoints were immobilization time and number of patients with persistent physical restrictions of the elbow range of motion as well as the type of restrictions and subjective complaints. Results A total of 67 patients treated for radial neck fracture were included in the first group (1999-2008). A total of 47 patients were allocated to the second group (2009-2013). Overall, 59 patients in group 1 and 39 patients in group 2 were treated nonoperatively. Average immobilization time was 22.7 days (range, 6-60 days) in group 1 and 13.2 days (range, 0-27 days) in group 2. Full range of motion was observed in 50 to 72.7% of patients in group 1 and in 71.4 to 92% of patients in group 2, depending on the grade of fracture displacement. Overall, 21 patients (31%) of group 1 showed a persistent functional restriction. In group 2, only six patients (12%) suffered from a persistent functional restriction of the elbow range of motion. Conclusion

  6. The Influence of Functional Fitness and Cognitive Training of Physical Disabilities of Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, I-Chen; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chen, Ko-Chia; Hong, Wei-Chin; Lu, Yu-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    According to an investigation done by Taiwan Ministry of the Interior in 2013, there was more than 90% of the disability care institutions mainly based on life care. Previous studies have shown that individuals can effectively improve physical and cognitive training, improved in independent living and everyday competence. The purpose of the study was to investigate influence of the intervention program applying functional fitness and cognitive training to disabled residents in the institution. The subjects were disabled persons of a care institution in southern Taiwan and were randomly divided into training and control groups, both having 17 subjects. The age of the subjects was between 56 and 98 years with a mean age of 79.08 ± 10.04 years; the subjects of training group implemented 12 weeks of training on physical and cognitive training, while the control group subjects did not have any training program. The results revealed that subjects of the training group have significantly improved their functional shoulder rotation flexibility of left and right anterior hip muscle group flexibility of right, sitting functional balance of left and right, naming, attention, delayed recall, orientation, and Montreal cognitive assessment (MOCA). The study suggested developing physical fitness programs and physical and cognitive prescriptions for the disabled people of the institutions. PMID:25756064

  7. The influence of horseback riding training on the physical function and psychological problems of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of horseback riding training on the physical function and psychological problems of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients were divided evenly into an experimental group and a control group. Both groups carried out neurodevelopmental treatment. The experimental group additionally performed mechanical horseback riding training for 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week, for 6 weeks. Physical function was evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT). Psychological problems were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). In order to compare differences within groups between before and after the experiment, the paired t test was conducted. In order to compare differences between groups before and after the experiment, the independent t test was conducted. [Results] In the experimental group, the BBS, TUGT, and BDI showed significant improvements after the intervention. The experimental group’s BBS, TUGT, and BDI post-intervention changes were significantly better than those observed in the control group. [Conclusion] According to our results, horseback riding training has a positive effect on the physical function and psychological problems of stroke patients. PMID:26504283

  8. Defining the players in higher-order networks: predictive modeling for reverse engineering functional influence networks.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Jason E; Archuleta, Michelle; Stevens, Susan L; Stenzel-Poore, Mary P; Sanfilippo, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Determining biological network dependencies that can help predict the behavior of a system given prior observations from high-throughput data is a very valuable but difficult task, especially in the light of the ever-increasing volume of experimental data. Such an endeavor can be greatly enhanced by considering regulatory influences on co-expressed groups of genes representing functional modules, thus constraining the number of parameters in the system. This allows development of network models that are predictive of system dynamics. We first develop a predictive network model of the transcriptomics of whole blood from a mouse model of neuroprotection in ischemic stroke, and show that it can accurately predict system behavior under novel conditions. We then use a network topology approach to expand the set of regulators considered and show that addition of topological bottlenecks improves the performance of the predictive model. Finally, we explore how improvements in definition of functional modules may be achieved through an integration of inferred network relationships and functional relationships defined using Gene Ontology similarity. We show that appropriate integration of these two types of relationships can result in models with improved performance.

  9. The influence of lung function on exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, Yoshihiro; Hattori, Noboru; Yokoyama, Akihito; Yamane, Kiminori; Sekikawa, Kiyokazu; Inamizu, Tsutomu; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2010-03-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes have impaired exercise capacity. While numerous factors are known to contribute to impaired exercise capacity, the role of lung function remains unclear. We conducted the present study to investigate the influence of lung function on exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was carried out in 31 male patients with type 2 diabetes without diabetic complications or cardiopulmonary diseases. Patients with abnormal spirometry results such as a percentage of predicted forced vital capacity (%FVC) < 80% and/or a ratio of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) to FVC (FEV1/FVC) < 70% were excluded from the study. We used the percentage of predicted maximal oxygen uptake (%VO2max) as an index of exercise capacity. The correlations between %VO2max and lung function and other factors known to be associated with impaired exercise capacity were then assessed. Univariate analysis revealed %VO2max correlated significantly with percentage of predicted FEV1 (%FEV1), duration of type 2 diabetes, regular exercise habits, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures. In a multivariate analysis, %FEV1 and regular exercise habits were found to be independent determinants of %VO2max. A mild reduction in %FEV1, which may be a complication of diabetes, is associated with impaired exercise capacity in patients with type 2 diabetes. When evaluating spirometric values in patients with type 2 diabetes, a reduction in %FEV1 should be noted even when both %FVC and FEV1/FVC are within normal limits.

  10. Modeling and validation of polishing tool influence functions for manufacturing segments for an extremely large telescope.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongyu; Walker, David; Yu, Guoyu; Zhang, Wei

    2013-08-10

    We present a simulation technique to predict tool influence functions (TIFs) based on the Precessions polishing process, which is driven by addressing mass fabrication of the European Extremely Large Telescope mirror segments. Precessions polishing requires accurate and predictable TIFs to optimize the multiple process parameters, particularly when sequential polishing runs are performed by different polishing tools. In this paper, the static and dynamic TIFs are simulated based on the Preston equation. The velocity distribution is calculated according to the geometry of the precession motion. The pressure distribution at the polishing spot is calculated by means of finite element analysis (FEA). The FEA result is validated by direct force measurement with a simulation error of 4.3%. The simulation results of TIFs are verified by an experiment that shows the residual errors are less than 5% for both static and dynamic TIFs.

  11. Effect of the influence function of deformable mirrors on laser beam shaping.

    PubMed

    González-Núñez, Héctor; Béchet, Clémentine; Ayancán, Boris; Neichel, Benoit; Guesalaga, Andrés

    2017-02-20

    The continuous membrane stiffness of a deformable mirror propagates the deformation of the actuators beyond their neighbors. When phase-retrieval algorithms are used to determine the desired shape of these mirrors, this cross-coupling-also known as influence function (IF)-is generally disregarded. We study this problem via simulations and bench tests for different target shapes to gain further insight into the phenomenon. Sound modeling of the IF effect is achieved as highlighted by the concurrence between the modeled and experimental results. In addition, we observe that the actuators IF is a key parameter that determines the accuracy of the output light pattern. Finally, it is shown that in some cases it is possible to achieve better shaping by modifying the input irradiance of the phase-retrieval algorithm. The results obtained from this analysis open the door to further improvements in this type of beam-shaping systems.

  12. The persistent influence of concussion on attention, executive control and neuroelectric function in preadolescent children.

    PubMed

    Moore, Davis R; Pindus, Dominika M; Raine, Lauren B; Drollette, Eric S; Scudder, Mark R; Ellemberg, Dave; Hillman, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to examine the influence of pediatric sport-related concussion on brain and cognitive function. To do so, we used a between-participants design, measures of executive control, and event-related potentials (ERPs). The findings demonstrate that children with a history of concussion exhibit behavioral deficits in attention, working memory and impulse control, as well as neuroelectric alterations in ERP indices of visual attention (N1), conflict resolution (N2) and attentional resource allocation (P3). Furthermore, the age at injury related to the magnitude of several concussion-related deficits. Accordingly, a single sports-related concussive incident during childhood (m=2.1years prior to testing) may lead to subtle, yet pervasive alterations in the behavioral and neural indices of attention and executive control, and age at injury may moderate injury outcomes.

  13. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: structure, function, and culture (Part II).

    PubMed

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Larrabee, Hollynn; Dyne, Pamela L; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    Strategies for approaching generational issues that affect teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology in emergency medicine (EM) have been reported. Tactics to address generational influences involving the structure and function of the academic emergency department (ED), organizational culture, and EM schedule have not been published. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic EM. Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can address some common issues encountered in academic EM. By understanding the differences and strengths of each of the cohorts in academic EM departments and considering simple mitigating strategies, faculty leaders can maximize their cooperative effectiveness and face the challenges of a new millennium.

  14. Housing conditions influence motor functions and exploratory behavior following focal damage of the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Gornicka-Pawlak, Elzbieta; Jabłońska, Anna; Chyliński, Andrzej; Domańska-Janik, Krystyna

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated influence of housing conditions on motor functions recovery and exploratory behavior following ouabain focal brain lesion in the rat. During 30 days post-surgery period rats were housed individually in standard cages (IS) or in groups in enriched environment (EE) and behaviorally tested. The EE lesioned rats showed enhanced recovery from motor impairments in walking beam task, comparing with IS animals. Contrarily, in the open field IS rats (both lesioned and control) traveled a longer distance, showed less habituation and spent less time resting at the home base than the EE animals. Unlike the EE lesioned animals, the lesioned IS rats, presented a tendency to hyperactivity in postinjury period. Turning tendency was significantly affected by unilateral brain lesion only in the EE rats. We can conclude that housing conditions distinctly affected the rat's behavior in classical laboratory tests.

  15. Flexible system model reduction and control system design based upon actuator and sensor influence functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Johnson, Timothy L.; Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1987-01-01

    A model reduction technique based on aggregation with respect to sensor and actuator influence functions rather than modes is presented for large systems of coupled second-order differential equations. Perturbation expressions which can predict the effects of spillover on both the reduced-order plant model and the neglected plant model are derived. For the special case of collocated actuators and sensors, these expressions lead to the derivation of constraints on the controller gains that are, given the validity of the perturbation technique, sufficient to guarantee the stability of the closed-loop system. A case study demonstrates the derivation of stabilizing controllers based on the present technique. The use of control and observation synthesis in modifying the dimension of the reduced-order plant model is also discussed. A numerical example is provided for illustration.

  16. Structure and function of a benthic invertebrate stream community as influenced by beaver (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    McDowell, Donald M; Naiman, Robert J

    1986-03-01

    Beaver (Castor canadensis) affect the benthic invertebrate community of small woodland streams in Quebec through habitat modifications. Their activities influence community structure through the replacement of lotic taxa by lentic forms and community function by increasing the absolute importance of collectors and predators while decreasing the relative importance of shredders and scrapers in impounded sites. At our study site during the 1983 ice-free season, standing stocks of coarse particulate organic matter (>1 mm) were 2-5 times greater (P<0.05) in impounded sites than riffle sites in spring and summer. Fine (212 μm-1 mm) and very fine (0.5 μm-212 μm) particulate organic matter were 3-10 times greater (P<0.05) in impounded sites in all seasons. Chlorophyll a standing stocks did not differ statistically among sites. Total density and biomass of invertebrates in impoundments were 2-5 times greater (P<0.05) than riffle sites in spring and summer, but statistically similar in autumn. Generic diversity (H') was greater (P<0.05) in unaltered sites in autumn. Non-impounded sites were dominated by Simuliidae, Tanytarsini chironomids, scraping mayflies and net spinning caddisflies while impounded sites were characterized by Tanypodinae and Chironomini chironomids, predacious odonates, Tubificidae, and filtering pelycopods. Our results suggest that current paradigms applied to lotic ecosystems need to be reevaluated to incorporate the influence of beaver upon invertebrate communities.

  17. Influence of maternal nutritional status on vascular function in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Poston, Lucilla

    2011-05-01

    Suboptimal maternal nutritional status has been implicated in the development of cardiovascular risk in the child. Initially inferred from studies of low-birthweight children, investigations in cohorts of women subjected to famine provide direct evidence for an independent influence of the mother's diet on the cardiovascular health of her child. Animal studies from rodents and sheep have shown associations between maternal undernutrition and raised blood pressure, as well as abnormalities in resistance artery function, particularly in endothelium-dependent responses. Early life exposure to the influences of maternal over nutritional states, e.g. obesity and excessive gestational weight gain, has also been associated with markers of cardiovascular risk in man, and animal models have shown raised blood pressure and endothelial dysfunction in offspring of diet-induced obese dams. Increased sympathetic tone is commonly associated with hypertension in animal models of both under nutritional and over nutritional states. This and several other similarities may indicate commonality of mechanism and could reflect supranormal nutritional status in postnatal life in both conditions.

  18. Lifespan aging and belief reasoning: Influences of executive function and social cue decoding.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Louise H; Bull, Rebecca; Allen, Roy; Insch, Pauline; Burr, Kirsty; Ogg, Will

    2011-08-01

    Older adults often perform poorly on Theory of Mind (ToM) tests that require understanding of others' beliefs and intentions. The course and specificity of age changes in belief reasoning across the adult lifespan is unclear, as is the cause of the age effects. Cognitive and neuropsychological models predict that two types of processing might influence age differences in belief reasoning: executive functioning and social cue detection. In the current study we assessed 129 adults aged between 18 and 86 on novel measures of ToM (video clips and verbal vignettes), which manipulated whether true or false belief reasoning was required. On both video and verbal tasks, older adults (aged 65-88) had specific impairments in false belief reasoning, but showed no such problem in performing true belief tasks. Middle-aged adults (aged 40-64) generally performed as well as the younger adults (aged 18-39). Difficulties in updating information in working memory (but not inhibitory problems) partially mediated the age differences in false belief reasoning. Also, the ability to decode biological motion, indexing social cue detection, partially mediated age-related variance in the ability to interpret false beliefs. These results indicate that age differences in decoding social cues and updating information in memory may be important influences on the specific problems encountered when reasoning about false beliefs in old age.

  19. Perceived Neighborhood Risk as a Predictor of Drug Use among Urban Ethnic Minority Adolescents: Moderating Influences of Psychosocial Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheier, Lawrence M.; Miller, Nicole L.; Ifill-Williams, Michelle; Botvin, Gilbert J.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the moderating influences of psychosocial functioning on the relation between perceived neighborhood risk and alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use in inner-city, ethnic minority youths. Neighborhood risk uniquely predicted alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use; however, some relations were qualified by level of psychosocial functioning.…

  20. A Loss of Function Analysis of Host Factors Influencing Vaccinia virus Replication by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Orland; Haga, Ismar R.; Pechenick Jowers, Tali; Reynolds, Danielle K.; Wildenhain, Jan; Tekotte, Hille; Auer, Manfred; Tyers, Mike; Ghazal, Peter; Zimmer, Ralf; Haas, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) is a large, cytoplasmic, double-stranded DNA virus that requires complex interactions with host proteins in order to replicate. To explore these interactions a functional high throughput small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen targeting 6719 druggable cellular genes was undertaken to identify host factors (HF) influencing the replication and spread of an eGFP-tagged VACV. The experimental design incorporated a low multiplicity of infection, thereby enhancing detection of cellular proteins involved in cell-to-cell spread of VACV. The screen revealed 153 pro- and 149 anti-viral HFs that strongly influenced VACV replication. These HFs were investigated further by comparisons with transcriptional profiling data sets and HFs identified in RNAi screens of other viruses. In addition, functional and pathway analysis of the entire screen was carried out to highlight cellular mechanisms involved in VACV replication. This revealed, as anticipated, that many pro-viral HFs are involved in translation of mRNA and, unexpectedly, suggested that a range of proteins involved in cellular transcriptional processes and several DNA repair pathways possess anti-viral activity. Multiple components of the AMPK complex were found to act as pro-viral HFs, while several septins, a group of highly conserved GTP binding proteins with a role in sequestering intracellular bacteria, were identified as strong anti-viral VACV HFs. This screen has identified novel and previously unexplored roles for cellular factors in poxvirus replication. This advancement in our understanding of the VACV life cycle provides a reliable knowledge base for the improvement of poxvirus-based vaccine vectors and development of anti-viral theraputics. PMID:24901222

  1. Non-linear controls influence functions in an aircraft dynamics simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Hubbard, James E., Jr.; Motter, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    In the development and testing of novel structural and controls concepts, such as morphing aircraft wings, appropriate models are needed for proper system characterization. In most instances, available system models do not provide the required additional degrees of freedom for morphing structures but may be modified to some extent to achieve a compatible system. The objective of this study is to apply wind tunnel data collected for an Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV), that implements trailing edge morphing, to create a non-linear dynamics simulator, using well defined rigid body equations of motion, where the aircraft stability derivatives change with control deflection. An analysis of this wind tunnel data, using data extraction algorithms, was performed to determine the reference aerodynamic force and moment coefficients for the aircraft. Further, non-linear influence functions were obtained for each of the aircraft s control surfaces, including the sixteen trailing edge flap segments. These non-linear controls influence functions are applied to the aircraft dynamics to produce deflection-dependent aircraft stability derivatives in a non-linear dynamics simulator. Time domain analysis of the aircraft motion, trajectory, and state histories can be performed using these nonlinear dynamics and may be visualized using a 3-dimensional aircraft model. Linear system models can be extracted to facilitate frequency domain analysis of the system and for control law development. The results of this study are useful in similar projects where trailing edge morphing is employed and will be instrumental in the University of Maryland s continuing study of active wing load control.

  2. Uteroplacental insufficiency and lactational environment separately influence arterial stiffness and vascular function in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Tare, Marianne; Parkington, Helena C; Bubb, Kristen J; Wlodek, Mary E

    2012-08-01

    Early life environmental influences can have lifelong consequences for health, including the risk of cardiovascular disease. Uteroplacental insufficiency causes fetal undernutrition and impairs fetal growth. Previously we have shown that uteroplacental insufficiency is associated with impaired maternal mammary development, compromising postnatal growth leading to hypertension in male rat offspring. In this study we investigated the roles of prenatal and postnatal nutritional environments on endothelial and smooth muscle reactivity and passive wall stiffness of resistance arteries of male rat offspring. Fetal growth restriction was induced by maternal bilateral uterine vessel ligation (restricted) on day 18 of pregnancy. Control offspring were from mothers that had sham surgery (control) and another group from mothers with their litter size reduced (reduced; litter size reduced to 5 at birth, equivalent to the restricted group). On postnatal day 1, offspring (control, restricted, and reduced) were cross-fostered onto control or restricted mothers. At 6 months, mesenteric and femoral arteries were studied using wire and pressure myography. In restricted-on-restricted rats, wall stiffness was increased, and sensitivity to phenylephrine and relaxation evoked by endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor and sodium nitroprusside were impaired in mesenteric arteries. In femoral arteries, relaxation to sodium nitroprusside was reduced, whereas wall stiffness was unaltered. Cross-fostering restricted offspring onto control mothers alleviated deficits in vascular stiffness and reactivity. Control or reduced offspring who suckled a restricted mother had marked vascular stiffening. In conclusion, prenatal and early postnatal environments separately influence vascular function and stiffness. Furthermore, the early postnatal lactational environment is a determinant of later cardiovascular function.

  3. Influence of the scattering phase function in numerical modeling of hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2016-03-01

    In simulations of light transport in biological tissues and organs knowledge of tissue optical properties is imperative for realism of the predicted effects. One factor which is commonly overlooked is the choice of appropriate scattering phase function. Henyey-Greenstein phase function (PF) is often applied due to its suitability for analytical derivations and availability of the corresponding tissue anisotropy factors. At the same time it is known that it doesn't match the angular distribution of scattering in many tissues. In here, we study the influence of the PF in 3D Monte Carlo simulations of hyperspectral imaging (HSI). For a simple geometrical (three-layered) model of skin and a discrete blood vessel, hyperspectral images in the 400-1000 nm spectral range were simulated using Henyey-Greenstein, modified Henyey-Greenstein, and Mie PF, respectively. The results are compared in the spatial and spectral domains. In addition, the effective tissue properties as determined from the simulated HSI using 1D inverse MC are compared with the input parameter values. The results show that the choice of PF assumed in light transport models has a substantial impact on simulated HSI. Using an inappropriate PF can result in significantly altered HSI and considerable artifacts in extracted values of the skin parameters.

  4. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays.

    PubMed

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Daugaard, Gedske; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2011-04-01

    Functional whole blood haemostatic assays are used increasingly to guide transfusion therapy and monitor medical treatment and are also applied for in-vitro evaluations of the haemostatic potential of stored platelets. We investigated how the cellular and plasmatic elements, both isolated and combined, influenced the two methodologically different assays, thrombelastography (TEG) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate). Platelet-rich plasma (200 × 10/l) or pure plasma (0 platelets), with and without added red blood cells (RBCs), hematocrit 0, 0.15 or 0.29, were produced in vitro from platelet concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG and Multiplate. In the TEG, increasing amounts of RBC reduced clot strength and clot kinetics (α-angle), most markedly in plasma/RBC without platelets. In contrast, RBC in a platelet concentrate matrix enhanced Multiplate aggregation in response to weak agonists (ADP and arachidonic acid). Furthermore, removing plasma from platelet concentrates eliminated the TEG response and diminished the Multiplate aggregation response, but readding plasma to the pure platelet concentrates restored the response. Each of the elements in whole blood, plasma, platelets and RBC, affected the Multiplate and TEG results differently. The results emphasize that the concentrations of all cellular and plasmatic components in whole blood should be taken into account when interpreting results obtained by TEG and multiplate.

  5. Envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: profound influences on immune functions.

    PubMed Central

    Chirmule, N; Pahwa, S

    1996-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) leads to progressive destruction of the CD4+ T-cell subset, resulting in immune deficiency and AIDS. The specific binding of the viral external envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1, gp120, to the CD4 molecules initiates viral entry. In the past few years, several studies have indicated that the interaction of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein with cells and molecules of the immune system leads to pleiotropic biological effects on immune functions, which include effects on differentiation of CD34+ lymphoid progenitor cells and thymocytes, aberrant activation and cytokine secretion patterns of mature T cells, induction of apoptosis, B-cell hyperactivity, inhibition of T-cell dependent B-cell differentiation, modulation of macrophage functions, interactions with components of complement, and effects on neuronal cells. The amino acid sequence homologies of the envelope glycoproteins with several cellular proteins have suggested that molecular mimicry may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. This review summarizes work done by several investigators demonstrating the profound biological effects of envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1 on immune system cells. Extensive studies have also been done on interactions of the viral envelope proteins with components of the immune system which may be important for eliciting a "protective immune response." Understanding the influences of HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins on the immune system may provide valuable insights into HIV-1 disease pathogenesis and carries implications for the trials of HIV-1 envelope protein vaccines and immunotherapeutics. PMID:8801439

  6. Influence of Early Intensive Rehabilitation on Functional Mobility after Low Back Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bizheva, Tsvetelina; Lubenova, Daniela; Maznev, Ivan; Grigorova-Petrova, Kristin; Dimitrova, Antoaneta; Vasileva, Danche; Nikolova, Milena

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The research aims to determine the influence of early goal-oriented physical therapy program in combination with educational booklet and standard physical therapy without written instructions on functional mobility outcomes in patients after low back surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty patients with similar functional impairments were randomly divided into two groups, a control group (CG n = 10) and an experimental group (EG n = 20). The outcome measures include time to move from lying to sitting position, the TUG test and the 6-meter walk test. Rehabilitation program includes daily physical therapy with mild to moderate intensity, achieving sitting position and education sessions how to perform activities of daily living (ADL) from the first day after surgery. RESULTS: There was a significant improvement from baseline in two groups for all performed tests (p < 0.001). Statistical significant differences between two groups for transfers in bed on discharge (p < 0.05), in one month (p < 0.01) and for TUG in one month (p < 0.05) were found. CONCLUSION: The study revealed that early rehabilitation program consists of therapeutic exercises and written educational booklet after low back surgery improves transfer abilities and basic activities in one month. PMID:28028409

  7. Influence of skin penetration enhancers on skin barrier function and skin protease activity.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Diar; Hirata, Kazumasa; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2014-01-23

    In order to overcome the skin's excellent barrier function formulation scientists often employ skin penetration enhancers (SPEs) in topical and transdermal formulations. The effects of these compounds on skin health is still not well understood at the molecular level. The aim of the present work was to probe the effects of some common SPEs on desquamatory protease activity in healthy skin. The SPEs studied were isopropyl myristate (IPM), propylene glycol, (PG), propylene glycol laurate (PGL) and Transcutol™ (TC). Occluded infinite doses of each SPE were applied to human volunteers for 24 h. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements were taken before and after application of SPEs. Tape strips were collected from the treated sites to determine protein content and the activity of two desquamatory proteases kallikrein 5 (KLK5) and kallikrein 7 (KLK7). TEWL values were also measured after tape stripping. PG was found to elevate both TEWL values and KLK7 activity to a significant extent (p<0.05). No significant effects were observed for the other SPEs. The ability of PG to alter the skin barrier at the macroscopic level and the influence of the molecule on protease activity reported here may have implications for its use in topical formulations used for the management of impaired skin barrier function such as atopic eczema or psoriasis.

  8. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  9. Uptake, retention and internalization of quantum dots in Daphnia is influenced by particle surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Feswick, A; Griffitt, R J; Siebein, K; Barber, D S

    2013-04-15

    Nanomaterials are a diverse group of compounds whose inevitable release into the environment warrants study of the fundamental processes that govern the ingestion, uptake and accumulation in aquatic organisms. Nanomaterials have the ability to transfer to higher trophic levels in aquatic ecosystems, and recent evidence suggests that the surface chemistry of both the nanoparticle and biological membrane can influence uptake kinetics. Therefore, our study investigates the effect of surface functionalization on uptake, internalization and depuration in Daphnia spp. Uncharged (polyethylene glycol; PEG), positively charged (amino-terminated: NH2) and negatively charged (carboxyl-modified; COOH) cadmium selenide/zinc sulfide quantum dots were used to monitor ingestion, uptake and depuration of nanometals in Daphnia magna and Ceriodaphnia dubia over 24h of exposure. These studies demonstrated that particles with higher negative charge (COOH quantum dots) were taken up to a greater extent by Daphnia (259.17±17.70 RFU/20 Daphnia) than either the NH2 (150.01±18.91) or PEG quantum dots (95.17±9.78), however this is likely related to the functional groups attached to the nanoparticles as there were no real differences in zeta potential. Whole body fluorescence associates well with fluorescent microscopic images obtained at the 24h timepoint. Confocal and electron microscopic analysis clearly demonstrated that all three types of quantum dots could cross the intestinal epithelial barrier and be translocated to other cells. Upon cessation of exposure, elimination of all three materials was biphasic with rapid initial clearance that likely represents elimination of material remaining in the GI tract followed by a much slower elimination phase that likely represents elimination of internalized material. These studies demonstrate that daphnids can take up intact nanomaterial from the water column and that this uptake is strongly influenced by particle surface functionalization

  10. Ankyrin domain of myosin 16 influences motor function and decreases protein phosphatase catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Kengyel, András; Bécsi, Bálint; Kónya, Zoltán; Sellers, James R; Erdődi, Ferenc; Nyitrai, Miklós

    2015-05-01

    The unconventional myosin 16 (Myo16), which may have a role in regulation of cell cycle and cell proliferation, can be found in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. It has a unique, eight ankyrin repeat containing pre-motor domain, the so-called ankyrin domain (My16Ank). Ankyrin repeats are present in several other proteins, e.g., in the regulatory subunit (MYPT1) of the myosin phosphatase holoenzyme, which binds to the protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP1c). My16Ank shows sequence similarity to MYPT1. In this work, the interactions of recombinant and isolated My16Ank were examined in vitro. To test the effects of My16Ank on myosin motor function, we used skeletal muscle myosin or nonmuscle myosin 2B. The results showed that My16Ank bound to skeletal muscle myosin (K D ≈ 2.4 µM) and the actin-activated ATPase activity of heavy meromyosin (HMM) was increased in the presence of My16Ank, suggesting that the ankyrin domain can modulate myosin motor activity. My16Ank showed no direct interaction with either globular or filamentous actin. We found, using a surface plasmon resonance-based binding technique, that My16Ank bound to PP1cα (K D ≈ 540 nM) and also to PP1cδ (K D ≈ 600 nM) and decreased its phosphatase activity towards the phosphorylated myosin regulatory light chain. Our results suggest that one function of the ankyrin domain is probably to regulate the function of Myo16. It may influence the motor activity, and in complex with the PP1c isoforms, it can play an important role in the targeted dephosphorylation of certain, as yet unidentified, intracellular proteins.

  11. Elucidating X Chromosome Influences on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Executive Function

    PubMed Central

    Green, Tamar; Shrestha, Sharon Bade; Chromik, Lindsay C.; Rutledge, Keetan; Pennington, Bruce F.; Hong, David S.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify distinct behavioral and cognitive profiles associated with ADHD in Turner syndrome (TS), relative to idiopathic ADHD and neurotypical controls, in order to elucidate X-linked influences contributing to ADHD. Methods We used a multilevel-model approach to compare 49 girls with TS to 37 neurotypical females, aged 5–12, on established measures of behavior (BASC-2) and neurocognitive function (NEPSY). We further compared girls with TS to BASC-2 and NEPSY age-matched reference data obtained from children with idiopathic ADHD. Results Within the TS group, 51% scored at or above the “at-risk” range for ADHD-associated behaviors on the BASC-2 (TS/+ADHD). The BASC-2 behavioral profile in this TS/+ADHD-subgroup was comparable to a reference group of boys with ADHD with respect to attentional problems and hyperactivity. However, the TS/+ADHD-subgroup had significantly higher hyperactivity scores relative to a reference sample of girls with ADHD (p=0.016). The behavioral profile in TS was associated with significantly lower attention and executive function scores on the NEPSY relative to neurotypical controls (p=0.015); but was comparable to scores from a reference sample of children with idiopathic ADHD. Deficits in attention and executive function were not observed in girls with TS having low levels of ADHD-associated behavior (TS/−ADHD). Conclusions ADHD-associated behavioral and cognitive problems in TS are prevalent and comparable in severity to those found in children with idiopathic ADHD. The ADHD phenotype in TS also appears relatively independent of cognitive features typically associated with TS, like visuospatial weaknesses. These findings suggest that X-linked haploinsufficiency and downstream biological effects contribute to increased risk for ADHD. PMID:26228422

  12. Control channels in the brain and their influence on brain executive functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qinglei; Choa, Fow-Sen; Hong, Elliot; Wang, Zhiguang; Islam, Mohammad

    2014-05-01

    In a computer network there are distinct data channels and control channels where massive amount of visual information are transported through data channels but the information streams are routed and controlled by intelligent algorithm through "control channels". Recent studies on cognition and consciousness have shown that the brain control channels are closely related to the brainwave beta (14-40 Hz) and alpha (7-13 Hz) oscillations. The high-beta wave is used by brain to synchronize local neural activities and the alpha oscillation is for desynchronization. When two sensory inputs are simultaneously presented to a person, the high-beta is used to select one of the inputs and the alpha is used to deselect the other so that only one input will get the attention. In this work we demonstrated that we can scan a person's brain using binaural beats technique and identify the individual's preferred control channels. The identified control channels can then be used to influence the subject's brain executive functions. In the experiment, an EEG measurement system was used to record and identify a subject's control channels. After these channels were identified, the subject was asked to do Stroop tests. Binaural beats was again used to produce these control-channel frequencies on the subject's brain when we recorded the completion time of each test. We found that the high-beta signal indeed speeded up the subject's executive function performance and reduced the time to complete incongruent tests, while the alpha signal didn't seem to be able to slow down the executive function performance.

  13. Instance influence estimation for hyperspectral target signature characterization using extended functions of multiple instances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Sheng; Zare, Alina

    2016-05-01

    The Extended Functions of Multiple Instances (eFUMI) algorithm1 is a generalization of Multiple Instance Learning (MIL). In eFUMI, only bag level (i.e. set level) labels are needed to estimate target signatures from mixed data. The training bags in eFUMI are labeled positive if any data point in a bag contains or represents any proportion of the target signature and are labeled as a negative bag if all data points in the bag do not represent any target. From these imprecise labels, eFUMI has been shown to be effective at estimating target signatures in hyperspectral subpixel target detection problems. One motivating scenario for the use of eFUMI is where an analyst circles objects/regions of interest in a hyperspectral scene such that the target signatures of these objects can be estimated and be used to determine whether other instances of the object appear elsewhere in the image collection. The regions highlighted by the analyst serve as the imprecise labels for eFUMI. Often, an analyst may want to iteratively refine their imprecise labels. In this paper, we present an approach for estimating the influence on the estimated target signature if the label for a particular input data point is modified. This instance influence estimation guides an analyst to focus on (re-)labeling the data points that provide the largest change in the resulting estimated target signature and, thus, reduce the amount of time an analyst needs to spend refining the labels for a hyperspectral scene. Results are shown on real hyperspectral sub-pixel target detection data sets.

  14. Life Experience and Demographic Influences on Cognitive Function in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Paul W. H.; Melrose, Rebecca J.; Marquine, María J.; Johnson, Julene K.; Napoles, Anna; MacKay-Brandt, Anna; Farias, Sarah; Reed, Bruce; Mungas, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined the influence of a broad spectrum of life experiences on longitudinal cognitive trajectories in a demographically diverse sample of older adults. Method Participants were 333 educationally, ethnically, and cognitively diverse older adults enrolled in a longitudinal aging study. Mixed-effects regression was used to measure baseline status in episodic memory, executive functioning, and semantic memory and change in a global cognition factor defined by change in these three domain-specific measures. We examined effects of life experience variables (literacy, childhood socioeconomic status, morphometric measures of physical development, life course physical and recreational activity) on longitudinal cognitive trajectories, covarying for age, APOE genotype and demographics (education, ethnicity, language). Results Non-Latino whites had higher baseline cognition, but life experience variables attenuated ethnic differences in cognitive scores. Age, literacy, childhood socioeconomic status and physical activity significantly influenced baseline cognition. Age, APOE ε4 and decline in intellectually and socially stimulating recreational activity from mid to late life were independently associated with increased late life cognitive decline. Higher literacy and late life recreational activity were associated with less decline. Literacy had similar effects for English and Spanish readers/speakers. Bilingual English and Spanish speakers did not differ from English Speakers in cognitive performance. Conclusions Life experience variables, especially literacy level, were strongly related to baseline cognition and substantially attenuated effects of race/ethnicity and education. Cognitive change was best explained by age, APOE ε4, literacy, and current recreational activities. Literacy had robust associations with baseline cognition and cognitive change in both English and Spanish speakers. PMID:24933483

  15. Environmental conditions and biotic interactions influence ecosystem structure and function in a drying stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludlam, J.P.; Magoulick, D.D.

    2010-01-01

    Benthic consumers influence stream ecosystem structure and function, but these interactions depend on environmental context. We experimentally quantified the effects of central stoneroller minnows (Campostoma anomalum (Rafinesque) and Meek's crayfish (Orconectes meeki meeki (Faxon)) on benthic communities using electric exclusion quadrats in Little Mulberry Creek before (June) and during (August) seasonal stream drying. Unglazed ceramic tiles were deployed in June and August to measure periphyton and invertebrate abundance, and leafpack decomposition and primary production were also measured in August. Relationships between stoneroller and crayfish density and the size of consumer effects were evaluated with multiple linear regression models. Average chlorophyll a abundance was greater on exposed than exclusion tiles in August, but not in June. Sediment dry mass, periphyton ash-free dry mass (AFDM), and chironomid densities on tiles did not differ among treatments in either period. Leaf packs decayed faster in exposed than exclusion treatments (kexposed = 0.038 ?? 0.013, kexclusion = 0.007 ?? 0.002), but consumer effects were stronger in some pools than others. Leafpack invertebrate biomass and abundance and tile primary productivity did not differ among treatments. Consumer effects on chlorophyll a were related to crayfish and stoneroller density, and effects on chironomid density were related to stoneroller density. These results contrast with a previous exclusion experiment in Little Mulberry Creek that demonstrated strong consumer effects. The influence of stream drying on consumer effects appears to have been reduced by strong spates, underscoring the importance of conducting multi-year studies to determine the magnitude of variability in ecological interactions. ?? US Government: USGS 2010.

  16. Preprocessing strategy influences graph-based exploration of altered functional networks in major depression.

    PubMed

    Borchardt, Viola; Lord, Anton Richard; Li, Meng; van der Meer, Johan; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Bogerts, Bernhard; Breakspear, Michael; Walter, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Resting-state fMRI studies have gained widespread use in exploratory studies of neuropsychiatric disorders. Graph metrics derived from whole brain functional connectivity studies have been used to reveal disease-related variations in many neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression (MDD). These techniques show promise in developing diagnostics for these often difficult to identify disorders. However, the analysis of resting-state datasets is increasingly beset by a myriad of approaches and methods, each with underlying assumptions. Choosing the most appropriate preprocessing parameters a priori is difficult. Nevertheless, the specific methodological choice influences graph-theoretical network topologies as well as regional metrics. The aim of this study was to systematically compare different preprocessing strategies by evaluating their influence on group differences between healthy participants (HC) and depressive patients. We thus investigated the effects of common preprocessing variants, including global mean-signal regression (GMR), temporal filtering, detrending, and network sparsity on group differences between brain networks of HC and MDD patients measured by global and nodal graph theoretical metrics. Occurrence of group differences in global metrics was absent in the majority of tested preprocessing variants, but in local graph metrics it is sparse, variable, and highly dependent on the combination of preprocessing variant and sparsity threshold. Sparsity thresholds between 16 and 22% were shown to have the greatest potential to reveal differences between HC and MDD patients in global and local network metrics. Our study offers an overview of consequences of methodological decisions and which neurobiological characteristics of MDD they implicate, adding further caution to this rapidly growing field.

  17. Influence of finger amputation on grip strength and objectively measured hand function: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Kuret, Zala; Burger, Helena; Vidmar, Gaj

    2015-06-01

    Finger amputations are common and hands are essential for functioning, but studies on factors influencing functioning after finger amputation are lacking. Therefore, we aimed to explore the influence of the number and level of amputated fingers on hand function and grip strength. A prospective descriptive cross-sectional study involving 69 patients with partial or complete amputation of one or more fingers of one hand was carried out. The function of both hands was assessed using the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure test; grip strength was measured in 42 patients. We confirmed that finger amputation worsens hand function (especially tripod and tip pinch) and reduces grip strength, whereby the extent of the worsening depends on amputation type - it is the smallest after thumb amputation and the largest after amputation of the index finger and fingers III-V. However, because of the variety of amputation types, we recommend that future studies either involve very large samples or focus on specific amputations.

  18. Sources of Variation Influencing Concordance between Functional MRI and Direct Cortical Stimulation in Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Melanie A.; Tam, Fred; Garavaglia, Marco M.; Hare, Gregory M. T.; Cusimano, Michael D.; Schweizer, Tom A.; Das, Sunit; Graham, Simon J.

    2016-01-01

    Object: Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) remains a promising method to aid in the surgical management of patients diagnosed with brain tumors. For patients that are candidates for awake craniotomies, surgical decisions can potentially be improved by fMRI but this depends on the level of concordance between preoperative brain maps and the maps provided by the gold standard intraoperative method, direct cortical stimulation (DCS). There have been numerous studies of the concordance between fMRI and DCS using sensitivity and specificity measures, however the results are variable across studies and the key factors influencing variability are not well understood. Thus, the present work addresses the influence of technical factors on fMRI and DCS concordance. Methods: Motor and language mapping data were collected for a group of glioma patients (n = 14) who underwent both preoperative fMRI and intraoperative DCS in an awake craniotomy procedure for tumor removal. Normative fMRI data were also acquired in a healthy control group (n = 12). The fMRI and DCS mapping data were co-registered; true positive (TP), true negative (TN), false positive (FP), and false negative (FN) occurrences were tabulated over the exposed brain surface. Sensitivity and specificity were measured for the total group, and for the motor and language sub-groups. The influence of grid placement, fMRI statistical thresholding, and task standardization were assessed. Correlations between proportions of agreement and error were also carefully scrutinized to evaluate concordance in more detail. Results: Concordance was significantly better for motor vs. language mapping. There was an inverse relationship between TP and TN with increasing statistical threshold, and FP dominated the total error. Sensitivity and specificity were reduced when tasks were not standardized across fMRI and DCS. Conclusions: Although the agreement between fMRI and DCS is good, variability is introduced by

  19. Factors influencing executive function by physical activity level among young adults: a near-infrared spectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Kensuke; Ikeda, Shou; Mitsutake, Tsubasa; Nakahara, Masami; Nagai, Yoshiharu; Ikeda, Takuro; Horikawa, Etsuo

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Prevention of dementia requires early intervention against it. To ensure that early interventions are effective it is crucial to study the cognitive functions related to dementia in young adulthood. Moreover, it is needed not only to verify the cognitive function test but also to elucidate the actual brain activity and the influence of related factors on the brain activity. To investigate the factors influencing cognitive function among young adults and examine the differences in executive function by physical activity level. [Subjects and Methods] Forty healthy university students (mean age, 20.4 years) were classified into two groups by cognitive function score (HIGH and LOW), determined according to Trail Making Test performance and Stroop task processing time. We then assessed what factors were related to cognitive function by logistic regression analysis. Executive function was determined by brain blood flow using near-infrared spectroscopy during the Stroop task, and was then compared by physical activity levels (determined according to number of steps per hour). [Results] Full-scale Intelligence Quotient according to the 3rd Wechsler Adult Intelligent Scale and number of steps per hour influenced cognitive function score, with odds ratios of 1.104 and 1.012, respectively. Oxy-hemoglobin concentrations in areas related to executive function during the Stroop task were significantly higher among those in the high physical activity group than among those in the low physical activity group. [Conclusion] The study revealed that Full-scale Intelligence Quotient and a number of steps per hour are factors associated with the cognitive functions in young adulthood. In addition, activity in execution function related area was found to be significantly higher in the high physical activity group than in the low physical activity group, suggesting the importance of physical activity for enhancing young adulthood cognitive functions. PMID:28356633

  20. Factors influencing executive function by physical activity level among young adults: a near-infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kensuke; Ikeda, Shou; Mitsutake, Tsubasa; Nakahara, Masami; Nagai, Yoshiharu; Ikeda, Takuro; Horikawa, Etsuo

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] Prevention of dementia requires early intervention against it. To ensure that early interventions are effective it is crucial to study the cognitive functions related to dementia in young adulthood. Moreover, it is needed not only to verify the cognitive function test but also to elucidate the actual brain activity and the influence of related factors on the brain activity. To investigate the factors influencing cognitive function among young adults and examine the differences in executive function by physical activity level. [Subjects and Methods] Forty healthy university students (mean age, 20.4 years) were classified into two groups by cognitive function score (HIGH and LOW), determined according to Trail Making Test performance and Stroop task processing time. We then assessed what factors were related to cognitive function by logistic regression analysis. Executive function was determined by brain blood flow using near-infrared spectroscopy during the Stroop task, and was then compared by physical activity levels (determined according to number of steps per hour). [Results] Full-scale Intelligence Quotient according to the 3rd Wechsler Adult Intelligent Scale and number of steps per hour influenced cognitive function score, with odds ratios of 1.104 and 1.012, respectively. Oxy-hemoglobin concentrations in areas related to executive function during the Stroop task were significantly higher among those in the high physical activity group than among those in the low physical activity group. [Conclusion] The study revealed that Full-scale Intelligence Quotient and a number of steps per hour are factors associated with the cognitive functions in young adulthood. In addition, activity in execution function related area was found to be significantly higher in the high physical activity group than in the low physical activity group, suggesting the importance of physical activity for enhancing young adulthood cognitive functions.

  1. DEFINING THE PLAYERS IN HIGHER-ORDER NETWORKS: PREDICTIVE MODELING FOR REVERSE ENGINEERING FUNCTIONAL INFLUENCE NETWORKS

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Costa, Michelle N.; Stevens, S.L.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.

    2011-01-20

    A difficult problem that is currently growing rapidly due to the sharp increase in the amount of high-throughput data available for many systems is that of determining useful and informative causative influence networks. These networks can be used to predict behavior given observation of a small number of components, predict behavior at a future time point, or identify components that are critical to the functioning of the system under particular conditions. In these endeavors incorporating observations of systems from a wide variety of viewpoints can be particularly beneficial, but has often been undertaken with the objective of inferring networks that are generally applicable. The focus of the current work is to integrate both general observations and measurements taken for a particular pathology, that of ischemic stroke, to provide improved ability to produce useful predictions of systems behavior. A number of hybrid approaches have recently been proposed for network generation in which the Gene Ontology is used to filter or enrich network links inferred from gene expression data through reverse engineering methods. These approaches have been shown to improve the biological plausibility of the inferred relationships determined, but still treat knowledge-based and machine-learning inferences as incommensurable inputs. In this paper, we explore how further improvements may be achieved through a full integration of network inference insights achieved through application of the Gene Ontology and reverse engineering methods with specific reference to the construction of dynamic models of transcriptional regulatory networks. We show that integrating two approaches to network construction, one based on reverse-engineering from conditional transcriptional data, one based on reverse-engineering from in situ hybridization data, and another based on functional associations derived from Gene Ontology, using probabilities can improve results of clustering as evaluated by a

  2. Influence of Parasite Load on Renal Function in Mice Acutely Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Parreira, Ricardo Cambraia; Miguel, Renata Botelho; de Paula Rogerio, Alexandre; Oliveira, Carlo Jose Freire; Chica, Javier Emilio Lazo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Despite the vast number of studies evaluating the pathophysiological mechanisms of the disease, the influence of parasite burden on kidney lesions remains unclear. Thus, the main goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of T. cruzi infection on renal function and determine whether there was a correlation between parasite load and renal injury using an acute experimental model of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Low, medium and high parasite loads were generated by infecting C57BL/6 mice with 300 (low), 3,000 (medium) or 30,000 (high) numbers of “Y” strain trypomastigotes. We found that mice infected with T. cruzi trypomastigotes show increased renal injury. The infection resulted in reduced urinary excretion and creatinine clearance. We also observed a marked elevation in the ratio of urine volume to kidney and body weight, blood urea nitrogen, chloride ion, nitric oxide, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and the number of leukocytes in the blood and/or renal tissues of infected mice. Additionally, we observed the presence of the parasite in the cortical/medullary and peri-renal region, an increase of inflammatory infiltrate and of vascular permeability of the kidney. Overall, most renal changes occurred mainly in animals infected with high parasitic loads. Conclusions/Significance These data demonstrate that T. cruzi impairs kidney function, and this impairment is more evident in mice infected with high parasitic loads. Moreover, these data suggest that, in addition to the extensively studied cardiovascular effects, renal injury should be regarded as an important indicator for better understanding the pan-infectivity of the parasite and consequently for understanding the disease in experimental models. PMID:23951243

  3. Impaired microvascular reactivity and endothelial function in patients with Cushing's syndrome: influence of arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Prázný, M; Jezková, J; Horová, E; Lazárová, V; Hána, V; Kvasnicka, J; Pecen, L; Marek, J; Skrha, J; Krsek, M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate skin microvascular reactivity (MVR) and possible influencing factors (fibrinolysis, oxidative stress, and endothelial function) in patients with Cushing's syndrome. Twenty-nine patients with active Cushing's syndrome (ten of them also examined after a successful operation) and 16 control subjects were studied. Skin MVR was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry during post-occlusive (PORH) and thermal hyperemia (TH). Malondialdehyde and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase were used as markers of oxidative stress. Fibrinolysis was estimated by tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and its inhibitor (PAI-1). N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase, E-selectin, P-selectin, and ICAM-1 were used as markers of endothelial function. Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction was present in patients with hypercortisolism, however, increased concentration of ICAM-1 was also found in patients after the operation as compared to controls (290.8+/-74.2 vs. 210.9+/-56.3 ng.ml(-1), p<0.05). Maximal perfusion was significantly lower in patients with arterial hypertension during PORH and TH (36.3+/-13.0 vs. 63.3+/-32.4 PU, p<0.01, and 90.4+/-36.6 vs. 159.2+/-95.3 PU, p<0.05, respectively) and similarly the velocity of perfusion increase during PORH and TH was lower (3.2+/-1.5 vs. 5.2+/-3.4 PU.s(-1), p<0.05, and 0.95+/-0.6 vs. 1.8+/-1.1 PU.s(-1), p<0.05, respectively). The most pronounced impairment of microvascular reactivity was present in patients with combination of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  4. Nutritional mode influences lipid accumulation in microalgae with the function of carbon sequestration and nutrient supplementation.

    PubMed

    Prathima Devi, M; Swamy, Y V; Venkata Mohan, S

    2013-08-01

    Effect of nutritional mode viz., photoautotrophic, photoheterotrophic and photomixotrophic on the biomass growth and lipid productivity of microalgae was studied. Experiments were designed and operated in biphasic mode i.e., growth phase (GP) followed by stress induced starvation phase (SP). Nutritional mode documented marked influence on biomass growth and subsequent lipid productivity. Mixotrophic mode of operation showed higher biomass growth (4.45 mg/ml) during growth phase while higher lipid productivity was observed with nitrogen deprived autotrophic mode (28.2%) followed by heterotrophic (26.1%) and mixotrophic (19.6%) operations. Relative increments in lipid productivities were noticed in SP operation from GP in mixotrophic operation (2.45) followed by autotrophic (2.2) and heterotrophic (2.14) mode of operations. Higher concentrations of chlorophyll b and presence of lipid accumulating species supported the lipid biosynthesis. Algal fatty acid composition varied with function of nutritional modes and depicted eighteen types of saturated (SFA) and unsaturated fatty acids (USFA) with wide fuel and food characteristics.

  5. Influence of the Component Excipients on the Quality and Functionality of a Transdermal Film Formulation.

    PubMed

    Saoji, Suprit D; Atram, Sandip C; Dhore, Pradip W; Deole, Priya S; Raut, Nishikant A; Dave, Vivek S

    2015-12-01

    The influence of formulation variables, i.e., a hydrophilic polymer (Methocel(®) E15) and a film-forming polymer (Eudragit(®) RL 100 and Eudragit(®) RS 100), on the physicochemical and functional properties of a transdermal film formulation was assessed. Several terpenes were initially evaluated for their drug permeation enhancement effects on the transdermal film formulations. D-Limonene was found to be the most efficient permeation enhancer among the tested terpenes. Transdermal film formulations containing granisetron (GRN) as a model drug, D-limonene as a permeation enhancer, and different ratios of a hydrophilic polymer (Methocel(®) E15) and a film-forming polymer (Eudragit(®) RL 100 or Eudragit(®) RS 100) were prepared. The prepared films were evaluated for their physicochemical properties such as weight variation, thickness, tensile strength, folding endurance, elongation (%), flatness, moisture content, moisture uptake, and the drug content uniformity. The films were also evaluated for the in vitro drug release and ex vivo drug permeation. The increasing ratios of Methocel(®):Eudragit(®) polymers in the formulation linearly and significantly increased the moisture content, moisture uptake, water vapor transmission rate (WVTR), and the transdermal flux of GRN from the film formulations. Increasing levels of Methocel(®) in the formulations also increased the rate and extent of the GRN release and the GRN permeation from the prepared films.

  6. Edge control in a computer controlled optical surfacing process using a heterocercal tool influence function.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haixiang; Zhang, Xin; Ford, Virginia; Luo, Xiao; Qi, Erhui; Zeng, Xuefeng; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-11-14

    Edge effect is regarded as one of the most difficult technical issues in a computer controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) process. Traditional opticians have to even up the consequences of the two following cases. Operating CCOS in a large overhang condition affects the accuracy of material removal, while in a small overhang condition, it achieves a more accurate performance, but leaves a narrow rolled-up edge, which takes time and effort to remove. In order to control the edge residuals in the latter case, we present a new concept of the 'heterocercal' tool influence function (TIF). Generated from compound motion equipment, this type of TIF can 'transfer' the material removal from the inner place to the edge, meanwhile maintaining the high accuracy and efficiency of CCOS. We call it the 'heterocercal' TIF, because of the inspiration from the heterocercal tails of sharks, whose upper lobe provides most of the explosive power. The heterocercal TIF was theoretically analyzed, and physically realized in CCOS facilities. Experimental and simulation results showed good agreement. It enables significant control of the edge effect and convergence of entire surface errors in large tool-to-mirror size-ratio conditions. This improvement will largely help manufacturing efficiency in some extremely large optical system projects, like the tertiary mirror of the Thirty Meter Telescope.

  7. Neighborhood Characteristics: Influences on Pain and Physical Function in Youth at Risk for Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schild, Cathleen; Reed, Emily A.; Hingston, Tessa; Dennis, Catlin H.; Wilson, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Neighborhood features such as community socioeconomic status, recreational facilities, and parks have been correlated to the health outcomes of the residents living within those neighborhoods, especially with regard to health-related quality of life, body mass index, and physical activity. The interplay between one’s built environment and one’s perceptions may affect physical health, well-being, and pain experiences. In the current study, neighborhood characteristics and attitudes about physical activity were examined in a high-risk (youths with a parent with chronic pain) and low-risk (youths without a parent with chronic pain) adolescent sample. There were significant differences in neighborhood characteristics between the high-risk (n = 62) and low-risk (n = 77) samples (ages 11–15), with low-risk participants living in residences with more walkability, closer proximity to parks, and higher proportion of neighborhood residents having college degrees. Results indicate that neighborhood features (e.g., walkability and proximity to parks), as well as positive attitudes about physical activity were correlated with lower levels of pain and pain-related disability, and higher performance in physical functioning tests. These findings suggest that the built environment may contribute to pain outcomes in youth, above and beyond the influence of family history of pain. PMID:27869773

  8. The lysine biosynthetic enzyme Lys4 influences iron metabolism, mitochondrial function and virulence in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Do, Eunsoo; Park, Minji; Hu, Guanggan; Caza, Mélissa; Kronstad, James W; Jung, Won Hee

    2016-09-02

    The lysine biosynthesis pathway via α-aminoadipate in fungi is considered an attractive target for antifungal drugs due to its absence in mammalian hosts. The iron-sulfur cluster-containing enzyme homoaconitase converts homocitrate to homoisocitrate in the lysine biosynthetic pathway, and is encoded by LYS4 in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we identified the ortholog of LYS4 in the human fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans, and found that LYS4 expression is regulated by iron levels and by the iron-related transcription factors Hap3 and HapX. Deletion of the LYS4 gene resulted in lysine auxotrophy suggesting that Lys4 is essential for lysine biosynthesis. Our study also revealed that lysine uptake was mediated by two amino acid permeases, Aap2 and Aap3, and influenced by nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). Furthermore, the lys4 mutant showed increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, agents that challenge cell wall/membrane integrity, and azole antifungal drugs. We showed that these phenotypes were due in part to impaired mitochondrial function as a result of LYS4 deletion, which we propose disrupts iron homeostasis in the organelle. The combination of defects are consistent with our observation that the lys4 mutant was attenuated virulence in a mouse inhalation model of cryptococcosis.

  9. Influence of particle size on bioprocess induced changes on technological functionality of wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Coda, Rossana; Kärki, Ilona; Nordlund, Emilia; Heiniö, Raija-Liisa; Poutanen, Kaisa; Katina, Kati

    2014-02-01

    Wheat bran is nutritionally an important source of dietary fibre, vitamins and minerals, but its negative influence on dough rheology, texture and sensory quality of bread limits its use in bread baking. The current study aimed at improving the technological functionality of bran by bioprocessing Wheat bran of different particle size (750, 400, 160, 50 μm) was fermented 8 h or 24 h with Lactobacillus brevis E95612 and Kazachstania exigua C81116 with or without addition of enzyme mixture with various carbohydrase activities. Kinetics of growth and acidification showed that the growth of the starters was enhanced in the presence of enzymes in bran having particle size of 160 and 50 μm. Fermentation was critical to improve dough stability and volume of bran enriched breads, whereas addition of enzymes had the most significant effect in improving bread shelf-life. Wheat bread containing 160 μm bran fermented 8 h with enzymes had mild flavour, the highest volume and shelf-life. Reduction of particle size increased perceived smoothness of mouthfeel but provided darker colour in bran-containing breads. The short 8 h bioprocessing, with or without enzymes did not increase pungent flavour or bitter aftertaste in comparison with the native bran.

  10. Endogenous fatty acids in olfactory hairs influence pheromone binding protein structure and function in Lymantria dispar.

    PubMed

    Nardella, Jason; Terrado, Mailyn; Honson, Nicolette S; Plettner, Erika

    2015-08-01

    The gypsy moth utilizes a pheromone, (7R,8S)-2-methyl-7,8-epoxyoctadecane, for mate location. The pheromone is detected by sensory hairs (sensilla) on the antennae of adult males. Sensilla contain the dendrites of olfactory neurons bathed in lymph, which contains pheromone binding proteins (PBPs). We have extracted and identified free fatty acids from lymph of sensory hairs, and we demonstrate that these function as endogenous ligands for gypsy moth PBP1 and PBP2. Homology modeling of both PBPs, and docking of fatty acids reveal multiple binding sites: one internal, the others external. Pheromone binding assays suggest that these fatty acids increase PBP-pheromone binding affinity. We show that fatty acid binding causes an increase in α-helix content in the N-terminal domain, but not in the C-terminal peptide of both proteins. The C-terminal peptide was shown to form a α-helix in a hydrophobic, homogeneous environment, but not in the presence of fatty acid micelles. Through partition assays we show that the fatty acids prevent adsorption of the pheromone on hydrophobic surfaces and facilitate pheromone partition into an aqueous phase. We propose that lymph is an emulsion of fatty acids and PBP that influence each other and thereby control the partition equilibria of hydrophobic odorants.

  11. Influence of phonons on solid-state cavity-QED investigated using nonequilibrium Green's functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornecker, Gaston; Auffèves, Alexia; Grange, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The influence of electron-phonon interactions on the dynamics of a quantum dot coupled to a photonic cavity mode is investigated by using a nonequilibrium Green's function approach. Within a polaron frame, the self-consistent-Born approximation is used to treat the phonon-assisted scattering processes between the quantum dot polaron and the cavity. Two-time correlators of the quantum dot-cavity system are calculated by solving the Kadanoff-Baym equations, giving access to photon spectra and photon indistinguishability. The non-Markovian nature of the interaction with the phonon bath is shown to be very accurately described by our method in various regimes of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity-QED). The indistinguishability of the emitted photons emitted at zero temperature are found to be in very good agreement with a previously reported exact diagonalization approach [Phys. Rev. B 87, 081308 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.081308]. Besides, our method enables the calculations of photon indistinguishability at finite temperatures and for strong electron-phonon interactions. More generally, our method opens new avenues in the study of open quantum system dynamics coupled to non-Markovian environments.

  12. Influence of pressure on ion energy distribution functions in EUV-induced hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, T. H. M.; Reefman, P.; de Meijere, C. A.; Banine, V. Y.; Beckers, J.

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation lithography tools currently use Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation to create even smaller features on computer chips. The high energy photons (92 eV) induce a plasma in the low pressure background gas by photoionization. Industries have realized that these plasmas are of significant importance with respect to machine lifetime because impacting ions affect exposed surfaces. The mass resolved ion energy distribution function (IEDF) is therefore one of the main plasma parameters of interest. In this research an ion mass spectrometer is used to investigate IEDFs of ions impacting on surfaces in EUV-induced plasmas. EUV radiation is focused into a vessel with a low pressure hydrogen environment. Here, photoionization creates free electrons with energies up to 76 eV, which further ionize the background gas. The influence of the pressure on plasma composition and IEDFs has been investigated in the range 0.1-10 Pa. In general the ion fluxes towards the surface increase with pressure. However, above 5 Pa the flux of H2+ is not affected by the increase in pressure due to the balance between the creation of H2+ and the conversion of H2+ to H3+. These results will be used to benchmark plasma scaling models and verify numerical simulations.

  13. Influence of green and gold kiwifruit on indices of large bowel function in healthy rats.

    PubMed

    Paturi, Gunaranjan; Butts, Christine A; Bentley-Hewitt, Kerry L; Ansell, Juliet

    2014-08-01

    The effects of kiwifruit on large bowel health were investigated in healthy rats. Four-week old Sprague-Dawley rats were given diets containing 10% homogenized green kiwifruit, gold kiwifruit or 10% glucose solution (control) over 4 or 6 wk. Green kiwifruit increased the fecal output compared to control. Growth of certain bacterial species in cecum was influenced by both green and gold kiwifruit. A significant increase in cecal Lachnospiraceae in rats fed the green kiwifruit diet was observed at week 4. At week 6, green and gold kiwifruit diets assisted in improving colonic barrier function by upregulating the expression of mucin (MUC)-2, MUC3, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 or trefoil factor-3 genes. Gold kiwifruit consumption increased the colonic goblet cells per crypt at week 6. Significant negative correlations between E. coli and β-defensin 1 and TLR4 expression were observed. Consuming green and gold kiwifruit for 6 wk significantly altered the biomarkers of large bowel health; indicating that regularly consuming kiwifruit helps attain optimal digestive health.

  14. Gas composition influence on ion energy distribution functions in an industrial ICP reactor with biased cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, David; Shannon, Steven; Coumou, David; White, Scott

    2016-09-01

    An industrial ICP reactor consisting of a top planar coil and RF biased lower electrode has been characterized using a hairpin resonator probe and gridded ion energy analyzer to measure electron density in the bulk plasma and ion energy distribution function (IEDF) at the surface of the biased cathode. Argon and oxygen were run at constant total flow with 20mTorr downstream pressure control with varying flow ratios between the two gases ranging from 0% to 100% oxygen content. ICP and bias power were adjusted to maintain constant electron density and sheath bias over this mixing matrix at four different setpoints reflecting high density / high bias, high density / low bias, low density / high bias, and low density / low bias. Although the fundamental parameters governing RF sheath behavior were held constant, several trends in ion energy distribution are observed with respect to gas composition (aside from the obvious influence of ion mass) that show considerable variation in measured IEDF particularly that can be attributed to ion collisions in the sheath as well as gas heating variation due to gas composition.

  15. The influence of physical activity during youth on structural and functional properties of the Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lenskjold, A; Kongsgaard, M; Larsen, J O; Nielsen, R H; Kovanen, V; Aagaard, P; Kjaer, M; Magnusson, S P

    2015-02-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a highly prevalent sports injury. Animal studies show a growth response in tendons in response to loading in the immature phase but not after puberty maturation. The aim of this investigation was to examine the structural and material properties in long distance runners who were either physically active (HAY) or inactive (LAY) in young age. Twelve men in HAY group and eight men in LAY group participated. Structural, functional, and biochemical properties of Achilles tendon were estimated from magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound video recordings, mechanical tests, and tendon biopsies, respectively. There was no difference between the groups with respect to tendon cross-sectional area or tendon free length. There was no difference between the groups with respect to maximal force or mechanical properties. The collagen content, enzymatic and nonenzymatic cross-link density did not differ between the groups, nor did collagen fibril density, diameter, and area. There was a correlation between age and pentosidine/collagen within the groups [(HAY: P < 0.05 and r(2) = 0.47) and (LAY: P < 0.05 and r(2) = 0.52)]. The data suggest that high or low activity during youth did not appreciably influence the mechanical, structural, or biochemical properties of the Achilles tendon in adult long distance runners.

  16. Influence of diet-mediated maternal thyroid alterations on functional properties of turkey eggs.

    PubMed

    Christensen, V L; Ort, J F

    1990-09-01

    Maternal thyroid status was altered by means of diet to determine its effect on functional properties of turkey eggshells. Hens were fed a control diet (CON), the CON diet containing .5 ppm triiodothyronine (T3), the CON diet containing 2.1 ppm iodine as potassium iodide (KI) or the CON diet containing .1% thiouracil (THIO). Feeding T3 decreased plasma thyroxine but elevated plasma T3 concentrations compared to CON. The KI diet had no effect on plasma thyroid hormone concentrations, but feeding THIO depressed plasma thyroxine with no effect on T3, resulting in an elevated ratio of the two hormones compared to the CON ratio. Feeding KI decreased egg volume and T3 increased egg density compared to CON, but no effects on egg weight, surface area, width, or length were noted. Dietary T3 depressed eggshell water vapor conductance compared to CON. Dietary iodine resulted in thinner eggshells with fewer pores than the CON, whereas THIO caused significantly more pores in eggshells than CON but had no effects on shell thickness. Dietary KI had no effects on maternal plasma thyroid hormone concentrations, suggesting that the effects were due to iodine availability rather than to thyroid hormones. It is concluded that the availability of iodine to turkey breeder hens may influence eggshell characteristics.

  17. Dopamine Inactivation Efficacy Related to Functional DAT1 and COMT Variants Influences Motor Response Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Stephan; Rellum, Thomas; Freitag, Christine; Resch, Franz; Rietschel, Marcella; Treutlein, Jens; Jennen-Steinmetz, Christine; Brandeis, Daniel; Banaschewski, Tobias; Laucht, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Background Dopamine plays an important role in orienting, response anticipation and movement evaluation. Thus, we examined the influence of functional variants related to dopamine inactivation in the dopamine transporter (DAT1) and catechol-O-methyltransferase genes (COMT) on the time-course of motor processing in a contingent negative variation (CNV) task. Methods 64-channel EEG recordings were obtained from 195 healthy adolescents of a community-based sample during a continuous performance task (A-X version). Early and late CNV as well as motor postimperative negative variation were assessed. Adolescents were genotyped for the COMT Val158Met and two DAT1 polymorphisms (variable number tandem repeats in the 3′-untranslated region and in intron 8). Results The results revealed a significant interaction between COMT and DAT1, indicating that COMT exerted stronger effects on lateralized motor post-processing (centro-parietal motor postimperative negative variation) in homozygous carriers of a DAT1 haplotype increasing DAT1 expression. Source analysis showed that the time interval 500–1000 ms after the motor response was specifically affected in contrast to preceding movement anticipation and programming stages, which were not altered. Conclusions Motor slow negative waves allow the genomic imaging of dopamine inactivation effects on cortical motor post-processing during response evaluation. This is the first report to point towards epistatic effects in the motor system during response evaluation, i.e. during the post-processing of an already executed movement rather than during movement programming. PMID:22649558

  18. Backward Transfer: An Investigation of the Influence of Quadratic Functions Instruction on Students' Prior Ways of Reasoning about Linear Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohensee, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The transfer of learning has been the subject of much scientific inquiry in the social sciences. However, mathematics education research has given little attention to a subclass called backward transfer, which is when learning about new concepts influences learners' ways of reasoning about previously encountered concepts. This study examined when…

  19. Body composition and reproductive function exert unique influences on indices of bone health in exercising women.

    PubMed

    Mallinson, Rebecca J; Williams, Nancy I; Hill, Brenna R; De Souza, Mary Jane

    2013-09-01

    Reproductive function, metabolic hormones, and lean mass have been observed to influence bone metabolism and bone mass. It is unclear, however, if reproductive, metabolic and body composition factors play unique roles in the clinical measures of areal bone mineral density (aBMD) and bone geometry in exercising women. This study compares lumbar spine bone mineral apparent density (BMAD) and estimates of femoral neck cross-sectional moment of inertia (CSMI) and cross-sectional area (CSA) between exercising ovulatory (Ov) and amenorrheic (Amen) women. It also explores the respective roles of reproductive function, metabolic status, and body composition on aBMD, lumbar spine BMAD and femoral neck CSMI and CSA, which are surrogate measures of bone strength. Among exercising women aged 18-30 years, body composition, aBMD, and estimates of femoral neck CSMI and CSA were assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Lumbar spine BMAD was calculated from bone mineral content and area. Estrone-1-glucuronide (E1G) and pregnanediol glucuronide were measured in daily urine samples collected for one cycle or monitoring period. Fasting blood samples were collected for measurement of leptin and total triiodothyronine. Ov (n = 37) and Amen (n = 45) women aged 22.3 ± 0.5 years did not differ in body mass, body mass index, and lean mass; however, Ov women had significantly higher percent body fat than Amen women. Lumbar spine aBMD and BMAD were significantly lower in Amen women compared to Ov women (p < 0.001); however, femoral neck CSA and CSMI were not different between groups. E1G cycle mean and age of menarche were the strongest predictors of lumbar spine aBMD and BMAD, together explaining 25.5% and 22.7% of the variance, respectively. Lean mass was the strongest predictor of total hip and femoral neck aBMD as well as femoral neck CSMI and CSA, explaining 8.5-34.8% of the variance. Upon consideration of several potential osteogenic stimuli, reproductive function appears to play

  20. Clinical, Anatomic and Functional Descriptors Influencing Morbidity, Survival and Adequacy of Revascularization Following Coronary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ellis L.; Craver, Joe M.; King, Spencer B.; Douglas, John S.; Bradford, James M.; Brown, Marlin; Bone, David K.; Hatcher, Charles R.

    1980-01-01

    Clinical data on 3,479 consecutive patients having coronary bypass surgery were retrospectively analyzed. Perioperative complications, incomplete revascularization, and reduced long-term survival could frequently be correlated with manifestations of myocardial damage. Patients with triple vessel and left main coronary disease had a greater frequency of inotropic requirements than did patients with single or double vessel disease (7.9% and 8.6% vs. 3.8% and 4.2%). Inotropic requirements in the perioperative period were significantly increased for patients with preoperative left ventricular dysfunction; a history of heart failure or multiple infarctions did not significantly increase the incidence of inotropic requirements. Presence of previous myocardial infarction, heart failure, or left ventricular contraction abnormalities significantly decreased the ability to achieve complete revascularization with bypass grafting. Hospital mortality since 1976 has been 0.8% (25/3,040). Hospital mortality was significantly increased by history of myocardial infarction, hypertension, heart failure, extent of anatomic disease, presence of preoperative ST-T wave changes, and severe abnormalities of left ventricular function. Hospital mortality in patients with ejection fraction ≤0.35 was 3.4% vs. 1.3% for those >0.35. Anginal pattern, history of hypertension, previous myocardial infarction, preoperative heart failure all significantly affected long-term survival. Occurrence of perioperative myocardial infarction did not adversely influence long-term survival. Patients with normal left ventricular function had excellent 42 month survival regardless of vessel disease (95%, 96%, and 94% for single, double, and triple vessel disease, respectively). Survival was significantly less for such patients with abnormal left ventricular function. Inability to achieve complete revascularization did not adversely affect hospital mortality, but did significantly reduce late survival. The

  1. Influence of emphysema distribution on pulmonary function parameters in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Helder Novais e; Neves, Inês; Redondo, Margarida; Cunha, Rui; Pereira, José Miguel; Magalhães, Adriana; Fernandes, Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact that the distribution of emphysema has on clinical and functional severity in patients with COPD. METHODS: The distribution of the emphysema was analyzed in COPD patients, who were classified according to a 5-point visual classification system of lung CT findings. We assessed the influence of emphysema distribution type on the clinical and functional presentation of COPD. We also evaluated hypoxemia after the six-minute walk test (6MWT) and determined the six-minute walk distance (6MWD). RESULTS: Eighty-six patients were included. The mean age was 65.2 ± 12.2 years, 91.9% were male, and all but one were smokers (mean smoking history, 62.7 ± 38.4 pack-years). The emphysema distribution was categorized as obviously upper lung-predominant (type 1), in 36.0% of the patients; slightly upper lung-predominant (type 2), in 25.6%; homogeneous between the upper and lower lung (type 3), in 16.3%; and slightly lower lung-predominant (type 4), in 22.1%. Type 2 emphysema distribution was associated with lower FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, and DLCO. In comparison with the type 1 patients, the type 4 patients were more likely to have an FEV1 < 65% of the predicted value (OR = 6.91, 95% CI: 1.43-33.45; p = 0.016), a 6MWD < 350 m (OR = 6.36, 95% CI: 1.26-32.18; p = 0.025), and post-6MWT hypoxemia (OR = 32.66, 95% CI: 3.26-326.84; p = 0.003). The type 3 patients had a higher RV/TLC ratio, although the difference was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: The severity of COPD appears to be greater in type 4 patients, and type 3 patients tend to have greater hyperinflation. The distribution of emphysema could have a major impact on functional parameters and should be considered in the evaluation of COPD patients. PMID:26785956

  2. Phthalates Are Metabolised by Primary Thyroid Cell Cultures but Have Limited Influence on Selected Thyroid Cell Functions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Juliana Frohnert; Brorson, Marianne Møller; Boas, Malene; Frederiksen, Hanne; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Lindström, Emma Sofie; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Hartoft-Nielsen, Marie-Louise; Frisch, Thomas; Main, Katharina M.; Bendtzen, Klaus; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Phthalates are plasticisers added to a wide variety of products, resulting in measurable exposure of humans. They are suspected to disrupt the thyroid axis as epidemiological studies suggest an influence on the peripheral thyroid hormone concentration. The mechanism is still unknown as only few in vitro studies within this area exist. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of three phthalate diesters (di-ethyl phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP)) and two monoesters (mono-n-butyl phthalate and mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP)) on the differentiated function of primary human thyroid cell cultures. Also, the kinetics of phthalate metabolism were investigated. DEHP and its monoester, MEHP, both had an inhibitory influence on 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate secretion from the cells, and MEHP also on thyroglobulin (Tg) secretion from the cells. Results of the lactate dehydrogenase-measurements indicated that the MEHP-mediated influence was caused by cell death. No influence on gene expression of thyroid specific genes (Tg, thyroid peroxidase, sodium iodine symporter and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor) by any of the investigated diesters could be demonstrated. All phthalate diesters were metabolised to the respective monoester, however with a fall in efficiency for high concentrations of the larger diesters DnBP and DEHP. In conclusion, human thyroid cells were able to metabolise phthalates but this phthalate-exposure did not appear to substantially influence selected functions of these cells. PMID:26985823

  3. Responses to Forces Influencing Cohesion as a Function of Player Status and Level of Male Varsity Basketball Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Joseph J.; Gray, Gary R.

    1982-01-01

    A study analyzed team cohesion perceptions of 515 male varsity basketball players (10 to 22 years of age) to determine if factors influencing team cohesion were a function of competitive intensity or of the importance of individual players to their team. Players with the most game playing time were more satisfied than those with less playing time.…

  4. [Study on the function and influence of hi-tech on medical and health undertakings development in China].

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Chi, Hui; Yang, Guozhong

    2010-05-01

    The invention and use of science and technology have always been a double-edged sword. The paper analysed the function and influence of medical hi-tech on medical and health undertakings development in China, and gives opinions on how to treat medical hi-tech correctly, so as to provide reference for the use and supervision of medical hi-tech.

  5. Molecular Recognition and Structural Influences on Function in Bio-nanosystems of Nucleic Acids and Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethaphong, Latsavongsakda

    duplexes alone interacted with cations distinct from a specific sequence. Under physiologically relevant conditions, a duplex of RNA polyguanine-polycitidine was highly responsive and able to sequester cations to the middle of the purine stretches. The least responsive structure was a DNA polyadenine-polythymine duplex. A random sequence DNA duplex contorted into an RNA-like helix resulted in cationic dynamics similar to RNA systems. These studies showed that cation diffusive binding events in nucleic acid duplex structures are sequence specific and heavily influenced by structural aspects helical forms to account for much of the differences observed. Although structural information in nucleic acids is encoded within their sequence, linking amino acid sequence to protein structure is murkier; the structural information within proteins is encoded by the folding process itself: a complex phenomenon driven toward the equilibrium state of the active conformation. Upwards of two thirds of a protein's sequence can be substituted with similar amino acids without significantly perturbing its function; conserved residues of about 10% seem to be vital; since evolutionary selection pressure in proteins operates 3-dimenionally, a linear sequence is partially informative. We explored this problem by folding de-novo the cytosolic portion of the membrane protein, cellulose synthase, CESA1 from upland cotton, Gossypium hirsutum (Ghcesa1). The cytoplasmic region was generated by homology modeling and refined with molecular dynamics. These mutations impair local structural flexibility which likely results in cellulose that is produced at a lower rate and is less crystalline. Additional modeling of fragments of cellulose synthases from the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, offered novel insights into the function of conserved cytosolic domains within plant cellulose synthases. Transport mechanisms related to the transmembrane region revealed significant differences between plants and a

  6. Menstrual cycle influence on cognitive function and emotion processing—from a reproductive perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sundström Poromaa, Inger; Gingnell, Malin

    2014-01-01

    The menstrual cycle has attracted research interest ever since the 1930s. For many researchers the menstrual cycle is an excellent model of ovarian steroid influence on emotion, behavior, and cognition. Over the past years methodological improvements in menstrual cycle studies have been noted, and this review summarizes the findings of methodologically sound menstrual cycle studies in healthy women. Whereas the predominant hypotheses of the cognitive field state that sexually dimorphic cognitive skills that favor men are improved during menstrual cycle phases with low estrogen and that cognitive skills that favor women are improved during cycle phases with increased estrogen and/or progesterone, this review has not found sufficient evidence to support any of these hypotheses. Mental rotation has gained specific interest in this aspect, but a meta-analysis yielded a standardized mean difference in error rate of 1.61 (95% CI −0.35 to 3.57), suggesting, at present, no favor of an early follicular phase improvement in mental rotation performance. Besides the sexually dimorphic cognitive skills, studies exploring menstrual cycle effects on tasks that probe prefrontal cortex function, for instance verbal or spatial working memory, have also been reviewed. While studies thus far are few, results at hand suggest improved performance at times of high estradiol levels. Menstrual cycle studies on emotional processing, on the other hand, tap into the emotional disorders of the luteal phase, and may be of relevance for women with premenstrual disorders. Although evidence at present is limited, it is suggested that emotion recognition, consolidation of emotional memories, and fear extinction is modulated by the menstrual cycle in women. With the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging, several studies report changes in brain reactivity across the menstrual cycle, most notably increased amygdala reactivity in the luteal phase. Thus, to the extent that behavioral changes

  7. Influence of local application of glaucoma medications-travoprost eye drops on patients' tear film function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengpu

    2015-03-01

    This study discussed about the influence of local application of glaucoma medications -- travoprost eye drops to patients' tear film function. We selected 24 patients, 45 eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma or intraocular hypertension. All of the patients topically used the travoprost eye drops for one time every night. After and before the pharmacy, we proceeded 1, 2, 3 mo lines symptom score and Schirmer's test (St), corneal fluorescein staining (FL), breakup time of tear film (BUT). Average value of symptom score and FL of all the patients before pharmacy were 1.32 ± 1. 55, 0.42 ± 0.68, and 1, 2, 3mo after pharmacy were respectively 2.68 ± 1.59, 0.96 ± 0.81; 4.97 ± 1.62, 1.46 ± 0.62; 6.21 ± 1.33, 1.88 ± 0.44. Symptom score and FL of 1, 2, 3 mo patients after pharmacy were all prominent higher than it before pharmacy (P=0.00), and it gradually increased. The average value of patients symptom BUT and St before pharmacy were (7.71 ± 0.87s), (8.32 ± 2.63mm /5min) and 1, 2, 3 mo after pharmacy were respectively (6.93 ± 1.17s), (7.69 ± 3. 33mm /5min); (5.48 ± 1.29s), (6.79 ± 2.94mm /5min); (4.33 ± 1.83s), (5.98 ± 3.11mm/5min). BUT and St value after pharmacy were prominent all lower than the level before pharmacy (P=0.00). And it gradually reduced. Short-term use of travoprost eye drops would aggravate the corneal irritation of patients, and decrease the tear film stability and tear secretion.

  8. The Influence of Ecological Isolation on the Structural and Functional Stability of Complex Microbial Communities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franklin, R. B.; Garland, J. L.; Mills, A. L.

    2005-01-01

    To help understand how the behavior of microorganisms and microbial communities in insular space habitats may differ from the behavior of these groups on Earth, long-term incubations (100+ days) were conducting using wastewater bioreactors (batch fed) designed to mimic "closed" and "open" ecological systems. The issue of immigration was considered, and the goal of the research was to determine whether the stability of microbial communities in space is reduced due to their prolonged isolation. Bioreactors were established by inoculating flasks of sterile synthetic wastewater with the microbial community obtained from a local treatment facility; each day, one-third of the medium in the flask was replaced with an equal volume of sterile artificial wastewater. Flasks were divided into two treatments: "closed" and "open" to recruitment of additional microorganisms. "Closed" flasks were maintained as described above, while the medium used to feed the "open" flasks was supplemented daily with a small amount of raw sewage (which provided a continuous source of new potential community members). Significant differences in microbial community structure and function developed in the two sets of communities, and the results suggest that the open community was more stable and better able to adjust to changing environmental conditions. Each community's resistance to environmental (temperature fluctuations) and biological stresses (starvation and invasion by an opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa) was monitored. Experiments were also conducted to determine whether the effect of isolation changes depending on the microbial communities' initial diversity or composition; communities with a low(er) initial diversity were less stable. Overall, the results indicate that isolation will be an important factor influencing the activity of microbial communities on board spacecraft. A possible way of mitigating these effects would be to include communities with high initial

  9. Urban air pollution: influences on olfactory function and pathology in exposed children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Osnaya, Norma; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Keefe, Sheyla; Palacios-Moreno, Juan; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Aiello-Mora, Mario; Maronpot, Robert R; Doty, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    Mexico City (MC) residents are exposed to severe air pollution and exhibit olfactory bulb inflammation. We compared the olfactory function of individuals living under conditions of extreme air pollution to that of controls from a relatively clean environment and explore associations between olfaction scores, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status, and pollution exposure. The olfactory bulbs (OBs) of 35 MC and 9 controls 20.8+/-8.5 years were assessed by light and electron microscopy. The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) was administered to 62 MC/25 controls 21.2+/-2.7 years. MC subjects had significantly lower UPSIT scores: 34.24+/-0.42 versus controls 35.76+/-0.40, p=0.03. Olfaction deficits were present in 35.5% MC and 12% of controls. MC APOE epsilon 4 carriers failed 2.4+/-0.54 items in the 10-item smell identification scale from the UPSIT related to Alzheimer's disease, while APOE 2/3 and 3/3 subjects failed 1.36+/-0.16 items, p=0.01. MC residents exhibited OB endothelial hyperplasia, neuronal accumulation of particles (2/35), and immunoreactivity to beta amyloid betaA(42) (29/35) and/or alpha-synuclein (4/35) in neurons, glial cells and/or blood vessels. Ultrafine particles were present in OBs endothelial cytoplasm and basement membranes. Control OBs were unremarkable. Air pollution exposure is associated with olfactory dysfunction and OB pathology, APOE 4 may confer greater susceptibility to such abnormalities, and ultrafine particles could play a key role in the OB pathology. This study contributes to our understanding of the influences of air pollution on olfaction and its potential contribution to neurodegeneration.

  10. Coming Together and Pulling Apart: Exploring the Influence of Functional Status on Co-resident Relationships in Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Navtej K.; Kemp, Candace L.; Ball, Mary M.; Burgess, Elisabeth O.; Perkins, Molly M.

    2013-01-01

    Social relationships can have considerable influence on physical and mental well-being in later life, particularly for those in long-term care settings such as assisted living (AL). Research set in AL suggests that other residents are among the most available social contacts and that co-resident relationships can affect life satisfaction, quality of life, and well-being. Functional status is a major factor influencing relationships, yet AL research has not studied in-depth or systematically considered the role it plays in residents’ relationships. This study examines the influences of physical and mental function on co-resident relationships in AL and identifies the factors shaping the influence of functional status. We present an analysis of qualitative data collected over a one-year period in two distinct AL settings. Data collection included: participant observation, informal interviews, and formal in-depth interviews with staff, residents, administrators and visitors, as well as surveys with residents. Grounded theory methods guided our data collection and analysis. Our analysis identified the core category, “coming together and pulling apart”, which signifies that functional status is multi-directional, fluid, and operates in different ways in various situations and across time. Key facility- (e.g., admission and retention practices, staff intervention) and resident-level (e.g., personal and situational characteristics) factors shape the influence of functional status on co-resident relationships. Based on our findings, we suggest strategies for promoting positive relationships among residents in AL, including the need to educate staff, families, and residents. PMID:24300052

  11. Influence of substituents and functional groups on the surface composition of ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Kolbeck, Claudia; Niedermaier, Inga; Deyko, Alexey; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Taccardi, Nicola; Wei, Wei; Wasserscheid, Peter; Maier, Florian; Steinrück, Hans-Peter

    2014-04-01

    We have performed a systematic study addressing the surface behavior of a variety of functionalized and non-functionalized ionic liquids (ILs). From angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, detailed conclusions on the surface enrichment of the functional groups and the molecular orientation of the cations and anions is derived. The systems include imidazolium-based ILs methylated at the C2 position, a phenyl-functionalized IL, an alkoxysilane-functionalized IL, halo-functionalized ILs, thioether-functionalized ILs, and amine-functionalized ILs. The results are compared with the results for corresponding non-functionalized ILs where available. Generally, enrichment of the functional group at the surface is only observed for systems that have very weak interaction between the functional group and the ionic head groups.

  12. SOIL N:P RATIO INFLUENCES MYCORRHIZAL FUNCTION AND SOIL ORGANISM FEEDBACKS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The degree to which plants benefit from mycorrhizal symbioses is influenced by soil fertility. Plants generally benefit the most from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) associations when they are growing in phosphorus (P) deficient soil; however soil nitrogen (N) availability can also influence mycorrhizal...

  13. Influence of Vegetations' Metabolites on the Composition and Functioning of Soil Microbial Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biryukov, Mikhail

    2013-04-01

    Microbiota is one of the major factors of soils fertility. It transforms organic substances in soil and, therefore, serves as the main component in the cycles of carbon and nitrogen. Microbial communities (MC) are characterized as highly diverse and extremely complex structures. This allows them to adapt to any affection and provide all the necessary biospheric functions. Hence, the study of their functional diversity and adaptivity of microbiota provides the key to the understanding of the ecosystems' functioning and their adaptivity to the human impact. The formation of MC at the initial stage is regulated by the fluxes of substrates and biologically active substances (BAS), which vary greatly in soils under different vegetations. These fluxes are presented by: low molecular weights organic substances (LMWOS), which can be directly included in metabolism of microbes; polymers, that can be decomposed to LMWOS by exoenzymes; and more complex compounds, having different "drug effects" (e.g. different types of phenolic acids) and regulating growth and enzymatic properties of microbiota. Therefore, the main hypothesis of the research was formulated as follows: penetration of different types of substrates and BAS into soil leads to the emergence of MC varying in enzymatic properties and structure. As a soil matrix we used the soil from the untreated variant of the lysimeter model experiment taking place in the faculty of Soil Science of the MSU for over the last 40 years. It was sieved with a 2mm sieves, humidified and incubated at 25C during one week. Subsequently, the samples were air-dried with occasional stirring for one more week. Thereafter, aliquots of the prepared soil were taken for the different experimental variants. The samples were rewetted with solutions of various substrates (glucose, cellulose, starch, etc.) and thoroughly mixed. The control variant was established with addition of deionised water. The samples were incubated at the 25C. During the

  14. Framework Design and Influencing Factor Analysis of a Water Environmental Functional Zone-Based Effluent Trading System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Han, Zhaoxing; Li, Shuang; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-10-01

    The efficacy of traditional effluent trading systems is questionable due to their neglect of seasonal hydrological variation and the creation of upstream hot spots within a watershed. Besides, few studies have been conducted to distinguish the impacts of each influencing factor on effluent trading systems outputs. In this study, a water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems framework was configured and a comprehensive analysis of its influencing factors was conducted. This proposed water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems was then applied for the control of chemical oxygen demand in the Beiyun River watershed, Beijing, China. Optimal trading results highlighted the integration of water quality constraints and different hydrological seasons, especially for downstream dischargers. The optimal trading of each discharger, in terms of pollutant reduction load and abatement cost, is greatly influenced by environmental and political factors such as background water quality, the location of river assessment points, and tradable discharge permits. In addition, the initial permit allowance has little influence on the market as a whole but does impact the individual discharger. These results provide information that is critical to understanding the impact of policy design on the functionality of an effluent trading systems.

  15. Framework Design and Influencing Factor Analysis of a Water Environmental Functional Zone-Based Effluent Trading System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Han, Zhaoxing; Li, Shuang; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-10-01

    The efficacy of traditional effluent trading systems is questionable due to their neglect of seasonal hydrological variation and the creation of upstream hot spots within a watershed. Besides, few studies have been conducted to distinguish the impacts of each influencing factor on effluent trading systems outputs. In this study, a water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems framework was configured and a comprehensive analysis of its influencing factors was conducted. This proposed water environmental functional zone-based effluent trading systems was then applied for the control of chemical oxygen demand in the Beiyun River watershed, Beijing, China. Optimal trading results highlighted the integration of water quality constraints and different hydrological seasons, especially for downstream dischargers. The optimal trading of each discharger, in terms of pollutant reduction load and abatement cost, is greatly influenced by environmental and political factors such as background water quality, the location of river assessment points, and tradable discharge permits. In addition, the initial permit allowance has little influence on the market as a whole but does impact the individual discharger. These results provide information that is critical to understanding the impact of policy design on the functionality of an effluent trading systems.

  16. Influence of Functional Knee Bracing on the Isokinetic and Functional Tests of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Deficient Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mortaza, Niyousha; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf; Razjouyan, Javad

    2013-01-01

    Use of functional knee braces has been suggested to provide protection and to improve kinetic performance of the knee in Anterior cruciate ligament(ACL)-injured patients. However, many athletes might refrain from wearing the braces because of the fear of performance hindrance in the playing field. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of three functional knee brace/sleeves upon the isokinetic and functional performance of ACL-deficient and healthy subjects. Six anterior cruciate ligament deficient (29.0±5.3 yrs., 175.2±5.4 cm, and 73.0±10.0 kg) and six healthy male subjects (27.2±3.7 yrs., 176.4±6.4 cm, and 70.3±6.9 kg) were selected. The effect of a custom-made functional knee brace, and two neoprene knee sleeves, one with four metal supports and one without support were examined via the use of isokinetic and functional tests in four sets (non-braced,wearing functional knee brace,and wearing the sleeves). Cross-over hop and single leg vertical jump test were performed and jump height, and hop distance were recorded. Peak torque to body weight ratio and average power in two isokinetic velocities(60°.s−1,180°.s−1) were recorded and the brace/sleeves effect was calculated as the changes in peak torque measured in the brace/sleeves conditions, expressed as a percentage of peak torque measured in non-braced condition. Frequency content of the isokinetic torque-time curves was also analyzed. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare the measured values in four test conditions within each control and ACL-deficient group,and Mann-Whitney U test was used for the comparison between the two groups. No significant differences in peak torque, average power, torque-time curve frequency content, vertical-jump and hop measurements were found within the experimental and the non-braced conditions (p>0.05). Although the examined functional knee brace/sleeves had no significant effect on the knee muscle performance, there have been some enhancement regarding

  17. The influence of caregiving stressors, social support, and caregiving appraisal on marital functioning among African American wife caregivers.

    PubMed

    Chadiha, Letha A; Rafferty, Jane; Pickard, Joseph

    2003-10-01

    Using a stress and coping framework, we examined the influence of caregiving stressors, social support, and caregiving appraisal on the marital functioning of 100 African American wife caregivers. Results of separate multivariate analyses revealed received church support, caregiving burden, and caregiving satisfaction significantly predicted wives' marital functioning, when caregivers' background characteristics (age and education), length of caregiving, whether first marriage, and urban versus rural location were controlled. Receiving church support was associated with increased marital functioning. Lower levels of caregiving burden were associated with increased marital functioning. Higher levels of caregiving satisfaction were associated with increased marital functioning. Findings illuminate wives' caregiving and marital experiences, and have implications for family therapy and future research.

  18. Analyzing the Stability of Price Response Functions: Measuring the Influence of Different Parameters in a Monte Carlo Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusch, Michael; Baier, Daniel

    The usage and the estimation of price response function is very important for strategic marketing decisions. Typically price response functions with an empirical basis are used. However, such price response functions are subject to a lot of disturbing influence factors, e.g., the assumed profit maximum price and the assumed corresponding quantity of sales. In such cases, the question how stable the found price response function is was not answered sufficiently up to now. In this paper, the question will be pursued how much (and what kind of) errors in market research are pardonable for a stable price response function. For the comparisons, a factorial design with synthetically generated and disturbed data is used.

  19. Silver nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotube carpets: influence of surface functionalization.

    PubMed

    Karumuri, Anil K; Oswal, Dhawal P; Hostetler, Heather A; Mukhopadhyay, Sharmila M

    2016-04-08

    The effectiveness of nanoparticle-based functional devices depends strongly on the surface morphology and area of the support. An emerging powerful approach of increasing the available surface area without decreasing strength or increasing bulk is to attach arrays of suitable nanotubes on the surface, and to attach the necessary nanoparticles to them. Earlier publications by this team have shown that carpet-like arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be successfully grown on a variety of larger carbon substrates such as graphite, foams and fabric, which offer hierarchical multiscale supporting architecture suitable for the attachment of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). A limiting factor of pure CNT arrays in fluid-based applications is their hydrophobicity, which can reduce the percolation of an aqueous medium through individual nanotubes. Previous studies have demonstrated that the treatment of CNT carpets with dry (oxygen) plasma can induce reversible wettability, and treatment with wet (sol-gel) coating can impart permanent wettability. In this paper, we report the influence of such treatments on the attachment of AgNPs, and their effectiveness in water disinfection treatments. Both types of hydrophilic surface treatment show an increase in silver loading on the CNT carpets. Oxygen-plasma treated surfaces (O-CNT) show fine and densely packed AgNPs, whereas silica-coated nanotubes (silica-CNT) show uneven clusters of AgNPs. However, O-CNT surfaces lose their hydrophilicity during AgNP deposition, whereas silica-CNT surfaces remain hydrophilic. This difference significantly impacts the antibacterial effectiveness of these materials, as tested in simulated water containing Gram negative Escherichia coli (E. coli, JM109). AgNPs on silica-coated CNT substrates showed significantly higher reduction rates of E. coli compared to AgNPs on plasma-treated CNT substrates, despite the finer and better dispersed AgNP distribution in the latter. These results provide important

  20. Mediterranean-type ecosystems: the influence of biodiversity on their functioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, George W.; Richardson, David M.; Keeley, Jon E.; Hobbs, Richard J.; Mooney, H.A.; Cushman, J.H.; Medina, E.; Sala, O.E.; Schulze, E.-D.

    1996-01-01

    Ecosystems in the Mediterranean-climate regions of the world have served as a unit for comparative ecological studies for over two decades. The cohesiveness of research in this set of widely distributed regions rests on the similarity of the climates where they occur, and the identifiable convergence in elements of their vegetation structure (Di Castri and Mooney 1973). In this chapter we review functional aspects of what have come to be known as Mediterranean-type ecosystems (METs) in the context of a concerned global interest in the sustainability of the human environment and its dependence on biological diversity. The approach we adopt here is to look for evidence that this biodiversity, for which some MTEs are renowned (Cowling, 1992; Hobbs, 1992), has an influence on processes which are important both for the maintenance of natural systems, and for providing "ecosystem services" with human utility. Almost a century ago, Schimper (1903) recognized the biological similarities between five widely separated regions characterized by Mediterranean-type climates, and much comparative work has been done on that basis since. These regions comprise the Mediterranean basin itself, a major portion of California, central Chile, the southwestern and southern extremities of South Africa, and parts of southwestern and southern Australia (Figure 7.1). The first attention paid to MTEs in terms of quantitative ecological research arose out of the International Biological Programme (IBP) of the 1960s and 1970s. Those efforts focused on comparisons between the Chilean and Californian systems (Mooney 1977), and dealt with parallel models of ecosystem processes, especially water flux (Fuentes et al 1995). Because of the already perceived similarities between vegetation in these and the other three regions, the project was soon extended to include all five regions. The first broad comparative overview was published as an anthology which considered the origins and the convergent

  1. Influence of Assessment Setting on the Results of Functional Analyses of Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Russell; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio; Didden, Robert; Rispoli, Mandy

    2010-01-01

    Analogue functional analyses are widely used to identify the operant function of problem behavior in individuals with developmental disabilities. Because problem behavior often occurs across multiple settings (e.g., homes, schools, outpatient clinics), it is important to determine whether the results of functional analyses vary across settings.…

  2. Factors Influencing Self-Assessment of Cognition and Functioning in Bipolar Disorder: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Philip D.; Paschall, Gayla; Depp, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Self-assessment deficits are common in schizophrenia and span multiple aspects of functioning, including awareness of symptoms, and the ability to assess objective levels of cognitive deficits and everyday functioning. While impaired awareness of illness in bipolar disorder during symptomatic periods is well understood, awareness of disability and cognitive deficits has been less well studied. Methods In this pilot study, 30 patients with a lifetime history of bipolar 1 disorder and current bipolar depression completed performance-based tests of cognition and functional capacity and self reported their opinions of their cognitive abilities, everyday functioning, and symptoms. High contact clinicians also provided impressions of the patients’ cognitive performance and everyday functioning. Results Clinician impressions of cognition and everyday functioning were correlated with the results of the performance-based assessments, whereas the patient self-reports of cognition and functioning were uncorrelated both with their own performance and with the clinician impressions. However, severity of depressive symptoms was correlated with self-reports of functioning in cognitive and functional domains, but not with either performance-based data or clinician impressions of cognition or functioning. Conclusions Depression appears to be a factor affecting self-assessment in bipolar disorder and reports of cognition and functioning were minimally related to objective information and clinician impressions. Symptoms of mania were minimal and not correlated with performance-based assessments or clinician impressions. PMID:26057868

  3. The value of trophic interactions for ecosystem function: dung beetle communities influence seed burial and seedling recruitment in tropical forests.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Hannah M; Bardgett, Richard D; Louzada, Julio; Barlow, Jos

    2016-12-14

    Anthropogenic activities are causing species extinctions, raising concerns about the consequences of changing biological communities for ecosystem functioning. To address this, we investigated how dung beetle communities influence seed burial and seedling recruitment in the Brazilian Amazon. First, we conducted a burial and retrieval experiment using seed mimics. We found that dung beetle biomass had a stronger positive effect on the burial of large than small beads, suggesting that anthropogenic reductions in large-bodied beetles will have the greatest effect on the secondary dispersal of large-seeded plant species. Second, we established mesocosm experiments in which dung beetle communities buried Myrciaria dubia seeds to examine plant emergence and survival. Contrary to expectations, we found that beetle diversity and biomass negatively influenced seedling emergence, but positively affected the survival of seedlings that emerged. Finally, we conducted germination trials to establish the optimum burial depth of experimental seeds, revealing a negative relationship between burial depth and seedling emergence success. Our results provide novel evidence that seed burial by dung beetles may be detrimental for the emergence of some seed species. However, we also detected positive impacts of beetle activity on seedling recruitment, which are probably because of their influence on soil properties. Overall, this study provides new evidence that anthropogenic impacts on dung beetle communities could influence the structure of tropical forests; in particular, their capacity to regenerate and continue to provide valuable functions and services.

  4. Aromatic Lateral Substituents Influence the Excitation Energies of Hexaaza Lanthanide Macrocyclic Complexes: A Wave Function Theory and Density Functional Study.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Murillo-López, Juliana A; Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2015-09-24

    The high interest in lanthanide chemistry, and particularly in their luminescence, has been encouraged by the need of understanding the lanthanide chemical coordination and how the design of new luminescent materials can be affected by this. This work is focused on the understanding of the electronic structure, bonding nature, and optical properties of a set of lanthanide hexaaza macrocyclic complexes, which can lead to potential optical applications. Here we found that the DFT ground state of the open-shell complexes are mainly characterized by the manifold of low lying f states, having small HOMO-LUMO energy gaps. The results obtained from the wave function theory calculations (SO-RASSI) put on evidence the multiconfigurational character of their ground state and it is observed that the large spin-orbit coupling and the weak crystal field produce a strong mix of the ground and the excited states. The electron localization function (ELF) and the energy decomposition analysis (EDA) support the idea of a dative interaction between the macrocyclic ligand and the lanthanide center for all the studied systems; noting that, this interaction has a covalent character, where the d-orbital participation is evidenced from NBO analysis, leaving the f shell completely noninteracting in the chemical bonding. From the optical part we observed in all cases the characteristic intraligand (IL) (π-π*) and ligand to metal charge-transfer (LMCT) bands that are present in the ultraviolet and visible regions, and for the open-shell complexes we found the inherent f-f electronic transitions on the visible and near-infrared region.

  5. Effects of race and socioeconomic status on the relative influence of education and literacy on cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Dotson, Vonetta M; Kitner-Triolo, Melissa H; Evans, Michele K; Zonderman, Alan B

    2009-07-01

    Previous research has shown that reading ability is a stronger predictor of cognitive functioning than years of education, particularly for African Americans. The current study was designed to determine whether the relative influence of literacy and education on cognitive abilities varies as a function of race or socioeconomic status (SES). We examined the unique influence of education and reading scores on a range of cognitive tests in low- and higher-SES African Americans and Whites. Literacy significantly predicted scores on all but one cognitive measure in both African American groups and low-SES Whites, while education was not significantly associated with any cognitive measure. In contrast, both education and reading scores predicted performance on many cognitive measures in higher-SES Whites. These findings provide further evidence that reading ability better predicts cognitive functioning than years of education and suggest that disadvantages associated with racial minority status and low SES affect the relative influence of literacy and years of education on cognition.

  6. A genome-wide supported psychiatric risk variant in NCAN influences brain function and cognitive performance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Raum, Heidelore; Dietsche, Bruno; Nagels, Arne; Witt, Stephanie H; Rietschel, Marcella; Kircher, Tilo; Krug, Axel

    2015-01-01

    The A allele of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1064395 in the NCAN gene has recently been identified as a susceptibility factor for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. NCAN encodes neurocan, a brain-specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan that is thought to influence neuronal adhesion and migration. Several lines of research suggest an impact of NCAN on neurocognitive functioning. In the present study, we investigated the effects of rs1064395 genotype on neural processing and cognitive performance in healthy subjects. Brain activity was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during an overt semantic verbal fluency task in 110 healthy subjects who were genotyped for the NCAN SNP rs1064395. Participants additionally underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing. Whole brain analyses revealed that NCAN risk status, defined as AA or AG genotype, was associated with a lack of task-related deactivation in a large left lateral temporal cluster extending from the middle temporal gyrus to the temporal pole. Regarding neuropsychological measures, risk allele carriers demonstrated poorer immediate and delayed verbal memory performance when compared to subjects with GG genotype. Better verbal memory performance was significantly associated with greater deactivation of the left temporal cluster during the fMRI task in subjects with GG genotype. The current data demonstrate that common genetic variation in NCAN influences both neural processing and cognitive performance in healthy subjects. Our study provides new evidence for a specific genetic influence on human brain function.

  7. Altering prosthetic foot stiffness influences foot and muscle function during below-knee amputee walking: a modeling and simulation analysis.

    PubMed

    Fey, Nicholas P; Klute, Glenn K; Neptune, Richard R

    2013-02-22

    Most prosthetic feet are designed to improve amputee gait by storing and releasing elastic energy during stance. However, how prosthetic foot stiffness influences muscle and foot function is unclear. Identifying these relationships would provide quantitative rationale for prosthetic foot prescription that may lead to improved amputee gait. The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of altered prosthetic foot stiffness on muscle and foot function using forward dynamics simulations of amputee walking. Three 2D muscle-actuated forward dynamics simulations of unilateral below-knee amputee walking with a range of foot stiffness levels were generated, and muscle and prosthetic foot contributions to body support and propulsion and residual leg swing were quantified. As stiffness decreased, the prosthetic keel provided increased support and braking (negative propulsion) during the first half of stance while the heel contribution to support decreased. During the second half of stance, the keel provided decreased propulsion and increased support. In addition, the keel absorbed less power from the leg, contributing more to swing initiation. Thus, several muscle compensations were necessary. During the first half of stance, the residual leg hamstrings provided decreased support and increased propulsion. During the second half of stance, the intact leg vasti provided increased support and the residual leg rectus femoris transferred increased energy from the leg to the trunk for propulsion. These results highlight the influence prosthetic foot stiffness has on muscle and foot function throughout the gait cycle and may aid in prescribing feet of appropriate stiffness.

  8. Effect of Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Combined with Testosterone Treatment on Cardiovascular Function in Rats: Influence of Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Engi, Sheila A.; Planeta, Cleopatra S.; Crestani, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of voluntary ethanol consumption combined with testosterone treatment on cardiovascular function in rats. Moreover, we investigated the influence of exercise training on these effects. To this end, male rats were submitted to low-intensity training on a treadmill or kept sedentary while concurrently being treated with ethanol for 6 weeks. For voluntary ethanol intake, rats were given access to two bottles, one containing ethanol and other containing water, three 24-hour sessions per week. In the last two weeks (weeks 5 and 6), animals underwent testosterone treatment concurrently with exercise training and exposure to ethanol. Ethanol consumption was not affected by either testosterone treatment or exercise training. Also, drug treatments did not influence the treadmill performance improvement evoked by training. However, testosterone alone, but not in combination with ethanol, reduced resting heart rate. Moreover, combined treatment with testosterone and ethanol reduced the pressor response to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Treatment with either testosterone or ethanol alone also affected baroreflex activity and enhanced depressor response to acetylcholine, but these effects were inhibited when drugs were coadministrated. Exercise training restored most cardiovascular effects evoked by drug treatments. Furthermore, both drugs administrated alone increased pressor response to phenylephrine in trained animals. Also, drug treatments inhibited the beneficial effects of training on baroreflex function. In conclusion, the present results suggest a potential interaction between toxic effects of testosterone and ethanol on cardiovascular function. Data also indicate that exercise training is an important factor influencing the effects of these substances. PMID:26760038

  9. Influence of personality and neuropsychological ability on social functioning and self-management in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Vierck, Esther; Joyce, Peter R

    2015-10-30

    A majority of bipolar patients (BD) show functional difficulties even in remission. In recent years cognitive functions and personality characteristics have been associated with occupational and psychosocial outcomes, but findings are not consistent. We assessed personality and cognitive functioning through a range of tests in BD and control participants. Three cognitive domains-verbal memory, facial-executive, and spatial memory-were extracted by principal component analysis. These factors and selected personality dimensions were included in hierarchical regression analysis to predict psychosocial functioning and the use of self-management strategies while controlling for mood status. The best determinants of good psychosocial functioning were good verbal memory and high self-directedness. The use of self-management techniques was associated with a low level of harm-avoidance. Our findings indicate that strategies to improve memory and self-directedness may be useful for increasing functioning in individuals with bipolar disorder.

  10. Evaluation of Particle Size Influence on Proximate Composition, Physicochemical, Techno-Functional and Physio-Functional Properties of Flours Obtained from Persimmon (Diospyros kaki Trumb.) Coproducts.

    PubMed

    Lucas-González, Raquel; Viuda-Martos, Manuel; Pérez-Álvarez, José Ángel; Fernández-López, Juana

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the work was to study the influence of particle size in the composition, physicochemical, techno-functional and physio-functional properties of two flours obtained from persimmon (Diospyros kaki Trumb. cvs. 'Rojo Brillante' (RBF) and 'Triump' (THF) coproducts. The cultivar (RBF and THF) and particle size significantly affected all parameters under study, although depending on the evaluated property, only one of these effects predominated. Carbohydrates (38.07-46.98 g/100 g) and total dietary fiber (32.07-43.57 g/100 g) were the main components in both flours (RBF and THF). Furthermore, insoluble dietary fiber represented more than 68% of total dietary fiber content. All color properties studied were influenced by cultivar and particle size. For both cultivars, the lower particle size, the higher lightness and hue values. RBF flours showed high values for emulsifying activity (69.33-74.00 mL/mL), while THF presented high values for water holding capacity (WHC: 9.47-12.19 g water/g sample). The bile holding capacity (BHC) and fat/oil binding values were, in general, higher in RBF (19.61-12.19 g bile/g sample and 11.98-9.07, respectively) than THF (16.12-12.40 g bile/g sample and 9.78-7.96, respectively). The effect of particle size was really evident in both WHC and BHC. Due to their dietary fiber content, techno-functional and physio-functional properties, persimmon flours seem to have a good profile to be used as potential functional ingredient.

  11. Epigenetics: Behavioral Influences on Gene Function, Part I: Maternal Behavior Permanently Affects Adult Behavior in Offspring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogren, Marilee P.; Lombroso, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    The article highlights the field of epigenetics and its relevance in determining the effects of maternal nurturing on behavioral patterns in offsprings. Results concluded that maternal behavior influences the offspring's behavior to stress in adulthood and the effects are transgenerational through epigenetic mechanisms.

  12. Factors Influencing Students' Adaptability in School: A Production Function Model and Multilevel Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Ping

    2008-01-01

    This study used sampling survey data from rural elementary schools in western China to analyze school adaptability, which is the representative noncognitive development of rural elementary students. It also investigated factors influencing the school adaptability of elementary school students at an individual and school level by using production…

  13. The Influence of Rurality and Parental Affect on Kindergarten Children's Social and Behavioral Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Susan M.; Koziol, Natalie A.; Clarke, Brandy L.; Rispoli, Kristin M.; Coutts, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Children's early academic achievement is supported by positive social and behavioral skills, and difficulties with these skills frequently gives way to underachievement. Social and behavioral problems often arise as a product of parent-child interactional patterns and environmental influences. Few studies have examined the role…

  14. Isotope and fatty acid trends along continental shelf depth gradients: Inshore versus offshore hydrological influences on benthic trophic functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouvelon, T.; Schaal, G.; Grall, J.; Pernet, F.; Perdriau, M.; A-Pernet, E. J.; Le Bris, H.

    2015-11-01

    Anthropogenic activities and land-based inputs into the sea may influence the trophic structure and functioning of coastal and continental shelf ecosystems, despite the numerous opportunities and services the latter offer to humans and wildlife. In addition, hydrological structures and physical dynamics potentially influence the sources of organic matter (e.g., terrestrial versus marine, or fresh material versus detrital material) entering marine food webs. Understanding the significance of the processes that influence marine food webs and ecosystems (e.g., terrestrial inputs, physical dynamics) is crucially important because trophic dynamics are a vital part of ecosystem integrity. This can be achieved by identifying organic matter sources that enter food webs along inshore-offshore transects. We hypothesised that regional hydrological structures over wide continental shelves directly control the benthic trophic functioning across the shelf. We investigated this issue along two transects in the northern ecosystem of the Bay of Biscay (north-eastern Atlantic). Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis (SIA) and fatty acid analysis (FAA) were conducted on different complementary ecosystem compartments that include suspended particulate organic matter (POM), sedimentary organic matter (SOM), and benthic consumers such as bivalves, large crustaceans and demersal fish. Samples were collected from inshore shallow waters (at ∼1 m in depth) to more than 200 m in depth on the offshore shelf break. Results indicated strong discrepancies in stable isotope (SI) and fatty acid (FA) compositions in the sampled compartments between inshore and offshore areas, although nitrogen SI (δ15N) and FA trends were similar along both transects. Offshore the influence of a permanently stratified area (described previously as a ;cold pool;) was evident in both transects. The influence of this hydrological structure on benthic trophic functioning (i.e., on the food sources available for

  15. The Influence of Family Factors on the Executive Functioning of Adult Children of Alcoholics in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schroeder, Valarie M.; Kelley, Michelle L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined executive functioning in college aged adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs; n = 84) and non-ACOAs (188). We examined whether characteristics of the family environment and family responsibility in one's family of origin were associated with executive functioning above the contribution of ACOA status. ACOAs reported more…

  16. How Homes Influence Schools: Early Parenting Predicts African American Children's Classroom Social-Emotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Claire E.; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E.

    2014-01-01

    Data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort were used to examine the extent to which early parenting predicted African American children's kindergarten social-emotional functioning. Teachers rated children's classroom social-emotional functioning in four areas (i.e., approaches to learning, self-control, interpersonal…

  17. Using an Adoption Design to Separate Genetic, Prenatal, and Temperament Influences on Toddler Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leve, Leslie D.; DeGarmo, David S.; Bridgett, David J.; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Harold, Gordon T.; Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Reiss, David

    2013-01-01

    Poor executive functioning has been implicated in children's concurrent and future behavioral difficulties, making work aimed at understanding processes related to the development of early executive function (EF) critical for models of developmental psychopathology. Deficits in EF have been associated with adverse prenatal experiences, genetic…

  18. Influence of Androgen Receptor Gene CAG and GGC Polymorphisms on Male Sexual Function: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Corona, Giovanni; Falzetti, Sara; delli Muti, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Background. No study has assessed the possible involvement of GGC androgen receptor (AR) polymorphism in sexual function. Our aim is to evaluate the association between CAG and GGC AR polymorphisms in this function. Methods. We retrospectively examined eighty-five outpatients. Clinical, biochemical, and genetic parameters were considered. Sexual assessment was performed using the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) which evaluates erectile function (EF), orgasmic function (OF), sexual desire (SD), intercourse satisfaction (IS), and overall satisfaction (OS). Results. In the whole sample, CAG repeats were inversely correlated with EF, OF, and total IIEF-15 score, whereas GGC tracts did not show any significant correlation with sexual function. CAG relationship with IIEF items retained significance only in the eugonadal but not in the hypogonadal cohort. On the other hand, GGC tracts were not found to be significantly correlated with IIEF variables in either eugonadal or hypogonadal subjects. In eugonadal subjects, logistic regression pointed out that a higher number of CAG triplets were associated with lower values of EF, OF, SD, OS, and total IIEF independently from other confounders. Conclusions. GGC polymorphism seems not to exert any influence on sexual function, whereas CAG polymorphism appears to affect sexual parameters only in eugonadal subjects. PMID:28243253

  19. Influence of the duration of breastfeeding on quality of muscle function during mastication in preschoolers: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There is some evidence of the benefits of breastfeeding to masticatory function, but no studies have evaluated the influence of breastfeeding duration on the quality of this function. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between duration of breastfeeding and quality of masticatory function in preschoolers. Methods Cross-sectional study nested in a contemporary cohort of 144 randomly selected Brazilian infants. Data on sociodemographic, dietary, and sucking-related parameters were collected shortly after birth and at 7, 30, 60, 120, and 180 days of life. Masticatory function was assessed between the ages of 3 and 5 years, using a standardized procedure involving three foodstuffs of different consistencies, for evaluation of incision, lip competence, masticatory patterns, masticatory movements, and perioral muscle use. The quality of masticatory function was scored, and multiple linear regression was used to test for association between this score and the duration of breastfeeding. Results A positive correlation was found between duration of breastfeeding and masticatory function scores (rs = 0.473; p < 0.001). Children breastfed for at least 12 months had significantly higher average scores, regardless of bottle-feeding or pacifier use. Children who were breastfed for longer were more likely to score satisfactorily across all tested parameters. Conclusions Breastfeeding has a positive impact on mastication. In our sample, duration of breastfeeding was positively associated with the quality of masticatory function at preschool age. PMID:23114410

  20. The influence of the great inequality on the secular disturbing function of the planetary system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musen, P.

    1971-01-01

    This paper derives the contribution by the great inequality to the secular disturbing function of the principal planets. Andoyer's expansion of the planetary disturbing function and von Zeipel's method of eliminating the periodic terms is employed; thereby, the corrected secular disturbing function for the planetary system is derived. The conclusion is drawn that the canonicity of the equations for the secular variation of the heliocentric elements can be preserved if there be retained, in the secular disturbing function, terms only of the second and fourth order relative to the eccentricity and inclinations. The Krylov-Bogoliubov method is suggested for eliminating periodic terms, if it is desired to include the secular perturbations of the fifth and higher order in the heliocentric elements. The additional part of the secular disturbing function derived in this paper can be included in existing theories of the secular effects of principal planets.

  1. Highly efficient hyperbranched CNT surfactants: influence of molar mass and functionalization.

    PubMed

    Bertels, Ellen; Bruyninckx, Kevin; Kurttepeli, Mert; Smet, Mario; Bals, Sara; Goderis, Bart

    2014-10-21

    End-group-functionalized hyperbranched polymers were synthesized to act as a carbon nanotube (CNT) surfactant in aqueous solutions. Variation of the percentage of triphenylmethyl (trityl) functionalization and of the molar mass of the hyperbranched polyglycerol (PG) core resulted in the highest measured surfactant efficiency for a 5000 g/mol PG with 5.6% of the available hydroxyl end-groups replaced by trityl functions, as shown by UV-vis measurements. Semiempirical model calculations suggest an even higher efficiency for PG5000 with 2.5% functionalization and maximal molecule specific efficiency in general at low degrees of functionalization. Addition of trityl groups increases the surfactant-nanotube interactions in comparison to unfunctionalized PG because of π-π stacking interactions. However, at higher functionalization degrees mutual interactions between trityl groups come into play, decreasing the surfactant efficiency, while lack of water solubility becomes an issue at very high functionalization degrees. Low molar mass surfactants are less efficient compared to higher molar mass species most likely because the higher bulkiness of the latter allows for a better CNT separation and stabilization. The most efficient surfactant studied allowed dispersing 2.85 mg of CNT in 20 mL with as little as 1 mg of surfactant. These dispersions, remaining stable for at least 2 months, were mainly composed of individual CNTs as revealed by electron microscopy.

  2. Influence of foot posture on the functioning of the windlass mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Rachel; Cornwall, Mark

    2017-01-17

    The absence of a functioning windlass mechanism may delay re-supination of the foot during locomotion and put excess stress on the mid-tarsal joint and soft tissues of the foot. The purpose of this study was to describe the foot posture of individuals that have an impaired or absent windlass mechanism. Forty-seven individuals (34 females and 13 males) with a mean age of 26 years were recruited to participate in this study. The Foot Posture Index was used to visually assess the posture of both feet. In addition, a digital gauge was used to measure dorsal arch height and midfoot width in bilateral resting standing. Dorsal arch height and mid-foot width were also measured in non-weight bearing. Finally, for those individuals without a functioning windlass mechanism, the amount of medial wedging needed to restore its function was measured. Subjects with an "absent" or "impaired" windlass mechanism had a mean Foot Posture Index of +6.8 (sd=2.5) compared to +2.5 (sd=3.1) for those with a functioning windlass mechanism. A series of independent t-tests showed that individuals without a functioning windlass mechanism had a more pronated foot posture, a lower dorsal arch height and a wider mid-foot width compared to those that had a functioning windlass mechanism. Finally, an average medial wedge of 5.1mm (sd=2.1) was able to produce a functioning windlass mechanism in those individuals that previously lacked one.

  3. The influence of functional electrical stimulation on hand motor recovery in stroke patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Quandt, Fanny; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2014-01-01

    Neuromuscular stimulation has been used as one potential rehabilitative treatment option to restore motor function and improve recovery in patients with paresis. Especially stroke patients who often regain only limited hand function would greatly benefit from a therapy that enhances recovery and restores movement. Multiple studies investigated the effect of functional electrical stimulation on hand paresis, the results however are inconsistent. Here we review the current literature on functional electrical stimulation on hand motor recovery in stroke patients. We discuss the impact of different parameters such as stage after stoke, degree of impairment, spasticity and treatment protocols on the functional outcome. Importantly, we outline the results from recent studies investigating the cortical effects elicited by functional electrical stimulation giving insights into the underlying mechanisms responsible for long-term treatment effects. Bringing together the findings from present research it becomes clear that both, treatment outcomes as well as the neurophysiologic mechanisms causing functional recovery, vary depending on patient characteristics. In order to develop unified treatment guidelines it is essential to conduct homogenous studies assessing the impact of different parameters on rehabilitative success.

  4. Nerve Regeneration: Understanding Biology and Its Influence on Return of Function After Nerve Transfers.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Tessa

    2016-05-01

    Poor functional outcomes are frequent after peripheral nerve injuries despite the regenerative support of Schwann cells. Motoneurons and, to a lesser extent, sensory neurons survive the injuries but outgrowth of axons across the injury site is slow. The neuronal regenerative capacity and the support of regenerating axons by the chronically denervated Schwann cells progressively declines with time and distance of the injury from the denervated targets. Strategies, including brief low-frequency electrical stimulation that accelerates target reinnervation and functional recovery, and the insertion of cross-bridges between a donor nerve and a recipient denervated nerve stump, are effective in promoting functional outcomes after complete and incomplete injuries.

  5. Family structure, family functioning and adolescent well-being: the transcendent influence of parental style.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, A H; Bellissimo, A; Norman, G R

    1995-07-01

    This study assessed the association between parental style, family functioning and adolescent well being, contrasting intact families with those of changed configuration. Eight hundred and one grade 10 general level teenagers in 11 high schools of a single educational system were the subjects. Results indicated that the configuration of the family was not the key determinant of effectiveness of family functioning. Instead the style of parenting turned out to be the main determinant of both family functioning and well being of the adolescents. While both "parents" were judged to have contributed to these outcomes cross gender effects were found.

  6. [Spermatogenic function under the influence of heavy metal salts and its correction by preparation Tivortin].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, A M; Sauliak, S V; Moskalenko, R A; Moskalenko, Iu V

    2012-01-01

    Entrance of threshold concentrations of copper, zinc, iron, manganese, lead, chromium into the body of sexually mature male rats leads to secretory malfunction of the testicles, which manifests by a decrease of sperm concentration in the ejaculate, a decrease of percentage of motile gametes, an increase in the proportion of morphologically abnormal sperm forms. The evidence of disorders in spermatogram's parameters is directly depends on the duration of the influence of combination of heavy metal salts. The application of the drug Tivortin against intoxication of heavy metal salts decrease the adverse movement of quantitative and qualitative parameters of rat's spermatogramms, so far as Tivortin improves blood circulation, stimulates cell proliferation and cell differentiation, inhibits oxidative apoptosis. These explain beneficial effects of the drug on the growth and maturation of germ cells in case of the influence heavy metal salts combination on organ and the whole body.

  7. Influence of He-Ne laser radiation of pacemaker on the frog's heart function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porozov, Yury B.; Brill, Gregory E.; Kiritchuk, Vyacheslav F.

    1997-02-01

    In experiments on isolated amphibian hearts changes in photoreactivity of pacemaker cells under the influence of He-Ne laser radiation in different phases of the heart cycle were studied. The specificity of heart photoreaction, peculiarities of relaxation period after laser light action and laser modification of hypodynamic depression development were revealed. Adaptation of pacemaker cells to the He-Ne laser exposure was observed.

  8. Pulmonary function changes and its influencing factors after preoperative brace treatment in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Bo; Fan, Yuxin; Yuan, Feng; Guo, Kaijin; Zhu, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The aim of the study was to retrospectively investigate the changes in pulmonary function and its influencing factors in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) undergoing preoperative brace treatment or not. Methods: Total 237 AIS patients (43 boys, 194 girls) who underwent operations and had a complete record of pulmonary function tests were enrolled and were divided into preoperative brace treatment group (brace treatment group, n = 60) and without preoperative brace treatment group (control group, n = 177). The pulmonary function parameters were compared between the 2 groups. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore whether the variables, including age at operation, height, coronal Cobb's angle of main curve, number of involved vertebrae, sagittal Cobb's angle of thoracic curve, brace treatment time per day and brace treatment duration, influenced pulmonary function in the brace treatment group. Results: No significant differences were observed in both predicted and actually measured value of forced vital capacity (FVC) and predicted value of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) between 2 groups (P > 0.05), but actually measured FEV1, the percentage of actually measured and predicted value of FVC (FVC%) and FEV1 (FEV1%) were significantly lower in the brace treatment group than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Importantly, the above changes in actually measured FEV1 and FEV1% were obvious in AIS patients presented with a main thoracic curve (P < 0.05), but not in patients with a primary thoracolumbar/lumbar curve. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that only the sagittal Cobb's angle of the thoracic curve was positively, but preoperative brace treatment duration was negatively associated with both the FVC% and FEV1% (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Preoperative brace treatment may deteriorate pulmonary function in AIS patients with thoracic curve. The small sagittal Cobb angle and

  9. Selection of a Novel Anti-Nicotine Vaccine: Influence of Antigen Design on Antibody Function in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pryde, David C.; Jones, Lyn H.; Gervais, David P.; Stead, David R.; Blakemore, David C.; Selby, Matthew D.; Brown, Alan D.; Coe, Jotham W.; Badland, Matthew; Beal, David M.; Glen, Rebecca; Wharton, Yvonne; Miller, Gavin J.; White, Phil; Zhang, Ningli; Benoit, Michelle; Robertson, Karen; Merson, James R.; Davis, Heather L.; McCluskie, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-nicotine vaccines may aid smoking cessation via the induction of anti-nicotine antibodies (Ab) which reduce nicotine entering the brain, and hence the associated reward. Ab function depends on both the quantity (titer) and the quality (affinity) of the Ab. Anti-nicotine vaccines tested previously in clinical studies had poor efficacy despite high Ab titer, and this may be due to inadequate function if Ab of low affinity were induced. In this study, we designed and synthesized a series of novel nicotine-like haptens which were all linked to diphtheria toxoid (DT) as carrier, but which differed in the site of attachment of linker to nicotine, the nature of linker used, and the handle used to attach the hapten to DT. The resulting hapten conjugates were evaluated in a mouse model, using CpG (a TLR9 agonist) and aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH)3) as adjuvants, whereby Ab titers, affinity and function were evaluated using a radiolabeled nicotine challenge model. A series of additional linkers varying in length, rigidity and polarity were used with a single hapten to generate additional DT-conjugates, which were also tested in mice. Conjugates made with different haptens resulted in various titers of anti-nicotine Ab. Several haptens gave similarly high Ab titers, but among these, Ab affinity and hence function varied considerably. Linker also influenced Ab titer, affinity and function. These results demonstrate that immune responses induced in mice by nicotine-conjugate antigens are greatly influenced by hapten design including site of attachment of linker to nicotine, the nature of linker used, and the handle used to attach the hapten to DT. While both Ab titer and affinity contributed to function, affinity was more sensitive to antigen differences. PMID:24098532

  10. Influence of the chemical structure of functional monomers on their adhesive performance.

    PubMed

    Van Landuyt, K L; Yoshida, Y; Hirata, I; Snauwaert, J; De Munck, J; Okazaki, M; Suzuki, K; Lambrechts, P; Van Meerbeek, B

    2008-08-01

    Functional monomers in adhesive systems can improve bonding by enhancing wetting and demineralization, and by chemical bonding to calcium. This study tested the hypothesis that small changes in the chemical structure of functional monomers may improve their bonding effectiveness. Three experimental phosphonate monomers (HAEPA, EAEPA, and MAEPA), with slightly different chemical structures, and 10-MDP (control) were evaluated. Adhesive performance was determined in terms of microtensile bond strength of 4 cements that differed only for the functional monomer. Based on the Adhesion-Decalcification concept, the chemical bonding potential was assessed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry of the dissolution rate of the calcium salt of the functional monomers. High bond strength of the adhesive cement corresponded to low dissolution rate of the calcium salt of the respective functional monomer. The latter is according to the Adhesion-Decalcification concept, suggestive of a high chemical bonding capacity. We conclude that the adhesive performance of an adhesive material depends on the chemical structure of the functional monomer.

  11. Analysis of evolutionary conservation patterns and their influence on identifying protein functional sites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chun; Noguchi, Tamotsu; Yamana, Hayato

    2014-10-01

    Evolutionary conservation information included in position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) has been widely adopted by sequence-based methods for identifying protein functional sites, because all functional sites, whether in ordered or disordered proteins, are found to be conserved at some extent. However, different functional sites have different conservation patterns, some of them are linear contextual, some of them are mingled with highly variable residues, and some others seem to be conserved independently. Every value in PSSMs is calculated independently of each other, without carrying the contextual information of residues in the sequence. Therefore, adopting the direct output of PSSM for prediction fails to consider the relationship between conservation patterns of residues and the distribution of conservation scores in PSSMs. In order to demonstrate the importance of combining PSSMs with the specific conservation patterns of functional sites for prediction, three different PSSM-based methods for identifying three kinds of functional sites have been analyzed. Results suggest that, different PSSM-based methods differ in their capability to identify different patterns of functional sites, and better combining PSSMs with the specific conservation patterns of residues would largely facilitate the prediction.

  12. Influence of functionalization on mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotube-based silver composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal; Sharma, Manjula

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have extended the molecular-level mixing method to fabricate multiwall carbon nanotube (CNT)-reinforced silver nanocomposites. The multiwall nanotubes used in the synthesis process were dispersed by two ways viz. covalent and non-covalent functionalization techniques. To elucidate the comparative effects of functionalization, structural, mechanical and electrical properties of nanocomposites were evaluated before and after sintering. The structural characterization revealed that the nanotubes were embedded, anchored and homogenously dispersed within the silver matrix. Hardness and Young's modulus of nanotube-reinforced nanocomposite were increased by a factor of 1-1.6 times than that of pure silver, even before and after the sintering. Covalently functionalized nanotube-based composites have shown more enhanced mechanical properties. The CNT reinforcement also improved the electrical conductivity of low-conducting nanosilver matrix before sintering. Non-covalently functionalized nanotube-based nanosilver composites showed more increased electrical conductivity before sintering. But a negative reinforcement effect was observed in high-conducting bulk silver matrix after the sintering. Thus, covalent functionalization might be appropriate for mechanical improvement in low-strength materials. However, non-covalent functionalization is suitable for electrical enhancement in low-conducting nanomaterials.

  13. The intrahemispheric functional properties of the developing sensorimotor cortex are influenced by maturation.

    PubMed

    Berchicci, Marika; Tamburro, Gabriella; Comani, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of the functional changes in the sensorimotor cortex has important clinical implications as deviations from normal development can anticipate developmental disorders. The functional properties of the sensorimotor cortex can be characterized through the rolandic mu rhythm, already present during infancy. However, how the sensorimotor network develops from early infancy to adulthood, and how sensorimotor processing contributes to the generation of perceptual-motor coupling remains largely unknown. Here, we analyzed magnetoencephalographic (MEG) data recorded in two groups of infants (11-24 and 26-47 weeks), two groups of children (24-34 and 36-60 months), and a control group of adults (20-39 years), during intermixed conditions of rest and prehension. The MEG sensor array was positioned over the sensorimotor cortex of the contralateral hemisphere. We characterized functional connectivity and topological properties of the sensorimotor network across ages and conditions through synchronization likelihood and segregation/integration measures in an individual mu rhythm frequency range. All functional measures remained almost unchanged during the first year of life, whereas they varied afterwards through childhood to reach adult values, demonstrating an increase of both segregation and integration properties. With age, the sensorimotor network evolved from a more random (infants) to a "small-world" organization (children and adults), more efficient both locally and globally. These findings are in line with prior studies on structural and functional brain development in infants, children and adults. We could not demonstrate any significant change in the functional properties of the sensorimotor cortex in the prehension condition with respect to rest. Our results support the view that, since early infancy, the functional properties of the developing sensorimotor cortex are modulated by maturation.

  14. The influence of dynamic orthosis training on upper extremity function after stroke: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Rodrigo Cappato; Rocha, Daniel Neves; Pitangui, Ana Carolina Rodarti; Pinotti, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the use of a dynamic orthosis on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients. A case series approach was utilized, with provision of a training program (3x/week, 50 minutes/session for 8 weeks) and employment of a dynamic orthosis. Six volunteers with persistent hemiparesis due to a single, unilateral stroke performed task-oriented movements with the aid of a dynamic orthosis. Tests were administered before and after training. Functional capacity was assessed using the TEMPA (Test d'Évaluation des Membres Supérieurs de Personnes Âgées) test. The Wilcoxon test was used for pre-training and post-training comparisons of TEMPA scores. The volunteers showed significant improvement of upper extremity function in the performance of a bilateral task (p = 0.01) and three unilateral tasks (p = 0.04). This pilot study suggests that the dynamic orthosis associated with the performance of functional tasks can have positive outcomes regarding the improvement of functional capacity of upper extremity.

  15. Influence of functionalized nanoparticles on conformational stability of type I collagen for possible biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kandamchira, Aswathy; Selvam, Sangeetha; Marimuthu, Nidhin; Janardhanan, Sreeram Kalarical; Fathima, Nishter Nishad

    2013-12-01

    Collagen-nanoparticle interactions are vital for many biomedical applications including drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using starch template according to our earlier reported procedures were functionalized by treating them with Gum Arabic (GA), a biocompatible polysaccharide, so as to enhance the interaction between nanoparticle surfaces and collagen. Viscosity, circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques have been used to study the collagen-nanoparticle interactions. The relative viscosity for collagen-nanoparticle conjugate was found to increase with increase in concentration of the nanoparticle within the concentration range investigated, which is due to the aggregation of protein onto the surface of nanoparticle. The CD spectra for the collagen-nanoparticle at different concentration ratios do not have much variation in the Rpn values (ratio of positive peak intensity over negative peak intensity) after functionalization with GA. The variation of molar ellipticity values for collagen-nanoparticle is due to the glycoprotein present in GA. The collagen triple helical structure is maintained after interaction with nanoparticles. The FTIR spectra of native collagen, Coll-Fs (nanoparticle without functionalization) and Coll-FsG (nanoparticle functionalized with GA) show clearly the amide I, II, III bands, with respect to collagen. The ability of polysaccharide stabilized/functionalized nanoparticles to maintain the collagen properties would help in its biomedical applications.

  16. Temperature and functional traits influence differences in nitrogen uptake capacity between native and invasive grasses.

    PubMed

    Leffler, A Joshua; James, Jeremy J; Monaco, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Performance differences between native and exotic invasive plants are often considered static, but invasive grasses may achieve growth advantages in western North America shrublands and steppe under only optimal growing conditions. We examine differences in N uptake and several morphological variables that influence uptake at temperatures between 5 and 25 °C. We contrast two native perennial grasses in western North America: Elymus elymoides and Pseudoroegneria spicata; two invasive annual grasses: Bromus tectorum and Taeniatherum caput-medusae; and one highly selected non-native perennial grass: Agropyron cristatum. The influence of temperature on N uptake is poorly characterized, yet these invasive annual grasses are known to germinate in warm soils in the autumn, and both experience cool soils during the short growing season following snowmelt in the spring. To further explore the influence of temperature on the correlation between morphological variables and N uptake, our data are applied to a previously published path model and one proposed here. Differences in N uptake between native and invasive grasses were small at the lowest temperature, but were large at the highest temperature. At lower temperatures, uptake of N by annuals and perennials was correlated with leaf N and mass. At higher temperatures, uptake by annuals was correlated only with these leaf traits, but uptake by perennials was correlated with these leaf traits as well as root N and mass. Consequently, our results imply that annual grasses face fewer morphological constraints on N uptake than perennial grasses, and annual grasses may gain further advantage in warmer temperature conditions or during more frequent warm periods.

  17. [Influence of peptides from pineal gland on thymus function at aging].

    PubMed

    Lin'kova, N S; Poliakova, V O; Trofimov, A V; Sevost'ianova, N N; Kvetnoĭ, I M

    2010-01-01

    The interference between thymus and pineal gland during their involution is considered in this review. The research data about influence of thymus peptides on pineal gland and pineal peptides on thymus is summarized. Analysis of these data showed that pineal peptides (epithalamin, epitalon) had more effective geroprotective effect on thymus involution in comparison with geroprotective effect of thymic peptides (thymalin, thymogen) on involution of pineal gland. The key mechanisms of pineal peptides effect on thymus dystrophy is immunoendocrine cooperation, which is realized as transcription's activation of various proteins.

  18. Large space structure model reduction and control system design based upon actuator and sensor influence functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Lang, J. H.; Johnson, T. L.; Shih, S.; Staelin, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    A model reduction procedure based on aggregation with respect to sensor and actuator influences rather than modes is presented for large systems of coupled second-order differential equations. Perturbation expressions which can predict the effects of spillover on both the aggregated and residual states are derived. These expressions lead to the development of control system design constraints which are sufficient to guarantee, to within the validity of the perturbations, that the residual states are not destabilized by control systems designed from the reduced model. A numerical example is provided to illustrate the application of the aggregation and control system design method.

  19. Static magnetic field influence on rat brain function detected by heart rate monitoring.

    PubMed

    Veliks, Viktors; Ceihnere, Edīte; Svikis, Igors; Aivars, Juris

    2004-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of a static magnetic field (SMF) on rat brain structures that control autonomic functions, specifically heart rate and heart rhythmicity. The experiments were carried out on 44 male Wistar rats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. SMF was induced using samarium-cobalt fused magnets (20 x 20 x 10 mm in size) placed bitemporally. Magnetic induction intensity was 100 mT on the surface of the head. Duration of magnetic field application was 15 min. An electrocardiogram was recorded from limb lead II, and both heart rate (average duration of cardiac cycles) and heart rhythmicity were analyzed before and after SMF application. SMF evoked changes in both heart rate and rhythm in 80% of the animals; the predominant effects were bradycardia and disappearance of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. However, the effectiveness of SMF in large measure depends on both functional peculiarities and functional activities of brain autonomic centers.

  20. A meta-analytic review of the influence of pediatric cancer on parent and family functioning.

    PubMed

    Pai, Ahna L H; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Lewandowski, Amy; Drotar, Dennis; Youngstrom, Eric; Peterson, Catherine Cant

    2007-09-01

    This study used meta-analytic methods to compare the functioning of parents of children with cancer to parents of physically healthy children or normative samples. A meta-analysis using fixed effects, weighted least squares methods was conducted on 29 studies examining psychological distress and marital and family functioning among parents of children with cancer. Mothers and fathers of children newly diagnosed with cancer reported significantly greater distress than comparison samples. Mothers reported greater distress than fathers up to 12 months postdiagnosis. Mothers of children with cancer reported higher levels of family conflict than mothers of healthy children. Findings suggest that pediatric cancer impacts parents' perceptions of self- and family functioning, especially within the 1st year following diagnosis.

  1. Influencing factors on the functional level of haemophilic patients assessed by FISH.

    PubMed

    Kachooei, A R; Badiei, Z; Zandinezhad, M E; Ebrahimzadeh, M H; Mazloumi, S M; Omidi-Kashani, F; Moradi, A; Mahdavian-Naghashzargar, R; Razi, S

    2014-03-01

    Joint destruction in early adulthood brings the patients to the orthopaedic clinics. If a haemophilic patient becomes disabled, it shows a number of factors such as timely diagnosis, availability of appropriate treatment depending on the country, access and affordability to treatments and equally importantly the responsibility of the patient in managing self care by remaining compliant by prescribed treatment regimen. We assessed the functional level by functional independence score in haemophilia (FISH). Overall, 104 patients with haemophilia A and 29 with haemophilia B were evaluated. We assessed the function of the patients by FISH. We divided the sum scores into weak (FISH score 8-16), moderate (17-24), and good (25-32). For evaluating the level of functional deficit in a 2 × 2 table, we categorized the weak and moderate levels into Disordered Group and the good level into Not-Disordered Group. The average age was 26.9 ± 14.24. Each 1 year increase in age can increase 1.07 fold the possibility of being placed in Disordered Function Group. Severe haemophilia can increase 7.34 fold, presence of inhibitor can increase 9.75 fold and home self-care increases 3.89 fold the possibility of being placed in Disordered Function Group. To decrease the burden of the cost on patient, family and the government, education plays the most important role. We suggest that we send a trained team of physician and nurses to the deprived villages and cities instead of waiting for the patient to refer to our Care Center.

  2. Sown species richness and realized diversity can influence functioning of plant communities differently.

    PubMed

    Rychtecká, Terezie; Lanta, Vojtěch; Weiterová, Iva; Lepš, Jan

    2014-08-01

    Biodiversity-ecosystem functioning experiments (BEF) typically manipulate sown species richness and composition of experimental communities to study ecosystem functioning as a response to changes in diversity. If sown species richness is taken as a measure of diversity and aboveground biomass production as a measure of community functioning, then this relationship is usually found to be positive. The sown species richness can be considered the equivalent of a local species pool in natural communities. However, in addition to species richness, realized diversity is also an important community diversity component. Realized diversity is affected by environmental filtering and biotic interactions operating within a community. As both sown species richness and the realized diversity in BEF studies (as well as local species pool vs observed realized richness in natural communities) can differ markedly, so can their effects on the community functioning. We tested this assumption using two data sets: data from a short-term pot experiment and data from the long-term Jena biodiversity plot experiment. We considered three possible predictors of community functioning (aboveground biomass production): sown species richness, realized diversity (defined as inverse of Simpson dominance index), and survivor species richness. Sown species richness affected biomass production positively in all cases. Realized diversity as well as survivor species richness had positive effects on biomass in approximately half of cases. When realized diversity or survivor species richness was tested together with sown species richness, their partial effects were none or negative. Our results suggest that we can expect positive diversity-productivity relationship when the local species pool size is the decisive factor determining realized observed diversity; in other cases, the shape of the diversity-functioning relationship may be quite opposite.

  3. The influence of white-coat hypertension on left atrial phasic function.

    PubMed

    Tadic, Marijana; Cuspidi, Cesare; Pencic, Biljana; Rihor, Branislav; Radojkovic, Jana; Kocijanic, Vesna; Celic, Vera

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between white-coat hypertension (WCH) and left atrial (LA) phasic function assessed by the volumetric and speckle tracking method. This cross-sectional study included 52 normotensive individuals, 49 subjects with WCH and 56 untreated hypertensive patients who underwent a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring and complete two-dimensional echocardiographic examination (2DE). WCH was diagnosed if clinic blood pressure (BP) was elevated and 24-h BP was normal. We obtained that maximum, minimum LA and pre-A LAV volumes and volume indexes gradually and significantly increased from the normotensive subjects, throughout the white-coat hypertensive individuals to the hypertensive patients. Passive LA emptying fraction (EF), representing the LA conduit function, gradually reduced from normotensive to hypertensive subjects. Active LA EF and the parameter of the LA booster pump function increased in the same direction. Similar results were obtained by 2DE strain analysis. The LA stiffness index gradually increased from normotensive controls, throughout white-coat hypertensive subjects to hypertensive patients. Clinic systolic BP was associated with LA passive EF (β= -0.283, p = 0.001), LA active EF (β = 0.342, p < 0.001), LA total longitudinal strain (β= -0.356, p < 0.001), LA positive longitudinal strain (β= -0.264, p = 0.009) and LA stiffness index (β = 0.398, p < 0.001) without regard to age, BMI, left ventricular structure and diastolic function in the whole study population. In the conclusion, WCH significantly impacts LA phasic function and stiffness. Clinic systolic BP was associated with functional and mechanical LA remodeling in the whole study population.

  4. A Parallel Independent Component Analysis Approach to Investigate Genomic Influence on Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyu; Demirci, Oguz; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2009-01-01

    Relationships between genomic data and functional brain images are of great interest but require new analysis approaches to integrate the high-dimensional data types. This letter presents an extension of a technique called parallel independent component analysis (paraICA), which enables the joint analysis of multiple modalities including interconnections between them. We extend our earlier work by allowing for multiple interconnections and by providing important overfitting controls. Performance was assessed by simulations under different conditions, and indicated reliable results can be extracted by properly balancing overfitting and underfitting. An application to functional magnetic resonance images and single nucleotide polymorphism array produced interesting findings. PMID:19834575

  5. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease in man

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A; Sehmi, Joban S; Gale, Daniel P; Wass, Mark N; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Bakker, Stephan JL; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk JG; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J; Caulfield, Mark J; Connell, John M C; Cook, Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Smith, George Davey; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D.; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G; Gansevoort, Ron T; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; van der Heide, Jaap J Homan; Hepkema, Bouke G; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J F; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Maréchal, Céline; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc AJ; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sjögren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H.; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael JE; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J.; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Maxwell, Patrick H; McCarthy, Mark I; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner., Jaspal S

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), the result of permanent loss of kidney function, is a major global problem. We identify common genetic variants at chr2p12-p13, chr6q26, chr17q23 and chr19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P=10−10 to 10−15). SNPs rs10206899 (near NAT8, chr2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, chr19q13) were also associated with CKD. Our findings provide new insight into metabolic, solute and drug-transport pathways underlying susceptibility to CKD. PMID:20383145

  6. Density Functional Study of the Influence of C5 Cytosine Substitution in Base Pairs with Guanine

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Adam; Guza, Rebecca; Tretyakova, Natalia; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study employs density-functional electronic structure methods to investigate the effect of chemical modification at the C5 position of cytosine. A series of experimentally motivated chemical modifications are considered, including alkyl, halogen, aromatic, fused ring, and strong σ and π withdrawing functional groups. The effect of these modifications on cytosine geometry, electronic structure, proton affinities, gas phase basicities, cytosine-guanine base-pair hydrogen bond network and corresponding nucleophilicity at guanine are examined. Ultimately, these results play a part in dissecting the effect of endogenous cytosine methylation on the reactivity of neighboring guanine toward carcinogens and DNA alkylating agents. PMID:19890472

  7. Police culture influences the brain function underlying compassion: a gender study.

    PubMed

    Mercadillo, Roberto E; Alcauter, Sarael; Fernández-Ruiz, Juan; Barrios, Fernando A

    2015-04-01

    Compassion is a prototypical moral emotion supporting cooperation and involves empathic decision-making and motor processes representing the interplay of biologically evolved and cultural mechanisms. We propose a social neuroscience approach to identify gender differences and to assess biological and cultural factors shaping compassion. We consider the police force as a cultural model to study this emotion, because it comprises a mixed-gender group using specific codes for collective safety that influence empathy and cooperativeness. From a sample of Mexican police officers working in a violent environment we integrated ethnographic data categorizing compassionate elements in the officers' activities, psychometric measures evaluating empathic attitudes, and fMRI scans identifying the brain activity related to compassionate experiences and decisions. The results suggest that the police culture influences genders equally with respect to empathic behavioral expressions. Nevertheless, women showed insular and prefrontal cortical activation, suggesting a more empathic experience of compassion. Officers manifested activity in the caudate nucleus, amygdala, and cerebellum, suggesting a more a highly accurate process to infer another's suffering and a reward system motivated by the notion of service and cooperation, both of which are cultural traits represented in the police force.

  8. Anode potential influences the structure and function of anodic electrode and electrolyte-associated microbiomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennis, Paul G.; Virdis, Bernardino; Vanwonterghem, Inka; Hassan, Alif; Hugenholtz, Phil; Tyson, Gene W.; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-12-01

    Three bioelectrochemical systems were operated with set anode potentials of +300 mV, +550 mV and +800 mV vs. Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE) to test the hypothesis that anode potential influences microbial diversity and is positively associated with microbial biomass and activity. Bacterial and archaeal diversity was characterized using 16 S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, and biofilm thickness was measured as a proxy for biomass. Current production and substrate utilization patterns were used as measures of microbial activity and the mid-point potentials of putative terminal oxidases were assessed using cyclic voltammetry. All measurements were performed after 4, 16, 23, 30 and 38 days. Microbial biomass and activity differed significantly between anode potentials and were lower at the highest potential. Anodic electrode and electrolyte associated community composition was also significantly influenced by anode potential. While biofilms at +800 mV were thinner, transferred less charge and oxidized less substrate than those at lower potentials, they were also associated with putative terminal oxidases with higher mid-point potentials and generated more biomass per unit charge. This indicates that microbes at +800 mV were unable to capitalize on the potential for additional energy gain due to a lack of adaptive traits to high potential solid electron acceptors and/or sensitivity to oxidative stress.

  9. Cellular iron status influences the functional relationship between microglia and oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Surguladze, N; Slagle-Webb, B; Cozzi, A; Connor, J R

    2006-12-01

    Previously, we have reported that there is a spatiotemporal relationship between iron accumulation in microglia and oligodendrocytes during normal development and in remyelination following injury. This in vivo observation has prompted us to develop a cell culture model to test the relationship between iron status of microglia and survival of oligodendrocytes. We found that conditioned media from iron-loaded microglia increases the survival of oligodendrocytes; but conditioned media from iron loaded activated microglia is toxic to oligodendrocytes. In the trophic condition, one of the proteins released by iron-loaded microglia is H-ferritin, and transfecting the microglia with siRNA for H-ferritin blocks the trophic response on oligodendrocytes. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation decreases the amount of H-ferritin that is released from microglia and increases the release of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1. LPS activation of iron-enriched microglia results in the activation of NF-kB and greater release of cytokines when compared with that of control microglia; whereas treating microglia with an iron chelator is associated with less NF-kB activation and less release of cytokines. These results indicate that microglia play an important role in iron homoeostasis and that their iron status can influence how microglia influence growth and survival of oligodendrocytes. The results further indicate that ferritin, released by microglia, is a significant source of iron for oligodendrocytes.

  10. A double-blind study of the influences of eszopiclone on dysgeusia and taste function.

    PubMed

    Doty, Richard L; Treem, Jonathan; Tourbier, Isabelle; Mirza, Natasha

    2009-12-01

    Taste disturbance is a common, but poorly understood, side effect of a large number of medications. This double-blind study examined the frequency, intensity, and quality of taste disturbances related to the widely used hypnotic sleep aid eszopiclone (ESZ; Lunesta, as well as their associations with age, sex, body mass index (BMI), time of day, phenyl thiocarbamide (PTC) taste sensitivity, and ESZ saliva and blood levels. Sixty six percent of 24 female subjects and 53% of 15 male subjects reported dysgeusic sensations, mostly bitter/metallic, during the drug administration (respective placebo figures 17% and 7%). No meaningful relationships were found between the frequency or the intensity of the sensations and age, BMI, or PTC taste sensitivity. Dysgeusia was more intense and longer lasting in women than in men, stronger in the morning than in the evening, and positively correlated with drug plasma and saliva levels. In women, intensity ratings decreased across treatment days. Taste test measures were marginally, at best, influenced by ESZ. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that the dysgeusia associated with ESZ is systemically influenced by a number of factors, including sex, time since drug administration, and both blood and saliva levels of the drug.

  11. Blood metal levels and metal-influenced immune functions of harbour seals in captivity.

    PubMed

    Kakuschke, Antje; Valentine-Thon, Elizabeth; Griesel, Simone; Rosenberger, Tanja; Mundry, Roger; Siebert, Ursula; Prange, Andreas

    2008-04-01

    Immunological blood parameters and the effects of environmental pollutants on the immune system are important to assess the health status of seals. Animals living permanently in seal centres are useful for development and validation of diagnostic tools for free-ranging animals. In this study, parameters of cellular immunity as well as metal concentrations in blood and metal influence on cell proliferation of seven seals from a seal centre were investigated repeatedly using multi-element analysis and a lymphocyte proliferation assay. The metal concentrations, except for tin and chromium, were in general comparable to those of free-ranging animals of the North Sea. The unstimulated and mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation showed strong intra- and inter-individual variability, which reflected variability in activation of the immune status. Furthermore, both immunosuppressive and stimulative influences of metals on lymphocytes were found. Summarising, the methods used in this investigation provided useful information on these animals, and their application to free-ranging animals can be recommended.

  12. Anode potential influences the structure and function of anodic electrode and electrolyte-associated microbiomes

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Paul G.; Virdis, Bernardino; Vanwonterghem, Inka; Hassan, Alif; Hugenholtz, Phil; Tyson, Gene W.; Rabaey, Korneel

    2016-01-01

    Three bioelectrochemical systems were operated with set anode potentials of +300 mV, +550 mV and +800 mV vs. Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE) to test the hypothesis that anode potential influences microbial diversity and is positively associated with microbial biomass and activity. Bacterial and archaeal diversity was characterized using 16 S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, and biofilm thickness was measured as a proxy for biomass. Current production and substrate utilization patterns were used as measures of microbial activity and the mid-point potentials of putative terminal oxidases were assessed using cyclic voltammetry. All measurements were performed after 4, 16, 23, 30 and 38 days. Microbial biomass and activity differed significantly between anode potentials and were lower at the highest potential. Anodic electrode and electrolyte associated community composition was also significantly influenced by anode potential. While biofilms at +800 mV were thinner, transferred less charge and oxidized less substrate than those at lower potentials, they were also associated with putative terminal oxidases with higher mid-point potentials and generated more biomass per unit charge. This indicates that microbes at +800 mV were unable to capitalize on the potential for additional energy gain due to a lack of adaptive traits to high potential solid electron acceptors and/or sensitivity to oxidative stress. PMID:27991591

  13. Influence of pyrolysis temperature on biochar property and function as heavy metal sorbent in soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While large-scale soil amendment of biochars continues to receive interests for enhancing crop yields and to remediate contaminated sites, systematic study is lacking on how biochar properties translate into purported functions such as the heavy metal sequestration. In this study, cottonseed hulls ...

  14. Factors of the Earning Functions and Their Influence on the Intellectual Capital of an Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ileanu, Bogdan Vasile; Tanasoiu, Ovidiu Emil

    2008-01-01

    This paper tries to consider some earning function as "start point" for the construction of indicators for intellectual capital measure. The analyze combines concepts from Mincer's and Becker theories and intellectual capital definitions currently in use. The correlation, significance and relation between elements are shown using three econometric…

  15. The Influence of Executive Functioning on Facial and Subjective Pain Responses in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive decline is known to reduce reliability of subjective pain reports. Although facial expressions of pain are generally considered to be less affected by this decline, empirical support for this assumption is sparse. The present study therefore examined how cognitive functioning relates to facial expressions of pain and whether cognition acts as a moderator between nociceptive intensity and facial reactivity. Facial and subjective responses of 51 elderly participants to mechanical stimulation at three intensities levels (50 kPa, 200 kPa, and 400 kPa) were assessed. Moreover, participants completed a neuropsychological examination of executive functioning (planning, cognitive inhibition, and working memory), episodic memory, and psychomotor speed. The results showed that executive functioning has a unique relationship with facial reactivity at low pain intensity levels (200 kPa). Moreover, cognitive inhibition (but not other executive functions) moderated the effect of pressure intensity on facial pain expressions, suggesting that the relationship between pressure intensity and facial reactivity was less pronounced in participants with high levels of cognitive inhibition. A similar interaction effect was found for cognitive inhibition and subjective pain report. Consequently, caution is needed when interpreting facial (as well as subjective) pain responses in individuals with a high level of cognitive inhibition. PMID:27274618

  16. Genetic Influences on Cognitive Function Using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Jamie J.; MacGregor, Alex J.; Cherkas, Lynn F.; Spector, Tim D.

    2006-01-01

    The genetic relationship between intelligence and components of cognition remains controversial. Conflicting results may be a function of the limited number of methods used in experimental evaluation. The current study is the first to use CANTAB (The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery). This is a battery of validated computerised…

  17. Pre-University Tuition in Science and Technology Can Influence Executive Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Méndez, Marta; Arias, Natalia; Menéndez, José R.; Villar, José R.; Neira, Ángel; Romano, Pedro V.; Núñez, José Carlos; Arias, Jorge L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Scientific and technological areas include tuition based on highly visuo-spatial specialization and problem solving. Spatial skills and problem solving are embedded in a curriculum that promotes understanding of Science and technical subjects. These abilities are related to the development of executive functions (EFs). We aim to…

  18. The Influences of Family Leisure Patterns on Perceptions of Family Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zabriskie, Ramon B.; McCormick, Bryan P.

    2001-01-01

    Conducted a preliminary test of a model of family leisure functioning by examining the relationship of core and balance family leisure patterns to family cohesion and adaptability. Hypothesized that core leisure patterns address family needs for stability and facilitate cohesive relationships, whereas balance leisure patterns address the need for…

  19. Does the lymph drainage from the head influence aqueous humour outflow and visual functions?

    PubMed

    Holló, G; Pap, G; Bagi, Z T; Kovácsovics, B

    1991-08-01

    Effect of lymphoedema of the head on the central nervous system is known. Possible changes in intraocular pressure, tonogram, electroretinogram, visual functions and ophthalmologic state was studied in animal experiments and in patients following serious surgical impairment of the cervical lymph drainage. Lymph drainage from the orbit to the deep cervical lymphatics was established, while no ophthalmologic alteration was detected after surgery.

  20. Influence of Socioeconomic and Anthropometric Factors on Respiratory Function in Female University Students.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, D; Kliś, K; Żurawiecka, M; Dubrowski, A; Wronka, Iwona

    2017-02-09

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate lung function in healthy young female university students and to seek the relation of lung function to socioeconomic and anthropometric indices. The methodology consisted of spirometry tests, anthropometric measures and a questionnaire conducted in November of 2015 among 152 female university students. At first, lung function was analyzed for any relationship with socioeconomic factors and smoking. The results of a multi-factor analysis of variance demonstrate significant differences in the FEV1/FVC ratio depending on the general socioeconomic status. Then, anthropometric and spirometric parameters were tested for correlations. A comparison of underweight, normal weigh, overweight, and obese subjects revealed statistically significant differences for FVC% and FEV1/FVC, with the highest values noted in the subjects of normal weight. Individuals with abdominal obesity had lower FVC% and FEV1% and a higher FEV1/FVC ratio. The findings of our study confirm that both general obesity and abdominal obesity are related to a reduced lung function.

  1. The Influence of Domain Knowledge on the Functional Capacity of Working Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricks, Travis Rex; Wiley, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Theories of expertise have proposed that superior cognitive performance is in part due to increases in the functional capacity of working memory during domain-related tasks. Consistent with this approach Fincher-Kiefer et al. (1988), found that domain knowledge increased scores on baseball-related reading span tasks. The present studies extended…

  2. Longitudinal Examination of Adaptive Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Influence of Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugliese, Cara E.; Anthony, Laura Gutermuth; Strang, John F.; Dudley, Katerina; Wallace, Gregory L.; Naiman, Daniel Q.; Kenworthy, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    This study characterizes longitudinal change in adaptive behavior in 64 children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) without intellectual disability evaluated on multiple occasions, and examines whether prior estimate of executive function (EF) problems predicts future adaptive behavior scores. Compared to standardized estimates…

  3. The Influence of Relational Knowledge and Executive Function on Preschoolers' Repeating Pattern Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael R.; Rittle-Johnson, Bethany; Loehr, Abbey M.; Fyfe, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    Children's knowledge of repeating patterns (e.g., ABBABB) is a central component of early mathematics, but the developmental mechanisms underlying this knowledge are currently unknown. We sought clarity on the importance of relational knowledge and executive function (EF) to preschoolers' understanding of repeating patterns. One hundred…

  4. Load influence on gear noise. [mathematical model for determining acoustic pressure level as function of load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merticaru, V.

    1974-01-01

    An original mathematical model is proposed to derive equations for calculation of gear noise. These equations permit the acoustic pressure level to be determined as a function of load. Application of this method to three parallel gears is reported. The logical calculation scheme is given, as well as the results obtained.

  5. Causal-Explanatory Pluralism: How Intentions, Functions, and Mechanisms Influence Causal Ascriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombrozo, Tania

    2010-01-01

    Both philosophers and psychologists have argued for the existence of distinct kinds of explanations, including teleological explanations that cite functions or goals, and mechanistic explanations that cite causal mechanisms. Theories of causation, in contrast, have generally been unitary, with dominant theories focusing either on counterfactual…

  6. Function-Based Modification of Check-In/Check-Out to Influence Escape-Maintained Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilgus, Stephen P.; Fallon, Lindsay M.; Feinberg, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has suggested Check-In/Check-Out (CICO) effectiveness is linked to the function of problem behavior. Though effective for students whose misbehavior occurs to gain attention, findings are equivocal for behavior that occurs to escape academic tasks. The purpose of this study was to therefore evaluate a modification to CICO, wherein…

  7. Maternal Relationship Instability Influences on Children's Emotional and Behavioral Functioning in Low-Income Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachman, Heather J.; Coley, Rebekah Levine; Carrano, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated associations between maternal relationship instability patterns and children's behavioral and emotional functioning in middle childhood in a representative sample of low-income urban families (N = 891). Data from the "Three-City Study" tracked maternal partnerships through the child's life, assessing total marital…

  8. Analysis of Influence of Sponsorship Career Function of Mentorship on Women's Leadership Advancement in Kenyan Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severina, Wambeti Njagi; Edabu, Paul; Kimani, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Women working in Kenyan universities should be provided with the many benefits of sponsorship, a mentorship function. Mentors should for example give their mentees challenging assignments which prepare them for top leadership positions. But it is possible that women may not be getting this support from their mentors. Therefore, the researcher did…

  9. Pycnogenol® and its fractions influence the function of isolated heart in rats with experimental diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kralova, Eva; Jankyova, Stanislava; Mucaji, Pavel; Gresakova, Eva; Stankovicova, Tatiana

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of Pycnogenol(®) (PYC) mixture and its three fractions (buthanolic, water, ethyl acetate) on heart function in rats with experimental diabetes mellitus (DM) and compare their effects to the diabetic group. Their antioxidant activity "in vitro" was also determined. DM rats (streptozotocin over 3 consecutive days at a dose of 25 mg/kg of body weight) had increased systolic blood pressure, thicker left ventriculi wall (LV) and weaker myocardial contraction, prolonged QT interval in comparison to controls rats. In comparison to the diabetic group, PYC (20 mg/kg b.w./day) suppressed the influence of DM on the LV, improved contraction, increased coronary flow and displayed negative effect on electrical activity of hearts. The most effective of PYC's fractions was the water fraction. It improved biometric parameters and hemodynamic function of the DM hearts, enhanced shortening the QT interval, reduced the amount of dysrhythmias of the DM hearts and had the strongest antioxidant activity. In conclusion, DM damaged isolated rat heart function. Only the water fraction improved the function of the diabetic heart. The different results of three fractions and PYC on myocardial function may be caused by a various lipo- and hydro-philic action of the PYC components.

  10. Power spectrum density analysis for the influence of complete denture on the brain function of edentulous patients - pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Praveen; Anitha, Kuttae Viswanathan; Reddy, Jetti Ramesh; Muthukumar, Balasubramanium

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This pilot study was to find the influence of complete denture on the brain activity and cognitive function of edentulous patients measured through Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study recruited 20 patients aged from 50 to 60 years requiring complete dentures with inclusion and exclusion criteria. The brain function and cognitive function were analyzed with a mental state questionnaire and a 15-minute analysis of power spectral density of EEG alpha waves. The analysis included edentulous phase and post denture insertion adaptive phase, each done before and after chewing. The results obtained were statistically evaluated. RESULTS Power Spectral Density (PSD) values increased from edentulous phase to post denture insertion adaption phase. The data were grouped as edentulous phase before chewing (EEG p1-0.0064), edentulous phase after chewing (EEG p2-0.0073), post denture insertion adaptive phase before chewing (EEG p3-0.0077), and post denture insertion adaptive phase after chewing (EEG p4-0.0096). The acquired values were statistically analyzed using paired t-test, which showed statistically significant results (P<.05). CONCLUSION This pilot study showed functional improvement in brain function of edentulous patients with complete dentures rehabilitation. PMID:27350852

  11. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  12. Decomposer diversity and identity influence plant diversity effects on ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Reich, Peter B; Isbell, Forest

    2012-10-01

    Plant productivity and other ecosystem functions often increase with plant diversity at a local scale. Alongside various plant-centered explanations for this pattern, there is accumulating evidence that multi-trophic interactions shape this relationship. Here, we investigated for the first time if plant diversity effects on ecosystem functioning are mediated or driven by decomposer animal diversity and identity using a double-diversity microcosm experiment. We show that many ecosystem processes and ecosystem multifunctionality (herbaceous shoot biomass production, litter removal, and N uptake) were affected by both plant and decomposer diversity, with ecosystem process rates often being maximal at intermediate to high plant and decomposer diversity and minimal at both low plant and decomposer diversity. Decomposers relaxed interspecific plant competition by enlarging chemical (increased N uptake and surface-litter decomposition) and spatial (increasing deep-root biomass) habitat space and by promoting plant complementarity. Anecic earthworms and isopods functioned as key decomposers; although decomposer diversity effects did not solely rely on these two decomposer species, positive plant net biodiversity and complementarity effects only occurred in the absence of isopods and the presence of anecic earthworms. Using a structural equation model, we explained 76% of the variance in plant complementarity, identified direct and indirect effect paths, and showed that the presence of key decomposers accounted for approximately three-quarters of the explained variance. We conclude that decomposer animals have been underappreciated as contributing agents of plant diversity-ecosystem functioning relationships. Elevated decomposer performance at high plant diversity found in previous experiments likely positively feeds back to plant performance, thus contributing to the positive relationship between plant diversity and ecosystem functioning.

  13. Executive Functioning in Men with Schizophrenia and Substance Use Disorders. Influence of Lifetime Suicide Attempts

    PubMed Central

    Capella, Maria del Mar; Prat, Gemma; Forero, Diego A.; López-Vera, Silvia; Navarro, José Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Background Lifetime suicide attempts in patients with comorbidity between psychotic disorders and Substance Use Disorder (SUD), known as dual diagnosis, was associated with a worse clinical and cognitive state, poor prognosis and premature death. However, to date no previous study has examined the cognitive performance of these patients considering as independent the presence or absence of lifetime suicide attempts. Methods We explore executive functioning differences between suicide attempters and non-attempters in dual schizophrenia (DS) patients and the possible related factors for both executive performance and current suicide risk. Fifty DS male patients in remission of SUD and clinically stables, 24 with and 26 without lifetime suicide attempts, were evaluated. We considered Z scores for all neuropsychological tests and a composite summary score for both premorbid IQ and executive functioning. Results DS patients showed low performance in set-shifting, planning and problem solving tasks. Those with suicide attempts presented lower composite summary scores, together with worse problem solving skills and decision-making, compared with non-attempters. However, after controlling for alcohol dependence, only differences in decision-making remained. Executive functioning was related to the premorbid intelligence quotient, and several clinical variables (duration, severity, months of abstinence and relapses of SUD, global functioning and negative symptoms). A relationship between current suicide risk, and first-degree relatives with SUD, insight and positive symptoms was also found. Conclusions Our results suggest that problem solving and, especially, decision-making tasks might be sensitive to cognitive impairment of DS patients related to presence of lifetime suicide attempts. The assessment of these executive functions and cognitive remediation therapy when necessary could be beneficial for the effectiveness of treatment in patients with DS. However, further

  14. Influences of maternal nutritional status on vascular function in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Poston, Lucilla

    2007-08-01

    Fetal growth restriction leading to low birthweight is associated with increased risk of ischaemic heart disease and hypertension in later life. Increasingly, it is recognised that cardiovascular risk may also be initiated in early life when the fetus and neonate are exposed to maternal nutritional excess. This review summarises the studies in man and animals that have investigated the potential role of vascular disorders in the aetiology of atherosclerosis and hypertension arising from early life nutritional deprivation or excess. Malfunction of the arterial endothelial cell layer in the offspring has been frequently described in association with both maternal under and overnutritional states and may play a permissive role in the origin of these disorders. Also prevalent is evidence for increased stiffness of the large arteries which may contribute to systolic hypertension. Further investigation is required into the intriguing suggestion that early life nutritional imbalance may adversely influence vascular angiogenesis leading to rarefaction and increased peripheral vascular resistance.

  15. VSL#3 Probiotic Differently Influence IEC-6 Intestinal Epithelial Cell Status and Function.

    PubMed

    Cinque, Benedetta; La Torre, Cristina; Lombardi, Francesca; Palumbo, Paola; Evtoski, Zoran; Santini, Silvano Jr; Falone, Stefano; Cimini, Annamaria; Amicarelli, Fernanda; Cifone, Maria Grazia

    2017-01-21

    The data here reported introduce the wound-healing assay as a tool for testing probiotics aimed at protecting gastrointestinal mucosal surfaces and to verify the consistency of their manufacturing. At the scope, we compared the in vitro effects of two multi-strain high concentration formulations both commercialized under the same brand VSL#3 but sourced from different production sites (USA and Italy) on a non-transformed small-intestinal epithelial cell line, IEC-6. The effects on cellular morphology, viability, migration, and H2 O2 -induced damage, were assessed before and after the treatment with both VSL#3 formulations. While the USA-sourced product ("USA-made") VSL#3 did not affect monolayer morphology and cellular density, the addition of bacteria from the Italy-derived product ("Italy-made") VSL#3 caused clear morphological cell damage and strongly reduced cellularity. The treatment with "USA-made" lysate led to a higher rate of wounded monolayer healing, while the addition of "Italy-made" bacterial lysate did not influence the closure rate as compared to untreated cells. While lysates from "USA-made" VSL#3 clearly enhanced the formation of elongated and aligned stress fibers, "Italy-made" lysates had not similar effect. "USA-made" lysate was able to cause a total inhibition of H2 O2 -induced cytotoxic effect whereas "Italy-made" VSL#3 lysate was unable to protect IEC-6 cells from H2 O2 -induced damage. ROS generation was also differently influenced, thus supporting the hypotesis of a protective action of "USA-made" VSL#3 lysates, as well as the idea that "Italy-made" formulation was unable to prevent significantly the H2 O2 -induced oxidative stress. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of oxygen functionalities on the environmental impact of imidazolium based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yun; Besse-Hoggan, Pascale; Sancelme, Martine; Delort, Anne-Marie; Husson, Pascale; Gomes, Margarida F Costa

    2011-12-30

    Several physico-chemical properties relevant to determine the environmental impact of ionic liquids - aqueous solubility, octanol-water partition coefficient and diffusion coefficients in water at infinite dilution - together with toxicity and biodegradability of ionic liquids based on 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations with or without different oxygenated functional groups (hydroxyl, ester and ether) are studied in this work. The presence of oxygen groups on the imidazolium cation reduces the toxicity of ionic liquids 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium with bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide or octylsulfate anions and simultaneously decreases the value of their octanol-water partition coefficient. The presence of ester functions renders the ionic liquids more easily biodegradable, especially for long alkyl side-chains in the cation but leads to hydrolysis with the formation of reaction products that accumulate. The imidazolium ring is resistant to biodegradability and to abiotic degradation. The oxygen functionalised ionic liquids are more soluble in water and, diffuse more slowly in this medium.

  17. Circadian rhythms on skin function of hairless rats: light and thermic influences.

    PubMed

    Flo, Ana; Díez-Noguera, Antoni; Calpena, Ana C; Cambras, Trinitat

    2014-03-01

    Circadian rhythms are present in most functions of living beings. We have demonstrated the presence of circadian rhythms in skin variables (transepidermal water loss, TEWL; stratum corneum hydration, SCH; and skin temperature) in hairless rats under different environmental conditions of light and temperature. Circadian rhythms in TEWL and SCH showed mean amplitudes of about 20% and 14% around the mean, respectively, and appeared under light-dark cycles as well as under constant darkness. Environmental temperature was able to override TEWL, but not SCH rhythm, evidencing the dependency of TEWL on the temperature. Mean daily values of TEWL and SCH, and also the amplitude of TEWL rhythm, increased with the age of the animal. Under constant light, situation that induces arrhythmicity in rats, SCH and TEWL were inversely correlated. The results suggest the importance to take into account the functional skin rhythms in research in dermatological sciences.

  18. The influence of cholesterol on membrane protein structure, function, and dynamics studied by molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Grouleff, Julie; Irudayam, Sheeba Jem; Skeby, Katrine K; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-09-01

    The plasma membrane, which encapsulates human cells, is composed of a complex mixture of lipids and embedded proteins. Emerging knowledge points towards the lipids as having a regulating role in protein function. Furthermore, insight from protein crystallography has revealed several different types of lipids intimately bound to membrane proteins and peptides, hereby possibly pointing to a site of action for the observed regulation. Cholesterol is among the lipid membrane constituents most often observed to be co-crystallized with membrane proteins, and the cholesterol levels in cell membranes have been found to play an essential role in health and disease. Remarkably little is known about the mechanism of lipid regulation of membrane protein function in health as well as in disease. Herein, we review molecular dynamics simulation studies aimed at investigating the effect of cholesterol on membrane protein and peptide properties. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid-protein interactions.

  19. How surface functional groups influence fracturation in nanofluids droplets dry-outs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brutin, David; Carle, Florian

    2012-11-01

    We report an experimental investigation of the drying of a deposited droplets of nanofluids with different surface functional groups. For identical nano-particles diameter, material and concentration, identical drying conditions, the substrate and the functional groups at the nano-particles surface are changed. Both flow motion, adhesion, gelation and fracturation occur during the evaporation of this complex matter leading to different final typical patterns. The differences in between the patterns are explained based on the surface chemical potential. Crack shapes and wavelengths are globally proportional to the electrical charges carried at the nano- particles surface which is a new parameter to implement in existing predicting models. Presently only the colloid concentration and softness and the deposit thickness are used (Allain and Limat, 1995). The authors gratefully acknowledge the help and the fruitful discussions raised with J.B. Lang.

  20. Exercise Influence on Hippocampal Function: Possible Involvement of Orexin-A

    PubMed Central

    Chieffi, Sergio; Messina, Giovanni; Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Esposito, Maria; Monda, Vincenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Esposito, Teresa; Carotenuto, Marco; Viggiano, Andrea; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Monda, Marcellino

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, we provide a brief review of current knowledge regarding the effects induced by physical exercise on hippocampus. Research involving animals and humans supports the view that physical exercise, enhancing hippocampal neurogenesis and function, improves cognition, and regulates mood. These beneficial effects depend on the contribute of more factors including the enhancement of vascularization and upregulation of growth factors. Among these, the BDNF seems to play a significant role. Another putative factor that might contribute to beneficial effects of exercise is the orexin-A. In support of this hypothesis there are the following observations: (1) orexin-A enhances hippocampal neurogenesis and function and (2) the levels of orexin-A increase with physical exercise. The beneficial effects of exercise may represent an important resource to hinder the cognitive decline associated with the aging-related hippocampal deterioration and ameliorate depressive symptoms. PMID:28261108

  1. Influence of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment to the pancreatic function in pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yulan; Ying, Xiao; Hu, Xiaoye; Zhao, Jing; Fang, Xuefeng; Wu, Minghui; Chen, Tian Zhou; Shen, Hong

    2015-05-01

    Present study was designed to investigate the pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function damage after High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) therapy in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. It was a retrospective analysis of blood glucose and amylase changes in 59 advanced pancreatic cancer patients treated with HIFU from 2010 February to 2014 January. The mean glucose and amylase before HIFU treatment were 6.02mmol/L and 59.17 U/L respectively. After HIFU treatment, it was shown that the mean glucose and amylase levels were 5.66mmol/L and 57.86/L respectively. There was no statistical significance between them. No acute pancreatitis was observed. The endocrine and exocrine function of pancreatic cancer patients was not damaged by HIFU treatment. HIFU treatment for the pancreatic cancer patients seems to be safe.

  2. [Comments on influence of different functional status of the body on clinical effects of acupuncture therapy].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Jie; Zeng, Fang; Yang, Jie; Ren, Yu-Lan; Liang, Fan-Rang

    2013-10-01

    Functional status is an important factor affecting clinical therapeutic effect of acupuncture therapy. Authors of the present article make an analysis on the related descriptions of ancient classical books about the patient's body constitution, age, duration of disease, type of disease or clinical conditions, psychological state, etc. which determine the functional state of patients. Moreover, the authors also make some comments on the results of modern clinical trials and experimental studies. However, till now, the results of many related modern studies were lower in reliability due to unreliable methodology. Fewer clinical trials involve the patient's psychological state, and constitution from the viewpoint of Chinese medicine. Correspondingly, the related experimental studies are fewer. The authors suggest that in the coming days clinical trials should be greatly improved in quality and the mutual interference among the influential factors should be excluded. At the same time, experimental studies on the related biochemical mechanisms should be strengthened.

  3. Factors Influencing Cognitive Functioning Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in OIF/OEF Burn Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 19 (2004), 825–834. [5] H.G. Belanger, T. Kretzmer, R. Yoash-Gantz, T. Pickett and L.A. Tupler...Poppe, N. Davis, B. Schmaus and S.E. Hobbs, Cognitive functioning and postconcussive symptoms in trau- ma patients with and without mild TBI, Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology 21...Koffler, C.R. Reynolds and C.H. Silver, Neuropsychological evalua- tion in the diagnosis and management of sports-related con- cussion, Archives of

  4. Influence of pyrolysis temperature on biochar property and function as a heavy metal sorbent in soil.

    PubMed

    Uchimiya, Minori; Wartelle, Lynda H; Klasson, K Thomas; Fortier, Chanel A; Lima, Isabel M

    2011-03-23

    While a large-scale soil amendment of biochars continues to receive interest for enhancing crop yields and to remediate contaminated sites, systematic study is lacking in how biochar properties translate into purported functions such as heavy metal sequestration. In this study, cottonseed hulls were pyrolyzed at five temperatures (200, 350, 500, 650, and 800 °C) and characterized for the yield, moisture, ash, volatile matter, and fixed carbon contents, elemental composition (CHNSO), BET surface area, pH, pHpzc, and by ATR-FTIR. The characterization results were compared with the literature values for additional source materials: grass, wood, pine needle, and broiler litter-derived biochars with and without post-treatments. At respective pyrolysis temperatures, cottonseed hull chars had ash content in between grass and wood chars, and significantly lower BET surface area in comparison to other plant source materials considered. The N:C ratio reached a maximum between 300 and 400 °C for all biomass sources considered, while the following trend in N:C ratio was maintained at each pyrolysis temperature: wood≪cottonseed hull≈grass≈pine needle≪broiler litter. To examine how biochar properties translate into its function as a heavy metal (NiII, CuII, PbII, and CdII) sorbent, a soil amendment study was conducted for acidic sandy loam Norfolk soil previously shown to have low heavy metal retention capacity. The results suggest that the properties attributable to the surface functional groups of biochars (volatile matter and oxygen contents and pHpzc) control the heavy metal sequestration ability in Norfolk soil, and biochar selection for soil amendment must be made case-by-case based on the biochar characteristics, soil property, and the target function.

  5. The emergence of gonadal hormone influences on dopaminergic function during puberty.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Cynthia; Johnson, Misha; Thomae, Alex; Luo, Brooke; Simon, Sidney A; Zhou, Guiying; Walker, Q David

    2010-06-01

    Adolescence is the developmental epoch during which children become adults-intellectually, physically, hormonally and socially. Brain development in critical areas is ongoing. Adolescents are risk-taking and novelty-seeking and they weigh positive experiences more heavily and negative experiences less than adults. This inherent behavioral bias can lead to risky behaviors like drug taking. Most drug addictions start during adolescence and early drug-taking is associated with an increased rate of drug abuse and dependence. The hormonal changes of puberty contribute to physical, emotional, intellectual and social changes during adolescence. These hormonal events do not just cause maturation of reproductive function and the emergence of secondary sex characteristics. They contribute to the appearance of sex differences in non-reproductive behaviors as well. Sex differences in drug use behaviors are among the latter. The male predominance in overall drug use appears by the end of adolescence, while girls develop the rapid progression from first use to dependence (telescoping) that represent a female-biased vulnerability. Sex differences in many behaviors including drug use have been attributed to social and cultural factors. A narrowing gap in drug use between adolescent boys and girls supports this thesis. However, some sex differences in addiction vulnerability reflect biologic differences in brain circuits involved in addiction. The purpose of this review is to summarize the contribution of sex differences in the function of ascending dopamine systems that are critical to reinforcement, to briefly summarize the behavioral, neurochemical and anatomical changes in brain dopaminergic functions related to addiction that occur during adolescence and to present new findings about the emergence of sex differences in dopaminergic function during adolescence.

  6. Minimal changes of thyroid axis activity influence brain functions in young females affected by subclinical hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Menicucci, D; Sebastiani, L; Comparini, A; Pingitore, A; Ghelarducci, B; L'Abbate, A; Iervasi, G; Gemignani, A

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence of an association between thyroid hormones (TH) alterations and mental dysfunctions related to procedural and working memory functions, but the physiological link between these domains is still under debate, also for the presence of age as a confounding factor. Thus, we investigated the TH tuning of cerebral functions in young females affected by the borderline condition of subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) and in euthyroid females of the same age. The experiment consisted in the characterization of the affective state and cognitive abilities of the subjects by means of specific neuropsychological questionnaires, and of brain activity (EEG) in resting state and during the passive viewing of emotional video-clips. We found that SH had i) increased anxiety for Physical Danger; ii) better scores for both Mental Control and no-working-memory-related functions; iii) association between anxiety for Physical Danger and fT4 levels. Thus, in young adults, SH increases inward attention and paradoxically improves some cognitive functions. In addition, self-assessed questionnaires showed that SH had a greater susceptibility to unpleasant emotional stimulation. As for EEG data, SH compared to controls showed: i) reduction of alpha activity and of gamma left lateralization in resting state; ii) increased, and lateralized to the right, beta2 activity during stimulations. Both results indicated that SH have higher levels of arousal and greater susceptibility to negative emotion than controls. In conclusion, our study indicates that minimal changes in TH levels produce subtle but well-defined mental changes, thus encouraging further studies for the prediction of pathology evolution.

  7. Peripheral and intrauterine neutrophil function in the cow: the influence of endogenous and exogenous sex steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Subandrio, A L; Sheldon, I M; Noakes, D E

    2000-05-01

    It has been accepted for many years that the susceptibility of the genital tract to infection is reduced during the follicular phase compared with the luteal phase of the estrous cycle. Since the role of intrauterine neutrophils is paramount in the elimination of bacteria, it can be hypothesized that these differences in resistance to infection could be mediated by differences in uterine-derived neutrophil function. In order to test this hypothesis two groups of cows were used in this study. Group 1 cows (n=5) were studied at estrus, diestrus, after ovariectomy, after exogenous estradiol and after progesterone treatment, at which time they underwent intrauterine infusion with 1% oyster glycogen (OG) and a bacterial-free filtrate (BFF) of Actinomyces genes (BFF), the latter having been recovered from a clinical case of endometritis; neutrophils were harvested by flushing from the lumen 15 to 18 h later. A peripheral blood sample was collected at the time of flushing for the assay of estradiol and progesterone for a WBC and differential count and for the harvesting of neutrophils using a Percoll single-stage discontinuous gradient. After the recovery of the cells they were re-suspended in HBSS. Group 2 (n=4) were infused with BFF during during all reproductive states as Group 1, but with OG only after ovariectomy and after treatment with progesterone and estradiol. Neutrophil chemotaxis was assessed by measuring their migration using a modified Boyden chamber and Zymogen-activated serum as a chemoattractant. Phagocytic activity was measured by determining the number of Candida albicans ingested by each neutrophil after incubation. The percentage of kill was determined using a radiometric assay in which C. albicans was labeled with L-(5-3H) Proline. Peripheral WBC concentration was not influenced by the reproductive state of the cow; however, the mean neutrophil concentration was significantly different between the reproductive states (P<0.001) and between individual

  8. Interindividual differences in cognitive flexibility: influence of gray matter volume, functional connectivity and trait impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Langner, Robert; Cieslik, Edna C.; Rottschy, Claudia; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive flexibility, a core aspect of executive functioning, is required for the speeded shifting between different tasks and sets. Using an interindividual differences approach, we examined whether cognitive flexibility, as assessed by the Delis–Kaplan card-sorting test, is associated with gray matter volume (GMV) and functional connectivity (FC) of regions of a core network of multiple cognitive demands as well as with different facets of trait impulsivity. The core multiple-demand network was derived from three large-scale neuroimaging meta-analyses and only included regions that showed consistent associations with sustained attention, working memory as well as inhibitory control. We tested to what extent self-reported impulsivity as well as GMV and resting-state FC in this core network predicted cognitive flexibility independently and incrementally. Our analyses revealed that card-sorting performance correlated positively with GMV of the right anterior insula, FC between bilateral anterior insula and midcingulate cortex/supplementary motor area as well as the impulsivity dimension “Premeditation.” Importantly, GMV, FC and impulsivity together accounted for more variance of card-sorting performance than every parameter alone. Our results therefore indicate that various factors contribute individually to cognitive flexibility, underlining the need to search across multiple modalities when aiming to unveil the mechanisms behind executive functioning. PMID:24878823

  9. The influence of lifestyle on health behavior and preference for functional foods.

    PubMed

    Szakály, Zoltán; Szente, Viktória; Kövér, György; Polereczki, Zsolt; Szigeti, Orsolya

    2012-02-01

    The main objective of this survey is to reveal the relationship between lifestyle, health behavior, and the consumption of functional foods on the basis of Grunert's food-related lifestyle model. In order to achieve this objective, a nationwide representative questionnaire-based survey was launched with 1000 participants in Hungary. The results indicate that a Hungarian consumer makes rational decisions, he or she seeks bargains, and he wants to know whether or not he gets good value for his money. Further on, various lifestyle segments are defined by the authors: the rational, uninvolved, conservative, careless, and adventurous consumer segments. Among these, consumers with a rational approach provide the primary target group for the functional food market, where health consciousness and moderate price sensitivity can be observed together. Adventurous food consumers stand out because they search for novelty; this makes them an equally important target group. Conservative consumers are another, one characterized by positive health behavior. According to the findings of the research, there is a significant relationship between lifestyle, health behavior, and the preference for functional food products.

  10. Influence of gamma-radiation on the nutritional and functional qualities of lotus seed flour.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Rajeev; Sridhar, Kandikere Ramaiah; Karim, Alias A; Young, Chiu C; Arun, Ananthapadmanabha B

    2009-10-28

    In the present study, we investigated the physicochemical and functional properties of lotus seed flour exposed to low and high doses of gamma-radiation (0-30 kGy; the dose recommended for quarantine and hygienic purposes). The results indicated raw seed flour to be rich in nutrients with minimal quantities of antinutritional factors. Irradiation resulted in a dose-dependent increase in some of the proximal constituents. The raw and gamma-irradiated seeds meet the Food and Agricultural Organization-World Health Organization recommended pattern of essential amino acids. Some of the antinutritional factors (phytic acid, total phenolics, and tannins) were lowered with gamma-irradiation, while the seed flours were devoid of lectins, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, and polonium-210. The functional properties of the seed flour were significantly improved with gamma-radiation. gamma-radiation selectively preserved or improved the desired nutritional and functional traits of lotus seeds, thus ensuring a safe production of appropriate nutraceutically valued products.

  11. Mzm1 Influences a Labile Pool of Mitochondrial Zinc Important for Respiratory Function*

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Aaron; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Smith, Pamela; Sabic, Hana; Eide, David; Winge, Dennis R.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc is essential for function of mitochondria as a cofactor for several matrix zinc metalloproteins. We demonstrate that a labile cationic zinc component of low molecular mass exists in the yeast mitochondrial matrix. This zinc pool is homeostatically regulated in response to the cellular zinc status. This pool of zinc is functionally important because matrix targeting of a cytosolic zinc-binding protein reduces the level of labile zinc and interferes with mitochondrial respiratory function. We identified a series of proteins that modulate the matrix zinc pool, one of which is a novel conserved mitochondrial protein designated Mzm1. Mutant mzm1Δ cells have reduced total and labile mitochondrial zinc, and these cells are hypersensitive to perturbations of the labile pool. In addition, mzm1Δ cells have a destabilized cytochrome c reductase (Complex III) without any effects on Complexes IV or V. Thus, we have established that a link exists between Complex III integrity and the labile mitochondrial zinc pool. PMID:20404342

  12. Influence of circadian blood pressure profile on endothelial function in patients with and without arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rekhviashvili, A; Giorgobiani, T; Minashvili, A; Baganashvili, E

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the relationship between the circadian BP rhythm and endothelial function in patients with essential hypertension. Consequently, we have hypothesized, that hypertensive patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile have more deteriorated endothelial function, than those with dipper BP profile. 57 untreated hypertensive patients and 17 normotensive controls were undergone to the anthropometrical measurements, physical examinations, review of their medical histories, 24-hour ABPM and vascular doppler-echography with high resolution ultrasound. Circadian BP profile was not independent from the BP level; namely, dipper profile was more frequent in normotensives. Independent from hypertension, dipper patients had significantly higher FMD%. In the whole study population, FMD showed strong negative correlation with 24-hour SBP, DBP and PP. Our study confirms the presence of disturbed endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in AH. Furthermore, our study showed that non-dipper circadian BP rhythm is associated with the significant impairment of endothelial function. Consequently, we can suggest that patients with non-dipper circadian BP profile could be assessed as a high risk group, which might need permanent supervising for avoiding of future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular complications.

  13. Tissue Dimensionality Influences the Functional Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Killing of Targets

    PubMed Central

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F. M.; de Boer, Rob J.; Beltman, Joost B.

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing of virus infections and tumors occurs over a wide range of conditions. The spatial environments in which CTLs encounter target cells vary from narrow vessels, to two-dimensional epithelial tissues, to densely populated 3-dimensional (3D) T cell areas within lymphoid tissues. How such spatial environments alter the functional response of CTL-mediated killing, i.e., how the killing efficiency depends on cell densities, is unclear. In this study, we perform cellular Potts model simulations in different spatial configurations to investigate how the dimensionality of the space affects the functional response of CTL-mediated killing. Irrespective of the spatial configuration, the function with separate saturation constants for CTL and for target cell densities that we previously proposed can in all cases describe the response, demonstrating its generality. However, the tissue dimensionality determines at which cell densities the killing rate starts to saturate. We show that saturation in a fully 3D environment is stronger than in a “flat” 3D environment, which is largely due to accompanying differences in the CTL–target encounter rates. PMID:28123385

  14. Functional polymorphism of the mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) influences reinforcement learning in humans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mary R; Gallen, Courtney L; Zhang, Xiaochu; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Goldman, David; Stein, Elliot A; Barr, Christina S

    2011-01-01

    Previous reports on the functional effects (i.e., gain or loss of function), and phenotypic outcomes (e.g., changes in addiction vulnerability and stress response) of a commonly occurring functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1 A118G) have been inconsistent. Here we examine the effect of this polymorphism on implicit reward learning. We used a probabilistic signal detection task to determine whether this polymorphism impacts response bias to monetary reward in 63 healthy adult subjects: 51 AA homozygotes and 12 G allele carriers. OPRM1 AA homozygotes exhibited typical responding to the rewarded response--that is, their bias to the rewarded stimulus increased over time. However, OPRM1 G allele carriers exhibited a decline in response to the rewarded stimulus compared to the AA homozygotes. These results extend previous reports on the heritability of performance on this task by implicating a specific polymorphism. Through comparison with other studies using this task, we suggest a possible mechanism by which the OPRM1 polymorphism may confer reduced response to natural reward through a dopamine-mediated decrease during positive reinforcement learning.

  15. The influence of herbal medicine on platelet function and coagulation: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Bradley J

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Platelet activation and aggregation play a central role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Herbal medicines have been traditionally used in the management of CVD and can play a role in modifying CVD progression, particularly in platelet function, and have the potential of altering platelet function tests, as well as some coagulation parameters. Herbal medicines, such as feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginseng, motherwort, St John's wort, and willow bark, were found to reduce platelet aggregation. In vitro studies show promise in the reduction of platelet aggregation for Andrographis, feverfew, garlic, ginger, Ginkgo, ginseng, hawthorn, horse chestnut, and turmeric. In addition, cranberry, danshen, dong quai, Ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, and St John's wort were found to have potential interactions with warfarin. Furthermore, St John's wort interacted with clopidogrel and danshen with aspirin. Therefore, repeat testing of platelet function and coagulation studies, particularly for patients on warfarin therapy, may be required after exclusion of herbal medicines that could have possibly affected initial test results.

  16. Tissue Dimensionality Influences the Functional Response of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Killing of Targets.

    PubMed

    Gadhamsetty, Saikrishna; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J; Beltman, Joost B

    2016-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-mediated killing of virus infections and tumors occurs over a wide range of conditions. The spatial environments in which CTLs encounter target cells vary from narrow vessels, to two-dimensional epithelial tissues, to densely populated 3-dimensional (3D) T cell areas within lymphoid tissues. How such spatial environments alter the functional response of CTL-mediated killing, i.e., how the killing efficiency depends on cell densities, is unclear. In this study, we perform cellular Potts model simulations in different spatial configurations to investigate how the dimensionality of the space affects the functional response of CTL-mediated killing. Irrespective of the spatial configuration, the function with separate saturation constants for CTL and for target cell densities that we previously proposed can in all cases describe the response, demonstrating its generality. However, the tissue dimensionality determines at which cell densities the killing rate starts to saturate. We show that saturation in a fully 3D environment is stronger than in a "flat" 3D environment, which is largely due to accompanying differences in the CTL-target encounter rates.

  17. The influence of the dopaminergic system on cognitive functioning: A molecular genetic approach.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Martin; Peters, Kristina; Schroeter, Katrin; Koebke, Wolfgang; Lenardon, Daniela; Bloch, Birte; Hennig, Juergen

    2005-10-14

    Many pharmacological and clinical studies have demonstrated the importance of the dopaminergic (DA) system for cognitive functioning but little is known about the genetic basis of general cognitive ability that has been demonstrated to be highly heritable. Attempts to detect associations between certain gene loci and endophenotypes of general cognitive ability have turned out to be more promising. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate two dopaminergic candidate genes (COMT VAL158MET and DRD2 TAQ IA) for endophenotypes of cognitive functioning i.e. attention, vigilance, interference, time estimation and sensoric and motoric reaction times. Out of a gene data bank of more than 600 healthy Caucasian participants, 96 subjects (n = 48 males and n = 48 females) were recruited according to their genotype/allele pattern, resulting in six independent groups (COMT: VAL/VAL, VAL/MET, MET/MET)x(DRD2: A1-, A1+) of n = 16 subjects each. Results showed associations of the COMT gene with attention and with time estimation but most noteworthy was an interaction effect DRD2xVAL on interference performance as measured by the STROOP-test explaining 13% of the variance. Findings suggest that a balance between DA related catabolic enzyme activity and receptor density are good predictors for the endophenotype of cognitive interference and that the COMT gene is in accordance with previous studies related to cognitive functioning.

  18. Surface modification influencing adsorption of red wine constituents: The role of functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierczynska-Vasilev, Agnieszka; Smith, Paul A.

    2016-11-01

    The adsorption of wine constituents at solid surfaces is important in applications such as filtration and membrane fouling, binding to tanks and fittings and interactions with processing aids such as bentonite. The interaction of wine constituents with surfaces is mediated through adsorbed wine components, where the type of constituents, amount, orientation, and conformation are of consequence for the surface response. This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the adsorption of red wine constituents. Plasma-polymerized films rich in amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, formyl and methyl functional groups were generated on solid substrates whereas, glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride was covalently attached to allylamine plasma-polymer modified surface and poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) was electrostatically adsorbed to an amine plasma-polymerized surface. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The ability of different substrates to adsorb red wine constituents was evaluated by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy. The results showed that substrates modified with -SO3H and -COOH groups can adsorb more of the wine nitrogen-containing compounds whereas -NH2 and -NR3 groups encourage carbon-containing compounds adsorption. Red wine constituents after filtration were adsorbed in higher extend on -NR3 and -CHO surfaces. The -OH modified surfaces had the lowest ability to absorb wine components.

  19. Influence of dehydration process in Castellano chickpea: changes in bioactive carbohydrates and functional properties.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Yolanda; Benítez, Vanesa; Mollá, Esperanza; Esteban, Rosa M; Martín-Cabrejas, María A

    2011-11-01

    Changes in bioactive carbohydrates, functional, and microstructural characteristics that occurred in chickpea under soaking, cooking, and industrial dehydration processing were evaluated. Raw chickpea exhibited important levels of raffinose family of oligosaccharides (RFOs), resistant starch (RS) and total dietary fibre (TDF), being insoluble dietary fibre (IDF) the main fraction (94%). The dehydration process increased RFOs (43%), RS (47%) and soluble dietary fiber (SDF) (59%) levels significantly. In addition, a noticeable increase in both fibre fractions was observed, being higher in soluble fibre in (SDF) (59%). The minimum nitrogen solubility of raw flours was at pH 4, and a high degree of protein insolubilization (80%) was observed in dehydrated flours. The raw and processed flours exhibited low oil-holding capacities (1.10 mg/ml), and did not show any change by thermal processing, whereas water-holding capacities rose to 5.50 mg/ml of sample. Cooking and industrial dehydration process reduced emulsifying activity and foaming capacity of chickpea flour. The microstructural observations were consistent with the chemical results. Thus, the significant occurrence of these bioactive carbohydrate compounds along with the interesting functional properties of the dehydrated flours could be considered useful as functional ingredients for food formulation.

  20. Endothelin-1 critically influences cardiac function via superoxide-MMP9 cascade.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Catherine K; Grant, Ruriko; Hagaman, John R; Hiller, Sylvia; Li, Feng; Xu, Longquan; Chang, Albert S; Madden, Victoria J; Bagnell, C Robert; Rojas, Mauricio; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Wu, Bingruo; Zhou, Bin; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2015-04-21

    We have generated low-expressing and high-expressing endothelin-1 genes (L and H) and have bred mice with four levels of expression: L/L, ∼20%; L/+, ∼65%; +/+ (wild type), 100%; and H/+, ∼350%. The hypomorphic L allele can be spatiotemporally switched to the hypermorphic H allele by Cre-loxP recombination. Young adult L/L and L/+ mice have dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and increased plasma volumes, together with increased ventricular superoxide levels, increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) expression, and reduced ventricular stiffness. H/+ mice have decreased plasma volumes and significantly heavy stiff hearts. Global or cardiomyocyte-specific switching expression from L to H normalized the abnormalities already present in young adult L/L mice. An epithelial sodium channel antagonist normalized plasma volume and blood pressure, but only partially corrected the cardiomyopathy. A superoxide dismutase mimetic made superoxide levels subnormal, reduced Mmp9 overexpression, and substantially improved cardiac function. Genetic absence of Mmp9 also improved cardiac function, but increased superoxide remained. We conclude that endothelin-1 is critical for maintaining normal contractile function, for controlling superoxide and Mmp9 levels, and for ensuring that the myocardium has sufficient collagen to prevent overstretching. Even a modest (∼35%) decrease in endothelin-1 gene (Edn1) expression is sufficient to cause cardiac dysfunction.

  1. Endothelin-1 critically influences cardiac function via superoxide-MMP9 cascade

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Catherine K.; Grant, Ruriko; Hagaman, John R.; Hiller, Sylvia; Li, Feng; Xu, Longquan; Chang, Albert S.; Madden, Victoria J.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Rojas, Mauricio; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Wu, Bingruo; Zhou, Bin; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    We have generated low-expressing and high-expressing endothelin-1 genes (L and H) and have bred mice with four levels of expression: L/L, ∼20%; L/+, ∼65%; +/+ (wild type), 100%; and H/+, ∼350%. The hypomorphic L allele can be spatiotemporally switched to the hypermorphic H allele by Cre-loxP recombination. Young adult L/L and L/+ mice have dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and increased plasma volumes, together with increased ventricular superoxide levels, increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) expression, and reduced ventricular stiffness. H/+ mice have decreased plasma volumes and significantly heavy stiff hearts. Global or cardiomyocyte-specific switching expression from L to H normalized the abnormalities already present in young adult L/L mice. An epithelial sodium channel antagonist normalized plasma volume and blood pressure, but only partially corrected the cardiomyopathy. A superoxide dismutase mimetic made superoxide levels subnormal, reduced Mmp9 overexpression, and substantially improved cardiac function. Genetic absence of Mmp9 also improved cardiac function, but increased superoxide remained. We conclude that endothelin-1 is critical for maintaining normal contractile function, for controlling superoxide and Mmp9 levels, and for ensuring that the myocardium has sufficient collagen to prevent overstretching. Even a modest (∼35%) decrease in endothelin-1 gene (Edn1) expression is sufficient to cause cardiac dysfunction. PMID:25848038

  2. Decoding Mechanisms by which Silent Codon Changes Influence Protein Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Bali, Vedrana; Bebok, Zsuzsanna

    2015-01-01

    Scope Synonymous codon usage has been a focus of investigation since the discovery of the genetic code and its redundancy. The occurrences of synonymous codons vary between species and within genes of the same genome, known as codon usage bias. Today, bioinformatics and experimental data allow us to compose a global view of the mechanisms by which the redundancy of the genetic code contributes to the complexity of biological systems from affecting survival in prokaryotes, to fine tuning the structure and function of proteins in higher eukaryotes. Studies analyzing the consequences of synonymous codon changes in different organisms have revealed that they impact nucleic acid stability, protein levels, structure and function without altering amino acid sequence. As such, synonymous mutations inevitably contribute to the pathogenesis of complex human diseases. Yet, fundamental questions remain unresolved regarding the impact of silent mutations in human disorders. In the present review we describe developments in this area concentrating on mechanisms by which synonymous mutations may affect protein function and human health. Purpose This synopsis illustrates the significance of synonymous mutations in disease pathogenesis. We review the different steps of gene expression affected by silent mutations, and assess the benefits and possible harmful effects of codon optimization applied in the development of therapeutic biologics. Physiological and medical relevance Understanding mechanisms by which synonymous mutations contribute to complex diseases such as cancer, neurodegeneration and genetic disorders, including the limitations of codon-optimized biologics, provides insight concerning interpretation of silent variants and future molecular therapies. PMID:25817479

  3. The influence of theta transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) on working memory storage and processing functions.

    PubMed

    Jaušovec, Norbert; Jaušovec, Ksenija; Pahor, Anja

    2014-02-01

    The study aimed to explore the role of the fronto-parietal brain network in working memory function--in temporary storage and manipulation of information. In a single blind sham controlled experiment 36 respondents solved different working memory tasks after theta transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) was applied to left frontal, left parietal and right parietal areas. Both verum tACS protocols stimulating parietal brain areas (target electrodes positioned at location P3, or P4) had a positive effect on WM storage capacity as compared with sham tACS, whereas no such influence was observed for the stimulation of the left frontal area (target electrode positioned at location F3). A second finding was that left parietal theta tACS had a more pronounced influence on backward recall than on forward recall, which was not related to task content (spatial or verbal). The influence of theta tACS on WM executive processes was most pronounced for right parietal stimulation. The results are discussed in the broad theoretical framework of the multicomponent model of working memory.

  4. The living arrangement may differentially influence IDU parents' motivation to reduce HIV risk as a function of gender.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Michael; Lee, I-Ching; Merz-Beyus, Amanda; Faghri, Pouran

    2010-11-01

    Studies that examine data from drug-abusing parents typically investigate the impact of parental behavior on their children's well-being and focus almost exclusively on the impact of mothers. Other approaches have examined the level of parental involvement among parents in drug treatment and find that a higher level of parental involvement is related to lower levels of addiction severity. Recent research examines the specific role of fathers and suggests that the promotion of responsible parenting may serve as a positive motivational influence among fathers participating in drug treatment. The present study investigated the influence of the living arrangement on improvements in HIV-risk reduction variables among 151 IDU parents who participated in the Community-friendly Health Recovery Program intervention. A gender×living arrangement interaction demonstrated greater enhancements in social and personal motivation to reduce HIV risk among fathers currently living with their children vs. fathers not living with their children while the opposite pattern of outcomes was demonstrated for mothers. Findings indicate that a parenting role that includes living with children may differentially influence parents' HIV-risk reduction motivation as a function of gender.

  5. The influence of pain on cerebral functioning after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Nadia; Chen, Jen-Kai; Bottari, Carolina; Petrides, Michael; Jubault, Thomas; Tinawi, Simon; de Guise, Elaine; Ptito, Alain

    2012-11-20

    More than 75% of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) report chronic pain whose potential detrimental effects on cognitive recovery need to be identified. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between pain, performance on a working memory task, gray matter density, and mid-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (mid-DLPFC) activation in subjects with a MTBI. For comparison purposes, we performed identical correlation analyses with a group of subjects without MTBI who sustained sports injuries. Twenty-four subjects who experienced a MTBI in the past 12 months, 16 control subjects, and 29 subjects with sport injuries were included. One hour prior to entering the magnetic resonance scanner, the subjects were asked to fill out the pain Visual Analogue Scale. Subsequently, a high-resolution T1-weighted image was acquired followed by a functional magnetic resonance imaging session using the visual externally ordered working memory task. Results showed that MTBI subjects reporting severe pain in the hour preceding the testing had reduced mid-DLPFC activation during the working memory task and poorer performance on the task. Subjects with sport injuries and severe levels of pain showed the reverse pattern: pain was associated with higher activation in the mid-DLPFC and did not correlate with performance. Gray matter density measures were independent of pain level. This study showed that behavioral performance and cerebral functioning are affected by pain after a MTBI. Moreover, this study suggests that pain, cognition, and cerebral functioning interactions could not easily be generalized from one clinical population to another.

  6. Influence of Adjuvant Therapy in Cancer Survivors on Endothelial Function and Skeletal Muscle Deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Ederer, Austin K.; Didier, Kaylin D.; Reiter, Landon K.; Brown, Michael; Hardy, Rachel; Caldwell, Jacob; Black, Christopher D.; Larson, Rebecca D.; Ade, Carl J.

    2016-01-01

    The cardiotoxic effects of adjuvant cancer treatments (i.e., chemotherapy and radiation treatment) have been well documented, but the effects on peripheral cardiovascular function are still unclear. We hypothesized that cancer survivors i) would have decreased resting endothelial function; and ii) altered muscle deoxygenation response during moderate intensity cycling exercise compared to cancer-free controls. A total of 8 cancer survivors (~70 months post-treatment) and 9 healthy controls completed a brachial artery FMD test, an index of endothelial-dependent dilation, followed by an incremental exercise test up to the ventilatory threshold (VT) on a cycle ergometer during which pulmonary V˙O2 and changes in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived microvascular tissue oxygenation (TOI), total hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]total), and muscle deoxygenation ([HHb] ≈ fractional O2 extraction) were measured. There were no significant differences in age, height, weight, and resting blood pressure between cancer survivors and control participants. Brachial artery FMD was similar between groups (P = 0.98). During exercise at the VT, TOI was similar between groups, but [Hb]total and [HHb] were significantly decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P < 0.01) The rate of change for TOI (ΔTOIΔ/V˙O2) and [HHb] (Δ[HHb]/ΔV˙O2) relative to ΔV˙O2 were decreased in cancer survivors compared to controls (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03 respectively). In cancer survivors, a decreased skeletal muscle microvascular function was observed during moderate intensity cycling exercise. These data suggest that adjuvant cancer therapies have an effect on the integrated relationship between O2 extraction, V˙O2 and O2 delivery during exercise. PMID:26807572

  7. Functional community structure of African monodominant Gilbertiodendron dewevrei forest influenced by local environmental filtering.

    PubMed

    Kearsley, Elizabeth; Verbeeck, Hans; Hufkens, Koen; Van de Perre, Frederik; Doetterl, Sebastian; Baert, Geert; Beeckman, Hans; Boeckx, Pascal; Huygens, Dries

    2017-01-01

    Monodominant patches of forest dominated by Gilbertiodendron dewevrei are commonly found in central African tropical forests, alongside forests with high species diversity. Although these forests are generally found sparsely distributed along rivers, their occurrence is not thought to be (clearly) driven by edaphic conditions but rather by trait combinations of G. dewevrei that aid in achieving monodominance. Functional community structure between these monodominant and mixed forests has, however, not yet been compared. Additionally, little is known about nondominant species in the monodominant forest community. These two topics are addressed in this study. We investigate the functional community structure of 10 one-hectare plots of monodominant and mixed forests in a central region of the Congo basin, in DR Congo. Thirteen leaf and wood traits are measured, covering 95% (basal area weighted) of all species present in the plots, including leaf nutrient contents, leaf isotopic compositions, specific leaf area, wood density, and vessel anatomy. The trait-based assessment of G. dewevrei shows an ensemble of traits related to water use and transport that could be favorable for its location near forest rivers. Moreover, indications have been found for N and P limitations in the monodominant forest, possibly related to ectomycorrhizal associations formed with G. dewevrei. Reduced leaf N and P contents are found at the community level for the monodominant forest and for different nondominant groups, as compared to those in the mixed forest. In summary, this work shows that environmental filtering does prevail in the monodominant G. dewevrei forest, leading to lower functional diversity in this forest type, with the dominant species showing beneficial traits related to its common riverine locations and with reduced soil N and P availability found in this environment, both coregulating the tree community assembly.

  8. What is Hidden in Hiding Functions? The Influence of Packing on Size-Selective Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, E.; Buxton, T. H.; Buffington, J. M.; Fremier, A. K.; Hassan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Studying landscape evolution and developing defensible land management plans require predictions of sediment flux in rivers. Bed load transport equations often use hiding functions to represent the relative mobility of different grain sizes, which is assumed to be caused by hiding effects. Hiding effects describe the tendency for small particles to have lower projection into the flow and higher friction angles than large grains, decreasing their mobility. Hiding function exponents (b) are fit using reach-scale measurements, whereas hiding effects operate at the grain scale. Therefore, the relation between b values and hiding effects has not been explicitly demonstrated. Hiding effects are also commonly measured for grains placed on bed surfaces rather than for in situ grains that experience the packing and burial that are typical of natural streambeds. To examine this issue, we measured resisting forces and projection for in situ and surface grains in a set of laboratory flume experiments. We used these values in a force balance equation to calculate critical shear stresses and then fit hiding functions to the predicted stresses. Lower projection and higher resistance of in situ grains caused their critical shear stresses to be much higher than those for surface grains. In situ grains also had much lower hiding effects because fine and coarse in situ sediment exhibited relatively similar projection values. We compared b values calculated for in situ and surface grains to those obtained from bedload transport measurements in our experiments. Only in situ sediment with relatively weak hiding effects predicted the observed b value from bedload observations. Our results demonstrate that the relative mobility of fine and coarse sediment was largely controlled by packing resistance and that hiding effects are less significant than previously thought.

  9. Analysis of causal relationships by structural equation modeling to determine the factors influencing cognitive function in elderly people in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Daisuke; Nakatani, Ken; Takeda, Tokunori; Fujita, Takashi; Sunahara, Nobuyuki; Inoue, Katsumi; Notoya, Masako

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify a potentiality factor that is a preventive factor for decline in cognitive function. Additionally, this study pursues to clarify the causal relationship between the each potential factor and its influence on cognitive function. Subjects were 366 elderly community residents (mean age 73.7 ± 6.4, male 51, female 315) who participated in the Taketoyo Project from 2007 to 2011. Factor analysis was conducted to identify groupings within mental, social, life, physical and cognitive functions. In order to detect clusters of 14 variables, the item scores were subjected to confirmatory factor analysis. We performed Structural Equation Modeling analysis to calculate the standardization coefficient and correlation coefficient for every factor. The cause and effect hypothesis model was used to gather two intervention theory hypotheses for dementia prevention (direct effect, indirect effect) in one system. Finally, we performed another Structural Equation Modeling analysis to calculate the standardization of the cause and effect hypothesis model. Social participation was found to be activated by the improvement of four factors, and in turn, activated "Social participation" acted on cognitive function.

  10. Influence of the angular shape of the volume-scattering function and multiple scattering on remote sensing reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chami, Malik; McKee, David; Leymarie, Edouard; Khomenko, Gueorgui

    2006-12-01

    Scattering phase functions derived from measured (volume-scattering meter, VSM) volume-scattering functions (VSFs) from Crimean coastal waters were found to have systematic differences in angular structure from Fournier-Forand (FF) functions with equivalent backscattering ratios. Hydrolight simulations demonstrated that differences in the angular structure of the VSF could result in variations in modeled subsurface radiance reflectances of up to ±20%. Furthermore, differences between VSM and FF simulated reflectances were found to be nonlinear as a function of scattering and could not be explained with the single-scattering approximation. Additional radiance transfer modeling demonstrated that the contribution of multiple scattering to radiance reflectance increased exponentially from a minimum of 16% for pure water to a maximum of ˜94% for turbid waters. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated that multiple forward-scattering events were the dominant contributors to the generation of radiance reflectance signals for turbid waters and that angular structures in the shape of the VSF at forward angles could have a significant influence in determining reflectance signals for turbid waters.

  11. Influence of the angular shape of the volume-scattering function and multiple scattering on remote sensing reflectance.

    PubMed

    Chami, Malik; McKee, David; Leymarie, Edouard; Khomenko, Gueorgui

    2006-12-20

    Scattering phase functions derived from measured (volume-scattering meter, VSM) volume-scattering functions (VSFs) from Crimean coastal waters were found to have systematic differences in angular structure from Fournier-Forand (FF) functions with equivalent backscattering ratios. Hydrolight simulations demonstrated that differences in the angular structure of the VSF could result in variations in modeled subsurface radiance reflectances of up to +/-20%. Furthermore, differences between VSM and FF simulated reflectances were found to be nonlinear as a function of scattering and could not be explained with the single-scattering approximation. Additional radiance transfer modeling demonstrated that the contribution of multiple scattering to radiance reflectance increased exponentially from a minimum of 16% for pure water to a maximum of approximately 94% for turbid waters. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated that multiple forward-scattering events were the dominant contributors to the generation of radiance reflectance signals for turbid waters and that angular structures in the shape of the VSF at forward angles could have a significant influence in determining reflectance signals for turbid waters.

  12. Influence of phosphate-buffered sucrose solution on early graft function in feline renal autotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Masaaki; Okamura, Yasuhiko; Shimamura, Shunsuke; Katayama, Rieko; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Uzuka, Yuji

    2014-10-01

    Graft perfusion with cold heparinized saline has known to induce ischemia and reperfusion injury in feline kidney transplantation. In this study, the effects of phosphate-buffered sucrose solution and heparinized saline solution on early kidney graft function were compared in feline kidney autotransplantation. Perfusion of grafts with or without hypothermic storage with chilled phosphate-buffered sucrose solution prevented ischemia and reperfusion injury despite a very short ischemic time. The results of our study suggest that phosphate-buffered sucrose perfusion and storage solution should be effective to reduce ischemia and reperfusion injury despite a very short ischemic time in feline kidney transplantation.

  13. Characterizing the avian gut microbiota: membership, driving influences, and potential function

    PubMed Central

    Waite, David W.; Taylor, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Birds represent a diverse and evolutionarily successful lineage, occupying a wide range of niches throughout the world. Like all vertebrates, avians harbor diverse communities of microorganisms within their guts, which collectively fulfill important roles in providing the host with nutrition and protection from pathogens. Although many studies have investigated the role of particular microbes in the guts of avian species, there has been no attempt to unify the results of previous, sequence-based studies to examine the factors that shape the avian gut microbiota as a whole. In this study, we present the first meta-analysis of the avian gut microbiota, using 16S rRNA gene sequences obtained from a range of publicly available clone-library and amplicon pyrosequencing data. We investigate community membership and structure, as well as probe the roles of some of the key biological factors that influence the gut microbiota of other vertebrates, such as host phylogeny, location within the gut, diet, and association with humans. Our results indicate that, across avian studies, the microbiota demonstrates a similar phylum-level composition to that of mammals. Host bird species is the most important factor in determining community composition, although sampling site, diet, and captivity status also contribute. These analyses provide a first integrated look at the composition of the avian microbiota, and serve as a foundation for future studies in this area. PMID:24904538

  14. Influence of hydrophilic polymers on functional properties and wound healing efficacy of hydrocolloid based wound dressings.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Kim, Kyeong Soo; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Dong Shik; Kim, Jin Ki; Yong, Chul Soon; Youn, Yu Seok; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different hydrophilic polymers on the swelling, bioadhesion and mechanical strength of hydrocolloid wound dressings (HCDs) in order to provide an appropriate composition for a hydrocolloid wound dressing system. In this study, the HCDs were prepared with styrene-isoprene-styrene copolymer (SIS) and polyisobutylene (PIB) as the base using a hot melting method. Additionally, numerous SIS/PIB-based HCDs were prepared with six hydrophilic polymers, and their wound dressing properties were assessed. Finally, the wound healing efficacy of the selected formulations was compared to a commercial wound dressing. The swelling ratio, bioadhesive force and mechanical strengths of HCDs were increased in the order of sodium alginate>sodium CMC=poloxamer=HPMC>PVA=PVP, sodium alginate>sodium CMC=poloxamer>PVA>HPMC=PVP and sodium alginate≥PVA>PVP=HPMC=sodium CMC>poloxamer, respectively. Among the hydrophilic polymers tested, sodium alginate most enhanced the swelling capacity, bioadhesive force and mechanical strengths. Thus, the hydrophilic polymers played great role in the swelling, bioadhesion and mechanical strength of SIS/PIB-based HCDs. The HCD formulation composed of PIB, SIS, liquid paraffin and sodium alginate at the weight ratio of 20/25/12/43 gave better wound dressing properties and more excellent wound healing efficacy than the commercial wound dressing. Therefore, the novel HCD formulation could be a promising hydrocolloid system for wound dressings.

  15. Influence of Phenol-Enriched Olive Oils on Human Intestinal Immune Function

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Peláez, Sandra; Castañer, Olga; Solà, Rosa; Motilva, María José; Castell, Margarida; Pérez-Cano, Francisco José; Fitó, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Olive oil (OO) phenolic compounds (PC) are able to influence gut microbial populations and metabolic output. Our aim was to investigate whether these compounds and changes affect the mucosal immune system. In a randomized, controlled, double blind cross-over human trial, for three weeks, preceded by two-week washout periods, 10 hypercholesterolemic participants ingested 25 mL/day of three raw virgin OO differing in their PC concentration and origin: (1) an OO containing 80 mg PC/kg (VOO); (2) a PC-enriched OO containing 500 mg PC/kg from OO (FVOO); and (3) a PC-enriched OO containing a mixture of 500 mg PC/kg from OO and thyme (1:1, FVOOT). Intestinal immunity (fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgA-coated bacteria) and inflammation markers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and fecal interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and calprotectin) was analyzed. The ingestion of high amounts of OO PC, as contained in FVOO, tended to increase the proportions of IgA-coated bacteria and increased plasma levels of CRP. However, lower amounts of OO PC (VOO) and the combination of two PC sources (FVOOT) did not show significant effects on the variables investigated. Results indicate a potential stimulation of the immune system with very high doses of OO PC, which should be further investigated. PMID:27077879

  16. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function. 1: Effect of modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, A.G.; Dubovick, B.V.; Degtyariov, I.G.; Pronkevich, A.N.

    1995-09-01

    Dependence of the microwave effect on modulation parameters (pulse width, duty ratio, and peak intensity) was studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The rate and amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches were measured during and after a 2 min exposure to 915 or 885 MHz microwaves and were compared to preexposure values. The studied ranges of modulation parameters were: pulse width, 10{sup {minus}6}--10{sup {minus}2} s; duty ratio, 7:100000, and peak specific absorption rate, 100--3,000 W/kg. Combinations of the parameters were chosen by chance, and about 400 various exposure regimes were tested. The experiments established that no regime was effective unless the average microwave power was high enough to induce preparation heating (0.1--0.4 C). The twitch rate instantly increased, and the amplitude decreased, as the temperature rose; similar changes could be induced by equivalent conventional heating. the data provide evidence that the effect of short-term microwave exposure on the isolated heart pacemaker and contractile functions depends on pulse modulation just as much as modulation determines the average absorbed power. These functions demonstrated no specific dependence on exposure parameters such as frequency or power windows.

  17. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function: I. Effect of modulation.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, A G; Dubovick, B V; Degtyariov, I G; Pronkevich, A N

    1995-01-01

    Dependence of the microwave effect on modulation parameters (pulse width, duty ratio, and peak intensity) was studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The rate and amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches were measured during and after a 2 min exposure to 915 or 885 MHz microwaves and were compared to preexposure values. The studied ranges of modulation parameters were: pulse width, 10(-6)-10(-2) s; duty ratio, 7:100000, and peak specific absorption rate, 100-3000 W/kg. Combinations of the parameters were chosen by chance, and about 400 various exposure regimes were tested. The experiments established that no regime was effective unless the average microwave power was high enough to induce preparation heating (0.1-0.4 degree C). The twitch rate instantly increased, and the amplitude decreased, as the temperature rose; similar changes could be induced by equivalent conventional heating. The data provide evidence that the effect of short-term microwave exposure on the isolated heart pacemaker and contractile functions depends on pulse modulation just as much as modulation determines the average absorbed power. These functions demonstrated no specific dependence on exposure parameters such as frequency or power windows.

  18. Mitochondrial Haplogroup Influences Motor Function in Long-Term HIV-1-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Ashley; Giovannetti, Tania; Pirrone, Vanessa; Nonnemacher, Michael R.; Passic, Shendra; Kercher, Katherine; Williams, Jean W.; Wigdahl, Brian; Dampier, William; Libon, David J.; Sell, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary divergence of the mitochondrial genome has given rise to distinct haplogroups. These haplogroups have arisen in specific geographical locations and are responsible for subtle functional changes in the mitochondria that may provide an evolutionary advantage in a given environment. Based on these functional differences, haplogroups could define disease susceptibility in chronic settings. In this study, we undertook a detailed neuropsychological analysis of a cohort of long-term HIV-1-infected individuals in conjunction with sequencing of their mitochondrial genomes. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the best model for predicting both working memory and declarative memory were age and years since diagnosis. In contrast, years since diagnosis and sub-haplogroup were significantly predictive of psychomotor speed. Consistent with this, patients with haplogroup L3e obtained better scores on psychomotor speed and dexterity tasks when compared to the remainder of the cohort, suggesting that this haplogroup provides a protective advantage when faced with the combined stress of HIV-1 infection and long-term antiretroviral therapies. Differential performance on declarative memory tasks was noted for individuals with other sub-L haplogroups, but these differences were not as robust as the association between L3e and psychomotor speed and dexterity tasks. This work provides evidence that mitochondrial haplogroup is related to neuropsychological test performance among patients in chronic disease settings such as HIV-1 infection. PMID:27711166

  19. Influence of Extraction Method on Quality and Functionality of Broccoli Juice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Gyu; Kim, Jin-Hee; Son, Min-Jung; Lee, Eun-Ju; Park, Woo-Dong; Kim, Jong-Boo; Lee, Sam-Pin; Lee, In-Seon

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to compare the quality and functionality of broccoli juice as affected by extraction method. Broccoli juice was extracted using method I (NUC Kuvings silent juicer), method II (NUC centrifugal juicer), and method III (NUC mixer), and the quality properties of the broccoli juices were analyzed using three different methods. Additionally, the antioxidative, anticancer, and anti-hyperglycemic activities of broccoli juice prepared by the three different methods were investigated in vitro. The broccoli juice made by method I contained the highest polyphenol and flavonoid contents at 1,226.24 mg/L and 1,018.32 mg/L, respectively. Particularly, broccoli juice prepared by method I showed higher DPPH and ABTS radical scavenging activities than those of the other samples. Additionally, broccoli juice made by method I showed the highest growth inhibitory effects against HeLa, A549, AGS, and HT-29 cancer cells. Broccoli juice prepared by method I had the highest α-glucosidase inhibitory effects. These results indicate that there are important differences in chemical and functional qualities between juice extraction techniques. PMID:24471122

  20. The influence of microtextured basal lamina analog topography on keratinocyte function and epidermal organization.

    PubMed

    Downing, Brett R; Cornwell, Kevin; Toner, Mehmet; Pins, George D

    2005-01-01

    The rational design of future bioengineered skin substitutes requires an understanding of the mechanisms by which the three-dimensional microarchitecture of tissue scaffolds modulates keratinocyte function. Microtextured basal lamina analogs were developed to investigate the relationship between the characteristic topography at the dermal-epidermal interface of native skin and keratinocyte function. Microfabrication techniques were used to create master patterns, negative replicates, and collagen membranes with ridges and channels of length scales (e.g., grooves of 50-200 microm in depth and width) similar to the invaginations found in basal lamina at the dermal-epidermal junction of native skin. Keratinocytes were seeded on the surfaces of basal lamina analogs, and histological analyses were performed after 7 days of tissue culture at the air-liquid interface. The keratinocytes formed a differentiated and stratified epidermis that conformed to the features of the microtextured membranes. Morphometric analyses of immunostained skin equivalents suggest that keratinocyte stratification and differentiation increases as channel depth increases and channel width decreases. This trend was most pronounced in channels with the highest depth-to-width ratios (i.e., 200 microm deep, 50 microm wide). It is anticipated that the findings from these studies will elucidate design parameters to enhance the performance of future bioengineered skin substitutes.

  1. Epistatic interactions influence terrestrial-marine functional shifts in cetacean rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Sarah Z; Chang, Belinda S W

    2017-03-15

    Like many aquatic vertebrates, whales have blue-shifting spectral tuning substitutions in the dim-light visual pigment, rhodopsin, that are thought to increase photosensitivity in underwater environments. We have discovered that known spectral tuning substitutions also have surprising epistatic effects on another function of rhodopsin, the kinetic rates associated with light-activated intermediates. By using absorbance spectroscopy and fluorescence-based retinal release assays on heterologously expressed rhodopsin, we assessed both spectral and kinetic differences between cetaceans (killer whale) and terrestrial outgroups (hippo, bovine). Mutation experiments revealed that killer whale rhodopsin is unusually resilient to pleiotropic effects on retinal release from key blue-shifting substitutions (D83N and A292S), largely due to a surprisingly specific epistatic interaction between D83N and the background residue, S299. Ancestral sequence reconstruction indicated that S299 is an ancestral residue that predates the evolution of blue-shifting substitutions at the origins of Cetacea. Based on these results, we hypothesize that intramolecular epistasis helped to conserve rhodopsin's kinetic properties while enabling blue-shifting spectral tuning substitutions as cetaceans adapted to aquatic environments. Trade-offs between different aspects of molecular function are rarely considered in protein evolution, but in cetacean and other vertebrate rhodopsins, may underlie multiple evolutionary scenarios for the selection of specific amino acid substitutions.

  2. Influence of using nanoobjects as filler on functionality-based energy use of nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roes, A. L.; Tabak, L. B.; Shen, L.; Nieuwlaar, E.; Patel, M. K.

    2010-08-01

    The goal of our study was to investigate the potential benefits of reinforcing polymer matrices with nanoobjects for structural applications by looking at both the mechanical properties and environmental impacts. For determining the mechanical properties, we applied the material indices defined by Ashby for stiffness and strength. For the calculation of environmental impacts, we applied the life cycle assessment methodology, focusing on non-renewable energy use (NREU). NREU has shown to be a good indicator also for other environmental impacts. We then divided the NREU by the appropriate Ashby index to obtain the `functionality-based NREU'. We studied 23 different nanocomposites, based on thermoplastic and thermosetting polymer matrices and organophilic montmorillonite, silica, carbon nanotubes (single-walled and multiwalled) and calcium carbonate as filler. For 17 of these, we saw a decrease of the functionality-based NREU with increasing filler content. We draw the conclusion that the use of nanoobjects as filler can have benefits from both an environmental point of view and with respect to mechanical properties.

  3. Functional hierarchy of two L domains in Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus (PERV) that influence release and infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Katherine T.; Martina, Yuri; Harrison, Frank; Wilson, Carolyn A.

    2008-01-01

    The Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus (PERV) Gag protein contains two late (L) domain motifs, PPPY and P(F/S)AP. Using viral release assays we demonstrate that PPPY is the dominant L domain involved in PERV release. PFAP represents a novel retroviral L domain variant and is defined by abnormal viral assembly phenotypes visualized by electron microscopy and attenuation of early PERV release as measured by viral genomes. PSAP is functionally dominant over PFAP in early PERV release. PSAP virions are 3.5-fold more infectious in vitro by TCID50 and in vivo results in more RNA positive tissues and higher levels of proviral DNA using our human PERV-A receptor (HuPAR-2) transgenic mouse model (Martina et al., 2006. Journal of Virology. 80: 3135-46). The functional hierarchies displayed by PERV L domains, demonstrates that L domain selection in viral evolution exists to promote efficient viral assembly, release and infectivity in the virus-host context. PMID:18355887

  4. Influence of a critical single nucleotide polymorphism on nuclear receptor PXR-promoter function.

    PubMed

    Rana, Manjul; Coshic, Poonam; Goswami, Ravinder; Tyagi, Rakesh K

    2017-02-15

    The Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor (PXR; NR1I2) is a ligand-modulated transcription factor that belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily. It is expressed at higher levels primarily in liver and intestine as compared to the levels in several other organs. It is activated by a broad spectrum of xenobiotics and endobiotics. The primary function of PXR is to regulate the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters and prevent the accumulation of toxic chemicals in the body, thereby maintaining body's homeostasis. In this study, we identified a C/T single nucleotide polymorphism at position -831 from the transcriptional start site of the PXR gene promoter and examined the functional significance of this variant using both the luciferase reporter gene assays and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Transient transfection experiments showed that the T-allele was associated with significantly greater transcriptional activity than the C-allele of SNP rs3814055. These results indicate that the -831C/T polymorphism has a direct effect on transcriptional regulation of PXR gene. This allelic variation may be a potential genetic marker that can help identify individuals at higher risk for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

  5. Influence of Pharmacotherapy on Cognitive Functions in Depression: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Orzechowska, Agata; Filip, Maria; Gałecki, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    In addition to irregularities relating to the emotional sphere, the cognitive impairment in depression is a part of the clinical picture of this affective disorder. Some of the cognitive deficits may be associated with the severity of psychopathological symptoms of depression, while others are more established and can also occur during periods of remission. The participation in cognitive functioning of people with depression have a number of factors: the severity of symptoms, concurrent anxiety disorders, gender, age, education, duration of the disease, and number of previous episodes, as well as general somatic health or medication used. The pharmacological treatment may have varying impact on the different areas of cognition. Research on pharmacotherapy for depression and its impact on cognitive functioning continue and are very popular among clinicians and researchers. The relationship between antidepressants and cognitive abilities is always modulated by the type of depressive disorder, neurobiological factors, and demographic variables. This article presents a review of the studies relating to assessment of the effects of various antidepressants on cognitive abilities among patients with depression. PMID:26599597

  6. Ploidy influences the functional attributes of de novo lager yeast hybrids.

    PubMed

    Krogerus, Kristoffer; Arvas, Mikko; De Chiara, Matteo; Magalhães, Frederico; Mattinen, Laura; Oja, Merja; Vidgren, Virve; Yue, Jia-Xing; Liti, Gianni; Gibson, Brian

    2016-08-01

    The genomes of hybrid organisms, such as lager yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae × Saccharomyces eubayanus), contain orthologous genes, the functionality and effect of which may differ depending on their origin and copy number. How the parental subgenomes in lager yeast contribute to important phenotypic traits such as fermentation performance, aroma production, and stress tolerance remains poorly understood. Here, three de novo lager yeast hybrids with different ploidy levels (allodiploid, allotriploid, and allotetraploid) were generated through hybridization techniques without genetic modification. The hybrids were characterized in fermentations of both high gravity wort (15 °P) and very high gravity wort (25 °P), which were monitored for aroma compound and sugar concentrations. The hybrid strains with higher DNA content performed better during fermentation and produced higher concentrations of flavor-active esters in both worts. The hybrid strains also outperformed both the parent strains. Genome sequencing revealed that several genes related to the formation of flavor-active esters (ATF1, ATF2¸ EHT1, EEB1, and BAT1) were present in higher copy numbers in the higher ploidy hybrid strains. A direct relationship between gene copy number and transcript level was also observed. The measured ester concentrations and transcript levels also suggest that the functionality of the S. cerevisiae- and S. eubayanus-derived gene products differs. The results contribute to our understanding of the complex molecular mechanisms that determine phenotypes in lager yeast hybrids and are expected to facilitate targeted strain development through interspecific hybridization.

  7. Influence of donor–recipient gender mismatch on graft function and survival following lung transplantation†

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Antonio; Moreno, Paula; Illana, Jennifer; Espinosa, Dionisio; Baamonde, Carlos; Arango, Elisabet; Algar, Francisco Javier; Salvatierra, Angel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES In current practice, donors and recipients are not matched for gender in lung transplantation. However, some data have suggested a possible effect of gender combinations on lung transplant outcomes. We examined whether donor–recipient (D/R) gender mismatch is related to adverse outcomes after lung transplantation in terms of early and long-term graft function and survival. METHODS We reviewed 256 donors and lung transplant recipients over a 14-year period. Patients were distributed into four groups: Group A (D/R: female/female), Group B (D/R: male/male), Group C (D/R: female/male), Group D (D/R: male/female). Donor and recipient variables were compared among groups, including early graft function, 30-day mortality, freedom from bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS), and long-term survival. RESULTS Group A: 57 (22%), Group B: 99 (39%), Group C: 62 (24%), Group D: 38 (15%) transplants (P = 0.001). Donor age was 29 ± 14, 27 ± 12, 33 ± 13 and 23 ± 12 years for Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.004). Recipient age was 31 ± 15, 44 ± 17, 42 ± 16 and 30 ± 16 years for Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.000). PaO2/FiO2 (mmHg) 24 h post-transplant was: Group A: 276 ± 144, Group B: 297 ± 131, Group C: 344 ± 133 and Group D: 238 ± 138 (P = 0.015). Primary graft dysfunction developed in 23, 14, 17 and 21% of recipients from Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.45). Operative mortality was 4.4, 6.5, 5.2 and 2%, for recipients from Groups A, B, C and D, respectively (P = 0.66). Freedom from BOS was 73, 59 and 36% for gender-matched transplants vs 76, 67 and 40% for gender-mismatched transplants at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively (P = 0.618), without differences among groups. A non-significant survival benefit was observed for female recipients, irrespective of the donor gender. CONCLUSIONS Donor–recipient gender mismatch does not have a negative impact on early graft function and mortality following lung transplantation. There is a

  8. Uptake of cerium oxide nanoparticles and its influence on functions of mouse leukemic monocyte macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiangyan; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Pengfei; Chen, Yiqi; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou

    2015-01-01

    Exposure of the CeO2 nanoparticles (NPs) causes a public concern on their potential health risk due to their wide applications in the fields of fuel additive, commodities, pharmaceutical, and other industries. In this study, the interactions between two commercial CeO2 NPs (D-CeO2 from Degussa and PC-CeO2 from PlasmaChem) and mouse leukemic monocyte macrophage Raw264.7 cells were investigated to provide a fast and in-depth understanding of the biological influences of the NPs. Both types of the CeO2 NPs had a negative surface charge around -12 mV and showed a tendency to form aggregates with sizes of 191 ± 5.9 and 60.9 ± 2.8 nm in cell culture environment, respectively. The cellular uptake of the CeO2 NPs increased along with the increase of feeding dosage and prolongation of the culture time. The PC-CeO2 NPs had a faster uptake rate and reached higher cellular loading amount at the highest feeding concentration (200 µg/mL). In general, both types of the CeO2 NPs had rather small cytotoxicity even with a dosage as high as 200 µg/mL. The D-CeO2 NPs showed a relative stronger cytotoxicity especially at higher concentrations and longer incubation time. The NPs were dispersed in vacuoles (most likely endosomes and lysosomes) and cytoplasm. Although both types of the CeO2 NPs could suppress the production of reactive oxygen species, they impaired the mitochondria membrane potential to some extent. The cytoskeleton organization was altered and consequently the cell adhesion ability decreased after uptake of both types of the CeO2 NPs.

  9. Policy shifts influence the functional changes of the CNH systems on the Mongolian plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiquan; John, Ranjeet; Shao, Changliang; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Yaoqi; Amarjargal, Amartuvshin; Brown, Daniel G.; Qi, Jiaguo; Han, Juanjuan; Lafortezza, Raffaele; Dong, Gang

    2015-08-01

    By applying the concept of the coupled natural and human system (CNH), we compared spatiotemporal changes in livestock (LSK), land cover, and ecosystem production to understand the relative roles that natural and social driving forces have on CNH dynamics on the Mongolia plateau. We used socioeconomic and physical data at prefecture level for Inner Mongolia and Mongolia from 1981 through 2010 to represent changes in net primary productivity (NPP), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), precipitation, annual average temperature, LSK, livestock density (LSKD), land cover change (LCC), gross domestic production (GDP), and population (POP). The ratios such as LSK:NPP, LSKD: EVI, LSKD:albedo, LSK:POP, and LSK:GDP were examined and compared between Inner Mongolia and Mongolia, and structural equation modeling (SEM) was applied to quantify the complex interactions. Substantial differences in LSK, POP, and economic development were found among the biomes and between Inner Mongolia and Mongolia. When various indicators for policy shifts—such as the World Trade Organization (WTO) for China, the Third Campaign to Reclaim Abandoned Agriculture Lands (ATAR-3), and the Grain for Green Program for China (GFG)—were added into our SEM, the results showed significant change in the strength of the above relationships. After China joined the WTO, the relationships in Inner Mongolia between LSKD:LCC and LSKD:NPP were immensely strengthened, whereas relationships in NPP:LCC were weakened. In Mongolia, the ATAR-3 program first appeared to be an insignificant policy, but the Collapse of the Soviet Union enhanced the correlation between LSKD:LCC, weakened the connection of LCC:NPP, and did not affect LSKD:NPP. We conclude that human influences on the Mongolian CNH system exceeded those of the biophysical changes, but that the significance varies in time and per biome, as well as between Inner Mongolia and Mongolia.

  10. Landscape Position Influences Microbial Composition and Function via Redistribution of Soil Water across a Watershed

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhe; Riveros-Iregui, Diego A.; Jones, Ryan T.; McDermott, Timothy R.; Dore, John E.; McGlynn, Brian L.; Emanuel, Ryan E.

    2015-01-01

    Subalpine forest ecosystems influence global carbon cycling. However, little is known about the compositions of their soil microbial communities and how these may vary with soil environmental conditions. The goal of this study was to characterize the soil microbial communities in a subalpine forest watershed in central Montana (Stringer Creek Watershed within the Tenderfoot Creek Experimental Forest) and to investigate their relationships with environmental conditions and soil carbonaceous gases. As assessed by tagged Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, community composition and structure differed significantly among three landscape positions: high upland zones (HUZ), low upland zones (LUZ), and riparian zones (RZ). Soil depth effects on phylogenetic diversity and β-diversity varied across landscape positions, being more evident in RZ than in HUZ. Mantel tests revealed significant correlations between microbial community assembly patterns and the soil environmental factors tested (water content, temperature, oxygen, and pH) and soil carbonaceous gases (carbon dioxide concentration and efflux and methane concentration). With one exception, methanogens were detected only in RZ soils. In contrast, methanotrophs were detected in all three landscape positions. Type I methanotrophs dominated RZ soils, while type II methanotrophs dominated LUZ and HUZ soils. The relative abundances of methanotroph populations correlated positively with soil water content (R = 0.72, P < 0.001) and negatively with soil oxygen (R = −0.53, P = 0.008). Our results suggest the coherence of soil microbial communities within and differences in communities between landscape positions in a subalpine forested watershed that reflect historical and contemporary environmental conditions. PMID:26431971

  11. [Opposite Semax influence on conditioning and functional disturbances of avoidance responses in rats].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    Semax effects on formation of active avoidance reaction in rats in different experimental models have been studied. It was shown that intraperitoneal Semax administration at a dose of 0.05 mg/kg accelerated acquisition of one-way active avoidance response when rats were trained to avoid electric foot-shock by jumping on the shelf. When rats were trained in shuttle-box the peptide increased the electroshock threshold value required to provocation of rat moving in experimental box and delayed acquisition of two-way active avoidance response. At the same time Semax stimulated avoidance response restoration in shuttle-box after functional disturbances induced by acute modification of cause-effect and spatial relationships in experimental environment. Data obtained support nootropic properties of Semax.

  12. The influence of corticosteroids and theophylline on cerebral function. A review.

    PubMed

    Schraa, J C; Dirks, J F

    1982-08-01

    Evidence indicating that corticosteroid therapy may adversely affect attention and memory in asthmatic subjects is reviewed. The potential impact of corticosteroid dosage levels (high versus low) and treatment regimens (daily versus alternate day) on attention and memory is discussed. Findings indicate that the suppression of ACTH by corticosteroids may have different effects on attention and memory as a function of the sex of the asthmatic patient. The need to establish what the effects of theophylline-induced reductions of cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygen tension are on higher cognitive processes are outlined. The importance of establishing whether or not medications commonly used for the treatment of asthma create deficits of memory or attention that interfere with medical compliance is emphasized.

  13. Longitudinal Examination of Adaptive Behavior in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Influence of Executive Function.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Cara E; Anthony, Laura Gutermuth; Strang, John F; Dudley, Katerina; Wallace, Gregory L; Naiman, Daniel Q; Kenworthy, Lauren

    2016-02-01

    This study characterizes longitudinal change in adaptive behavior in 64 children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) without intellectual disability evaluated on multiple occasions, and examines whether prior estimate of executive function (EF) problems predicts future adaptive behavior scores. Compared to standardized estimates for their developmental stage, adaptive behavior in most participants was impaired and did not improve over time. Prior EF predicted later adaptive behavior in daily living skills and socialization domains after controlling for age and IQ. Self-monitoring behaviors robustly predicted later adaptive behavior in all domains (d = 0.60-0.94). Results support targeting treatment of adaptive skills in ASD, as well as the importance of assessing for EF problems that may contribute to adaptive behavior difficulties.

  14. Do 12-week yoga program influence respiratory function of elderly women?

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Lídia Aguiar; de Melo, Helton Fabrício; Garay, Ana Paula; Reis, Victor Machado; Aidar, Felipe José; Bodas, Ana Rita; Garrido, Nuno Domingos; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó

    2014-09-29

    Aging produces several respiratory limitations and reduces tolerance to physical efforts, sometimes leading to pulmonary diseases in the elderly. The literature draws attention to the possible benefits of Yoga practice among the elderly, presenting evidence for significant improvements in quality of life. It was hypothesized that yoga practice can improve respiratory function in the elderly. The effects of a yoga program on pulmonary volumes and respiratory muscle strength were verified in 36 elderly women divided into a yoga group [YG] (63.1 ± 13.3 years of age) and a control group (61.0 ± 6.9 years of age). Maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure (MIP and MEP) were assessed by a manovacuometer and tidal volume (VT), vital capacity (VC) and minute ventilation (VE) were measured by a ventilometer. The program comprised 65 min sessions, 3 times/week during 12 weeks. The heart rate and respiratory rate decreased significantly in the YG (76-39 ± 8-03 vs. 74-61±10.26 bpm and 18.61 ± 3.15 vs. 16.72 ± 3.12 resp/min, respectively). In the YG, VT and VE increased significantly (0.55 ± 0.22 vs. 0.64 ± 0.2 ml and 9.19 ± 2.39 vs. 10.05 ± 2.11 ml, respectively), as well as VC (1.48 ± 0.45 vs. 2.03 ± 0.72 ml). Improvements were also found in MIP and MEP in the YG (62.17 ± 14.77 vs. 73.06 ± 20.16 cmH2O and 80.56 ± 23.94 vs. 86.39 ± 20.16 cmH2O, respectively). It was concluded that a 12-week yoga program significantly improves pulmonary function of aged women.

  15. Do 12-Week Yoga Program Influence Respiratory Function of Elderly Women?

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Lídia Aguiar; de Melo, Helton Fabrício; Garay, Ana Paula; Reis, Victor Machado; Aidar, Felipe José; Bodas, Ana Rita; Garrido, Nuno Domingos; de Oliveira, Ricardo Jacó

    2014-01-01

    Aging produces several respiratory limitations and reduces tolerance to physical efforts, sometimes leading to pulmonary diseases in the elderly. The literature draws attention to the possible benefits of Yoga practice among the elderly, presenting evidence for significant improvements in quality of life. It was hypothesized that yoga practice can improve respiratory function in the elderly. The effects of a yoga program on pulmonary volumes and respiratory muscle strength were verified in 36 elderly women divided into a yoga group [YG] (63.1 ± 13.3 years of age) and a control group (61.0 ± 6.9 years of age). Maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure (MIP and MEP) were assessed by a manovacuometer and tidal volume (VT), vital capacity (VC) and minute ventilation (VE) were measured by a ventilometer. The program comprised 65 min sessions, 3 times/week during 12 weeks. The heart rate and respiratory rate decreased significantly in the YG (76-39 ± 8-03 vs. 74-61±10.26 bpm and 18.61 ± 3.15 vs. 16.72 ± 3.12 resp/min, respectively). In the YG, VT and VE increased significantly (0.55 ± 0.22 vs. 0.64 ± 0.2 ml and 9.19 ± 2.39 vs. 10.05 ± 2.11 ml, respectively), as well as VC (1.48 ± 0.45 vs. 2.03 ± 0.72 ml). Improvements were also found in MIP and MEP in the YG (62.17 ± 14.77 vs. 73.06 ± 20.16 cmH2O and 80.56 ± 23.94 vs. 86.39 ± 20.16 cmH2O, respectively). It was concluded that a 12-week yoga program significantly improves pulmonary function of aged women. PMID:25713658

  16. Quantifying the cribriform plate: influences of allometry, function, and phylogeny in Carnivora.

    PubMed

    Bird, Deborah J; Amirkhanian, Arsineh; Pang, Benison; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2014-11-01

    The small, perforated bony cup of the anterior cranial fossa called the cribriform plate (CP) is perhaps the best-preserved remnant of olfactory anatomy in fossil mammal skulls. The CP and its myriad foramina record the passage of peripheral olfactory nerves from nasal cavity to olfactory bulb. Previous work has suggested that CP surface area reflects aspects of olfactory capacity (as inferred from habitat and observed behavior) in mammals. To further explore the utility of CP as a proxy for olfactory function, we designed novel, nondestructive digital methods to quantify CP morphology from dry skulls. Using CT scans and 3-D imaging software, we quantified CP features from 42 species of Carnivora, a group that represents a wide spectrum of ecologies and sensory demands. Two metrics, CP surface area (CPSA) and cumulative CP foramina area (FXSA), scaled to skull length with negative allometry, and differed between aquatic and terrestrial species, with the former having reduced areas. Number of foramina (NF) was not correlated with skull length but tended to be greater in caniforms than feliforms. Both CPSA and FXSA are well correlated with ethmoturbinal surface area, a known osteological correlate of olfactory function. This suggests that CPSA and FXSA are useful proxies for olfactory ability, especially when studying fossils or skulls in which turbinals are not preserved. Total area of CP foramina (FXSA), an exacting measure of olfactory nerve endocasts, is tightly correlated with CPSA. Because of this, it may be desirable to use CPSA alone as a proxy given that it is easier to measure than FXSA.

  17. Influence of basal nitric oxide secretion on cardiac function in man.

    PubMed Central

    Clarkson, P B; Lim, P O; MacDonald, T M

    1995-01-01

    1. Nitric oxide is recognised as an important biological mediator, which is thought to be involved in cardiovascular homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of basal nitric oxide synthesis on cardiac function in man, by blocking nitric oxide synthesis with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). 2. Eight normal volunteers were studied on two separate occasions. Measurements of heart rate, blood pressure and echocardiographic indices of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function were made at baseline on each day and every 20 min during incremental infusion of L-NMMA (0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg kg-1 h-1) or placebo. 3. A trend towards reduction in heart rate was observed with L-NMMA infusion although this did not reach statistical significance, whereas significant increases in both systolic blood pressure (at 2.0 mg kg-1 h-1) and systemic vascular resistance index (at 0.5 mg kg-1 h-1) were seen. 4. L-NMMA infusion caused significant reductions in stroke distance and cardiac index, although there was no change in the ratio of end systolic wall stress/end systolic volume index (an afterload independent index of left ventricular systolic performance). 5. The isovolumic relaxation time significantly increased with L-NMMA infusion, together with a significant reduction in the 'E' wave flow velocity integral. Reductions in both peak E/A ratio and E/A flow velocity integral ratio were also seen, although these failed to reach statistical significance. 6. In conclusion, the basal generation of nitric oxide in man appears to maintain a vasodilated state, and modifies left ventricular diastolic filling parameters. PMID:8554930

  18. Temperature and transmural region influence functional measurements in unloaded left ventricular cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Charles S; Campbell, Kenneth S

    2013-01-01

    Intact cardiomyocytes are increasingly being used to investigate the molecular mechanisms of contraction and to screen new therapeutic compounds. The function of the cardiomyocytes is often measured from the calcium transients and sarcomere length profiles. We studied the role of experimental temperature and transmural region on indices of function in freshly isolated, unloaded cardiomyocytes. Intact cardiomyocytes were isolated from the subendocardium, midmyocardium, and subepicardium of 3-month-old Sprague-Dawley rats. Myocytes from each region were studied at 25°C, 31°C, and 37°C. Cytosolic calcium transients were measured using Fura-2 fluorescence, whereas sarcomere length shortening and relengthening profiles were measured using high-speed video capture. For both the calcium transients and sarcomere length profiles, the time to peak and the time to half relaxation decreased significantly with increasing temperature. Increasing temperature also raised the minimum and maximum calcium levels of all cells. Of note, there was a reduced coefficient of variation (standard deviation divided by the mean) at higher temperatures for calcium fluorescence amplitudes, time to peak calcium, and rates of sarcomeric shortening and relengthening. The amplitudes and minimum of the calcium transients were significantly dependent on transmural region, and several sarcomere length parameters exhibited statistical interactions between temperature and transmural region. Together, these results show that biological variability can be reduced by performing experiments at 37°C rather than at room temperature, and by isolating cells from a specific transmural region. Adopting these procedures will improve the statistical power of subsequent analyses and increase the efficiency of future experiments. PMID:24400159

  19. Changes at the KinA PAS-A Dimerization Interface Influence Histidine Kinase Function

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, James; Tomchick, Diana R.; Brautigam, Chad A.; Machius, Mischa; Kort, Remco; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.; Gardner, Kevin H.

    2008-11-12

    The Bacillus subtilis KinA protein is a histidine protein kinase that controls the commitment of this organism to sporulate in response to nutrient deprivation and several other conditions. Prior studies indicated that the N-terminal Per-ARNT-Sim domain (PAS-A) plays a critical role in the catalytic activity of this enzyme, as demonstrated by the significant decrease of the autophosphorylation rate of a KinA protein lacking this domain. On the basis of the environmental sensing role played by PAS domains in a wide range of proteins, including other bacterial sensor kinases, it has been suggested that the PAS-A domain plays an important regulatory role in KinA function. We have investigated this potential by using a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods to examine PAS-A structure and function, both in isolation and within the intact protein. Here, we present the X-ray crystal structure of the KinA PAS-A domain, showing that it crystallizes as a homodimer using {beta}-sheet/{beta}-sheet packing interactions as observed for several other PAS domain complexes. Notably, we observed two dimers with tertiary and quaternary structure differences in the crystalline lattice, indicating significant structural flexibility in these domains. To confirm that KinA PAS-A also forms dimers in solution, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy, gel filtration chromatography, and analytical ultracentrifugation, the results of which are all consistent with the crystallographic results. We experimentally tested the importance of several residues at the dimer interface using site-directed mutagenesis, finding changes in the PAS-A domain that significantly alter KinA enzymatic activity in vitro and in vivo. These results support the importance of PAS domains within KinA and other histidine kinases and suggest possible routes for natural or artificial regulation of kinase activity.

  20. The frequency and influence of gallbladder varices on gallbladder functions in patients with portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chawla, A; Dewan, R; Sarin, S K

    1995-11-01

    Gallbladder varices have been reported in patients with portal hypertension. The exact frequency and significance of these collaterals in patients with cirrhotic and noncirrhotic portal hypertension is not known. One hundred and two patients with portal hypertension [38 with cirrhosis, 29 with noncirrhotic portal fibrosis (NCPF) and 35 with extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO)] and 25 healthy controls were studied. Gallbladder varices were seen at ultrasound as tortuous, dilated vessels in the wall or in the bed of the gallbladder. In 35 patients (19 patients with and 16 without gallbladder varices) and in 10 healthy controls, gallbladder functions were studied by determining fasting volume (FV) and then residual volume (RV) every 10 min over 1 h after giving a liquid meal of 420 k.cal. Ejection fraction (EF) was computed as a percentage by the formula: FV--RV/FV x 100. Twenty four (24%) patients had gallbladder varices: Five (13%) with cirrhosis, seven (24%) with NCPF, and 12 (34%) with EHPVO. FV in EHPVO patients was seen significantly more than in cirrhotics (31.6 +/- 15.4 vs 19.3 +/- 6.0 ml, p < 0.05). The RV and EF were not different in the three groups of patients compared with the controls. The EF was similar in patients with or without gallbladder varices (63.3 +/- 10.2% vs 64.6 +/- 10.4%). Gallbladder varices are often seen in portal hypertension, more often in EHPVO patients, and these collaterals cause some gallbladder stasis but do not impede gallbladder function and hence seem unlikely to contribute to gallstone formation.

  1. The Analysis of Polymorphism of Alcohol Dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) Gene and Influence of Liver Function Status in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Suhartini; Mustofa; Nurhantari, Yudha; Rianto, Bambang Udji Djoko

    2017-01-31

    Indonesian culture actually has no historical record of behaviors in consuming alcohol, but there are many recent reports of alcohol abuse among Asian people involving their traditional drink. In genotype studies, the damage of the liver caused by consuming alcohol is influenced by the presence of the polymorphism enzyme gene. The lack of study regarding such topic is a signal to further investigate ADH3 gene distribution and its effect on liver function status. The total of 197 research subjects of Javanese descent received alcohol dehydrogenase 3 (ADH3) genetic polymorphism and liver status tests in the city of Yogyakarta, Indonesian. An analytical study with a cross-sectional design was then conducted on the subjects, with the resulting isolated DNAs amplified through polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genotype of ADH3 was determined by means of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using Ssp1 restricting enzyme. Liver function status was assessed by measuring serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvate transaminase (SGPT) and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) using a photometric system. Gene types of ADH3*1 (2.1%), ADH3*2 (82.7%) and ADH3*1/3*2 (15.2%) on the subjects were concluded, finding that there is no difference between the gender. In conclusion most of the ADH3 gene polymorphism of the subjects were ADH3*2 (82.7%). The influence of genetic polymorphisms on the status of liver function in the subjects showed significant difference according to GGT measurement, but the same cannot be said on the other two values measuring SGOT and SGPT.

  2. [THE INFLUENCE OF PROGENITOR NEURO- CELLS SUPERNATANT ON THE LYMPHO- CYTES CYTOTOXIC FUNCTION IN RATS WITH GLIOMA].

    PubMed

    Liubich, L D; Lisyany, N I

    2015-01-01

    The impact of rat neurogenic progenitor cells supernatant (RPNS) on the cytotoxic function of lymphocytes in rats under conditions of physiological norm and experimentally modeled tumor (brain glioma strain 101.8) was studied. The research was carried out in animals with inoculated tumor without RPNS injection and with different regimes of RPNS injection (thrice repeated from 5th to 10th day after glioma inoculation as well as 1 week and 1 month before tumor inoculation). Comparison groups included rats without glioma who triple injected with RPNS; and intact animals (control). RPNS was received from suspension of neurogenic progenitor cells (NPC) of rat brain on 14th day of gestation and injected intraperitoneally (0,12 mg per animal). Cytotoxic function of lymphocytes of experimental rats was evaluated in MTT-colorimetric test with allogeneic glioma cells. RPNS administration increased the cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes in vitro tests with allogeneic tumor cells in intact animals (to 37-38%) as well as in rats with glioma (to 11-22%). Under the RPNS influence the life expectancy and median survival of tumor-bearing animals increased (an average of 3-4 days). RPNS input modes such as triple injection from 5th to 10th day after glioma inoculation and 1 week before inoculation were the most effective. Thus, indirect tumor-inhibiting effect under intraperitoneal. RPNS administration in rats with glioma is demonstrated, which is obviously due to increased efficiency of cytotoxic function of immune cells of animals with inoculated tumor under the influence of the factors produced by NPC.

  3. The effects of a lupin-enriched diet on oxidative stress and factors influencing vascular function in overweight subjects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingbin; Croft, Kevin D; Lee, Ya P; Mori, Trevor A; Puddey, Ian B; Sipsas, Sofia; Barden, Anne; Swinny, Ewald; Hodgson, Jonathan M

    2010-11-15

    A diet enriched in lupin kernel flour can lower blood pressure, but mechanisms responsible are unclear. Lupin is a source of polyphenols, protein, and L-arginine, factors that may influence blood pressure via effects on oxidative stress and vascular function. Therefore, we aimed to determine the effects of a lupin-enriched diet on oxidative stress and factors influencing vascular function as potential mechanisms for demonstrated benefits on blood pressure. Overweight men and women (n = 88) were recruited to a 16-week parallel-design study. Participants were randomly assigned to replace 15%-20% of their usual daily energy intake with white bread (control) or lupin kernel flour-enriched bread (lupin). All measurements were taken at baseline and 16 weeks. At baseline, plasma F₂-isoprostanes and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) were positively associated with blood pressure, and plasma nitrite was negatively associated with blood pressure (p < 0.05). For lupin relative to control, the estimated differences in plasma F₂-isoprostanes (45 pmol/L; 95%CI: -68, 158), urinary F₂-isoprostanes (17 pmol/mmol creatinine; 95%CI: -43, 76), plasma 20-HETE (75 pmol/L; 95%CI: -91, 241), and plasma nitrite (-0.3 μmol/L; 95%CI: -1.1, 0.4) were not significant. Although regular consumption of lupin-enriched bread can lower blood pressure, these results do not support for the hypothesis that this is via effects on oxidative stress or vascular function.

  4. [Influences of renal stone surgeries on renal function--evaluation of renal function with 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Katayama, Y

    1991-10-01

    From 1984 to 1990, 99mTc-DMSA renal scintigraphy was performed before and after nephrolithotomy (15 cases), pyelolithotomy (15 cases), percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL: 15 cases) and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL: 16 cases, 17 kidneys) in order to evaluate of influences of renal stone surgeries on split renal function. DMSA renal uptake change ratio of treated kidneys of nephrolithotomy (-24.94 +/- 5.60%) was significantly lower than that of PNL (-0.06 +/- 3.92%), pyelolithotomy (-4.08 +/- 4.79%) (p less than 0.01) and ESWL (-7.72 +/- 3.87%) (p less than 0.05). The average change ratios of contralateral kidneys were as follows: PNL 4.80 +/- 4.21% nephrolithotomy 4.67 +/- 4.73%, pyelolithotomy -1.46 +/- 5.39% and ESWL -2.02 +/- 4.44%. One to 3 weeks after PNL, the cold area on the renal image was found in 10 (66.7%) of 15 cases. In cases of ESWL, DMSA renal uptake decreased even 4-10 weeks (mean 7 weeks) after treatment. In conclusion, possivility of deterioration of renal function after ESWL was suggested.

  5. Influence of heme environment structure on dioxygen affinity for the dual function Amphitrite ornata hemoglobin/dehaloperoxidase. Insights into the evolutional structure-function adaptations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Shengfang; Sono, Masanori; Wang, Chunxue; Du, Jing; Lebioda, Lukasz; Dawson, John H.

    2014-05-15

    Sea worm, Amphitrite ornata, has evolved its globin (an O2 carrier) also to serves as a dehaloperoxidase (DHP) to detoxify haloaromatic pollutants generated by competing species. A previous mutagenesis study by our groups on both DHP and sperm whale myoglobin (SW Mb) revealed some structural factors that influence the dehaloperoxidase activities (significantly lower for Mb) of both proteins. Using an isocyanide/O2 partition constant measurement method in this study, we have examined the effects of these structural factors on the O2 equilibrium constants (KO2) of DHP, SW Mb, and their mutants. A clear trend of decreasing O2 affinity and increasing catalytic activity along with the increase in the distal His Nε–heme iron distance is observed. An H93K/T95H Mb double mutant mimicking the DHP proximal His positioning exhibited markedly enhanced O2 affinity, confirming the essential effect of proximal His rotation on the globin function of DHP. For DHP, the L100F, T56G and M86E variants showed the effects of distal volume, distal His flexibility and proximal electronic push, respectively, on the O2 affinity. This study provides insights into how DHP has evolved its heme environment to gain significantly enhanced peroxidase capability without compromising its primary function as an O2 carrier.

  6. Influence of IL-3 functional fragment on cord blood stem cell ex vivo expansion and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhihua; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yanxi; Jiang, Wenhong; Dai, Wei; Ding, Xinxin

    2016-01-01

    Background Recombinant human interleukin-3 (rhIL-3) is a multiple hematopoietic growth factor, which enhances stem cell expansion and hematopoiesis regeneration in vitro and in vivo, when administrated in combination with other cytokines. However, the structure-function study of rhIL-3 remains rarely studied, so far. The purpose of this study was to recognize the short peptide with similar function as rhIL-3, and assess the hematopoietic efficacy in umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cell culture as well. Methods Two novel monoclonal antibodies (mAb) (C1 and E1) were generated against rhIL-3 using hybridoma technique. Eleven short peptides were depicted and synthesized to overlap covering the full length sequence of rhIL-3. ELISA was employed to distinguish the antibody-binding peptide from the negative peptides. In addition, the multi-potential hematopoiesis capabilities of the positive peptides were evaluated by adding 25 ng/mL of each peptide to the culture medium of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) derived from UCB. Total nucleated cell number and the CD34+ cell number from each individual treatment group were calculated on day 7. Correlated antibodies at 0.5 or 2 molar fold to each peptide were also tested in the stem cell expansion experiment, to further confirm the bioactivity of the peptides. Results Two peptides were recognized by the novel generated antibodies, using ELISA. Peptide 3 and 8 exhibited comparable hematopoiesis potentials, with 25.01±0.14 fold, and 19.89±0.12 fold increase of total nucleated cell number on day 7, respectively, compared with the basal medium control (4.93±0.55 fold). These biological effects were neutralized by adding the corresponding mAb at a dose dependent manner. Conclusions Our results identified two specific regions of rhIL-3 responsible for HSC proliferation and differentiation, which were located from 28 to 49 amino acids (P3), and 107 to 127 amino acids (P8), respectively. The short peptide 3 and 8 might act

  7. Functionality and antioxidant properties of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) as influenced by the degree of hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Foh, Mohamed Beva Kelfala; Amadou, Issoufou; Foh, Betty Mabel; Kamara, Mohamed Tabita; Xia, Wenshui

    2010-04-26

    Freeze dried protein powders (Fresh minced meat, FMM and Hot water dip, HWD) from tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were hydrolyzed by Alcalase 2.4 L (Alc), Flavourzyme (Flav) and Neutrase (Neut), and investigated for antioxidant activity and their functional properties. FMM and HWD hydrolysed by Alc, exhibiting superior antioxidant activity, had estimated degrees of hydrolysis (DH) of 23.40% and 25.43%, respectively. The maximum values of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), 3-(2-pyridyl) 5,6-bis(4-phenyl-sulphonic acid)-1,2,4-triazine (ferrozine), radical scavenging activities and metal chelating properties were 86.67%, 91.27% and 82.57%, and 84.67%, 92.60% and 78.00% for FMM and HWD, respectively, with a significant difference (P < 0.05) between the samples. Essential amino acids were above the amounts recommended by the Food and Agricultural Organization/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO/UNU) for humans. Lower molecular weight sizes <3,000 Da were more predominant in FMM and HWD hydrolysed by Alc, while in hydrolysed by Flav and Neut they were >8,000 Da. At pH 2, FMM and HWD hydrolysates have varying solubilities above 85% (Alc FMM; 91.33%, Flav FMM; 79.5%, Neut FMM; 83.8% and Alc HWD; 90.45%, Flav HWD; 83.5%, and Neut HWD; 85.8%). They have 'U' shaped solubility curves, water holding capacity was in the range of 2.77 and 1.77 mL/g, while oil holding capacity ranged between 3.13 and 2.23 mL/g. FMM and HWD have the highest bulk density of 0.53 and 0.53 for Neutrase and Alcalase 2.4 L, respectively. Foam capacity and stability ranged from 125.5 to 61.4, 138.5 to 45.2, 130.0 to 62.5, and 124.5 to 55.0, 137.5 to 53.3, 129.6 to 62.7 for FMM and HWD hydrolyzed with Alcalase 2.4 L, Flavourzyme and Neutrase, respectively. Tilapia fish protein hydrolysates are thus potential functional food ingredients.

  8. Functionality and Antioxidant Properties of Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) as Influenced by the Degree of Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Foh, Mohamed Beva Kelfala; Amadou, Issoufou; Foh, Betty Mabel; Kamara, Mohamed Tabita; Xia, Wenshui

    2010-01-01

    Freeze dried protein powders (Fresh minced meat, FMM and Hot water dip, HWD) from tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) were hydrolyzed by Alcalase 2.4 L (Alc), Flavourzyme (Flav) and Neutrase (Neut), and investigated for antioxidant activity and their functional properties. FMM and HWD hydrolysed by Alc, exhibiting superior antioxidant activity, had estimated degrees of hydrolysis (DH) of 23.40% and 25.43%, respectively. The maximum values of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS), 3-(2-pyridyl) 5,6-bis(4-phenyl-sulphonic acid)-1,2,4-triazine (ferrozine), radical scavenging activities and metal chelating properties were 86.67%, 91.27% and 82.57%, and 84.67%, 92.60% and 78.00% for FMM and HWD, respectively, with a significant difference (P < 0.05) between the samples. Essential amino acids were above the amounts recommended by the Food and Agricultural Organization/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO/UNU) for humans. Lower molecular weight sizes <3,000 Da were more predominant in FMM and HWD hydrolysed by Alc, while in hydrolysed by Flav and Neut they were >8,000 Da. At pH 2, FMM and HWD hydrolysates have varying solubilities above 85% (Alc FMM; 91.33%, Flav FMM; 79.5%, Neut FMM; 83.8% and Alc HWD; 90.45%, Flav HWD; 83.5%, and Neut HWD; 85.8%). They have ‘U’ shaped solubility curves, water holding capacity was in the range of 2.77 and 1.77 mL/g, while oil holding capacity ranged between 3.13 and 2.23 mL/g. FMM and HWD have the highest bulk density of 0.53 and 0.53 for Neutrase and Alcalase 2.4 L, respectively. Foam capacity and stability ranged from 125.5 to 61.4, 138.5 to 45.2, 130.0 to 62.5, and 124.5 to 55.0, 137.5 to 53.3, 129.6 to 62.7 for FMM and HWD hydrolyzed with Alcalase 2.4 L, Flavourzyme and Neutrase, respectively. Tilapia fish protein hydrolysates are thus potential functional food ingredients. PMID:20480046

  9. The function and structural influence of selective relaxed constraint at functional intracellular loop3 of 5-HT(1A) serotonin-1 receptor family.

    PubMed

    Dass, J Febin Prabhu; Sudandiradoss, C

    2012-10-25

    Serotonin (5-HT) and its receptors have been involved in critical signal transduction mechanism and deregulation implicated in mood-related disorders. 5-HT activities are mediated through a family of transmembrane spanning serotonin receptors. Both within the family and species, 5-HT receptor protein sequence diversity and 7-transmembrane structural homogeneity have long been intriguing. In this study, we have analyzed the codon site constraint in 5-HT1 subclass receptors from 13 orthologous mammalian mRNA coding sequence. Further, the study was extended to computationally investigate the impact of non-synonymous sites with respect to function and structural significance through sequence homology algorithm and molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). Codon sites with significant posterior probability were observed in 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(1D) receptor indicating variations in site constraint within the 5-HT1 sub-class genes. In 5-HT(1A) receptor, seven sites were detected at the functional intracellular loop(3) (ICL(3)) with higher substitution rate through Codeml program. Sequence homology algorithm identifies that these sites were functionally tolerant within the mammals representing a selectively relaxed constraint at this domain. On the other hand, the root mean square deviation (rmsd) values from MDS suggest differences in structural conformation of ICL(3) models among the species. Specifically, the human ICL(3) model fluctuation was comparatively more stable than other species. Hence, we argue that these sites may have varying influence in G-proteins coupling and activation of effectors systems through downstream interacting accessory proteins of cell among the species. However, further experimental studies are required to elucidate the precise role and the seeming difference of these sites in 5-HT receptors between species.

  10. Soil Microbial Functional and Fungal Diversity as Influenced by Municipal Sewage Sludge Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Frąc, Magdalena; Oszust, Karolina; Lipiec, Jerzy; Jezierska-Tys, Stefania; Nwaichi, Eucharia Oluchi

    2014-01-01

    Safe disposal of municipal sewage sludge is a challenging global environmental concern. The aim of this study was to assess the response of soil microbial functional diversity to the accumulation of municipal sewage sludge during landfill storage. Soil samples of a municipal sewage sludge (SS) and from a sewage sludge landfill that was 3 m from a SS landfill (SS3) were analyzed relative to an undisturbed reference soil. Biolog EcoPlatesTM were inoculated with a soil suspension, and the Average Well Color Development (AWCD), Richness (R) and Shannon-Weaver index (H) were calculated to interpret the results. The fungi isolated from the sewage sludge were identified using comparative rDNA sequencing of the LSU D2 region. The MicroSEQ® ID software was used to assess the raw sequence files, perform sequence matching to the MicroSEQ® ID-validated reference database and create Neighbor-Joining trees. Moreover, the genera of fungi isolated from the soil were identified using microscopic methods. Municipal sewage sludge can serve as a habitat for plant pathogens and as a source of pathogen strains for biotechnological applications. PMID:25170681

  11. Mother-Child Communication: The Influence of ADHD Symptomatology and Executive Functioning on Paralinguistic Style.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Elizabeth S; Rints, Ami; Ethier, Nicole; Moroz, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Paralinguistic style, involving features of speech such as pitch and volume, is an important aspect of one's communicative competence. However, little is known about the behavioral traits and cognitive skills that relate to these aspects of speech. This study examined the extent to which ADHD traits and executive functioning (EF) related to the paralinguistic styles of 8- to 12-year-old children and their mothers. Data was collected via parent report (ADHD traits), independent laboratory tasks of EF (working memory, inhibitory control, and cognitive flexibility), and an interactive problem-solving task (completed by mothers and children jointly) which was coded for paralinguistic speech elements (i.e., pitch level/variability; volume level/variability). Dyadic data analyses revealed that elevated ADHD traits in children were associated with a more exaggerated paralinguistic style (i.e., elevated and more variable pitch/volume) for both mothers and children. Mothers' paralinguistic style was additionally predicted by an interaction of mothers' and children's ADHD traits, such that mothers with elevated ADHD traits showed exaggerated paralinguistic styles particularly when their children also had elevated ADHD traits. Highlighting a cognitive mechanism, children with weaker inhibitory control showed more exaggerated paralinguistic styles.

  12. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function: II. Combined effect of radiation and some drugs.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, A G; Dubovick, B V; Degtyariov, I G; Pronkevich, A N

    1995-01-01

    The combined effects of microwave radiation and some drugs were studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The experiments established that exposure to pulse-modulated 915 MHz microwaves for up to 40 min had no effect on either the rate or the amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches, unless the average absorbed power was high enough to produce preparation heating. Treatment of the preparation with saline containing (0.6-3.0) 10(-5) M of propranolol or (0.5-1.5) 10(-7) M of atropine altered neither its pacemaker nor its contractile functions; these drugs also had no effect when they were combined with nonthermal microwave irradiation. Caffeine (1 mM) strongly increased the average heart power, which was calculated as the product of twitch rate and amplitude. The caffeine effect appeared to be significantly augmented (by about 15%, P < 0.02) under exposure to burst-type pulsed microwaves (pulse width, 1.5 msec; pause, 2.5 msec; 8 pulses/burst, 16 bursts/s; average SAR, 8-10 W/kg). By itself, this modulation was not effective; the heating of the preparation and saline during exposure was approximately 0.1 degrees C, which could not account for the detected changes. The experimental results demonstrate that caffeine treatment increases the microwave sensitivity of the frog auricle preparation and reveals primarily subthreshold, nonthermal microwave effect.

  13. Automatic numerical determination of lateral influence functions for fast-CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Marshal A.; Yamazoe, Kenji; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents kernel convolution with pattern matching (KCPM), which is an updated version of fast-CAD pattern matching for assessing lithography process variations. With KCPM, kernels that capture lateral feature interaction between features due to process variations are convolved with a mask layout to calculate a match factor, which indicates approximate change in intensity at the target location. The algorithm incorporates a custom source, a mask with electromagnetic effects, and an arbitrary pupil function. For further accuracy improvement, we introduce a source splitting technique. Though the evaluation speed is decreased, R2 correlation of the match factor and change in intensity is increased. Results are shown with R2 correlation as high as 0.99 for nearly coherent and annular illumination. Additionally, with a numerical aperture of 1.35, unbalanced quadrapole illumination, 10mλ RMS random aberration in projection optics and complex mask with EMF effects included, R2 correlation of more than 0.87 is achieved. This process is extremely fast (40μs per location) making it valuable for a wide range of applications, most commonly hot spot detection and optimization.

  14. Fusaric acid, a mycotoxin, and its influence on blood coagulation and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Devaraja, Sannaningaiah; Girish, Kesturu S; Santhosh, Martin S; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Nayaka, Siddaiah C; Kemparaju, Kempaiah

    2013-06-01

    The current study intended to explore the effect of fusaric acid on blood coagulation including plasma coagulation and platelet aggregation. Fusaric acid exhibited biphasic effects on citrated human plasma recalcification time. At concentrations below 50 ng, fusaric acid decreased the clotting time of plasma dose-dependently from 130 ± 3s control value to 32 ± 3s; however, above 50 ng, fusaric acid increased the clotting time from 32 ± 3s and reached a maximum of 152 s at 100 ng and remained unaltered thereafter for the increased dose of fusaric acid. Fusaric acid without damaging red blood cells and platelets, inhibited agonists such as collagen, ADP, thrombin, and epinephrine-induced aggregation of both platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and washed platelets preparations of human. Interestingly, fusaric acid showed biphasic effects only in thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of washed platelets, and at lower concentration (below 900 ng) it activated platelet aggregation; however, in increased concentration (above 900 ng) it inhibited the platelet aggregation of washed platelets. In addition, fusaric acid also inhibited the agonist ADP-induced platelet aggregation of washed platelet suspension but did not show biphasic effect. Further, fusaric acid did not induce the platelets to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that clearly suggests that the induction of platelet function could be the result of the fusaric acid-mediated receptor interaction but not through the morphological shape change.

  15. Probiotic Bacteria Influence the Composition and Function of the Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, Paul W.; Cooney, Jakki C.

    2008-01-01

    Probiotics have a range of proposed health benefits for the consumer, which may include modulating the levels of beneficial elements in the microbiota. Recent investigations using molecular approaches have revealed a human intestinal microbiota comprising over 1000 phylotypes. Mechanisms whereby probiotics impact on the intestinal microbiota include competition for substrates, direct antagonism by inhibitory substances, competitive exclusion, and potentially host-mediated effects such as improved barrier function and altered immune response. We now have the microbial inventories and genetic blueprints to begin tackling intestinal microbial ecology at an unprecedented level of detail, aided by the understanding that dietary components may be utilized differentially by individual phylotypes. Controlled intervention studies in humans, utilizing latest molecular technologies, are required to consolidate evidence for bacterial species that impact on the microbiota. Mechanistic insights should be provided by metabolomics and other analytical techniques for small molecules. Rigorous characterization of interactions between the diet, microbiota, and probiotic bacteria will provide new opportunities for modulating the microbiota towards improving human health. PMID:19277099

  16. The Functionality of Spontaneous Mimicry and Its Influences on Affiliation: An Implicit Socialization Account.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Liam C; Winkielman, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    There is a broad theoretical and empirical interest in spontaneous mimicry, or the automatic reproduction of a model's behavior. Evidence shows that people mimic models they like, and that mimicry enhances liking for the mimic. Yet, there is no satisfactory account of this phenomenon, especially in terms of its functional significance. While affiliation is often cited as the driver of mimicry, we argue that mimicry is primarily driven by a learning process that helps to produce the appropriate bodily and emotional responses to relevant social situations. Because the learning process and the resulting knowledge is implicit, it cannot easily be rejected, criticized, revised, and employed by the learner in a deliberative or deceptive manner. We argue that these characteristics will lead individuals to preferentially mimic ingroup members, whose implicit information is worth incorporating. Conversely, mimicry of the wrong person is costly because individuals will internalize "bad habits," including emotional reactions and mannerisms indicating wrong group membership. This pattern of mimicry, in turn, means that observed mimicry is an honest signal of group affiliation. We propose that the preferences of models for the mimic stems from this true signal value. Further, just like facial expressions, mimicry communicates a genuine disposition when it is truly spontaneous. Consequently, perceivers are attuned to relevant cues such as appropriate timing, fidelity, and selectivity. Our account, while assuming no previously unknown biological endowments, also explains greater mimicry of powerful people, and why affiliation can be signaled by mimicry of seemingly inconsequential behaviors.

  17. Mother-Child Communication: The Influence of ADHD Symptomatology and Executive Functioning on Paralinguistic Style

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Elizabeth S.; Rints, Ami; Ethier, Nicole; Moroz, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Paralinguistic style, involving features of speech such as pitch and volume, is an important aspect of one’s communicative competence. However, little is known about the behavioral traits and cognitive skills that relate to these aspects of speech. This study examined the extent to which ADHD traits and executive functioning (EF) related to the paralinguistic styles of 8- to 12-year-old children and their mothers. Data was collected via parent report (ADHD traits), independent laboratory tasks of EF (working memory, inhibitory control, and cognitive flexibility), and an interactive problem-solving task (completed by mothers and children jointly) which was coded for paralinguistic speech elements (i.e., pitch level/variability; volume level/variability). Dyadic data analyses revealed that elevated ADHD traits in children were associated with a more exaggerated paralinguistic style (i.e., elevated and more variable pitch/volume) for both mothers and children. Mothers’ paralinguistic style was additionally predicted by an interaction of mothers’ and children’s ADHD traits, such that mothers with elevated ADHD traits showed exaggerated paralinguistic styles particularly when their children also had elevated ADHD traits. Highlighting a cognitive mechanism, children with weaker inhibitory control showed more exaggerated paralinguistic styles. PMID:27559327

  18. Influence of green waste compost on azimsulfuron dissipation and soil functions under oxic and anoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    García-Jaramillo, M; Cox, L; Hermosín, M C; Cerli, C; Kalbitz, K

    2016-04-15

    Concerns have been raised over the sustainability of intensive rice cultivation, where the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides has been associated with numerous environmental problems. The objective of this study was to test the effect of the herbicide azimsulfuron on important soil functions as affected by amendment with a byproduct of the olive oil industry. Soil was collected from a Mediterranean rice field. Part of it was amended with alperujo compost (AC). Amended and unamended soils were incubated for 43days in presence or not of azimsulfuron, under anoxic-flooded (AF) and oxic-unflooded (OU) conditions. We monitored the dissipation of the herbicide azimsulfuron, C mineralization, soil microbial biomass (SMB) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) content and its nature. Under AF conditions, the application of compost produced an increase in the dissipation of the herbicide (up to 12.4%). It was related with the higher DOC content, 4 times higher than under OU conditions. Though increases in carbon turnover (under AF and OU conditions) and reduction of SMBC after herbicide application (only under AF conditions) were observed, the differences were not statistically significant. The application of this organic amendment is presented as an efficient management strategy to increase C turnover in agricultural soils and reduce some of the negative effects derived from the application of azimsulfuron under flooded conditions.

  19. Migration of model contaminants from PET bottles: influence of temperature, food simulant and functional barrier.

    PubMed

    Widén, H; Leufvén, A; Nielsen, T

    2004-10-01

    To simulate post-consumer recycled plastics, selected model contaminants were incorporated into PET bottles using a time saving method. Migration into 3% acetic acid, a cola-type beverage and 95% ethanol was followed during 1 year of storage at 20 and 40 degrees C. Aroma compounds previously found in post-consumer PET material were used as model contaminants. Benzaldehyde was found to migrate to the highest extent. Storage at 40 degrees C affected the bottle material and this might be one reason for the high migration values of these bottles. Migration into ethanol was up to 20 times higher than into 3% acetic acid or a cola-type beverage. Bottles with a functional barrier resisted migration into food simulants even when filled with 95% ethanol and stored for 1 year at 40 degrees C. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements showed that ethanol was interacting with the plastic material. This resulted in a lower glass transition temperature of bottles stored with ethanol compared with bottles stored empty or with other food simulants.

  20. Influences of Family Environment and Meditation Efficacy on Hemodynamic Function among African American Adolescents*

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Vernon A.; Gregoski, Mathew J.; Tingen, Martha S.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of breathing awareness meditation (BAM) compared to health education (HE) and lifeskills training (LS) upon resting systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate (HR) within the context of potential moderating factors of family environment and expectancy of benefit. 186 African American adolescents (mean age: 15.1±0.7 yrs) were randomly assigned by school to three-month BAM, LS, or HE interventions. Laboratory resting blood pressure (BP), Family Relations Index (FRI) and expectancy of benefit evaluations were conducted at pre- and post-intervention. Higher expectancy of benefit from any of the three interventions resulted in greater reductions in SBP. A two-way interaction indicated that BAM group subjects who came from positive family environments exhibited greater decreases in SBP. A two-way interaction indicated that BAM and LS subjects who came from positive family environments exhibited greater DBP decreases. A two-way interaction indicated that BAM subjects who came from positive family environments exhibited a greater HR decrease (all p<.05). Expectancy of intervention benefits beneficially impacted success of behavioral interventions aimed at reducing SBP. Positive family environments in combination with either BAM or LS appear to have a beneficial impact upon hemodynamic function in AA adolescents. PMID:22328869

  1. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function. 2: Combined effect of radiation and some drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, A.G.; Dubovick, B.V.; Degtyariov, I.G.; Pronkevich, A.N.

    1995-09-01

    The combined effects of microwave radiation and some drugs were studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The experiments established that exposure to pulse-modulated 915 Mhz microwaves for up to 40 min had no effect on either the rate or the amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches, unless the average absorbed power was high enough to produce preparation heating. Treatment of the preparation with saline containing (0.6--3.0) 10{sup {minus}5} M of propranolol or (0.5--1.5) 10{sup {minus}7} M of atropine altered neither its pacemaker nor its contractile functions; these drugs also had no effect when they were combined with nonthermal microwave irradiation. Caffeine (1 mM) strongly increased the average heart power, which was calculated as the product of twitch rate ad amplitude. The caffeine effect appeared to be significantly augmented (by about 15%, P<0.02) under exposure to burst-type pulsed microwaves (pulse width, 1.5 msec; pause, 2.5 msec; 8 pulses/burst, 16 bursts/s; average SAR, 8--10 W/kg). By itself, this modulation was not effective; the heating of the preparation and saline during exposure was approximately 0.1 C, which could not account for the detected changes. The experimental results demonstrate that caffeine treatment increases the microwave sensitivity of the frog auricle preparation and reveals primarily subthreshold, nonthermal microwave effect.

  2. Influence of the amount of dietary gluten on gastrointestinal morphology and function in dermatitis herpetiformis.

    PubMed

    Andersson, H; Björkman, A C; Gillberg, R; Kastrup, W; Mobacken, H; Stockbrügger, R

    1984-07-01

    The individual daily intake of gluten was calculated in 45 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) on the basis of a depth interview about food habits. Gastric and small intestinal morphology and function were studied concurrently. Mean daily gluten intake was estimated to be 15 g, a figure which corresponds well to the average gluten intake in Sweden. There was a significant correlation between the degree of morphological mucosal changes of the small intestine and the quantity of gluten ingested. All patients with jejunal villous atrophy consumed more than 10 g gluten daily and all but one patient with normal jejunal villous structure had a gluten intake of less than 10 g/d. The findings suggest a dose-dependent effect of gluten on the intestinal mucosa. Conversely, the daily gluten intake was not correlated to gastric morphology, gastric acid secretion, serum gastrin levels or serum parietal cell antibodies. Patients with reduced ability to secrete gastric acid did not differ from the remaining patients in this respect. Whereas the coeliac-like enteropathy in DH seems to be caused by ingested gluten, the frequently occurring achlorhydric atrophic gastritis must be assumed to be of different immunopathogenesis.

  3. Influence of shoulder pain on muscle function: implications for the assessment and therapy of shoulder disorders.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Filip; Lluch, Enrique; Falla, Deborah; Meeus, Mira; Noten, Suzie; Nijs, Jo

    2015-02-01

    Shoulder pain is often a challenging clinical phenomenon because of the potential mismatch between pathology and the perception of pain. Current evidence clearly emphasizes an incomplete understanding of the nature of shoulder pain. Indeed, the effective diagnosis and treatment of shoulder pain should not only rely upon a detailed knowledge of the peripheral pathologies that may be present in the shoulder, but also on current knowledge of pain neurophysiology. To assess and treat shoulder pain, a comprehensive understanding of the way in which pain is processed is essential. This review reflects modern pain neurophysiology to the shoulder and aims to answer the following questions: why does my shoulder hurt? What is the impact of shoulder pain on muscle function? What are the implications for the clinical examination of the shoulder? And finally, what are the clinical implications for therapy? Despite the increasing amount of research in this area, an in-depth understanding of the bidirectional nociception-motor interaction is still far from being achieved. Many questions remain, especially related to the treatment of nociception-motor interactions.

  4. Evaluating the Influence of Spatial Resampling for Motion Correction in Resting-State Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lisha; He, Hongjian; Zhang, Han; Zhong, Jianhui

    2016-01-01

    Head motion is one of major concerns in current resting-state functional MRI studies. Image realignment including motion estimation and spatial resampling is often applied to achieve rigid-body motion correction. While the accurate estimation of motion parameters has been addressed in most studies, spatial resampling could also produce spurious variance, and lead to unexpected errors on the amplitude of BOLD signal. In this study, two simulation experiments were designed to characterize these variance related with spatial resampling. The fluctuation amplitude of spurious variance was first investigated using a set of simulated images with estimated motion parameters from a real dataset, and regions more likely to be affected by spatial resampling were found around the peripheral regions of the cortex. The other simulation was designed with three typical types of motion parameters to represent different extents of motion. It was found that areas with significant correlation between spurious variance and head motion scattered all over the brain and varied greatly from one motion type to another. In the last part of this study, four popular motion regression approaches were applied respectively and their performance in reducing spurious variance was compared. Among them, Friston 24 and Voxel-specific 12 model (Friston et al., 1996), were found to have the best outcomes. By separating related effects during fMRI analysis, this study provides a better understanding of the characteristics of spatial resampling and the interpretation of motion-BOLD relationship. PMID:28082860

  5. The influence of Adh function on ethanol preference and tolerance in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ogueta, Maite; Cibik, Osman; Eltrop, Rouven; Schneider, Andrea; Scholz, Henrike

    2010-11-01

    Preference determines behavioral choices such as choosing among food sources and mates. One preference-affecting chemical is ethanol, which guides insects to fermenting fruits or leaves. Here, we show that adult Drosophila melanogaster prefer food containing up to 5% ethanol over food without ethanol and avoid food with high levels (23%) of ethanol. Although female and male flies behaved differently at ethanol-containing food sources, there was no sexual dimorphism in the preference for food containing modest ethanol levels. We also investigated whether Drosophila preference, sensitivity and tolerance to ethanol was related to the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), the primary ethanol-metabolizing enzyme in D. melanogaster. Impaired Adh function reduced ethanol preference in both D. melanogaster and a related species, D. sechellia. Adh-impaired flies also displayed reduced aversion to high ethanol concentrations, increased sensitivity to the effects of ethanol on postural control, and negative tolerance/sensitization (i.e., a reduction of the increased resistance to ethanol's effects that normally occurs upon repeated exposure). These data strongly indicate a linkage between ethanol-induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in adult fruit flies: Adh deficiency resulted in reduced preference to low ethanol concentrations and reduced aversion to high ones, despite recovery from ethanol being strongly impaired.

  6. The Functionality of Spontaneous Mimicry and Its Influences on Affiliation: An Implicit Socialization Account

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Liam C.; Winkielman, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    There is a broad theoretical and empirical interest in spontaneous mimicry, or the automatic reproduction of a model’s behavior. Evidence shows that people mimic models they like, and that mimicry enhances liking for the mimic. Yet, there is no satisfactory account of this phenomenon, especially in terms of its functional significance. While affiliation is often cited as the driver of mimicry, we argue that mimicry is primarily driven by a learning process that helps to produce the appropriate bodily and emotional responses to relevant social situations. Because the learning process and the resulting knowledge is implicit, it cannot easily be rejected, criticized, revised, and employed by the learner in a deliberative or deceptive manner. We argue that these characteristics will lead individuals to preferentially mimic ingroup members, whose implicit information is worth incorporating. Conversely, mimicry of the wrong person is costly because individuals will internalize “bad habits,” including emotional reactions and mannerisms indicating wrong group membership. This pattern of mimicry, in turn, means that observed mimicry is an honest signal of group affiliation. We propose that the preferences of models for the mimic stems from this true signal value. Further, just like facial expressions, mimicry communicates a genuine disposition when it is truly spontaneous. Consequently, perceivers are attuned to relevant cues such as appropriate timing, fidelity, and selectivity. Our account, while assuming no previously unknown biological endowments, also explains greater mimicry of powerful people, and why affiliation can be signaled by mimicry of seemingly inconsequential behaviors. PMID:27064398

  7. Aromatic Functionality of Target Proteins Influences Monomer Selection for Creating Artificial Antibodies on Plasmonic Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Rong; Luan, Jingyi; Kharasch, Evan D; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Morrissey, Jeremiah J

    2017-01-11

    Natural antibodies used as biorecognition elements suffer from numerous shortcomings, such as limited chemical and environmental stability and cost. Artificial antibodies based on molecular imprinting are an attractive alternative to natural antibodies. We investigated the role of aromatic interactions in target recognition capabilities of artificial antibodies. Three proteins with different aromatic amino acid content were employed as model targets. Artificial antibodies were formed on nanostructures using combinations of silane monomers of varying aromatic functionality. We employed refractive index sensitivity of plasmonic nanostructures as a transduction platform for monitoring various steps in the imprinting process and to quantify the target recognition capabilities of the artificial antibodies. The sensitivity of the artificial antibodies with aromatic interactions exhibited a protein-dependent enhancement. Selectivity and sensitivity enhancement due to the presence of aromatic groups in imprinted polymer matrix was found to be higher for target proteins with higher aromatic amino acid content. Our results indicate that tailoring the monomer composition based on the amino acid content of the target protein can improve the sensitivity of plasmonic biosensors based on artificial antibodies without affecting the selectivity.

  8. Influence of myocardial infarction size on radionuclide and Doppler echocardiographic measurements of diastolic function

    SciTech Connect

    Johannessen, K.A.; Cerqueira, M.D.; Stratton, J.R. )

    1990-03-15

    To assess the relation between myocardial infarction size and diastolic function as measured by radionuclide ventriculography and Doppler echocardiography, 83 patients (aged 58 +/- 9 years) without significant valvular disease were studied 8 to 12 weeks after an acute myocardial infarction. Myocardial infarction size was measured by resting thallium-201 tomography. Peak early filling rate (in end-diastolic volumes/s) was measured by gated blood pool scintigraphy. Doppler measures of mitral inflow were peak early (E) and atrial (A) filling velocities, slopes of E and A, percent E and A filling, E/A ratio and diastolic filling period. In univariate analyses, there was a significant inverse correlation between infarction size and the peak early filling rate (r = -0.59, p less than 0.001), and this remained significant (r = -0.63, p less than 0.0001) in an analysis that included 2 other determinants of the filling rate, age and diastolic filling period. Infarction size was directly correlated to the peak E velocity (r = 0.37, p less than 0.01), deceleration of E (r = 0.41, p less than 0.01) and percent E filling (r = 0.31, p less than 0.01), and was inversely correlated to peak A (r = -0.27, p less than 0.05) and percent A filling (r = -0.26, p less than 0.05).

  9. Influence of alloferin on neuromuscular function in myasthenia patients undergoing thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Luo, X; Yie, T; Luo, A; Ren, H; Jin, Y

    1994-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis patients are hypersensitive to nondepolarizing relaxants, such as alcuronium, an intermediate-long nondepolarizing agent. This study observed the effects of alcuronium treatment in myasthenia gravis patients as compared with non-MG patients during operation. Ten MG patients (Ossermann class I-IV, scheduled for thymectomy) and 10 non-MG patients (ASA class I-II, scheduled for operation) were selected. An induction dose of alcuronium 0.2 mg/kg and thiopental 4-6 mg/kg was given, followed by intubation and ventilation with 50% nitrous oxide in oxygen and 0.5-1.5% ethrane. Neuromuscular transmission was monitored using an accelerograph and degrees of neuromuscular function at different depths were recorded. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups. The effect of alloferin in the MG group was quicker and deeper. This study also found a relation between MG class and the recovery of respiration: Respiratory recovery was quicker in classes I-II than in classes III-IV.

  10. Adipokines in the skeleton: influence on cartilage function and joint degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Rodolfo; Lago, Francisca; Gomez-Reino, Juan; Dieguez, Carlos; Gualillo, Oreste

    2009-07-01

    The discovery of leptin in 1994 marked the beginning of a new understanding about white adipose tissue (WAT) and modified a static vision of this tissue which was viewed up to the end of the 20th century as an inert tissue, devoted to body protection from heat loss and to passively storing energy. The identification of the product of the gene obese accentuated the role of adipose tissue in the physiopathology of obesity-linked diseases, and led to the discovery of various adipokines, many of a pro-inflammatory nature. It has become progressively manifest that WAT-derived adipokines can now be considered as the fulcrum between obesity-related environmental causes, such as nutrition and lifestyle, and the biochemical shifts that lead to metabolic syndrome, inflammatory and/or autoimmune conditions, and rheumatic diseases. Herein, we review recent adipokine research, with particular emphasis to the role of leptin, adiponectin, resistin, and visfatin in chondrocyte function and skeleton, as well as in inflammatory and degenerative cartilage joint diseases.

  11. Mitochondrial function in heart and kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rats: influence of captopril treatment.

    PubMed

    Mujkosová, Jana; Ulicná, Olga; Waczulíková, Iveta; Vlkovicová, Jana; Vancová, Ol'ga; Ferko, Miroslav; Polák, Stefan; Ziegelhöffer, Attila

    2010-06-01

    Effect of captopril treatment on capability of heart and kidney mitochondria to produce ATP was investigated in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Heart mitochondria from SHR responded to hypertension with tendency to compensate the elevated energy demands of cardiac cells by moderate increase in mitochondrial Mg2+-ATPase activity, membrane fluidity (MF) and in majority of functional parameters of the mitochondria (p>0.05). Significant increase exhibited only the oxygen consumption (QO2; p<0.01-0.001) and oxidative phosphorylation rate (OPR; p<0.003) with glutamate+malate (GLUT+MAL) as substrates. Lowering the blood pressure (p<0.02) captopril also eliminated the above compensatory response and impaired the oxidative ATP production by decreasing OPR (p<0.001). Kidney mitochondria of SHR experienced serious disarrangement in parameters of oxidative ATP production: increase in Mg2+-ATPase activity (p<0.05) but, also scattered QO2 values (p<0.03-0.01) leading to decrease in OPR and the ADP:O (p<0.05-0.01) values with both GLUT+MAL and succinate as substrates. Captopril treatment does not alleviated but even worsened the above alterations. Mg2+-ATPase became also decreased and the depression of ADP:O became aggravated (p<0.0001).

  12. Influence of tacrolimus metabolism rate on renal function after solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thölking, Gerold; Gerth, Hans Ulrich; Schuette-Nuetgen, Katharina; Reuter, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) tacrolimus (TAC) is an integral part of the immunosuppressive regimen after solid organ transplantation. Although TAC is very effective in prevention of acute rejection episodes, its highly variable pharmacokinetic and narrow therapeutic window require frequent monitoring of drug levels and dose adjustments. TAC can cause CNI nephrotoxicity even at low blood trough levels (4-6 ng/mL). Thus, other factors besides the TAC trough level might contribute to CNI-related kidney injury. Unfortunately, TAC pharmacokinetic is determined by a whole bunch of parameters. However, for daily clinical routine a simple application strategy is needed. To address this problem, we and others have evaluated a simple calculation method in which the TAC blood trough concentration (C) is divided by the daily dose (D). Fast TAC metabolism (C/D ratio < 1.05) was identified as a potential risk factor for an inferior kidney function after transplantation. In this regard, we recently showed a strong association between fast TAC metabolism and CNI nephrotoxicity as well as BKV infection. Therefore, the TAC C/D ratio may assist transplant clinicians in a simple way to individualize the immunosuppressive regimen. PMID:28280692

  13. Influence of surgical orthodontic treatment on masticatory function in skeletal Class III patients.

    PubMed

    Kubota, T; Yagi, T; Tomonari, H; Ikemori, T; Miyawaki, S

    2015-10-01

    Skeletal Class III patients exhibit malocclusion characterised by Angle Class III and anterior crossbite, and their occlusion shows total or partially lateral crossbite of the posterior teeth. Most patients exhibit lower bite force and muscle activity than non-affected subjects. While orthognathic surgery may help improve masticatory function in these patients, its effects have not been fully elucidated. The aims of the study were to evaluate jaw movement and the electromyographic (EMG) activity of masticatory muscles before and after orthognathic treatment in skeletal Class III patients in comparison with control subjects with normal occlusion. Jaw movement variables and EMG data were recorded in 14 female patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion and 15 female controls with good occlusion. Significant changes in jaw movement, from a chopping to a grinding pattern, were observed after orthognathic treatment (closing angle P < 0.01; cycle width P < 0.01), rendering jaw movement in the patient group similar to that of the control group. However, the grinding pattern in the patient group was not as broad as that of controls. The activity indexes, indicating the relative contributions of the masseter and temporalis muscles (where a negative value corresponds to relatively more temporalis activity and vice versa) changed from negative to positive after treatment (P < 0.05), becoming similar to those of control subjects. Our findings suggest that orthognathic treatment in skeletal Class III patients improves the masticatory chewing pattern and muscle activity. However, the chewing pattern remains incomplete compared with controls.

  14. The influence of antidotal treatment of low-level tabun exposure on cognitive functions in rats using a water maze.

    PubMed

    Kassa, J; Kunesova, G

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the influence of antidotal treatment of tabun poisoning on cognitive function, in the case of low-level tabun exposure, was studied. The impairment of cognitive function was evaluated by the measurement of spatial learning and memory in rats poisoned with a sublethal dose of tabun and treated with atropine alone or in combination with newly developed oximes {K027 [1-(4-hydroxyiminomethyl- pyridinium)-3-(4-carbamoylpyridinium) propane dibromide] and K048 [1-(4-hydroxyimino- methylpyridinium)-3-(4-carbamoylpyridinium) butane dibromide]} or currently available oxime (trimedoxime), using the Morris water maze. While atropine alone caused an impairment of studied cognitive functions, the addition of an oxime to atropine contributes to the improvement of cognitive performance of treated tabun-poisoned rats regardless of the type of oxime. The differences in the ameliorative effects of oximes on atropine-induced mnemonic deficits were not significant. Therefore, each low-level nerve agent exposure should be treated by complex antidotal treatment consisting of anticholinergic drug and oxime.

  15. Influence of ester functional groups on the liquid-phase structure and solvation properties of imidazolium-based ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Pensado, Alfonso S; Pádua, Agílio A H; Costa Gomes, Margarida F

    2011-04-14

    The incorporation of ester functions in the side chains in 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium cations seems to increase the biodegradability of these ionic liquids. We study here how the presence of ester functional groups affects the liquid-state structure (namely, the microphase segregation between polar and nonpolar domains in these ionic liquids) and the way in which the solvation of gases can be understood in these solvents. We use molecular simulation to study the structure of the ionic liquids 3-methyl-1-(pentoxycarbonylmethyl)imidazolium octylsulfate, [C(1)COOC(5)C(1)im][C(8)SO(4)]; and 3-methyl-1-(pentoxycarbonylmethyl)imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, [C(1)COOC(5)C(1)im][NTf(2)] in the liquid phase and to assess the molecular mechanisms of solvation of carbon dioxide and ethane. The presence of ester functions influences the relative size of the polar and nonpolar domains in the ionic liquids, but does not significantly affect the solvation of gases.

  16. Influence of functional groups on water splitting in carbon nanodot and graphitic carbon nitride composites: a theoretical mechanism study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jin; Liu, Guokui; Yuan, Shiling; Ma, Yuchen

    2017-02-15

    The coupling of carbon nanodots (C-Dots) with graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) has been demonstrated to boost the overall photocatalytic solar water splitting efficiency. However, the understanding on the role of the C-Dots and how the structure of C-Dots influences the photocatalytic reaction is still limited. In this work, we investigate the excited states of some C-Dot/g-C3N4 composites with the C-Dots containing different functional groups including -OH, -CHO and -COOH by first-principles many-body Green's function theory. It is found that the increase of efficiency can be ascribed to the high separation rate and the low recombination rate of the electron-hole pair benefiting from the emergence of the charge-transfer excited state between the C-Dots and g-C3N4. Functional groups on the C-Dots play a crucial role in determining the charge transfer direction, active sites for reduction reaction and oxidation reaction of water, and whether the reaction is a four-electron process or a two-electron/two-electron process. These results can provide guidance for the design and optimization of the C-Dots for heterojunction photocatalysts.

  17. Influence of carboxylic acid functionalization on the cytotoxic effects induced by single wall carbon nanotubes on human endothelial cells (HUVEC).

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Pichardo, Silvia; Sánchez, Elena; Grilo, Antonio; Cameán, Ana Maria; Jos, Angeles

    2011-12-01

    A vast variety of nanomaterials have been developed in the recent years, being carbon nanotubes (CNTs) the ones that have attracted more attention, due to its unique properties which make them suitable for numerous applications. Consequently, it is predicted that tons of CNTs will be produced worldwide every year, being its exposure of toxicological concern. Nanomaterials, once into the body, can translocate from the uptake sites to the blood circulation or the lymphatic system, resulting in distribution throughout the body. Thus, the vascular endothelium can be in contact with them and can suffer from their toxic effects. In this regard, the aim of this work was to investigate the cytotoxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) on human endothelial cells evaluating the influence of acid carboxylic functionalization and also the exposure time (24 and 48 h). Biomarkers assessed were neutral red uptake, protein content, a tetrazolium salt metabolization and cell viability by means of the Trypan blue exclusion test. Cells were exposed to concentrations between 0 and 800 μg/mL SWCNTs for 24 and 48 h. Results have shown that both SWCNTs and carboxylic acid functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-SWCNTs) induce toxic effects in HUVEC cells in a concentration- and time-dependent way. Moreover, the carboxylic acid functionalization results in a higher toxicity compared to the SWCNTs.

  18. Catalytic reduction of organic dyes at gold nanoparticles impregnated silica materials: influence of functional groups and surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azad, Uday Pratap; Ganesan, Vellaichamy; Pal, Manas

    2011-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in three different silica based sol-gel matrixes with and without surfactants are prepared. They are characterized by UV-vis absorbance and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies. The size and shape of Au NPs varied with the organo-functional group present in the sol-gel matrix. In the presence of mercaptopropyl functionalized organo-silica, large sized (200-280 nm) spherical Au NPs are formed whereas in the presence of aminopropyl functionalized organo-silica small sized (5-15 nm) Au NPs are formed inside the tube like organo-silica. Further, it is found that Au NPs act as efficient catalyst for the reduction of organic dyes. The catalytic rate constant is evaluated from the decrease in absorbance of the dye molecules. Presence of cationic or anionic surfactants greatly influences the catalytic reaction. The other factors like hydrophobicity of the organic dyes, complex formation of the dyes with anionic surfactants, repulsion between dyes and cationic surfactant, adsorption of dyes on the Au NPs also play important role on the reaction rate.

  19. Influence of mental practice and movement observation on motor memory, cognitive function and motor performance in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Altermann, Caroline D. C.; Martins, Alexandre S.; Carpes, Felipe P.; Mello-Carpes, Pâmela B.

    2014-01-01

    Background With aging, it is important to maintain cognitive and motor functions to ensure autonomy and quality of life. During the acquisition of motor skills, it is necessary for the elderly to understand the purpose of the proposed activities. Physical and mental practice, as well as demonstrations, are strategies used to learn movements. Objectives To investigate the influence of mental practice and the observation of movement on motor memory and to understand the relationship between cognitive function and motor performance in the execution of a sequence of digital movements in the elderly. Method This was a cross-sectional study conducted with 45 young and 45 aged subjects. The instruments used were Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Manual Preference Inventory and a Digital Motor Task (composed of a training of a sequence of movements, an interval and a test phase). The subjects were divided into three subgroups: control, mental practice and observation of movement. Results The elderly depend more strongly on mental practice for the acquisition of a motor memory. In comparing the performances of people in different age groups, we found that in the elderly, there was a negative correlation between the MMSE score and the execution time as well as the number of errors in the motor task. Conclusions For the elderly, mental practice can advantage motor performance. Also, there is a significant relationship between cognitive function, learning and the execution of new motor skills. PMID:24839046

  20. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) influences epithelial barrier function by regulating Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin expression

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Eric A.; Kwon, Mike; Hilgarth, Roland S; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-01-01

    The apical junctional complex (AJC) encompassing the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) plays a pivotal role in regulating epithelial barrier function and epithelial cell proliferative processes through signaling events that remain poorly characterized. A potential regulator of AJC protein expression is Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3). GSK-3 is a constitutively active kinase that is repressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report that GSK-3 activity regulates the structure and function of the AJC in polarized model intestinal (SK-CO15) and kidney (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK)) epithelial cells. Reduction of GSK-3 activity, either by small molecule inhibitors or siRNA targeting GSK-3 alpha and beta mRNA, resulted in increased permeability to both ions and bulk solutes. Immunofluorescence labeling and immunoblot analyses revealed that the barrier defects correlated with decreased protein expression of AJC transmembrane proteins Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin without influencing other TJ proteins, Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A). The decrease in Occludin and E-cadherin protein expression correlated with downregulation of the corresponding mRNA levels for these respective proteins following GSK-3 inhibition. These observations implicate an important role of GSK-3 in the regulation of the structure and function of the AJC that is mediated by differential modulation of mRNA transcription of key AJC proteins, Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin. PMID:20617560

  1. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 (GSK-3) influences epithelial barrier function by regulating Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Severson, Eric A.; Kwon, Mike; Hilgarth, Roland S.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma

    2010-07-02

    The Apical Junctional Complex (AJC) encompassing the tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) plays a pivotal role in regulating epithelial barrier function and epithelial cell proliferative processes through signaling events that remain poorly characterized. A potential regulator of AJC protein expression is Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3). GSK-3 is a constitutively active kinase that is repressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). In the present study, we report that GSK-3 activity regulates the structure and function of the AJC in polarized model intestinal (SK-CO15) and kidney (Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK)) epithelial cells. Reduction of GSK-3 activity, either by small molecule inhibitors or siRNA targeting GSK-3 alpha and beta mRNA, resulted in increased permeability to both ions and bulk solutes. Immunofluorescence labeling and immunoblot analyses revealed that the barrier defects correlated with decreased protein expression of AJC transmembrane proteins Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin without influencing other TJ proteins, Zonula Occludens-1 (ZO-1) and Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A). The decrease in Occludin and E-cadherin protein expression correlated with downregulation of the corresponding mRNA levels for these respective proteins following GSK-3 inhibition. These observations implicate an important role of GSK-3 in the regulation of the structure and function of the AJC that is mediated by differential modulation of mRNA transcription of key AJC proteins, Occludin, Claudin-1 and E-cadherin.

  2. Influence of COPD Assessment Text (CAT) evaluation and rehabilitation education guidance on the respiratory and motor functions of COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Meng, Guangju; Ma, Yi; Zhang, Xia; Chen, Dongmei; Chen, Mengting

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the influence of the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) evaluation and rehabilitation education guidance on the respiratory and motor functions of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Forty-five patients with COPD admitted from Nov. 2012 to Nov. 2013 were treated with combined bronchodilators and inhaled corticosteroids. Thirty-five patients admitted from Nov. 2012 to Nov. 2013 and classified as a study group received rehabilitation education guidance on the basis of the treatment of the control group to compare the quality-of-life-scale score, dyspnea index score, and motor function of the two groups of patients after 48 weeks of treatment. After treatment, the CAT score of both groups of patients was significantly lowered. After 48 weeks of treatment, the respiratory function of both groups was significantly improved, but the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale for the study group after treatment was significantly lower than that for the control group. After 48 weeks of rehabilitation exercises, the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) for patients with COPD was significantly prolonged, but the test results were significantly higher for the study group after treatment than for the control group. After receiving CAT rehabilitation education, COPD patients had significantly improved life quality and significantly enhanced exercise tolerance. The treatment mode may be gradually introduced in future clinic and nursing work. PMID:28352725

  3. Modulating Influence of Chemotactic Factor-Induced Cell Adhesiveness on Granulocyte Function

    PubMed Central

    Fehr, Jorg; Dahinden, Clemens

    1979-01-01

    The importance of adhesion in regulating locomotion and accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) has remained vague. We found that the chemotaxis of human PMN resuspended in heat-inactivated plasma was maximal toward 1-10 nM N-formyl-met-leu-phe (f-Met-Leu-Phe), but fell below random motility toward ≥ 100 nM. This impressive decrease of motility was paralleled by increased cell adherence on Petri dishes being minimal at 1 nM and maximal at >10 nM f-Met-Leu-Phe (6±1 and 37±2% [SE] adherent cells, respectively). Checked by phase-contrast microscopy, cells under stimulated adhesion lost the typical bipolar shape of moving PMN and became immobilized and highly flattened. PMN, preexposed to 250 nM f-Met-Leu-Phe and tested after washing, retained increased adhesiveness and showed extremely low random and chemotactic motility. In contrast, preexposure to 1 nM f-Met-Leu-Phe had no effect on chemotaxis. Supporting the concept that immobilizing hyperadhesiveness does not correspond to a general functional hyporesponsiveness of PMN, no depression of the initial ingestion rate was observed in the presence of 250 nM f-Met-Leu-Phe. Moreover, a close correlation was found between the induction of PMN adhesiveness and the stimulation of the hexose monophosphate pathway activity as well as of lysomal enzyme release (r ≥ 0.98). Thus, “chemotactic deactivation” and “high-dose inhibition of chemotaxis” by N-formyl peptides is the consequence of increased cell adhesiveness. This phenomenon provides a mechanism for cell trapping at the inflammatory site. Conversely, if operative in circulating blood, e.g., in septicemia, it may impair PMN emigration to such sites. Images PMID:447862

  4. Influence of condensed sweet cream buttermilk on the manufacture, yield, and functionality of pizza cheese.

    PubMed

    Govindasamy-Lucey, S; Lin, T; Jaeggi, J J; Johnson, M E; Lucey, J A

    2006-02-01

    Compositional changes in raw and pasteurized cream and unconcentrated sweet cream buttermilk (SCB) obtained from a local dairy were investigated over 1 yr. Total phospholipid (PL) composition in SCB ranged from 0.113 to 0.153%. Whey protein denaturation in pasteurized cream over 1 yr ranged from 18 to 59%. Pizza cheese was manufactured from milk standardized with condensed SCB (approximately 34.0% total solids, 9.0% casein, 17.8% lactose). Effects of using condensed SCB on composition, yield, PL recovery, and functional properties of pizza cheese were investigated. Cheesemilks were prepared by adding 0, 2, 4, and 6% (wt/wt) condensed SCB to part-skim milk, and cream was added to obtain cheesemilks with approximately 11.2 to 12.7% total solids and casein:fat ratio of approximately 1. Use of condensed SCB resulted in a significant increase in cheese moisture. Cheese-making procedures were modified to obtain similar cheese moisture contents. Fat and nitrogen recoveries in SCB cheeses were slightly lower and higher, respectively, than in control cheeses. Phospholipid recovery in cheeses was below 40%. Values of pH and 12% trichloro-acetic acid-soluble nitrogen were similar among all treatments. Cheeses made from milk standardized with SCB showed less melt and stretch than control cheese, especially at the 4 and 6% SCB levels. Addition of SCB significantly lowered free oil at wk 1 but there were no significant differences at wk 2 and 4. Use of SCB did not result in oxidized flavor in unmelted cheeses. At low levels (e.g., 2% SCB), addition of condensed SCB improved cheese yield without affecting compositional, rheological, and sensory properties of cheese.

  5. Influence of sportive activity on skin barrier function: a quantitative evaluation of 60 athletes.

    PubMed

    Luebberding, Stefanie; Kolbe, Lea; Kerscher, Martina

    2013-06-01

    While sports-related diseases are well documented in the literature, no study regarding the physiology of athlete's skin has been published yet. However, some evidence is given for impairment of the skin barrier due to sportive activity accompanied by an increase in sweating. In this explorative study, we investigated the effect of sportive activity on skin physiology, namely stratum corneum hydration, skin surface pH, and sebum content. A total of 60 healthy Caucasian volunteers (35 females, 25 males; mean 27.35 ± 4.09) were enrolled in this study. Measurements were done before and after 45 minutes of endurance cardio training at forehead, chest, forearm, and armpits. Hydration level, sebum secretion, and pH value of hydrolipid acid film were measured with worldwide-acknowledged biophysical measuring methods. Stratum corneum hydration significantly increased after sportive activity. The increase was about 51.9% at the forearm and 31.9% at the chest. Sebum content at the forehead significantly decreased during exercising, from 87.36 μg/cm2 to 62.41 μg/cm2. At all investigated body sites, measured values for skin surface pH increased after sportive activity. Highest pH value was measured in armpits (pH 5.64-5.98) and lowest at forearm (pH 4.75-4.93). Sportive activity is accompanied by significant changes of skin physiology that could stress the barrier function of the skin. Higher skin surface pH and hyperhydration of the stratum corneum as well as increased lipid content on the skin surface are probably caused by an increased sweat production. The impaired skin barrier may also be the reason for some reported sports-related dermatoses.

  6. Influence of chronic exposure to cold environment on thyroid gland function in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, S; Elgazzar, A

    2014-07-01

    Chronic exposure to cold can affect the thyroid gland. However, the effect on thyroid gland perfusion images and the ratio between thyroid hormones secretion were not addressed in any previous study. The present study investigates the effects of chronic cold exposure on thyroid gland function using radionuclide tracer and thyroid hormones secretion concentration. New Zealand white rabbits weighing approximately 1.8-2 kg were kept in a cold room (4°C) for 7 weeks. Thyroid scintigraphy was performed for cold exposed rabbits and a control rabbit group. Each rabbit was injected with 115 MBq (3.1 mCi) technetium-99m pertechnetate (99mTc pertechnetate). Studies were performed using Gamma camera equipped with a low energy, high resolution, pinhole collimator interfaced with a computer. Static images were acquired 20 min after administration of the radiotracer. Rabbits chronically exposed to cold had less body weights than control. Thyroid gland uptake is higher in rabbits chronically exposed to cold than controls using radionuclide perfusion study. The increase was proportional to the time period, so the increase after 7 weeks was greater than 5 weeks. There is also an increase in free triiodothyronine (FT3) and a decrease in free thyroxine (FT4) values. Our results indicate that thyroid gland uptake is higher in rabbits chronically exposed to cold than control and the increase was proportional to the duration. The decrease in rabbit body weights may be related to the increase in metabolism due to the increase of thyroid hormones. Chronic cold exposure also increased the conversion of T4 to T3, which is more potent in thermogenic effect.

  7. Influence of crop rotation and tillage intensity on soil physical properties and functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krümmelbein, Julia

    2013-04-01

    Soil tillage intensity can vary concerning tillage depth, frequency, power input into the soil and degree of soil turn-over. Conventional tillage systems where a plough is regularly used to turn over the soil can be differentiated from reduced tillage systems without ploughing but with loosening the upper soil and no tillage systems. Between conventional tillage and no tillage is a wide range of more or less reduced tillage systems. In our case the different tillage intensities are not induced by different agricultural machinery or techniques, but result from varying crop rotations with more or less perennial crops and therefore lower or higher tillage frequency. Our experimental area constitutes of quite unstructured substrates, partly heavily compacted. The development of a functioning soil structure and accumulation of nutrients and organic matter are of high importance. Three different crop rotations induce varying tillage intensities and frequencies. The first crop rotation (Alfalfa monoculture) has only experienced seed bed preparation once and subsequently is wheeled once a year to cut and chaff the biomass. The second crop rotation contains perennial and annual crops and has therefore been tilled more often, while the third crop rotation consists only of annual crops with annual seedbed preparation. Our results show that reduced tillage intensity/frequency combined with the intense root growth of Alfalfa creates the most favourable soil physical state of the substrate compared to increased tillage and lower root growth intensity of the other crop rotations. Soil tillage disturbs soil structure development, especially when the substrate is mechanically unstable as in our case. For such problematic locations it is recommendable to reduce tillage intensity and/or frequency to allow the development of soil structure enhanced by root growth and thereby the accumulation of organic matter and nutrients within the rooting zone.

  8. Influence of hydrotherapy on clinical and cardiac autonomic function in migraine patients

    PubMed Central

    Sujan, M. U.; Rao, M. Raghavendra; Kisan, Ravikiran; Abhishekh, Hulegar A.; Nalini, Atchayaram; Raju, Trichur R.; Sathyaprabha, T. N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Migraine is associated with autonomic symptoms. The growing body of literature suggests that the dysfunctional autonomic nervous system might play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of migraine. Thermal therapies have been hypothesized to modulate these changes and alleviate pain. However, data regarding the efficacy of hydrotherapy in migraine remain scant. We evaluated the effect of add on hydrotherapy procedure (a hot arm and foot bath with ice massage to head) in migraine patients. Methods: Forty chronic migraine patients fulfilling the International Classification of Headache Disorders II criteria were recruited from the neurology outpatient clinic. Patients were randomized to receive either hydrotherapy plus conventional pharmacological care (n = 20) or conventional medication only (n = 20). Hydrotherapy group received treatment with hot arm and foot bath (103°F to 110°F) and ice massage to head daily for 20 min for 45 days. Patients were assessed using headache impact test (HIT), visual analog scale for pain and cardiac autonomic function by heart rate variability (HRV) before and after intervention period. Results: There was a significant decrease in HIT score, frequency, and intensity of headaches following treatment in both the groups. However, it was more evident in add on hydrotherapy group compared to pharmacological treatment alone group. There was also significant improvement in the HRV parameters. In particular, there was a significant decrease in heart rate (P = 0.017), increase in high frequency (HF) (P = 0.014) and decrease in low frequency/HF ratio (P = 0.004) in add on hydrotherapy group. Conclusion: Our study shows that add on hydrotherapy enhanced the vagal tone in addition to reducing the frequency and intensity of headaches in migraine patients. PMID:26933356

  9. Neonatally induced mild diabetes: influence on development, behavior and reproductive function of female Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neonatal STZ treatment induces a state of mild hyperglycemia in adult rats that disrupts metabolism and maternal/fetal interactions. The aim of this study was investigate the effect of neonatal STZ treatment on the physical development, behavior, and reproductive function of female Wistar rats from infancy to adulthood. Methods At birth, litters were assigned either to a Control (subcutaneous (s.c.) citrate buffer, n = 10) or STZ group, (streptozotocin (STZ) - 100 mg/kg-sc, n = 6). Blood glucose levels were measured on postnatal days (PND) 35, 84 and 120. In Experiment 1 body weight, length and the appearance of developmental milestones such as eye and vaginal opening were monitored. To assess the relative contribution of the initial and long term effects of STZ treatment this group was subdivided based on blood glucose levels recorded on PND 120: STZ hyperglycemic (between 120 and 300 mg/dl) and STZ normoglycemic (under 120 mg/dl). Behavioral activity was assessed in an open field on PND 21 and 75. In Experiment 2 estrous cyclicity, sexual behavior and circulating gonadotropin, ovarian steroid, and insulin levels were compared between control and STZ-hyperglycemic rats. In all measures the litter was the experimental unit. Parametric data were analyzed using one-way or, where appropriate, two-way ANOVA and significant effects were investigated using Tukey’s post hoc test. Fisher’s exact test was employed when data did not satisfy the assumption of normality e.g. presence of urine and fecal boli on the open field between groups. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05 for all data. Results As expected neonatal STZ treatment caused hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia in adulthood. STZ-treated pups also showed a temporary reduction in growth rate that probably reflected the early loss of circulating insulin. Hyperglycemic rats also exhibited a reduction in locomotor and exploratory behavior in the open field. Mild hyperglycemia did

  10. Influence of dietary taurine and housing density on oviduct function in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bin; Zhang, Yuan-shu; Ma, Zi-li; Zheng, Liu-hai; Li, Shuang-jie; Dou, Xin-hong; Gong, Jian-sen; Miao, Jin-feng

    2015-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the effects of dietary taurine and housing density on oviduct function in laying hens. Green-shell laying hens were randomly assigned to a free range group and two caged groups, one with low-density and the other with high-density housing. Each group was further divided into control (C) and taurine treatment (T) groups. All hens were fed the same basic diet except that the T groups' diet was supplemented with 0.1% taurine. The experiment lasted 15 d. Survival rates, laying rates, daily feed consumption, and daily weight gain were recorded. Histological changes, inflammatory mediator levels, and oxidation and anti-oxidation levels were determined. The results show that dietary taurine supplementation and reduced housing density significantly attenuated pathophysiological changes in the oviduct. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) DNA binding activity increased significantly in the high-density housing group compared with the two other housing groups and was reduced by taurine supplementation. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA expression in the high-density and low-density C and T groups increased significantly. In the free range and low-density groups, dietary taurine significantly reduced the expression of TNF-α mRNA. Supplementation with taurine decreased interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA expression significantly in the low-density groups. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) mRNA expression was significantly higher in caged hens. IL-10 mRNA expression was higher in the high-density C group than in the free range and low-density C groups. Supplementation with taurine decreased IL-10 mRNA expression significantly in the high-density group and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the free range hens. We conclude that taurine has important protective effects against oviduct damage. Reducing housing density also results in less oxidative stress, less inflammatory cell infiltration, and lower levels of inflammatory mediators in the oviduct

  11. Influence of heavy ions on cell survival, cytogenetic damage and mitochondrial function of human endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Sylvia; Helm, Alexander; Lee, Ryonfa; Pollet, Dieter; Durante, Marco

    There is increasing evidence that there is an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease among atomic bomb survivors and radiotherapy patients, typically developing with a long latency. However, essentially no information is available on the potential cardiovascular risks associated with space radiation, in particular heavy ions. To address this issue, we have chosen human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) as a model system. Cells at an early passage number were irradiated with 0.1 to 4 Gy of either 9.8 MeV/u C-ions (LET=170 keV/µm), 91 MeV/u C-ions (LET=29 keV/µm) or 250 kV X-rays. Cells were regularly subcultured up to 40 days (20 population doublings) post-irradiation. Immediately after exposure cell inactivation was deter-mined by the colony forming assay. Furthermore, at selected time-points cytogenetic damage (formation of micronuclei in binucleated cells) and the mitochondrial membrane potential ΨM (flow cytometric analysis following JC-1 staining) were assessed. Measurement of the directly induced radiation damage showed that 9.8 MeV/u and 91 MeV/u C-ions were more effective than X-rays (i.e. about 3 and 2 times, respectively) with respect to cell inactivation or the in-duction of cytogenetic damage. At the subsequent days in the irradiated cultures the number of cells with micronuclei declined to the control level (3-5Altogether our data indicate that under the applied radiation conditions the integrity of mitochondria which play a significant role in the regulation of cardiovascular cell function is not impaired. With respect to directly induced genetic damage C-ions are more effective than X-rays as observed in other cell systems. If the effectiveness of charged particles for the occurrence of late chromosomal damage in endothelial cells is higher than that of sparsely ionizing radiation needs further clarification. The data obtained up to now indicate that sophisticated cytogenetic techniques have to be applied in order to draw any firm

  12. The Influence of Glycemic Index on Cognitive Functioning: A Systematic Review of the Evidence1

    PubMed Central

    Philippou, Elena; Constantinou, Marios

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the rate of carbohydrate absorption, as measured by the carbohydrate’s glycemic index (GI) on cognitive performance, is not clear. The aim of this review was to systematically assess the relevant research studies. A systematic review of English-language articles using Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PsycARTICLES (up to July 2012) using the search terms “glyc(a)emic index” or “glycaemic load” combined with “cognitive function” or “cognition” or “memory” was carried out. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were prespecified. Eligibility of the identified studies was assessed independently by the 2 reviewers. Independent extraction of data was carried out by the 2 authors using predefined data fields. The primary outcome measure was the effect on cognitive function (CF) after the consumption of meals varying in GI. Eleven eligible studies were identified. The age range of the participants varied from 6 to 82 y old. Overall, the findings were inconsistent, with some studies showing benefits toward either the high-GI or the low-GI meal, others not finding any differences between the 2 meals, and other studies showing a positive or negative effect on performance on only some cognitive domain or domains after consumption of 1 of the 2 meals. A number of methodologic and confounding factors were identified that could explain these inconsistencies. These include the study design, the selected sample (size, age, blood glucose regulation), the timing of testing, the cognitive domain being examined, the number and type of cognitive tests used, the meals provided (composition, size), the timing of blood samples collected, as well as the possibility of bias because participants and investigators were not blinded to randomization. A low-GI meal may favor CF in adults, but the findings at present are inconclusive. On the basis of this review, it is suggested that future studies address the identified

  13. Influence of Hyperinsulinemia and Insulin Resistance on In Vivo β-Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Mari, Andrea; Tura, Andrea; Natali, Andrea; Anderwald, Christian; Balkau, Beverley; Lalic, Nebojsa; Walker, Mark; Ferrannini, Ele

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent work has shown that insulin stimulates its own secretion in insulin-sensitive humans, suggesting that insulin resistance in the β-cell could cause β-cell dysfunction. We have tested whether insulin exposure and insulin sensitivity modulate β-cell function in subjects with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) and whether they contribute to dysglycemia in impaired glucose regulation (IGR). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Insulin sensitivity (by euglycemic clamp), insulin-induced secretory response at isoglycemia (IISR) (as C-peptide percent change from basal during the clamp), glucose-induced secretory response (GISR) to an intravenous glucose bolus, and β-cell glucose sensitivity (β-GS) (by oral glucose tolerance test [OGTT] modeling) were measured in 1,151 NGT and 163 IGR subjects from the RISC (Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease) study. RESULTS In NGT, IISR was related to both insulin sensitivity and antecedent insulin exposure; GISR was related to insulin exposure. IISR was positively, if weakly, related to β-GS (r= 0.16, P < 0.0001). Both IISR (−23 [39] vs. −9 [2]%, median [interquartile range], P < 0.03) and β-GS (69 [47] vs. 118 [83] pmol ⋅ min–1 ⋅ m–2 ⋅ mmol–1 ⋅ L, P < 0.0001) were decreased in IGR compared with NGT. Insulin sensitivity and β-GS were the major determinants of mean OGTT glucose in both NGT and IGR, with a minor role for IISR. In a multivariate logistic model, IGR was predicted by β-GS (odds ratio 4.84 [95% CI 2.89–8.09]) and insulin sensitivity (3.06 [2.19–4.27]) but not by IISR (1.11 [0.77–1.61]). CONCLUSIONS Pre-exposure to physiological hyperinsulinemia stimulates insulin secretion to a degree that depends on insulin sensitivity. However, this phenomenon has limited impact on β-cell dysfunction and dysglycemia. PMID:22028180

  14. Influence of growth factors and cytokines on angiogenic function of endothelial progenitor cells: a review of in vitro human studies.

    PubMed

    Peplow, Philip V

    2014-06-01

    Growth factors and cytokines released at sites of injury and inflammation play an important role in stimulating endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) migration to these sites. A comparative analysis of the literature shows under neutral in vitro conditions (pH 7.4), several growth factors and cytokines influenced favorably indices of EPC angiogenic function. They included SDF-1, VEGF, PlGF, FGF-2, NGF and IL-1β. Others, e.g. TNF-α, have an unfavorable influence. SDF-1 and VEGF in combination increased chemotactic cell migration and reduced apoptosis caused by serum starvation. Under acidic conditions (pH 6.5), the biological activity of certain growth factors may be impaired, although TPO, SCF and IL-3 were each able to rescue EPCs from acidic exposure apoptosis, a combination of these three factors stimulated cell proliferation and prevented apoptosis. Possible combinations of growth factors and cytokines together with EPC transplantation may provide for a greater extent of vessel repair and new vessel formation.

  15. Identification of differences in human and great ape phytanic acid metabolism that could influence gene expression profiles and physiological functions

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It has been proposed that anatomical differences in human and great ape guts arose in response to species-specific diets and energy demands. To investigate functional genomic consequences of these differences, we compared their physiological levels of phytanic acid, a branched chain fatty acid that can be derived from the microbial degradation of chlorophyll in ruminant guts. Humans who accumulate large stores of phytanic acid commonly develop cerebellar ataxia, peripheral polyneuropathy, and retinitis pigmentosa in addition to other medical conditions. Furthermore, phytanic acid is an activator of the PPAR-alpha transcription factor that influences the expression of genes relevant to lipid metabolism. Results Despite their trace dietary phytanic acid intake, all great ape species had elevated red blood cell (RBC) phytanic acid levels relative to humans on diverse diets. Unlike humans, chimpanzees showed sexual dimorphism in RBC phytanic acid levels, which were higher in males relative to females. Cultured skin fibroblasts from all species had a robust capacity to degrade phytanic acid. We provide indirect evidence that great apes, in contrast to humans, derive significant amounts of phytanic acid from the hindgut fermentation of plant materials. This would represent a novel reduction of metabolic activity in humans relative to the great apes. Conclusion We identified differences in the physiological levels of phytanic acid in humans and great apes and propose this is causally related to their gut anatomies and microbiomes. Phytanic acid levels could contribute to cross-species and sex-specific differences in human and great ape transcriptomes, especially those related to lipid metabolism. Based on the medical conditions caused by phytanic acid accumulation, we suggest that differences in phytanic acid metabolism could influence the functions of human and great ape nervous, cardiovascular, and skeletal systems. PMID:20932325

  16. Influence of dietary n-3 LC-PUFA on growth, nutritional composition and immune function in marine fish Sebastiscus marmoratus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shiming; Yue, Yanfeng; Gao, Quanxin; Shi, Zhaohong; Yin, Fei; Wang, Jiangang

    2014-09-01

    A 60-day feeding experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of dietary omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA) on growth, nutritional composition and immune function of marine fish Sebastiscus marmoratus. Five diets containing 3.6, 10.2, 18.2, 26.5, or 37.0 g/kg n-3 LC-PUFA were prepared. The results reveal significant influences of dietary n-3 LC-PUFA on the final weight, weight gain, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio, and condition factor. As dietary n-3 LCPUFA increased, weight gain and specific growth rate increased and were significantly higher in groups fed 18.2, 26.5 and 37.0 g/kg than in groups fed 3.6 and 10.2 g/kg ( P<0.05); there was no significant difference between groups fed 18.2, 26.5, or 37.0 g/kg ( P>0.05). With increasing dietary n-3 LC-PUFA, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexenoic acid content in muscle and liver increased significantly, immunoglobulin class M content gradually increased from 9.1 to 14.8 μg/L, and lysozyme activity content increased from 1 355 to 2 268 U/mL. Broken line model analysis according to weight gain indicated that a dietary n-3 LC-PUFA level of 18.2 g/kg is essential for normal growth at a fat level of 125 g/kg. Therefore, appropriate dietary n-3 LC-PUFA not only promote growth and improve the n-3 LC-PUFA content, but also enhance immune function in S. marmoratus.

  17. Influence of Cognitive Interferences and Self-Talk Functions on Performance During Competition in Elite Female Field Hockey Players.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Encinas, Cristina; Fernández-Campos, Francisco J; Rodas, Gil; Barrios, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Pérez-Encinas, C, Fernández-Campos, FJ, Rodas, G, and Barrios, C. Influence of cognitive interferences and self-talk functions on performance during competition in elite female field hockey players. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3339-3346, 2016-Cognitive interferences in the form of distracting thoughts and self-talk functions may play an important role in athletes' performance. The purpose of this study was to explore the types of interfering thoughts and the concomitant use of self-talk functions occurring in a sample of elite female field hockey players. The variation in these interferences in relation to athletes' performance level in competition was also investigated. Thirty-two female players of the first and the Under-21 National Team completed the Thought Occurrence Questionnaire for Sport and the Self-Talk Questionnaire after an international competition. The trainer rated the players' performance during competition in 3 different categories according to his expectancies based on the athletes' conditioning: Low (n = 6), Normal (n = 15), and High Performance (n = 11). Those players classified as low performing had increased the occurrence of irrelevant thoughts as compared with other groups. These athletes also showed the highest scores on the thoughts of escape subscale. Athletes with high performance during tournaments exhibited the lowest scores on all subscales, especially in thoughts of escape. The S-TQ subscales showed no differences among the 3 performance groups. Under-21 players had higher scores on the occurrence of performance worries and thoughts of escape subscales than first national team players. Interfering thoughts are common in female field hockey players during world-class competitions. The occurrence of irrelevant thoughts and thoughts of escape was related to players exhibiting low performance. The use of self-talk functions was relatively low in these athletes and could explain the enhanced occurrence of interfering thoughts.

  18. Influence of rifampicin on the expression and function of human intestinal cytochrome P450 enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Glaeser, H; Drescher, S; Eichelbaum, M; Fromm, M F

    2005-01-01

    List of nonstandard abbreviations mlpc multilumen perfusion catheter TMPD: transmucosal potential difference a.u. arbitrary unit Aims To investigate the potential induction by rifampicin of intestinal CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 using preparations of human enterocytes. Methods Using a multilumen perfusion catheter shed human enterocytes were collected from 6 healthy subjects before and after 10 days of 600 mg day−1 oral rifampicin administration. The protein expression of CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 as well as that of CYP3A4 mRNA was determined using Western blotting and RT-PCR, respectively. Results CYP3A4 mRNA expression in shed enterocytes increased from 74.6 ± 44.2 to 143.2 ± 68.4 a.u. (P < 0.05, 95% CI: 21.8–115.3). Expression of CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 increased from 5.1 ± 0.9 to 10.4 ± 2.3 pmol mg−1 protein (P < 0.01, 95% CI: 2.8–7.7) and from 4.2 ± 1.4 to 5.7 ± 1.1 pmol mg−1 protein (P < 0.01, 95% CI: 0.6–2.4), respectively. No significant difference in CYP2D6 expression before and during rifampicin intake was observed. Rifampicin administration also resulted in a significant induction of CYP3A4 protein (34.1 ± 10.7 vs. 113.9 ± 31.1 pmol mg−1 protein (P < 0.001, 95% CI: 51.8–107.6)). Ex vivo incubation of enterocyte homogenates with verapamil resulted in a significantly increased production of the metabolites formed via CYP3A4 (D-617: 125.9 ± 118.8 vs. 277.2 ± 145.5 pmol min−1 mg−1 protein (P < 0.05, 95% CI: 30.1–272.5); norverapamil: 113.0 ± 57.9 vs. 398.4 ± 148.2 pmol min−1 mg−1 protein (P < 0.05, 95% CI: 47.2–523.6)). Conclusion Our findings indicate that shed enterocytes are a useful tool to study the expression, regulation and function of drug metabolizing enzymes. Induction of intestinal CYP2C8 and CYP2C9 might contribute in part to rifampicin – mediated drug interactions, in addition to their hepatic counterparts and intestinal and hepatic CYP3A4. PMID:15676042

  19. Computational study of influence of diffuse basis functions on geometry optimization and spectroscopic properties of losartan potassium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizera, Mikołaj; Lewadowska, Kornelia; Talaczyńska, Alicja; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta

    2015-02-01

    The work was aimed at investigating the influence of diffusion of basis functions on the geometry optimization of molecule of losartan in acidic and salt form. Spectroscopic properties of losartan potassium were also calculated and compared with experiment. Density functional theory method with various basis sets: 6-31G(d,p) and its diffused variations 6-31G(d,p)+ and 6-31G(d,p)++ was used. Application of diffuse basis functions in geometry optimization resulted in significant change of total molecule energy. Total molecule energy of losartan potassium decreased by 112.91 kJ/mol and 114.32 kJ/mol for 6-31G(d,p)+ and 6-31G(d,p)++ basis sets, respectively. Almost the same decrease was observed for losartan: 114.99 kJ/mol and 117.08 kJ/mol respectively for 6-31G(d,p)+ and 6-31G(d,p)++ basis sets. Further investigation showed significant difference within geometries of losartan potassium optimized with investigated basis sets. Application of diffused basis functions resulted in average 1.29 Å difference in relative position between corresponding atoms of three obtained geometries. Similar study taken on losartan resulted in only average 0.22 Å of dislocation. Extensive analysis of geometry changes in molecules obtained with diffused and non-diffuse basis functions was carried out in order to elucidate observed changes. The analysis was supported by electrostatic potential maps and calculation of natural atomic charges. UV, FT-IR and Raman spectra of losartan potassium were calculated and compared with experimental results. No crucial differences between Raman spectra obtained with different basis sets were observed. However, FT-IR spectra of geometry of losartan potassium optimized with 6-31G(d,p)++ basis set resulted in 40% better correlation with experimental FT-IR spectra than FT-IR calculated with geometry optimized with 6-31G(d,p) basis set. Therefore, it is highly advisable to optimize geometry of molecules with ionic interactions using diffuse basis functions

  20. Computational study of influence of diffuse basis functions on geometry optimization and spectroscopic properties of losartan potassium.

    PubMed

    Mizera, Mikołaj; Lewadowska, Kornelia; Talaczyńska, Alicja; Cielecka-Piontek, Judyta

    2015-02-25

    The work was aimed at investigating the influence of diffusion of basis functions on the geometry optimization of molecule of losartan in acidic and salt form. Spectroscopic properties of losartan potassium were also calculated and compared with experiment. Density functional theory method with various basis sets: 6-31G(d,p) and its diffused variations 6-31G(d,p)+ and 6-31G(d,p)++ was used. Application of diffuse basis functions in geometry optimization resulted in significant change of total molecule energy. Total molecule energy of losartan potassium decreased by 112.91kJ/mol and 114.32kJ/mol for 6-31G(d,p)+ and 6-31G(d,p)++ basis sets, respectively. Almost the same decrease was observed for losartan: 114.99kJ/mol and 117.08kJ/mol respectively for 6-31G(d,p)+ and 6-31G(d,p)++ basis sets. Further investigation showed significant difference within geometries of losartan potassium optimized with investigated basis sets. Application of diffused basis functions resulted in average 1.29Å difference in relative position between corresponding atoms of three obtained geometries. Similar study taken on losartan resulted in only average 0.22Å of dislocation. Extensive analysis of geometry changes in molecules obtained with diffused and non-diffuse basis functions was carried out in order to elucidate observed changes. The analysis was supported by electrostatic potential maps and calculation of natural atomic charges. UV, FT-IR and Raman spectra of losartan potassium were calculated and compared with experimental results. No crucial differences between Raman spectra obtained with different basis sets were observed. However, FT-IR spectra of geometry of losartan potassium optimized with 6-31G(d,p)++ basis set resulted in 40% better correlation with experimental FT-IR spectra than FT-IR calculated with geometry optimized with 6-31G(d,p) basis set. Therefore, it is highly advisable to optimize geometry of molecules with ionic interactions using diffuse basis functions when

  1. Lipase immobilization on differently functionalized vinyl-based amphiphilic polymers: influence of phase segregation on the enzyme hydrolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Bellusci, Mariangela; Francolini, Iolanda; Martinelli, Andrea; D'Ilario, Lucio; Piozzi, Antonella

    2012-03-12

    Microbial lipase from Candida rugosa was immobilized by physical adsorption onto an ethylene-vinyl alcohol polymer (EVAL) functionalized with acyl chlorides. To evaluate the influence of the reagent chain-length on the amount and activity of immobilized lipase, three differently long aliphatic fatty acids were employed (C8, C12, C18), obtaining EVAL functionalization degrees ranging from 5% to 65%. The enzyme-polymer affinity increased with both the length of the alkyl chain and the matrix hydrophobicity. In particular, the esterified polymers showed a tendency to give segregated hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains. It was observed the formation of an enzyme multilayer at both low and high protein concentrations. Desorption experiments showed that Candida rugosa lipase may be adsorbed in a closed form on the polymer hydrophilic domains and in an open, active structure on the hydrophobic ones. The best results were found for the EVAL-C18 13% matrix that showed hyperactivation with both the soluble and unsoluble substrate after enzyme desorption. In addition, this supported biocatalyst retained its activity for repetitive cycles.

  2. Macrophage reprogramming: influence of latex beads with various functional groups on macrophage phenotype and phagocytic uptake in vitro.

    PubMed

    Akilbekova, Dana; Philiph, Rachel; Graham, Austin; Bratlie, Kaitlin M

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play a crucial role in initiating immune responses with various functions ranging from wound healing to antimicrobial actions. The type of biomaterial is suggested to influence macrophage phenotype. Here, we show that exposing M1- and M2-activated macrophages to polystyrene latex beads bearing different functional groups can alter secretion profiles, providing a possible method for altering the course of the host response. Macrophages were stimulated with either lipopolysaccharide or interleukin (IL) 4 and cultured for 24 h with 10 different latex beads. Proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, monocyte chemotactic protein 1) and nitrite served as markers for the M1 phenotype and proangiogenic cytokine (IL-10) and arginase activity for M2 cells. The ability of the macrophages to phagocytize Escherichia coli particles and water contact angles of the polymers were also assessed. Different patterns of cytokine expression and phagocytosis activity were induced by the various particles. Particles did not polarize the cells toward one specific phenotype versus another, but rather induced changes in both pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. Our results suggest a dependence of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and phagocytic activities on material type and cytokine stimuli. These data also illustrate how biomaterials can be exploited to alter host responses for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.

  3. Influence of Skeletal Maturity on Size, Function and Sport-specific Technical Skills in Youth Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Gouvea, M; Cyrino, E S; Ribeiro, A S; da Silva, D R P; Ohara, D; Valente-Dos-Santos, J; Coelho-E-Silva, M J; Ronque, E

    2016-06-01

    This study compared variation in size, function and sport-specific technical skills of youth soccer players associated with differences in biological maturity status. 60 male soccer players of under-14 (U14) and under-17 (U17) categories were submitted to anthropometric and body composition measurements as well as motor and soccer-specific technical skill tests. Skeletal maturity was determined by skeletal age. Athletes of both categories were classified as early, on-time or late-maturing, according to the difference between chronological age and skeletal age. Body mass and height were lower in the late athletes, independent of category (P<0.01). Differences in adiposity were found only between athletes of the U14 (lateinfluences body mass, height, body fat, flexibility, muscular strength of upper limbs and cardiorespiratory fitness, whereas the specific technical skills and other functional capabilities do not seem to be affected.

  4. Stormwater sediment and bioturbation influences on hydraulic functioning, biogeochemical processes, and pollutant dynamics in laboratory infiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Nogaro, Geraldine; Mermillod-Blondin, Florian

    2009-05-15

    Stormwater sediments that accumulate at the surface of infiltration basins reduce infiltration efficiencies by physical clogging and produce anoxification in the subsurface. The present study aimed to quantify the influence of stormwater sediment origin (urban vs industrial catchments) and the occurrence of bioturbators (tubificid worms) on the hydraulic functioning, aerobic/anaerobic processes, and pollutant dynamics in stormwater infiltration systems. In laboratory sediment columns, effects of stormwater sediments and tubificids were examined on hydraulic conductivity, microbial processes, and pollutant releases. Significant differences in physical (particle size distribution) and chemical characteristics betoveen the two stormwater sediments led to distinct effects of these sediments on hydraulic and biogeochemical processes. Bioturbation by tubificid worms could increase the hydraulic conductivity in stormwater infiltration columns, but this effect depended on the characteristics of the stormwater sediments. Bioturbation-driven increases in hydraulic conductivity stimulated aerobic microbial processes and enhanced vertical fluxes of pollutants in the sediment layer. Our results showed that control of hydraulic functioning by stormwater sediment characteristics and/ or biological activities (such as bioturbation) determined the dynamics of organic matter and pollutants in stormwater infiltration devices.

  5. The influence of hot and cool executive function on the development of eating styles related to overweight in children.

    PubMed

    Groppe, Karoline; Elsner, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Studies linking executive function (EF) and overweight suggest that a broad range of executive functions might influence weight via obesity-related behaviors, such as particular eating styles. Currently, however, longitudinal studies investigating this assumption in children are rare. We hypothesized that lower hot and cool EF predicts a stronger increase in eating styles related to greater weight gain (food approach) and a weaker increase in eating styles related to less weight gain (food avoidance) over a 1-year period. Hot (delay of gratification, affective decision-making) and cool (attention shifting, inhibition, working memory updating) EF was assessed experimentally in a sample of 1657 elementary-school children (German school classes 1-3) at two time points, approximately one year apart. The children's food-approach and food-avoidance behavior was rated mainly via parent questionnaires at both time points. As expected, lower levels of hot and cool EF predicted a stronger increase in several food-approach eating styles across a 1-year period, mainly in girls. Unexpectedly, poorer performance on the affective decision-making task also predicted an increase in certain food-avoidance styles, namely, slowness in eating and satiety responsiveness, in girls. Results implicate that lower EF is not only seen in eating-disordered or obese individuals but also acts as a risk factor for an increase in particular eating styles that play a role in the development of weight problems in children.

  6. Functional characterization of two paralogs that are novel RNA binding proteins influencing mitochondrial transcripts of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Kafková, Lucie; Ammerman, Michelle L; Faktorová, Drahomíra; Fisk, John C; Zimmer, Sara L; Sobotka, Roman; Read, Laurie K; Lukes, Julius; Hashimi, Hassan

    2012-10-01

    A majority of Trypanosoma brucei proteins have unknown functions, a consequence of its independent evolutionary history within the order Kinetoplastida that allowed for the emergence of several unique biological properties. Among these is RNA editing, needed for expression of mitochondrial-encoded genes. The recently discovered mitochondrial RNA binding complex 1 (MRB1) is composed of proteins with several functions in processing organellar RNA. We characterize two MRB1 subunits, referred to herein as MRB8170 and MRB4160, which are paralogs arisen from a large chromosome duplication occurring only in T. brucei. As with many other MRB1 proteins, both have no recognizable domains, motifs, or orthologs outside the order. We show that they are both novel RNA binding proteins, possibly representing a new class of these proteins. They associate with a similar subset of MRB1 subunits but not directly with each other. We generated cell lines that either individually or simultaneously target the mRNAs encoding both proteins using RNAi. Their dual silencing results in a differential effect on moderately and pan-edited RNAs, suggesting a possible functional separation of the two proteins. Cell growth persists upon RNAi silencing of each protein individually in contrast to the dual knockdown. Yet, their apparent redundancy in terms of cell viability is at odds with the finding that only one of these knockdowns results in the general degradation of pan-edited RNAs. While MRB8170 and MRB4160 share a considerable degree of conservation, our results suggest that their recent sequence divergence has led to them influencing mitochondrial mRNAs to differing degrees.

  7. The influence of sol-gel-derived silica coatings functionalized with betamethasone on adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs).

    PubMed

    Donesz-Sikorska, Anna; Grzesiak, Jakub; Smieszeka, Agnieszk; Krzak, Justyna; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2014-09-01

    Silica-based sol-gel coatings have gained attention in bone therapies and orthopedic applications, due to the biocompatibility and bioactivity, including a high potential for the controlled release both in vitro and in vivo. Bioactive materials are created to facilitate the biocompatibility of orthopedic implants. One of the promising alternatives is biomaterials with immobilized drugs. In this study we demonstrated for the first time novel sol-gel-derived silica coatings with active amino groups (SiO2(NH2)) functionalized with a steroid drug-betamethasone, applied to a substrate 316 L using dip coating technique. The presence of betamethasone in functionalized coatings was directly confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis. The wettability was evaluated by the sessile drop method, while the surface free energy was estimated based on the contact angles measured. Our results showed a shift in surface properties from hydrophobic to hydrophilic after application of the coatings. We have investigated the morphology, proliferation factor, and the population doubling time of adipose-derived stem cells for biological purposes. Moreover, the analysis of the distribution and localization of cellular microvesicles was performed to evaluate the influence of functionalized surfaces on cellular cytophysiological activity. Increased proliferation and activation of cells, determined by the observations of microvesicles shedding processes, provided evidence of the availability of the drug. Therefore, we conclude that the sol-gel synthesis proposed here allows to improve the metal substrates and can be successfully used for immobilization of betamethasone. This in turn enables the direct delivery of the drug with implanted material into the wound site, and to stimulate the activity of cells to enhance tissue regeneration.

  8. Increasing age influences uterine integrity, but not ovarian function or oocyte quality, in the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Crosier, Adrienne E; Comizzoli, Pierre; Baker, Tom; Davidson, Autumn; Munson, Linda; Howard, JoGayle; Marker, Laurie L; Wildt, David E

    2011-08-01

    Although the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) routinely lives for more than 12 yr in ex situ collections, females older than 8 yr reproduce infrequently. We tested the hypothesis that reproduction is compromised in older female cheetahs due to a combination of disrupted gonadal, oocyte, and uterine function/integrity. Specifically, we assessed 1) ovarian response to gonadotropins; 2) oocyte meiotic, fertilization, and developmental competence; and 3) uterine morphology in three age classes of cheetahs (young, 2-5 yr, n = 17; prime, 6-8 yr, n = 8; older, 9-15 yr, n = 9). Ovarian activity was stimulated with a combination of equine chorionic gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and fecal samples were collected for 45 days before gonadotropin treatment and for 30 days after oocyte recovery by laparoscopy. Twenty-six to thirty hours post-hCG, uterine morphology was examined by ultrasound, ovarian follicular size determined by laparoscopy, and aspirated oocytes assessed for nuclear status or inseminated in vitro. Although no influence of age on fecal hormone concentrations or gross uterine morphology was found (P > 0.05), older females produced fewer (P < 0.05) total antral follicles and oocytes compared to younger counterparts. Regardless of donor age, oocytes had equivalent (P > 0.05) nuclear status and ability to reach metaphase II and fertilize in vitro. A histological assessment of voucher specimens revealed an age-related influence on uterine tissue integrity, with more than 87% and more than 56% of older females experiencing endometrial hyperplasia and severe pathologies, respectively. Our collective findings reveal that lower reproductive success in older cheetahs appears to be minimally influenced by ovarian and gamete aging and subsequent dysfunction. Rather, ovaries from older females are responsive to gonadotropins, produce normative estradiol/progestogen concentrations, and develop follicles containing oocytes with the capacity to mature and be

  9. Specific Glucoside Transporters Influence Septal Structure and Function in the Filamentous, Heterocyst-Forming Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Morión, Mercedes; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; López-Igual, Rocío; Frías, José E; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Wolk, C Peter; Flores, Enrique

    2017-04-01

    When deprived of combined nitrogen, some filamentous cyanobacteria contain two cell types: vegetative cells that fix CO2 through oxygenic photosynthesis and heterocysts that are specialized in N2 fixation. In the diazotrophic filament, the vegetative cells provide the heterocysts with reduced carbon (mainly in the form of sucrose) and heterocysts provide the vegetative cells with combined nitrogen. Septal junctions traverse peptidoglycan through structures known as nanopores and appear to mediate intercellular molecular transfer that can be traced with fluorescent markers, including the sucrose analog esculin (a coumarin glucoside) that is incorporated into the cells. Uptake of esculin by the model heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 was inhibited by the α-glucosides sucrose and maltose. Analysis of Anabaena mutants identified components of three glucoside transporters that move esculin into the cells: GlsC (Alr4781) and GlsP (All0261) are an ATP-binding subunit and a permease subunit of two different ABC transporters, respectively, and HepP (All1711) is a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein that was shown previously to be involved in formation of the heterocyst envelope. Transfer of fluorescent markers (especially calcein) between vegetative cells of Anabaena was impaired by mutation of glucoside transporter genes. GlsP and HepP interact in bacterial two-hybrid assays with the septal junction-related protein SepJ, and GlsC was found to be necessary for the formation of a normal number of septal peptidoglycan nanopores and for normal subcellular localization of SepJ. Therefore, beyond their possible role in nutrient uptake in Anabaena, glucoside transporters influence the structure and function of septal junctions.IMPORTANCE Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria have the ability to perform oxygenic photosynthesis and to assimilate atmospheric CO2 and N2 These organisms grow as filaments that fix these gases specifically in vegetative

  10. The influence of prehypertension, controlled and uncontrolled hypertension on left ventricular diastolic function and structure in the general Korean population.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ju Young; Park, Sung Keun; Oh, Chang-Mo; Kang, Jeong Gyu; Choi, Joong-Myung; Ryoo, Jae-Hong; Lee, Jae-Hon

    2017-01-26

    Although hypertension is a clear risk factor for cardiovascular disease, how prehypertension and controlled hypertension influence left ventricular (LV) diastolic function and structure remain to be elucidated. Thus, this study was intended to investigate the link between LV diastolic dysfunction and structural changes in different categories of hypertension. A cohort of 52 111 Korean adults receiving echocardiograms was enrolled. The study population was stratified into five groups according to the following categories of hypertension and blood pressure (BP): normotensive (<120/80 mm Hg), prehypertensive (120-139/80-89 mm Hg), controlled hypertensive (<140/90 mm Hg), newly recognized hypertensive and uncontrolled hypertensive (⩾140/90 mm Hg). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the odds ratios (ORs) for LV hypertrophy (LVH) and increased relative wall thickness (RWT), and the adjusted mean values of diastolic parameters were used to examine differences in LV diastolic function. We found a significant relationship between elevated BP and LVH. In addition, an association was observed with LV remodeling (increased RWT). The ORs of LV hypertrophy, remodeling and adjusted mean values of echocardiographic parameters showed dose-response relationships across the study groups, in the order (from lowest to highest) of normotensive, prehypertensive, controlled hypertension, newly recognized hypertension and uncontrolled hypertension. The full adjusted ORs of increased RWT were 1.65 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.45-1.87) in prehypertension, 2.02 (95% CI: 1.74-2.34) in controlled hypertension, 2.85 (95% CI: 2.35-3.43) in newly recognized hypertension and 3.31 (95% CI: 2.68-4.07) in uncontrolled hypertension. The present study results suggest the importance of early detection and proper management of hypertension.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 26 January 2017; doi:10.1038/hr.2016.191.

  11. Adverse influence of coumestrol on secretory function of bovine luteal cells in the first trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Młynarczuk, J; Wróbel, M H; Kotwica, J

    2013-07-01

    Coumestrol is one of a few biologically active substances present in leguminous plants, which are widely used as fodder for ruminants. Depending on the doses, coumestrol acts on the reproductive processes as an estrogen-like factor or antiestrogen to evoke a decrease in ovulation frequency, elongation of estrous cycle duration. The aim of the current investigations was to study the influence of coumestrol on secretory function of luteal cells obtained from first trimester of pregnant cows. Luteal cells (2.5 × 10(5) /mL) from 3rd to 5th, 6th to 8th, and 9th to 12th week of pregnancy were preincubated for 24 h and incubated with coumestrol (1 × 10(-6) M) for successive 48 h and the medium concentrations of progesterone (P4), oxytocin (OT), prostaglandin (PG) E2 and F2α were determined. Moreover, the expression of mRNA for neurophysin-I/oxytocin (NP-I/OT; precursor of OT) and peptidyl-glycine-α-amidating mono-oxygenase (PGA, an enzyme responsible for post-translational OT synthesis) was determined after 8 h of treatment. Coumestrol did not affect P4 secretion but increased the secretion of OT from the cells collected at all stages of gestation studied. Hence, the ratio of P4 to OT was markedly decreased. Simultaneously, coumestrol increased the expression of NP-I/OT mRNA during 9th to 12th weeks of pregnancy, and mRNA for PGA during 3rd to 5th and 9th to 12th weeks of gestation. Furthermore, coumestrol decreased PGE2 secretion from luteal cells in all studied stages of pregnancy, while it affected PGF2α metabolite (PGFM) concentration only from week 3 to 5 of pregnancy. Obtained results suggest that coumestrol impairs secretory function of the corpus luteum (CL) and this way it can affect the maintenance of pregnancy in the cow.

  12. Nocebo context modulates long-term habituation to heat pain and influences functional connectivity of the operculum.

    PubMed

    Ellerbrock, Isabel; Wiehler, Antonius; Arndt, Manuela; May, Arne

    2015-11-01

    In the past, nocebo manipulations have been found to modulate pain perception and influence long-term habituation to pain. Recently, neural correlates accompanying this finding have been identified: habituation over days is mirrored by decreased activity in pain-processing brain areas, whereas nocebo-specific modulation specifically involves the opercular cortex. Focusing on duration and central network characteristics of nocebo information in a longitudinal heat pain paradigm, we investigated 40 healthy participants over a period of 21 consecutive days, whereof sessions on days 1, 8, 14, and 21 were performed during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Negative context information was given to half of the participants, inducing a nocebo manipulation through verbal suggestions. The analysis was focused on brain areas associated with habituation and nocebo effects and identified coupled brain regions using functional connectivity analysis. Decreased pain perception over days was reflected in reduced blood oxygenation level dependent signal in pain-processing areas, such as the insula and somatosensory cortices, whereas increased rostral anterior cingulate cortex activation reflected the central correlate for habituation over time. Habituation was significantly less pronounced in the nocebo group. Consistent with previous results, the nocebo manipulation not only modulated pain perception but also was accompanied by the activation of the operculum over an extended period of time. Importantly, the operculum exhibited changes in coupling during nociceptive input over time, as demonstrated by decreased connectivity with the basal ganglia and pinpoints differences, depending on whether a nocebo context was given. These data suggest that negative verbal suggestions prognosticating increasing pain may prevail by modulating basal ganglia-thalamocortical loops.

  13. FUNCTIONING OF ALCOHOL USE DISORDER CRITERIA AMONG MEN AND WOMEN WITH ARRESTS FOR DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL

    PubMed Central

    McCutcheon, Vivia V.; Agrawal, Arpana; Heath, Andrew C.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Hesselbrock, Victor M.; Schuckit, Marc A.; Kramer, John R.; Bucholz, Kathleen K.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many states require screening of individuals arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) to determine recidivism risk and the need for treatment based on severity of alcohol problems. Several screening instruments use DSM-IV criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence to assess alcohol problems in this population, but whether they adequately measure alcohol problems in individuals with DUIs has not been examined. In addition, gender differences in DUI samples suggest that female offenders have more severe alcohol problems than male offenders. The current study examines differences in alcohol criteria functioning by DUI history and gender using an item response theory (IRT) approach. METHODS Data from diagnostic interviews with 8605 participants in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism, including 1655 who ever reported a DUI arrest (20% women), were used to examine differences in alcohol criteria functioning between men and women with and without DUIs. The factor underlying item response was conceptualized as unidimensional, representing alcohol problem severity. RESULTS Social/interpersonal problems, larger/longer, and inability/persistent desire to quit displayed greater discrimination of IRT-defined alcohol problem severity among individuals with DUIs than those without. Irrespective of DUI status, women had a higher threshold than men for time spent drinking or recovering. Women without DUIs had a higher threshold than similar men for social/interpersonal problems. Taken as a whole, the criteria yielded similar amounts of information in all groups. CONCLUSIONS DSM-IV criteria for alcohol abuse and dependence adequately detect alcohol problem severity in individuals with DUIs and some are better at detecting severity in this particularly high-risk group than in individuals without DUIs. However, the criteria as a whole are equally effective in measuring alcohol problem severity among individuals with and without DUIs, and

  14. Influence of smoking on respiratory symptoms and lung function indices in sawmill workers in Benin City, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ugheoke, A J; Ebomoyi, M I; Iyawe, V I

    2006-01-01

    The study was done to assess the influence of smoking on respiratory symptoms and respiratory function in sawmill workers in Benin City. 150 sawmill workers who were all males and aged between 18 and 50 years, and had been in continuous employment in sawmill factories for a minimum of one year were studied. They were selected by a two-stage random sampling process from sawmills in Benin City. These were compared to 150 age and sex matched controls in order to determine the effect of sawdust exposure on the respiratory system. Questionnaire was used to elicit morbidity patterns and anthropometric measurements were also made. Respiratory rates, Peak Expiratory Flow Rates and Blood Pressures were measured in both groups. Respiratory symptoms were more common among sawmill workers compared to the controls. Smoking by some of these workers further aggravated their respiratory symptoms. Although blood pressure was similar in both groups, Respiratory rates were higher and Peak Flow Rates were lower in the sawmill workers compared to the controls (20.83 +/- 2.02 cycles/minute and 516.72 +/- 38.48 L/minute for the sawmill workers; 15.45 +/- 1.23 cycles/minute and 575.37 +/- 27.34 L/minute for the controls, respectively). Less than 5% of the sawmill workers wore protective devices/clothing, and health and safety standards were neither practiced nor enforced. The findings suggest that respiratory symptoms especially sputum production and chest pain are common in sawmill workers. Respiratory function is compromised in these workers.

  15. Influences of evergreen gymnosperm and deciduous angiosperm tree species on the functioning of temperate and boreal forests.

    PubMed

    Augusto, Laurent; De Schrijver, An; Vesterdal, Lars; Smolander, Aino; Prescott, Cindy; Ranger, Jacques

    2015-05-01

    It has been recognized for a long time that the overstorey composition of a forest partly determines its biological and physical-chemical functioning. Here, we review evidence of the influence of evergreen gymnosperm (EG) tree species and deciduous angiosperm (DA) tree species on the water balance, physical-chemical soil properties and biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients. We used scientific publications based on experimental designs where all species grew on the same parent material and initial soil, and were similar in stage of stand development, former land use and current management. We present the current state of the art, define knowledge gaps, and briefly discuss how selection of tree species can be used to mitigate pollution or enhance accumulation of stable organic carbon in the soil. The presence of EGs generally induces a lower rate of precipitation input into the soil than DAs, resulting in drier soil conditions and lower water discharge. Soil temperature is generally not different, or slightly lower, under an EG canopy compared to a DA canopy. Chemical properties, such as soil pH, can also be significantly modified by taxonomic groups of tree species. Biomass production is usually similar or lower in DA stands than in stands of EGs. Aboveground production of dead organic matter appears to be of the same order of magnitude between tree species groups growing on the same site. Some DAs induce more rapid decomposition of litter than EGs because of the chemical properties of their tissues, higher soil moisture and favourable conditions for earthworms. Forest floors consequently tend to be thicker in EG forests compared to DA forests. Many factors, such as litter lignin content, influence litter decomposition and it is difficult to identify specific litter-quality parameters that distinguish litter decomposition rates of EGs from DAs. Although it has been suggested that DAs can result in higher accumulation of soil carbon stocks, evidence from

  16. A novel method to harvest Chlorella sp. via low cost bioflocculant: Influence of temperature with kinetic and thermodynamic functions.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Richa; Pathak, Vinayak V; Pandey, Arya; Ahmad, Shamshad; Srivastava, Chandni; Tyagi, V V

    2017-02-01

    In this study, harvesting efficiency (HE) of bioflocculant (egg shell) was observed with variation in flocculent concentrations (0-100mgL(-1)), temperature (30°C, 35°C 40°C, 45°C and 50°C) and variable contact time (0-50min). It was found maximum (≈95.6%) with 100mgL(-1) bioflocculant concentration whereas influence of temperature was also observed with optimized concentration of bioflocculant (100mgL(-1)) at 40°C (≈98.1%) and 50°C (≈99.3%), in 30min of contact time. Significant changes in algal cell structures were also analyzed after exposure to various temperatures with microscopy, SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) and EDS (Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) images with and without bioflocculant. The experimental data was found to be a good fit with pseudo-second order kinetic model. The thermodynamic functions such as ΔG (Gibbs free energy), ΔH (enthalpy), ΔS (entropy) were also determined. The negative value of ΔG and positive value of ΔH and ΔS shows the spontaneous and endothermic nature of flocculation process.

  17. The influence of an ankle-foot orthosis on the spatiotemporal gait parameters and functional balance in chronic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Bouchalová, Vendula; Houben, Els; Tancsik, Dorine; Schaekers, Lotte; Meuws, Leni; Feys, Peter

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Observational study investigating the influence of various ankle-foot orthoses on the spatiotemporal gait parameters and functional balance in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen chronic stroke patients participated in this study after providing informed consent. Two groups of patients were differentiated based on the Timed Up and Go Test. Patients were tested in three different conditions: with standard prefabricated ankle-foot orthosis (Maramed), with individualized ankle-foot orthosis (Y-tech), and without any ankle-foot orthrosis. Spatiotemporal gait parameters were obtained by walking on an instrumented walkway (GAITRite®) at usual and fastest speed. Balance was assessed with Timed Up and Go Test, Step Test, and Four Square Step Test. [Results] Maramed and Y-tech significantly improved the spatiotemporal parameters while walking at usual and maximal speed (single support time affected side; double support time affected side and step length unaffected side). The Y-tech in addition improved velocity and cadence. Among the balance tests, only the Timed Up and Go test showed improvements in favor of Maramed and Y-tech. [Conclusion] Patients benefited from wearing orthosis at both usual and maximal speed, irrespective of whether they wore Maramed or Y-tech. Only severe stroke patients benefited from wearing an orthoses compared to mild impaired group. PMID:27313385

  18. Acute and chronic wound fluids inversely influence adipose-derived stem cell function: molecular insights into impaired wound healing.

    PubMed

    Koenen, Paola; Spanholtz, Timo A; Maegele, Marc; Stürmer, Ewa; Brockamp, Thomas; Neugebauer, Edmund; Thamm, Oliver C

    2015-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process that requires a well-orchestrated interaction of mediators as well as resident and infiltrating cells. In this context, mesenchymal stem cells play a crucial role as they are attracted to the wound site and influence tissue regeneration by various mechanisms. In chronic wounds, these processes are disturbed. In a comparative approach, adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) were treated with acute and chronic wound fluids (AWF and CWF, respectively). Proliferation and migration were investigated using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and transwell migration assay. Gene expression changes were analysed using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. AWF had a significantly stronger chemotactic impact on ASC than CWF (77·5% versus 59·8% migrated cells). While proliferation was stimulated by AWF up to 136·3%, CWF had a negative effect on proliferation over time (80·3%). Expression of b-FGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was strongly induced by CWF compared with a mild induction by AWF. These results give an insight into impaired ASC function in chronic wounds. The detected effect of CWF on proliferation and migration of ASC might be one reason for an insufficient healing process in chronic wounds.

  19. The influence of the Tribulus terrestris extract on the parameters of the functional preparedness and athletes' organism homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Milasius, K; Dadeliene, R; Skernevicius, Ju

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the Tribulus terrestris extract on the parameters of the functional preparadness and athletes' organism homeostase was investigated. It was established the positive impact of dietary supplement "Tribulus" (Optimum Nutrition, U.S.A.) using per 1 capsule 3 times a day during 20 days on athletes' physical power in various energy producing zones: anaerobic alactic muscular power and anaerobic alactic glycolytic power statistically reliable increased. Tribulus terrestris extract, after 20 days of consuming it, did not have essential effect on erythrocytes, haemoglobin and thrombocytes indices. During the experimental period statistically importantly increased percentage of granulocytes and decreased percentage of leucocytes show negative impact of this food supplement on changes of leucocytes formula in athletes' blood. Creatinkinase concentration in athletes' blood statistically importantly has increased and creatinine amount has had a tendency to decline during 20 days period of consuming Tribulus terrestris extract. The declining tendency of urea, cholesterol and bilirubin concentrations has appeared. The concentration of blood testosterone increased statistically reliable during the first half (10 days) of the experiment; it did not grow during the next 10 days while consuming Tribulus still.

  20. Understanding the cognitive and genetic underpinnings of procrastination: Evidence for shared genetic influences with goal management and executive function abilities.

    PubMed

    Gustavson, Daniel E; Miyake, Akira; Hewitt, John K; Friedman, Naomi P

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has suggested that individual differences in procrastination are tied to everyday goal-management abilities, but little research has been conducted on specific cognitive abilities that may underlie tendencies for procrastination, such as executive functions (EFs). In this study, we used behavioral genetics methodology to investigate 2 hypotheses about the relationships between procrastination and EF ability: (a) that procrastination is negatively correlated with general EF ability, and (b) that this relationship is due to the genetic components of procrastination that are most related to other everyday goal-management abilities. The results confirmed both of these hypotheses. Procrastination was related to worse general EF ability at both the phenotypic and genetic levels, and this relationship was due to the component of procrastination shared with self-report measures of everyday goal-management failures. These results were observed even after controlling for potential self-report biases stemming from the urge to respond in a socially desirable manner. Together, these findings provide strong evidence for growing theories of procrastination emphasizing the importance of goal-related cognitive abilities and further highlight important genetic influences that underlie procrastination.

  1. The influence of chronic intake of saccharin on rat hepatic and pancreatic function and morphology: gender differences.

    PubMed

    Andrejić, Bojana M; Mijatović, Vesna M; Samojlik, Isidora N; Horvat, Olga J; Ćalasan, Jelena D; Đolai, Matilda A

    2013-05-01

    There are opposite hypotheses on the effect of saccharin. Our aim was reviewing the influence of chronically ingested saccharin on the function and histological structure of liver and pancreas and all this in light of gender differences. The rats were divided into control group - (Group C) and saccharin-treated group - (Group S) which was given a normal diet and 0.0005% saccharin in drinking water for 6 weeks. Liver and pancreas were histologically processed and quantitative histological analysis was performed. Glucose blood levels and plasma activities of aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT), body weight, and food intake were analyzed. Quantitative histological analysis determined that the values of diameter and volume density of both Langerhans islets and exocrine acini were significantly higher in S group, especially in males. AST levels were significantly higher in treated group. Glucose levels were higher in treated group, mainly due to the values of the female subgroup. Food intake was significantly higher in control group, while weight gain was higher in treated group. Treated males had significantly higher food intake and weight gain in comparison with treated females. The data presented here suggests that chronic saccharin intake affects the examined parameters. Reported facts reflect various metabolic, hormonal and neural responses in males and females.

  2. Understanding the Cognitive and Genetic Underpinnings of Procrastination: Evidence for Shared Genetic Influences with Goal Management and Executive Function Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Gustavson, Daniel E.; Miyake, Akira; Hewitt, John K.; Friedman, Naomi P.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that individual differences in procrastination are tied to everyday goal-management abilities, but little research has been conducted on specific cognitive abilities that may underlie tendencies for procrastination, such as executive functions (EFs). In this study, we used behavioral genetics methodology to investigate two hypotheses about the relationships between procrastination and EF ability: (a) that procrastination is negatively correlated with general EF ability, and (b) that this relationship is due to the genetic components of procrastination that are most related to other everyday goal-management abilities. The results confirmed both of these hypotheses. Procrastination was related to worse general EF ability at both the phenotypic and genetic levels, and this relationship was due to the component of procrastination shared with self-report measures of everyday goal-management failures. These results were observed even after controlling for potential self-report biases stemming from the urge to respond in a socially desirable manner. Together, these findings provide strong evidence for growing theories of procrastination emphasizing the importance of goal-related cognitive abilities and further highlight important genetic influences that underlie procrastination. PMID:26389573

  3. The influence of oxygen-containing functional groups on the dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in amide solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, S. D. F.; Andrada, D.; Mesquita, A. F.; Santos, A. P.; Gorgulho, H. F.; Paniago, R.; Pimenta, M. A.; Fantini, C.; Furtado, C. A.

    2010-08-01

    Surface composition plays an important role in carbon nanotube dispersibility in different environments. Indeed, it determines the choice of dispersion medium. In this paper the effect of oxidation on the dispersion of HiPCO single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in N-methyl-pyrrolidinone (NMP), N, N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N, N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-dodecyl-pyrrolidinone (N12P) and cyclohexyl-pyrrolidinone (CHP) was systematically studied. During the oxidation process, similar amounts of carboxylic acid and phenolic groups were introduced to mostly already existing defects. For each solvent the dispersion limits and the absorption coefficients were estimated by optical absorption analysis over a range of SWNT concentrations. The presence of acid oxygenated groups increased SWNT dispersibility in NMP, DMF and DMA, but decreased in N12P and CHP. The absorption coefficients, however, decreased for all solvents after oxidation, reflecting the weakening of the effective transition dipole of the π-π transition with even limited extension functionalization and solvent interaction. The analysis of the results in terms of Hansen and Flory-Huggins solubility parameters evidenced the influence of dipolar interactions and hydrogen bonding on the dispersibility of oxidized SWNTs.

  4. The influence of oxygen-containing functional groups on the dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in amide solvents.

    PubMed

    Brandão, S D F; Andrada, D; Mesquita, A F; Santos, A P; Gorgulho, H F; Paniago, R; Pimenta, M A; Fantini, C; Furtado, C A

    2010-08-25

    Surface composition plays an important role in carbon nanotube dispersibility in different environments. Indeed, it determines the choice of dispersion medium. In this paper the effect of oxidation on the dispersion of HiPCO single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in N-methyl-pyrrolidinone (NMP), N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-dodecyl-pyrrolidinone (N12P) and cyclohexyl-pyrrolidinone (CHP) was systematically studied. During the oxidation process, similar amounts of carboxylic acid and phenolic groups were introduced to mostly already existing defects. For each solvent the dispersion limits and the absorption coefficients were estimated by optical absorption analysis over a range of SWNT concentrations. The presence of acid oxygenated groups increased SWNT dispersibility in NMP, DMF and DMA, but decreased in N12P and CHP. The absorption coefficients, however, decreased for all solvents after oxidation, reflecting the weakening of the effective transition dipole of the π-π transition with even limited extension functionalization and solvent interaction. The analysis of the results in terms of Hansen and Flory-Huggins solubility parameters evidenced the influence of dipolar interactions and hydrogen bonding on the dispersibility of oxidized SWNTs.

  5. Non-sequential optimization technique for a computer controlled optical surfacing process using multiple tool influence functions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Wook; Kim, Sug-Whan; Burge, James H

    2009-11-23

    Optical surfaces can be accurately figured by computer controlled optical surfacing (CCOS) that uses well characterized sub-diameter polishing tools driven by numerically controlled (NC) machines. The motion of the polishing tool is optimized to vary the dwell time of the polisher on the workpiece according to the desired removal and the calibrated tool influence function (TIF). Operating CCOS with small and very well characterized TIF achieves excellent performance, but it takes a long time. This overall polishing time can be reduced by performing sequential polishing runs that start with large tools and finish with smaller tools. In this paper we present a variation of this technique that uses a set of different size TIFs, but the optimization is performed globally - i.e. simultaneously optimizing the dwell times and tool shapes for the entire set of polishing runs. So the actual polishing runs will be sequential, but the optimization is comprehensive. As the optimization is modified from the classical method to the comprehensive non-sequential algorithm, the performance improvement is significant. For representative polishing runs we show figuring efficiency improvement from approximately 88% to approximately 98% in terms of residual RMS (root-mean-square) surface error and from approximately 47% to approximately 89% in terms of residual RMS slope error.

  6. Conjugation of cytochrome c with ferrocene-terminated hyperbranched polymer and its influence on protein structure, conformation and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Fengjuan; Yue, Lin; Li, Song; Li, Xinxin

    2016-06-01

    Interaction mechanism of a new hyperbranched polyurethane-based ferrocene (HPU-Fc) with cytochrome c (cyt c) and cyt c structure and conformation change induced by HPU-Fc were investigated using cyclic voltammogram(CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and absorbance spectroscopy technique. The peroxidase activity of cyt c in the presence of HPU-Fc was also studied. The structure and conformation of protein are relatively stable at moderate concentration of HPU-Fc without obvious perturbation of the heme pocket and significant changes in protein secondary structure. Conjugation of cyt c with excessive HPU-Fc (over about 3 times of cyt c) slightly changed the α-helix structure in protein, disturbed the microenvironment around heme as well as away from the heme crevice, which caused the changes of the electrochemical behavior and the absorption spectra. Reasonable amount of HPU-Fc has no significant influence on the protein enzymatic activity, while excess HPU-Fc may cause a conformation not suitable for H2O2 activation and guaiacol oxidation. The interaction of HPU-Fc with cyt c and the conservation of protein function at suitable HPU-Fc amount make prepared complex promising for the synergistic anticancer therapy. CV curves of 10 μM HPU-Fc, 10 μM cyt c and HPU-Fc/cyt c complex (n HPU-Fc: n cyt c = 3.5:1) in 0.5 M KCl (versus SCE) at a sweep rate of 100 mV ṡ s- 1 (b). Interaction mechanism of a new hyperbranched polyurethane-based ferrocene (HPU-Fc) with cytochrome c (cyt c) and cyt c structure and conformation change induced by HPU-Fc were investigated. The structure and conformation of protein are relatively stable at moderate concentration of HPU-Fc. Conjugation of cyt c with excessive HPU-Fc (over about 3 times of cyt c) slightly changed the α-helix structure in protein, disturbed the microenvironment around heme as well as away from the heme crevice, which caused the changes of the

  7. INFLUENCES OF ASTHMA AND HOUSEHOLD ENVIRONMENT ON LUNG FUNCTION OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS: THE THIRD NATIONAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined influences of asthma and household environment (passive smoking, gas stove use, and having a dog or cat), on seven measures of spirometric lung function in 8-16 yearold subjects, as measured in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). ...

  8. The Influences of Face Inversion and Facial Expression on Sensitivity to Eye Contact in High-Functioning Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vida, Mark D.; Maurer, Daphne; Calder, Andrew J.; Rhodes, Gillian; Walsh, Jennifer A.; Pachai, Matthew V.; Rutherford, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the influences of face inversion and facial expression on sensitivity to eye contact in high-functioning adults with and without an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Participants judged the direction of gaze of angry, fearful, and neutral faces. In the typical group only, the range of directions of gaze leading to the perception of eye…

  9. Influence of low-dose proton pump inhibitors administered concomitantly or separately on the anti-platelet function of clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Takahisa; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Kodaira, Chise; Nishino, Masafumi; Yamade, Mihoko; Uotani, Takahiro; Sahara, Shu; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Kagami, Takuma; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Hamaya, Yasushi; Osawa, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Ken; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) at low doses can effectively prevent gastrointestinal bleeding due to aspirin and are widely used in Japan for gastroprotection in patients taking anti-platelet agents. We examined the influence of different PPIs at low doses administered concomitantly or separately on anti-platelet functions of clopidogrel. In 41 healthy Japanese volunteers with different CYP2C19 genotypes who took clopidogrel 75 mg in the morning alone, or with omeprazole 10 mg, esomeprazole 10 mg, lansoprazole 15 mg, or rabeprazole 10 mg, either concomitantly in the morning or separately in the evening, we measured the inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA, %) using VerifyNow P2Y12 assay at 4 h after the last clopidogrel dose on Day 7 of each regimen. IPA by clopidogrel with rabeprazole administered at lunchtime, approximately 4 h after clopidogrel, was also measured. Mean IPAs in those concomitantly receiving omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole or rabeprazole (47.2 ± 21.1%, 43.2 ± 20.2%, 46.4 ± 18.8%, and 47.3 ± 19.2%, respectively) were significantly decreased compared with those receiving clopidogrel alone (56.0%) (all ps < 0.001). This decrease was observed when PPIs were administered separately in the evening. However, IPA by clopidogrel with rabeprazole administered at lunchtime was 51.6%, which was markedly similar to that of clopidogrel alone (p = 0.114). All tested PPIs reduce the efficacy of clopidogrel when administered concomitantly. Our preliminary data suggest that administration of rabeprazole 4 h following clopidogrel may minimize potential drug-drug interactions.

  10. Influence of Titration of Neurohormonal Antagonists and Blood Pressure Reduction on Renal Function and Decongestion in Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, F. Perry; Brisco, Meredith A.; Bellumkonda, Lavanya; Jacoby, Daniel; Coca, Steven G.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Testani, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduction in systolic blood pressure (SBP reduction) during the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is strongly and independently associated with worsening renal function (WRF). Our objective was to determine if SBP reduction or titration of oral neurohormonal antagonists during ADHF treatment negatively influences diuresis and decongestion. Methods and Results SBP reduction was evaluated from admission to discharge in consecutive ADHF admissions (n=656). Diuresis and decongestion was examined across a range of parameters such as diuretic efficiency, fluid output, hemoconcentration, and diuretic dose. The average reduction in SBP was 14.4 ± 19.4 mmHg and 77.6% of the population had discharge SBP lower than admission. SBP reduction was strongly associated with WRF (OR=1.9, 95% CI: 1.2-2.9, p=0.004), a finding that persisted after adjusting for parameters of diuresis and decongestion (OR=2.0, 95% CI: 1.3-3.2, p=0.002). However, SBP reduction did not negatively impact diuresis or decongestion (p≥0.25 for all parameters). Uptitration of neurohormonal antagonists occurred in over 50% of admissions and was associated with a modest additional reduction in blood pressure (≤ 5.6 mmHg). Notably, WRF was not increased and diuretic efficiency was significantly improved with the uptitration of neurohormonal antagonists. Conclusions Despite a higher rate of WRF, blood pressure reduction was not associated with worsening of diuresis or decongestion. Furthermore, titration of oral neurohormonal antagonists was actually associated with improved diuresis in this cohort. These results provide reassurance that the guideline recommended titration of chronic oral medication during ADHF hospitalization may not be antagonistic to the short-term goal of decongestion. PMID:26699390

  11. Influence of gold, silver and gold–silver alloy nanoparticles on germ cell function and embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Rehbock, Christoph; Kues, Wilfried A

    2015-01-01

    Summary The use of engineered nanoparticles has risen exponentially over the last decade. Applications are manifold and include utilisation in industrial goods as well as medical and consumer products. Gold and silver nanoparticles play an important role in the current increase of nanoparticle usage. However, our understanding concerning possible side effects of this increased exposure to particles, which are frequently in the same size regime as medium sized biomolecules and accessorily possess highly active surfaces, is still incomplete. That particularly applies to reproductive aspects, were defects can be passed onto following generations. This review gives a brief overview of the most recent findings concerning reprotoxicological effects. The here presented data elucidate how composition, size and surface modification of nanoparticles influence viablility and functionality of reproduction relevant cells derived from various animal models. While in vitro cultured embryos displayed no toxic effects after the microinjection of gold and silver nanoparticles, sperm fertility parameters deteriorated after co-incubation with ligand free gold nanoparticles. However, the effect could be alleviated by bio-coating the nanoparticles, which even applies to silver and silver-rich alloy nanoparticles. The most sensitive test system appeared to be in vitro oocyte maturation showing a dose-dependent response towards protein (BSA) coated gold–silver alloy and silver nanoparticles leading up to complete arrest of maturation. Recent biodistribution studies confirmed that nanoparticles gain access to the ovaries and also penetrate the blood–testis and placental barrier. Thus, the design of nanoparticles with increased biosafety is highly relevant for biomedical applications. PMID:25821705

  12. The Overarching Influence of the Gut Microbiome on End-Organ Function: The Role of Live Probiotic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Vitetta, Luis; Manuel, Rachel; Zhou, Joyce Yusi; Linnane, Anthony W.; Hall, Sean; Coulson, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    At the time of birth, humans experience an induced pro-inflammatory beneficial event. The mediators of this encouraged activity, is a fleet of bacteria that assault all mucosal surfaces as well as the skin. Thus initiating effects that eventually provide the infant with immune tissue maturation. These effects occur beneath an emergent immune system surveillance and antigenic tolerance capability radar. Over time, continuous and regulated interactions with environmental as well as commensal microbial, viral, and other antigens lead to an adapted and maintained symbiotic state of tolerance, especially in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) the organ site of the largest microbial biomass. However, the perplexing and much debated surprise has been that all microbes need not be targeted for destruction. The advent of sophisticated genomic techniques has led to microbiome studies that have begun to clarify the critical and important biochemical activities that commensal bacteria provide to ensure continued GIT homeostasis. Until recently, the GIT and its associated micro-biometabolome was a neglected factor in chronic disease development and end organ function. A systematic underestimation has been to undervalue the contribution of a persistent GIT dysbiotic (a gut barrier associated abnormality) state. Dysbiosis provides a plausible clue as to the origin of systemic metabolic disorders encountered in clinical practice that may explain the epidemic of chronic diseases. Here we further build a hypothesis that posits the role that subtle adverse responses by the GIT microbiome may have in chronic diseases. Environmentally/nutritionally/and gut derived triggers can maintain microbiome perturbations that drive an abnormal overload of dysbiosis. Live probiotic cultures with specific metabolic properties may assist the GIT microbiota and reduce the local metabolic dysfunctions. As such the effect may translate to a useful clinical treatment approach for patients diagnosed with a

  13. [The mechanisms of interdependent influence of prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and amygdala on the basal ganglia functioning and selection of behaviour].

    PubMed

    Sil'kis, I G

    2014-01-01

    The hypothetical mechanism of functioning of neural networks that include limbic structures, neocortex and basal ganglia is proposed. A hypothesis is based on known data that the hippocampus, amygdala and prefrontal cortex interreact with each other, that their efferents converge on spiny cells of nucleus accumbens, that these inputs are topically organised and could be modified. Since GABAergic spiny cells of nucleus accumbens innervate neurons in the output basal ganglia nuclei which inhibit excitatory transmission through the thalamic nuclei into limbic structures and neocortex, the degree of activation of neurones in mentioned structures and, hence, a behaviour selection essentially depends on the character of responses of spiny cells. A summation of excitation of spiny cells and amplification of their responses during simultaneous firing of neurons of a limbic structure and neocortex, ultimately will lead to rising in neocortical activity and increase of its influence on a behaviour selection. If two structures are excited with temporary shift, activation of neurons of that structure which has firstly been strongly excited can be additionally increased due to a disinhibition of thalamic nuclei through the basal ganglia, whereas activity of neurons in other structure can be depressed if responses of spiny cells evoked by excitation arriving from this structure are decreased. Such suppression can be a consequence of heterosynaptic depression which is based on potentiation of efficacy of excitatory inputs from the different structures converging on inhibitory interneurons in the nucleus accumbens and basolateral amygdala. As a result, the behaviour choice will be determined by that structure which has been involved in activity firstly. A damage of different inputs into the nucleus accumbens from limbic structures must result in various behaviour disorders owing to the topical organisation of these inputs.

  14. Influence of encapsulated functional lipids on crystal structure and chemical stability in solid lipid nanoparticles: Towards bioactive-based design of delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Hanna; Gömmel, Christina; Leuenberger, Bruno H; Weiss, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of physicochemical properties of encapsulated functional lipids--vitamin A, β-carotene and ω-3 fish oil--on the structural arrangement of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN). The relationship between the crystal structure and chemical stability of the incorporated bioactive lipids was evaluated with different emulsifier compositions of a saponin-rich, food-grade Quillaja extract alone or combined with high-melting or low-melting lecithins. The major factors influencing the structural arrangement and chemical stability of functional lipids in solid lipid dispersions were their solubility in the aqueous phase and their crystallization temperature in relation to that of the carrier lipid. The results showed that the stabilization of the α-subcell crystals in the lattice of the carrier lipid is a key parameter for forming stable solid lipid dispersions. This study contributes to a better understanding of SLN as a function of the bioactive lipid.

  15. The influence of intravenous laser irradiation of blood on some metabolic and functional parameters in intact rabbits and experimental cerebral ischaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechipurenko, N.; Vasilevskaya, L.; Musienko, J.; Maslova, G.

    2007-07-01

    It has been studied the intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB) influence with helium-neon laser (HNL) of 630 nm wavelength on some of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and antioxidant system (AOS) findings, aside-base status (ABS) and blood oxygen transport (BOT), state of dermal microhaemodynamics (MGD) in the intact rabbits and after modeling of local ischemia of brain (LIB). Depending on conditions of organism functioning (norm or brain ischaemia) ILIB has resulted in stimulating or normalizing effects on the whole metabolic and microhaemocirculation processes which had been studied during our investigation. It is discussed the mechanisms of pathogenetic directivity of ILIB influence in cerebral ischaemia

  16. Influence of protein nutrition and virginiamycin supplementation on feedlot growth performance and digestive function of calf-fed Holstein steers.

    PubMed

    Salinas-Chavira, J; Barreras, A; Plascencia, A; Montano, M F; Navarrete, J D; Torrentera, N; Zinn, R A

    2016-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to examine the influence of protein and virginiamycin (VM) supplementation on feedlot growth performance, digestion, and metabolizable AA (MAA) supply of calf-fed Holstein steers. Growth performance and dietary energetics were evaluated in 120 Holstein steers (127 ± 9 kg). During the initial 112-d feeding period, a steam-flaked corn-based diet was balanced to meet either 100% (MAB) or 87% (UREA) of MAA requirements. Diets were supplemented with or without 22.5 mg/kg VM in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Subsequently (d 112 to 308), all steers received the UREA diet with or without VM. During the initial 112-d, MAB increased ADG, G:F, and dietary NE ( < 0.01). Thereafter, when all steers received the UREA diet, ADG, G:F, and dietary NE were not different ( > 0.10) across initial supplementation treatments. Overall (d 1 to 308), MAB did not affect ADG ( > 0.10) but enhanced G:F efficiency ( = 0.03) and dietary NE ( = 0.05). During the initial 112-d period and through the remainder of the experiment, VM increased G:F ( < 0.01) and dietary NE ( < 0.01). Four Holstein steers (146 ± 4 kg) with cannulas in the rumen and proximal duodenum were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square design to evaluate initial 112-d treatment effects on digestive function. There were no treatment effects ( > 0.10) on ruminal digestion of OM, NDF, starch, microbial efficiency, or total tract digestion of OM and NDF. The MAB increased indispensable AA flow to the small intestine ( < 0.01) and total tract digestion of N ( < 0.01) and starch ( = 0.04). Observed AA supply to small intestine was in agreement with expected supply ( = 0.96). Virginiamycin decreased ( = 0.04) nonammonia N flow to the small intestine and did not affect ( > 0.10) total tract N digestion. Extrapolating from AA supplies in the metabolism study, MAB satisfied indispensable AA requirements during the initial 112-d period, whereas the UREA diet met 73.5% and 79.2% of methionine and lysine

  17. A Trematode Parasite Derived Growth Factor Binds and Exerts Influences on Host Immune Functions via Host Cytokine Receptor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Azad A.; Zolnierczyk, Katarzyna; Japa, Ornampai; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Hodgkinson, Jane E.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The trematode Fasciola hepatica is responsible for chronic zoonotic infection globally. Despite causing a potent T-helper 2 response, it is believed that potent immunomodulation is responsible for rendering this host reactive non-protective host response thereby allowing the parasite to remain long-lived. We have previously identified a growth factor, FhTLM, belonging to the TGF superfamily can have developmental effects on the parasite. Herein we demonstrate that FhTLM can exert influence over host immune functions in a host receptor specific fashion. FhTLM can bind to receptor members of the Transforming Growth Factor (TGF) superfamily, with a greater affinity for TGF-β RII. Upon ligation FhTLM initiates the Smad2/3 pathway resulting in phenotypic changes in both fibroblasts and macrophages. The formation of fibroblast CFUs is reduced when cells are cultured with FhTLM, as a result of TGF-β RI kinase activity. In parallel the wound closure response of fibroblasts is also delayed in the presence of FhTLM. When stimulated with FhTLM blood monocyte derived macrophages adopt an alternative or regulatory phenotype. They express high levels interleukin (IL)-10 and arginase-1 while displaying low levels of IL-12 and nitric oxide. Moreover they also undergo significant upregulation of the inhibitory receptor PD-L1 and the mannose receptor. Use of RNAi demonstrates that this effect is dependent on TGF-β RII and mRNA knock-down leads to a loss of IL-10 and PD-L1. Finally, we demonstrate that FhTLM aids newly excysted juveniles (NEJs) in their evasion of antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC) by reducing the NO response of macrophages—again dependent on TGF