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Sample records for glycolipidic bio surfactants

  1. Natural surfactants used in cosmetics: glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Lourith, N; Kanlayavattanakul, M

    2009-08-01

    Cosmetic surfactant performs detergency, wetting, emulsifying, solubilizing, dispersing and foaming effects. Adverse reactions of chemical synthesis surfactant have an effect on environment and humans, particularly severe in long term. Biodegradability, low toxicity and ecological acceptability which are the benefits of naturally derived surfactant that promises cosmetic safety are, therefore, highly on demand. Biosurfactant producible from microorganisms exhibiting potential surface properties suitable for cosmetic applications especially incorporate with their biological activities. Sophorolipids, rhamnolipids and mannosylerythritol lipids are the most widely used glycolipids biosurfactant in cosmetics. Literatures and patents relevant to these three glycolipids reviewed were emphasizing on the cosmetic applications including personal care products presenting the cosmetic efficiency, efficacy and economy benefits of glycolipids biosurfactant.

  2. Baking performance of synthetic glycolipids in comparison to commercial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Selmair, Patrick L; Koehler, Peter

    2008-08-13

    To gain insight into structure-activity relationships of glycolipids in breadmaking monogalactosyl dilinoleylglycerol ( 8) and monogalactosyl monolinoleylglycerol ( 6) were synthesized. Then their functional properties in dough and breadmaking were compared to those of commercial surfactants such as lecithins (from soybean, rapeseed, and sunflower), diacetyltartaric acid esters of monoglycerides (DATEM), monoglycerides, and sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate. Chemical synthesis of the galactolipids consisted of a four-step reaction pathway, yielding amounts of 1-1.5 g suitable for the determination of the functional properties. Variation of the acylation time in the third step provided either the monoacyl ( 6) or the diacyl compound ( 8). The functional properties were determined by means of rheological and baking tests on a microscale (10 g of flour). The synthetic galactolipids both displayed an excellent baking performance, with 6 having by far the best baking activity of all examined surfactants. The baking activities of 8, DATEM, and the monoglycerides were in the same range, whereas sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate was less active. Although the lecithins gained similar maxima in bread volume increases as the synthetic surfactants did, considerably higher concentrations were required to do so. An antistaling effect was found for only 6 and not for 8. However, this effect was weaker than for sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate and the monoglycerides.

  3. Novel characteristics of sophorolipids, yeast glycolipid biosurfactants, as biodegradable low-foaming surfactants.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yoshihiko; Ryu, Mizuyuki; Oda, Yuka; Igarashi, Keisuke; Nagatsuka, Asami; Furuta, Taro; Sugiura, Masaki

    2009-08-01

    Sophorolipids (SLs) are a family of glycolipid type biosurfactants, which are largely produced by the non-pathogenic yeast, Candida bombicola. In order to investigate the possibility of SLs for industrial use, here we examined the interfacial activities, cytotoxicity and biodegradability of SLs, and compared these properties with those of two lipopeptide type biosurfactants (surfactin and arthrofactin), sodium laurate (soap, SP) and four kinds of chemically synthesized surfactants including two block-copolymer nonionic surfactants (BPs), polyoxyethylene lauryl ether (AE) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). It was indicated that SLs had extremely low-foaming properties and high detergency comparable with commercially available low-foaming BPs. These interfacial activities of SLs were maintained under 100 ppm water hardness. Cytotoxicity of SLs on human keratinocytes was the same as surfactin, which has already been commercialized as cosmetic material, but higher than BPs. Moreover, biodegradability of SLs using the OECD Guidelines for Testing of Chemicals (301C, Modified MITI Test) displayed that SLs can be classified as "readily" biodegradable chemicals, which are defined as chemicals that are degraded 60% within 28 days under specified test methods. We observed 61% degradation of SLs on the eighth day of cultivation. Our results indicate that SLs are low-foaming surfactants with high detergency, which also exhibit both low cytotoxicity and readily biodegradable properties.

  4. Bio-inspired surfactants capable of generating plant volatiles.

    PubMed

    Bhadani, Avinash; Rane, Jayant; Veresmortean, Cristina; Banerjee, Sanjoy; John, George

    2015-04-21

    Plants are able to synthesize, store and release lipophilic organic molecules known as plant volatiles (PVs) utilizing specific biological pathways and different enzymes which play vital roles in the plant's defence and in dealing with biotic and abiotic stress situations. The process of generation, storage and release of PVs by plants acquired during the course of evolution is a very complex phenomenon. Bio-inspired molecular design of farnesol-based surfactants facilitates similar production, storage and release of PVs. The designed molecules adsorb at air-water interface and self-aggregate into micelles in aqueous system. The structural design of the molecules allows them to self-activate in water via intramolecular cation-π interactions. The activated molecules undergo molecular rearrangements generating volatile organic molecules both at interface and inside the micelle core. The molecules adsorbed at the interface initially release the formed volatile molecules creating vacant space at interface, thus thermodynamically directing the micelle to release the manufactured volatile products.

  5. Oil recovery test using bio surfactants of indigenous bacteria in variation concentration of carbon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudono, B.; Purwaningrum, W.; Estuningsih, S. P.; Kaffah, S.

    2017-05-01

    Recovery tests of crude oil by using bio surfactant of indigenous bacteria Pseudomonas peli, Pseudomonas citronellolis, Burkholderia glumae and Bacillus firmus. The bio surfactants were prepared with the variation concentrations of molasses carbon source; 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 %. The results showed that 10 g samples, which concentration 18.64% TPH could be dissolved in the bio surfactant 10%. Optimally in the molasses carbon source concentrations for each bacterium at 5, 10, 20 and 15 % with oil recovery as much as 31.92, 17.65, 22.32, and 14.38 % respectively. Oil components which extracted by bio surfactant were analyzed by using GLC (Gas Liquid Chromatography). The bio surfactants of Pseudomonas peli could dissolve oil fraction temperatures; 139.85; 144.69; 149.98; 1.55.03: 174.22 °C, Pseudomonas citronellolis could dissolve oil fraction temperatures; 139.13; 142.64;147.99; 155.03; 159.85; 164.50 °C, Burkholderia glumae could dissolve oil fraction temperatures 144.69; 149.98; 155.03; 159.85; 164.50 °C, and Bacillus firmus could dissolve oil fraction temperatures; 149.98; 155.03; 158.46; 164.50 °C.

  6. The Rebirth of Waste Cooking Oil to Novel Bio-based Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi-Qi; Cai, Bang-Xin; Xu, Wen-Jie; Gang, Hong-Ze; Liu, Jin-Feng; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) is a kind of non-edible oil with enormous quantities and its unreasonable dispose may generate negative impact on human life and environment. However, WCO is certainly a renewable feedstock of bio-based materials. To get the rebirth of WCO, we have established a facile and high-yield method to convert WCO to bio-based zwitterionic surfactants with excellent surface and interfacial properties. The interfacial tension between crude oil and water could reach ultra-low value as 0.0016 mN m−1 at a low dosage as 0.100 g L−1 of this bio-based surfactant without the aid of extra alkali, which shows a strong interfacial activity and the great potential application in many industrial fields, in particular, the application in enhanced oil recovery in oilfields in place of petroleum-based surfactants. PMID:25944301

  7. The Rebirth of Waste Cooking Oil to Novel Bio-based Surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi-Qi; Cai, Bang-Xin; Xu, Wen-Jie; Gang, Hong-Ze; Liu, Jin-Feng; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-05-01

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) is a kind of non-edible oil with enormous quantities and its unreasonable dispose may generate negative impact on human life and environment. However, WCO is certainly a renewable feedstock of bio-based materials. To get the rebirth of WCO, we have established a facile and high-yield method to convert WCO to bio-based zwitterionic surfactants with excellent surface and interfacial properties. The interfacial tension between crude oil and water could reach ultra-low value as 0.0016 mN m-1 at a low dosage as 0.100 g L-1 of this bio-based surfactant without the aid of extra alkali, which shows a strong interfacial activity and the great potential application in many industrial fields, in particular, the application in enhanced oil recovery in oilfields in place of petroleum-based surfactants.

  8. The Rebirth of Waste Cooking Oil to Novel Bio-based Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi-Qi; Cai, Bang-Xin; Xu, Wen-Jie; Gang, Hong-Ze; Liu, Jin-Feng; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-05-06

    Waste cooking oil (WCO) is a kind of non-edible oil with enormous quantities and its unreasonable dispose may generate negative impact on human life and environment. However, WCO is certainly a renewable feedstock of bio-based materials. To get the rebirth of WCO, we have established a facile and high-yield method to convert WCO to bio-based zwitterionic surfactants with excellent surface and interfacial properties. The interfacial tension between crude oil and water could reach ultra-low value as 0.0016 mN m(-1) at a low dosage as 0.100 g L(-1) of this bio-based surfactant without the aid of extra alkali, which shows a strong interfacial activity and the great potential application in many industrial fields, in particular, the application in enhanced oil recovery in oilfields in place of petroleum-based surfactants.

  9. Effect of bio-surfactant on municipal solid waste composting process.

    PubMed

    Xi, Bei-Dou; Liu, Hong-Liang; Huang, G H; Zhang, Bai-Yu; Qin, Xiao-Sheng

    2005-01-01

    Bio-surfactant is a new type of surfactant that is produced in microbial metabolism. Adding bio-surfactant during composting process, especially to those contain some toxic substances, has been proved to be a promising way. In this study, Strains III (2), a bacterial with high activity to produce bio-surfactant, were isolated firstly. Following comparison experiments with and without adding Strains III (2), namely Run 1 and Run R, were conducted, respectively. The experimental results showed that, by adding Strains III (2), the surface tension could reduce from 46.5 mN/m to 39.8 mN/m and the corresponding time to maintain the surface tension under 50 mN/ m could prolong from 60 h to 90 h. The oxygen uptake rate and total accumulated oxygen consumption with Stains III (2) were both higher than those without Strains III (2), while the accumulation of H2S in outlet gas was reduced to around 50% of Run R. Moreover, two additional experiments were also carried out to examine the effects of strains coming from different systems. One is adding Strains III (2) with a dose of 0.4% (Run 2), and the other is seedling commercial Strains at the same conditions, the composting experiments showed that: Run 2 was more effective than Run 3, because the commercial Strains can be suppressed significantly in a complex composting system with different pH, high temperature and some of metals. The bio-surfactant was also added into the solid waste, which contained some toxic substances, the corresponding results showed that the remove rate of Hg and sodium pentachlorophenolate (PCP-Na) could be improved highly. Thus, the microenvironment, reactionrate and composting quality could be enhanced effectively by adding bio-surfactant to the composting process.

  10. Green synthesis and characterization of cuprous oxide nanoparticles in presence of a bio-surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, M.; Giri, G.

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we report a facile green synthesis of Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) using copper sulfate as precursor salt and hydrazine hydrate as reducing agent in presence of bio-surfactant (i.e. leaves extract of arka — a perennial shrub) at 60 to 70 °C in an aqueous medium. A broad band centered at 460 nm in absorption spectrum reveals the formation of surfactant stabilized Cu2O NPs. X-ray diffraction pattern of the surfactant stabilized NPs suggests the formation of only Cu2O phase in assistance of a bio-surfactant with the crystallite size of ˜8 nm. A negative zeta potential of -12 mV at 8.0 pH in surfactant stabilized Cu2O NPs hints non-bonding electron transfer from O-atom of saponin to the surface of NP. Red-shift in the vibrational band (Cu-O stretching) of Cu2O from 637 cm-1 to 640 cm-1 in presence of bio-surfactant suggests an interfacial interaction between NPs and O-atoms of -OH groups of saponin present in the plant (i.e. Calotropis gigantean) extract. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra, a decrease in binding energy of both 2p3/2 and 2p1/2 bands in Cu2O with saponin molecules as compared to bulk Cu atom reveals a charge transfer interaction between NP and saponin surfactant molecules. Transmission electron microscopy images show crystalline nature of Cu2O NPs with an fcc lattice.

  11. A bio-inspired sensor based on surfactant film and Pd nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zapp, Eduardo; Souza, Franciane D; Souza, Bruno S; Nome, Faruk; Neves, Ademir; Vieira, Iolanda C

    2013-01-21

    A bio-inspired complex, [(bpbpmp)Fe(III)(m-OAc)(2)Cu(II)](ClO(4)), was combined with a zwitterionic surfactant (ImS3-14) stabilizing pre-formed palladium nanoparticles and coated on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). This bio-inspired surfactant film was capable of catalyzing redox reactions of dihydroxybenzenes, thus allowing the simultaneous electrochemical quantification of CC and HQ in cigarette residue samples by square-wave voltammetry (SWV). The best experimental conditions were obtained using phosphate buffer solution (0.1 mol L(-1), pH 7.0), with 1.3 nmol of the bio-inspired complex, 0.15 μmol of the surfactant and 1.08 nmol of Pd. The best voltammetric parameters were: frequency 100 Hz, pulse amplitude 40 mV and step potential 8 mV. The limits of detection calculated from simultaneous curves were found to be 2.2 × 10(-7) and 2.1 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) for HQ and CC respectively.

  12. Biosynthesis and skin health applications of antimicrobial glycolipids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial-produced glycolipids (MGLs) such as sophorolipids (SLs), rhamnolipids (RLs), and mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are amphiphilic molecules, and thus have been widely explored for use as surfactants/detergents, emulsifiers, and lubricants. One major hindrance to their widespread commercia...

  13. Production and antimicrobial property of glycolipid biosurfactants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial glycolipids such as rhamnolipid (RL) and sophorolipid (SL) are an important class of biosurfactants with excellent surface tension-lowering activity. Besides their surfactant- and environment-friendly properties, however, additional value-added property such as bacteriocidal activity is n...

  14. Application of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis regulatory protein PhaR as a bio-surfactant and bactericidal agent.

    PubMed

    Ma, Hong-Kun; Liu, Ming-Ming; Li, Shi-Yan; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Jin-Chun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2013-06-20

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA), a family of diverse bio-polyesters, are produced by many bacteria as an energy and carbon storage material. PHA synthesis regulatory protein PhaR was reported to attach on the surface of intracellular PHA granules for convenience of synthesis regulation. PhaR was found to have an amphiphilic property. However, no study was conducted to exploit this property for applications as bio-surfactant and bactericide agent. Purified PhaR showed a higher emulsification ability than that of the widely used chemical surfactants including SDS, Tween 20, sodium oleate, and liquefied detergent (LD). PhaR also showed a higher emulsification ability than bio-surfactants rhamnose and PHA granules associated protein termed phasin or PhaP. Non-purified PhaR, namely, the native inclusion bodies and cell lysates, also demonstrated to be an excellent surfactant. PhaR was found highly stable even at 95 °C. In addition, PhaR was revealed to be a promising bactericidal agent against Gram positive and negative bacteria. PhaR can be conveniently produced by recombinant Escherichia coli. It has shown to be a bio-surfactant with excellent emulsification ability and strong bactericidal capacity at elevated temperature as high as 95 °C. Therefore, PhaR could be used in areas including food, beverage, pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of the combination between bio-surfactant product types and washing times on the removal of crude oil in nonwoven fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triawan, Agus; Ni'matuzahroh, Supriyanto, Agus

    2017-06-01

    This research aimed to characterize bio-surfactants produced by Bacillus subtilis 3KP, Pseudomonas putida T1-8, Micrococcus sp. L II 61 and Acinetobacter sp. P 2(1) and to investigate its combination's effects on the removal of crude oil in nonwoven fabric with different washing times vary from 12, 24 to 36 hours. The production of bio-surfactants was done on Synthetic Mineral Water mixed with molasses 4% within four days. The bio-surfactant products were characterized by measuring the Surface Tension (ST) (mN/m) and Emulsion Activity (EA) (%). Oil removal experiment was done by mixing 10 mL bio-surfactant with nonwoven fabric that contains crude oil into 50 mL bottle inside a shaker. The removed crude oil was extracted with n-hexane and measured gravimetrically. The results were then being analyzed with two ways ANOVA and Duncan test. Bio-surfactant produced by four bacteria has variations of Surface Tension and Emulsion Activity values. Bio-surfactant produced by Bacillus subtilis 3KP and Pseudomonas putida T1-8 showed the increasing of crude oil removal as washing times increase, while bio-surfactant produced by Micrococcus sp. L II 61 and Acinetobacter sp. P2(1) showed the decreasing result at 36 hours. However, the combination that showed the best result was Acinetobacter sp. P 2(1) at 24 hours valued 65,3%.

  16. Synthesis of Glycolipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakao, Masahiro; Suda, Yasuo

    Glycolipids, composed of hydrophilic carbohydrate and hydrophobic aliphatic residues, have a wide variety of biological activity. Natural glycolipids are known to be very complex and heterogeneous, and sometimes contain lipophilic contaminants, which cause confusion in the understanding of their original functions in biological process. To investigate their function at the molecular level, structurally defined glycolipids are necessary. A chemical synthetic approach may be the only method to overcome this issue. So far, a lot of synthetic efforts have been devoted in this field. This chapter summarizes syntheses of natural and related glycolipids, sphingoglycolipids, glyceroglycolipids, lipoteichoic acid, mycoloyl arabinan, lipopolysaccharide, glycophosphatidylinositol, etc.

  17. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kügler, Johannes H.; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Globally the change towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application. PMID:25852670

  18. Characteristic of flotation deinking using bio and synthetic surfactant at different air flow rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trismawati, Wardana, I. N. G.; Hamidi, Nurkholis; Sasongko, Mega Nur

    2016-03-01

    Flotation deinking has industrially applied but several problems keep unsolved because limitations have to compete with several variables present. Flotation deinking is multi variables process, so studying flotation deinking is still interesting. In this research, the amount of variables was reduced and focused to the performance comparison between flotation deinking of old newspaper (ONP) using biodegradable fatty acid of morinda citrifolia as the raw bio surfactant (RBS) and biodegradable fatty acid of palm oil that had been converted to be commercial surfactant (CS). The flotation was done at laboratory flotation cell equipped with orifice at different diameter (orifice number 20, 40 and 60) with adjustable airflow rate. Brightness and Effective Residual Ink Concentration (ERIC) of the deinked pulp were measured. The best results were achieved on orifice number 40 with the highest brightness of 41.96 °ISO and 40.96 °ISO when using CS and RBS respectively, and lowest ERIC of 896.82 ppm and 1001.72 ppm when using CS and RBS respectively. The percentage delta of deinking power characteristic between CS and RBS was 2.36% and 11.70% for brightness and ERIC, respectively.

  19. Chlorpyrifos-methyl solubilisation by humic acids used as bio-surfactants extracted from lignocelluloses and kitchen wastes.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Barbara; Baglieri, Andrea; Tambone, Fulvia; Gennari, Mara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-09-01

    Chlorpyrifos-methyl (CLP-m) is a widely used organophosphate insecticide that can accumulate in soil and become toxic to humans. CLP-m can be removed from soil by its solubilisation using synthetic surfactants. However, synthetic surfactants can accumulate in soil causing contamination phenomena themselves. Bio-surfactants can be used as an alternative to synthetic ones, reducing costs and environmental issues. In this work, humic acid (HA) extracted from raw biomasses, i.e. lignocelluloses (HAL) and lignocelluloses plus kitchen food waste (HALF), corresponding composts (C) (HALC and HALFC) and leonardite (HAc), were tested in comparison with commercial surfactants, i.e. SDS, Tween 20 and DHAB, to solubilize CLP-m. Results obtained indicated that only biomass-derived HA, composted biomass-derived HA, and SDS solubilized CLP-m: SDS = 0.006; HAL = 0.007; HALC = 0.009 g; HALF = 0.025; HALFC = 0.024) (g CLP-m g(-1) surfactant). Lignocelluloses HAs (HAL, HALF) solubilized CLP-m just as well as SDS while lignocellulosic plus kitchen food waste HA (HALF, HALFC) showed a three times higher CLP-m solubilisation capability. This difference was attributed to the higher concentration of alkyl-Carbon that creates strong links with CLP-m in the hydrophobic micelle-core of the surfactants.

  20. An experimental study on the bio-surfactant-assisted remediation of crude oil and salt contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Li, Jianbing; Huang, Guohe; Song, Weikun; Huang, Yuefei

    2011-01-01

    The effect of bio-surfactant (rhamnolipid) on the remediation of crude oil and salt contaminated soil was investigated in this study. The experimental results indicated that there was a distinct decline of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentration within the soil when using rhamnolipid during a remediation period of 30 days, with maximum TPH reduction of 86.97%. The most effective remediation that was observed was with rhamnolipid at a concentration of 2 CMC in soil solution, and a first-order TPH degradation rate constant of 0.0866 d(-1). The results also illustrated that salts in soil had a negative impact on TPH reduction, and the degradation rate was negatively correlated with NaCl concentration in soil solution. The analysis of soil TPH fractions indicated that there was a significant reduction of C13-C30 during the remediation process when using bio-surfactant.

  1. Molecular structure and baking performance of individual glycolipid classes from lecithins.

    PubMed

    Selmair, Patrick L; Koehler, Peter

    2009-06-24

    The potential of individual glycolipid classes from lecithins (soybean, rapeseed, and sunflower) in breadmaking was determined in comparison to classical surfactants such as diacetyltartaric acid esters of mono- and diacylglycerides (DATEM), monoacylglycerides, sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate (SSL), and two synthetic glycolipids by means of rheological and baking tests on a microscale. A highly glycolipid-enriched sample containing the entire glycolipid moiety of the lecithin was obtained using an optimized batch procedure with silica gel. This sample was subsequently used to gain individual glycolipid classes through column chromatography on silica gel. The major glycolipid classes in the lecithins, digalactosyl diacylglycerides (1), sterol glucosides (2), acylated sterol glucosides (3), and cerebrosides (4), were identified and characterized. All isolated glycolipid classes displayed excellent baking performance. A better baking activity than that of the classical surfactants was displayed by 1, 3, and 4 and an equivalent baking activity by 2. The same glycolipid classes, except 3, of different lecithin origin showed only slight differences in their baking activities, due to different fatty acid compositions. Furthermore, the glycolipid classes influenced the crumb structure significantly by improving the crumb softness and grain. Interestingly, none of the glycolipid classes showed significant antistaling effect. A direct effect on the overall rheological behavior of the dough was only found for the commercial surfactants. However, the rheological effect seen on gluten isolated from surfactant-containing dough revealed that the surfactants could be divided into two main groups, one of them directly forming and stabilizing liquid film lamellae through adsorption to interfaces and the other indirectly increasing the surface activity of the endogenous lipids in the flour. The results suggest that in wheat dough, glycolipids seem to have an impact on the dough liquor

  2. Engineering Halomonas spp. as A Low-Cost Production Host for Production of Bio-surfactant Protein PhaP.

    PubMed

    Lan, Lu-Hong; Zhao, Han; Chen, Jin-Chun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2016-12-01

    Halomonas spp. have been studied as a low cost production host for producing bulk materials such as polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) bioplastics, since they are able to grow at high pH and high NaCl concentration under unsterile and continuous conditions without microbial contamination. In this paper, Halomonas strain TD is used as a host to produce a protein named PHA phasin or PhaP which has a potential to be developed into a bio-surfactant. Four Halomonas TD expression strains are constructed based on a strong T7-family expression system. Of these, the strain with phaC deletion and chromosomal expression system resulted in the highest production of PhaP in soluble form, reaching 19% of total cellular soluble proteins and with a yield of 1.86 g/L in an open fed-batch fermentation process. A simple "heat lysis and salt precipitation" method is applied to allow rapid PhaP purification from a mixture of cellular proteins with a PhaP recovery rate of 63%. It clearly demonstrated that Halomonas TD could be used for high yield expression of a bio-surfactant protein PhaP for industrial application in an economical way.

  3. Synthesis and bio-physicochemical properties of amide-functionalized N-methylpiperazinium surfactants.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Vinay; Singh, Sukhprit; Mishra, Rachana; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2014-12-15

    Four new amide functionalized N-methylpiperazinium amphiphiles having tetradecyl, hexadecyl alkyl chain lengths and counterions; chloride or bromide have been synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. These new surfactants have been investigated in detail for their self-assembling behavior by surface tension, conductivity and fluorescence measurements. The thermodynamic parameters of these surfactants indicate that micellization is exothermic and entropy-driven. The dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments have been performed to insight the aggregate size of these cationics. Thermal degradation of these new surfactants has also been evaluated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). These new surfactants form stable complexes with DNA as acknowledged by agarose gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide exclusion and zeta potential measurements. They have also been found to have low cytotoxicity by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay on the C6 glioma cell line.

  4. Production of glycolipid biosurfactants by basidiomycetous yeasts.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2009-05-01

    BSs (biosurfactants) produced by various micro-organisms show unique properties (e.g. mild production conditions, lower toxicity, higher biodegradability and environmental compatibility) compared with chemically synthesized surfactants. The numerous advantages of BSs have prompted applications not only in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries but also in environmental protection and energy-saving technology. Among BSs, glycolipid types are the most promising, owing to their high productivity from renewable resources and versatile biochemical properties. MELs (mannosylerythritol lipids), which are glycolipid BSs abundantly produced by basidiomycetous yeasts such as strains of Pseudozyma, exhibit not only excellent interfacial properties, but also remarkable differentiation-inducing activities against human leukaemia cells. MELs also show high binding affinity towards different immunoglobulins and lectins. Recently, a cationic liposome bearing MEL has been demonstrated to increase dramatically the efficiency of gene transfection into mammalian cells. These features of BSs should broaden their application in new advanced technologies. In the present review the current status of research and development on glycolipid BSs, especially their production by Pseudozyma yeasts, is described.

  5. Bio-inspired pulmonary surfactant-modified nanogels: A promising siRNA delivery system.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Braeckmans, Kevin; Stuart, Marc C A; Demeester, Jo; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-05-28

    Inhalation therapy with small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a promising approach in the treatment of pulmonary disorders. However, clinical translation is severely limited by the lack of suitable delivery platforms. In this study, we aim to address this limitation by designing a novel bioinspired hybrid nanoparticle with a core-shell nanoarchitecture, consisting of a siRNA-loaded dextran nanogel (siNG) core and a pulmonary surfactant (Curosurf®) outer shell. The decoration of siNGs with a surfactant shell enhances the colloidal stability and prevents siRNA release in the presence of competing polyanions, which are abundantly present in biofluids. Additionally, the impact of the surfactant shell on the biological efficacy of the siNGs is determined in lung cancer cells. The presence of the surfactants substantially reduces the cellular uptake of siNGs. Remarkably, the lowered intracellular dose does not impede the gene silencing effect, suggesting a crucial role of the pulmonary surfactant in the intracellular processing of the nanoparticles. In order to surmount the observed reduction in cellular dose, folate is incorporated as a targeting ligand in the pulmonary surfactant shell to incite receptor-mediated endocytosis. The latter substantially enhances both cellular uptake and gene silencing potential, achieving efficient knockdown at siRNA concentrations in the low nanomolar range. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Current status in biotechnological production and applications of glycolipid biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Bruno Nicolau; Pessôa, Marina Gabriel; Mano, Mario Cezar Rodrigues; Molina, Gustavo; Neri-Numa, Iramaia Angélica; Pastore, Glaucia Maria

    2016-12-01

    Biosurfactants are natural compounds with surface activity and emulsifying properties produced by several types of microorganisms and have been considered an interesting alternative to synthetic surfactants. Glycolipids are promising biosurfactants, due to low toxicity, biodegradability, and chemical stability in different conditions and also because they have many biological activities, allowing wide applications in different fields. In this review, we addressed general information about families of glycolipids, rhamnolipids, sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids, and trehalose lipids, describing their chemical and surface characteristics, recent studies using alternative substrates, and new strategies to improve of production, beyond their specificities. We focus in providing recent developments and trends in biotechnological process and medical and industrial applications.

  7. Production of microbial glycolipid biosurfactants and their antimicrobial activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial glycolipids produced by bacteria or yeast as secondary metabolites, such as sophorolipids (SLs), rhamnolipids (RLs) and mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) are “green” biosurfactants desirable in a bioeconomy. High cost of production is a major hurdle toward widespread commercial use of bios...

  8. A surfactant-free bio-compatible film with a highly ordered honeycomb pattern fabricated via an improved phase separation method.

    PubMed

    Bui, Van-Tien; Ko, Seung Hyeon; Choi, Ho-Suk

    2014-04-14

    Thin films of bio-compatible poly(lactic acid) with highly ordered hexagonal patterns were successfully fabricated under normal ambient conditions without using any surfactant via an improved phase separation method. The patterned surface was successfully applied to fabricate silicon/copper dome-patterned electrodes for high-performance hybrid capacitors.

  9. Bio-inspired surfactant assisted nano-catalyst impregnation of Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Ozmen, Ozcan; Zondlo, John W.; Lee, Shiwoo; ...

    2015-11-02

    A bio-inspired surfactant was utilized to assist in the efficient impregnation of a nano-CeO₂ catalyst throughout both porous Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC’s) electrodes simultaneously. The process included the initial modification of electrode pore walls with a polydopamine film. The cell was then submersed into a cerium salt solution. The amount of nano-CeO₂ deposited per impregnation step increased by 3.5 times by utilizing this two-step protocol in comparison to a conventional drip impregnation method. The impregnated cells exhibited a 20% higher power density than a baseline cell without the nano-catalyst at 750°C (using humid H₂ fuel).

  10. Bio-inspired surfactant assisted nano-catalyst impregnation of Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ozmen, Ozcan; Zondlo, John W.; Lee, Shiwoo; Sabolsky, Edward M.

    2015-11-02

    A bio-inspired surfactant was utilized to assist in the efficient impregnation of a nano-CeO₂ catalyst throughout both porous Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC’s) electrodes simultaneously. The process included the initial modification of electrode pore walls with a polydopamine film. The cell was then submersed into a cerium salt solution. The amount of nano-CeO₂ deposited per impregnation step increased by 3.5 times by utilizing this two-step protocol in comparison to a conventional drip impregnation method. The impregnated cells exhibited a 20% higher power density than a baseline cell without the nano-catalyst at 750°C (using humid H₂ fuel).

  11. Bio-inspired materials in drug delivery: Exploring the role of pulmonary surfactant in siRNA inhalation therapy.

    PubMed

    De Backer, Lynn; Cerrada, Alejandro; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Raemdonck, Koen

    2015-12-28

    Many pathologies of the respiratory tract are inadequately treated with existing small molecule-based therapies. The emergence of RNA interference (RNAi) enables the post-transcriptional silencing of key molecular disease factors that cannot readily be targeted with conventional small molecule drugs. Pulmonary administration of RNAi effectors, such as small interfering RNA (siRNA), allows direct delivery into the lung tissue, hence reducing systemic exposure. Unfortunately, the clinical translation of RNAi is severely hampered by inefficient delivery of siRNA therapeutics towards the cytoplasm of the target cells. In order to have a better control of the siRNA delivery process, both extra- and intracellular, siRNAs are typically formulated in nanosized delivery vehicles (nanoparticles, NPs). In the lower airways, which are the targeted sites of action for multiple pulmonary disorders, these siRNA-loaded NPs will encounter the pulmonary surfactant (PS) layer, covering the entire alveolar surface. The interaction between the instilled siRNA-loaded NPs and the PS at this nano-bio interface results in the adsorption of PS components onto the surface of the NPs. The formation of this so-called biomolecular corona conceals the original NP surface and will therefore profoundly determine the biological efficacy of the NP. Though this interplay has initially been regarded as a barrier towards efficient siRNA delivery to the respiratory target cell, recent reports have illustrated that the interaction with PS might also be beneficial for local pulmonary siRNA delivery.

  12. Removal of BTEX by using a surfactant--Bio originated composite.

    PubMed

    Shakeri, H; Arshadi, M; Salvacion, J W L

    2016-03-15

    The application of ostrich bone waste-loaded a cationic surfactant (OBW-OH-CTABr) bioadsorbent for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene (BTEX) removal from the synthetic and real waters have been studied, and the prepared biomaterials were studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), surface area measurements (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and point of zero (pH(PZC)). The immobilization of CTABr molecules on the framework of modified OBW showed good tendency to adsorb BTEX from aqueous solution. The exposure time to obtain equilibrium for maximum removal of BTEX was observed to be 60 min. The removal kinetics of BTEX has been evaluated in terms of pseudo-first- and -second-order kinetics, and the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models have also been utilized to the equilibrium removal data. The removal process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature and followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The immobilized CTABr showed high reusability because of its high adsorption efficiency after 12th cycles. The proposed low-cost bioadsorbent could also be utilized to adsorb BTEX from the real water (Anzali lagoon water). The OBW-OH-CTABr composite is indeed an attractive biomaterial for drinking water-based pollutants and act as an adsorbent for BTEX and oil spills especially in third world due to its low-cost preparation and regeneration and clean processing of the biomaterial with no byproducts after utilize. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Glycolipids: Occurrence, Significance, and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holst, Otto

    This chapter focuses on the occurrence and the physicochemical properties of glycolipids in Nature. Owing to space limitations, the presented overview must be incomplete, and, thus, mainly publications of the past 15 years are included. However, all review articles cited herein inform the interested reader about earlier work. Although lipopolysaccharides (LPS), lipoarabinomannan (LAM), lipomannan, lipoglycans, and lipoteichoic acids are not understood as glycolipids per definition, their occurrence and properties are also described in this chapter. GPI-anchored lipids is a main topic of Chap. 7.4.

  14. Application of oil refinery waste in the biosynthesis of glycolipids by yeast.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Włodzimierz; Adamczak, Marek; Tomasik, Jan; Płaszczyk, Mariusz

    2004-10-01

    Candida antarctica or Candida apicola synthesized surfactants (glycolipids) in the cultivation medium supplemented with oil refinery waste, either with soapstock (from 5.0% to 12.0% v/v) or post-refinery fatty acids (from 2.0% to 5.0% v/v). The efficiency of glycolipids synthesis was determined by the amount of waste supplemented to the medium and was from 7.3 to 13.4 g/l and from 6.6 to 10.5 g/l in the medium supplemented with soapstock and post-refinery fatty acids, respectively. The studied yeast also synthesized glycolipids in the non-supplemented medium however, by the enrichment of medium with the oil refinery waste, a 7.5-8.5-fold greater concentration of glycolipids was obtained in the post-culture liquid then in the medium without addition of oil refinery waste. The yeast synthesized from 6.6 to 10.3 g dry biomass/l and the intra-cellular fat content was from 16.8% to 30.2%. The efficiency of glycolipids synthesis was determined by yeast species, medium acidity and culture period. The surface tension of the post-culture liquid separated from yeast biomass was reduced to 35.6 mN/m, which corresponded to the surface tension obtained at the critical micelle concentration of glycolipids.

  15. Improved microbial growth inhibition activity of bio-surfactant induced Ag-TiO2 core shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nithyadevi, D.; Kumar, P. Suresh; Mangalaraj, D.; Ponpandian, N.; Viswanathan, C.; Meena, P.

    2015-02-01

    Surfactant induced silver-titanium dioxide core shell nanoparticles within the size range of 10-50 nm were applied in the antibacterial agent to inhibit the growth of bacterial cells. The single crystalline silver was located in the core part of the composite powder and the titanium dioxide components were uniformly distributed in the shell part. HRTEM and XRD results indicated that silver was completely covered by titanium dioxide and its crystal structure was not affected after being coated by titanium dioxide. The effect of silver-titanium dioxide nanoparticles in the inhibition of bacterial cell growth was studied by means of disk diffusion method. The inhibition zone results reveal that sodium alginate induced silver-titanium dioxide nanoparticles exhibit 100% more antibacterial activity than that with cetyltrimethylbromide or without surfactant. UV-vis spectroscopic analysis showed a large concentration of silver was rapidly released into phosphate buffer solution (PBS) within a period of 1 day, with a much smaller concentration being released after this 1-day period. It was concluded that sodium alginate induced silver-titanium dioxide core shell nanoparticles could enhance long term cell growth inhibition in comparison with cetyltrimethylbromide or without surfactant. The surfactant mediated core shell nanoparticles have comparatively rapid, less expensive and wider applications in modern antibacterial therapy.

  16. Pentaerythritol as the core of multivalent glycolipids: synthesis of a glycolipid with three SO3Lea ligands.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jie; Zhu, Junmin; Marchant, Roger E; Guo, Zhongwu

    2005-08-18

    A glycolipid containing three SO(3)Le(a) ligands was synthesized with pentaerythritol as the core. The glycolipid was used to prepare glycoliposomes that showed stability similar to that of DSPC liposomes without glycolipid. The easily prepared derivatives of pentaerythritol proved to be useful scaffolds for multivalent displaying of carbohydrates in the form of glycolipids and clustered glycoliposomes. [structure: see text

  17. Dehydration resistance of liposomes containing trehalose glycolipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyberg, Kendra; Goulding, Morgan; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2010-03-01

    The pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has an unusual outer membrane containing trehalose glycolipids that may contribute to its ability to survive freezing and dehydration. Based on our recent discovery that trehalose glycolipids confer dehydration resistance to supported lipid monolayers (Biophys. J. 94: 4718-4724 (2008); Langmuir 25: 5193-5198, (2009)), we hypothesized that liposomes containing synthetic trehalose glycolipids may be dehydration-resistant as well. To test this, we measured the leakage of encapsulated fluorophores and larger macromolecular cargo from such liposomes subject to freeze drying. Both leakage assays and size measurements show that the liposomes are dehydration-resistant. In addition to demonstrating a possibly technologically useful encapsulation platform, our results corroborate the view that encapsulation in a trehalose-glycolipid-rich membrane is a biophysically viable route to protection of mycobacteria from environmental stresses.

  18. DGDG and Glycolipids in Plants and Algae.

    PubMed

    Kalisch, Barbara; Dörmann, Peter; Hölzl, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthetic organelles in plants and algae are characterized by the high abundance of glycolipids, including the galactolipids mono- and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG, DGDG) and the sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG). Glycolipids are crucial to maintain an optimal efficiency of photosynthesis. During phosphate limitation, the amounts of DGDG and SQDG increase in the plastids of plants, and DGDG is exported to extraplastidial membranes to replace phospholipids. Algae often use betaine lipids as surrogate for phospholipids. Glucuronosyldiacylglycerol (GlcADG) is a further glycolipid that accumulates under phosphate deprived conditions. In contrast to plants, a number of eukaryotic algae contain very long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids of 20 or more carbon atoms in their glycolipids. The pathways and genes for galactolipid and sulfolipid synthesis are largely conserved between plants, Chlorophyta, Rhodophyta and algae with complex plastids derived from secondary or tertiary endosymbiosis. However, the relative contribution of the endoplasmic reticulum- and plastid-derived lipid pathways for glycolipid synthesis varies between plants and algae. The genes for glycolipid synthesis encode precursor proteins imported into the photosynthetic organelles. While most eukaryotic algae contain the plant-like galactolipid (MGD1, DGD1) and sulfolipid (SQD1, SQD2) synthases, the red alga Cyanidioschyzon harbors a cyanobacterium-type DGDG synthase (DgdA), and the amoeba Paulinella, derived from a more recent endosymbiosis event, contains cyanobacterium-type enzymes for MGDG and DGDG synthesis (MgdA, MgdE, DgdA).

  19. Blue light emitting Y2O3:Tm3 + nanophosphors with tunable morphology obtained by bio-surfactant assisted sonochemical route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalaiah, K. N.; Nagabhushana, H.; Darshan, G. P.; Basavaraj, R. B.; Daruka Prasad, B.; Sharma, S. C.

    2017-09-01

    Modified sonochemical route was used to prepare Y2O3:Tm3+ (1-11 mol%) nanophosphor using Mimosa pudica (M.P.) leaves extract as bio-surfactant. The prepared samples were exhibited high crystalline nature with various morphologies. This was due to sonochemical experimental reaction took place between cavitation bubbles and nearby solution. The average crystallite sizes of the prepared samples were about 15 nm to 21 nm as obtained from PXRD and TEM analysis. The ultraviolet visible absorption spectra showed prominent bands with an energy gap varied from 5.73 eV to 5.84 eV. Photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra shows the prominent blue light emission peak at 456 nm attributed to 1D2 → 3F4 transitions of Tm3+ ions. Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters were estimated by using PL emission spectra. The photometric characteristics of the prepared compounds were very close to the blue color of NTSC standards. So the results were fruitful in making use of Y2O3:Tm3 + nanophosphor as an alternative material for effective blue component in WLED's.

  20. Antibodies to single glycolipids and glycolipid complexes in Guillain-Barré syndrome subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Shahrizaila, Nortina; Kokubun, Norito; Sawai, Setsu; Umapathi, Thirugnanam; Chan, Yee-Cheun; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Hirata, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To comprehensively investigate the relationship between antibodies to single glycolipids and their complexes and Guillain-Barré syndrome subtypes and clinical features. Methods: In acute sera from 199 patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome, immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to glycolipids and ganglioside complexes were tested using ELISA against individual antigens from single glycolipids including gangliosides (LM1, GM1, GM1b, GD1a, GalNAc-GD1a, GD1b, GT1a, GT1b, GQ1b) and a neutral glycolipid, asialo-GM1 (GA1), and antigens from the combination of 2 different glycolipids. Based on serial nerve conduction studies, the electrodiagnoses were as follows: 69 demyelinating subtype, 85 axonal subtypes, and 45 unclassified. Results: Significant associations were detected between acute motor axonal neuropathy subtype and IgG antibodies to GM1, GalNAc-GD1a, GA1, or LM1/GA1 complex. Reversible conduction failure was significantly associated with IgG antibodies to GM1, GalNAc-GD1a, GD1b, or complex of LM1/GA1. No significant association was demonstrated between acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and any of the glycolipids or ganglioside complexes. Anti-ganglioside complex antibodies alone were detected in 7 patients (5 axonal subtype). Conclusions: The current study demonstrates that antibodies to single glycolipids and ganglioside complexes are associated with acute motor axonal neuropathy or acute motor conduction block neuropathy but not acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class II evidence that antibodies to glycolipids are increased in patients with acute motor axonal neuropathy and acute motor conduction block neuropathy but not acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. PMID:24920848

  1. Future perspectives for glycolipid research in medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Timothy M

    2003-01-01

    Medical interest in glycolipids has been mainly directed to the rare and complex glycosphingolipid storage disorders that are principally caused by unitary deficiencies of lysosomal acid hydrolases. However, glycolipids are critical components of cell membranes and occur within newly described membrane domains known as lipid rafts. Glycolipids are components of important antigen systems and membrane receptors; they participate in intracellular signalling mechanisms and may be presented to the immune system in the context of the novel CD1 molecules present on T lymphocytes. A knowledge of their mechanism of action in the control of cell growth and survival as well as developmental pathways is likely to shed light on the pathogenesis of the glycosphingolipid storage disorders as well as the role of lipid second messengers in controlling cell mobility and in the mobilization of intracellular calcium stores (a biological role widely postulated particularly for the lysosphingolipid metabolite sphingosine 1-phosphate). Other sphingolipid metabolites such as ceramide 1-phosphate may be involved in apoptotic responses and in phagocytosis and synaptic vesicle formation. The extraordinary pharmaceutical success of enzymatic complementation for Gaucher's disease using macrophage-targeted human glucocerebrosidase has focused further commercial interest in other glycolipid storage diseases: the cost of targeted enzyme therapy and its failure to restore lysosomal enzymatic deficiencies in the brain has also stimulated interest in the concept of substrate reduction therapy using diffusible inhibitory molecules. Successful clinical trials of the iminosugar N-butyldeoxynojirimycin in type 1 Gaucher's disease prove the principle of substrate reduction therapy and have attracted attention to this therapeutic method. They will also foster important further experiments into the use of glycolipid synthesis inhibitors for the severe neuronopathic glycosphingolipidoses, for which no

  2. Application of yeast glycolipid biosurfactant, mannosylerythritol lipid, as agrospreaders.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Yoshida, Shigenobu; Nakamura, Junichi; Koitabashi, Motoo; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    The spreading property of mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs) was investigated in connection with our search for new application in agriculture. The wetting ability of MEL solutions for hydrophobic surfaces was evaluated based on contact angle measurements for several surfactant solutions on abiotic and biotic surfaces. The contact angle of MEL-A solution on a hydrophobic plastic surface at 100 s after placement decreased to 8.4°, and those of other MEL solutions decreased more significantly compared to those of commonly-used nonionic surfactants. In addition, the contact angle of MEL solutions also dropped down to around 10° on various plant leaf surfaces. MEL solutions, in particular, efficiently spread even on poorly wettable Gramineae plant surfaces on which general nonionic surfactant solutions could not. Moreover, the wetting ability of MEL solutions was found to be greatly affected by the structural difference in their carbohydrate configuration. Furthermore, surface pretreatment with MEL solution led to more efficient spreading and fixing of microbial cells onto plant leaf surface compared to several conventional surfactants used in this study. These results suggested that MELs have a potential to use as a natural bio-based spreading agent, particularly as agrochemical spreader for biopesticides.

  3. Biosurfactants: a sustainable replacement for chemical surfactants?

    PubMed

    Marchant, Roger; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2012-09-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants produced by bacteria and yeasts provide significant opportunities to replace chemical surfactants with sustainable biologically produced alternatives in bulk commercial products such as laundry detergents and surface cleaners. Sophorolipids are already available in sufficient yield to make their use feasible while rhamnolipids and mannosylerythritol lipids require further development. The ability to tailor the biosurfactant produced to the specific needs of the product formulation will be an important future step.

  4. Analysis of glycolipids by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bosch, M P; Parra, J L; Manresa, M A; Ventura, F; Rivera, J

    1989-12-01

    The positive and negative ion fast atom bombardment (FAB) mass spectra of four glycolipids obtained from microbial cultures are reported. The spectra of the glycolipids in the positive ion mode are characterized by abundant [M + Na]+, [M + Na + matrix]+ and [M + 2Na - H]+ species. In negative FAB conditions the molecules yield [M - H]-. Our understanding of the FAB behaviour of glycolipids in both positive and negative modes has been considerably aided in the structure elucidation, without any derivatization or degradation reaction of the compounds studied. The technique allows unambiguous molecular weight determination of low-microgram amounts of these glycolipids purified from biological sources and provides useful fragmentation information.

  5. Nitrogen and hydrophosphate affects glycolipids composition in microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Shen, Zhouyuan; Miao, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Glycolipids had received increasing attention because of their uses in various industries like cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, food and machinery manufacture. Microalgae were competitive organisms to accumulate metabolic substance. However, using microalgae to produce glycolipid was rare at present. In this study, glycolipid content of Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Synechococcus sp. under different nitrate and hydrophosphate levels were investigated. The highest glycolipid contents of 24.61% for C. pyrenoidosa and 15.37% for Synechococcus sp. were obtained at nitrate absence, which were 17.19% for C. pyrenoidosa and 10.99% for Synechococcus sp. at 0.01 and 0 g L−1 hydrophosphate, respectively. Glycolipid productivities of two microalgae could reach at more than 10.59 mg L−1 d−1. Nitrate absence induced at least 8.5% increase in MGDG, DGDG and SQDG, while hydrophosphate absence resulted in over 21.2% increase in DGDG and over 48.4% increase in SQDG and more than 22.2% decrease in MGDG in two microalgae. Simultaneous nitrate and hydrophosphate limitation could make further improvement of glycolipid accumulation, which was more than 25% for C. pyrenoidosa and 21% for Synechococcus sp. These results suggest that nitrogen and phosphorus limitation or starvation should be an efficient way to improve microalgal glycolipid accumulation. PMID:27440670

  6. Lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, S A

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of pulmonary surfactant are reviewed from a biochemical perspective. The major emphasis is on the lipid components of surfactant. Topics reviewed include surfactant composition, cellular and subcellular sites as well as pathways of biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, disaturated phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol. The surfactant system in the developing fetus and neonate is considered in terms of phospholipid content and composition, rates of precursor incorporation, activities of individual enzymes of phospholipid synthesis and glycogen content and metabolism. The influence of the following hormones and other factors on lung maturation and surfactant production is discussed: glucocorticoids, thyroid hormone, estrogen, prolactin, cyclic AMP, beta-adrenergic and cholinergic agonists, prostaglandins and growth factors. The influence of maternal diabetes, fetal sex, stress and labor are also considered. Nonphysiologic and toxic agents which influence surfactant in the fetus, newborn and adult are reviewed. PMID:6145585

  7. Interaction of virions with membrane glycolipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bally, M.; Dimitrievski, K.; Larson, G.; Zhdanov, V. P.; Höök, F.

    2012-04-01

    Cellular membranes contain various lipids including glycolipids (GLs). The hydrophilic head groups of GLs extend from the membrane into the aqueous environment outside the cell where they act as recognition sites for specific interactions. The first steps of interaction of virions with cells often include contacts with GLs. To clarify the details of such contacts, we have used the total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to explore the interaction of individual unlabelled virus-like particles (or, more specifically, norovirus protein capsids), which are firmly bound to a lipid bilayer, and fluorescent vesicles containing glycosphingolipids (these lipids form a subclass of GLs). The corresponding binding kinetics were earlier found to be kinetically limited, while the detachment kinetics were logarithmic over a wide range of time. Here, the detachment rate is observed to dramatically decrease with increasing concentration of glycosphingolipids from 1% to 8%. This effect has been analytically explained by using a generic model describing the statistics of bonds in the contact area between a virion and a lipid membrane. Among other factors, the model takes the formation of GL domains into account. Our analysis indicates that in the system under consideration, such domains, if present, have a characteristic size smaller than the contact area between the vesicle and the virus-like particle.

  8. Deconvolution procedure of the UV-vis spectra. A powerful tool for the estimation of the binding of a model drug to specific solubilisation loci of bio-compatible aqueous surfactant-forming micelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calabrese, Ilaria; Merli, Marcello; Turco Liveri, Maria Liria

    2015-05-01

    UV-vis-spectra evolution of Nile Red loaded into Tween 20 micelles with pH and [Tween 20] have been analysed in a non-conventional manner by exploiting the deconvolution method. The number of buried sub-bands has been found to depend on both pH and bio-surfactant concentration, whose positions have been associated to Nile Red confined in aqueous solution and in the three micellar solubilisation sites. For the first time, by using an extended classical two-pseudo-phases-model, the robust treatment of the spectrophotometric data allows the estimation of Nile Red binding constant to the available loci. Hosting capability towards Nile Red is exalted by the pH enhancement. Comparison between binding constant values classically evaluated and those estimated by the deconvolution protocol unveiled that overall binding values perfectly match with the mean values of the local binding sites. This result suggests that deconvolution procedure provides more precise and reliable values, which are more representative of drug confinement.

  9. Deconvolution procedure of the UV-vis spectra. A powerful tool for the estimation of the binding of a model drug to specific solubilisation loci of bio-compatible aqueous surfactant-forming micelle.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Ilaria; Merli, Marcello; Turco Liveri, Maria Liria

    2015-05-05

    UV-vis-spectra evolution of Nile Red loaded into Tween 20 micelles with pH and [Tween 20] have been analysed in a non-conventional manner by exploiting the deconvolution method. The number of buried sub-bands has been found to depend on both pH and bio-surfactant concentration, whose positions have been associated to Nile Red confined in aqueous solution and in the three micellar solubilisation sites. For the first time, by using an extended classical two-pseudo-phases-model, the robust treatment of the spectrophotometric data allows the estimation of Nile Red binding constant to the available loci. Hosting capability towards Nile Red is exalted by the pH enhancement. Comparison between binding constant values classically evaluated and those estimated by the deconvolution protocol unveiled that overall binding values perfectly match with the mean values of the local binding sites. This result suggests that deconvolution procedure provides more precise and reliable values, which are more representative of drug confinement.

  10. Synthetic glycolipid modification of red blood cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Frame, Tom; Carroll, Tim; Korchagina, Elena; Bovin, Nicolai; Henry, Stephen

    2007-05-01

    Glycolipids have a natural ability to insert into red cell (RBC) membranes. Based on this concept the serology of RBCs modified with synthetic analogs of blood group glycolipids (KODE technology) was developed, which entails making synthetic glycolipid constructs engineered to have specific performance criteria. Such synthetic constructs can be made to express a potentially unlimited range of carbohydrate blood group determinants. Synthetic constructs incorporating A, B, acquired-B, and Le(a) blood group determinants were constructed and used to modify RBCs. Modified cells were assessed by routine serologic methods using a range of commercially available monoclonal antibodies. RBCs modified with different concentrations of synthetic glycolipids were able to give controllable serologic results. Synthetic A and B modified cells were able to be created to represent the serology of "weak" subgroups. Specialized cells such as those bearing synthetic acquired-B antigen reacted as expected, but also exhibited extended features due to the cells bearing only specific antigen. Synthetic Le(a)-modified cells reacted as expected with anti-Le(a) reagents, but unexpectedly, were also able to detect the chemical anti-Le(ab) specificity of serologic monoclonal anti-Le(b) reagents. RBCs can be created to express normal and novel carbohydrate profiles by inserting synthetic glycolipids into them. Such cells will be useful in creating specialized antigen panels and for quality control purposes.

  11. A mouse B16 melanoma mutant deficient in glycolipids.

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, S; Nakajo, N; Sakiyama, H; Hirabayashi, Y

    1994-01-01

    Mouse B16 melanoma cell line, GM-95 (formerly designated as MEC-4), deficient in sialyllactosylceramide was examined for its primary defect. Glycolipids from the mutant cells were analyzed by high-performance TLC. No glycolipid was detected in GM-95 cells, even when total lipid from 10(7) cells was analyzed. In contrast, the content of ceramide, a precursor lipid molecule of glycolipids, was normal. Thus, the deficiency of glycolipids was attributed to the first glucosylation step of ceramide. The ceramide glucosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.80) activity was not detected in GM-95 cells. There was no significant difference of sialyllactosylceramide synthase activity, however, between GM-95 and the parental cells. The deficiency of glycolipids in GM-95 cells was associated with changes of the cellular morphology and growth rate. The parental cells showed irregular shapes and tended to overlap each other. On the other hand, GM-95 cells exhibited an elongated fibroblastic morphology and parallel arrangement. The population-doubling times of GM-95 and the parental cells in serum-free medium were 28 hr and 19 hr, respectively. Images PMID:8146177

  12. Glycolipid Biosurfactants Activate, Dimerize, and Stabilize Thermomyces lanuginosus Lipase in a pH-Dependent Fashion.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jens Kvist; Kaspersen, Jørn Døvling; Andersen, Camilla Bertel; Nedergaard Pedersen, Jannik; Andersen, Kell Kleiner; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Otzen, Daniel E

    2017-08-15

    We present a study of the interactions between the lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosus (TlL) and the two microbially produced biosurfactants (BSs), rhamnolipid (RL) and sophorolipid (SL). Both RL and SL are glycolipids; however, RL is anionic, while SL is a mixture of anionic and non-ionic species. We investigate the interactions of RL and SL with TlL at pH 6 and 8 and observe different effects at the two pH values. At pH 8, neither RL nor SL had any major effect on TlL stability or activity. At pH 6, in contrast, both surfactants increase TlL's thermal stability and fluorescence and activity measurements indicate interfacial activation of TlL, resulting in 3- and 6-fold improved activity in SL and RL, respectively. Nevertheless, isothermal titration calorimetry reveals binding of only a few BS molecules per lipase. Size-exclusion chromatography and small-angle X-ray scattering suggest formation of TlL dimers with binding of small amounts of either RL or SL at the dimeric interface, forming an elongated complex. We conclude that RL and SL are compatible with TlL and constitute promising green alternatives to traditional surfactants.

  13. Impact of surfactant type for ionic liquid pretreatment on enhancing delignification of rice straw.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ken-Lin; Chen, Xi-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Han, Ye-Ju; Potprommanee, Laddawan; Liu, Jing-Yong; Liao, Yu-Ling; Ning, Xun-An; Sun, Shui-Yu; Huang, Qing

    2017-03-01

    This work describes an environmentally friendly method for pretreating rice straw by using 1-Allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl) as an ionic liquid (IL) assisted by surfactants. The impacts of surfactant type (including nonionic-, anionic-, cationic- and bio-surfactant) on the ionic liquid pretreatment were investigated. The bio-surfactant+IL-pretreated rice straw showed significant lignin removal (26.14%) and exhibited higher cellulose conversion (36.21%) than the untreated (16.16%) rice straw. The cellulose conversion of the rice straw pretreated with bio-surfactant+IL was the highest and the lowest was observed for pretreated with cationic-surfactant+IL. Untreated and pretreated rice straw was thoroughly characterized through SEM and AFM. In conclusion, the results provided an effective and environmental method for pretreating lignocellulosic substrates by using green solvent (ionic liquid) and biodegradable bio-surfactant.

  14. CD1 mediated T cell recognition of glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Zajonc, Dirk M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2007-10-01

    Specialized subsets of T lymphocytes can distinguish the carbohydrate portions of microbial and self-glycolipids when they are presented by proteins in the CD1 family of antigen presenting molecules. Recent immunochemical and structural analyses indicate that the chemical composition of the presented carbohydrate, together with its precise orientation above the CD1 binding groove, determines if a particular T cell is activated. More recently, however, it has been shown that the lipid backbone of the glycolipid, buried inside the CD1 protein, also can have an impact on T cell activation. While glycolipid recognition is a relatively new category of T cell specificity, the powerful combination of microbial antigen discovery and structural biochemistry has provided great insight into the mechanism of carbohydrate recognition.

  15. Endotoxic Glycolipid from a Heptoseless Mutant of Salmonella minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, N.; Nowotny, A.

    1967-01-01

    The endotoxin of a heptoseless mutant of Salmonella minnesota R595 was extracted with phenol-water. Most of this material was found distributed in the insoluble fraction of the extract. The results showed that the R595 endotoxin behaved as a lipid rather than as a lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The preparation, although it does not contain O-specific polysaccharides, does contain 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonic acid (KDO), hexosamine, and several other unidentified compounds. Therefore, the term “glycolipid” is used in this paper instead of lipopolysaccharide. The crude glycolipid fraction, which was soluble in a mixture of chloroform-methanol (8:2), was purified by a procedure including fractionation with organic solvents and by different-column chromatographic methods. Although a chromatographic fraction of the glycolipid showed homogeneity in most systems investigated, the presence of contaminants could not be excluded. Chemical analysis of the glycolipids showed the absence of hexoses and heptoses. Constituents which were found were hexosamine, KDO, fatty acids, and phosphorus, which showed a relatively simple chemical composition. Partial acidic hydrolysis of the glycolipid yielded hexosamine-phosphates, as described in “Lipid A” fractions of smooth LPS preparations. Thin-layer chromatography of the partially hydrolyzed glycolipid showed a pattern similar to “Lipid A” fractions of other strains. The biological activity of the glycolipid was at the same level as that of other gram-negative endotoxins. Pyrogenicity, Shwartzman reactivity, and chick embryo ld50 values were as high or higher than those of purified Serratia marcescens endotoxin preparations, but mouse ld50 measurements gave significantly lower results. Images PMID:4965363

  16. Antibodies to heteromeric glycolipid complexes in multifocal motor neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Galban-Horcajo F, Francesc; Fitzpatrick, Amanda M.; Hutton, Andrew J.; Dunn, Siobhan M.; Kalna, Gabriela; Brennan, Kathryn M.; Rinaldi, Simon; Yu, Robert K.; Goodyear, Carl; Willison, Hugh J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Measurement of anti-GM1 IgM antibodies in multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) sera is confounded by relatively low sensitivity that limits clinical usefulness. Combinatorial assay methods, in which antibodies reactive to heteromeric complexes of 2 or more glycolipids are being increasingly applied to this area of diagnostic testing. Methods A newly developed combinatorial glycoarray able to identify antibodies to 45 different heteromeric glycolipid complexes and their 10 individual glycolipid components was applied to a randomly selected population of 33 MMN cases and 57 normal or disease controls. Comparison with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was conducted for selected single glycolipids and their complexes. Results By ELISA, 22/33 MMN cases had detectable anti-GM1 IgM antibodies, whereas 19/33 MMN samples were positive for anti-GM1 antibodies by glycoarray. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that of the 55 possible single glycolipids and their 1:1 complexes, antibodies to the GM1:galactocerebroside (GM1:GalC) complex were most significantly associated with MMN, returning 33/33 MMN samples as positive by glycoarray and 29/33 positive by ELISA. Regression analysis revealed a high correlation in absolute values between ELISA and glycocarray. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis revealed insignificantly different diagnostic performance between the two methods, although at the lower end of sensitivity, the glycoarray appeared slightly advantageous by identifying antibodies in 4 ELISA-negative samples. Conclusions The use of combinatorial glycoarray or ELISA increased the diagnostic sensitivity of anti-glycolipid antibody testing in this cohort of MMN cases, without significantly affecting specificity, and may be a useful assay modification for routine clinical screening. PMID:22727042

  17. Confined organization of Au nanocrystals in glycolipid nanotube hollow cylinders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bo; Kamiya, Shoko; Yoshida, Kaname; Shimizu, Toshimi

    2004-03-07

    Mild fabrication of anisotropic metal-lipid nanotube (LNT) nanocomposites, in which Au nanoparticles of 3-10 nm wide are organized in a glycolipid nanotube hollow cylinder, has been achieved by filling the internal channel of the LNT with HAuCl(4) aqueous solution by capillary force and subsequent photochemical reduction of [AuCl(4)](-).

  18. Glycolipid biosurfactants: Potential related biomedical and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Inès, Mnif; Dhouha, Ghribi

    2015-10-30

    Glycolipids, consisting of a carbohydrate moiety linked to fatty acids, are microbial surface active compounds produced by various microorganisms. They are characterized by highly structural diversity and have the ability to decrease the surface and interfacial tension at the surface and interface respectively. Rhamnolipids, trehalolipids, mannosylerythritol-lipids and cellobiose lipids are among the most popular glycolipids. Moreover, their ability to form pores and destabilize biological membrane permits their use in biomedicine as antibacterial, antifungal and hemolytic agents. Their antiviral and antitumor effects enable their use in pharmaceutic as therapeutic agents. Also, glycolipids can inhibit the bioadhesion of pathogenic bacteria enabling their use as anti-adhesive agents and for disruption of biofilm formation and can be used in cosmetic industry. Moreover, they have great potential application in industry as detergents, wetting agents and for flotation. Furthermore, glycolipids can act at the surface and can modulate enzyme activity permitting the enhancement or the inhibition of the activity of certain enzymes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Glycolipid presentation to natural killer T cells differs in an organ-dependent fashion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieg, John; Yang, Guangli; Franck, Richard W.; van Rooijen, Nico; Tsuji, Moriya

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) are able to present glycolipids to natural killer (NK) T cells in vivo. However, the essential role of DCs, as well as the role of other cells in glycolipid presentation, is unknown. Here, we show that DCs are the crucial antigen-presenting cells (APCs) for splenic NK T cells, whereas Kupffer cells are the key APCs for hepatic NK T cells. Both cell types stimulate cytokine production by NK T cells within 2 h of glycolipid administration, but only DCs are involved in the systemic, downstream responses to glycolipid administration. More specifically, CD8+ DCs produce IL-12 in response to glycolipid presentation, which stimulates secondary IFN- production by NK cells in different organs. Different APCs participate in glycolipid presentation to NK T cells in vivo but differ in their involvement in the overall glycolipid response. dendritic cell | Kupffer cell

  20. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  1. Glycolipid class profiling by packed-column subcritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Frantz S; Lesellier, Eric; Bleton, Jean; Baillet, Arlette; Tchapla, Alain; Chaminade, Pierre

    2004-06-18

    The potential of packed-column subcritical fluid chromatography (SubFC) for the separation of lipid classes has been assessed in this study. Three polar stationary phases were checked: silica, diol, and poly(vinyl alcohol). Carbon dioxide (CO2) with methanol as modifier was used as mobile phase and detection performed by evaporative light scattering detection. The influence of methanol content, temperature, and pressure on the chromatographic behavior of sphingolipids and glycolipids were investigated. A complete separation of lipid classes from a crude wheat lipid extract was achieved using a modifier gradient from 10 to 40% methanol in carbon dioxide. Solute selectivity was improved using coupled silica and diol columns in series. Because the variation of eluotropic strength depending on the fluid density changes, a normalized separation factor product (NSP) was used to select the nature, the number and the order of the columns to reach the optimum glycolipid separation.

  2. Phospholipids and Glycolipids of Sterol-requiring Mycoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.; Koostra, Walter L.

    1967-01-01

    The phospholipids of Mycoplasma hominis type 2 strain 07 are composed almost entirely of phosphatidyl glycerol. Traces of other glycerophospholipids may exist. No glycolipids are found. The phospholipids of Mycoplasma sp. avian strain J are composed of diphosphatidyl glycerol, which predominates in older cultures, a monoacyl glycerophosphoryl glycerophosphate, which may serve as a precursor of diphosphatidyl glycerol, and phosphatidyl glycerophosphate. This organism also contains cholesteryl glucoside and an unidentified glycolipid which appears to be similar to a monoglucosyl diglyceride. No turnover or radioisotope labeling of the phospholipids occurs during metabolism. This lack of turnover during growth is indicative of a structural role for these glycerophospholipids. A concomitant decrease of monoacyl glycerophosphoryl glycerophosphate and increase of diphosphatidyl glycerol occurs during growth. PMID:6025304

  3. Surfactant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Novakovic, M.; Abend, P.G.

    1987-09-29

    A surfactant composition is described for subsequent addition to a soap slurring comprising an acyloxy alkane sulfonate salt. The sulfonate salt is present in an amount by weight of about 44 percent of about 56 percent. The polyol is present in an amount by weight of about 2 percent to about 6 percent, and water is present in an amount by weight of 26 to 36 percent. The composition constituting a solid reversible solution at ambient temperature and having a solids content of about 58 to 72 percent, whereby subsequent addition of the surfactant composition to a soap slurry results in formation of a soap/detergent bar having a smooth texture, uniform wear properties and a lack of grittiness.

  4. Immunogenicity of surfactant. I. Human alveolar surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Strayer, D S; Hallman, M; Merritt, T A

    1991-01-01

    The immunogenicity of lung surfactant derived from amniotic fluid has been well established. We have set out to examine the antigenic similarity of human surfactant to non-human alveolar surfactants currently being used therapeutically in clinical trials with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. To this end, we raised a series of eight monoclonal antibodies in rats directed to human surfactant (H1 to H8). All antibodies bound human surfactant as measured by ELISA. Four of these monoclonal antibodies bound surfactant components by Western blot analysis: all bound a 9-10-kD species. In addition, one antibody (H2) bound a protein of 16 kD, one (H8) a 6-kD protein, and one (H6) a 30-kD protein. When mixed with surfactant, three antibodies, H4, H7 and H8, profoundly altered surfactant activity in vitro in the pulsating bubble surfactometer. Three other antibodies, H1, H2, and H5 moderately inhibited surfactant's surface activity. We also examined the cross-reactivity of these monoclonal antibodies with bovine (CLSE) and porcine (Curosurf) surfactants. By Western blot analysis, only H6 bound these heterologous surfactants. Other antibodies did so by ELISA. However, functional assays indicated that antibodies H7, H8 and H4 all greatly inhibited CLSE surface activity in vitro. Five antibodies (H1-H4 and H8) inhibited Curosurf function. Thus, human surfactant species, especially low molecular weight species, are highly antigenic. Antibodies to alveolar surfactants may inhibit surfactant function in vitro. As indicated by Western blot and cross-inhibition data, human lower molecular weight surfactants share epitopes with proteins from therapeutically important porcine and bovine surfactants. The potential importance of these findings to treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome with heterologous surfactants is discussed. PMID:1988229

  5. Genetics of Capsular Polysaccharides and Cell Envelope (Glyco)lipids

    PubMed Central

    Daffé, Mamadou; Crick, Dean C.; Jackson, Mary

    2014-01-01

    This chapter summarizes what is currently known of the structures, physiological roles, involvement in pathogenicity and biogenesis of a variety of non-covalently bound cell envelope lipids and glycoconjugates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other Mycobacterium species. Topics addressed in this chapter include phospholipids; phosphatidylinositol mannosides; triglycerides; isoprenoids and related compounds (polyprenyl phosphate, menaquinones, carotenoids, non-carotenoid cyclic isoprenoids); acyltrehaloses (lipooligosaccharides, trehalose mono- and di-mycolates, sulfolipids, di- and poly-acyltrehaloses); mannosyl-beta-1-phosphomycoketides; glycopeptidolipids; phthiocerol dimycocerosates, para-hydroxybenzoic acids and phenolic glycolipids; mycobactins; mycolactones; and capsular polysaccharides. PMID:25485178

  6. Myristate exchange in glycolipid A and VSG of African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, L U

    1994-02-01

    The variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) of T. brucei is anchored to the plasma membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor which is unique in that its fatty acids are exclusively myristate (a fourteen carbon saturated fatty acid). We showed that the myristate is added to the GPI precursor in a remodeling reaction involving deacylation and reacylation. We now demonstrate that trypanosomes have a second pathway of myristoylation for GPI anchors that we call "myristate exchange" which is distinct from the fatty acid remodeling pathway. We propose that this is an exchange of [3H]myristate into both sn-1 and sn-2 positions of glycolipid A, which already contains myristate, and have demonstrated this using inhibitors and a variety of other methods. We have partially characterized myristate exchange with respect to specificity and susceptibility to some inhibitors. The apparent Km for myristoyl CoA is 7 nM. This myristate-specific process may represent a proof-reading system to ensure that the fatty acids on VSG are exclusively myristate. Although myristate exchange was first discovered for glycolipid A, we now believe that VSG is the true substrate of this reaction. VSG is efficiently labeled by exchange in the presence of cycloheximide, which prevents anchoring of newly synthesized protein. Although its location is not yet known, we have evidence that exchange does not localize to either the endoplasmic reticulum or the plasma membrane. We will present data indicating that surface VSG may be internalized and undergo myristate exchange.

  7. Tight cohesion between glycolipid membranes results from balanced water-headgroup interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schlaich, Alexander; de Vries, Alex H.; Jouhet, Juliette; Maréchal, Eric; Demé, Bruno; Netz, Roland R.; Schneck, Emanuel

    2017-04-01

    Membrane systems that naturally occur as densely packed membrane stacks contain high amounts of glycolipids whose saccharide headgroups display multiple small electric dipoles in the form of hydroxyl groups. Experimentally, the hydration repulsion between glycolipid membranes is of much shorter range than that between zwitterionic phospholipids whose headgroups are dominated by a single large dipole. Using solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, here we reproduce the experimentally observed, different pressure-versus-distance curves of phospholipid and glycolipid membrane stacks and show that the water uptake into the latter is solely driven by the hydrogen bond balance involved in non-ideal water/sugar mixing. Water structuring effects and lipid configurational perturbations, responsible for the longer-range repulsion between phospholipid membranes, are inoperative for the glycolipids. Our results explain the tight cohesion between glycolipid membranes at their swelling limit, which we here determine by neutron diffraction, and their unique interaction characteristics, which are essential for the biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes.

  8. Tight cohesion between glycolipid membranes results from balanced water-headgroup interactions.

    PubMed

    Kanduč, Matej; Schlaich, Alexander; de Vries, Alex H; Jouhet, Juliette; Maréchal, Eric; Demé, Bruno; Netz, Roland R; Schneck, Emanuel

    2017-04-03

    Membrane systems that naturally occur as densely packed membrane stacks contain high amounts of glycolipids whose saccharide headgroups display multiple small electric dipoles in the form of hydroxyl groups. Experimentally, the hydration repulsion between glycolipid membranes is of much shorter range than that between zwitterionic phospholipids whose headgroups are dominated by a single large dipole. Using solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, here we reproduce the experimentally observed, different pressure-versus-distance curves of phospholipid and glycolipid membrane stacks and show that the water uptake into the latter is solely driven by the hydrogen bond balance involved in non-ideal water/sugar mixing. Water structuring effects and lipid configurational perturbations, responsible for the longer-range repulsion between phospholipid membranes, are inoperative for the glycolipids. Our results explain the tight cohesion between glycolipid membranes at their swelling limit, which we here determine by neutron diffraction, and their unique interaction characteristics, which are essential for the biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes.

  9. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  10. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  11. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  12. Research progress of surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Minyi; Mo, Lingyun; Qin, Ruqiong; Liang, Liying; Zhang, Fan

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of surfactant and the large growing use of the materials, the safety of surfactant may be a problem that draw worldwide attention. The surfactant can be discharged into environment through various approach and may cause toxic effects in organism. This paper reviews the environmental effects of surfactant materials for plants and animals, and raises some questions by describing the results of environmental toxicology. We put it that it is a great significant of promote the sustainable development of surfactant industry through a comprehensive understanding of surfactant environmental safety.

  13. Self-assembled potential bio nanocarriers for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Akter, Nasima; Radiman, Shahidan; Mohamed, Faizal; Reza, Mohammad Imam Hasan

    2013-07-01

    Self-assembled nanocarriers attract increasing attention due to their wide application in various practical fields; among them, one of the most focused fields is drug delivery. Appropriate selection of surfactant is the basis for preparing a successful nanocarrier. Until now, from phospholipid to synthetic surfactants, many surfactants have been used to explore a suitable drug delivery vehicle for the complex in-vivo environment. Among all, bio surfactants are found to be more suitable due to their bio-origin, less-toxicity, biodegradability, cheaper rate and above all, their versatile molecular structures. This molecular property enables them to self assemble into fascinating structures. Moreover, binding DNA, enhancing pH sensitivity and stability allows novelty over their synthetic counterparts and phospholipid. This review paper focuses on the properties and applications of bio-nano-carriers for drug delivery. Micelle, microemulsion, and vesicle are the three nanocarriers which are discussed herein.

  14. Glycolipid biosurfactants: main properties and potential applications in agriculture and food industry.

    PubMed

    Mnif, Inès; Ghribi, Dhouha

    2016-10-01

    Glycolipids, consisting of a carbohydrate moiety linked to fatty acids, are microbial surface active compounds produced by various microorganisms. They are characterized by high structural diversity and have the ability to decrease the surface and interfacial tension at the surface and interface, respectively. Rhamnolipids, trehalolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids and cellobiose lipids are among the most popular glycolipids. They have received much practical attention as biopesticides for controlling plant diseases and protecting stored products. As a result of their antifungal activity towards phytopathogenic fungi and larvicidal and mosquitocidal potencies, glycolipid biosurfactants permit the preservation of plants and plant crops from pest invasion. Also, as a result of their emulsifying and antibacterial activities, glycolipids have great potential as food additives and food preservatives. Furthermore, the valorization of food byproducts via the production of glycolipid biosurfactant has received much attention because it permits the bioconversion of byproducts on valuable compounds and decreases the cost of production. Generally, the use of glycolipids in many fields requires their retention from fermentation media. Accordingly, different strategies have been developed to extract and purify glycolipids. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Adaptation of marine plankton to environmental stress by glycolipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Gašparović, Blaženka; Godrijan, Jelena; Frka, Sanja; Tomažić, Igor; Penezić, Abra; Marić, Daniela; Djakovac, Tamara; Ivančić, Ingrid; Paliaga, Paolo; Lyons, Daniel; Precali, Robert; Tepić, Nataša

    2013-12-01

    A systematic investigation of non-phosphorus containing glycolipids (GL) was conducted in the northern Adriatic Sea during two years at two stations with different nutrient loads. GL concentration varied both spatially and temporally, with values of 1.1-21.5 μg/L and 0.4-44.7 μg/L in the particulate and the dissolved fraction, respectively. The highest concentrations were measured during summer in surface waters and at the more oligotrophic station, where GL yields (% of total lipids) were often higher than 20% and 50% in the particulate and dissolved fractions, respectively. To obtain more insight into factors governing GL accumulation autotrophic plankton community structure (pico-, nano- and microplankton fractions), chlorophyll a, heterotrophic bacteria and nutrient concentrations were measured together with hydrographic parameters and sunlight intensity. During the investigated period smaller autotrophic plankton cells (pico- and followed by nanoplankton) prevailed in abundance over larger cells (microplankton), which were found in large numbers in freshened surface samples. Several major findings resulted from the study. Firstly, during PO4 limitation, particularly at the oligotrophic station, enhanced glycolipid instead of phospholipid accumulation takes place, representing an effective phosphate-conserving mechanism. Secondly, results suggest that at seawater temperatures >19 °C autotrophic plankton considerably accumulate GL, probably to achieve thermal stability. Thirdly, high sunlight intensities seem to influence increased GL accumulation; GL possibly plays a role in cell mechanisms that prevent/mitigate photooxidation. And finally, substantial accumulation of GL detected in the dissolved fraction could be related to the fact that GL do not contain biologically relevant elements, like phosphorus, which makes them an unattractive substrate for enzyme activity. Therefore, substantial portion of CO2 could be removed from the atmosphere in P

  16. Genome and transcriptome analysis of the basidiomycetous yeast Pseudozyma antarctica producing extracellular glycolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Koike, Hideaki; Hagiwara, Hiroko; Ito, Emi; Machida, Masayuki; Sato, Shun; Habe, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Dai

    2014-01-01

    Pseudozyma antarctica is a non-pathogenic phyllosphere yeast known as an excellent producer of mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), multi-functional extracellular glycolipids, from vegetable oils. To clarify the genetic characteristics of P. antarctica, we analyzed the 18 Mb genome of P. antarctica T-34. On the basis of KOG analysis, the number of genes (219 genes) categorized into lipid transport and metabolism classification in P. antarctica was one and a half times larger than that of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (140 genes). The gene encoding an ATP/citrate lyase (ACL) related to acetyl-CoA synthesis conserved in oleaginous strains was found in P. antarctica genome: the single ACL gene possesses the four domains identical to that of the human gene, whereas the other oleaginous ascomycetous species have the two genes covering the four domains. P. antarctica genome exhibited a remarkable degree of synteny to U. maydis genome, however, the comparison of the gene expression profiles under the culture on the two carbon sources, glucose and soybean oil, by the DNA microarray method revealed that transcriptomes between the two species were significantly different. In P. antarctica, expression of the gene sets relating fatty acid metabolism were markedly up-regulated under the oily conditions compared with glucose. Additionally, MEL biosynthesis cluster of P. antarctica was highly expressed regardless of the carbon source as compared to U. maydis. These results strongly indicate that P. antarctica has an oleaginous nature which is relevant to its non-pathogenic and MEL-overproducing characteristics. The analysis and dataset contribute to stimulate the development of improved strains with customized properties for high yield production of functional bio-based materials.

  17. Immunology in the clinic review series; focus on cancer: glycolipids as targets for tumour immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Durrant, L G; Noble, P; Spendlove, I

    2012-02-01

    Research into aberrant glycosylation and over-expression of glycolipids on the surface of the majority of cancers, coupled with a knowledge of glycolipids as functional molecules involved in a number of cellular physiological pathways, has provided a novel area of targets for cancer immunotherapy. This has resulted in the development of a number of vaccines and monoclonal antibodies that are showing promising results in recent clinical trials.

  18. Glycosylation of Glycolipids in Cancer: Basis for Development of Novel Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Daniotti, Jose L.; Vilcaes, Aldo A.; Torres Demichelis, Vanina; Ruggiero, Fernando M.; Rodriguez-Walker, Macarena

    2013-01-01

    Altered networks of gene regulation underlie many pathologies, including cancer. There are several proteins in cancer cells that are turned either on or off, which dramatically alters the metabolism and the overall activity of the cell, with the complex machinery of enzymes involved in the metabolism of glycolipids not being an exception. The aberrant glycosylation of glycolipids on the surface of the majority of cancer cells, associated with increasing evidence about the functional role of these molecules in a number of cellular physiological pathways, has received considerable attention as a convenient immunotherapeutic target for cancer treatment. This has resulted in the development of a substantial number of passive and active immunotherapies, which have shown promising results in clinical trials. More recently, antibodies to glycolipids have also emerged as an attractive tool for the targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, thereby providing a rationale for future therapeutic interventions in cancer. This review first summarizes the cellular and molecular bases involved in the metabolic pathway and expression of glycolipids, both in normal and tumor cells, paying particular attention to sialosylated glycolipids (gangliosides). The current strategies in the battle against cancer in which glycolipids are key players are then described. PMID:24392350

  19. Novel Glycolipids Synthesized Using Plant Essential Oils and Their Application in Quorum Sensing Inhibition and as Antibiofilm Agents

    PubMed Central

    Prabhune, Asmita

    2014-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) form an important part of traditional medicine so their anti-microbial and, in the recent past, antiquorum sensing activity has been well studied. However it is likely that due to their hydrophobic nature and reduced solubility in aqueous environments full potential of their activity cannot be realized. hence it is only rational to formulate a process to make these molecules more polar in nature. The present paper reports synthesis of sophorolipids using 12 different essential oils as substrates, thus providing surfactant-like properties to these EOs. The synthesis protocol makes the use of Candida bombicola ATCC 22214 as producer organism. The production process required 7 days of incubation at 28°C and 180 rpm. Preliminary characterization of the synthesized essential oil sophorolipids (EOSLs) was performed using thin layer chromatography (TLC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Additionally, essential oils that were incapable of mediating quorum sensing inhibition (QSI) on their own became potent quorum sensing inhibitors upon conversion into their corresponding EOSLs. Antibiofilm potential of these EOSLs was also demonstrated using V. cholerae as test organism. Use of essential oils as substrates for glycolipid synthesis has not been attempted previously, and hence this is the first report. PMID:24558341

  20. Neurobiology and cellular pathogenesis of glycolipid storage diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Walkley, Steven U

    2003-01-01

    Disorders of lysosomal metabolism often involve the accumulation of specific types of glycolipid, particularly gangliosides, because of either degradative failure or other currently unknown mechanisms. Although the precise role of gangliosides in cells remains enigmatic, the presence of specific abnormalities secondary to ganglioside accumulation in lysosomal diseases has suggested important biological functions. Chief among these is the growth of new dendrites on particular classes of mature neurons secondary to an increase in GM2 ganglioside. That GM2 has also been shown to be elevated in normal immature neurons coincident with dendritic sprouting provides a compelling argument that this ganglioside plays a role in dendritic initiation. This discovery has led to the search for other regulators of dendritic differentiation that may in some way be linked to the expression and/or function of GM2 ganglioside. Principal candidates that have emerged include tyrosine kinase receptors, small GTPases and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Understanding the mechanism underlying ectopic dendritogenesis in lysosomal diseases can be expected to generate significant insight into the control of dendritic plasticity in normal brain. The detrimental aspects of ganglioside accumulation in storage diseases as well as the potential link between gangliosides and dendritogenesis also provide a strong rationale for developing pharmacological means to manipulate ganglioside expression in neurons. PMID:12803923

  1. Erylusamides: Novel Atypical Glycolipids from Erylus cf. deficiens.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Helena; Cutignano, Adele; Grauso, Laura; Neng, Nuno; Cachatra, Vasco; Fontana, Angelo; Xavier, Joana; Cerejo, Marta; Vieira, Helena; Santos, Susana

    2016-10-11

    Among marine organisms, sponges are the richest sources of pharmacologically-active compounds. Stemming from a previous lead discovery program that gathered a comprehensive library of organic extracts of marine sponges from the off-shore region of Portugal, crude extracts of Erylus cf. deficiens collected in the Gorringe Bank (Atlantic Ocean) were tested in the innovative high throughput screening (HTS) assay for inhibitors of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and showed activity. Bioassay guided fractionation of the dichloromethane extract led to the isolation of four new glycolipids, named erylusamide A-D. The structures of the isolated compounds were established by 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) and chemical derivatization. The metabolites shared a pentasaccharide moiety constituted by unusual highly acetylated ᴅ-glucose moieties as well as ᴅ-xylose and ᴅ-galactose. The aglycones were unprecedented long chain dihydroxyketo amides. Erylusamides A, B and D differ in the length of the hydrocarbon chain, while erylusamide C is a structural isomer of erylusamide B.

  2. Formation of gold nanoparticles by glycolipids of Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Fumiya; Kato, Yugo; Furihata, Kazuo; Kogure, Toshihiro; Imura, Yuki; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Suzuki, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have particular properties distinct from those of bulk gold crystals, and such nanoparticles are used in various applications in optics, catalysis, and drug delivery. Many reports on microbial synthesis of gold nanoparticles have appeared. However, the molecular details (reduction and dispersion) of such synthesis remain unclear. In the present study, we studied gold nanoparticle synthesis by Lactobacillus casei. A comparison of L. casei components before and after addition of an auric acid solution showed that the level of unsaturated lipids decreased significantly after addition. NMR and mass spectrum analysis showed that the levels of diglycosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG) and triglycosyldiacylglycerol (TGDG) bearing unsaturated fatty acids were much reduced after formation of gold nanoparticles. DGDG purified from L. casei induced the synthesis of gold nanoparticles in vitro. These results suggested that glycolipids, such as DGDG, play important roles in reducing Au(III) to Au(0) and in ensuring that the nanoparticles synthesized remain small in size. Our work will lead to the development of novel, efficient methods by which gold nanoparticles may be produced by, and accumulated within, microorganisms. PMID:27725710

  3. Erylusamides: Novel Atypical Glycolipids from Erylus cf. deficiens

    PubMed Central

    Gaspar, Helena; Cutignano, Adele; Grauso, Laura; Neng, Nuno; Cachatra, Vasco; Fontana, Angelo; Xavier, Joana; Cerejo, Marta; Vieira, Helena; Santos, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Among marine organisms, sponges are the richest sources of pharmacologically-active compounds. Stemming from a previous lead discovery program that gathered a comprehensive library of organic extracts of marine sponges from the off-shore region of Portugal, crude extracts of Erylus cf. deficiens collected in the Gorringe Bank (Atlantic Ocean) were tested in the innovative high throughput screening (HTS) assay for inhibitors of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and showed activity. Bioassay guided fractionation of the dichloromethane extract led to the isolation of four new glycolipids, named erylusamide A–D. The structures of the isolated compounds were established by 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) and chemical derivatization. The metabolites shared a pentasaccharide moiety constituted by unusual highly acetylated d-glucose moieties as well as d-xylose and d-galactose. The aglycones were unprecedented long chain dihydroxyketo amides. Erylusamides A, B and D differ in the length of the hydrocarbon chain, while erylusamide C is a structural isomer of erylusamide B. PMID:27727161

  4. Sulfoglucuronosyl glycolipids as putative antigens for autoimmune inner ear disease.

    PubMed

    Yamawaki, M; Ariga, T; Gao, Y; Tokuda, A; Yu, J S; Sismanis, A; Yu, R K

    1998-04-15

    Autoimmune inner ear disease is diagnosed based on clinical history of fluctuating but progressive sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) with or without vestibular symptoms occurring over weeks to months. An initial response to steroids or immunosuppressive drugs usually reverses the hearing loss. In search of specific diagnostic and therapeutic markers for autoimmune inner ear diseases, we investigated serum anti-glycolipid antibody activities in these patients by two different methods, HPTLC-immunoblotting and ELISA. We found that 37 out of 74 patients of clinically diagnosed autoimmune inner ear disease (30 of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) (group I), 14 of vestibular symptoms only (group II), 30 of Menieres symptoms (with both hearing loss and vestibular symptoms) (group III)) showed positive anti-sulfoglucuronosyl lactosaminyl paragloboside (SGLPG) antibody titers (p < 0.001). On the other hand, anti-sulfoglucuronosyl paragloboside (SGPG) titers were not elevated in these conditions. In contrast, only 3 out of 56 pathological control and 2 out of 28 healthy volunteers had measurable anti-SGLPG antibody titers. We further analyzed the localization of SGLPG in the auditory pathway and found that the antigens existed exclusively in inner ear and the eighth nerve, but not in pons, cerebellum, nor cerebrum. We conclude that the anti-SGLPG antibody represents a novel diagnostic marker for autoimmune inner ear disease and may participate in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  5. Identification of the fatty alcohol oxidase FAO1 from Starmerella bombicola and improved novel glycolipids production in an FAO1 knockout mutant.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumikazu; Igarashi, Kazuaki; Hagihara, Hiroshi

    2016-11-01

    Alkyl polyglucosides (APGs), which were first commercialized in the 1990s, are mild, non-ionic surfactants comprising fatty alcohols and glucose derived from recyclable starch. APGs have good properties as cleaners, foaming agents, and emulsifiers, and they do not undergo hydrolysis at an alkaline pH. In addition to their advantages over traditional synthetic surfactants, APGs are low-irritant surfactants that are nontoxic and easily degradable in the environment. Thus, APGs are considered to be environmentally friendly surfactants. Starmerella bombicola glycosylates long-chain omega or omega-1 hydroxy fatty acids, and it also directly glycosylates secondary alcohols. Although it is generally difficult to directly glycosylate primary alcohols, they are easily converted to the corresponding fatty acids by S. bombicola because of its strong alcohol oxidase activity. To redirect unconventional substrates toward APG synthesis, the long-chain alcohol oxidation pathway was blocked by knocking out the fatty alcohol oxidase gene. The complete sequence of the S. bombicola FAO1 gene (2046 bp) was cloned, and the obtained nucleotide sequence was used to construct a knockout cassette. An FAO1 knockout mutant with the correct genotype and phenotype was evaluated by fermentation on 1-tetradecanol. The mutant produced tetradecyl disaccharides and tetradecanediol tetrasaccharides. The APGs and diol polyglucosides (DPGs) production of the mutant was 27.3 g/L ((APGs + DPGs)/de novo sophorolipids ratio was about 15:1), while the parent strain did not produce APG or DPG. These data indicate that the substrates had been redirected toward novel glycolipids synthesis in the mutant.

  6. Surfactant Enhanced DNAPL Removal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-08-01

    or the permeability contrast (i.e., degree of heterogeneity) that is present in the DNAPL zone. To solubilize DNAPL with surfactants, a sufficient...with respect to the effects of permeability and heterogeneity upon the costs of SEAR: as permeability decreases and/or the degree of heterogeneity...not be an issue for surfactant recovery at all sites. The degree to which MEUF will concentrate the calcium is a function of the surfactant itself

  7. Characterization of glycolipids synthesized in an identified neuron of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Sherbany, A A; Ambron, R T; Schwartz, J H

    1984-07-01

    Because radioactive precursors can be injected directly into the cell body or axon of R2, a giant, identified neuron of the Aplysia abdominal ganglion, it was possible to show that glycolipid is synthesized in the cell body, inserted into membranes along with glycoprotein, and then exported into the axon within organelles that are moved by fast axonal transport. After intrasomatic injection of N-[3H]-acetyl-D-galactosamine, five major 3H-glycolipids were identified using thin layer polysilicic acid glass fiber chromatography. At least two of the lipids are negatively charged. Analysis of 32P-labeled lipid from the abdominal ganglion revealed the presence of 2-aminoethylphosphonate, indicating that these polar substances are sphingophosphonoglycolipids. The major 3H-glycolipids synthesized in R2 are similar to a family of phospholipids isolated from the skin of A. kurodai, previously characterized by Araki et al. (Araki, S., Y. Komai, and M. Satake (1980) Biochem J. 87: 503-510). Since sialic acid is absent in Aplysia as in other invertebrates, these polar glycolipids may function like gangliosides in vertebrates. The polar 3H-glycolipids are synthesized and incorporated into intracytoplasmic membranes solely in the cell body. Direct injection of the labeled sugar into the axon revealed no local synthesis or exchange of glycolipid. Moreover, there was no indication for transfer from glial cells into axoplasm. Although the incorporation of N-[3H]-acetyl-D-galactosamine into glycolipid is not affected by anisomycin, an effective inhibitor of protein synthesis, the export into the axon of membranes containing the newly synthesized lipid is completely blocked by the drug.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Mapping fucosylated epitopes on glycoproteins and glycolipids of Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, adult worms and eggs.

    PubMed

    Robijn, M L M; Wuhrer, M; Kornelis, D; Deelder, A M; Geyer, R; Hokke, C H

    2005-01-01

    The developmental expression of the antigenic fucosylated glycan motifs Fucalpha1-3GalNAcbeta1-4GlcNAc (F-LDN), Fucalpha1-3GalNAcbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAc (F-LDN-F), GalNAcbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAc (LDN-F), Galbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAc (Lewis X), and GalNAcbeta1-4(Fucalpha1-2Fucalpha1-3)GlcNAc (LDN-DF) in Schistosoma mansoni cercariae, adult worms and eggs, was surveyed using previously defined anti-carbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Lewis X was found both on glycolipids and glycoproteins, yet with completely different expression patterns during the life-cycle: on glycolipids, Lewis X was mainly found in the cercarial stage, while protein-conjugated Lewis X was mainly present in the egg stage. Also protein-conjugated LDN-F and LDN-DF were most highly expressed in the egg-stage. On glycolipids LDN-DF was found in all three examined stages, whereas LDN-F containing glycolipids were restricted to adult worms and eggs. The motifs F-LDN and F-LDN-F were found both on glycoproteins and glycolipids of the cercarial and egg stage, while in the adult stage, they appeared to occur predominantly on glycolipids. Immunofluorescence assays (IFA) showed that these F-LDN and F-LDN-F containing glycolipids were localized in a yet undefined duct or excretory system of adult worms. Murine infection serum showed major reactivity with this adult worm duct-system, which could be fully inhibited by pre-incubation with keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH). Clearly, the use of defined mAbs provides a quick and convenient way to map expression profiles of carbohydrate epitopes.

  9. Establishment of cells exhibiting mutated glycolipid synthesis from mouse thymus by immortalization with SV-40 virus.

    PubMed

    Iwamori, Masao; Iwamori, Yuriko

    2005-11-01

    Immortalization with simian virus-40 and cloning of immortalized cells from mouse thymus were performed to establish cell lines for characterization of the mode of glycolipid expression in the thymic cells. Among the 25 cell lines obtained, three lines with different morphologies were established, that is, epithelial (IMTH-E), fibroblastic (IMTH-F), and asterisk-like (IMTH-I) cells, and their glycolipids, together with those in the thymus, were determined systematically. The major glycolipids in mouse thymus were the globo- and ganglio-series, both of which, were co-expressed in the three cell lines established. However, the mode of modification of the globo- and ganglio-series was distinct for each cell line. As to the globo-series, the structures with the longest carbohydrate chain for IMTH-E, -F, and -I cells were Gb3Cer, Gb4Cer, and Forssman antigen, respectively, having stepwise shorter carbohydrates at the nonreducing termini. Although the acidic glycolipids in IMTH-E cells comprised GM3 and GM2, and their sulfated isomers, IMTH-F and -I cells expressed GMlb and GDlc for the alpha-pathway, and up to GDI a for the a-pathway of ganglio-series glycolipids. GMlb-GalNAc present in the thymus was not detected in IMTH-F and -I cells, probably due to the lower synthetic activity for the metabolic intermediate Gg4Cer. The results indicate that the immortalization technique is useful for obtaining individual cells having unique glycolipid profiles for analysis of the functional significance and metabolism of glycolipids in the thymus.

  10. Microarray screening of Guillain-Barré syndrome sera for antibodies to glycolipid complexes

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Susan K.; Kalna, Gabriela; Islam, Mohammad B.; Jahan, Israt; Mohammad, Quazi D.; Jacobs, Bart C.; Endtz, Hubert P.; Islam, Zhahirul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the patterns of autoantibodies to glycolipid complexes in a large cohort of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and control samples collected in Bangladesh using a newly developed microarray technique. Methods: Twelve commonly studied glycolipids and lipids, plus their 66 possible heteromeric complexes, totaling 78 antigens, were applied to polyvinylidene fluoride–coated slides using a microarray printer. Arrays were probed with 266 GBS and 579 control sera (2 μL per serum, diluted 1/50) and bound immunoglobulin G detected with secondary antibody. Scanned arrays were subjected to statistical analyses. Results: Measuring antibodies to single targets was 9% less sensitive than to heteromeric complex targets (49.2% vs 58.3%) without significantly affecting specificity (83.9%–85.0%). The optimal screening protocol for GBS sera comprised a panel of 10 glycolipids (4 single glycolipids GM1, GA1, GD1a, GQ1b, and their 6 heteromeric complexes), resulting in an overall assay sensitivity of 64.3% and specificity of 77.1%. Notable heteromeric targets were GM1:GD1a, GM1:GQ1b, and GA1:GD1a, in which exclusive binding to the complex was observed. Conclusions: Rationalizing the screening protocol to capture the enormous diversity of glycolipid complexes can be achieved by miniaturizing the screening platform to a microarray platform, and applying simple bioinformatics to determine optimal sensitivity and specificity of the targets. Glycolipid complexes are an important category of glycolipid antigens in autoimmune neuropathy cases that require specific analytical and bioinformatics methods for optimal detection. PMID:27790627

  11. Characterization of glycolipids synthesized in an identified neuron of Aplysia californica

    SciTech Connect

    Sherbany, A.A.; Ambron, R.T.; Schwartz, J.H.

    1984-07-01

    Because radioactive precursors can be injected directly into the cell body or axon of R2, a giant, identified neuron of the Aplysia abdominal ganglion, it was possible to show that glycolipid is synthesized in the cell body, inserted into membranes along with glycoprotein, and then exported into the axon within organelles that are moved by fast axonal transport. After intrasomatic injection of N-(/sup 3/H)-acetyl-D-galactosamine, five major /sup 3/H-glycolipids were identified using thin layer polysilicic acid glass fiber chromatography. At least two of the lipids are negatively charged. Analysis of /sup 32/P-labeled lipid from the abdominal ganglion revealed the presence of 2-aminoethylphosphonate, indicating that these polar substances are sphingophosphonoglycolipids. The major /sup 3/H-glycolipids synthesized in R2 are similar to a family of phospholipids isolated from the skin of A. kurodai. Since sialic acid is absent in Aplysia as in other invertebrates, these polar glycolipids may function like gangliosides in vertebrates. The polar /sup 3/H-glycolipids are synthesized and incorporated into intracytoplasmic membranes solely in the cell body. Direct injection of the labeled sugar into the axon revealed no local synthesis or exchange of glycolipid. Moreover, there was no indication for transfer from glial cells into axoplasm. Although the incorporation of N-(/sup 3/H)-acetyl-D-galactosamine into glycolipid is not affected by anisomycin, an effective inhibitor of protein synthesis, the export into the axon of membranes containing the newly synthesized lipid is completely blocked by the drug.

  12. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is comprised of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. PMID:23026158

  13. Surfactants, skin cleansing protagonists.

    PubMed

    Corazza, M; Lauriola, M M; Zappaterra, M; Bianchi, A; Virgili, A

    2010-01-01

    The correct choice of cosmetic products and cleansers is very important to improve skin hydration, to provide moisturizing benefits and to minimize cutaneous damage caused by surfactants. In fact, surfactants may damage protein structures and solubilize lipids. Soaps, defined as the alkali salts of fatty acids, are the oldest surfactants and are quite aggressive. Syndets (synthetic detergents) vary in composition and surfactant types (anionic, cationic, amphotheric, non-ionic). These new skin cleansing products also contain preservatives, fragrances, and sometimes emollients, humectants and skin nutrients. We present a revision of the literature and discuss recent findings regarding skin cleansers.

  14. Towards unravelling surfactant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Mathieu; Panda, Satyananda

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant transport arises in many natural or industrial settings. Examples include lipid tear layers in the eye, pulmonary surfactant replacement therapy, or industrial coating flows. Flows driven by the surface tension gradient which arises as a consequence of surfactant concentration inhomogeneity, also known as Marangoni-driven flows, have attracted the attention of fluid dynamists for several decades and has led to the development of sophisticated models and the undeniable advancement of the understanding of such flows. Yet, experimental confirmation of these models has been hampered by the difficulty in reliably and accurately measuring the surfactant concentration and its temporal evolution. In this contribution, we propose a methodology which may help shed some light on surfactant transport at the surface of thin liquid films. The surface stress induced by surfactant concentration induces a flow at the free surface which is visible and measurable. In the context of thin film flows for which the lubrication approximation hold, we demonstrate how the knowledge of this free surface flow field provides sufficient information to reconstruct the surfactant tension field. From the surface tension and an assumed equation of state, the local surfactant concentration can also be calculated and other transport parameters such as the surfactant surface diffusivity indirectly inferred. In this contribution, the proposed methodology is tested with synthetic data generated by the forward solution of the governing partial differential equations in order to illustrate the feasibility of the algorithm and highlight numerical challenges.

  15. Mechanisms to explain surfactant responses.

    PubMed

    Jobe, Alan H

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant is now standard of care for infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Surfactant treatments are effective because of complex metabolic interactions between surfactant and the preterm lung. The large treatment dose functions as substrate; it is taken up by the preterm lung and is reprocessed and secreted with improved function. The components of the treatment surfactant remain in the preterm lung for days. If lung injury is avoided, then surfactant inhibition is minimized. Prenatal corticosteroids complement surfactant to further enhance lung function. The magic of surfactant therapy results from the multiple interactions between surfactant and the preterm lung. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Enterogenous bacterial glycolipids are required for the generation of natural killer T cells mediated liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yingfeng; Zeng, Benhua; Chen, Jianing; Cui, Guangying; Lu, Chong; Wu, Wei; Yang, Jiezuan; Wei, Hong; Xue, Rufeng; Bai, Li; Chen, Zhi; Li, Lanjuan; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Uede, Toshimitsu; Van Kaer, Luc; Diao, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Glycolipids are potent activator of natural killer T (NKT) cells. The relationship between NKT cells and intestinal bacterial glycolipids in liver disorders remained unclear. We found that, in sharp contrast to specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice, germ-free (GF) mice are resistant to Concanavalin A (ConA)-induced liver injury. ConA treatment failed to trigger the activation of hepatic NKT cells in GF mice. These defects correlated with the sharply reduced levels of CD1d-presented glycolipid antigens in ConA-treated GF mice compared with SPF counterparts. Nevertheless, CD1d expression was similar between these two kinds of mice. The absence of intestinal bacteria did not affect the incidence of αGalCer-induced liver injury in GF mice. Importantly, we found the intestinal bacteria contain glycolipids which can be presented by CD1d and recognized by NKT cells. Furthermore, supplement of killed intestinal bacteria was able to restore ConA-mediated NKT cell activation and liver injury in GF mice. Our results suggest that glycolipid antigens derived from intestinal commensal bacteria are important hepatic NKT cell agonist and these antigens are required for the activation of NKT cells during ConA-induced liver injury. These finding provide a mechanistic explanation for the capacity of intestinal microflora to control liver inflammation. PMID:27821872

  17. Interview: glycolipid antigen presentation by CD1d and the therapeutic potential of NKT cell activation.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2007-01-01

    Natural Killer T cells (NKT) are critical determinants of the immune response to cancer, regulation of autioimmune disease, clearance of infectious agents, and the development of artheriosclerotic plaques. In this interview, Mitch Kronenberg discusses his laboratory's efforts to understand the mechanism through which NKT cells are activated by glycolipid antigens. Central to these studies is CD1d--the antigen presenting molecule that presents glycolipids to NKT cells. The advent of CD1d tetramer technology, a technique developed by the Kronenberg lab, is critical for the sorting and identification of subsets of specific glycolipid-reactive T cells. Mitch explains how glycolipid agonists are being used as therapeutic agents to activate NKT cells in cancer patients and how CD1d tetramers can be used to assess the state of the NKT cell population in vivo following glycolipid agonist therapy. Current status of ongoing clinical trials using these agonists are discussed as well as Mitch's prediction for areas in the field of immunology that will have emerging importance in the near future.

  18. Tight cohesion between glycolipid membranes results from balanced water–headgroup interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kanduč, Matej; Schlaich, Alexander; de Vries, Alex H.; Jouhet, Juliette; Maréchal, Eric; Demé, Bruno; Netz, Roland R.; Schneck, Emanuel

    2017-01-01

    Membrane systems that naturally occur as densely packed membrane stacks contain high amounts of glycolipids whose saccharide headgroups display multiple small electric dipoles in the form of hydroxyl groups. Experimentally, the hydration repulsion between glycolipid membranes is of much shorter range than that between zwitterionic phospholipids whose headgroups are dominated by a single large dipole. Using solvent-explicit molecular dynamics simulations, here we reproduce the experimentally observed, different pressure-versus-distance curves of phospholipid and glycolipid membrane stacks and show that the water uptake into the latter is solely driven by the hydrogen bond balance involved in non-ideal water/sugar mixing. Water structuring effects and lipid configurational perturbations, responsible for the longer-range repulsion between phospholipid membranes, are inoperative for the glycolipids. Our results explain the tight cohesion between glycolipid membranes at their swelling limit, which we here determine by neutron diffraction, and their unique interaction characteristics, which are essential for the biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes. PMID:28367975

  19. Identification of the ESKAPE pathogens by mass spectrometric analysis of microbial membrane glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Leung, Lisa M; Fondrie, William E; Doi, Yohei; Johnson, J Kristie; Strickland, Dudley K; Ernst, Robert K; Goodlett, David R

    2017-07-25

    Rapid diagnostics that enable identification of infectious agents improve patient outcomes, antimicrobial stewardship, and length of hospital stay. Current methods for pathogen detection in the clinical laboratory include biological culture, nucleic acid amplification, ribosomal protein characterization, and genome sequencing. Pathogen identification from single colonies by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis of high abundance proteins is gaining popularity in clinical laboratories. Here, we present a novel and complementary approach that utilizes essential microbial glycolipids as chemical fingerprints for identification of individual bacterial species. Gram-positive and negative bacterial glycolipids were extracted using a single optimized protocol. Extracts of the clinically significant ESKAPE pathogens: E nterococcus faecium, S taphylococcus aureus, K lebsiella pneumoniae, A cinetobacter baumannii, P seudomonas aeruginosa, and E nterobacter spp. were analyzed by MALDI-TOF-MS in negative ion mode to obtain glycolipid mass spectra. A library of glycolipid mass spectra from 50 microbial entries was developed that allowed bacterial speciation of the ESKAPE pathogens, as well as identification of pathogens directly from blood bottles without culture on solid medium and determination of antimicrobial peptide resistance. These results demonstrate that bacterial glycolipid mass spectra represent chemical barcodes that identify pathogens, potentially providing a useful alternative to existing diagnostics.

  20. Formation and characterization of planar lipid bilayer membranes from synthetic phytanyl-chained glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Baba, T; Toshima, Y; Minamikawa, H; Hato, M; Suzuki, K; Kamo, N

    1999-09-21

    The formability, current-voltage characteristics and stability of the planar lipid bilayer membranes from the synthetic phytanyl-chained glycolipids, 1, 3-di-O-phytanyl-2-O-(beta-glycosyl)glycerols (Glc(Phyt)(2), Mal(N)(Phyt)(2)) were studied. The single bilayer membranes were successfully formed from the glycolipid bearing a maltotriosyl group (Mal(3)(Phyt)(2)) by the folding method among the synthetic glycolipids examined. The membrane conductance of Mal(3)(Phyt)(2) bilayers in 100 mM KCl solution was significantly lower than that of natural phospholipid, soybean phospholipids (SBPL) bilayers, and comparable to that of 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) bilayers. From the permeation measurements of lipophilic ions through Mal(3)(Phyt)(2) and DPhPC bilayers, it could be presumed that the carbonyl groups in glycerol backbone of the lipid molecule are not necessarily required for the total dipole potential barrier against cations in Mal(3)(Phyt)(2) bilayer. The stability of Mal(3)(Phyt)(2) bilayers against long-term standing and external electric field change was rather high, compared with SBPL bilayers. Furthermore, a preliminary experiment over the functional incorporation of membrane proteins was demonstrated employing the channel proteins derived from octopus retina microvilli vesicles. The channel proteins were functionally incorporated into Mal(3)(Phyt)(2) bilayers in the presence of a negatively charged glycolipid. From these observations, synthetic phytanyl-chained glycolipid bilayers are promising materials for reconstitution and transport studies of membrane proteins.

  1. Synthetic glycolipid activators of natural killer T cells as immunotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Carreño, Leandro J; Saavedra-Ávila, Noemí A; Porcelli, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    Certain types of glycolipids have been found to have remarkable immunomodulatory properties as a result of their ability to activate specific T lymphocyte populations with an extremely wide range of immune effector properties. The most extensively studied glycolipid reactive T cells are known as invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells. The antigen receptors of these cells specifically recognize certain glycolipids, most notably glycosphingolipids with α-anomeric monosaccharides, presented by the major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule CD1d. Once activated, iNKT cells can secrete a very diverse array of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Thus, glycolipid-mediated activation of iNKT cells has been explored for immunotherapy in a variety of disease states, including cancer and a range of infections. In this review, we discuss the design of synthetic glycolipid activators for iNKT cells, their impact on adaptive immune responses and their use to modulate iNKT cell responses to improve immunity against infections and cancer. Current challenges in translating results from preclinical animal studies to humans are also discussed.

  2. Neutral glycolipid and ganglioside composition of type-1 and type-2 astrocytes from rat cerebral hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Murakami, K; Asou, H; Adachi, T; Takagi, T; Kunimoto, M; Saito, H; Uyemura, K

    1999-02-01

    We reported previously that the major gangliosides in primary mixed-type astrocyte cultures are GM3 and GD3. To obtain more information regarding the exact distribution of glycosphingolipids in different types of astrocytes, we established a line of type-1 astrocytes that are characterized by a Ran-2 positive, broad flat morphology, and by the absence of binding to A2B5 antibodies. We also purified O-2A progenitor cells by immunopanning and cultured them in the presence of 10% newborn calf serum. They differentiated into type-2 astrocytes that were identified by immunostaining for each of GD3, A2B5, and GFAP. Using these cell cultures, we demonstrate that the major gangliosides were GM3 in type-1 astrocytes and GM3 and GD3 in type-2 astrocytes. In addition, a set of neutral glycolipids was identified based on the HP-TLC migration properties of CMH, CDH, CTH, and Glob, but the component distribution of these glycolipids is related to that of glycolipids of astrocytes. A marked increase in the expression of CTH and Glob was shown in type-2 astrocytes. The amount of neutral glycolipid-sugar was higher in the type-2 astrocytes than in the type-1 astrocytes. These results suggest that the increase in the total glycosphingolipid content and the change in the neutral glycolipid composition produced by type-2 astrocytes may be related to their biological functions and the cellular compositions.

  3. Immunogenicity of surfactant. II. Porcine and bovine surfactants.

    PubMed Central

    Strayer, D S; Hallman, M; Merritt, T A

    1991-01-01

    Protein-containing surfactants of human and animal origin are being used increasingly to treat neonatal and adult respiratory distress syndromes. This trend led us to examine the antigenicity of two important preparations of animal surfactant, cow lung surfactant extract (CLSE) and a porcine surfactant preparation, Curosurf. We describe here 15 monoclonal antibodies against Curosurf and four against CLSE. Antibodies were studied by Western blot analysis to determine their ability to recognize protein components of their respective surfactant preparations. They were also tested for their ability to inactivate surfactant in vitro, assayed using the pulsating bubble surfactometer. Several antibodies directed against CLSE or Curosurf functionally inactivate the surfactant to which they were raised. We determined the degree of immunologic cross-reactivity between antibodies directed to CLSE and Curosurf against the other surfactant and also against human surfactant, both by Western blot and by examining functional inactivation in vitro. Antibodies to these animal surfactants that are commonly used therapeutically may inactivate the specific animal surfactant to which they were raised, as well as human and other surfactants. Generally, when antibodies inactivate surfactant from more than one animal species, they inactivate heterologous surfactants comparably to the extent to which they inactivate the surfactant to which they are directed. Immune complexes between anti-surfactant antibodies and surfactant have been described in the course of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. The potential pathophysiological importance of anti-surfactant antibodies may therefore lie in their ability to inactivate administered surfactant, other similar surfactants and endogenous surfactant. In so doing, these antibodies may potentiate surfactant deficiency or pulmonary injury initiated by other stimuli. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:1988231

  4. SURFACTANTS AND SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the limitations of pump-and-trat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the application...

  5. SURFACTANTS AND SUBSURFACE REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of the limitations of pump-and-trat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the application...

  6. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  7. New generation synthetic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Curstedt, Tore; Calkovska, Andrea; Johansson, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of preterm newborn rabbits with synthetic surfactants containing simple phospholipid mixtures and peptides gives similar tidal volumes to treatment with poractant alfa (Curosurf®). The addition of both surfactant protein B and C analogs to the phospholipid mixture will stabilize the alveoli, measured as lung gas volumes at end expiration, even if no positive end-expiratory pressure is applied. The effect on lung gas volumes seems to depend on the structure of the peptides as well as the phospholipid composition. It seems that synthetic surfactants containing two peptides and a more complex phospholipid composition will be able to replace natural surfactants within the near future, but more experiments need to be performed before any conclusion can be drawn about the ideal composition of this new generation of synthetic surfactants.

  8. Lipid and Glycolipid Isomer Analyses Using Ultra-High Resolution Ion Mobility Spectrometry Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcik, Roza; Webb, Ian; Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Sandilya; Prost, Spencer; Ibrahim, Yehia; Baker, Erin; Smith, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the biological mechanisms related to lipids and glycolipids is challenging due to the vast number of possible isomers. Mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for studying and providing detailed information on lipid and glycolipid structures. However, difficulties in distinguishing many structural isomers (e.g. distinct acyl chain positions, double bond locations, as well as glycan isomers) inhibit the understanding of their biological roles. Here we utilized ultra-high resolution ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations based upon the use of traveling waves in a serpentine long path length multi-pass Structures for Lossless Manipulations (SLIM) to enhance isomer resolution. The multi-pass arrangement allowed separations ranging from ~16 m (1 pass) to ~470 m (32 passes) to be investigated for the distinction of lipids and glycolipids with extremely small structural differences. These ultra-high resolution SLIM IMS-MS analyses provide a foundation for exploring and better understanding isomer specific biological and disease processes.

  9. Glycolipids produced by Rouxiella sp. DSM 100043 and isolation of the biosurfactants via foam-fractionation.

    PubMed

    Kügler, Johannes H; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Hansen, Silla H; Völp, Annika R; Kirschhöfer, Frank; Kühl, Boris; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Luy, Burkhard; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms produce a great variety of secondary metabolites that feature surface active and bioactive properties. Those possessing an amphiphilc molecular structure are also termed biosurfactant and are of great interest due to their often unique properties. Rouxiella sp. DSM 100043 is a gram negative enterobacter isolated from peat-bog soil and described as a new biosurfactant producing species in this study. Rouxiella sp. produces glycolipids, biosurfactants with a carbohydrate moiety in its structure. This study characterizes the composition of glycolipids with different hydrophobicities that have been produced during cultivation in a bioreactor and been extracted and purified from separated foam. Using two dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the hydrophilic moieties are elucidated as glucose with various acylation sites and as talose within the most polar glycolipids. The presence of 3' hydroxy lauroleic acid as well as myristic and myristoleic acid has been detected.

  10. Invariant NKT cells recognize glycolipids from pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kinjo, Yuki; Illarionov, Petr; Vela, José Luis; Pei, Bo; Girardi, Enrico; Li, Xiangming; Li, Yali; Imamura, Masakazu; Kaneko, Yukihiro; Okawara, Akiko; Miyazaki, Yoshitsugu; Gómez-Velasco, Anaximandro; Rogers, Paul; Dahesh, Samira; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Khurana, Archana; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Yesilkaya, Hasan; Andrew, Peter W.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Kawakami, Kazuyoshi; Nizet, Victor; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Tsuji, Moriya; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize glycolipid antigens presented by CD1d. These cells express an evolutionarily conserved, invariant T cell receptor (TCR), but the forces driving TCR conservation have remained uncertain. Here we show that NKT cells recognize diacylglycerol-containing glycolipids from Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia, and group B Streptococcus, which causes neonatal sepsis and meningitis. Furthermore, CD1d-dependent responses by NKT cells are required for activation and host protection. The glycolipid response was dependent on vaccenic acid, which is found at a low level in mammalian cells. Our results show how microbial lipids position the sugar for recognition by the invariant TCR, and most important, they extend the range of microbes recognized by this conserved TCR to several clinically important bacteria. PMID:21892173

  11. Phenolic glycolipids of Mycobacterium bovis: new structures and synthesis of a corresponding seroreactive neoglycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, D; Bozic, C M; Knisley, C; Cho, S N; Brennan, P J

    1989-01-01

    The glycolipid that characterizes the majority of isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and that has come to be known as M. bovis-identifying lipid is the phenolic glycolipid mycoside B described in the literature by others. However, when mycoside B obtained from M. bovis BCG, field isolates, and infected tissues was examined in detail, it was shown to be different from that described in the literature in some important respects. In particular, the glycosyl substituent is 2-O-methyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranose rather than 2-O-methyl-beta-D-rhamnopyranose. With this information, a seroreactive neoglycoprotein (neoantigen) containing the 2-O-methyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl substituent suitable for the serodiagnosis of bovine tuberculosis was synthesized. M. bovis also contains other minor seroreactive phenolic glycolipids, one of which is a deacylated form of mycoside B and another of which contains an alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl unit rather than 2-O-methyl-alpha-L-rhamnopyranose. Images PMID:2643563

  12. Self-Organisation, Thermotropic and Lyotropic Properties of Glycolipids Related to their Biological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Garidel, Patrick; Kaconis, Yani; Heinbockel, Lena; Wulf, Matthias; Gerber, Sven; Munk, Ariane; Vill, Volkmar; Brandenburg, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Glycolipids are amphiphilic molecules which bear an oligo- or polysaccharide as hydrophilic head group and hydrocarbon chains in varying numbers and lengths as hydrophobic part. They play an important role in life science as well as in material science. Their biological and physiological functions are quite diverse, ranging from mediators of cell-cell recognition processes, constituents of membrane domains or as membrane-forming units. Glycolipids form an exceptional class of liquid-crystal mesophases due to the fact that their self-organisation obeys more complex rules as compared to classical monophilic liquid-crystals. Like other amphiphiles, the supra-molecular structures formed by glycolipids are driven by their chemical structure; however, the details of this process are still hardly understood. Based on the synthesis of specific glycolipids with a clearly defined chemical structure, e.g., type and length of the sugar head group, acyl chain linkage, substitution pattern, hydrocarbon chain lengths and saturation, combined with a profound physico-chemical characterisation of the formed mesophases, the principles of the organisation in different aggregate structures of the glycolipids can be obtained. The importance of the observed and formed phases and their properties are discussed with respect to their biological and physiological relevance. The presented data describe briefly the strategies used for the synthesis of the used glycolipids. The main focus, however, lies on the thermotropic as well as lyotropic characterisation of the self-organised structures and formed phases based on physico-chemical and biophysical methods linked to their potential biological implications and relevance. PMID:26464591

  13. Phase sensitive molecular dynamics of self-assembly glycolipid thin films: A dielectric spectroscopy investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velayutham, T. S.; Ng, B. K.; Gan, W. C.; Majid, W. H. Abd.; Hashim, R.; Zahid, N. I.; Chaiprapa, Jitrin

    2014-08-01

    Glycolipid, found commonly in membranes, is also a liquid crystal material which can self-assemble without the presence of a solvent. Here, the dielectric and conductivity properties of three synthetic glycolipid thin films in different thermotropic liquid crystal phases were investigated over a frequency and temperature range of (10-2-106 Hz) and (303-463 K), respectively. The observed relaxation processes distinguish between the different phases (smectic A, columnar/hexagonal, and bicontinuous cubic Q) and the glycolipid molecular structures. Large dielectric responses were observed in the columnar and bicontinuous cubic phases of the longer branched alkyl chain glycolipids. Glycolipids with the shortest branched alkyl chain experience the most restricted self-assembly dynamic process over the broad temperature range studied compared to the longer ones. A high frequency dielectric absorption (Process I) was observed in all samples. This is related to the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network from the sugar group. An additional low-frequency mechanism (Process II) with a large dielectric strength was observed due to the internal dynamics of the self-assembly organization. Phase sensitive domain heterogeneity in the bicontinuous cubic phase was related to the diffusion of charge carriers. The microscopic features of charge hopping were modelled using the random walk scheme, and two charge carrier hopping lengths were estimated for two glycolipid systems. For Process I, the hopping length is comparable to the hydrogen bond and is related to the dynamics of the hydrogen bond network. Additionally, that for Process II is comparable to the bilayer spacing, hence confirming that this low-frequency mechanism is associated with the internal dynamics within the phase.

  14. Structural Determination and Tryptophan Fluorescence of Heterokaryon Incompatibility C2 Protein (HET-C2), a Fungal Glycolipid Transfer Protein (GLTP), Provide Novel Insights into Glycolipid Specificity and Membrane Interaction by the GLTP Fold*

    PubMed Central

    Kenoth, Roopa; Simanshu, Dhirendra K.; Kamlekar, Ravi Kanth; Pike, Helen M.; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Benson, Linda M.; Bergen, H. Robert; Prendergast, Franklyn G.; Malinina, Lucy; Venyaminov, Sergei Y.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Brown, Rhoderick E.

    2010-01-01

    HET-C2 is a fungal protein that transfers glycosphingolipids between membranes and has limited sequence homology with human glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP). The human GLTP fold is unique among lipid binding/transfer proteins, defining the GLTP superfamily. Herein, GLTP fold formation by HET-C2, its glycolipid transfer specificity, and the functional role(s) of its two Trp residues have been investigated. X-ray diffraction (1.9 Å) revealed a GLTP fold with all key sugar headgroup recognition residues (Asp66, Asn70, Lys73, Trp109, and His147) conserved and properly oriented for glycolipid binding. Far-UV CD showed secondary structure dominated by α-helices and a cooperative thermal unfolding transition of 49 °C, features consistent with a GLTP fold. Environmentally induced optical activity of Trp/Tyr/Phe (2:4:12) detected by near-UV CD was unaffected by membranes containing glycolipid but was slightly altered by membranes lacking glycolipid. Trp fluorescence was maximal at ∼355 nm and accessible to aqueous quenchers, indicating free exposure to the aqueous milieu and consistent with surface localization of the two Trps. Interaction with membranes lacking glycolipid triggered significant decreases in Trp emission intensity but lesser than decreases induced by membranes containing glycolipid. Binding of glycolipid (confirmed by electrospray injection mass spectrometry) resulted in a blue-shifted emission wavelength maximum (∼6 nm) permitting determination of binding affinities. The unique positioning of Trp208 at the HET-C2 C terminus revealed membrane-induced conformational changes that precede glycolipid uptake, whereas key differences in residues of the sugar headgroup recognition center accounted for altered glycolipid specificity and suggested evolutionary adaptation for the simpler glycosphingolipid compositions of filamentous fungi. PMID:20164530

  15. Structural Determination and Tryptophan Fluorescence of Heterokaryon Incompatibility C2 Protein (HET-C2), a Fungal Glycolipid Transfer Protein (GLTP), Provide Novel Insights into Glycolipid Specificity and Membrane Interaction by the GLTP Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Kenoth, Roopa; Simanshu, Dhirendra K.; Kamlekar, Ravi Kanth; Pike, Helen M.; Molotkovsky, Julian G.; Benson, Linda M.; Bergen, III, H. Robert; Prendergast, Franklyn G.; Malinina, Lucy; Venyaminov, Sergei Y.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Brown, Rhoderick E.

    2010-06-21

    HET-C2 is a fungal protein that transfers glycosphingolipids between membranes and has limited sequence homology with human glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP). The human GLTP fold is unique among lipid binding/transfer proteins, defining the GLTP superfamily. Herein, GLTP fold formation by HET-C2, its glycolipid transfer specificity, and the functional role(s) of its two Trp residues have been investigated. X-ray diffraction (1.9 {angstrom}) revealed a GLTP fold with all key sugar headgroup recognition residues (Asp{sup 66}, Asn{sup 70}, Lys{sup 73}, Trp{sup 109}, and His{sup 147}) conserved and properly oriented for glycolipid binding. Far-UV CD showed secondary structure dominated by {alpha}-helices and a cooperative thermal unfolding transition of 49 C, features consistent with a GLTP fold. Environmentally induced optical activity of Trp/Tyr/Phe (2:4:12) detected by near-UV CD was unaffected by membranes containing glycolipid but was slightly altered by membranes lacking glycolipid. Trp fluorescence was maximal at {approx}355 nm and accessible to aqueous quenchers, indicating free exposure to the aqueous milieu and consistent with surface localization of the two Trps. Interaction with membranes lacking glycolipid triggered significant decreases in Trp emission intensity but lesser than decreases induced by membranes containing glycolipid. Binding of glycolipid (confirmed by electrospray injection mass spectrometry) resulted in a blue-shifted emission wavelength maximum ({approx}6 nm) permitting determination of binding affinities. The unique positioning of Trp{sup 208} at the HET-C2 C terminus revealed membrane-induced conformational changes that precede glycolipid uptake, whereas key differences in residues of the sugar headgroup recognition center accounted for altered glycolipid specificity and suggested evolutionary adaptation for the simpler glycosphingolipid compositions of filamentous fungi.

  16. Phytosphingosine is a characteristic component of the glycolipids in the vertebrate intestine.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, K

    1987-01-01

    Sphingoids in the intestinal lipids of an agnatha, a chondrichthyes, two osteichthyes, three amphibia, three reptiles and two avian species were analyzed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography. The glycolipid fraction of all the samples studied contained 4-D-hydroxysphinganine as the major component together with sphingosine and sphinganine. While the trihydroxy base was not found in their sphingomyelin fraction. The trihydroxy base was considered to be a characteristic component of the intestinal glycolipids for the vertebrates in general. Its concentration in the intestinal tissue had little correlation with the food habitat of the animals.

  17. Structural variation of glycolipids from Meiothermus taiwanensis ATCC BAA-400 under different growth temperatures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Liang; Yang, Feng-Ling; Huang, Zih-You; Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Zou, Wei; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2010-10-07

    A major glycolipid, alpha-Galf(1-3)-alpha-Galp(1-6)-beta-GlcpNAcyl(1-2)-alpha-Glcp(1-1)-2-acylalkyldiol, is obtained from Meiothermus taiwanensis. This novel glycolipid is found only when the bacterium grows above 62 degrees C, which is significantly different from those from the same bacteria incubated at 55 degrees C. Terminal galactofuranoside and 1,2-alkyldiol lipids replaced galactopyranoside and glycerol lipids, respectively, under increased growth temperature. This variation is likely necessary for bacteria for keeping the stable outer membrane and surviving under extreme environments.

  18. Surfactants in the environment.

    PubMed

    Ivanković, Tomislav; Hrenović, Jasna

    2010-03-01

    Surfactants are a diverse group of chemicals that are best known for their wide use in detergents and other cleaning products. After use, residual surfactants are discharged into sewage systems or directly into surface waters, and most of them end up dispersed in different environmental compartments such as soil, water or sediment. The toxic effects of surfactants on various aquatic organisms are well known. In general, surfactants are present in the environment at levels below toxicity and in Croatia below the national limit. Most surfactants are readily biodegradable and their amount is greatly reduced with secondary treatment in wastewater treatment plants. The highest concern is the release of untreated wastewater or wastewater that has undergone primary treatment alone. The discharge of wastewater polluted with massive quantities of surfactants could have serious effects on the ecosystem. Future studies of surfactant toxicities and biodegradation are necessary to withdraw highly toxic and non-biodegradable compounds from commercial use and replace them with more environmentally friendly ones.

  19. Investigation of the effect of sugar stereochemistry on biologically relevant lyotropic phases from branched-chain synthetic glycolipids by small-angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Zahid, N Idayu; Conn, Charlotte E; Brooks, Nicholas J; Ahmad, Noraini; Seddon, John M; Hashim, Rauzah

    2013-12-23

    Synthetic branched-chain glycolipids are suitable as model systems in understanding biological cell membranes, particularly because certain natural lipids possess chain branching. Herein, four branched-chain glycopyranosides, namely, 2-hexyl-decyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (α-Glc-OC10C6), 2-hexyl-decyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (β-Glc-OC10C6), 2-hexyl-decyl-α-D-galactopyranoside (α-Gal-OC10C6), and 2-hexyl-decyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (β-Gal-OC10C6), with a total alkyl chain length of 16 carbon atoms have been synthesized, and their phase behavior has been studied. The partial binary phase diagrams of these nonionic surfactants in water were investigated by optical polarizing microscopy (OPM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The introduction of chain branching in the hydrocarbon chain region is shown to result in the formation of inverse structures such as inverse hexagonal and inverse bicontinuous cubic phases. A comparison of the four compounds showed that they exhibited different polymorphism, especially in the thermotropic state, as a result of contributions from anomeric and epimeric effects according to their stereochemistry. The neat α-Glc-OC10C6 compound exhibited a lamellar (Lα) phase whereas dry α-Gal-OC10C6 formed an inverse bicontinuous cubic Ia3d (QII(G)) phase. Both β-anomers of glucoside and galactoside adopted the inverse hexagonal phase (HII) in the dry state. Generally, in the presence of water, all four glycolipids formed inverse bicontinuous cubic Ia3d (QII(G)) and Pn3m (QII(D)) phases over wide temperature and concentration ranges. The formation of inverse nonlamellar phases by these Guerbet branched-chain glycosides confirms their potential as materials for novel biotechnological applications such as drug delivery and crystallization of membrane proteins.

  20. Metathesis depolymerizable surfactants

    DOEpatents

    Jamison, Gregory M.; Wheeler, David R.; Loy, Douglas A.; Simmons, Blake A.; Long, Timothy M.; McElhanon, James R.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Staiger, Chad L.

    2008-04-15

    A class of surfactant molecules whose structure includes regularly spaced unsaturation in the tail group and thus, can be readily decomposed by ring-closing metathesis, and particularly by the action of a transition metal catalyst, to form small molecule products. These small molecules are designed to have increased volatility and/or enhanced solubility as compared to the original surfactant molecule and are thus easily removed by solvent extraction or vacuum extraction at low temperature. By producing easily removable decomposition products, the surfactant molecules become particularly desirable as template structures for preparing meso- and microstructural materials with tailored properties.

  1. Recent advances in gemini surfactants: oleic Acid-based gemini surfactants and polymerizable gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenichi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Gemini surfactants recently developed by our research group are introduced from the standpoints of their syntheses, aqueous solution properties, and potential applications. Two series of gemini surfactants are introduced in this short review, the first of which is the oleic acid-based gemini surfactants, and the second is the polymerizable gemini surfactants. These gemini surfactants have been developed not only as environmentally friendly materials (the use of gemini surfactants enables the reduction of the total consumption of surfactants in chemical products owing to their excellent adsorption and micellization capabilities at low concentrations) but also as functional organic materials.

  2. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    PubMed

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties.

  3. Rhamnolipids--next generation surfactants?

    PubMed

    Müller, Markus Michael; Kügler, Johannes H; Henkel, Marius; Gerlitzki, Melanie; Hörmann, Barbara; Pöhnlein, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2012-12-31

    The demand for bio-based processes and materials in the petrochemical industry has significantly increased during the last decade because of the expected running out of petroleum. This trend can be ascribed to three main causes: (1) the increased use of renewable resources for chemical synthesis of already established product classes, (2) the replacement of chemical synthesis of already established product classes by new biotechnological processes based on renewable resources, and (3) the biotechnological production of new molecules with new features or better performances than already established comparable chemically synthesized products. All three approaches are currently being pursued for surfactant production. Biosurfactants are a very promising and interesting substance class because they are based on renewable resources, sustainable, and biologically degradable. Alkyl polyglycosides are chemically synthesized biosurfactants established on the surfactant market. The first microbiological biosurfactants on the market were sophorolipids. Of all currently known biosurfactants, rhamnolipids have the highest potential for becoming the next generation of biosurfactants introduced on the market. Although the metabolic pathways and genetic regulation of biosynthesis are known qualitatively, the quantitative understanding relevant for bioreactor cultivation is still missing. Additionally, high product titers have been exclusively described with vegetable oil as sole carbon source in combination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Competitive productivity is still out of reach for heterologous hosts or non-pathogenic natural producer strains. Thus, on the one hand there is a need to gain a deeper understanding of the regulation of rhamnolipid production on process and cellular level during bioreactor cultivations. On the other hand, there is a need for metabolizable renewable substrates, which do not compete with food and feed. A sustainable bioeconomy approach should

  4. Specific surface modification of the acetylene-linked glycolipid vesicle by click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidehiro; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Yashima, Eiji

    2012-06-07

    A novel glycolipid with a terminal acetylene was synthesized and used to prepare unilamellar vesicles. Using these vesicles, a convenient method was developed for the specific modification of the vesicle surface using the photoresponsive copper complex [Cu(OH(2))(cage)] as the catalyst for a click reaction.

  5. A study on partially biodegradable microparticles as carriers of active glycolipids.

    PubMed

    López-Donaire, M L; Fernández-Gutiérrez, M; Parra-Cáceres, J; Vázquez-Lasa, B; García-Alvarez, I; Fernández-Mayoralas, A; Román, J San

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes a study on the preparation and characterisation of partially biodegradable microparticles of poly(epsilon-caprolactone)/poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PCL/PEMA) as carriers of synthetic glycolipids with antimitotic activity against brain tumour cells. Microparticles prepared by suspension polymerisation of methacrylate in the presence of already polymerised PCL showed a predominantly spherical but complex morphology, with segregation of PCL micro/nano-domains towards the surface. Small diameter discs were prepared by compression moulding of blends of microparticles and the active principle under mild conditions. The in vitro behaviour of the discs and release of the glycolipid were studied in different simulated fluid models. Ingress of fluids increased with increasing hydrophobicity of the medium. Release of the glycolipid was sustained in all fluids, the most prolonged profile being in human synovial fluid and phosphate-buffered saline modified with 20 vol.% dioxane. Slow disintegration of the discs and partial degradation of the microparticles was evident in accelerated studies. The antimitotic activity of glycolipid released from the discs was proved against a human glioblastoma line. This activity, along with selectivity against human fibroblasts, could be controlled by the amount of drug charged in the disc.

  6. Improved separation and analysis of glycolipids by Iatroscan thin-layer chromatography-flame ionization detection.

    PubMed

    Gašparović, Blaženka; Kazazić, Snježana P; Cvitešić, Ana; Penezić, Abra; Frka, Sanja

    2015-08-28

    We demonstrate improved power of Iatroscan thin layer chromatography/flame ionization detection (TLC-FID) technique for analysis of complex marine lipid mixture by developing protocol for the separation and analysis of glycolipids including sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerols (SQDG), monogalactosyldiacylglycerols (MGDG) and digalactosyldiacylglycerols (DGDG). We have modified the common protocol used so far for the analysis of lipid classes by replacing the elution step which uses pure acetone for the elution of acetone mobile polar lipids, with the elution step containing chloroform-acetone (72:28, v:v) for separation of MGDG and DGDG. To separate SQDG from the complex lipid matrix we introduced solvent mixture acetone-chloroform-methanol-formic acid (33:33:33:0.6, v:v:v:v). Quantification of glycolipid classes was performed after calibration with glycolipid standards for the masses between 0.2 and 2.7-5.0μg. With this new protocol we have successfully separated three glycolipids from the complex particulate lipid mixture of the seawater samples. Such an approach extends the power of existing protocol for the analysis of lipids which altogether ensure detection and quantification of 18 lipid classes what was demonstrated on seawater samples. This enables to gain a very broad system overview of the particularly complex environments as are seas, oceans and freshwaters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of a variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) glycolipid precursor in Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Krakow, J.; Hereld, D.; Hart, G.; Englund, P.

    1986-05-01

    The VSG coat protein of T. brucei has a glycolipid covalently attached to its C terminus which anchors it to the cell membrane. Compositional analyses of VSG, reported by several laboratories, indicate that the glycolipid contains myristic acid, glycerol, phosphate, inositol, several sugars, and ethanolamine. This glycolipid is found on the VSG polypeptide within 1 minute after translation, suggesting that prior to incorporation, it may exist in the cell as a preformed precursor. The authors have isolated a molecule which has properties consistent with being a VSG lipid precursor: it is highly polar and can be labelled by (/sup 3/H)myristate but not by (/sup 3/H)palmitate. It reaches steady-state during continuous labelling and shows rapid turnover in pulse-chase experiments, suggesting that it is a metabolic intermediate rather than an end product. When treated with HNO/sub 2/ it liberates phophatidylinositol, as does VSG, and, like VSG, releases dimyristylglycerol when treated with purified endogenous phospholipase C from trypanosomes. These data provide strong evidence that the glycolipid is a preformed precursor which is transferred to the VSG polypeptide en bloc.

  8. SYNTHESIS OF GLYCOPROTEIN, GLYCOLIPID, PROTEIN, AND LIPID IN SYNCHRONIZED L5178Y CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Bosmann, H. Bruce; Winston, R. Alan

    1970-01-01

    Synthesis of four macromolecular classes found in membranes—glycoprotein, glycolipid, protein, and lipid—was measured as a function of time of the cell cycle in synchronized L5178Y cells. Incorporation of leucine, choline, fucose, glucosamine, or thymidine into the cells, protein, nucleic acid, or lipid was measured by pulse-labeling for ½ hr at ½ hr intervals after release from the mitotic block. The amount of protein, lipid, glycoprotein, or glycolipid released or secreted into the medium by the L5178Y cells was also measured as a function of time of the cell cycle. Cellular protein was found to be synthesized throughout the cell cycle, with the highest synthesis occurring in the S period; synthesis was depressed in the M period. Cellular glycoprotein was synthesized at approximately the same times as protein, except that the rates of glycoprotein synthesis in the S period relative to other periods were much greater than for protein. Secreted protein was synthesized throughout the cell cycle without any general pattern, except that secretion was elevated in the late S and G2 periods. Secreted glycoprotein was similar to secreted protein. Cellular lipid and cellular glycolipid were synthesized almost exclusively in the G2 and M periods; there was no synthesis in the G1 and S periods. Release or secretion of glycolipid and lipid also occurred in the G2 and M periods. PMID:5458998

  9. Lewis phenotype of erythrocytes and Leb-active glycolipid in serum of pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Hammar, L; Månsson, S; Rohr, T; Chester, M A; Ginsburg, V; Lundblad, A; Zopf, D

    1981-01-01

    In an attempt to provide an explanation for the previously reported effect of pregnancy on the Lewis phenotype of erythrocytes, the level of Leb-active glycolipid in serum was compared with the reactions of erythrocytes, using samples obtained from 73 nonpregnant women, 74 women at the time of delivery, and 2 women at weekly intervals during their pregnancy. In this Swedish population, the frequency of the Le(a--b-) blood group increased from 11% in nonpregnant women to 36% in women at the time of delivery. Among Le(a--b+) women of all ABO groups, those who were A1 most often became (Leb-) during pregnancy. The change in phenotype occurred as early as the 24th week of gestation; the Leb antigen was again detectable within 6 weeks after delivery. The concentration of Leb glycolipid in serum, as measured by radioimmunoassay, decreased only slightly during pregnancy. The repartition of glycolipids, secondary to the increased ratio of lipoprotein to red cell mass that occurs during pregnancy, may account for the relative lack of Lewis glycolipid on erythrocytes.

  10. Lipid and Glycolipid Isomer Analyses Using Ultra-High Resolution Ion Mobility Spectrometry Separations.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, Roza; Webb, Ian K; Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Prost, Spencer A; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Baker, Erin S; Smith, Richard D

    2017-01-18

    Understanding the biological roles and mechanisms of lipids and glycolipids is challenging due to the vast number of possible isomers that may exist. Mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for studying and providing detailed information on lipid and glycolipid presence and changes. However, difficulties in distinguishing the many structural isomers, due to the distinct lipid acyl chain positions, double bond locations or specific glycan types, inhibit the delineation and assignment of their biological roles. Here we utilized ultra-high resolution ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations by applying traveling waves in a serpentine multi-pass Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) platform to enhance the separation of selected lipid and glycolipid isomers. The multi-pass arrangement allowed the investigation of paths ranging from ~16 m (one pass) to ~60 m (four passes) for the distinction of lipids and glycolipids with extremely small structural differences. These ultra-high resolution SLIM IMS-MS analyses provide a foundation for exploring and better understanding isomer-specific biological activities and disease processes.

  11. Lipid and Glycolipid Isomer Analyses Using Ultra-High Resolution Ion Mobility Spectrometry Separations

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Roza; Webb, Ian K.; Deng, Liulin; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Prost, Spencer A.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Baker, Erin S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the biological roles and mechanisms of lipids and glycolipids is challenging due to the vast number of possible isomers that may exist. Mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for studying and providing detailed information on lipid and glycolipid presence and changes. However, difficulties in distinguishing the many structural isomers, due to the distinct lipid acyl chain positions, double bond locations or specific glycan types, inhibit the delineation and assignment of their biological roles. Here we utilized ultra-high resolution ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations by applying traveling waves in a serpentine multi-pass Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (SLIM) platform to enhance the separation of selected lipid and glycolipid isomers. The multi-pass arrangement allowed the investigation of paths ranging from ~16 m (one pass) to ~60 m (four passes) for the distinction of lipids and glycolipids with extremely small structural differences. These ultra-high resolution SLIM IMS-MS analyses provide a foundation for exploring and better understanding isomer-specific biological activities and disease processes. PMID:28106768

  12. Structure of a New Glycolipid from the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare Complex

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Motoko; Ohta, Akihiro; Sasaki, Shun-ichi; Minnikin, David E.

    1999-01-01

    From the lipid fraction of a freeze-dried cell mass of a strain of the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare complex, a new glycolipid was isolated and was characterized as 5-mycoloyl-α-arabinofuranosyl (1→1′)-glycerol, mainly on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies. PMID:10094713

  13. Biosynthesis and derivatization of microbial glycolipids and their potential application in tribology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microbial-produced glycolipids are biobased products with immense potential for commercial applications. Advances in the production process have led to the lowering of production cost and the appearance of commercial products in niche markets. The ability to manipulate the molecular structure by f...

  14. Purification and some properties of the glycolipid transfer protein from pig brain.

    PubMed

    Abe, A; Sasaki, T

    1985-09-15

    A glycolipid-specific lipid transfer protein has been purified to apparent homogeneity from pig brain post-mitochondrial supernatant. The purified protein was obtained after about 6,000-fold purification at a yield of 19%. Evidence for the homogeneity of the purified protein includes the following: (i) a single band in acidic gel electrophoresis, in sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis, (ii) a single band in analytical gel isoelectric focusing, (iii) exact correspondence between the glycolipid transfer activity and stained protein absorbance in the acidic gel electrophoresis, and (iv) coincidence between the transfer activity and protein absorption at 280 nm in gel filtration through Ultrogel AcA 54. The protein has an isoelectric point of about 8.3 and a molecular weight of 22,000, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A molecular weight of 15,000 was calculated from AcA 54 gel filtration. The amino acid composition has been determined. The protein binds [3H]galactosylceramide but not [3H]phosphatidylcholine. Under the conditions used, 1 mol of the transfer protein bound about 0.13 mol of [3H]galactosylceramide. The glycolipid transfer protein-[3H]galactosylceramide complex was isolated by a Sephadex G-75 chromatography. An incubation of the complex with liposomes resulted in the transfer of [3H]galactosylceramide from the complex to the acceptor liposomes. The result indicates that the complex functions as an intermediate in the glycolipid transfer reaction. The protein facilitates the transfer of [3H]galactosylceramide from donor liposomes to acceptor liposomes lacking in glycolipid as well as to acceptor liposomes containing galactosylceramide.

  15. Sulfate- and sialic acid-containing glycolipids inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Simbulan, C M; Taki, T; Tamiya-Koizumi, K; Suzuki, M; Savoysky, E; Shoji, M; Yoshida, S

    1994-03-16

    The effects of various glycolipids on the activity of immunoaffinity-purified calf thymus DNA polymerase alpha were studied in vitro. Preincubation with sialic acid-containing glycolipids, such as sialosylparagloboside (SPG), GM3, GM1, and GD1a, and sulfatide (cerebroside sulfate ester, CSE) dose-dependently inhibited the activity of DNA polymerase alpha, while other glycolipids, as well as free sphingosine and ceramide did not. About 50% inhibition was achieved by preincubating the enzyme with 2.5 microM of CSE, 50 microM of SPG or GM3, and 80 microM of GM1. Inhibition was noncompetitive with both the DNA template and the substrate dTTP, as well as with the other dNTPs. Since the inhibition was largely reversed by the addition of 0.05% Nonidet P40, these glycolipids may interact with the hydrophobic region of the enzyme protein. Apparently, the sulfate moiety in CSE and the sialic acid moiety in gangliosides were essential for the inhibition since neither neutral glycolipids (i.e., glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide, lactosylceramide) nor asialo-gangliosides (GA1 and GA2) showed any inhibitory effect. Furthermore, the ceramide backbone was also found to be necessary for maximal inhibition since the inhibition was largely abolished by substituting the lipid backbone with cholesterol. Increasing the number of sialic acid moieties per molecule further enhanced the inhibition, while elongating the sugar chain diminished it. It was clearly shown that the N-acetyl residue of the sialic acid moiety is particularly essential for inhibition by both SPG and GM3 because the loss of this residue or substitution with a glycolyl residue completely negated their inhibitory effect on DNA polymerase alpha activity.

  16. Iminosugars Inhibit Dengue Virus Production via Inhibition of ER Alpha-Glucosidases—Not Glycolipid Processing Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sayce, Andrew C.; Alonzi, Dominic S.; Killingbeck, Sarah S.; Tyrrell, Beatrice E.; Hill, Michelle L.; Caputo, Alessandro T.; Iwaki, Ren; Kinami, Kyoko; Ide, Daisuke; Kiappes, J. L.; Beatty, P. Robert; Kato, Atsushi; Harris, Eva; Dwek, Raymond A.; Miller, Joanna L.; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    It has long been thought that iminosugar antiviral activity is a function of inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum-resident α-glucosidases, and on this basis, many iminosugars have been investigated as therapeutic agents for treatment of infection by a diverse spectrum of viruses, including dengue virus (DENV). However, iminosugars are glycomimetics possessing a nitrogen atom in place of the endocyclic oxygen atom, and the ubiquity of glycans in host metabolism suggests that multiple pathways can be targeted via iminosugar treatment. Successful treatment of patients with glycolipid processing defects using iminosugars highlights the clinical exploitation of iminosugar inhibition of enzymes other than ER α-glucosidases. Evidence correlating antiviral activity with successful inhibition of ER glucosidases together with the exclusion of alternative mechanisms of action of iminosugars in the context of DENV infection is limited. Celgosivir, a bicyclic iminosugar evaluated in phase Ib clinical trials as a therapeutic for the treatment of DENV infection, was confirmed to be antiviral in a lethal mouse model of antibody-enhanced DENV infection. In this study we provide the first evidence of the antiviral activity of celgosivir in primary human macrophages in vitro, in which it inhibits DENV secretion with an EC50 of 5 μM. We further demonstrate that monocyclic glucose-mimicking iminosugars inhibit isolated glycoprotein and glycolipid processing enzymes and that this inhibition also occurs in primary cells treated with these drugs. By comparison to bicyclic glucose-mimicking iminosugars which inhibit glycoprotein processing but do not inhibit glycolipid processing and galactose-mimicking iminosugars which do not inhibit glycoprotein processing but do inhibit glycolipid processing, we demonstrate that inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum-resident α-glucosidases, not glycolipid processing, is responsible for iminosugar antiviral activity against DENV. Our data suggest that

  17. Novel Polyoxyethylene-Containing Glycolipids Are Synthesized in Corynebacterium matruchotii and Mycobacterium smegmatis Cultured in the Presence of Tween 80

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cindy; Mahrous, Engy A.; Lee, Richard E.; Vestling, Martha M.; Takayama, Kuni

    2011-01-01

    The addition of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) to a culture of mycobacteria greatly influences cell permeability and sensitivity to antibiotics but very little is known regarding the underlying mechanism. Here we show that Corynebacterium matruchotii (surrogate of mycobacteria) converts Tween 80 to a structural series of polyoxyethylenic acids which are then used to form novel series-2A and series-2B glycolipids. Minor series-3 glycolipids were also synthesized. The polyoxyethylenic acids replaced corynomycolic acids in the cell wall. Correspondingly the trehalose dicorynomycolate content was reduced. MALDI mass spectrometry, MS-MS, 1H-NMR, and 13C-NMR were used to characterize the series-2 glycolipids. Series-2A glycolipid is trehalose 6-C36:2-corynomycolate-6′-polyoxyethylenate and series-2B glycolipid is trehalose 6-C36:2-corynomycolate-6′-furan ring-containing polyoxyethylenate. Mycobacterium smegmatis grown in the presence of Tween 80 also synthesizes series-2 type glycolipids. The synthesis of these novel glycolipids in corynebacteria and mycobacteria should result in gross changes in the cell wall permeability and drug sensitivity. PMID:21490808

  18. Novel Polyoxyethylene-Containing Glycolipids Are Synthesized in Corynebacterium matruchotii and Mycobacterium smegmatis Cultured in the Presence of Tween 80.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cindy; Mahrous, Engy A; Lee, Richard E; Vestling, Martha M; Takayama, Kuni

    2011-01-01

    The addition of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) to a culture of mycobacteria greatly influences cell permeability and sensitivity to antibiotics but very little is known regarding the underlying mechanism. Here we show that Corynebacterium matruchotii (surrogate of mycobacteria) converts Tween 80 to a structural series of polyoxyethylenic acids which are then used to form novel series-2A and series-2B glycolipids. Minor series-3 glycolipids were also synthesized. The polyoxyethylenic acids replaced corynomycolic acids in the cell wall. Correspondingly the trehalose dicorynomycolate content was reduced. MALDI mass spectrometry, MS-MS, (1)H-NMR, and (13)C-NMR were used to characterize the series-2 glycolipids. Series-2A glycolipid is trehalose 6-C(36:2)-corynomycolate-6'-polyoxyethylenate and series-2B glycolipid is trehalose 6-C(36:2)-corynomycolate-6'-furan ring-containing polyoxyethylenate. Mycobacterium smegmatis grown in the presence of Tween 80 also synthesizes series-2 type glycolipids. The synthesis of these novel glycolipids in corynebacteria and mycobacteria should result in gross changes in the cell wall permeability and drug sensitivity.

  19. Amphitropic liquid crystal phases from polyhydroxy sugar surfactants: Fundamental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou Zied, Osama K.; Hashim, Rauzah; Timimi, B. A.

    2015-03-01

    The self-assembly phenomena on a special class of poly-hydroxy sugar surfactant have been studied extensively. This class of material is classified as amphitropic liquid crystals since they exhibit both thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline properties. Hence the potential applications of these non-ionic surfactants are more versatile than those from the conventional lyotropic liquid crystals including those from thermotropic phases, but the latters are yet to be realized. Unfortunately, due to the lack of interest (or even awareness), fundamental studies in thermotropic glycolipids are scanty to support application development, and any tangible progress is often mired by the complexity of the sugar stereochemistry. However, some applications may be pursued from these materials by taking the advantage of the sugar chirality and the tilted structure of the lipid organization which implies ferroelectric behavior. Here, we present our studies on the stereochemical diversity of the sugar units in glycosides that form the thermotropic/lyotropic phases. The structure to property relationship compares different chain designs and other popular polyhydroxy compounds, such as monooleins and alkylpolyglucosides. Different structural properties of these glycosides are discussed with respect to their self-assembly organization and potential applications, such as delivery systems and membrane mimetic study.

  20. Enhanced stability and in vitro bioactivity of surfactant-loaded liposomes containing Asiatic Pennywort extract.

    PubMed

    Saesoo, Somsak; Sramala, Issara; Soottitantawat, Apinan; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rungsardthong

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this work has been the microencapsulation of Asiatic Pennywort (AP) extract with lecithin from soybean. The effect of various quantities of non-ionic surfactant (Montanov82) on liposomes upon physicochemical characteristics as well as their in vitro bio-activities was investigated. An addition of surfactant resulted in a decrease in particle size and an increase in percentage AP entrapment efficiency of liposomes. The surfactant-loaded liposomes demonstrated higher stability than surfactant-free liposomes where higher percentage AP remaining of liposomes can be achieved depending on surfactant concentration. No significant difference was found on AP release profiles among varied surfactant concentrations, although a presence of surfactant resulted in prolonged AP release rate. Liposomal AP with 20% w/w surfactant or higher demonstrated low cytotoxicity, a stronger anti-oxidation effect and collagen production on dermal fibroblast cells when compared with free AP and surfactant-free liposomes, possibly due to better cell internalization and less AP degradation in cells.

  1. Ionic liquids as surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, N. A.; Safonova, E. A.

    2010-10-01

    Problems of self-assembling in systems containing ionic liquids (ILs) are discussed. Main attention is paid to micellization in aqueous solutions of dialkylimidazolium ILs and their mixtures with classical surfactants. Literature data are reviewed, the results obtained by the authors and co-workers are presented. Thermodynamic aspects of the studies and problems of molecular-thermodynamic modeling receive special emphasis. It is shown that the aggregation behavior of dialkylimidazolium ILs is close to that of alkyltrimethylammonium salts (cationic surfactants) though ILs have a higher ability to self-organize, especially as it concerns long-range ordering. Some aspects of ILs applications are outlined where their common features with classical surfactants and definite specificity are of value.

  2. Surfactant mixing rules applied to surfactant enhanced alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.C. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses surfactant mixing rules which have been used to describe crude oil/alkali/surfactant phase behavior, using David Lloydminster crude oil and the surfactant Neodol 25-3S. It was found that at a fixed salinity and alkali concentration, a specific mole fraction of synthetic surfactant to petroleum soap was required to produce optimal phase behavior as the water-to-oil ratio varied. This methodology is useful in understanding the relationship between the variables of water-to-oil ratio and synthetic surfactant concentration in phase behavior systems that produce a petroleum soap.

  3. Formation of the two novel glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylribitol lipid and mannosylarabitol lipid, by Pseudozyma parantarctica JCM 11752T.

    PubMed

    Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Kitamoto, Dai

    2012-11-01

    In order to develop novel glycolipid biosurfactants, Pseudozyma parantarctica JCM 11752(T), which is known as a producer of mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL), was cultivated using different sugar alcohols with the presence of vegetable oil. When cultivated in a medium containing 4 % (w/v) olive oil and 4 % D-ribitol or D-arabitol, the yeast strain provided different glycolipids, compared to the case of no sugar alcohol. On TLC, both of the extracted glycolipid fractions gave two major spots corresponding to MEL-A (di-acetylated MEL) and MEL-B (mono-acetylated MEL). Based on (1)H NMR analysis, one glycolipid was identified as MEL-A, but the other was not MEL-B. On high-performance liquid chromatography after acid hydrolysis, the unknown glycolipid from the D-ribitol culture provided mainly two peaks identical to D-mannose and D-ribitol, and the other unknown glycolipid from the D-arabitol culture did two peaks identical to D-mannose and D-arabitol. Accordingly, the two unknown glycolipids were identified as mannosylribitol lipid (MRL) and mannosylarabitol lipid (MAL), respectively. The observed critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surface tension at CMC of MRL were 1.6 × 10(-6) M and 23.7 mN/m, and those of MAL were 1.5 × 10(-6) M and 24.2 mN/m, respectively. These surface-tension-lowering activities were significantly higher compared to conventional MEL. Furthermore, on a water-penetration scan, MRL and MAL efficiently formed not only the lamella phase (L(α)) but also the myelins at a wide range of concentrations, indicating their excellent self-assembling properties and high hydrophilicity. The present two glycolipids should thus facilitate the application of biosurfactants as new functional materials.

  4. Immunochemical studies of trehalose-containing major glycolipid from Tsukamurella pulmonis.

    PubMed

    Paściak, Mariola; Kaczyński, Zbigniew; Lindner, Buko; Holst, Otto; Gamian, Andrzej

    2010-07-19

    The chemical structure of the major glycolipid present in the chloroform-methanol extract of bacterial biomass of Tsukamurella pulmonis is reported. This compound was purified by TLC and HPLC. The sugar analysis revealed only glucose. Detailed chemical analyses, NMR, and MALDI FT-ICR-mass spectrometric studies identified 2,3-di-O-acyl-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-(1-->1)-alpha-d-glucopyranose as the final structure. Short branched fatty acids (4:0 or 5:0) were linked to C-3 and saturated, mono, and diunsaturated 18:0, 18:1, 18:2, 20:1, 20:2, and 20:0 to C-2 of the same glucose residue. ELISA tests revealed the weak cross-reactivity of the glycolipid with rabbit antisera against cells of T. paurometabola, Rhodococcus wratislaviensis, and Nocardiopsis dassonvillei. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Glycolipids from some extreme thermophilic bacteria belonging to the genus Thermus.

    PubMed Central

    Pask-Hughes, R A; Shaw, N

    1982-01-01

    The lipids of Thermus aquaticus YT1, Thermus thermophilus HB8, Thermus sp. strains H and J (from Icelandic hot springs), and Thermus sp. strain NH (from domestic hot water) have been investigated. Each strain contained two major components, a glycolipid and a glycophospholipid, which have been isolated and analyzed. All of the strains contained as the principal component (41 to 57% of total lipid) a diacyldiglycosyl-(N-acyl)glycosaminylglucosylglycerol, but the five glycolipids differed in carbohydrate composition. The glycophospholipid appeared to be identical in each strain and contained an N-acylglucosamine residue. The principal fatty acids were C15 and C17 branched-chain compounds. This unique polar lipid composition should be of value in the classification of other thermophiles in the genus Thermus. The exceptionally high carbohydrate content of the lipids of these extreme thermophiles may be of significance in relation to the molecular basis of thermophily. PMID:7054151

  6. Near-field scanning optical microscopy detects nanoscale glycolipid domains in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Abulrob, A; Lu, Z; Brunette, E; Pulla, D; Stanimirovic, D; Johnston, L J

    2008-11-01

    The localization of asialo-GM1 in ordered membrane raft domains in HeLa cells has been examined using a combination of membrane fractionation and fluorescence imaging. The glycolipid is enriched in Triton X-100 insoluble membrane fractions that contain high concentrations of cholesterol and caveolin-1 but is also found in detergent soluble membrane fractions. Near-field fluorescence microscopy shows that a fraction of the asialo-GM1 is localized in small nanoscale clusters that have an upper limit for the average diameter of approximately 90 nm and are partially colocalized with caveolae membrane domains. In addition to clusters, a diffuse, non-clustered population of asialo-GM1 is observed and is hypothesized to correspond to glycolipid isolated in detergent soluble membrane fractions.

  7. Membrane Glycolipids Content Variety in Gastrointestinal Tumors and Transplantable Hepatomas in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jun; Lv, Can Qun; Wang, Bo-Liang; Mei, Ping; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the variety of plasma contents of membrane glycolipids in 65 gastrointestinal tumors and 31 transplant hepatomas in mice. Material/Methods The experimental model was a transplantable murine hepatoma. Experimental mice were divided into 3 groups. Results The LSA and TSA content in the 2 groups were significantly difference (p<0.01), and were significantly lower in the therapeutic group than in the control group (p<0.01). Conclusions These results indicate that membrane glycolipids index LSA and TSA are sensitive markers in gastrointestinal tumors. In the transplanted hepatomas in mice, they may be considered as ancillary indicators for judging the therapeutic effect of hepatoma. PMID:27554918

  8. Glycolipid analyses of light-harvesting chlorosomes from envelope protein mutants of Chlorobaculum tepidum.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Thweatt, Jennifer; Tank, Marcus; Bryant, Donald A; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    Chlorosomes are large and efficient light-harvesting organelles in green photosynthetic bacteria, and they characteristically contain large numbers of bacteriochlorophyll c, d, or e molecules. Self-aggregated bacteriochlorophyll pigments are surrounded by a monolayer envelope membrane comprised of glycolipids and Csm proteins. Here, we analyzed glycolipid compositions of chlorosomes from the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum tepidum mutants lacking one, two, or three Csm proteins by HPLC equipped with an evaporative light-scattering detector. The ratio of monogalactosyldiacylglyceride (MGDG) to rhamnosylgalactosyldiacylglyceride (RGDG) was smaller in chlorosomes from mutants lacking two or three proteins in CsmC/D/H motif family than in chlorosomes from the wild-type, whereas chlorosomes lacking CsmIJ showed relatively less RGDG than MGDG. The results suggest that the CsmC, CsmD, CsmH, and other chlorosome proteins are involved in organizing MGDG and RGDG and thereby affect the size and shape of the chlorosome.

  9. The isolation and partial characterization of the glycolipids of BP8/C3H ascites-sarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gray, G. M.

    1965-01-01

    1. The total lipid was extracted from BP8/C3H ascites-sarcoma cells with acetone, light petroleum, pyridine and chloroform–methanol successively. Each extract was treated with mild alkali. The alkali-stable lipids from the pyridine and chloroform–methanol extracts, which included the glycolipids, were fractionated on silicic acid and silica gel G columns. 2. The total yield of glycolipid was about 60 mg./100 g. dry wt. of tumour cells, about 0·4% of the total lipid. Four classes of glycolipid were isolated and characterized as ceramide monohexoside (G1), ceramide dihexoside (G2), ceramide trihexoside (G3) and ceramide hexosaminyltrihexoside (G4). 3. G1, G2, G3 and G4 constituted 55, 21, 9 and 15% of the total glycolipid respectively. 4. G1 was a mixture of ceramide glucoside (70%) and ceramide galactoside. 5. The general structures of the oligosaccharide moieties of G2, G3 and G4 were elucidated by partial acid hydrolysis of the glycolipids with water-soluble polystyrenesulphonic acid. G2 was mostly ceramidelactoside with about 10% of ceramide galactosylgalactoside. G3 and G4 were probably a ceramide digalactosylglucoside and a ceramide N-acetylgalactosaminylgalactosylgalactosylglucoside respectively. 6. The fatty acid compositions of the glycolipids were very similar; lignoceric acid and nervonic acid were the major components and all contained monohydroxy acids in proportions varying from 10 to 25% of the total acids. PMID:14342256

  10. Antibody responses to glycolipid-borne carbohydrates require CD4+ T cells but not CD1 or NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Dale; Vaughan, Hilary A; Milland, Julie; Miland, Julie; Dodge, Natalie; Mouhtouris, Effie; Smyth, Mark J; Godfrey, Dale I; Sandrin, Mauro S

    2011-05-01

    Naturally occurring anti-carbohydrate antibodies play a major role in both the innate and adaptive immune responses. To elicit an anti-carbohydrate immune response, glycoproteins can be processed to glycopeptides and presented by the classical antigen-presenting molecules, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class I and II. In contrast, much less is known about the mechanism(s) for anti-carbohydrate responses to glycolipids, although it is generally considered that the CD1 family of cell surface proteins presents glycolipids to T cells or natural killer T (NKT) cells. Using model carbohydrate systems (isogloboside 3 and B blood group antigen), we examined the anti-carbohydrate response on glycolipids using both antibody neutralisation and knockout mouse-based experiments. These studies showed that CD4(+) T cells were required to generate antibodies to the carbohydrates expressed on glycolipids, and unexpectedly, these antibody responses were CD1d and NKT cell independent. They also did not require peptide help. These data provide new insight into glycolipid antigen recognition by the immune system and indicate the existence of a previously unrecognised population of glycolipid antigen-specific, CD1-independent, CD4(+) T cells.

  11. Accumulation of Novel Glycolipids and Ornithine Lipids in Mesorhizobium loti under Phosphate Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Diercks, Hannah; Semeniuk, Adrian; Gisch, Nicolas; Moll, Hermann; Duda, Katarzyna A.

    2014-01-01

    Glycolipids are found mainly in photosynthetic organisms (plants, algae, and cyanobacteria), Gram-positive bacteria, and a few other bacterial phyla. They serve as membrane lipids and play a role under phosphate deprivation as surrogates for phospholipids. Mesorhizobium loti accumulates different di- and triglycosyl diacylglycerols, synthesized by the processive glycosyltransferase Pgt-Ml, and two so far unknown glycolipids, which were identified in this study by mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as O-methyl-digalactosyl diacylglycerol (Me-DGD) and glucuronosyl diacylglycerol (GlcAD). Me-DGD is a novel glycolipid, whose synthesis depends on Pgt-Ml activity and the involvement of an unknown methyltransferase, while GlcAD is formed by a novel glycosyltransferase encoded by the open reading frame (ORF) mlr2668, using UDP-glucuronic acid as a sugar donor. Deletion mutants lacking GlcAD are not impaired in growth. Our data suggest that the different glycolipids in Mesorhizobium can mutually replace each other. This may be an adaptation mechanism to enhance the competitiveness in natural environments. A further nonphospholipid in Mesorhizobium was identified as a hydroxylated form of an ornithine lipid with the additional hydroxy group linked to the amide-bound fatty acid, introduced by the hydroxylase OlsD. The presence of this lipid has not been reported for rhizobia yet. The hydroxy group is placed on the C-2 position of the acyl chain as determined by NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the isolated ornithine lipids contained up to 80 to 90% d-configured ornithine, a stereoform so far undescribed in bacteria. PMID:25404698

  12. Human glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) genes: organization, transcriptional status and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Xianqiong; Chung, Taeowan; Lin, Xin; Malakhova, Margarita L; Pike, Helen M; Brown, Rhoderick E

    2008-01-01

    Background Glycolipid transfer protein is the prototypical and founding member of the new GLTP superfamily distinguished by a novel conformational fold and glycolipid binding motif. The present investigation provides the first insights into the organization, transcriptional status, phylogenetic/evolutionary relationships of GLTP genes. Results In human cells, single-copy GLTP genes were found in chromosomes 11 and 12. The gene at locus 11p15.1 exhibited several features of a potentially active retrogene, including a highly homologous (~94%), full-length coding sequence containing all key amino acid residues involved in glycolipid liganding. To establish the transcriptional activity of each human GLTP gene, in silico EST evaluations, RT-PCR amplifications of GLTP transcript(s), and methylation analyses of regulator CpG islands were performed using various human cells. Active transcription was found for 12q24.11 GLTP but 11p15.1 GLTP was transcriptionally silent. Heterologous expression and purification of the GLTP paralogs showed glycolipid intermembrane transfer activity only for 12q24.11 GLTP. Phylogenetic/evolutionary analyses indicated that the 5-exon/4-intron organizational pattern and encoded sequence of 12q24.11 GLTP were highly conserved in therian mammals and other vertebrates. Orthologs of the intronless GLTP gene were observed in primates but not in rodentiates, carnivorates, cetartiodactylates, or didelphimorphiates, consistent with recent evolutionary development. Conclusion The results identify and characterize the gene responsible for GLTP expression in humans and provide the first evidence for the existence of a GLTP pseudogene, while demonstrating the rigorous approach needed to unequivocally distinguish transcriptionally-active retrogenes from silent pseudogenes. The results also rectify errors in the Ensembl database regarding the organizational structure of the actively transcribed GLTP gene in Pan troglodytes and establish the intronless GLTP as

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of the Yeast Starmerella bombicola NBRC10243, a Producer of Sophorolipids, Glycolipid Biosurfactants

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Koike, Hideaki; Saika, Azusa; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Sato, Shun; Habe, Hiroshi; Kitamoto, Dai

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Starmerella bombicola NBRC10243 is an excellent producer of sophorolipids (SLs) from various feedstocks. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of S. bombicola NBRC10243. Analysis of the sequence may provide insight into the properties of this yeast that make it superior for use in the production of functional glycolipids and biomolecules, leading to the further development of S. bombicola NBRC10243 for industrial applications. PMID:25814600

  14. Surfactant-enhanced bioremediation

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, P.F.; Dudley, R.J.; Churchill, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken to examine the effect of three structurally related, non-ionic surfactants, Triton X-45, Triton X-100 and Triton X-165, as well as the oleophilic fertilizer, Inipol EAP 22, on the rate of biodegradation of phenanthrene by pure bacterial cultures. Each surfactant dramatically increased the apparent aqueous solubility of phenanthrene. Model studies were conducted to investigate the ability of these surfactants to enhance the rate of transport and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons into bacterial cells, and to assess the impact that increasing the aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons has on their rate of biodegradation. The results indicate that increasing the apparent aqueous solubility of hydrocarbons can lead to enhanced biodegradation rates by two Pseudomonas saccharophila strains. However, the experiments also suggest that some surfactants can inhibit aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation by certain bacteria. The data also support the hypothesis that surface-active components present in the oleophilic fertilizer formulation, Inipol EAP 22, may have significantly contributed to the positive results reported in tests of remedial agent impact on bioremediation, which was used as a supplemental clean-up technology on Exxon Valdez crude oil-contaminated Alaskan beaches.

  15. Fossilized glycolipids reveal past oceanic N2 fixation by heterocystous cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bauersachs, Thorsten; Speelman, Eveline N.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Reichart, Gert-Jan; Schouten, Stefan; Damsté, Jaap S. Sinninghe

    2010-01-01

    N2-fixing cyanobacteria play an essential role in sustaining primary productivity in contemporary oceans and freshwater systems. However, the significance of N2-fixing cyanobacteria in past nitrogen cycling is difficult to establish as their preservation potential is relatively poor and specific biological markers are presently lacking. Heterocystous N2-fixing cyanobacteria synthesize unique long-chain glycolipids in the cell envelope covering the heterocyst cell to protect the oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase enzyme. We found that these heterocyst glycolipids are remarkably well preserved in (ancient) lacustrine and marine sediments, unambiguously indicating the (past) presence of N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria. Analysis of Pleistocene sediments of the eastern Mediterranean Sea showed that heterocystous cyanobacteria, likely as epiphytes in symbiosis with planktonic diatoms, were particularly abundant during deposition of sapropels. Eocene Arctic Ocean sediments deposited at a time of large Azolla blooms contained glycolipids typical for heterocystous cyanobacteria presently living in symbiosis with the freshwater fern Azolla, indicating that this symbiosis already existed in that time. Our study thus suggests that heterocystous cyanobacteria played a major role in adding “new” fixed nitrogen to surface waters in past stratified oceans. PMID:20966349

  16. Lipid and glycolipid isomer analyses using ultra-high resolution ion mobility spectrometry separations

    DOE PAGES

    Wojcik, Roza; Webb, Ian K.; Deng, Liulin; ...

    2017-01-18

    Understanding the biological mechanisms related to lipids and glycolipids is challenging due to the vast number of possible isomers. Mass spectrometry (MS) measurements are currently the dominant approach for studying and providing detailed information on lipid and glycolipid structures. However, difficulties in distinguishing many structural isomers (e.g. distinct acyl chain positions, double bond locations, as well as glycan isomers) inhibit the understanding of their biological roles. Here we utilized ultra-high resolution ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations based upon the use of traveling waves in a serpentine long path length multi-pass Structures for Lossless Manipulations (SLIM) to enhance isomer resolution. Themore » multi-pass arrangement allowed separations ranging from ~16 m (1 pass) to ~470 m (32 passes) to be investigated for the distinction of lipids and glycolipids with extremely small structural differences. Lastly, these ultra-high resolution SLIM IMS-MS analyses provide a foundation for exploring and better understanding isomer specific biological and disease processes.« less

  17. Mechanisms for glycolipid antigen-driven cytokine polarization by Valpha14i NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Barbara A; Nagarajan, Niranjana A; Wingender, Gerhard; Wang, Jing; Scott, Iain; Tsuji, Moriya; Franck, Richard W; Porcelli, Steven A; Zajonc, Dirk M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    Certain glycolipid Ags for Valpha14i NKT cells can direct the overall cytokine balance of the immune response. Th2-biasing OCH has a lower TCR avidity than the most potent agonist known, alpha-galactosylceramide. Although the CD1d-exposed portions of OCH and alpha-galactosylceramide are identical, structural analysis indicates that there are subtle CD1d conformational differences due to differences in the buried lipid portion of these two Ags, likely accounting for the difference in antigenic potency. Th1-biasing C-glycoside/CD1d has even weaker TCR interactions than OCH/CD1d. Despite this, C-glycoside caused a greater downstream activation of NK cells to produce IFN-gamma, accounting for its promotion of Th1 responses. We found that this difference correlated with the finding that C-glycoside/CD1d complexes survive much longer in vivo. Therefore, we suggest that the pharmacokinetic properties of glycolipids are a major determinant of cytokine skewing, suggesting a pathway for designing therapeutic glycolipids for modulating invariant NKT cell responses.

  18. Carbohydrate specificity of the recognition of diverse glycolipids by natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Zajonc, Dirk M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2009-07-01

    Most T lymphocytes recognize peptide antigens bound to or presented by molecules encoded in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The CD1 family of antigen-presenting molecules is related to the MHC-encoded molecules, but CD1 proteins present lipid antigens, mostly glycolipids. Here we review T-lymphocyte recognition of glycolipids, with particular emphasis on the subpopulation known as natural killer T (NKT) cells. NKT cells influence many immune responses, they have a T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) that is restricted in diversity, and they share properties with cells of the innate immune system. NKT cells recognize antigens presented by CD1d with hexose sugars in alpha-linkage to lipids, although other, related antigens are known. The hydrophobic alkyl chains are buried in the CD1d groove, with the carbohydrate exposed for TCR recognition, together with the surface of the CD1d molecule. Therefore, understanding the biochemical basis for antigen recognition by NKT cells requires an understanding of how the trimolecular complex of CD1d, glycolipid, and the TCR is formed, which is in part a problem of carbohydrate recognition by the TCR. Recent investigations from our laboratories as well as studies from other groups have provided important information on the structural basis for NKT-cell specificity.

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 2 and Mincle Cooperatively Sense Corynebacterial Cell Wall Glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Schick, Judith; Etschel, Philipp; Bailo, Rebeca; Ott, Lisa; Bhatt, Apoorva; Lepenies, Bernd; Kirschning, Carsten; Burkovski, Andreas; Lang, Roland

    2017-07-01

    Nontoxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans cause invasive disease in humans and animals. Host sensing of corynebacteria is largely uncharacterized, albeit the recognition of lipoglycans by Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) appears to be important for macrophage activation by corynebacteria. The members of the order Corynebacterineae (e.g., mycobacteria, nocardia, and rhodococci) share a glycolipid-rich cell wall dominated by mycolic acids (termed corynomycolic acids in corynebacteria). The mycolic acid-containing cord factor of mycobacteria, trehalose dimycolate, activates the C-type lectin receptor (CLR) Mincle. Here, we show that glycolipid extracts from the cell walls of several pathogenic and nonpathogenic Corynebacterium strains directly bound to recombinant Mincle in vitro Macrophages deficient in Mincle or its adapter protein Fc receptor gamma chain (FcRγ) produced severely reduced amounts of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and of nitric oxide (NO) upon challenge with corynebacterial glycolipids. Consistently, cell wall extracts of a particular C. diphtheriae strain (DSM43989) lacking mycolic acid esters neither bound Mincle nor activated macrophages. Furthermore, TLR2 but not TLR4 was critical for sensing of cell wall extracts and whole corynebacteria. The upregulation of Mincle expression upon encountering corynebacteria required TLR2. Thus, macrophage activation by the corynebacterial cell wall relies on TLR2-driven robust Mincle expression and the cooperative action of both receptors. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Fusaroside, a unique glycolipid from Fusarium sp., an endophytic fungus isolated from Melia azedarach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Xiang; Wang, Hong-Peng; Gao, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Qiang; Laatsch, Hartmut; Kuang, Yi

    2012-01-28

    Fusaroside (1), a unique trehalose-containing glycolipid composed of the 4-hydroxyl group of a trehalose unit attached to the carboxylic carbon of a long-chain fatty acid, was isolated from the organic extract of fermentation broths of an endophytic fungus, Fusarium sp. LN-11 isolated from the leaves of Melia azedarach. Six known compounds, phalluside (2), (9R*,10R*,7E)-6, 9,10-trihydroxyoctadec-7-enoic acid (3), porrigenic acid (4), (9Z)-2,3-dihydroxypropyl octadeca-9-enoate (5), cerevisterol (6) and ergokonin B (7), were also isolated from this fungus. The glycolipid contains a rare branched long-chain fatty acid (C(20:4)) with a conjugated diene moiety and a conjugated ketone moiety. The structure of the new compound 1 was elucidated by spectroscopic methods (1D and 2D NMR experiments, MS) and chemical degradations. The metabolites 1-5 were shown to have moderate to weak active against the brine shrimp larvae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation of the first representative of a new family of glycolipids from natural sources.

  1. Diseases of Pulmonary Surfactant Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Wert, Susan E.; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in physiology and biochemistry have provided fundamental insights into the role of pulmonary surfactant in the pathogenesis and treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Identification of the surfactant proteins, lipid transporters, and transcriptional networks regulating their expression has provided the tools and insights needed to discern the molecular and cellular processes regulating the production and function of pulmonary surfactant prior to and after birth. Mutations in genes regulating surfactant homeostasis have been associated with severe lung disease in neonates and older infants. Biophysical and transgenic mouse models have provided insight into the mechanisms underlying surfactant protein and alveolar homeostasis. These studies have provided the framework for understanding the structure and function of pulmonary surfactant, which has informed understanding of the pathogenesis of diverse pulmonary disorders previously considered idiopathic. This review considers the pulmonary surfactant system and the genetic causes of acute and chronic lung disease caused by disruption of alveolar homeostasis. PMID:25621661

  2. Surfactant treatments alter endogenous surfactant metabolism in rabbit lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Oetomo, S.B.; Lewis, J.; Ikegami, M.; Jobe, A.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The effect of exogenous surfactant on endogenous surfactant metabolism was evaluated using a single-lobe treatment strategy to compare effects of treated with untreated lung within the same rabbit. Natural rabbit surfactant, Survanta, or 0.45% NaCl was injected into the left main stem bronchus by use of a Swan-Ganz catheter. Radiolabeled palmitic acid was then given by intravascular injection at two times after surfactant treatment, and the ratios of label incorporation and secretion in the left lower lobe to label incorporation and secretion in the right lung were compared. The treatment procedure resulted in a reasonably uniform surfactant distribution and did not disrupt lobar pulmonary blood flow. Natural rabbit surfactant increased incorporation of palmitate into saturated phosphatidylcholine (Sat PC) approximately 2-fold (P less than 0.01), and secretion of labeled Sat PC increased approximately 2.5-fold in the surfactant-treated left lower lobe relative to the right lung (P less than 0.01). Although Survanta did not alter incorporation, it did increase secretion but not to the same extent as rabbit surfactant (P less than 0.01). Alteration of endogenous surfactant Sat PC metabolism in vivo by surfactant treatments was different from that which would have been predicted by previous in vitro studies.

  3. Design, synthesis, and functional activity of labeled CD1d glycolipid agonists.

    PubMed

    Jervis, Peter J; Polzella, Paolo; Wojno, Justyna; Jukes, John-Paul; Ghadbane, Hemza; Garcia Diaz, Yoel R; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Cox, Liam R

    2013-04-17

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are restricted by CD1d molecules and activated upon CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipids to T cell receptors (TCRs) located on the surface of the cell. Because the cytokine response profile is governed by the structure of the glycolipid, we sought a method for labeling various glycolipids to study their in vivo behavior. The prototypical CD1d agonist, α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer) 1, instigates a powerful immune response and the generation of a wide range of cytokines when it is presented to iNKT cell TCRs by CD1d molecules. Analysis of crystal structures of the TCR-α-GalCer-CD1d ternary complex identified the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid side chain, and more specifically the pro-S hydrogen at this position, as a site for incorporating a label. We postulated that modifying the glycolipid in this way would exert a minimal impact on the TCR-glycolipid-CD1d ternary complex, allowing the labeled molecule to function as a good mimic for the CD1d agonist under investigation. To test this hypothesis, the synthesis of a biotinylated version of the CD1d agonist threitol ceramide (ThrCer) was targeted. Both diastereoisomers, epimeric at the label tethering site, were prepared, and functional experiments confirmed the importance of substituting the pro-S, and not the pro-R, hydrogen with the label for optimal activity. Significantly, functional experiments revealed that biotinylated ThrCer (S)-10 displayed behavior comparable to that of ThrCer 5 itself and also confirmed that the biotin residue is available for streptavidin and antibiotin antibody recognition. A second CD1d agonist, namely α-GalCer C20:2 4, was modified in a similar way, this time with a fluorescent label. The labeled α-GalCer C20:2 analogue (11) again displayed functional behavior comparable to that of its unlabeled substrate, supporting the notion that the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid amide chain should be a suitable site for attaching

  4. Coacervation with surfactants: From single-chain surfactants to gemini surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiwei; Wang, Yilin

    2017-01-01

    Coacervation is a spontaneous process during which a colloidal dispersion separates into two immiscible liquid phases: a colloid-rich liquid phase in equilibrium with a diluted phase. Coacervation is usually divided into simple coacervation and complex coacervation according to the number of components. Surfactant-based coacervation normally contains traditional single-chain surfactants. With the development of surfactants, gemini surfactants with two amphiphilic moieties have been applied to form coacervation. This review summarizes the development of simple coacervation and complex coacervation in the systems of single-chain surfactants and gemini surfactants. Simple coacervation in surfactant solutions with additives or at elevated temperature and complex coacervation in surfactant/polymer mixtures by changing charge densities, molecular weight, ionic strength, pH, or temperature are reviewed. The comparison between gemini surfactants and corresponding monomeric single-chain surfactants reveals that the unique structures of gemini surfactants endow them with higher propensity to generate coacervation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Solubilization and Interaction Studies of Bile Salts with Surfactants and Drugs: a Review.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nisar Ahmad

    2016-05-01

    In this review, bile salt, bile salt-surfactant, and bile salt-drug interactions and their solubilization studies are mainly focused. Usefulness of bile salts in digestion, absorption, and excretion of various compounds and their rare properties in ordering the shape and size of the micelles owing to the presence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces are taken into consideration while compiling this review. Bile salts as potential bio-surfactants to solubilize drugs of interest are also highlighted. This review will give an insight into the selection of drugs in different applications as their properties get modified by interaction with bile salts, thus influencing their solution behavior which, in turn, modifies the phase-forming behavior, microemulsion, and clouding phenomenon, besides solubilization. Finally, their future perspectives are taken into consideration to assess their possible uses as bio-surfactants without side effects to human beings.

  6. Mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; Noll, L.A.

    1990-12-01

    The results of an evaluation of mixed surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery are described. Several surfactant combinations have been studied. These include alkyl aryl sulfonates as primary surfactants and carboxymethylated ethoxylated (CME) surfactants and ethoxylated sulfonates (ES) as secondary surfactants. The ethoxylated surfactants increase the salinity tolerance of the primary surfactants and, in theory, allow tailoring of the surfactant system to match selected reservoir conditions. The experiments conducted included interfacial tension (IFT) measurements, phase behavior measurements, adsorption and/or chromatographic separation of mixed surfactant systems, measurements of solution properties such as the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant mixtures, and crude oil displacement experiments. The effects of temperature, surfactant concentration, salinity, presence of divalent ions, hydrocarbon type, and component proportions in the mixed surfactant combinations, and injection strategies on the performance potential of the targeted surfactant/hydrocarbon systems were studied. 40 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. The interaction of boron with glycolipids is required to increase tolerance to stresses in Anabaena PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Isidro; Orús, Isabel; Bolaños, Luis; Bonilla, Ildefonso

    2014-10-01

    Boron (B) is an essential nutrient for heterocystous cyanobacteria growing under diazotrophic conditions. Under B-deficient conditions, the heterocyst envelope is highly disorganized, and the glycolipid layer is predominantly lost. Therefore, we examined whether B is implicated in the regulation of synthesis or processing and/or stability of glycolipids in Anabaena PCC 7120. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the expression of hglE was not significantly changed under B deficiency, suggesting that the synthesis of glycolipids during heterocyst formation was not compromised. In contrast, the overexpression of devB and hepA, encoding a glycolipid and a carbohydrate transporter, respectively, results in the instability of the envelope under B-deficient conditions. The capacity of borate to bind and stabilize molecules is considered the basis of any B biological function. Using a borate-binding-specific resin and thin layer chromatography, we detected the glycolipids that interact with B. Several heterocyst-specific glycolipids were detected as putative B ligands, suggesting a role for B in stabilizing the heterocyst envelope. Moreover, the glycolipids of Anabaena growing in non-diazotrophic conditions were also detected as putative B ligands. Although B is not essential for Anabaena under non-N2-fixing conditions, the presence of this micronutrient increased the tolerance of Anabaena to detergent treatment, salinity and hyperosmotic conditions. Taken together, the results of the present experiment suggest a beneficial role for B in environmental adaptation. Furthermore, we discuss the nutrient requirement for living organisms growing in nature and not under laboratory conditions.

  8. Tissue-specific loss of fucosylated glycolipids in mice with targeted deletion of alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes.

    PubMed Central

    Iwamori, Masao; Domino, Steven E

    2004-01-01

    Glycolipids in epithelial tissues of the gastrointestinal tract act as receptors for enteric bacteria and are implicated in the activation of the intestinal immune system. To clarify the genes involved in the fucosylation of the major glycolipids, substrate glycolipids and fucosylated products were measured in tissues of wild-type and mutant mice lacking alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes FUT1 or FUT2. Quantitative determination was performed by TLC-immunostaining for GA1 (Gg4Cer), FGA1 (fucosyl GA1), GM1 (II3NeuAc-Gg4Cer), FGM1 (fucosyl GM1), and Forssman glycolipids. Both FGM1 and FGA1 completely disappeared from the antrum, cecum, and colon of FUT2-null mice, but not those of FUT1-null and wild-type mice. Precursor glycolipids, GM1 and GA1, accumulated in tissues of FUT2-null mice, indicating that the FUT2-encoded enzyme preferentially participates in the fucosylation of GA1 and GM1 in these tissues. Female reproductive organs were similarly found to utilize FUT2 for the fucosylation of glycolipids FGA1 (uterus and cervix), and FGM1 (ovary), due to their absence in FUT2-null mice. In FUT1-null mice FGA1 was lost from the pancreas, but was present in wild-type and FUT2-null mice, indicating that FUT1 is essential for fucosylation of GA1 in the pancreas. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I lectin histochemistry for alpha(1,2)fucose residues confirmed the absence of alpha(1,2)fucose residues from the apical surface of pancreatic acinar glands of FUT1-null mice. Ileum, epididymis, and testis retained specific fucosylated glycolipids, irrespective of targeted deletion of either gene, indicating either compensation for or redundancy of the alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase genes in these tissues. PMID:14967068

  9. Self Assembly of Biogenic Surfactants at Mineral Surfaces and Their Effect on Biological Iron Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    Microorganisms exude biogenic surfactants to modify the physical and chemical properties of mineral-water interfaces. Surfactants with negatively charged hydrophilic head groups interact strongly with oppositely charged mineral surfaces such as iron or aluminum oxides. Surfactant self assembly at mineral surfaces can result in the formation of admicelles that have a significant effect on the surface charge and hydrophobicity. These effects are exploited by microorganisms to facilitate attachment to mineral surfaces. Similarly, plants exude surfactants into the rhizosphere and change the surface tension and flow of soil water. Other surface active compounds that are typically found in soils and surface waters are humic substances and fatty acids that are produced by degradation of biomass. In general, surface active compounds are ubiquitous in natural systems. In this study we investigated how surfactants influence bio-mineral interactions using the example of siderophore promoted iron acquisition. Siderophore promoted iron acquisition involves the adsorption of a biogenic iron specific ligand (i.e. the siderophore) to iron oxides and the subsequent siderophore promoted iron oxide dissolution. The hypothesis of this project is that the modification of the iron oxide surface charge and hydrophobicity by adsorbed surfactants will have an important effect on siderophore adsorption and dissolution kinetics. We approached this subject by investigating the adsorption of a natural surfactant (rhamnolipids: RhL) and the synthetic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate: SDS) on goethite (α-FeOOH, a common pedogenic iron oxide) and observing the effect of surfactant self assembly on the properties of the mineral water interface. We observed fast adsorption kinetics at pH 3 and slow adsorption at pH 6. The adsorbed surfactants reversed the surface potential of goethite (as evidenced by electrophoretic mobility measurements) at soluble surfactant concentrations below 10 μM (SDS

  10. Surfactants at the Design Limit.

    PubMed

    Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-04

    This article analyzes how the individual structural elements of surfactant molecules affect surface properties, in particular, the point of reference defined by the limiting surface tension at the aqueous cmc, γcmc. Particular emphasis is given to how the chemical nature and structure of the hydrophobic tails influence γcmc. By comparing the three different classes of surfactants, fluorocarbon, silicone, and hydrocarbon, a generalized surface packing index is introduced which is independent of the chemical nature of the surfactants. This parameter ϕcmc represents the volume fraction of surfactant chain fragments in a surface film at the aqueous cmc. It is shown that ϕcmc is a useful index for understanding the limiting surface tension of surfactants and can be useful for designing new superefficient surfactants.

  11. A single subset of dendritic cells controls the cytokine bias of natural killer T cell responses to diverse glycolipid antigens.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pooja; Baena, Andres; Yu, Karl O A; Saini, Neeraj K; Kharkwal, Shalu S; Goldberg, Michael F; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Kim, John; Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Lauvau, Gregoire; Chang, Young-tae; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Cox, Liam R; Jervis, Peter J; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Porcelli, Steven A

    2014-01-16

    Many hematopoietic cell types express CD1d and are capable of presenting glycolipid antigens to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). However, the question of which cells are the principal presenters of glycolipid antigens in vivo remains controversial, and it has been suggested that this might vary depending on the structure of a particular glycolipid antigen. Here we have shown that a single type of cell, the CD8α(+) DEC-205(+) dendritic cell, was mainly responsible for capturing and presenting a variety of different glycolipid antigens, including multiple forms of α-galactosylceramide that stimulate widely divergent cytokine responses. After glycolipid presentation, these dendritic cells rapidly altered their expression of various costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules in a manner that was dependent on the structure of the antigen. These findings show flexibility in the outcome of two-way communication between CD8α(+) dendritic cells and iNKT cells, providing a mechanism for biasing toward either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis lipoprotein LprG (Rv1411c) binds triacylated glycolipid agonists of Toll-like receptor 2

    SciTech Connect

    Drage, Michael G.; Tsai, Han-Chun; Pecora, Nicole D.; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Arida, Ahmad R.; Shukla, Supriya; Rojas, Roxana E.; Seshadri, Chetan; Moody, D. Branch; Boom, W. Henry; Sacchettini, James C.; Harding, Clifford V.

    2010-09-27

    Knockout of lprG results in decreased virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in mice. MTB lipoprotein LprG has TLR2 agonist activity, which is thought to be dependent on its N-terminal triacylation. Unexpectedly, here we find that nonacylated LprG retains TLR2 activity. Moreover, we show LprG association with triacylated glycolipid TLR2 agonists lipoarabinomannan, lipomannan and phosphatidylinositol mannosides (which share core structures). Binding of triacylated species was specific to LprG (not LprA) and increased LprG TLR2 agonist activity; conversely, association of glycolipids with LprG enhanced their recognition by TLR2. The crystal structure of LprG in complex with phosphatidylinositol mannoside revealed a hydrophobic pocket that accommodates the three alkyl chains of the ligand. In conclusion, we demonstrate a glycolipid binding function of LprG that enhances recognition of triacylated MTB glycolipids by TLR2 and may affect glycolipid assembly or transport for bacterial cell wall biogenesis.

  13. A Single Subset of Dendritic Cells Controls the Cytokine Bias of Natural Killer T Cell Responses to Diverse Glycolipid Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Baena, Andres; Yu, Karl O.A.; Saini, Neeraj K.; Kharkwal, Shalu S.; Goldberg, Michael F.; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J.; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Kim, John; Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Lauvau, Gregoire; Chang, Young-tae; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Cox, Liam R.; Jervis, Peter J.; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many hematopoietic cell types express CD1d and are capable of presenting glycolipid antigens to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). However, the question of which cells are the principal presenters of glycolipid antigens in vivo remains controversial, and it has been suggested that this might vary depending on the structure of a particular glycolipid antigen. Here we have shown that a single type of cell, the CD8α+ DEC-205+ dendritic cell, was mainly responsible for capturing and presenting a variety of different glycolipid antigens, including multiple forms of α-galactosylceramide that stimulate widely divergent cytokine responses. After glycolipid presentation, these dendritic cells rapidly altered their expression of various costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules in a manner that was dependent on the structure of the antigen. These findings show flexibility in the outcome of two-way communication between CD8α+ dendritic cells and iNKT cells, providing a mechanism for biasing toward either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:24412610

  14. Beneficial effect of dietary wheat glycolipids on cecum short-chain fatty acid and secondary bile acid profiles in mice.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, T; Miyazawa, T

    2001-08-01

    In the present study, to explore the beneficial effect of dietary galactoglycerolipids on the lower digestive tract environment, male BALB/c mice were fed a 5% wheat glycolipid, fiber-free diet, or the standard AIN diet for 3 wk. The wheat glycolipid composition was digalactosyldiacylglycerol 51.6%, ceramide monohexoside 6.6%, acylated sterylglucoside 3.4%, and other lipids 22.2%, (mostly phospholipids). Cecum and colon weights and colonic crypt depth were significantly greater in the glycolipid-diet mice relative to groups fed the other two diets. Furthermore, in the cecum, propionate. butyrate, and total short-chain fatty acids, concentrations were significantly greater in the glycolipid-diet mice than others were, and correlated with the observed increased lower digestive tract (cecum and colon) weights and colonic crypt depth. The cecal lithocholic acid/deoxycholic acid ratio, a risk index for colorectal cancer, was significantly lower in the glycolipid-diet mice than in the other two dietary groups. These results suggest that the dietary supplementation of plant-source galactoglycerolipids may contribute to improving the lower digestive tract environment.

  15. Bio-based polyurethane foams from renewable resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanzione, M.; Russo, V.; Sorrentino, A.; Tesser, R.; Lavorgna, M.; Oliviero, M.; Di Serio, M.; Iannace, S.; Verdolotti, L.

    2016-05-01

    In the last decades, bio-derived natural materials, such as vegetable oils, polysaccharides and biomass represent a rich source of hydroxyl precursors for the synthesis of polyols which can be potentially used to synthesize "greener" polyurethane foams. Herein a bio-based precursor (obtained from succinic acid) was used as a partial replacement of conventional polyol to synthesize PU foams. A mixture of conventional and bio-based polyol in presence of catalysts, silicone surfactant and diphenylmethane di-isocyanate (MDI) was expanded in a mold and cured for two hours at room temperature. Experimental results highlighted the suitability of this bio-precursor to be used in the production of flexible PU foams. Furthermore the chemo-physical characterization of the resulting foams show an interesting improvement in thermal stability and elastic modulus with respect to the PU foams produced with conventional polyol.

  16. Antibodies to glycolipids activate complement and promote proteinuria in passive Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed

    Susani, M; Schulze, M; Exner, M; Kerjaschki, D

    1994-04-01

    Passive Heymann nephritis is an experimental rat model of human membranous nephropathy induced by injection of antisera against crude renal cortical fractions such as Fx1A or rat tubular microvilli. This results in the formation of subepithelial immune deposits, the activation of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex of complement, and severe proteinuria. While the formation of immune deposits is attributed to in situ immune complex formation with antibodies specific for the gp330-Heymann nephritis antigenic complex (HNAC), activation of complement and proteinuria appear to be caused by at least one additional antibody species present in anti-Fx1A sera. We have separated by affinity absorption polyspecific antisera against Fx1A and rat microvilli into one IgG fraction directed specifically against microvillar proteins (anti-Fx1A-prot) and another IgG fraction specific for glycolipids (ant-Fx1A-lip) of tubular microvilli. When injected into rats, the anti-Fx1A-prot fraction induced immune deposits but failed to activate complement or produce proteinuria, similar to results obtained with affinity-purified anti-gp330 IgG. When the antibodies of the anti-Fx1A-lip fraction were injected alone they did not bind to glomeruli. By contrast, when the IgGs specific for the Fx1A-prot fraction (or for gp330-HNAC) were combined with those directed against the Fx1A-lip glycolipid preparation, immune deposits were formed, in situ complement activation was observed, and also proteinuria was induced. It is concluded that within anti-Fx1A and anti-microvillar sera there are at least two IgG fractions of relevance for the development of PHN: one directed against the gp330-HNAC complex which is responsible for the development of immune deposits, and a second specific for glycolipid antigen(s) which activate(s) the complement cascade.

  17. Synthesis and antigenicity of BBGL-2 glycolipids of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease

    PubMed Central

    Pozsgay, Vince; Kubler-Kielb, Joanna; Coxon, Bruce; Marques, Adriana; Robbins, John B.; Schneerson, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is the etiological agent for Lyme disease (LD), the most common vector borne disease in the United States. There is no human vaccine against LD currently available. Our approach to a vaccine is based on its surface-exposed glycolipids. One group of these glycolipids termed BBGL-2 consists of 1,2-di-O-acyl-3-O-(α-D-galactopyranosyl)-sn-glycerol congeners having palmitic, oleic, stearic, linoleic, and myristic acids. In order to delineate the immunodominant region(s) of the BBGL-2 components, we embarked on a synthetic project to provide available structurally defined, homogeneous analogs of BBGL-2 that might help identify the best vaccine candidate. The antigenicity of the synthetic glycolipids was examined by dot-blot analysis using mice sera obtained by immunization with killed B. burgdorferi cells, with native BBGL-2 in complete Freund's adjuvant, as well as sera obtained from patients with Lyme disease. We found that the presence of two acyl groups in the glycerol moiety was essential for antigenicity. At least one of these groups must be an oleoyl moiety. Neither the anomeric configuration of the galactose nor the configuration of the glycerol at C-2 was a decisive factor. Based on these findings we designed an `unnatural' BBGL-2 analog having the structure 3-O-(β-D-galactopyranosyl)-1,2-di-O-oleoyl-DL-glycerol which is easier and less expensive to synthesize than the other BBGL-2 congeners prepared in this study. This substance proved to be antigenic and is considered a candidate vaccine for Lyme disease. PMID:21601180

  18. Design, Synthesis, and Functional Activity of Labeled CD1d Glycolipid Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are restricted by CD1d molecules and activated upon CD1d-mediated presentation of glycolipids to T cell receptors (TCRs) located on the surface of the cell. Because the cytokine response profile is governed by the structure of the glycolipid, we sought a method for labeling various glycolipids to study their in vivo behavior. The prototypical CD1d agonist, α-galactosyl ceramide (α-GalCer) 1, instigates a powerful immune response and the generation of a wide range of cytokines when it is presented to iNKT cell TCRs by CD1d molecules. Analysis of crystal structures of the TCR−α-GalCer–CD1d ternary complex identified the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid side chain, and more specifically the pro-S hydrogen at this position, as a site for incorporating a label. We postulated that modifying the glycolipid in this way would exert a minimal impact on the TCR–glycolipid–CD1d ternary complex, allowing the labeled molecule to function as a good mimic for the CD1d agonist under investigation. To test this hypothesis, the synthesis of a biotinylated version of the CD1d agonist threitol ceramide (ThrCer) was targeted. Both diastereoisomers, epimeric at the label tethering site, were prepared, and functional experiments confirmed the importance of substituting the pro-S, and not the pro-R, hydrogen with the label for optimal activity. Significantly, functional experiments revealed that biotinylated ThrCer (S)-10 displayed behavior comparable to that of ThrCer 5 itself and also confirmed that the biotin residue is available for streptavidin and antibiotin antibody recognition. A second CD1d agonist, namely α-GalCer C20:2 4, was modified in a similar way, this time with a fluorescent label. The labeled α-GalCer C20:2 analogue (11) again displayed functional behavior comparable to that of its unlabeled substrate, supporting the notion that the α-methylene unit in the fatty acid amide chain should be a suitable site for

  19. Plasma-dependent chemotaxis of macrophages toward BCG cell walls and the mycobacterial glycolipid P3.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M T

    1977-01-01

    BCG cell walls, associated with oil droplets in the form of emulsions in saline, generate macrophage chemotactic activity from fresh guinea pig plasma. Serum and heat-inactivated plasma were inactive, suggesting involvement of complement or fibrinogen-derived chemotactic factors. Suspensions of cell walls and oil droplets each generated chemotactic activity from plasma, and the activity of the cell wall vaccine was due to the additive effects of these two components. A mycobacterial glycolipid (P3), which is a constituent of BCG cell walls, also had plasma-dependent chemotactic activity. The results suggest that macrophage chemotaxis may be an important part of the immunopotentiating activity of these mycobacterial products.

  20. Influence of Nonionic Surfactants on Bioavailability and Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Volkering, F.; Breure, A. M.; van Andel, J. G.; Rulkens, W. H.

    1995-01-01

    The presence of the synthetic nonionic surfactants Triton X-100, Tergitol NPX, Brij 35, and Igepal CA-720 resulted not only in increased apparent solubilities but also in increased maximal rates of dissolution of crystalline naphthalene and phenanthrene. A model based on the assumption that surfactant micelles are formed and act as a separate phase underestimated the dissolution rates; this led to the conclusion that surfactants present at concentrations higher than the critical micelle concentration affect the dissolution process. This conclusion was confirmed by the results of batch growth experiments, which showed that the rates of biodegradation of naphthalene and phenanthrene in the dissolution-limited growth phase were increased by the addition of surfactant, indicating that the dissolution rates were higher than the rates in the absence of surfactant. In activity and growth experiments, no toxic effects of the surfactants at concentrations up to 10 g liter(sup-1) were observed. Substrate present in the micellar phase was shown to be not readily available for degradation by the microorganisms. This finding has important consequences for the application of (bio)surfactants in biological soil remediation. PMID:16535016

  1. Influence of nonionic surfactants on bioavailability and biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Volkering, F; Breure, A M; van Andel, J G; Rulkens, W H

    1995-05-01

    The presence of the synthetic nonionic surfactants Triton X-100, Tergitol NPX, Brij 35, and Igepal CA-720 resulted not only in increased apparent solubilities but also in increased maximal rates of dissolution of crystalline naphthalene and phenanthrene. A model based on the assumption that surfactant micelles are formed and act as a separate phase underestimated the dissolution rates; this led to the conclusion that surfactants present at concentrations higher than the critical micelle concentration affect the dissolution process. This conclusion was confirmed by the results of batch growth experiments, which showed that the rates of biodegradation of naphthalene and phenanthrene in the dissolution-limited growth phase were increased by the addition of surfactant, indicating that the dissolution rates were higher than the rates in the absence of surfactant. In activity and growth experiments, no toxic effects of the surfactants at concentrations up to 10 g liter(sup-1) were observed. Substrate present in the micellar phase was shown to be not readily available for degradation by the microorganisms. This finding has important consequences for the application of (bio)surfactants in biological soil remediation.

  2. Carbohydrates act as receptors for the periodontitis-associated bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis: a study of bacterial binding to glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Ulrika; Hallberg, Eva C; Sandros, Jens; Rydberg, Lennart; Bäcker, Annika E

    2004-06-01

    In this study we show for the first time the use of carbohydrate chains on glycolipids as receptors for the periodontitis-associated bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis. Previous studies have shown that this bacterium has the ability to adhere to and invade the epithelial lining of the dental pocket. Which receptor(s) the adhesin of P. gingivalis exploit in the adhesion to epithelial cells has not been shown. Therefore, the binding preferences of this specific bacterium to structures of carbohydrate origin from more than 120 different acid and nonacid glycolipid fractions were studied. The bacteria were labeled externally with (35)S and used in a chromatogram binding assay. To enable detection of carbohydrate receptor structures for P. gingivalis, the bacterium was exposed to a large number of purified total glycolipid fractions from a variety of organs from different species and different histo-blood groups. P. gingivalis showed a preference for fractions of human and pig origin for adhesion. Both nonacid and acid glycolipids were used by the bacterium, and a preference for shorter sugar chains was noticed. Bacterial binding to human acid glycolipid fractions was mainly obtained in the region of the chromatograms where sulfated carbohydrate chains usually are found. However, the binding pattern to nonacid glycolipid fractions suggests a core chain of lactose bound to the ceramide part as a tentative receptor structure. The carbohydrate binding of the bacterium might act as a first step in the bacterial invasion process of the dental pocket epithelium, subsequently leading to damage to periodontal tissue and tooth loss.

  3. Surfactant monitoring by foam generation

    DOEpatents

    Mullen, Ken I.

    1997-01-01

    A device for monitoring the presence or absence of active surfactant or other surface active agents in a solution or flowing stream based on the formation of foam or bubbles is presented. The device detects the formation of foam with a light beam or conductivity measurement. The height or density of the foam can be correlated to the concentration of the active surfactant present.

  4. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  5. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore–surfactant interactions. PMID:27688765

  6. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  7. Surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Improved process of coal liquefaction utilizing nonaqueous surfactant has increased oil yield from 50 to about 80%. Asphaltene molecule formation of colloid particles is prevented by surfactant. Separated molecules present more surface area for hydrogenation reaction. Lower requirements for temperature, pressure, and hydrogen lead to reduction in capital and operation costs.

  8. Surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1977-01-01

    Improved process of coal liquefaction utilizing nonaqueous surfactant has increased oil yield from 50 to about 80%. Asphaltene molecule formation of colloid particles is prevented by surfactant. Separated molecules present more surface area for hydrogenation reaction. Lower requirements for temperature, pressure, and hydrogen lead to reduction in capital and operation costs.

  9. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-11

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than [Formula: see text] to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning-here through ion exchange-unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  10. Surfactant adsorption kinetics in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riechers, Birte; Maes, Florine; Akoury, Elias; Semin, Benoît; Gruner, Philipp; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions. Their lifetimes are directly related to the dynamics of surfactants. We design a microfluidic method to measure the kinetics of adsorption of surfactants to the droplet interface, a key process involved in foaming, emulsification, and droplet coarsening. The method is based on the pH decay in the droplet as a direct measurement of the adsorption of a carboxylic acid surfactant to the interface. From the kinetic measurement of the bulk equilibration of the pH, we fully determine the adsorption process of the surfactant. The small droplet size and the convection during the droplet flow ensure that the transport of surfactant through the bulk is not limiting the kinetics of adsorption. To validate our measurements, we show that the adsorption process determines the timescale required to stabilize droplets against coalescence, and we show that the interface should be covered at more than 90% to prevent coalescence. We therefore quantitatively link the process of adsorption/desorption, the stabilization of emulsions, and the kinetics of solute partitioning—here through ion exchange—unraveling the timescales governing these processes. Our method can be further generalized to other surfactants, including nonionic surfactants, by making use of fluorophore-surfactant interactions.

  11. High- and low-molecular-mass microbial surfactants.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, E; Ron, E Z

    1999-08-01

    Microorganisms synthesize a wide variety of high- and low-molecular-mass bioemulsifiers. The low-molecular-mass bioemulsifiers are generally glycolipids, such as trehalose lipids, sophorolipids and rhamnolipids, or lipopeptides, such as surfactin, gramicidin S and polymyxin. The high-molecular-mass bioemulsifiers are amphipathic polysaccharides, proteins, lipopolysaccharides, lipoproteins or complex mixtures of these biopolymers. The low-molecular-mass bioemulsifiers lower surface and interfacial tensions, whereas the higher-molecular-mass bioemulsifiers are more effective at stabilizing oil-in-water emulsions. Three natural roles for bioemulsifiers have been proposed: (i) increasing the surface area of hydrophobic water-insoluble growth substrates; (ii) increasing the bioavailability of hydrophobic substrates by increasing their apparent solubility or desorbing them from surfaces; (iii) regulating the attachment and detachment of microorganisms to and from surfaces. Bioemulsifiers have several important advantages over chemical surfactants, which should allow them to become prominent in industrial and environmental applications. The potential commercial applications of bioemulsifiers include bioremediation of oil-polluted soil and water, enhanced oil recovery, replacement of chlorinated solvents used in cleaning-up oil-contaminated pipes, vessels and machinery, use in the detergent industry, formulations of herbicides and pesticides and formation of stable oil-in-water emulsions for the food and cosmetic industries.

  12. Sinularioside, a triacetylated glycolipid from the Indonesian soft coral Sinularia sp., is an inhibitor of NO release.

    PubMed

    Putra, Masteria Yunovilsa; Ianaro, Angela; Panza, Elisabetta; Bavestrello, Giorgio; Cerrano, Carlo; Fattorusso, Ernesto; Taglialatela-Scafati, Orazio

    2012-04-15

    Chemical analysis of the Indonesian soft coral Sinularia sp. (order Alcyonacea, family Alcyoniidae) afforded a known glucosylcerebroside of the sarcoehrenoside-type and sinularioside (2), a new naturally triacetylated glycolipid containing two α-D-arabinopyranosyl residues and a myristyl alcohol unit. Their complete stereostructures were solved by interpretation of MS and NMR data along with CD analysis of degradation products. Sinularioside proved to moderately inhibit LPS-induced NO release, providing interesting clues into the poorly understood structure-activity relationships for anti-inflammatory glycolipids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. On-line surfactant monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, K.I.; Neal, E.E.; Soran, P.D.; Smith, B.

    1995-04-01

    This group has developed a process to extract metal ions from dilute aqueous solutions. The process uses water soluble polymers to complex metal ions. The metal/polymer complex is concentrated by ultrafiltration and the metals are recovered by a pH adjustment that frees the metal ions. The metal ions pass through the ultrafiltration membrane and are recovered in a concentrated form suitable for reuse. Surfactants are present in one of the target waste streams. Surfactants foul the costly ultrafiltration membranes. It was necessary to remove the surfactants before processing the waste stream. This paper discusses an on-line device the authors fabricated to monitor the process stream to assure that all the surfactant had been removed. The device is inexpensive and sensitive to very low levels of surfactants.

  14. Major surface antigen, P30, of Toxoplasma gondii is anchored by a glycolipid

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S.D.; Boothroyd, J.C.

    1989-04-05

    P30, the major surface antigen of the parasitic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, can be specifically labeled with (/sup 3/H)palmitic acid and with myo-(2-/sup 3/H)inositol. The fatty acid label can be released by treatment of P30 with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Such treatment exposes an immunological cross-reacting determinant first described on Trypanosoma brucei variant surface glycoprotein. PI-PLC cleavage of intact parasites metabolically labeled with (/sup 35/S)methionine results in the release of intact P30 polypeptide in a form which migrates faster in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These results argue that P30 is anchored by a glycolipid. Results from thin layer chromatography analysis of purified (/sup 3/H) palmitate-labeled P30 treated with PI-PLC, together with susceptibility to mild alkali hydrolysis and to cleavage with phospholipase A2, suggest that the glycolipid anchor of T. gondii P30 includes a 1,2-diacylglycerol moiety.

  15. Alteration of glycolipids in ras-transfected NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Matyas, G.R.; Aaronson, S.A.; Brady, R.O.; Fishman, P.H.

    1987-09-01

    Glycosphingolipid alterations upon viral transformation are well documented. Transformation of mouse 3T3 cells with murine sarcoma viruses results in marked decreases in the levels of gangliosides GM1 and GD1a and an increase in gangliotriaosylceramide. The transforming oncogenes of these viruses have been identified as members of the ras gene family. The authors analyzed NIH 3T3 cells transfected with human H-, K- and N-ras oncogenes for their glycolipid composition and expression of cell surface gangliosides. Using conventional thin-layer chromatographic analysis, they found that the level of GM3 was increased and that of GD1a was slightly decreased or unchanged, and GM1 was present but not in quantifiable levels. Cell surface levels of GM1 were determined by /sup 125/I-labeled cholera toxin binding to intact cells. GD1a was determined by cholera toxin binding to cells treated with sialidase prior to toxin binding. All ras-transfected cells had decreased levels of surface GM1 and GD1 as compared to logarithmically growing normal NIH 3T3 cells. Levels of GM1 and, to a lesser extent, GD1a increased as the latter cells became confluent. Using a monoclonal antibody assay, they found that gangliotriaosylceramide was present in all ras-transfected cells studied but not in logarithmically growing untransfected cells. These results indicated that ras oncogenes derived form human tumors are capable of inducing alterations in glycolipid composition.

  16. Hydration and molecular motions in synthetic phytanyl-chained glycolipid vesicle membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Baba, T; Minamikawa, H; Hato, M; Handa, T

    2001-01-01

    Proton permeation rates across membranes of a synthetic branch-chained glycolipid, 1,3-di-O-phytanyl-2-O-(beta-D-maltotriosyl)glycerol (Mal3(Phyt)2) as well as a branch-chained phospholipid, diphytanoylphosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) were lower than those of straight-chained lipids such as egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EPC) by a factor of approximately 4 at pH 7.0 and 25 degrees C. To examine whether degrees of water penetration and molecular motions in Mal3(Phyt)2 membranes can account for the lower permeability, nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was applied to various membranes of branch-chained lipids (Mal3(Phyt)2, DPhPC, and a tetraether lipid from an extremely thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum), as well as straight-chained lipids (EPC, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG)) using several fluorescent lipids. Degrees of hydration of glycolipids, Mal3(Phyt)2, and DGDG were lower than those of phospholipids, EPC, POPC, and DPhPC at the membrane-water interfaces. DPhPC showed the highest hydration among the lipids examined. Meanwhile, rotational and lateral diffusive motions of the fluorescent phospholipid in branch-chained lipid membranes were more restricted than those in straight-chained ones. The results suggest that the restricted motion of chain segments rather than the lower hydration accounts for the lower proton permeability of branch-chained lipid membranes. PMID:11721000

  17. The moisturizing effects of glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, on human skin.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shuhei; Morita, Tomotake; Fukuoka, Tokuma; Imura, Tomohiro; Yanagidani, Shusaku; Sogabe, Atsushi; Kitamoto, Dai; Kitagawa, Masaru

    2012-01-01

    Glycolipid biosurfactants, such as mannosylerythritol lipids (MELs), are produced by different yeasts belonging to the genus Pseudozyma and have been attracting much attention as new cosmetic ingredients owing to their unique liquid-crystal-forming and moisturizing properties. In this study, the effects of different MEL derivatives on the skin were evaluated in detail using a three-dimensional cultured human skin model and an in vivo human study. The skin cells were cultured and treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the effects of different lipids on the SDS-damaged cells were evaluated on the basis of cell viability. Most MEL derivatives efficiently recovered the viability of the cells and showed high recovery rates (over 80%) comparable with that of natural ceramide. It is interesting that the recovery rate with MEL-A prepared from olive oil was significantly higher than that of MEL-A prepared from soybean oil. The water retention properties of MEL-B were further investigated on human forearm skin in a preliminary study. Compared with the control, the aqueous solution of MEL-B (5 wt%) was estimated to considerably increase the stratum corneum water content in the skin. Moreover, perspiration on the skin surface was clearly suppressed by treatment with the MEL-B solution. These results suggest that MELs are likely to exhibit a high moisturizing action, by assisting the barrier function of the skin. Accordingly, the yeast glycolipids have a strong potential as a new ingredient for skin care products.

  18. Extension of the GLYCAM06 Biomolecular Force Field to Lipids, Lipid Bilayers and Glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Tessier, Matthew B; Demarco, Mari L; Yongye, Austin B; Woods, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    GLYCAM06 is a generalisable biomolecular force field that is extendible to diverse molecular classes in the spirit of a small-molecule force field. Here we report parameters for lipids, lipid bilayers and glycolipids for use with GLYCAM06. Only three lipid-specific atom types have been introduced, in keeping with the general philosophy of transferable parameter development. Bond stretching, angle bending, and torsional force constants were derived by fitting to quantum mechanical data for a collection of minimal molecular fragments and related small molecules. Partial atomic charges were computed by fitting to ensemble-averaged quantum-computed molecular electrostatic potentials.In addition to reproducing quantum mechanical internal rotational energies and experimental valence geometries for an array of small molecules, condensed-phase simulations employing the new parameters are shown to reproduce the bulk physical properties of a DMPC lipid bilayer. The new parameters allow for molecular dynamics simulations of complex systems containing lipids, lipid bilayers, glycolipids, and carbohydrates, using an internally consistent force field. By combining the AMBER parameters for proteins with the GLYCAM06 parameters, it is also possible to simulate protein-lipid complexes and proteins in biologically relevant membrane-like environments.

  19. Mutation of β-glucosidase 2 causes glycolipid storage disease and impaired male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Yildiz; Matern, Heidrun; Thompson, Bonne; Allegood, Jeremy C.; Warren, Rebekkah L.; Ramirez, Denise M.O.; Hammer, Robert E.; Hamra, F. Kent; Matern, Siegfried; Russell, David W.

    2006-01-01

    β-Glucosidase 2 (GBA2) is a resident enzyme of the endoplasmic reticulum thought to play a role in the metabolism of bile acid–glucose conjugates. To gain insight into the biological function of this enzyme and its substrates, we generated mice deficient in GBA2 and found that these animals had normal bile acid metabolism. Knockout males exhibited impaired fertility. Microscopic examination of sperm revealed large round heads (globozoospermia), abnormal acrosomes, and defective mobility. Glycolipids, identified as glucosylceramides by mass spectrometry, accumulated in the testes, brains, and livers of the knockout mice but did not cause obvious neurological symptoms, organomegaly, or a reduction in lifespan. Recombinant GBA2 hydrolyzed glucosylceramide to glucose and ceramide; the same reaction catalyzed by the β-glucosidase acid 1 (GBA1) defective in subjects with the Gaucher’s form of lysosomal storage disease. We conclude that GBA2 is a glucosylceramidase whose loss causes accumulation of glycolipids and an endoplasmic reticulum storage disease. PMID:17080196

  20. Innovation in surfactant therapy II: surfactant administration by aerosolization.

    PubMed

    Pillow, J Jane; Minocchieri, S

    2012-01-01

    Instilled bolus surfactant is the only approved surfactant treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. However, recent trends towards increased utilization of noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with surfactant deficiency have created a demand for a similarly noninvasive means of administering exogenous surfactant. Past approaches to surfactant nebulization met with varying success due to inefficient aerosol devices resulting in low intrapulmonary delivery doses of surfactant with variable clinical effectiveness. The recent development of vibrating membrane nebulizers, coupled with appropriate positioning of the interface device, indicates that efficient delivery of aerosolized surfactant is now a realistic goal in infants. Evidence of clinical effect despite low total administered dose in pilot studies, together with suggestions of enhanced homogeneity of pulmonary distribution indicate that this therapy may be applied in a cost-effective manner, with minimal patient handling and disruption. These studies need to be subjected to appropriately designed randomized controlled trials. Further work is also required to determine the optimum delivery route (mask, intranasal prong, nasopharyngeal or laryngeal), dosing amount and redosing interval. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Surfactant damping of water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary S.; Dowling, David R.; Schultz, William W.

    1997-11-01

    The most well known and perhaps most important distinguishing characteristic of a water surface laden with surfactant is the profound increase in small-wave damping with the addition of even small amounts of surfactant material. It would seem to follow that damping increases with increasing surfactant concentration. This is undoubtedly true for some surfactants, however our experiments with a soluble surfactant show that it is possible to increase surfactant concentration and measure a decrease in damping. While the increased concentration is accompanied by a dramatic decrease in measured static surface tension, some of the capillary-wave frequency regime is less damped. Experimental measurements of the real and imaginary parts of the wave speed are compared with existing theory where at least one other physical quantity besides surface tension is needed to properly model the interface. Our on-going work with insoluble surfactants may also provide an example of this type of behavior for materials that do not readily transfer to and from the bulk water. [Supported by the Office of Naval Research

  2. Electrokinetic investigation of surfactant adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bellmann, C; Synytska, A; Caspari, A; Drechsler, A; Grundke, K

    2007-05-15

    Fuerstenau [D.W. Fuerstenau, in: M.L. Hair (Ed.), Dekker, New York, 1971, p. 143] has already discussed the role of hydrocarbon chain of surfactants, the effect of alkyl chain length, chain structure and the pH of the solution on the adsorption process of surfactants. Later Kosmulski [M. Kosmulski, Chemical Properties of Material Surfaces, Surfactant Science Series, vol. 102, Dekker, New York, Basel, 2001] included the effect of surfactant concentration, equilibration time, temperature and electrolyte in his approaches. Certainly, the character of the head groups of the surfactant and the properties of the adsorbent surface are the basis for the adsorption process. Different surfactants and adsorbents cause different adsorption mechanisms described firstly by Rosen [M.J. Rosen, Surfactants and Interfacial Phenomena, second ed., Wiley, New York, 1989]. These adsorption mechanisms and their influencing factors were studied by electrokinetic investigations. Here only changes of the charges at the surfaces could be detected. To control the results of electrokinetic investigations they were compared with results from ellipsometric measurements. In the case of surfactant adsorption the chain length was vitally important. It could be shown by the adsorption of alkyl trimethyl ammonium bromides onto polymer films spin coated at wafer surfaces. The influence of the chain length depending on surface properties of the polymer film was studied. Streaming potential measurements were applied for these investigations. The obtained results enabled us to calculate the molar cohesive free energy per mol of CH2-group in the alkaline chain of the surfactant if all other specific adsorption effects were neglected.

  3. Structural Studies of Protein-Surfactant Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Chodankar, S. N.; Aswal, V. K.; Wagh, A. G.

    2008-03-17

    The structure of protein-surfactant complexes of two proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lysozyme in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) has been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). It is observed that these two proteins form different complex structures with the surfactant. While BSA protein undergoes unfolding on addition of surfactant, lysozyme does not show any unfolding even up to very high surfactant concentrations. The unfolding of BSA protein is caused by micelle-like aggregation of surfactant molecules in the complex. On the other hand, for lysozyme protein there is only binding of individual surfactant molecules to protein. Lysozyme in presence of higher surfactant concentrations has protein-surfactant complex structure coexisting with pure surfactant micelles.

  4. Pulmonary surfactant for neonatal respiratory disorders.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jeffrey D; Ballard, Roberta A

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant therapy has revolutionized neonatal care and is used routinely for preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Recent investigation has further elucidated the function of surfactant-associated proteins and their contribution toward surfactant and lung immune defense functions. As the field of neonatology moves away from intubation and mechanical ventilation of preterm infants at birth toward more aggressive use of nasal continuous positive airway pressure, the optimal timing of exogenous surfactant therapy remains unclear. Evidence suggests that preterm neonates with bronchopulmonary dysplasia and prolonged mechanical ventilation also experience surfactant dysfunction; however, exogenous surfactant therapy beyond the first week of life has not been well studied. Surfactant replacement therapy has been studied for use in other respiratory disorders, including meconium aspiration syndrome and pneumonia. Commercial surfactant preparations currently available are not optimal, given the variability of surfactant protein content and their susceptibility to inhibition. Further progress in the treatment of neonatal respiratory disorders may include the development of "designer" surfactant preparations.

  5. The Drosophila melanogaster brainiac protein is a glycolipid-specific beta 1,3N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Müller, Reto; Altmann, Friedrich; Zhou, Dapeng; Hennet, Thierry

    2002-09-06

    Mutations at the Drosophila melanogaster brainiac locus lead to defective formation of the follicular epithelium during oogenesis and to neural hyperplasia. The brainiac gene encodes a type II transmembrane protein structurally similar to mammalian beta1,3-glycosyltransferases. We have cloned the brainiac gene from D. melanogaster genomic DNA and expressed it as a FLAG-tagged recombinant protein in Sf9 insect cells. Glycosyltransferase assays showed that brainiac is capable of transferring N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) to beta-linked mannose (Man), with a marked preference for the disaccharide Man(beta1,4)Glc, the core of arthro-series glycolipids. The activity of brainiac toward arthro-series glycolipids was confirmed by showing that the enzyme efficiently utilized glycolipids from insects as acceptors whereas it did not with glycolipids from mammalian cells. Methylation analysis of the brainiac reaction product revealed a beta1,3 linkage between GlcNAc and Man, proving that brainiac is a beta1,3GlcNAc-transferase. Human beta1,3GlcNAc-transferases structurally related to brainiac were unable to transfer GlcNAc to Man(beta1,4)Glc-based acceptor substrates and failed to rescue a homozygous lethal brainiac allele, indicating that these proteins are paralogous and not orthologous to brainiac.

  6. The glycolipids from the non-capsulated strain of Pneumococcus I-192R, A.T.C.C. 12213

    PubMed Central

    Brundish, D. E.; Shaw, N.; Baddiley, J.

    1965-01-01

    1. The total lipid was extracted from the non-capsulated strain of Pneumococcus I–192R, A.T.C.C. 12213, with chloroform–methanol mixtures. Two glycolipids were isolated by chromatography on silicic acid and DEAE-cellulose (acetate form). 2. The major glycolipid was obtained pure in a yield of 640mg./34g. dry wt. of cells and represents about 34% of the total lipid. It contained galactose, glucose, glycerol and fatty acid ester residues in the proportions 1:1:1:2, and yielded on saponification a crystalline non-reducing glycoside. 3. The structure of the glycoside was shown to be O-α-d-galactopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-α-d-glucopyranosyl-(1→1)-d-glycerol. The fatty acids obtained on saponification were identified by gas–liquid partition chromatography of their methyl esters. 4. The minor glycolipid was obtained as a 1:1 (w/w) mixture with the major component, but after saponification the two glycosides were separated by paper chromatography. Evidence was obtained for the structure of the glycoside derived from the minor glycolipid as 1-O-α-d-glucosylglycerol. 5. A general method is described for determining the stereochemistry of the glycerol moiety in 1-linked glycerol glycosides. PMID:16749097

  7. Antibodies to glycolipids activate complement and promote proteinuria in passive Heymann nephritis.

    PubMed Central

    Susani, M.; Schulze, M.; Exner, M.; Kerjaschki, D.

    1994-01-01

    Passive Heymann nephritis is an experimental rat model of human membranous nephropathy induced by injection of antisera against crude renal cortical fractions such as Fx1A or rat tubular microvilli. This results in the formation of subepithelial immune deposits, the activation of the C5b-9 membrane attack complex of complement, and severe proteinuria. While the formation of immune deposits is attributed to in situ immune complex formation with antibodies specific for the gp330-Heymann nephritis antigenic complex (HNAC), activation of complement and proteinuria appear to be caused by at least one additional antibody species present in anti-Fx1A sera. We have separated by affinity absorption polyspecific antisera against Fx1A and rat microvilli into one IgG fraction directed specifically against microvillar proteins (anti-Fx1A-prot) and another IgG fraction specific for glycolipids (ant-Fx1A-lip) of tubular microvilli. When injected into rats, the anti-Fx1A-prot fraction induced immune deposits but failed to activate complement or produce proteinuria, similar to results obtained with affinity-purified anti-gp330 IgG. When the antibodies of the anti-Fx1A-lip fraction were injected alone they did not bind to glomeruli. By contrast, when the IgGs specific for the Fx1A-prot fraction (or for gp330-HNAC) were combined with those directed against the Fx1A-lip glycolipid preparation, immune deposits were formed, in situ complement activation was observed, and also proteinuria was induced. It is concluded that within anti-Fx1A and anti-microvillar sera there are at least two IgG fractions of relevance for the development of PHN: one directed against the gp330-HNAC complex which is responsible for the development of immune deposits, and a second specific for glycolipid antigen(s) which activate(s) the complement cascade. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:8160779

  8. Minimally invasive approaches for surfactant administration.

    PubMed

    Trevisanuto, D; Marchetto, L

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is the most common respiratory morbidity in preterm infants. In addition to respiratory support, the current clinical treatment includes endotracheal intubation and rapid instillation of exogenous surfactant. However, this approach needs skilled operators and has been associated with complications such as hemodynamic instability and electroencephalogram abnormalities. New, less invasive methods for surfactant administration are needed. In this article, we reviewed the available noninvasive procedures for surfactant administration. In particular, we focused on aerosolized surfactant and surfactant administration through LMA.

  9. Nanomapping of CD1d-glycolipid complexes on THP1 cells by using simultaneous topography and recognition imaging.

    PubMed

    Duman, Memed; Chtcheglova, Lilia A; Zhu, Rong; Bozna, Bianca L; Polzella, Paolo; Cerundolo, Vicenzo; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2013-09-01

    CD1d molecule, a monomorphic major histocompatibility complex class I-like molecule, presents different types of glycolipids to invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells that play an important role in immunity to infection and tumors, as well as in regulating autoimmunity. Here, we present simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) analysis to detect density, distribution and localization of single CD1d molecules on THP1 cells that were loaded with different glycolipids. TREC was conducted using magnetically coated atomic force microscopy tips functionalized with a biotinylated iNKT cell receptor (TCR). The recognition map revealed binding sites visible as dark spots, resulting from oscillation amplitude reduction during specific binding between iNKT TCR and the CD1d-glycolipid complex. THP1 cells were pulsed with three different glycolipids (α-GalCer, C20 and OCH12) for 4 and 16 hr. Whereas CD1d-α-GalCer and CD1d-C20:2 complexes on cellular membrane formed smaller microdomains up to ~10 000 nm(2) (dimension area), OCH12 loaded CD1d complexes presented larger clusters with a dimension up to ~30 000 nm(2). Moreover, the smallest size of recognition spots was about 25 nm, corresponding to a single CD1d binding site. TREC successfully revealed the distribution and localization of CD1d-glycolipid complexes on THP1 cell with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: surfactant dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... easy. Without normal surfactant, the tissue surrounding the air sacs in the lungs (the alveoli ) sticks together (because of a force called surface tension) after exhalation, causing the alveoli ...

  11. Surfactant-enhanced aquifier remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Fountain, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    Surfactants can be used to rapidly remove NAPL from contaminated aquifers. They are effective for virtually any organic contaminant. Use in LNAPL contaminated sites requires adequate hydraulic conductivity and control of flow using either hydraulic or physical methods. The presence of DNAPL requires consideration of vertical mobility; a competent confining layer (aquitard) is required if additional aquifers are present at greater depths. Surfactant processes, whether based upon mobilization or solubilization, can be effective at mass removal, but cannot be expected to provide resortation to drinking water standards. The fraction of mass removal, and the cost of remediation using surfactants are dependent upon a sites hydrogeology. Both minimization of cost and maximization of NAPL removal requires detailed characterization of sites contaminant distribution and hydrogeology. Assessment of the feasibility of surfactant-enhanced remediation is dependent upon a detailed site characterization.

  12. Interactions between polymers and surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    de Gennes, P.G. )

    1990-11-01

    A surfactant film (at the water/air interface, or in a bilayer) is exposed to a solution of a neutral, flexible, polymer. Depending on the interactions, and on the Langmuir pressure II of the pure surfactant film, the authors expected to find three types of behavior: (I) the polymer does not absorb; (II) the polymer absorbs and mixes with the surfactant; (III) the polymer absorbs but segregates from the surfactant. Their interest here is in case II. They predict that (a) bilayers become rigid; (b) bilayers, exposed to polymer on one side only, tend to bend strongly; (c) the surface viscosity of monolayers or bilayers is considerably increased; soap films or foams, which usually drain by turbulent (two-dimensional) flows, may be stabilized in case II.

  13. Convenient and rapid removal of detergent from glycolipids in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Kabayama, Kazuya

    2012-03-01

    Although detergents are often essential in protocols, they are usually incompatible with further biochemical analysis. There are several methods for detergent removal, but the procedures are complicated or suffer from sample loss. Here, we describe a convenient and rapid method for detergent removal from sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids (gangliosides) and neutral glycolipids in detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) microdomain. It is based on selective detergent extraction, in which the sample is dried on a glass tube, followed by washing with organic solvent. We investigated 18 organic solvents and used high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-QIT-TOF MS) to confirm that dichloroethane (DCE) was the most suitable solvent and completely removed the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. Furthermore, DCE extraction effectively removed interference caused by other nonionic, zwitterionic, or ionic detergents in MALDI-QIT-TOF MS analysis.

  14. Pivotal surfaces in inverse hexagonal and cubic phases of phospholipids and glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Derek

    2011-03-01

    Data on the location and dimensions of the pivotal surfaces in inverse hexagonal (H(II)) and inverse cubic (Q(II)) phases of phospholipids and glycolipids are reviewed. This includes the H(II) phases of dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, 2:1 mol/mol mixtures of saturated fatty acids with the corresponding diacyl phosphatidylcholine, and glucosyl didodecylglycerol, and also the Q(II)(230/G) gyroid inverse cubic phases of monooleoylglycerol and glucosyl didodecylglycerol. Data from the inverse cubic phases are largely compatible with those from inverse hexagonal H(II)-phases. The pivotal plane is located in the hydrophobic region, relatively close to the polar-apolar interface. The area per lipid at the pivotal plane is similar in size to lipid cross-sectional areas found in the fluid lamellar phase (L(α)) of lipid bilayers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Convenient and rapid removal of detergent from glycolipids in detergent-resistant membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yusuke; Kabayama, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    Although detergents are often essential in protocols, they are usually incompatible with further biochemical analysis. There are several methods for detergent removal, but the procedures are complicated or suffer from sample loss. Here, we describe a convenient and rapid method for detergent removal from sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids (gangliosides) and neutral glycolipids in detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) microdomain. It is based on selective detergent extraction, in which the sample is dried on a glass tube, followed by washing with organic solvent. We investigated 18 organic solvents and used high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization quadrupole ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-QIT-TOF MS) to confirm that dichloroethane (DCE) was the most suitable solvent and completely removed the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. Furthermore, DCE extraction effectively removed interference caused by other nonionic, zwitterionic, or ionic detergents in MALDI-QIT-TOF MS analysis. PMID:22217704

  16. Natural Sphingomonas glycolipids vary greatly in their ability to activate natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Kinjo, Yuki; Pei, Bo; Bufali, Simone; Raju, Ravinder; Richardson, Stewart K; Imamura, Masakazu; Fujio, Masakazu; Wu, Douglass; Khurana, Archana; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi; Wong, Chi-Huey; Howell, Amy R; Seeberger, Peter H; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-07-21

    Mouse natural killer T (NKT) cells expressing an invariant T cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognize glycosphingolipids (GSLs) from Sphingomonas bacteria. The synthetic antigens previously tested, however, were designed to closely resemble the potent synthetic agonist alpha-galactosyl ceramide (alphaGalCer), which contains a monosaccharide and a C18:0 sphingosine lipid. Some Sphingomonas bacteria, however, also have oligosaccharide-containing GSLs, and they normally synthesize several GSLs with different sphingosine chains including one with a cyclopropyl ring-containing C21:0 (C21cycl) sphingosine. Here we studied the stimulation of NKT cells with synthetic GSL antigens containing natural tetrasaccharide sugars, or the C21cycl sphingosine. Our results indicate that there is a great degree of variability in the antigenic potency of different natural Sphingomonas glycolipids, with the C21cycl sphingosine having intermediate potency and the oligosaccharide-containing antigens exhibiting limited or no stimulatory capacity.

  17. Testing for anti-glycolipid IgM antibodies in chronic immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Giannotta, Claudia

    2011-06-01

    Antibodies to several nerve antigens have been reported in patients with chronic immune-mediated demyelinating neuropathies including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, multifocal motor neuropathy, and IgM paraproteinemic demyelinating polyneuropathy. The association of some reactivities with specific neuropathies, such as IgM antibodies to the myelin-associated glycoprotein in neuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal gammopathy, permitted to cast some light in their pathogenetic mechanisms and introduced new useful tools in their diagnosis. Other antibodies have been variably associated with other forms of neuropathy or with neuropathy itself, casting some doubts on their diagnostic relevance in the workout of these neuropathies. This is particularly true for IgM antibodies to glycolipids, including ganglioside and sulfatides, whose possible role in immune-mediated neuropathies is still debated and will be here reviewed. © 2011 Peripheral Nerve Society.

  18. pH-triggered formation of nanoribbons from yeast-derived glycolipid biosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Cuvier, Anne-Sophie; Berton, Jan; Stevens, Christian V; Fadda, Giulia C; Babonneau, Florence; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Soetaert, Wim; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Baccile, Niki

    2014-06-14

    In the present paper, we show that the saturated form of acidic sophorolipids, a family of industrially scaled bolaform microbial glycolipids, unexpectedly forms chiral nanofibers only at pH below 7.5. In particular, we illustrate that this phenomenon derives from a subtle cooperative effect of molecular chirality, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals forces and steric hindrance. The pH-responsive behaviour was shown by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), pH-titration and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) while the nanoscale chirality was evidenced by Circular Dichroism (CD) and cryo Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM). The packing of sophorolipids within the ribbons was studied using Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS), Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) and 2D (1)H-(1)H through-space correlations via Nuclear Magnetic Resonance under very fast (67 kHz) Magic Angle Spinning (MAS-NMR).

  19. T cell receptor recognition of CD1b presenting a mycobacterial glycolipid

    PubMed Central

    Gras, Stephanie; Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Shahine, Adam; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Bhati, Mugdha; Tan, Li Lynn; Halim, Hanim; Tuttle, Kathryn D.; Gapin, Laurent; Le Nours, Jérôme; Moody, D. Branch; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    CD1 proteins present microbial lipids to T cells. Germline-encoded mycolyl lipid-reactive (GEM) T cells with conserved αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) recognize CD1b presenting mycobacterial mycolates. As the molecular basis underpinning TCR recognition of CD1b remains unknown, here we determine the structure of a GEM TCR bound to CD1b presenting glucose-6-O-monomycolate (GMM). The GEM TCR docks centrally above CD1b, whereby the conserved TCR α-chain extensively contacts CD1b and GMM. Through mutagenesis and study of T cells from tuberculosis patients, we identify a consensus CD1b footprint of TCRs present among GEM T cells. Using both the TCR α- and β-chains as tweezers to surround and grip the glucose moiety of GMM, GEM TCRs create a highly specific mechanism for recognizing this mycobacterial glycolipid. PMID:27807341

  20. Physicochemical properties of nanoparticles regulate translocation across pulmonary surfactant monolayer and formation of lipoprotein corona.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guoqing; Jiao, Bao; Shi, Xinghua; Valle, Russell P; Fan, Qihui; Zuo, Yi Y

    2013-12-23

    Interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film, being the first line of host defense, represents the initial bio-nano interaction in the lungs. Such interaction determines the fate of the inhaled nanoparticles and their potential therapeutic or toxicological effect. Despite considerable progress in optimizing physicochemical properties of nanoparticles for improved delivery and targeting, the mechanisms by which inhaled nanoparticles interact with the pulmonary surfactant film are still largely unknown. Here, using combined in vitro and in silico methods, we show how hydrophobicity and surface charge of nanoparticles differentially regulate the translocation and interaction with the pulmonary surfactant film. While hydrophilic nanoparticles generally translocate quickly across the pulmonary surfactant film, a significant portion of hydrophobic nanoparticles are trapped by the surfactant film and encapsulated in lipid protrusions upon film compression. Our results support a novel model of pulmonary surfactant lipoprotein corona associated with inhaled nanoparticles of different physicochemical properties. Our data suggest that the study of pulmonary nanotoxicology and nanoparticle-based pulmonary drug delivery should consider this lipoprotein corona.

  1. Th1-skewed tissue responses to a mycolyl glycolipid in mycobacteria-infected rhesus macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Hattori, Yuki; Komori, Takaya; Nakamura, Takashi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Sugita, Masahiko

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Glucose monomycolate (GMM) is a marker glycolipid for active tuberculosis. •Tissue responses to GMM involved up-regulation of Th1-attracting chemokines. •Th1-skewed local responses were mounted at the GMM-injected tissue. -- Abstract: Trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate (TDM) is a major glycolipid of the cell wall of mycobacteria with remarkable adjuvant functions. To avoid detection by the host innate immune system, invading mycobacteria down-regulate the expression of TDM by utilizing host-derived glucose as a competitive substrate for their mycolyltransferases; however, this enzymatic reaction results in the concomitant biosynthesis of glucose monomycolate (GMM) which is recognized by the acquired immune system. GMM-specific, CD1-restricted T cell responses have been detected in the peripheral blood of infected human subjects and monkeys as well as in secondary lymphoid organs of small animals, such as guinea pigs and human CD1-transgenic mice. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined how tissues respond at the site where GMM is produced. Here we found that rhesus macaques vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin mounted a chemokine response in GMM-challenged skin that was favorable for recruiting T helper (Th)1 T cells. Indeed, the expression of interferon-γ, but not Th2 or Th17 cytokines, was prominent in the GMM-injected tissue. The GMM-elicited tissue response was also associated with the expression of monocyte/macrophage-attracting CC chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL4 and CCL8. Furthermore, the skin response to GMM involved the up-regulated expression of granulysin and perforin. Given that GMM is produced primarily by pathogenic mycobacteria proliferating within the host, the Th1-skewed tissue response to GMM may function efficiently at the site of infection.

  2. Enterococcus faecalis Glycolipids Modulate Lipoprotein-Content of the Bacterial Cell Membrane and Host Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Andreas; Sava, Irina G.; Wobser, Dominique; Bao, Yinyin; Hese, Katrin; Broszat, Melanie; Henneke, Philipp; Becher, Dörte; Huebner, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of the cell membrane composition of E. faecalis on its recognition by the host immune system. To this end, we employed an E. faecalis deletion mutant (ΔbgsA) that does not synthesize the major cell membrane glycolipid diglycosyl-diacylglycerol (DGlcDAG). Proteomic analysis revealed that 13 of a total of 21 upregulated surface-associated proteins of E. faecalis ΔbgsA were lipoproteins. This led to a total lipoprotein content in the cell membrane of 35.8% in ΔbgsA compared to only 9.4% in wild-type bacteria. Increased lipoprotein content strongly affected the recognition of ΔbgsA by mouse macrophages in vitro with an increased stimulation of TNF-α production by heat-fixed bacteria and secreted antigens. Inactivation of the prolipoprotein diacylglycerol transferase (lgt) in ΔbgsA abrogated TNF-α induction by a ΔbgsA_lgt double mutant indicating that lipoproteins mediate increased activation of mouse macrophages by ΔbgsA. Heat-fixed ΔbgsA bacteria, culture supernatant, or cell membrane lipid extract activated transfected HEK cells in a TLR2-dependent fashion; the same was not true of wild-type bacteria. In mice infected intraperitoneally with a sublethal dose of E. faecalis we observed a 70% greater mortality in mice infected with ΔbgsA compared with wild-type-infected mice. Increased mortality due to ΔbgsA infection was associated with elevated plasma levels of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and MIP-2. In summary, our results provide evidence that an E. faecalis mutant lacking its major bilayer forming glycolipid DGlcDAG upregulates lipoprotein expression leading to increased activation of the host innate immune system and virulence in vivo. PMID:26172831

  3. Soluble human TLR2 ectodomain binds diacylglycerol from microbial lipopeptides and glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Dalmaroni, Maximiliano J; Radcliffe, Catherine M; Harvey, David J; Wormald, Mark R; Verdino, Petra; Ainge, Gary D; Larsen, David S; Painter, Gavin F; Ulevitch, Richard; Beutler, Bruce; Rudd, Pauline M; Dwek, Raymond A; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key innate immune receptors that recognize conserved features of biological molecules that are found in microbes. In particular, TLR2 has been reported to be activated by different kinds of microbial ligands. To advance our understanding of the interaction of TLR2 with its ligands, the recombinant human TLR2 ectodomain (hTLR2ED) was expressed using a baculovirus/insect cell expression system, and its biochemical as well as ligand binding properties were investigated. The hTLR2ED binds synthetic bacterial and mycoplasmal lipopeptides, lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus, and synthetic lipoarabinomannan precursors from Mycobacterium at extracellular physiological conditions, in the absence of its co-receptors TLR1 and TLR6. We also determined that lipopeptides and glycolipids cannot bind simultaneously to hTLR2ED and that the phosphatidyl inositol mannoside 2 (Pim2) is the minimal lipoarabinomannan structure for binding to hTLR2ED. Binding of hTLR2ED to Pim4, which contains a diacylglycerol group with one of its acyl chain containing 19 carbon atoms, indicates that hTLR2ED can bind ligands with acyl chains longer than 16 carbon atoms. In summary, our data indicate that diacylglycerol is the ligand moiety of microbial glycolipids and lipoproteins that bind to hTLR2ED and that both types of ligands bind to the same binding site of hTLR2ED. The design of novel inhibitors of TLR2, based on their ability to bind to TLR2 but not activate the TLR2 signaling pathway, may lead to the development of novel treatments for septic shock caused by Gram- positive bacteria. PMID:24591200

  4. Antimicrobial activities of a promising glycolipid biosurfactant from a novel marine Staphylococcus saprophyticus SBPS 15.

    PubMed

    Mani, P; Dineshkumar, G; Jayaseelan, T; Deepalakshmi, K; Ganesh Kumar, C; Senthil Balan, S

    2016-12-01

    Biosurfactants have gained a renewed interest in the recent years for their commercial application in diverse research areas. Recent evidences suggest that the antimicrobial activities exhibited by biosurfactants make them promising molecules for the application in the field of therapeutics. Marine microbes are well known for their unique metabolic and functional properties; however, few reports are available till date regarding their biosurfactant production and antimicrobial potential. In an ongoing survey for bioactive microbial metabolites from microbes isolated from diverse ecological niches, a marine Staphylococcus saprophyticus SBPS 15 isolated from the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated coastal site, Puducherry, India, was identified as a promising biosurfactant producer based on multiple screening methods. This bacterium exhibited growth-dependent biosurfactant production and the recorded yield was 1.345 ± 0.056 g/L (on dry weight basis). The biosurfactant was purified and chemically characterized as a glycolipid with a molecular mass of 606.7 Da, based on TLC, biochemical estimation methods, FT-IR spectrum and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis. Further, the estimated molecular mass was different from the earlier reports on biosurfactants. This new glycolipid biosurfactant exhibited a board range of pH and temperature stability. Furthermore, it revealed a promising antimicrobial activity against many tested human pathogenic bacterial and fungal clinical isolates. Based on these observations, the isolated biosurfactant from the marine S. saprophyticus revealed board physicochemical stabilities and possess excellent antimicrobial activities which proves its significance for possible use in various therapeutic and biomedical applications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a biosurfactant from the bacterium, S. saprophyticus.

  5. Expression and Characterization of a Mycoplasma genitalium Glycosyltransferase in Membrane Glycolipid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, Eduardo; Martínez, Núria; Planas, Antoni

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasmas contain glycoglycerolipids in their plasma membrane as key structural components involved in bilayer properties and stability. A membrane-associated glycosyltransferase (GT), GT MG517, has been identified in Mycoplasma genitalium, which sequentially produces monoglycosyl- and diglycosyldiacylglycerols. When recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, the enzyme was functional in vivo and yielded membrane glycolipids from which Glcβ1,6GlcβDAG was identified as the main product. A chaperone co-expression system and extraction with CHAPS detergent afforded soluble protein that was purified by affinity chromatography. GT MG517 transfers glucosyl and galactosyl residues from UDP-Glc and UDP-Gal to dioleoylglycerol (DOG) acceptor to form the corresponding β-glycosyl-DOG, which then acts as acceptor to give β-diglycosyl-DOG products. The enzyme (GT2 family) follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. kcat is about 5-fold higher for UDP-Gal with either DOG or monoglucosyldioleoylglycerol acceptors, but it shows better binding for UDP-Glc than UDP-Gal, as reflected by the lower Km, which results in similar kcat/Km values for both donors. Although sequentially adding glycosyl residues with β-1,6 connectivity, the first glycosyltransferase activity (to DOG) is about 1 order of magnitude higher than the second (to monoglucosyldioleoylglycerol). Because the ratio between the non-bilayer-forming monoglycosyldiacylglycerols and the bilayer-prone diglycosyldiacylglycerols contributes to regulate the properties of the plasma membrane, both synthase activities are probably regulated. Dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (anionic phospholipid) activates the enzyme, kcat linearly increasing with dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol concentration. GT MG517 is shown to be encoded by an essential gene, and the addition of GT inhibitors results in cell growth inhibition. It is proposed that glycolipid synthases are potential targets for drug discovery against infections by mycoplasmas. PMID

  6. Bio-based Polymer Foam from Soyoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnaillie, Laetitia M.; Wool, Richard P.

    2006-03-01

    The growing bio-based polymeric foam industry is presently lead by plant oil-based polyols for polyurethanes and starch foams. We developed a new resilient, thermosetting foam system with a bio-based content higher than 80%. The acrylated epoxidized soybean oil and its fatty acid monomers is foamed with pressurized carbon dioxide and cured with free-radical initiators. The foam structure and pore dynamics are highly dependent on the temperature, viscosity and extent of reaction. Low-temperature cure hinds the destructive pore coalescence and the application of a controlled vacuum results in foams with lower densities ˜ 0.1 g/cc, but larger cells. We analyze the physics of foam formation and stability, as well as the structure and mechanical properties of the cured foam using rigidity percolation theory. The parameters studied include temperature, vacuum applied, and cross-link density. Additives bring additional improvements: nucleating agents and surfactants help produce foams with a high concentration of small cells and low bulk density. Hard and soft thermosetting foams with a bio content superior to 80% are successfully produced and tested. Potential applications include foam-core composites for hurricane-resistant housing, structural reinforcement for windmill blades, and tissue scaffolds.

  7. Separation and determination of glycolipids from edible plant sources by high-performance liquid chromatography and evaporative light-scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, T; Miyazawa, T

    1999-11-01

    Glycolipids from edible plant sources were accurately quantified by silica-based, normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using an evaporative light-scattering detector. Five major glycolipid classes (acylated steryl glucoside, steryl glucoside, ceramide monohexoside, monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, and digalactosyldiacylglycerol) were separated and determined with a binary gradient system consisting of chloroform and methanol/water (95:5, vol/vol) without any interference from other lipid classes and pigments. The described method was applied to 48 edible plants available in Japan including cereals, legumes, vegetables, and fruits. Examined plant species contained glycolipids in wide concentration ranges, such as 5-645 mg/100 g tissue.

  8. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    PubMed

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  9. Charged nanoparticles as supramolecular surfactants for controlling the growth and stability of microcrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalczyk, Bartlomiej; Bishop, Kyle J. M.; Lagzi, Istvan; Wang, Dawei; Wei, Yanhu; Han, Shuangbing; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2012-03-01

    Microcrystals of desired sizes are important in a range of processes and materials, including controlled drug release, production of pharmaceutics and food, bio- and photocatalysis, thin-film solar cells and antibacterial fabrics. The growth of microcrystals can be controlled by a variety of agents, such as multivalent ions, charged small molecules, mixed cationic-anionic surfactants, polyelectrolytes and other polymers, micropatterned self-assembled monolayers, proteins and also biological organisms during biomineralization. However, the chief limitation of current approaches is that the growth-modifying agents are typically specific to the crystalizing material. Here, we show that oppositely charged nanoparticles can function as universal surfactants that control the growth and stability of microcrystals of monovalent or multivalent inorganic salts, and of charged organic molecules. We also show that the solubility of the microcrystals can be further tuned by varying the thickness of the nanoparticle surfactant layers and by reinforcing these layers with dithiol crosslinks.

  10. Surfactant therapy and spontaneous diuresis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R; John, E; Diaz-Blanco, J; Ortega, R; Fornell, L; Vidyasagar, D

    1989-03-01

    The effect of artificial surfactant therapy on renal function and the onset of spontaneous diuresis was prospectively evaluated in 19 infants with hyaline membrane disease in a double-blind, controlled study. Twelve infants were in the surfactant group; seven infants received placebo (0.9% saline solution). There was no difference in the time of onset of spontaneous diuresis (as defined by output greater than or equal to 80% of intake). The glomerular filtration rate, determined by endogenous creatinine clearance, was also similar in the surfactant- and placebo-treated infants during the first 3 days of life. The fractional excretion of sodium was significantly higher in the placebo group at 24 hours and 36 hours. Infants in the placebo group had a higher negative sodium balance than those in the surfactant group. Ventilatory status improved significantly soon after surfactant treatment, as evidenced by improvement in the alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure ratio and by a lower mean airway pressure. These data suggest that ventilatory status can be improved without diuresis; the factors that regulate diuresis are multiple and not fully understood.

  11. Preparations of organobentonite using nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y H

    2001-08-01

    Due to hydrophilic environment at its surface, natural bentonite is an ineffective sorbent for nonpolar nonionic organic compounds in water even though it has high surface area. The surface properties of natural bentonite can be greatly modified by simple ion-exchange reactions with large organic cations (cationic surfactants) and this organobentonite is highly effective in removing nonionic organic compounds from water. Cationic surfactant derived organobentonites have been investigated extensively for a wide variety of environmental applications. In this study, the preparation of organobentonite using nonionic surfactants has been investigated for the first time. Results indicate that nonionic surfactants intercalates into the interlamellar space of bentonite and may demonstrate higher sorption capacity than cationic surfactant. It is possible to create large interlayer spacing and high organic carbon content organobentonite by use of nonionic surfactants with suitable balance between the hydrocarbon and ethylene oxide chain lengths. In addition, nonionic surfactant derived organobentonites are more chemically stable than cationic surfactant derived organobentonites.

  12. Surfactant recovery from water using foam fractionation

    SciTech Connect

    Tharapiwattananon, N.; Osuwan, S.; Scamehorn, J.F.

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of foam fractionation to recover surfactant from water. A simple continuous mode foam fractionation was used and three surfactants were studied (two anionic and one cationic). The effects of air flow rate, foam height, liquid height, liquid feed surfactant concentration, and sparger porosity were studied. This technique was shown to be effective in either surfactant recovery or the reduction of surfactant concentration in water to acceptable levels. As an example of the effectiveness of this technique, the cetylpyridinium chloride concentration in water can be reduced by 90% in one stage with a liquid residence time of 375 minutes. The surfactant concentration in the collapsed foam is 21.5 times the feed concentration. This cationic surfactant was easier to remove from water by foam fractionation than the anionic surfactants studied.

  13. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  14. Surfactant for Pediatric Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Willson, Douglas F.; Chess, Patricia R.; Notter, Robert H.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews exogenous surfactant therapy and its use in mitigating acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in infants, children, and adults. Biophysical and animal research documenting surfactant dysfunction in ALI/ARDS is described, and the scientific rationale for treatment with exogenous surfactant is discussed. Major emphasis is on reviewing clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients with ALI/ARDS. Particular advantages from surfactant therapy in direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes are described. Also discussed are additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactants in ALI/ARDS, including the multifaceted pathology of inflammatory lung injury, the effectiveness of surfactant delivery in injured lungs, and composition-based activity differences among clinical exogenous surfactant preparations. PMID:18501754

  15. Polymer/surfactant transport in micellar flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, C.S.; Kellerhals, G.E.

    1981-10-01

    For the surfactant formulations used (particular surfactant concentration, surfactant type, cosolvent type, cosolvent concentration, etc.), the results show that surfactant systems containing polymer as a mobility control agent may exhibit adverse polymer transport behavior during flow through porous media. Polymer generally lagged behind the surfactant even though the two species were injected simultaneously in the surfactant slug. This poor polymer transport definitely could have a detrimental effect on the efficiency of a micellar flooding process in the field. Phase studies show that when some surfactant systems containing xanthan gum are mixed with crude oil at various salinities, a polymer-rich, gel-like phase forms. The polymer lag phenomenon in core tests can be related to phase separation due to divalent cations generated in situ as a result of ion exchange with the clays and the surfactant. 18 refs.

  16. Biofoams and natural protein surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.

    2010-01-01

    Naturally occurring foam constituent and surfactant proteins with intriguing structures and functions are now being identified from a variety of biological sources. The ranaspumins from tropical frog foam nests comprise a range of proteins with a mixture of surfactant, carbohydrate binding and antimicrobial activities that together provide a stable, biocompatible, protective foam environment for developing eggs and embryos. Ranasmurfin, a blue protein from a different species of frog, displays a novel structure with a unique chromophoric crosslink. Latherin, primarily from horse sweat, but with similarities to salivary, oral and upper respiratory tract proteins, illustrates several potential roles for surfactant proteins in mammalian systems. These proteins, together with the previously discovered hydrophobins of fungi, throw new light on biomolecular processes at air–water and other interfaces. This review provides a perspective on these recent findings, focussing on structure and biophysical properties. PMID:20615601

  17. Specific tumor delivery of paclitaxel using glycolipid-like polymer micelles containing gold nanospheres.

    PubMed

    You, Jian; Wang, Zuhua; Du, Yongzhong; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Peizun; Zhou, Jialin; Liu, Fei; Li, Chun; Hu, Fuqiang

    2013-06-01

    It is difficult for most of the drug delivery systems to really display a temporal and spatial release of entrapped drug once the systems are iv administrated. We hypothesized that the photothermal effect, mediated by a near-infrared (NIR) laser and hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS), can modulate paclitaxel (PTX) release from polymer micelles, and further result in the enhanced antitumor activity of the micelles. We loaded PTX and HAuNS, which display strong plasmon absorption in the NIR region, into glycolipid-like polymer micelles with an excellent cell internalization capability. The surface of the micelles was conjugated successfully with a peptide, which has the specific-binding with EphB4, a member of the Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases overexpressed on cell membrane of numerous tumors, to increase the delivery of PTX into tumor cells. Rapid and repetitive drug release from our polymer (HP-TCS) micelles could be readily achieved upon NIR laser irradiation. Our data demonstrated the specific delivery of HP-TCS micelles into positive-EphB4 tumors using a duel-tumor model after iv administration during the whole experiment process (1-48 h). Interestingly, significantly higher uptake of the micelles by SKOV3 tumors (positive-EphB4) than A549 tumors (negtive-EphB4) was observed, with increased ratio on experiment time. However, the specific cell uptake was observed only during the short incubation time (1-4 h) in vitro. Our data also indicated the treatment of tumor cells with the micelles followed by NIR laser irradiation showed significantly greater toxicity activity than the treatment with the micelles alone, free PTX and the micelles (without PTX loading) plus NIR laser irradiation. The enhanced toxicity activity to tumor cells should be attributed to the enhanced drug cellular uptake mediated by the glycolipid-like micelles, chemical toxicity of the released drug from the micelles due to the trigger of NIR laser, and the photothermal ablation under NIR

  18. Microbial production of surfactants and their commercial potential.

    PubMed

    Desai, J D; Banat, I M

    1997-03-01

    Many microorganisms, especially bacteria, produce biosurfactants when grown on water-immiscible substrates. Biosurfactants are more effective, selective, environmentally friendly, and stable than many synthetic surfactants. Most common biosurfactants are glycolipids in which carbohydrates are attached to a long-chain aliphatic acid, while others, like lipopeptides, lipoproteins, and heteropolysaccharides, are more complex. Rapid and reliable methods for screening and selection of biosurfactant-producing microorganisms and evaluation of their activity have been developed. Genes involved in rhamnolipid synthesis (rhlAB) and regulation (rhlI and rhlR) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are characterized, and expression of rhlAB in heterologous hosts is discussed. Genes for surfactin production (sfp, srfA, and comA) in Bacillus spp. are also characterized. Fermentative production of biosurfactants depends primarily on the microbial strain, source of carbon and nitrogen, pH, temperature, and concentration of oxygen and metal ions. Addition of water-immiscible substrates to media and nitrogen and iron limitations in the media result in an overproduction of some biosurfactants. Other important advances are the use of water-soluble substrates and agroindustrial wastes for production, development of continuous recovery processes, and production through biotransformation. Commercialization of biosurfactants in the cosmetic, food, health care, pulp- and paper-processing, coal, ceramic, and metal industries has been proposed. However, the most promising applications are cleaning of oil-contaminated tankers, oil spill management, transportation of heavy crude oil, enhanced oil recovery, recovery of crude oil from sludge, and bioremediation of sites contaminated with hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and other pollutants. Perspectives for future research and applications are also discussed.

  19. Microbial production of surfactants and their commercial potential.

    PubMed Central

    Desai, J D; Banat, I M

    1997-01-01

    Many microorganisms, especially bacteria, produce biosurfactants when grown on water-immiscible substrates. Biosurfactants are more effective, selective, environmentally friendly, and stable than many synthetic surfactants. Most common biosurfactants are glycolipids in which carbohydrates are attached to a long-chain aliphatic acid, while others, like lipopeptides, lipoproteins, and heteropolysaccharides, are more complex. Rapid and reliable methods for screening and selection of biosurfactant-producing microorganisms and evaluation of their activity have been developed. Genes involved in rhamnolipid synthesis (rhlAB) and regulation (rhlI and rhlR) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are characterized, and expression of rhlAB in heterologous hosts is discussed. Genes for surfactin production (sfp, srfA, and comA) in Bacillus spp. are also characterized. Fermentative production of biosurfactants depends primarily on the microbial strain, source of carbon and nitrogen, pH, temperature, and concentration of oxygen and metal ions. Addition of water-immiscible substrates to media and nitrogen and iron limitations in the media result in an overproduction of some biosurfactants. Other important advances are the use of water-soluble substrates and agroindustrial wastes for production, development of continuous recovery processes, and production through biotransformation. Commercialization of biosurfactants in the cosmetic, food, health care, pulp- and paper-processing, coal, ceramic, and metal industries has been proposed. However, the most promising applications are cleaning of oil-contaminated tankers, oil spill management, transportation of heavy crude oil, enhanced oil recovery, recovery of crude oil from sludge, and bioremediation of sites contaminated with hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and other pollutants. Perspectives for future research and applications are also discussed. PMID:9106364

  20. Fiber coating with surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Amy Q.; Gleason, Blake; McKinley, Gareth H.; Stone, Howard A.

    2002-11-01

    When a fiber is withdrawn at low speeds from a pure fluid, the variation in the thickness of the entrained film with imposed fiber velocity is well-predicted by the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin (LLD) equation. However, surfactant additives are known to alter this response. We study the film thickening properties of the protein BSA (bovine serum albumin), the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, and the anionic surfactant SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate). For each of these additives, the film thickening factor alpha (the ratio of the measured thickness to the LLD prediction) for a fixed fiber radius varies as a function of the ratio of the surfactant concentration c to the critical micelle concentration (CMC). In the case of BSA, which does not form micelles, the reference value is the concentration at which multilayers form. As a result of Marangoni effects, alpha reaches a maximum as c approaches the CMC from below. However, when the surfactant concentration c exceeds the CMC, the behavior of alpha varies as a consequence of the dynamic surface properties, owing for example to different sorption kinetics of these additives, or possibly surface or bulk rheological effects. For SDS, alpha begins to decrease when c exceeds the CMC and causes the surface to become partially or completely remobilized, which is consistent with the experimental and theoretical results published for studies of slug flows of bubbles and surfactant solutions in a capillary tube and the rise of bubbles in surfactant solutions. However, when the SDS or Triton X-100 surfactant concentration is well above the CMC, we observe that the film thickening parameter alpha increases once again. In the case of SDS we observe a second maximum in the film thickening factor. For all the experiments, transport of monomers to the interface is limited by diffusion and the second maximum in the film thickening factor may be explained as a result of a nonmonotonic change in the stability characteristics of suspended SDS

  1. Glycolipid and Hormonal Profiles in Young Men with Early-Onset Androgenetic Alopecia: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Cannarella, Rossella; La Vignera, Sandro; Condorelli, Rosita A; Calogero, Aldo E

    2017-08-10

    Hormonal and metabolic abnormalities have been reported in men with early-onset androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Although this has been ascribed to the existence of a male polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-equivalent, data on this topic are inconsistent and this syndrome has not been already acknowledged. To evaluate if, already before the age of 35 years, any difference occurs in the glycolipid and hormonal profiles and in the body weight in men with AGA compared to age-matched controls, we performed a comprehensive meta-analysis of all the available observational case-control studies of literature, using MEDLINE, Google Schoolar and Scopus databases. Among 10596 papers retrieved, seven studies were finally included, enrolling a total of 1009 participants. Our findings demonstrate that young men with AGA have a slightly but significantly worse glycolipid profile compared to controls and a hormonal pattern resembling those of women with PCOS, already before the age of 35 years. Therefore, early-onset AGA might represent a phenotypic sign of the male PCOS-equivalent. The acknowledgement of this syndrome would be of importance to prevent the long-term consequences on health in the affected men. The glycolipid profile and the body weight should be monitored in men with AGA starting from the second decade of life.

  2. Functions and potential applications of glycolipid biosurfactants--from energy-saving materials to gene delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Dai; Isoda, Hiroko; Nakahara, Tadaatsu

    2002-01-01

    Biosurfactants (BS) produced by various microorganisms show unique properties (e.g., mild production conditions, lower toxicity, higher biodegradability and environmental compatibility) compared to their chemical counterparts. The numerous advantages of BS have prompted applications not only in the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries but in environmental protection and energy-saving technology as well. Glycolipid BS are the most promising, due to high productivity from renewable resources and versatile biochemical properties. Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL), which are glycolipid BS produced by a yeast Candida antarctrica, exhibit not only excellent interfacial properties but also remarkable differentiation-inducing activities against human leukemia cells. MEL also show a potential anti-agglomeration effect on ice particles in ice slurry used for cold thermal storage. Recently, the cationic liposome bearing MEL has been demonstrated to increase dramatically the efficiency of gene transfection into mammalian cells. These features of BS should broaden its applications in new advanced technologies. The current status of research and development on glycolipid BS, especially their function and potential applications, is discussed.

  3. SURFACTANT ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION WITH SURFACTANT REGENERATION/REUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A demonstration of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation was conducted during the spring of 1999 at Marine Corps Base, Camp LeJeune, NC. A PCE-DNAPL zone was identified and delineated by extensive soil sampling in 1997, and was further characteized by a partitioning interwell t...

  4. Biosurfactants and surfactants interacting with membranes and proteins: Same but different?

    PubMed

    Otzen, Daniel E

    2017-04-01

    Biosurfactants (BS) are surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms. For several decades they have attracted interest as promising alternatives to current petroleum-based surfactants. Aside from their green profile, they have remarkably low critical micelle concentrations, reduce the air/water surface tension to very low levels and are excellent emulsifiers, all of which make them comparable or superior to their synthetic counterparts. These remarkable physical properties derive from their more complex chemical structures in which hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are not as clearly separated as chemical surfactants but have a more mosaic distribution of polarity as well as branched or circular structures. This allows the lipopeptide surfactin to adopt spherical structures to facilitate dense packing at interfaces. They are also more complex. Glycolipid BS, e.g. rhamnolipids (RL) and sophorolipids, are produced biologically as mixtures which vary in the size and saturation of the hydrophobic region as well as modifications in the hydrophilic headgroup, such as the number of sugar groups and different levels of acetylation, leading to variable surface-active properties. Their amphiphilicity allows RL to insert easily into membranes at sub-cmc concentrations to modulate membrane structure and extract lipopolysaccharides, leading to extensive biofilm remodeling in vivo, sometimes in collaboration with hydrophobic RL precursors. Thanks to their mosaicity, even anionic BS like RL only bind weakly to proteins and show much lower denaturing potency, even supporting membrane protein refolding. Nevertheless, they can promote protein degradation by proteases e.g. by neutralizing positive charges, which together with their biofilm-combating properties makes them very promising detergent surfactants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  5. A Macrophage Response to Mycobacterium leprae Phenolic Glycolipid Initiates Nerve Damage in Leprosy.

    PubMed

    Madigan, Cressida A; Cambier, C J; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M; Scumpia, Philip O; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Zailaa, Joseph; Bloom, Barry R; Moody, D Branch; Smale, Stephen T; Sagasti, Alvaro; Modlin, Robert L; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2017-08-24

    Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy and is unique among mycobacterial diseases in producing peripheral neuropathy. This debilitating morbidity is attributed to axon demyelination resulting from direct interaction of the M. leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-1) with myelinating glia and their subsequent infection. Here, we use transparent zebrafish larvae to visualize the earliest events of M. leprae-induced nerve damage. We find that demyelination and axonal damage are not directly initiated by M. leprae but by infected macrophages that patrol axons; demyelination occurs in areas of intimate contact. PGL-1 confers this neurotoxic response on macrophages: macrophages infected with M. marinum-expressing PGL-1 also damage axons. PGL-1 induces nitric oxide synthase in infected macrophages, and the resultant increase in reactive nitrogen species damages axons by injuring their mitochondria and inducing demyelination. Our findings implicate the response of innate macrophages to M. leprae PGL-1 in initiating nerve damage in leprosy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Simultaneous analysis of glycolipids and phospholids molecular species in avocado (Persea americana Mill) fruit.

    PubMed

    Pacetti, Deborah; Boselli, Emanuele; Lucci, Paolo; Frega, Natale G

    2007-05-25

    The molecular species of phospholipids (PLs) and glycolipids (GLs) were simultaneously characterized in the pulp and almond of the avocado fruit (Persea americana Mill) of four varieties by means of high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry. In the pulp, the predominant species of monoglycosyldiglycerides (MGD) were m/z 796.6 (oleic/linolenic and linoleic/linoleic acids) and m/z 800.4 (stearic/linoleic and oleic/oleic acids). One of the main diglycosyldiglycerides (DGD) both in the pulp and almond was m/z 958.5 (oleic/linolenic); however, the pulp was also rich of m/z 962.4 (oleic/oleic), whereas in the almond, m/z 934.5 (palmitic/linoleic and palmitoleic/oleic) and m/z 960.5 (oleic/linoleic and stearic/linolenic) were more abundant. In the almond, the main PL classes (phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylinositol (PI)) contained always palmitic/linoleic acids. Alpha-linolenic acid was contained as MGD (linolenic/linolenic) and DGD (linolenic/linolenic), more present in the pulp than in the almond. The major molecular species of glycocerebrosides (GCer) in the pulp and almond carried hydroxy-palmitic acid (C(16h:0))/4,8-sphyngadienine (d(18:2)).

  7. Mycoplasma fermentans glycolipid-antigen as a pathogen of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahito, Yutaka; Ichinose, Sizuko; Sano, Hajime; Tsubouchi, Yasunori; Kohno, Masataka; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Tokunaga, Daisaku; Hojo, Tatsuya; Harasawa, Ryo; Nakano, Teruaki; Matsuda, Kazuhiro

    2008-05-02

    Mycoplasma fermentans has been suspected as one of the causative pathogenic microorganisms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) however, the pathogenic mechanism is still unclear. We, previously, reported that glycolipid-antigens (GGPL-I and III) are the major antigens of M. fermentans. Monoclonal antibody against the GGPL-III could detect the existence of the GGPL-III antigens in synovial tissues from RA patients. GGPL-III antigens were detected in 38.1% (32/84) of RA patient's tissues, but not in osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissues. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed that a part of GGPL-III antigens are located at endoplasmic reticulum. GGPL-III significantly induced TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 production from peripheral blood mononulear cells, and also proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Further study is necessary to prove that M. fermentans is a causative microorganism of RA; however, the new mechanisms of disease pathogenesis provides hope for the development of effective and safe immunotherapeutic strategies based on the lipid-antigen, GGPL-III, in the near future.

  8. Accelerated in vivo wound healing evaluation of microbial glycolipid containing ointment as a transdermal substitute.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sonam; Raghuwanshi, Navdeep; Varshney, Ritu; Banat, I M; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Pruthi, Parul A; Pruthi, Vikas

    2017-10-01

    A potent biosurfactant (BS) producing Bacillus licheniformis SV1 (NCBI GenBank Accession No. KX130852) was isolated from oil contaminated soil sample. Physicochemical investigations (TLC, HPLC, FTIR, GC-MS and NMR) revealed it to be glycolipid in nature. Fibroblast culture assay showed cytocompatibility and increased cell proliferation of 3T3/NIH fibroblast cells treated with this biosurfactant when checked using MTT assay and DAPI fluorescent staining. To evaluate the wound healing potential, BS ointment was formulated and checked for its spreadability and viscosity consistency. In vivo wound healing examination of full thickness skin excision wound rat model demonstrated the prompt re-epithelialization and fibroblast cell proliferation in the early phase while quicker collagen deposition in later phases of wound healing when BS ointment was used. These results validated the potential usage of BS ointment as a transdermal substitute for faster healing of impaired skin wound. Biochemical evaluation also substantiated the highest concentration of hydroxyproline (32.18±0.46, p<0.001) in the BS ointment treated animal tissue samples compared to the control. Hematoxylin-Eosin (H&E) and Masson's Trichrome staining validated the presence of increased amount of collagen fibers and blood vessels in the test animals treated with BS ointment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Human CD1d–glycolipid tetramers generated by in vitro oxidative refolding chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Karadimitris, Anastasios; Gadola, Stephan; Altamirano, Myriam; Brown, Dave; Woolfson, Adrian; Klenerman, Paul; Chen, Ji-Li; Koezuka, Yasuhiko; Roberts, Irene A. G.; Price, David A.; Dusheiko, Geoff; Milstein, César; Fersht, Alan; Luzzatto, Lucio; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2001-01-01

    CD1 molecules are specialized in presenting lipids to T lymphocytes, but identification and isolation of CD1-restricted lipidspecific T cells has been hampered by the lack of reliable and sensitive techniques. We here report the construction of CD1d–glycolipid tetramers from fully denatured human CD1d molecules by using the technique of oxidative refolding chromatography. We demonstrate that chaperone- and foldase-assisted refolding of denatured CD1d molecules and β2-microglobulin in the presence of synthetic lipids is a rapid method for the generation of functional and specific CD1d tetramers, which unlike previously published protocols ensures isolation of CD1d tetramers loaded with a single lipid species. The use of human CD1d–α-galactosylceramide tetramers for ex vivo staining of peripheral blood lymphocytes and intrahepatic T cells from patients with viral liver cirrhosis allowed for the first time simultaneous analysis of frequency and specificity of natural killer T cells in human clinical samples. Application of this protocol to other members of the CD1 family will provide powerful tools to investigate lipid-specific T cell immune responses in health and in disease. PMID:11248072

  10. The structures of glycolipids isolated from the highly thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus Samu-SA1.

    PubMed

    Leone, Serena; Molinaro, Antonio; Lindner, Buko; Romano, Ida; Nicolaus, Barbara; Parrilli, Michelangelo; Lanzetta, Rosa; Holst, Otto

    2006-08-01

    Thermophiles constitute a class of microorganisms able to grow at extremely elevated temperatures. Some of these species are classified as Gram-negative bacteria, because of the presence of an outer membrane in the cell envelope, which is located on the top of a thick murein layer. Unlike typical Gram-negative bacteria, the outer membranes of Thermus species are not composed of lipopolysaccharides but of peculiar glycolipids (GL), whose structures seem to be strictly involved in the adaptation to high temperatures. In this work, the complete structures of the major GL components from the cell envelope of the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus Samu-SA1 are presented. Protocols conventionally adopted for Gram-negative bacteria were used, and, for the first time, GL from Thermus were analyzed in their native form. Two GL and one phosphoglycolipid (PGL) were detected and characterized. The two GL, analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ESI FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, possessed the same tetrasaccharide structure linked to a glycerol unit or, alternatively, to a long-chain diol. Moreover, a PGL from Thermus was characterized for the first time, in which N-glyceroyl-heptadecaneamine was present. These molecules are chemically related to other GL from thermophile bacteria, in which they play a crucial role in the adaptation of cell membranes to heat.

  11. Lipidomic Approaches towards Deciphering Glycolipids from Microalgae as a Reservoir of Bioactive Lipids

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Elisabete; Silva, Joana; Mendonça, Sofia Hoffman; Abreu, Maria Helena; Domingues, Maria Rosário

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, noteworthy research has been performed around lipids from microalgae. Among lipids, glycolipids (GLs) are quite abundant in microalgae and are considered an important source of fatty acids (FAs). GLs are rich in 16- and 18-carbon saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and often contain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) like n-3 α-linolenic (ALA 18:3), eicosapentaenoic (EPA, 20:5) and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6). GLs comprise three major classes: monogalactosyldiacyl glycerolipids (MGDGs), digalactosyl diacylglycerolipids (DGDGs) and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerolipids (SQDGs), whose composition in FA directly depends on the growth conditions. Some of these lipids are high value-added compounds with antitumoral, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities and also with important nutritional significance. To fully explore GLs’ bioactive properties it is necessary to fully characterize their structure and to understand the relation between the structure and their biological properties, which can be addressed using modern mass spectrometry (MS)-based lipidomic approaches. This review will focus on the up-to-date FA composition of GLs identified by MS-based lipidomics and their potential as phytochemicals. PMID:27213410

  12. Modulation of the cytokine response in human monocytes by mycobacterium leprae phenolic glycolipid-1.

    PubMed

    Manca, Claudia; Peixoto, Blas; Malaga, Wladimir; Guilhot, Christophe; Kaplan, Gilla

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic but treatable infectious disease caused by the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. M. leprae cell wall is characterized by a unique phenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) reported to have several immune functions. We have examined the role of PGL-1 in the modulation of monocyte cytokine/chemokine production in naive human monocytes. PGL-1 in its purified form or expressed in a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Colmette-Guérin (BCG) background (rBCG-PGL-1) was tested. We found that PGL-1 selectively modulated the induction of specific monocyte cytokines and chemokines and, when used as prestimulus, exerted priming and/or inhibitory effects on the induction of selected cytokines/chemokines in response to a second stimulus. Taken together, the results of this study support a modulatory role for PGL-1 in the innate immune response to M. leprae. Thus, PGL-1 may play an important role in the development of the anergic clinical forms of disease and in tissue damage seen in lepromatous patients and during the reactional states of leprosy.

  13. Glycolipid Crosslinking Is Required for Cholera Toxin to Partition Into and Stabilize Ordered Domains.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Krishnan; Wong, Tiffany H; Chinnapen, Daniel J; Lencer, Wayne I; Jobling, Michael G; Kenworthy, Anne K

    2016-12-20

    Current models of lipid rafts propose that lipid domains exist as nanoscale compositional fluctuations and these fluctuations can potentially be stabilized into larger domains, consequently better compartmentalizing cellular functions. However, the mechanisms governing stabilized raft assembly and function remain unclear. Here, we test the role of glycolipid crosslinking as a raft targeting and ordering mechanism using the well-studied raft marker cholera toxin B pentamer (CTxB) that binds up to five GM1 glycosphingolipids to enter host cells. We show that when applied to cell-derived giant plasma membrane vesicles, a variant of CTxB containing only a single functional GM1 binding site exhibits significantly reduced partitioning to the ordered phase compared to wild-type CTxB with five binding sites. Moreover, monovalent CTxB does not stabilize membrane domains, unlike wild-type CTxB. These results support the long-held hypothesis that CTxB stabilizes raft domains via a lipid crosslinking mechanism and establish a role for crosslinking in the partitioning of CTxB to ordered domains.

  14. Glycolipid-based TLR4 Modulators and Fluorescent Probes: Rational Design, Synthesis, and Biological Properties.

    PubMed

    Ciaramelli, Carlotta; Calabrese, Valentina; Sestito, Stefania E; Pérez-Regidor, Lucia; Klett, Javier; Oblak, Alja; Jerala, Roman; Piazza, Matteo; Martín-Santamaría, Sonsoles; Peri, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    The cationic glycolipid IAXO-102, a potent TLR4 antagonist targeting both MD-2 and CD14 co-receptors, has been used as scaffold to design new potential TLR4 modulators and fluorescent labels for the TLR4 receptor complex (membrane TLR4.MD-2 dimer and CD14). The primary amino group of IAXO-102, not involved in direct interaction with MD-2 and CD14 receptors, has been exploited to covalently attach a fluorescein (molecules 1 and 2) or to link two molecules of IAXO-102 through diamine and diammonium spacers, obtaining 'dimeric' molecules 3 and 4. The structure-based rational design of compounds 1-4 was guided by the optimization of MD-2 and CD14 binding. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited TLR4 activation, in a concentration-dependent manner, and signaling in HEK-Blue TLR4 cells. The fluorescent labeling of murine macrophages by molecule 1 was inhibited by LPS and was also abrogated when cell surface proteins were digested by trypsin, thus suggesting an interaction of fluorescent probe 1 with membrane proteins of the TLR4 receptor system.

  15. On-line overpressure thin-layer chromatographic separation and electrospray mass spectrometric detection of glycolipids.

    PubMed

    Chai, Wengang; Leteux, Christine; Lawson, Alexander M; Stoll, Mark S

    2003-01-01

    On-line thin-layer chromatographic separation and electrospray mass spectrometry (TLC/ESI-MS) has been accomplished by direct linking of a commercial overpressure TLC instrument, OPLC 50, and a Q-TOF mass spectrometer. Mass spectrometric detection sensitivity and chromatographic resolution achieved by this configuration were assessed using acidic glycolipids as examples. Under the optimized conditions, a sensitivity of 5 pmol of glycosphingolipid was readily demonstrated for TLC/ESI-MS and 20 pmol for TLC/ESI-MS/MS production scanning to derive the saccharide sequence and long chain base/fatty acid composition of the ceramide. Initial preconditioning of TLC plates is necessary to achieve high sensitivity detection by reducing chemical background noise. Plates can be used repeatedly (at least 10 times) for analysis, although this may result in a minor reduction in TLC resolution. Following solvent development, separated components on the TLC plates can be detected in the conventional way by nondestructive staining or UV absorption or fluorescence and can be stored for on-line TLC/ESI-MS analysis at a later stage without reduction in mass spectrometric detection sensitivity and chromatographic resolution. Aspects for further improvement of OPLC instrumentation include use of narrower TLC plate dimensions and refined design of the eluate exit system.

  16. Lipidomic Approaches towards Deciphering Glycolipids from Microalgae as a Reservoir of Bioactive Lipids.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Elisabete; Silva, Joana; Mendonça, Sofia Hoffman; Abreu, Maria Helena; Domingues, Maria Rosário

    2016-05-19

    In recent years, noteworthy research has been performed around lipids from microalgae. Among lipids, glycolipids (GLs) are quite abundant in microalgae and are considered an important source of fatty acids (FAs). GLs are rich in 16- and 18-carbon saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and often contain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) like n-3 α-linolenic (ALA 18:3), eicosapentaenoic (EPA, 20:5) and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6). GLs comprise three major classes: monogalactosyldiacyl glycerolipids (MGDGs), digalactosyl diacylglycerolipids (DGDGs) and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerolipids (SQDGs), whose composition in FA directly depends on the growth conditions. Some of these lipids are high value-added compounds with antitumoral, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities and also with important nutritional significance. To fully explore GLs' bioactive properties it is necessary to fully characterize their structure and to understand the relation between the structure and their biological properties, which can be addressed using modern mass spectrometry (MS)-based lipidomic approaches. This review will focus on the up-to-date FA composition of GLs identified by MS-based lipidomics and their potential as phytochemicals.

  17. Differential Interaction of Synthetic Glycolipids with Biomimetic Plasma Membrane Lipids Correlates with the Plant Biological Response.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Lins, Laurence; Crowet, Jean-Marc; Ongena, Marc; Dorey, Stephan; Dhondt-Cordelier, Sandrine; Clément, Christophe; Bouquillon, Sandrine; Haudrechy, Arnaud; Sarazin, Catherine; Fauconnier, Marie-Laure; Nott, Katherine; Deleu, Magali

    2017-09-26

    Natural and synthetic amphiphilic molecules including lipopeptides, lipopolysaccharides, and glycolipids are able to induce defense mechanisms in plants. In the present work, the perception of two synthetic C14 rhamnolipids, namely, Alk-RL and Ac-RL, differing only at the level of the lipid tail terminal group have been investigated using biological and biophysical approaches. We showed that Alk-RL induces a stronger early signaling response in tobacco cell suspensions than does Ac-RL. The interactions of both synthetic RLs with simplified biomimetic membranes were further analyzed using experimental and in silico approaches. Our results indicate that the interactions of Alk-RL and Ac-RL with lipids were different in terms of insertion and molecular responses and were dependent on the lipid composition of model membranes. A more favorable insertion of Alk-RL than Ac-RL into lipid membranes is observed. Alk-RL forms more stable molecular assemblies than Ac-RL with phospholipids and sterols. At the molecular level, the presence of sterols tends to increase the RLs' interaction with lipid bilayers, with a fluidizing effect on the alkyl chains. Taken together, our findings suggest that the perception of these synthetic RLs at the membrane level could be related to a lipid-driven process depending on the organization of the membrane and the orientation of the RLs within the membrane and is correlated with the induction of early signaling responses in tobacco cells.

  18. Dynamic Modulation of the Glycosphingolipid Content in Supported Lipid Bilayers by Glycolipid Transfer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Carton, Ixaskun; Lucy Malinina; Richter, Ralf P.

    2010-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are popular models of cell membranes. Owing to the importance of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in modulating structure and function of membranes and membrane proteins, methods to tune the GSL content in SLBs would be desirable. Glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) can selectively transfer GSLs between membrane compartments. Using the ganglioside GM1 as a model GSL, and two mass-sensitive and label-free characterization techniques—quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and ellipsometry—we demonstrate that GLTP is an efficient and robust biochemical tool to dynamically modulate the GSL content of SLBs up to 10 mol % GM1, and to quantitatively control the GSL content in the bulk-facing SLB leaflet. By exploiting what we believe to be a novel tool, we provide evidence that GM1 distributes highly asymmetrically in silica-supported lipid bilayers, with ∼85% of the ganglioside being present in the bulk-facing membrane leaflet. We report also that the pentameric B-subunit of cholera toxin binds with close-to-maximal stoichiometry to GM1 in SLBs over a large range of GM1 concentrations. Furthermore, we quantify the liganding affinity of GLTP for GM1 in an SLB context to be 1.5 μM. PMID:21044592

  19. Dynamic modulation of the glycosphingolipid content in supported lipid bilayers by glycolipid transfer protein.

    PubMed

    Carton, Ixaskun; Malinina, Lucy; Richter, Ralf P

    2010-11-03

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are popular models of cell membranes. Owing to the importance of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in modulating structure and function of membranes and membrane proteins, methods to tune the GSL content in SLBs would be desirable. Glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) can selectively transfer GSLs between membrane compartments. Using the ganglioside GM1 as a model GSL, and two mass-sensitive and label-free characterization techniques-quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and ellipsometry-we demonstrate that GLTP is an efficient and robust biochemical tool to dynamically modulate the GSL content of SLBs up to 10 mol % GM1, and to quantitatively control the GSL content in the bulk-facing SLB leaflet. By exploiting what we believe to be a novel tool, we provide evidence that GM1 distributes highly asymmetrically in silica-supported lipid bilayers, with ∼85% of the ganglioside being present in the bulk-facing membrane leaflet. We report also that the pentameric B-subunit of cholera toxin binds with close-to-maximal stoichiometry to GM1 in SLBs over a large range of GM1 concentrations. Furthermore, we quantify the liganding affinity of GLTP for GM1 in an SLB context to be 1.5 μM. Copyright © 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Deciphering the Glycolipid Code of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Amyloid Proteins Allowed the Creation of a Universal Ganglioside-Binding Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Yahi, Nouara; Fantini, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    A broad range of microbial and amyloid proteins interact with cell surface glycolipids which behave as infectivity and/or toxicity cofactors in human pathologies. Here we have deciphered the biochemical code that determines the glycolipid-binding specificity of two major amyloid proteins, Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and Parkinson's disease associated protein α-synuclein. We showed that both proteins interact with selected glycolipids through a common loop-shaped motif exhibiting little sequence homology. This 12-residue domain corresponded to fragments 34-45 of α-synuclein and 5-16 of Aβ. By modulating the amino acid sequence of α-synuclein at only two positions in which we introduced a pair of histidine residues found in Aβ, we created a chimeric α-synuclein/Aβ peptide with extended ganglioside-binding properties. This chimeric peptide retained the property of α-synuclein to recognize GM3, and acquired the capacity to recognize GM1 (an Aβ-inherited characteristic). Free histidine (but not tryptophan or asparagine) and Zn2+ (but not Na+) prevented this interaction, confirming the key role of His-13 and His-14 in ganglioside binding. Molecular dynamics studies suggested that the chimeric peptide recognized cholesterol-constrained conformers of GM1, including typical chalice-shaped dimers, that are representative of the condensed cholesterol-ganglioside complexes found in lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane of neural cells. Correspondingly, the peptide had a particular affinity for raft-like membranes containing both GM1 and cholesterol. The chimeric peptide also interacted with several other gangliosides, including major brain gangliosides (GM4, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) but not with neutral glycolipids such as GlcCer, LacCer or asialo-GM1. It could inhibit the binding of Aβ1-42 onto neural SH-SY5Y cells and did not induce toxicity in these cells. In conclusion, deciphering the glycolipid code of amyloid proteins allowed us to create a universal

  1. Deciphering the glycolipid code of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's amyloid proteins allowed the creation of a universal ganglioside-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Yahi, Nouara; Fantini, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    A broad range of microbial and amyloid proteins interact with cell surface glycolipids which behave as infectivity and/or toxicity cofactors in human pathologies. Here we have deciphered the biochemical code that determines the glycolipid-binding specificity of two major amyloid proteins, Alzheimer's β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) and Parkinson's disease associated protein α-synuclein. We showed that both proteins interact with selected glycolipids through a common loop-shaped motif exhibiting little sequence homology. This 12-residue domain corresponded to fragments 34-45 of α-synuclein and 5-16 of Aβ. By modulating the amino acid sequence of α-synuclein at only two positions in which we introduced a pair of histidine residues found in Aβ, we created a chimeric α-synuclein/Aβ peptide with extended ganglioside-binding properties. This chimeric peptide retained the property of α-synuclein to recognize GM3, and acquired the capacity to recognize GM1 (an Aβ-inherited characteristic). Free histidine (but not tryptophan or asparagine) and Zn2+ (but not Na+) prevented this interaction, confirming the key role of His-13 and His-14 in ganglioside binding. Molecular dynamics studies suggested that the chimeric peptide recognized cholesterol-constrained conformers of GM1, including typical chalice-shaped dimers, that are representative of the condensed cholesterol-ganglioside complexes found in lipid raft domains of the plasma membrane of neural cells. Correspondingly, the peptide had a particular affinity for raft-like membranes containing both GM1 and cholesterol. The chimeric peptide also interacted with several other gangliosides, including major brain gangliosides (GM4, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) but not with neutral glycolipids such as GlcCer, LacCer or asialo-GM1. It could inhibit the binding of Aβ1-42 onto neural SH-SY5Y cells and did not induce toxicity in these cells. In conclusion, deciphering the glycolipid code of amyloid proteins allowed us to create a universal

  2. Physical properties of botanical surfactants.

    PubMed

    Müller, Lillian Espíndola; Schiedeck, Gustavo

    2017-08-24

    Some vegetal species have saponins in their composition with great potential to be used as natural surfactants in organic crops. This work aims to evaluate some surfactants physical properties of Quillaja brasiliensis and Agave angustifolia, based on different methods of preparation and concentration. The vegetal samples were prepared by drying and grinding, frozen and after chopped or used fresh and chopped. The neutral bar soap was used as a positive control. The drying and grinding of samples were the preparation method that resulted in higher foam column height in both species but Q. brasiliensis was superior to A. angustifolia in all comparisons and foam index was 2756 and 1017 respectively. Critical micelle concentration of Q. brasiliensis was 0.39% with the superficial tension of 54.40mNm(-1) while neutral bar soap was 0.15% with 34.96mNm(-1). Aspects such as genetic characteristics of the species, environmental conditions, and analytical methods make it difficult to compare the results with other studies, but Q. brasiliensis powder has potential to be explored as a natural surfactant in organic farming. Not only the surfactants physical properties of botanical saponins should be taken into account but also its effect on insects and diseases control when decided using them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Forensic Analysis of BIOS Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershteyn, Pavel; Davis, Mark; Shenoi, Sujeet

    Data can be hidden in BIOS chips without hindering computer performance. This feature has been exploited by virus writers and computer game enthusiasts. Unused BIOS storage can also be used by criminals, terrorists and intelligence agents to conceal secrets. However, BIOS chips are largely ignored in digital forensic investigations. Few techniques exist for imaging BIOS chips and no tools are available specifically for analyzing BIOS data.

  4. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Nathan J.; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E.

    2012-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned towards the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C’s seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C’s molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable poly-valine helix is replaced with a structurally stable, poly-leucine helix and includes a well placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is both structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach

  5. An anionic surfactant for EOR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagir, Muhammad; Tan, Isa M.; Mushtaq, Muhammad

    2014-10-01

    This work is to investigate the new anionic surfactants for the Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) application. Sulfonated anionic surfactant was produced by attaching SO3 to an ethoxylated alcohol to increase the performance of the surfactant. Methallyl chloride and ethoxylated alcohol was reacted followed by the reaction with sodium bisulfite to produce anionic sulfonated surfactant in 80.3 % yield. The sulfonation reaction parameters such as reactants mole ratio, reaction temperature and catalyst amount were optimized. The generation and stability of foam from the synthesized surfactant is also tested and results are reported. The synthesized novel surfactant was further investigated for the effect on the CO2 mobility in porous media and the findings are presented here. This in house developed surfactant has a great potential for CO2- EOR applications.

  6. Inactivation of surfactant in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Bruni, R; Fan, B R; David-Cu, R; Taeusch, H W; Walther, F J

    1996-02-01

    Although surfactant replacement therapy has dramatically improved the outcome of premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome, approximately 30% of treated infants show a transient or no response. Nonresponse to surfactant replacement therapy may be due to extreme lung immaturity and possibly surfactant inactivation. Surfactant inactivation involves aspecific biophysical events, such as interference with the formation or activity of an alveolar monolayer, and specific interactions with serum proteins, including antibodies, leaking into the alveolar space. As formulations containing surfactant proteins appear to better tolerate serum inactivation, we used an excised rat lung model to compare the susceptibility to serum inactivation of a mixture of synthetic phospholipids selected from surfactant lipid constituents, Exosurf (a protein-free synthetic surfactant), Survanta [containing surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and -C)], and a porcine surfactant (containing SP-A, -B, and -C). For each of these preparations, we used pressure/volume determinations as an in situ measure of surfactant activity and retested the same preparations after mixing with human serum, a nonspecific surfactant inactivator. Human serum inactivated porcine surfactant to a lesser extent than Survanta, Exosurf, or synthetic phospholipids. Temperature exerted a significant effect on deflation stability, as shown by a greater lung compliance in untreated, normal lungs and a larger improvement in compliance after treating lavaged lungs with synthetic phospholipids at 37 degrees C than at 22 degrees C. We conclude that surfactant containing SP-A, -B, and -C is only moderately susceptible to inactivation with whole serum and may therefore exert a greater clinical response than protein-free surfactants or those containing only SP-B and -C.

  7. The influence of surfactant on the deformation and breakup of a viscous drop: The effect of surfactant solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Milliken, W.J. ); Leal, L.G. . Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-09-01

    The influence of surfactant on the deformation of a viscous drop in a uniaxial extensional flow is considered. Previous studies have examined the role in insoluble surfactant. Here, the authors examine soluble surfactant, i.e., surfactant that may be transferred between the interface and the continuous phase. The transfer of surfactant to and from the interface mitigates many of the effects observed with insoluble surfactant by diminishing the magnitude of surfactant gradients. In the presence of soluble surfactant, the deformation generally lies between that of insoluble surfactant and that of a drop with a constant and uniform coverage of surfactant. However, there are notable exceptions particularly at high surfactant activity. The influence of surfactant on the interfacial velocity of the drop is also explicitly considered. It is shown that while insoluble surfactant can substantially retard a drop interface, interphase surfactant transfer acts to remobilize the interface.

  8. Effect of exogenous surfactant on the development of surfactant synthesis in premature rabbit lung.

    PubMed

    Amato, Maurizio; Petit, Kevin; Fiore, Humberto H; Doyle, Cynthia A; Frantz, Ivan D; Nielsen, Heber C

    2003-04-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective therapy for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. Full recovery from respiratory distress syndrome requires development of endogenous surfactant synthesis and metabolism. The influence of exogenous surfactant on the development of surfactant synthesis in premature lungs is not known. We hypothesized that different exogenous surfactants have different effects on the development of endogenous surfactant production in the premature lung. We treated organ cultures of d 25 fetal rabbit lung for 3 d with 100 mg/kg body weight of natural rabbit surfactant, Survanta, and Exosurf and measured their effects on the development of surfactant synthesis. Additional experiments tested how these surfactants and Curosurf affected surfactant protein (SP) SP-A, SP-B, and SP-C mRNA expression. Surfactant synthesis was measured as the incorporation of 3H-choline and 14C-glycerol into disaturated phosphatidylcholine recovered from lamellar bodies. Randomized-block ANOVA showed significant differences among treatments for incorporation of both labels (p < 0.01), with natural rabbit surfactant less than control, Survanta greater than control, and Exosurf unchanged. Additional experiments with natural rabbit surfactant alone showed no significant effects in doses up to 1000 mg/kg. Survanta stimulated disaturated phosphatidylcholine synthesis (173 +/- 41% of control; p = 0.01), increased total lamellar body disaturated phosphatidylcholine by 22% (p < 0.05), and increased 14C-disat-PC specific activity by 35% (p < 0.05). The response to Survanta was dose-dependent up to 1000 mg/kg. Survanta did not affect surfactant release. No surfactant altered the expression of mRNA for SP-A, SP-B, or SP-C. We conclude that surfactant replacement therapy can enhance the maturation of surfactant synthesis, but this potential benefit differs with different surfactant preparations.

  9. Weak and Saturable Protein–Surfactant Interactions in the Denaturation of Apo-α-Lactalbumin by Acidic and Lactonic Sophorolipid

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kell K.; Vad, Brian S.; Roelants, Sophie; van Bogaert, Inge N. A.; Otzen, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Biosurfactants are of growing interest as sustainable alternatives to fossil-fuel-derived chemical surfactants, particularly for the detergent industry. To realize this potential, it is necessary to understand how they affect proteins which they may encounter in their applications. However, knowledge of such interactions is limited. Here, we present a study of the interactions between the model protein apo-α-lactalbumin (apo-aLA) and the biosurfactant sophorolipid (SL) produced by the yeast Starmerella bombicola. SL occurs both as an acidic and a lactonic form; the lactonic form (lactSL) is sparingly soluble and has a lower critical micelle concentration (cmc) than the acidic form [non-acetylated acidic sophorolipid (acidSL)]. We show that acidSL affects apo-aLA in a similar way to the related glycolipid biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL), with the important difference that RL is also active below the cmc in contrast to acidSL. Using isothermal titration calorimetry data, we show that acidSL has weak and saturable interactions with apo-aLA at low concentrations; due to the relatively low cmc of acidSL (which means that the monomer concentration is limited to ca. 0–1 mM SL), it is only possible to observe interactions with monomeric acidSL at high apo-aLA concentrations. However, the denaturation kinetics of apo-aLA in the presence of acidSL are consistent with a collaboration between monomeric and micellar surfactant species, similar to RL and non-ionic or zwitterionic surfactants. Inclusion of diacetylated lactonic sophorolipid (lactSL) as mixed micelles with acidSL lowers the cmc and this effectively reduces the rate of unfolding, emphasizing that SL like other biosurfactants is a gentle anionic surfactant. Our data highlight the potential of these biosurfactants for future use in the detergent and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:27877155

  10. Weak and Saturable Protein-Surfactant Interactions in the Denaturation of Apo-α-Lactalbumin by Acidic and Lactonic Sophorolipid.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kell K; Vad, Brian S; Roelants, Sophie; van Bogaert, Inge N A; Otzen, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Biosurfactants are of growing interest as sustainable alternatives to fossil-fuel-derived chemical surfactants, particularly for the detergent industry. To realize this potential, it is necessary to understand how they affect proteins which they may encounter in their applications. However, knowledge of such interactions is limited. Here, we present a study of the interactions between the model protein apo-α-lactalbumin (apo-aLA) and the biosurfactant sophorolipid (SL) produced by the yeast Starmerella bombicola. SL occurs both as an acidic and a lactonic form; the lactonic form (lactSL) is sparingly soluble and has a lower critical micelle concentration (cmc) than the acidic form [non-acetylated acidic sophorolipid (acidSL)]. We show that acidSL affects apo-aLA in a similar way to the related glycolipid biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL), with the important difference that RL is also active below the cmc in contrast to acidSL. Using isothermal titration calorimetry data, we show that acidSL has weak and saturable interactions with apo-aLA at low concentrations; due to the relatively low cmc of acidSL (which means that the monomer concentration is limited to ca. 0-1 mM SL), it is only possible to observe interactions with monomeric acidSL at high apo-aLA concentrations. However, the denaturation kinetics of apo-aLA in the presence of acidSL are consistent with a collaboration between monomeric and micellar surfactant species, similar to RL and non-ionic or zwitterionic surfactants. Inclusion of diacetylated lactonic sophorolipid (lactSL) as mixed micelles with acidSL lowers the cmc and this effectively reduces the rate of unfolding, emphasizing that SL like other biosurfactants is a gentle anionic surfactant. Our data highlight the potential of these biosurfactants for future use in the detergent and pharmaceutical industry.

  11. Animal ice-binding (antifreeze) proteins and glycolipids: an overview with emphasis on physiological function.

    PubMed

    Duman, John G

    2015-06-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) assist in subzero tolerance of multiple cold-tolerant organisms: animals, plants, fungi, bacteria etc. IBPs include: (1) antifreeze proteins (AFPs) with high thermal hysteresis antifreeze activity; (2) low thermal hysteresis IBPs; and (3) ice-nucleating proteins (INPs). Several structurally different IBPs have evolved, even within related taxa. Proteins that produce thermal hysteresis inhibit freezing by a non-colligative mechanism, whereby they adsorb onto ice crystals or ice-nucleating surfaces and prevent further growth. This lowers the so-called hysteretic freezing point below the normal equilibrium freezing/melting point, producing a difference between the two, termed thermal hysteresis. True AFPs with high thermal hysteresis are found in freeze-avoiding animals (those that must prevent freezing, as they die if frozen) especially marine fish, insects and other terrestrial arthropods where they function to prevent freezing at temperatures below those commonly experienced by the organism. Low thermal hysteresis IBPs are found in freeze-tolerant organisms (those able to survive extracellular freezing), and function to inhibit recrystallization - a potentially damaging process whereby larger ice crystals grow at the expense of smaller ones - and in some cases, prevent lethal propagation of extracellular ice into the cytoplasm. Ice-nucleator proteins inhibit supercooling and induce freezing in the extracellular fluid at high subzero temperatures in many freeze-tolerant species, thereby allowing them to control the location and temperature of ice nucleation, and the rate of ice growth. Numerous nuances to these functions have evolved. Antifreeze glycolipids with significant thermal hysteresis activity were recently identified in insects, frogs and plants. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Direct xylan conversion into glycolipid biosurfactants, mannosylerythritol lipids, by Pseudozyma antarctica PYCC 5048(T).

    PubMed

    Faria, Nuno Torres; Marques, Susana; Fonseca, César; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo

    2015-04-01

    Mannosylerythritol lipids (MEL) are glycolipid biosurfactants, produced by Pseudozyma spp., with increasing commercial interest. While MEL can be produced from d-glucose and d-xylose, the direct conversion of the respective lignocellulosic polysaccharides, cellulose and xylan, was not reported yet. The ability of Pseudozyma antarctica PYCC 5048(T) and Pseudozyma aphidis PYCC 5535(T) to use cellulose (Avicel(®)) and xylan (beechwood) as carbon and energy source has been assessed along with their capacity of producing cellulolytic and hemicellulolytic enzymes, toward a consolidated bioprocess (CBP) for MEL production. The yeasts assessed were neither able to grow in medium containing Avicel(®) nor produce cellulolytic enzymes under the conditions tested. On contrary, both yeasts were able to efficiently grow in xylan, but MEL production was only detected in P. antarctica PYCC 5048(T) cultures. MEL titers reached 1.3g/l after 10 days in batch cultures with 40g/l xylan, and 2.0g/l in fed-batch cultures with xylan feeding (additional 40g/l) at day 4. High levels of xylanase activities were detected in xylan cultures, reaching 47-62U/ml (31-32U/mg) at 50°C, and still exhibiting more than 10U/ml under physiological temperature (28°C). Total β-xylosidase activities, displayed mainly as wall-bounded and extracellular activity, accounted for 0.154 and 0.176U/ml in P. antarctica PYCC 5048(T) and P. aphidis PYCC 5535(T) cultures, respectively. The present results demonstrate the potential of Pseudozyma spp. for using directly a fraction of lignocellulosic biomass, xylan, and combining in the same bioprocess the production of xylanolytic enzymes with MEL production.

  13. Solubilization and fractionation of glycoproteins and glycolipids of KB cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Butters, Terry D.; Hughes, R. Colin

    1974-01-01

    1. A fraction enriched in plasma membranes of human tumour KB cell line, a permissive cell for adenovirus type 5, was obtained. 2. Electrophoresis of the membranes in polyacrylamide gels with buffers containing sodium dodecyl sulphate showed that the membranes after reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol contained over 20 polypeptide species. Three polypeptides were glycosylated and had apparent mol.wts. of 92000, 72000 and 62000. 3. The glycoproteins and the specific receptors responsible for adenovirus adsorption to the membranes were readily extracted into solutions containing low concentrations of Triton X-100. Glycolipids and proteins were also made soluble. A membranous residue obtained after Triton X-100 extraction was enriched in several proteins that appeared to consist of polypeptides of lower molecular weight than the average of KB membrane polypeptides. 4. Sphingomyelin, cholesterol and triglycerides were similarly concentrated in the insoluble residue remaining after successive extractions of KB membranes with Triton X-100. Further, ceramide trihexoside was significantly less easily extracted from KB membranes than lactosyl ceramide. 5. The differences noted in the ease of extraction of membrane components are discussed. 6. The components of membranes made soluble by detergent extraction and containing the large part of the KB membrane glycoproteins were subjected to chromatography on Sepharose 6B and DEAE-cellulose and to isoelectric focusing in the presence of buffers containing Triton X-100. In general, the degree of separation into fractions enriched in individual glycoproteins was disappointing. Possible reasons for the poor fractionation of membrane components by chromatographic systems conveniently used for purification of proteins and glycoproteins of non-membranous origin are briefly discussed. ImagesPLATE 3PLATE 4PLATE 1PLATE 2 PMID:4447626

  14. A novel glycolipid antigen for NKT cells that preferentially induces IFN-γ production

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, Alysia M.; Girardi, Enrico; Wingender, Gerhard; Khurana, Archana; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Meng; Zahner, Sonja; Illarionov, Petr A.; Wen, Xiangshu; Li, Michelle; Yuan, Weiming; Porcelli, Steven A.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Zajonc, Dirk M.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Here we characterize a novel Ag for invariant natural killer T-cells (iNKT cells) capable of producing an especially robust Th1 response. This glycosphingolipid (GSL), DB06-1, is similar in chemical structure to the well-studied α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), the only change being in a single atom, the substitution of a carbonyl oxygen with a sulfur atom. Although DB06-1 is not a more effective Ag in vitro, the small chemical change has a marked impact on the ability of this lipid Ag to stimulate iNKT cells in vivo, with increased IFN-γ production at 24 h compared to αGalCer, increased IL-12, and increased activation of NK cells to produce IFN-γ. These changes are correlated with an enhanced ability of DB06-1 to load in the CD1d molecules expressed by DCs in vivo. Moreover, structural studies suggest a tighter fit into the CD1d binding groove by DB061 compared to αGalCer. Surprisingly, when iNKT cells previously exposed to DB06-1 are restimulated weeks later, they have greatly increased IL-10 production. Our data are therefore consistent with a model whereby augmented and or prolonged presentation of a glycolipid Ag leads to increased activation of NK cells and a Th1-skewed immune response, which may result in part from enhanced loading into CD1d. Furthermore, our data suggest that strong antigenic stimulation in vivo may lead to the expansion of IL-10 producing iNKT cells, which could counteract the benefits of increased, early IFN-γ production. PMID:26078271

  15. A Novel Glycolipid Antigen for NKT Cells That Preferentially Induces IFN-γ Production.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Girardi, Enrico; Wingender, Gerhard; Khurana, Archana; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Meng; Zahner, Sonja; Illarionov, Petr A; Wen, Xiangshu; Li, Michelle; Yuan, Weiming; Porcelli, Steven A; Besra, Gurdyal S; Zajonc, Dirk M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we characterize a novel Ag for invariant NKT (iNKT) cells capable of producing an especially robust Th1 response. This glycosphingolipid, DB06-1, is similar in chemical structure to the well-studied α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), with the only change being a single atom: the substitution of a carbonyl oxygen with a sulfur atom. Although DB06-1 is not a more effective Ag in vitro, the small chemical change has a marked impact on the ability of this lipid Ag to stimulate iNKT cells in vivo, with increased IFN-γ production at 24 h compared with αGalCer, increased IL-12, and increased activation of NK cells to produce IFN-γ. These changes are correlated with an enhanced ability of DB06-1 to load in the CD1d molecules expressed by dendritic cells in vivo. Moreover, structural studies suggest a tighter fit into the CD1d binding groove by DB06-1 compared with αGalCer. Surprisingly, when iNKT cells previously exposed to DB06-1 are restimulated weeks later, they have greatly increased IL-10 production. Therefore, our data are consistent with a model whereby augmented and or prolonged presentation of a glycolipid Ag leads to increased activation of NK cells and a Th1-skewed immune response, which may result, in part, from enhanced loading into CD1d. Furthermore, our data suggest that strong antigenic stimulation in vivo may lead to the expansion of IL-10-producing iNKT cells, which could counteract the benefits of increased early IFN-γ production.

  16. Antibacterial and antiviral evaluation of sulfonoquinovosyldiacylglyceride: a glycolipid isolated from Azadirachta indica leaves.

    PubMed

    Bharitkar, Y P; Bathini, S; Ojha, D; Ghosh, S; Mukherjee, H; Kuotsu, K; Chattopadhyay, D; Mondal, N B

    2014-02-01

    Assessment of antibacterial as well as antiherpes virus activity of sulfonoquinovosyldiacylglyceride (SQDG), a glycolipid, isolated from the leaves of Azadirachta indica has been described. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated against Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria and herpes simplex virus. SQDG showed significant inhibitory activity against Salmonella typhi and two isolates of Shigella dysenteriae with MIC values 32 μg ml(-1) , while three isolates of Salm. typhi, Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae were inhibited at 64 μg ml(-1) and have shown zone diameter ranging from 6.2 to 12.3 mm. The growth kinetics study of SQDG on Salm. typhi and Sh. dysenteriae revealed that the growths were completely inhibited at their MIC values within 24 h of exposure. Interestingly, SQDG inhibits herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and 2 with the EC50 of 9.1 and 8.5 μg ml(-1) , compared with acyclovir (2.2 and 2.8 μg ml(-1) against HSV-1 and HSV-2). The selectivity index (SI) was found to be 12.4 against HSV-1 and 13.41 with HSV-2. Furthermore, the expression of proinflammatory cytokines of HSV-infected and SQDG-treated macrophages using ELISA kit revealed that SQDG significantly downregulated the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12 and IL-6. The water-soluble metabolite sulfonoquinovosyldiacylglyceride (SQDG) isolated from Azadirachta indica (Neem) possess significant antibacterial as well as anti-HSV activity. The efficacies as well as the solubility factor of SQDG substantiate a greater attention for its use as phytotherapeutic drug for controlling microbial infections as most consumers have better acceptance of phytomedicines than synthetic drugs. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Putative glycoprotein and glycolipid polymorphonuclear leukocyte receptors for the Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 fimbrial lectin.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, A L; Ruhl, S; Joralmon, R A; Brennan, M J; Sutphin, M J; Cisar, J O

    1995-01-01

    Recognition of receptors on sialidase-treated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) by the Gal/GalNAc lectin associated with the type 2 fimbriae of certain strains of actinomyces results in activation of the PMNs, phagocytosis, and destruction of the bacteria. In the present study, plant lectins were utilized as probes to identify putative PMN receptors for the actinomyces lectin. The Gal-reactive lectin from Ricinus communis (RCAI), the Gal/GalNAc-reactive lectins from R. communis (RCAII) and Bauhinia purpurea (BPA), as well as the Gal beta 1-3GalNAc-specific lectins from Arachis hypogaea (PNA) and Agaricus bisporus (ABA) inhibited killing of Actinomyces naeslundii WVU45 by sialidase-treated PMNs. These five lectins detected a 130-kDa surface-labeled glycoprotein on nitrocellulose transfers of PMN extracts separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This glycoprotein was revealed only after treatment of the transfers with sialidase, a condition analogous to the sialidase dependence of the lectin-mediated biological responses of the PMNs to the actinomyces. The mannose-reactive lectin concanavalin A did not inhibit killing of the actinomyces and failed to detect the 130-kDa glycoprotein but did block PMN-dependent killing of Escherichia coli B, a bacterium that possesses mannose-sensitive fimbriae. Therefore, the PMN glycoprotein receptor for A. naeslundii is clearly distinct from those recognized by E. coli. Two major putative glycolipid receptors were also identified by actinomyces and RCAI overlays on sialidase-treated thin-layer chromatograms of PMN gangliosides. Thus, both a 130-kDa glycoprotein and certain gangliosides are implicated in the attachment of the actinomyces to PMNs. PMID:7790078

  18. Dysregulated Expression of Glycolipids in Tumor Cells: From Negative Modulator of Anti-tumor Immunity to Promising Targets for Developing Therapeutic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Daniotti, Jose Luis; Lardone, Ricardo D.; Vilcaes, Aldo A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycolipids are complex molecules consisting of a ceramide lipid moiety linked to a glycan chain of variable length and structure. Among these are found the gangliosides, which are sialylated glycolipids ubiquitously distributed on the outer layer of vertebrate plasma membranes. Changes in the expression of certain species of gangliosides have been described to occur during cell proliferation, differentiation, and ontogenesis. However, the aberrant and elevated expression of gangliosides has been also observed in different types of cancer cells, thereby promoting tumor survival. Moreover, gangliosides are actively released from the membrane of tumor cells, having a strong impact on impairing anti-tumor immunity. Beyond the undesirable effects of gangliosides in cancer cells, a substantial number of cancer immunotherapies have been developed in recent years that have used gangliosides as the main target. This has resulted in successful immune cell- or antibody-responses against glycolipids, with promising results having been obtained in clinical trials. In this review, we provide a general overview on the metabolism of glycolipids, both in normal and tumor cells, as well as examining glycolipid-mediated immune modulation and the main successes achieved in immunotherapies using gangliosides as molecular targets. PMID:26779443

  19. Colonization of olive trees (Olea europaea L.) with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus sp. modified the glycolipids biosynthesis and resulted in accumulation of unsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Mechri, Beligh; Attia, Faouzi; Tekaya, Meriem; Cheheb, Hechmi; Hammami, Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonization on photosynthesis, mineral nutrition, the amount of phospholipids and glycolipids in the leaves of olive (Olea europaea L.) trees was investigated. After six months of growth, the rate of photosynthesis, carboxylation efficiency, transpiration and stomatal conductance in mycorrhizal (M) plants was significantly higher than that of non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants. The inoculation treatment increased the foliar P and Mg but not N. The amount of glycolipids in the leaves of M plants was significantly higher than that of NM plants. However, the amount of phospholipids in the leaves of M plants was not significantly different to that in the leaves of NM plants. Also, we observed a significant increase in the level of α-linolenic acid (C18:3ω3) in glycolipids of M plants. This work supports the view that increased glycolipids level in the leaves of M plants could be involved, at least in part, in the beneficial effects of mycorrhizal colonization on photosynthesis performance of olive trees. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the effect of AM fungi on the amount of glycolipids in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants.

  20. Structural Characterization and Anti-HSV-1 and HSV-2 Activity of Glycolipids from the Marine Algae Osmundaria obtusiloba Isolated from Southeastern Brazilian Coast

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Lauro M.; Sassaki, Guilherme L.; Romanos, Maria Teresa Villela; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana

    2012-01-01

    Glycolipids were extracted from the red alga Osmundaria obtusiloba from Southeastern Brazilian coast. The acetone insoluble material was extracted with chloroform/methanol and the lipids, enriched in glycolipids, were fractionated on a silica gel column eluted with chloroform, acetone and then methanol. Three major orcinol-positive bands were found in the acetone and methanol fractions, being detected by thin layer chromatography. The structures of the corresponding glycolipids were elucidated by ESI-MS and 1H/13C NMR analysis, on the basis of their tandem-MS behavior and HSQC, TOCSY fingerprints. For the first time, the structure of sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol from the red alga Osmundaria obtusiloba was characterized. This molecule exhibited potent antiviral activity against HSV-1 and HSV-2 with EC50 values of 42 µg/mL to HSV-1 and 12 µg/mL to HSV-2, respectively. Two other glycolipids, mono- and digalactosyldiacylglycerol, were also found in the alga, being characterized by ESI-MS/MS. The structural elucidation of algae glycolipids is a first step for a better understanding of the relation between these structures and their biological activities. PMID:22690151

  1. Evaluation of the humoral immune response and cross reactivity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis of mice immunized with liposomes containing glycolipids of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis (Ms) is a nonpathogenic mycobacteria of rapid growth, which shares many characteristics with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), the major causative agent of tuberculosis. MTB has several cell wall glycolipids in common with Ms, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis and the induction of a protective immune response against MTB infection in some animal models. In this study, the humoral immune response and cross reactivity against MTB, of liposomes containing a mixture of cell wall glycolipids of Ms and commercial lipids was evaluated, in order to study its possible use as a component of a vaccine candidate against tuberculosis. Liposomes containing total lipids extracted from Ms, distearoyl phosphatidyl choline and cholesterol were prepared by the dehydration-rehydration technique. Balb/c mice were immunized with the liposomes obtained and the antibody response and cross reactivity against MTB were tested by ELISA. Total lipids extract from Ms showed the presence of several polar glycolipids in common with MTB, such as phosphatidylinositol mannosides. Liposomes that contained glycolipids of Ms were capable of inducing a specific IgG antibody response that allowed the recognition of surface antigens of MTB. The results of this study demonstrated the presence of immunogenic glycolipids in Ms, which could be included to enhance the protective effects of subunit vaccine formulations against tuberculosis. PMID:23458474

  2. A Novel Glycolipid Biosurfactant Confers Grazing Resistance upon Pantoea ananatis BRT175 against the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Derek D. N.; Nickzad, Arvin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pantoea is a versatile genus of bacteria with both plant- and animal-pathogenic strains, some of which have been suggested to cause human infections. There is, however, limited knowledge on the potential determinants used for host association and pathogenesis in animal systems. In this study, we used the model host Dictyostelium discoideum to show that isolates of Pantoea ananatis exhibit differential grazing susceptibility, with some being resistant to grazing by the amoebae. We carried out a high-throughput genetic screen of one grazing-resistant isolate, P. ananatis BRT175, using the D. discoideum pathosystem to identify genes responsible for the resistance phenotype. Among the 26 candidate genes involved in grazing resistance, we identified rhlA and rhlB, which we show are involved in the biosynthesis of a biosurfactant that enables swarming motility in P. ananatis BRT175. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), the biosurfactant was shown to be a glycolipid with monohexose-C10-C10 as the primary congener. We show that this novel glycolipid biosurfactant is cytotoxic to the amoebae and is capable of compromising cellular integrity, leading to cell lysis. The production of this biosurfactant may be important for bacterial survival in the environment and could contribute to the establishment of opportunistic infections. IMPORTANCE The genetic factors used for host interaction by the opportunistic human pathogen Pantoea ananatis are largely unknown. We identified two genes that are important for the production of a biosurfactant that confers grazing resistance against the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. We show that the biosurfactant, which exhibits cytotoxicity toward the amoebae, is a glycolipid that incorporates a hexose rather than rhamnose. The production of this biosurfactant may confer a competitive advantage in the environment and could potentially contribute to the establishment of opportunistic infections. PMID

  3. Surfactant transport on viscous bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Omar; Craster, Richard; Warner, Mark

    2001-11-01

    We model the external delivery of surfactant to pulmonary airways, an integral part of Surfactant Replacement Therapy (SRT), a method of treatment of Respiratory Distress Syndrome in neonates. We examine the spreading dynamics of insoluble surfactant by Marangoni stresses along the mucus-perciliary liquid bilayers that line the inside of airways. The bilayer is modelled as a thin highly viscous mucus surface film (mucus) overlying a much less viscous perciliary liquid layer (PCL); this is appropriate for small airways. By exploiting this large viscosity constrast, a variant of standard lubrication theory is adopted wherein terms, which would have otherwise been neglected in the lubrication approximation, are promoted in order to model correctly the presence of the mucus. Inclusion of van der Waals forces in the model permit the study of the effect of this mucus 'skin' on the possibility of bilayer rupture, a potential cause of failure of SRT. We find that increasing the viscosity contrast and initial mucus layer thickness delays the onset of rupture, while increasing the relative significance of Marangoni stresses leads to more marked thinning and rapid bilayer rupture [1]. [1] O. K. Matar, R. V. Craster and M. R. Warner, submitted to J. Fluid Mech. (2001).

  4. Production of antibodies against glycolipids from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall in aerosol murine models of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cardona, P J; Julián, E; Vallès, X; Gordillo, S; Muñoz, M; Luquin, M; Ausina, V

    2002-06-01

    Evolution of antibodies against glycolipids from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall has been studied for the first time in experimental murine models of tuberculosis induced by aerosol, in which infection, reinfection, reactivation, prophylaxis and treatment with antibiotics have been assayed. Results show a significant humoral response against these antigens, where diacyltrehaloses (DAT) and sulpholipid I (SL-I) elicited higher antibody levels than protein antigens like antigen 85 protein complex (Ag85), culture filtrate proteins (CFP) and purified protein derivative (PPD). Only immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies have been detected against DAT and SL-I. Their evolution has a positive correlation with bacillary concentration in tissues.

  5. Permeability reductions induced by sorption of surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renshaw, Carl E.; Zynda, Gregory D.; Fountain, John C.

    Surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is an attractive alternative to traditional pump and treat methods for remediating aquifers contaminated with nonaqueous phase liquids. However, initial studies indicate that the application of surfactant can reduce aquifer permeability by more than an order of magnitude, limiting the efficiency of SEAR. A series of column experiments using mixtures of medium sand and montmorillonite clay demonstrate that existing permeability reduction models for biofouling and deep-bed filtration poorly predict surfactant induced permeability reductions. An alternative permeability reduction model is proposed which is based on the assumption that the sorbed surfactant effectively increases the volume fraction of the clay. The model is shown to reasonably predict observed permeability reductions, particularly for clay fractions less than 20%. A numerical simulation of surfactant transport that incorporates the effective clay fraction model demonstrates that induced permeability reductions significantly influence the transport of surfactant through an aquifer.

  6. Solution behavior of surfactants. Vol. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, K.L.; Fendler, E.J.

    1983-01-01

    This three-volume set constitutes the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Surfactants in Solution held in Sweden in 1982. Volume 1 considers phase behavior and phase equilibria in surfactant solutions (e.g., thermodynamics of partially miscible micelles and liquid crystals; multi-method characterization of micelles; the surfactant-block model of micelle structure). Volume 2 considers thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of micellization (computation of the micelle-size distribution; salt-induced sphere-rod transition of ionic micelles; micellar effects on kinetics and equilibria of electron transfer reactions). Volume 3 considers reverse micelles, microemulsions and reactions in microemulsions. Topics covered include solubilization, surfactants in analytical chemistry, the adsorption and binding of surfactants, the polymerization of organized surfactant assemblies, light scattering by liquid surfaces, and vesicles.

  7. Surfactant Therapy of ALI and ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendran, K; Willson, D; Notter, RH

    2011-01-01

    This article examines exogenous lung surfactant replacement therapy and its utility in mitigating clinical acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Biophysical research has documented that lung surfactant dysfunction can be reversed or mitigated by increasing surfactant concentration, and multiple studies in animals with ALI/ARDS have shown that respiratory function and pulmonary mechanics in vivo can be improved by exogenous surfactant administration. Exogenous surfactant therapy is a routine intervention in neonatal intensive care, and is life-saving in preventing or treating the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS) in premature infants. In applications relevant for lung injury-related respiratory failure and ALI/ARDS, surfactant therapy has been shown to be beneficial in term infants with pneumonia and meconium aspiration lung injury, and in children up to age 21 with direct pulmonary forms of ALI/ARDS. However, extension of exogenous surfactant therapy to adults with respiratory failure and clinical ALI/ARDS remains a challenge. Coverage here reviews clinical studies of surfactant therapy in pediatric and adult patients with ALI/ARDS, particularly focusing on its potential advantages in patients with direct pulmonary forms of these syndromes. Also discussed is the rationale for mechanism-based therapies utilizing exogenous surfactant in combination with agents targeting other aspects of the multifaceted pathophysiology of inflammatory lung injury. Additional factors affecting the efficacy of exogenous surfactant therapy in ALI/ARDS are also described, including the difficulty of effectively delivering surfactants to injured lungs and the existence of activity differences between clinical surfactant drugs. PMID:21742216

  8. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials.

  9. Bio-Inspired Dry Adhesives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    of mask respirators with bio -inspired adhesive integrated into their peripheral seals; and (2) assessment of the competitive position of the new bio -inspired adhesives in broader fields of application.

  10. The Interplay of Lung Surfactant Proteins and Lipids Assimilates the Macrophage Clearance of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ruge, Christian A.; Schaefer, Ulrich F.; Herrmann, Jennifer; Kirch, Julian; Cañadas, Olga; Echaide, Mercedes; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Casals, Cristina; Müller, Rolf; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2012-01-01

    The peripheral lungs are a potential entrance portal for nanoparticles into the human body due to their large surface area. The fact that nanoparticles can be deposited in the alveolar region of the lungs is of interest for pulmonary drug delivery strategies and is of equal importance for toxicological considerations. Therefore, a detailed understanding of nanoparticle interaction with the structures of this largest and most sensitive part of the lungs is important for both nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. Astonishingly, there is still little known about the bio-nano interactions that occur after nanoparticle deposition in the alveoli. In this study, we compared the effects of surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) on the clearance of magnetite nanoparticles (mNP) with either more hydrophilic (starch) or hydrophobic (phosphatidylcholine) surface modification by an alveolar macrophage (AM) cell line (MH-S) using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Both proteins enhanced the AM uptake of mNP compared with pristine nanoparticles; for the hydrophilic ST-mNP, this effect was strongest with SP-D, whereas for the hydrophobic PL-mNP it was most pronounced with SP-A. Using gel electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering methods, we were able to demonstrate that the observed cellular effects were related to protein adsorption and to protein-mediated interference with the colloidal stability. Next, we investigated the influence of various surfactant lipids on nanoparticle uptake by AM because lipids are the major surfactant component. Synthetic surfactant lipid and isolated native surfactant preparations significantly modulated the effects exerted by SP-A and SP-D, respectively, resulting in comparable levels of macrophage interaction for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanoparticles. Our findings suggest that because of the interplay of both surfactant lipids and proteins, the AM clearance of nanoparticles is essentially the same, regardless of different

  11. The interplay of lung surfactant proteins and lipids assimilates the macrophage clearance of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ruge, Christian A; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Herrmann, Jennifer; Kirch, Julian; Cañadas, Olga; Echaide, Mercedes; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Casals, Cristina; Müller, Rolf; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2012-01-01

    The peripheral lungs are a potential entrance portal for nanoparticles into the human body due to their large surface area. The fact that nanoparticles can be deposited in the alveolar region of the lungs is of interest for pulmonary drug delivery strategies and is of equal importance for toxicological considerations. Therefore, a detailed understanding of nanoparticle interaction with the structures of this largest and most sensitive part of the lungs is important for both nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. Astonishingly, there is still little known about the bio-nano interactions that occur after nanoparticle deposition in the alveoli. In this study, we compared the effects of surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) on the clearance of magnetite nanoparticles (mNP) with either more hydrophilic (starch) or hydrophobic (phosphatidylcholine) surface modification by an alveolar macrophage (AM) cell line (MH-S) using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Both proteins enhanced the AM uptake of mNP compared with pristine nanoparticles; for the hydrophilic ST-mNP, this effect was strongest with SP-D, whereas for the hydrophobic PL-mNP it was most pronounced with SP-A. Using gel electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering methods, we were able to demonstrate that the observed cellular effects were related to protein adsorption and to protein-mediated interference with the colloidal stability. Next, we investigated the influence of various surfactant lipids on nanoparticle uptake by AM because lipids are the major surfactant component. Synthetic surfactant lipid and isolated native surfactant preparations significantly modulated the effects exerted by SP-A and SP-D, respectively, resulting in comparable levels of macrophage interaction for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanoparticles. Our findings suggest that because of the interplay of both surfactant lipids and proteins, the AM clearance of nanoparticles is essentially the same, regardless of different

  12. Inhibition of Aflatoxin Production by Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Susan B.; Mahoney, Noreen E.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of 12 surfactants on aflatoxin production, growth, and conidial germination by the fungus Aspergillus flavus is reported. Five nonionic surfactants, Triton X-100, Tergitol NP-7, Tergitol NP-10, polyoxyethylene (POE) 10 lauryl ether, and Latron AG-98, reduced aflatoxin production by 96 to 99% at 1% (wt/vol). Colony growth was restricted by the five nonionic surfactants at this concentration. Aflatoxin production was inhibited 31 to 53% by lower concentrations of Triton X-100 (0.001 to 0.0001%) at which colony growth was not affected. Triton X-301, a POE-derived anionic surfactant, had an effect on colony growth and aflatoxin production similar to that of the five POE-derived nonionic surfactants. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), an anionic surfactant, and dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, a cationic surfactant, suppressed conidial germination at 1% (wt/vol). SDS had no effect on aflatoxin production or colony growth at 0.001%. The degree of aflatoxin inhibition by a surfactant appears to be a function of the length of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic chains of POE-derived surfactants. Images PMID:16349144

  13. Remediation using trace element humate surfactant

    DOEpatents

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Taylor, Steven Cheney; Bruhn, Debra Fox

    2016-08-30

    A method of remediation at a remediation site having one or more undesirable conditions in which one or more soil characteristics, preferably soil pH and/or elemental concentrations, are measured at a remediation site. A trace element humate surfactant composition is prepared comprising a humate solution, element solution and at least one surfactant. The prepared trace element humate surfactant composition is then dispensed onto the remediation site whereby the trace element humate surfactant composition will reduce the amount of undesirable compounds by promoting growth of native species activity. By promoting native species activity, remediation occurs quickly and environmental impact is minimal.

  14. Biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant function by polymeric nanoparticles: role of surfactant protein B and C.

    PubMed

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms involved in the process of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by polymeric nanoparticles (NP). The minimal surface tension of diverse synthetic surfactants was monitored in the presence of bare and surface-decorated (i.e. poloxamer 407) sub-100 nm poly(lactide) NP. Moreover, the influence of NP on surfactant composition (i.e. surfactant protein (SP) content) was studied. Dose-elevations of SP advanced the biophysical activity of the tested surfactant preparation. Surfactant-associated protein C supplemented phospholipid mixtures (PLM-C) were shown to be more susceptible to biophysical inactivation by bare NP than phospholipid mixture supplemented with surfactant protein B (PLM-B) and PLM-B/C. Surfactant function was hindered owing to a drastic depletion of the SP content upon contact with bare NP. By contrast, surface-modified NP were capable of circumventing unwanted surfactant inhibition. Surfactant constitution influences the extent of biophysical inhibition by polymeric NP. Steric shielding of the NP surface minimizes unwanted NP-surfactant interactions, which represents an option for the development of surfactant-compatible nanomedicines. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamics of Liquid Plugs of Buffer and Surfactant Solutions in a Micro-Engineered Pulmonary Airway Model

    PubMed Central

    Tavana, Hossein; Kuo, Chuan-Hsien; Lee, Qian Yi; Mosadegh, Bobak; Huh, Dongeun; Christensen, Paul J.; Grotberg, James B.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    We describe a bio-inspired microfluidic system that resembles pulmonary airways and enables on-chip generation of airway occluding liquid plugs from a stratified air-liquid two-phase flow. User-defined changes in the air stream pressure facilitated by mechanical components and tuning the wettability of the microchannels enable generation of well-defined liquid plugs. Significant differences are observed in liquid plug generation and propagation when surfactant is added to the buffer. The plug flow patterns suggest a protective role of surfactant for airway epithelial cells against pathological flow-induced mechanical stresses. We discuss the implications of the findings for clinical settings. This approach and the described platform will enable systematic investigation of the effect of different degrees of fluid mechanical stresses on lung injury at the cellular level and administration of exogenous therapeutic surfactants. PMID:20017471

  16. Detecting Protein-Glycolipid Interactions Using Glycomicelles and CaR-ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Han, Ling; Kitova, Elena N; Klassen, John S

    2016-11-01

    This study reports on the use of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay, combined with glycomicelles, as a method for detecting specific interactions between water-soluble proteins and glycolipids (GLs) in aqueous solution. The B subunit homopentamers of cholera toxin (CTB5) and Shiga toxin type 1 B (Stx1B5) and the gangliosides GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, GT1b, and GD2 served as model systems for this study. The CTB5 exhibits broad specificity for gangliosides and binds to GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b; Stx1B5 does not recognize gangliosides. The CaR-ESI-MS assay was used to analyze solutions of CTB5 or Stx1B5 and individual gangliosides (GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, GT1b, and GD2) or mixtures thereof. The high affinity interaction of CTB5 with GM1 was successfully detected. However, the apparent affinity, as determined from the mass spectra, is significantly lower than that of the corresponding pentasaccharide or when GM1 is presented in model membranes such as nanodiscs. Interactions between CTB5 and the low affinity gangliosides GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b, as well as GD2, which served as a negative control, were detected; no binding of CTB5 to GM2 or GM3 was observed. The CaR-ESI-MS results obtained for Stx1B5 reveal that nonspecific protein-ganglioside binding can occur during the ESI process, although the extent of binding varies between gangliosides. Consequently, interactions detected for CTB5 with GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b are likely nonspecific in origin. Taken together, these results reveal that the CaR-ESI-MS/glycomicelle approach for detecting protein-GL interactions is prone to false positives and false negatives and must be used with caution. Graphical Abstract .

  17. Detecting Protein-Glycolipid Interactions Using Glycomicelles and CaR-ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ling; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.

    2016-11-01

    This study reports on the use of the catch-and-release electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CaR-ESI-MS) assay, combined with glycomicelles, as a method for detecting specific interactions between water-soluble proteins and glycolipids (GLs) in aqueous solution. The B subunit homopentamers of cholera toxin (CTB5) and Shiga toxin type 1 B (Stx1B5) and the gangliosides GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, GT1b, and GD2 served as model systems for this study. The CTB5 exhibits broad specificity for gangliosides and binds to GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b; Stx1B5 does not recognize gangliosides. The CaR-ESI-MS assay was used to analyze solutions of CTB5 or Stx1B5 and individual gangliosides (GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, GT1b, and GD2) or mixtures thereof. The high affinity interaction of CTB5 with GM1 was successfully detected. However, the apparent affinity, as determined from the mass spectra, is significantly lower than that of the corresponding pentasaccharide or when GM1 is presented in model membranes such as nanodiscs. Interactions between CTB5 and the low affinity gangliosides GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b, as well as GD2, which served as a negative control, were detected; no binding of CTB5 to GM2 or GM3 was observed. The CaR-ESI-MS results obtained for Stx1B5 reveal that nonspecific protein-ganglioside binding can occur during the ESI process, although the extent of binding varies between gangliosides. Consequently, interactions detected for CTB5 with GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b are likely nonspecific in origin. Taken together, these results reveal that the CaR-ESI-MS/glycomicelle approach for detecting protein-GL interactions is prone to false positives and false negatives and must be used with caution.

  18. Seasonal lake surface water temperature trends reflected by heterocyst glycolipid-based molecular thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauersachs, T.; Rochelmeier, J.; Schwark, L.

    2015-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that the relative distribution of heterocyst glycolipids (HGs) in cultures of N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria is largely controlled by growth temperature, suggesting a potential use of these components in paleoenvironmental studies. Here, we investigated the effect of environmental parameters (e.g., surface water temperatures, oxygen concentrations and pH) on the distribution of HGs in a natural system using water column filtrates collected from Lake Schreventeich (Kiel, Germany) from late July to the end of October 2013. HPLC-ESI/MS (high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry) analysis revealed a dominance of 1-(O-hexose)-3,25-hexacosanediols (HG26 diols) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-25-hexacosanol (HG26 keto-ol) in the solvent-extracted water column filtrates, which were accompanied by minor abundances of 1-(O-hexose)-3,27-octacosanediol (HG28 diol) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-27-octacosanol (HG28 keto-ol) as well as 1-(O-hexose)-3,25,27-octacosanetriol (HG28 triol) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-25,27-octacosanediol (HG28 keto-diol). Fractional abundances of alcoholic and ketonic HGs generally showed strong linear correlations with surface water temperatures and no or only weak linear correlations with both oxygen concentrations and pH. Changes in the distribution of the most abundant diol and keto-ol (e.g., HG26 diol and HG26 keto-ol) were quantitatively expressed as the HDI26 (heterocyst diol index of 26 carbon atoms) with values of this index ranging from 0.89 in mid-August to 0.66 in mid-October. An average HDI26 value of 0.79, which translates into a calculated surface water temperature of 15.8 ± 0.3 °C, was obtained from surface sediments collected from Lake Schreventeich. This temperature - and temperatures obtained from other HG indices (e.g., HDI28 and HTI28) - is similar to the one measured during maximum cyanobacterial productivity in early to mid-September and suggests that HGs

  19. Seasonal lake surface water temperature trends reflected by heterocyst glycolipid based molecular thermometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauersachs, T.; Rochelmeier, J.; Schwark, L.

    2015-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the relative distribution of heterocyst glycolipids (HGs) in cultures of N2-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria is largely controlled by growth temperature, suggesting a potential use of these components in paleoenvironmental studies. Here, we investigated the effect of environmental parameters (e.g. surface water temperatures, oxygen concentrations and pH) on the distribution of HGs in a natural system using water column filtrates collected from Lake Schreventeich (Kiel, Germany) from late July to the end of October 2013. HPLC-ESI/MS analysis revealed a dominance of 1-(O-hexose)-3,25-hexacosanediols (HG26 diols) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-25-hexacosanol (HG26 keto-ol) in the solvent extracted water column filtrates, which were accompanied by minor abundances of 1-(O-hexose)-3,27-octacosanediol (HG28 diol) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-27-octacosanol (HG28 keto-ol) as well as 1-(O-hexose)-3,25,27-octacosanetriol (HG28 triol) and 1-(O-hexose)-3-keto-25,27-octacosanediol (HG28 keto-diol). Fractional abundances of alcoholic and ketonic HGs generally showed strong linear correlations with surface water temperatures and no or only weak linear correlations with both oxygen concentrations and pH. Changes in the distribution of the most abundant diol and keto-ol (e.g., HG26 diol and HG26 keto-ol) were quantitatively expressed as the HDI26 (heterocyst diol index of 26carbon atoms) with values of this index ranging from 0.89 in mid-August to 0.66 in mid-October. An average HDI26 value of 0.79, which translates into a calculated surface water temperature of 15.8 ± 0.3 °C, was obtained from surface sediments collected from Lake Schreventeich. This temperature - and temperatures obtained from other HG indices (e.g., HDI28 and HTI28) - is similar to the one measured during maximum cyanobacterial productivity in early to mid-September and suggests that HGs preserved in Lake Schreventeich sediments record summer surface water temperatures. As N2-fixing

  20. Polymers and surfactants at fluid interfaces studied with specular neutron reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Braun, Larissa; Uhlig, Martin; von Klitzing, Regine; Campbell, Richard A

    2017-07-12

    This review addresses the advances made with specular neutron reflectometry in studies of aqueous mixtures of polymers and surfactants at fluid interfaces during the last decade (or so). The increase in neutron flux due to improvements in instrumentation has led to routine measurements at the air/water interface that are faster and involve samples with lower isotopic contrast than in previous experiments. One can now resolve the surface excess of a single deuterated component on the second time scale and the composition of a mixture on the minute time scale, and information about adsorption processes and dynamic rheology can also be accessed. Research areas addressed include the types of formed equilibrium surface structures, the link to foam film stability and the range of non-equilibrium effects that dominate the behavior of oppositely charged polyelectrolyte/surfactant mixtures, macroscopic film formation in like-charged polymer/surfactant mixtures, and the properties of mixtures of bio-polymers with surfactants and lipids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Chest position and pulmonary deposition of surfactant in surfactant depleted rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Broadbent, R.; Fok, T. F.; Dolovich, M.; Watts, J.; Coates, G.; Bowen, B.; Kirpalani, H.

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the correlation between chest position and the distribution of surfactant in the lungs of surfactant depleted rabbits, to corroborate current guidelines on the intratracheal instillation of exogenous surfactant in newborns. METHODS--Twelve tracheotomised rabbits, depleted of pulmonary surfactant by saline bronchoalveolar lavage, were given intratracheal 99m Technetium labelled Exosurf in three positions (prone, right side down, and left side down) (n = 4 in each group). They were monitored for 10 minutes using dynamic gamma scintigraphy monitoring. Instillation completed, the lateral lying animals were turned to the opposite side to determine whether redistribution of the surfactant had taken place. The amount of radiolabelled surfactant deposited at the peripheral, central, dorsal and ventral parts of the lungs was then estimated by gamma counting of the lung sections at necropsy. RESULTS--Both gamma scintigraphy and gamma counting showed similar rates and total amount of surfactant accumulation in both lungs of the prone animals. In the lateral lying animals surfactant accumulated at a significantly faster rate in the dependent lungs: the amount of surfactant deposition was three to 14-fold that in the raised lungs (p = 0.017; nested ANOVA). Changing the chest position immediately after instillation did not redistribute the surfactant. In all three groups of animals there was no significant difference in deposition between the peripheral, central, ventral and dorsal parts of the lungs. CONCLUSIONS--Pulmonary distribution of intratracheally instilled surfactant is largely determined by gravity, and changing the chest position after instillation does not result in any redistribution of the surfactant. During the instillation of exogenous surfactant to newborn infants, keeping the chest in the horizontal position may therefore result in the most even distribution of the surfactant in the two lungs. Further deposition studies are required to

  2. Diamond bio electronics.

    PubMed

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions.

  3. Implications of Lymphocyte Anergy to Glycolipids in Multiple Sclerosis (MS): iNKT Cells May Mediate the MS Infectious Trigger

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Edward L; Podbielska, Maria; O’Keeffe, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Immunogenic lipids may play key roles in host defenses against infection and in generating autoimmune inflammation and organ-specific damage. In multiple sclerosis (MS) there are unequivocal autoimmune features and vulnerability to aggravation or induction by microbial or viral infection. We have found glycolipid-driven anergy of circulating lymphocytes in MS indicating that this immune response is affected in MS and the robust effects of iNKT activation with potent cellular and cytokine activities emphasizes its potential importance. Diverse glycolipids including the endogenous myelin acetylated-galactosylceramides (AcGalCer) can drive activation that could be critical to the inflammatory demyelination in the central nervous system and clinical consequences. The iNKT cells and their invariant or iTCR (Vα24Jα18Vβ11) receptor an innate defense–a discrete immune arm that is separate from peptide-driven acquired immune responses. This offers new possibilities for insight including a likelihood that the pattern recognition of exogenous microbial and myelin immunogens can overlap and cross-react especially in an inflammatory milieu. PMID:26347308

  4. Accumulation of a novel glycolipid and a betaine lipid in cells of Rhodobacter sphaeroides grown under phosphate limitation.

    PubMed

    Benning, C; Huang, Z H; Gage, D A

    1995-02-20

    Cells of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides grown under phosphate-limiting conditions accumulated nonphosphorous glycolipids and lipids carrying head groups derived from amino acids. Concomitantly, the relative amount of phosphoglycerolipids decreased from 90 to 22 mol% of total polar lipids in the membranes. Two lipids, not detectable in cells grown under standard conditions, were synthesized during phosphate-limited growth. Fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy, exact mass measurements, 1H NMR spectroscopy, sugar composition analysis, and methylation analysis of the predominant glycolipid led to the identification of the novel compound 1,2-di-O-acyl-3-O-[alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)-O-beta-D-galactopyr anosyl]glycerol. The second lipid was identified as the betaine lipid 1,2-di-O-acyl-[4'-(N,N,N-trimethyl)-homoserine]glycerol by cochromatography employing an authentic standard from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, fast atom bombardment mass spectroscopy, exact mass measurements, and 1H NMR spectroscopy. Prior to this observation, the occurrence of this lipid was thought to be restricted to lower plants and algae. Apparently, these newly synthesized nonphosphorous lipids, in addition to the sulfo- and the ornithine lipid also found in R. sphaeroides grown under optimal conditions, take over the role of phosphoglycerolipids in phosphate-deprived cells.

  5. High Content Phenotypic Cell-Based Visual Screen Identifies Mycobacterium tuberculosis Acyltrehalose-Containing Glycolipids Involved in Phagosome Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; Gilleron, Martine; Ewann, Fanny; Christophe, Thierry; Fenistein, Denis; Jang, Jichan; Jang, Mi-Seon; Park, Sei-Jin; Rauzier, Jean; Carralot, Jean-Philippe; Shrimpton, Rachel; Genovesio, Auguste; Gonzalo-Asensio, Jesus A.; Puzo, Germain; Martin, Carlos; Brosch, Roland; Stewart, Graham R.; Gicquel, Brigitte; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    The ability of the tubercle bacillus to arrest phagosome maturation is considered one major mechanism that allows its survival within host macrophages. To identify mycobacterial genes involved in this process, we developed a high throughput phenotypic cell-based assay enabling individual sub-cellular analysis of over 11,000 Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutants. This very stringent assay makes use of fluorescent staining for intracellular acidic compartments, and automated confocal microscopy to quantitatively determine the intracellular localization of M. tuberculosis. We characterised the ten mutants that traffic most frequently into acidified compartments early after phagocytosis, suggesting that they had lost their ability to arrest phagosomal maturation. Molecular analysis of these mutants revealed mainly disruptions in genes involved in cell envelope biogenesis (fadD28), the ESX-1 secretion system (espL/Rv3880), molybdopterin biosynthesis (moaC1 and moaD1), as well as in genes from a novel locus, Rv1503c-Rv1506c. Most interestingly, the mutants in Rv1503c and Rv1506c were perturbed in the biosynthesis of acyltrehalose-containing glycolipids. Our results suggest that such glycolipids indeed play a critical role in the early intracellular fate of the tubercle bacillus. The unbiased approach developed here can be easily adapted for functional genomics study of intracellular pathogens, together with focused discovery of new anti-microbials. PMID:20844580

  6. Glycosylphosphatidylinositols of Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi: a basis for the study of malarial glycolipid toxins in a rodent model.

    PubMed Central

    Gerold, P; Vivas, L; Ogun, S A; Azzouz, N; Brown, K N; Holder, A A; Schwarz, R T

    1997-01-01

    Free and protein-bound glycosylphosphatidylinositols (GPIs) of the blood stages of the rodent malarial parasite Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS were identified and characterized. TLC analysis of material extracted by organic solvents from metabolically labelled parasites revealed a distinct set of glycolipids. These glycolipids were identified as GPIs by specific chemical and enzymic treatments and by structural analysis of their glycan and hydrophobic parts. These analyses revealed that P.c.chabaudi AS synthesizes a set of GPI-biosynthesis intermediates and two potential GPI-anchor precursors exhibiting the following structures: ethanolamine-phosphate [(alpha1-2)mannose]mannose (alpha 1-2) mannose (alpha 1-6) mannose (alpha 1-4) glucosamine - (acyl) inositol-phosphate-diacylglycerol (P.ch. alpha) and ethanolamine-phosphate - mannose (alpha 1-2) mannose (alpha 1-6) mannose (alpha 1-4) glucosamine-(acyl)inositol-phosphate-diacylglycerol (P.ch. beta). One of these GPI-anchor precursors (P.ch. alpha) possesses the same carbohydrate structure as the GPI membrane anchor of merozoite surface protein-1 from P.c.chabaudi AS. PMID:9396737

  7. Coadministration of glycolipid-like micelles loading cytotoxic drug with different action site for efficient cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Meng-Dan; Hu, Fu-Qiang; Du, Yong-Zhong; Yuan, Hong; Chen, Feng-Ying; Lou, Ya-Min; Yu, He-Yong

    2009-02-01

    To reduce the side effects and drug resistance in cancer chemotherapy, we have examined the in vitro efficacy of the combination of paclitaxel (PTX) and doxorubicin (DOX) loaded in nanosized polymeric micelles with glycolipid-like structure, which formed by lipid grafted chitosan. The cytotoxicities of PTX and DOX, either as single agents or in combination, were examined using drug sensitive tumor cells and drug resistant cells. It was found that the 50% inhibition of cellular growth (IC50) of PTX and DOX in micelles against drug sensitive cells was lowered about 20-fold and 4-7-fold compared to that of Taxol and DOX solution, respectively. The IC50 of PTX and DOX in micelles against drug resistant cells was lowered more significantly, and no clear difference was found between drug sensitive and drug resistant cells. The coadministration of PTX and DOX in micelles showed a more conspicuous effect than that of micelles loaded with a single drug. The micelles presented excellent internalization to cancer cells, which results in increased intracellular accumulation of PTX and DOX in its molecular-target site. The coadministration of glycolipid-like micelles loaded with different cytotoxic drugs indicated synergistic effects for drug sensitive cells and drug resistant cells.

  8. Antibody to endotoxin core glycolipid reverses reticuloendothelial system depression in an animal model of severe sepsis and surgical injury

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, M.C.; Chadwick, S.J.; Cheslyn-Curtis, S.; Rapson, N.; Dudley, H.A.

    1987-10-01

    To study the effect of severe sepsis on the function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) we have measured the clearance kinetics and organ distribution of both low-dose technetium tin colloid (TTC) and /sup 75/selenomethionine-labelled E. coli in rabbits 24 hours after either sham laparotomy or appendix devascularization. Sepsis resulted in similar delayed blood clearance and reduced liver (Kupffer cell) uptake of both TTC and E. coli. To investigate the ability of polyclonal antibody to E. coli-J-5 (core glycolipid) to improve RES function in the same model of sepsis, further animals were pretreated with either core glycolipid antibody or control serum (10 ml IV) 2 hours before induction of sepsis. TTC clearance kinetics were determined 24 hours later. Antibody pretreated animals showed: a reduced incidence of bacteremia; normalization of the rate of blood clearance and liver uptake of TTC; and a 'rebound' increase in splenic uptake of TTC. We conclude that antibody to E. coli-J-5 enhances bacterial clearance by the RES.

  9. Novel design and synthesis of a radioiodinated glycolipid analog as an acceptor substrate for N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V.

    PubMed

    Arimitsu, Kenji; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kajimoto, Tetsuya; Ono, Masahiro; Ohmomo, Yoshiro; Yamashita, Masayuki; Node, Manabu; Saji, Hideo

    2013-09-01

    Guided by the known molecular recognition interactions between N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V (GnT-V) and certain synthetic substrates, we synthesized a radiolabeled double-stranded glycolipid composed of a long-chain alkyl unit and a radioiodinated phenylalkyl unit, [(125)I]-2-[N-(2-hydroxy-3-hexadecyloxy)propyl-15-(4-iodophenyl)pentadecanecarboxamido]ethyl 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-D-mannopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyranoside ([(125)I]2), as a novel intravital glycolipid mimic substrate of GnT-V. The radioactive iodine ((125)I) was incorporated via iododestannylation of the phenyltributyltin derivative, 2-[N-(2-acetoxy-3-hexadecyloxy)propyl-15-(4-tributylstannylphenyl)pentadecanecarboxamido]ethyl 3,4,6-tri-O-acetyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl-(1→2)-3,4,6-O-acetyl-α-D-mannopyranosyl-(1→6)-2,3,4-tri-O-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (26). Subsequent deacetylation at the final step afforded [(125)I]2. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Hemolysis by surfactants--A review.

    PubMed

    Manaargadoo-Catin, Magalie; Ali-Cherif, Anaïs; Pougnas, Jean-Luc; Perrin, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    An overview of the use of surfactants for erythrocyte lysis and their cell membrane action mechanisms is given. Erythrocyte membrane characteristics and its association with the cell cytoskeleton are presented in order to complete understanding of the erythrocyte membrane distortion. Cell homeostasis disturbances caused by surfactants might induce changes starting from shape modification to cell lysis. Two main mechanisms are hypothesized in literature which are osmotic lysis and lysis by solubilization even if the boundary between them is not clearly defined. Another specific mechanism based on the formation of membrane pores is suggested in the particular case of saponins. The lytic potency of a surfactant is related to its affinity for the membrane and the modification of the lipid membrane curvature. This is to be related to the surfactant shape defined by its hydrophobic and hydrophilic moieties but also by experimental conditions. As a consequence, prediction of the hemolytic potency of a given surfactant is challenging. Several studies are focused on the relation between surfactant erythrolytic potency and their physico-chemical parameters such as the critical micellar concentration (CMC), the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), the surfactant membrane/water partition coefficient (K) or the packing parameter (P). The CMC is one of the most important factors considered even if a lytic activity cut-off effect points out that the only consideration of CMC not enough predictive. The relation K.CMC must be considered in addition to the CMC to predict the surfactant lytic capacity within the same family of non ionic surfactant. Those surfactant structure/lytic activity studies demonstrate the requirement to take into account a combination of physico-chemical parameters to understand and foresee surfactant lytic potency.

  11. A minimal length rigid helical peptide motif allows rational design of modular surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Sudipta; Varenik, Maxim; Bloch, Daniel Nir; Atsmon-Raz, Yoav; Jacoby, Guy; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Shimon, Linda J.W.; Beck, Roy; Miller, Yifat; Regev, Oren; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Extensive work has been invested in the design of bio-inspired peptide emulsifiers. Yet, none of the formulated surfactants were based on the utilization of the robust conformation and self-assembly tendencies presented by the hydrophobins, which exhibited highest surface activity among all known proteins. Here we show that a minimalist design scheme could be employed to fabricate rigid helical peptides to mimic the rigid conformation and the helical amphipathic organization. These designer building blocks, containing natural non-coded α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib), form superhelical assemblies as confirmed by crystallography and microscopy. The peptide sequence is amenable to structural modularity and provides the highest stable emulsions reported so far for peptide and protein emulsifiers. Moreover, we establish the ability of short peptides to perform the dual functions of emulsifiers and thickeners, a feature that typically requires synergistic effects of surfactants and polysaccharides. This work provides a different paradigm for the molecular engineering of bioemulsifiers. PMID:28084315

  12. A minimal length rigid helical peptide motif allows rational design of modular surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sudipta; Varenik, Maxim; Bloch, Daniel Nir; Atsmon-Raz, Yoav; Jacoby, Guy; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Shimon, Linda J. W.; Beck, Roy; Miller, Yifat; Regev, Oren; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Extensive work has been invested in the design of bio-inspired peptide emulsifiers. Yet, none of the formulated surfactants were based on the utilization of the robust conformation and self-assembly tendencies presented by the hydrophobins, which exhibited highest surface activity among all known proteins. Here we show that a minimalist design scheme could be employed to fabricate rigid helical peptides to mimic the rigid conformation and the helical amphipathic organization. These designer building blocks, containing natural non-coded α-aminoisobutyric acid (Aib), form superhelical assemblies as confirmed by crystallography and microscopy. The peptide sequence is amenable to structural modularity and provides the highest stable emulsions reported so far for peptide and protein emulsifiers. Moreover, we establish the ability of short peptides to perform the dual functions of emulsifiers and thickeners, a feature that typically requires synergistic effects of surfactants and polysaccharides. This work provides a different paradigm for the molecular engineering of bioemulsifiers.

  13. Current Application of Lipid- and Surfactant-based Vesicles for Cosmeceuticals: A Review.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tzung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Skincare products with multiple beneficial functions are currently of great interest to most cosmeceutical consumers in the world, which provides a strong driving force for the search of new bio-active ingredients. Along with the development of cosmeceuticals, seeking the efficient delivery systems to convey these active substances to the human skin has also gained increasing attention in the field of research and development. In order to elevate the delivery efficacy of cosmetics/drugs, colloidal carriers such as vesicles, nano/micro-emulsions, and nano/micro-particles have been widely developed. This review focuses on the recent investigations of lipid- and surfactant-based vesicles for cosmeceutical applications. Categories, preparation methods, physicochemical characteristics, and safety and efficacy evaluations of lipid- and surfactant-based vesicles capable of delivering cosmeceuticals are discussed in this review.

  14. Crystallographic Complexes of Surfactant Protein A and Carbohydrates Reveal Ligand-induced Conformational Change*

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Feifei; Rynkiewicz, Michael J.; McCormack, Francis X.; Wu, Huixing; Cafarella, Tanya M.; Head, James F.; Seaton, Barbara A.

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A), a C-type lectin, plays an important role in innate lung host defense against inhaled pathogens. Crystallographic SP-A·ligand complexes have not been reported to date, limiting available molecular information about SP-A interactions with microbial surface components. This study describes crystal structures of calcium-dependent complexes of the C-terminal neck and carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-A with d-mannose, d-α-methylmannose, and glycerol, which represent subdomains of glycans on pathogen surfaces. Comparison of these complexes with the unliganded SP-A neck and carbohydrate recognition domain revealed an unexpected ligand-associated conformational change in the loop region surrounding the lectin site, one not previously reported for the lectin homologs SP-D and mannan-binding lectin. The net result of the conformational change is that the SP-A lectin site and the surrounding loop region become more compact. The Glu-202 side chain of unliganded SP-A extends out into the solvent and away from the calcium ion; however, in the complexes, the Glu-202 side chain translocates 12.8 Å to bind the calcium. The availability of Glu-202, together with positional changes involving water molecules, creates a more favorable hydrogen bonding environment for carbohydrate ligands. The Lys-203 side chain reorients as well, extending outward into the solvent in the complexes, thereby opening up a small cation-friendly cavity occupied by a sodium ion. Binding of this cation brings the large loop, which forms one wall of the lectin site, and the adjacent small loop closer together. The ability to undergo conformational changes may help SP-A adapt to different ligand classes, including microbial glycolipids and surfactant lipids. PMID:21047777

  15. Exogenous surfactant in ischemia/reperfusion: effects on endogenous surfactant pools.

    PubMed

    Mühlfeld, Christian; Becker, Laura; Bussinger, Christine; Vollroth, Marcel; Nagib, Ragi; Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Knudsen, Lars; Richter, Joachim; Madershahian, Navid; Wahlers, Thorsten; Wittwer, Thorsten; Ochs, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    Pre-ischemic surfactant treatment attenuates ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. In this study we investigate whether exogenous surfactant acts by influencing endogenous intra-alveolar and intracellular surfactant pools and subtype composition. Rat lungs from control with (C + S) or without (C - S) surfactant treatment and I/R with (I/R + S) or without (I/R - S) surfactant treatment were analyzed. In I/R groups, lungs underwent ischemic storage for 4 hours at 4 degrees C and reperfusion for 60 minutes. The ultrastructure of intra-alveolar and intracellular surfactant forms fixed in their natural localization and microorganization was investigated by light- and electron-microscopic stereology. Only slight differences in alveolar epithelial Type II cell number or volume and lamellar body parameters were observed. Intra-alveolar surfactant volume was significantly enhanced in C + S and I/R + S. I/R increased inactivated surfactant forms (unilamellar vesicles) in untreated [mean (SD): C - S: 26.0% (8.0%) vs I/R - S: 64.8% (5.5%); p < 0.01], but not in surfactant-treated rats [I/R + S: 23.5% (11.5%); p < 0.01 vs I/R - S]. The increase in unilamellar vesicles was closely correlated with intra-alveolar edema and decreased perfusate oxygenation. Attenuation of I/R injury by pre-ischemic exogenous surfactant treatment is mainly based on stabilizing and increasing the active endogenous intra-alveolar surfactant pool.

  16. Innovation in surfactant therapy I: surfactant lavage and surfactant administration by fluid bolus using minimally invasive techniques.

    PubMed

    Dargaville, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Innovation in the field of exogenous surfactant therapy continues more than two decades after the drug became commercially available. One such innovation, lung lavage using dilute surfactant, has been investigated in both laboratory and clinical settings as a treatment for meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Studies in animal models of MAS have affirmed that dilute surfactant lavage can remove meconium from the lung, with resultant improvement in lung function. In human infants both non-randomised studies and two randomised controlled trials have demonstrated a potential benefit of dilute surfactant lavage over standard care. The largest clinical trial, performed by our research group in infants with severe MAS, found that lung lavage using two 15-ml/kg aliquots of dilute surfactant did not reduce the duration of respiratory support, but did appear to reduce the composite outcome of death or need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. A further trial of lavage therapy is planned to more precisely define the effect on survival. Innovative approaches to surfactant therapy have also extended to the preterm infant, for whom the more widespread use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has meant delaying or avoiding administration of surfactant. In an effort to circumvent this problem, less invasive techniques of bolus surfactant therapy have been trialled, including instillation directly into the pharynx, via laryngeal mask and via brief tracheal catheterisation. In a recent clinical trial, instillation of surfactant into the trachea using a flexible feeding tube was found to reduce the need for subsequent intubation. We have developed an alternative method of brief tracheal catheterisation in which surfactant is delivered via a semi-rigid vascular catheter inserted through the vocal cords under direct vision. In studies to date, this technique has been relatively easy to perform, and resulted in rapid improvement in lung function and reduced need for

  17. Surfactant effects on soil aggregate tensile strength

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little is known regarding a soil aggregate's tensile strength response to surfactants that may be applied to alleviate soil water repellency. Two laboratory investigations were performed to determine surfactant effects on the tensile strength of 1) Ap horizons of nine wettable, agricultural soils co...

  18. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

  19. Measuring surfactant concentration in plating solutions

    DOEpatents

    Bonivert, William D.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Hachman, John T.

    1989-01-01

    An arrangement for measuring the concentration of surfactants in a electrolyte containing metal ions includes applying a DC bias voltage and a modulated voltage to a counter electrode. The phase angle between the modulated voltage and the current response to the modulated voltage at a working electrode is correlated to the surfactant concentration.

  20. Cutaneous Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity to Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Joseph F; Shaughnessy, Cristin N; Belsito, Donald V; DeKoven, Joel G; Deleo, Vincent A; Fransway, Anthony F; Maibach, Howard I; Marks, James G; Mathias, C G Toby; Pratt, Melanie; Sasseville, Denis; Taylor, James S; Warshaw, Erin M; Zirwas, Matthew J; Zug, Kathryn A; Lorenz, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Repeated and prolonged use of surfactants can cause irritant as well as allergic contact dermatitis. This study reports the frequency of positive patch test results to surfactants tested on the North American Contact Dermatitis Group screening series including cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB), amidoamine (AA), dimethylaminopropylamine (DMAPA), oleamidopropyl dimethylamine (OPD), and cocamide diethanolamide (CDEA), and correlations of positive reactions between CAPB and the other surfactants. This was a retrospective analysis of 10 877 patients patch tested between 2009 and 2014 to the surfactants CAPB, AA, DMAPA, OPD, and CDEA. Frequencies of positive reactions to these surfactants were calculated, and trends of reactivity between the surfactants analyzed. The OPD had the highest rate of positive patch reactions (2.3%) followed by DMAPA (1.7%), and CAPB (1.4%). The AA and CDEA had the lowest rate of positive reactions (0.8%). There was a high degree of overlap in positive patch tests between the surfactants. The CDEA was the least likely to coreact with another surfactant.

  1. Hyaluronan decreases surfactant inactivation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lu, Karen W; Goerke, Jon; Clements, John A; Taeusch, H William

    2005-02-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is an anionic polymer and a constituent of alveolar fluid that can bind proteins, phospholipids, and water. Previous studies have established that nonionic polymers improve the surface activity of pulmonary surfactants by decreasing inactivation of surfactant. In this work, we investigate whether HA can also have beneficial effects when added to surfactants. We used a modified pulsating bubble surfactometer to measure mixtures of several commercially available pulmonary surfactants or native calf surfactant with and without serum inactivation. Surface properties such as equilibrium surface tension, minimum and maximum surface tensions on compression and expansion of a surface film, and degree of surface area reduction required to reach a surface tension of 10 mN/m were measured. In the presence of serum, addition of HA dramatically improved the surface activities of all four surfactants and in some cases in the absence of serum as well. These results indicate that HA reduces inactivation of surfactants caused by serum and add evidence that endogenous HAs may interact with alveolar surfactant under normal and abnormal conditions.

  2. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  3. Surfactant Adsorption: A Revised Physical Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Marc R.; Hagen, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Many physical chemistry lab courses include an experiment in which students measure surface tension as a function of surfactant concentration. In the traditional experiment, the data are fit to the Gibbs isotherm to determine the molar area for the surfactant, and the critical micelle concentration is used to calculate the Gibbs energy of micelle…

  4. Metathesis depolymerization for removable surfactant templates.

    SciTech Connect

    Zifer, Thomas; Wheeler, David Roger; Rahimian, Kamayar; McElhanon, James Ross; Long, Timothy Michael; Jamison, Gregory Marks; Loy, Douglas Anson; Kline, Steven R.; Simmons, Blake Alexander

    2005-03-01

    Current methodologies for the production of meso- and nanoporous materials include the use of a surfactant to produce a self-assembled template around which the material is formed. However, post-production surfactant removal often requires centrifugation, calcination, and/or solvent washing which can damage the initially formed material architecture(s). Surfactants that can be disassembled into easily removable fragments following material preparation would minimize processing damage to the material structure, facilitating formation of templated hybrid architectures. Herein, we describe the design and synthesis of novel cationic and anionic surfactants with regularly spaced unsaturation in their hydrophobic hydrocarbon tails and the first application of ring closing metathesis depolymerization to surfactant degradation resulting in the mild, facile decomposition of these new compounds to produce relatively volatile nonsurface active remnants.

  5. Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L. ); Lewis, B.A. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    At one installation, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of the research program in which twenty-one surfactants were screened for possible use to mobilize the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on actual contaminated soil samples obtained from the site. 18 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Solubilisation capacity of Brij surfactants.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Maria E N P; de Moura, Carolina L; Vieira, Mariano G S; Gramosa, Nilce V; Chaibundit, Chiraphon; de Mattos, Marcos C; Attwood, David; Yeates, Stephen G; Nixon, S Keith; Ricardo, Nágila M P S

    2012-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of selected Brij non-ionic surfactants for enhancing the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs. Griseofulvin was selected as a model drug candidate enabling comparisons to be made with the solubilisation capacities of other poly(ethylene oxide)-based copolymers. UV/Vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopies were used to quantify the enhancement of solubility of griseofulvin in 1 wt% aqueous micellar solutions of Brij 78 (C(18)H(37)E(20)), Brij 98 (C(18)H(35)E(20)) and Brij 700 (C(18)H(37)E(100)) (where E represents the OCH(2)CH(2) unit of the poly(ethylene oxide) chain) at 25, 37 and 40 °C. Solubilisation capacities (S(cp) expressed as mg griseofulvin per g Brij) were similar for Brij 78 and 98 (range 6-11 mg g(-1)) but lower for Brij 700 (3-4 mg g(-1)) as would be expected for the surfactant with the higher ethylene oxide content. The drug loading capacity of micelles of Brij 78 was higher than many di- and triblock copolymers with hydrophilic E-blocks specifically designed for enhancement of drug solubility.

  7. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The future of exogenous surfactant therapy.

    PubMed

    Willson, Douglas F; Notter, Robert H

    2011-09-01

    Since the identification of surfactant deficiency as the putative cause of the infant respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) by Avery and Mead in 1959, our understanding of the role of pulmonary surfactant in respiratory physiology and the pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI) has advanced substantially. Surfactant replacement has become routine for the prevention and treatment of infant RDS and other causes of neonatal lung injury. The role of surfactant in lung injury beyond the neonatal period, however, has proven more complex. Relative surfactant deficiency, dysfunction, and inhibition all contribute to the disturbed physiology seen in ALI and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Consequently, exogenous surfactant, while a plausible therapy, has proven to be less effective in ALI/ARDS than in RDS, where simple deficiency is causative. This failure may relate to a number of factors, among them inadequacy of pharmaceutical surfactants, insufficient dosing or drug delivery, poor drug distribution, or simply an inability of the drug to substantially impact the underlying pathophysiology of ALI/ARDS. Both animal and human studies suggest that direct types of ALI (eg, aspiration, pneumonia) may be more responsive to surfactant therapy than indirect lung injury (eg, sepsis, pancreatitis). Animal studies are needed, however, to further clarify aspects of drug composition, timing, delivery, and dosing before additional human trials are pursued, as the results of human trials to date have been inconsistent and largely disappointing. Further study and perhaps the development of more robust pharmaceutical surfactants offer promise that exogenous surfactant will find a place in our armamentarium of treatment of ALI/ARDS in the future.

  9. Project BioShield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-10

    to Congress. Expedited Peer Review . The Project BioShield Act of 2004 authorizes the HHS Secretary to use an expedited award process, rather than the...normal peer review process, for grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements related to biomedical countermeasure R&D activity, if the Secretary... peer review process will reduce the quality of the research.6 Peer review is designed to maximize the chances that only proposals with the greatest

  10. Project BioShield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-27

    Expedited Peer Review . The Project BioShield Act of 2004 authorizes the HHS Secretary to use an expedited award process, rather than the normal peer ...such awards, or to many, will depend on what needs the Secretary deems pressing. Some scientists have expressed concerns that an expedited peer review process...will reduce the quality of the research.6 Peer review is designed to maximize the chances that only proposals with the greatest scientific

  11. BioReactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosiano, John; Roberts, Randy; Cleland, Tim; Gray, Perry

    2003-04-18

    BioReactor is a simulation tool kit for modeling networks of coupled chemical processes (or similar productions rules). The tool kit is implemented in C++ and has the following functionality: 1. Monte Carlo discrete event simulator 2. Solvers for ordinary differential equations 3. Genetic algorithm optimization routines for reverse engineering of models using either Monte Carlo or ODE representation )i.e., 1 or 2)

  12. Characterization of novel long-chain 1,2-diols in Thermus species and demonstration that Thermus strains contain both glycerol-linked and diol-linked glycolipids.

    PubMed Central

    Wait, R; Carreto, L; Nobre, M F; Ferreira, A M; da Costa, M S

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we purified and characterized tetra- and triglycosyl glycolipids (GL-1 and GL-2, respectively) from two different colonial forms of Thermus scotoductus X-1, from T. filiformis Tok4 A2, and from T. oshimai SPS-11. Acid hydrolysis of the purified glycolipids liberated, in addition to the expected long-chain fatty acids, two components which were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry as 16-methylheptadecane-1,2-diol and 15-methylheptadecane-1,2-diol. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of the intact glycolipids indicated that a major proportion consisted of components with glycan head groups linked to long-chain 1,2-diols rather than to glycerol, although in all cases glycerol-linked compounds containing similar glycan head groups were also present. As in other Thermus strains, the polar head group of GL-1 from T. filiformis Tok4 A2 and from T. scotoductus X-1 colony type t2 was a glucosylgalactosyl-(N-acyl)glucosaminylglucosyl moiety. However, GL-2 from T. scotoductus X-1 colony type t1 and from T. oshimai SPS-11 was a truncated analog which lacked the nonreducing terminal glucose. Long-chain 1,2-diols have been previously reported in the polar lipids of Thermomicrobium roseum and (possibly) Chloroflexus aurantiacus, but to our knowledge, this is the first report of their detection in other bacteria and the first account of the structural determination of long-chain diol-linked glycolipids. PMID:9324266

  13. Lipoarabinomannan, and its related glycolipids, induce divergent and opposing immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis depending on structural diversity and experimental variations.

    PubMed

    Källenius, Gunilla; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Buteme, Helen; Hamasur, Beston; Svenson, Stefan B

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) may lead to active or latent tuberculosis, or clearance of Mtb, depending essentially on the quality of the host's immune response. This response is initiated through the interaction of Mtb cell wall surface components, mostly glycolipids, with cells of the innate immune system, particularly macrophages (Mφs) and dendritic cells (DCs). The way Mφs and DC alter their cytokine secretome, activate or inhibit different microbicidal mechanisms and present antigens and consequently trigger the T cell-mediated immune response impacts the host immune response against Mtb. Lipoarabinomannan (LAM) is one of the major cell wall components of Mtb. Mannosyl-capped LAM (ManLAM), and its related cell wall-associated types of glycolipids/lipoglycans, namely phosphatidylinositol mannosides (PIMs) and lipomannan (LM), exhibit important and distinct immunomodulatory properties. The structure, internal heterogeneity and abundance of these molecules vary between Mtb strains exhibiting distinct degrees of virulence. Thus ManLAM, LM and PIMs may be considered crucial Mtb-associated virulence factors in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis. Of particular relevance for this review, there is controversy about the specific immunomodulatory properties of these distinct glycolipids, particularly when tested as purified molecules in vitro. In addition to the variability in the glycolipid composition conflicting reports may also result from differences in the protocols used for glycolipid isolation and for in vitro experiments including immune cell types and procedures to generate them. Understanding the immunomodulatory properties of these cell wall glycolipids, how they differ between distinct Mtb strains, and how they influence the degree of Mtb virulence, is of utmost relevance to understand how the host mounts a protective or otherwise pathologic immune response. This is essential for the design of preventive strategies against tuberculosis. Thus

  14. Exogenous Pulmonary Surfactant as a Vehicle for Antimicrobials: Assessment of Surfactant-Antibacterial Interactions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Owing to its unique surface-active properties, an exogenous pulmonary surfactant may become a promising drug delivery agent, in particular, acting as a vehicle for antibiotics in topical treatment of pneumonia. The purpose of this study was to assess a mutual influence of natural surfactant preparation and three antibiotics (amikacin, cefepime, and colistimethate sodium) in vitro and to identify appropriate combination(s) for subsequent in vivo investigations of experimental surfactant/antibiotic mixtures. Influence of antibiotics on surface-active properties of exogenous surfactant was assessed using the modified Pattle method. Effects of exogenous surfactant on antibacterial activity of antimicrobials against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were evaluated using conventional microbiologic procedures. Addition of amikacin or cefepime to surfactant had no significant influence on surface-active properties of the latter. Obvious reduction of surface-active properties was confirmed for surfactant/colistimethate composition. When suspended with antibiotics, surfactant either had no impact on their antimicrobial activity (amikacin) or exerted mild to moderate influence (reduction of cefepime bactericidal activity and increase of colistimethate bacteriostatic activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa). Considering favorable compatibility profile, the surfactant/amikacin combination is advisable for subsequent investigation of joint surfactant/antibacterial therapy in animals with bacterial pneumonia. PMID:24876994

  15. Different effects of surfactant proteins B and C - implications for development of synthetic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with synthetic surfactants containing a surfactant protein C analogue in a simple phospholipid mixture gives similar tidal volumes as treatment with poractant alfa (Curosurf(R)) but ventilation with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is needed for this synthetic surfactant to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. The effect on lung gas volumes seems to depend on the structure of the peptide since treatment with a synthetic surfactant containing the 21-residue peptide (LysLeu(4))(4)Lys (KL(4)) gives low lung gas volumes in experiments also performed with PEEP. Surfactant preparations containing both surfactant proteins B and C or their analogues prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration even if ventilated without PEEP. Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with different natural surfactants indicates that both the lipid composition and the proteins are important in order to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. Synthetic surfactants containing two peptides may be able to replace natural surfactants within the near future but more trials need to be performed before any conclusion can be drawn about the ideal composition of this new generation of synthetic surfactants. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-15

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  17. Improvement of Absorber's Performance by a Surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Nobuya; Nomura, Tomohiro; Iyota, Hiroyuki; Kawakami, Ryuichiro

    Effects of an addition of surfactant to a lithium bromide aqueous solution have been investigated experimentally. N-octanol was used as a surfactant. The Marangoni convection occurred at/beneath the solution surface in the very beginning of steam absorption was observed both by a real-time type laser holographic visualization and by temperature measurements with extremely fine gauge thermocouples. Generation and growth of the Marangoni convection were both observed and evaluated quantitatively by the flow visualization. Furthermore, solution's surface temperatures with and without addition of the surfactant were measured minutely. Cell's formation pattern and migration speed at the surface were measured varying the initial surfactant's concentration ranging from 0 to 50000 ppm and the shallow liquid layer thickness ranging from 2 to 5 mm. And spacio-temporal scales of the Marangoni convection were determined. Also solution temperature changes at the surface were compared. Temperature increases when the surfactant was added to its solubility limit became almost double than that case of no surfactant. From these temperature differences, effects of the surfactant on absorber's performances were estimated by a calculation quantitatively with diffusion coefficient as an evaluation value.

  18. Fluorescence emission of pyrene in surfactant solutions.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro, Lucas; Novo, Mercedes; Al-Soufi, Wajih

    2015-01-01

    The systematic description of the complex photophysical behaviour of pyrene in surfactant solutions in combination with a quantitative model for the surfactant concentrations reproduces with high accuracy the steady-state and the time resolved fluorescence intensity of pyrene in surfactant solutions near the cmc, both in the monomer and in the excimer emission bands. We present concise model equations that can be used for the analysis of the pyrene fluorescence intensity in order to estimate fundamental parameters of the pyrene-surfactant system, such as the binding equilibrium constant K of pyrene to a given surfactant micelle, the rate constant of excimer formation in micelles, and the equilibrium constant of pyrene-surfactant quenching. The values of the binding equilibrium constant K(TX100)=3300·10³ M⁻¹ and K(SDS)=190·10³ M⁻¹ for Triton X-100 (TX100) and SDS micelles, respectively, show that the partition of pyrene between bulk water and micelles cannot be ignored, even at relatively high surfactant concentrations above the cmc. We apply the model to the determination of the cmc from the pyrene fluorescence intensity, especially from the intensity ratio at two vibronic bands in the monomer emission or from the ratio of excimer to monomer emission intensity. We relate the finite width of the transition region below and above the cmc with the observed changes in the pyrene fluorescence in this region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Adsorption of Gemini surfactants onto clathrate hydrates.

    PubMed

    Salako, O; Lo, C; Couzis, A; Somasundaran, P; Lee, J W

    2013-12-15

    This work addresses the adsorption of two Gemini surfactants at the cyclopentane (CP) hydrate-water interface. The Gemini surfactants investigated here are Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 that have two anionic head groups and one hydrophobic tail group. The adsorption of these surfactants was quantified using adsorption isotherms and the adsorption isotherms were determined using liquid-liquid titrations. Even if the Gemini surfactant adsorption isotherms show multi-layer adsorption, they possess the first Langmuir layer with the second adsorption layer only evident in the 2A1 adsorption isotherm. Zeta potentials of CP hydrate particles in the surfactant solution of various concentrations of Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were measured to further explain their adsorption behavior at the CP hydrate-water interface. Zeta potentials of alumina particles as a model particle system in different concentrations of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Dowfax C6L and Dowfax 2A1 were also measured to confirm the configuration of all the surfactants at the interface. The determination of the isotherms and zeta-potentials provides an understanding framework for the adsorption behavior of the two Gemini surfactants at the hydrate-water interface. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    PubMed

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Domka, Ludwik; Skrzypczak, Andrzej; Kozak, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay - hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1‧-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d001) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH2 and CH3 groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  2. A study of surfactant-assisted waterflooding

    SciTech Connect

    Scamehorn, J F; Harwell, J H

    1990-09-01

    In surfactant-assisted waterflooding, a surfactant slug is injected into a reservoir, followed by a brine spacer, followed by second surfactant slug. The charge on the surfactant in the first slug has opposite sign to that in the second slug. When the two slugs mix in the reservoir, a precipitate or coacervate is formed which plugs the permeable region of the reservoir. Subsequently injected water or brine is forced through the low permeability region of the reservoir, increasing sweep efficiency of the waterflood, compared to a waterflood not using surfactants. In this part of the work, two major tasks are performed. First, core floods are performed with oil present to demonstrate the improvement in incremental oil production, as well as permeability modification. Second, a reservoir simulation model will be proposed to further delineate the optimum strategy for implementation of the surfactant-assisted waterflooding, as well as indicate the reservoir types for which it would be most effective. Surfactants utilized were sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl pyridinium chloride. 44 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. The BioHub Knowledge Base: Ontology and Repository for Sustainable Biosourcing.

    PubMed

    Read, Warren J; Demetriou, George; Nenadic, Goran; Ruddock, Noel; Stevens, Robert; Winter, Jerry

    2016-06-01

    The motivation for the BioHub project is to create an Integrated Knowledge Management System (IKMS) that will enable chemists to source ingredients from bio-renewables, rather than from non-sustainable sources such as fossil oil and its derivatives. The BioHubKB is the data repository of the IKMS; it employs Semantic Web technologies, especially OWL, to host data about chemical transformations, bio-renewable feedstocks, co-product streams and their chemical components. Access to this knowledge base is provided to other modules within the IKMS through a set of RESTful web services, driven by SPARQL queries to a Sesame back-end. The BioHubKB re-uses several bio-ontologies and bespoke extensions, primarily for chemical feedstocks and products, to form its knowledge organisation schema. Parts of plants form feedstocks, while various processes generate co-product streams that contain certain chemicals. Both chemicals and transformations are associated with certain qualities, which the BioHubKB also attempts to capture. Of immediate commercial and industrial importance is to estimate the cost of particular sets of chemical transformations (leading to candidate surfactants) performed in sequence, and these costs too are captured. Data are sourced from companies' internal knowledge and document stores, and from the publicly available literature. Both text analytics and manual curation play their part in populating the ontology. We describe the prototype IKMS, the BioHubKB and the services that it supports for the IKMS. The BioHubKB can be found via http://biohub.cs.manchester.ac.uk/ontology/biohub-kb.owl .

  4. COMBINED MICROBIAL SURFACTANT-POLYMER SYSTEM FOR IMPROVED OIL MOBILITY AND CONFORMANCE CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2004-08-01

    Many domestic oil fields are facing abandonment even though they still contain two-thirds of their original oil. A significant number of these fields can yield additional oil using advanced oil recovery (AOR) technologies. To maintain domestic oil production at current levels, AOR technologies are needed that are affordable and can be implemented by independent oil producers of the future. Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) technologies have become established as cost-effective solutions for declining oil production. MEOR technologies are affordable for independent producers operating stripper wells and can be used to extend the life of marginal fields. The demonstrated versatility of microorganisms can be used to design advanced microbial systems to treat multiple production problems in complex, heterogeneous reservoirs. The proposed research presents the concept of a combined microbial surfactant-polymer system for advanced oil recovery. The surfactant-polymer system utilizes bacteria that are capable of both biosurfactant production and metabolically-controlled biopolymer production. This novel technology combines complementary mechanisms to extend the life of marginal fields and is applicable to a large number of domestic reservoirs. The research project described in this report is performed jointly by, Bio-Engineering Inc., a woman owned small business, Texas A&M University and Prairie View A&M University, a Historically Black College and University. This report describes the results of our laboratory work to grow microbial cultures and the work done on recovery experiments on core rocks. We have selected two bacterial strains capable of producing both surfactant and polymers. We have conducted laboratory experiments to determine under what conditions surfactants and polymers can be produced from one single strain. We have conduct recovery experiments to determine the performance of these strains under different conditions. Our results do not show a

  5. A test to illustrate the effects of BioSolve on the mobility of contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Lorri M.

    1999-05-27

    Mountain States BioSolve manufactures products for in-situ bioremediation projects. One of their products, BioSolve, desorbs and emulsifies hydrocarbons in a contaminated substrate. BioSolve is a blend of water-based, biodegradable surfactants which were engineered as a clean-up and mitigation agent for hydrocarbon products. Its basic mechanism is to emulsify the hydrocarbon into small encapsulated particles in a water/oxygen-bearing solution, desorbing hydrocarbon molecules from soil particles. This allows bacteria to more effectively metabolize the contaminate. During desorption, Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) levels may increase shortly after application due to the removal of contaminate from soil particles which increases the total recoverable hydrocarbon. This allows the hydrocarbon, in the pump and treat process, to become mobile, and thus carried with the water to the recovery wells where it can be removed. This testing does not address pump and treat technology but only the increased surface area for bioremediation enhancement.

  6. Influence of surfactants in forced dynamic dewetting.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Franziska; Fell, Daniela; Truszkowska, Dorota; Weirich, Marcel; Anyfantakis, Manos; Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Wagner, Manfred; Auernhammer, Günter K; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-09-20

    In this work we show that the forced dynamic dewetting of surfactant solutions depends sensitively on the surfactant concentration. To measure this effect, a hydrophobic rotating cylinder was horizontally half immersed in aqueous surfactant solutions. Dynamic contact angles were measured optically by extrapolating the contour of the meniscus to the contact line. Anionic (sodium 1-decanesulfonate, S-1DeS), cationic (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) and nonionic surfactants (C4E1, C8E3 and C12E5) with critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) spanning four orders of magnitude were used. The receding contact angle in water decreased with increasing velocity. This decrease was strongly enhanced when adding surfactant, even at surfactant concentrations of 10% of the critical micelle concentration. Plots of the receding contact angle-versus-velocity almost superimpose when being plotted at the same relative concentration (concentration/CMC). Thus the rescaled concentration is the dominating property for dynamic dewetting. The charge of the surfactants did not play a role, thus excluding electrostatic effects. The change in contact angle can be interpreted by local surface tension gradients, i.e. Marangoni stresses, close to the three-phase contact line. The decrease of dynamic contact angles with velocity follows two regimes. Despite the existence of Marangoni stresses close to the contact line, for a dewetting velocity above 1-10 mm s(-1) the hydrodynamic theory is able to describe the experimental results for all surfactant concentrations. At slower velocities an additional steep decrease of the contact angle with velocity was observed. Particle tracking velocimetry showed that the flow profiles do not differ with and without surfactant on a scales >100 μm.

  7. Glycolipid-based nanostructures with thermal-phase transition behavior functioning as solubilizers and refolding accelerators for protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Kameta, N; Matsuzawa, T; Yaoi, K; Fukuda, J; Masuda, M

    2017-05-03

    The self-assembly of synthetic glycolipids produced nanostructures such as vesicles and nanotubes consisting of bilayer membranes, which underwent a gel-to-liquid crystalline thermal phase transition. Vesicles formed at temperatures above the thermal phase transition temperatures (Tg-l) could solubilize aggregates of denatured proteins by trapping them in the fluid bilayer membranes. Cooling to temperatures below Tg-l caused a morphological transformation into nanotubes that accompanied the thermal phase transition from the fluid to the solid state. This phenomenon allowed the trapped proteins to be quickly released into the bulk solution and simultaneously facilitated the refolding of the proteins. The refolding efficiency strongly depended on the electrostatic attraction between the bilayer membranes of the nanostructures and the proteins. Because of the long shape (>400 nm) of the nanotubes, simple membrane filtration through a pore size of 200 nm led to complete separation and recovery of the refolded proteins (3-9 nm sizes).

  8. Delayed hypersensitivity and granulomatous response after immunization with protein antigens associated with a mycobacterial glycolipid and oil droplets.

    PubMed

    Granger, D L; Yamamoto, K I; Ribi, E

    1976-02-01

    A myocardial glycolipid (P3) mixed with protein antigens in oil-in-water emulsion induced lasting delayed hypersensitivity (DH) and granulomatous inflammation after intradermal injection into guinea pigs. This did not occur when P3 and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were given in Freund's incomplete adjuvant. The oil-in-water emulsions consisted of microscopic oil droplets suspended in aqueous medium. By separating oil and aqueous phases from BSA + P3 emulsion it was shown that antigen retained with oil droplets led to DH and granuloma formation. The association of antigen with oil droplets was P3 dependent and was quantitated with 125I-labeled BSA. The same phenomenon occurred with 125I-labeled rabbit gamma-globulin (RGG) + P3 emulsion. Fluorescein-conjugated RGG was observed in a particulate state within or on oil droplets in emulsion containing P3. These physical characteristics of antigen + P3 emulsion appeared to be important for immunogenicity.

  9. Surfactant-associated proteins: structure, function and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Ketko, Anastasia K; Donn, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    Surfactant replacement therapy is now the standard of care for infants with respiratory distress syndrome. As the understanding of surfactant structure and function has evolved, surfactant-associated proteins are now understood to be essential components of pulmonary surfactant. Their structural and functional diversity detail the complexity of their contributions to normal pulmonary physiology, and deficiency states result in significant pathology. Engineering synthetic surfactant protein constructs has been a major research focus for replacement therapies. This review highlights what is known about surfactant proteins and how this knowledge is pivotal for future advancements in treating respiratory distress syndrome as well as other pulmonary diseases characterized by surfactant deficiency or inactivation.

  10. Prediction of glycolipid-binding domains from the amino acid sequence of lipid raft-associated proteins: application to HpaA, a protein involved in the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to gastrointestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Garmy, Nicolas; Yahi, Nouara

    2006-09-12

    Protein-glycolipid interactions mediate the attachment of various pathogens to the host cell surface as well as the association of numerous cellular proteins with lipid rafts. Thus, it is of primary importance to identify the protein domains involved in glycolipid recognition. Using structure similarity searches, we could identify a common glycolipid-binding domain in the three-dimensional structure of several proteins known to interact with lipid rafts. Yet the three-dimensional structure of most raft-targeted proteins is still unknown. In the present study, we have identified a glycolipid-binding domain in the amino acid sequence of a bacterial adhesin (Helicobacter pylori adhesin A, HpaA). The prediction was based on the major properties of the glycolipid-binding domains previously characterized by structural searches. A short (15-mer) synthetic peptide corresponding to this putative glycolipid-binding domain was synthesized, and we studied its interaction with glycolipid monolayers at the air-water interface. The synthetic HpaA peptide recognized LacCer but not Gb3. This glycolipid specificity was in line with that of the whole bacterium. Molecular modeling studies gave some insights into this high selectivity of interaction. It also suggested that Phe147 in HpaA played a key role in LacCer recognition, through sugar-aromatic CH-pi stacking interactions with the hydrophobic side of the galactose ring of LacCer. Correspondingly, the replacement of Phe147 with Ala strongly affected LacCer recognition, whereas substitution with Trp did not. Our method could be used to identify glycolipid-binding domains in microbial and cellular proteins interacting with lipid shells, rafts, and other specialized membrane microdomains.

  11. Interfacial behavior of catanionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Stocco, Antonio; Carriere, David; Cottat, Maximilien; Langevin, Dominique

    2010-07-06

    We report a dramatic increase in foam stability for catanionic mixtures (myristic acid and cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTABr) with respect to that of CTABr solutions. This increase was related to the low surface tension, high surface concentration, and high viscoelastic compression moduli, as measured with rising bubble experiments and ellipsometry. Dialysis of the catanionic mixtures has been used to decrease the concentration of free surfactant ions (CTA(+)). The equilibrium surface tension is reached faster for nondialyzed samples because of the presence of these free ions. As a consequence, the foamability of the dialyzed solutions is lower. Foam coarsening has been studied using multiple light scattering: it is similar for dialyzed and nondialyzed samples and much slower than for pure CTABr foams.

  12. Surfactant-Assisted Coal Liquefaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    Obtaining liquid fuels from coal which are economically competitive with those obtained from petroleum based sources is a significant challenge for the researcher as well as the chemical industry. Presently, the economics of coal liquefaction are not favorable because of relatively intense processing conditions (temperatures of 430 degrees C and pressures of 2200 psig), use of a costly catalyst, and a low quality product slate of relatively high boiling fractions. The economics could be made more favorable by achieving adequate coal conversions at less intense processing conditions and improving the product slate. A study has been carried out to examine the effect of a surfactant in reducing particle agglomeration and improving hydrodynamics in the coal liquefaction reactor to increase coal conversions...

  13. Production of a new glycolipid biosurfactant from marine Nocardiopsis lucentensis MSA04 in solid-state cultivation.

    PubMed

    Kiran, G Seghal; Thomas, T Anto; Selvin, Joseph

    2010-06-15

    Considering the need of potential biosurfactant producers and economic production processes using industrial waste, the present study aims to develop solid-state culture (SSC) of a marine actinobacterium for biosurfactant production. A potential biosurfactant producer Nocardiopsis lucentensis MSA04 was isolated from the marine sponge Dendrilla nigra. Among the substrates screened, wheat bran increased the production significantly (E(24) 25%) followed by oil seed cake and industrial waste such as tannery pretreated sludge, treated molasses (distillery waste) and pretreated molasses. Enhanced biosurfactant production was achieved under SSC conditions using kerosene as carbon source, beef extract as nitrogen source and wheat bran as substrate. The maximum production of biosurfactant by MSA04 occurred at a C/N ratio of 0.5 envisaging that a higher amount of nitrogen source is required by the strain compared to that of the carbon source. The kerosene and beef extract interactively increase the production and a stable production was attained with the influence of both factors independently. A significant interactive influence of secondary control factors such as copper sulfate and inoculum size was validated in response surface methods-based experiments. The surface active compound produced by MSA04 was characterized as glycolipid with a hydrophobic non-polar hydrocarbon chain (nonanoic acid methyl ester) and hydrophilic sugar, 3-acetyl 2,5 dimethyl furan. In conclusion, the strain N. lucentensis MSA04 was a potential source of glycolipid biosurfactant, could be used for the development of bioremediation processes in the marine environment. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Common links in the structure and cellular localization of Rhizobium chitolipooligosaccharides and general Rhizobium membrane phospholipid and glycolipid components.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, R A; Lee, J; Ross, K L; Hollingsworth, R I

    1995-04-04

    Several common links between the structural chemistry of the chitolipooligosaccharides of Rhizobium and the general rhizobial membrane lipid and lipopolysaccharide chemistry of these bacteria have been uncovered. Aspects of common chemistry include sulfation, methylation, and the position and extent of fatty acyl chain unsaturation. We find that bacteria which are known to synthesize sulfated chitolipooligosaccharides (such as Rhizobium meliloti strains and the broad-host-range Rhizobium species strain NGR234) also have sulfated lipopolysaccharides. Their common origins of sulfation have been demonstrated by using mutants which are known to be impaired in sulfating their chitolipooligosaccharides. In such cases, there is a corresponding diminution or complete lack of sulfation of the lipopolysaccharides. The structural diversity of the fatty acids observed in the chitolipooligosaccharides is also observed in the other membrane lipids. For instance, the doubly unsaturated fatty acids which are known to be predominant components of R. meliloti chitolipooligosaccharides were also found in the usual phospholipids and glycolipids. Also, the known functionalization of the chitolipooligosaccharides of R. sp. NGR234 by O- and N-methylation was also reflected in the lipopolysaccharide of this organism. The common structural features of chitolipooligosaccharides and membrane components are consistent with a substantial degree of biosynthetic overlap and a large degree of cellular, spatial overlap between these molecules. The latter aspect is clearly demonstrated here since we show that the chitolipooligosaccharides are, in fact, normal membrane components of Rhizobium. This increases the importance of understanding the role of the bacterial cell surface chemistry in the Rhizobium/legume symbiosis and developing a comprehensive understanding of the highly integrated membrane lipid and glycolipid chemistry of Rhizobium.

  15. Structure-function features of a Mycoplasma glycolipid synthase derived from structural data integration, molecular simulations, and mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Romero-García, Javier; Francisco, Carles; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Glycoglycerolipids are structural components of mycoplasma membranes with a fundamental role in membrane properties and stability. Their biosynthesis is mediated by glycosyltransferases (GT) that catalyze the transfer of glycosyl units from a sugar nucleotide donor to diacylglycerol. The essential function of glycolipid synthases in mycoplasma viability, and the absence of glycoglycerolipids in animal host cells make these GT enzymes a target for drug discovery by designing specific inhibitors. However, rational drug design has been hampered by the lack of structural information for any mycoplasma GT. Most of the annotated GTs in pathogenic mycoplasmas belong to family GT2. We had previously shown that MG517 in Mycoplasma genitalium is a GT-A family GT2 membrane-associated glycolipid synthase. We present here a series of structural models of MG517 obtained by homology modeling following a multiple-template approach. The models have been validated by mutational analysis and refined by long scale molecular dynamics simulations. Based on the models, key structure-function relationships have been identified: The N-terminal GT domain has a GT-A topology that includes a non-conserved variable region involved in acceptor substrate binding. Glu193 is proposed as the catalytic base in the GT mechanism, and Asp40, Tyr126, Tyr169, Ile170 and Tyr218 define the substrates binding site. Mutation Y169F increases the enzyme activity and significantly alters the processivity (or sequential transferase activity) of the enzyme. This is the first structural model of a GT-A glycoglycerolipid synthase and provides preliminary insights into structure and function relationships in this family of enzymes.

  16. Structure-Function Features of a Mycoplasma Glycolipid Synthase Derived from Structural Data Integration, Molecular Simulations, and Mutational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Romero-García, Javier; Francisco, Carles; Biarnés, Xevi; Planas, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Glycoglycerolipids are structural components of mycoplasma membranes with a fundamental role in membrane properties and stability. Their biosynthesis is mediated by glycosyltransferases (GT) that catalyze the transfer of glycosyl units from a sugar nucleotide donor to diacylglycerol. The essential function of glycolipid synthases in mycoplasma viability, and the absence of glycoglycerolipids in animal host cells make these GT enzymes a target for drug discovery by designing specific inhibitors. However, rational drug design has been hampered by the lack of structural information for any mycoplasma GT. Most of the annotated GTs in pathogenic mycoplasmas belong to family GT2. We had previously shown that MG517 in Mycoplasma genitalium is a GT-A family GT2 membrane-associated glycolipid synthase. We present here a series of structural models of MG517 obtained by homology modeling following a multiple-template approach. The models have been validated by mutational analysis and refined by long scale molecular dynamics simulations. Based on the models, key structure-function relationships have been identified: The N-terminal GT domain has a GT-A topology that includes a non-conserved variable region involved in acceptor substrate binding. Glu193 is proposed as the catalytic base in the GT mechanism, and Asp40, Tyr126, Tyr169, Ile170 and Tyr218 define the substrates binding site. Mutation Y169F increases the enzyme activity and significantly alters the processivity (or sequential transferase activity) of the enzyme. This is the first structural model of a GT-A glycoglycerolipid synthase and provides preliminary insights into structure and function relationships in this family of enzymes. PMID:24312618

  17. Surfactant concentration effects on micellar properties.

    PubMed

    Jusufi, Arben; LeBard, David N; Levine, Benjamin G; Klein, Michael L

    2012-01-26

    A hydrophobic theory is combined with a Debye-Hückel approximation to calculate surfactant micellization properties such as the critical micelle concentration (cmc) and concentration effects. The predictive power of the theory is validated by comparison with experimental data of various ionic surfactant types in presence of salt. The theory is also used to describe micellar properties of surfactant models developed for molecular simulations for which cmc computations become infeasible. The theory allows such computations and helps to evaluate the quality of models used in simulations.

  18. Gemini surfactants from natural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lourdes; Pinazo, Aurora; Pons, Ramon; Infante, Mrosa

    2014-03-01

    In this review, we report the most important contributions in the structure, synthesis, physicochemical (surface adsorption, aggregation and phase behaviour) and biological properties (toxicity, antimicrobial activity and biodegradation) of Gemini natural amino acid-based surfactants, and some potential applications, with an emphasis on the use of these surfactants as non-viral delivery system agents. Gemini surfactants derived from basic (Arg, Lys), neutral (Ser, Ala, Sar), acid (Asp) and sulphur containing amino acids (Cys) as polar head groups, and Geminis with amino acids/peptides in the spacer chain are reviewed.

  19. Surfactant-Templated Mesoporous Metal Oxide Nanowires

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Hongmei; Lin, Qianglu; Baber, Stacy; ...

    2010-01-01

    We demore » monstrate two approaches to prepare mesoporous metal oxide nanowires by surfactant assembly and nanoconfinement via sol-gel or electrochemical deposition. For example, mesoporous Ta 2 O 5 and zeolite nanowires are prepared by block copolymer Pluronic 123-templated sol-gel method, and mesoporous ZnO nanowires are prepared by electrodeposition in presence of anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant, in porous membranes. The morphologies of porous nanowires are studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses.« less

  20. How to overcome surfactant dysfunction in meconium aspiration syndrome?

    PubMed

    Mokra, Daniela; Calkovska, Andrea

    2013-06-01

    Surfactant dysfunction in meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) is caused by meconium components, by plasma proteins leaking through the injured alveolocapillary membrane and by substances originated in meconium-induced inflammation. Surfactant inactivation in MAS may be diminished by several ways. Firstly, aspirated meconium should be removed from the lungs to decrease concentrations of meconium inhibitors coming into the contact with surfactant in the alveolar compartment. Once the endogenous surfactant becomes inactivated, components of surfactant should be substituted by exogenous surfactant at a sufficient dose, and surfactant administration should be repeated, if oxygenation remains compromised. To delay the inactivation by inhibitors, exogenous surfactants may be enriched with surfactant proteins, phospholipids, or other substances such as polymers. Finally, to diminish an adverse action of products of meconium-induced inflammation on both endogenous and exogenously delivered surfactant, anti-inflammatory drugs may be administered. A combined therapeutic approach may result in better outcome in patients with MAS and in lower costs of treatment.

  1. Studies on the electrocapillary curves of anionic surfactants in presence of non-ionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Bembi, R; Goyal, R N; Malik, W U

    1976-09-01

    Polyoxyethylated non-ionic surfactants such as Tween 20, Tween 40, Nonidet P40 and Nonex 501 have been supposed to be associated with cationic characteristics. Studies on the effect of these surfactants on the electrocapillary curves of the anionic surfactants Aerosol IB, Manaxol OT and sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), show that the electrocapillary maxima shift towards positive potentials. The order of adsorption of the anionic surfactants is SLS > Manaxol OT > Aerosol IB while the shift in maxima is in the order Aerosol IB ~ Manaxol OT > SLS which confirms association of cationic characteristics with the micelles of these non-ionic surfactants. The magnitude of the shift in electrocapillary maxima is Nonex 501 > Nonidet P40 > Tween 20 > Tween 40 which may be the order of magnitude of the positive charge carried by these non-ionic surfactants.

  2. Less invasive surfactant administration (LISA) - ways to deliver surfactant in spontaneously breathing infants.

    PubMed

    Herting, Egbert

    2013-11-01

    The idea to deliver surfactant to spontaneously breathing premature infants is not new. The spectrum of methods reported reaches from aerosol administration over pharyngeal deposition, the use of laryngeal masks, short term intubation, surfactant administration and rapid extubation (INSURE) to an approach of keeping premature neonates on spontaneous breathing with continuous positive airway pressure support and administering surfactant by laryngoscopy via a small diameter tube. This way of Less Invasive Surfactant Administration (LISA) is in increasing use in the last decade in Germany. More than 1000 babies have been included in clinical studies on LISA by now. A first prospective randomized controlled trial (AMV-trial) demonstrated a significant reduction in the use of mechanical ventilation in LISA patients compared to standard treatment with intratracheal bolus administration of surfactant. Another recent study (Take Care study) indicates, that LISA may even be superior to INSURE. The search for even more "gentle" methods (e.g. nebulization) to deliver surfactant continues.

  3. Studies on Octylphenoxy Surfactants 1

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Warren E.; Bukovac, Martin J.

    1987-01-01

    Sorption characteristics of a polyethoxy (EO) derivative of octylphenol (OP) were determined for enzymically isolated mature tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv Sprinter) fruit cuticles at 25°C. Sorption was followed using 14C-labeled OP + 9.5EO (Triton X-100). Solution pH (2.2-6.2) did not affect surfactant sorption by tomato fruit cuticular membranes (CM). Surfactant concentration (0.001-1.0%, w/v) had a marked impact on sorption. Sorption equilibrium was reached in 24 hours for OP + 9.5EO concentrations below the critical micelle concentration (CMC), whereas 72 to 120 hours were required to reach equilibrium with concentrations greater than the CMC. Regardless of when equilibrium was attained, initial sorption of OP + 9.5EO occurred rapidly. Partition coefficients (K) of approximately 300 were obtained at pre-CMC concentrations, whereas at the highest concentration (1.0%), K values were approximately 15- to 20-fold lower. Sorption was higher for dewaxed CM (DCM) than for CM. At OP + 9.5EO concentrations below the CMC, the amount (millimoles per kilogram) sorbed by CM and DCM increased sharply as the CMC was reached. After an apparent plateau in the amount sorbed at concentrations immediately below and above the CMC, sorption by CM and DCM increased dramatically with OP + 9.5EO concentrations greater than the CMC (0.5 and 1.0%). In contrast, sorption of OP + 5EO (Triton X-45) by CM and DCM differed from one another at relatively high (0.5 and 1.0%) concentrations, where sorption by DCM increased with increasing concentration, but plateaued for the CM. Sorption of OP + 9.5EO was also related to CM concentration, with an inverse relationship existing between sorption and CM at concentrations less than 3.33 milligrams per milliliter. PMID:16665839

  4. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  5. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Anu, Sharma Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-06

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  6. Bio-forensics

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.

    2004-01-01

    Bioforensics presents significant technical challenges. Determining if an outbreak is natural or not, and then providing evidence to trace an outbreak to its origin is very complex. Los Alamos scientists pioneered research and development that has generated leading edge strain identification methods based on sequence data. Molecular characterization of environmental background samples enable development of highly specific pathogen signatures. Economic impacts of not knowing the relationships at the molecular level Many different kinds of data are needed for DNA-based bio-forensics.

  7. Molecular-thermodynamic theory of micellization of multicomponent surfactant mixtures: 2. pH-sensitive surfactants.

    PubMed

    Goldsipe, Arthur; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2007-05-22

    In article 1 of this series, we developed a molecular-thermodynamic (MT) theory to model the micellization of mixtures containing an arbitrary number of conventional (pH-insensitive) surfactants. In this article, we extend the MT theory to model mixtures containing a pH-sensitive surfactant. The MT theory was validated by examining mixtures containing both a pH-sensitive surfactant and a conventional surfactant, which effectively behave like ternary surfactant mixtures. We first compared the predicted micellar titration data to experimental micellar titration data that we obtained for varying compositions of mixed micelles containing the pH-sensitive surfactant dodecyldimethylamine oxide (C12DAO) mixed with either a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide, C12TAB), a nonionic surfactant (dodecyl octa(ethylene oxide), C12E8), or an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) surfactant. The MT theory accurately modeled the titration behavior of C12DAO mixed with C12E8. However, C12DAO was observed to interact more favorably with SDS and with C12TAB than was predicted by the MT theory. We also compared predictions to data from the literature for mixtures of C12DAO and SDS. Although the pH values of solutions with no added acid were modeled with only qualitative accuracy, the MT theory resulted in quantitatively accurate predictions of solution pH for mixtures containing added acid. In addition, the predicted degree of counterion binding yielded a lower bound to the experimentally measured value. Finally, we predicted the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of solutions of two pH-sensitive surfactants, tetradecyldimethylamine oxide (C14DAO) and hexadecyldimethyl betaine (C16Bet), at varying solution pH and surfactant composition. However, at the pH values considered, the pH sensitivity of C16Bet could be neglected, and it was equivalently modeled as a zwitterionic surfactant. The cmc's predicted using the MT theory agreed well with the experimental

  8. Influence of surfactant charge on antimicrobial efficacy of surfactant-stabilized thyme oil nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Ziani, Khalid; Chang, Yuhua; McLandsborough, Lynne; McClements, David Julian

    2011-06-08

    Thyme oil-in-water nanoemulsions stabilized by a nonionic surfactant (Tween 80, T80) were prepared as potential antimicrobial delivery systems (pH 4). The nanoemulsions were highly unstable to droplet growth and phase separation, which was attributed to Ostwald ripening due to the relatively high water solubility of thyme oil. Ostwald ripening could be inhibited by incorporating ≥75% of corn oil (a hydrophobic material with a low water solubility) into the nanoemulsion droplets. The electrical characteristics of the droplets in the nanoemulsions were varied by incorporating ionic surfactants with different charges after homogenization: a cationic surfactant (lauric arginate, LAE) or an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS). The antifungal activity of nanoemulsions containing positive, negative, or neutral thymol droplets was then conducted against four strains of acid-resistant spoilage yeasts: Zygosaccharomyces bailli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Brettanomyces bruxellensis, and Brettanomyces naardenensis. The antifungal properties of the three surfactants (T80, LAE, SDS) were also tested in the absence of thymol droplets. Both ionic surfactants showed strong antifungal activity in the absence of thymol droplets, but no antimicrobial activity in their presence. This effect was attributed to partitioning of the antimicrobial surfactant molecules between the oil droplet and microbial surfaces, thereby reducing the effective concentration of active surfactants available to act as antimicrobials. This study shows oil droplets may decrease the efficacy of surfactant-based antimicrobials, which has important consequences for formulating effective antimicrobial agents for utilization in emulsion-based food and beverage products.

  9. Lung Surfactant Levels are Regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by Monitoring Surfactant Protein D

    PubMed Central

    Fukuzawa, Taku; Ishida, Junji; Kato, Akira; Ichinose, Taro; Ariestanti, Donna Maretta; Takahashi, Tomoya; Ito, Kunitoshi; Abe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta+/+ and Ig-Hepta−/− mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i) balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii) surfactant secretion, and (iii) a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake) in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space. PMID:23922714

  10. Surface film formation in vitro by infant and therapeutic surfactants: role of surfactant protein B.

    PubMed

    Danhaive, Olivier; Chapin, Cheryl; Horneman, Hart; Cogo, Paola E; Ballard, Philip L

    2015-02-01

    Pulmonary surfactant provides an alveolar surface-active film that is critical for normal lung function. Our objective was to determine in vitro film formation properties of therapeutic and infant surfactants and the influence of surfactant protein (SP)-B content. We used a multiwell fluorescent assay measuring maximum phospholipid surface accumulation (Max), phospholipid concentration required for half-maximal film formation (½Max), and time for maximal accumulation (tMax). Among five therapeutic surfactants, calfactant (highest SP-B content) had film formation values similar to natural surfactant, and addition of SP-B to beractant (lowest SP-B) normalized its Max value. Addition of budesonide to calfactant did not adversely affect film formation. In tracheal aspirates of preterm infants with evolving chronic lung disease, SP-B content correlated with ½Max and tMax values, and SP-B supplementation of SP-B-deficient infant surfactant restored normal film formation. Reconstitution of normal surfactant indicated a role for both SP-B and SP-C in film formation. Film formation in vitro differs among therapeutic surfactants and is highly dependent on SP-B content in infant surfactant. The results support a critical role of SP-B for promoting surface film formation.

  11. Efficiency of surfactant-enhanced desorption for contaminated soils depending on the component characteristics of soil-surfactant--PAHs system.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjun; Zhu, Lizhong

    2007-05-01

    The sorption of surfactants onto soils has a significant effect on the performance of surfactant enhanced desorption. In this study, the efficiency of surfactants in enhancing desorption for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contaminated soils relative to water was evaluated with a term of relative efficiency coefficient (REC). Since the sorption of surfactants onto soils, surfactants only enhanced PAH desorption when REC values were larger than 1 and the added surfactant concentration was greater than the corresponding critical enhance desorption concentration (CEDC), which was defined as the corresponding surfactant concentration with REC=1. A model was utilized to describe and predict the REC and CEDC values for PAH desorption. The model and experimental results indicated that the efficiency of surfactants in enhancing PAH desorption showed strong dependence on the soil composition, surfactant structure and PAH properties. These results are of practical interest for the selection of surfactant to optimize soil remediation technologies.

  12. Aggregation of sulfosuccinate surfactants in water

    SciTech Connect

    Magid, L.J.; Daus, K.A.; Butler, P.D.; Quincy, R.B.

    1983-12-22

    The aggregation of sodium di-n-alkyl sulfosuccinates in water (H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O at 45/sup 0/C) has been investigated. A self-consistent picture of the dependence of sodium ion binding on surfactant concentration is obtained from emf measurements, conductimetry, and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements. The concentration dependence of the micellar agregation number for the sulfosuccinates and related double-tailed surfactants depends markedly on surfactant solubility. A sphere-to-disk transition in micellar shape, which might have been expected as a precursor to formation of a lamellar mesophase, was not observed as the surfactant concentration was increased. 8 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Surfactant Activated Dip-Pen Nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2005-03-01

    Direct nanoscale patterning of maleimide-linked biotin on mercaptosilane-functionalized glass substrates using dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) is facilitated by the addition of a small amount of the biocompatible nonionic surfactant Tween-20. A correlation was found between activated ink transfer from the AFM tip when surfactant was included in the ink and an increase in the wettability of the partially hydrophobic silanized substrate. Surfactant concentration represents a new control variable for DPN that complements relative humidity, tip-substrate contact force, scan speed, and temperature. Using surfactants systematically as ink additives expands the possible ink-substrate combinations that can be used for patterning biotin and other molecules. For example, we are currently exploring the possibility of developing nickel/nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-maleimide based inks that will bind to mercaptosilanized glass surfaces for the reversible immobilization of biomolecules containing polyhistidine tags.

  14. Spatial and temporal control of surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyang; Abbott, Nicholas L

    2009-11-01

    This paper reviews some recent progress on approaches leading to spatial and temporal control of surfactant systems. The approaches revolve around the use of redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants. Perspectives are presented on experiments that have realized approaches for active control of interfacial properties of aqueous surfactant systems, reversible control of microstructures and nanostructures formed within bulk solutions, and in situ manipulation of the interactions of surfactants with polymers, DNA and proteins. A particular focus of this review is devoted to studies of amphiphiles that contain the redox-active group ferrocene - reversible control of the oxidation state of ferrocene leads to changes in the charge/hydrophobicity of these amphiphiles, resulting in substantial changes in their self-assembly. Light-sensitive surfactants containing azobenzene, which undergo changes in shape/polarity upon illumination with light, are a second focus of this review. Examples of both redox-active and light-sensitive surfactants that lead to large (>20mN/m) and spatially localized ( approximately mm) changes in surface tensions on a time scale of seconds are presented. Systems that permit reversible transformations of bulk solution nanostructures - such as micelle-to-vesicle transitions or monomer-to-micelle transitions - are also described. The broad potential utility of these emerging classes of amphiphiles are illustrated by the ability to drive changes in functional properties of surfactant systems, such as rheological properties and reversible solubilization of oils, as well as the ability to control interactions of surfactants with biomolecules to modulate their transport into cells.

  15. Process for making surfactant capped nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A Paul; Rockenberger, Joerg

    2002-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for making surfactant capped nanocrystals of transition metal oxides. The process comprises reacting a metal cupferron complex of the formula M Cup, wherein M is a transition metal, and Cup is a cupferron, with a coordinating surfactant, the reaction being conducted at a temperature ranging from about 250 to about 300 C., for a period of time sufficient to complete the reaction.

  16. Bio-tribology.

    PubMed

    Dowson, Duncan

    2012-01-01

    It is now forty six years since the separate topics of friction, lubrication, wear and bearing design were integrated under the title 'Tribology' [Department of Education and Science, Lubrication (Tribology) Education and Research. A Report on the Present Position and Industry's Needs, HMSO, London, 1966]. Significant developments have been reported in many established and new aspects of tribology during this period. The subject has contributed to improved performance of much familiar equipment, such as reciprocating engines, where there have been vast improvements in engine reliability and efficiency. Nano-tribology has been central to remarkable advances in information processing and digital equipment. Shortly after widespread introduction of the term tribology, integration with biology and medicine prompted rapid and extensive interest in the fascinating sub-field now known as Bio-tribology [D. Dowson and V. Wright, Bio-tribology, in The Rheology of Lubricants, ed. T. C. Davenport, Applied Science Publishers, Barking, 1973, pp. 81-88]. An outline will be given of some of the developments in the latter field.

  17. Structure-interfacial properties relationship and quantification of the amphiphilicity of well-defined ionic and non-ionic surfactants using the PIT-slope method.

    PubMed

    Ontiveros, Jesús F; Pierlot, Christel; Catté, Marianne; Molinier, Valérie; Salager, Jean-Louis; Aubry, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-15

    The Phase Inversion Temperature of a reference C10E4/n-Octane/Water system exhibits a quasi-linear variation versus the mole fraction of a second surfactant S2 added in the mixture. This variation was recently proposed as a classification tool to quantify the Hydrophilic-Lipophilic Balance (HLB) of commercial surfactants. The feasibility of the so-called PIT-slope method for a wide range of well-defined non-ionic and ionic surfactants is investigated. The comparison of various surfactants having the same dodecyl chain tail allows to rank the polar head hydrophilicity as: SO3Na⩾SO4Na⩾NMe3Br>E2SO3Na≈CO2Na⩾E1SO3Na⩾PhSO3Na>Isosorbide(exo)SO4Na≫IsosorbideendoSO4Na≫E8⩾NMe2O>E7>E6⩾Glucosyl>E5⩾Diglyceryl⩾E4>E3>E2≈Isosorbide(exo)>Glyceryl>Isosorbide(endo). The influence on the surfactant HLB of other structural parameters, i.e. hydrophobic chain length, unsaturation, replacement of Na(+) by K(+) counterion, and isomerism is also investigated. Finally, the method is successfully used to predict the optimal formulation of a new bio-based surfactant, 1-O-dodecyldiglycerol, when performing an oil scan at 25 °C. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nonlinear water waves with soluble surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, Gary; Dowling, David; Schultz, William

    1998-11-01

    The hydrodynamic effects of surfactants have fascinated scientists for generations. This presentation describes an experimental investigation into the influence of a soluble surfactant on nonlinear capillary-gravity waves in the frequency range from 12 to 20 Hz. Waves were generated in a plexiglass wave tank (254 cm long, 30.5 cm wide, and 18 cm deep) with a triangular plunger wave maker. The tank was filled with carbon- and particulate-filtered water into which the soluble surfactant Triton-X-100® was added in known amounts. Wave slope was measured nonintrusively with a digital camera running at 225 fps by monitoring the position of light beams which passed up through the bottom of the tank, out through the wavy surface, and onto a white screen. Wave slope data were reduced to determine wave damping and the frequency content of the wave train. Both were influenced by the presence of the surfactant. Interestingly, a subharmonic wave occurring at one-sixth the paddle-driving frequency was found only when surfactant was present and the paddle was driven at amplitudes high enough to produce nonlinear waves in clean water. Although the origins of this subharmonic wave remain unclear, it appears to be a genuine manifestation of the combined effects of the surfactant and nonlinearity.

  19. Surfactant toxicity identification with a municipal wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, J.R.; Wayment, D.D.

    1998-12-31

    An acute toxicity identification evaluation following US EPA guidelines was performed with a municipal wastewater to identify effluent components responsible for lethality of larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and Ceriodaphnia dubia. Ammonia toxicity, also present in the effluent, was not the object of this study. The study was designed to characterize effluent toxicity not due to ammonia. To minimize ammonia toxicity interferences, all Phase 1 testing was performed at pH`s where ammonia toxicity would be negligible. Phase 1 toxicity characterization results indicated surfactants as the class of compounds causing acute non-ammonia toxicity for both test species. A distinct toxicant characteristic, specifically sublation at alkaline pH, was employed to track suspect surfactant loadings in the collection system. Concurrently, effluent surfactant residue testing determined nonionic surfactants were at adequate concentrations and were sufficiently toxic to cause the measured adverse effects. Influent surfactant toxicity was determined to be much less than in the final effluent indicating the treatment process was enhancing surfactant toxicity.

  20. SURFACTANT - POLYMER INTERACTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1998-10-01

    The goal of this research is to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, adsorption and mobility control. Surfactant--polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation high adsorption and viscous/heterogeneity fingering. A mixture comprising a ''pseudo oil'' with appropriate surfactant and polymer has been selected to study micellar-polymer chemical flooding. The physical properties and phase behavior of this system have been determined. A surfactant-polymer slug has been designed to achieve high efficiency recovery by improving phase behavior and mobility control. Recovery experiments have been performed on linear cores and a quarter 5-spot. The same recovery experiments have been simulated using a commercially available simulator (UTCHEM). Good agreement between experimental data and simulation results has been achieved.

  1. Surfactant mediated polyelectrolyte self-assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, Monojoy; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Pincus, Phillip A.; Sumpter, Bobby G.

    2015-11-25

    Self-assembly and dynamics of polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant complex (PES) is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The complexation is systematically studied for five different PE backbone charge densities. At a fixed surfactant concentration the PES complexation exhibits pearl-necklace to agglomerated double spherical structures with a PE chain decorating the surfactant micelles. The counterions do not condense on the complex, but are released in the medium with a random distribution. The relaxation dynamics for three different length scales, polymer chain, segmental and monomer, show distinct features of the charge and neutral species; the counterions are fastest followed by the PE chain and surfactants. The surfactant heads and tails have the slowest relaxation due to their restricted movement inside the agglomerated structure. At the shortest length scale, all the charge and neutral species show similar relaxation dynamics confirming Rouse behavior at monomer length scales. Overall, the present study highlights the structure-property relationship for polymer-surfactant complexation. These results will help improve the understanding of PES complex and should aid in the design of better materials for future applications.

  2. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Imbibition in an originally oil-wet 2D capillary is the fastest in the case of Alf-38 and slowest in the case of DTAB (among the surfactants studied). Force of adhesion studies and contact angle measurements show that greater wettability alteration is possible with these anionic surfactants than the cationic surfactant studied. The water imbibition rate does not increase monotonically with an increase in the surfactant concentration. A numerical model has been developed that fits the rate of imbibition. Plans for the next quarter include conducting simulation and imbibition studies.

  3. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate wettability. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

  4. Surfactant mediated polyelectrolyte self-assembly

    DOE PAGES

    Goswami, Monojoy; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M.; Pincus, Phillip A.; ...

    2015-11-25

    Self-assembly and dynamics of polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant complex (PES) is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The complexation is systematically studied for five different PE backbone charge densities. At a fixed surfactant concentration the PES complexation exhibits pearl-necklace to agglomerated double spherical structures with a PE chain decorating the surfactant micelles. The counterions do not condense on the complex, but are released in the medium with a random distribution. The relaxation dynamics for three different length scales, polymer chain, segmental and monomer, show distinct features of the charge and neutral species; the counterions are fastest followed by the PE chain andmore » surfactants. The surfactant heads and tails have the slowest relaxation due to their restricted movement inside the agglomerated structure. At the shortest length scale, all the charge and neutral species show similar relaxation dynamics confirming Rouse behavior at monomer length scales. Overall, the present study highlights the structure-property relationship for polymer-surfactant complexation. These results will help improve the understanding of PES complex and should aid in the design of better materials for future applications.« less

  5. New synthetic surfactant - how and when?

    PubMed

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Animal-derived surfactant preparations are very effective in the treatment of premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome but they are expensive to produce and supplies are limited. In order to widen the indications for surfactant treatment there is a need for synthetic preparations, which can be produced in large quantities and at a reasonable cost. However, development of clinically active synthetic surfactants has turned out to be more complicated than initially anticipated. The hydrophobic surfactant proteins, SP-B and SP-C, which are involved in the adsorption of surface-active lipids to the air-liquid interface of the alveoli and increase alveolar stability, are either too big to synthesize, structurally complex or unstable in pure form. A new generation of synthetic surfactants containing simplified phospholipid mixtures and small amounts of peptides replacing the hydrophobic proteins is currently under development and will in the near future be introduced into the market. However, more trials need to be performed before any conclusions can be drawn about the effectiveness of these synthetic surfactants in relation to natural animal-derived preparations. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Lung surfactant as a drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Vermehren, C; Frokjaer, S; Aurstad, T; Hansen, J

    2006-01-03

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of mainly phospholipids and proteins. The composition leads to a unique spreading effect of the surfactant as well as spontaneous vesicle formation, which may be favourable characteristics of a drug delivery system for pulmonary delivery. The aim of study was to investigate the potential use of the surfactant extract, HL10 (LeoPharma, DK) as a drug delivery system. Studies involved incorporation of hydrophilic- and amphipathic model drugs (sucrose and acylated peptides) into HL10 and elucidation of the influence of surfactant proteins on the HL10 behaviour. Results showed that HL10 vesicles did not retain sucrose indicating formation of leaky vesicles. Studying the influence of surfactant proteins on release from DPPC-liposomes showed tendencies toward a protein-induced release. Hence, the surfactant proteins may influence the membrane lipid packing and characteristics resulting in leakiness of the membranes. Incorporation of acylated peptides into HL10 depended on the chain length rendering a successful incorporation of the peptide acylated with C14-acyl chains. This study suggests that HL10 may be a promising drug delivery system for the pulmonary delivery of amphipathic drug substances, e.g. therapeutically active acylated peptides (e.g. acylated insulin).

  7. [Deficiency of surfactant protein: Case report].

    PubMed

    Milet, María Beatriz; Mena N, Patricia; Pérez, Héctor I; Espinoza, Tatiana

    Congenital surfactant deficiency is a condition infrequently diagnosed in newborns. A clinical case is presented of surfactant protein B deficiency. A review is performed on the study, treatment and differential diagnosis of surfactant protein deficiencies and infant chronic interstitial lung disease. The case is presented of a term newborn that developed respiratory distress, recurrent pulmonary opacification, and a transient response to the administration of surfactant. Immunohistochemical and genetic studies confirmed the diagnosis of surfactant protein B deficiency. Pulmonary congenital anomalies require a high index of suspicion. Surfactant protein B deficiency is clinically progressive and fatal in the majority of the cases, similar to that of ATP binding cassette subfamily A member 3 (ABCA3) deficiency. Protein C deficiency is insidious and may present with a radiological pulmonary interstitial pattern. Due to the similarity in the histological pattern, genetic studies help to achieve greater certainty in the prognosis and the possibility of providing adequate genetic counselling. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (SS-6656, Alfoterra 35, 38, 63,65,68) have been identified which can change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. All the carbonate surfaces (Lithographic Limestone, Marble, Dolomite and Calcite) show similar behavior with respect to wettability alteration with surfactant 4-22. Anionic surfactants (5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38 and Alfoterra-68), which lower the interfacial tension with a West Texas crude oil to very low values (<10{sup -2} nM/m), have also been identified. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability, mobilization, and imbibition studies.

  9. Bio-threat microparticle simulants

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald

    2014-09-16

    A bio-threat simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the bio-threat simulant.

  10. Bio-threat microparticle simulants

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N

    2012-10-23

    A bio-threat simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the bio-threat simulant.

  11. What is BioOne?

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2005-01-01

    BioOne is a Web-based aggregation of full-text, high-impact bioscience research journals. Most of its titles are published by small societies or non-commercial publishers and have not been previously available in electronic format. This column describes the BioOne database and gives some basic information about the best ways to search its content.

  12. Autonomous Bio-Optical Instruments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-30

    Autonomous Bio -Optical Instruments Russ E. Davis Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla CA 92093-0230 phone: (858) 534-4415 fax: (858) 534... Bio -Optical Instruments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK

  13. DNA interaction with cis- and trans- isomers of photosensitive surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unksov, I. N.; Kasyanenko, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Interaction between DNA and photosensitive cationic surfactant in a solution is studied. Studies were conducted to examine the impact of the surfactant in its cis- conformation on the size of DNA molecule and also to investigate the phase behavior of the system depending on DNA and surfactant concentration. We conclude that trans- isomer of surfactant requires its smaller concentration to reach the DNA compaction compared with cis- isomer received by UV radiation of solutions. Studies of DNA-surfactant systems were performed by means of spectrophotometry and viscometry. Variation of surfactant concentration enables us to determine the precipitation zone on phase diagram. From the viscosity study it can be indicated that precipitation zone is narrower for UV-radiated surfactant and it shifts to higher surfactant concentration. Also we examine the reversibility of DNA compaction in systems with the surfactant in its trans- form.

  14. Structural and biological evaluation of a multifunctional SWCNT-AgNPs-DNA/PVA bio-nanofilm.

    PubMed

    Subbiah, Ramesh P; Lee, Haisung; Veerapandian, Murugan; Sadhasivam, Sathya; Seo, Soo-Won; Yun, Kyusik

    2011-04-01

    A bio-nanofilm consisting of a tetrad nanomaterial (nanotubes, nanoparticles, DNA, polymer) was fabricated utilizing in situ reduction and noncovalent interactions and it displayed effective antibacterial activity and biocompatibility. This bio-nanofilm was composed of homogenous silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) coated on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), which were later hybridized with DNA and stabilized in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) in the presence of a surfactant with the aid of ultrasonication. Electron microscopy and bio-AFM (atomic force microscopy) images were used to assess the morphology of the nanocomposite (NC) structure. Functionalization and fabrication were examined using FT-Raman spectroscopy by analyzing the functional changes in the bio-nanofilm before and after fabrication. UV-visible spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) confirmed that AgNPs were present in the final NC on the basis of its surface plasmon resonance (370 nm) and crystal planes. Thermal gravimetric analysis was used to measure the percentage weight loss of SWCNT (17.5%) and final SWCNT-AgNPs-DNA/PVA (47.7%). The antimicrobial efficiency of the bio-nanofilm was evaluated against major pathogenic organisms. Bactericidal ratios, zone of inhibition, and minimum inhibitory concentration were examined against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. A preliminary cytotoxicity analysis was conducted using A549 lung cancer cells and IMR-90 fibroblast cells. Confocal laser microscopy, bio-AFM, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images demonstrated that the NCs were successfully taken up by the cells. These combined results indicate that this bio-nanofilm was biocompatible and displayed antimicrobial activity. Thus, this novel bio-nanofilm holds great promise for use as a multifunctional tool in burn therapy, tissue engineering, and other biomedical applications.

  15. Influence of Surfactant Bilayers and Substrate Immobilization on the Refractive Index Sensitivity of Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahjamali, Mohammad; Large, Nicolas; Martinsson, Erik; Zaraee, Negin; Schatz, George; Aili, Daniel; Mirkin, Chad

    2015-03-01

    Shape-controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) generally involves the use of surfactants to regulate the nucleation growth process and to obtain colloidally stable AuNPs. The surfactants adsorb on the NP surface making further functionalization difficult and therefore limit their practical use in many applications such as bio- and molecular sensing, surface-enhanced spectrosopies, and NP assembly. Herein, we report on how cetyltrimethylammonium (CTAX, X =Cl-, Br-) , a common surfactant used in anisotropic AuNPs synthesis, affectsthe nanoparticle sensitivity to local dielectric environment changes and limitsrefractometric plasmonic sensing. We experimentally and theoretically show that the CTAX bilayer significantly reduces the refractive index (RI) sensitivity of anisotropic AuNPs such as flat and concave nanocubes, nanorods, and nanoprisms. We show that the RI sensitivity can be improvedby up to 40% by removing the CTAXfrom immobilized AuNPs using oxygen plasma treatment. The substrate effect on the RI sensitivity caused by NP immobilization isalso investigated. The strategy presented herein is a simple andeffective method to improvethe RI sensitivity of CTAX-stabilized AuNPs, thus increasing their potential in nanoplasmonic sensingand in biomedical applications.

  16. Synthesis and interfacial properties of monoacyl glyceric acids as a new class of green surfactants.

    PubMed

    Fukuoka, Tokuma; Ikeda, Shintaro; Habe, Hiroshi; Sato, Shun; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kitamoto, Dai; Sakaki, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Glyceric acid (GA) is one of the most promising functional hydroxyl acids, and it is abundantly obtained from glycerol by a bioprocess using acetic acid bacteria. In this study, several monoacyl GAs were synthesized by esterification of GA and saturated fatty acyl chlorides (C12, C14, C16, and C18), forming a new class of bio-based surfactants. By the present method, a mixture of two isomers, namely 2-O-acyl and 3-O-acyl GAs, was produced, in which the 2-O-acyl derivatives were obtained as a major product. These isomers were isolated, and their surface-active properties were investigated for the first time. The surface tensions of 2-O-acyl GAs with different chain lengths were determined by the Wilhelmy method. At concentrations below 10(-4) M, the 2-O-acyl GAs exhibited higher surface-active properties compared to commercially available synthetic surfactants. For example, 2-O-lauroyl GA reduced the surface tension of water to around 25 mN/m above the critical micelle concentration (3.0×10(-4) M). In addition, 2-O-acyl derivatives showed higher surface-tension-lowering activity than 3-O-acyl GAs. The monoacyl GAs synthesized herein can potentially be used as "green surfactants."

  17. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizhong; Chen, Baoliang; Tao, Shu; Chiou, Cary T

    2003-09-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insightto interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  18. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  19. Structure and dynamics of polyelectrolyte surfactant mixtures under conditions of surfactant excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Ingo; Simon, Miriam; Farago, Bela; Schweins, Ralf; Falus, Peter; Holderer, Olaf; Gradzielski, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Oppositely charged polyelectrolyte (PE) surfactant mixtures can self-assemble into a large variety of mesoscopic structures, so-called polyelectrolyte surfactant complexes (PESCs). These structures directly affect the macroscopic behavior of such solutions. In this study, we investigated mixtures of the cationically charged PE JR 400 and the anionic surfactant SDS with the help of different neutron scattering and fluorescence methods. While an excess of PE charges in semi-dilute solutions causes an increase of viscosity, it has been observed that an excess of surfactant charges reduces the viscosity while precipitation is observed at charge equilibrium. The increase in viscosity had been investigated before and was attributed to the formation of cross links between PE chains. In this publication we focus our attention on the reduction of viscosity which is observed with an excess of surfactant charges. It is found that the PE chains form relatively large and densely packed clusters near the phase boundary on the surfactant rich side, thereby occupying less space and reducing the viscosity. For even higher surfactant concentrations, individual surfactant decorated PE chains are observed and their viscosity is found to be similar to that of the pure PE.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa protease IV degrades surfactant proteins and inhibits surfactant host defense and biophysical functions.

    PubMed

    Malloy, Jaret L; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Thibodeaux, Brett A; O'Callaghan, Richard J; Wright, Jo Rae

    2005-02-01

    Pulmonary surfactant has two distinct functions within the lung: reduction of surface tension at the air-liquid interface and participation in innate host defense. Both functions are dependent on surfactant-associated proteins. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is primarily responsible for respiratory dysfunction and death in cystic fibrosis patients and is also a leading pathogen in nosocomial pneumonia. P. aeruginosa secretes a number of proteases that contribute to its virulence. We hypothesized that P. aeruginosa protease IV degrades surfactant proteins and results in a reduction in pulmonary surfactant host defense and biophysical functions. Protease IV was isolated from cultured supernatant of P. aeruginosa by gel chromatography. Incubation of cell-free bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with protease IV resulted in degradation of surfactant proteins (SP)-A, -D, and -B. SPs were degraded in a time- and dose-dependent fashion by protease IV, and degradation was inhibited by the trypsin-like serine protease inhibitor Nalpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine-chloromethyl ketone (TLCK). Degradation by protease IV inhibited SP-A- and SP-D-mediated bacterial aggregation and uptake by macrophages. Surfactant treated with protease IV was unable to reduce surface tension as effectively as untreated surfactant, and this effect was inhibited by TLCK. We speculate that protease IV may be an important contributing factor to the development and propagation of acute lung injury associated with P. aeruginosa via loss of surfactant function within the lung.

  1. Surfactant Delivery into the Lung

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotberg, James; Filoche, Marcel

    2014-11-01

    We have developed a multiscale, compartmentalized model of surfactant and liquid delivery into the lung. Assuming liquid plug propagation, the airway compartment accounts for the plug's volume deposition (coating) on the airway wall, while the bifurcation compartment accounts for plug splitting from the parent airway to the two daughter airways. Generally the split is unequal due to gravity and geometry effects. Both the deposition ratio RD (deposition volume/airway volume), and the splitting ratio, RS, of the daughters volumes are solved independently from one another. Then they are used in a 3D airway network geometry to achieve the distribution of delivery into the lung. The airway geometry is selected for neonatal as well as adult applications, and can be advanced from symmetric, to stochastically asymmetric, to personalized. RD depends primarily on the capillary number, Ca, while RS depends on Ca, the Reynolds number, Re, the Bond number, Bo, the dose volume, VD, and the branch angles. The model predicts the distribution of coating on the airway walls and the remaining plug volume delivered to the alveolar region at the end of the tree. Using this model, we are able to simulate and test various delivery protocols, in order to optimize delivery and improve the respiratory function.

  2. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces

  3. Microemulsion-based lycopene extraction: Effect of surfactants, co-surfactants and pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Rigi, Atefeh; Abbasi, Soleiman

    2016-04-15

    Lycopene is a potent antioxidant that has received extensive attention recently. Due to the challenges encountered with current methods of lycopene extraction using hazardous solvents, industry calls for a greener, safer and more efficient process. The main purpose of present study was application of microemulsion technique to extract lycopene from tomato pomace. In this respect, the effect of eight different surfactants, four different co-surfactants, and ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments on lycopene extraction efficiency was examined. Experimental results revealed that application of combined ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments, saponin as a natural surfactant, and glycerol as a co-surfactant, in the bicontinuous region of microemulsion was the optimal experimental conditions resulting in a microemulsion containing 409.68±0.68 μg/glycopene. The high lycopene concentration achieved, indicates that microemulsion technique, using a low-cost natural surfactant could be promising for a simple and safe separation of lycopene from tomato pomace and possibly from tomato industrial wastes.

  4. Selection of surfactant in remediation of DDT-contaminated soil by comparison of surfactant effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ping; Chen, Weiwei; Li, Yueming; Chen, Tao; Li, Linhui; Wang, Guanzhu

    2014-01-01

    With an aim to select the most appropriate surfactant for remediation of DDT-contaminated soil, the performance of nonionic surfactants Tween80, TX-100, and Brij35 and one anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) in enhancement of DDT water solubility and desorption of DDT from contaminated soil and their adsorption onto soil and ecotoxicities were investigated in this study. Tween80 had the highest solubilizing and soil-washing ability for DDT among the four experimental surfactants. The adsorption loss of surfactants onto soil followed the order of TX-100 > Tween80 > Brij35 > SDBS. The ecotoxicity of Tween80 to ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) was lowest. The overall performance considering about the above four aspects suggested that Tween80 should be selected for the remediation of DDT-contaminated soil, because Tween80 had the greatest solubilizing and soil-washing ability for DDT, less adsorption loss onto soil, and the lowest ecotoxicity in this experiment.

  5. A Review on Progress in QSPR Studies for Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiwei; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Wang, Zhengwu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a review on recent progress in quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies of surfactants and applications of various molecular descriptors. QSPR studies on critical micelle concentration (cmc) and surface tension (γ) of surfactants are introduced. Studies on charge distribution in ionic surfactants by quantum chemical calculations and its effects on the structures and properties of the colloids of surfactants are also reviewed. The trends of QSPR studies on cloud point (for nonionic surfactants), biodegradation potential and some other properties of surfactants are evaluated. PMID:20479997

  6. Surfactant-enhanced low-pH alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Peru, D.A. and Co., Columbia, MD . Research Div.); Lorenz, P.B. )

    1990-08-01

    This paper reports sodium bicarbonate investigated as a potential alkaline agent in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding because it has very little tendency to dissolve silicate minerals. In experiments performed with Wilmington, CA, crude oil and three types of surfactants, the bicarbonate/surfactant combination caused a marked lowering of interfacial tension (IFT). Bicarbonate protected the surfactant against divalent cations and reduced adsorption of surfactant and polymer on various minerals. Coreflood test confirm that sodium bicarbonate plus surfactant can be an effective alternative to the high-pH flooding process.

  7. Growing Characteristics of Fine Ice Particles in Surfactant Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Kosuke; Komoda, Yoshiyuki; Usui, Hiromoto; Okada, Kazuto; Fujisawa, Ryo

    Time variation characteristics of ice particles in a surfactant solution have been investigated. The effect of surfactants on corrosion characteristics was also studied. The results were compared with those treated with poly(vinyl alcohol). From the results, the present surfactant, cetyl dimethyl betaine was not found to be effective on preventing Ostward ripening of ice particles as poly(vinyl alcohol) showed. Then, it was concluded some effective technology has to be installed with surfactants when this surfactant treatment is realized. On the corrosion characteristics, it was found that the present surfactant shows the same level as tap water.

  8. Carbohydrate recognition in the peripheral nervous system: a calcium- dependent membrane binding site for HNK-1 reactive glycolipids potentially involved in Schwann cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The carbohydrate determinants recognized by the HNK-1 antibody are potential cell-cell recognition ligands in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The HNK-1 reactive sulfoglucuronylneolacto (SGNL) glycolipids specifically support Schwann cell adhesion, suggesting the presence of a cell surface receptor specific for SGNL-oligosaccharides. We directly probed PNS membranes for receptors complementary to SGNL determinants using a synthetic radioligand consisting of radioiodinated serum albumin derivatized with multiple SGNL-oligosaccharides. A high- affinity, saturable, calcium-dependent binding site for this ligand was found in PNS myelin membranes. Binding activity was carbohydrate- specific (most potently inhibited by SGNL-lipids compared to other glycolipids) and PNS-specific (absent from comparable central nervous system membranes). The SGNL-specific binding activity on PNS membranes reported here may be involved in peripheral myelination or myelin stabilization. PMID:8468354

  9. The structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF06475 reveals a new fold with possible involvement in glycolipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bakolitsa, Constantina; Kumar, Abhinav; McMullan, Daniel; Krishna, S. Sri; Miller, Mitchell D.; Carlton, Dennis; Najmanovich, Rafael; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Elias, Ylva; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Marciano, David; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Trout, Christina V.; van den Bedem, Henry; Weekes, Dana; White, Aprilfawn; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of PA1994 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a member of the Pfam PF06475 family classified as a domain of unknown function (DUF1089), reveals a novel fold comprising a 15-stranded β-sheet wrapped around a single α-helix that assembles into a tight dimeric arrangement. The remote structural similarity to lipoprotein localization factors, in addition to the presence of an acidic pocket that is conserved in DUF1089 homologs, phospholipid-binding and sugar-binding proteins, indicate a role for PA1994 and the DUF1089 family in glycolipid metabolism. Genome-context analysis lends further support to the involvement of this family of proteins in glycolipid metabolism and indicates possible activation of DUF1089 homologs under conditions of bacterial cell-wall stress or host–pathogen interactions. PMID:20944213

  10. The use of surfactant in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Amital, Anat; Shitrit, David; Raviv, Yael; Saute, Milton; Medalion, Benjamin; Bakal, Llana; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2008-12-15

    Lung transplantation impairs surfactant activity, which may contribute to primary graft dysfunction (PGD). Prompted by studies in animals and a few reports in humans, this study sought to determine if the administration of surfactant during transplantation serves as an effective preventive measure. An open, randomized, controlled prospective design was used. Forty-two patients scheduled for single (n=38) or double (n=4) lung transplantation at a major tertiary medical center were randomly assigned to receive, or not, intraoperative surfactant treatment. In the treated group, bovine surfactant was administered at a dose of 20 mg phospholipids/kg through bronchoscope after the establishment of bronchial anastomosis. The groups were compared for oxygenation (PaO2/FiO2), chest X-ray findings, PGD grade, and outcome. Compared with the untreated group, the patients who received surfactant were characterized by better postoperative oxygenation mean PaO2/FiO2 (418.8+/-123.8 vs. 277.9+/-165 mm Hg, P=0.004), better chest radiograph score, a lower PGD grade (0.66 vs. 1.86, P=0.005), fewer cases of severe PGD (1 patient vs. 12, P<0.05), earlier extubation (by 2.2 hr; 95% CI 1.1-4.3 hr, P=0.027), shorter intensive care unit stay (by 2.3 days; 95% CI 1.47-3.74 days, P=0.001), and better vital capacity at 1 month (61% vs. 50%, P=0.022). One treated and 2 untreated patients died during the first postoperative month. Surfactant instillation during lung transplantation improves oxygenation, prevents PGD, shortens intubation time, and enhances early posttransplantation recovery. Further, larger studies are needed to assess whether surfactant should be used routinely in lung transplantation.

  11. Surfactants and the Mechanics of Respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Alveoli are small sacs found at the end of terminal bronchioles in human lungs with a mean diameter of 200 μm. A thin layer of fluid (hypophase) coats the inner face of an alveolus and is in contact with the air in the lungs. The thickness of this layer varies among alveoli, but is in the range of 0.1 to 0.5 μm for many portions of the alveolar network. The interfacial tension σ at the air-hypophase interface tends to favor collapse of the alveolus, and resists its expansion during inhalation. Type II alveolar cells synthesize and secrete a mixture of phospholipids and proteins called pulmonary surfactant. These surfactant molecules adsorb to the interface causing σ of water at body temperature is 70 mN/m and falls to an equilibrium value of 25 mN/m when surfactants are present. Also, in a dynamic sense, it is known that σ is reduced to near 0 during exhalation when the surfactant film compresses. In this work, the authors develop a mechanical and transport model of the alveolus to study the effect of surfactants on various aspects of respiration. The model is composed of three principal parts: (i) air movement into and out of the alveolus; (ii) a balance of linear momentum across the two-layered membrane of the alveolus (hypophase and elastic wall); and (iii) a pulmonary surfactant transport problem in the hypophase. The goal is to evaluate the influence of pulmonary surfactant on respiratory mechanics.

  12. Influence of clay mineral structure and surfactant nature on the adsorption capacity of surfactants by clays.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martín, M J; Dorado, M C; del Hoyo, C; Rodríguez-Cruz, M S

    2008-01-15

    Adsorption of three surfactants of different nature, Triton X-100 (TX100) (non-ionic), sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) (anionic) and octadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (ODTMA) (cationic) by four layered (montmorillonite, illite, muscovite and kaolinite) and two non-layered (sepiolite and palygorskite) clay minerals was studied. The objective was to improve the understanding of surfactant behaviour in soils for the possible use of these compounds in remediation technologies of contaminated soils by toxic organic compounds. Adsorption isotherms were obtained using surfactant concentrations higher and lower than the critical micelle concentration (cmc). These isotherms showed different adsorption stages of the surfactants by the clay minerals, and were classified in different subgroups of the L-, S- or H-types. An increase in the adsorption of SDS and ODTMA by all clay minerals is observed up to the cmc of the surfactant in the equilibrium solution is reached. However, there was further TX100 adsorption when the equilibrium concentration was well above the cmc. Adsorption constants from Langmuir and Freundlich equations (TX100 and ODTMA) or Freundlich equation (SDS) were used to compare adsorption of different surfactants by clay minerals studied. These constants indicated the surfactant adsorption by clay minerals followed this order ODTMA>TX100>SDS. The adsorption of TX100 and ODTMA was higher by montmorillonite and illite, and the adsorption of SDS was found to be higher by kaolinite and sepiolite. Results obtained show the influence of clay mineral structure and surfactant nature on the adsorption capacity of surfactants by clays, and they indicate the interest to consider the soil mineralogical composition when one surfactant have to be selected in order to establish more efficient strategies for the remediation of soils and water contaminated by toxic organic pollutants.

  13. Minimum structure requirement of immunomodulatory glycolipids for predominant Th2 cytokine induction and the discovery of non-linear phytosphingosine analogs.

    PubMed

    Toba, Tetsuya; Murata, Kenji; Nakanishi, Kyoko; Takahashi, Bitoku; Takemoto, Naohiro; Akabane, Minako; Nakatsuka, Takashi; Imajo, Seiichi; Yamamura, Takashi; Miyake, Sachiko; Annoura, Hirokazu

    2007-05-15

    Analogs of immunomodulatory glycolipid OCH (2) were prepared and minimum structure requirement to exhibit equivalent profiles was disclosed. Analogs bearing non-linear hydrocarbon chain in the phytosphingosine moiety (18, 19) were shown for the first time to possess comparable cytokine inducing profile to 2. Molecular modeling of 2/hCD1d complex based on the crystal structure of alpha-GalCer (1)/hCD1d complex is also described.

  14. Improving Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guèrin as a Vaccine Delivery Vector for Viral Antigens by Incorporation of Glycolipid Activators of NKT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kharkwal, Shalu S.; Carreño, Leandro J.; Johnson, Alison J.; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Jervis, Peter J.; Cox, Liam R.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Wen, Xiangshu; Yuan, Weiming; Tsuji, Moriya; Li, Xiangming; Ho, David D.; Chan, John; Lee, Sunhee; Frothingham, Richard; Haynes, Barton F.; Panas, Michael W.; Gillard, Geoffrey O.; Sixsmith, Jaimie D.; Korioth-Schmitz, Birgit; Schmitz, Joern E.; Larsen, Michelle H.; Jacobs, William R.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guèrin (rBCG) has been explored as a vector for vaccines against HIV because of its ability to induce long lasting humoral and cell mediated immune responses. To maximize the potential for rBCG vaccines to induce effective immunity against HIV, various strategies are being employed to improve its ability to prime CD8+ T cells, which play an important role in the control of HIV infections. In this study we adopted a previously described approach of incorporating glycolipids that activate CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells to enhance priming of CD8+ T cells by rBCG strains expressing an SIV Gag antigen (rBCG-SIV gag). We found that the incorporation of the synthetic NKT activating glycolipid α-galactosylceramide (α-GC) into rBCG-SIV gag significantly enhanced CD8+ T cell responses against an immunodominant Gag epitope, compared to responses primed by unmodified rBCG-SIV gag. The abilities of structural analogues of α-GC to enhance CD8+ T cell responses to rBCG were compared in both wild type and partially humanized mice that express human CD1d molecules in place of mouse CD1d. These studies identified an α-GC analogue known as 7DW8-5, which has previously been used successfully as an adjuvant in non-human primates, as a promising compound for enhancing immunogenicity of antigens delivered by rBCG.vectors. Our findings support the incorporation of synthetic glycolipid activators of NKT cells as a novel approach to enhance the immunogenicity of rBCG-vectored antigens for induction of CD8+ T cell responses. The glycolipid adjuvant 7DW8-5 may be a promising candidate for advancing to non-human primate and human clinical studies for the development of HIV vaccines based on rBCG vectors. PMID:25255287

  15. Antibacterial properties of a glycolipid-rich extract and active principle from Nunavik collections of the macroalgae Fucus evanescens C. Agardh (Fucaceae).

    PubMed

    Treyvaud Amiguet, Virginie; Jewell, Linda E; Mao, Halimasadia; Sharma, Manju; Hudson, James B; Durst, Tony; Allard, Marc; Rochefort, Guy; Arnason, John Thor

    2011-09-01

    This study investigated the antibacterial activity of glycolipid-rich extracts of the brown macroalga Fucus evanescens in cell culture. Accessions were collected on the Arctic coast of Ungava Bay, Nunavik, Quebec. The crude ethyl acetate extract of these accessions showed strong antibacterial activity (≥4 log(10) cfu) against Hemophilus influenzae , Legionella pneumophila , Propionibacterium acnes (ATCC and clinical isolate), and Streptococcus pyogenes at 100 µg/mL. This algal extract inhibited by 3 log(10) Clostridium difficile and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , whereas Bacillus cereus , Escherichia coli , Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were not significantly affected. Further investigations of the activity of a glycolipid-rich fraction, extracted with dichloromethane, against Propionibacterium acnes showed an MIC(100) of 50 µg/mL, with an inhibition of more than 99% at only 7.8 µg/mL. The main active compound, a β-d-galactosyl O-linked glycolipid, was synthesized for the bioassay and showed an MIC(100) of 50 µg/mL but lost its activity more quickly with only 50% of inhibition at 12.5 µg/mL. Therefore, the semipurified F. evanescens extract could be a good choice for future research into the development of alternative treatments for acne therapy.

  16. Adsorption and adsolubilization of polymerizable surfactants on aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Attaphong, Chodchanok; Asnachinda, Emma; Charoensaeng, Ampira; Sabatini, David A; Khaodhiar, Sutha

    2010-04-01

    Surfactant-based adsorption processes have been widely investigated for environmental applications. A major problem facing surfactant-modified adsorbents is surfactant loss from the adsorbent due to loss of monomers from solution and subsequent surfactant desorption. For this study, a bilayer of anionic polymerizable surfactant (Hitenol BC 05, Hitenol BC 10 and Hitenol BC 20) and non-polymerizable surfactant (Hitenol N 08) was adsorbed onto alumina. The results of adsorption studies showed that as the number of ethylene oxide (EO) groups of the surfactants increased, the area per molecule increased and the maximum adsorption decreased. The lowest maximum adsorption onto alumina was for Hitenol BC 20 (20 EO groups) corresponding to 0.08 mmol/g or 0.34 molecule/nm(2) while the highest level of adsorption was 0.30 mmol/g or 1.28 molecule/nm(2) for Hitenol BC 05 (5 EO groups). This variation in adsorption was attributed to the increased bulkiness of the head group with increasing number of EO groups. Relative to the adsolubilization capacity of organic solutes, ethylcyclohexane adsolubilizes more than styrene. Styrene and ethylcyclohexane adsolubilization were both independent of the number of EO groups of the surfactant. For surfactant desorption studies, the polymerization of polymerizable surfactants increased the stability of surfactants adsorbed onto the alumina surface and reduced surfactant desorption from the alumina surface. These results provide useful information on surfactant-based surface modification to enhance contaminant remediation and industrial applications.

  17. Oil recovery performances of surfactant solutions by capillary imbibition.

    PubMed

    Babadagli, Tayfun; Boluk, Yaman

    2005-02-01

    Critical parameters playing a role in oil recovery by capillary imbibition of surfactant solutions were studied. Experiments conducted on sandstone and carbonate samples using different oil and surfactant types were evaluated for surfactant selection. In this evaluation interfacial tension (IFT), surfactant type, solubility characteristics of surfactants, rock type, initial water (pre-wet rock), and surfactant concentration were considered. In addition to these, a new technique was adopted to facilitate the surfactant screening process. This technique is based on assigning inorganic and organic property values and plotting organic conception diagrams (OCD) for surfactants. OCD defines the property of a compound in terms of physical chemistry in such a way that the property that depends much on the van der Waals force is called "organic" and the one that depends much on electric affinity is called "inorganic." Correlations between the capillary imbibition recovery performance and the properties of surfactant and oil (organic value (OV), inorganic value (IV), and IFT of surfactant solutions, oil viscosity, and surfactant type) were obtained. These correlations are expected to be useful in selecting the proper surfactant for improved oil recovery as well as identifying the effects of surfactant properties on the capillary imbibition performance.

  18. Surface shear inviscidity of soluble surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Zell, Zachary A.; Nowbahar, Arash; Mansard, Vincent; Leal, L. Gary; Deshmukh, Suraj S.; Mecca, Jodi M.; Tucker, Christopher J.; Squires, Todd M.

    2014-01-01

    Foam and emulsion stability has long been believed to correlate with the surface shear viscosity of the surfactant used to stabilize them. Many subtleties arise in interpreting surface shear viscosity measurements, however, and correlations do not necessarily indicate causation. Using a sensitive technique designed to excite purely surface shear deformations, we make the most sensitive and precise measurements to date of the surface shear viscosity of a variety of soluble surfactants, focusing on SDS in particular. Our measurements reveal the surface shear viscosity of SDS to be below the sensitivity limit of our technique, giving an upper bound of order 0.01 μN·s/m. This conflicts directly with almost all previous studies, which reported values up to 103–104 times higher. Multiple control and complementary measurements confirm this result, including direct visualization of monolayer deformation, for SDS and a wide variety of soluble polymeric, ionic, and nonionic surfactants of high- and low-foaming character. No soluble, small-molecule surfactant was found to have a measurable surface shear viscosity, which seriously undermines most support for any correlation between foam stability and surface shear rheology of soluble surfactants. PMID:24563383

  19. Surfactant remediation of diesel fuel polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Khalladi, Razika; Benhabiles, Ouassila; Bentahar, Fatiha; Moulai-Mostefa, Naji

    2009-05-30

    Soil contamination with petroleum hydrocarbons has caused critical environmental and health defects and increasing attention has been paid for developing innovative technology for cleaning up this contamination. In this work, the washing process of a soil column by ionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was investigated. Water flow rate and the contamination duration (age) have been studied. The performance of water in the removal of diesel fuel was found to be non-negligible, while water contributed by 24.7% in the global elimination of n-alkanes. The effect of SDS is significant beyond a concentration of 8mM. After 4h of treatment with surfactant solution, the diesel soil content remains constant, which shows the existence of a necessary contact time needed to the surfactant to be efficient. The soil washing process at a rate of 3.2 mL/min has removed 97% of the diesel fuel. This surfactant soil remediation process was shown to be governed by the first-order kinetics. These results are of practical interest in developing effective surfactant remediation technology of diesel fuel contaminated soils.

  20. Rheology of Natural Lung Surfactant Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Coralie; Waring, Alan; Zsadzinski, Joseph

    2004-03-01

    The lung surfactant (LS) is a lipoprotein mixture lining the inside of the pulmonary alveoli which has the ability to lower the surface tension of the air-liquid hypophase interface to value near zero thus reducing the work of breathing and which also prevents the alveolar collapse. A lack or malfunction of lung surfactant, as it is often the case for premature infants, leads to respiratory distress syndrome. RDS can be treated by supplying replacement LS to the infants and several medications derived from natural sources, are now widely used. The lung surfactant is adsorbed at the air-liquid interface and is subjected to incessant compression expansion cycles therefore Langmuir monolayers provide a suitable model to investigate the physical properties of lung surfactant films. Using a magnetic needle rheometer, we measured the shear viscosity of natural lung surfactant spread at the air-liquid interface upon compression and expansion cycles for three different formulations. The shear viscosity of Survanta changes by orders of magnitude along one cycle while for Curosurf samples it changes only slightly and for Infasurf films it remains constant. These different behaviors can be explained by differences in composition between the three formulations leading to different organizations on the molecular scale.

  1. 2-DE using hemi-fluorinated surfactants.

    PubMed

    Starita-Geribaldi, Mireille; Thebault, Pascal; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frederic; Geribaldi, Serge

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis of hemi-fluorinated zwitterionic surfactants was realized and assessed for 2-DE, a powerful separation method for proteomic analysis. These new fluorinated amidosulfobetaine (FASB-p,m) were compared to their hydrocarbon counterparts amidosulfobetaine (ASB-n) characterized by a hydrophilic polar head, a hydrophobic and lipophilic tail, and an amido group as connector. The tail of these FASB surfactants was in part fluorinated resulting in the modulation of its lipophilicity (or oleophobicity). Their effect on the red blood cell (RBC) membrane showed a specific solubilization depending on the length of the hydrophobic part. A large number of polypeptide spots appeared in the 2-DE patterns by using FASB-p,m. The oleophobic character of these surfactants was confirmed by the fact that Band 3, a highly hydrophobic transmembrane protein, was not solubilized by these fluorinated structures. The corresponding pellet was very rich in Band 3 and could then be solubilized by using a strong detergent such as amidosulfobetaine with an alkyl tail containing 14 carbon atoms (ASB-14). Thus, these hemi-fluorinated surfactants appeared as powerful tools when used at the first step of a two-step solubilization strategy using a hydrocarbon homologous surfactant in the second step.

  2. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-10-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Simulation studies indicate that both wettability alteration and gravity-driven flow play significant role in oil recovery from fractured carbonates. Anionic surfactants (Alfoterra 35, 38) recover about 55% of the oil in about 150 days by imbibition driven by wettability alteration and low tension in the core-scale. Anionic surfactant, Alfoterra-68, recovers about 40% of the oil by lower tension aided gravity-driven imbibition in the core-scale. Cationic surfactant, DTAB recovers about 35% of the oil. Plans for the next quarter include conducting simulation and imbibition studies.

  3. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2004-03-31

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Anionic surfactants (Alfoterra 35, 38) recover more than 40% of the oil in about 50 days by imbibition driven by wettability alteration in the core-scale. Anionic surfactant, Alfoterra-68, recovers about 28% of the oil by lower tension aided gravity-driven imbibition in the core-scale. Residual oil saturation showed little capillary number dependence between 10{sup -5} and 10{sup -2}. Wettability alteration increases as the number of ethoxy groups increases in ethoxy sulfate surfactants. Plans for the next quarter include conducting mobilization, and imbibition studies.

  4. Electrical surface potential of pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Zoya; Rodenstein, Mathias; Döhner, Jana; Eng, Lukas M; Amrein, Matthias

    2006-11-21

    Pulmonary surfactant is a mixed lipid protein substance of defined composition that self-assembles at the air-lung interface into a molecular film and thus reduces the interfacial tension to close to zero. A very low surface tension is required for maintaining the alveolar structure. The pulmonary surfactant film is also the first barrier for airborne particles entering the lung upon breathing. We explored by frequency modulation Kelvin probe force microscopy (FM-KPFM) the structure and local electrical surface potential of bovine lipid extract surfactant (BLES) films. BLES is a clinically used surfactant replacement and here served as a realistic model surfactant system. The films were distinguished by a pattern of molecular monolayer areas, separated by patches of lipid bilayer stacks. The stacks were at positive electrical potential with respect to the surrounding monolayer areas. We propose a particular molecular arrangement of the lipids and proteins in the film to explain the topographic and surface potential maps. We also discuss how this locally variable surface potential may influence the retention of charged or polar airborne particles in the lung.

  5. Analysis of supercooling activities of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Terauchi, Ryuji; Tochigi, Hiroshi; Takaoka, Hisao; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2014-08-01

    Supercooling-promoting activities (SCAs) of 25 kinds of surfactants including non-ionic, anionic, cationic and amphoteric types were examined in solutions (buffered Milli-Q water, BMQW) containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, silver iodide (AgI) or BMQW alone, which unintentionally contained unidentified ice nucleators, by a droplet freezing assay. Most of the surfactants exhibited SCA in solutions containing AgI but not in solutions containing the INB E. ananas or BMQW alone. SCAs of many surfactants in solutions containing AgI were very high compared with those of previously reported supercooling-promoting substances. Cationic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (C16TAC), at concentrations of 0.01% (w/v) exhibited SCA of 11.8 °C, which is the highest SCA so far reported. These surfactants also showed high SCAs at very low concentrations in solutions containing AgI. C16TAB exhibited SCA of 5.7 °C at a concentration of 0.0005% (w/v).

  6. Surfactants with colloids: adsorption or absorption?

    PubMed

    Smith, Gregory N; Grillo, Isabelle; Rogers, Sarah E; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-07-01

    The interaction of Aerosol OT (AOT) surfactant with systems of model colloids in nonaqueous solvents (water-in-oil microemulsions, surfactant-stabilized silica organosols, and sterically-stabilized PMMA latexes) is expected to be system specific. Two limiting cases are expected: adsorption, with surfactant located at the particle surfaces, or absorption, with surfactant incorporated into the particle cores. Two approaches have been used to determine how AOT is distributed in the colloidal systems. The stability of the colloids in different alkanes (heptane to hexadecane, including mixtures) has been studied to determine any effects on the colloid surfaces. Contrast-variation small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements of the colloid cores and of AOT-colloid mixtures in colloid-matched solvent have also been performed. Normalization to account for the different scattering intensities and different particle radii have been used to enable a system-independent comparison. AOT in water-in-oil microemulsions and surfactant-stabilized silica organosols is determined to be adsorbed, whereas, surprisingly, AOT in sterically-stabilized PMMA latexes is found to be absorbed. Possible origins of these differences are discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Foaming behaviour of polymer surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Martínez, Alfredo; Maldonado, Amir

    2007-06-01

    We study the effect of a non-ionic amphiphilic polymer (PEG-100 stearate also called Myrj 59) on the foaming behaviour of aqueous solutions of an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate or SDS). The SDS concentration was kept fixed while the Myrj 59 concentration was varied. Measurements of foamability, surface tension and electrical conductivity were carried out. The results show two opposite effects depending on the polymer concentration: foamability is higher when the Myrj 59 concentration is low; however, it decreases considerably when the polymer concentration is increased. This behaviour is due to the polymer adsorption at the air/liquid interface at lower polymer concentrations, and to the formation of a polymer-surfactant complex in the bulk at higher concentrations. The results are confirmed by surface tension and electrical conductivity measurements, which are interpreted in terms of the microstructure of the polymer-surfactant solutions. The observed behaviour is due to the amphiphilic nature of the studied polymer. The increased hydrophobicity of Myrj 59, compared to that of water-soluble polymers like PEG or PEO, increases its 'reactivity' towards SDS, i.e. the strength of its interaction with this anionic surfactant. Our results show that hydrophobically modified polymers have potential applications as additives in order to control the foaming properties of surfactant solutions.

  8. SURFACTANT - POLYMER INTERACTION FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    1997-09-01

    The goal of this research is to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, adsorption and mobility control. Surfactant--polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation, high adsorption and viscous/heterogeneity fingering. This report contains data concerning selection of appropriate fluids for use in laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. A mixture comprising a ''pseudo oil'' with appropriate surfactant and polymer is proposed. The properties of this system has been determined. The experimental set-up has been conditioned for use and experiments involving the aforementioned system have already started. A commercial simulator has been acquired for use in reproducing the experiments. A graduate student has been trained in its use. Linear stability analysis equations have been developed and phase maps for one and two-dimensions are currently computed.

  9. Surfactant apoprotein in nonmalignant pulmonary disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, G.; Katyal, S. L.

    1980-01-01

    Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lungs exhibiting a variety of nonmalignant disorders were studied by immunoperoxidase staining using antibodies specific for surfactant apoprotein, IgG, IgM, IgA, albumin, fibrinogen, and lysozyme. Normal Type II pneumocytes showed staining for surfactant apoprotein in the perinuclear region only. The extent and intensity of staining for apoprotein was markedly increased in reactive Type II pneumocytes. This increase appeared to be a nonspecific reaction to lung injury. The intra-alveolar material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for surfactant apoprotein, indicating that the accumulated proteinaceous material contained pulmonary surfactant. Type II pneumocytes in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis exhibited hyperplasia as well as hypertrophy. The few macrophages in lung affected by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis stained intensely for lysozyme. The excessive intraalveolar accumulation of proteinaceous material in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis may be the result of both an over-production as well as a deficient removal of pulmonary surfactant. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 p[57]-a PMID:7004201

  10. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  11. Surfactant treatment for acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Herce, J.; de Lucas, N.; Carrillo, A.; Bustinza, A.; Moral, R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine prospectively the efficacy of surfactant in acute respiratory distress syndrome.
STUDY DESIGN—Twenty patients, 1 month to 16 years of age, diagnosed with an acute pulmonary disease with severe hypoxaemia (PaO2/FiO2 < 100) (13 with systemic or pulmonary disease and seven with cardiac disease) were treated with one to six doses of 50-200 mg/kg of porcine surfactant administered directly into the trachea. The surfactant was considered to be effective when the PaO2/FiO2 improved by > 20%.
RESULTS—After initial surfactant administration the PaO2/FiO2 increased significantly in patients with systemic or pulmonary disease from 68 to 111, and the oxygenation index (OI) diminished significantly from 36.9 to 27.1. The PaO2/FiO2 and OI did not improve in children with cardiac disease. The improvement of the patients who survived was greater than that of those who died.
CONCLUSIONS—Surfactant moderately improves oxygenation in some children with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome secondary to pulmonary or systemic disease.

 PMID:10325705

  12. BioSurfDB: knowledge and algorithms to support biosurfactants and biodegradation studies.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jorge S; Araújo, Wydemberg; Lopes Sales, Ana Isabela; Brito Guerra, Alaine de; Silva Araújo, Sinara Carla da; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara F; Freitas, Ana Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Crude oil extraction, transportation and use provoke the contamination of countless ecosystems. Therefore, bioremediation through surfactants mobilization or biodegradation is an important subject, both economically and environmentally. Bioremediation research had a great boost with the recent advances in Metagenomics, as it enabled the sequencing of uncultured microorganisms providing new insights on surfactant-producing and/or oil-degrading bacteria. Many research studies are making available genomic data from unknown organisms obtained from metagenomics analysis of oil-contaminated environmental samples. These new datasets are presently demanding the development of new tools and data repositories tailored for the biological analysis in a context of bioremediation data analysis. This work presents BioSurfDB, www.biosurfdb.org, a curated relational information system integrating data from: (i) metagenomes; (ii) organisms; (iii) biodegradation relevant genes; proteins and their metabolic pathways; (iv) bioremediation experiments results, with specific pollutants treatment efficiencies by surfactant producing organisms; and (v) a biosurfactant-curated list, grouped by producing organism, surfactant name, class and reference. The main goal of this repository is to gather information on the characterization of biological compounds and mechanisms involved in biosurfactant production and/or biodegradation and make it available in a curated way and associated with a number of computational tools to support studies of genomic and metagenomic data.

  13. BioSurfDB: knowledge and algorithms to support biosurfactants and biodegradation studies

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jorge S.; Araújo, Wydemberg; Lopes Sales, Ana Isabela; de Brito Guerra, Alaine; da Silva Araújo, Sinara Carla; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara F.; Freitas, Ana Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Crude oil extraction, transportation and use provoke the contamination of countless ecosystems. Therefore, bioremediation through surfactants mobilization or biodegradation is an important subject, both economically and environmentally. Bioremediation research had a great boost with the recent advances in Metagenomics, as it enabled the sequencing of uncultured microorganisms providing new insights on surfactant-producing and/or oil-degrading bacteria. Many research studies are making available genomic data from unknown organisms obtained from metagenomics analysis of oil-contaminated environmental samples. These new datasets are presently demanding the development of new tools and data repositories tailored for the biological analysis in a context of bioremediation data analysis. This work presents BioSurfDB, www.biosurfdb.org, a curated relational information system integrating data from: (i) metagenomes; (ii) organisms; (iii) biodegradation relevant genes; proteins and their metabolic pathways; (iv) bioremediation experiments results, with specific pollutants treatment efficiencies by surfactant producing organisms; and (v) a biosurfactant-curated list, grouped by producing organism, surfactant name, class and reference. The main goal of this repository is to gather information on the characterization of biological compounds and mechanisms involved in biosurfactant production and/or biodegradation and make it available in a curated way and associated with a number of computational tools to support studies of genomic and metagenomic data. Database URL: www.biosurfdb.org PMID:25833955

  14. Navigating the Bio-Politics of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Nick; Motzkau, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Childhood research has long shared a bio-political terrain with state agencies in which children figure primarily as "human futures". In the 20th century bio-social dualism helped to make that terrain navigable by researchers, but, as life processes increasingly become key sites of bio-political action, bio-social dualism is becoming…

  15. Navigating the Bio-Politics of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Nick; Motzkau, Johanna

    2011-01-01

    Childhood research has long shared a bio-political terrain with state agencies in which children figure primarily as "human futures". In the 20th century bio-social dualism helped to make that terrain navigable by researchers, but, as life processes increasingly become key sites of bio-political action, bio-social dualism is becoming…

  16. COMBINED MICROBIAL SURFACTANT-POLYMER SYSTEM FOR IMPROVED OIL MOBILITY AND CONFORMANCE CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2005-08-01

    Many domestic oil fields are facing abandonment even though they still contain two-thirds of their original oil. A significant number of these fields can yield additional oil using advanced oil recovery (AOR) technologies. To maintain domestic oil production at current levels, AOR technologies are needed that are affordable and can be implemented by the independent oil producers of the future. Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) technologies have become established as cost-effective solutions for declining oil production. MEOR technologies are affordable for independent producers operating stripper wells and can be used to extend the life of marginal fields. The demonstrated versatility of microorganisms can be used to design advanced microbial systems to treat multiple production problems in complex, heterogeneous reservoirs. The proposed research presents the concept of a combined microbial surfactant-polymer system for advanced oil recovery. The surfactant-polymer system utilizes bacteria that are capable of both biosurfactant production and metabolically-controlled biopolymer production. This novel technology combines complementary mechanisms to extend the life of marginal fields and is applicable to a large number of domestic reservoirs. The research project described in this report was performed by Bio-Engineering Inc., a woman owned small business, Texas A&M University and Prairie View A&M University, a Historically Black College and University. This report describes the results of our laboratory work to grow microbial cultures, the work done on recovery experiments on core rocks, and computer simulations. We have selected two bacterial strains capable of producing both surfactant and polymers. We have conducted laboratory experiments to determine under what conditions surfactants and polymers can be produced from one single strain. We have conduct recovery experiments to determine the performance of these strains under different conditions. Our results

  17. Exclusion of CD45 inhibits activity of p56lck associated with glycolipid-enriched membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    p56lck (Lck) is a lymphoid-specific Src family tyrosine kinase that is critical for T-cell development and activation. Lck is also a membrane protein, and approximately half of the membrane-associated Lck is associated with a glycolipid-enriched membrane (GEM) fraction that is resistant to solubilization by Triton X-100 (TX-100). To compare the membrane-associated Lck present in the GEM and TX-100-soluble fractions of Jurkat cells, Lck from each fraction was immunoblotted with antibody to phosphotyrosine. Lck in the GEM fraction was found to be hyperphosphorylated on tyrosine, and this correlated with a lower kinase specific activity relative to the TX-100-soluble Lck. Peptide mapping and phosphatase diagests showed that the hyperphosphorylation and lower kinase activity of GEM-associated Lck was due to phosphorylation of the regulatory COOH-terminal Tyr505. In addition, we determined that the membrane-bound tyrosine phosphatase CD45 was absent from the GEM fraction. Cells lacking CD45 showed identical phosphorylation of Lck in GEM and TX-100-soluble membranes. We propose that the GEM fraction represents a specific membrane domain present in T-cells, and that the hyperphosphorylation of tyrosine and lower kinase activity of GEM-associated Lck is due to exclusion of CD45 from these domains. Lck associated with the GEM domains may therefore consitute a reservoir of enzyme that can be readily activated. PMID:8978819

  18. Spatially-Resolved Analysis of Glycolipids and Metabolites in Living Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 Using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Geydebrekht, Oleg V.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Konopka, Allan; Laskin, Julia

    2013-04-07

    Microorganisms release a diversity of organic compounds that couple interspecies metabolism, enable communication, or provide benefits to other microbes. Increased knowledge of microbial metabolite production will contribute to understanding of the dynamic microbial world and can potentially lead to new developments in drug discovery, biofuel production, and clinical research. Nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) is an ambient ionization technique that enables detailed chemical characterization of molecules from a specific location on a surface without special sample pretreatment. Due to its ambient nature, living bacterial colonies growing on agar plates can be rapidly and non-destructively analyzed. We performed spatially resolved nano-DESI analysis of living Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 colonies on agar plates. We use high resolution mass spectrometry and MS/MS analysis of the living Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 colonies to detect metabolites and lipids, and confirm their identities. We found that despite the high salt content of the agar (osmolarity ca. 700 mM), nano-DESI analysis enables detailed characterization of metabolites produced by the colony. Using this technique, we identified several glycolipids found on the living colonies and examined the effect of the age of the colony on the chemical gradient of glucosylglycerol secreted onto agar.

  19. Binding Sites for Acylated Trehalose Analogs of Glycolipid Ligands on an Extended Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of the Macrophage Receptor Mincle*

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Hadar; Rambaruth, Neela D. S.; Jégouzo, Sabine A. F.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Djurhuus, Rasmus; Poulsen, Thomas B.; Weis, William I.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage receptor mincle binds to trehalose dimycolate on the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Signaling initiated by this interaction leads to cytokine production, which underlies the ability of mycobacteria to evade the immune system and also to function as adjuvants. In previous work the mechanism for binding of the sugar headgroup of trehalose dimycolate to mincle has been elucidated, but the basis for enhanced binding to glycolipid ligands, in which hydrophobic substituents are attached to the 6-hydroxyl groups, has been the subject of speculation. In the work reported here, the interaction of trehalose derivatives with bovine mincle has been probed with a series of synthetic mimics of trehalose dimycolate in binding assays, in structural studies by x-ray crystallography, and by site-directed mutagenesis. Binding studies reveal that, rather than reflecting specific structural preference, the apparent affinity of mincle for ligands with hydrophobic substituents correlates with their overall size. Structural and mutagenesis analysis provides evidence for interaction of the hydrophobic substituents with multiple different portions of the surface of mincle and confirms the presence of three Ca2+-binding sites. The structure of an extended portion of the extracellular domain of mincle, beyond the minimal C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, also constrains the way the binding domains may interact on the surface of macrophages. PMID:27542410

  20. TCR bias and affinity define two compartments of the CD1b-glycolipid-specific T Cell repertoire.

    PubMed

    Van Rhijn, Ildiko; Gherardin, Nicholas A; Kasmar, Anne; de Jager, Wilco; Pellicci, Daniel G; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Tan, Li Lynn; Bhati, Mugdha; Gras, Stephanie; Godfrey, Dale I; Rossjohn, Jamie; Moody, D Branch

    2014-05-01

    Current views emphasize TCR diversity as a key feature that differentiates the group 1 (CD1a, CD1b, CD1c) and group 2 (CD1d) CD1 systems. Whereas TCR sequence motifs define CD1d-reactive NKT cells, the available data do not allow a TCR-based organization of the group 1 CD1 repertoire. The observed TCR diversity might result from donor-to-donor differences in TCR repertoire, as seen for MHC-restricted T cells. Alternatively, diversity might result from differing CD1 isoforms, Ags, and methods used to identify TCRs. Using CD1b tetramers to isolate clones recognizing the same glycolipid, we identified a previously unknown pattern of V gene usage (TRAV17, TRBV4-1) among unrelated human subjects. These TCRs are distinct from those present on NKT cells and germline-encoded mycolyl lipid-reactive T cells. Instead, they resemble the TCR of LDN5, one of the first known CD1b-reactive clones that was previously thought to illustrate the diversity of the TCR repertoire. Interdonor TCR conservation was observed in vitro and ex vivo, identifying LDN5-like T cells as a distinct T cell type. These data support TCR-based organization of the CD1b repertoire, which consists of at least two compartments that differ in TCR sequence motifs, affinity, and coreceptor expression.

  1. Production and characterisation of glycolipid biosurfactant by Halomonas sp. MB-30 for potential application in enhanced oil recovery.

    PubMed

    Dhasayan, Asha; Kiran, G Seghal; Selvin, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Biosurfactant-producing Halomonas sp. MB-30 was isolated from a marine sponge Callyspongia diffusa, and its potency in crude oil recovery from sand pack column was investigated. The biosurfactant produced by the strain MB-30 reduced the surface tension to 30 mN m(-1) in both glucose and hydrocarbon-supplemented minimal media. The critical micelle concentration of biosurfactant obtained from glucose-based medium was at 0.25 mg ml(-1) at critical micelle dilution 1:10. The chemical structure of glycolipid biosurfactant was characterised by infrared spectroscopy and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The emulsification activity of MB-30 biosurfactant was tested with different hydrocarbons, and 93.1 % emulsification activity was exhibited with crude oil followed by kerosene (86.6 %). The formed emulsion was stable for up to 1 month. To identify the effectiveness of biosurfactant for enhanced oil recovery in extreme environments, the interactive effect of pH, temperature and salinity on emulsion stability with crude oil and kerosene was evaluated. The stable emulsion was formed at and above pH 7, temperature >80 °C and NaCl concentration up to 10 % in response surface central composite orthogonal design model. The partially purified biosurfactant recovered 62 % of residual crude oil from sand pack column. Thus, the stable emulsifying biosurfactant produced by Halomonas sp. MB-30 could be used for in situ biosurfactant-mediated enhanced oil recovery process and hydrocarbon bioremediation in extreme environments.

  2. Identification of a Site in Sar1 Involved in the Interaction with the Cytoplasmic Tail of Glycolipid Glycosyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Quintero, Cristián A.; Giraudo, Claudio G.; Villarreal, Marcos; Montich, Guillermo; Maccioni, Hugo J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Glycolipid glycosyltransferases (GGT) are transported from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi, their site of residence, via COPII vesicles. An interaction of a (R/K)X(R/K) motif at their cytoplasmic tail (CT) with Sar1 is critical for the selective concentration in the transport vesicles. In this work using computational docking, we identify three putative binding pockets in Sar1 (sites A, B, and C) involved in the interaction with the (R/K)X(R/K) motif. Sar1 mutants with alanine replacement of amino acids in site A were tested in vitro and in cells. In vitro, mutant versions showed a reduced ability to bind immobilized peptides with the CT sequence of GalT2. In cells, Sar1 mutants (Sar1D198A) specifically affect the exiting of GGT from the ER, resulting in an ER/Golgi concentration ratio favoring the ER. Neither the typical Golgi localization of GM130 nor the exiting and transport of the G protein of the vesicular stomatitis virus were affected. The protein kinase inhibitor H89 produced accumulation of Sec23, Sar1, and GalT2 at the ER exit sites; Sar1D189A also accumulated at these sites, but in this case GalT2 remained disperse along ER membranes. The results indicate that amino acids in site A of Sar1 are involved in the interaction with the CT of GGT for concentration at ER exiting sites. PMID:20650895

  3. Collapsed bipolar glycolipids at the air/water interface: effect of the stereochemistry on the stretched/bent conformations.

    PubMed

    Jacquemet, Alicia; Terme, Nolwenn; Benvegnu, Thierry; Vié, Véronique; Lemiègre, Loïc

    2013-12-15

    This article describes a comparative study of several bipolar lipids derived from tetraether structures. The sole structural difference between the main two glycolipids is a unique stereochemical variation on a cyclopentyl ring placed in the middle of the lipids. We discuss the comparative results obtained at the air/water interface on the basis of tensiometry and ellipsometry. Langmuir-Blodgett depositions during lipid film compressions and decompressions were also analyzed by AFM. The lactosylated tetraether (bipolar) lipid structures involved the formation of highly stable multilayers, which are still present at 10 mN m(-1) during decompression. This study suggests also that the stereochemistry of a central cyclopentyl ring dramatically drives the conformation of the corresponding bipolar lipids. Both isomers (trans and cis) adopt a U-shaped (bent) conformation at the air/water interface but the trans cyclopentyl ring induces a much more frustration within this type of conformation. Consequently, this bipolar lipid (trans-tetraether) undergoes a flip of one polar head-group (lactosyl) leading to a stretched conformation during collapse.

  4. Ieodoglucomide C and Ieodoglycolipid, New Glycolipids from a Marine-Derived Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis 09IDYM23.

    PubMed

    Tareq, Fakir Shahidullah; Lee, Hyi-Seung; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Jong Seok; Shin, Hee Jae

    2015-05-01

    Chemical examination of the ethyl acetate extract from the fermentation broth of the marine-derived bacterium Bacillus licheniformis resulted in the isolation of two new glycolipids, ieodoglucomide C (1) and ieodoglycolipid (2). The structural characterization of 1 and 2 was achieved by extensive spectroscopic evidence, including 2D NMR experiments. A combination of chemical derivatization techniques followed by NMR studies, LC-MS data analysis and a literature review was deployed for the establishment of the stereo-configurations of 1 and 2. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibited good antibiotic properties against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella typhi, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with MICs ranging from 0.01 to 0.05 μM. Furthermore, the antifungal activity of 1 and 2 was evaluated against plant pathogenic fungi Aspergillus niger, Rhizoctonia solani, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum acutatum as well as the human pathogen Candida albicans. Compounds 1 and 2 inhibited the mycelial growth of these pathogens with MIC values of 0.03-0.05 μM, revealing that these compounds are good candidates for the development of new fungicides.

  5. Bioactivity of a Novel Glycolipid Produced by a Halophilic Buttiauxella sp. and Improving Submerged Fermentation Using a Response Surface Method.

    PubMed

    Marzban, Abdolrazagh; Ebrahimipour, Gholamhossein; Danesh, Abolghasem

    2016-09-22

    An antimicrobial glycolipid biosurfactant (GBS), extracted and identified from a marine bacterium, was studied to inhibit pathogenic microorganisms. Production of the GBS was optimized using a statistical method, a response surface method (RSM) with a central composite design (CCD) for obtaining maximum yields on a cost-effective substrate, molasses. The GBS-producing bacterium was identified as Buttiauxella Species in terms of biochemical and molecular characteristics. This compound showed a desirable antimicrobial activity against some pathogens such as E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus cereus, Candida albicans, Aspergilus niger, Salmonella enterica. The rheological studies described the stability of the GBS at high values in a range of pH (7-8), temperature (20-60) and salinity (0%-3%). The statistical optimization of GBS fermentation was found to be pH 7, temperature 33 °C, Peptone 1%, NaCl 1% and molasses 1%. The potency of the GBS as an effective antimicrobial agent provides evidence for its use against food and human pathogens. Moreover, favorable production of the GBS in the presence of molasses as a cheap substrate and the feasibility of pilot scale fermentation using an RSM method could expand its uses in food, pharmaceutical products and oil industries.

  6. Synthesis of mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite by using zwitterions surfactant

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite (mn-HAP) was successfully synthesized via a novel micelle-templating method using lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid as zwitterionic surfactant. The systematic use of such a surfactant in combination with microwave energy inputenables the precise contr...

  7. Chemomechanical behaviors of polymer gels by surfactant binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narita, Tetsuharu; Gong, Jianping; Osada, Yoshihito

    1999-05-01

    A weakly crosslinked poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid) immersed in cationic surfactant (N-n-alkylpyridinium chloride) shows biomimetic chemomechanical movement under dc current. The principle of the movement is based on an electrokinetic molecular assembly reaction of the surfactant onto the polymer network. In order to analyze the diffusion and binding processes which are both of importance for understanding the alkyl size dependence of the chemomechanical behavior, kinetic studies of the surfactants binding were made systematically changing the alkyl size and concentration of the surfactants and ionic strength. It was found that the driving force of the surfactant diffusion is the electrochemical potential gradient, while the surfactant binding enhances the diffusion proces. A mathematical model for the surfactant diffusion was developed taking account of the surfactant binding process and obtained results were well explained the experimental observations.

  8. Surfactant ionic liquid-based microemulsions for polymerization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Feng; Texter, John

    2006-07-05

    Surfactants based on imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs), including polymerizable surfactant ILs, have been synthesized and used to stabilize polymerizable microemulsions useful for producing polymer nanoparticles, gels, and open-cell porous materials.

  9. Synthesis of mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite by using zwitterions surfactant

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite (mn-HAP) was successfully synthesized via a novel micelle-templating method using lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid as zwitterionic surfactant. The systematic use of such a surfactant in combination with microwave energy inputenables the precise contr...

  10. Fullerene surfactants and their use in polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, Kwan-Yue; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi

    2015-12-15

    Fullerene surfactant compounds useful as interfacial layer in polymer solar cells to enhance solar cell efficiency. Polymer solar cell including a fullerene surfactant-containing interfacial layer intermediate cathode and active layer.

  11. Bio-regenerative life support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, Robert D.; Wydeven, Theodore, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    The basis for and the potential uses of bio-regenerative life support are examined. Bio-regenerative life support systems are an alternative to physical-chemical regeneration techniques for use when resupply of a crew in space is expensive, or when the logistics of resupply are difficult. Many of the scientific studies required for bio-regenerative life support systems have been completed and preliminary development of some components will begin within the next 12 to 18 months. The focus of the work that lies ahead will be efficient power and mass use, long-term system stability, component function, systems integration, and extensive testing in the space environment. Because of the advantages of bio-regeneration, it is anticipated that human life support for long-term space missions will evolve to include increasingly large amounts of biologically-based regeneration.

  12. DNA- and DNA-CTMA: novel bio-nanomaterials for application in photonics and in electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindroiu, Mihaela; Manea, Ana-Maria; Rau, Ileana; Grote, James G.; Oliveira, Hyrla C.; Pawlicka, Agnieszka; Kajzar, Francois

    2013-06-01

    Functionalization of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) with surfactants, photosensitive and conductivity increasing molecules as well as thin film processing is reviewed and discussed. The comparative spectroscopic studies of chemical and photothermal stability of several chromophores show a better stability in DNA-cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) surfactant complexes than in polycarbonate (PC) or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) matrices. Also the optical damage threshold in nanosecond pulsed laser illumination is higher in thin films of bio-macromolecules such as DNA, DNACTMA, collagen than in PC. The electrical conductivity of doped DNA based systems exhibits a typical ionic character and can be improved by an appropriate doping. Practical applications of DNA based complexes are reviewed and discussed.

  13. Simulation of surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.L.; Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Abriola, L.M.

    1994-11-01

    This paper demonstrates that surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) can be modeled in two and three dimensions using a finite-difference simulator and incorporating realistic heterogenieties in aquifer properties and complex surfactant chemistry based upon a multicomponent, multiphase compositional description of the experimental chemistry. The presented simulations provide significant new insights into the SEAR process. The effectiveness of SEAR is sensitive to many variables including the initial infiltration rate of DNAPL, the natural hydraulic gradient, well locations, well pumping and injection rates, aquifer heterogenieties, and properties such as cappillary pressure, relative permeability, and surfactant chemistry. In this paper a comprehensive model for SEAR is presented and applied to explore the potential performance of this technology on an aquifer scale. This study illustrates the value of modeling in SEAR design, how this modeling can be accomplished, what information is necessary, and what kinds of results modeling can be expected to produce.

  14. Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1992-01-01

    A phase 2 study was initiated to investigate surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction, with the objective of quantifying the enhancement in liquid yields and product quality. This publication covers the first quarter of work. The major accomplishments were: the refurbishment of the high-pressure, high-temperature reactor autoclave, the completion of four coal liquefaction runs with Pittsburgh #8 coal, two each with and without sodium lignosulfonate surfactant, and the development of an analysis scheme for the product liquid filtrate and filter cake. Initial results at low reactor temperatures show that the addition of the surfactant produces an improvement in conversion yields and an increase in lighter boiling point fractions for the filtrate.

  15. Recent Food Applications of Microbial Surfactants.

    PubMed

    Nitschke, Marcia; Silva, Sumária Sousa E

    2016-07-20

    During last years the interest on microbial surfactants or biosurfactants has gained attention due to their natural origin and environmental compatibility. These characteristics fulfill the demand of regulatory agencies and society to use of more sustained and green chemicals. Microbial-derived surfactants can replace synthetic surfactants in a great variety of industrial applications as detergents, foaming, emulsifiers, solubilizers and wetting agents. Change in trend of consumers to natural from synthetic additives and also the increasing health and environmental concerns creating demand for new "green" additives in food. Apart from their inherent surface-active properties, BS have been shown antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity against food pathogens; therefore, BS can be versatile additives or ingredients for food processing. These interesting applications will be discussed in this review.

  16. Nanotube Dispersions Made With Charged Surfactant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuper, Cynthia; Kuzma, Mike

    2006-01-01

    Dispersions (including monodispersions) of nanotubes in water at relatively high concentrations have been formulated as prototypes of reagents for use in making fibers, films, and membranes based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Other than water, the ingredients of a dispersion of this type include one or more charged surfactant(s) and carbon nanotubes derived from the HiPco(TradeMark) (or equivalent) process. Among reagents known to be made from HiPco(TradeMark)(or equivalent) SWNTs, these are the most concentrated and are expected to be usable in processing of bulk structures and materials. Test data indicate that small bundles of SWNTs and single SWNTs at concentrations up to 1.1 weight percent have been present in water plus surfactant. This development is expected to contribute to the growth of an industry based on applied carbon nanotechnology. There are expected to be commercial applications in aerospace, avionics, sporting goods, automotive products, biotechnology, and medicine.

  17. Surfactant mediated liquid phase exfoliation of graphene.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Rekha; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-01-01

    Commercialization of graphene based applications inevitably requires cost effective mass production. From the early days of research on graphene, direct liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) of graphite has been considered as the most promising strategy to produce high-quality mono or few-layer graphene sheets in solvent dispersion forms. Substantial success has been achieved thus far in the LPE of graphene employing numerous solvent systems and suitable surfactants. This invited review article principally showcase the recent research progress as well as shortcomings of surfactant assisted LPE of graphene. In particular, a comprehensive assessment of the quality and yield of the graphene sheets produced by different categories of the surfactants are summarized. Future direction of LPE methods is also proposed for the eventual success of commercial applications.

  18. Surfactant mediated liquid phase exfoliation of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Rekha; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-10-01

    Commercialization of graphene based applications inevitably requires cost effective mass production. From the early days of research on graphene, direct liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) of graphite has been considered as the most promising strategy to produce high-quality mono or few-layer graphene sheets in solvent dispersion forms. Substantial success has been achieved thus far in the LPE of graphene employing numerous solvent systems and suitable surfactants. This invited review article principally showcase the recent research progress as well as shortcomings of surfactant assisted LPE of graphene. In particular, a comprehensive assessment of the quality and yield of the graphene sheets produced by different categories of the surfactants are summarized. Future direction of LPE methods is also proposed for the eventual success of commercial applications.

  19. Surfactant studies for bench-scale operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hickey, Gregory S.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1993-01-01

    A phase 2 study has been initiated to investigate surfactant-assisted coal liquefaction, with the objective of quantifying the enhancement in liquid yields and product quality. This report covers the second quarter of work. The major accomplishments were: completion of coal liquefaction autoclave reactor runs with Illinois number 6 coal at processing temperatures of 300, 325, and 350 C, and pressures of 1800 psig; analysis of the filter cake and the filtrate obtained from the treated slurry in each run; and correlation of the coal conversions and the liquid yield quality to the surfactant concentration. An increase in coal conversions and upgrading of the liquid product quality due to surfactant addition was observed for all runs.

  20. Exogenous surfactant restores lung function but not peripheral immunosuppression in ventilated surfactant-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Vreugdenhil, Harriet A; Lachmann, Burkhard; Haitsma, Jack J; Zijlstra, Jitske; Heijnen, Cobi J; Jansen, Nicolaas J; van Vught, Adrianus J

    2006-01-01

    The authors have previously shown that mechanical ventilation can result in increased pulmonary inflammation and suppressed peripheral leukocyte function. In the present study the effect of surfactant therapy on pulmonary inflammation and peripheral immune function in ventilated surfactant-deficient rats was assessed. Surfactant deficiency was induced by repeated lung lavage, treated rats with surfactant or left them untreated, and ventilated the rats during 2 hours. Nonventilated rats served as healthy control group. Expression of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2 was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), interleukin (IL)-1beta, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) were measured in total lung homogenates. Outside the lung phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced lymphocyte proliferation, interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-10 production, and natural killer activity were measured in splenocytes. After 2 hours of mechanical ventilation, expression of MIP-2, IL-1beta, and HSP70 increased significantly in the lungs of surfactant-deficient rats. Outside the lung, mitogen-induced proliferation and production of IFN-gamma and IL-10 reduced significantly. Only natural killer cell activity remained unaffected. Surfactant treatment significantly improved lung function, but could not prevent increased pulmonary expression of MIP-2, IL-1beta, and HSP70 and decreased peripheral mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-gamma and IL-10 production in vitro. In conclusion, 2 hours of mechanical ventilation resulted in increased lung inflammation and partial peripheral leukocyte suppression in surfactant-deficient rats. Surfactant therapy ameliorated lung function but could not prevent or restore peripheral immunosuppression. The authors postulate that peripheral immunosuppression may occur in ventilated surfactant deficient patients, which may enhance susceptibility for infections.

  1. Preparation and characterization of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianxi; Qing, Yanhong; Wang, Tong; Zhu, Runliang; Wei, Jingming; Tao, Qi; Yuan, Peng; He, Hongping

    2011-08-15

    A series of zwitterionic surfactant-modified montmorillonites (ZSMMs) were synthesized using montmorillonite and three zwitterionic surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths at different concentrations [0.2-4.0 cation exchange capacity (CEC)]. These ZSMMs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermo-gravimetric analysis and differential thermo-gravimetric (TG/DTG) analyses. The zwitterionic surfactant could be intercalated into the interlayer spaces of montmorillonites and causing interlayer space-swelling. From XRD measurements, the amount of the surfactants loaded and the basal spacing increased with surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. One endothermic DTG peak occurred at ~390 °C, which was assigned to the decomposition of the zwitterionic surfactant on the organo-montmorillonites from 0.2 to 0.6 CEC. When the surfactant loading was increased, a new endothermic peak appeared at ~340 °C. From the microstructures of these ZSMMs, the mechanism of zwitterionic surfactant adsorption was proposed. At relatively low loadings of the zwitterionic surfactant, most of surfactants enter the spacing by an ion-exchange mechanism and are adsorbed onto the interlayer cation sites. When the concentration of the zwitterionic surfactant exceeds the CEC of montmorillonite, the surfactant molecules then adhere to the surface-adsorbed surfactant. Some surfactants enter the interlayers, whereas the others are attached to the clay surface. When the concentration of surfactant increases further beyond 2.0 CEC, the surfactants may occupy the inter-particle space within the house-of-cards aggregate structure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Surfactant-Polymer Interaction for Improved Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2002-01-07

    The goal of this research was to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, oil solubility in the displacing fluid and mobility control. Surfactant-polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation and viscous/heterogeneity fingering.

  3. Effect of surfactants on properties of soap-based greases

    SciTech Connect

    Fuks, I.G.

    1983-07-01

    Surfactants often influence the susceptibility of the grease to additives. This paper considers ways to improve the effectiveness of surfactant additives by the use of additive packages. The mechanism of surfactant action in forming grease structures are elucidated, and methods for preventing grease softening are established. The softening effect of surfactants is explained in part by retardation of the initial stages of the structurization i.e., association and micelle formation.

  4. Adhesion of latex films. Influence of surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Charmeau, J.Y.; Kientz, E.; Holl, Y.

    1996-12-31

    In the applications of film forming latexes in paint, paper, coating, adhesive, textile industries, one of the most important property of latex films is adhesion onto a support. From the point of view of adhesion, latex films have two specificities. The first one arises from the particular structure of the film which is usually not homogeneous but retains to a certain extent the memory of the particles it was made from. These structure effects are clearly apparent when one compares mechanical or adhesion properties of pure latex films and of films of the same polymers but prepared from a solution. Latex films show higher Young`s moduli and lower adhesion properties than solution films. The second specificity of latex films comes from the presence of the surfactant which was used in the synthesis and as stabilizer for the latex. Most industrial latexes contain low amounts of surfactant, typically in the range 0.1 to 2-3 wt%. However, being usually incompatible with the polymer, the surfactant is not homogeneously distributed in the film. It tends to segregate towards the film-air or film-support interfaces or to form domains in the bulk of the film. Distribution of surfactants in latex films has been studied by several authors. The influence of the surfactant on adhesion, as well as on other properties, is thus potentially very important. This article presents the results of the authors investigation of surfactant effects on adhesion properties of latex films. To the authors knowledge, there is no other example, in the open literature, of this kind of study.

  5. Novel surfactant-selective membrane electrode based on polyelectrolyte-surfactant complex.

    PubMed

    Zorin, Ivan; Scherbinina, Tatiana; Fetin, Petr; Makarov, Ivan; Bilibin, Alexander

    2014-12-01

    Novel class of active ionophores for surfactant selective electrodes is proposed. PVC membrane doped with polyelectrolyte-surfactant stoichiometric complex is used for ion-selective electrode construction responsive to cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide and related surfactants. New ionophore is quite stable and completely insoluble in aqueous media in wide range of pH. The electrode displays nearly Nernstian slope in CTAB concentration range 10(-6)-10(-3)M. Polyelectrolyte platform allows to design wide range of different ionophores responsive to cationic organic substances. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Control of acid mine drainage using surfactants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-02-01

    This news sheet describes US Bureau of Mines work on the reduction or prevention of acid mine drainage from coal refuse piles and surface mines by inhibiting the growth of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. It has been found that the direct application of a dilute surfactant or detergent solution to coal refuse piles or overburden can be an effective preventive measure or can reduce water treatment costs by controlling acid drainage at its source. Of the anionic surfactants tested to date, sodium lauryl sulphate appears to be the most effective. Alpha olefin sulphonate and alkyl benzene sulphonate are acceptable alternatives. The results of field trials are presented.

  7. Two-dimensional photonic crystal surfactant detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Tao; Smith, Natasha; Asher, Sanford A

    2012-08-07

    We developed a novel two-dimensional (2-D) crystalline colloidal array photonic crystal sensing material for the visual detection of amphiphilic molecules in water. A close-packed polystyrene 2-D array monolayer was embedded in a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-based hydrogel film. These 2-D photonic crystals placed on a mirror show intense diffraction that enables them to be used for visual determination of analytes. Binding of surfactant molecules attaches ions to the sensor that swells the PNIPAAm-based hydrogel. The resulting increase in particle spacing red shifts the 2-D diffracted light. Incorporation of more hydrophobic monomers increases the sensitivity to surfactants.

  8. Effects of selected surfactants on soil microbial activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surfactants (surface-active agents) facilitate and accentuate the emulsifying, dispersing, spreading, and wetting properties of liquids. Surfactants are used in industry to reduce the surface tension of liquid and to solubilize compounds. For agricultural pest management, surfactants are an import...

  9. Reuse of surfactants and cosolvents for NAPL remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, D.F.; Oubre, C.L.; Ward, C.H.

    2000-07-01

    Recovery and reuse of surfactants used in site remediation can substantially improve the overall economics. Prior to this project, it has not been demonstrated that a surfactant recovery process could be reliably designed and operated at field conditions. Nor had the question of the most cost effective surfactant recovery scheme been addressed. This book highlights innovative and cost effective technologies for ground water remediation.

  10. INTRODUCTION: Wetting and dewetting in bio-related systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herminghaus, S.

    2005-03-01

    Research on such genuinely soft-matter related phenomena as wetting and dewetting would not be complete without reminiscence to biological systems. The recent stir around what has been known as the lotus effect, the amazing ultra-hydrophobic properties of many plants, has highlighted the interconnections of wetting with bio-systems. In the first paper of this section (Mock et al), a `biomimetic' system is conceived which imitates the properties of plant leaves with elastic hairs. The synthesis of such a system turns out to be tricky, but the progress is encouraging. The next three papers deal with surfactant layers, as they occur in many biological systems, such as the plasma membrane. Various experimental techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy (Tanaka et al), neutron reflectivity (Steitz et al), and x-ray scattering (Ahrens et al), are demonstrated as powerful tools for their investigation. The last paper (Heim et al) takes us back to where we started: the morphologies emerging upon dewetting of a liquid. This time, the full diversity of patterns is shown which appears in the deposited solute, once the liquid has evaporated. The motivation of this work is the morphology of deposition of DNA on bio-chips, which may affect the readout results of such devices. It is shown that although much can already be understood, a lot of work has still to be done, and many beautiful mechanisms may still be discovered.

  11. A new bio-inspired route to metal-nanoparticle-based heterogeneous catalysts.

    PubMed

    Debecker, Damien P; Faure, Chrystel; Meyre, Marie-Edith; Derré, Alain; Gaigneaux, Eric M

    2008-10-01

    Onion-type multilamellar vesicles are made of concentric bilayers of organic surfactant and are mainly known for their potential applications in biotechnology. They can be used as microreactors for the spontaneous and controlled production of metal nanoparticles. This process does not require any thermal treatment and, hence, it is also attractive for material sciences such as heterogeneous catalysis. In this paper, silver-nanoparticle-based catalysts are prepared by transferring onion-grown silver nanoparticles onto inorganic supports. The resulting materials are active in the total oxidation of benzene, attesting that this novel bio-inspired concept is promising in inorganic catalysis.

  12. Bio-inspired vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980`s, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ``neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems

  13. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Robert C.; Jones, Samuel T.; Pollard, Anthony

    2017-04-04

    The present invention relates to a method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also disclosed are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  14. Bio-oil fractionation and condensation

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Robert C; Jones, Samuel T; Pollard, Anthony

    2013-07-02

    A method of fractionating bio-oil vapors which involves providing bio-oil vapors comprising bio-oil constituents is described. The bio-oil vapors are cooled in a first stage which comprises a condenser having passages for the bio-oil separated by a heat conducting wall from passages for a coolant. The coolant in the condenser of the first stage is maintained at a substantially constant temperature, set at a temperature in the range of 75 to 100.degree. C., to condense a first liquid fraction of liquefied bio-oil constituents in the condenser of the first stage. The first liquid fraction of liquified bio-oil constituents from the condenser in the first stage is collected. Also described are steps for subsequently recovering further liquid fractions of liquefied bio-oil constituents. Particular compositions of bio-oil condensation products are also described.

  15. Bio-Engineering High Performance Microbial Strains for MEOR

    SciTech Connect

    Xiangdong Fang; Qinghong Wang; Patrick Shuler

    2007-12-30

    The main objectives of this three-year research project are: (1) to employ the latest advances in genetics and bioengineering, especially Directed Protein Evolution technology, to improve the effectiveness of the microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) process. (2) to improve the surfactant activity and the thermal stability of bio-surfactant systems for MEOR; and (3) to develop improved laboratory methods and tools that screen quickly candidate bio-systems for EOR. Biosurfactants have been receiving increasing attention as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) agents because of their unique properties (i.e., mild production conditions, lower toxicity, and higher biodegradability) compared to their synthetic chemical counterparts. Rhamnolipid as a potent natural biosurfactant has a wide range of potential applications, including EOR and bioremediation. During the three-year of the project period, we have successfully cloned the genes involved in the rhamnolipid bio-synthesis. And by using the Transposon containing Rhamnosyltransferase gene rhlAB, we engineered the new mutant strains P. aeruginosa PEER02 and E. coli TnERAB so they can produce rhamnolipid biosurfactans. We were able to produce rhamnolipds in both P. aeroginosa PAO1-RhlA- strain and P. fluorescens ATCC15453 strain, with the increase of 55 to 175 fold in rhamnolipid production comparing with wild type bacteria strain. We have also completed the first round direct evolution studies using Error-prone PCR technique and have constructed the library of RhlAB-containing Transposon to express mutant gene in heterologous hosts. Several methods, such as colorimetric agar plate assay, colorimetric spectrophotometer assay, bioactive assay and oil spreading assay have been established to detect and screen rhamnolipid production. Our engineered P. aeruginosa PEER02 strain can produce rhamnolipids with different carbon sources as substrate. Interfacial tension analysis (IFT) showed that different rhamnolipids from different

  16. Surfactant-assisted bio-conjugated synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs).

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shokit; Al-Thabaiti, Shaeel Ahmed; Khan, Zaheer

    2014-09-01

    A simple one-spot synthetic route for the production of Ag-nanoparticles using aqueous extract of citrus lemon is being reported in presence of shape-directing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). To our knowledge, this is the first report where the biomolecules form a layer around a group of the Ag-nanoparticles in which the inner layer is bound to the AgNPs surface via the hydroxyl groups of citric acid. The appearance of a sharp surface plasmon resonance band in the UV-visible region might be due to the formation of spherical Ag-nanoparticles. Agglomeration number (N Ag), the average number of silver atoms per nanoparticle (N), molar concentrations of nanoparticle (C) in solution, extinction coefficient (ε) and increase in the Fermi energy (ΔE F) were calculated using Mie theory and discussed. Interestingly, reaction mixture became turbid at higher [CTAB] due to the uncontrolled growth of Ag-nanoparticles. The transmission electron microscopic images of nanoparticles, recorded at different magnifications.

  17. Surfactant effects on bio-based emulsions used as lubrication fluids

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The successful formulation of a lubricating emulsion requires carefully balancing the mixture of base oil, water and a plethora of additives. The factors that affect the performance of lubrication emulsions range from the macroscopic stability to the microscopic surface properties of the base oil. ...

  18. Effect of surfactant alkyl chain length on soil cadmium desorption using surfactant/ligand systems.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mari; Barrington, Suzelle F; Marshall, William D; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2005-02-01

    The effect of surfactant alkyl chain length on soil Cd desorption was studied using nonionic surfactants of polyethylene oxide (PEO) of PEO chain lengths of 7.5 (Triton X-114), 9.5 (Triton X-100), 30 (Triton X-305), or 40 units (Triton X-405) in combination with the I- ligand. Triplicate 1 g soil samples were equilibrated with 15 ml of surfactant-ligand mixture, at concentrations of 0.025, 0.50 or 0.10, and 0.0, 0.168 or 0.336 mol/l, respectively. After shaking the samples for 24 h, the supernatant fraction was analyzed for Cd content to determine the percent of Cd desorbed from the soil. After five successive washings, 53%, 40% and 25% of Cd had been desorbed by 0.025, 0.050 or 0.10 mol/l of Triton X-114, respectively, in the presence of 0.336 mol/l of I-, whereas with the same conditions, Triton X-100 desorbed 61%, 57% and 56% Cd and either Triton X-305 or Triton X-405 desorbed 51, 40 and 14 to 16% Cd. The most efficient Cd desorption was obtained using 0.025 mol/l Triton X-100 in admixture with 0.336 mol/l I-. Increased surfactant concentration was detrimental to Cd desorption consistent with a process that blocked ligand access to the soil particle surface. After 5 washings,the cumulative cadmium desorption decreased with increasing surfactant alkyl chain length, indicating that the metal-ligand complexes are preferably stabilized by the micelles' hydrophobic octyl phenyl (OP) group rather than by the hydrophilic PEO group. In the absence of ligand, the surfactants alone desorbed less than 1% Cd from the contaminated soil, suggesting that the ligand, rather than the surfactant, extracts the metal, to be subsequently stabilized within the surfactant micelles.

  19. SIMULATION OF SURFACTANT-ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is currently under active investigation as one of the most promising alternatives to conventional pump-and-treat remediation for aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase organic liquids. An existing three-dimensional finite-di...

  20. SURFACTANT FLUSH: HOW WELL DID IT WORK?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Oklahoma Corporation Commission through a contract with Surbec-Art, Inc. of Norman Oklahoma has remediated TPH contamination at a gasoline spill at Golden, Oklahoma. Residual gasoline was removed from the subsurface using a flush of surfactant, followed by in situ bioremedia...

  1. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-10-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the best hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (35-62% OOIP) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Core-scale simulation results match those of the experiments. Initial capillarity-driven imbibition gives way to a final gravity-driven process. As the matrix block height increases, surfactant alters wettability to a lesser degree, or permeability decreases, oil production rate decreases. The scale-up to field scale will be further studied in the next quarter.

  2. Nanoparticle interaction with model lung surfactant monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Saleem, Mohammed; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important functions of the lung surfactant monolayer is to form the first line of defence against inhaled aerosols such as nanoparticles (NPs), which remains largely unexplored. We report here, for the first time, the interaction of polyorganosiloxane NPs (AmorSil20: 22 nm in diameter) with lipid monolayers characteristic of alveolar surfactant. To enable a better understanding, the current knowledge about an established model surface film that mimics the surface properties of the lung is reviewed and major results originating from our group are summarized. The pure lipid components dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol have been used to study the biophysical behaviour of their monolayer films spread at the air–water interface in the presence of NPs. Film balance measurements combined with video-enhanced fluorescence microscopy have been used to investigate the formation of domain structures and the changes in the surface pattern induced by NPs. We are able to show that NPs are incorporated into lipid monolayers with a clear preference for defect structures at the fluid–crystalline interface leading to a considerable monolayer expansion and fluidization. NPs remain at the air–water interface probably by coating themselves with lipids in a self-assembly process, thereby exhibiting hydrophobic surface properties. We also show that the domain structure in lipid layers containing surfactant protein C, which is potentially responsible for the proper functioning of surfactant material, is considerably affected by NPs. PMID:19846443

  3. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have acquired field oil and core samples and field brine compositions from Marathon. We have conducted preliminary adsorption and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Receding contact angles increase with surfactant adsorption. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

  4. SIMULATION OF SURFACTANT-ENHANCED AQUIFER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR) is currently under active investigation as one of the most promising alternatives to conventional pump-and-treat remediation for aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase organic liquids. An existing three-dimensional finite-di...

  5. Photosensitive surfactants: micellization and interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Roxlau, Julian; Brezesinski, Gerald; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-28

    Recently, photosensitive surfactants have re-attracted considerable attention. It has been shown that their association with oppositely charged biologically important polyelectrolytes, such as DNA or microgels, can be efficiently manipulated simply by light exposure. In this article, we investigate the self-assembly of photosensitive surfactants as well as their interactions with DNA by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Critical micelle concentration (CMC), standard micellization enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy were determined in different conditions (ionic strengths and temperatures) for a series of cationic surfactants with an azobenzene group in their tail. It is shown, that aggregation forces of photosensitive units play an important role in the micellization giving the major contribution to the micellization enthalpy. The onset of the aggregation can be traced from shift of the absorption peak position in the UV-visible spectrum. Titration UV-visible spectroscopy is used as an alternative, simple, and sensitive approach to estimate CMC. The titration UV-visible spectroscopy was also employed to investigate interactions (CAC: critical aggregation concentration, precipitation, and colloidal stabilization) in the DNA-surfactant complex.

  6. SURFACTANT FLUSH: HOW WELL DID IT WORK?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Oklahoma Corporation Commission through a contract with Surbec-Art, Inc. of Norman Oklahoma has remediated TPH contamination at a gasoline spill at Golden, Oklahoma. Residual gasoline was removed from the subsurface using a flush of surfactant, followed by in situ bioremedia...

  7. Average molecular weight of surfactants in aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, M. T.; Brimblecombe, P.

    2007-09-01

    Surfactants in atmospheric aerosols determined as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) and ethyl violet active substances (EVAS). The MBAS and EVAS concentrations can be correlated with surface tension as determined by pendant drop analysis. The effect of surface tension was more clearly indicated in fine mode aerosol extracts. The concentration of MBAS and EVAS was determined before and after ultrafiltration analysis using AMICON centrifuge tubes that define a 5000 Da (5 K Da) nominal molecular weight fraction. Overall, MBAS and to a greater extent EVAS predominates in fraction with molecular weight below 5 K Da. In case of aerosols collected in Malaysia the higher molecular fractions tended to be a more predominant. The MBAS and EVAS are correlated with yellow to brown colours in aerosol extracts. Further experiments showed possible sources of surfactants (e.g. petrol soot, diesel soot) in atmospheric aerosols to yield material having molecular size below 5 K Da except for humic acid. The concentration of surfactants from these sources increased after ozone exposure and for humic acids it also general included smaller molecular weight surfactants.

  8. Photosensitive surfactants: Micellization and interaction with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Roxlau, Julian; Brezesinski, Gerald; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    Recently, photosensitive surfactants have re-attracted considerable attention. It has been shown that their association with oppositely charged biologically important polyelectrolytes, such as DNA or microgels, can be efficiently manipulated simply by light exposure. In this article, we investigate the self-assembly of photosensitive surfactants as well as their interactions with DNA by calorimetric and spectroscopic methods. Critical micelle concentration (CMC), standard micellization enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy were determined in different conditions (ionic strengths and temperatures) for a series of cationic surfactants with an azobenzene group in their tail. It is shown, that aggregation forces of photosensitive units play an important role in the micellization giving the major contribution to the micellization enthalpy. The onset of the aggregation can be traced from shift of the absorption peak position in the UV-visible spectrum. Titration UV-visible spectroscopy is used as an alternative, simple, and sensitive approach to estimate CMC. The titration UV-visible spectroscopy was also employed to investigate interactions (CAC: critical aggregation concentration, precipitation, and colloidal stabilization) in the DNA-surfactant complex.

  9. Surfactant loss: Effects of temperature, salinity, and wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Noll, L.A.; Gall, B.L.; Crocker, M.E.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-05-01

    Adsorption of sodium dodecylsulfate, Triton X-100, decyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactants onto silica gel and Berea sandstone mineral surfaces has been studied as a function of temperature, solution salt concentration, and mineral surface wettability. Adsorption studies using a flow calorimeter were conducted using pure surfactants and minerals. The studies were then extended to the adsorption of one type of commercial surfactant onto both consolidated and crushed Berea sandstone using column techniques. This has allowed the comparison of different methods to evaluate surfactant losses from flowing rather than static surfactant solutions. 20 refs., 15 figs., 37 tabs.

  10. Thermally stable surfactants and compositions and methods of use thereof

    DOEpatents

    Chaiko, David J.

    2008-09-02

    There are provided novel thermally stable surfactants for use with fillers in the preparation of polymer composites and nanocomposites. Typically, surfactants of the invention are urethanes, ureas or esters of thiocarbamic acid having a hydrocarbyl group of from 10 to 50 carbons and optionally including an ionizable or charged group (e.g., carboxyl group or quaternary amine). Thus, there are provided surfactants having Formula I: ##STR00001## wherein the variables are as defined herein. Further provided are methods of making thermally stable surfactants and compositions, including composites and nanocomposites, using fillers coated with the surfactants.

  11. Palm oil based surfactant products for petroleum industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Permadi, P.; Fitria, R.; Hambali, E.

    2017-05-01

    In petroleum production process, many problems causing reduced production are found. These include limited oil recovery, wax deposit, asphaltene deposit, sludge deposit, and emulsion problem. Petroleum-based surfactant has been used to overcome these problems. Therefore, innovation to solve these problems using surfactant containing natural materials deserves to be developed. Palm oil-based surfactant is one of the potential alternatives for this. Various types of derivative products of palm oil-based surfactant have been developed by SBRC IPB to be used in handling problems including surfactant flooding, well stimulation, asphaltene dissolver, well cleaning, and wax removal found in oil and gas industry.

  12. Surfactant-laden drops rising in a stratified ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchette, Francois; Martin, David

    2015-11-01

    We present results of a numerical study of the dynamics of rising drops in the presence of both surfactants and stratification. Our simulations model oil drops rising in the oceans, where naturally occurring or man-made surfactants are present. We study surfactant covered drops in uniform and density-stratified ambients, as well as clean drops entering a dissolved surfactant layer. We quantify the effects of entrainment for various Reynolds and Marangoni numbers. We also report a brief acceleration followed by a significant deceleration as a clean drop enters a surfactant layer, and describe how the adsorption rate affects those dynamics.

  13. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  14. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry quantitative method for the cellular analysis of varying structures of gemini surfactants designed as nanomaterial drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Donkuru, McDonald; Michel, Deborah; Awad, Hanan; Katselis, George; El-Aneed, Anas

    2016-05-13

    Diquaternary gemini surfactants have successfully been used to form lipid-based nanoparticles that are able to compact, protect, and deliver genetic materials into cells. However, what happens to the gemini surfactants after they have released their therapeutic cargo is unknown. Such knowledge is critical to assess the quality, safety, and efficacy of gemini surfactant nanoparticles. We have developed a simple and rapid liquid chromatography electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) method for the quantitative determination of various structures of gemini surfactants in cells. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was employed allowing for a short simple isocratic run of only 4min. The lower limit of detection (LLOD) was 3ng/mL. The method was valid to 18 structures of gemini surfactants belonging to two different structural families. A full method validation was performed for two lead compounds according to USFDA guidelines. The HILIC-MS/MS method was compatible with the physicochemical properties of gemini surfactants that bear a permanent positive charge with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic elements within their molecular structure. In addition, an effective liquid-liquid extraction method (98% recovery) was employed surpassing previously used extraction methods. The analysis of nanoparticle-treated cells showed an initial rise in the analyte intracellular concentration followed by a maximum and a somewhat more gradual decrease of the intracellular concentration. The observed intracellular depletion of the gemini surfactants may be attributable to their bio-transformation into metabolites and exocytosis from the host cells. Obtained cellular data showed a pattern that grants additional investigations, evaluating metabolite formation and assessing the subcellular distribution of tested compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Intratracheal atomized surfactant provides similar outcomes as bolus surfactant in preterm lambs with respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Milesi, Ilaria; Tingay, David G; Zannin, Emanuela; Bianco, Federico; Tagliabue, Paolo; Mosca, Fabio; Lavizzari, Anna; Ventura, Maria Luisa; Zonneveld, C Elroy; Perkins, Elizabeth J; Black, Don; Sourial, Magdy; Dellacá, Raffaele L

    2016-07-01

    Aerosolization of exogenous surfactant remains a challenge. This study is aimed to evaluate the efficacy of atomized poractant alfa (Curosurf) administered with a novel atomizer in preterm lambs with respiratory distress syndrome. Twenty anaesthetized lambs, 127 ± 1 d gestational age, (mean ± SD) were instrumented before birth and randomized to receive either (i) positive pressure ventilation without surfactant (Control group), (ii) 200 mg/kg of bolus instilled surfactant (Bolus group) at 10 min of life or (iii) 200 mg/kg of atomized surfactant (Atomizer group) over 60 min from 10 min of life. All lambs were ventilated for 180 min with a standardized protocol. Lung mechanics, regional lung compliance (electrical impedance tomography), and carotid blood flow (CBF) were measured with arterial blood gas analysis. Dynamic compliance and oxygenation responses were similar in the Bolus and Atomizer groups, and both better than Control by 180 min (all P < 0.05; two-way ANOVA). Both surfactant groups demonstrated more homogeneous regional lung compliance throughout the study period. There were no differences in CBFConclusion:In a preterm lamb model, atomized surfactant resulted in similar gas exchange and mechanics as bolus administration. This study suggests evaluation of supraglottic atomization with this system when noninvasive support is warranted.

  16. Organised surfactant assemblies in analytical atomic spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Fernandez de la Campa, Maria del Rosario; Gonzalez, Elisa Blanco; Fernandez-Sanchez, Maria Luisa

    1999-02-01

    The use of surfactant-based organised assemblies in analytical atomic spectroscopy is extensively and critically reviewed along three main lines: first, the ability of organised media to enhance detection of atomic spectroscopic methods by favourable manipulation of physical and chemical properties of the sample solution second, the extension of separation mechanisms by resorting to organised media and third a discussion of synergistic combinations of liquid chromatography separations and atomic detectors via the use of vesicular mobile phases. Changes in physical properties of sample solutions aspirated in atomic spectrometry by addition of surfactants can be advantageously used in at least four different ways: (i) to improve nebulisation efficiency; (ii) to enhance wettability of solid surfaces used for atomisation; (iii) to improve compatibility between aqueous and organic phases; and (iv) to achieve good dispersion of small particles in "slurry" techniques. Controversial results and statements published so far are critically discussed. The ability of surfactant-based organised assemblies, such as micelles and vesicles, to organise reactants at the molecular level has also been applied to enhance the characteristics of chemical generation of volalite species of metals and semi-metals (e.g., hydride or ethylide generation of As, Pb, Cd, Se, Sn, and cold vapour Hg generation) used in atomic methods. Enhancements in efficiency/transport of volatile species, increases in the reaction kinetics, stabilisation of some unstable species and changes in the selectivity of the reactions by surfactants are dealt with. Non-chromatographic cloud-point separations to design pre-concentration procedures with subsequent metal determination by atomic methods are addressed along with chromatographic separations of expanded scope by addition of surfactants to the conventional aqueous mobile phases of reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Finally, the synergistic

  17. Adsorption of surfactants and polymers at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Orlando Jose

    Surface tension and high-resolution laser light scattering experiments were used to investigate the adsorption of isomeric sugar-based surfactants at the air/liquid interface in terms of surfactant surface packing and rheology. Soluble monolayers of submicellar surfactant solutions exhibited a relatively viscous behavior. It was also proved that light scattering of high-frequency thermally-induced capillary waves can be utilized to study surfactant exchange between the surface and the bulk solution. Such analysis revealed the existence of a diffusional relaxation mechanism. A procedure based on XPS was developed for quantification, on an absolute basis, of polymer adsorption on mica and Langmuir-Blodgett cellulose films. The adsorption of cationic polyelectrolytes on negatively-charged solid surfaces was highly dependent on the polymer ionicity. It was found that the adsorption process is driven by electrostatic mechanisms. Charge overcompensation (or charge reversal) of mica occurred after adsorption of polyelectrolytes of ca. 50% charge density, or higher. It was demonstrated that low-charge-density polyelectrolytes adsorb on solid surfaces with an extended configuration dominated by loops and tails. In this case the extent of adsorption is limited by steric constraints. The conformation of the polyelectrolyte in the adsorbed layer is dramatically affected by the presence of salts or surfactants in aqueous solution. The phenomena which occur upon increasing the ionic strength are consistent with the screening of the electrostatic attraction between polyelectrolyte segments and solid surface. This situation leads to polyelectrolyte desorption accompanied by both an increase in the layer thickness and the range of the steric force. Adsorbed polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants readily associate at the solid/liquid interface. Such association induces polyelectrolyte desorption at a surfactant concentration which depends on the polyelectrolyte charge

  18. Effects of sleeve gastrectomy with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ming-Wei; Liu, Shao-Zhuang; Zhang, Guang-Yong; Zhang, Xiang; Hu, San-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore the effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) with jejuno-jejunal or jejuno-ileal loop on glycolipid metabolism in diabetic rats. METHODS Diabetic rats, which were induced by high-fat diet (HFD), nicotinamide and low-dose streptozotocin, underwent sham operations, SG, SG with jejuno-ileal loop (SG-JI) and SG with jejuno-jejunal loop (SG-JJ) followed by postoperative HFD. Then, at the time points of baseline and 2, 12 and 24 wk postoperatively, we determined and compared several variables, including the area under the curve for the results of oral glucose tolerance test (AUCOGTT), serum levels of triglyceride, cholesterol and ghrelin in fasting state, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), body weight, calorie intake, glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 and insulin secretions after glucose gavage at dose of 1 g/kg. RESULTS At 2 wk postoperatively, rats that underwent SG, SG-JJ and SG-JI, compared with sham-operated (SHAM) rats, demonstrated lower body weight, calorie intake and ghrelin (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), enhanced secretion of insulin and GLP-1 after glucose gavage (P < 0.05 vs SHAM), improved AUCOGTT, HOMA-IR, fasting serum triglyceride and cholesterol (AUCOGTT: 1616.9 ± 83.2, 837.4 ± 83.7, 874.9 ± 97.2 and 812.6 ± 81.9, P < 0.05 vs SHAM; HOMA-IR: 4.31 ± 0.54, 2.94 ± 0.22, 3.17 ± 0.37 and 3.41 ± 0.22, P < 0.0