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Sample records for glycopeptide antibiotic production

  1. Old and New Glycopeptide Antibiotics: Action and Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Binda, Elisa; Marinelli, Flavia; Marcone, Giorgia Letizia

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides are considered antibiotics of last resort for the treatment of life-threatening infections caused by relevant Gram-positive human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp. and Clostridium difficile. The emergence of glycopeptide-resistant clinical isolates, first among enterococci and then in staphylococci, has prompted research for second generation glycopeptides and a flurry of activity aimed at understanding resistance mechanisms and their evolution. Glycopeptides are glycosylated non-ribosomal peptides produced by a diverse group of soil actinomycetes. They target Gram-positive bacteria by binding to the acyl-d-alanyl-d-alanine (d-Ala-d-Ala) terminus of the growing peptidoglycan on the outer surface of the cytoplasmatic membrane. Glycopeptide-resistant organisms avoid such a fate by replacing the d-Ala-d-Ala terminus with d-alanyl-d-lactate (d-Ala-d-Lac) or d-alanyl-d-serine (d-Ala-d-Ser), thus markedly reducing antibiotic affinity for the cellular target. Resistance has manifested itself in enterococci and staphylococci largely through the expression of genes (named van) encoding proteins that reprogram cell wall biosynthesis and, thus, evade the action of the antibiotic. These resistance mechanisms were most likely co-opted from the glycopeptide producing actinomycetes, which use them to avoid suicide during antibiotic production, rather than being orchestrated by pathogen bacteria upon continued treatment. van-like gene clusters, similar to those described in enterococci, were in fact identified in many glycopeptide-producing actinomycetes, such as Actinoplanes teichomyceticus, which produces teicoplanin, and Streptomyces toyocaensis, which produces the A47934 glycopeptide. In this paper, we describe the natural and semi-synthetic glycopeptide antibiotics currently used as last resort drugs for Gram-positive infections and compare the van gene-based strategies of glycopeptide resistance among the pathogens and the producing

  2. Redesign of Glycopeptide Antibiotics – Back to the Future

    PubMed Central

    James, Robert C.; Pierce, Joshua G.; Okano, Akinori; Xie, Jian; Boger, Dale L.

    2012-01-01

    The glycopeptide antibiotics are the most important class of drugs used in the treatment of resistant bacterial infections including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). After more than 50 years of clinical use, the emergence of glycopeptide resistant Gram-positive pathogens such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) presents a serious global challenge to public health at a time few new antibiotics are being developed. This has led to renewed interest in the search for additional effective treatments including the development of new derivatives of the glycopeptide antibiotics. General approaches have been explored for modifying glycopeptide antibiotics, typically through the derivatization of the natural products themselves or more recently through chemical total synthesis. In this Perspective, we consider recent efforts to redesign glycopeptide antibiotics for the treatment of resistant microbial infections, including VRE and VRSA, and examine their future potential for providing an even more powerful class of antibiotics that are even less prone to bacterial resistance. PMID:22330049

  3. Opportunities for synthetic biology in antibiotics: expanding glycopeptide chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Maulik N; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-03-20

    Synthetic biology offers a new path for the exploitation and improvement of natural products to address the growing crisis in antibiotic resistance. All antibiotics in clinical use are facing eventual obsolesce as a result of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms, yet there are few new drug leads forthcoming from the pharmaceutical sector. Natural products of microbial origin have proven over the past 70 years to be the wellspring of antimicrobial drugs. Harnessing synthetic biology thinking and strategies can provide new molecules and expand chemical diversity of known antibiotic scaffolds to provide much needed new drug leads. The glycopeptide antibiotics offer paradigmatic scaffolds suitable for such an approach. We review these strategies here using the glycopeptides as an example and demonstrate how synthetic biology can expand antibiotic chemical diversity to help address the growing resistance crisis.

  4. F-O-G Ring Formation in Glycopeptide Antibiotic Biosynthesis is Catalysed by OxyE

    PubMed Central

    Peschke, Madeleine; Brieke, Clara; Cryle, Max J.

    2016-01-01

    The glycopeptide antibiotics are peptide-based natural products with impressive antibiotic function that derives from their unique three-dimensional structure. Biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotics centres of the combination of peptide synthesis, mediated by a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, and the crosslinking of aromatic side chains of the peptide, mediated by the action of a cascade of Cytochrome P450s. Here, we report the first example of in vitro activity of OxyE, which catalyses the F-O-G ring formation reaction in teicoplanin biosynthesis. OxyE was found to only act after an initial C-O-D crosslink is installed by OxyB and to require an interaction with the unique NRPS domain from glycopeptide antibiotic – the X-domain – in order to display catalytic activity. We could demonstrate that OxyE displays limited stereoselectivity for the peptide, which mirrors the results from OxyB-catalysed turnover and is in sharp contrast to OxyA. Furthermore, we show that activity of a three-enzyme cascade (OxyB/OxyA/OxyE) in generating tricyclic glycopeptide antibiotic peptides depends upon the order of addition of the OxyA and OxyE enzymes to the reaction. This work demonstrates that complex enzymatic cascades from glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis can be reconstituted in vitro and provides new insights into the biosynthesis of these important antibiotics. PMID:27752135

  5. Novel mechanism of resistance to glycopeptide antibiotics in Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    Cremniter, Julie; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Josseaume, Nathalie; Quincampoix, Jean-Charles; Dubost, Lionel; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Marie, Arul; Gutmann, Laurent; Rice, Louis B.; Arthur, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Glycopeptides and β-lactams are the major antibiotics available for the treatment of infections due to Gram-positive bacteria. Emergence of cross-resistance to these drugs by a single mechanism has been considered as unlikely since they inhibit peptidoglycan polymerization by different mechanisms. The glycopeptides bind to the peptidyl-D-Ala4-D-Ala5 extremity of peptidoglycan precursors and block by steric hindrance the essential glycosyltransferase and D,D-transpeptidase activities of the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). The β-lactams are structural analogues of D-Ala4-D-Ala5 and act as suicide substrates of the D,D-transpeptidase module of the PBPs. Here we show that bypass of the PBPs by the recently described β-lactam-insensitive L,D-transpeptidase from Enterococcus faecium (Ldtfm) can lead to high-level resistance to glycopeptides and β-lactams. Cross-resistance was selected by glycopeptides alone or serially by β-lactams and glycopeptides. In the corresponding mutants, UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide was extensively converted to UDP-MurNAc-tetrapeptide following hydrolysis of D-Ala5, thereby providing the substrate of Ldtfm. Complete elimination of D-Ala5, a residue essential for glycopeptide binding, was possible since Ldtfm uses the energy of the L-Lys3-D-Ala4 peptide bond for cross-link formation in contrast to PBPs which use the energy of the D-Ala4-D-Ala5 bond. This novel mechanism of glycopeptide resistance was unrelated to the previously identified replacement of D-Ala5 by D-Ser or D-lactate. PMID:16943188

  6. Glycopeptide antibiotics: evolving resistance, pharmacology and adverse event profile.

    PubMed

    Henson, Karl Evans R; Levine, Miriam T; Wong, Eunice Ann H; Levine, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The first glycopeptide antibiotic was vancomycin, isolated from the soil in the 1950s; since then, the class has expanded to include teicoplanin and the new semisynthetic glycopeptides dalbavancin, oritavancin and telavancin. They are bactericidal, active against most Gram-positive organisms, and in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibit cell wall synthesis. Resistance to vancomycin has emerged, especially among enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus through a variety of mechanisms. This emerging resistance to vancomycin makes proper dosing and monitoring of the area under the curve/MIC critically important. The chief adverse effect of vancomycin is nephrotoxicity, which is also intricately related to its dose. The efficacy of the semisynthetic glycopeptides has been demonstrated in skin and soft-tissue infections, but remains to be seen in serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  7. MM 55266 and MM 55268, glycopeptide antibiotics produced by a new strain of Amycolatopsis. Isolation, purification and structure determination.

    PubMed

    Box, S J; Coates, N J; Davis, C J; Gilpin, M L; Houge-Frydrych, C S; Milner, P H

    1991-08-01

    Two novel glycopeptide antibiotics MM 55266 and MM 55268 containing fatty acid acyl functions, and of molecular formula C86H89N8O35Cl5 and C87H91N8O35Cl5, respectively, have been isolated and identified from a complex produced by Amycolatopsis sp. NCIB 40089. Fermentation conditions for their production, and methods for their isolation are described. Structures have been deduced by use of COSY and NOE NMR techniques and supported by chemical degradation studies. Both glycopeptides possessed good antibacterial activity against Gram-positive organisms. PMID:1917694

  8. Relationship between Glycopeptide Production and Resistance in the Actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727

    PubMed Central

    Binda, Elisa; Carrano, Lucia; Bibb, Mervyn; Marinelli, Flavia

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides and β-lactams inhibit bacterial peptidoglycan synthesis in Gram-positive bacteria; resistance to these antibiotics is studied intensively in enterococci and staphylococci because of their relevance to infectious disease. Much less is known about antibiotic resistance in glycopeptide-producing actinomycetes that are likely to represent the evolutionary source of resistance determinants found in bacterial pathogens. Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727, the producer of A40926 (the precursor for the semisynthetic dalbavancin), does not harbor the canonical vanHAX genes. Consequently, we investigated the role of the β-lactam-sensitive d,d-peptidase/d,d-carboxypeptidase encoded by vanYn, the only van-like gene found in the A40926 biosynthetic gene cluster, in conferring immunity to the antibiotic in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727. Taking advantage of the tools developed recently to genetically manipulate this uncommon actinomycete, we varied vanYn gene dosage and expressed vanHatAatXat from the teicoplanin producer Actinoplanes teichomyceticus in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727. Knocking out vanYn, complementing a vanYn mutant, or duplicating vanYn had no effect on growth but influenced antibiotic resistance and, in the cases of complementation and duplication, antibiotic production. Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727 was found to be resistant to penicillins, but its glycopeptide resistance was diminished in the presence of penicillin G, which inhibits VanYn activity. The heterologous expression of vanHatAatXat increased A40926 resistance in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727 but did not increase antibiotic production, indicating that the level of antibiotic production is not directly determined by the level of resistance. The vanYn-based self-resistance in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727 resembles the glycopeptide resistance mechanism described recently in mutants of Enterococcus faecium selected in vitro for high-level resistance to glycopeptides and penicillins. PMID:24957828

  9. Relationship between glycopeptide production and resistance in the actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727.

    PubMed

    Marcone, Giorgia Letizia; Binda, Elisa; Carrano, Lucia; Bibb, Mervyn; Marinelli, Flavia

    2014-09-01

    Glycopeptides and β-lactams inhibit bacterial peptidoglycan synthesis in Gram-positive bacteria; resistance to these antibiotics is studied intensively in enterococci and staphylococci because of their relevance to infectious disease. Much less is known about antibiotic resistance in glycopeptide-producing actinomycetes that are likely to represent the evolutionary source of resistance determinants found in bacterial pathogens. Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727, the producer of A40926 (the precursor for the semisynthetic dalbavancin), does not harbor the canonical vanHAX genes. Consequently, we investigated the role of the β-lactam-sensitive D,D-peptidase/D,D-carboxypeptidase encoded by vanYn, the only van-like gene found in the A40926 biosynthetic gene cluster, in conferring immunity to the antibiotic in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727. Taking advantage of the tools developed recently to genetically manipulate this uncommon actinomycete, we varied vanYn gene dosage and expressed vanHatAatXat from the teicoplanin producer Actinoplanes teichomyceticus in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727. Knocking out vanYn, complementing a vanYn mutant, or duplicating vanYn had no effect on growth but influenced antibiotic resistance and, in the cases of complementation and duplication, antibiotic production. Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727 was found to be resistant to penicillins, but its glycopeptide resistance was diminished in the presence of penicillin G, which inhibits VanYn activity. The heterologous expression of vanHatAatXat increased A40926 resistance in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727 but did not increase antibiotic production, indicating that the level of antibiotic production is not directly determined by the level of resistance. The vanYn-based self-resistance in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727 resembles the glycopeptide resistance mechanism described recently in mutants of Enterococcus faecium selected in vitro for high-level resistance to glycopeptides and penicillins.

  10. Crystal Structure of StaL, A Glycopeptide Antibiotic Sulfotransferase from Streptomyces Toyocaensis

    SciTech Connect

    Shi,R.; Lamb, S.; Bhat, S.; Sulea, T.; Wright, G.; Matte, A.; Cygler, M.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, antimicrobial resistance has emerged as a major public health crisis. Glycopeptide antibiotics such as vanco-mycin and teicoplanin are clinically important for the treatment of Gram-positive bacterial infections. StaL is a 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate-dependent sulfotransferase capable of sulfating the cross-linked heptapeptide substrate both in vivo and in vitro, yielding the product A47934 [GenBank], unique teicoplanin-class glycopeptide antibiotic. The sulfonation reaction catalyzed by StaL constitutes the final step in A47934 [GenBank] biosynthesis. Here we report the crystal structure of StaL and its complex with the cofactor product 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate. This is only the second prokaryotic sulfotransferase to be structurally characterized. StaL belongs to the large sulfotransferase family and shows higher similarity to cytosolic sulfotransferases (ST) than to the bacterial ST (Stf0). StaL has a novel dimerization motif, different from any other STs that have been structurally characterized. We have also applied molecular modeling to investigate the binding mode of the unique substrate, desulfo-A47934. Based on the structural analysis and modeling results, a series of residues was mutated and kinetically characterized. In addition to the conserved residues (Lys{sup 12}, His{sup 67}, and Ser{sup 98}), molecular modeling, fluorescence quenching experiments, and mutagenesis studies identified several other residues essential for substrate binding and/or activity, including Trp{sup 34}, His{sup 43}, Phe{sup 77}, Trp{sup 132}, and Glu{sup 205}.

  11. The Glycopeptide Antitumor Antibiotic Zorbamycin from Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC 21892: Strain Improvement and Structure Elucidation⊥

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyan; Yun, Bong-Sik; George, Nicholas P.; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Galm, Ute; Oh, Tae-Jin; Coughlin, Jane M.; Zhang, Guodong; Tao, Meifeng; Shen, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Zorbamycin (1, ZBM) is a glycopeptide antitumor antibiotic first reported in 1971. The partial structures of 1 were speculated on the basis of its acid hydrolysis products, but the structure of the intact molecule has never been established. The low titer of 1 from the wild-type strains, combined with its acid-instability, has so far hampered its isolation. By random mutagensis of Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, a wild-type producer of 1, with UV irradiation, two high-producing strains of 1, S. flavoviridis SB9000 and SB9001, were isolated. Under the optimized fermentation conditions, these two strains produced about 10 mg/L of 1, which was about 10-fold higher than the wild-type ATCC21892 strain, as estimated by HPLC analysis. Finally, 1 was isolated both as a 1-Cu complex and Cu-free molecule, and the intact structure of 1 was established on the basis of a combination of mass spectrometry and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopic analyses. PMID:17311457

  12. Use of a Hepta-tyr glycopeptide antibiotic as chiral selector in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fanali, S; Aturki, Z; Desiderio, C; Bossi, A; Righetti, P G

    1998-07-01

    A new glycopeptide antibiotic, MDL 63,246 (Hepta-tyr), of the teicoplanin family, has been evaluated in capillary electrophoresis for the resolution of chiral compounds of pharmaceutical and environmental interest. Electrophoretic separations were carried out in a polyacrylamide-coated capillary using the partial filling-counter current mode with aqueous-organic buffers in the pH range 4-6. Experimental parameters affecting resolution, such as antibiotic concentration, buffer pH, organic modifier type and capillary temperature, were studied. The Hepta-tyr antibiotic exhibited a high enantiorecognition capability towards the studied compounds at very low concentrations (1-2 mg/mL). The optimum experimental conditions were achieved by using a buffer at pH 5 containing acetonitrile at 25 degrees C.

  13. Glycopeptide Antibiotic To Overcome the Intrinsic Resistance of Gram-Negative Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Manjunath, Goutham B; Sarkar, Paramita; Akkapeddi, Padma; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Shome, Bibek R; Ravikumar, Raju; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-02-12

    The emergence of drug resistance along with a declining pipeline of clinically useful antibiotics has made it vital to develop more effective antimicrobial therapeutics, particularly against difficult-to-treat Gram-negative pathogens (GNPs). Many antibacterial agents, including glycopeptide antibiotics such as vancomycin, are inherently inactive toward GNPs because of their inability to cross the outer membrane of these pathogens. Here, we demonstrate, for the first time, lipophilic cationic (permanent positive charge) vancomycin analogues were able to permeabilize the outer membrane of GNPs and overcome the inherent resistance of GNPs toward glycopeptides. Unlike vancomycin, these analogues were shown to have a high activity against a variety of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii. In the murine model of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii infection, the optimized compound showed potent activity with no observed toxicity. The notable activity of these compounds is attributed to the incorporation of new membrane disruption mechanisms (cytoplasmic membrane depolarization along with outer and inner (cytoplasmic) membrane permeabilization) into vancomycin. Therefore, our results indicate the potential of the present vancomycin analogues to be used against drug-resistant GNPs, thus strengthening the antibiotic arsenal for combating Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:27624964

  14. Structure and Function of the Glycopeptide N-methyltransferase MtfA, a Tool for the Biosynthesis of Modified Glycopeptide Antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Rong; Lamb, Sherry S.; Zakeri, Bijan; Proteau, Ariane; Cui, Qizhi; Sulea, Traian; Matte, Allan; Wright, Gerard D.; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2009-06-01

    There is a considerable interest in the modification of existing antibiotics to generate new antimicrobials. Glycopeptide antibiotics (GPAs) are effective against serious Gram-positive bacterial pathogens including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, resistance to these antibiotics is becoming a serious problem requiring new strategies. We show that the Amycolatopsis orientalis (S)-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferase MtfA, from the vancomycin-class GPA chloroeremomycin biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes in vivo and in vitro methyl transfer to generate methylated GPA derivatives of the teicoplanin class. The crystal structure of MtfA complexed with (S)-adenosyl-L-methionine, (S)-adenosylhomocysteine, or sinefungin inhibitor, coupled with mutagenesis, identified His228 as a likely general base required for methyl transfer to the N terminus of the glycopeptide. Computational docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to model binding of demethyl-vancomycin aglycone to MtfA. These results demonstrate its utility as a tool for engineering methylated analogs of GPAs.

  15. Antimicrobial activity of MDL 63,246, a new semisynthetic glycopeptide antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, B P; Candiani, G; Arain, T M; Romanò, G; Ciciliato, I; Berti, M; Abbondi, M; Scotti, R; Mainini, M; Ripamonti, F

    1995-07-01

    MDL 63,246 is a semisynthetic derivative of the naturally occurring glycopeptide antibiotic MDL 62,476 (A40926). It was more active in vitro against Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci than MDL 62,476, teicoplanin, and vancomycin and was more active than mideplanin (MDL 62,873) against some isolates. MDL 63,246 had excellent activity against streptococci and teicoplanin-susceptible enterococci, and it also had in vitro activity against some VanA enterococcal isolates. It was more active than teicoplanin and vancomycin against acute staphylococcal, streptococcal, and enterococcal septicemia in immunocompetent and neutropenic mice. It was highly efficacious in reducing the bacterial load in the hearts of rats in staphylococcal endocarditis experiments and the bacterial load of Staphylococcus epidermis in a high infection model in neutropenic mice. The excellent in vivo activity of MDL 63,246 appears to correlate both with its in vitro antibacterial activity and with its long half-life in rodents. PMID:7492108

  16. In vivo antibacterial activity and pharmacological properties of the membrane-active glycopeptide antibiotic YV11455.

    PubMed

    Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Konai, Mohini M; Manjunath, Goutham B; Prakash, Relekar G; Mani, Bhuvana; Paramanandham, Krishnamoorthy; Ranjan, Shome B; Ravikumar, Raju; Chakraborty, Subhankari P; Roy, Somenath; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-06-01

    The membrane-active glycopeptide antibiotic YV11455 is a lipophilic cationic vancomycin analogue that demonstrates rapid and concentration-dependent killing of clinically relevant multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-positive bacteria in vitro. YV11455 was 2-fold and 54-270-fold more effective than vancomycin against clinical isolates of vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant bacteria, respectively. In this study, the in vivo efficacy, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and acute toxicology of YV11455 were investigated. In vivo activity and pharmacodynamics were determined in the neutropenic mouse thigh infection model against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). YV11455 produced dose-dependent reductions in MRSA titres in thigh muscle. When administered intravenously, the 50% effective dose (ED(50)) for YV11455 against MRSA was found to be 3.3 mg/kg body weight, and titres were reduced by up to ca. 3log(10)CFU/g from pre-treatment values at a dosage of 12 mg/kg with single treatment. Single-dose pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated linear kinetics and a prolonged half-life, with an increase in drug exposure (area under the concentration-time curve) compared with vancomycin. The peak plasma concentration following an intravenous dose of 12 mg/kg was 543.5 μg/mL. Acute toxicology studies revealed that YV11455 did not cause any significant alterations in biochemical parameters or histological pictures related to major organs such as the liver and kidney at its pharmacodynamic endpoint (ED(3-log kill)). These findings collectively suggest that YV11455 could be used clinically for the treatment of infections caused by MDR Gram-positive bacteria.

  17. Anti-biofilm activity and synergism of novel thiazole compounds with glycopeptide antibiotics against multidrug-resistant staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Haroon; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a leading cause of death among all fatalities caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. With the rise of increasing resistance to current antibiotics, new antimicrobials and treatment strategies are urgently needed. Thiazole compounds have been shown to possess potent antimicrobial activity. A lead thiazole 1 and a potent derivative 2 were synthesized and their activity in combination with glycopeptide antibiotics was determined against an array of MRSA and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) clinical isolates. In addition, the anti-biofilm activity of the novel thiazoles was investigated against S. epidermidis. Compound 2 behaved synergistically with vancomycin against MRSA and was able to resensitize VRSA to vancomycin, reducing its MIC by 512-fold in two strains. In addition, both thiazole compounds were superior to vancomycin in significantly reducing S. epidermidis biofilm mass. Collectively, the results obtained demonstrate that compounds 1 and 2 possess potent antimicrobial activity alone or in combination with vancomycin against multidrug-resistant staphylococci and show potential for use in disrupting staphylococcal biofilm. PMID:25315757

  18. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  19. In Vitro Activity of TD-1792, a Multivalent Glycopeptide-Cephalosporin Antibiotic, against 377 Strains of Anaerobic Bacteria and 34 Strains of Corynebacterium Species

    PubMed Central

    Citron, Diane M.; Warren, Yumi A.; Goldstein, Ellie J. C.

    2012-01-01

    TD-1792 is a multivalent glycopeptide-cephalosporin heterodimer antibiotic with potent activity against Gram-positive bacteria. We tested TD-1792 against 377 anaerobes and 34 strains of Corynebacterium species. Against nearly all Gram-positive strains, TD-1792 had an MIC90 of 0.25 μg/ml and was typically 3 to 7 dilutions more active than vancomycin and daptomycin. PMID:22290981

  20. Antibiotic use in livestock production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic usage is a useful and commonly implemented practice in livestock and production agriculture that has progressively gained attention in recent years from consumers of animal products due to concerns about human and environmental health. Sub-therapeutic usage of antibiotics has led to a con...

  1. Characterization of Structural Variations in the Peptidoglycan of Vancomycin-Susceptible Enterococcus faecium: Understanding Glycopeptide-Antibiotic Binding Sites using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Patti, Gary J.; Chen, Jiawei; Schaefer, Jacob; Gross, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium, an opportunistic pathogen that causes a significant number of hospital-acquired infections each year, presents a serious clinical challenge because an increasing number of infections are resistant to the so-called antibiotic of last resort, vancomycin. Vancomycin and other new glycopeptide derivatives target the bacterial cell wall, thereby perturbing its biosynthesis. To help determine the modes of action of glycopeptide antibiotics, we have developed a bottom-up mass spectrometry approach complemented by solid-state NMR to elucidate important structural characteristics of vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium peptidoglycan. Using accurate-mass measurements and integrating ion-current chromatographic peaks of digested peptidoglycan, we identified individual muropeptide species and approximated the relative amount of each. Even though the organism investigated is susceptible to vancomycin, only 3% of the digested peptidoglycan has the well-known D-Ala-D-Ala vancomycin-binding site. The data are consistent with a previously proposed template model of cell-wall biosynthesis where D-Ala-D-Ala stems that are not cross-linked are cleaved in mature peptidoglycan. Additionally, our mass-spectrometry approach allowed differentiation and quantification of muropeptide species seen as unresolved chromatographic peaks. Our method provides an estimate of the extent of muropeptides containing O-acetylation, amidation and hydroxylation, and the number of species forming cyclic imides. The varieties of muropeptides on which the modifications are detected suggest that significant processing occurs in mature peptidoglycan where several enzymes are active in editing cell-wall structure. PMID:18692403

  2. Current perspectives on glycopeptide resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Woodford, N; Johnson, A P; Morrison, D; Speller, D C

    1995-01-01

    In the last 5 years, clinical isolates of gram-positive bacteria with intrinsic or acquired resistance to glycopeptide antibiotics have been encountered increasingly. In many of these isolates, resistance arises from an alteration of the antibiotic target site, with the terminal D-alanyl-D-alanine moiety of peptidoglycan precursors being replaced by groups that do not bind glycopeptides. Although the criteria for defining resistance have been revised frequently, the reliable detection of low-level glycopeptide resistance remains problematic and is influenced by the method chosen. Glycopeptide-resistant enterococci have emerged as a particular problem in hospitals, where in addition to sporadic cases, clusters of infections with evidence of interpatient spread have occurred. Studies using molecular typing methods have implicated colonization of patients, staff carriage, and environmental contamination in the dissemination of these bacteria. Choice of antimicrobial therapy for infections caused by glycopeptide-resistant bacteria may be complicated by resistance to other antibiotics. Severe therapeutic difficulties are being encountered among patients infected with enterococci, with some infections being untreatable with currently available antibiotics. PMID:8665471

  3. Expedient antibiotics production: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Byers, C.H.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-05-01

    The literature on the manufacture, separation and purification, and clinical uses of antibiotics was reviewed, and a bibliography of the pertinent material was completed. Five antimicrobial drugs, penicillin V and G, (and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid), Cephalexin (a cephalosporin), tetracycline and oxytetracycline, Bacitracin (topical), and sulfonamide (chemically produced) were identified for emergency production. Plants that manufacture antibiotics in the continental United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico have been identified along with potential alternate sites such as those where SCP, enzyme, and fermentation ethanol are produced. Detailed process flow sheets and process descriptions have been derived from the literature and documented. This investigation revealed that a typical antibiotic-manufacturing facility is composed of two main sections: (1) a highly specialized, but generic, fermentation unit and (2) a multistep, complex separation and purification unit which is specific to a particular antibiotic product. The fermentation section requires specialized equipment for operation in a sterile environment which is not usually available in other industries. The emergency production of antibiotics under austere conditions will be feasible only if a substantial reduction in the complexity and degree of separation and purity normally required can be realized. Detailed instructions were developed to assist state and federal officials who would be directing the resumption of antibiotic production after a nuclear attack. 182 refs., 54 figs., 26 tabs.

  4. Increased production of penicillin-binding protein 2, increased detection of other penicillin-binding proteins, and decreased coagulase activity associated with glycopeptide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, B; Boyle-Vavra, S; deJonge, B L; Daum, R S

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of glycopeptide resistance in the genus Staphylococcus is unknown. Since these antimicrobial compounds act by binding the peptidoglycan precursor terminus, the target of transglycosylase and transpeptidase enzymes, it was hypothesized that resistance might be mediated in Staphylococcus aureus by increased production or activity of these enzymes, commonly called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). To evaluate this possibility, glycopeptide-resistant mutants were prepared by passage of several clinical isolates of this species in nutrient broth containing successively increasing concentrations of the glycopeptide vancomycin or teicoplanin. Decreased coagulase activity and increased resistance to lysostaphin were uniformly present in the vancomycin-resistant mutants. Peptidoglycan cross-linking increased in one resistant isolate and decreased in two resistant isolates. The amounts of radioactive penicillin that bound to each PBP in susceptible and resistant strains were compared; PBP2 production was also evaluated by Western blotting. Increased penicillin labeling and production of PBP2 were found in all resistant derivatives selected by either vancomycin or teicoplanin. Moreover, the increase in PBP2 penicillin labeling occurred early in a series of vancomycin-selected derivatives and was strongly correlated (r > 0.9) with the increase in vancomycin and teicoplanin MIC. An increase in penicillin labeling also occurred, variably, in PBP1, PBP3, and/or PBP4. These data demonstrate a strong correlation between resistance to glycopeptides and increased PBP activity and/or production in S. aureus. Such an increase could allow PBPs to better compete with glycopeptides for the peptidoglycan precursor. PMID:9257762

  5. Antibiotics: natural products essential to human health.

    PubMed

    Demain, Arnold L

    2009-11-01

    For more than 50 years, natural products have served us well in combating infectious bacteria and fungi. Microbial and plant secondary metabolites helped to double our life span during the 20th century, reduced pain and suffering, and revolutionized medicine. Most antibiotics are either (i) natural products of microorganisms, (ii) semi-synthetically produced from natural products, or (iii) chemically synthesized based on the structure of the natural products. Production of antibiotics began with penicillin in the late 1940s and proceeded with great success until the 1970-1980s when it became harder and harder to discover new and useful products. Furthermore, resistance development in pathogens became a major problem, which is still with us today. In addition, new pathogens are continually emerging and there are still bacteria that are not eliminated by any antibiotic, e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition to these problems, many of the major pharmaceutical companies have abandoned the antibiotic field, leaving much of the discovery efforts to small companies, new companies, and the biotechnology industries. Despite these problems, development of new antibiotics has continued, albeit at a much lower pace than in the last century. We have seen the (i) appearance of newly discovered antibiotics (e.g., candins), (ii) development of old but unutilized antibiotics (e.g., daptomycin), (iii) production of new semi-synthetic versions of old antibiotics (e.g., glycylcyclines, streptogrammins), as well as the (iv) very useful application of old but underutilized antibiotics (e.g., teicoplanin).

  6. Glycopeptide dendrimers as Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Bergmann, Myriam; Darbre, Tamis

    2013-06-01

    Synthetic glycopeptide dendrimers composed of a branched oligopeptide tree structure appended with glycosidic groups at its multiple N-termini were investigated for binding to the Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectins LecB and LecA. These lectins are partly responsible for the formation of antibiotic resistant biofilms in the human pathogenic bacterium P. aeruginosa, which causes lethal airway infections in immune-compromised and cystic fibrosis patients. Glycopeptide dendrimers with high affinity to the lectins were identified by screening of combinatorial libraries. Several of these dendrimers, in particular the LecB specific glycopeptide dendrimers FD2 and D-FD2 and the LecA specific glycopeptide dendrimers GalAG2 and GalBG2, also efficiently block P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and induce biofilm dispersal in vitro. Structure-activity relationship and structural studies are reviewed, in particular the observation that multivalency is essential to the anti-biofilm effect in these dendrimers.

  7. In Vivo Characterization of the Activation and Interaction of the VanR-VanS Two-Component Regulatory System Controlling Glycopeptide Antibiotic Resistance in Two Related Streptomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    Novotna, Gabriela Balikova; Kwun, Min Jung

    2015-01-01

    The VanR-VanS two-component system is responsible for inducing resistance to glycopeptide antibiotics in various bacteria. We have performed a comparative study of the VanR-VanS systems from two streptomyces strains, Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces toyocaensis, to characterize how the two proteins cooperate to signal the presence of antibiotics and to define the functional nature of each protein in each strain background. The results indicate that the glycopeptide antibiotic inducer specificity is determined solely by the differences between the amino acid sequences of the VanR-VanS two-component systems present in each strain rather than by any inherent differences in general cell properties, including cell wall structure and biosynthesis. VanR of S. coelicolor (VanRsc) functioned with either sensor kinase partner, while VanR of S. toyocaensis (VanRst) functioned only with its cognate partner, S. toyocaensis VanS (VanSst). In contrast to VanRsc, which is known to be capable of phosphorylation by acetylphosphate, VanRst could not be activated in vivo independently of a VanS sensor kinase. A series of amino acid sequence modifications changing residues in the N-terminal receiver (REC) domain of VanRst to the corresponding residues present in VanRsc failed to create a protein capable of being activated by VanS of S. coelicolor (VanSsc), which suggests that interaction of the response regulator with its cognate sensor kinase may require a region more extended than the REC domain. A T69S amino acid substitution in the REC domain of VanRst produced a strain exhibiting weak constitutive resistance, indicating that this particular amino acid may play a key role for VanS-independent phosphorylation in the response regulator protein. PMID:26711760

  8. Glycopeptide Antibiotics Potently Inhibit Cathepsin L in the Late Endosome/Lysosome and Block the Entry of Ebola Virus, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Pan, Ting; Zhang, Junsong; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Xue; Bai, Chuan; Huang, Feng; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Chao; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-04-22

    Ebola virus infection can cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality in humans. The outbreaks of Ebola viruses in 2014 represented the most serious Ebola epidemics in history and greatly threatened public health worldwide. The development of additional effective anti-Ebola therapeutic agents is therefore quite urgent. In this study, via high throughput screening of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, we identified that teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic, potently prevents the entry of Ebola envelope pseudotyped viruses into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, teicoplanin also has an inhibitory effect on transcription- and replication-competent virus-like particles, with an IC50 as low as 330 nm Comparative analysis further demonstrated that teicoplanin is able to block the entry of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) envelope pseudotyped viruses as well. Teicoplanin derivatives such as dalbavancin, oritavancin, and telavancin can also inhibit the entry of Ebola, MERS, and SARS viruses. Mechanistic studies showed that teicoplanin blocks Ebola virus entry by specifically inhibiting the activity of cathepsin L, opening a novel avenue for the development of additional glycopeptides as potential inhibitors of cathepsin L-dependent viruses. Notably, given that teicoplanin has routinely been used in the clinic with low toxicity, our work provides a promising prospect for the prophylaxis and treatment of Ebola, MERS, and SARS virus infection.

  9. Biologically Relevant Glycopeptides: Synthesis and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Clay S.; Payne, Richard J.; Koeller, Kathryn M.; Wong, Chi-Huey

    Over the past two decades interest in glycopeptides and glycoproteins has intensified, due in part to the development of new and efficient methods for the synthesis of these compounds. This includes a number of chemical and enzymatic techniques for incorporating glycosylation onto the peptide backbone as well as the introduction of powerful peptide ligation methods for the construction of glycoproteins. This review discusses these methods with a special emphasis on biologically relevant glycopeptides and glycoproteins. This includes the development of a number of antigens which hold promise as potential vaccines for HIV, cancer, or a host of other clinically important diseases. In addition the development of new antibiotics aimed at overcoming the problem of resistance will be discussed. Finally, chemical and enzymatic methods for the construction of glycopeptide mimetics will be described.

  10. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jessica A.; Charkoudian, Louise K.; Docherty, Kathryn M.; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W.; Green, Jessica L.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics. PMID:26102275

  11. Beta-glucan-depleted, glycopeptide-rich extracts from Brewer's and Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) lower interferon-gamma production by stimulated human blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roderick; Dias, Daniel A; Jayasinghe, Nirupama; Roessner, Ute; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-04-15

    Regulation of the human immune system requires controlled pro- and anti-inflammatory responses for host defence against infection and disease states. Yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), as used in brewing and baking, are mostly known for ability to stimulate the human immune-system predominantly reflecting the pro-inflammatory cell wall β-glucans. However, in this study, using food-compatible processing methods, glycopeptide-enriched and β-glucan-depleted products were each prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeasts, which suppressed production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in human whole blood cell assay, signifying that anti-inflammatory factors are also present in yeast. Anti-inflammatory bioactivities of products prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeast were compared with the commercial yeast product, Epicor®. While unfractionated Epicor was inactive, the C18 resin-binding fractions of Brewer's and Baker's yeast products and Epicor dose-dependently lowered IFN-γ, demonstrating that Epicor also contained both pro-inflammatory (β-glucans) and anti-inflammatory components. Anti-inflammatory activity was attributed to C18 resin-binding species glyco-peptides in Epicor and experimental yeast products. This study demonstrated that pro- and anti-inflammatory factors could be resolved and enriched in yeasts by suitable processing, with potential to improve specific activities.

  12. Beta-glucan-depleted, glycopeptide-rich extracts from Brewer's and Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) lower interferon-gamma production by stimulated human blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roderick; Dias, Daniel A; Jayasinghe, Nirupama; Roessner, Ute; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-04-15

    Regulation of the human immune system requires controlled pro- and anti-inflammatory responses for host defence against infection and disease states. Yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), as used in brewing and baking, are mostly known for ability to stimulate the human immune-system predominantly reflecting the pro-inflammatory cell wall β-glucans. However, in this study, using food-compatible processing methods, glycopeptide-enriched and β-glucan-depleted products were each prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeasts, which suppressed production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in human whole blood cell assay, signifying that anti-inflammatory factors are also present in yeast. Anti-inflammatory bioactivities of products prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeast were compared with the commercial yeast product, Epicor®. While unfractionated Epicor was inactive, the C18 resin-binding fractions of Brewer's and Baker's yeast products and Epicor dose-dependently lowered IFN-γ, demonstrating that Epicor also contained both pro-inflammatory (β-glucans) and anti-inflammatory components. Anti-inflammatory activity was attributed to C18 resin-binding species glyco-peptides in Epicor and experimental yeast products. This study demonstrated that pro- and anti-inflammatory factors could be resolved and enriched in yeasts by suitable processing, with potential to improve specific activities. PMID:26617014

  13. Editorial: advances in therapeutic glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wenbin; Chen, Yue-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides, peptides containing sugar β-amino acids, have significant impact on medicinal chemistry research and pharmaceutical industr. In 1956, the discovery of one classic glycopeptide, vancomycin, broke the dawn of a new age for antibacterial research. Employing glycopeptides for the therapeutic purposes used to be regarded as proposals. Owing largely to the recent improvements in separation practices, characterization techniques, synthetic methods, and biological research, these proposals have been transformed into ongoing research projects in many laboratories around the world. Previously known as antibiotics, glycopeptides have been used as chemotherapeutic, antiviral, antitubercular, antifungal, antiproliferative and apoptotic agents. Nowadays they are even considered for the development of HIV and cancer vaccines. While several of them are in clinical trials, it could be expected that in the near future, treatment regimen of such difficult diseases might be reformed accordingly. Many interesting preliminary results are being produced in this emerging area. As witnesses and practitioners in this exciting area, however, we notice that the related communication in public domain is still limited due to the relatively small number of researchers involved. Thus, we feel the necessity to compile a timely issue about the special topic "Advances in Therapeutic Glycopeptides", covering state-of-the-art research papers and expert reviews from this area. We are glad that Protein & Peptide Letters is willing to realize the idea with us. The opening paper of this issue by Dr. Voglmeir and coauthor discusses three types of PNGases in respect of their general properties and applications of the commercially available PNGases in glycopeptide and glycoprotein analysis. Dr. Liu and coauthors describe current techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), and mass spectrometry (MS), for the characterization of

  14. Understanding and manipulating antibiotic production in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Mervyn J

    2013-12-01

    Actinomycetes are prolific producers of natural products with a wide range of biological activities. Many of the compounds that they make (and derivatives thereof) are used extensively in medicine, most notably as clinically important antibiotics, and in agriculture. Moreover, these organisms remain a source of novel and potentially useful molecules, but maximizing their biosynthetic potential requires a better understanding of natural product biosynthesis. Recent developments in genome sequencing have greatly facilitated the identification of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. In the present article, I summarize the recent contributions of our laboratory in applying genomic technologies to better understand and manipulate natural product biosynthesis in a range of different actinomycetes.

  15. Physics and the production of antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbrother, Robert; Riddle, Wendy; Fairbrother, Neil

    2006-01-01

    This article is the first in a series that describe some of the physics involved in the production of antibiotics. The field is often referred to as biochemical engineering but this does not indicate the considerable part played by physics and physicists. It is a process that undergoes continual research and development. Penicillin has been selected for the focus of this article, although the engineering principles and underlying physics apply to the production of other microbial products such as amino acids (which can be used as food additives), bulk chemicals such as ethanol (used in everything from hair spray and aftershave to solvents for paints and explosives) and the well-known processes of brewing and baking. In this article the application of physics to the design of the fermenter—the giant vessel in which the production of these products occurs—is discussed.

  16. The small MbtH-like protein encoded by an internal gene of the balhimycin biosynthetic gene cluster is not required for glycopeptide production.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Efthimia; Rausch, Christian; Stockert, Sigrid; Burkert, Daniel; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2006-09-01

    The balhimycin biosynthetic gene cluster of the glycopeptide producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina includes a gene (orf1) with unknown function. orf1 shows high similarity to the mbtH gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In almost all nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) biosynthetic gene clusters, we could identify a small mbtH-like gene whose function in peptide biosynthesis is not known. The mbtH-like gene is always colocalized with the NRPS genes; however, it does not have a specific position in the gene cluster. In all glycopeptide biosynthetic gene clusters the orf1-like gene is always located downstream of the gene encoding the last module of the NRPS. We inactivated the orf1 gene in A. balhimycina by generating a deletion mutant. The balhimycin production is not affected in the orf1-deletion mutant and is indistinguishable from that of the wild type. For the first time, we show that the inactivation of an mbtH-like gene does not impair the biosynthesis of a nonribosomal peptide.

  17. CNS Active O-Linked Glycopeptides that Penetrate the BBB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Evan; Polt, Robin

    2015-06-01

    Naturally occurring glycopeptides and glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes. Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in vivo. Glycopeptides are involved in cell signaling and sorting, providing cell surface markers for recognition. From the drug design and synthesis perspective, modification of a peptide through glycosylation results in increased bioavailability and bioactivity of glycopeptides in living systems with negligible toxicity of degradation products. Glycopeptide synthesis can be accomplished through incorporation of a glycosylated amino acid in solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) to form the desired peptide, or via incorporation of sugar-amino acid moieties. Additionally, research indicates that glycosylation increases penetration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by peptides, which may lead to novel therapeutics for neurological disorders. Recent applications of glycopeptides have focused on the in vivo central nervous system effects after peripheral administration of centrally active peptides modified with various carbohydrates.

  18. Botanical alternatives to antibiotics for use in organic poultry production.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; D'Souza, Doris; Biswas, Debrabrata; Hanning, Irene

    2015-06-01

    The development of antibiotic resistant pathogens has resulted from the use of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics delivered in poultry feed. Furthermore, there are a number of consumer concerns regarding the use of antibiotics in food animals including residue contamination of poultry products and antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. These issues have resulted in recommendations to reduce the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in livestock in the United States. Unlike conventional production, organic systems are not permitted to use antibiotics. Thus, both conventional and organic poultry production need alternative methods to improve growth and performance of poultry. Herbs, spices, and various other plant extracts are being evaluated as alternatives to antibiotics and some do have growth promoting effects, antimicrobial properties, and other health-related benefits. This review aims to provide an overview of herbs, spices, and plant extracts, currently defined as phytobiotics as potential feed additives. PMID:25743421

  19. Botanical alternatives to antibiotics for use in organic poultry production.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; D'Souza, Doris; Biswas, Debrabrata; Hanning, Irene

    2015-06-01

    The development of antibiotic resistant pathogens has resulted from the use of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics delivered in poultry feed. Furthermore, there are a number of consumer concerns regarding the use of antibiotics in food animals including residue contamination of poultry products and antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. These issues have resulted in recommendations to reduce the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in livestock in the United States. Unlike conventional production, organic systems are not permitted to use antibiotics. Thus, both conventional and organic poultry production need alternative methods to improve growth and performance of poultry. Herbs, spices, and various other plant extracts are being evaluated as alternatives to antibiotics and some do have growth promoting effects, antimicrobial properties, and other health-related benefits. This review aims to provide an overview of herbs, spices, and plant extracts, currently defined as phytobiotics as potential feed additives.

  20. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, Moussa S.; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities. PMID:24987390

  1. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Moussa S; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities. PMID:24987390

  2. Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  3. Efforts to slacken antibiotic resistance: Labeling meat products from animals raised without antibiotics in the United States.

    PubMed

    Centner, Terence J

    2016-09-01

    As bacteria and diseases spread due to climatic change, greater amounts of antibiotics will be used thereby exacerbating the problem of antibiotic resistance. To help slacken the development of resistant bacteria, the medical community is attempting to reduce unnecessary and excessive usage of antibiotics. One of the targets is the use of antibiotics for enhancing animal growth and promoting feed efficiency in the production of food animals. While governments can adopt regulations prohibiting nontherapeutic uses of antibiotics in food animals and strategies to reduce antibiotic usage, another idea is to publicize when antibiotics are used in food animal production by allowing labeled meat products. This paper builds upon existing labeling and marketing efforts in the United States to show how a government can develop a verified antibiotic-free labeling program that would allow consumers to purchase meat products from animals that had never received antibiotics. PMID:27236477

  4. Short communication: Rapid antibiotic screening tests detect antibiotic residues in powdered milk products.

    PubMed

    Kneebone, J; Tsang, P C W; Townson, D H

    2010-09-01

    Rapid antibiotic screening tests are widely used in the dairy industry to monitor milk for the presence of antibiotic residues above regulated levels. Given the persistent concern over contamination of milk products with antibiotic residues, we investigated the utility of IDEXX Snap test devices (IDEXX Laboratories Inc., Westbrook, ME) as tools for detecting antibiotic residues in powdered milk products. Five powdered milk products were reconstituted according to manufacturer specification with distilled water: Carnation (Nestlé USA Inc., Solon, OH), Nido youth and Nido adult (Nestlé Mexico Inc., Mexico City, Mexico), ELK (Campina, Eindhoven, the Netherlands), and Regilait (Saint-Martin-Belle-Roche, France). Positive samples were generated by spiking reconstituted milk with penicillin G, cephapirin, or tetracycline to either the European Union-regulated maximum residue limit or the FDA-regulated safe/tolerance level, whichever was lower. Control, unspiked negative milk samples and positive samples were tested with appropriate IDEXX Snap test kits (penicillin G and cephapirin with New Beta-Lactam, tetracycline with New Tetracycline). All samples yielded definitive results consistent with expectations, and there were no instances of false-positive or false-negative readings. These results suggest that both the New Beta-Lactam and New Tetracycline IDEXX Snap test kits effectively detect antibiotic residues in commercially available powdered milk samples and are useful tools for monitoring antibiotic residues in reconstituted powdered milk products. PMID:20723670

  5. Physics and the Production of Antibiotics: 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbrother, Robert; Riddle, Wendy; Fairbrother, Neil

    2006-01-01

    In an article in the preceding issue we discussed the design and construction of fermenters in which antibiotics are cultured. For industrial purposes these fermenters can range in size up to 500 m[cube]. They have to be sterilized, filled with sterile culture medium and the culture itself and supplied with oxygen continuously. In some cases they…

  6. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  7. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  8. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  9. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  10. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  11. Counteraction of antibiotic production and degradation stabilizes microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Kelsic, Eric D.; Zhao, Jeffrey; Vetsigian, Kalin; Kishony, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Summary A major challenge in theoretical ecology is understanding how natural microbial communities support species diversity1-8, and in particular how antibiotic producing, sensitive and resistant species coexist9-15. While cyclic “rock-paper-scissors” interactions can stabilize communities in spatial environments9-11, coexistence in unstructured environments remains an enigma12,16. Here, using simulations and analytical models, we show that the opposing actions of antibiotic production and degradation enable coexistence even in well-mixed environments. Coexistence depends on 3-way interactions where an antibiotic degrading species attenuates the inhibitory interactions between two other species. These 3-way interactions enable coexistence that is robust to substantial differences in inherent species growth rates and to invasion by “cheating” species that cease producing or degrading antibiotics. At least two antibiotics are required for stability, with greater numbers of antibiotics enabling more complex communities and diverse dynamical behaviors ranging from stable fixed-points to limit cycles and chaos. Together, these results show how multi-species antibiotic interactions can generate ecological stability in both spatial and mixed microbial communities, suggesting strategies for engineering synthetic ecosystems and highlighting the importance of toxin production and degradation for microbial biodiversity. PMID:25992546

  12. Antibiotic production by myxobacteria plays a role in predation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yao; Wei, Xueming; Ebright, Richard; Wall, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    Myxobacteria are predatory and are prolific producers of secondary metabolites. Here, we tested a hypothesized role that secondary metabolite antibiotics function as weapons in predation. To test this, a Myxococcus xanthus Δta1 mutant, blocked in antibiotic TA (myxovirescin) production, was constructed. This TA(-) mutant was defective in producing a zone of inhibition (ZOI) against Escherichia coli. This shows that TA is the major M. xanthus-diffusible antibacterial agent against E. coli. Correspondingly, the TA(-) mutant was defective in E. coli killing. Separately, an engineered E. coli strain resistant to TA was shown to be resistant toward predation. Exogenous addition of spectinomycin, a bacteriostatic antibiotic, rescued the predation defect of the TA(-) mutant. In contrast, against Micrococcus luteus the TA(-) mutant exhibited no defect in ZOI or killing. Thus, TA plays a selective role on prey species. To extend these studies to other myxobacteria, the role of antibiotic corallopyronin production in predation was tested and also found to be required for Corallococcus coralloides killing on E. coli. Next, a role of TA production in myxobacterial fitness was assessed by measuring swarm expansion. Here, the TA(-) mutant had a specific swarm rate reduction on prey lawns, and thus reduced fitness, compared to an isogenic TA(+) strain. Based on these observations, we conclude that myxobacterial antibiotic production can function as a predatory weapon. To our knowledge, this is the first report to directly show a link between secondary metabolite production and predation.

  13. Antibiotic susceptibility of enterococci isolated from traditional fermented meat products.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, J; Ferreira, V; Teixeira, P

    2009-08-01

    Antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated for 182 Enterococcus spp. isolated from Alheira, Chouriça de Vinhais and Salpicão de Vinhais, fermented meat products produced in the North of Portugal. Previously, a choice was made from a group of 1060 isolates, using phenotypic and genotypic tests. From these, 76 were previously identified as Enterococcus faecalis, 44 as Enterococcus faecium, one as Enterococcus casseliflavus and 61 as Enteroccocus spp. In order to encompass several of the known chemical and functional classes of antibiotics, resistance to ampicillin, penicillin G, ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, nitrofurantoin, rifampicin, tetracycline and vancomycin was evaluated. All the isolates were sensitive to antibiotics of clinical importance, such as penicillins and vancomycin. Some differences in Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) of antibiotics, could be associated with the enterococcal species.

  14. Current status of antibiotic resistance in animal production.

    PubMed

    Franklin, A

    1999-01-01

    spread of resistance genes should be studied in detail. Research in these areas will lead to new ideas on how to inhibit the resistance mechanisms. So far, it has been well established that a heavy antimicrobial drug selective pressure in overcrowded populations of production animals creates favourable environments both for the emergence and the spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

  15. Chapter 4. Analyzing the regulation of antibiotic production in streptomycetes.

    PubMed

    Bibb, Mervyn; Hesketh, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    This chapter outlines the approaches and techniques that can be used to analyze the regulation of antibiotic production in streptomycetes. It describes how to isolate antibiotic nonproducing and overproducing mutants by UV, nitrosoguanidine (NTG), transposon, and insertion mutagenesis, and then how to use those mutants to identify regulatory genes. Other approaches to identify both pathway-specific and pleiotropic regulatory genes include overexpression and genome scanning. A variety of methods used to characterize pathway-specific regulatory genes for antibiotic biosynthesis are then covered, including transcriptional analysis and techniques that can be used to distinguish between direct and indirect regulation. Finally, genome-wide approaches that can be taken to characterize pleiotropic regulatory genes, including microarray and ChIP-on-Chip technologies, are described.

  16. Allantoin catabolism influences the production of antibiotics in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Navone, Laura; Casati, Paula; Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtémoc; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Gramajo, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Purines are a primary source of carbon and nitrogen in soil; however, their metabolism is poorly understood in Streptomyces. Using a combination of proteomics, metabolomics, and metabolic engineering, we characterized the allantoin pathway in Streptomyces coelicolor. When cells grew in glucose minimal medium with allantoin as the sole nitrogen source, quantitative proteomics identified 38 enzymes upregulated and 28 downregulated. This allowed identifying six new functional enzymes involved in allantoin metabolism in S. coelicolor. From those, using a combination of biochemical and genetic engineering tools, it was found that allantoinase (EC 3.5.2.5) and allantoicase (EC 3.5.3.4) are essential for allantoin metabolism in S. coelicolor. Metabolomics showed that under these growth conditions, there is a significant intracellular accumulation of urea and amino acids, which eventually results in urea and ammonium release into the culture medium. Antibiotic production of a urease mutant strain showed that the catabolism of allantoin, and the subsequent release of ammonium, inhibits antibiotic production. These observations link the antibiotic production impairment with an imbalance in nitrogen metabolism and provide the first evidence of an interaction between purine metabolism and antibiotic biosynthesis.

  17. Background antibiotic resistance patterns in antibiotic-free pastured poultry production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a significant public health issue, and agroecosystems are often viewed as major environmental sources of antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens. While the use of antibiotics in agroecosystems can potentially increase AR, appropriate background resistance levels in th...

  18. Identification and antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates from probiotic products.

    PubMed

    Temmerman, R; Pot, B; Huys, G; Swings, J

    2003-02-25

    In the present study, a total of 55 European probiotic products were evaluated with regard to the identity and the antibiotic resistance of the bacterial isolates recovered from these products. Bacterial isolation from 30 dried food supplements and 25 dairy products, yielded a total of 268 bacterial isolates selected from several selective media. Counts of food supplements showed bacterial recovery in 19 (63%) of the dried food supplements ranging from 10(3) to 10(6) CFU/g, whereas all dairy products yielded growth in the range of 10(5)-10(9) CFU/ml. After identification of the isolates using whole-cell protein profiling, mislabeling was noted in 47% of the food supplements and 40% of the dairy products. In six food supplements, Enterococcus faecium was isolated whereas only two of those products claim this species on their label. Using the disc diffusion method, antibiotic resistance among 187 isolates was detected against kanamycin (79% of the isolates), vancomycin (65%), tetracycline (26%), penicillinG (23%), erythromycin (16%) and chloramphenicol (11%). Overall, 68.4% of the isolates showed resistance against multiple antibiotics including intrinsic resistances. Initially, 38% of the isolated enterococci was classified as vancomycin resistant using the disc diffusion method, whereas additional broth dilution and PCR assays clearly showed that all E. faecium isolates were in fact vancomycin susceptible.

  19. Crp Is a Global Regulator of Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chan; Hindra; Mulder, David; Yin, Charles; Elliot, Marie A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic AMP receptor protein (Crp) is a transcription regulator controlling diverse cellular processes in many bacteria. In Streptomyces coelicolor, it is well established that Crp plays a critical role in spore germination and colony development. Here, we demonstrate that Crp is a key regulator of secondary metabolism and antibiotic production in S. coelicolor and show that it may additionally coordinate precursor flux from primary to secondary metabolism. We found that crp deletion adversely affected the synthesis of three well-characterized antibiotics in S. coelicolor: actinorhodin (Act), undecylprodigiosin (Red), and calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-microarray (ChIP-chip) assays, we determined that eight (out of 22) secondary metabolic clusters encoded by S. coelicolor contained Crp-associated sites. We followed the effect of Crp induction using transcription profiling analyses and found secondary metabolic genes to be significantly affected: included in this Crp-dependent group were genes from six of the clusters identified in the ChIP-chip experiments. Overexpressing Crp in a panel of Streptomyces species led to enhanced antibiotic synthesis and new metabolite production, suggesting that Crp control over secondary metabolism is broadly conserved in the streptomycetes and that Crp overexpression could serve as a powerful tool for unlocking the chemical potential of these organisms. PMID:23232715

  20. Microbial antibiotic production aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Benoit, M R; Li, W; Stodieck, L S; Lam, K S; Winther, C L; Roane, T M; Klaus, D M

    2006-04-01

    Previous studies examining metabolic characteristics of bacterial cultures have mostly suggested that reduced gravity is advantageous for microbial growth. As a consequence, the question of whether space flight would similarly enhance secondary metabolite production was raised. Results from three prior space shuttle experiments indicated that antibiotic production was stimulated in space for two different microbial systems, albeit under suboptimal growth conditions. The goal of this latest experiment was to determine whether the enhanced productivity would also occur with better growth conditions and over longer durations of weightlessness. Microbial antibiotic production was examined onboard the International Space Station during the 72-day 8A increment. Findings of increased productivity of actinomycin D by Streptomyces plicatus in space corroborated with previous findings for the early sample points (days 8 and 12); however, the flight production levels were lower than the matched ground control samples for the remainder of the mission. The overall goal of this research program is to elucidate the specific mechanisms responsible for the initial stimulation of productivity in space and translate this knowledge into methods for improving efficiency of commercial production facilities on Earth.

  1. Interaction of immunoglobulin glycopeptides with concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, R; Ferris, C

    1975-04-10

    A number of intact and partially degraded immunoglobulin glycopeptides have been tested for their ability to interact with concanavalin A. The degraded glycopeptides were prepared by using purified glycosidases to remove sugar residues from the nonreducing ends of the oligosaccharide chains of intact glycopeptides. A quantitative and sensitive assay was devised to measure the potency of the glycopeptides as haptene inhibitors of 125I-concanavalin A binding to guinea pig erythrocytes. The most potent haptene, derived from an immunoglobulin G glycopeptide, had a branched chain oligosaccharide with two GlcNAc (see article) Man (see article) nonreducing termini linked to a mannose residue in the core. The other very potent glycopeptide was an immunoglobulin E high mannose glycopeptide which contained 3 terminal alpha-mannose residues and 1 internal 2-O-mannose residue. Removal of terminal beta-N-acetylglucosamine residues or alpha-mannose residues reduced the activity of these and other glycopeptides as inhibitors of 125I-concanavalin A binding. It was concluded that the ability of these glycopeptides to interact with concanavalin A is dependent on their content of terminal beta-N-acetylglucosamine residues, terminal alpha-mannose residues, and also internal mannose residues substituted on the C-2 hydroxyl group, and that the saccharide combining site of concanavalin A must be able to bind several sugar residues.

  2. Triclosan and prescription antibiotic exposures and enterolactone production in adults

    PubMed Central

    Adgent, Margaret A.; Rogan, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The gut microbiome plays an important role in the development of disease. The composition of the microbiome is influenced by factors such as mode of delivery at birth, diet and antibiotic use, yet the influence of environmental chemical exposures is largely unknown. The antimicrobial compound triclosan, found in many personal care products and widely detected in human urine, is an environmental exposure for which systemic microbiotic effects may be of particular interest. To investigate the relationship between triclosan and gut microflora, we assessed the association between triclosan and enterolactone, an intestinal metabolite that is produced via bacterial transformation of dietary lignans (seeds, nuts) and has known susceptibility to oral antibiotics. Methods We examined urinary triclosan and enterolactone for 2005–2008 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey subjects, aged ≥ 20 years (n = 3,041). We also examined the association between prescription antibiotic use and enterolactone to confirm its susceptibility to changes in bacterial composition of the body. Associations between natural log-transformed enterolactone and 1) detected vs. not detected (<2.3 ng/mL) triclosan, 2) triclosan quintiles (Q1–Q5), and 3) any vs. no antibiotics were estimated with multiple linear regression, adjusting for sex, age, race, body mass index, poverty income ratio, education, fiber intake, bowel movement frequency, cotinine and creatinine (n=2,441). Results Triclosan was detected in 80% of subjects (range: <2.3 – 3620 ng/mL), while enterolactone was detected in >99% of subjects (range: <0.1 – 122,000 ng/mL). After adjustment, enterolactone was not associated with triclosan (detect vs. nondetect: β= 0.07 (95% CI: −0.15, 0.30); Q5 (≥104.5 ng/mL) vs. Q1 (none): β= 0.06 (95% CI:−0.21, 0.34)). In sex-stratified analyses, triclosan was associated with higher enterolactone in women (detect vs. non-detect: β= 0.31 (95% CI:−0.07, 0.70), but

  3. Stochastic modelling and control of antibiotic subtilin production.

    PubMed

    Thalhofer, V; Annunziato, M; Borzì, A

    2016-09-01

    A stochastic hybrid model for the production of the antibiotic subtilin by the Bacillus subtilis is investigated. This model consists of 5 variables with four possible discrete dynamical states and this high dimensionality represents a bottleneck for using statistical tools that require to solve the corresponding Fokker-Planck problem. For this reason, a suitable reduced model with 3 variables and two dynamical states is proposed. The corresponding Fokker-Planck hyperbolic system is used to validate the evolution statistics and to construct a robust feedback control strategy to increase subtilin production. Results of numerical experiments are presented that show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme. PMID:26837869

  4. From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Silber, Johanna; Kramer, Annemarie; Labes, Antje; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics. PMID:27455283

  5. From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Silber, Johanna; Kramer, Annemarie; Labes, Antje; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics. PMID:27455283

  6. From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Silber, Johanna; Kramer, Annemarie; Labes, Antje; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-07-21

    Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics.

  7. The evolution of antibiotic production and public health problems.

    PubMed

    Mansford, K R; Slocombe, B

    1987-06-01

    Antibiotic evolution is closely paralleled by the evolution of bacterial resistance. Prior to wide usage of penicillin G, resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics as a consequence of beta-lactamase production had been recognized, and has been an increasing clinical problem ever since. Discovery of antibiotics other than beta-lactams, such as macrolides, tetracyclines and aminoglycosides, has also resulted in the eventual selection of bacteria resistant to these agents. Synthesis of novel beta-lactam derivatives from 6-APA, such as methicillin and isoxazolyl penicillins, resistant to staphylococcal beta-lactamase, overcame the clinical problem of penicillin-resistant S. aureus. Likewise, the isolation of cephamycins and monobactams, and further exploitation of the cephalosporin nucleus, led to the development of derivatives which display a high degree of stability to a wide range of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial beta-lactamases, thus rendering organisms producing these enzymes susceptible to these agents. Analogous modification of the penicillin nucleus, to give 6 alpha-substituted penicillins, also resulted in derivatives with exceptional stability to beta-lactamases. An alternative approach to the problem of beta-lactamase was the isolation or synthesis of substances able to inhibit the activity of enzymes, thus protecting the unstable beta-lactams from inactivation by beta-lactamase. In this way the activity of beta-lactamase-labile agents was effectively restored against a wide range of beta-lactamase-producing bacterial pathogens. The wide diversity of new antibacterial agents, together with an increasing knowledge and understanding of mechanisms of resistance, indicates that further advances against resistant bacterial pathogens is ensured.

  8. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... these products really help. To Learn More about Antibiotic Resistance Get Smart About Antibiotics (Video) Fact Sheets and ...

  9. Report: antibiotic production by thermophilic Bacillus specie SAT-4.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Ahmad, Safia; Hameed, Abdul

    2009-07-01

    Production of antimicrobial compounds seems to be a general phenomenon for most bacteria. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among key microbial pathogens is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide. Current solutions involve development of a more rationale approach to antibiotic use and discover of new antimicrobials. Bacillus species produce a large number of biological compounds active against bacteria, fungi, protozoa and viruses. The process of production usually involves screening of wide range of microorganisms, testing and modification. Production is carried out using fermentation. Thermophilic spore-forming, gram positive, motile rod bacterial strains were isolated from the Thar Desserts, Sindh Province, Pakistan. These strains were screened and checked for antibacterial activity. The best activity was observed by SAT4 against Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeroginosa. The activity was only observed against gram positive bacteria and no activity was seen against Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Thermophilic Bacillus specie SAT4 was found to be active in the fermentation process to produce the antimicrobial agents. Further optimizations of different conditions (time of incubation, media, pH, glucose concentrations, nitrogen concentrations, and temperature) for antimicrobial production by the selected bacterial strain was performed. Agar diffusion assay was performed to evaluate the antibacterial activity. Optimum conditions for the production of antimicrobials by selected isolate were observed to be 48 hour, pH 5, temperature 55 degrees C, 2% glucose and 1.5% nitrogen concentration. This newly isolated bacterial strain has great potential for antimicrobial production at industrial scale. PMID:19553186

  10. Glycopeptide resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Biavasco, F; Vignaroli, C; Varaldo, P E

    2000-06-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were the first organisms in which acquired glycopeptide resistance was recognized. Ever since the early reports, it has been apparent that resistance to teicoplanin is more common than that to vancomycin and that resistance occurs mostly in species such as Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of teicoplanin for CNS usually fall over a wide range, and, especially in some methicillin-resistant isolates of the two above-mentioned species, they can reach and even exceed the resistance breakpoint, whereas vancomycin MICs tend to remain more stable over a narrower range within the limits of susceptibility. CNS strains intermediately susceptible and even resistant not only to teicoplanin but also to vancomycin have, however, been isolated, most frequently from patients subjected to prolonged glycopeptide treatment. Laboratory detection of glycopeptide-resistant CNS may be problematic, mainly because susceptibility tests, particularly those for teicoplanin, are influenced by various technical factors, and agar diffusion tests may yield false susceptibility data. In studies with experimental glycopeptides, some molecules have exhibited improved in vitro activity compared with teicoplanin and vancomycin, but these encouraging microbiological findings have not usually been followed by in vivo trials. Stepwise and single-step exposure to teicoplanin and vancomycin has allowed stable clones for which glycopeptide MICs are increased to be obtained from susceptible CNS strains, particularly strains of Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. In these studies, resistance to teicoplanin was generally easier to obtain than resistance to vancomycin, and the levels of teicoplanin resistance were higher. Population studies have demonstrated the usually heterogeneous nature of glycopeptide resistance in CNS. Although glycopeptide-resistant CNS have been shown to

  11. Why and how antibiotics are used in swine production.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Gary L

    2002-05-01

    In summary, published research data clearly show that the use of antibiotics during all phases of growth benefits the rate and efficiency of body weight gain, reduces mortality and morbidity, reduces subclinical disease, and improves health in pigs. Also, antibiotics at breeding and during lactation benefits reproductive and lactational performance in sows. The economic benefits are several-fold greater than the cost of the antibiotic when a cost-effective antibiotic is used for this purpose. Monitoring and surveillance of microbial resistance in animals and humans has continued, with no animal-to-human infection path being clearly delineated. Although the incidence of antibiotic resistance in the human population remains high, there is no clear evidence that the levels or patterns have changed. The high levels of antimicrobial resistance in humans likely result from antibiotics prescribed directly to humans, because well over half of the antibiotics produced in the United States is used in human medicine. Whether antibiotic usage in swine, poultry, and other food-producing animals contributes to antibiotic resistance in the human population will continue to be debated. Even though antibiotics have been fed for nearly 50 years to literally billions of animals, there is still no convincing evidence of unfavorable health effects in humans that can be directly linked to the feeding of subtherapeutic levels of antibiotics to swine or other animals. Hopefully, policy decisions in the future regarding the use of antimicrobials in animals will be based on science and sound risk assessment, and not on emotionalism. PMID:12212945

  12. Small molecule inhibition of microbial natural product biosynthesis – An emerging antibiotic strategy

    PubMed Central

    Cisar, Justin S.; Tan, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    A variety of natural products modulate critical biological processes in the microorganisms that produce them. Thus, inhibition of the corresponding natural product biosynthesis pathways represents a promising avenue to develop novel antibiotics. In this tutorial review, we describe several recent examples of designed small molecule inhibitors of microbial natural product biosynthesis and their use in evaluating this emerging antibiotic strategy. PMID:18568158

  13. Occurrence and spread of antibiotic resistances in Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Klare, Ingo; Konstabel, Carola; Badstübner, Dietlinde; Werner, Guido; Witte, Wolfgang

    2003-12-01

    Enterococci are the second to third most important bacterial genus in hospital infections. Especially Enterococcus (E.) faecium possesses a broad spectrum of natural and acquired antibiotic resistances which are presented in detail in this paper. From medical point of view, the transferable resistances to glycopeptides (e.g., vancomycin, VAN, or teicoplanin, TPL) and streptogramins (e.g., quinupristin/dalfopristin, Q/D) in enterococci are of special interest. The VanA type of enterococcal glycopeptide resistance is the most important one (VAN-r, TPL-r); its main reservoir is E. faecium. Glycopeptide-resistant E. faecium (GREF) can be found in hospitals and outside of them, namely in European commercial animal husbandry in which the glycopeptide avoparcin (AVO) was used as growth promoter in the past. There are identical types of the vanA gene clusters in enterococci from different ecological origins (faecal samples of animals, animal feed, patients in hospitals, persons in the community, waste water samples). Obviously, across the food chain (by GREF-contaminated meat products), these multiple-resistant bacteria or their vanA gene clusters can reach humans. In hospital infections, widespread epidemic-virulent E. faecium isolates of the same clone with or without glycopeptide resistance can occur; these strains often harbour different plasmids and the esp gene. This indicates that hospital-adapted epidemic-virulent E. faecium strains have picked up the vanA gene cluster after they were already widely spread. The streptogramin virginiamycin was also used as feed additive in commercial animal husbandry in Europe for more than 20 years, and it created reservoirs for streptogramin-resistant E. faecium (SREF). In 1998/1999, SREF could be isolated in Germany from waste water of sewage treatment plants, from faecal samples and meat products of animals that were fed virginiamycin (cross resistance to Q/D), from stools of humans in the community, and from clinical samples

  14. Alternative Pathway to a Glycopeptide-Resistant Cell Wall in the Balhimycin Producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina.

    PubMed

    Frasch, Hans-Joerg; Kalan, Lindsay; Kilian, Regina; Martin, Tobias; Wright, Gerard D; Stegmann, Evi

    2015-06-12

    Balhimycin, a vancomycin-type glycopeptide, is a lipid II targeting antibiotic produced by Amycolatopsis balhimycina. A. balhimycina has developed a self-resistance mechanism based on the synergistic action of different enzymes resulting in modified peptidoglycan. The canonical resistance mechanism against glycopeptides is the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors ending with acyl-d-alanyl-d-lactate (d-Ala-d-Lac) rather than acyl-d-alanyl-d-alanine (d-Ala-d-Ala). This reprogramming is the result of the enzymes VanH, VanA, and VanX. VanH and VanA are required to produce d-Ala-d-Lac; VanX cleaves cytosolic pools of d-Ala-d-Ala, thereby ensuring that peptidoglycan is enriched in d-Ala-d-Lac. In A. balhimycina, the ΔvanHAXAb mutant showed a reduced glycopeptide resistance in comparison to the wild type. Nevertheless, ΔvanHAXAb was paradoxically still able to produce d-Ala-d-Lac containing resistant cell wall precursors suggesting the presence of a novel alternative glycopeptide resistance mechanism. In silico analysis, inactivation studies, and biochemical assays led to the characterization of an enzyme, Ddl1Ab, as a paraloguous chromosomal d-Ala-d-Lac ligase able to complement the function of VanAAb in the ΔvanHAXAb mutant. Furthermore, A. balhimycina harbors a vanYAb gene encoding a d,d-carboxypeptidase. Transcriptional analysis revealed an upregulated expression of vanYAb in the ΔvanHAXAb mutant. VanYAb cleaves the endstanding d-Ala from the pentapeptide precursors, reducing the quantity of sensitive cell wall precursors in the absence of VanXAb. These findings represent an unprecedented coordinated layer of resistance mechanisms in a glycopeptide antibiotic producing bacterium. PMID:27622740

  15. Effect of support materials on antibiotic MSW2000 production by immobilized Streptomyces violatus.

    PubMed

    el-Naggar, Mousatfa Y; Hassan, Maha A; Said, Wafa Y Y; el-Aassar, Samy A

    2003-08-01

    The production of an antibiotic by free and immobilized cells of Streptomyces violatus through entrapment or adsorption on different materials was investigated. S. violatus entrapped in Ca-alginate beads gave low antibiotic activity compared to the free cell or adsorbed cell, while the adsorption of S. violatus on sponge cubes yielded the highest antibiotic concentration after 4 days of incubation in static cultures. A starch concentration of 10 g/L was optimum for the production of the antibiotic by adsorbed cells. The weight and size of the sponge cubes used for immobilization influenced production of the antibiotic and the optimum weight and size of the sponge were 0.8 g and 1.0 cm(3), respectively, yielding a maximum antibiotic production of 280 mg/ml. Maximum antibiotic production was obtained at an initial pH value of 7.5 and in an inoculum size of 3 ml (spore suspension) per 50 ml. The production of the antibiotic in a fixed-bed bioreactor reached a maximum value after 2 days of incubation at a circulation rate of 30 ml/h. The immobilized cells in the bioreactor were reused seven successive times over a period of 14 days.

  16. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27383577

  17. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  18. Evaluation of residual antibacterial potency in antibiotic production wastewater using a real-time quantitative method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Liu, Miaomiao

    2015-11-01

    While antibiotic pollution has attracted considerable attention due to its potential in promoting the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment, the antibiotic activity of their related substances has been neglected, which may underestimate the environmental impacts of antibiotic wastewater discharge. In this study, a real-time quantitative approach was established to evaluate the residual antibacterial potency of antibiotics and related substances in antibiotic production wastewater (APW) by comparing the growth of a standard bacterial strain (Staphylococcus aureus) in tested water samples with a standard reference substance (e.g. oxytetracycline). Antibiotic equivalent quantity (EQ) was used to express antibacterial potency, which made it possible to assess the contribution of each compound to the antibiotic activity in APW. The real-time quantitative method showed better repeatability (Relative Standard Deviation, RSD 1.08%) compared with the conventional fixed growth time method (RSD 5.62-11.29%). And its quantification limits ranged from 0.20 to 24.00 μg L(-1), depending on the antibiotic. We applied the developed method to analyze the residual potency of water samples from four APW treatment systems, and confirmed a significant contribution from antibiotic transformation products to potent antibacterial activity. Specifically, neospiramycin, a major transformation product of spiramycin, was found to contribute 13.15-22.89% of residual potency in spiramycin production wastewater. In addition, some unknown related substances with antimicrobial activity were indicated in the effluent. This developed approach will be effective for the management of antibacterial potency discharge from antibiotic wastewater and other waste streams.

  19. Evaluation of residual antibacterial potency in antibiotic production wastewater using a real-time quantitative method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Liu, Miaomiao

    2015-11-01

    While antibiotic pollution has attracted considerable attention due to its potential in promoting the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment, the antibiotic activity of their related substances has been neglected, which may underestimate the environmental impacts of antibiotic wastewater discharge. In this study, a real-time quantitative approach was established to evaluate the residual antibacterial potency of antibiotics and related substances in antibiotic production wastewater (APW) by comparing the growth of a standard bacterial strain (Staphylococcus aureus) in tested water samples with a standard reference substance (e.g. oxytetracycline). Antibiotic equivalent quantity (EQ) was used to express antibacterial potency, which made it possible to assess the contribution of each compound to the antibiotic activity in APW. The real-time quantitative method showed better repeatability (Relative Standard Deviation, RSD 1.08%) compared with the conventional fixed growth time method (RSD 5.62-11.29%). And its quantification limits ranged from 0.20 to 24.00 μg L(-1), depending on the antibiotic. We applied the developed method to analyze the residual potency of water samples from four APW treatment systems, and confirmed a significant contribution from antibiotic transformation products to potent antibacterial activity. Specifically, neospiramycin, a major transformation product of spiramycin, was found to contribute 13.15-22.89% of residual potency in spiramycin production wastewater. In addition, some unknown related substances with antimicrobial activity were indicated in the effluent. This developed approach will be effective for the management of antibacterial potency discharge from antibiotic wastewater and other waste streams. PMID:26395288

  20. Antibiotic resistance—consequences for animal health, welfare, and food production

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Most of the literature on the consequences of emergence and spread of bacteria resistant to antibiotics among animals relate to the potential impact on public health. But antibiotics are used to treat sick animals, and resistance in animal pathogens may lead to therapy failure. This has received little scientific attention, and therefore, in this article, we discuss examples that illustrate the possible impact of resistance on animal health and consequences thereof. For all animals, there may be a negative effect on health and welfare when diseases cannot be treated. Other consequences will vary depending on why and how different animal species are kept. Animals kept as companions or for sports often receive advanced care, and antibiotic resistance can lead to negative social and economic consequences for the owners. Further, spread of hospital-acquired infections can have an economic impact on the affected premises. As to animals kept for food production, antibiotics are not needed to promote growth, but, if infectious diseases cannot be treated when they occur, this can have a negative effect on the productivity and economy of affected businesses. Antibiotic resistance in animal bacteria can also have positive consequences by creating incentives for adoption of alternative regimes for treatment and prevention. It is probable that new antibiotic classes placed on the market in the future will not reach veterinary medicine, which further emphasizes the need to preserve the efficacy of currently available antibiotics through antibiotic stewardship. A cornerstone in this work is prevention, as healthy animals do not need antibiotics. PMID:24678738

  1. Antibiotic resistance--consequences for animal health, welfare, and food production.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Björn; Greko, Christina

    2014-05-01

    Most of the literature on the consequences of emergence and spread of bacteria resistant to antibiotics among animals relate to the potential impact on public health. But antibiotics are used to treat sick animals, and resistance in animal pathogens may lead to therapy failure. This has received little scientific attention, and therefore, in this article, we discuss examples that illustrate the possible impact of resistance on animal health and consequences thereof. For all animals, there may be a negative effect on health and welfare when diseases cannot be treated. Other consequences will vary depending on why and how different animal species are kept. Animals kept as companions or for sports often receive advanced care, and antibiotic resistance can lead to negative social and economic consequences for the owners. Further, spread of hospital-acquired infections can have an economic impact on the affected premises. As to animals kept for food production, antibiotics are not needed to promote growth, but, if infectious diseases cannot be treated when they occur, this can have a negative effect on the productivity and economy of affected businesses. Antibiotic resistance in animal bacteria can also have positive consequences by creating incentives for adoption of alternative regimes for treatment and prevention. It is probable that new antibiotic classes placed on the market in the future will not reach veterinary medicine, which further emphasizes the need to preserve the efficacy of currently available antibiotics through antibiotic stewardship. A cornerstone in this work is prevention, as healthy animals do not need antibiotics.

  2. [Degradation pathways and main degradation products of tetracycline antibiotics: research progress].

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Ming; Bao, Yan-Yu; Zhou, Qi-Xing

    2012-08-01

    Tetracycline antibiotics (TCs) can produce a series of abiotic degradation reactions in the process of production and storage, and some of the degradation products have lower antibacterial activity but higher toxicity, as compared to the parent antibiotics. TCs can enter the environment via the disposal of livestock and poultry wastes, and then degrade in one or more ways according to the external conditions. Besides abiotic degradation, bio-degradation also happens. This paper reviewed the degradation pathways and main degradation products of TCs in different ecological environments, and discussed the future research directions, aimed to provide valuable reference for the ecological risk assessment of the antibiotics.

  3. Detection of glycopeptide resistance genotypes and identification to the species level of clinically relevant enterococci by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Dutka-Malen, S; Evers, S; Courvalin, P

    1995-01-01

    A PCR assay that allows simultaneous detection of glycopeptide resistance genotypes and identification to the species level of clinically relevant enterococci (Enterococcus faecium, E. faecalis, E. gallinarum, and E. casseliflavus) was developed. This assay was based on specific amplification of internal fragments of genes encoding D-alanine:D-alanine ligases and related glycopeptide resistance proteins. The specificity of the assay was tested on 5 well-characterized glycopeptide-resistant strains and on 15 susceptible enterococcal type strains. Clinical isolates of enterococci that could not be identified to the species level by conventional methods were identified by the PCR test. This assay offers a specific and rapid alternative to antibiotic susceptibility tests, in particular for detection of low-level vancomycin resistance. PMID:7699051

  4. N-Glycopeptide Profiling in Arabidopsis Inflorescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shou-Ling; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Burlingame, Alma L; Chalkley, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the first large-scale analysis of plant intact glycopeptides. Using wheat germ agglutinin lectin weak affinity chromatography to enrich modified peptides, followed by electron transfer dissociation (ETD)(1) fragmentation tandem mass spectrometry, glycan compositions on over 1100 glycopeptides from 270 proteins found in Arabidopsis inflorescence tissue were characterized. While some sites were only detected with a single glycan attached, others displayed up to 16 different glycoforms. Among the identified glycopeptides were four modified in nonconsensus glycosylation motifs. While most of the modified proteins are secreted, membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), or Golgi-localized proteins, surprisingly, N-linked sugars were detected on a protein predicted to be cytosolic or nuclear. PMID:27067053

  5. Termite usage associated with antibiotic therapy: enhancement of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity by natural products of Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky 1855)

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Henrique DM; Vasconcellos, Alexandre; Lima, Micheline A; Almeida-Filho, Geraldo G; Alves, Rômulo RN

    2009-01-01

    Background Several species from Insecta are used as remedies. Among these species, the termite Nasutitermes corniger is commonly used in traditional medicine in Northeast Brazil. The present work tests the modifying antibiotic activity of Nasutitermes corniger, a termite used in folk medicine in Northeastern region of Brazil. Methods Chlorpromazine and decocts of N. corniger were collected from two different plant species used in the traditional medicine were tested for their antimicrobial activity against strains of Escherichia coli resistant to aminoglycosides. The growth of two bacterial strains of E. coli was tested using decocts and chlorpromazine alone or associeted with aminogycosides. Results The MIC and MBC values were ≥1024 μg/ml for both strains of E. coli assayed. A significant synergism was observed between both decocts and chlorpromazine when assyed with neomycin. This synergism with neomycin indicates the involvement of an efflux system in the resistance to this aminoglycoside. Conclusion Therefore it is suggested that natural products from N. corniger could be used as a source of zoo-derived natural products with modifying antibiotic activity to aminoglycosides, being a new weapon against the bacterial resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19761599

  6. Characterization of immunomodulatory activities of honey glycoproteins and glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Mesaik, M Ahmed; Dastagir, Nida; Uddin, Nazim; Rehman, Khalid; Azim, M Kamran

    2015-01-14

    Recent evidence suggests an important role for natural honey in modulating immune response. To identify active components responsible, this study investigated the immunomodulatory properties of glycoproteins and glycopeptides fractionated from Ziziphus honey. Honey proteins/peptides were fractionated by size exclusion chromatography into five peaks with molecular masses in the range of 2-450 kDa. The fractionated proteins exhibited potent, concentration-dependent inhibition of reactive oxygen species production in zymosan-activated human neutrophils (IC50 = 6-14 ng/mL) and murine macrophages (IC50 = 2-9 ng/mL). Honey proteins significantly suppressed the nitric oxide production by LPS-activated murine macrophages (IC50 = 96-450 ng/mL). Moreover, honey proteins inhibited the phagocytosis latex bead macrophages. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α by human monocytic cell line in the presence of honey proteins was analyzed. Honey proteins did not affect the production of IL-1β; however, TNF-α production was significantly suppressed. These findings indicated that honey glycoproteins and glycopeptides significantly interfere with molecules of the innate immune system.

  7. Activation of Antibiotic Production in Bacillus spp. by Cumulative Drug Resistance Mutations.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Shigeo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Ochi, Kozo

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains produce a wide range of antibiotics, including ribosomal and nonribosomal peptide antibiotics, as well as bacilysocin and neotrehalosadiamine. Mutations in B. subtilis strain 168 that conferred resistance to drugs such as streptomycin and rifampin resulted in overproduction of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin. Cumulative drug resistance mutations, such as mutations in the mthA and rpsL genes, which confer low- and high-level resistance, respectively, to streptomycin, and mutations in rpoB, which confer resistance to rifampin, resulted in cells that overproduced bacilysin. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated that the enhanced transcription of biosynthesis genes was responsible for the overproduction of bacilysin. This approach was effective also in activating the cryptic genes of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, leading to actual production of antibiotic(s).

  8. The transport of antibiotic resistance genes and residues in groundwater near swine production facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. F.; Yannarell, A. C.; Mackie, R. I.; Krapac, I. G.; Chee-Sanford, J. S.; Koike, S.

    2008-12-01

    The use of antibiotics at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for disease prevention, disease treatment, and growth promotion can contribute to the spread of antibiotic compounds, their breakdown products, and antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or the genes that confer resistance. In addition, constitutive use of antibiotics at sub-therapeutic levels can select for antibiotic resistance among the bacteria that inhabit animal intestinal tracts, onsite manure treatment facilities, and any environments receiving significant inputs of manure (e.g. through waste lagoon leakage or fertilizer amendments to farm soils). If the antibiotic resistant organisms persist in these new environments, or if they participate in genetic exchanges with the native microflora, then CAFOs may constitute a significant reservoir for the spread of antibiotic resistance to the environment at large. Our results have demonstrated that leakage from waste treatment lagoons can influence the presence and persistence of tetracycline resistance genes in the shallow aquifer adjacent to swine CAFOs, and molecular phylogeny allowed us to distinguish "native" tetracycline resistance genes in control groundwater wells from manure-associated genes introduced from the lagoon. We have also been able to detect the presence of erythromycin resistance genes in CAFO surface and groundwater even though erythromycin is strictly reserved for use in humans and thus is not utilized at any of these sites. Ongoing research, including modeling of particle transport in groundwater, will help to determine the potential spatial and temporal extent of CAFO-derived antibiotic resistance.

  9. Antibiotic resistance in bacteria associated with food animals: a United States perspective of livestock production.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Alan G; Cissell, Robin; Liamthong, S

    2007-01-01

    The use of antimicrobial compounds in food animal production provides demonstrated benefits, including improved animal health, higher production and, in some cases, reduction in foodborne pathogens. However, use of antibiotics for agricultural purposes, particularly for growth enhancement, has come under much scrutiny, as it has been shown to contribute to the increased prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria of human significance. The transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and selection for resistant bacteria can occur through a variety of mechanisms, which may not always be linked to specific antibiotic use. Prevalence data may provide some perspective on occurrence and changes in resistance over time; however, the reasons are diverse and complex. Much consideration has been given this issue on both domestic and international fronts, and various countries have enacted or are considering tighter restrictions or bans on some types of antibiotic use in food animal production. In some cases, banning the use of growth-promoting antibiotics appears to have resulted in decreases in prevalence of some drug resistant bacteria; however, subsequent increases in animal morbidity and mortality, particularly in young animals, have sometimes resulted in higher use of therapeutic antibiotics, which often come from drug families of greater relevance to human medicine. While it is clear that use of antibiotics can over time result in significant pools of resistance genes among bacteria, including human pathogens, the risk posed to humans by resistant organisms from farms and livestock has not been clearly defined. As livestock producers, animal health experts, the medical community, and government agencies consider effective strategies for control, it is critical that science-based information provide the basis for such considerations, and that the risks, benefits, and feasibility of such strategies are fully considered, so that human and animal health can be maintained while

  10. Alternatives to antibiotics: a symposium on the challenges and solutions for animal production.

    PubMed

    Seal, Bruce S; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Donovan, David M; Gay, Cyril G

    2013-06-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most important medical discoveries of the 20th century and will remain an essential tool for treating animal and human diseases in the 21st century. However, antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens and concerns over their extensive use in food animals has garnered global interest in limiting antibiotic use in animal agriculture. Yet, limiting the availability of medical interventions to prevent and control animal diseases on the farm will directly impact global food security and safety as well as animal and human health. Insufficient attention has been given to the scientific breakthroughs and novel technologies that provide alternatives to antibiotics. The objectives of the symposium 'Alternatives to Antibiotics' were to highlight promising research results and novel technologies that could potentially lead to alternatives to conventional antibiotics, and assess challenges associated with their commercialization, and provide actionable strategies to support development of alternative antimicrobials. The symposium focused on the latest scientific breakthroughs and technologies that could provide new options and alternative strategies for preventing and treating diseases of animals. Some of these new technologies have direct applications as medical interventions for human health, but the focus of the symposium was animal production, animal health and food safety during food-animal production. Five subject areas were explored in detail through scientific presentations and expert panel discussions, including: (1) alternatives to antibiotics, lessons from nature; (2) immune modulation approaches to enhance disease resistance and to treat animal diseases; (3) gut microbiome and immune development, health and diseases; (4) alternatives to antibiotics for animal production; and (5) regulatory pathways to enable the licensure of alternatives to antibiotics. PMID:23702321

  11. Alternatives to antibiotics: a symposium on the challenges and solutions for animal production.

    PubMed

    Seal, Bruce S; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Donovan, David M; Gay, Cyril G

    2013-06-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most important medical discoveries of the 20th century and will remain an essential tool for treating animal and human diseases in the 21st century. However, antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens and concerns over their extensive use in food animals has garnered global interest in limiting antibiotic use in animal agriculture. Yet, limiting the availability of medical interventions to prevent and control animal diseases on the farm will directly impact global food security and safety as well as animal and human health. Insufficient attention has been given to the scientific breakthroughs and novel technologies that provide alternatives to antibiotics. The objectives of the symposium 'Alternatives to Antibiotics' were to highlight promising research results and novel technologies that could potentially lead to alternatives to conventional antibiotics, and assess challenges associated with their commercialization, and provide actionable strategies to support development of alternative antimicrobials. The symposium focused on the latest scientific breakthroughs and technologies that could provide new options and alternative strategies for preventing and treating diseases of animals. Some of these new technologies have direct applications as medical interventions for human health, but the focus of the symposium was animal production, animal health and food safety during food-animal production. Five subject areas were explored in detail through scientific presentations and expert panel discussions, including: (1) alternatives to antibiotics, lessons from nature; (2) immune modulation approaches to enhance disease resistance and to treat animal diseases; (3) gut microbiome and immune development, health and diseases; (4) alternatives to antibiotics for animal production; and (5) regulatory pathways to enable the licensure of alternatives to antibiotics.

  12. Aerobic inhibition assessment for anaerobic treatment effluent of antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cetecioglu, Zeynep

    2014-02-01

    Biological treatment of antibiotic production effluents is an economical approach; however, there are still difficulties to overcome because of the recalcitrant characteristics of these compounds to biodegradation. This study aims to reveal that anaerobic treatment technology can be an option as pretreatment before the activated sludge system treatment to treat antibiotic production effluents. The ISO 8192 method was chosen to test the inhibitory effect of raw and treated antibiotic production effluents in this work. Inhibition tests, which were applied according to ISO 8192, highlighted that the anaerobic treatment effluent is less inhibitory than antibiotic production effluent for activated sludge system. Early EC50 concentrations (30-min values) of raw and treated wastewaters were lower than 180-min values. Also, triple effects (sulfamethoxazole-erythromycin-tetracycline) of antibiotics are more toxic than dual effects (sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline). In light of the experimental results obtained and their evaluation, it can be concluded that anaerobic digestion can be applied as a biological pretreatment method for pharmaceutical industry wastewater including antibiotic mixtures prior to aerobic treatment.

  13. YS-822A, a new polyene macrolide antibiotic. I. Production, isolation, characterization and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Itoh, A; Ido, J; Iwamoto, Y; Goshima, E; Miki, T; Hasuda, K; Hirota, H

    1990-08-01

    A new polyene macrolide antibiotic, YS-822A was isolated from the culture filtrate of a mutant strain H-8 of Streptoverticillium eurocidicum var. asterocidicus S-822. Whereas the original S-822 strain produced not only YS-822 substances but also teleocidin as by-product which is well-known as a strong carcinogenic promoter, the mutagenized H-8 strain produced the antibiotic with only a trace amount of teleocidin. Chemical and biological characterizations of the antibiotic revealed that YS-822A (molecular formula: C37H59NO14) is a new polyene macrolide with a wide antifungal spectrum and a low acute toxicity. PMID:2211361

  14. Occurrence of antibiotics and their impacts to primary productivity in fishponds around Tai Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Chao; Zhang, Cong; Fan, Limin; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Wei; Meng, Shunlong; Hu, Gengdong; Kamira, Barry; Chen, Jiazhang

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are widely used to improve the health and yields of farmed animals, including fish, but their use is accompanied by undesirable ecological effects. Relatively little is known about the water-body burden of antibiotics and their influence on primary productivity in aquaculture ecosystem. In this study, antibiotics usage within 24 fishponds, covering 4 areas, sampled 5 times, and having 5 fish species, was investigated surrounding Tai Lake in China. The study analyzed 15 antibiotics (including 5 sulfonamides, 2 quinolones, 3 β-lactams, 3 tetracyclines, 1 amphenicol, and 1 macrolide), and all of them were detected in water samples, with a detection frequency of 2-60%. Sulfonamides were the most prevalent, and concentrations of sulfamethoxazole, sulfamonomethoxine, and florfenicol being over 2000 ng L(-1) in some samples, while the other antibiotics levels ranged from ND (no detection) to 551.18 ng L(-1). Significant differences were observed in antibiotic burden among different regions for total antibiotics, sulfonamides, quinolones, and amphenicols; among time points for quinolones, β-lactams, and tetracyclines; and among species for quinolones and macrolides. Furthermore, basing on the risk quotient (RQ) method, the assessment revealed that florfenicol was of highest risk to algae with RQ values exceeding 0.1, while macrolide erythromycin posed the second highest risk. The partial correlation coefficient between total antibiotics and chlorophyll (a) was -0.035 that clearly indicated total antibiotics were detrimental to green algae growth, while the nutrient input and other physical - chemical factors were much more beneficial. Overall, holistic far-reaching measures of antibiotics control are recommended to preserve aquaculture ecosystem health. PMID:27424054

  15. Suppression of methanogenesis for hydrogen production in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells using various antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Catal, Tunc; Lesnik, Keaton Larson; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens can utilize the hydrogen produced in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), thereby decreasing the hydrogen generation efficiency. However, various antibiotics have previously been shown to inhibit methanogenesis. In the present study antibiotics, including neomycin sulfate, 2-bromoethane sulfonate, 2-chloroethane sulfonate, 8-aza-hypoxanthine, were examined to determine if hydrogen production could be improved through inhibition of methanogenesis but not hydrogen production in MECs. 1.1mM neomycin sulfate inhibited both methane and hydrogen production while 2-chloroethane sulfonate (20mM), 2-bromoethane sulfonate (20mM), and 8-aza-hypoxanthine (3.6mM) can inhibited methane generation and with concurrent increases in hydrogen production. Our results indicated that adding select antibiotics to the mixed species community in MECs could be a suitable method to enhance hydrogen production efficiency.

  16. Comparative Analysis of the Biosynthetic Gene Clusters and Pathways for Three Structurally Related Antitumor Antibiotics Bleomycin, Tallysomycin and Zorbamycin†

    PubMed Central

    Galm, Ute; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Wang, Liyan; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Unsin, Claudia; Tao, Meifeng; Coughlin, Jane M.; Shen, Ben

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthetic gene clusters for the glycopeptide antitumor antibiotics bleomycin (BLM), tallysomycin (TLM), and zorbamycin (ZBM) have been recently cloned and characterized from Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003, Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158, and Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, respectively. The striking similarities and differences among the biosynthetic gene clusters for the three structurally related glycopeptide antitumor antibiotics prompted us to compare and contrast their respective biosynthetic pathways and to investigate various enzymatic elements. The presence of different numbers of isolated nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) domains in all three clusters does not result in major structural differences of the respective compounds. The seemingly identical domain organization of the NRPS modules responsible for heterocycle formation, on the other hand, is contrasted by the biosynthesis of two different structural entities, bithiazole and thiazolinyl-thiazole, for BLM/TLM and ZBM, respectively. Variations in sugar biosynthesis apparently dictate the glycosylation patterns distinct for each of the BLM, TLM, and ZBM glycopeptide scaffolds. These observations demonstrate nature’s ingenuity and flexibility in achieving structural differences and similarities via various mechanisms and will surely inspire combinatorial biosynthesis efforts to expand on natural product structural diversity. PMID:21210656

  17. Manipulating and understanding antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) with decoy oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Michael; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2008-01-22

    We have adapted and extended the decoy oligonucleotide technique for use in prokaryotes. To identify cis-acting regulatory elements within a promoter, we developed a DNase I/T7 exonuclease footprinting technique and applied it to actII-orf4 from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), which encodes the pathway-specific activator for production of the antibiotic actinorhodin. Our in vivo mapping data allowed us to create decoy oligonucleotides incorporating the identified regulatory elements and to test whether their introduction into S. coelicolor affected antibiotic production. We mapped the promoter region when in a transcriptionally inactive state before the onset of actinorhodin production with the aim of designing decoy oligonucleotides capable of interfering with potential repressor binding and so stimulate actinorhodin production. Mapping identified five candidates for decoy oligonucleotides, and these were tested in a plate-based assay to rapidly validate their activity. A transfection protocol was developed for liquid cultures that enabled efficient uptake of decoys, and quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated decoy persistence for >70 h. Measurement of the effects on growth, expression of actII-orf4, and antibiotic production demonstrated that one of the decoys, in concordance with the plate assay, was more efficacious than the others in increasing actinorhodin production. Two of the identified regulatory elements occurred upstream of gene SCO5812, deletion of which reduced actinorhodin production, confirming that experimental analysis of regulatory motifs can provide new insights into factors influencing antibiotic production in streptomycetes.

  18. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-05-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  19. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi. PMID:27143514

  20. Biomedicine of Enkephalin-Derived Glycopeptide Analgesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polt, Robin

    The incorporation of glycosides into peptide neurotransmitters imparts drug-like character to the neurotransmitter "message" via "membrane hopping". The importance of the glycopeptide-membrane interaction is emphasized, and the biousian theory is briefly explained. Application of this approach to enkephalins, the endogenous opioid peptides, leads to potent analgesic compounds capable of systemic delivery. The clinical applications of these compounds are advocated by the author.

  1. A High-throughput O-Glycopeptide Discovery Platform for Seromic Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Blixt, Ola; Cló, Emiliano; Nudelman, Aaron S.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Clausen, Thomas; Wandall, Hans H.; Livingston, Philip O.; Clausen, Henrik; Jensen, Knud J.

    2010-01-01

    Biomarker microarrays are becoming valuable tools for serological screening of disease-associated autoantibodies. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as glycosylation extend the range of protein function, and a variety of glycosylated proteins are known to be altered in disease progression. Here, we have developed a synthetic screening microarray platform for facile display of O-glycosylated peptides (O-PTMs). By introducing a capping step during chemical solid-phase glycopeptide synthesis, selective enrichment of N-terminal glycopeptide end products were achieved on an amine-reactive hydrogel coated microarray glass surface, allowing high-throughput display of large numbers of glycopeptides. Utilizing a repertoire of recombinant glycosyltransferases enabled further diversification of the array libraries in-situ and display of a new level of potential biomarker candidates for serological screening. As proof-of-concept we have demonstrated that MUC1 glycopeptides could be assembled and used to detect autoantibodies in vaccine induced disease free breast cancer patients and in patients, with confirmed disease at time of diagnosis. PMID:20726594

  2. Dynamics of symbiont-mediated antibiotic production reveal efficient long-term protection for beewolf offspring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insects have evolved a wide range of mechanisms to defend themselves and their offspring against antagonists. One of these strategies involves the utilization of antimicrobial compounds provided by symbiotic bacteria to protect the host or its nutritional resources from pathogens and parasites. In the symbiosis of the solitary digger wasp, Philanthus triangulum (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae), the bacterial symbiont ‘Candidatus Streptomyces philanthi’ defends the developing larvae against pathogens by producing a mixture of at least nine antimicrobial substances on the cocoon surface. This antibiotic cocktail inhibits the growth of a broad range of detrimental fungi and bacteria, thereby significantly enhancing the offspring’s survival probability. Results Here we show that the production of antimicrobial compounds by the beewolf symbionts is confined to the first two weeks after cocoon spinning, leading to a high concentration of piericidins and streptochlorin on the cocoon surface. Expression profiling of housekeeping, sporulation, and antibiotic biosynthesis genes indicates that antibiotic production coincides with morphological differentiation that enables the symbionts to survive the nutrient-limited conditions on the beewolf cocoon. The antibiotic substances remain stable on the cocoon surface for the entire duration of the beewolf’s hibernation period, demonstrating that the compounds are resistant against environmental influences. Conclusions The antibiotic production by the beewolf symbionts serves as a reliable protection for the wasp offspring against pathogenic microorganisms during the long and unpredictable developmental phase in the subterranean brood cells. Thus, the beewolf-Streptomyces symbiosis provides one of the rare examples of antibiotics serving as an efficient defense in the natural environment and may aid in devising new strategies for the utilization of antibiotic combination therapies in human medicine against increasingly

  3. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against the antibiotic tilmicosin.

    PubMed

    Beier, Ross C; Creemer, Lawrence C; Ziprin, Richard L; Nisbet, David J

    2005-12-14

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were developed that specifically bind tilmicosin. Keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugates were used for the immunogen and plate coating antigen, respectively. The conjugates were synthesized by different methods, resulting in different linkages. Six hybridoma cell lines were isolated that produced Mabs that competed with tilmicosin, and have IgG1 isotype. The Til-1 and Til-5 Mabs had IC50 values for tilmicosin of 9.6 and 6.4 ng/well (48 and 32 ng/mL), respectively, and limits of detection at IC20 of 1.84 and 0.89 ng/well (9.2 and 4.45 ng/mL), respectively. The Mabs demonstrated high cross-reactivity to the macrolides containing 3,5-dimethylpiperidine at C20 and the amino sugar at C5. No cross-reactivity was observed for tylosin and other macrolides that did not contain 3,5-dimethylpiperidine. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the antibiotic tilmicosin by use of the developed Mabs. These Mabs may be excellent candidates for the determination and immunolocalization of tilmicosin.

  4. Prevalence of veterinary antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in the surface water of a livestock production region in northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L(-1). The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment. PMID:25372873

  5. Prevalence of veterinary antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in the surface water of a livestock production region in northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L(-1). The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment.

  6. Prevalence of Veterinary Antibiotics and Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli in the Surface Water of a Livestock Production Region in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L−1. The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment. PMID:25372873

  7. Detection of new mutations conferring resistance to linezolid in glycopeptide-intermediate susceptibility Staphylococcus hominis subspecies hominis circulating in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Sorlozano, A; Gutierrez, J; Martinez, T; Yuste, M E; Perez-Lopez, J A; Vindel, A; Guillen, J; Boquete, T

    2010-01-01

    Glycopeptides and linezolid are the most widely used antibiotics to treat infections by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. We report the presence of various isolates of methicillin-resistant S. hominis subsp. hominis with resistance to linezolid and reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides. We studied ten blood culture isolates of S. hominis subsp. hominis from nine patients admitted to our hospital. Etest was used to study susceptibility to antibiotics commonly prescribed against staphylococci. Domain V region of the 23S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced to detect possible mutations that confer resistance to linezolid. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used for the clonality study of isolates. All isolates were resistant to oxacillin, gentamicin, levofloxacin, cotrimoxazole, and linezolid, and susceptible to tigecycline and daptomycin. Nine of the isolates were resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin, and showed heterogeneous resistance to glycopeptides. C2190T, G2603T, and G2474T mutations were detected in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. PFGE showed the presence of two different clones. This report alerts to the possible appearance of clinical strains of methicillin-resistant staphylococci with intermediate resistance to glycopeptides, resistance to linezolid, and multiple resistance to other second-line antibiotics.

  8. ARS Research Review on "Recent progress in developing alternative strategies to antibiotics in poultry production"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The global animal industry needs to address the increasing regulatory restrictions on the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in animal production. Many AGPs have already been restricted by animal farms in the European Union and soon other countries are expected to be under increasing scrutin...

  9. Comparative in vitro study of the antimicrobial activities of different commercial antibiotic products for intravenous administration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The antimicrobial resistance is a global problem, probably due to the indiscriminate and irrational use of antibiotics, prescriptions for incorrect medicines or incorrect determinations of dose, route and/or duration. Another consideration is the uncertainty of patients receiving antibiotics about whether the quality of a generic medicine is equal to, greater than or less than its equivalent brand-name drug. The antibiotics behaviors must be evaluated in vitro and in vivo in order to confirm their suitability for therapeutic use. Methods The antimicrobial activities of Meropenem and Piperacillin/Tazobactam were studied by microbiological assays to determine their potencies (content), minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), critical concentrations and capacity to produce spontaneous drug-resistant mutants. Results With respect to potency (content) all the products fulfill USP requirements, so they should all be considered pharmaceutical equivalents. The MIC values of the samples evaluated (trade marks and generics) were the same for each strain tested, indicating that all products behaved similarly. The critical concentration values were very similar for all samples, and the ratios between the critical concentration of the standard and those of each sample were similar to the ratios of their specific antibiotic contents. Overall, therefore, the results showed no significant differences among samples. Finally, the production of spontaneous mutants did not differ significantly among the samples evaluated. Conclusions All the samples are pharmaceutical equivalents and the products can be used in antimicrobial therapy. PMID:20113478

  10. Cold drugs. Circulation, production and intelligence of antibiotics in post-WWII years.

    PubMed

    Capocci, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The paper details how the earliest antibiotics were subject to a strict control during the earliest phase of the Cold War. Because of antibiotics strategic and economic value, Anglo-American Governments restricted circulation of scientists, techno-scientific know-how and technology related to penicillin production, as well as closely controlling the circulation of the drugs in the Communist countries. These efforts are documented by archival documents, testifying how drugs were actual instruments of propaganda and political strategies, affecting pharmaceutical development both in the Western and the Eastern bloc.

  11. Antibiotics and bioactive natural products in treatment of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A brief review

    PubMed Central

    Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains with Methicillin resistance are associated with increased mortality and morbidity, aggressive course, multiple drug resistance and hospital outbreaks. Several first and second line antibiotics are rapidly becoming ineffective for treatment due to emergence of resistance. Extracts of medicinal plants are rich source of unique phytochemicals. Plants used in traditional medicine have been reported to have significant anti-MRSA activity. The objective of this review is to provide a brief overview of antibiotics as well as anti-MRSA natural products and their future prospect. PMID:26009690

  12. Cold drugs. Circulation, production and intelligence of antibiotics in post-WWII years.

    PubMed

    Capocci, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The paper details how the earliest antibiotics were subject to a strict control during the earliest phase of the Cold War. Because of antibiotics strategic and economic value, Anglo-American Governments restricted circulation of scientists, techno-scientific know-how and technology related to penicillin production, as well as closely controlling the circulation of the drugs in the Communist countries. These efforts are documented by archival documents, testifying how drugs were actual instruments of propaganda and political strategies, affecting pharmaceutical development both in the Western and the Eastern bloc. PMID:26054208

  13. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  14. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  15. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  16. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  17. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug,...

  18. Production of peptide antibiotics by Bacillus sp. GU 057 indigenously isolated from saline soil

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Adnan; Khan, Muhammad Ayaz; Ehsanullah, Malik; Haroon, Uzma; Azam, Sheikh Muhammad Farooq; Hameed, Abdul

    2012-01-01

    A total of 112 soil samples were taken from differents areas of district D.I.Khan and Kohat (KPK) Pakistan and screened for production of antibiotics against the Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus. Widest zone of inhibition (18mm) was produced by microorganism isolated from saline soil. The strain was later identified as Bacillus GU057 by standard biochemical assays. Maximum activity (18mm inhibition zone) was observed against Staphylococcus aureus after 48 hours of incubation at pH 8 and 4% concentration of glucose. The antibiotic was identified by autobiography as bacitracin. The Bacillus strain GU057 was confirmed as good peptide antibiotic producer and can effectively be indulged as biocontrol agent. PMID:24031962

  19. The Effect of Antibiotics on Associated Bacterial Community of Stored Product Mites

    PubMed Central

    Kopecky, Jan; Nesvorna, Marta; Mareckova-Sagova, Marketa; Hubert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteria are associated with the gut, fat bodies and reproductive organs of stored product mites (Acari: Astigmata). The mites are pests due to the production of allergens. Addition of antibiotics to diets can help to characterize the association between mites and bacteria. Methodology and Principal Findings Ampicillin, neomycin and streptomycin were added to the diets of mites and the effects on mite population growth (Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae) and associated bacterial community structure were assessed. Mites were treated by antibiotic supplementation (1 mgg−1 of diet) for 21 days and numbers of mites and bacterial communities were analyzed and compared to the untreated control. Bacterial quantities, determined by real-time PCR, significantly decreased in antibiotic treated specimens from 5 to 30 times in A. siro and T. putrescentiae, while no decline was observed in L. destructor. Streptomycin treatment eliminated Bartonella-like bacteria in the both A. siro and T. putrescentiae and Cardinium in T. putrescentiae. Solitalea-like bacteria proportion increased in the communities of neomycin and streptomycin treated A. siro specimens. Kocuria proportion increased in the bacterial communities of ampicillin and streptomycin treated A. siro and neomycin and streptomycin treated L. destructor. Conclusions/Significance The work demonstrated the changes of mite associated bacterial community under antibiotic pressure in pests of medical importance. Pre-treatment of mites by 1 mgg−1 antibiotic diets improved mite fitness as indicated accelerated population growth of A. siro pretreated streptomycin and neomycin and L. destructor pretreated by neomycin. All tested antibiotics supplemented to diets caused the decrease of mite growth rate in comparison to the control diet. PMID:25387104

  20. Natural Products as a Source for Novel Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Moloney, Mark G

    2016-08-01

    Natural products have historically been of crucial importance in the identification and development of antibacterial agents. Interest in these systems has waned in recent years, but the rapid emergence of resistant bacterial strains has forced their re-evaluation as a route to identify novel chemical skeletons with antibacterial activity for elaboration in drug development. This overview examines the current situation, highlights new natural product systems which have been found, together with re-examination of some old ones, and new technologies for their identification. While natural products certainly have the potential to re-emerge as a key start-point in antibacterial drug discovery, reports of new or reinvestigated structures need to be supported with sufficient quality chemical (solubility, stability), biochemical (including toxicity in particular, along with target information) and microbiological [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and resistance frequency] validation data to assist in the identification of promising hit structures and to avoid wasted effort from trawling over already cultivated territory. This is particularly important in a resource-limited research environment. PMID:27267698

  1. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  2. Increasing antibiotic resistance in preservative-tolerant bacterial strains isolated from cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Orús, Pilar; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Leranoz, Sonia; Berlanga, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    To ensure the microbiological quality, consumer safety and organoleptic properties of cosmetic products, manufacturers need to comply with defined standards using several preservatives and disinfectants. A drawback regarding the use of these preservatives is the possibility of generating cross-insusceptibility to other disinfectants or preservatives, as well as cross resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to understand the adaptive mechanisms of Enterobacter gergoviae, Pseudomonas putida and Burkholderia cepacia that are involved in recurrent contamination in cosmetic products containing preservatives. Diminished susceptibility to formaldehyde-donors was detected in isolates but not to other preservatives commonly used in the cosmetics industry, although increasing resistance to different antibiotics (β-lactams, quinolones, rifampicin, and tetracycline) was demonstrated in these strains when compared with the wild-type strain. The outer membrane protein modifications and efflux mechanism activities responsible for the resistance trait were evaluated. The development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms due to the selective pressure from preservatives included in cosmetic products could be a risk for the emergence and spread of bacterial resistance in the environment. Nevertheless, the large contribution of disinfection and preservation cannot be denied in cosmetic products.

  3. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance genes in staphylococci isolated from ready-to-eat meat products.

    PubMed

    Podkowik, M; Bystroń, J; Bania, J

    2012-01-01

    Prevalence of mecA, blaZ, tetO/K/M, ermA/B/C, aph, and vanA/B/C/D genes conferring resistance to oxacillin, penicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, and vancomycin was investigated in 65 staphylococcal isolates belonging to twelve species obtained from ready-to-eat porcine, bovine, and chicken products. All coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) and S. aureus isolates harbored at least one antibiotic resistance gene. None of the S. aureus possessed more than three genes, while 25% of the CNS isolates harbored at least four genes encoding resistance to clinically used antibiotics. In 15 CNS isolates the mecA gene was detected, while all S. aureus isolates were mecA-negative. We demonstrate that in ready-to-eat food the frequency of CNS harboring multiple antibiotic resistance genes is higher than that of multiple resistant S. aureus, meaning that food can be considered a reservoir of bacteria containing genes potentially contributing to the evolution of antibiotic resistance in staphylococci.

  4. Hfq regulates antibacterial antibiotic biosynthesis and extracellular lytic-enzyme production in Lysobacter enzymogenes OH11

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gaoge; Zhao, Yuxin; Du, Liangcheng; Qian, Guoliang; Liu, Fengquan

    2015-01-01

    Lysobacter enzymogenes is an important biocontrol agent with the ability to produce a variety of lytic enzymes and novel antibiotics. Little is known about their regulatory mechanisms. Understanding these will be helpful for improving biocontrol of crop diseases and potential medical application. In the present study, we generated an hfq (encoding a putative ribonucleic acid chaperone) deletion mutant, and then utilized a new genomic marker-free method to construct an hfq-complemented strain. We showed for the first time that Hfq played a pleiotropic role in regulating the antibacterial antibiotic biosynthesis and extracellular lytic enzyme activity in L. enzymogenes. Mutation of hfq significantly increased the yield of WAP-8294A2 (an antibacterial antibiotic) as well as the transcription of its key biosynthetic gene, waps1. However, inactivation of hfq almost abolished the extracellular chitinase activity and remarkably decreased the activity of both extracellular protease and cellulase in L. enzymogenes. We further showed that the regulation of hfq in extracellular chitinase production was in part through the impairment of the secretion of chitinase A. Collectively, our results reveal the regulatory roles of hfq in antibiotic metabolite and extracellular lytic enzymes in the underexplored genus of Lysobacter. PMID:25683974

  5. The re-emerging role of microbial natural products in antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Genilloud, Olga

    2014-07-01

    New classes of antibacterial compounds are urgently needed to respond to the high frequency of occurrence of resistances to all major classes of known antibiotics. Microbial natural products have been for decades one of the most successful sources of drugs to treat infectious diseases but today, the emerging unmet clinical need poses completely new challenges to the discovery of novel candidates with the desired properties to be developed as antibiotics. While natural products discovery programs have been gradually abandoned by the big pharma, smaller biotechnology companies and research organizations are taking over the lead in the discovery of novel antibacterials. Recent years have seen new approaches and technologies being developed and integrated in a multidisciplinary effort to further exploit microbial resources and their biosynthetic potential as an untapped source of novel molecules. New strategies to isolate novel species thought to be uncultivable, and synthetic biology approaches ranging from genome mining of microbial strains for cryptic biosynthetic pathways to their heterologous expression have been emerging in combination with high throughput sequencing platforms, integrated bioinformatic analysis, and on-site analytical detection and dereplication tools for novel compounds. These different innovative approaches are defining a completely new framework that is setting the bases for the future discovery of novel chemical scaffolds that should foster a renewed interest in the identification of novel classes of natural product antibiotics from the microbial world.

  6. Crystal Structures of Lipoglycopeptide Antibiotic Deacetylases: Implications for the Biosynthesis of A40926 and Teicoplanin

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yaozhong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Nair, Satish K.

    2008-07-08

    The lipoglycopeptide antibiotics teicoplanin and A40926 have proven efficacy against Gram-positive pathogens. These drugs are distinguished from glycopeptide antibiotics by N-linked long chain acyl-D-glucosamine decorations that contribute to antibacterial efficacy. During the biosynthesis of lipoglycopeptides, tailoring glycosyltransferases attach an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine to the aglycone, and this N-acetyl-glucosaminyl pseudoaglycone is deacetylated prior to long chain hydrocarbon attachment. Here we present several high-resolution crystal structures of the pseudoaglycone deacetylases from the biosynthetic pathways of teicoplanin and A40926. The cocrystal structure of the teicoplanin pseudoaglycone deacetylase with a fatty acid product provides further insights into the roles of active-site residues, and suggests mechanistic similarities with structurally distinct zinc deacetylases, such as peptidoglycan deacetylase and LpxC. A unique, structurally mobile capping lid, located at the apex of these pseudoaglycone deacetylases, likely serves as a determinant of substrate specificity.

  7. Immunological Evaluation of Recent MUC1 Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Wall, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    Aberrantly glycosylated mucin 1 (MUC1) is a recognized tumor-specific antigen on epithelial cell tumors. A wide variety of MUC1 glycopeptide anti-cancer vaccines have been formulated by many research groups. Some researchers have used MUC1 alone as an immunogen whereas other groups used different antigenic carrier proteins such as bovine serum albumin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin for conjugation with MUC1 glycopeptide. A variety of adjuvants have been used with MUC1 glycopeptides to improve their immunogenicity. Fully synthetic multicomponent vaccines have been synthesized by incorporating different T helper cell epitopes and Toll-like receptor agonists. Some vaccine formulations utilized liposomes or nanoparticles as vaccine delivery systems. In this review, we discuss the immunological evaluation of different conjugate or synthetic MUC1 glycopeptide vaccines in different tumor or mouse models that have been published since 2012. PMID:27472370

  8. Immunological Evaluation of Recent MUC1 Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Wall, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrantly glycosylated mucin 1 (MUC1) is a recognized tumor-specific antigen on epithelial cell tumors. A wide variety of MUC1 glycopeptide anti-cancer vaccines have been formulated by many research groups. Some researchers have used MUC1 alone as an immunogen whereas other groups used different antigenic carrier proteins such as bovine serum albumin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin for conjugation with MUC1 glycopeptide. A variety of adjuvants have been used with MUC1 glycopeptides to improve their immunogenicity. Fully synthetic multicomponent vaccines have been synthesized by incorporating different T helper cell epitopes and Toll-like receptor agonists. Some vaccine formulations utilized liposomes or nanoparticles as vaccine delivery systems. In this review, we discuss the immunological evaluation of different conjugate or synthetic MUC1 glycopeptide vaccines in different tumor or mouse models that have been published since 2012. PMID:27472370

  9. Macroalgal Endophytes from the Atlantic Coast of Canada: A Potential Source of Antibiotic Natural Products?

    PubMed Central

    Flewelling, Andrew J.; Ellsworth, Katelyn T.; Sanford, Joseph; Forward, Erica; Johnson, John A.; Gray, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    As the need for new and more effective antibiotics increases, untapped sources of biodiversity are being explored in an effort to provide lead structures for drug discovery. Endophytic fungi from marine macroalgae have been identified as a potential source of biologically active natural products, although data to support this is limited. To assess the antibiotic potential of temperate macroalgal endophytes we isolated endophytic fungi from algae collected in the Bay of Fundy, Canada and screened fungal extracts for the presence of antimicrobial compounds. A total of 79 endophytes were isolated from 7 species of red, 4 species of brown, and 3 species of green algae. Twenty of the endophytes were identified to the genus or species level, with the remaining isolates designated codes according to their morphology. Bioactivity screening assays performed on extracts of the fermentation broths and mycelia of the isolates revealed that 43 endophytes exhibited antibacterial activity, with 32 displaying antifungal activity. Endophytic fungi from Bay of Fundy macroalgae therefore represent a significant source of antibiotic natural products and warrant further detailed investigation.

  10. Games of life and death: antibiotic resistance and production through the lens of evolutionary game theory.

    PubMed

    Conlin, Peter L; Chandler, Josephine R; Kerr, Benjamin

    2014-10-01

    In this review, we demonstrate how game theory can be a useful first step in modeling and understanding interactions among bacteria that produce and resist antibiotics. We introduce the basic features of evolutionary game theory and explore model microbial systems that correspond to some classical games. Each game discussed defines a different category of social interaction with different resulting population dynamics (exclusion, coexistence, bistability, cycling). We then explore how the framework can be extended to incorporate some of the complexity of natural microbial communities. Overall, the game theoretical perspective helps to guide our expectations about the evolution of some forms of antibiotic resistance and production because it makes clear the precise nature of social interaction in this context.

  11. Characterization of immunoglobulins through analysis of N-glycopeptides by MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Emy; Buist, Marjorie; Roy, Rini; Gomes de Oliveira, Andrey Giovanni; Bodnar, Edward; Salama, Apolline; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Perreault, Hélène

    2016-07-15

    The aim of this report is to emphasize the role, usefulness and power of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in the analysis of glycoforms of antibodies (Abs) through their proteolytic glycopeptides. Abs are complex biomolecules in which glycans hold determinant properties and thus need to be thoroughly characterized following Ab production by recombinant methods or Ab collection from human/animal serum or tissue. In spite of the great robustness of MALDI-TOF MS in terms of tolerance to impurities, the analysis of Abs and Ab components using this technique requires extensive sample preparation involving all or some of chromatography, solid phase extraction, enzymatic modification, and chemical derivatization. This report focuses on a monoclonal Ab produced in cell culture, as well as on a polyclonal human immunoglobulin (Ig) G obtained commercially and a polyclonal porcine IgG obtained from serum. A method is first provided to separate Ab protein chain components (light chains, heavy chains) by gel electrophoresis, which is useful for instance for protein-A eluates of Igs either from cell culture or biological samples. This allows for in-gel proteolytic digestion of the protein gel band(s) of choice for further MS characterization. Also discussed is the more conventional in-solution overnight digestion method used here with each of two proteolytic enzymes, i.e. trypsin and chymotrypsin. The overnight method is in turn compared with a much faster approach, that of digesting Abs with trypsin or chymotrypsin through the action of microwave heating. For method comparison, glycopeptides are fractionated from digestion mixtures using mostly C-18 cartridges for simplicity, although this enrichment procedure is also compared with other published procedures. The advantages of MALDI tandem mass spectrometry are highlighted for glycopeptide analysis, and lastly an esterification method applied to glycopeptides is

  12. Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria in a river impacted by both an antibiotic production plant and urban treated discharges.

    PubMed

    Sidrach-Cardona, Ricardo; Hijosa-Valsero, María; Marti, Elisabet; Balcázar, José Luis; Becares, Eloy

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the abundance and spatial dynamics of antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria (Escherichia coli, total coliforms and Enterococcus spp.) were determined in water and sediment samples from a river impacted by both antibiotic production plant (APP) and urban wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharges. Agar dilution and disk diffusion methods were also used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Two antimicrobial agents, cephalexin (25 μg/ml) and amoxicillin (50 μg/ml), were evaluated using the agar dilution method for E. coli, total coliforms (TC) and Enterococcus spp., whereas the degree of sensitivity or resistance of E. coli isolates to penicillin (10 U), ampicillin (10 μg), doxycycline (30 μg), tetracycline (30 μg), erythromycin (15 μg), azithromycin (15 μg) and streptomycin (10 μg) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Real-time PCR assays were used to determine the prevalence of three antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs). The agar dilution method showed that most E. coli isolates and TC were resistant to amoxicillin, especially after receiving the APP discharges. Antibiotic resistances to amoxicillin and cephalexin were higher after the APP discharge point than after the WWTP effluent. The disk diffusion method revealed that 100% of bacterial isolates were resistant to penicillin and erythromycin. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected and showed a higher proportion at the WWTP discharge point than those in the APP. Highly multidrug-resistant bacteria (resistance to more than 4 antibiotics) were also detected, reaching mean values of 41.6% in water samples and 50.1% in sediments. The relative abundance of the blaTEM, blaCTX-M and blaSHV genes was higher in samples from the treatment plants than in those collected upstream from the discharges, especially for water samples collected at the APP discharge point. These results clearly demonstrate that both the APP and the WWTP contribute to the emergence and spread of antibiotic

  13. Random Glycopeptide Bead Libraries for Seromic Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kračun, Stjepan K.; Cló, Emilano; Clausen, Henrik; Levery, Steven B.; Jensen, Knud J.; Blixt, Ola

    2010-01-01

    Identification of disease specific biomarkers is important to address early diagnosis and management of disease. Aberrant post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins such as O-glycosylations (O-PTMs) are emerging as triggers of autoantibodies that can serve as sensitive biomarkers. Here we have developed a random glycopeptide bead library screening platform for detection of autoantibodies and other binding proteins. Libraries were build on biocompatible PEGA beads including a safety-catch C-terminal amide linker (SCAL) that allowed mild cleavage conditions (I2/NaBH4 and TFA) for release of glycopeptides and sequence determination by ESI-MSn. As proof-of principle, tumor specific glycopeptide reporter epitopes were built-in into the libraries and were detected by tumor specific monoclonal antibodies and autoantibodies from cancer patients. Sequenced and identified glycopeptides were re-synthesized at preparative scale by automated parallel peptide synthesis and printed on microarrays for validation and broader analysis with larger sets of sera. We further showed that chemical synthesis of the monosaccharide O-glycopeptide library (Tn-glycoform) could be diversified to other tumor glycoforms by on-bead enzymatic glycosylation reactions with recombinant glycosyltransferases. Hence, we have developed a high-throughput flexible platform for rapid biomarker discovery O-glycopeptides and the method has applicability in other types of assays like lectin/antibody/enzyme specificity studies as well as investigation of other PTMs. PMID:20886906

  14. 60Co irradiation for sterilization of veterinary mastitis products containing antibiotics and steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, K.; Kane, M. P.; Rahn, P. D.; Steindler, K. A.

    Effects of 60Co irradiation for sterilization of veterinary mastitis products were evaluated. The mastitis products which were examined contained various combinations of antibiotics and steroids suspended in peanut oil vehicle. Bioburden data indicated that the unirradiated products were only occasionally contaminated with microorganisms. The D-values of the nonsterile product and environmental isolates were 0.028, 0.15, 0.017, and 0.018 Mrads for Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium oxalicum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas maltophilia, respectively. The D-value of the biological indicator organism, Bacillus pumilus spores, in the vehicle was 0.27 Mrads. Thus, an irradiation dose of 1.6 Mrads would be sufficient to achieve six log cycles of destruction of the biological indicator organism. The minimum absorbed irradiation dose of 2.5 Mrads preferred by many countries for sterilization would achieve 9.3 log cycle destruction of the indicator organism and guarantee a probability of 1 × 10 -15 assurance for the most radio-resistant product isolate, Penicillium oxalicum. In order to examine short and long term chemical stabilities of active components, stability indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods for the determination of the following antibiotics and steroids were developed. They were: dihydrostreptomycin, neomycin, novobiocin, penicillin G, hydrocortisone acetate, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, and prednisolone. The rates of degradation and radiolytic degradation schemes for the majority of these compounds were elucidated. Formation of new compounds was not observed in these antibiotics and steroids upon 60Co irradiation. The compounds that increased by irradiation were inherently present in commercially available non-irradiated lots and/or can easily be formed by either acidic, basic, or thermal treatment.

  15. Comparative in vitro study of the antimicrobial activities of different commercial antibiotic products of vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the most critical problems about antimicrobial therapy is the increasing resistance to antibiotics. Previous studies have shown that there is a direct relation between erroneous prescription, dosage, route, duration of the therapy and the antibiotics resistance. Other important point is the uncertainty about the quality of the prescribed medicines. Some physicians believe that generic drugs are not as effective as innovator ones, so it is very important to have evidence that shows that all commercialized drugs are suitable for therapeutic use. Methods Microbial assays were used to establish the potency, the Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs), the Minimal Bactericidal Concentration (MBCs), the critical concentrations, and the production of spontaneous mutants that are resistant to vancomycin. Results The microbial assay was validated in order to determine the Vancomycin potency of the tasted samples. All the products showed that have potency values between 90 - 115% (USP requirement). The products behave similarly because the MICs, The MBCs, the critical concentrations, the critical concentrations ratios between standard and samples, and the production of spontaneous mutants don't have significant differences. Conclusions All products analyzed by microbiological tests, show that both trademarks and generics do not have statistical variability and the answer of antimicrobial activity Show also that they are pharmaceutical equivalents. PMID:21777438

  16. Degradation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by ferrate(VI): Effects of water constituents and oxidized products.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Wang, Xinghao; Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Sui, Yunxia; Cizmas, Leslie; Wang, Zunyao; Sharma, Virender K

    2016-10-15

    The degradation of five fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics (flumequine (FLU), enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL) and marbofloxacin (MAR)) by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)) was examined to demonstrate the potential of this iron-based chemical oxidant to treat antibiotics in water. Experiments were conducted at different molar ratios of Fe(VI) to FQs at pH 7.0. All FQs, except FLU, were degraded within 2 min at [Fe(VI)]:[FQ] ≤ 20.0. Multiple additions of Fe(VI) improved the degradation efficiency, and provided greater degradation than a single addition of Fe(VI). The effects of anions, cations, and humic acid (HA), usually present in source waters and wastewaters, on the removal of FLU were investigated. Anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-), and HCO3(-)) and monovalent cations (Na(+) and K(+)) had no influence on the removal of FLU. However, multivalent cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+)) in water decreased the efficiency of FLU removal by Fe(VI). An increase in the ionic strength of the solution, and the presence of HA in the water, also decreased the percentage of FLU removed by Fe(VI). Experiments on the removal of selected FQs, present as co-existing antibiotics in pure water, river water, synthetic water and wastewater, were also conducted to demonstrate the practical application of Fe(VI) to remove the antibiotics during water treatment. The seventeen oxidized products (OPs) of FLU were identified using solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. The reaction pathways are proposed, and are theoretically confirmed by molecular orbital calculations.

  17. Degradation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by ferrate(VI): Effects of water constituents and oxidized products.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Wang, Xinghao; Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Sui, Yunxia; Cizmas, Leslie; Wang, Zunyao; Sharma, Virender K

    2016-10-15

    The degradation of five fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics (flumequine (FLU), enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL) and marbofloxacin (MAR)) by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)) was examined to demonstrate the potential of this iron-based chemical oxidant to treat antibiotics in water. Experiments were conducted at different molar ratios of Fe(VI) to FQs at pH 7.0. All FQs, except FLU, were degraded within 2 min at [Fe(VI)]:[FQ] ≤ 20.0. Multiple additions of Fe(VI) improved the degradation efficiency, and provided greater degradation than a single addition of Fe(VI). The effects of anions, cations, and humic acid (HA), usually present in source waters and wastewaters, on the removal of FLU were investigated. Anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-), and HCO3(-)) and monovalent cations (Na(+) and K(+)) had no influence on the removal of FLU. However, multivalent cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+)) in water decreased the efficiency of FLU removal by Fe(VI). An increase in the ionic strength of the solution, and the presence of HA in the water, also decreased the percentage of FLU removed by Fe(VI). Experiments on the removal of selected FQs, present as co-existing antibiotics in pure water, river water, synthetic water and wastewater, were also conducted to demonstrate the practical application of Fe(VI) to remove the antibiotics during water treatment. The seventeen oxidized products (OPs) of FLU were identified using solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. The reaction pathways are proposed, and are theoretically confirmed by molecular orbital calculations. PMID:27429354

  18. Impact of Malic Enzymes on Antibiotic and Triacylglycerol Production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Navone, Laura; Casati, Paula; Gramajo, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we have characterized two malic enzymes (ME), SCO2951 and SCO5261, from Streptomyces coelicolor and analyzed their role in antibiotic and triacylglycerol (TAG) production. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that Sco2951 and Sco5261 genes encode NAD+- and NADP+-dependent malic enzymes, respectively. Single or double mutants in the ME-encoding genes show no effect on growth rate compared to the parental M145 strain. However, the single Sco2951 and the double Sco2951 Sco5261 mutants display a strong reduction in the production of the polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin; additionally, the Sco2951 Sco5261 mutant shows a decrease in stored TAGs during exponential growth. The lower production of actinorhodin in the double mutant occurs as a consequence of a decrease in the expression of actII-ORF4, the transcriptional activator of the actinorhodin gene cluster. On the other hand, the reduced TAG accumulation is not due to reduced transcript levels of fatty acid biosynthetic genes nor to changes in the amount of the precursor acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). This mutant accumulates intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that could alter the regulation of the actinorhodin biosynthetic pathway, suggesting that MEs are important anaplerotic enzymes that redirect C4 intermediates from the TCA cycle to maintain secondary metabolism and TAG production in Streptomyces. PMID:22544242

  19. The antibiotic planosporicin coordinates its own production in the actinomycete Planomonospora alba.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Emma J; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2013-07-01

    Planosporicin is a ribosomally synthesized, posttranslationally modified peptide lantibiotic produced by the actinomycete Planomonospora alba. It contains one methyl-lanthionine and four lanthionine bridges and inhibits cell wall biosynthesis in other Gram-positive bacteria probably by binding to lipid II, the immediate precursor for cell wall biosynthesis. Planosporicin production, which is encoded by a cluster of 15 genes, is confined to stationary phase in liquid culture and to the onset of morphological differentiation when P. alba is grown on agar. This growth phase-dependent gene expression is controlled transcriptionally by three pathway-specific regulatory proteins: an extracytoplasmic function σ factor (PspX), its cognate anti-σ factor (PspW), and a transcriptional activator (PspR) with a C-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain. Using mutational analysis, S1 nuclease mapping, quantitative RT-PCR, and transcriptional fusions, we have determined the direct regulatory dependencies within the planosporicin gene cluster and present a model in which subinhibitory concentrations of the lantibiotic function in a feed-forward mechanism to elicit high levels of planosporicin production. We show that in addition to acting as an antibiotic, planosporicin can function as an extracellular signaling molecule to elicit precocious production of the lantibiotic, presumably ensuring synchronous and concerted lantibiotic biosynthesis in the wider population and, thus, the production of ecologically effective concentrations of the antibiotic.

  20. Functional analysis of SGR4635-induced enhancement of pigmented antibiotic production in Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Chi, Won-Jae; Lee, Soon-Youl; Lee, Jaehag

    2011-10-01

    The Gram-positive mycelium-producing bacterium Streptomyces undergoes complex morphological differentiation after autolytic degradation of the vegetative mycelium. Cell-wall breakdown during growth stimulates cell development and secondary metabolite production by Streptomyces. N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) produced by cell-wall lysis acts as a signal molecule, triggering the production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor A3(2). Here, we report that introduction of multiple copies of the GlcNAc-internalizing gene (sgr4635, encoding nagE2) of S. griseus activates actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin production during the late growth of S. lividans in the absence of GlcNAc. Furthermore, the repressor-type transcriptional regulator DasR binds to two operator sites upstream of sgr4635. Our findings indicate that sgr4635 induces DasR-mediated antibiotic production by internalizing the GlcNAc accumulated from cell-wall lysis.

  1. The development of synthetic antitumour vaccines from mucin glycopeptide antigens.

    PubMed

    Gaidzik, Nikola; Westerlind, Ulrika; Kunz, Horst

    2013-05-21

    Based on important cell-biological and biochemical results concerning the structural difference between membrane glycoproteins of normal epithelial cells and epithelial tumour cells, tumour-associated glycopeptide antigens have been chemically synthesised and structurally confirmed. Glycopeptide structures of the tandem repeat sequence of mucin MUC1 of epithelial tumour cells constitute the most promising tumour-associated antigens. In order to generate a sufficient immunogenicity of these endogenous structures, usually tolerated by the immune system, these synthetic glycopeptide antigens were conjugated to immune stimulating components: in fully synthetic two-component vaccines either with T-cell peptide epitopes or with Toll-like receptor2 lipopeptide ligands or in three-component vaccines with both these stimulants. Alternatively, the synthetic glycopeptide antigens were coupled to immune stimulating carrier proteins. In particular, MUC1 glycopeptide conjugates with Tetanus toxoid proved to be efficient vaccines inducing very strong immune responses in mice. The antibodies elicited with the fully synthetic vaccines showed selective recognition of the tumour-associated glycopeptides as was shown by neutralisation and micro-array binding experiments. After booster immunisations, most of the immune responses showed the installation of an immunological memory. Immunisation with fully synthetic three-component vaccines induced immune reactions with therapeutic effects in terms of reduction of the tumour burden in mice or in killing of tumour cells in culture, while MUC1 glycopeptide-Tetanus toxoid vaccines elicited antibodies in mice which recognised tumour cells in human tumour tissues. The results achieved so far are considered to be promising for the development of an active immunisation against tumours.

  2. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with retail aquaculture products from Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Lu, Zhang; Li, Xinhui; Shi, Lei; Huang, Ying; Wang, Hua H

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant (ART) bacteria and representative antibiotic resistance (AR)-encoding genes associated with several aquaculture products from retail markets in Guangzhou, China. ART commensal bacteria were found in 100% of the products examined. Among 505 multidrug-resistant isolates examined, close to one-fourth contained intI and sul1 genes: 15% contained sul2 and 5% contained tet (E). Incidences of β-lactamase-encoding genes bla(TEM), bla(CMY) and erythromycin resistance determinants ermB and ermC were 4.5, 1.7, 1.3, and 0.3%, respectively. Most of the ART isolates identified from the rinse water were Aeromonas spp.; those from intestines belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae. Plasmid-associated intI and AR-encoding genes were identified in several ART isolates by Southern hybridization. Three multidrug resistance-encoding plasmids were transferred into Escherichia coli DH5 a by chemical transformation and led to acquired AR in the transformants. In addition, the AR traits in many isolates were quite stable, even in the absence of selective pressure. Further studies are needed to reveal risk factors associated with the aquaculture production chain for targeted AR mitigation.

  3. Prevalence of LRTI in Patients Presenting with Productive Cough and Their Antibiotic Resistance Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Aim To find out the prevalence of Lower Respiratory Tract Infection (LRTI) such as bacterial, fungal, mycobacterial infections etc. in patients with productive cough of duration less than 15 days and to rule out the patients having previous history of tuberculosis or having treatment of tuberculosis. Materials and Methods Outdoor and Indoor patients of Department of Medicine and Chest & TB, SRG hospital and Jhalawar Medical College, Jhalawar were included. After sample collection the specimens were sent to the Microbiology department, for processing of Gram staining, Acid fast staining, KOH mount and bacteriological culture and sensitivity. Results A total of 200 samples were obtained from the outpatient and inpatient Department of Medicine and Chest & TB of which 66% were male and 34% were female. Seventy seven percent of samples were culture positive for both single pathogen and mixed infection of which 56.5% were male and 20.5% were female as males are more at risk for LRTI. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most prevalent pathogen (71/193), followed by coagulase positive Staphylococci i.e. COPS (43/193). More resistant pattern was found in coagulase negative Staohylococci (CONS) showed 61.11% Methicillin Resistant Staohylococci (MRS) incidence compared to 41.86% in COPS, also regarding Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamase (ESBL) production Escherichia coli showed incidence of 36.36% as compared to other gram negative bacilli. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most resistant organism found based on the antibiotic susceptibility pattern while Proteus mirabilis was the most sensitive organism. Conclusion Lower respiratory tract infections can spread easily among community and indiscriminate use of antibiotics contributes to their therapeutic failure. Area-wise studies on antimicrobial susceptibility profiles are essential to guide policy on the appropriate use of antibiotics to reduce the morbidity and mortality and also to control the emergence of antimicrobial resistance

  4. Resistance to colistin: what is the fate for this antibiotic in pig production?

    PubMed

    Rhouma, Mohamed; Beaudry, Francis; Letellier, Ann

    2016-08-01

    Colistin, a cationic polypeptide antibiotic, has reappeared in human medicine as a last-line treatment option for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB). Colistin is widely used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae. GNB resistant to colistin owing to chromosomal mutations have already been reported both in human and veterinary medicine, however several recent studies have just identified a plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene encoding for colistin resistance in Escherichia coli colistin resistance. The discovery of a non-chromosomal mechanism of colistin resistance in E. coli has led to strong reactions in the scientific community and to concern among physicians and veterinarians. Colistin use in food animals and particularly in pig production has been singled out as responsible for the emergence of colistin resistance. The present review will focus mainly on the possible link between colistin use in pigs and the spread of colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. First we demonstrate a possible link between Enterobacteriaceae resistance emergence and oral colistin pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and its administration modalities in pigs. We then discuss the potential impact of colistin use in pigs on public health with respect to resistance. We believe that colistin use in pig production should be re-evaluated and its dosing and usage optimised. Moreover, the search for competitive alternatives to using colistin with swine is of paramount importance to preserve the effectiveness of this antibiotic for the treatment of MDR-GNB infections in human medicine. PMID:27234675

  5. Improvement of antibiotic productivity by knock-out of dauW in Streptomyces coeruleobidus.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Tianjie; Yin, Chenghui; Zhu, Chunbao; Zhu, Baoquan; Hu, Youjia

    2011-10-20

    Daunorubicin (DNR) is an important anthracycline antibiotic. Its biosynthesis pathway has been well understood, however, the regulation of DNR biosynthesis needs further investigations. An ORF cloned between drrB and dnrX from the genome of a DNR producer, Streptomyces coeruleobidus DM, was named dauW and designated as an orthologous gene with dnrW and drrD. Several plasmids were constructed for over-expression and/or disruption of dauW in DM. Complete disruption of dauW can significantly increase the yield of DNR. We also found that the transcription level of dnrI, a major regulatory protein in the biosynthesis of DNR, and the self-resistance level were improved in dauW knock-out mutant. These results suggested that dauW may be a down-regulatory gene for DNR biosynthesis. Antibiotics productivity in S. coeruleobidus could be improved via regulation of the transcription of dnrI, a SARP regulator. The production of DNR in a high-producer and the yield of epi-DNR in an engineering strain were also increased by disruption of dauW.

  6. Resolving Isomeric Glycopeptide Glycoforms with Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography (HILIC)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yining; Nie, Yongxin; Boyes, Barry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to resolve glycans while attached to tryptic peptides would greatly facilitate glycoproteomics, as this would enable site-specific glycan characterization. Peptide/glycopeptide separations are typically performed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), where retention is driven by hydrophobic interaction. As the hydrophilic glycans do not interact significantly with the RPLC stationary phase, it is difficult to resolve glycopeptides that differ only in their glycan structure, even when these differences are large. Alternatively, glycans interact extensively with the stationary phases used in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), and consequently, differences in glycan structure have profound chromatographic shifts in this chromatographic mode. Here, we evaluate HILIC for the separation of isomeric glycopeptide mixtures that have the same peptide backbone but isomeric glycans. Hydrophilic functional groups on both the peptide and the glycan interact with the HILIC stationary phase, and thus, changes to either of these moieties can alter the chromatographic behavior of a glycopeptide. The interactive processes permit glycopeptides to be resolved from each other based on differences in their amino acid sequences and/or their attached glycans. The separations of glycans in HILIC are sufficient to permit resolution of isomeric N-glycan structures, such as sialylated N-glycan isomers differing in α2-3 and α2-6 linkages, while these glycans remain attached to peptides. PMID:27582638

  7. Resolving Isomeric Glycopeptide Glycoforms with Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography (HILIC).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yining; Nie, Yongxin; Boyes, Barry; Orlando, Ron

    2016-09-01

    The ability to resolve glycans while attached to tryptic peptides would greatly facilitate glycoproteomics, as this would enable site-specific glycan characterization. Peptide/glycopeptide separations are typically performed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), where retention is driven by hydrophobic interaction. As the hydrophilic glycans do not interact significantly with the RPLC stationary phase, it is difficult to resolve glycopeptides that differ only in their glycan structure, even when these differences are large. Alternatively, glycans interact extensively with the stationary phases used in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), and consequently, differences in glycan structure have profound chromatographic shifts in this chromatographic mode. Here, we evaluate HILIC for the separation of isomeric glycopeptide mixtures that have the same peptide backbone but isomeric glycans. Hydrophilic functional groups on both the peptide and the glycan interact with the HILIC stationary phase, and thus, changes to either of these moieties can alter the chromatographic behavior of a glycopeptide. The interactive processes permit glycopeptides to be resolved from each other based on differences in their amino acid sequences and/or their attached glycans. The separations of glycans in HILIC are sufficient to permit resolution of isomeric N-glycan structures, such as sialylated N-glycan isomers differing in α2-3 and α2-6 linkages, while these glycans remain attached to peptides. PMID:27582638

  8. A turning point for natural product discovery--ESF-EMBO research conference: synthetic biology of antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Takano, Eriko; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Breitling, Rainer

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic Biology is in a critical phase of its development: it has finally reached the point where it can move from proof-of-principle studies to real-world applications. Secondary metabolite biosynthesis, especially the discovery and production of antibiotics, is a particularly relevant target area for such applications of synthetic biology. The first international conference to explore this subject was held in Spain in October 2011. In four sessions on General Synthetic Biology, Filamentous Fungal Systems, Actinomyces Systems, and Tools and Host Structures, scientists presented the most recent technological and scientific advances, and a final-day Forward Look Plenary Discussion identified future trends in the field.

  9. Antibiotics and sweeteners in the aquatic environment: biodegradability, formation of phototransformation products, and in vitro toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bergheim, Marlies; Gminski, Richard; Spangenberg, Bernd; Debiak, Malgorzata; Bürkle, Alexander; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Kümmerer, Klaus; Gieré, Reto

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, in vitro toxicity as well as biopersistence and photopersistence of four artificial sweeteners (acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharine, and sucralose) and five antibiotics (levofloxacin, lincomycin, linezolid, marbofloxacin, and sarafloxacin) and of their phototransformation products (PTPs) were investigated. Furthermore, antibiotic activity was evaluated after UV irradiation and after exposure to inocula of a sewage treatment plant. The study reveals that most of the tested compounds and their PTPs were neither readily nor inherently biodegradable in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-biodegradability tests. The study further demonstrates that PTPs are formed upon irradiation with an Hg lamp (UV light) and, to a lesser extent, upon irradiation with a Xe lamp (mimics sunlight). Comparing the nonirradiated with the corresponding irradiated solutions, a higher chronic toxicity against bacteria was found for the irradiated solutions of linezolid. Neither cytotoxicity nor genotoxicity was found in human cervical (HeLa) and liver (Hep-G2) cells for any of the investigated compounds or their PTPs. Antimicrobial activity of the tested fluoroquinolones was reduced after UV treatment, but it was not reduced after a 28-day exposure to inocula of a sewage treatment plant. This comparative study shows that PTPs can be formed as a result of UV treatment. The study further demonstrated that UV irradiation can be effective in reducing the antimicrobial activity of antibiotics, and consequently may help to reduce antimicrobial resistance in wastewaters. Nevertheless, the study also highlights that some PTPs may exhibit a higher ecotoxicity than the respective parent compounds. Consequently, UV treatment does not transform all micropollutants into harmless compounds and may not be a large-scale effluent treatment option. PMID:26169816

  10. Antibiotics and sweeteners in the aquatic environment: biodegradability, formation of phototransformation products, and in vitro toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bergheim, Marlies; Gminski, Richard; Spangenberg, Bernd; Debiak, Malgorzata; Bürkle, Alexander; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Kümmerer, Klaus; Gieré, Reto

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, in vitro toxicity as well as biopersistence and photopersistence of four artificial sweeteners (acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharine, and sucralose) and five antibiotics (levofloxacin, lincomycin, linezolid, marbofloxacin, and sarafloxacin) and of their phototransformation products (PTPs) were investigated. Furthermore, antibiotic activity was evaluated after UV irradiation and after exposure to inocula of a sewage treatment plant. The study reveals that most of the tested compounds and their PTPs were neither readily nor inherently biodegradable in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-biodegradability tests. The study further demonstrates that PTPs are formed upon irradiation with an Hg lamp (UV light) and, to a lesser extent, upon irradiation with a Xe lamp (mimics sunlight). Comparing the nonirradiated with the corresponding irradiated solutions, a higher chronic toxicity against bacteria was found for the irradiated solutions of linezolid. Neither cytotoxicity nor genotoxicity was found in human cervical (HeLa) and liver (Hep-G2) cells for any of the investigated compounds or their PTPs. Antimicrobial activity of the tested fluoroquinolones was reduced after UV treatment, but it was not reduced after a 28-day exposure to inocula of a sewage treatment plant. This comparative study shows that PTPs can be formed as a result of UV treatment. The study further demonstrated that UV irradiation can be effective in reducing the antimicrobial activity of antibiotics, and consequently may help to reduce antimicrobial resistance in wastewaters. Nevertheless, the study also highlights that some PTPs may exhibit a higher ecotoxicity than the respective parent compounds. Consequently, UV treatment does not transform all micropollutants into harmless compounds and may not be a large-scale effluent treatment option.

  11. Does the Recent Growth of Aquaculture Create Antibiotic Resistance Threats Different from those Associated with Land Animal Production in Agriculture?

    PubMed

    Done, Hansa Y; Venkatesan, Arjun K; Halden, Rolf U

    2015-05-01

    Important antibiotics in human medicine have been used for many decades in animal agriculture for growth promotion and disease treatment. Several publications have linked antibiotic resistance development and spread with animal production. Aquaculture, the newest and fastest growing food production sector, may promote similar or new resistance mechanisms. This review of 650+ papers from diverse sources examines parallels and differences between land-based agriculture of swine, beef, and poultry and aquaculture. Among three key findings was, first, that of 51 antibiotics commonly used in aquaculture and agriculture, 39 (or 76%) are also of importance in human medicine; furthermore, six classes of antibiotics commonly used in both agriculture and aquaculture are also included on the World Health Organization's (WHO) list of critically important/highly important/important antimicrobials. Second, various zoonotic pathogens isolated from meat and seafood were observed to feature resistance to multiple antibiotics on the WHO list, irrespective of their origin in either agriculture or aquaculture. Third, the data show that resistant bacteria isolated from both aquaculture and agriculture share the same resistance mechanisms, indicating that aquaculture is contributing to the same resistance issues established by terrestrial agriculture. More transparency in data collection and reporting is needed so the risks and benefits of antibiotic usage can be adequately assessed.

  12. N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone regulates carbapenem antibiotic production in Erwinia carotovora.

    PubMed

    Bainton, N J; Stead, P; Chhabra, S R; Bycroft, B W; Salmond, G P; Stewart, G S; Williams, P

    1992-12-15

    Erwinia carotovora A.T.C.C. 39048 produces the antibiotic 1-carbapen-2-em-3-carboxylic acid. A number of mutants with a carbapenem-non-producing phenotype were selected as part of an investigation into the molecular and genetic basis of carbapenem biosynthesis. Cross-feeding studies revealed that the mutants fell into two discrete groups. Group 1 mutants were found to secrete a diffusible low-molecular-mass compound which restored carbapenem production in group 2 mutants. This compound was isolated from the spent culture supernatant of a group 1 mutant using solvent extraction, hydrophobic-interaction chromatography and silica-gel chromatography, and finally purified by reverse-phase semipreparative h.p.l.c. M.s. and n.m.r. spectroscopy revealed that the compound was N-(3-oxohexanoyl)homoserine lactone. Both D- and L-isomers were synthesized, and subsequent analysis by c.d. established that the natural product has the L-configuration. Although carbapenem production was restored by both isomers, dose-response curves indicated that the L-isomer has greater activity, with an induction threshold of about 0.5 micrograms/ml. N-(3-Oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone is, therefore, an autoregulator of carbapenem biosynthesis rather than a biosynthetic intermediate. This compound is already known for its role in autoinduction of bioluminescence in the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. It is also structurally-related to the A- and I-factors which are known to regulate production of antibiotics in some Streptomyces species. Its association in this work with the regulation of carbapenem biosynthesis implies a broader role for autoregulator-controlled gene expression in prokaryotes.

  13. Stigmatellin, a new antibiotic from Stigmatella aurantiaca (Myxobacterales). I. Production, physico-chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Kunze, B; Kemmer, T; Höfle, G; Reichenbach, H

    1984-05-01

    An antibiotic activity was extracted from the cell mass of the myxobacterium, Stigmatella aurantiaca strain Sg a15. The antibiotic was toxic for yeasts and filamentous fungi, but not for most bacteria. The compound had the molecular formula C30H42O7, appears to be a new antibiotic, and was named stigmatellin. In addition to stigmatellin, the strain produced relatively large quantities of a second, structurally unrelated antibiotic, a mixture of three myxalamid homologues. PMID:6429114

  14. Glycan Side Reaction May Compromise ETD-Based Glycopeptide Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darula, Zsuzsanna; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.

    2014-06-01

    Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) is one of the most frequently used buffer ingredients. Among other things, it is recommended and is usually used for lectin-based affinity enrichment of glycopeptides. Here we report that sialic acid, a common `capping' unit in both N- and O-linked glycans may react with this chemical, and this side reaction may compromise glycopeptide identification when ETD spectra are the only MS/MS data used in the database search. We show that the modification may alter N- as well as O-linked glycans, the Tris-derivative is still prone to fragmentation both in `beam-type' CID (HCD) and ETD experiments, at the same time—since the acidic carboxyl group was `neutralized'—it will display a different retention time than its unmodified counterpart. We also suggest solutions that—when incorporated into existing search engines—may significantly improve the reliability of glycopeptide assignments.

  15. Structural analysis and immunostimulatory activity of glycopeptides from Paecilomyces sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Meng, Meng; Sun, Huiqing; Li, Yang; Yu, Na; Zhang, Yong-Min

    2016-03-01

    The parasitic fungus, Paecilomyces sinensis, is used to produce Cordyceps materials as a succedaneum of natural Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) in China. In this work, a glycopeptide (CPS-II) was isolated and purified from Paecilomyces sinensis. The result of HPLC indicated that CPS-II was a glycopeptide. The estimated average molecular weight of CPS-II was 2 × 10(6) Da. FTIR, methylation, periodate oxidation, Smith degradation, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and CD were used for its structural analysis. The glycopeptide CPS-II was mainly composed of (1 → 3), (1 → 4) connected glucose and galactose as the backbone, there are (1 → 2,3,6) connected glucose, (1 → 3,6) connected mannose, and (1 → 6) connected galactose. Cell proliferation assay and morphological observations indicated that in a certain range of concentrations and time, CPS-II can significantly improve the proliferation activity of RAW264.7 cells. PMID:26912165

  16. Production of polypeptide antibiotic from Streptomyces parvulus and its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Prakasham Reddy; Buddana, Sudheer Kumar; Tatipamula, Vinay Bharadwaj; Naga, Yaswanth Varanasi Venkata; Ahmad, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    A highly potent secondary metabolite producing actinomycetes strain is isolated from marine soil sediments of Visakhapatnam sea coast, Bay of Bengal. Over all ten strains are isolated from the collected soil sediments. Among the ten actinomycetes strains the broad spectrum strain RSPSN2 was selected for molecular characterization, antibiotic production and its purification. The nucleotide sequence of the 1 rRNA gene (1261 base pairs) of the most potent strain evidenced a 96% similarity with Streptomyces parvulus 1044 strain, Streptomyces parvulus NBRC 13193 and Streptomyces parvulus BY-F. From the taxonomic features, the actinomycetes isolate RSPSN2 matches with Streptomyces parvulus in the morphological, physiological and biochemical characters. Thus, it was given the suggested name Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2. The active metabolite was extracted using ethyl acetate (1:3, v/v) at pH 7.0. The separation of active ingredient and its purification was performed by using both thin layer chromatography (TLC) and column chromatography (CC) techniques. Spectrometric studies such as UV-visible, FTIR, and NMR and mass were performed. The antibacterial activity of pure compound was performed by cup plate method against some pathogenic bacteria including of streptomycin resistant bacteria like (Pseudomonas mirabilis, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus cereus). In conclusion, the collected data emphasized the fact that a polypeptide antibiotic (Actinomycin D) was produced by Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2.

  17. Production of polypeptide antibiotic from Streptomyces parvulus and its antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Prakasham Reddy; Buddana, Sudheer Kumar; Tatipamula, Vinay Bharadwaj; Naga, Yaswanth Varanasi Venkata; Ahmad, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    A highly potent secondary metabolite producing actinomycetes strain is isolated from marine soil sediments of Visakhapatnam sea coast, Bay of Bengal. Over all ten strains are isolated from the collected soil sediments. Among the ten actinomycetes strains the broad spectrum strain RSPSN2 was selected for molecular characterization, antibiotic production and its purification. The nucleotide sequence of the 1 rRNA gene (1261 base pairs) of the most potent strain evidenced a 96% similarity with Streptomyces parvulus 1044 strain, Streptomyces parvulus NBRC 13193 and Streptomyces parvulus BY-F. From the taxonomic features, the actinomycetes isolate RSPSN2 matches with Streptomyces parvulus in the morphological, physiological and biochemical characters. Thus, it was given the suggested name Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2. The active metabolite was extracted using ethyl acetate (1:3, v/v) at pH 7.0. The separation of active ingredient and its purification was performed by using both thin layer chromatography (TLC) and column chromatography (CC) techniques. Spectrometric studies such as UV-visible, FTIR, and NMR and mass were performed. The antibacterial activity of pure compound was performed by cup plate method against some pathogenic bacteria including of streptomycin resistant bacteria like (Pseudomonas mirabilis, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus cereus). In conclusion, the collected data emphasized the fact that a polypeptide antibiotic (Actinomycin D) was produced by Streptomyces parvulus RSPSN2. PMID:24948949

  18. Screening of antibiotics and chemical analysis of penicillin residue in fresh milk and traditional dairy products in Oyo state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olatoye, Isaac Olufemi; Daniel, Oluwayemisi Folashade; Ishola, Sunday Ayobami

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: There are global public health and economic concerns on chemical residues in food of animal origin. The use of antibiotics in dairy cattle for the treatment of diseases such as mastitis has contributed to the presence of residues in dairy products. Penicillin residues as low as 1 ppb can lead to allergic reactions and shift of resistance patterns in microbial population as well as interfere with the processing of several dairy products. Antibiotic monitoring is an essential quality control measure in safe milk production. This study was aimed at determining antibiotic residue contamination and the level of penicillin in dairy products from Fulani cattle herds in Oyo State. Materials and Methods: The presence of antibiotic residues in 328 samples of fresh milk, 180 local cheese (wara), and 90 fermented milk (nono) from Southwest, Nigeria were determined using Premi® test kit (R-Biopharm AG, Germany) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of penicillin-G residue. Results: Antibiotic residues were obtained in 40.8%, 24.4% and 62.3% fresh milk, wara and nono, respectively. Penicillin-G residue was also detected in 41.1% fresh milk, 40.2% nono and 24.4% wara at mean concentrations of 15.22±0.61, 8.24±0.50 and 7.6±0.60 μg/L with 39.3%, 36.7% and 21.1%, respectively, containing penicillin residue above recommended Codex maximum residue limit (MRL) of 5 μg/L in dairy. There was no significant difference between the mean penicillin residues in all the dairy products in this study. Conclusion: The results are of food safety concern since the bulk of the samples and substantial quantities of dairy products in Oyo state contained violative levels of antibiotic residues including penicillin residues in concentrations above the MRL. This could be due to indiscriminate and unregulated administration of antibiotics to dairy cattle. Regulatory control of antibiotic use, rapid screening of milk and dairy farmers’ extension education

  19. Prevalence, genetic diversity, and antibiotic resistance of Bacillus cereus isolated from Korean fermented soybean products.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Seung-Hak; Kang, Suk-Ho; Park, Yong-Bae; Yoon, Mi-Hye; Lee, Jong-Bok; No, Wan-Seob; Kim, Jung-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus contamination is a major food safety problem for Korean fermented soybean products, but few studies have assessed its potential to cause foodborne illness. The objectives of this study were to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of B. cereus isolated from Korean fermented soybean products. B. cereus was detected in 110 of 162 (67.9%) samples. The highest B. cereus frequency was observed in deonjang (68 of 93 samples, 73.1%) and cheonggukjang (18 of 25, 72.0%); however, nonhemolytic enterotoxin was detected only in 22 of 162 samples (13.6%). Although the tested B. cereus isolates showed diverse pulsotypes according to repetitive sequence-PCR banding patterns, they displayed similar antibiotic sensitivity spectra. The low frequency of enterotoxin detection suggests that the potential risk of B. cereus foodborne illness associated with Korean fermented soybean products is lower than generally presumed. However, considering the prevalence of B. cereus and the high content of fermented soybean products in the Korean diet, it is necessary to constantly monitor the level of contamination with B. cereus and its toxins in such Korean food products.

  20. Gold nanostructure-integrated silica-on-silicon waveguide for the detection of antibiotics in milk and milk products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozhikandathil, Jayan; Badilescu, Simona; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2012-10-01

    Antibiotics are extensively used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases. The use of antibiotics for the treatment of animals used for food production raised the concern of the public and a rapid screening method became necessary. A novel approach of detection of antibiotics in milk is reported in this work by using an immunoassay format and the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance property of gold. An antibiotic from the penicillin family that is, ampicillin is used for testing. Gold nanostructures deposited on a glass substrate by a novel convective assembly method were heat-treated to form a nanoisland morphology. The Au nanostructures were functionalized and the corresponding antibody was absorbed from a solution. Solutions with known concentrations of antigen (antibiotics) were subsequently added and the spectral changes were monitored step by step. The Au LSPR band corresponding to the nano-island structure was found to be suitable for the detection of the antibody antigen interaction. The detection of the ampicillin was successfully demonstrated with the gold nano-islands deposited on glass substrate. This process was subsequently adapted for the integration of gold nanostructures on the silica-on-silicon waveguide for the purpose of detecting antibiotics.

  1. Finding alternatives to antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires new treatments. The availability of new antibiotics has severely declined, and so alternatives to antibiotics need to be considered in both animal agriculture and human medicine. Products for disease prevention are different than products for d...

  2. Stationary phases for the enrichment of glycoproteins and glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bao-Yu; Yang, Chun-Kai; Liu, Ching-Piao; Liu, Chuen-Ying

    2014-08-01

    The analysis of protein glycosylation is important for biomedical and biopharmaceutical research. Recent advances in LC-MS analysis have enabled the identification of glycosylation sites, the characterisation of glycan structures and the identification and quantification of glycoproteins and glycopeptides. However, this type of analysis remains challenging due to the low abundance of glycopeptides in complex protein digests, the microheterogeneity at glycosylation sites, ion suppression effects and the competition for ionisation by co-eluting peptides. Specific sample preparation is necessary for comprehensive and site-specific glycosylation analyses using MS. Therefore, researchers continue to pursue new columns to broaden their applications. The current manuscript covers recent literature published from 2008 to 2013. The stationary phases containing various chemical bonding methods or ligands immobilisation strategies on solid supports that selectively enrich N-linked or sialylated N-glycopeptides are categorised with either physical or chemical modes of binding. These categories include lectin affinity, hydrophilic interactions, boronate affinity, titanium dioxide affinity, hydrazide chemistry and other separation techniques. This review should aid in better understanding the syntheses and physicochemical properties of each type of stationary phases for enriching glycoproteins and glycopeptides. PMID:24729282

  3. Bacteria subsisting on antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Gautam; Sommer, Morten O A; Oluwasegun, Rantimi D; Church, George M

    2008-04-01

    Antibiotics are a crucial line of defense against bacterial infections. Nevertheless, several antibiotics are natural products of microorganisms that have as yet poorly appreciated ecological roles in the wider environment. We isolated hundreds of soil bacteria with the capacity to grow on antibiotics as a sole carbon source. Of 18 antibiotics tested, representing eight major classes of natural and synthetic origin, 13 to 17 supported the growth of clonal bacteria from each of 11 diverse soils. Bacteria subsisting on antibiotics are surprisingly phylogenetically diverse, and many are closely related to human pathogens. Furthermore, each antibiotic-consuming isolate was resistant to multiple antibiotics at clinically relevant concentrations. This phenomenon suggests that this unappreciated reservoir of antibiotic-resistance determinants can contribute to the increasing levels of multiple antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria. PMID:18388292

  4. Stored-product insects carry antibiotic-resistant and potentially virulent enterococci.

    PubMed

    Channaiah, Lakshmikantha H; Subramanyam, Bhadriraju; McKinney, Leland J; Zurek, Ludek

    2010-11-01

    A total of 154 enterococcal isolates from 95 stored-product insects collected from a feed mill, a grain storage silo, and a retail store were isolated and identified to the species level using PCR. Enterococcus casseliflavus represented 51% of the total isolates, followed by Enterococcus gallinarum (24%), Enterococcus faecium (14%), Enterococcus faecalis (7%), and Enterococcus hirae (5%). Many isolates were resistant to tetracycline (48%), followed by streptomycin (21%), erythromycin (14%), kanamycin (13%), ciprofloxacin (12%), ampicillin (4%), and chloramphenicol (<1%). Enterococci carried genes coding for virulence factors, including the gelatinase gene gelE (26% of isolates), an enterococcal surface protein gene esp (1%), and the cytolysin gene cylA (2%). An aggregation substance (asa1) gene was detected in six out of 10 E. faecalis isolates and five of these were positive for the aggregation substance. Enterococci were positive for hemolytic (57% of isolates) and gelatinolytic (23%) activity. The filter-mating assay showed that the tetracycline resistance gene, tetM, was transferable among E. faecalis by conjugation. These data demonstrated that stored-product insects can serve as potential vectors in disseminating antibiotic-resistant and potentially virulent enterococci.

  5. Effects of returning NF concentrate on the MBR-NF process treating antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Cheng, Yutao; Wang, Jianxing; Zhang, Junya; Liu, Jibao; Yu, Dawei; Li, Mingyue; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-07-01

    The optimization of the nanofiltration (NF) concentrate backflow ratio (R cb) and the influence of the NF concentrate on the performance of membrane bioreactor-nanofiltration (MBR-NF) process treating antibiotic production wastewater were investigated on a laboratory scale. The R cb was optimized at 60 % based on the removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH4 (+)-N by MBR. Data analyses indicated that salinity brought by NF concentrate is the major driver leading to the decrease of sludge activity, especially at a high R cb. EPS analysis showed that electric conductivity (EC), proteins in soluble microbial products (SMP), and SMP brought by NF concentrate are the dominant factors causing the severe membrane fouling in MBR. Furthermore, undegradable substances including fulvic acid-like and humic acid-like compounds accumulated in NF concentrate showed significant influence on fouling of NF. MBR could well degrade small MW compounds in NF concentrate, which confirmed the enhancement of organic removal efficiency by recycling the NF concentrate to MBR. The MBR-NF process showed a relatively stable performance at the R cb of 60 % (volume reduction factor (VRF) = 5), and the NF permeate could satisfy the water quality standard for fermentation process with a water recovery rate of 90.9 %.

  6. Antibiotic resistance in lactic acid bacteria isolated from some pharmaceutical and dairy products

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Gamal Fadl M.; Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M.; Farag, Zeinab Shawky H.

    2014-01-01

    A total of 244 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains were isolated from 180 dairy and pharmaceutical products that were collected from different areas in Minia governorate, Egypt. LAB were identified phenotypically on basis of morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics. Lactobacillus isolates were further confirmed using PCR-based assay. By combination of phenotypic with molecular identification Lactobacillus spp. were found to be the dominant genus (138, 76.7%) followed by Streptococcus spp. (65, 36.1%) and Lactococcus spp. (27, 15%). Some contaminant organisms such as (Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., mould and yeast) were isolated from the collected dairy samples but pharmaceutical products were free of such contaminants. Susceptibility of LAB isolates to antibiotics representing all major classes was tested by agar dilution method. Generally, LAB were highly susceptible to Beta-lactams except penicillin. Lactobacilli were resistant to vancomycin, however lactococci and streptococci proved to be very susceptible. Most strains were susceptible to tetracycline and showed a wide range of streptomycin MICs. The MICs of erythromycin and clindamycin for most of the LAB were within the normal range of susceptibility. Sixteen Lactobacillus, 8 Lactococcus and 8 Streptococcus isolates including all tetracycline and/or erythromycin resistant strains were tested for the presence of tetracycline and/or erythromycin resistant genes [tet(M) and/or erm(B)]. PCR assays shows that some resistant strains harbor tet(M) and/or erm(B) resistance genes. PMID:24948910

  7. Effects of returning NF concentrate on the MBR-NF process treating antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Cheng, Yutao; Wang, Jianxing; Zhang, Junya; Liu, Jibao; Yu, Dawei; Li, Mingyue; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-07-01

    The optimization of the nanofiltration (NF) concentrate backflow ratio (R cb) and the influence of the NF concentrate on the performance of membrane bioreactor-nanofiltration (MBR-NF) process treating antibiotic production wastewater were investigated on a laboratory scale. The R cb was optimized at 60 % based on the removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH4 (+)-N by MBR. Data analyses indicated that salinity brought by NF concentrate is the major driver leading to the decrease of sludge activity, especially at a high R cb. EPS analysis showed that electric conductivity (EC), proteins in soluble microbial products (SMP), and SMP brought by NF concentrate are the dominant factors causing the severe membrane fouling in MBR. Furthermore, undegradable substances including fulvic acid-like and humic acid-like compounds accumulated in NF concentrate showed significant influence on fouling of NF. MBR could well degrade small MW compounds in NF concentrate, which confirmed the enhancement of organic removal efficiency by recycling the NF concentrate to MBR. The MBR-NF process showed a relatively stable performance at the R cb of 60 % (volume reduction factor (VRF) = 5), and the NF permeate could satisfy the water quality standard for fermentation process with a water recovery rate of 90.9 %. PMID:27000117

  8. Effect of retS gene on antibiotics production in Pseudomonas fluorescens FD6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingxia; Xiao, Qi; Xu, Jingyou; Tong, Yunhui; Wen, Jia; Chen, Xijun; Wei, Lihui

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid sensor kinase termed RetS (regulator of exopolysaccharide and Type III secretion) controls expression of numerous genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To investigate the function of RetS in P. fluorescens FD6, the retS gene was disrupted. Genetic inactivation of retS resulted in enhanced production of 2, 4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, and pyoluteorin. The retS mutant also exhibited significant increase in phlA-lacZ, prnA-lacZ, and pltA-lacZ transcription levels, influencing expression levels of the small regulatory RNAs RsmX and RsmZ. In the gacSretS double mutant, all the phenotypic changes caused by the retS deletion were reversed to the level of gacS single mutant. Furthermore, the retS mutation drastically elevated biofilm formation and improved the colonization ability of strain FD6 on wheat rhizospheres. Based on these results, we proposed that RetS negatively controlled the production of antibiotics through the Gac/Rsm pathway in P. fluorescens FD6. PMID:26505308

  9. Luminamicin, a new antibiotic. Production, isolation and physico-chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Iwata, R; Iwai, Y; Taga, S; Tanaka, Y; Tomoda, H

    1985-10-01

    A new antibiotic, luminamicin, was isolated from the culture broth of an actinomycete strain OMR-59. It exhibits antibacterial activity against anaerobic bacteria, especially against Clostridium sp. The molecular formula of the antibiotic was determined as C32H38O12 on the basis of high resolution mass spectrum, elemental analysis and NMR spectrum. PMID:3840790

  10. Alternatives to antibiotics: a symposium on the challenges and solutions for animal production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics are one of the most important medical discoveries of the 20th century and will remain an essential tool for treating animal and human diseases in the 21st century. However, antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens and concerns over their prudent use in animals has garnered global...

  11. [Utilization of mycelial waste of antibiotic production in the technology of kilned construction materials].

    PubMed

    Karpukhin, V F; Krymskiĭ, M V; Ivanov, I A; Makridin, N I; Kalashnikov, V I

    1985-01-01

    At present the main part of the mycelial waste of antibiotic production is collected in sludge lagoones, discarded to the sewage treatment system or burnt. The mycelial waste is one of the causes of the environmental pollution. It contains a significant quantity of valuable substances, such as lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and amino acids. The inorganic portion of the waste includes the compounds of calcium, magnesium, sodium, iron, silicium and phosphorus. The levels of the above substances in the mycelial waste allow using it as organic mineral additives in making expanded clay aggregate gravel with the use of low quality clay and loam. It may be also used as the burn-out of the raw material charge in making burnt bricks and other burnt building materials. By its calorific value the mycelial waste is equal to brown coal or peat. It was shown that the structural and mechanical properties of the mixtures of the mycelium and clay depended on the moisture content of the composition and the proportion of its components. The mycelial waste provided a decrease in the optimal temperature of burning by 40-50 degrees C. The production tests at the expanded clay aggregate plants showed that the bulk weight of expanded clay aggregate might be lowered by 50-100 kg/m3 and the usual additives with the use of petroleum products might be completely excluded from the technological process. The use of the mycelial waste for manufacture of burnt building materials provides saving of the fuel energy sources and improvement of the quality of the finished product. It is also important from the ecological viewpoint.

  12. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  13. Farm factors associated with the use of antibiotics in pig production.

    PubMed

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Puister-Jansen, L F; van Asselt, E D; Burgers, S L G E

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate farm-level economic and technical factors that are associated with the use of antibiotics on pig farms. Identification of such factors, like farm size and net farm result, may help to increase epidemiological knowledge and to specify farm advice and policy making to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics. The study used over 300 farm-year records collected during 2004 to 2007 from pig farms in the Netherlands. Data included economic and technical factors as well as antibiotic administration. Data were statistically analyzed for factors associated with antibiotic use, both for fattening pig and sow farms (piglets only), separately. The response variable was the average number of daily dosages per average pig year. Statistical analysis was performed on 16 and 19 potential explanatory factors for the fattening pig and sow farms, respectively. The results showed that, both on the fattening pig and sow farms, the average use of antibiotics increased from 2004 to 2006, but decreased during 2007, but the effect of year was not significant (P > 0.05). Use of antibiotics varied between individual farms. Large farm repeatability for the use of antibiotics in the different years was found. Factors associated (P < 0.05) with the use of antibiotics included: farm system, number of pigs, and population density in the region of the farm (for sow farms only). As these factors are easy to collect and to register, they can be used to specify farm advice and investigation, as well as for policy making. The majority of the technical and economic factors were not significantly (P > 0.05) related to the on-farm use of antibiotics. Therefore, it is recommended to focus future research on the potential role of socioeconomic factors associated with antibiotic use on pig farms. PMID:21606448

  14. Effect of production batches of antibiotics on in vitro selection criterion for potential probiotic candidates.

    PubMed

    Ogunshe, Adenike A O

    2008-12-01

    Fifty-four potential probiotic candidates were assayed for their phenotypic susceptibility to two batches of antibiotics manufactured by the same company, using the agar disc diffusion method on de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) agar. Cloxacillin was generally resisted (40.0-100%), while gentamicin (3.85-20.0%) was the least resisted antibiotic. The overall percentage differences among the potential probiotics in both batches of antibiotics were 76.5% in fermented foods, 67.3% in fermented beverages, and 53.9% in infantile fecal samples, respectively. There was slightly more overall resistance in batch 1 (46.1% and 46.7%) than in batch 2 (38.4% and 40.0%) of the test antibiotics except in the multiresistance of infantile probiotic candidates (53.8% and 61.5%, respectively). Six of the probiotic candidates did not have any corresponding matching similarity profile, while none of the 54 potential probiotics had 100% antibiogram similarity profiles in both batches of the test antibiotics, despite the fact that they met some other selection criteria such as inhibition of pathogenic bacteria and survival in simulated gastric and intestinal juices and bile. It is therefore suggested that, though routine antibiotic susceptibility testing has been advocated as an essential selection criterion for potential probiotic candidates, more than one batch of antibiotic discs be used in the phenotypic antibiotic screening in developing countries like Nigeria, in order not to lose the most promising indigenous probiotic candidates, since most of the antibiotics used for antibiotic susceptibility studies are imported into the country and their origin cannot be currently fully ascertained.

  15. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  16. Cloning of the Staphylococcus aureus ddh gene encoding NAD+-dependent D-lactate dehydrogenase and insertional inactivation in a glycopeptide-resistant isolate.

    PubMed Central

    Boyle-Vavra, S; de Jonge, B L; Ebert, C C; Daum, R S

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of low-level glycopeptide resistance among staphylococci is not known. A cytoplasmic protein, provisionally called Ddh (W. M. Milewski, S. Boyle-Vavra, B. Moreira, C. C. Ebert, and R. S. Daum, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 40:166-172, 1996), and the RNA transcript that contains the ddh gene, which encodes Ddh, are present in increased amounts in a vancomycin-resistant isolate, 523k, compared with the susceptible parent isolate, 523. Sequence analysis had previously revealed that Ddh is related to NAD+-dependent D-lactate dehydrogenase (D-nLDH) and VanH. This latter protein is essential for high-level glycopeptide resistance in Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis by synthesizing the D-lactate needed for biosynthesis of D-lactate-terminating peptidoglycan precursors with low affinity for vancomycin. We now provide the direct evidence that the ddh gene product is Staphylococcus aureus D-nLDH and hereafter refer to the protein as D-nLDH. However, overproduction of this protein in isolate 523k did not result in production of D-lactate-containing peptidoglycan precursors, and susceptibility testing of ddh mutants of 523k demonstrated that S. aureus D-nLDH is not necessary for glycopeptide resistance in this isolate. We conclude that the mechanism of glycopeptide resistance in this isolate is distinct from that in enterococci. PMID:9352927

  17. Isolation of N-linked glycopeptides by hydrazine-functionalized magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shisheng; Yang, Ganglong; Wang, Ting; Wang, Qinzhe; Chen, Chao; Li, Zheng

    2010-04-01

    We introduce a novel combination of magnetic particles with hydrazine chemistry, dubbed as hydrazine-functionalized magnetic particles (HFMP) for isolation of glycopeptides. Four methods have been developed and compared for the production of HFMP by hydrazine modification of the surface of the carboxyl and epoxy-silanized magnetic particles, respectively. The evaluation of the capability and specificity of HFMP as well as the optimization of the coupling condition for capturing of glycoproteins were systematically investigated. The results showed that HFMP prepared by adipic dihydrazide functionalization from carboxyl-silanized magnetic particles (HFCA) displayed the maximum capture capacity and isolated efficiency for glycoprotein. When measured with glycoproteins, the capacity of the HFCA (1 g) for coupling bovine fetuin was 130 +/- 5.3 mg. The capability of this method was also confirmed by successful isolation of all formerly glycosylated peptides from standard glycoproteins and identification of their glycosylation sites, which demonstrated the feasibility of the HFCA as an alternative solid support for isolation of glycoproteins/glycopeptides. PMID:20169334

  18. The VanRS Homologous Two-Component System VnlRSAb of the Glycopeptide Producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina Activates Transcription of the vanHAXSc Genes in Streptomyces coelicolor, but not in A. balhimycina

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Regina; Frasch, Hans-Joerg; Kulik, Andreas; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In enterococci and in Streptomyces coelicolor, a glycopeptide nonproducer, the glycopeptide resistance genes vanHAX are colocalized with vanRS. The two-component system (TCS) VanRS activates vanHAX transcription upon sensing the presence of glycopeptides. Amycolatopsis balhimycina, the producer of the vancomycin-like glycopeptide balhimycin, also possesses vanHAXAb genes. The genes for the VanRS-like TCS VnlRSAb, together with the carboxypeptidase gene vanYAb, are part of the balhimycin biosynthetic gene cluster, which is located 2 Mb separate from the vanHAXAb. The deletion of vnlRSAb did not affect glycopeptide resistance or balhimycin production. In the A. balhimycina vnlRAb deletion mutant, the vanHAXAb genes were expressed at the same level as in the wild type, and peptidoglycan (PG) analyses proved the synthesis of resistant PG precursors. Whereas vanHAXAb expression in A. balhimycina does not depend on VnlRAb, a VnlRAb-depending regulation of vanYAb was demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNA-seq analyses. Although VnlRAb does not regulate the vanHAXAb genes in A. balhimycina, its heterologous expression in the glycopeptide-sensitive S. coelicolor ΔvanRSSc deletion mutant restored glycopeptide resistance. VnlRAb activates the vanHAXSc genes even in the absence of VanS. In addition, expression of vnlRAb increases actinorhodin production and influences morphological differentiation in S. coelicolor. PMID:27420548

  19. Bioprocess intensification of antibiotic production by Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) in micro-porous culture.

    PubMed

    Ndlovu, T M; Ward, A C; Glassey, J; Eskildsen, J; Akay, G

    2015-04-01

    A novel functionalized micro-porous matrix was developed with well-controlled physicochemical proprieties such as pore size and surface chemistry. The matrix was used as a solid support in the growth of "Streptomyces coelicolor" A3(2) to enhance the production of antibiotics. The results shown support a higher production of prodigiosin and actinorhodin with overall production increase of 2-5 and 6-17, respectively, compared to conventional submerged liquid culture, offering a potential improvement in volumetric productivity. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to evaluate pore size as well as bacterial adhesion, penetration, proliferation and migration within the micro-porous matrix.

  20. SweetNET: A Bioinformatics Workflow for Glycopeptide MS/MS Spectral Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Waqas; Toledo, Alejandro Gomez; Noborn, Fredrik; Nilsson, Jonas; Wang, Mingxun; Bandeira, Nuno; Larson, Göran

    2016-08-01

    Glycoproteomics has rapidly become an independent analytical platform bridging the fields of glycomics and proteomics to address site-specific protein glycosylation and its impact in biology. Current glycopeptide characterization relies on time-consuming manual interpretations and demands high levels of personal expertise. Efficient data interpretation constitutes one of the major challenges to be overcome before true high-throughput glycopeptide analysis can be achieved. The development of new glyco-related bioinformatics tools is thus of crucial importance to fulfill this goal. Here we present SweetNET: a data-oriented bioinformatics workflow for efficient analysis of hundreds of thousands of glycopeptide MS/MS-spectra. We have analyzed MS data sets from two separate glycopeptide enrichment protocols targeting sialylated glycopeptides and chondroitin sulfate linkage region glycopeptides, respectively. Molecular networking was performed to organize the glycopeptide MS/MS data based on spectral similarities. The combination of spectral clustering, oxonium ion intensity profiles, and precursor ion m/z shift distributions provided typical signatures for the initial assignment of different N-, O- and CS-glycopeptide classes and their respective glycoforms. These signatures were further used to guide database searches leading to the identification and validation of a large number of glycopeptide variants including novel deoxyhexose (fucose) modifications in the linkage region of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. PMID:27399812

  1. SweetNET: A Bioinformatics Workflow for Glycopeptide MS/MS Spectral Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Waqas; Toledo, Alejandro Gomez; Noborn, Fredrik; Nilsson, Jonas; Wang, Mingxun; Bandeira, Nuno; Larson, Göran

    2016-08-01

    Glycoproteomics has rapidly become an independent analytical platform bridging the fields of glycomics and proteomics to address site-specific protein glycosylation and its impact in biology. Current glycopeptide characterization relies on time-consuming manual interpretations and demands high levels of personal expertise. Efficient data interpretation constitutes one of the major challenges to be overcome before true high-throughput glycopeptide analysis can be achieved. The development of new glyco-related bioinformatics tools is thus of crucial importance to fulfill this goal. Here we present SweetNET: a data-oriented bioinformatics workflow for efficient analysis of hundreds of thousands of glycopeptide MS/MS-spectra. We have analyzed MS data sets from two separate glycopeptide enrichment protocols targeting sialylated glycopeptides and chondroitin sulfate linkage region glycopeptides, respectively. Molecular networking was performed to organize the glycopeptide MS/MS data based on spectral similarities. The combination of spectral clustering, oxonium ion intensity profiles, and precursor ion m/z shift distributions provided typical signatures for the initial assignment of different N-, O- and CS-glycopeptide classes and their respective glycoforms. These signatures were further used to guide database searches leading to the identification and validation of a large number of glycopeptide variants including novel deoxyhexose (fucose) modifications in the linkage region of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans.

  2. Multivalency effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm inhibition and dispersal by glycopeptide dendrimers targeting lectin LecA.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Myriam; Michaud, Gaëlle; Visini, Ricardo; Jin, Xian; Gillon, Emilie; Stocker, Achim; Imberty, Anne; Darbre, Tamis; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    The galactose specific lectin LecA partly mediates the formation of antibiotic resistant biofilms by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen causing lethal airways infections in immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis patients, suggesting that preventing LecA binding to natural saccharides might provide new opportunities for treatment. Here 8-fold (G3) and 16-fold (G4) galactosylated analogs of GalAG2, a tetravalent G2 glycopeptide dendrimer LecA ligand and P. aeruginosa biofilm inhibitor, were obtained by convergent chloroacetyl thioether (ClAc) ligation between 4-fold or 8-fold chloroacetylated dendrimer cores and digalactosylated dendritic arms. Hemagglutination inhibition, isothermal titration calorimetry and biofilm inhibition assays showed that G3 dendrimers bind LecA slightly better than their parent G2 dendrimers and induce complete biofilm inhibition and dispersal of P. aeruginosa biofilms, while G4 dendrimers show reduced binding and no biofilm inhibition. A binding model accounting for the observed saturation of glycopeptide dendrimer galactosyl groups and LecA binding sites is proposed based on the crystal structure of a G3 dendrimer LecA complex.

  3. MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes predicted by computational glycomics

    PubMed Central

    SONG, WEI; DELYRIA, ELIZABETH S.; CHEN, JIEQING; HUANG, WEI; LEE, JUN SOO; MITTENDORF, ELIZABETH A.; IBRAHIM, NUHAD; RADVANYI, LASZLO G.; LI, YUNSEN; LU, HONGZHOU; XU, HUAXI; SHI, YINQIANG; WANG, LAI-XI; ROSS, JEREMY A.; RODRIGUES, SILAS P.; ALMEIDA, IGOR C.; YANG, XIFENG; QU, JIN; SCHOCKER, NATHANIEL S.; MICHAEL, KATJA; ZHOU, DAPENG

    2012-01-01

    Bioinformatic tools and databases for glycobiology and glycomics research are playing increasingly important roles in functional studies. However, to verify hypotheses generated by computational glycomics with empirical functional assays is only an emerging field. In this study, we predicted glycan epitopes expressed by a cancer-derived mucin, MUC1, by computational glycomics. MUC1 is expressed by tumor cells with a deficiency in glycosylation. Although numerous diagnostic reagents and cancer vaccines have been designed based on abnormally glycosylated MUC1 sequences, the glycan and peptide sequences responsible for immune responses in vivo are poorly understood. The immunogenicity of synthetic MUC1 glycopeptides bearing Tn or sialyl-Tn antigens have been studied in mouse models, while authentic glyco-epitopes expressed by tumor cells remain unclear. To examine the immunogenicity of authentic cancer derived MUC1 glyco-epitopes, we expressed membrane bound forms of MUC1 tandem repeats in Jurkat, a mutant cancer cell line deficient of mucin-type core-1 β1–3 galactosyltransferase activity, and immunized mice with cancer cells expressing authentic MUC1 glyco-epitopes. Antibody responses to individual glyco-epitopes were determined by chemically synthesized candidate MUC1 glycopeptides predicted through computational glycomics. Monoclonal antibodies can be generated toward chemically synthesized glycopeptide sequences. With RPAPGS(Tn)TAPPAHG as an example, a monoclonal antibody 16A, showed 25-fold higher binding to glycosylated peptide (EC50=9.278±1.059 ng/ml) compared to its non-glycosylated form (EC50=247.3±16.29 ng/ml) as measured by ELISA experiments with plate-bound peptides. A library of monoclonal antibodies toward authentic MUC1 glycopeptide epitopes may be a valuable tool for studying glycan and peptide sequences in cancer, as well as reagents for diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23023583

  4. Taguchi's experimental design for optimizing the production of novel thermostable polypeptide antibiotic from Geobacillus pallidus SAT4.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Syed Aun; Ahmed, Safia; Ismail, Tariq; Hameed, Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Polypeptide antimicrobials used against topical infections are reported to obtain from mesophilic bacterial species. A thermophilic Geobacillus pallidus SAT4 was isolated from hot climate of Sindh Dessert, Pakistan and found it active against Micrococcus luteus ATCC 10240, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Bacillus subtilis NCTC 10400 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 49189. The current experiment was designed to optimize the production of novel thermostable polypeptide by applying the Taguchi statistical approach at various conditions including the time of incubation, temperature, pH, aeration rate, nitrogen, and carbon concentrations. There were two most important factors that affect the production of antibiotic including time of incubation and nitrogen concentration and two interactions including the time of incubation/pH and time of incubation/nitrogen concentration. Activity was evaluated by well diffusion assay. The antimicrobial produced was stable and active even at 55°C. Ammonium sulphate (AS) was used for antibiotic recovery and it was desalted by dialysis techniques. The resulted protein was evaluated through SDS-PAGE. It was concluded that novel thermostable protein produced by Geobacillus pallidus SAT4 is stable at higher temperature and its production level can be improved statistically at optimum values of pH, time of incubation and nitrogen concentration the most important factors for antibiotic production.

  5. pGlyco: a pipeline for the identification of intact N-glycopeptides by using HCD- and CID-MS/MS and MS3

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wen-Feng; Liu, Ming-Qi; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Jian-Qiang; Fang, Pan; Peng, Chao; Nie, Aiying; Yan, Guoquan; Cao, Weiqian; Liu, Chao; Chi, Hao; Sun, Rui-Xiang; Wong, Catherine C. L.; He, Si-Min; Yang, Pengyuan

    2016-01-01

    Confident characterization of the microheterogeneity of protein glycosylation through identification of intact glycopeptides remains one of the toughest analytical challenges for glycoproteomics. Recently proposed mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods still have some defects such as lack of the false discovery rate (FDR) analysis for the glycan identification and lack of sufficient fragmentation information for the peptide identification. Here we proposed pGlyco, a novel pipeline for the identification of intact glycopeptides by using complementary MS techniques: 1) HCD-MS/MS followed by product-dependent CID-MS/MS was used to provide complementary fragments to identify the glycans, and a novel target-decoy method was developed to estimate the false discovery rate of the glycan identification; 2) data-dependent acquisition of MS3 for some most intense peaks of HCD-MS/MS was used to provide fragments to identify the peptide backbones. By integrating HCD-MS/MS, CID-MS/MS and MS3, intact glycopeptides could be confidently identified. With pGlyco, a standard glycoprotein mixture was analyzed in the Orbitrap Fusion, and 309 non-redundant intact glycopeptides were identified with detailed spectral information of both glycans and peptides. PMID:27139140

  6. In-Depth Characterization and Spectral Library Building of Glycopeptides in the Tryptic Digest of a Monoclonal Antibody Using 1D and 2D LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Yan, Xinjian; Liang, Yuxue; Stein, Stephen E

    2016-05-01

    This work presents a detailed analysis of glycopeptides produced in the tryptic digestion of an IgG1 reference material. Analysis was done by nanospray ESI LC-MS/MS over a wide range of HCD collision energies with both conventional 1D separation for various digestion conditions and a 20 fraction 2D-LC study of a single digest. An extended version of NIST-developed software for analysis of "shotgun" proteomics served to identify the glycopeptides from their precursor masses and product ions for peptides with up to three missed cleavages. A peptide with a single missed cleavage, TKPREEQYNSTYR, was dominant and led to the determination of almost all glycans reported in this study. The 2D studies found a total of 247 glycopeptide ions and 60 glycans of different masses, including 30 glycans found in the 1D studies. This significantly larger number of glycans than found in any other glycoanalysis of therapeutic glycoproteins is due to both the improved separation of sialylated versus asialylated species in the first (high-pH) dimension and the ability to inject large amounts of glycosylated peptides in the 2D studies. Systematic variations in retention with glycan size were also noted. Energy-dependent changes in HCD fragmentation confirmed the proposed glycan structures and led to a peak-annotated mass spectral library to aid the analysis of glycopeptides derived from IgG1 drugs.

  7. Quantitative Glycopeptide Changes in Rat Sperm During Epididymal Transit.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Ana Izabel Silva Balbin; Hetherington, Louise; Baker, Mark A

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa acquire fertilizing potential as they undergo a series of changes during epididymal transit. One major facet of such is the alterations in the sperm glycome. Modifications of the sialic acid content within glycan moieties are known to regulate epitope presentation and cellular adhesion and signaling, all of which may be critical for sperm to successfully reach and fertilize the egg. To date, there is paucity of information regarding the sialic acid changes that occur on spermatozoa during epididymal transit. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify N-linked sialylated glycoproteins in rat epididymal sperm and investigate whether they are regulated during epididymal transit. Sialylated glycopeptides from caput, corpus, and cauda spermatozoa were enriched using titanium dioxide beads. Bound N-linked glycopeptides were released by enzymatic deglycosylation using PNGase F and then analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry. A total of 92 unique N-linked sialylated glycopeptides were identified from 65 different proteins. These included members of the disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein family (ADAM), Basigin, and Testis-expressed protein 101 (TEX101). Remarkably, label-free quantification showed that more than half of these peptides (48/92) were regulated during epididymal transit. Of interest, the protein TEX101 exhibited PNGase F-resistant deglycosylation under the conditions used in this study. The results from this study showed that changes in the N-linked sialoglycoprotein profile is a major hallmark of sperm maturation in rats.

  8. The structure of a glycopeptide purified from porcine thyroblobulin.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, M; Egami, F

    1971-07-01

    1. The structure of a purified glycopeptide isolated from porcine thyroglobulin was studied by sequential hydrolysis with specific glycosidases, by periodate oxidation and by treatment with galactose oxidase. 2. Sequential hydrolysis with several combinations of neuraminidase, alpha-l-fucosidase, beta-d-galactosidase, beta-N-acetyl-d-glucosaminidase and alpha-d-mannosidase presented the evidence for the following structure. 3. The monosaccharide sequence of the peripheral moiety of the heteropolysaccharide chain was sialic acid-->galactose-->N-acetylglucosamine. Some of the galactose residues were non-reducing end-groups with the sequence galactose-->N-acetylglucosamine. 4. After removal of the peripheral moiety composed of sialic acid, fucose, galactose and N-acetylglucosamine, alpha-mannosidase released 1.4mol of mannose/mol of glycopeptide, indicating that two of the three mannose residues were located between peripheral N-acetylglucosamine and internal N-acetylglucosamine or mannose. 5. Periodate oxidation and sodium borohydride reduction confirmed the results obtained by enzymic degradation and gave information concerning the position of substitution. 6. Based on the results obtained by enzymic hydrolysis and periodate oxidation together with the treatment with galactose oxidase, a structure is proposed for the glycopeptide.

  9. Acquired genetic mechanisms of a multiresistant bacterium isolated from a treatment plant receiving wastewater from antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Johnning, Anna; Moore, Edward R B; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Shouche, Yogesh S; Larsson, D G Joakim; Kristiansson, Erik

    2013-12-01

    The external environment, particularly wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), where environmental bacteria meet human commensals and pathogens in large numbers, has been highlighted as a potential breeding ground for antibiotic resistance. We have isolated the extensively drug-resistant Ochrobactrum intermedium CCUG 57381 from an Indian WWTP receiving industrial wastewater from pharmaceutical production contaminated with high levels of quinolones. Antibiotic susceptibility testing against 47 antibiotics showed that the strain was 4 to >500 times more resistant to sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, macrolides, and the aminoglycoside streptomycin than the type strain O. intermedium LMG 3301T. Whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in the Indian strain causing amino acid substitutions in the target enzymes of quinolones. We also characterized three acquired regions containing resistance genes to sulfonamides (sul1), tetracyclines [tet(G) and tetR], and chloramphenicol/florfenicol (floR). Furthermore, the Indian strain harbored acquired mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer, including a type I mating pair-forming system (MPFI), a MOBP relaxase, and insertion sequence transposons. Our results highlight that WWTPs serving antibiotic manufacturing may provide nearly ideal conditions for the recruitment of resistance genes into human commensal and pathogenic bacteria.

  10. [Mechanism of action of antibiotics:some examples].

    PubMed

    Michel-Briand, Y

    1978-01-01

    Antibiotics are very commonly used substances to eradicate bacterial infections by bacteriostatic or even bactericid effect. They act at a very specific stage (target), although other less important or secondary interactions can occur. We studied the interaction of three antibiotic families (beta-lactamins, aminosides, rifampicin) with bacterial cell. Penicillin disturbs the cell wall synthesis and more accurately the glycopeptide (or murein) formation, a substance giving rigidity or shape to bacteria. It acts in the late phase of murein-biosynthesis, when N-acetyl glucosamin -- N-acetyl muramic acid L ala -D glu M-DAP (L lys) -D ala -D ala are linked together by the peptide part, under the effect of several enzymes, particularly transpeptidase and DD-carboxy-peptidase. It would appear that beta-lactame-thiazolidine rings have a steric analogy with dipeptide D-alanyl D-alanine. The result would be that the enzyme would act on the antibiotic instead of peptide: the consequence would be inhibition of the peptidic link, giving an abnormal murein, and an incomplete cell wall i.e. fragile bacteria. Aminosides, particularly Streptomycin, link themselves to 30 S subunit of bacterial ribosome. In this case, it seems that it is a 3''OH function which reacts with lysine (from S 12 protein part of 30 S subunit). The consequence is an alteration in the RNA messager lecture, and a false traduction and consequently protein biosynthesis stops with a decrease of polyribosomes and of the formation of inert 70 S ribosome. Rifamycins, and particularly Rifampicin act by inhibition of RNA messager synthesis. One molecule of antibiotic links itself to one molecule of RNA messager : hydroxyl and cetone function in C1 Cs C21 C23 and "ansa" bridge link to beta subunit of RNA polymerase. This linkage gives a conformational change to the RNA polymerase-DNA complex, inhibiting the catalytic action of this enzyme, and consequently stopping RNA messager and protein synthesis. The study of the

  11. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a halotolerant strain of Penicillium chrysogenum: antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Guedes, Sumaya; Mendes, Benilde; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The extensive use of pesticides in agriculture has prompted intensive research on chemical and biological methods in order to protect contamination of water and soil resources. In this paper the degradation of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a Penicillium chrysogenum strain previously isolated from a salt mine was studied in batch cultures. Co-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid with additives such as sugar and intermediates of pesticide metabolism was also investigated. Penicillium chrysogenum in solid medium was able to grow at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with sucrose. Meanwhile, supplementation of the solid medium with glucose and lactose led to fungal growth at concentrations up to 500 mg/L of herbicide. Batch cultures of 2,4-D at 100 mg/L were developed under aerobic conditions with the addition of glucose, lactose and sucrose, showing sucrose as the best additional carbon source. The 2,4-D removal was quantified by liquid chromatography. The fungus was able to use 2,4-D as the sole carbon and energy source under 0%, 2% and 5.9% NaCl. The greatest 2,4-D degradation efficiency was found using alpha-ketoglutarate and ascorbic acid as co-substrates under 2% NaCl at pH 7. Penicillin production was evaluated in submerged cultures by bioassay, and higher amounts of beta-lactam antibiotic were produced when the herbicide was alone. Taking into account the ability of P. chrysogenum CLONA2 to degrade aromatic compounds, this strain could be an interesting tool for 2,4-D herbicide remediation in saline environments. PMID:22629643

  12. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a halotolerant strain of Penicillium chrysogenum: antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Guedes, Sumaya; Mendes, Benilde; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The extensive use of pesticides in agriculture has prompted intensive research on chemical and biological methods in order to protect contamination of water and soil resources. In this paper the degradation of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a Penicillium chrysogenum strain previously isolated from a salt mine was studied in batch cultures. Co-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid with additives such as sugar and intermediates of pesticide metabolism was also investigated. Penicillium chrysogenum in solid medium was able to grow at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with sucrose. Meanwhile, supplementation of the solid medium with glucose and lactose led to fungal growth at concentrations up to 500 mg/L of herbicide. Batch cultures of 2,4-D at 100 mg/L were developed under aerobic conditions with the addition of glucose, lactose and sucrose, showing sucrose as the best additional carbon source. The 2,4-D removal was quantified by liquid chromatography. The fungus was able to use 2,4-D as the sole carbon and energy source under 0%, 2% and 5.9% NaCl. The greatest 2,4-D degradation efficiency was found using alpha-ketoglutarate and ascorbic acid as co-substrates under 2% NaCl at pH 7. Penicillin production was evaluated in submerged cultures by bioassay, and higher amounts of beta-lactam antibiotic were produced when the herbicide was alone. Taking into account the ability of P. chrysogenum CLONA2 to degrade aromatic compounds, this strain could be an interesting tool for 2,4-D herbicide remediation in saline environments.

  13. [Contribution of microbiologists of Kirov City to development of penicillin and streptomycin production processes (70 years since development of technology for submerged production of first domestic antibiotics)].

    PubMed

    Bakulin, M K; Tumanov, A S; Bakulin, V M; Kalininskiĭ, V B

    2014-01-01

    The publication is concerned with development of the technological processes for submered production of the first domestic antibiotics 70 years age. The literature data on the contribution of the microbiologists of the Kirov City and mainly the workers of the Red Army Research Institute of Epidemiology and Hygiene (nowadays Central Research Institute No. 48 of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation, Kirov), to development of the manufacture processes for production of penicillin and streptomycin are reviewed.

  14. Click Synthesis of Hydrophilic Maltose-Functionalized Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanoparticles Based on Dopamine Anchors for Highly Selective Enrichment of Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Bi, Changfen; Zhao, Yingran; Shen, Lijin; Zhang, Kai; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-11-11

    The development of methods to isolate and enrich low-abundance glycopeptides from biological samples is crucial to glycoproteomics. Herein, we present an easy and one-step surface modification strategy to prepare hydrophilic maltose functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs). First, based on the chelation of the catechol ligand with iron atoms, azido-terminated dopamine (DA) derivative was assembled on the surface of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles by sonication. Second, the hydrophilic maltose-functionalized Fe3O4 (Fe3O4-DA-Maltose) NPs were obtained via copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click chemistry). The morphology, structure, and composition of Fe3O4-DA-Maltose NPs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Meanwhile, hydrophilicity of the obtained NPs was evaluated by water contact angle measurement. The hydrophilic Fe3O4-DA-Maltose NPs were applied in isolation and enrichment of glycopeptides from horseradish peroxidase (HRP), immunoglobulin (IgG) digests. The MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the novel NPs exhibited high detection sensitivity in enrichment from HRP digests at concentration as low as 0.05 ng μL(-1), a large binding capacity up to 43 mg g(-1), and good recovery for glycopeptides enrichment (85-110%). Moreover, the Fe3O4-DA-Maltose NPs were applied to enrich glycopeptides from human renal mesangial cells (HRMC) for identification of N-glycosylation sites. Finally, we identified 115 different N-linked glycopeptides, representing 93 gene products and 124 glycosylation sites in HRMC.

  15. Production and biological activities of a new antifungal antibiotic, TAN-950 A.

    PubMed

    Hakoda, S; Tsubotani, S; Iwasa, T; Suzuki, M; Kondo, M; Harada, S

    1992-06-01

    A novel antifungal antibiotic, TAN-950 complex, was isolated from the culture filtrate of Streptomyces platensis A-136 (IFO 14603, FERM BP-1786). The water-soluble amphoteric substances in this complex were purified by chromatography using ion-exchange resins, QAE-Sephadex and adsorptive resins and were designated TAN-950 A and TAN-950 A-E mixture. The molecular formula of TAN-950 A was determined to be C6H7N2O4Na for the sodium salt. This new amino acid antibiotic showed antifungal activity against Candida albicans in vitro and in vivo, and had low toxicity in mice. PMID:1500350

  16. Deciphering the Regulon of Streptomyces coelicolor AbrC3, a Positive Response Regulator of Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Rico, Sergio; Santamaría, Ramón I.; Yepes, Ana; Rodríguez, Héctor; Laing, Emma; Bucca, Giselda; Smith, Colin P.

    2014-01-01

    The atypical two-component system (TCS) AbrC1/C2/C3 (encoded by SCO4598, SCO4597, and SCO4596), comprising two histidine kinases (HKs) and a response regulator (RR), is crucial for antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor and for morphological differentiation under certain nutritional conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of the RR-encoding gene, abrC3 (SCO4596), results in a dramatic decrease in actinorhodin (ACT) and undecylprodiginine (RED) production and delays morphological development. In contrast, the overexpression of abrC3 in the parent strain leads to a 33% increase in ACT production in liquid medium. Transcriptomic analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation with microarray technology (ChIP-chip) analysis of the ΔabrC3 mutant and the parent strain revealed that AbrC3 directly controls ACT production by binding to the actII-ORF4 promoter region; this was independently verified by in vitro DNA-binding assays. This binding is dependent on the sequence 5′-GAASGSGRMS-3′. In contrast, the regulation of RED production is not due to direct binding of AbrC3 to either the redZ or redD promoter region. This study also revealed other members of the AbrC3 regulon: AbrC3 is a positive autoregulator which also binds to the promoter regions of SCO0736, bdtA (SCO3328), absR1 (SCO6992), and SCO6809. The direct targets share the 10-base consensus binding sequence and may be responsible for some of the phenotypes of the ΔabrC3 mutant. The identification of the AbrC3 regulon as part of the complex regulatory network governing antibiotic production widens our knowledge regarding TCS involvement in control of antibiotic synthesis and may contribute to the rational design of new hyperproducer host strains through genetic manipulation of such systems. PMID:24509929

  17. Performance and fate of organics in a pilot MBR-NF for treating antibiotic production wastewater with recycling NF concentrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxing; Li, Kun; Wei, Yuansong; Cheng, Yutao; Wei, Dongbin; Li, Mingyue

    2015-02-01

    A double membrane system comprising a membrane bioreactor (MBR) combined with a nanofiltration (NF) membrane was investigated on a pilot scale for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater over a three-month period at a pharmaceutical company in Wuxi, China. By recycling the NF concentrate, the combined MBR-NF process was shown to be effective for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater, resulting in excellent water quality and a high water yield of 92±5.6%. The water quality of the pilot-scale MBR-NF process was excellent; e.g., the concentrations of TOC, NH4(+)-N, TP were stable at 5.52, 0.68, 0.34 mg L(-1), respectively, and the values of turbidity and conductivity of the NF permeate were 0.15 NTU and 2.5 mS cm(-1), respectively; these values meet China's water quality standard requirements for industrial use (GB21903-2008). Not only were the antibiotic removal rates of spiramycin (SPM) and new spiramycin (NSPM) over 95%, the acute toxicity was also drastically reduced by the MBR-NF pilot system. The main organics in the MBR effluent were proteins, polysaccharides, and humic-like substances; they were almost completely retained by the NF membrane and further biodegraded in the MBR because the NF concentrate was recycled. The microbial community of the MBR did not significantly change with the recycling of the NF concentrate.

  18. A Regulatory Gene SCO2140 is Involved in Antibiotic Production and Morphological Differentiation of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingjun; Pan, Yuanyuan; Liu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Streptomyces coelicolor is the soil-dwelling bacterium with a complex life cycle and a strong ability to produce plenty of secondary metabolites which are strictly regulated by a variety of regulators. Amino acid alignment shows that the deduced protein of SCO2140 belongs to the family of Leucine-responsive regulatory proteins (Lrps). Disruption of SCO2140 significantly decreased the yields of actinorhodin and calcium-dependent antibiotics, and the complemented strain restored the antibiotic productions to the wild-type level. In contrast, overexpression of SCO2140 increased the actinorhodin production. In agreement with it, the transcriptions of actII-ORF4 and cdaR remarkably reduced in the SCO2140 disruption mutant. The aerial mycelium formation of the SCO2140 disruption mutant was clearly delayed in R2YE medium due to the decrease of ramS expression while its complemented strain could restore the normal formation of aerial mycelia. These results indicated that SCO2140 was involved in antibiotic biosynthesis and morphological differentiation of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). PMID:27113590

  19. Variability of antibiotic susceptibility and toxin production of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic commensal bacterium that mostly colonizes the skin and soft tissues. The pathogenicity of S. aureus is due to both its ability to resist antibiotics, and the production of toxins. Here, we characterize a group of genes responsible for toxin production and antibiotic resistance of S. aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections. Results A total of 136 S. aureus strains were collected from five different types of infection: furuncles, pyomyositis, abscesses, Buruli ulcers, and osteomyelitis, from hospital admissions and out-patients in Benin. All strains were resistant to benzyl penicillin, while 25% were resistant to methicillin, and all showed sensitivity to vancomycin. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was the most commonly produced virulence factor (70%), followed by staphylococcal enterotoxin B (44%). Exfoliative toxin B was produced by 1.3% of the strains, and was only found in isolates from Buruli ulcers. The tsst-1, sec, and seh genes were rarely detected (≤1%). Conclusions This study provides new insight into the prevalence of toxin and antibiotic resistance genes in S. aureus strains responsible for skin, soft tissue, and bone infections. Our results showed that PVL was strongly associated with pyomyositis and osteomyelitis, and that there is a high prevalence of PVL-MRSA skin infections in Benin. PMID:23924370

  20. Advanced oxidation of the antibiotic sulfapyridine by UV/H₂O₂: Characterization of its transformation products and ecotoxicological implications.

    PubMed

    García-Galán, Ma Jesús; Anfruns, Alba; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Comas, Joaquim

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate, under lab-scale conditions, the removal and transformation of the antibiotic sulfapyridine (SPY) upon advanced oxidation with UV/H2O2. High resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) analyses by means of an ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC)-linear ion trap high resolution Orbitrap instrument (LTQ-Orbitrap-MS) were carried out in order to elucidate the different transformation products (TPs) generated. The abatement (>99%) of the antibiotic was only achieved after 180 min, highlighting its resilience to elimination and its potential persistence in the environment A total of 10 TPs for SPY were detected and their molecular structures elucidated by means of MS(2) and MS(3) scans. Finally, the combined ecotoxicity at different treatment times was evaluated by means of bioluminescence inhibition assays with the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri. PMID:26789837

  1. Total Syntheses and Initial Evaluation of [Ψ[C(=S)NH]Tpg4]vancomycin, [Ψ[C(=NH)NH]Tpg4]vancomycin, [Ψ[CH2NH]Tpg4]vancomycin and their (4-Chlorobiphenyl)methyl Derivatives: Synergistic Binding Pocket and Peripheral Modifications for the Glycopeptide Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Akinori; Nakayama, Atsushi; Wu, Kejia; Lindsey, Erick A.; Schammel, Alex W.; Feng, Yiqing; Collins, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Full details of studies are disclosed on the total synthesis of binding pocket analogues of vancomycin, bearing the peripheral L-vancosaminyl-1,2-D-glucosyl disaccharide, that contain changes to a key single atom in the residue 4 amide (residue 4 carbonyl O → S, NH, H2) designed to directly address the underlying molecular basis of resistance to vancomycin. Also disclosed are studies piloting the late stage transformations conducted on the synthetically more accessible C-terminus hydroxymethyl aglycon derivatives and full details of the peripheral chlorobiphenyl functionalization of all the binding pocket modified vancomycin analogues designed for dual D-Ala-D-Ala/D-Ala-D-Lac binding are reported. Their collective assessment indicate that combined binding pocket and chlorobiphenyl peripherally modified analogues exhibit a remarkable spectrum of antimicrobial activity (VSSA, MRSA, VanA and VanB VRE) and impressive potencies against both vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant bacteria (MICs = 0.06–0.005 μg/mL and 0.5–0.06 μg/mL for the amidine and methylene analogues, respectively) and likely benefit from two independent and synergistic mechanisms of action, only one of which is dependent on D-Ala-D-Ala/D-Ala-D-Lac binding. Such analogues are likely to display especially durable antibiotic activity not prone to rapidly acquired clinical resistance. PMID:25750995

  2. Marine myxobacteria as a source of antibiotics--comparison of physiology, polyketide-type genes and antibiotic production of three new isolates of Enhygromyxa salina.

    PubMed

    Schäberle, Till F; Goralski, Emilie; Neu, Edith; Erol, Ozlem; Hölzl, Georg; Dörmann, Peter; Bierbaum, Gabriele; König, Gabriele M

    2010-01-01

    Three myxobacterial strains, designated SWB004, SWB005 and SWB006, were obtained from beach sand samples from the Pacific Ocean and the North Sea. The strains were cultivated in salt water containing media and subjected to studies to determine their taxonomic status, the presence of genes for the biosynthesis of polyketides and antibiotic production. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed the type strain Enhygromyxa salina SHK-1(T) as their closest homolog, displaying between 98% (SWB005) and 99% (SWB004 and SWB006) sequence similarity. All isolates were rod-shaped cells showing gliding motility and fruiting body formation as is known for myxobacteria. They required NaCl for growth, with an optimum concentration of around 2% [w/v]. The G + C-content of genomic DNA ranged from 63.0 to 67.3 mol%. Further, the strains were analyzed for their potential to produce polyketide-type structures. PCR amplified ketosynthase-like gene fragments from all three isolates enhances the assumption that these bacteria produce polyketides. SWB005 was shown to produce metabolites with prominent antibacterial activity, including activity towards methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE).

  3. Marine myxobacteria as a source of antibiotics--comparison of physiology, polyketide-type genes and antibiotic production of three new isolates of Enhygromyxa salina.

    PubMed

    Schäberle, Till F; Goralski, Emilie; Neu, Edith; Erol, Ozlem; Hölzl, Georg; Dörmann, Peter; Bierbaum, Gabriele; König, Gabriele M

    2010-01-01

    Three myxobacterial strains, designated SWB004, SWB005 and SWB006, were obtained from beach sand samples from the Pacific Ocean and the North Sea. The strains were cultivated in salt water containing media and subjected to studies to determine their taxonomic status, the presence of genes for the biosynthesis of polyketides and antibiotic production. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed the type strain Enhygromyxa salina SHK-1(T) as their closest homolog, displaying between 98% (SWB005) and 99% (SWB004 and SWB006) sequence similarity. All isolates were rod-shaped cells showing gliding motility and fruiting body formation as is known for myxobacteria. They required NaCl for growth, with an optimum concentration of around 2% [w/v]. The G + C-content of genomic DNA ranged from 63.0 to 67.3 mol%. Further, the strains were analyzed for their potential to produce polyketide-type structures. PCR amplified ketosynthase-like gene fragments from all three isolates enhances the assumption that these bacteria produce polyketides. SWB005 was shown to produce metabolites with prominent antibacterial activity, including activity towards methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE). PMID:20948900

  4. Alternatives to antibiotics as growth promoters for use in swine production: a review.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Philip A

    2013-01-01

    In the past two decades, an intensive amount of research has been focused on the development of alternatives to antibiotics to maintain swine health and performance. The most widely researched alternatives include probiotics, prebiotics, acidifiers, plant extracts and neutraceuticals such as copper and zinc. Since these additives have been more than adequately covered in previous reviews, the focus of this review will be on less traditional alternatives. The potential of antimicrobial peptides, clay minerals, egg yolk antibodies, essential oils, eucalyptus oil-medium chain fatty acids, rare earth elements and recombinant enzymes are discussed. Based on a thorough review of the literature, it is evident that a long and growing list of compounds exist which have been tested for their ability to replace antibiotics as feed additives in diets fed to swine. Unfortunately, the vast majority of these compounds produce inconsistent results and rarely equal antibiotics in their effectiveness. Therefore, it would appear that research is still needed in this area and that the perfect alternative to antibiotics does not yet exist. PMID:24034214

  5. Lysozyme as an alternative to growth promoting antibiotics in swine production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lysozyme is a naturally occurring enzyme found in bodily secretions such as tears, saliva, and milk. It functions as an antimicrobial agent by cleaving the peptidoglycan component of bacterial cell walls, which leads to cell death. Antibiotics are also antimicrobials and have been fed at subtherape...

  6. Coevolution of antibiotic production and counter-resistance in soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Laskaris, Paris; Tolba, Sahar; Calvo-Bado, Leo; Wellington, Elizabeth M; Wellington, Liz

    2010-03-01

    We present evidence for the coexistence and coevolution of antibiotic resistance and biosynthesis genes in soil bacteria. The distribution of the streptomycin (strA) and viomycin (vph) resistance genes was examined in Streptomyces isolates. strA and vph were found either within a biosynthetic gene cluster or independently. Streptomyces griseus strains possessing the streptomycin cluster formed part of a clonal complex. All S. griseus strains possessing solely strA belonged to two clades; both were closely related to the streptomycin producers. Other more distantly related S. griseus strains did not contain strA. S. griseus strains with only vph also formed two clades, but they were more distantly related to the producers and to one another. The expression of the strA gene was constitutive in a resistance-only strain whereas streptomycin producers showed peak strA expression in late log phase that correlates with the switch on of streptomycin biosynthesis. While there is evidence that antibiotics have diverse roles in nature, our data clearly support the coevolution of resistance in the presence of antibiotic biosynthetic capability within closely related soil dwelling bacteria. This reinforces the view that, for some antibiotics at least, the primary role is one of antibiosis during competition in soil for resources. PMID:20067498

  7. Alternatives to antibiotics as growth promoters for use in swine production: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the past two decades, an intensive amount of research has been focused on the development of alternatives to antibiotics to maintain swine health and performance. The most widely researched alternatives include probiotics, prebiotics, acidifiers, plant extracts and neutraceuticals such as copper and zinc. Since these additives have been more than adequately covered in previous reviews, the focus of this review will be on less traditional alternatives. The potential of antimicrobial peptides, clay minerals, egg yolk antibodies, essential oils, eucalyptus oil-medium chain fatty acids, rare earth elements and recombinant enzymes are discussed. Based on a thorough review of the literature, it is evident that a long and growing list of compounds exist which have been tested for their ability to replace antibiotics as feed additives in diets fed to swine. Unfortunately, the vast majority of these compounds produce inconsistent results and rarely equal antibiotics in their effectiveness. Therefore, it would appear that research is still needed in this area and that the perfect alternative to antibiotics does not yet exist. PMID:24034214

  8. Crystal Structures of the Glycopeptide Sulfotransferase Teg12 in a Complex with the Teicoplanin Aglycone

    SciTech Connect

    Bick, Matthew J.; Banik, Jacob J.; Darst, Seth A.; Brady, Sean F.

    2010-06-25

    The TEG gene cluster, a glycopeptide biosynthetic gene cluster that is predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a polysulfated glycopeptide congener, was recently cloned from DNA extracted directly from desert soil. This predicted glycopeptide gene cluster contains three closely related sulfotransferases (Teg12, -13, and -14) that sulfate teicoplanin-like glycopeptides at three unique sites. Here we report a series of structures: an apo structure of Teg12, Teg12 bound to the desulfated cosubstrate 3{prime}-phosphoadenosine 5{prime}-phosphate, and Teg12 bound to the teicoplanin aglycone. Teg12 appears to undergo a series of significant conformational rearrangements during glycopeptide recruitment, binding, and catalysis. Loop regions that exhibit the most conformational flexibility show the least sequence conservation between TEG sulfotransferases. Site-directed mutagenesis guided by our structural studies confirmed the importance of key catalytic residues as well as the importance of residues found throughout the conformationally flexible loop regions.

  9. Crystal Structures of the Glycopeptide Sulfotransferase Teg12 Complexed with the Teicoplanin Aglycone

    PubMed Central

    Bick, Matthew J.; Banik, Jacob J.; Darst, Seth A.; Brady, Sean F.

    2010-01-01

    The TEG gene cluster, a glycopeptide biosynthetic gene cluster that is predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a polysulfated glycopeptide congener, was recently cloned from DNA extracted directly from desert soil. This predicted glycopeptide gene cluster contains three closely related sulfotransferases (Teg12, 13, and 14) that sulfate teicoplanin-like glycopeptides at three unique sites. Here we report a series of structures including: an apo structure of Teg12, Teg12 bound to the desulfated co-substrate 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate and Teg12 bound to the teicoplanin aglycone. Teg12 appears to undergo a series of significant conformational rearrangements during glycopeptide recruitment, binding and catalysis. Loop regions that exhibit the most conformational flexibility show the least sequence conservation between TEG sulfotransferases. Site directed mutagenesis guided by our structural studies confirmed the importance of key catalytic residues as well as the importance of residues found throughout the conformationally flexible loop regions. PMID:20361791

  10. Antibiotic Resistance and Biofilm Production in Staphylococcus epidermidis Strains, Isolated from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Contreras, Roberto; Morelos-Ramírez, Rubén; Galicia-Camacho, Ada Nelly; Meléndez-Herrada, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from nosocomial infections represent a serious problem worldwide. In various Mexican states several reports have shown isolates from hospitals with antibiotic resistance to methicillin. In Mexico City, there is scarce information on staphylococcal infections in hospitals. Here, our research findings are shown in a four-year period study (2006–2010) for Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. Susceptibility and/or resistance to antibiotics in SE strains were assessed by phenotypic and molecular methods as mecA gene by PCR, as well as the correlation with biofilm production for these isolates and the relationship to the infection site. Out of a total of 161 (66%) negative biofilm SE strains, just 103 (64%) SE strains were confirmed as MRSE by PCR to mecA gene. From 84 (34%) positive biofilm SE strains, 76 (91%) were confirmed as MRSE by PCR to mecA gene. Higher percentages of resistance to antibiotics and higher number of resistance markers were found in biofilm-forming clinical strains (9 to 14) than non-biofilm-forming SE strains (3 to 8). These research findings represent a guide to establish infection control programs for this hospital. PMID:23724338

  11. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review article proposes a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal ...

  12. Muraymycin nucleoside-peptide antibiotics: uridine-derived natural products as lead structures for the development of novel antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Marius; Niro, Giuliana; Leyerer, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Muraymycins are a promising class of antimicrobial natural products. These uridine-derived nucleoside-peptide antibiotics inhibit the bacterial membrane protein translocase I (MraY), a key enzyme in the intracellular part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This review describes the structures of naturally occurring muraymycins, their mode of action, synthetic access to muraymycins and their analogues, some structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies and first insights into muraymycin biosynthesis. It therefore provides an overview on the current state of research, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in this field. PMID:27340469

  13. Muraymycin nucleoside-peptide antibiotics: uridine-derived natural products as lead structures for the development of novel antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Wiegmann, Daniel; Koppermann, Stefan; Wirth, Marius; Niro, Giuliana; Leyerer, Kristin; Ducho, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Muraymycins are a promising class of antimicrobial natural products. These uridine-derived nucleoside-peptide antibiotics inhibit the bacterial membrane protein translocase I (MraY), a key enzyme in the intracellular part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This review describes the structures of naturally occurring muraymycins, their mode of action, synthetic access to muraymycins and their analogues, some structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies and first insights into muraymycin biosynthesis. It therefore provides an overview on the current state of research, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in this field. PMID:27340469

  14. Fractionation and analysis of veterinary antibiotics and their related degradation products in agricultural soils and drainage waters following swine manure amendment.

    PubMed

    Solliec, Morgan; Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Gasser, Marc-Olivier; Coté, Caroline; Généreux, Mylène; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    The fate of antimicrobial active compound residues in the environment, and especially antibiotics used in swine husbandry are of particular interest for their potential toxicity and contribution to antibiotic resistance. The presence of relatively high concentrations of bioactive compounds has been reported in agricultural areas but few information is available on their degradation products. Veterinary antibiotics reach terrestrial environments through many routes, including application of swine manure to soils. The objectives of this project were first, to develop an analytical method able to quantify and identify veterinary antibiotics and their degradation products in manure, soil and water samples; and second, to study the distribution of these target compounds in soils and drainage waters. A brief evaluation of their potential toxicity in the environment was also made. In order to achieve these objectives, liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry was used for its ability to quantify contaminants with sensitivity and selectivity, and its capacity to identify degradation products. Samples of manure, soil and water came from a long-term experimental site where swine manure containing veterinary antibiotics has been applied for many years. In this study, tetracycline antibiotics were found at several hundred μg L(-1) in the swine manure slurry used for fertilization, several hundred of ng L(-1) in drainage waters and several ng g(-1) in soils, while degradation products were sometimes found at concentrations higher than the parent compounds.

  15. Comparison of NF membrane fouling and cleaning by two pretreatment strategies for the advanced treatment of antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxing; Li, Kun; Yu, Dawei; Zhang, Junya; Wei, Yuansong; Chen, Meixue; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-01-01

    The nanofiltration (NF) membrane fouling characteristics and cleaning strategies were investigated and compared for treating membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluent and MBR-granular activated carbon (GAC) effluent of an antibiotic production wastewater by DK membrane. Results showed that the fouling of treating MBR effluent was more severe than that of treating MBR-GAC effluent. After filtering for 216 h, the difference of membrane flux decline was obvious between MBR effluent and MBR-GAC effluent, with 14.9% and 10.3% flux decline, respectively. Further study showed that organic fouling is the main NF membrane fouling in the advanced treatment of antibiotic production wastewater for both of the two different effluents. Soluble microbial by-product like and tyrosine-like substances were the dominant components in the foulants, whereas humic-like substances existing in the effluents had little contribution to the NF membrane fouling. A satisfactory efficiency of NF chemical cleaning could be obtained using combination of acid (HCl, pH 2.0-2.5) and alkali (NaOH + 0.3 wt% NaDS, pH 10.0-10.5). The favorable cleaning strategy is acid-alkali for treating the MBR-GAC effluent, while it is alkali-acid for treating the MBR effluent. PMID:27148729

  16. Liofilchem® Chromatic VRE and vancomycin MIC Test Strip detected glycopeptide resistance in a vanB neonatal Enterococcus faecium isolate showing alternate vancomycin susceptibility and resistance with bioMérieux Vitek2

    PubMed Central

    Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; D’Incecco, Carmine; Fazii, Paolo; Gherardi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A 1-month old neonate urine sample yielded vanB Enterococcus faecium; nevertheless, the isolate alternatively showed susceptibility and resistance to vancomycin with bioMérieux Vitek2 (cards AST592, AST632, AST586), while glycopeptide resistance was detected by Liofilchem® vancomycin MIC Test Strip and disc along with the Chromatic VRE chromogenic medium. This communication emphasizes that, as vanB gene may be heterogeneously expressed within a given Enterococcus population, glycopeptide resistance may be missed when using automated systems for antibiotic susceptibility testing. We suggest therefore that vancomycin in vitro activity be studied on all clinical isolates through agar methods, including use of chromogenic media. PMID:25337280

  17. LC-MS-Based Metabolomics Study of Marine Bacterial Secondary Metabolite and Antibiotic Production in Salinispora arenicola

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Utpal; Hewavitharana, Amitha K.; Ng, Yi Kai; Shaw, Paul Nicholas; Fuerst, John A.; Hodson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    An LC-MS-based metabolomics approach was used to characterise the variation in secondary metabolite production due to changes in the salt content of the growth media as well as across different growth periods (incubation times). We used metabolomics as a tool to investigate the production of rifamycins (antibiotics) and other secondary metabolites in the obligate marine actinobacterial species Salinispora arenicola, isolated from Great Barrier Reef (GBR) sponges, at two defined salt concentrations and over three different incubation periods. The results indicated that a 14 day incubation period is optimal for the maximum production of rifamycin B, whereas rifamycin S and W achieve their maximum concentration at 29 days. A “chemical profile” link between the days of incubation and the salt concentration of the growth medium was shown to exist and reliably represents a critical point for selection of growth medium and harvest time. PMID:25574739

  18. 4-Mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized graphene oxide composites: Preparation, characterization and selective enrichment of glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Qu, Yanyan; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-03-17

    Selective enrichment and isolation of glycopeptides from complex biological samples was indispensable for mass spectrometry (MS)-based glycoproteomics, however, it remained a great challenge due to the low abundance of glycoproteins and the ion suppression of non-glycopeptides. In this work, 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid functionalized graphene oxide composites were synthesized via loading gold nanoparticles on polyethylenimine modified graphene oxide surface, followed by 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid immobilization by the formation of Au-S bonding (denoted as GO/PEI/Au/4-MPB composites). The composites showed highly specific and efficient capture of glycopeptides due to their excellent hydrophilicity and abundant boronic acid groups. The composites could selectively capture the glycopeptides from the mixture of glycopeptides and nonglycopeptides, even when the amounts of non-glycopeptides were 100 times more than glycopeptides. Compared with commercial meta-amino phenylboronic acid agarose, the composites showed better selectivity when the sample was decreased to 10 ng. These results clearly verified that the GO/PEI/Au/4-MPB composites might be a promising material for glycoproteomics analysis.

  19. Highly Selective Enrichment of Glycopeptides Based on Zwitterionically Functionalized Soluble Nanopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weiqian; Huang, Jiangming; Jiang, Biyun; Gao, Xing; Yang, Pengyuan

    2016-01-01

    Efficient glycopeptides enrichment prior to mass spectrometry analysis is essential for glycoproteome study. ZIC-HILIC (zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography) based glycopeptides enrichment approaches have been attracting more attention for several benefits like easy operating, high enrichment specificity and intact glycopeptide retained. In this study, Poly (amidoamine) dendrimer (PAMAM) was adopted for the synthesis of zwitterionically functionalized (ZICF) materials for glycopeptide enrichment. The multiple branched structure and good solubility of ZICF-PAMAM enables a sufficient interaction with glycopeptides. The ZICF-PAMAM combined with the FASP-mode enrichment strategy exhibits more superior performance compared with the existing methods. It has the minimum detectable concentration of femtomolar level and high recovery rate of over 90.01%, and can efficiently enrich glycopeptides from complex biological samples even for merely 0.1 μL human serum. The remarkable glycopeptides enrichment capacity of ZICF-PAMAM highlights the potential application in in-depth glycoproteome research, which may open up new opportunities for the development of glycoproteomics. PMID:27412817

  20. Presence of fucosyl residues on the oligosaccharide antennae of membrane glycopeptides of human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Santer, U.V.; Glick, M.C.

    1983-09-01

    Fucosyl residues linked alpha 1 leads to 3 or 4 to N-acetylglucosamine were found in large amounts on glycopeptides from the membranes of human tumor cells of neurectodermal origin but not on membrane glycopeptides from human fibroblasts. The fucosyl residues were detected by release of radioactive fucose from the glycopeptides with an almond alpha-L-fucosidase specific for fucosyl alpha 1 leads to 3(4)-N-acetylglucosamine. In other studies, the linkage was shown to be alpha 1 leads to 3 by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. Glycopeptides containing these fucosyl residues from four human neuroblastoma cell lines were defined by binding to immobilized lectins. In addition, the glycopeptides from one human neuroblastoma cell line, CHP-134, were further characterized by enzyme degradation and columns calibrated for size and charge. The antennary position of fucosyl alpha 1 leads to 3-N-acetylglucosamine on the glycopeptides was demonstrated by the use of exoglycosidases and endoglycosidase D, since complete degradation to yield fucosyl-N-acetylglucosaminylasparagine was obtained only after treatment with almond alpha-L-fucosidase prior to the sequential degradation. Fucosyl alpha 1 leads to 3-N-acetylglucosamine was present on most size and charge classes of membrane glycopeptides and therefore was not limited to a few glycoproteins. Since the almond alpha-L-fucosidase cleaves fucosyl residues from glycoproteins, the physiological effects of the increased specific fucosylation on human tumors of neurectodermal origin can be examined.

  1. Separation and identification of isomeric glycopeptides by high field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Creese, Andrew J; Cooper, Helen J

    2012-03-01

    The analysis of intact glycopeptides by mass spectrometry is challenging due to the numerous possibilities for isomerization, both within the attached glycan and the location of the modification on the peptide backbone. Here, we demonstrate that high field asymmetric wave ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), also known as differential ion mobility, is able to separate isomeric O-linked glycopeptides that have identical sequences but differing sites of glycosylation. Two glycopeptides from the glycoprotein mucin 5AC, GT(GalNAc)TPSPVPTTSTTSAP and GTTPSPVPTTST(GalNAc)TSAP (where GalNAc is O-linked N-acetylgalactosamine), were shown to coelute following reversed-phase liquid chromatography. However, FAIMS analysis of the glycopeptides revealed that the compensation voltage ranges in which the peptides were transmitted differed. Thus, it is possible at certain compensation voltages to completely separate the glycopeptides. Separation of the glycopeptides was confirmed by unique reporter ions produced by supplemental activation electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. These fragments also enable localization of the site of glycosylation. The results suggest that glycan position plays a key role in determining gas-phase glycopeptide structure and have implications for the application of FAIMS in glycoproteomics.

  2. Highly Selective Enrichment of Glycopeptides Based on Zwitterionically Functionalized Soluble Nanopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Weiqian; Huang, Jiangming; Jiang, Biyun; Gao, Xing; Yang, Pengyuan

    2016-07-01

    Efficient glycopeptides enrichment prior to mass spectrometry analysis is essential for glycoproteome study. ZIC-HILIC (zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography) based glycopeptides enrichment approaches have been attracting more attention for several benefits like easy operating, high enrichment specificity and intact glycopeptide retained. In this study, Poly (amidoamine) dendrimer (PAMAM) was adopted for the synthesis of zwitterionically functionalized (ZICF) materials for glycopeptide enrichment. The multiple branched structure and good solubility of ZICF-PAMAM enables a sufficient interaction with glycopeptides. The ZICF-PAMAM combined with the FASP-mode enrichment strategy exhibits more superior performance compared with the existing methods. It has the minimum detectable concentration of femtomolar level and high recovery rate of over 90.01%, and can efficiently enrich glycopeptides from complex biological samples even for merely 0.1 μL human serum. The remarkable glycopeptides enrichment capacity of ZICF-PAMAM highlights the potential application in in-depth glycoproteome research, which may open up new opportunities for the development of glycoproteomics.

  3. Atpenins, new antifungal antibiotics produced by Penicillium sp. Production, isolation, physico-chemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Tomoda, H; Kimura, K; Zhen, D Z; Kumagai, H; Igarashi, K; Imamura, N; Takahashi, Y; Tanaka, Y; Iwai, Y

    1988-12-01

    Penicillium sp. FO-125, a soil isolate, was found to produce a new antifungal antibiotic complex named atpenin. Three components A4, A5 and B were isolated from the fermentation broth of the producing strain by solvent extraction, silica gel column chromatography and HPLC. The molecular formula of atpenins A4, A5 and B were determined to be C15H22NO5Cl, C15H21NO5Cl2 and C15H23NO5, respectively, on the basis of high resolution electron impact mass spectrometry and elemental analysis. They are active against filamentous fungi, especially, Trichophyton sp. PMID:3209470

  4. Aurantimycins, new depsipeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces aurantiacus IMET 43917. Production, isolation, structure elucidation, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, U; Schlegel, R; Ritzau, M; Ihn, W; Dornberger, K; Stengel, C; Fleck, W F; Gutsche, W; Härtl, A; Paulus, E F

    1995-02-01

    Aurantimycins A (1), B (2) and C (3) were isolated from the mycelium of Streptomyces aurantiacus JA 4570 as new representatives of the azinothricin group of hexadepsipeptide antibiotics. Their structures were settled by X-ray diffraction analysis of crystalline aurantimycin A (1), high field homo- and heteronuclear 2D NMR experiments, high-resolution mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. Aurantimycins are characterized by a new side chain containing fourteen carbon atoms. They display strong activity against Gram-positive bacteria and cytotoxic effects against L-929 mouse fibroblast cells.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of AbsC, a novel regulator of antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Kock, Holger; Mootien, Saraspadee; Davies, Sîan C.; Bibb, Mervyn J.; Lawson, David M.

    2007-03-01

    A novel regulator of antibiotic production in S. coelicolor, AbsC, has been crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. X-ray data to 2.25 Å resolution were collected on station PX 14.1 at Daresbury. Crystals of recombinant AbsC (subunit MW = 18 313 Da; 158 amino acids), a novel regulator of antibiotic production from Streptomyces coelicolor, were grown by vapour diffusion. The protein crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 43.53, b = 121.30, c = 143.75 Å. Native data to a resolution of 2.25 Å were recorded at station PX 14.1 (Daresbury) from a single crystal. Preliminary analysis of these data suggests that the asymmetric unit contains four copies of the AbsC monomer, giving an estimated solvent content of 47.0%. AbsC belongs to the MarR family of proteins that mediate ligand-responsive transcriptional control.

  6. Incidence, Antibiotic Susceptibility, and Toxin Profiles of Bacillus cereus sensu lato Isolated from Korean Fermented Soybean Products.

    PubMed

    Yim, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Kwang-Yeop; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Hong-Seok; Choi, Da-Som; Choi, In-Soo; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Korean fermented soybean products, such as doenjang, kochujang, ssamjang, and cho-kochujang, can harbor foodborne pathogens such as Bacillus cereus sensu lato (B. cereus sensu lato). The aim of this study was to characterize the toxin gene profiles, biochemical characteristics, and antibiotic resistance patterns of B. cereus sensu lato strains isolated from Korean fermented soybean products. Eighty-eight samples of Korean fermented soybean products purchased from retails in Seoul were tested. Thirteen of 26 doenjang samples, 13 of 23 kochujang samples, 16 of 30 ssamjang samples, and 5 of 9 cho-kochujang samples were positive for B. cereus sensu lato strains. The contamination level of all positive samples did not exceed 4 log CFU/g of food (maximum levels of Korea Food Code). Eighty-seven B. cereus sensu lato strains were isolated from 47 positive samples, and all isolates carried at least one enterotoxin gene. The detection rates of hblCDA, nheABC, cytK, and entFM enterotoxin genes among all isolates were 34.5%, 98.9%, 57.5%, and 100%, respectively. Fifteen strains (17.2%) harbored the emetic toxin gene. Most strains tested positive for salicin fermentation (62.1%), starch hydrolysis (66.7%), hemolysis (98.9%), motility test (100%), and lecithinase production (96.6%). The B. cereus sensu lato strains were highly resistant to β-lactam antibiotics such as ampicillin, penicillin, cefepime, imipenem, and oxacillin. Although B. cereus sensu lato levels in Korean fermented soybean products did not exceed the maximum levels permitted in South Korea (<10(4) CFU/g), these results indicate that the bacterial isolates have the potential to cause diarrheal or emetic gastrointestinal diseases.

  7. Vancomycin Molecular Interactions: Antibiotic and Enantioselective Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Timothy J.; Gilmore, Aprile; Ward, Karen; Vowell, Courtney

    Medical studies established that vancomycin and other related macrocyclic antibiotics have an enhanced antimicrobial activity when they are associated as dimers. The carbohydrate units attached to the vancomycin basket have an essential role in the dimerization reaction. Covalently synthesized dimers were found active against vancomycin-resistant bacterial strains. A great similarity between antibiotic potential and enantioselectivity was established. A covalent vancomycin dimer was studied in capillary electrophoresis producing excellent chiral separation of dansyl amino acids. Balhimycin is a macrocyclic glycopeptide structurally similar to vancomycin. The small differences are, however, responsible for drastic differences in enantioselectivity in the same experimental conditions. Contributions from studies examining vancomycin's mechanism for antimicrobial activity have substantially aided our understanding of its mechanism in chiral recognition.

  8. Evaluation and validation of a multi-residue method based on biochip technology for the simultaneous screening of six families of antibiotics in muscle and aquaculture products.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Valérie; Hedou, Celine; Soumet, Christophe; Verdon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Evidence Investigator™ system (Randox, UK) is a biochip and semi-automated system. The microarray kit II (AM II) is capable of detecting several compounds belonging to different families of antibiotics: quinolones, ceftiofur, thiamphenicol, streptomycin, tylosin and tetracyclines. The performance of this innovative system was evaluated for the detection of antibiotic residues in new matrices, in muscle of different animal species and in aquaculture products. The method was validated according to the European Decision No. EC/2002/657 and the European guideline for the validation of screening methods, which represents a complete initial validation. The false-positive rate was equal to 0% in muscle and in aquaculture products. The detection capabilities CCβ for 12 validated antibiotics (enrofloxacin, difloxacin, ceftiofur, desfuroyl ceftiofur cysteine disulfide, thiamphenicol, florfenicol, tylosin, tilmicosin, streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, tetracycline, doxycycline) were all lower than the respective maximum residue limits (MRLs) in muscle from different animal origins (bovine, ovine, porcine, poultry). No cross-reactions were observed with other antibiotics, neither with the six detected families nor with other families of antibiotics. The AM II kit could be applied to aquaculture products but with higher detection capabilities from those in muscle. The detection capabilities CCβ in aquaculture products were respectively at 0.25, 0.10 and 0.5 of the respective MRL in aquaculture products for enrofloxacin, tylosin and oxytetracycline. The performance of the AM II kit has been compared with other screening methods and with the performance characteristics previously determined in honey. PMID:26612266

  9. Evaluation and validation of a multi-residue method based on biochip technology for the simultaneous screening of six families of antibiotics in muscle and aquaculture products.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Valérie; Hedou, Celine; Soumet, Christophe; Verdon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Evidence Investigator™ system (Randox, UK) is a biochip and semi-automated system. The microarray kit II (AM II) is capable of detecting several compounds belonging to different families of antibiotics: quinolones, ceftiofur, thiamphenicol, streptomycin, tylosin and tetracyclines. The performance of this innovative system was evaluated for the detection of antibiotic residues in new matrices, in muscle of different animal species and in aquaculture products. The method was validated according to the European Decision No. EC/2002/657 and the European guideline for the validation of screening methods, which represents a complete initial validation. The false-positive rate was equal to 0% in muscle and in aquaculture products. The detection capabilities CCβ for 12 validated antibiotics (enrofloxacin, difloxacin, ceftiofur, desfuroyl ceftiofur cysteine disulfide, thiamphenicol, florfenicol, tylosin, tilmicosin, streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, tetracycline, doxycycline) were all lower than the respective maximum residue limits (MRLs) in muscle from different animal origins (bovine, ovine, porcine, poultry). No cross-reactions were observed with other antibiotics, neither with the six detected families nor with other families of antibiotics. The AM II kit could be applied to aquaculture products but with higher detection capabilities from those in muscle. The detection capabilities CCβ in aquaculture products were respectively at 0.25, 0.10 and 0.5 of the respective MRL in aquaculture products for enrofloxacin, tylosin and oxytetracycline. The performance of the AM II kit has been compared with other screening methods and with the performance characteristics previously determined in honey.

  10. Insights into solar TiO2-assisted photocatalytic oxidation of two antibiotics employed in aquatic animal production, oxolinic acid and oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Pereira, João H O S; Reis, Ana C; Queirós, Daniel; Nunes, Olga C; Borges, Maria T; Vilar, Vítor J P; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2013-10-01

    In this study, solar driven TiO2-assisted heterogeneous photocatalytic experiments in a pilot-plant with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs) were carried out to study the degradation of two authorized veterinary antibiotics with particular relevance in finfish aquaculture, oxolinic acid (OXA) and oxytetracycline (OTC), using pure solutions of individual or mixed antibiotics. Firstly, the influence of natural solar photolysis was assessed for each antibiotic. Secondly, photocatalytic degradation kinetic rate constants for individual and mixed antibiotics were compared, using a catalyst load of 0.5 g L(-1) and an initial pH around 7.5. Thirdly, for individually photocatalytic-treated OXA and OTC in the same conditions, the growth inhibition of Escherichia coli DSM 1103 was followed, and the mineralization extent was assessed by the residual dissolved organic carbon (DOC), low-molecular-weight carboxylate anions and inorganic ions concentration. Finally, the effect of inorganic ions, such as chlorides, sulfates, nitrates, phosphates, ammonium and bicarbonates, on the photocatalytic degradation of individual solutions of OXA and OTC was also evaluated and the formation of different reactive oxygen species were probed using selective scavengers. The removal profiles of each antibiotic, both as single component or in mixture were similar, being necessary 2.5 kJ L(-1) of solar UV energy to fully remove them, and 18 kJ(UV) L(-1) to achieve 73% and 81% mineralization, for OXA and OTC, respectively. The remaining organic carbon content was mainly due to low-molecular-weight carboxylate anions. After complete removal of the antibiotics, the remaining degradation by-products no longer showed antibacterial activity. Also, 10% and 55% of the nitrogen content of each antibiotic was converted to ammonium, while no conversion to nitrite or nitrate was detected. The presence of phosphates hindered considerably the removal of both antibiotics, whereas the presence of other inorganic

  11. Increased resveratrol production in wines using engineered wine strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 and relaxed antibiotic or auxotrophic selection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Liang, Jing-Long; Kang, Lin-Zhi; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Jia-Jun; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Guo, Li-Qiong; Lin, Jun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound with diverse beneficial effects on human health. Red wine is the major dietary source of resveratrol but the amount that people can obtain from wines is limited. To increase the resveratrol production in wines, two expression vectors carrying 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase gene (4CL) from Arabidopsis thaliana and resveratrol synthase gene (RS) from Vitis vinifera were transformed into industrial wine strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118. When cultured with 1 mM p-coumaric acid, the engineered strains grown with and without the addition of antibiotics produced 8.249 and 3.317 mg/L of trans-resveratrol in the culture broth, respectively. Resveratrol content of the wine fermented with engineered strains was twice higher than that of the control, indicating that our engineered strains could increase the production of resveratrol during wine fermentation.

  12. Antibiotic Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... specific to women Antibiotics can lead to vaginal yeast infections. This happens because antibiotics kill the normal bacteria in the vagina and this causes yeast to grow rapidly. Symptoms of a yeast infection ...

  13. Antibiotic Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References POLICY ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network Africa ...

  14. Relationship of amino acid composition and molecular weight of antifreeze glycopeptides to non-colligative freezing point depression.

    PubMed

    Schrag, J D; O'Grady, S M; DeVries, A L

    1982-08-01

    Many polar fishes synthesize a group of eight glycopeptides that exhibit a non-colligative lowering of the freezing point of water. These glycopeptides range in molecular weight between 2600 and 33 700. The largest glycopeptides [1-5] lower the freezing point more than the small ones on a weight basis and contain only two amino acids, alanine and threonine, with the disaccharide galactose-N-acetyl-galactosamine attached to threonine. The small glycopeptides, 6, 7, and 8, also lower the freezing point and contain proline, which periodically substitutes for alanine. Glycopeptides with similar antifreeze properties isolated from the saffron cod and the Atlantic tomcod contain an additional amino acid, arginine, which substitutes for threonine in glycopeptide 6. In this study we address the question of whether differences in amino acid composition or molecular weight between large and small glycopeptides are responsible for the reduced freezing point depressing capability of the low molecular weight glycopeptides. The results indicate that the degree of amino acid substitutions that occur in glycopeptides 6-8 do not have a significant effect on the unusual freezing point lowering and that the observed decrease in freezing point depression with smaller glycopeptides can be accounted for on the basis of molecular weight.

  15. A35512, a complex of new antibacterial antibiotics produced by Streptomyces candidus. I. Isolation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Michel, K H; Shah, R M; Hamill, R L

    1980-12-01

    The new antibiotic complex A35512 produced by Streptomyces candidus was isolated from the filtered fermentation broth. The individual factors A, B, C, E, and H were separated and purified by column chromatography. A35512B, the major factor, was isolated as the dihydrochloride salt, a white crystalline compound with an approximate empirical formula of C90H101 N8O39Cl.2HCl. The A35512 antibiotics belong to the glycopeptide class of antibiotics and possess high in vitro and in vivo activity against Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:7251482

  16. Auxotrophic markers pyrF and proC can replace antibiotic markers on protein production plasmids in high-cell-density Pseudomonas fluorescens fermentation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jane C; Jenings, Annika F; Mun, Deborah M; McGovern, Patricia M; Chew, Lawrence C

    2005-01-01

    The use of antibiotic-resistance genes as selectable markers in transgenic organisms is coming under increased scrutiny, for fear that they may spread to human pathogens, thereby reducing the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. A current Pseudomonas fluorescens protein expression system uses a tetracycline resistance gene (tetR/tetA) to maintain an expression plasmid under control of a repressible promoter and a kanamycin resistance gene (kanR) to maintain a plasmid carrying a repressor gene. We investigated using auxotrophic markers to replace these two antibiotic resistance genes: pyrF (encoding orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase) in place of tetR/tetA and proC (encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase) in place of kanR, complementing their respective precise chromosomal deletions created by allele exchange using a suicide vector carrying pyrF as a counterselectable marker. The resulting strains, devoid of antibiotic-resistance genes, were shown to achieve high productivity of nitrilase and thermostable alpha-amylase equal to that of the former antibiotic-resistant production host. The production plasmids were stable. The pyrF (uracil-dependent) background of the production host strain also allows us to sequentially alter the genome to incorporate other desired genomic changes, deletions, or insertions using 5'-fluoroorotic acid counterselection, restoring the selectable marker after each step.

  17. Production of destomycin-A antibiotic by Streptomyces sp. using rice straw as fermented substrate.

    PubMed

    Atta, H M; Abul-Hamd, A T; Radwan, H G

    2009-01-01

    Hundred and twenty microbial isolates could be isolated from different soil samples collected from different localities in Egypt. One of the actinomycete culture AZ-H-A5 from three cultures was found to produce a wide spectrum antimicrobial agent when cultivated on rice straw. The actinomycete AZ-H-A5 could be isolated from a soil sample collected from Helwan district, Egypt. The nucleotide sequence of the 16s RNA gene (1.5 Kb) of the most potent strain evidenced an 85% similarity with Streptomyces pseudovenezue, EU841712 and Streptomyces galilaeus. From the taxonomic features, the actinomycetes isolate AZ-H-A5 matches with Streptomyces rimosus in the morphological, physiological and biochemical characters. Thus, it was given the suggested name Streptomyces rimosus, AZ-H-A5. The parameters controlling the biosynthetic process of antimicrobial agent formation including: inoculum size, different pH values, different temperatures, different incubation period, and different carbon and nitrogen sources, potassium nitrate, K2HPO4, MgSO4.7H2O and KCl concentrations were fully investigates. The active metabolite was extracted using ethyl acetate (1:1, v/v) at pH 7.0. The separation of the active ingredient and its purification was performed using both thin layer chromatography (TLC) and column chromatography (CC) techniques. The physicochemical characteristics of the purified antibiotic viz. color, melting point, solubility, elemental analysis, spectroscopic characteristics and chemical reactions have been investigated. This analysis indicates a suggested empirical formula of C20H37N13O13. The minimum inhibition concentrations "MICs" of the purified antimicrobial agent were also determined. The purified antimicrobial agent was suggestive of being belonging to Destomycin-A antibiotic produced by Streptomyces rimosus, AZ-H-A5. PMID:20222575

  18. Reciprocal immune benefit based on complementary production of antibiotics by the leech Hirudo verbana and its gut symbiont Aeromonas veronii

    PubMed Central

    Tasiemski, Aurélie; Massol, François; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Roger, Emmanuel; Rodet, Franck; Fournier, Isabelle; Thomas, Frédéric; Salzet, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal leech has established a long-term mutualistic association with Aeromonas veronii, a versatile bacterium which can also display free-living waterborne and fish- or human-pathogenic lifestyles. Here, we investigated the role of antibiotics in the dynamics of interaction between the leech and its gut symbiont Aeromonas. By combining biochemical and molecular approaches, we isolated and identified for the first time the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the leech digestive tract and by its symbiont Aeromonas. Immunohistochemistry data and PCR analyses evidenced that leech AMP genes are induced in the gut epithelial cells when Aeromonas load is low (starved animals), while repressed when Aeromonas abundance is the highest (post blood feeding). The asynchronous production of AMPs by both partners suggests that these antibiotic substances (i) provide them with reciprocal protection against invasive bacteria and (ii) contribute to the unusual simplicity of the gut microflora of the leech. This immune benefit substantially reinforces the evidence of an evolutionarily stable association between H. verbana and A. veronii. Altogether these data may provide insights into the processes making the association with an Aeromonas species in the digestive tract either deleterious or beneficial. PMID:26635240

  19. In vitro activities of arylomycin natural-product antibiotics against Staphylococcus epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Smith, Peter A; Powers, Michael E; Roberts, Tucker C; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2011-03-01

    The arylomycins are a class of natural-product antibiotics that act via the inhibition of type I signal peptidase (SPase), and we have found in diverse bacteria that their activity is limited by the presence of a resistance-conferring Pro residue in SPase that reduces inhibitor binding. We have also demonstrated that Staphylococcus epidermidis, which lacks this Pro residue, is extremely susceptible to the arylomycins. Here, to further explore the potential utility of the arylomycins, we report an analysis of the activity of a synthetic arylomycin derivative, arylomycin C₁₆, against clinical isolates of S. epidermidis and other coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) from distinct geographical locations. Against many important species of CoNS, including S. epidermidis, S. haemolyticus, S. lugdunensis, and S. hominis, we find that arylomycin C₁₆ exhibits activity equal to or greater than that of vancomycin, the antibiotic most commonly used to treat CoNS infections. While the susceptibility was generally correlated with the absence of the previously identified Pro residue, several cases were identified where additional factors also appear to contribute.

  20. High level of antibiotic production in a double polyphosphate kinase and phosphate-binding protein mutant of Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Margarita; Sevillano, Laura; Rico, Sergio; Lombo, Felipe; Braña, Alfredo F; Salas, Jose A; Mendez, Carmen; Santamaría, Ramón I

    2013-05-01

    Phosphate metabolism regulates most of the life processes of microorganisms. In the present work we obtained and studied a Streptomyces lividans ppk/pstS double mutant, which lacks polyphosphate kinase (PPK) and the high-affinity phosphate-binding protein (PstS), impairing at the same time the intracellular storage of polyphosphate and the intake of new inorganic phosphate from a phosphate-limited medium, respectively. In some of the aspects analyzed, the ppk/pstS double mutant was more similar to the wt strain than was the single pstS mutant. The double mutant was thus able to grow in phosphate-limited media, whereas the pstS mutant required the addition of 1 mM phosphate under the assay conditions used. The double mutant was able to incorporate more than one fourth of the inorganic phosphate incorporated by the wt strain, whereas phosphate incorporation was almost completely impaired in the pstS mutant. Noteworthy, under phosphate limitation conditions, the double ppk/pstS mutant showed a higher production of the endogenous antibiotic actinorhodin and the heterologous antitumor 8-demethyl-tetracenomycin (up to 10-fold with respect to the wt strain), opening new possibilities for the use of this strain in the heterologous expression of antibiotic pathways.

  1. Reciprocal immune benefit based on complementary production of antibiotics by the leech Hirudo verbana and its gut symbiont Aeromonas veronii.

    PubMed

    Tasiemski, Aurélie; Massol, François; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Roger, Emmanuel; Rodet, Franck; Fournier, Isabelle; Thomas, Frédéric; Salzet, Michel

    2015-12-04

    The medicinal leech has established a long-term mutualistic association with Aeromonas veronii, a versatile bacterium which can also display free-living waterborne and fish- or human-pathogenic lifestyles. Here, we investigated the role of antibiotics in the dynamics of interaction between the leech and its gut symbiont Aeromonas. By combining biochemical and molecular approaches, we isolated and identified for the first time the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the leech digestive tract and by its symbiont Aeromonas. Immunohistochemistry data and PCR analyses evidenced that leech AMP genes are induced in the gut epithelial cells when Aeromonas load is low (starved animals), while repressed when Aeromonas abundance is the highest (post blood feeding). The asynchronous production of AMPs by both partners suggests that these antibiotic substances (i) provide them with reciprocal protection against invasive bacteria and (ii) contribute to the unusual simplicity of the gut microflora of the leech. This immune benefit substantially reinforces the evidence of an evolutionarily stable association between H. verbana and A. veronii. Altogether these data may provide insights into the processes making the association with an Aeromonas species in the digestive tract either deleterious or beneficial.

  2. Development, Antibiotic Production, and Ribosome Assembly in Streptomyces venezuelae Are Impacted by RNase J and RNase III Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie E.; Leong, Vivian; Ortega, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    RNA metabolism is a critical but frequently overlooked control element affecting virtually every cellular process in bacteria. RNA processing and degradation is mediated by a suite of ribonucleases having distinct cleavage and substrate specificity. Here, we probe the role of two ribonucleases (RNase III and RNase J) in the emerging model system Streptomyces venezuelae. We show that each enzyme makes a unique contribution to the growth and development of S. venezuelae and further affects the secondary metabolism and antibiotic production of this bacterium. We demonstrate a connection between the action of these ribonucleases and translation, with both enzymes being required for the formation of functional ribosomes. RNase III mutants in particular fail to properly process 23S rRNA, form fewer 70S ribosomes, and show reduced translational processivity. The loss of either RNase III or RNase J additionally led to the appearance of a new ribosomal species (the 100S ribosome dimer) during exponential growth and dramatically sensitized these mutants to a range of antibiotics. PMID:25266378

  3. Facile synthesis of boronic acid-functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rongna; Hu, Junjie; Cai, Zongwei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-02-01

    A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) via an amide reaction. The introduction of PASE could bridge the MCNT and APBA, suppress the nonspecific adsorption and reduce the steric hindrance among the bound molecules. Due to the excellent structure of the MCNTs, the functionalization of PASE and then APBA on MCNTs was quite simple, specific and effective. The glycopeptides enrichment and separation with a magnetic field could be achieved by their reversible covalent binding with the boronic group of APBA-MCNTs. The exceptionally large specific surface area and the high density of boronic acid groups of APBA-MCNTs resulted in rapid and highly efficient enrichment of glycopeptides, even in the presence of large amounts of interfering nonglycopeptides. The functional MCNTs possessed high selectivity for enrichment of 21 glycopeptides from the digest of horseradish peroxidase demonstrated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis showing more glycopeptides detected than the usual 9 glycopeptides with commercially available APBA-agarose. The proposed system showed better specificity for glycopeptides even in the presence of non-glycopeptides with 50 times higher concentration. The boronic acid functionalized MCNTs provide a promising selective enrichment platform for precise glycoproteomic analysis.A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid

  4. Arabinosylated glycopeptide hormones: new insights into CLAVATA3 structure.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Hidefumi; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu

    2010-10-01

    Secreted peptides are now recognized as important members of hormones that coordinate and specify cellular functions in plants. Recent accumulating evidence shows that secreted peptide hormones are often post-translationally modified, and such modification is critical for their function. In this review, we highlight hydroxyproline arabinosylation, which has been found in several peptide hormones including CLAVATA3 (CLV3), a key peptide controlling stem cell renewal and differentiation in Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem. Arabinosylation of CLV3 is important for its biological activity and for high-affinity binding to its receptor, CLV1. We discuss the physiological functions of known glycopeptide hormones, the structural information on sugar chains, and possible mechanisms of glycosylation.

  5. Glucose metabolism in the antibiotic producing actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Nina; Bruheim, Per; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-12-01

    The actinomycete Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727, producer of the glycopeptide A40926 that is used as precursor for the novel antibiotic dalbavancin, has an unusual carbon metabolism. Glucose is primarily metabolized via the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway, although the energetically more favorable Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway is present in this organism. Moreover, Nonomuraea utilizes a PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase, an enzyme that has been connected with anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes and higher plants, but recently has been recognized in several actinomycetes. In order to study its primary carbon metabolism in further detail, Nonomuraea was cultivated with [1-13C] glucose as the only carbon source and the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids were determined by GC-MS analysis. Through this method, the fluxes in the central carbon metabolism during balanced growth were estimated. Moreover, a shift in the label incorporation pattern was observed in connection with phosphate limitation and increased antibiotic productivity in Nonomuraea. The shift indicated an increased flux through the EMP pathway at the expense of the flux through the ED pathway, a suggestion that was supported by alterations in intracellular metabolite levels during phosphate limitation. In contrast, expression levels of genes encoding enzymes in the ED and EMP pathways were not affected by phosphate limitation.

  6. Prevalence of antibiotic resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci from spontaneously fermented meat products and safety assessment for new starters.

    PubMed

    Marty, Esther; Bodenmann, Chantal; Buchs, Jasmin; Hadorn, Ruedi; Eugster-Meier, Elisabeth; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2012-10-01

    To provide new meat starter strains lacking antibiotic (AB) resistances, we explored the AB susceptibility in 116 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) isolates from traditionally fermented sausages (n=40) manufactured with meat from conventional animal breeding, and from meat products (n=76) made from meat of animals raised in natural habitats under low- or no-antibiotic pressure. Less than 50% of these CNS isolates showed phenotypic resistances to at least one antibiotic (AB) by using microdilution assay. Resistances to penicillins and tetracycline were most often observed and could be traced back to blaZ and tet(K) genes. Prevalence of AB resistances was species-dependent and mainly found in isolates of Staphylococcus warneri (78%), Staphylococcus capitis (75%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (67%), but only sporadically detected in Staphylococcus carnosus (27%) and Staphylococcus equorum (18%). AB resistances were more often observed in S. xylosus isolates originating from natural habitats compared to traditionally fermented sausages made from conventional meat. A selection of 101 isolates belonging to S. xylosus (n=63), S. carnosus (n=21) and S. equorum (n=17) were subsequently grouped by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) into strain clusters. No S. carnosus and only five S. xylosus strains were lacking AB resistances and exhibited a PFGE genotype different from commercial starters. These strains, together with 17 S. equorum strains, were further studied for safety and technological characteristics. The ability to produce biogenic amines was not detected in any strain. PCR amplifications for enterotoxin encoding genes seg-sej were detected in one, and for δ-hemolysin encoding gene hld in four S. equorum strains, but phenotypic hemolytic activity was visible for three S. xylosus and 15 S. equorum strains. Catalase and nitrate reductase activity was observed in all isolates tested; particularly S. equorum showed high nitrate reduction. In conclusion, we

  7. [Antibiotic Stewardship].

    PubMed

    Lanckohr, Christian; Ellger, Björn

    2016-02-01

    The adequate management of infections is an important task in critical care medicine which has an effect on patient outcome. As a result, the prevalence of antiinfective therapy is high in intensive care units. In the face of an unsettling development of worldwide microbial resistance, an optimization and reduction of antiinfective therapy is necessary. Antibiotic stewardship tries to improve antiinfective therapy with an interdisciplinary approach. One overall objective of antibiotic stewardship is the reduction of resistance induction in order to preserve the therapeutic efficiency of antibiotics. Intensive care units are important fields of action for antibiotic stewardship interventions. This article reviews available evidence and some practical aspects for antibiotic stewardship.

  8. The role of proton mobility in determining the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation channels of N-glycopeptide ions.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Venkata; Roth, Heidi A; De La Cruz, Gabriela; Fernando, Ganga S; Dodds, Eric D

    2015-10-01

    Site-specific glycoproteomic analysis largely hinges on the use of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to identify glycopeptides. Experiments of this type are usually aimed at drawing connections between individual oligosaccharide structures and their specific sites of attachment to the polypeptide chain. These determinations inherently require ion dissociation methods capable of interrogating both the monosaccharide and amino acid connectivity of the glycopeptide. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) shows potential to satisfy this requirement, as the vibrational activation/dissociation of protonated N-glycopeptides has been observed to access cleavage of either glycosidic bonds of the glycan or amide bonds of the peptide in an energy-resolved manner. Nevertheless, the relative energy requirement for these fragmentation pathways varies considerably among analytes. This research addresses the influence of proton mobility on the vibrational energy necessary to achieve either glycan or peptide cleavage in a collection of protonated N-glycopeptide ions. While greater proton mobility of the precursor ion was found to correlate with lower energy requirements for precursor ion depletion and appearance of glycosidic fragments, the vibrational energy deposition necessary for appearance of peptide backbone fragments showed no relation to the precursor ion proton mobility. These results are consistent with observations suggesting that peptide fragments arise from an intermediate fragment which is generally of lower proton mobility than the precursor ion. Such findings have potential to facilitate the rational selection of CID conditions which are best suited to provide either glycan or peptide cleavage products in MS/MS based N-glycoproteomic analysis.

  9. Prevalence, persistence, and molecular characterization of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci in Norwegian poultry and poultry farmers 3 to 8 years after the ban on avoparcin.

    PubMed

    Sørum, M; Johnsen, P J; Aasnes, B; Rosvoll, T; Kruse, H; Sundsfjord, A; Simonsen, G S

    2006-01-01

    Environmental reservoirs of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE) in Norway have been linked to former growth promoting use of the glycopeptide avoparcin in poultry production. We have examined the prevalence of fecal GRE in poultry and poultry farmers 3 to 8 years after the Norwegian avoparcin ban in 1995 and performed molecular analyses of the GRE population. Fecal samples from poultry farmers and their flocks on 29 previously avoparcin-exposed farms were collected on five occasions during the study period (1998 to 2003). All flocks (100%) were GRE positive in 1998. Throughout the study period, 78.5% of the poultry samples were GRE positive. Glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium (GREF) was isolated from 27.6% of the farmer samples in 1998 and from 27.8% of the samples collected between 1998 and 2003. The prevalence of fecal GRE in poultry declined significantly during the study period, but prevalence in samples from the farmers did not decline. PCR analysis revealed a specific Tn1546-plasmid junction fragment in 93.9% of E. faecium isolates. A putative postsegregation killing (PSK) system linked to Tn1546 was detected in 97.1% of the isolates examined. Multilocus sequence typing of glycopeptide-susceptible (n = 10) and -resistant (n = 10) E. faecium isolates from humans (n = 10) and poultry (n = 10) on two farms displayed 17 different sequence types. The study confirms the continuing persistence of a widespread common plasmid-mediated vanA-pRE25-PSK element within a heterogeneous GRE population on Norwegian poultry farms 8 years after the avoparcin ban. Moreover, it suggests an important role of PSK systems in the maintenance of antimicrobial resistance determinants in reservoirs without apparent antimicrobial selection. PMID:16391086

  10. Elucidation of the sugar recognition ability of the lectin domain of UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 by using unnatural glycopeptide substrates.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Yayoi; Nudelman, Aaron S; Levery, Steven B; Wandall, Hans H; Bennett, Eric P; Hindsgaul, Ole; Clausen, Henrik; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro

    2012-03-01

    Mucin-type glycosylation [α-N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (α-GalNAc)-O-Ser/Thr] on proteins is initiated biosynthetically by 16 homologous isoforms of GalNAc-Ts (uridine diphosphate-GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases). All the GalNAc-Ts consist of a catalytic domain and a lectin domain. Previous reports of GalNAc-T assays toward peptides and α-GalNAc glycopeptides showed that the lectin domain recognized the sugar on the substrates and affected the reaction; however, the details are not clear. Here, we report a new strategy to give insight on the sugar recognition ability and the function of the GalNAc-T3 lectin domain using chemically synthesized natural-type (α-GalNAc-O-Thr) and unnatural-type [β-GalNAc-O-Thr, α-Fuc-O-Thr and β-GlcNAc-O-Thr] MUC5AC glycopeptides. GalNAc-T3 is one of isoforms expressed in various organs, its substrate specificity extensively characterized and its anomalous expression has been identified in several types of cancer (e.g. pancreas and stomach). The glycopeptides used in this study were designed based on a preliminary peptide assay with a sequence derived from the MUC5AC tandem repeat. Through GalNAc-T3 and lectin-inactivated GalNAc-T3, competition assays between the glycopeptide substrates and product analyses (MALDI-TOF MS, RP-HPLC and ETD-MS/MS), we show that the lectin domain strictly recognized GalNAc on the substrate and this specificity controlled the glycosylation pathway.

  11. Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to Subinhibitory Concentrations of β-Lactam Antibiotics Induces Heterogeneous Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Roch, Mélanie; Clair, Perrine; Renzoni, Adriana; Reverdy, Marie-Elisabeth; Dauwalder, Olivier; Bes, Michèle; Martra, Annie; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Laurent, Frédéric; Reix, Philippe; Dumitrescu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides are known to select for heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (h-VISA) from susceptible strains. In certain clinical situations, h-VISA strains have been isolated from patients without previous exposure to glycopeptides, such as cystic fibrosis patients, who frequently receive repeated treatments with beta-lactam antibiotics. Our objective was to determine whether prolonged exposure to beta-lactam antibiotics can induce h-VISA. We exposed 3 clinical vancomycin-susceptible methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains to ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, imipenem, and vancomycin (as a control) at subinhibitory concentrations for 18 days in vitro. Population analyses showed progressive increases in vancomycin resistance; seven of the 12 derived strains obtained after induction were classified as h-VISA according to the following criteria: area under the curve (AUC) on day 18/AUC of Mu3 of ≥90% and/or growth on brain heart infusion (BHI) agar with 4 mg/liter vancomycin. The derived isolates had thickened cell walls proportional to the level of glycopeptide resistance. Genes known to be associated with glycopeptide resistance (vraSR, yvqF, SA1703, graRS, walKR, and rpoB) were PCR sequenced; no de novo mutations were observed upon beta-lactam exposure. To determine whether trfA, a gene encoding a glycopeptide resistance factor, was essential in the selection of h-VISA upon beta-lactam pressure, a trfA-knockout strain was generated by allelic replacement. Indeed, beta-lactam exposure of this mutated strain showed no capacity to induce vancomycin resistance. In conclusion, these results showed that beta-lactam antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations can induce intermediate vancomycin resistance in vitro. This induction required an intact trfA locus. Our results suggest that prior use of beta-lactam antibiotics can compromise vancomycin efficacy in the treatment of MRSA infections. PMID:24957836

  12. Sequencing of the ddl gene and modeling of the mutated D-alanine:D-alanine ligase in glycopeptide-dependent strains of Enterococcus faecium.

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Y; Prevost, M; Van Bambeke, F; Casadewall, B; Tulkens, P M; Courvalin, P

    2001-04-01

    Glycopeptide dependence for growth in enterococci results from mutations in the ddl gene that inactivate the host D-Ala:D-Ala ligase. The strains require glycopeptides as inducers for synthesis of resistance proteins, which allows for the production of peptidoglycan precursors ending in D-Ala-D-Lac instead of D-Ala-D-Ala. The sequences of the ddl gene from nine glycopeptide-dependent Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates were determined. Each one had a mutation consisting either in a 5-bp insertion at position 41 leading to an early stop codon, an in-frame 6-bp deletion causing the loss of two residues (KDVA243-246 to KA), or single base-pair changes resulting in an amino acid substitution (E13 --> G, G99 --> R, V241 --> D, D295 --> G, P313 --> L). The potential consequences of the deletion and point mutations on the 3-D structure of the enzyme were evaluated by comparative molecular modeling of the E. faecium enzyme, using the X-ray structure of the homologous Escherichia coli D-Ala:D-Ala ligase DdlB as a template. All mutated residues were found either to interact directly with one of the substrates of the enzymatic reaction (E13 and D295) or to stabilize the position of critical residues in the active site. Maintenance of the 3-D structure in the vicinity of these mutations in the active site appears critical for D-Ala:D-Ala ligase activity.

  13. Characterization of Protein N-Glycosylation by Analysis of ZIC-HILIC-Enriched Intact Proteolytic Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Pohlentz, Gottfried; Marx, Kristina; Mormann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ZIC-HILIC) solid-phase extraction (SPE) combined with direct-infusion nanoESI mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem MS/MS is a well-suited method for the analysis of protein N-glycosylation. A site-specific characterization of N-glycopeptides is achieved by the combination of proteolytic digestions employing unspecific proteases, glycopeptide enrichment by use of ZIC-HILIC SPE, and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis. The use of thermolysin or a mixture of trypsin and chymotrypsin leads per se to a mass-based separation, that is, small nonglycosylated peptides and almost exclusively glycopeptides at higher m/z values. As a result of their higher hydrophilicity N-glycopeptides comprising short peptide backbones are preferably accumulated by the ZIC-HILIC-based separation procedure. By employing this approach complications associated with low ionization efficiencies of N-glycopeptides resulting from signal suppression in the presence of highly abundant nonglycosylated peptides can be largely reduced. Here, we describe a simple protocol aimed at the enrichment of N-glycopeptides derived from in-solution and in-gel digestions of SDS-PAGE-separated glycoproteins preceding mass spectrometric analysis.

  14. A small RNA controls a protein regulator involved in antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Eyraud, Alex; Tattevin, Pierre; Chabelskaya, Svetlana; Felden, Brice

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of Staphylococcus aureus strains that are resistant to glycopeptides has led to alarming scenarios where serious staphylococcal infections cannot be treated. The bacterium expresses many small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that have unknown biological functions for the most part. Here we show that an S. aureus sRNA, SprX (alias RsaOR), shapes bacterial resistance to glycopeptides, the invaluable treatments for Methicillin-resistant staphylococcal infections. Modifying SprX expression levels influences Vancomycin and Teicoplanin glycopeptide resistance. Comparative proteomic studies have identified that SprX specifically downregulates stage V sporulation protein G, SpoVG. SpoVG is produced from the yabJ-spoVG operon and contributes to S. aureus glycopeptide resistance. SprX negatively regulates SpoVG expression by direct antisense pairings at the internal translation initiation signals of the second operon gene, without modifying bicistronic mRNA expression levels or affecting YabJ translation. The SprX and yabJ-spoVG mRNA domains involved in the interaction have been identified, highlighting the importance of a CU-rich loop of SprX in the control of SpoVG expression. We have shown that SpoVG might not be the unique SprX target involved in the glycopeptide resistance and demonstrated that the regulation of glycopeptide sensitivity involves the CU-rich domain of SprX. Here we report the case of a sRNA influencing antibiotic resistance of a major human pathogen. PMID:24557948

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of AbsC, a novel regulator of antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Kock, Holger; Mootien, Saraspadee; Davies, Sîan C.; Bibb, Mervyn J.; Lawson, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Crystals of recombinant AbsC (subunit MW = 18 313 Da; 158 amino acids), a novel regulator of antibiotic production from Streptomyces coelicolor, were grown by vapour diffusion. The protein crystallizes in space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 43.53, b = 121.30, c = 143.75 Å. Native data to a resolution of 2.25 Å were recorded at station PX 14.1 (Daresbury) from a single crystal. Preliminary analysis of these data suggests that the asymmetric unit contains four copies of the AbsC monomer, giving an estimated solvent content of 47.0%. AbsC belongs to the MarR family of proteins that mediate ligand-responsive transcriptional control. PMID:17329821

  16. Antibiotic Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Meat-Processing Environments, Beef Products, and Clinical Cases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; de Castilho, Natalia Parma Augusto; da Silva, Danilo Augusto Lopes; Vallim, Deyse Christina; Hofer, Ernesto; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to assess the antimicrobial resistance and the presence of virulence markers in 137 Listeria monocytogenes isolates obtained from meat-processing environments, beef products, and clinical cases. All isolates were subject to molecular serogrouping and their antibiotic resistance profiles were assessed against 12 antimicrobials. In addition, isolates were subjected to detection of virulence marker genes (inlA, inlC, inlJ). The isolates were classified into serogroups 4b, 4d, 4a, or 4c (46%), 1/2c or 3c (27%), 1/2a or 3a (13.9%), and 1/2b or 3b (13.1%). All tested isolates presented sensitivity to the majority of the tested antimicrobials, but most of them presented resistance or intermediate resistance to clindamycin (88.3%) and oxacillin (73.7%). Virulence markers were detected in all isolates, demanding further analysis to better characterize their pathogenic potential.

  17. Jacalin interacts with Asn-linked glycopeptides containing multi-antennary oligosaccharide structure with terminal alpha-linked galactose.

    PubMed

    Do, S I; Lee, K Y

    1998-01-01

    The carbohydrate binding properties of jacalin lectin were examined using RAF9 cell-derived D-[6-3H]glucosamine-radiolabeled total glycopeptides containing N-linked and O-linked oligosaccharides. The binding of N-linked glycopeptides to jacalin was abolished by treatment of alpha-galactosidase whereas O-linked glycopeptides were still bound lectin after this treatment. The removal of O-linked oligosaccharides by mild alkaline/borohydride treatment completely eliminated the lectin binding of alpha-galactosidase treated glycopeptides. These results demonstrate that jacalin interacts with cellular glycopeptides containing N-linked oligosaccharides with terminal alpha-galactose residues as well as glycopeptides containing O-linked oligosaccharides.

  18. Site-Specific Mutation of Staphylococcus aureus VraS Reveals a Crucial Role for the VraR-VraS Sensor in the Emergence of Glycopeptide Resistance▿

    PubMed Central

    Galbusera, Elena; Renzoni, Adriana; Andrey, Diego O.; Monod, Antoinette; Barras, Christine; Tortora, Paolo; Polissi, Alessandra; Kelley, William L.

    2011-01-01

    An initial response of Staphylococcus aureus to encounter with cell wall-active antibiotics occurs by transmembrane signaling systems that orchestrate changes in gene expression to promote survival. Histidine kinase two-component sensor-response regulators such as VraRS contribute to this response. In this study, we examined VraS membrane sensor phosphotransfer signal transduction and explored the genetic consequences of disrupting signaling by engineering a site-specific vraS chromosomal mutation. We have used in vitro autophosphorylation assay with purified VraS[64-347] lacking its transmembrane anchor region and tested site-specific kinase domain histidine mutants. We identified VraS H156 as the probable site of autophosphorylation and show phosphotransfer in vitro using purified VraR. Genetic studies show that the vraS(H156A) mutation in three strain backgrounds (ISP794, Newman, and COL) fails to generate detectable first-step reduced susceptibility teicoplanin mutants and severely reduces first-step vancomycin mutants. The emergence of low-level glycopeptide resistance in strain ISP794, derived from strain 8325 (ΔrsbU), did not require a functional σB, but rsbU restoration could enhance the emergence frequency supporting a role for this alternative sigma factor in promoting glycopeptide resistance. Transcriptional analysis of vraS(H156A) strains revealed a pronounced reduction but not complete abrogation of the vraRS operon after exposure to cell wall-active antibiotics, suggesting that additional factors independent of VraS-driven phosphotransfer, or σB, exist for this promoter. Collectively, our results reveal important details of the VraRS signaling system and predict that pharmacologic blockade of the VraS sensor kinase will have profound effects on blocking emergence of cell wall-active antibiotic resistance in S. aureus. PMID:21173175

  19. Prevalence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and/or biocides on meat processing plant surfaces throughout meat chain production.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2013-02-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence of resistant bacteria to biocides and/or antibiotics throughout meat chain production from sacrifice till end of production line, samples from various surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse representative of the region were analyzed by the culture dependent approach. Resistant Psychrotrophs (n=255 strains), Pseudomonas sp. (n=166 strains), E. coli (n=23 strains), Staphylococcus sp. (n=17 strains) and LAB (n=82 represented mainly by Lactobacillus sp.) were isolated. Resistant psychrotrophs and pseudomonads (47 and 29%, respectively) to different antimicrobials were frequently detected in almost all areas of meat processing plant regardless the antimicrobial used, although there was a clear shift in the spectrum of other bacterial groups and for this aim such resistance was determined according to several parameters: antimicrobial tested, sampling zone and the bacterial group. Correlation of different parameters was done using a statistical tool "Principal component analysis" (PCA) which determined that quaternary ammonium compounds and hexadecylpyridinium were the most relevant biocides for resistance in Pseudomonas sp., while ciprofloxacin and hexachlorophene were more relevant for psychrotrophs, LAB, and in lesser extent Staphylococcus sp. and Escherichia coli. On the other hand, PCA of sampling zones determined that sacrifice room (SR) and cutting room (CR) considered as main source of antibiotic and/or biocide resistant bacteria showed an opposite behaviour concerning relevance of antimicrobials to determine resistance being hexadecylpyridinium, cetrimide and chlorhexidine the most relevant in CR, while hexachlorophene, oxonia 6P and PHMG the most relevant in SR. In conclusion, rotational use of the relevant biocides as disinfectants in CR and SR is recommended in an environment which is frequently disinfected. PMID:23279818

  20. Production of lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A using soybean curd residue cultivated with Bacillus subtilis in solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, S; Hirai, M; Shoda, M

    2006-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis RB14-CS, which suppresses the growth of various plant pathogens in vitro by producing the lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A, was cultured using soybean curd residue, okara, a by-product of tofu manufacture in solid-state fermentation. After 4 days incubation, iturin A production reached 3,300 mg/kg wet solid material (14 g/kg dry solid material), which is approximately tenfold higher than that in submerged fermentation. When the okara product cultured with RB14-CS was introduced into soil infested with Rhizoctonia solani, which is a causal agent of damping-off of tomato, the disease occurrence was significantly suppressed. After 14 days, the number of RB14-CS cells remained in soil at the initial level, whereas almost no iturin A was detected in soil. As the okara cultured with RB14-CS exhibited functions of both plant disease suppression and nutritional effect on tomato seedlings, this product is expected to contribute to the recycling of the soybean curd residue. PMID:16575567

  1. Production of lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A using soybean curd residue cultivated with Bacillus subtilis in solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, S; Hirai, M; Shoda, M

    2006-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis RB14-CS, which suppresses the growth of various plant pathogens in vitro by producing the lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A, was cultured using soybean curd residue, okara, a by-product of tofu manufacture in solid-state fermentation. After 4 days incubation, iturin A production reached 3,300 mg/kg wet solid material (14 g/kg dry solid material), which is approximately tenfold higher than that in submerged fermentation. When the okara product cultured with RB14-CS was introduced into soil infested with Rhizoctonia solani, which is a causal agent of damping-off of tomato, the disease occurrence was significantly suppressed. After 14 days, the number of RB14-CS cells remained in soil at the initial level, whereas almost no iturin A was detected in soil. As the okara cultured with RB14-CS exhibited functions of both plant disease suppression and nutritional effect on tomato seedlings, this product is expected to contribute to the recycling of the soybean curd residue.

  2. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saswati; Chattopadhyay, Madhab K.; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in sub-inhibitory concentrations acting as signaling molecules supporting the process of quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host–parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell, and so on). The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behavior of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and the genes that confer resistance to antibiotics

  3. In Search of the E. coli Compounds that Change the Antibiotic Production Pattern of Streptomyces coelicolor During Inter-species Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mavituna, Ferda; Luti, Khalid Jaber Kadhum; Gu, Lixing

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the interaction between E.coli and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2) for the increased production of undecylprodigiosin and identify the E. coli actives mediating this inter-species interaction. The antibiotics of interest were the red-pigmented undecylprodigiosin and blue-pigmented actinorhodin. Pure cultures of S. coelicolor in a defined medium produced higher concentrations of actinorhodin compared to those of undecylprodigiosin. The latter however, is more important due to its immunosuppressive and antitumor properties. As a strategy to increase undecylprodigiosin production, we added separately, live cells and heat-killed cells of E. coli C600, and the cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture to S. coelicolor cultures in shake flasks. The interaction with live cells of E. coli altered the antibiotic production pattern and undecylprodigiosin production was enhanced by 3.5-fold compared to the pure cultures of S. coelicolor and actinorhodin decreased by 15-fold. The heat-killed cells of E. coli however, had no effect on antibiotic production. In all cases, growth and glucose consumption of S. coelicolor remained almost the same as those observed in the pure culture indicating that the changes in antibiotic production were not due to nutritional stress. Results with cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture indicated that the interaction between S. coelicolor and E. coli was mediated via diffusible molecule(s). Using a set of extraction procedures and agar-well diffusion bioassays, we isolated and preliminarily identified a class of compounds. For the preliminary verification, we added the compound which was the common chemical structural moiety in this class of compounds to the pure S. coelicolor cultures. We observed similar effects on antibiotic production as with the live E. coli cells and their supernatant indicating that this class of compounds secreted by E. coli indeed could act as actives during interspecies

  4. In Search of the E. coli Compounds that Change the Antibiotic Production Pattern of Streptomyces coelicolor During Inter-species Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mavituna, Ferda; Luti, Khalid Jaber Kadhum; Gu, Lixing

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the interaction between E.coli and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2) for the increased production of undecylprodigiosin and identify the E. coli actives mediating this inter-species interaction. The antibiotics of interest were the red-pigmented undecylprodigiosin and blue-pigmented actinorhodin. Pure cultures of S. coelicolor in a defined medium produced higher concentrations of actinorhodin compared to those of undecylprodigiosin. The latter however, is more important due to its immunosuppressive and antitumor properties. As a strategy to increase undecylprodigiosin production, we added separately, live cells and heat-killed cells of E. coli C600, and the cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture to S. coelicolor cultures in shake flasks. The interaction with live cells of E. coli altered the antibiotic production pattern and undecylprodigiosin production was enhanced by 3.5-fold compared to the pure cultures of S. coelicolor and actinorhodin decreased by 15-fold. The heat-killed cells of E. coli however, had no effect on antibiotic production. In all cases, growth and glucose consumption of S. coelicolor remained almost the same as those observed in the pure culture indicating that the changes in antibiotic production were not due to nutritional stress. Results with cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture indicated that the interaction between S. coelicolor and E. coli was mediated via diffusible molecule(s). Using a set of extraction procedures and agar-well diffusion bioassays, we isolated and preliminarily identified a class of compounds. For the preliminary verification, we added the compound which was the common chemical structural moiety in this class of compounds to the pure S. coelicolor cultures. We observed similar effects on antibiotic production as with the live E. coli cells and their supernatant indicating that this class of compounds secreted by E. coli indeed could act as actives during interspecies

  5. [Antibiotics: present and future].

    PubMed

    Bérdy, János

    2013-04-14

    The author discuss the up to date interpretation of the concept of antibiotics and antibiotic research, as well as the present role of various natural, semisynthetic and synthetic antibiotic compounds in various areas of the human therapy. The origin and the total number of all antibiotics and applied antibiotics in the practice, as well as the bioactive microbial metabolites (antibiotics) in other therapeutical, non-antibiotic fields (including agriculture) are also reviewed. The author discusses main problems, such as increasing (poly)resistance, virulence of pathogens and the non-scientific factors (such as a decline of research efforts and their sociological, economic, financial and regulatory reasons). A short summary of the history of Hungarian antibiotic research is also provided. The author briefly discusses the prospects in the future and the general advantages of the natural products over synthetic compounds. It is concluded that new approaches for the investigation of the unlimited possibilities of the living world are necessary. The discovery of new types or simply neglected (micro)organisms and their biosynthetic capabilities, the introduction of new biotechnological and genetic methods (genomics, metagenom, genome mining) are absolutely required in the future.

  6. Toward Homogeneous Erythropoietin: Chemical Synthesis of the Ala1-Gly28 Glycopeptide Domain by “Alanine” Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Cindy; Trzupek, John D.; Wu, Bin; Wan, Qian; Chen, Gong; Tan, Zhongping; Yuan, Yu; Danishefsky, Samuel J.

    2009-01-01

    The Ala1—Gly28 glycopeptide fragment (28) of EPO was prepared by chemical synthesis as a single glycoform. Key steps in the synthesis include attachment of a complex dodecasaccharide (7) to a seven amino acid peptide via Lansbury aspartylation, native chemical ligation to join peptide 19 with the glycopeptide domain 18, and a selective desulfurization at the ligation site to reveal the natural Ala19. This glycopeptide fragment (28) contains both the requisite N-linked dodecasaccharide and a C-terminal αthioester handle, the latter feature permitting direct coupling with a glycopeptide fragment bearing N-terminal Cys29 without further functionalization. PMID:19334679

  7. Enantiomeric separation of bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-based 2-amino-3-carboxylic acids on macrocyclic glycopeptide chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Pataj, Zoltán; Ilisz, István; Grecsó, Nóra; Palkó, Márta; Fülöp, Ferenc; Armstrong, Daniel W; Péter, Antal

    2014-04-01

    Direct high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separation of four bicyclo[2.2.2]octane based 2-amino-3-carboxylic acid enantiomers were developed on chiral stationary phases (CSPs) containing different macrocyclic glycopeptide antibiotic selectors. The analyses were performed under reversed-phase, polar organic and polar ionic mode on macrocyclic-glycopeptide-based Chirobiotic T, T2, TAG, and R columns. The effects of the mobile phase composition including the acid and base modifier, the structure of the analytes, and the temperature on the separations were investigated. Experiments were achieved at constant mobile phase compositions on different stationary phases in the temperature range 5-40°C. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated from plots of ln k or ln α versus 1/T. It was recognized that the enantioseparations in reversed-phase and polar organic mode were enthalpically driven, but under polar-ionic conditions entropically driven enantioseparation was observed as well. Baseline separation and determination of elution sequence were achieved in all cases.

  8. Diversity, Distribution and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Goat and Lamb Slaughterhouse Surfaces and Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Knapp, Charles W.; Correa Galeote, David; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and quantification of tetracycline, sulfonamide and beta-lactam resistance genes were assessed in slaughterhouse zones throughout meat chain production and the meat products; this study represents the first to report quantitatively monitor antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in goat and lamb slaughterhouse using a culture independent approach, since most studies focused on individual bacterial species and their specific resistance types. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed a high prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetB in almost all slaughterhouse zones. Sulfonamide resistance genes were largely distributed, while beta-lactam resistance genes were less predominant. Statistical analysis revealed that resistant bacteria, in most cases, were spread by the same route in almost all slaughterhouse zones, except for tetB, blaCTX and blaTEM genes, which occurred in few zones as isolated ‘hot spots.’ The sum of all analyzed ARG indicated that slaughterhouse surfaces and end products act as reservoirs of ARG, mainly tet genes, which were more prevalent in slaughtering room (SR), cutting room (CR) and commercial meat products (MP). Resistance gene patterns suggest they were disseminated throughout slaughterhouse zones being also detected in commercial meat products, with significant correlations between different sampling zones/end products and total resistance in SR, CR and white room (WR) zones, and also refrigerator 4 (F4) and MP were observed. Strategically controlling key zones in slaughterhouse (SR, CR and WR) by adequate disinfection methods could strategically reduce the risks of ARG transmission and minimize the issues of food safety and environment contamination. PMID:25479100

  9. Diversity, distribution and quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in goat and lamb slaughterhouse surfaces and meat products.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Knapp, Charles W; Correa Galeote, David; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and quantification of tetracycline, sulfonamide and beta-lactam resistance genes were assessed in slaughterhouse zones throughout meat chain production and the meat products; this study represents the first to report quantitatively monitor antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in goat and lamb slaughterhouse using a culture independent approach, since most studies focused on individual bacterial species and their specific resistance types. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed a high prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetB in almost all slaughterhouse zones. Sulfonamide resistance genes were largely distributed, while beta-lactam resistance genes were less predominant. Statistical analysis revealed that resistant bacteria, in most cases, were spread by the same route in almost all slaughterhouse zones, except for tetB, blaCTX and blaTEM genes, which occurred in few zones as isolated 'hot spots.' The sum of all analyzed ARG indicated that slaughterhouse surfaces and end products act as reservoirs of ARG, mainly tet genes, which were more prevalent in slaughtering room (SR), cutting room (CR) and commercial meat products (MP). Resistance gene patterns suggest they were disseminated throughout slaughterhouse zones being also detected in commercial meat products, with significant correlations between different sampling zones/end products and total resistance in SR, CR and white room (WR) zones, and also refrigerator 4 (F4) and MP were observed. Strategically controlling key zones in slaughterhouse (SR, CR and WR) by adequate disinfection methods could strategically reduce the risks of ARG transmission and minimize the issues of food safety and environment contamination.

  10. Diversity, distribution and quantification of antibiotic resistance genes in goat and lamb slaughterhouse surfaces and meat products.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Knapp, Charles W; Correa Galeote, David; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and quantification of tetracycline, sulfonamide and beta-lactam resistance genes were assessed in slaughterhouse zones throughout meat chain production and the meat products; this study represents the first to report quantitatively monitor antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in goat and lamb slaughterhouse using a culture independent approach, since most studies focused on individual bacterial species and their specific resistance types. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed a high prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetB in almost all slaughterhouse zones. Sulfonamide resistance genes were largely distributed, while beta-lactam resistance genes were less predominant. Statistical analysis revealed that resistant bacteria, in most cases, were spread by the same route in almost all slaughterhouse zones, except for tetB, blaCTX and blaTEM genes, which occurred in few zones as isolated 'hot spots.' The sum of all analyzed ARG indicated that slaughterhouse surfaces and end products act as reservoirs of ARG, mainly tet genes, which were more prevalent in slaughtering room (SR), cutting room (CR) and commercial meat products (MP). Resistance gene patterns suggest they were disseminated throughout slaughterhouse zones being also detected in commercial meat products, with significant correlations between different sampling zones/end products and total resistance in SR, CR and white room (WR) zones, and also refrigerator 4 (F4) and MP were observed. Strategically controlling key zones in slaughterhouse (SR, CR and WR) by adequate disinfection methods could strategically reduce the risks of ARG transmission and minimize the issues of food safety and environment contamination. PMID:25479100

  11. afsR is a pleiotropic but conditionally required regulatory gene for antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Floriano, B; Bibb, M

    1996-07-01

    The N-terminal region of AfsR, a putative pleiotropic regulatory protein for antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), is homologous to RedD and Actil-ORF4, pathway-specific regulatory proteins required for the production of the antibiotics undecylprodigiosin (Red) and actinorhodin (Act), respectively. The recent identification of afsS, which lies immediately 3' of afsR and which stimulates antibiotic production when cloned at high copy number, questioned whether afsR was a pleiotropic regulatory gene. In this study we demonstrate that multiple copies of afsR can stimulate both Act and Red production and that, despite its homology, it cannot substitute for the pathway-specific regulatory genes. Moreover, an in-frame deletion that removed most of the afsR coding sequence resulted in loss of Act and Red production, and a marked reduction in the synthesis of the calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA), but only under some (non-permissive) nutritional conditions. Although additional copies of afsR resulted in elevated levels of the actII-ORF4 and redD transcripts, transcription of the pathway-specific regulatory genes under non-permissive conditions was unaffected by deletion of afsR. While afsR may operate independently of the pathway-specific regulatory proteins to influence antibiotic production, the activity of ActII-ORF4 and of RedD under non-permissive conditions could depend on interaction with, or modification by, AfsR.

  12. Process design and evaluation of production of bioethanol and β-lactam antibiotic from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bong; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2014-11-01

    To design biorefinery processes producing bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass with dilute acid pretreatment, biorefinery processes were simulated using the SuperPro Designer program. To improve the efficiency of biomass use and the economics of biorefinery, additional pretreatment processes were designed and evaluated, in which a combined process of dilute acid and aqueous ammonia pretreatments, and a process of waste media containing xylose were used, for the production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid. Finally, the productivity and economics of the designed processes were compared.

  13. Hydrazide functionalized core-shell magnetic nanocomposites for highly specific enrichment of N-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liting; Yu, Meng; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Changchun; Lu, Haojie

    2014-05-28

    In view of the biological significance of glycosylation for human health, profiling of glycoproteome from complex biological samples is highly inclined toward the discovery of disease biomarkers and clinical diagnosis. Nevertheless, because of the existence of glycopeptides at relatively low abundances compared with nonglycosylated peptides and glycan microheterogeneity, glycopeptides need to be highly selectively enriched from complex biological samples for mass spectrometry analysis. Herein, a new type of hydrazide functionalized core-shell magnetic nanocomposite has been synthesized for highly specific enrichment of N-glycopeptides. The nanocomposites with both the magnetic core and the polymer shell hanging high density of hydrazide groups were prepared by first functionalization of the magnetic core with polymethacrylic acid by reflux precipitation polymerization to obtain the Fe3O4@poly(methacrylic acid) (Fe3O4@PMAA) and then modification of the surface of Fe3O4@PMAA with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) to obtain Fe3O4@poly(methacrylic hydrazide) (Fe3O4@PMAH). The abundant hydrazide groups toward highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides and the magnetic core make it suitable for large-scale, high-throughput, and automated sample processing. In addition, the hydrophilic polymer surface can provide low nonspecific adsorption of other peptides. Compared to commercially available hydrazide resin, Fe3O4@PMAH improved more than 5 times the signal-to-noise ratio of standard glycopeptides. Finally, this nanocomposite was applied in the profiling of N-glycoproteome from the colorectal cancer patient serum. In total, 175 unique glycopeptides and 181 glycosylation sites corresponding to 63 unique glycoproteins were identified in three repeated experiments, with the specificities of the enriched glycopeptides and corresponding glycoproteins of 69.6% and 80.9%, respectively. Because of all these attractive features, we believe that this novel hydrazide functionalized

  14. The phzI gene of Pseudomonas aureofaciens 30-84 is responsible for the production of a diffusible signal required for phenazine antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Wood, D W; Pierson, L S

    1996-02-01

    The production of phenazine (Ph) antibiotics in Pseudomonas aureofaciens (Pau) 30-84 is positively regulated by PhzR, a protein belonging to the LuxR family of transcriptional activators. We have now identified phzI, a second gene required for PH production. The product of phzI is a member of the LuxI family of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (N-acyl-HSL) synthases. Inactivation of phzI results in the loss of Ph production in Pau 30-84. The presence of phzI in Escherichia coli is sufficient for the production of a diffusible signal which activates phzB expression in Pau 30-84 and traA expression in a N-acyl-HSL-dependent reporter strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. In addition, synthetic N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-HSL induces phzB expression in Pau 30-84. These results suggest that Pau 30-84 produces a N-acyl-HSL signal that regulates Ph production, and that phzI plays a central role in this signaling pathway.

  15. [Investigation of the serotype distribution, biofilm production and antibiotic susceptibilities of group B streptococci isolated from urinary samples].

    PubMed

    Baba, Sevinç; Aydın, Mustafa Derya

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus, GBS), a member of normal flora of human gastrointestinal and genitourinary systems, is a leading cause of sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia particularly in newborn. GBS can also cause severe infections in pregnant women and adults with underlying disease, as well as mild diseases, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs). GBS strains exhibit 10 different serotypes, and the identification of serotype distribution is important epidemiologically. The role of biofilm production is one of the virulence factors that has been discussed in the pathogenesis of GBS infections. Although resistance to penicillin and ampicillin has not been documented in GBS, different rates of resistance has been reported for the alternative antibiotics to penicillin. The aim of this study was to investigate the serotype distribution, the ability of biofilm formation and the antibiotic susceptibilities of S.agalactiae strains isolated from urine cultures. A total of 60 strains were included in the study, 40 of them were isolated from patients (38 female 2 male; mean age: 36.7 years) with urinary tract complaints whose cultures yielded single type of colonies in the number of ≥ 50.000 cfu/ml, whereas 20 of them were isolated from patients (19 female 1 male; mean age: 37.2 years) without urinary tract complaints whose cultures yielded mixed colonies in the number of ≤ 20.000 cfu/ml. Chromogenic media were used for the isolation and the isolates were identified by conventional methods. The isolates were then serotyped by latex agglutination method and their antibiotic susceptibilities were determined by disk diffusion method recommended by CLSI documents. Biofilm formation of the strains were investigated by microplate and Congo red agar (CRA) methods. In our study, the most frequently detected serotypes were V (n= 18; 30%) and II (n= 14; 23.3%), followed by serotype Ia (n= 10; 16.7%), III (n= 9; 15%), Ib (n= 3; 5%), VI (n= 1; 1.7%) and VII (n

  16. Genetic diversity and virulence gene determinants of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella isolated from preharvest turkey production sources.

    PubMed

    Nayak, R; Stewart, T; Wang, R-F; Lin, J; Cerniglia, C E; Kenney, P B

    2004-02-15

    This study evaluated the molecular diversity of 29 Salmonella serotypes isolated from turkey ceca and the production environment. Isolates were resistant to bacitracin (100%), erythromycin (100%), novobiocin (100%), rifampin (100%), streptomycin (62%), gentamicin (52%), spectinomycin (48%), tetracycline (31%), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT) (3%) and tobramycin (3%). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranged from 32 to >/=1024 microg/ml. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and ribotyping patterns were identical within each of the serotypes Heidelberg, Worthington and Muenster. The plasmid profiles were identical within each of the Salmonella serotypes. Two different clones of Salmonella anatum were differentiated by PFGE typing but not by ribotyping. Heidelberg isolates from nine turkey ceca and three drinker samples had identical antibiotic resistance, PFGE, ribotype and plasmid patterns, suggesting that transmission of this particular clone may have occurred between the birds and the drinkers. Identical PFGE, ribotype and plasmid patterns were observed in one Salmonella worthington isolate from turkey ceca in one flock and two S. worthington isolates from feeder contents and drinkers from a subsequent flock, suggesting transmission of this pathogen between flocks. Individual and multiple polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses revealed the presence of the virulence genes invA, aceK and sopB and the absence of the h-1i gene in all isolates. A combination of genotypic and phenotypic markers can be useful in studying genetic variation among natural salmonellae populations in turkey production and delineating possible transmission pathways.

  17. Biofilm formation and antibiotic production in Ruegeria mobilis are influenced by intracellular concentrations of cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate.

    PubMed

    D'Alvise, Paul W; Magdenoska, Olivera; Melchiorsen, Jette; Nielsen, Kristian F; Gram, Lone

    2014-05-01

    In many species of the marine Roseobacter clade, periods of attached life, in association with phytoplankton or particles, are interspersed with planktonic phases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether shifts between motile and sessile life in the globally abundant Roseobacter clade species Ruegeria mobilis are associated with intracellular concentrations of the signal compound cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate (c-di-GMP), which in bacteria regulates transitions between motile and sessile life stages. Genes for diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which are involved in c-di-GMP signalling, were found in the genome of R. mobilis strain F1926. Ion pair chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed 20-fold higher c-di-GMP concentrations per cell in biofilm-containing cultures than in planktonic cells. An introduced diguanylate cyclase gene increased c-di-GMP and enhanced biofilm formation and production of the potent antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA). An introduced phosphodiesterase gene decreased c-di-GMP and reduced biofilm formation and TDA production. tdaC, a key gene for TDA biosynthesis, was expressed only in attached or biofilm-forming cells, and expression was induced immediately after initial attachment. In conclusion, c-di-GMP signalling controls biofilm formation and biofilm-associated traits in R. mobilis and, as suggested by presence of GGDEF and EAL domain protein genes, also in other Roseobacter clade species.

  18. GPQuest: A Spectral Library Matching Algorithm for Site-Specific Assignment of Tandem Mass Spectra to Intact N-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Shah, Punit; Yang, Weiming; Li, Xingde; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Glycoprotein changes occur in not only protein abundance but also the occupancy of each glycosylation site by different glycoforms during biological or pathological processes. Recent advances in mass spectrometry instrumentation and techniques have facilitated analysis of intact glycopeptides in complex biological samples by allowing the users to generate spectra of intact glycopeptides with glycans attached to each specific glycosylation site. However, assigning these spectra, leading to identification of the glycopeptides, is challenging. Here, we report an algorithm, named GPQuest, for site-specific identification of intact glycopeptides using higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation of complex samples. In this algorithm, a spectral library of glycosite-containing peptides in the sample was built by analyzing the isolated glycosite-containing peptides using HCD LC-MS/MS. Spectra of intact glycopeptides were selected by using glycan oxonium ions as signature ions for glycopeptide spectra. These oxonium-ion-containing spectra were then compared with the spectral library generated from glycosite-containing peptides, resulting in assignment of each intact glycopeptide MS/MS spectrum to a specific glycosite-containing peptide. The glycan occupying each glycosite was determined by matching the mass difference between the precursor ion of intact glycopeptide and the glycosite-containing peptide to a glycan database. Using GPQuest, we analyzed LC-MS/MS spectra of protein extracts from prostate tumor LNCaP cells. Without enrichment of glycopeptides from global tryptic peptides and at a false discovery rate of 1%, 1008 glycan-containing MS/MS spectra were assigned to 769 unique intact N-linked glycopeptides, representing 344 N-linked glycosites with 57 different N-glycans. Spectral library matching using GPQuest assigns the HCD LC-MS/MS generated spectra of intact glycopeptides in an automated and high-throughput manner. Additionally, spectral library

  19. Monitoring and determination of sulfonamide antibiotics (sulfamethoxydiazine, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole and sulfadiazine) in imported Pangasius catfish products in Thailand using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jansomboon, Worawat; Boontanon, Suwanna Kitpati; Boontanon, Narin; Polprasert, Chongrak; Thi Da, Chau

    2016-12-01

    This research aimed to monitor the concentrations of sulfamethoxydiazine (SMD), sulfamethazine (SMT), sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and sulfadiazine (SDZ) in imported Pangasius catfish products in Thailand. The residues of the four sulfonamides (SAs) were analyzed by extraction process and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. The highest concentrations found were 10.97ng/g for SMD, 6.23ng/g for SMT, 11.13ng/g for SDZ and 245.91ng/g for SMX, which was higher than the European Union (EU) standard (100ng/g). Moreover, all samples contaminated with SMX also contained SMT, indicating that more than one antibiotic was used for production in the country of origin. Because Thai standards for antibiotics in food have not been completely set, all contaminated discovered would not be considered to be an illegal food, in which antibiotic residues may affect human health in the long term. Therefore, antibiotic residues in Pangasius catfish products should be continually regulated and monitored. PMID:27374578

  20. Work plan for determining the occurrence of glyphosate, its transformation product AMPA, other herbicide compounds, and antibiotics in midwestern United States streams, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Kolpin, D.W.; Scribner, E.A.; Sandstrom, M.W.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of glyphosate and its primary transformation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in midwestern streams during post-application and harvest-season runoff events. Water samples will be collected in 2002 during two post-herbicide-application runoff events and one harvest-season runoff event from 53 sites on streams in the Midwestern United States. All samples will be analyzed at the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, for glyphosate and 20 other herbicides. Samples will also be analyzed for a glyphosate transformation product (AMPA) and 26 other herbicide transformation products, using GC/MS or HPLC/MS. Selected samples will be analyzed for 36 antibiotics or antibiotic transformational products. Results from this study will represent the first broad-scale investigation of glyphosate and AMPA in U.S. water resources.

  1. [The possibility for obtaining sorbents from the mycelial wastes of antibiotic production].

    PubMed

    Iakubova, A R; Lagunov, V M; Faĭngol'd, Z L

    1995-05-01

    A technological process for production of a sorbent based on the mycelial waste of penicillin manufacture was developed. The process and its parameters are described. The exploitation conditions determine whether a strong sorbent with low sorption properties or a sorbent with higher sorption properties and lower granule strength is prepared.

  2. Optimizing Performance of Glycopeptide Capture for Plasma Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Berven, Frode S.; Ahmad, Rushdy; Clauser, Karl R.; Carr, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Selective capture of glycopolypeptides followed by release and analysis of the former glycosylation-site peptides has been shown to have promise for reducing complexity of body fluids such as blood for biomarker discovery. In this work, a protocol based on capture of polypeptides containing a N-linked carbohydrate from human plasma using commercially available magnetic beads coupled with hydrazide chemistry was optimized and partially automated through the use of a KingFisher magnetic particle processor. Comparison of bead-based glycocapture at the protein-level vs. peptide-level revealed differences in the specificity, reproducibility and absolute number of former glycosylation-site peptides detected. Evaluation of a range of capture and elution conditions led to an optimized protocol with a 24% intraday and 30% interday CV, and a glycopeptide capture specificity of 99%. Depleting the plasma of 14 high abundance proteins improved detection sensitivity by approximately one order of magnitude compared to non-depleted plasma and resulted in an increase of 24% in the number of identified glycoproteins. The sensitivity of SPEG for detection of glycoproteins in depleted, non-fractionated plasma was found to be in the 10 to 100 pmol/ml range corresponding to glycoprotein levels ranging from 100’s of nanograms/ml to 10’s of micrograms/ml. Despite high capture specificity,the total number of glycoproteins detected and the sensitivity of SPEG in plasma is surprisingly limited. PMID:20235580

  3. Endocytosis of Nanomedicines: The Case of Glycopeptide Engineered PLGA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vilella, Antonietta; Ruozi, Barbara; Belletti, Daniela; Pederzoli, Francesca; Galliani, Marianna; Semeghini, Valentina; Forni, Flavio; Zoli, Michele; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Tosi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The success of nanomedicine as a new strategy for drug delivery and targeting prompted the interest in developing approaches toward basic and clinical neuroscience. Despite enormous advances on brain research, central nervous system (CNS) disorders remain the world’s leading cause of disability, in part due to the inability of the majority of drugs to reach the brain parenchyma. Many attempts to use nanomedicines as CNS drug delivery systems (DDS) were made; among the various non-invasive approaches, nanoparticulate carriers and, particularly, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) seem to be the most interesting strategies. In particular, the ability of poly-lactide-co-glycolide NPs (PLGA-NPs) specifically engineered with a glycopeptide (g7), conferring to NPs’ ability to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in rodents at a concentration of up to 10% of the injected dose, was demonstrated in previous studies using different routes of administrations. Most of the evidence on NP uptake mechanisms reported in the literature about intracellular pathways and processes of cell entry is based on in vitro studies. Therefore, beside the particular attention devoted to increasing the knowledge of the rate of in vivo BBB crossing of nanocarriers, the subsequent exocytosis in the brain compartments, their fate and trafficking in the brain surely represent major topics in this field. PMID:26102358

  4. Interaction modes and approaches to glycopeptide and glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Chun; Su, Wan-Chih; Huang, Bao-Yu; Chen, Yu-Ju; Tai, Hwan-Ching; Obena, Rofeamor P

    2014-02-21

    Protein glycosylation has received increased attention for its critical role in cell biology and diseases. Developing new methodologies to discern phenotype-dependent glycosylation will not only elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cell signaling cascades but also accelerate biomarker discovery for disease diagnosis or prognosis. In the analytical pipeline, enrichment at either the protein or peptide level is the most critical prerequisite for analyzing heterogeneous glycan composition, linkage, site occupancy and carrier proteins. Because the critical factor for choosing a suitable enrichment method is primarily a particular technique's selectivity and affinity towards target glycoproteins/glycopeptides, it is important to fully understand the working principles for the different approaches. For mechanistic insight into the enrichment protocol, we focused on the fundamental chemical and physical processes for the commonly used approaches based on: (a) glycan/peptide physicochemical properties (hydrophilic interactions, chelation/coordination chemistry) and (b) glycan-specific recognition (lectin-based affinity, covalent bond formation by hydrazide/boronic acid). Various interaction modes, such as hydrogen bonding, van der Waals interaction, multivalency, and metal- or water-mediated stabilization, are discussed in detail. In addition, we will review the design of and modifications to such methods, hyphenated approaches, and glycoproteomic applications. Finally, we will outline challenges to existing strategies and offer novel proposals for glycoproteome enrichment. PMID:24336240

  5. High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of paclitaxel intermediate phenylisoserine derivatives on macrocyclic glycopeptide and cyclofructan-based chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Ilisz, István; Grecsó, Nóra; Forró, Enikő; Fülöp, Ferenc; Armstrong, Daniel W; Péter, Antal

    2015-10-10

    High-performance liquid chromatographic methods were developed for the separation of enantiomers of four unnatural paclitaxel precursor phenylisoserine analogs on chiral stationary phases containing macrocyclic glycopeptides and cyclofructans as chiral selectors. The effects of the mobile phase composition, the nature and concentration of different mobile phase additives (alcohols, amines and acids) in different chromatographic modes, temperature and the structures of the analytes on the separations were investigated. Separations were carried out at constant mobile phase compositions in the temperature range 10-50°C on macrocyclic antibiotic-based and 5-35°C on cyclofructan-based columns and the changes in enthalpy, Δ(ΔH°), entropy, Δ(ΔS°), and free energy, Δ(ΔG°), were calculated. The elution sequence was determined in most cases; no general rule could be observed.

  6. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment.

  7. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really replace antibiotics remains a controversial issue. This review summarizes recent development and perspectives of alternatives to antibiotics. The mechanism of actions, applications, and prospectives of the alternatives such as immunity modulating agents, bacteriophages and their lysins, antimicrobial peptides, pro-, pre-, and synbiotics, plant extracts, inhibitors targeting pathogenicity (bacterial quorum sensing, biofilm, and virulence), and feeding enzymes are thoroughly discussed. Lastly, the feasibility of alternatives to antibiotics is deeply analyzed. It is hard to conclude that the alternatives might substitute antibiotics in veterinary medicine in the foreseeable future. At the present time, prudent use of antibiotics and the establishment of scientific monitoring systems are the best and fastest way to limit the adverse effects of the abuse of antibiotics and to ensure the safety of animal-derived food and environment. PMID:24860564

  8. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  9. Contribution of enterococci to the spread of antibiotic resistance in the production chain of swine meat commodities.

    PubMed

    Rizzotti, Lucia; Simeoni, Desj; Cocconcelli, Piersandro; Gazzola, Simona; Dellaglio, Franco; Torriani, Sandra

    2005-05-01

    Thirty-six samples, including fecal specimens, dry feedstuffs, raw and processed pork meat products, and dry fermented sausages, were collected from two production chains of swine meat commodities and analyzed for the presence of 11 antibiotic resistance (AR) genes. Specific PCR assays carried out on DNA extracted directly from the samples revealed a high incidence of the genes tet(K) (80.5%), ermB (66.7%), and tet(M) (66.7%). Feces and feedstuffs gave the largest number of positive amplifications. To elucidate the contribution of enterococci to the occurrence and spread of AR, 146 resistant enterococci were isolated, and their identity, genetic fingerprints, and AR gene profiles were determined by means of molecular techniques. Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were the predominant isolated species (43.8 and 38.4%, respectively); Other Enterococcus species identified were E. durans (8.9%), E. hirae (2.7%), E. gallinarum (2.1%), E. mundtii (2.1%), and E. casseliflavus (2.1%). A number of isolates displayed a complex AR gene profile comprising up to four different resistance determinants. The genes tet(M) and ermB were highly diffused, being present in 86.9 and 84.9%, respectively, of the isolates. The application of amplified fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting was particularly valuable to monitor the resistant enterococcal isolates along the production chain and to individuate steps in which contamination might occur. In fact, isolates of E. faecalis and E. faecium showing the same amplified fragment length polymorphism profile and AR gene pattern were detected in samples taken at different steps of the food chain suggesting three cases of bacterial clonal spread. PMID:15895727

  10. DNA sequence and mutational analysis of genes involved in the production and resistance of the antibiotic peptide trifolitoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Breil, B T; Ludden, P W; Triplett, E W

    1993-01-01

    The 7.1-kb fragment of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii T24 DNA which confers trifolitoxin production and resistance to nonproducing, sensitive Rhizobium strains (E. W. Triplett, M. J. Schink, and K. L. Noeldner, Mol. Plant-Microbe Interact. 2:202-208, 1989) was subcloned, sequenced, and mutagenized with a transcriptional fusion cassette. The sequence of this fragment revealed seven complete open reading frames, tfxABCDEFG, all transcribed in the same direction. TfxA has an 11-amino-acid carboxy terminus identical to the known amino acid sequence of the trifolitoxin backbone, DIGGSRXGCVA, where X is an UV-absorbing chromophore. This is evidence that trifolitoxin is synthesized ribosomally as a prepeptide that is posttranslationally modified to yield the active peptide. TfxB shows 27.6% identity with McbC, a protein required for the production of the ribosomally synthesized antibiotic microcin B17. Tn3GUS transcriptional fusion insertions in tfxA, tfxB, tfxD, or tfxF caused a nonproducing, trifolitoxin-resistant phenotype and confirmed the direction of transcription of these frames. No insertion mutations were found in tfxE or tfxG. Sequence analysis along with insertion and deletion mutation analysis suggest that (i) trifolitoxin is synthesized ribosomally from tfxA; (ii) tfxA, tfxE, and tfxG have their own promoters; (iii) TfxG is required for immunity; (iv) TfxB, TfxD, and TfxF are required for trifolitoxin production; and (v) the UV-absorbing chromophore is derived from glutamine. PMID:8509324

  11. New antimicrobial molecules and new antibiotic strategies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Naranjo, Olga Rajas; Marco, Javier Aspa; Violán, Jordi Solé

    2009-04-01

    Drug options for treatment of infections are increasingly limited. The pharmaceutical industry has found it difficult to discover new antimicrobial agents, and only two novel classes of antibiotics, the oxazolidinones and the cyclic lipopeptides, have entered the market since the late 1960s. Few new agents have reached the market in the last decade with potential interest for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) treatment, including linezolid (the first oxazolidinone in clinical use), new fluoroquinolones, cefditoren, ertapenem, and telithromycin. Agents currently in clinical development include other novel quinolones and ketolides, broad-spectrum cephalosporin derivatives, faropenem, several glycopeptides, and iclaprim. Other molecules are considered to be promising candidates for the future. In addition to the foregoing agents, alternative treatment approaches have also been introduced into clinical practice, which include the administration of the appropriate antimicrobials in a timely manner and the consideration of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic properties of the agent(s). PMID:19296416

  12. The stationary phase sigma factor, RpoS, regulates the production of a carbapenem antibiotic, a bioactive prodigiosin and virulence in the enterobacterial pathogen Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

    PubMed

    Wilf, Nabil M; Salmond, George P C

    2012-03-01

    Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 (S39006) is a Gram-negative bacterium that is virulent in plant (potato) and invertebrate animal (Caenorhabditis elegans) models. It produces two secondary metabolite antibiotics, a prodigiosin and a carbapenem, and the exoenzymes pectate lyase and cellulase. We showed previously that deletion of the RNA chaperone Hfq abolished antibiotic production and attenuated virulence in both animal and plant hosts. Hfq and dependent small RNAs (sRNAs) are known to regulate the post-transcriptional expression of rpoS, which encodes σ(S), the stationary phase sigma factor subunit of RNA polymerase. An S39006 hfq deletion mutant showed decreased transcript levels of rpoS. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether the phenotypes regulated by Hfq were mediated through its control of rpoS. Whereas loss of Hfq abolished prodigiosin and carbapenem production and attenuated virulence in both C. elegans and potato, characterization of an S39006 rpoS mutant showed unexpectedly elevated prodigiosin and carbapenem production. Furthermore, the rpoS mutant exhibited attenuated animal pathogenesis, but not plant pathogenesis. Additionally, a homologue of the Hfq-dependent sRNA, RprA, was identified and shown to regulate prodigiosin production in a manner consistent with its role in positively regulating translation of rpoS mRNA. Combined, these results demonstrate that Hfq regulation of secondary metabolism and plant pathogenesis is independent of RpoS and establishes RpoS and RprA as regulators of antibiotic production.

  13. The interaction of mannose binding lectin (MBL) with mannose containing glycopeptides and the resultant potential impact on invasive fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Sealy, Patricia I; Garner, Bianca; Swiatlo, Ed; Chapman, Stanley W; Cleary, John D

    2008-09-01

    Mannnose-binding lectin (MBL) binds oligosaccharides on the surface of microorganisms to form complexes that activate the complement cascade and facilitate phagocytosis. Teicoplanin and dalbavancin glycopeptide antibiotics possess N-acetyl glucosamine and mannose oligosaccharides that may bind MBL. Pharmaceuticals capable of binding to MBL may decrease clearance of significant pathogens such as yeast. An invasive candidemia murine model was utilized to evaluate differences in survival between mannose- and teicoplanin-treated groups compared to a control group administered normal saline. Three groups of BALB/c mice were injected with Candida albicans ATCC 44858 (1.4 x 10(6) CFU). Pharmaceutical agents were administered 2 h pre-infection and 8 h post-infection. In vivo cumulative survival at 52 h revealed 10%, 30% and 90% survival rates for mice administered mannose, teicoplanin, and saline, respectively. There was 0% survival for mice given mannose or teicoplanin at 56 h, compared with 70% for the normal saline treated mice at the same time point (P < 0.05). This in vivo study shows 'accelerated progression of infection' for Candida-inoculated mice exposed to mannose or teicoplanin compared to those given normal saline. Further, protein polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis studies suggested a potential MBL-drug interaction which may attenuate complement activation, opsonization and phagocytosis.

  14. More than anticipated - production of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Hua; Koumoutsi, Alexandra; Scholz, Romy; Borriss, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    The genome of environmental Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 harbors numerous gene clusters involved in synthesis of antifungal and antibacterial acting secondary metabolites. Five gene clusters, srf, bmy, fen, nrs, dhb, covering altogether 137 kb, direct non-ribosomal synthesis of the cyclic lipopeptides surfactin, bacillomycin, fengycin, an unknown peptide, and the iron siderophore bacillibactin. Bacillomycin and fengycin were shown to act against phytopathogenic fungi in a synergistic manner. Three gene clusters, mln, bae, and dif, with a total length of 199 kb were shown to direct synthesis of the antibacterial acting polyketides macrolactin, bacillaene, and difficidin. Both, non-ribosomal synthesis of cyclic lipopeptides and synthesis of polyketides are dependent on the presence of a functional sfp gene product, 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase, as evidenced by knockout mutation of the sfp gene resulting in complete absence of all those eight compounds. In addition, here we present evidence that a gene cluster encoding enzymes involved in synthesis and export of the antibacterial acting dipeptide bacilysin is also functional in FZB42. In summary, environmental FZB42 devoted about 340 kb, corresponding to 8.5% of its total genetic capacity, to synthesis of secondary metabolites useful to cope with other competing microorganisms present in the plant rhizosphere. PMID:18957859

  15. Automated glycopeptide analysis--review of current state and future directions.

    PubMed

    Dallas, David C; Martin, William F; Hua, Serenus; German, J Bruce

    2013-05-01

    Glycosylation of proteins is involved in immune defense, cell-cell adhesion, cellular recognition and pathogen binding and is one of the most common and complex post-translational modifications. Science is still struggling to assign detailed mechanisms and functions to this form of conjugation. Even the structural analysis of glycoproteins-glycoproteomics-remains in its infancy due to the scarcity of high-throughput analytical platforms capable of determining glycopeptide composition and structure, especially platforms for complex biological mixtures. Glycopeptide composition and structure can be determined with high mass-accuracy mass spectrometry, particularly when combined with chromatographic separation, but the sheer volume of generated data necessitates computational software for interpretation. This review discusses the current state of glycopeptide assignment software-advances made to date and issues that remain to be addressed. The various software and algorithms developed so far provide important insights into glycoproteomics. However, there is currently no freely available software that can analyze spectral data in batch and unambiguously determine glycopeptide compositions for N- and O-linked glycopeptides from relevant biological sources such as human milk and serum. Few programs are capable of aiding in structural determination of the glycan component. To significantly advance the field of glycoproteomics, analytical software and algorithms are required that: (i) solve for both N- and O-linked glycopeptide compositions, structures and glycosites in biological mixtures; (ii) are high-throughput and process data in batches; (iii) can interpret mass spectral data from a variety of sources and (iv) are open source and freely available. PMID:22843980

  16. Antibiotics Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Viruses b) Bacteria c) Viruses and Bacteria 2. Bacteria are germs that cause colds and flu. a) ... The Flu c) Cold d) Strep Throat 4. Bacteria that cause infections can become resistant to antibiotics. ...

  17. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Bowman, Alison A; Young, Vincent B

    2016-01-01

    , allowing for Clostridium difficile infection, which is a significant public health problem. Changes in the structure of the gut microbiota alter the metabolome, specifically the production of secondary bile acids. Specific bile acids are able to initiate C. difficile spore germination and also inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro, although no study to date has defined physiologically relevant bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we define the bile acids C. difficile spores encounter in the small and large intestines before and after various antibiotic treatments. Antibiotics that alter the gut microbiota and deplete secondary bile acid production allow C. difficile colonization, representing a mechanism of colonization resistance. Multiple secondary bile acids in the large intestine were able to inhibit C. difficile spore germination and growth at physiological concentrations and represent new targets to combat C. difficile in the large intestine. PMID:27239562

  18. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Bowman, Alison A; Young, Vincent B

    2016-01-01

    , allowing for Clostridium difficile infection, which is a significant public health problem. Changes in the structure of the gut microbiota alter the metabolome, specifically the production of secondary bile acids. Specific bile acids are able to initiate C. difficile spore germination and also inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro, although no study to date has defined physiologically relevant bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we define the bile acids C. difficile spores encounter in the small and large intestines before and after various antibiotic treatments. Antibiotics that alter the gut microbiota and deplete secondary bile acid production allow C. difficile colonization, representing a mechanism of colonization resistance. Multiple secondary bile acids in the large intestine were able to inhibit C. difficile spore germination and growth at physiological concentrations and represent new targets to combat C. difficile in the large intestine.

  19. Antibiotic-Induced Alterations of the Gut Microbiota Alter Secondary Bile Acid Production and Allow for Clostridium difficile Spore Germination and Outgrowth in the Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Alison A.; Young, Vincent B.

    2016-01-01

    microbiota, allowing for Clostridium difficile infection, which is a significant public health problem. Changes in the structure of the gut microbiota alter the metabolome, specifically the production of secondary bile acids. Specific bile acids are able to initiate C. difficile spore germination and also inhibit C. difficile growth in vitro, although no study to date has defined physiologically relevant bile acids in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we define the bile acids C. difficile spores encounter in the small and large intestines before and after various antibiotic treatments. Antibiotics that alter the gut microbiota and deplete secondary bile acid production allow C. difficile colonization, representing a mechanism of colonization resistance. Multiple secondary bile acids in the large intestine were able to inhibit C. difficile spore germination and growth at physiological concentrations and represent new targets to combat C. difficile in the large intestine. PMID:27239562

  20. Isolation and molecular characterization of antibiotic-resistant lactic acid bacteria from poultry and swine meat products.

    PubMed

    Aquilanti, Lucia; Garofalo, Cristiana; Osimani, Andrea; Silvestri, Gloria; Vignaroli, Carla; Clementi, Francesca

    2007-03-01

    The transfer via the food chain from animals to humans of microbes that are resistant to antimicrobial agents is of increasing concern. To determine the contributions of nonpathogenic microflora to the occurrence and spread of antibiotic resistance (AR) genes in the food chain, 123 lactic acid bacteria were isolated from 29 samples of raw and processed pork and chicken meat products that had previously tested positive for one or more AR genes that encode clinically relevant ARs: tet(M), tet(O), tet(K), erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), aac (6')-Ie aph (2")-Ia, mecA, and blaZ. All of the isolates were initially tested for their AR gene profiles by PCR. The 59 isolates carrying a tet, erm, or blaZ gene were taken through molecular identification, analyzed by determination of the MIC, and subjected to genetic fingerprinting. Lactococcus garvieae was the predominant species (28 isolates), followed by Lactobacillus plantarum (11 isolates) and L. salivarius (6 isolates), whereas Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactobacillus johnsonii, L. reuteri, L. crispatus, and L. brevis were identified at lower frequencies. The tet(M) and erm(B) genes were the most frequently detected. Assessment of multiple resistances in 18 tet positive (tet+) isolates revealed that tet(M) plus erm(B) and tet(K) plus erm(B) were the most frequent AR gene patterns. Partial sequencing of the tet(M) open reading frame of three selected strains showed high sequence similarities (> 99%) with tet(M) genes previously found in human pathogens (Listeria monocytogenes and Neisseria meningitidis). Southern hybridization with plasmid profiles revealed these strains contained tet(M)-carrying plasmids. PMID:17388042

  1. Correlation between antibiotic and biocide resistance in mesophilic and psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp. isolated from slaughterhouse surfaces throughout meat chain production.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate biocide susceptibility in mesophilic and psychrotrophic pseudomonads isolated from surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse, which was representative of the region. To determine biocide resistance in pseudomonads, we determined for the first time the epidemiological cut-off values (ECOFFs) of benzalkonium, cetrimide, chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene, P3 oxonia, polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHMG), topax 66 and triclosan being generally very similar in different Pseudomonas spp. with some exceptions. Thus, resistance of pseudomonads was mainly shown to triclosan, and in lesser extent to cetrimide and benzalkonium chloride depending on the species, however they were highly susceptible to industrial formulations of biocides. By means of statistical analysis, positive correlations between antibiotics, biocides and both antimicrobials in pseudomonads were detected suggesting a co- or cross resistance between different antimicrobials in goat and lamb slaughterhouse environment. Cross-resistance between biocides and antibiotics in pseudomonads were especially detected between PHMG or triclosan and different antibiotics depending on the biocide and the population type. Thus, the use of those biocides as disinfectant in slaughterhouse zones must be carefully evaluated because of the selection pressure effect of antimicrobials on the emergence of resistant bacteria which could be spread to the consumer. It is noteworthy that specific industrial formulations such as topax 66 and oxonia P3 showed few correlations with antibiotics (none or 1-2 antibiotics) which should be taken into consideration for disinfection practices in goat and lamb slaughterhouse. PMID:26187825

  2. A comparison of energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation characteristics of protonated and sodiated high mannose N-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Aboufazeli, Forouzan; Kolli, Venkata; Dodds, Eric D

    2015-04-01

    Fragmentation of glycopeptides in tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) plays a pivotal role in site-specific protein glycosylation profiling by allowing specific oligosaccharide compositions and connectivities to be associated with specific loci on the corresponding protein. Although MS/MS analysis of glycopeptides has been successfully performed using a number of distinct ion dissociation methods, relatively little is known regarding the fragmentation characteristics of glycopeptide ions with various charge carriers. In this study, energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation was examined via collision-induced dissociation for a group of related high mannose tryptic glycopeptides as their doubly protonated, doubly sodiated, and hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions. The doubly protonated glycopeptide ions with various compositions were found to undergo fragmentation over a relatively low but wide range of collision energies compared with the doubly sodiated and hybrid charged ions, and were found to yield both glycan and peptide fragmentation depending on the applied collision energy. By contrast, the various doubly sodiated glycopeptides were found to dissociate over a significantly higher but narrow range of collision energies, and exhibited only glycan cleavages. Interestingly, the hybrid protonated sodium adduct ions were consistently the most stable of the precursor ions studied, and provided fragmentation information spanning both the glycan and the peptide moieties. Taken together, these findings illustrate the influence of charge carrier over the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation characteristics of glycopeptides, and serve to suggest potential strategies that exploit the analytically useful features uniquely afforded by specific charge carriers or combinations thereof.

  3. Probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria in a fermented milk product with added fruit preparation reduce antibiotic associated diarrhea and Helicobacter pylori activity.

    PubMed

    de Vrese, Michael; Kristen, Holger; Rautenberg, Peter; Laue, Christiane; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2011-11-01

    To investigate matrix-specifity of probiotic effects and particularly of the reduction of antibiotics-associated diarrhea, a controlled, randomized, double-blind study was performed, in which 88 Helicobacter pylori-infected but otherwise healthy subjects were given for eight weeks either a) a probiotic fruit yoghurt "mild" containing Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5 plus Bifidobacterium lactis BB-12, n = 30), b) the same product but pasteurized after fermentation (n = 29) or c) milk acidified with lactic acid (control, n = 29). During week five, a Helicobacter eradication therapy was performed. Helicobacter activity was measured via 13C-2-urea breath tests and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and other gastrointestinal complaints were recorded by validated questionnaires. In intervention group a, b and c the mean number of days with diarrhoea was 4, 10 and 10 (P<0·05), the frequency of episodes 17%, 7% and 27% (n.s.), and the change in total symptoms score before antibiotics treatment was -1·4 ± 1·1, -1·2 ± 1·1, 2·6 ± 1·1 points/four weeks (P<0·05). All milk products decreased Helicobacter activity by 18 to 45% without significant differences between groups. The observed decrease in Hel. pylori activity seems to be not or not only due to probiotic bacteria but (rather) to components of acidified milk (most probably lactic acid). Fruit-yogurt-like fermented milk products with living probiotic bacteria significantly shorten the duration of antibiotics-associated diarrhoea and improve gastrointestinal complaints. Fruit yogurt-like fermented milk is a matrix suitable for probiotic bacteria.

  4. Individual use of antibiotics and prevalence of beta-lactamase production among bacterial pathogens from middle ear fluid.

    PubMed

    Thrane, N; Olesen, C; Sørensen, H T; Schønheyder, H C

    2001-02-01

    Prescription data and clinical laboratory data were analysed to assess the influence of previous antibiotic therapy on the prevalence of beta-lactamase in isolates of Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis from primary specimens of middle ear fluid from 2129 children aged 0-5 years. The prevalence of beta-lactamase-positive H. influenzae was 6.6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.5-9.8%] in children who received antibiotics 5-90 days before isolation of the organism compared with 7.0% (95% CI: 3.9-10.2%) in those who did not. The prevalence of beta-lactamase-positive M. catarrhalis was 90.9% (95% CI: 84.0-97.8%) in children who received antibiotics compared with 86.7% (95% CI: 79.0-94.4%) in those who did not.

  5. Cancer biomarkers defined by autoantibody signatures to aberrant O-glycopeptide epitopes.

    PubMed

    Wandall, Hans H; Blixt, Ola; Tarp, Mads A; Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Mandel, Ulla; Ragupathi, Govind; Livingston, Phil O; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Taylor-Papadimitriou, Joyce; Burchell, Joy; Clausen, Henrik

    2010-02-15

    Autoantibodies to cancer antigens hold promise as biomarkers for early detection of cancer. Proteins that are aberrantly processed in cancer cells are likely to present autoantibody targets. The extracellular mucin MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many cancers; thus, we evaluated whether autoantibodies generated to aberrant O-glycoforms of MUC1 might serve as sensitive diagnostic biomarkers for cancer. Using an antibody-based glycoprofiling ELISA assay, we documented that aberrant truncated glycoforms were not detected in sera of cancer patients. An O-glycopeptide microarray was developed that detected IgG antibodies to aberrant O-glycopeptide epitopes in patients vaccinated with a keyhole limpet hemocyanin-conjugated truncated MUC1 peptide. We detected cancer-associated IgG autoantibodies in sera from breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer patients against different aberrent O-glycopeptide epitopes derived from MUC1. These autoantibodies represent a previously unaddressed source of sensitive biomarkers for early detection of cancer. The methods we have developed for chemoenzymatic synthesis of O-glycopeptides on microarrays may allow for broader mining of the entire cancer O-glycopeptidome. PMID:20124478

  6. Synthetic Studies of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) Anchors and GPI-Anchored Peptides, Glycopeptides, and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhongwu

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchorage of proteins and glycoproteins onto the cell surface is ubiquitous in eukaryotes, and GPI-anchored proteins and glycoproteins play an important role in many biological processes. To study GPI anchorage and explore the functions of GPIs and GPI-anchored proteins and glycoproteins, it is essential to have access to these molecules in homogeneous and structurally defined forms. This review is focused on the progress that our laboratory has made towards the chemical and chemoenzymatic synthesis of structurally defined GPI anchors and GPI-anchored peptides, glycopeptides, and proteins. Briefly, highly convergent strategies were developed for GPI synthesis and were employed to successfully synthesize a number of GPIs, including those carrying unsaturated lipids and other useful functionalities such as the azido and alkynyl groups. The latter enabled further site-specific modification of GPIs by click chemistry. GPI-linked peptides, glycopeptides, and proteins were prepared by regioselective chemical coupling of properly protected GPIs and peptides/glycopeptides or through site-specific ligation of synthetic GPIs and peptides/glycopeptides/proteins under the influence of sortase A. The investigation of interactions between GPI anchors and pore-forming bacterial toxins by means of synthetic GPI anchors and GPI analogs is also discussed. PMID:24955081

  7. Boronic Acid functionalized core-shell polymer nanoparticles prepared by distillation precipitation polymerization for glycopeptide enrichment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yanyan; Liu, Jianxi; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2012-07-16

    The boronic acid-functionalized core-shell polymer nanoparticles, poly(N,N-methylenebisacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid)@4-vinylphenylboronic acid (poly(MBA-co-MAA)@VPBA), were successfully synthesized for enriching glycosylated peptides. Such nanoparticles were composed of a hydrophilic polymer core prepared by distillation precipitation polymerization (DPP) and a boronic acid-functionalized shell designed for capturing glycopeptides. Owing to the relatively large amount of residual vinyl groups introduced by DPP on the core surface, the VPBA monomer was coated with high efficiency, working as the shell. Moreover, the overall polymerization route, especially the use of DPP, made the synthesis of nanoparticles facile and time-saving. With the poly(MBA-co-MAA)@VPBA nanoparticles, 18 glycopeptides from horseradish peroxidase (HRP) digest were captured and identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis, relative to eight glycopeptides enriched by using commercially available meta-aminophenylboronic acid agarose under the same conditions. When the concentration of the HRP digest was decreased to as low as 5 nmol, glycopeptides could still be selectively isolated by the prepared nanoparticles. Our results demonstrated that the synthetic poly(MBA-co-MAA)@VPBA nanoparticles might be a promising selective enrichment material for glycoproteome analysis. PMID:22707097

  8. Lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc transferases exhibit glycopeptide binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Bennett, Eric P; Schjoldager, Katrine T-B G; Meldal, Morten; Holmér, Andreas P; Blixt, Ola; Cló, Emiliano; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H

    2011-09-16

    UDP-GalNAc:polypeptide α-N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) constitute a family of up to 20 transferases that initiate mucin-type O-glycosylation. The transferases are structurally composed of catalytic and lectin domains. Two modes have been identified for the selection of glycosylation sites by GalNAc-Ts: confined sequence recognition by the catalytic domain alone, and concerted recognition of acceptor sites and adjacent GalNAc-glycosylated sites by the catalytic and lectin domains, respectively. Thus far, only the catalytic domain has been shown to have peptide sequence specificity, whereas the primary function of the lectin domain is to increase affinity to previously glycosylated substrates. Whether the lectin domain also has peptide sequence selectivity has remained unclear. Using a glycopeptide array with a library of synthetic and recombinant glycopeptides based on sequences of mucins MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6, and MUC7 as well as a random glycopeptide bead library, we examined the binding properties of four different lectin domains. The lectin domains of GalNAc-T1, -T2, -T3, and -T4 bound different subsets of small glycopeptides. These results indicate an additional level of complexity in the initiation step of O-glycosylation by GalNAc-Ts.

  9. Whole Genome Sequencing and Complete Genetic Analysis Reveals Novel Pathways to Glycopeptide Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Renzoni, Adriana; Andrey, Diego O.; Jousselin, Ambre; Barras, Christine; Monod, Antoinette; Vaudaux, Pierre; Lew, Daniel; Kelley, William L.

    2011-01-01

    The precise mechanisms leading to the emergence of low-level glycopeptide resistance in Staphylococcus aureus are poorly understood. In this study, we used whole genome deep sequencing to detect differences between two isogenic strains: a parental strain and a stable derivative selected stepwise for survival on 4 µg/ml teicoplanin, but which grows at higher drug concentrations (MIC 8 µg/ml). We uncovered only three single nucleotide changes in the selected strain. Nonsense mutations occurred in stp1, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, and in yjbH, encoding a post-transcriptional negative regulator of the redox/thiol stress sensor and global transcriptional regulator, Spx. A missense mutation (G45R) occurred in the histidine kinase sensor of cell wall stress, VraS. Using genetic methods, all single, pairwise combinations, and a fully reconstructed triple mutant were evaluated for their contribution to low-level glycopeptide resistance. We found a synergistic cooperation between dual phospho-signalling systems and a subtle contribution from YjbH, suggesting the activation of oxidative stress defences via Spx. To our knowledge, this is the first genetic demonstration of multiple sensor and stress pathways contributing simultaneously to glycopeptide resistance development. The multifactorial nature of glycopeptide resistance in this strain suggests a complex reprogramming of cell physiology to survive in the face of drug challenge. PMID:21738716

  10. Sugar-Assisted Glycopeptide Ligation with Complex Oligosaccharides: Scope and Limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Clay S.; Dean, Stephen M.; Payne, Richard J.; Ficht, Simon; Brik, Ashraf

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown sugar-assisted ligation (SAL) to be a useful method for the convergent construction of glycopeptides. However to date SAL has only been carried out on systems where the thiol auxiliary is attached to a monosaccharide. For SAL to be truly applicable to the construction of fully elaborated glycopeptides and glycoproteins it must be possible to carry out the reaction when the thiol auxiliary is attached to more elaborate sugars, as these are frequently what are observed in nature. Here we examine the effects of glycosylation at C-3, C-4 and C-6 of the C-2 auxiliary-containing glycan. Model glycopeptides where synthesized chemoenzymatically and reacted with peptide thioesters used in our previous work. These studies reveal that SAL is sensitive to extended glycosylation on the auxiliary-containing sugar. While it is possible to carry out SAL with extended glycosylation at C-4 and C-6, the presence of glycosylation at C-3 prevents the ligation from occurring. Additionally, with glycosylation at C-4 the ligation efficiency is affected by the identity of the N-terminal AA, while the nature of the C-terminal residue of the peptide thioester does not appear affect ligation efficiency. These studies provide useful guidelines in deciding when it is appropriate to use SAL in the synthesis of complex glycopeptides and glycoproteins, and how to design ligation junctions for optimal yield. PMID:18698778

  11. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  12. [Separation of the biosynthesis products of a mutant strain of Actinomyces chrysomallus var. carotenoides and the identification of actinomycin antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sverdlova, A N; Nefelova, M V; Silaev, A B

    1979-01-01

    An orange antibiotically active substance isolated from the mycelium of a mutant strain of Actinomyces chrysomallus var. carotenoides was identified as a mixture of actinomycins according to its light absorption spectra, circular dichroism spectra, IR spectra and chromatographic comparison with the standard samples. A scheme for successive extraction of the biologically active substances from the mycelium resulting in isolation of a fraction enriched with antibiotic substances and a fraction enriched with pigments is presented. A method for separation and purification of 3 groups of biologically active substances from the mycelium enriched extract was developed.

  13. Cephamycins, a new family of beta-lactam antibiotics. I. Production by actinomycetes, including Streptomyces lactamdurans sp. n.

    PubMed

    Stapley, E O; Jackson, M; Hernandez, S; Zimmerman, S B; Currie, S A; Mochales, S; Mata, J M; Woodruff, H B; Hendlin, D

    1972-09-01

    A number of actinomycetes isolated from soil were found to produce one or more members of a new family of antibiotics, the cephamycins, which are structurally related to cephalosporin C. The cephamycins were produced in submerged fermentation in a wide variety of media by one or more of eight different species of Streptomyces, including a newly described species, S. lactamdurans. These antibiotics exhibit antibacterial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria which includes many that are resistant to the cephalosporins and penicillins. PMID:4790552

  14. [Evolution in the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance].

    PubMed

    Stefani, S

    2009-07-01

    Over the last decade the proliferation of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has been a growing problem, especially in some geographic areas, making useless most of the classical antibiotic therapies. The rapid emergence of resistant bacteria is the result of different factors as the intrinsic microbial complexity, the growing attitude to travel of humans, animals and goods, the use of antibiotics outside hospitals, and the lack of precise therapeutic chooses for high risk group of patients. The antibiotic-resistance becomes certainly a serious problem when a resistant pathogen, and often multi-resistant today, is present in an infective site. In fact in a recent estimate of the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) about 90.000 deaths per year in the USA are attributable to bacterial infections and in particular to resistant pathogens. It appears clear that the clinic relevance of this problem is the decimation of the sensible germs of the normal flora that leads to the upper hand of the only resistant bacteria. The antibiotic therapy, in fact, select the resistance and each bacteria has developed a particular strategy to survive: mutations of the genetic content or acquisition of resistance genes from the external. Among the Gram positive bacteria, besides methicillin resistant Staphyloccocus aureus, there are other pathogens such as coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis, some species of streptococci and multiresistant Corynebacterium. The CoNS, eg. S. epidermidis, S. hominis and S. haemolyticus, are recognized as new important nosocomial pathogens and are not only responsible of invasive infections but have become in few years resistant to oxacillin (more than 60%) and multiresistant. The unsuspected fragility of glycopeptides, which for 40 years have been the most important treatment against infections due to Gram-positive bacteria, has posed the need for new antimicrobial molecules. Among the therapeutic

  15. Safely coupling livestock and crop production systems: how rapidly do antibiotic resistance genes dissipate in soil following a commercial application of swine or dairy manure?

    PubMed

    Marti, Romain; Tien, Yuan-Ching; Murray, Roger; Scott, Andrew; Sabourin, Lyne; Topp, Edward

    2014-05-01

    Animal manures recycled onto crop production land carry antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The present study evaluated the fate in soil of selected genes associated with antibiotic resistance or genetic mobility in field plots cropped to vegetables and managed according to normal farming practice. Referenced to unmanured soil, fertilization with swine or dairy manure increased the relative abundance of the gene targets sul1, erm(B), str(B), int1, and IncW repA. Following manure application in the spring of 2012, gene copy number decayed exponentially, reaching background levels by the fall of 2012. In contrast, gene copy number following manure application in the fall of 2012 or spring of 2013 increased significantly in the weeks following application and then declined. In both cases, the relative abundance of gene copy numbers had not returned to background levels by the fall of 2013. Overall, these results suggest that under conditions characteristic of agriculture in a humid continental climate, a 1-year period following a commercial application of raw manure is sufficient to ensure that an additional soil burden of antibiotic resistance genes approaches background. The relative abundance of several gene targets exceeded background during the growing season following a spring application or an application done the previous fall. Results from the present study reinforce the advisability of treating manure prior to use in crop production systems. PMID:24632259

  16. Antibiotic lock therapy: review of technique and logistical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Justo, Julie Ann; Bookstaver, P Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic lock therapy (ALT) for the prevention and treatment of catheter-related bloodstream infections is a simple strategy in theory, yet its real-world application may be delayed or avoided due to technical questions and/or logistical challenges. This review focuses on these latter aspects of ALT, including preparation information for a variety of antibiotic lock solutions (ie, aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones, folate antagonists, glycopeptides, glycylcyclines, lipopeptides, oxazolidinones, polymyxins, and tetracyclines) and common clinical issues surrounding ALT administration. Detailed data regarding concentrations, additives, stability/compatibility, and dwell times are summarized. Logistical challenges such as lock preparation procedures, use of additives (eg, heparin, citrate, or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), timing of initiation and therapy duration, optimal dwell time and catheter accessibility, and risks of ALT are also described. Development of local protocols is recommended in order to avoid these potential barriers and encourage utilization of ALT where appropriate. PMID:25548523

  17. NsdB, a TPR-like-domain-containing protein negatively affecting production of antibiotics in Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Wen-Cheng; Zhao, Chun-Hua; Chater, Keith F; Tao, Mei-Feng

    2007-10-01

    Tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains usually mediate protein-protein interactions. NsdA, one of the 70 proteins containing TPR-like domains in Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2), was previously found to negatively control sporulation and antibiotic production. Here we show that elimination of SCO7252, which encodes another of these proteins, also caused overproduction of two antibiotics, actinorhodin and CDA, but did not affect morphological differentiation. Disruption of SCO1593, encoding another of the family, had no obvious phenotypic effects. In surface-grown cultures, expression of SCO7252, which was named nsdB, was initiated at about 30 h, like that of nsdA. Analysis in silico of the 70 predicted TPR-like-containing proteins of S. coelicolor showed that 32 of them contained only TPR-like domains, and 25 of the remainder contained additional DNA-binding domains, implying that they might control gene expression directly.

  18. Characterization of intact N- and O-linked glycopeptides using higher energy collisional dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Li; Tolic, Nikola; Qu, Yi; Meng, Da; Zhao, Rui; Zhang, Qibin; Moore, Ronald J.; Zink, Erika M.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Wu, Si

    2014-01-15

    Simultaneous elucidation of the glycan structure and the glycosylation site are needed to reveal the biological function of protein glycosylation. In this study, we employed a recent type of fragmentation termed higher energy collisional dissociation (HCD) to examine fragmentation patterns of intact glycopeptides generated from a mixture of standard glycosylated proteins. The normalized collisional energy (NCE) value for HCD was varied from 30% to 60% to evaluate the optimal conditions for the fragmentation of peptide backbones and glycoconjugates. Our results indicated that HCD with lower NCE valuespreferentially fragmented the sugar chains attached to the peptides to generate a ladder of neutral loss of monosaccharides, thus enabling the putative glycan structure characterization. Also, detection of the oxonium ions enabled unambiguous differentiation of glycopeptides from non-glycopeptides. On the contrary, HCD with higher NCE values preferentially fragmented the peptide backbone and thus provided information needed for confident peptide identification. We evaluated the HCD approach with alternating NCE parameters for confident characterization of intact N-linked and O-linked glycopeptides in a single liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. In addition, we applied a novel data analysis pipeline, so-called GlycoFinder, to form a basis for automated data analysis. Overall, 38 unique intact glycopeptides corresponding to eight glycosylation sites (including six N-linked and two O-linked sites) were confidently identified from a standard protein mixture. This approach provided concurrent characterization of both, the peptide and the glycan, thus enabling comprehensive structural characterization of glycoproteins in a single LC-MS/MS analysis.

  19. Cell surface glycopeptides from human intestinal epithelial cell lines derived from normal colon and colon adenocarcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Youakim, A.; Herscovics, A.

    1985-11-01

    The cell surface glycopeptides from an epithelial cell line (CCL 239) derived from normal human colon were compared with those from three cell lines (HCT-8R, HCT-15, and CaCo-2) derived independently from human colonic adenocarcinomas. Cells were incubated with D-(2-TH)mannose or L-(5,6-TH)fucose for 24 h and treated with trypsin to release cell surface components which were then digested exhaustively with Pronase and fractionated on Bio-Gel P-6 before and after treatment with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H. The most noticeable difference between the labeled glycopeptides from the tumor and CCL 239 cells was the presence in the former of an endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H-resistant high molecular weight glycopeptide fraction which was eluted in the void volume of Bio-Gel P-6. This fraction was obtained with both labeled mannose and fucose as precursors. However, acid hydrolysis of this fraction obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose revealed that as much as 60-90% of the radioactivity was recovered as fucose. Analysis of the total glycopeptides (cell surface and cell pellet) obtained after incubation with (2-TH)mannose showed that from 40-45% of the radioactivity in the tumor cells and less than 10% of the radioactivity in the CCL 239 cells was recovered as fucose. After incubation of the HCT-8R cells with D-(1,6-TH)glucosamine and L-(1- UC)fucose, strong acid hydrolysis of the labeled glycopeptide fraction excluded from Bio-Gel P-6 produced TH-labeled N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine.

  20. Glycoproteomic analysis of embryonic stem cells: identification of potential glycobiomarkers using lectin affinity chromatography of glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Manilla, Gerardo; Warren, Nicole L.; Atwood, James; Orlando, Ron; Dalton, Stephen; Pierce, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies have recently focused on the identification of specific glycan biomarkers; given the important roles that protein linked glycans play, for example, during development and disease progression. The identification of protein glycobiomarkers, which are part of a very complex proteome, has involved the use of fractionation techniques such as lectin affinity chromatography. In this study, the glycoproteomic characterization of pluripotent murine embryonic stem cells (ES) and from ES cells that were differentiated into embroid bodies (EB) was performed using immobilized Concanavalin A (ConA). This procedure allowed the isolation of glycopeptides that express biantennary and hybrid N-linked structures (ConA2 fraction) as well as high mannose glycans (ConA3 fraction), that were abundant in both ES and EB stages. A total of 293 unique N-linked glycopeptide sequences (from 180 glycoproteins) were identified in the combined data sets from ES and EB cells. Of these glycopeptides, a total of 119 sequences were identified exclusively in only one of the lectin bound fractions, (24 in the ES-ConA2, 15 in the ES-ConA3, 16 in the EB-ConA2 and 64 in the EB-ConA3). Results from this study allowed the identification of individual N-glycosylation sites of proteins that express specific glycan types. The absence of some of these lectin bound glycopeptides in a cell stage suggested that they were derived from proteins that were either expressed exclusively on a defined developmental stage, or were expressed in both cell stages but carried the lectin bound oligosaccharides in only one of them. Therefore, these lectin bound glycopeptides can be considered as stage specific glycobiomarkers. PMID:19545112

  1. Nucleoside antibiotics: biosynthesis, regulation, and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Niu, Guoqing; Tan, Huarong

    2015-02-01

    The alarming rise in antibiotic-resistant pathogens has coincided with a decline in the supply of new antibiotics. It is therefore of great importance to find and create new antibiotics. Nucleoside antibiotics are a large family of natural products with diverse biological functions. Their biosynthesis is a complex process through multistep enzymatic reactions and is subject to hierarchical regulation. Genetic and biochemical studies of the biosynthetic machinery have provided the basis for pathway engineering and combinatorial biosynthesis to create new or hybrid nucleoside antibiotics. Dissection of regulatory mechanisms is leading to strategies to increase the titer of bioactive nucleoside antibiotics.

  2. Antibiotic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Mast, Yvonne; Stegmann, Evi; Ziemert, Nadine

    2016-09-01

    Due to the threat posed by the increase of highly resistant pathogenic bacteria, there is an urgent need for new antibiotics; all the more so since in the last 20 years, the approval for new antibacterial agents had decreased. The field of natural product discovery has undergone a tremendous development over the past few years. This has been the consequence of several new and revolutionizing drug discovery and development techniques, which is initiating a 'New Age of Antibiotic Discovery'. In this review, we concentrate on the most significant discovery approaches during the last and present years and comment on the challenges facing the community in the coming years. PMID:27470984

  3. Knowing prior methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonization status increases the empirical use of glycopeptides in MRSA bacteraemia and may decrease mortality.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J O; Phillips, M; Christiansen, K J; Pearson, J C; Coombs, G W; Murray, R J

    2014-06-01

    To compare the management and outcome of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia in patients known to be MRSA-colonized/infected (C-patients) with the management and outcome in those not known to be colonized/infected (NC-patients), we conducted a 10-year retrospective review of MRSA bacteraemia in an adult tertiary hospital. Clinical data were obtained by chart review, and mortality data from linked databases. Prior MRSA colonization/infection status was available to treating clinicians at the time of the bacteraemia as a 'Micro-Alert' tag on the patient's labels, in medical charts, and in electronic information systems. C-patients accounted for 35.4% of all MRSA bacteraemia episodes. C-patients were more likely to be indigenous, to be diabetic, or to have a history of previous S. aureus infection. Markers of illness severity (Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS)-II, need for admission to the intensive-care unit, length of stay, and metastatic seeding) were similar in both groups. Empirical therapy included a glycopeptide in 49.3% of C-patients vs. 18.9% of NC-patients (p <0.01), and contained an antibiotic to which the MRSA isolate tested susceptible in vitro in 56.7% of C-patients vs. 45.1% of NC-patients (p 0.13). All-cause 7-day and 30-day mortality were 7.5% vs. 18.9% (p 0.04), and 22.4% vs. 31.1% (p 0.20), in the C-patient and NC-patient groups, respectively. Knowing MRSA colonization status was significantly associated with lower 30-day mortality in Cox regression analysis (p <0.01). These data suggest that mortality from MRSA bacteraemia is lower in C-patients, which may reflect the earlier use of glycopeptides. The low use of empirical glycopeptides in septic patients known to be previously MRSA-colonized/infected may represent a missed opportunity for infection control to positively impact on clinical management.

  4. Knowing prior methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonization status increases the empirical use of glycopeptides in MRSA bacteraemia and may decrease mortality.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J O; Phillips, M; Christiansen, K J; Pearson, J C; Coombs, G W; Murray, R J

    2014-06-01

    To compare the management and outcome of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia in patients known to be MRSA-colonized/infected (C-patients) with the management and outcome in those not known to be colonized/infected (NC-patients), we conducted a 10-year retrospective review of MRSA bacteraemia in an adult tertiary hospital. Clinical data were obtained by chart review, and mortality data from linked databases. Prior MRSA colonization/infection status was available to treating clinicians at the time of the bacteraemia as a 'Micro-Alert' tag on the patient's labels, in medical charts, and in electronic information systems. C-patients accounted for 35.4% of all MRSA bacteraemia episodes. C-patients were more likely to be indigenous, to be diabetic, or to have a history of previous S. aureus infection. Markers of illness severity (Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS)-II, need for admission to the intensive-care unit, length of stay, and metastatic seeding) were similar in both groups. Empirical therapy included a glycopeptide in 49.3% of C-patients vs. 18.9% of NC-patients (p <0.01), and contained an antibiotic to which the MRSA isolate tested susceptible in vitro in 56.7% of C-patients vs. 45.1% of NC-patients (p 0.13). All-cause 7-day and 30-day mortality were 7.5% vs. 18.9% (p 0.04), and 22.4% vs. 31.1% (p 0.20), in the C-patient and NC-patient groups, respectively. Knowing MRSA colonization status was significantly associated with lower 30-day mortality in Cox regression analysis (p <0.01). These data suggest that mortality from MRSA bacteraemia is lower in C-patients, which may reflect the earlier use of glycopeptides. The low use of empirical glycopeptides in septic patients known to be previously MRSA-colonized/infected may represent a missed opportunity for infection control to positively impact on clinical management. PMID:24224545

  5. Toxin production and antibiotic resistances in Escherichia coli isolated from bathing areas along the coastline of the Oslo fjord.

    PubMed

    Charnock, Colin; Nordlie, Anne-Lise; Hjeltnes, Bjarne

    2014-09-01

    The presence of enterovirulent and/or antibiotic resistant strains of Escherichia coli in recreational bathing waters would represent a clear health issue. In total, 144 E. coli isolated from 26 beaches along the inner Oslo fjord were examined for virulence determinants and resistance to clinically important antibiotics. No isolates possessed the genetic determinants associated with enterotoxigenic strains and none showed the prototypic sorbitol negative, O157:H7 phenotype. A small number (∼1 %) produced alpha-hemolysin. Occurrences and patterns of antibiotic resistances were similar to those of E. coli isolated previously from environmental samples. In total, 6 % of the strains showed one or more clinically relevant resistances and 1.4 % were multi-drug resistant. Microarray analyses suggested that the resistance determinants were generally associated with mobile genetic elements. Resistant strains were not clonally related, and were, furthermore not concentrated at one or a few beach sites. This suggests that these strains are entering the waters at a low rate but in a widespread manner. The study demonstrates that resistant E. coli are present in coastal bathing waters where they can come into contact with bathers, and that the resistance determinants are potentially transferable. Some of the resistances registered in the study are to important antibiotics used in human medicine such as fluoroquinolones. The spread of antibiotic resistant genes, from the clinical setting to the environment, has clear implications with respect to the current management of bacterial infections and the long term value of antimicrobial therapy. The present study is the first of its kind in Norway.

  6. Antibiotics in dentistry: Bacteremia, antibiotic prophylaxis, and antibiotic misuse.

    PubMed

    Dinsbach, Nathan A

    2012-01-01

    What is known regarding bacteremia? How effective is antibiotic prophylaxis for distant-site infections (late prosthetic joint infections and infective endocarditis)? Antibiotic resistance poses a growing danger to mankind. The misuse of antibiotics is a main cause of antibiotic resistance in bacteria. The author undertook a Medline search and a hand search of the literature regarding bacteremia, antibiotic prophylaxis for late prosthetic joint infections and infective endocarditis, antibiotic misuse, and antibiotic resistance. The findings indicate a clearer understanding of bacteremia emerging in the past 30 years, which has led to recent changes in antibiotic prophylaxis regimens. Dentists should understand how bacteremia affects their at-risk patients, the rationale for antibiotic prophylaxis, and how antibiotic misuse poses a threat to all.

  7. Self-adjuvanting synthetic antitumor vaccines from MUC1 glycopeptides conjugated to T-cell epitopes from tetanus toxoid.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hui; Chen, Mei-Sha; Sun, Zhan-Yi; Zhao, Yu-Fen; Kunz, Horst; Li, Yan-Mei

    2013-06-01

    The T-helper epitope peptide P30 (green in the scheme) from tetanus toxoid was used as the immunostimulant in MUC1 glycopeptide antitumor vaccines and apparently also acts as a built-in adjuvant. P30-conjugated glycopeptide vaccines containing three glycans in the immunodominant motifs PDTRP and GSTAP induced much stronger immune responses and complement dependent cytotoxicity mediated killing of tumor cells when applied in plain PBS solution without complete Freund's adjuvant.

  8. Chiral analysis by capillary electrophoresis using antibiotics as chiral selector.

    PubMed

    Desiderio, C; Fanali, S

    1998-05-20

    The separation of chiral compounds by capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a very interesting field of research in different areas such as pharmaceutical, environmental, agricultural analysis etc. The separation of two enantiomers can be achieved in CE using a chiral environment interacting with the two analytes on forming diastereoisomers with different stability constants and thus different mobilities. A wide number of chiral selectors have been employed in CE and among them glycopeptide antibiotics exhibited excellent enantioselective properties towards a wide number of racemic compounds. Vancomycin, ristocetin A, rifamycins, teicoplanin, kanamycin, streptomycin, fradiomycin, and two vancomycin analogues, added to the background electrolyte (BGE), are the antibiotics studied by CE running the separation in untreated and/or coated fused-silica capillary. Due to adsorption and absorption phenomena, some drawbacks can be expected when using bare fused-silica capillary, e.g., changes of electroosmotic flow (EOF), broaden peaks, reduced efficiency and low sensitivity. Coated capillary and counter current mode can be the solution to overcome the above mentioned problems. This review surveys the separation of enantiomers by CE when macrocyclic antibiotics are used as chiral selector. The enantioselectivity can be easily controlled modifying several parameters such as antibiotic type and concentration, pH, ionic strength and concentration of the background electrolyte, organic modifier etc. The paper also presents a list of the latest chiral separations achieved by CE where antibiotics were used as chiral selector.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of the interaction of the antibiotic teicoplanin and its aglycone with cell-wall peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga, P; Laynez, J; Menendez, M; Cañada, J; Garcia-Blanco, F

    1990-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the interaction of the glycopeptidic antibiotic teicoplanin and its peptidic moiety with analogues of bacterial cell-wall peptides were studied by means of calorimetric and spectrophotometric techniques. The analysis of the thermodynamic data has allowed us to evaluate the contributions of the different peptide groups to the binding process. The nature of the primary binding forces is also discussed for each interacting group, on the basis of their enthalpic and entropic contribution and in connection with the detailed structural information available for these antibiotics from n.m.r. data. Similar analyses for the case of vancomycin and ristocetin are also reported. PMID:2137332

  10. The global role of ppGpp synthesis in morphological differentiation and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Andrew; Chen, Wenqiong Joan; Ryding, Jamie; Chang, Sherman; Bibb, Mervyn

    2007-01-01

    Background Regulation of production of the translational apparatus via the stringent factor ppGpp in response to amino acid starvation is conserved in many bacteria. However, in addition to this core function, it is clear that ppGpp also exhibits genus-specific regulatory effects. In this study we used Affymetrix GeneChips to more fully characterize the regulatory influence of ppGpp synthesis on the biology of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), with emphasis on the control of antibiotic biosynthesis and morphological differentiation. Results Induction of ppGpp synthesis repressed transcription of the major sigma factor hrdB, genes with functions associated with active growth, and six of the thirteen conservons present in the S. coelicolor genome. Genes induced following ppGpp synthesis included the alternative sigma factor SCO4005, many for production of the antibiotics CDA and actinorhodin, the regulatory genes SCO4198 and SCO4336, and two alternative ribosomal proteins. Induction of the CDA and actinorhodin clusters was accompanied by an increase in transcription of the pathway regulators cdaR and actII-ORF4, respectively. Comparison of transcriptome profiles of a relA null strain, M570, incapable of ppGpp synthesis with its parent M600 suggested the occurrence of metabolic stress in the mutant. The failure of M570 to sporulate was associated with a stalling between production of the surfactant peptide SapB, and of the hydrophobins: it overproduced SapB but failed to express the chaplin and rodlin genes. Conclusion In S. coelicolor, ppGpp synthesis influences the expression of several genomic elements that are particularly characteristic of streptomycete biology, notably antibiotic gene clusters, conservons, and morphogenetic proteins. PMID:17683547

  11. Synthesis of Zwitterionic Polymer Particles via Combined Distillation Precipitation Polymerization and Click Chemistry for Highly Efficient Enrichment of Glycopeptide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianxi; Yang, Kaiguang; Shao, Wenya; Li, Senwu; Wu, Qi; Zhang, Shen; Qu, Yanyan; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-08-31

    Because of the low abundance of glycopeptide in natural biological samples, methods for efficient and selective enrichment of glycopeptides play a significant role in mass spectrometry (MS)-based glycoproteomics. In this study, a novel kind of zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction chromatography polymer particles, namely, poly(N,N-methylenebisacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid)@l-Cys (poly(MBAAm-co-MAA)@l-Cys), for the enrichment of glycopeptides was synthesized by a facile and efficient approach that combined distillation precipitation polymerization (DPP) and "thiol-ene" click reaction. In the DPP approach, residual vinyl groups explored outside the core with high density, then the functional ligand cysteine was immobilized onto the surface of core particles by highly efficient thiol-ene click reaction. Taking advantage of the unique structure of poly(MBAAm-co-MAA)@l-Cys, the resulting particles possess remarkable enrichment selectivity for glycopeptides from the tryptic digested human immunoglobulin G. The polymer particles were successfully employed for the analysis of human plasma, and 208 unique glycopeptides corresponding to 121 glycoproteins were reliably identified in triple independent nano-LC-MS/MS runs. The selectivity toward glycopeptides of these particles poly(MBAAm-co-MAA)@l-Cys is ∼2 times than that of the commercial beads. These results demonstrated that these particles had great potential for large-scale glycoproteomics research. Moreover, the strategy with the combination of DPP and thiol-ene click chemistry might be a facile method to produce functional polymer particles for bioenrichment application. PMID:27498760

  12. Glycopeptide Site Heterogeneity and Structural Diversity Determined by Combined Lectin Affinity Chromatography/IMS/CID/MS Techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Feifei; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Clemmer, David E

    2015-07-01

    Glycopeptides from a tryptic digest of chicken ovomucoid were enriched using a simplified lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) platform, and characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) as well as ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MS. The LAC platform effectively enriched the glycoproteome, from which a total of 117 glycopeptides containing 27 glycan forms were identified for this protein. IMS-MS analysis revealed a high degree of glycopeptide site heterogeneity. Comparison of the IMS distributions of the glycopeptides from different charge states reveals that higher charge states allow more structures to be resolved. Presumably the repulsive interactions between charged sites lead to more open configurations, which are more readily separated compared with the more compact, lower charge state forms of the same groups of species. Combining IMS with collision induced dissociation (CID) made it possible to determine the presence of isomeric glycans and to reconstruct their IMS profiles. This study illustrates a workflow involving hybrid techniques for determining glycopeptide site heterogeneity and evaluating structural diversity of glycans and glycopeptides. PMID:25840811

  13. Glycopeptide Site Heterogeneity and Structural Diversity Determined by Combined Lectin Affinity Chromatography/IMS/CID/MS Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feifei; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Clemmer, David E.

    2015-07-01

    Glycopeptides from a tryptic digest of chicken ovomucoid were enriched using a simplified lectin affinity chromatography (LAC) platform, and characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) as well as ion mobility spectrometry (IMS)-MS. The LAC platform effectively enriched the glycoproteome, from which a total of 117 glycopeptides containing 27 glycan forms were identified for this protein. IMS-MS analysis revealed a high degree of glycopeptide site heterogeneity. Comparison of the IMS distributions of the glycopeptides from different charge states reveals that higher charge states allow more structures to be resolved. Presumably the repulsive interactions between charged sites lead to more open configurations, which are more readily separated compared with the more compact, lower charge state forms of the same groups of species. Combining IMS with collision induced dissociation (CID) made it possible to determine the presence of isomeric glycans and to reconstruct their IMS profiles. This study illustrates a workflow involving hybrid techniques for determining glycopeptide site heterogeneity and evaluating structural diversity of glycans and glycopeptides.

  14. Antibiotic resistance patterns of coagulase-negative staphylococcus strains isolated from blood cultures of septicemic patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Koksal, F; Yasar, H; Samasti, M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine antibiotic resistance patterns and slime production characteristics of coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CoNS) caused nosocomial bacteremia. A total of 200 CoNS strains were isolated from blood samples of patients with true bacteremia who were hospitalized in intensive care units and in other departments of Istanbul University Cerrahpasa Medical Hospital between 1999 and 2006. Among 200 CoNS isolates, Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most prevalent species (87) followed by Staphylococcus haemolyticus (23), Staphylococcus hominis (19), Staphylococcus lugdunensis (18), Staphylococcus capitis (15), Staphylococcus xylosus (10), Staphylococcus warneri (8), Staphylococcus saprophyticus (5), Staphylococcus lentus (5), Staphylococcus simulans (4), Staphylococcus chromogenes (3), Staphylococcus cohnii (1), Staphylococcus schleiferi (1), and Staphylococcus auricularis (1). Resistance to methicillin was detected in 67.5% of CoNS isolates. Methicillin-resistant CoNS strains were determined to be more resistant to antibiotics than methicillin-susceptible CoNS strains. Resistance rates of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible CoNS strains to the antibacterial agents, respectively, were as follows: gentamicin 90% and 17%, erythromycin 80% and 37%, clindamycin 72% and 18%, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole 68% and 38%, ciprofloxacin 67% and 23%, tetracycline 60% and 45%, chloramphenicol 56% and 13% and fusidic acid 25% and 15%. None of the strains were resistant to vancomycin and teicoplanin. Slime production was detected in 86 of 200 CoNS strains. Resistance to methicillin was found in 81% of slime-positive and in 57% of slime-negative strains. Our results indicated that there is a high level of resistance to widely used agents in causative methicillin-resistant CoNS strains. However fusidic acid has the smallest resistance ratio, with the exception of glycopeptides. Additionally, most S. epidermidis strains were slime

  15. Collective antibiotic tolerance: Mechanisms, dynamics, and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Hannah R.; Srimani, Jaydeep K.; Lee, Anna J.; Lopatkin, Allison J.; You, Lingchong

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have developed resistance against every antibiotic at an alarming rate, considering the timescale at which new antibiotics are developed. Thus, there is a critical need to use antibiotics more effectively, extend the shelf life of existing antibiotics, and minimize their side effects. This requires understanding the mechanisms underlying bacterial drug responses. Past studies have focused on survival in the presence of antibiotics by individual cells, as genetic mutants or persisters. In contrast, a population of bacterial cells can collectively survive antibiotic treatments lethal to individual cells. This tolerance can arise by diverse mechanisms, including resistance-conferring enzyme production, titration-mediated bistable growth inhibition, swarming, and inter-population interactions. These strategies can enable rapid population recovery after antibiotic treatment, and provide a time window for otherwise susceptible bacteria to acquire inheritable genetic resistance. Here, we emphasize the potential for targeting collective antibiotic tolerance behaviors as an antibacterial treatment strategy. PMID:25689336

  16. Automated Glycan Sequencing from Tandem Mass Spectra of N-Linked Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuan-Yih; Mayampurath, Anoop; Zhu, Rui; Zacharias, Lauren; Song, Ehwang; Wang, Lei; Mechref, Yehia; Tang, Haixu

    2016-06-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a routine experimental tool for proteomic biomarker analysis of human blood samples, partly due to the large availability of informatics tools. As one of the most common protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) in mammals, protein glycosylation has been observed to alter in multiple human diseases and thus may potentially be candidate markers of disease progression. While mass spectrometry instrumentation has seen advancements in capabilities, discovering glycosylation-related markers using existing software is currently not straightforward. Complete characterization of protein glycosylation requires the identification of intact glycopeptides in samples, including identification of the modification site as well as the structure of the attached glycans. In this paper, we present GlycoSeq, an open-source software tool that implements a heuristic iterated glycan sequencing algorithm coupled with prior knowledge for automated elucidation of the glycan structure within a glycopeptide from its collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrum. GlycoSeq employs rules of glycosidic linkage as defined by glycan synthetic pathways to eliminate improbable glycan structures and build reasonable glycan trees. We tested the tool on two sets of tandem mass spectra of N-linked glycopeptides cell lines acquired from breast cancer patients. After employing enzymatic specificity within the N-linked glycan synthetic pathway, the sequencing results of GlycoSeq were highly consistent with the manually curated glycan structures. Hence, GlycoSeq is ready to be used for the characterization of glycan structures in glycopeptides from MS/MS analysis. GlycoSeq is released as open source software at https://github.com/chpaul/GlycoSeq/ . PMID:27111718

  17. CpG-loaded multifunctional cationic nanohydrogel particles as self-adjuvanting glycopeptide antitumor vaccines.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Sebastian; Nuhn, Lutz; Palitzsch, Björn; Glaffig, Markus; Stergiou, Natascha; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Schmitt, Edgar; Kunz, Horst; Zentel, Rudolf

    2015-03-11

    Self-adjuvanting antitumor vaccines by multifunctional cationic nanohydrogels loaded with CpG. A conjugate consisting of tumor-associated MUC1-glycopeptide B-cell epitope and tetanus toxin T-cell epitope P2 is linked to cationic nanogels. Oligonucleotide CpG complexation enhances toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulated T-cell proliferation and rapid immune activation. This co-delivery promotes induction of specific MUC1-antibodies binding to human breast tumor cells without external adjuvant.

  18. Oligosaccharide structure and amino acid sequence of the major glycopeptides of mature human. beta. -hexosaminidase

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dowd, B.F.; Cumming, D.A.; Gravel, R.A.; Mahuran, D.

    1988-07-12

    Human ..beta..-hexosaminidase is a lysosomal enzyme that hydrolyzes terminal N-acetylhexosamines from GM/sub 2/ ganglioside, oligosaccharides, and other carbohydrate-containing macromolecules. There are two major forms of hexosaminidase: hexosaminidase A, with the structure ..cap alpha..(..beta../sub a/..beta../sub b/), and hexosaminidase B, 2(..beta../sub a/..beta../sub b/). Like other lysosomal proteins, hexosaminidase is targeted to its destination via glycosylation and processing in the rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Phosphorylation of specific mannose residues allows binding of the protein to the phosphomannosyl receptor and transfer to the lysosome. In order to define the structure and placement of the oligosaccharides in mature hexosaminidase and thus identify candidate mannose 6-phosphate recipient sites, the major tryptic/chymotryptic glycopeptides from each isozyme were purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Two major concanavalin A binding glycopeptides, localized to the ..beta../sub b/f chain, and one non concanavalin A binding glycopeptide, localized to the ..beta../sub a/ chain, were found associated with the ..beta..-subunit in both hexosaminidase A and hexosaminidase B. The oligosaccharide structures were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. The unique glycopeptide associated with the ..beta../sub a/ chain contained a single GlcNAc residue. Thus all three mature polypeptides comprising the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. subunits of hexosaminidase contain carbohydrate, the structures of which have the appearance of being partially degraded in the lysosome. In the ..cap alpha.. chain they found only one possible site for in vivo phosphorylation. In the ..beta.. it is unclear if only one or all three of the sites could have contained phosphate. However, mature placental hexosaminidase A and B can be rephosphorylated in vitro. This requires the presence of an oligosaccharide containing an ..cap

  19. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Malignant Ovarian Cancer Ascites Fluid Identifies Unusual Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Suzanne; Ruhaak, L Renee; Stroble, Carol; Salemi, Michelle R; Phinney, Brett; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Leiserowitz, Gary S

    2016-09-01

    Ovarian cancer is a major cause of cancer mortality among women, largely due to late diagnosis of advanced metastatic disease. More extensive molecular analysis of metastatic ovarian cancer is needed to identify post-translational modifications of proteins, especially glycosylation that is particularly associated with metastatic disease to better understand the metastatic process and identify potential therapeutic targets. Glycoproteins in ascites fluid were enriched by affinity binding to lectins (ConA or WGA) and other affinity matrices. Separate glycomic, proteomic, and glycopeptide analyses were performed. Relative abundances of different N-glycan groups and proteins were identified from ascites fluids and a serum control. Levels of biomarkers CA125, MUC1, and fibronectin were also monitored in OC ascites samples by Western blot analysis. N-Glycan analysis of ascites fluids showed the presence of large, highly fucosylated and sialylated complex and hybrid glycans, some of which were not observed in normal serum. OC ascites glycoproteins, haptoglobin, fibronectin, lumican, fibulin, hemopexin, ceruloplasmin, alpha-1-antitrypsin, and alpha-1-antichymotrypsin were more abundant in OC ascites or not present in serum control samples. Further glycopeptide analysis of OC ascites identified N- and O-glycans in clusterin, hemopexin, and fibulin glycopeptides, some of which are unusual and may be important in OC metastasis. PMID:27500424

  20. Analysis of ER-associated glycoprotein degradation using synthetic glycopeptide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Hagihara, Shinya; Goda, Kazuhito; Matsuo, Ichiro; Ito, Yukishige . E-mail: yukito@riken.jp

    2007-08-24

    Quality control of proteins is an essential process for maintaining normal cell activity. It ensures that only correctly folded proteins are produced and terminally misfolded proteins are eliminated by degradation. ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of misfolded proteins is an important aspect of protein quality control system. Recent studies have revealed that glycoprotein glycans play significant roles in this process. It includes polyubiquitination, deglycosylation, and proteasomal degradation. In the present study, a systematic analysis of these steps was carried out using chemically synthesized glycopeptides. We revealed that N-linked glycopeptides are degraded by 20S proteasome, but with drastically reduced rate compared to non-glycosylated peptide. This result strongly suggests that deglycosylating activity of peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is important for the facile degradation of glycoproteins. Our study showed, for the first time, that PNGase cleaves truncated glycans as short as chitobiose from peptide. However, this cleavage required the presence of hydrophobic region nearby N-glycosylation site. Furthermore, analysis of interactions with F-box protein Fbs1 was conducted with fluorescent correlation spectroscopy (FCS). It was shown that the presence of Fbs1 perturb the activity of PNGase toward high-mannose-type glycopeptides.

  1. Amine Chemistry Method for Selective Enrichment of N-Linked Glycopeptides for Glycoproteomics Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang; Sun, Deguang; Cong, Yuting; Mao, Jiawei; Huang, Junfeng; Qin, Hongqiang; Liu, Jing; Huang, Guang; Wang, Liming; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-09-01

    An amine chemistry method was developed for the extraction of N-glycopeptides using amine-functionalized beads for glycoproteomics analysis. Two reductive amination reactions between primary amine and aldehyde were employed in this approach. The first one was to block the primary amines in the peptides by addition of formaldehyde and sodium cyanoborohydride into the peptide sample, and the second one was to couple the glycopeptides onto solid phase beads by incubating the glycopeptides containing aldehyde groups (oxidized by periodate) with the amine-functionalized beads in the presence of sodium cyanoborohydride. It was demonstrated that the blocking of primary amines in the peptides by the first reductive amination reaction prior to the periodate oxidation made the amine chemistry method very efficient and sensitive. This new method was validated by analysis of glycoprotein standards as well as proteome samples. It was found that this new method led to significant increase in the identification of N-glycosites compared with the conventional hydrazide chemistry method.

  2. Resistance to Antibiotics Mediated by Target Alterations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Brian G.

    1994-04-01

    The development of resistance to antibiotics by reductions in the affinities of their enzymatic targets occurs most rapidly for antibiotics that inactivate a single target and that are not analogs of substrate. In these cases of resistance (for example, resistance to rifampicin), numerous single amino acid substitutions may provide large decreases in the affinity of the target for the antibiotic, leading to clinically significant levels of resistance. Resistance due to target alterations should occur much more slowly for those antibiotics (penicillin, for example) that inactivate multiple targets irreversibly by acting as close analogs of substrate. Resistance to penicillin because of target changes has emerged, by unexpected mechanisms, only in a limited number of species. However, inactivating enzymes commonly provide resistance to antibiotics that, like penicillin, are derived from natural products, although such enzymes have not been found for synthetic antibiotics. Thus, the ideal antibiotic would be produced by rational design, rather than by the modification of a natural product.

  3. Antibiotic resistance in wild birds

    PubMed Central

    Bonnedahl, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Wild birds have been postulated as sentinels, reservoirs, and potential spreaders of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been isolated from a multitude of wild bird species. Several studies strongly indicate transmission of resistant bacteria from human rest products to wild birds. There is evidence suggesting that wild birds can spread resistant bacteria through migration and that resistant bacteria can be transmitted from birds to humans and vice versa. Through further studies of the spatial and temporal distribution of resistant bacteria in wild birds, we can better assess their role and thereby help to mitigate the increasing global problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:24697355

  4. Antibiotic resistance in wild birds.

    PubMed

    Bonnedahl, Jonas; Järhult, Josef D

    2014-05-01

    Wild birds have been postulated as sentinels, reservoirs, and potential spreaders of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been isolated from a multitude of wild bird species. Several studies strongly indicate transmission of resistant bacteria from human rest products to wild birds. There is evidence suggesting that wild birds can spread resistant bacteria through migration and that resistant bacteria can be transmitted from birds to humans and vice versa. Through further studies of the spatial and temporal distribution of resistant bacteria in wild birds, we can better assess their role and thereby help to mitigate the increasing global problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:24697355

  5. Antibiotic resistance versus antimicrobial substances production by gram-negative foodborne pathogens isolated from minas frescal cheese: heads or tails?

    PubMed

    Damaceno, Hugo Figueiredo Botelho; de Freitas J, Claudinei Vieira; Marinho, Iuri Lourenço; Cupertino, Thomaz Rocha; Costa, Leonardo Emanuel de Oliveira; Nascimento, Janaína dos Santos

    2015-04-01

    In this study, 15 Gram-negative isolates from Minas Frescal cheese sold in commercial establishments in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were able to produce antimicrobial substances (AMSs). Seven, four, two, one, and one isolates identified as Yersinia, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, Escherichia, and Hafnia genera, respectively, were considered potentially pathogenic. All 15 AMS(+) isolates were resistant to at least 1 antibiotic; however, 7 strains presented resistance to at least 3 antibiotics from different classes, exhibiting multiresistance profiles. The strains were also subjected to plasmid profile analysis. All isolates presented different plasmid forms with most ranging in size from 1 to 10 kb. Activity against various pathogens associated with food was tested and all 15 AMS(+) showed the same activity spectrum, inhibiting all Escherichia coli and Salmonella strains that were tested. Although restricted, the action spectrum of AMS-producing strains is extremely relevant to the food industry because Gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli and Salmonella spp. are most often associated with foodborne illnesses. The findings of this study reveal that even AMS produced by pathogens can have potential applications against other foodborne pathogens. PMID:25622265

  6. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trends and Cost Español: Datos breves Facts about Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotic resistance has been called one of the world’s most ... antibiotic use is a key strategy to control antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance in children is of particular concern ...

  7. cmdABCDEF, a cluster of genes encoding membrane proteins for differentiation and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptomyces coelicolor is the most studied Streptomyces species and an excellent model for studying differentiation and antibiotic production. To date, many genes have been identified to be required for its differentiation (e.g. bld genes for aerial growth and whi genes for sporulation) and antibiotics production (including actII-orf4, redD, cdaR as pathway-specific regulatory genes and afsR, absA1/A2 as pleiotropic regulatory genes). Results A gene cluster containing six genes (SCO4126-4131) was proved to be co-transcribed in S. coelicolor. Deletions of cmdABCDEF (SCO4126-4131) displayed defective sporulation including formation of aberrant branches, and abnormalities in chromosome segregation and spore septation. Disruption mutants of apparently orthologous genes of S. lividans and S. avermitilis also showed defective sporulation, implying that the role of these genes is similar among Streptomyces. Transcription of cmdB, and therefore presumably of the whole operon, was regulated developmentally. Five of the encoded proteins (CmdA, C, D, E, F) were predicted membrane proteins. The other, CmdB, a predicted ATP/GTP-binding protein with an ABC-transporter-ATPase domain shown here to be essential for its function, was also located on the cell membrane. These results indicate that CmdABCDEF proteins mainly affect Streptomyces differentiation at an early stage of aerial hyphae formation, and suggest that these proteins may form a complex on cell membrane for proper segregation of chromosomes. In addition, deletions of cmdABCDEF also revealed over-production of blue-pigmented actinorhodin (Act) via activation of transcription of the pathway-specific regulatory gene actII-orf4 of actinorhodin biosynthesis. Conclusion In this study, six co-transcribed genes cmdABCDEF were identified by their effects on differentiation and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). These six membrane-located proteins are possibly assembled into a complex to

  8. New glycoproteomics software, GlycoPep Evaluator, generates decoy glycopeptides de novo and enables accurate false discovery rate analysis for small data sets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhikai; Su, Xiaomeng; Go, Eden P; Desaire, Heather

    2014-09-16

    Glycoproteins are biologically significant large molecules that participate in numerous cellular activities. In order to obtain site-specific protein glycosylation information, intact glycopeptides, with the glycan attached to the peptide sequence, are characterized by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods such as collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD). While several emerging automated tools are developed, no consensus is present in the field about the best way to determine the reliability of the tools and/or provide the false discovery rate (FDR). A common approach to calculate FDRs for glycopeptide analysis, adopted from the target-decoy strategy in proteomics, employs a decoy database that is created based on the target protein sequence database. Nonetheless, this approach is not optimal in measuring the confidence of N-linked glycopeptide matches, because the glycopeptide data set is considerably smaller compared to that of peptides, and the requirement of a consensus sequence for N-glycosylation further limits the number of possible decoy glycopeptides tested in a database search. To address the need to accurately determine FDRs for automated glycopeptide assignments, we developed GlycoPep Evaluator (GPE), a tool that helps to measure FDRs in identifying glycopeptides without using a decoy database. GPE generates decoy glycopeptides de novo for every target glycopeptide, in a 1:20 target-to-decoy ratio. The decoys, along with target glycopeptides, are scored against the ETD data, from which FDRs can be calculated accurately based on the number of decoy matches and the ratio of the number of targets to decoys, for small data sets. GPE is freely accessible for download and can work with any search engine that interprets ETD data of N-linked glycopeptides. The software is provided at https://desairegroup.ku.edu/research.

  9. Antibiotic resistance, virulence determinants and production of biogenic amines among enterococci from ovine, feline, canine, porcine and human milk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that mammalian milk represents a continuous supply of commensal bacteria, including enterococci. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the presence of enterococci in milk of different species and to screen them for several genetic and phenotypic traits of clinical significance among enterococci. Results Samples were obtained from, at least, nine porcine, canine, ovine, feline and human healthy hosts. Enterococci could be isolated, at a concentration of 1.00 × 102 -1.16 × 103 CFU/ml, from all the porcine samples and, also from 85, 50, 25 and 25% of the human, canine, feline and ovine ones, respectively. They were identified as Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus hirae, Enterococcus casseliflavus and Enterococcus durans. Among the 120 initial enterococcal isolates, 36 were selected on the basis of their different PFGE profiles and further characterized. MLST analysis revealed a wide diversity of STs among the E. faecalis and E. faecium strains, including some frequently associated to hospital infections and novel STs. All the E. faecalis strains possessed some of the potential virulence determinants (cad, ccf, cob, cpd, efaAfs, agg2, gelE, cylA, espfs) assayed while the E. faecium ones only harboured the efaAfm gene. All the tested strains were susceptible to tigecycline, linezolid and vancomycin, and produced tyramine. Their susceptibility to the rest of the antimicrobials and their ability to produce other biogenic amines varied depending on the strain. Enterococci strains isolated from porcine samples showed the widest spectrum of antibiotic resistance. Conclusions Enterococci isolated from milk of different mammals showed a great genetic diversity. The wide distribution of virulence genes and/or antibiotic resistance among the E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates indicates that they can constitute a reservoir of such traits and a risk to animal and human health. PMID:24325647

  10. 21 CFR 333.110 - First aid antibiotic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false First aid antibiotic active ingredients. 333.110... (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE TOPICAL ANTIMICROBIAL DRUG PRODUCTS FOR OVER-THE-COUNTER HUMAN USE First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.110 First aid antibiotic active ingredients. The product consists of any...

  11. Antibiotic Multiresistance Analysis of Mesophilic and Psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from Goat and Lamb Slaughterhouse Surfaces throughout the Meat Production Process

    PubMed Central

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance profiles of pseudomonads isolated from surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse, which were representative of areas that are possible sources of meat contamination. Mesophilic (85 isolates) and psychrotrophic (37 isolates) pseudomonads identified at the species level generally were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, rifampin, and ceftazidime (especially mesophiles), as well as colistin and tetracycline (especially psychrotrophes). However, they generally were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, and kanamycin regardless of species identity. Worryingly, in the present study, we found multidrug resistance (MDR) to up to 13 antibiotics, which was related to intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, a link between various antimicrobial resistance genes was shown for beta-lactams and tetracycline, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides. The distribution and resistome-based analysis of MDR pseudomonads in different slaughterhouse zones indicated that the main sources of the identical or related pseudomonad strains were the animals (feet and wool) and the slaughterhouse environment, being disseminated from the beginning, or entrance environment, to the environment of the finished meat products. Those facts must be taken into consideration to avoid cross-contamination with the subsequent flow of mobile resistance determinants throughout all slaughterhouse zones and then to humans and the environment by the application of adequate practices of hygiene and disinfection measures, including those for animal wool and feet and also the entrance environment. PMID:25172860

  12. Repression of Antibiotic Production and Sporulation in Streptomyces coelicolor by Overexpression of a TetR Family Transcriptional Regulator ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Delin; Seghezzi, Nicolas; Esnault, Catherine; Virolle, Marie-Joelle

    2010-01-01

    The overexpression of a regulatory gene of the TetR family (SCO3201) originating either from Streptomyces lividans or from Streptomyces coelicolor was shown to strongly repress antibiotic production (calcium-dependent antibiotic [CDA], undecylprodigiosin [RED], and actinorhodin [ACT]) of S. coelicolor and of the ppk mutant strain of S. lividans. Curiously, the overexpression of this gene also had a strong inhibitory effect on the sporulation process of S. coelicolor but not on that of S. lividans. SCO3201 was shown to negatively regulate its own transcription, and its DNA binding motif was found to overlap its −35 promoter sequence. The interruption of this gene in S. lividans or S. coelicolor did not lead to any obvious phenotypes, indicating that when overexpressed SCO3201 likely controls the expression of target genes of other TetR regulators involved in the regulation of the metabolic and morphological differentiation process in S. coelicolor. The direct and functional interaction of SCO3201 with the promoter region of scbA, a gene under the positive control of the TetR-like regulator, ScbR, was indeed demonstrated by in vitro as well as in vivo approaches. PMID:20935121

  13. Antibiotic multiresistance analysis of mesophilic and psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp. isolated from goat and lamb slaughterhouse surfaces throughout the meat production process.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance profiles of pseudomonads isolated from surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse, which were representative of areas that are possible sources of meat contamination. Mesophilic (85 isolates) and psychrotrophic (37 isolates) pseudomonads identified at the species level generally were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, rifampin, and ceftazidime (especially mesophiles), as well as colistin and tetracycline (especially psychrotrophes). However, they generally were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, and kanamycin regardless of species identity. Worryingly, in the present study, we found multidrug resistance (MDR) to up to 13 antibiotics, which was related to intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, a link between various antimicrobial resistance genes was shown for beta-lactams and tetracycline, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides. The distribution and resistome-based analysis of MDR pseudomonads in different slaughterhouse zones indicated that the main sources of the identical or related pseudomonad strains were the animals (feet and wool) and the slaughterhouse environment, being disseminated from the beginning, or entrance environment, to the environment of the finished meat products. Those facts must be taken into consideration to avoid cross-contamination with the subsequent flow of mobile resistance determinants throughout all slaughterhouse zones and then to humans and the environment by the application of adequate practices of hygiene and disinfection measures, including those for animal wool and feet and also the entrance environment.

  14. The bldD Gene of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2): a Regulatory Gene Involved in Morphogenesis and Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Elliot, Marie; Damji, Farzana; Passantino, Rosa; Chater, Keith; Leskiw, Brenda

    1998-01-01

    The bld mutants of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) are blocked at the earliest stage of sporulation, the formation of aerial hyphae, and are pleiotropically defective in antibiotic production. Using a phage library of wild-type S. coelicolor DNA, we isolated a recombinant phage which restored both sporulation and antibiotic production to strains carrying the single known bldD mutation. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a 1.3-kb complementing subclone identified an open reading frame, designated bldD, encoding a translation product of 167 amino acid residues. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the bldD-containing fragment amplified from the chromosome of a bldD mutant strain revealed a point mutation changing a tyrosine residue at amino acid position 62 to a cysteine. Although a comparison of the BldD sequence to known proteins in the databases failed to show any strong similarities, analysis of the BldD sequence for secondary structural elements did reveal a putative helix-turn-helix, DNA recognition element near the C terminus of the protein. A comparison of bldD transcript levels in the bldD+ and bldD mutant strains using both Northern blot analysis and S1 nuclease protection studies showed vast overexpression of bldD transcripts in the mutant, suggesting that BldD negatively regulates its own synthesis. High-resolution S1 nuclease mapping identified the transcription start point as a G residue 63 nucleotides upstream from the bldD start codon and 7 nucleotides downstream from −10 and −35 sequences resembling E. coli-like streptomycete promoters. PMID:9515925

  15. Highly Efficient Release of Glycopeptides from Hydrazide Beads by Hydroxylamine Assisted PNGase F Deglycosylation for N-Glycoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Junfeng; Wan, Hao; Yao, Yating; Li, Jinan; Cheng, Kai; Mao, Jiawei; Chen, Jin; Wang, Yan; Qin, Hongqiang; Zhang, Weibing; Ye, Mingliang; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-10-20

    Selective enrichment of glycopeptides from complex sample followed by cleavage of N-glycans by PNGase F to expose an easily detectable mark on the former glycosylation sites has become the popular protocol for comprehensive glycoproteome analysis. On account of the high enrichment specificity, hydrazide chemistry based solid-phase extraction of N-linked glycopeptides technique has sparked numerous interests. However, the enzymatic release of glycopeptides captured by hydrazide beads through direct incubation of the beads with PNGase F is not efficient due to the inherent steric hindrance effect. In this study, we developed a hydroxylamine assisted PNGase F deglycosylation (HAPD) method using the hydroxylamine to release glycopeptides captured on the hydrazide beads through the cleavage of hydrazone bonds by transamination followed with the PNGase F deglycosylation of the released glycopeptides in the free solution. Because of the homogeneous condition for the deglycosylation, the recovery of deglycosylated peptides (deglycopeptides) was improved significantly. It was found that 27% more N-glycosylation sites were identified by the HAPD strategy compared with the conventional method. Moreover, the ratio of identified N-terminal glycosylated peptides was improved over 5-fold.

  16. Fate and transport of veterinary antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance gene from fields receiving poultry manure during storm events

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobials are used in production agriculture to treat disease and promote animal growth, but the presence of antibiotics in the environment raises concern about widespread antibiotic resistance. This study documents the occurrence and transport of tylosin, tetracycline, enterococci resistant to...

  17. The Double Life of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Mee-Ngan F.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a persistent health care problem worldwide. Evidence for the negative consequences of subtherapeutic feeding in livestock production has been mounting while the antibiotic pipeline is drying up. In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in our perception of antibiotics. Apart from its roles in self-defense, antibiotics also serve as inter-microbial signaling molecules, regulators of gene expression, microbial food sources, and as mediators of host immune response. “The time may come when penicillin can be bought by anyone in the shops. Then there is the danger that the ignorant man may easily under-dose himself and by exposing his microbes to nonlethal quantities of the drug make them resistant.”~Alexander Fleming PMID:24003650

  18. Antibiotic Resistance Determinants in a Pseudomonas putida Strain Isolated from a Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Duque, Estrella; Fernández, Matilde; Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Roca, Amalia; Porcel, Mario; de la Torre, Jesús; Segura, Ana; Plesiat, Patrick; Jeannot, Katy; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Environmental microbes harbor an enormous pool of antibiotic and biocide resistance genes that can impact the resistance profiles of animal and human pathogens via horizontal gene transfer. Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have been seldom isolated from humans. We have established a collection of P. putida strains isolated from in-patients in different hospitals in France. One of the isolated strains (HB3267) kills insects and is resistant to the majority of the antibiotics used in laboratories and hospitals, including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, cationic peptides, chromoprotein enediyne antibiotics, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones and quinolones, glycopeptide antibiotics, macrolides, polyketides and sulfonamides. Similar to other P. putida clinical isolates the strain was sensitive to amikacin. To shed light on the broad pattern of antibiotic resistance, which is rarely found in clinical isolates of this species, the genome of this strain was sequenced and analysed. The study revealed that the determinants of multiple resistance are both chromosomally-borne as well as located on the pPC9 plasmid. Further analysis indicated that pPC9 has recruited antibiotic and biocide resistance genes from environmental microorganisms as well as from opportunistic and true human pathogens. The pPC9 plasmid is not self-transmissible, but can be mobilized by other bacterial plasmids making it capable of spreading antibiotic resistant determinants to new hosts. PMID:24465371

  19. Penetration barrier contributes to bacterial biofilm-associated resistance against only select antibiotics, and exhibits genus-, strain- and antibiotic-specific differences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rachna; Sahore, Simmi; Kaur, Preetinder; Rani, Alka; Ray, Pallab

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial biofilms are implicated in a wide range of implant-based and chronic infections. These infections are often associated with adverse therapeutic outcomes, owing to the decreased antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms compared with their planktonic counterparts. This altered biofilm susceptibility has been attributed to multiple factors, including a reduced antibiotic penetration. Although several studies have addressed the role of penetration barrier in biofilm-associated drug resistance, it remains inconclusive. This study was done to elucidate antibiotic penetration through biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, using an agar disk diffusion assay. Penetration capacity of six antimicrobial drugs from different classes (β-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, phenicols, fluoroquinolones and glycopeptides) through biofilms formed by standard strains and clinical isolates from catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) was elucidated by measuring their growth-inhibition zones in lawn cultures on Mueller-Hinton agar, following diffusion of an antibiotic from an overlying disk through their biofilm to the agar medium. Penetration of only select antimicrobials (vancomycin and chloramphenicol) was hindered through biofilms. There was considerable variation in biofilm-permeating capacity depending upon the genus, strain/CRBSI isolate and antibiotic tested. Furthermore, antibiotics failed to kill the biofilm cells independent of penetration, indicating that other factors contributed substantially to biofilm resistance.

  20. Penetration barrier contributes to bacterial biofilm-associated resistance against only select antibiotics, and exhibits genus-, strain- and antibiotic-specific differences.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rachna; Sahore, Simmi; Kaur, Preetinder; Rani, Alka; Ray, Pallab

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial biofilms are implicated in a wide range of implant-based and chronic infections. These infections are often associated with adverse therapeutic outcomes, owing to the decreased antibiotic susceptibility of biofilms compared with their planktonic counterparts. This altered biofilm susceptibility has been attributed to multiple factors, including a reduced antibiotic penetration. Although several studies have addressed the role of penetration barrier in biofilm-associated drug resistance, it remains inconclusive. This study was done to elucidate antibiotic penetration through biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, using an agar disk diffusion assay. Penetration capacity of six antimicrobial drugs from different classes (β-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, phenicols, fluoroquinolones and glycopeptides) through biofilms formed by standard strains and clinical isolates from catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) was elucidated by measuring their growth-inhibition zones in lawn cultures on Mueller-Hinton agar, following diffusion of an antibiotic from an overlying disk through their biofilm to the agar medium. Penetration of only select antimicrobials (vancomycin and chloramphenicol) was hindered through biofilms. There was considerable variation in biofilm-permeating capacity depending upon the genus, strain/CRBSI isolate and antibiotic tested. Furthermore, antibiotics failed to kill the biofilm cells independent of penetration, indicating that other factors contributed substantially to biofilm resistance. PMID:27402781

  1. Enhanced production of the nonribosomal peptide antibiotic valinomycin in Escherichia coli through small-scale high cell density fed-batch cultivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Jaitzig, Jennifer; Hillig, Friederike; Süssmuth, Roderich; Neubauer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs), a large family of natural products, possess numerous pharmaceutically significant bioactivities. However, many native microbial producers of NRPs are not cultivable or have low production yields making mass production infeasible. The recombinant production of natural products in a surrogate host has emerged as a strategy to overcome these limitations. De novo recombinant production of the NRP antibiotic valinomycin in an engineered Escherichia coli host strain was established with the necessary biosynthetic pathway constituents from Streptomyces tsusimaensis. In the present study, the initially modest valinomycin yields could be significantly increased from 0.3 up to 2.4 mg L⁻¹ by switching from a batch to an enzyme-based fed-batch mode in shake flasks. A subsequent design of experiment-driven optimization of parallel fed-batch cultivations in 24-well plates with online monitoring of dissolved oxygen and pH led to valinomycin yields up to 6.4 mg L⁻¹. Finally, repeated glucose polymer feeding to enzyme-based high cell density cultivations in shake flasks resulted in cell densities of OD₆₀₀>50 and a valinomycin titer of appr. 10 mg L⁻¹. This represents a 33-fold improvement compared to the initial batch cultivations and is the highest concentration of a nonribosomal peptide which has been produced in E. coli without feeding of specific precursors so far to our knowledge. Also, such a small-scale optimization under fed-batch conditions may be generally applicable for the development and scale-up of natural product production processes in E. coli.

  2. Study of Antibiotic Resistance Pattern in Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus with Special Reference to Newer Antibiotic

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Dardi Charan; Chate, Sadhana Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The worldwide epidemic of antibiotic resistance is in danger of ending the golden age of antibiotic therapy. Resistance impacts on all areas of medicine, and is making successful empirical therapy much more difficult to achieve. Staphylococcus aureus demonstrates a unique ability to quickly respond to each new antibiotic with the development of a resistance mechanism, starting with penicillin, until the most recent, linezolid and daptomycin. Methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has become endemic today in hospitals worldwide. Resistance to the newer antimicrobial-agents — linezolid, vancomycin, teicoplanin, and daptomycin are been reported and also the fear of pandrug-resistance. This study was carried out to know the antimicrobial resistant pattern of MRSA to newer antibiotic, to know any isolates are extensively-drug resistant (XDR)/pandrug resistant (PDR), inducible macrolide-lincosamide streptogramin B (iMLSB), and mupirocin resistance. Thirty-six MRSA isolates resistant to the routinely tested antibiotic were further tested for list of antibiotic by a group of international experts. Isolates were tested for iMLSB and mupirocin resistance by the disk diffusion method. Of 385 MRSA, 36 (9.35%) isolates of MRSA were resistant to the routinely tested antibiotic. Among these 36 MRSA isolates, none of our isolates were XDR/PDR or showed resistant to anti-MRSA cephalosporins (ceftaroline), phosphonic acids, glycopeptides, glycylcyclines, and fucidanes. Lower resistance was seen in oxazolidinones (2.78%), streptogramins (5.56%), lipopeptide (5.56%). Thirty-four (94.44%) isolates showed constitutive MLSB (cMLSB) resistance and two (5.56%) iMLSB phenotypes. High- and low-level mupirocin resistance were seen in 13 (36.11%) and six (16.67%), respectively. In our study, none of our isolates were XDR or PDR. No resistance was observed to ceftaroline, telavancin, teicoplanin, and vancomycin; but the presence of linezolid resistance (1, 2.28%) and daptomycin resistance (2

  3. Fluorographic detection of tritiated glycopeptides and oligosaccharides separated on polyacrylamide gels: analysis of glycans from Dictyostelium discoideum glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Prem Das, O.; Henderson, E.J.

    1986-11-01

    Previous workers have shown that oligosaccharides and glycopeptides can be separated by electrophoresis in buffers containing borate ions. However, normal fluorography of tritium-labeled structures cannot be performed because the glycans are soluble and can diffuse during equilibration with scintillants. This problem has been circumvented by equilibration of the gel with 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) prior to electrophoresis. The presence of PPO in the gel during electrophoresis does not alter mobility of the glycopeptides and oligosaccharides. After electrophoresis, the gel is simply dried and fluorography performed. This allows sensitive and precise comparisons of labeled samples in parallel lanes of a slab gel and, since mobilities are highly reproducible, between different gels. The procedure is preparative in that after fluorography the gel bands can be quantitatively eluted for further study, without any apparent modification by the procedure. In this report, the procedure is illustrated by fractionation of both neutral and anionic glycopeptides produced by the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

  4. The Art of Destruction: Optimizing Collision Energies in Quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-TOF) Instruments for Glycopeptide-Based Glycoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Hinneburg, Hannes; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Schweiger-Hufnagel, Ulrike; Pengelley, Stuart; Jabs, Wolfgang; Seeberger, Peter H; Silva, Daniel Varón; Wuhrer, Manfred; Kolarich, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    In-depth site-specific investigations of protein glycosylation are the basis for understanding the biological function of glycoproteins. Mass spectrometry-based N- and O-glycopeptide analyses enable determination of the glycosylation site, site occupancy, as well as glycan varieties present on a particular site. However, the depth of information is highly dependent on the applied analytical tools, including glycopeptide fragmentation regimes and automated data analysis. Here, we used a small set of synthetic disialylated, biantennary N-glycopeptides to systematically tune Q-TOF instrument parameters towards optimal energy stepping collision induced dissociation (CID) of glycopeptides. A linear dependency of m/z-ratio and optimal fragmentation energy was found, showing that with increasing m/z-ratio, more energy is required for glycopeptide fragmentation. Based on these optimized fragmentation parameters, a method combining lower- and higher-energy CID was developed, allowing the online acquisition of glycan and peptide-specific fragments within a single tandem MS experiment. We validated this method analyzing a set of human immunoglobulins (IgA1+2, sIgA, IgG1+2, IgE, IgD, IgM) as well as bovine fetuin. These optimized fragmentation parameters also enabled software-assisted glycopeptide assignment of both N- and O-glycopeptides including information about the most abundant glycan compositions, peptide sequence and putative structures. Twenty-six out of 30 N-glycopeptides and four out of five O-glycopeptides carrying >110 different glycoforms could be identified by this optimized LC-ESI tandem MS method with minimal user input. The Q-TOF based glycopeptide analysis platform presented here opens the way to a range of different applications in glycoproteomics research as well as biopharmaceutical development and quality control.

  5. The Art of Destruction: Optimizing Collision Energies in Quadrupole-Time of Flight (Q-TOF) Instruments for Glycopeptide-Based Glycoproteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinneburg, Hannes; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Schweiger-Hufnagel, Ulrike; Pengelley, Stuart; Jabs, Wolfgang; Seeberger, Peter H.; Silva, Daniel Varón; Wuhrer, Manfred; Kolarich, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    In-depth site-specific investigations of protein glycosylation are the basis for understanding the biological function of glycoproteins. Mass spectrometry-based N- and O-glycopeptide analyses enable determination of the glycosylation site, site occupancy, as well as glycan varieties present on a particular site. However, the depth of information is highly dependent on the applied analytical tools, including glycopeptide fragmentation regimes and automated data analysis. Here, we used a small set of synthetic disialylated, biantennary N-glycopeptides to systematically tune Q-TOF instrument parameters towards optimal energy stepping collision induced dissociation (CID) of glycopeptides. A linear dependency of m/z-ratio and optimal fragmentation energy was found, showing that with increasing m/z-ratio, more energy is required for glycopeptide fragmentation. Based on these optimized fragmentation parameters, a method combining lower- and higher-energy CID was developed, allowing the online acquisition of glycan and peptide-specific fragments within a single tandem MS experiment. We validated this method analyzing a set of human immunoglobulins (IgA1+2, sIgA, IgG1+2, IgE, IgD, IgM) as well as bovine fetuin. These optimized fragmentation parameters also enabled software-assisted glycopeptide assignment of both N- and O-glycopeptides including information about the most abundant glycan compositions, peptide sequence and putative structures. Twenty-six out of 30 N-glycopeptides and four out of five O-glycopeptides carrying >110 different glycoforms could be identified by this optimized LC-ESI tandem MS method with minimal user input. The Q-TOF based glycopeptide analysis platform presented here opens the way to a range of different applications in glycoproteomics research as well as biopharmaceutical development and quality control.

  6. 3-Aminoquinoline/p-coumaric acid as a MALDI matrix for glycopeptides, carbohydrates, and phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Yuko; Funakoshi, Natsumi; Takeyama, Kohei; Hioki, Yusaku; Nishikaze, Takashi; Kaneshiro, Kaoru; Kawabata, Shin-Ichirou; Iwamoto, Shinichi; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-02-18

    Glycosylation and phosphorylation are important post-translational modifications in biological processes and biomarker research. The difficulty in analyzing these modifications is mainly their low abundance and dissociation of labile regions such as sialic acids or phosphate groups. One solution in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry is to improve matrices for glycopeptides, carbohydrates, and phosphopeptides by increasing the sensitivity and suppressing dissociation of the labile regions. Recently, a liquid matrix 3-aminoquinoline (3-AQ)/α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) (3-AQ/CHCA), introduced by Kolli et al. in 1996, has been reported to increase sensitivity for carbohydrates or phosphopeptides, but it has not been systematically evaluated for glycopeptides. In addition, 3-AQ/CHCA enhances the dissociation of labile regions. In contrast, a liquid matrix 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidium (TMG, G) salt of p-coumaric acid (CA) (G3CA) was reported to suppress dissociation of sulfate groups or sialic acids of carbohydrates. Here we introduce a liquid matrix 3-AQ/CA for glycopeptides, carbohydrates, and phosphopeptides. All of the analytes were detected as [M + H](+) or [M - H](-) with higher or comparable sensitivity using 3-AQ/CA compared with 3-AQ/CHCA or 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB). The sensitivity was increased 1- to 1000-fold using 3-AQ/CA. The dissociation of labile regions such as sialic acids or phosphate groups and the fragmentation of neutral carbohydrates were suppressed more using 3-AQ/CA than using 3-AQ/CHCA or 2,5-DHB. 3-AQ/CA was thus determined to be an effective MALDI matrix for high sensitivity and the suppression of dissociation of labile regions in glycosylation and phosphorylation analyses.

  7. Antibiotics and production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro. A comparison of cefodizime and ceftriaxone.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Y; Hosni, R; Dagrosa, E E; Gormand, F; Guibert, B; Chabannes, B; Lagarde, M; Perrin-Fayolle, M

    1994-04-01

    Cultured human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) produce both granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 8 (IL-8). The influence of cefodizime (CAS 69739-16-8), a new broad spectrum cephalosporin with immunostimulatory effects, and ceftriaxone on the production of GM-CSF and IL-8 in HBEC primary cultures was investigated. HBEC were isolated from biopsy specimens obtained during fibreoptic bronchoscopy in 12 patients (most frequent diagnosis: chronic bronchitis). Confluent monolayers of HBEC cultured on collagen were incubated for 24 h in a medium without study drugs (spontaneous production) or containing cefodizime or ceftriaxone at the clinically relevant concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 mg/l, with or without tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha, 100 U/ml). GM-CSF and IL-8 were measured in supernatant by ELISA technique. TNF alpha alone led to a significant (p < 0.005) increase in both GM-CSF and IL-8 production. Cefodizime induced a significant (p < 0.05), dose-dependent increase in GM-CSF release. No additive effect of cefodizime with TNF alpha was observed. Cefodizime did not affect IL-8 production and ceftriaxone had no influence on cytokine production. This is the first report of a stimulatory effect of a beta-lactam antibiotic on cytokine production by epithelial cells. GM-CSF production by epithelial cells is an important immunological step for neutrophil and monocyte recruitment and cell priming during lung defence. Previous studies with cefodizime in immunodepressed subjects have shown activation of phagocytosis and phagocytosis-related functions in non-lung phagocytes. An indirect mechanism of action, similar to that indicated by our results, may have been responsible for these stimulatory effects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. A fully synthetic glycopeptide antitumor vaccine based on multiple antigen presentation on a hyperbranched polymer.

    PubMed

    Glaffig, Markus; Palitzsch, Björn; Hartmann, Sebastian; Schüll, Christoph; Nuhn, Lutz; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Schmitt, Edgar; Frey, Holger; Kunz, Horst

    2014-04-01

    For antitumor vaccines both the selected tumor-associated antigen, as well as the mode of its presentation, affect the immune response. According to the principle of multiple antigen presentation, a tumor-associated MUC1 glycopeptide combined with the immunostimulating T-cell epitope P2 from tetanus toxoid was coupled to a multi-functionalized hyperbranched polyglycerol by "click chemistry". This globular polymeric carrier has a flexible dendrimer-like structure, which allows optimal antigen presentation to the immune system. The resulting fully synthetic vaccine induced strong immune responses in mice and IgG antibodies recognizing human breast-cancer cells.

  9. The non-antibiotic macrolide EM900 inhibits rhinovirus infection and cytokine production in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lusamba Kalonji, Nadine; Nomura, Kazuhiro; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Ota, Chiharu; Kubo, Hiroshi; Sato, Takeya; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Ōmura, Satoshi; Yamaya, Mutsuo

    2015-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of macrolides may be associated with a reduced frequency of exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, because the long-term use of antibiotics may promote the growth of drug-resistant bacteria, the development of a treatment to prevent COPD exacerbation with macrolides that do not exert anti-bacterial effects is necessary. Additionally, the inhibitory effects of nonantibiotic macrolides on the replication of rhinovirus (RV), which is the major cause of COPD exacerbation, have not been demonstrated. Primary cultures of human tracheal epithelial cells and nasal epithelial cells were pretreated with the nonantibiotic macrolide EM900 for 72 h prior to infection with a major group RV type 14 rhinovirus (RV14) and were further treated with EM900 after infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection reduced RV14 titers in the supernatants and viral RNA within the cells. Moreover, cytokine levels, including interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, were reduced in the supernatants following RV14 infection. Treatment with EM900 before and after infection also reduced the mRNA and protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), which is the receptor for RV14, after infection and reduced the activation of the nuclear factor kappa-B protein p50 in nuclear extracts after infection. Pretreatment with EM900 reduced the number and fluorescence intensity of the acidic endosomes through which RV RNA enters the cytoplasm. Thus, pretreatment with EM900 may inhibit RV infection by reducing the ICAM-1 levels and acidic endosomes and thus modulate the airway inflammation associated with RV infections. PMID:26462747

  10. In vivo pharmacodynamic activity of the glycopeptide dalbavancin.

    PubMed

    Andes, David; Craig, William A

    2007-05-01

    Dalbavancin is a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic with broad-spectrum activity against gram-positive cocci and a markedly prolonged serum elimination half-life. We used the neutropenic murine thigh and lung infection models to characterize the pharmacodynamics of dalbavancin. Single-dose pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated linear kinetics and a prolonged elimination half-life which ranged from 7.6 to 13.1 h over the dose range of 2.5 to 80 mg/kg of body weight. The level of protein binding in mouse serum was 98.4%. The time course of in vivo activity of dalbavancin over the same dose range was examined in neutropenic ICR Swiss mice infected with a strain of either Streptococcus pneumoniae or Staphylococcus aureus by using the thigh infection model. The burden of organisms for S. pneumoniae was markedly reduced over the initial 24 h of study, and organism regrowth was suppressed in a dose-dependent fashion for up to the entire 96 h of study following dalbavancin doses of 2.5 mg/kg or greater. Dalbavancin doses of 20 mg/kg or greater resulted in less killing of S. aureus but were still followed by a prolonged suppression of regrowth. Multiple-dosing-regimen studies with the same organisms were used to determined which of the pharmacodynamic indices (maximum concentration in serum [C(max)]/MIC, area under the concentration-versus-time curve [AUC]/MIC, or the duration of time that levels in serum exceed the MIC) best correlated with treatment efficacy. These studies used a dose range of 3.8 to 480 mg/kg/6 days fractionated into 2, 4, 6, or 12 doses over the 144-h dosing period. Nonlinear regression analysis was used to examine the data fit with each pharmacodynamic index. Dalbavancin administration by the use of large, widely spaced doses was the most efficacious for both organisms. Both the 24-h AUC/MIC and the C(max)/MIC parameters correlated well with the in vivo efficacy of treatment against S. pneumoniae and S. aureus (for 24-h AUC/MIC, R(2) = 78 and 77%, respectively

  11. 21 CFR 333.110 - First aid antibiotic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false First aid antibiotic active ingredients. 333.110 Section 333.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.110 First aid antibiotic active ingredients. The product consists of any...

  12. 21 CFR 333.110 - First aid antibiotic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false First aid antibiotic active ingredients. 333.110 Section 333.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.110 First aid antibiotic active ingredients. The product consists of any...

  13. 21 CFR 333.110 - First aid antibiotic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false First aid antibiotic active ingredients. 333.110 Section 333.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.110 First aid antibiotic active ingredients. The product consists of any...

  14. 21 CFR 333.110 - First aid antibiotic active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false First aid antibiotic active ingredients. 333.110 Section 333.110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.110 First aid antibiotic active ingredients. The product consists of any...

  15. Diversity of Natural Product Biosynthetic Genes in the Microbiome of the Deep Sea Sponges Inflatella pellicula, Poecillastra compressa, and Stelletta normani

    PubMed Central

    Borchert, Erik; Jackson, Stephen A.; O’Gara, Fergal; Dobson, Alan D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Three different deep sea sponge species, Inflatella pellicula, Poecillastra compressa, and Stelletta normani comprising seven individual samples, retrieved from depths of 760–2900 m below sea level, were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing for their secondary metabolomic potential targeting adenylation domain and ketosynthase domain sequences. The data obtained suggest a diverse microbial origin of nonribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthase fragments that in part correlates with their respective microbial community structures that were previously described and reveals an untapped source of potential novelty. The sequences, especially the ketosynthase fragments, display extensive clade formations which are clearly distinct from sequences hosted in public databases, therefore highlighting the potential of the microbiome of these deep sea sponges to produce potentially novel small-molecule chemistry. Furthermore, sequence similarities to gene clusters known to be involved in the production of many classes of antibiotics and toxins including lipopeptides, glycopeptides, macrolides, and hepatotoxins were also identified. PMID:27446062

  16. Diversity of Natural Product Biosynthetic Genes in the Microbiome of the Deep Sea Sponges Inflatella pellicula, Poecillastra compressa, and Stelletta normani.

    PubMed

    Borchert, Erik; Jackson, Stephen A; O'Gara, Fergal; Dobson, Alan D W

    2016-01-01

    Three different deep sea sponge species, Inflatella pellicula, Poecillastra compressa, and Stelletta normani comprising seven individual samples, retrieved from depths of 760-2900 m below sea level, were investigated using 454 pyrosequencing for their secondary metabolomic potential targeting adenylation domain and ketosynthase domain sequences. The data obtained suggest a diverse microbial origin of nonribosomal peptide synthetases and polyketide synthase fragments that in part correlates with their respective microbial community structures that were previously described and reveals an untapped source of potential novelty. The sequences, especially the ketosynthase fragments, display extensive clade formations which are clearly distinct from sequences hosted in public databases, therefore highlighting the potential of the microbiome of these deep sea sponges to produce potentially novel small-molecule chemistry. Furthermore, sequence similarities to gene clusters known to be involved in the production of many classes of antibiotics and toxins including lipopeptides, glycopeptides, macrolides, and hepatotoxins were also identified. PMID:27446062

  17. Antibiotic Therapy for Infective Endocarditis in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Chiodo, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Infective endocarditis is relatively uncommon in childhood, but its epidemiology has changed in the past three to four decades and its incidence has been increasing in recent years. With the improved survival rates of children with congenital heart diseases and the overall decreased frequency of rheumatic valvular heart disease in developed countries, congenital cardiac abnormalities now represent the predominant underlying condition for infective endocarditis in children over the age of two years in Western Europe and Northern America. Moreover, the complex management of neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit patients has increased the risk of catheter-related endocarditis. More specifically, the surgical correction of congenital heart alterations is associated with the risk of postoperative infections. Endocarditis in children may be difficult to diagnosis and manage. Emerging resistant bacteria, such as methicillin- or vancomycin-resistant staphylococci and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, are becoming a new challenge for conventional antibiotic therapy. Newer antimicrobial compounds recently introduced in clinical practice, such as streptogramins and oxazolidinones, may be effective alternatives in children with endocarditis sustained by Gram-positive cocci resistant to glycopeptides. Home intravenous therapy has become an acceptable approach for stable patients who are at low risk for embolic complications. However, further clinical studies are needed in order to assess efficacy and safety of these antimicrobial agents in children. This review should help outline the most appropriate antimicrobial treatments for infective endocarditis in children. PMID:23118646

  18. The role of absC, a novel regulatory gene for secondary metabolism, in zinc-dependent antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Hesketh, Andy; Kock, Holger; Mootien, Saraspadee; Bibb, Mervyn

    2009-12-01

    The availability of zinc was shown to have a marked influence on the biosynthesis of actinorhodin in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Production of actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin was abolished when a novel pleiotropic regulatory gene, absC, was deleted, but only when zinc concentrations were low. AbsC was shown to control expression of the gene cluster encoding production of coelibactin, an uncharacterized non-ribosomally synthesized peptide with predicted siderophore-like activity, and the observed defect in antibiotic production was found to result from elevated expression of this gene cluster. Promoter regions in the coelibactin cluster contain predicted binding motifs for the zinc-responsive regulator Zur, and dual regulation of coelibactin expression by zur and absC was demonstrated using strains engineered to contain deletions in either or both of these genes. An AbsC binding site was identified in a divergent promoter region within the coelibactin biosynthetic gene cluster, adjacent to a putative Zur binding site. Repression of the coelibactin gene cluster by both AbsC and Zur appears to be required to maintain appropriate intracellular levels of zinc in S. coelicolor.

  19. Hospital Acquired Pneumonia Due to Achromobacter spp. in a Geriatric Ward in China: Clinical Characteristic, Genome Variability, Biofilm Production, Antibiotic Resistance and Integron in Isolated Strains

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Pan, Fei; Guo, Jun; Yan, Weifeng; Jin, Yi; Liu, Changting; Qin, Long; Fang, Xiangqun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) due to Achromobacter has become a substantial concern in recent years. However, HAP due to Achromobacter in the elderly is rare. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 15 elderly patients with HAP due to Achromobacter spp., in which the sequence types (STs), integrons, biofilm production and antibiotic resistance of the Achromobacter spp. were examined. Results: The mean age of the 15 elderly patients was 88.8 ± 5.4 years. All patients had at least three underlying diseases and catheters. Clinical outcomes improved in 10 of the 15 patients after antibiotic and/or mechanical ventilation treatment, but three patients had chronic infections lasting more than 1 year. The mortality rate was 33.3% (5/15). All strains were resistant to aminoglycosides, aztreonam, nitrofurantoin, and third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins (except ceftazidime and cefoperazone). Six new STs were detected. The most frequent ST was ST306. ST5 was identified in two separate buildings of the hospital. ST313 showed higher MIC in cephalosporins, quinolones and carbapenems, which should be more closely considered in clinical practice. All strains produced biofilm and had integron I and blaOXA-114-like. The main type was blaOXA-114q. The variable region of integron I was different among strains, and the resistance gene of the aminoglycosides was most commonly inserted in integron I. Additionally, blaPSE-1 was first reported in this isolate. Conclusion: Achromobacter spp. infection often occurs in severely ill elders with underlying diseases. The variable region of integrons differs, suggesting that Achromobacter spp. is a reservoir of various resistance genes. PMID:27242678

  20. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  1. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria.

    PubMed

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S; Nett, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  2. Tailoring enzyme-rich environmental DNA clones: a source of enzymes for generating libraries of unnatural natural products.

    PubMed

    Banik, Jacob J; Craig, Jeffrey W; Calle, Paula Y; Brady, Sean F

    2010-11-10

    A detailed bioinformatics analysis of six glycopeptide biosynthetic gene clusters isolated from soil environmental DNA (eDNA) megalibraries indicates that a subset of these gene clusters contains collections of tailoring enzymes that are predicted to result in the production of new glycopeptide congeners. In particular, sulfotransferases appear in eDNA-derived gene clusters at a much higher frequency than would be predicted from the characterization of glycopeptides from cultured Actinomycetes . Enzymes found on tailoring-enzyme-rich eDNA clones associated with these six gene clusters were used to produce a series of new sulfated glycopeptide derivatives in both in vitro and in vivo derivatization studies. The derivatization of known natural products with eDNA-derived tailoring enzymes is likely to be a broadly applicable strategy for generating libraries of new natural product variants.

  3. Glycopeptide-Based Antibody Detection in Multiple Sclerosis by Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Real-Fernández, Feliciana; Passalacqua, Irene; Peroni, Elisa; Chelli, Mario; Lolli, Francesco; Papini, Anna Maria; Rovero, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) the gold standard for the diagnosis and prognosis is, up to now, the use of magnetic resonance imaging markers. No alternative simpler assays proven of use, except for cerebrospinal fluid analysis, have been provided in MS diagnosis. Therefore, there is a need to develop non-invasive, sensitive, simple new techniques for the clinical routine. Herein we present the evaluation of the feasibility of a glycopeptide-based biosensor to detect MS specific antibodies in sera using the surface plasmon resonance technology. The previously described glycopeptide antigen CSF114(Glc) has been immobilized on a gold sensor chip and the method has been optimized for real-time specific autoantibody detection directly in sera. A population of 60 healthy blood donors and 61 multiple sclerosis patients has been screened. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC)-based analysis has established the optimal diagnostic cut-off value for the method obtaining a sensitivity of 36% and a specificity of 95%. Sample sera have been also screened with a previously validated ELISA. PMID:22778603

  4. Chemical Synthesis of a Glycopeptide Derived from Skp1 for Probing Protein Specific Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Chinoy, Zoeisha S.; Schafer, Christopher M.; West, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Skp1 is a cytoplasmic and nuclear protein, best known as an adaptor of the SCF family of E3-ubiquitin ligases that label proteins for their degradation. Skp1 in Dictyostelium is posttranslationally modified on a specific hydroxyproline (Hyp) residue by a pentasaccharide, which consists of a Fucα1,2-Galβ-1,3-GlcNAcα core, decorated with two α-linked Gal residues. A glycopeptide derived form Skp1 was prepared to characterize the α-galactosyltransferase (AgtA) that mediates the addition of the α-Gal moieties, and to develop antibodies suitable for tracking the trisaccharide isoform of Skp1 in cells. A strategy was developed for the synthesis of the core trisaccharide-Hyp based on the use of 2-naphthylmethyl (Nap) ethers as permanent protecting groups to allow late stage installation of the Hyp moiety. Tuning of glycosyl donor and acceptor reactivities was critical for achieving high yields and anomeric selectivities of glycosylations. The trisaccharide-Hyp moiety was employed for the preparation of the glycopeptide using microwave-assisted solid phase peptide synthesis. Enzyme kinetic studies revealed that trisaccharide-Hyp and trisaccharide-peptide are poorly recognized by AgtA, indicating the importance of context provided by the native Skp1 protein for engagement with the active site. The trisaccharide-peptide was a potent immunogen capable of generating a rabbit antiserum that was highly selective toward the trisaccharide isoform of full-length Skp1. PMID:26179871

  5. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; Ling, Chang-Chun; Klassen, John S.; Noren, Christopher J.; Mahal, Lara K.; Woods, Robert J.; Coates, Leighton; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 out of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.

  6. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    DOE PAGES

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; et al

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 outmore » of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.« less

  7. Conformational and dynamic properties of a 14 residue antifreeze glycopeptide from Antarctic cod.

    PubMed Central

    Lane, A. N.; Hays, L. M.; Feeney, R. E.; Crowe, L. M.; Crowe, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of a 14-residue antifreeze glycopeptide from Antarctic cod (Tetramatomnus borchgrevinki) containing two proline residues have been assigned. 13C NMR relaxation experiments indicate motional anisotropy of the peptide, with a tumbling time in water at 5 degrees C of 3-4 ns. The relaxation data and lack of long-range NOEs are consistent with a linear peptide undergoing significant segmental motion. However, extreme values of some coupling constants and strong sequential NOEs indicate regions of local order, which are most evident at the two ATPA subsequences. Similar spectroscopic properties were observed in the 16-residue analogue containing an Arg-Ala dipeptide added to the C-terminus. Molecular modeling also showed no evidence of long-range order, but the two ATPA subsequences were relatively well determined by the experimental data. These motifs were quite distinct from helical structures or beta turns commonly found in proteins, but rather resemble sections of an extended polyproline helix. Thus, the NMR data provide a description of the local order, which is of relevance to the mechanism of action of the antifreeze activity of the antifreeze glycopeptides as well as their ability to protect cells during hypothermic storage. PMID:9684888

  8. The 2.7 Å resolution structure of the glycopeptide sulfotransferase Teg14

    SciTech Connect

    Bick, Matthew J.; Banik, Jacob J.; Darst, Seth A.; Brady, Sean F.

    2010-12-01

    The 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of Teg14, a glycopeptide sulfotransferase cloned from an uncultured soil bacterium, is described. The relationship of Teg14 to other sulfotransferases is discussed. The TEG gene cluster was recently isolated from an environmental DNA library and is predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a polysulfated glycopeptide congener. Three closely related sulfotransferases found in the TEG gene cluster (Teg12, Teg13 and Teg14) have been shown to sulfate the teicoplanin aglycone at three unique sites. Crystal structures of the first sulfotransferase from the TEG cluster, Teg12, in complex with the teicoplanin aglycone and its desulfated cosubstrate PAP have recently been reported [Bick et al. (2010 ▶), Biochemistry, 49, 4159–4168]. Here, the 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the apo form of Teg14 is reported. Teg14 sulfates the hydroxyphenylglycine at position 4 in the teicoplanin aglycone. The Teg14 structure is discussed and is compared with those of other bacterial 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate-dependent sulfotransferases facilitating crystallographic experiments, especially in the field of microcrystallography.

  9. Hydrogen-bond interaction assisted branched copolymer HILIC material for separation and N-glycopeptides enrichment.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenya; Liu, Jianxi; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Yu; Weng, Yejing; Li, Senwu; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-09-01

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) has attracted increasing attention in recent years due to its efficient application in the separation of polar compounds and the enrichment of glycopeptides. However, HILIC materials are still of weak hydrophilicity and thereby present weak retention and selectivity. In this work, branched copolymer modified hydrophilic material Sil@Poly(THMA-co-MBAAm), with high hydrophilicity and unique "claw-like" polyhydric groups, were prepared by "grafting from" thiol-ene click reaction. Due to the abundant functional groups provided by branched copolymer, the material showed excellent retention for nucleosides, necleobases, acidic compounds, sugars and peptides. Furthermore, Sil@Poly(THMA-co-MBAAm) was also applied for the N-glycosylation sites profiling towards the digests of the mouse brain, and 1997N-glycosylated peptides were identified, corresponding to 686 glycoprotein groups. Due to the assisted hydrogen-bond interaction, the selectivity for glycopeptide enrichment in the real sample reached 94.6%, which was the highest as far as we know. All these results indicated that such hydrogen-bond interaction assisted branched copolymer HILIC material possessed great potential for the separation and large scale glycoproteomics analysis. PMID:27343616

  10. Isolation and Characterization of Glycopeptide-Resistant Enterococci from Hospitalized Patients over a 30-Month Period

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R. R. S.; McGregor, K. F.; Brown, A. R.; Amyes, S. G. B.; Young, H.-K.

    2000-01-01

    In February 1996, a Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee-style screening program was commenced to isolate and subsequently characterize glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE) from patients at a hospital trust in Glasgow, Scotland. Over the next 30 months, GRE were isolated from 154 patients. GRE were isolated from patients in traditionally high-risk areas such as the renal unit and intensive care unit and also in areas considered to be lower risk, including medical wards and associated long-stay geriatric hospitals. The majority (90%) of isolates were Enterococcus faecium vanB. The remaining isolates consisted of seven E. faecalis (vanA), three E. gallinarum (vanC), and a further six E. faecium (five vanA, one both vanA and vanB) isolates. Analysis of SmaI-digested DNA by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that 34 of 40 (85%) VanB E. faecium isolates were identical or closely related, while 11 of 13 (85%) VanA GRE were distinct. High-level aminoglycoside resistance was seen in less than 8% of isolates. VanB E. faecium isolates were almost uniformly resistant to ampicillin and tetracycline. In this study, GRE have been isolated over a prolonged period from a broad range of patients. Glycopeptide resistance within the study hospital trust appeared to be mainly due to the clonal dissemination of a single strain of E. faecium VanB. PMID:10834962

  11. Systems, not pills: The options market for antibiotics seeks to rejuvenate the antibiotic pipeline.

    PubMed

    Brogan, David M; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing recognition of the increasing growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and a relative decline in the production of novel antibacterial therapies. The combination of these two forces poses a potentially grave threat to global health, in both developed and developing countries. Current market forces do not provide appropriate incentives to stimulate new antibiotic development, thus we propose a new incentive mechanism: the Options Market for Antibiotics. This mechanism, modelled on the principle of financial call options, allows payers to buy the right, in early stages of development, to purchase antibiotics at a discounted price if and when they ever make it to market approval. This paper demonstrates the effect of such a model on the expected Net Present Value of a typical antibacterial project. As part of an integrated strategy to confront the impending antibiotic crisis, the Options Market for Antibiotics may effectively stimulate corporate and public investment into antibiotic research and development. PMID:26808335

  12. Systems, not pills: The options market for antibiotics seeks to rejuvenate the antibiotic pipeline.

    PubMed

    Brogan, David M; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a growing recognition of the increasing growth of antibiotic resistant bacteria and a relative decline in the production of novel antibacterial therapies. The combination of these two forces poses a potentially grave threat to global health, in both developed and developing countries. Current market forces do not provide appropriate incentives to stimulate new antibiotic development, thus we propose a new incentive mechanism: the Options Market for Antibiotics. This mechanism, modelled on the principle of financial call options, allows payers to buy the right, in early stages of development, to purchase antibiotics at a discounted price if and when they ever make it to market approval. This paper demonstrates the effect of such a model on the expected Net Present Value of a typical antibacterial project. As part of an integrated strategy to confront the impending antibiotic crisis, the Options Market for Antibiotics may effectively stimulate corporate and public investment into antibiotic research and development.

  13. Selective strategies for antibiotic fermentation, Part II: Effect of aeration on streptomycin production by Streptomyces griseus JB-19.

    PubMed

    Maladkar, N K

    1991-01-01

    The effect of higher aerated fermentation medium which enhanced streptomycin production by Streptomyces griseus JB-19 was found mainly related to the changes in dextrose consumption, inorganic phosphate utilisation and ammonia nitrogen accumulation under optimal and suboptimal supply of soluble vegetative protein.

  14. Long-term effect of the antibiotic cefalexin on methane production during waste activated sludge anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xueqin; Zhen, Guangyin; Liu, Yuan; Hojo, Toshimasa; Estrada, Adriana Ledezma; Li, Yu-You

    2014-10-01

    Long-term experiments herein were conducted to investigate the effect of cefalexin (CLX) on methane production during waste activated sludge (WAS) anaerobic digestion. CLX exhibited a considerable inhibition in methane production during the initial 25 days while the negative effect attenuated subsequently and methane production recovered depending on CLX doses used (600 and 1000 mg/L). The highest methane yield reached 450 mL at 1000 mg-CLX/L after 157 days of digestion, 63.8% higher than CLX-free one. Stimulated excretion of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by CLX served as microbial protecting layers, creating a suitable environment for microbes' growth and fermentation. Further examination via ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectra also verified the elevated slime EPS, LB-EPS and TB-EPS indicated by UV-254 in the presence of CLX. Unlike the commonly accepted adverse effect, this study demonstrated the beneficial role of CLX in methane production, providing new insights into its true environmental impacts.

  15. Highly efficient and selective enrichment of glycopeptides using easily synthesized magG/PDA/Au/l-Cys composites.

    PubMed

    Wu, Runqing; Li, Lanting; Deng, Chunhui

    2016-05-01

    Highly selective and efficient enrichment of glycopeptides from complex biological samples is necessary. In this study, novel zwitterionic hydrophilic polydopamine-coated magnetic graphene composites (magG/PDA/Au/l-Cys) were synthesized and applied to the enrichment of glycopeptides. The size, morphology, and composition of magG/PDA/Au/l-Cys composites were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, FT-infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The composites possessed a number of desirable characteristics, including good biocompatibility easy separation property and excellent hydrophilicity. By virtue of the features contributed by different ingredients, the prepared composites demonstrated superior performance for glycopeptide enrichment with high sensitivity (0.1 fmol), efficiency, selectivity (1:100), and repeatability (at least ten times). In addition, the composites were successfully applied to the enrichment of glycopeptides from human serum and 40 unique N-glycosylation peptides from 31 different N-linked glycoproteins were identified. The superior hydrophilic material is of great potential for the analysis of glycoproteins.

  16. Heterologous Production of the Marine Myxobacterial Antibiotic Haliangicin and Its Unnatural Analogues Generated by Engineering of the Biochemical Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuwei; Feng, Zhiyang; Tomura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Akira; Miyano, Seishi; Tsuge, Takashi; Mori, Hitoshi; Suh, Joo-Won; Iizuka, Takashi; Fudou, Ryosuke; Ojika, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite their fastidious nature, marine myxobacteria have considerable genetic potential to produce novel secondary metabolites. The marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 produces the antifungal polyketide haliangicin (1), but its productivity is unsatisfactory. The biosynthetic gene cluster hli (47.8 kbp) associated with 1 was identified and heterologously expressed in Myxococcus xanthus to permit the production of 1 with high efficiency (tenfold greater amount and threefold faster in growth speed compared with the original producer), as well as the generation of bioactive unnatural analogues of 1 through gene manipulation. A unique acyl-CoA dehydrogenase was found to catalyse an unusual γ,δ-dehydrogenation of the diketide starter unit, leading to the formation of the terminal alkene moiety of 1. Biological evaluation of the analogues obtained through this study revealed that their bioactivities (anti-oomycete and cytotoxic activities) can be modified by manipulating the vinyl epoxide at the terminus opposite the β-methoxyacrylate pharmacophore. PMID:26915413

  17. Spatial mapping of antibiotic resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A serious concern for modern animal production is the fear that feed antimicrobials, such as monensin, increase the potential for high levels of antibiotic resistant (AR) gene prevalence in the manure, which may subsequently be shared with soil communities and eventually be taken up by human pathoge...

  18. Immune modulation of innate immunity as alternatives-to-antibiotics strategies to mitigate the use of drugs in poultry production.

    PubMed

    Lillehoj, H S; Lee, K W

    2012-06-01

    Following is invited commentary on the symposium "A Crystal Ball Look into the Future of…" delivered July 16, 2011, at the Poultry Science Association's 100th annual meeting, St. Louis, Missouri. The symposium examined various aspects that will impact the future of poultry production over the next 10 to 20 yr. Topics included genetics, nutrition, incubation, and bird health. This paper deals with various aspects of future issues affecting global feeding and nutrition of poultry. PMID:22582284

  19. Thiol-ene click synthesis of L-Cysteine-bonded zwitterionic hydrophilic magnetic nanoparticles for selective and efficient enrichment of glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Runqing; Xie, Yang; Deng, Chunhui

    2016-11-01

    Efficient and specific enrichment of low-abundant glycopeptides from complex biological samples is essential to glycoproteomics analysis. Herein, novel magnetic zwitterionic hydrophilic nanoparticles based on thiol-ene click chemistry were synthesized. The functionalized magnetic nanoparticles exhibited superior performance in glycopeptide enrichment of HRP tryptic digest, demonstrating low detection limit (0.04ng/μL), high selectivity (a mixture of HRP and BSA at the mass ratio of 1:50) and reproducibility (5 repeating cycles). In addition, the material was successfully applied to glycopeptide enrichment from human serum. The outstanding results indicate the potential of the method in the development of glycoproteomics analysis in real biological samples. PMID:27591639

  20. [Mercurimetric determination of cephalosporin antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Pospísilová, B; Kubes, J

    1988-04-01

    The conditions for a potenciometric estimation of cefuroxime, cefsulodin, cefotaxime and ceftriaxon with mercury(II) perchlorate after the previous reaction of the antibiotics with hydroxylamine were established. The mercurimetric determination was well reproducible with the relative error of the mean ranging up to 1% and the results are identical with the spectrometric and microbiological determination. There is no need to use a standard. With this technique only the content of effective antibiotic with an intact beta-lactam ring can be estimated. The method did not provide objective results for cefoperazone and cefoxitin. The direct determination of cephalosporin degradation products was verified for cefalexin, cefalothin, cefuroxime, cefsulodin and ceftriaxon.

  1. Killing of Mycolic Acid-Containing Bacteria Aborted Induction of Antibiotic Production by Streptomyces in Combined-Culture

    PubMed Central

    Asamizu, Shumpei; Ozaki, Taro; Teramoto, Kanae; Satoh, Katsuya; Onaka, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Co-culture of Streptomyces with mycolic acid-containing bacteria (MACB), which we termed “combined-culture,” alters the secondary metabolism pattern in Streptomyces and has been a useful method for the discovery of bioactive natural products. In the course of our investigation to identify the inducing factor(s) of MACB, we previously observed that production of pigments in Streptomyces lividans was not induced by factors such as culture extracts or mycolic acids. Although dynamic changes occurred in culture conditions because of MACB, the activation of pigment production by S. lividans was observed in a limited area where both colonies were in direct contact. This suggested that direct attachment of cells is a requirement and that components on the MACB cell membrane may play an important role in the response by S. lividans. Here we examined whether this response was influenced by dead MACB that possess intact mycolic acids assembled on the outer cell membrane. Formaldehyde fixation and γ-irradiation were used to prepare dead cells that retain their shape and mycolic acids of three MACB species: Tsukamurella pulmonis, Rhodococcus erythropolis, and Rhodococcus opacus. Culturing tests verified that S. lividans does not respond to the intact dead cells of three MACB. Observation of combined-culture by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that adhesion of live MACB to S. lividans mycelia were a significant interaction that resulted in formation of co-aggregation. In contrast, in the SEM analysis, dead cells were not observed to adhere. Therefore, direct attachment by live MACB cells is proposed as one of the possible factors that causes Streptomyces to alter its specialized metabolism in combined-culture. PMID:26544713

  2. Reconnaissance data for glyphosate, other selected herbicides, their degradation products, and antibiotics in 51 streams in nine midwestern states, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, Elisabeth A.; Battaglin, William A.; Dietze, Julie E.; Thurman, E.M.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1989, the U.S. Geological Survey has conducted periodic reconnaissance studies of streams in the Midwestern United States to determine the geographic and seasonal distribution of herbicide compounds. These studies have documented that large amounts of acetochlor, alachlor, atrazine, cyanazine, metolachlor, and their degradation products are flushed into streams during post-application runoff. Additional studies show that peak herbicide concentrations tend to occur during the first runoff after herbicide application and that herbicide flushes can occur during runoff for several weeks to months following application. Since the first stream study conducted in 1989, several significant changes in herbicide use have occurred. The most substantial change is the tripling in the use of glyphosate during the past 5 years. Over this same time period (1997-2001), usage of acetochlor and atrazine increased slightly, whereas alachlor, cyanazine, and metolachlor usage decreased. During 2002, 154 samples were collected from 51 streams in nine Midwestern States during three periods of runoff. This report provides a compilation of the analytical results of five laboratory methods. Results show that glyphosate was detected in 55 (36 percent) of the samples, and aminomethylphosphonic acid (a degradation product of glyphosate) was detected in 107 (69 percent) of the samples. Atrazine, the most frequently detected herbicide, was found in 93 percent of the samples, followed by metolachlor, found in 73 percent of the samples; metolachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA) and oxanilic acid (OXA) were the most frequently detected herbicide degradation products, both being found in more than 95 percent of the samples. The data presented here are valuable for comparison with results from the earlier reconnaissance studies.

  3. Killing of Mycolic Acid-Containing Bacteria Aborted Induction of Antibiotic Production by Streptomyces in Combined-Culture.

    PubMed

    Asamizu, Shumpei; Ozaki, Taro; Teramoto, Kanae; Satoh, Katsuya; Onaka, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    Co-culture of Streptomyces with mycolic acid-containing bacteria (MACB), which we termed "combined-culture," alters the secondary metabolism pattern in Streptomyces and has been a useful method for the discovery of bioactive natural products. In the course of our investigation to identify the inducing factor(s) of MACB, we previously observed that production of pigments in Streptomyces lividans was not induced by factors such as culture extracts or mycolic acids. Although dynamic changes occurred in culture conditions because of MACB, the activation of pigment production by S. lividans was observed in a limited area where both colonies were in direct contact. This suggested that direct attachment of cells is a requirement and that components on the MACB cell membrane may play an important role in the response by S. lividans. Here we examined whether this response was influenced by dead MACB that possess intact mycolic acids assembled on the outer cell membrane. Formaldehyde fixation and γ-irradiation were used to prepare dead cells that retain their shape and mycolic acids of three MACB species: Tsukamurella pulmonis, Rhodococcus erythropolis, and Rhodococcus opacus. Culturing tests verified that S. lividans does not respond to the intact dead cells of three MACB. Observation of combined-culture by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that adhesion of live MACB to S. lividans mycelia were a significant interaction that resulted in formation of co-aggregation. In contrast, in the SEM analysis, dead cells were not observed to adhere. Therefore, direct attachment by live MACB cells is proposed as one of the possible factors that causes Streptomyces to alter its specialized metabolism in combined-culture. PMID:26544713

  4. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance pattern of Salmonella serovars in integrated crop-livestock farms and their products sold in local markets.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mengfei; Salaheen, Serajus; Almario, Jose Alejandro; Tesfaye, Bezait; Buchanan, Robert; Biswas, Debabrata

    2016-05-01

    Major concern in the Mixed Crop-Livestock (MCL) farms, in which livestock and vegetables grown closely in the same facility, is cross-contamination of zoonotic bacterial pathogens especially Salmonella. To investigate the distribution of Salmonella serovars in MCL and their products, a total of 1287 pre-harvest samples from various farms and 1377 post-harvest samples from retail supermarkets in Maryland and Washington D.C. areas were collected and analysed. A total of 315 Salmonella isolates were recovered, with 17.44% and 5.88%, from MCL and conventional farms samples (P < 0.001). At post-harvest level, the prevalence of Salmonella was 30.95%, 19.83%, and 8.38% in chicken meat (P < 0.001) from farmers, organic, and conventional retail markets respectively, and 16.81% and 6.06% in produce products (P < 0.001) from farmers and organic retail markets, but none from conventional retail markets. From the isolated Salmonella, 34.50% was confirmed S. Typhimurium, followed by S. Heidelberg (10.86%) and S. Enteritidis (9.90%). The overall multi-antibiotic resistance in recovered Salmonella was 23.81% versus 4.55% in conventional and MCL farms (P = 0.004) and 66.67% versus 7.76% in conventional and farmers markets (P < 0.001). Overall the data reveals higher Salmonella risks in MCL farms' environment and their products sold in farmers markets and warrants taking necessary measures to limit Salmonella transmission.

  5. New hydrolysis products of the beta-lactam antibiotic amoxicillin, their pH-dependent formation and search in municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Hirte, Kristin; Seiwert, Bettina; Schüürmann, Gerrit; Reemtsma, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Amoxicillin (AMX) is a widespread β-lactam-antibiotic and, together with some of its transformation products (TPs) originating from hydrolysis, a known environmental contaminant. To shed light on the abiotic degradation of AMX and the stability of its known TPs, laboratory hydrolysis experiments of AMX were carried out at pH 3, 7 and 11. Not only the rate of hydrolysis but also the pattern of TPs was strongly pH-dependent. The time courses of the obtained transformation products were analyzed by UPLC-HR-QToF-MS. AMX penicilloic acid (TP 1), AMX 2',5'-diketopiperazine (TP 2), AMX penilloic acid (TP 3) and 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)pyrazinol (TP 4) were found at neutral pH. Surprisingly, the first three were not stable but transformed into 23 yet unknown TPs within three to four weeks. Seven TPs were tentatively identified, based on their product ion spectra and, where possible, confirmed with reference standards, e.g. penicillamine disulfide, 2-[amino(carboxy)methyl]-5,5-dimethyl-1,3-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid and dehydrocarboxylated amoxicillin penilloic acid. Analysis of samples from municipal wastewater treatment plants confirmed these findings with TP 1 being the dominant TP in the influent and a shift towards TP 2, TP 3 and TP 4 in the effluents. The lab experiments predicted up to 13 consecutive TPs from TP 1, TP 2 and TP 3 under neutral conditions. Their detection from surface waters will be difficult, because their large number and slow formation kinetics will lead to comparatively low environmental concentrations. Nevertheless the abiotic degradation of TP 1, TP 2 and TP 3 to further TPs needs to be considered in future studies of the environmental fate of amoxicillin.

  6. Use of organic acids and competitive exclusion product as an alternative to antibiotic as a growth promoter in the raising of commercial turkeys.

    PubMed

    Milbradt, E L; Okamoto, A S; Rodrigues, J C Z; Garcia, E A; Sanfelice, C; Centenaro, L P; Andreatti Filho, R L

    2014-07-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of organic acids (OA) and competitive exclusion product (CE) on growth performance, intestinal morphology, and concentration of volatile fatty acids in the cecal content. The experiment lasted for 10 wk. Four hundred twenty 1-d-old female commercial cross turkey poults (British United Turkeys, BUT Big 9) were distributed into 4 treatments with 5 replicates/pen of 21 birds each. The birds were fed a basal diet without growth promoter (control), diet with lincomycin (44 mg/kg), diet with organic acids (2 g/kg), and diet with product of CE (10(9) cfu/kg). Dietary levels of other nutrients, housing, and general management practices were similar for all treatments. On the first week (d 0-7), the BW and BW gain of the birds that fed diets with OA were lower than in the control group. In the fattening phase (d 28-70), the feed intake of the OA-treated group was lower than compared with the control. The birds that received diet with OA and CE product presented higher concentrations of propionic acid, at 14 d, and butyric acid in cecal content at 28, 56, and 70 d, compared with the control. Dietary inclusion of additives had no significant effects on intestinal villus height, crypt depth, and villus:crypt ratio. Organic acids had negative effects either on early gain or feed intake throughout the study. Because the test was conducted under controlled experimental conditions, the additives that showed results similar to those found by using antibiotics should be studied further in commercial farms to obtain results that can be incorporated into practice.

  7. Antibiotics and Resistance: Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... induced by natural or human activity on the ecology and living organisms. Ecology The study of the relationships and interactions between ... antibiotics The Cost of Resistance Science of Resistance Ecology Antibiotics in Agriculture Antibacterial Agents Glossary References Web ...

  8. Combating Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... for infectious diseases. back to top Antibiotics Fight Bacteria, Not Viruses Antibiotics are meant to be used ... treat strep throat, which is caused by streptococcal bacteria, and skin infections caused by staphylococcal bacteria. Although ...

  9. Marine Myxobacteria as a Source of Antibiotics—Comparison of Physiology, Polyketide-Type Genes and Antibiotic Production of Three New Isolates of Enhygromyxa salina

    PubMed Central

    Schäberle, Till F.; Goralski, Emilie; Neu, Edith; Erol, Özlem; Hölzl, Georg; Dörmann, Peter; Bierbaum, Gabriele; König, Gabriele M.

    2010-01-01

    Three myxobacterial strains, designated SWB004, SWB005 and SWB006, were obtained from beach sand samples from the Pacific Ocean and the North Sea. The strains were cultivated in salt water containing media and subjected to studies to determine their taxonomic status, the presence of genes for the biosynthesis of polyketides and antibiotic production. 16S rDNA sequence analysis revealed the type strain Enhygromyxa salina SHK-1T as their closest homolog, displaying between 98% (SWB005) and 99% (SWB004 and SWB006) sequence similarity. All isolates were rod-shaped cells showing gliding motility and fruiting body formation as is known for myxobacteria. They required NaCl for growth, with an optimum concentration of around 2% [w/v]. The G + C-content of genomic DNA ranged from 63.0 to 67.3 mol%. Further, the strains were analyzed for their potential to produce polyketide-type structures. PCR amplified ketosynthase-like gene fragments from all three isolates enhances the assumption that these bacteria produce polyketides. SWB005 was shown to produce metabolites with prominent antibacterial activity, including activity towards methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE). PMID:20948900

  10. Reversibility of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although theoretically attractive, the reversibility of resistance has proven difficult in practice, even though antibiotic resistance mechanisms induce a fitness cost to the bacterium. Associated resistance to other antibiotics and compensatory mutations seem to ameliorate the effect of antibiotic interventions in the community. In this paper the current understanding of the concepts of reversibility of antibiotic resistance and the interventions performed in hospitals and in the community are reviewed. PMID:24836051

  11. Efficacy of Telavancin in the Treatment of Experimental Endocarditis Due to Glycopeptide-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus▿

    PubMed Central

    Miró, José M.; García-de-la-Mària, Cristina; Armero, Yolanda; de-Lazzari, Elisa; Soy, Dolors; Moreno, Asunción; del Rio, Ana; Almela, Manel; Mestres, Carlos A.; Gatell, José M.; Jiménez-de-Anta, María-Teresa; Marco, Francesc

    2007-01-01

    The efficacy of telavancin, a novel lipoglycopeptide, was evaluated in experimental endocarditis in rabbits using two clinical isolates of glycopeptide-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus: ATCC 700788 and HIP 5836. Infected rabbits were treated for 2 days with telavancin (10 mg/kg of body weight once daily intravenously) or vancomycin (1 g twice daily intravenously), administered with a computer-controlled infusion pump system simulating human serum kinetics. Vegetations were harvested at 16 h postinoculation in the control group and at the end of treatment in the drug-treated group. For ATCC 700788, MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), respectively, were 1 mg/liter and 4 mg/liter for telavancin and 8 mg/liter and 128 mg/liter for vancomycin. For HIP 5836, MICs and MBCs, respectively, were 4 mg/liter and 8 mg/liter for telavancin and 8 mg/liter and 128 mg/liter for vancomycin. Peak and trough levels were 90 μg/ml and 6 μg/ml, respectively, for telavancin and 46 μg/ml and 6 μg/ml, respectively, for vancomycin. In glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus ATCC 700788, telavancin sterilized 6 of 16 vegetations (37%), whereas vancomycin sterilized 4 of 20 (20%) (P = 0.29) compared with 0 of 17 in the control group. In HIP 5836 experiments, telavancin and vancomycin sterilized 5 of 16 (31%) and 1 of 15 (7%) vegetations (P = 0.17), respectively, compared with none in the control group. Telavancin reduced vegetation titers by 2.0 and 2.3 logs greater than vancomycin for the ATCC 700788 (4.6 [2.0 to 5.8] versus 6.6 [2.0 to 6.9] log CFU/g vegetation; P = 0.05) and HIP 5836 (4.4 [2.0 to 7.4] versus 6.7 [4.5 to 8.7] log CFU/g vegetation; P = 0.09) strains, respectively; these differences did not reach statistical significance. All isolates from vegetations remained susceptible to telavancin after therapy. The results suggest that telavancin may be an effective treatment for endocarditis caused by glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus. PMID:17485502

  12. Degradation Kinetics and Mechanism of a β-Lactam Antibiotic Intermediate, 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid, in a New Integrated Production Process.

    PubMed

    Su, Min; Sun, Hua; Zhao, Yingying; Lu, Aidang; Cao, Xiaohui; Wang, Jingkang

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to promote sustainability and to reduce manufacturing costs, the traditional production process for 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) has been modified to include less processing units. The objectives of this study are to investigate the degradation kinetics of 6-APA, to propose a reasonable degradation mechanism, and to optimize the manufacturing conditions within this new process. A series of degradation kinetic studies were conducted in the presence of impurities, as well as at various chemical and physical conditions. The concentrations of 6-APA were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. An Arrhenius-type kinetic model was established to give a more accurate prediction on the degradation rates of 6-APA. A hydrolysis degradation mechanism is shown to be the major pathway for 6-APA. The degradation mechanisms and the kinetic models for 6-APA in the new system enable the design of a good manufacturing process with optimized parameters. PMID:26852849

  13. Assessment of bacterial antibiotic resistance transfer in the gut.

    PubMed

    Schjørring, Susanne; Krogfelt, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    We assessed horizontal gene transfer between bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. During the last decades, the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains and treatment failures of bacterial infections have increased the public awareness of antibiotic usage. The use of broad spectrum antibiotics creates a selective pressure on the bacterial flora, thus increasing the emergence of multiresistant bacteria, which results in a vicious circle of treatments and emergence of new antibiotic resistant bacteria. The human gastrointestinal tract is a massive reservoir of bacteria with a potential for both receiving and transferring antibiotic resistance genes. The increased use of fermented food products and probiotics, as food supplements and health promoting products containing massive amounts of bacteria acting as either donors and/or recipients of antibiotic resistance genes in the human GI tract, also contributes to the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains. This paper deals with the assessment of antibiotic resistance gene transfer occurring in the gut. PMID:21318188

  14. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... Many ear infections Top of Page Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Examples of How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads Click for ...

  15. Early antibiotic selection and efficient rooting and acclimatization improve the production of transgenic plum plants (Prunus domestica L.).

    PubMed

    Gonzalez Padilla, I M; Webb, K; Scorza, R

    2003-08-01

    We describe here an improved system for routinely developing transgenic plum plants (Prunus domestica L.) through the use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The production of non-transformed "escapes" has been virtually eliminated, and rates of plant establishment in the greenhouse have been dramatically improved. The system is based on the regeneration of shoots from hypocotyls extracted from mature seed. The shoot regeneration medium is Murashige and Skoog (MS) salts and vitamins supplemented with 7.5 microM thidiazuron and 0.25 microM indole-butyric acid. Transferring the explants after co-cultivation to shoot regeneration medium containing 80 mg l(-1) of kanamycin and 300 mg l(-1) of Timentin reduced the total number of regenerated shoots without affecting the transformation rate. Transformation rates using the described system averaged 1.2% of the hypocotyl slices producing transgenic plants, with a range of 0-4.2%. The transgenic shoots rooted at a rate of 90% on half-strength MS salts and vitamins supplemented with 5 microM alpha-naphthaleneacetic acid and 0.01 microM kinetin. Plantlets were transferred to a greenhouse directly from culture tubes with a 90% average survival.

  16. 9 CFR 114.10 - Antibiotics as preservatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS PRODUCTION REQUIREMENTS FOR BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS § 114.10 Antibiotics as preservatives. Antibiotics are authorized for use as preservatives for biological products if used within the limitations as to kinds and amounts prescribed in...

  17. A Hybrid NRPS-PKS Gene Cluster Related to the Bleomycin Family of Antitumor Antibiotics in Alteromonas macleodii Strains

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Kimes, Nikole E.; López-Pérez, Mario; Ausó, Eva; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Ghai, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Although numerous marine bacteria are known to produce antibiotics via hybrid NRPS-PKS gene clusters, none have been previously described in an Alteromonas species. In this study, we describe in detail a novel hybrid NRPS-PKS cluster identified in the plasmid of the Alteromonasmacleodii strain AltDE1 and analyze its relatedness to other similar gene clusters in a sequence-based characterization. This is a mobile cluster, flanked by transposase-like genes, that has even been found inserted into the chromosome of some Alteromonasmacleodii strains. The cluster contains separate genes for NRPS and PKS activity. The sole PKS gene appears to carry a novel acyltransferase domain, quite divergent from those currently characterized. The predicted specificities of the adenylation domains of the NRPS genes suggest that the final compound has a backbone very similar to bleomycin related compounds. However, the lack of genes involved in sugar biosynthesis indicates that the final product is not a glycopeptide. Even in the absence of these genes, the presence of the cluster appears to confer complete or partial resistance to phleomycin, which may be attributed to a bleomycin-resistance-like protein identified within the cluster. This also suggests that the compound still shares significant structural similarity to bleomycin. Moreover, transcriptomic evidence indicates that the NRPS-PKS cluster is expressed. Such sequence-based approaches will be crucial to fully explore and analyze the diversity and potential of secondary metabolite production, especially from increasingly important sources like marine microbes. PMID:24069455

  18. Accelerated Detection of Mycolactone Production and Response to Antibiotic Treatment in a Mouse Model of Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease

    PubMed Central

    Converse, Paul J.; Xing, Yalan; Kim, Ki Hyun; Tyagi, Sandeep; Li, Si-Yang; Almeida, Deepak V.; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Grosset, Jacques H.; Kishi, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of the neglected tropical disease, Buruli ulcer, can be made by acid-fast smear microscopy, specimen culture on mycobacterial growth media, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and/or histopathology. All have drawbacks, including non-specificity and requirements for prolonged culture at 32°C, relatively sophisticated laboratory facilities, and expertise, respectively. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, produces a unique toxin, mycolactone A/B (ML) that can be detected by thin layer chromatography (TLC) or mass spectrometric analysis. Detection by the latter technique requires sophisticated facilities. TLC is relatively simple but can be complicated by the presence of other lipids in the specimen. A method using a boronate-assisted fluorogenic chemosensor in TLC can overcome this challenge by selectively detecting ML when visualized with UV light. This report describes modifications in the fluorescent TLC (F-TLC) procedure and its application to the mouse footpad model of M. ulcerans disease to determine the kinetics of mycolactone production and its correlation with footpad swelling and the number of colony forming units in the footpad. The response of all three parameters to treatment with the current standard regimen of rifampin (RIF) and streptomycin (STR) or a proposed oral regimen of RIF and clarithromycin (CLR) was also assessed. ML was detectable before the onset of footpad swelling when there were <105 CFU per footpad. Swelling occurred when there were >105 CFU per footpad. Mycolactone concentrations increased as swelling increased whereas CFU levels reached a plateau. Treatment with either RIF+STR or RIF+CLR resulted in comparable reductions of mycolactone, footpad swelling, and CFU burden. Storage in absolute ethanol appears critical to successful detection of ML in footpads and would be practical for storage of clinical samples. F-TLC may offer a new tool for confirmation of suspected clinical lesions and be more specific than smear

  19. Accelerated detection of mycolactone production and response to antibiotic treatment in a mouse model of Mycobacterium ulcerans disease.

    PubMed

    Converse, Paul J; Xing, Yalan; Kim, Ki Hyun; Tyagi, Sandeep; Li, Si-Yang; Almeida, Deepak V; Nuermberger, Eric L; Grosset, Jacques H; Kishi, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    Diagnosis of the neglected tropical disease, Buruli ulcer, can be made by acid-fast smear microscopy, specimen culture on mycobacterial growth media, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and/or histopathology. All have drawbacks, including non-specificity and requirements for prolonged culture at 32°C, relatively sophisticated laboratory facilities, and expertise, respectively. The causative organism, Mycobacterium ulcerans, produces a unique toxin, mycolactone A/B (ML) that can be detected by thin layer chromatography (TLC) or mass spectrometric analysis. Detection by the latter technique requires sophisticated facilities. TLC is relatively simple but can be complicated by the presence of other lipids in the specimen. A method using a boronate-assisted fluorogenic chemosensor in TLC can overcome this challenge by selectively detecting ML when visualized with UV light. This report describes modifications in the fluorescent TLC (F-TLC) procedure and its application to the mouse footpad model of M. ulcerans disease to determine the kinetics of mycolactone production and its correlation with footpad swelling and the number of colony forming units in the footpad. The response of all three parameters to treatment with the current standard regimen of rifampin (RIF) and streptomycin (STR) or a proposed oral regimen of RIF and clarithromycin (CLR) was also assessed. ML was detectable before the onset of footpad swelling when there were <10(5) CFU per footpad. Swelling occurred when there were >10(5) CFU per footpad. Mycolactone concentrations increased as swelling increased whereas CFU levels reached a plateau. Treatment with either RIF+STR or RIF+CLR resulted in comparable reductions of mycolactone, footpad swelling, and CFU burden. Storage in absolute ethanol appears critical to successful detection of ML in footpads and would be practical for storage of clinical samples. F-TLC may offer a new tool for confirmation of suspected clinical lesions and be more specific than

  20. On-line selective enrichment and ion-pair reaction for structural determination of sulfated glycopeptides by capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Imami, Koshi; Ishihama, Yasushi; Terabe, Shigeru

    2008-06-20

    We describe a new capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS)-based technique for analyzing sulfated glycopeptides. The proposed method performs selective enrichment of sulfated glycopeptides from a complex mixture of peptides based on field-enhanced sample injection and ion-pair reaction with a basic ion-pair reagent (Lys-Lys-Lys; KKK) at the exit end of a capillary in a single analysis, which permits successful fragmentation of sulfated glycopeptides in positive-ion mode at the MS/MS stage for comprehensive structural analysis. In this study, the method was verified using a model sulfated monosaccharide, N-acetyl-d-galactosamine 4-sulfate (GalNAc 4S). As an example of an application of this method, sulfated glycopeptides were selectively enriched from the enzymatic digest of thyroid stimulating hormone, affording approximately 500-fold sensitivity enhancement, and structural information was successfully obtained via on-line ion-pair complexation reaction.

  1. The 2.7 Å resolution structure of the glycopeptide sulfotransferase Teg14

    PubMed Central

    Bick, Matthew J.; Banik, Jacob J.; Darst, Seth A.; Brady, Sean F.

    2010-01-01

    The TEG gene cluster was recently isolated from an environmental DNA library and is predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a polysulfated glycopeptide congener. Three closely related sulfotransferases found in the TEG gene cluster (Teg12, Teg13 and Teg14) have been shown to sulfate the teicoplanin aglycone at three unique sites. Crystal structures of the first sulfotransferase from the TEG cluster, Teg12, in complex with the teicoplanin aglycone and its desulfated cosubstrate PAP have recently been reported [Bick et al. (2010 ▶), Biochemistry, 49, 4159–4168]. Here, the 2.7 Å resolution crystal structure of the apo form of Teg14 is reported. Teg14 sulfates the hydroxyphenylglycine at position 4 in the teicoplanin aglycone. The Teg14 structure is discussed and is compared with those of other bacterial 3′-phospho­adenosine 5′-­phosphosulfate-dependent sulfotransferases. PMID:21123867

  2. [Historical and Hygienic Aspects on Roles of Quality Requirements for Antibiotic Products in Japan: Part 2--Achievements of Domestic Production of Penicillin and Streptomycin].

    PubMed

    Yagisawa, Morimasa; Foster, Patrick J; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Domestic production of penicillin was initiated in 1946 and that of streptomycin in 1950. In the early days, however, the quality of products was considerably lower and the capacity of production small. Surprisingly, there was a sufficient amount of penicillin preparations, with a purity of 85% or more, satisfying domestic demand within three years (1949). In the case of streptomycin, within three years (1953), preparations with a purity two-fold higher than initially available were produced in amounts sufficient to meet both domestic demand and create a surplus availability for exporting purposes. Such increases in quality and production were considered to be made possible by strict quality control of penicillin and streptomycin preparations, based on "Minimum Requirements for Penicillin" established in May 1947 and "Minimum Requirements for Streptomycin" established in December 1949. These requirements were also amended over time in order to provide even higher quality standards in response to the evolving improvements in production processes. Life-threatening diseases such as septicemia and pneumonia were controlled by the sufficient supply of high-quality penicillin preparations and the mortality rate of tuberculosis, regarded as a national disease at the time, markedly decreased by that of streptomycin preparations. Achievements of domestic production of penicillin and streptomycin were considered important factors that contributed greatly to the maintenance of public health in Japan.

  3. Agricultural use of antibiotics and the evolution and transfer of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Khachatourians, G G

    1998-11-01

    Microbial Resistance to antibiotics is on the rise, in part because of inappropriate use of antibiotics in human medicine but also because of practices in the agricultural industry. Intensive animal production involves giving livestock animals large quantities of antibiotics to promote growth and prevent infection. These uses promote the selection of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations. The resistant bacteria from agricultural environments may be transmitted to humans, in whom they cause disease that cannot be treated by conventional antibiotics. The author reviews trends in antibiotic use in animal husbandry and agriculture in general. The development of resistance is described, along with the genetic mechanisms that create resistance and facilitate its spread among bacterial species. Particular aspects of resistance in bacterial species common to both the human population and the agrifood industry are emphasized. Control measures that might reverse the current trends are highlighted.

  4. Molecular Regulation of Antibiotic Biosynthesis in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang; Chandra, Govind; Niu, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptomycetes are the most abundant source of antibiotics. Typically, each species produces several antibiotics, with the profile being species specific. Streptomyces coelicolor, the model species, produces at least five different antibiotics. We review the regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis in S. coelicolor and other, nonmodel streptomycetes in the light of recent studies. The biosynthesis of each antibiotic is specified by a large gene cluster, usually including regulatory genes (cluster-situated regulators [CSRs]). These are the main point of connection with a plethora of generally conserved regulatory systems that monitor the organism's physiology, developmental state, population density, and environment to determine the onset and level of production of each antibiotic. Some CSRs may also be sensitive to the levels of different kinds of ligands, including products of the pathway itself, products of other antibiotic pathways in the same organism, and specialized regulatory small molecules such as gamma-butyrolactones. These interactions can result in self-reinforcing feed-forward circuitry and complex cross talk between pathways. The physiological signals and regulatory mechanisms may be of practical importance for the activation of the many cryptic secondary metabolic gene cluster pathways revealed by recent sequencing of numerous Streptomyces genomes. PMID:23471619

  5. Antibiotics regulate the immune response in both presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide through modulation of Toll-like receptors, cytokine production and phagocytosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bode, Christian; Diedrich, Britta; Muenster, Stefan; Hentschel, Viktoria; Weisheit, Christina; Rommelsheim, Kuno; Hoeft, Andreas; Meyer, Rainer; Boehm, Olaf; Knuefermann, Pascal; Baumgarten, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The inflammatory response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in sepsis is mediated via Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Since TLRs also trigger various immune functions, including phagocytosis, their modulation is a promising strategy in the treatment of sepsis. As antibiotics have immunomodulatory properties, this study examined the effect of commonly used classes of antibiotics on i) the expression of TLRs and cytokines and ii) the phagocytic activity under sepsis-like conditions in vitro. This was achieved by incubating THP-1 monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from patients after open-heart surgery with the addition of LPS and six key antibiotics (piperacillin, doxycycline, erythromycin, moxifloxacin or gentamicin). After 24h, mRNA levels of both cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6) and TLRs (1, 2, 4, and 6) were monitored and phagocytosis was determined following coincubation with Escherichia coli. Each antibiotic differentially regulated the gene expression of the investigated TLRs and cytokines in monocytes. Erythromycin, moxifloxacin and doxycyclin displayed the strongest effects and changed mRNA-levels of the investigated genes up to 5.6-fold. Consistent with this, antibiotics and, in particular, moxifloxacin, regulated the TLR-and cytokine expression in activated PBMCs obtained from patients after open-heart surgery. Furthermore, piperacillin, doxycyclin and moxifloxacin inhibited the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Our results suggest that antibiotics regulate the immune response by modulating TLR- and cytokine expression as well as phagocytosis under septic conditions. Moxifloxacin, doxycycline and erythromycin were shown to possess the strongest immunomodulatory effects and these antibiotic classes should be considered for future immunomodulatory studies in sepsis. PMID:24239744

  6. [Micromonospora resistence to definite antibiotics and their ability to produce structurally analogous antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Bibikova, M V; Ivanitskaia, L P; Tikhonova, A S

    1980-01-01

    Thirty six cultures of Micromonospora freshly isolated from soil samples were studied with respect to their sensitivity to a number of antibiotics of various structures and modes of action. It was found that all of them were highly sensitive to penicillin, ristomycin, tetracycline, rifampicin, streptomycin, olivomycin, carminomycin and dactinomycin. Significant differences in sensitivity of the Micromonospora cultures were revealed only with respect to gentamicin, tobramicin, erythromycin and lincomycin. Seven cultures were resistant to gentamicin and tobramicin and sensitive to all of the other antibiotics. Broad spectrum antibiotics were isolated from these cultures. The study of the antibiotic chemistry showed that they were 2-desoxystreptamine-containing aminoglycosides. Two cultures proved to be resistant to erythromycin and lincomycin. When identified with the use of antibiotic resistant staphylococcal strains, the crude antibiotic substances isolated from these cultures appeared to be not active against staphylococci resistant to erythromycin and lincomycin. By their chromatograpi- behaviour the antibiotics were close to macrolides. Therefore, it was found that production of aminoglycoside and macrolide antibiotics was most characteristic of Micromonospora. A certain correlation between resistance of Micromonospora to these 2 antibiotic groups and capacity for their production was shown. PMID:7356302

  7. The two kinases, AbrC1 and AbrC2, of the atypical two-component system AbrC are needed to regulate antibiotic production and differentiation in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Rico, Sergio; Yepes, Ana; Franco-Echevarría, Elsa; Antoraz, Sergio; Santamaría, Ramón I.; Díaz, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) are the most important sensing mechanisms in bacteria. In Streptomyces, TCSs-mediated responses to environmental stimuli are involved in the regulation of antibiotic production. This study examines the individual role of two histidine kinases (HKs), AbrC1 and AbrC2, which form part of an atypical TCS in Streptomyces coelicolor. qRT-PCR analysis of the expression of both kinases demonstrated that both are expressed at similar levels in NB and NMMP media. Single deletion of abrC1 elicited a significant increase in antibiotic production, while deletion of abrC2 did not have any clear effect. The origin of this phenotype, probably related to the differential phosphorylation ability of the two kinases, was also explored indirectly, analyzing the toxic phenotypes associated with high levels of phosphorylated RR. The higher the AbrC3 regulator phosphorylation rate, the greater the cell toxicity. For the first time, the present work shows in Streptomyces the combined involvement of two different HKs in the response of a regulator to environmental signals. Regarding the possible applications of this research, the fact that an abrC1 deletion mutant overproduces three of the S. coelicolor antibiotics makes this strain an excellent candidate as a host for the heterologous production of secondary metabolites. PMID:26029189

  8. Cooperative Antibiotic Resistance in a Multi-Drug Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurtsev, Eugene; Dai, Lei; Gore, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is a significant health concern. A frequent mechanism of antibiotic resistance involves the production of an enzyme which inactivates the antibiotic. By inactivating the antibiotic, resistant cells can ``share'' their resistance with other cells in the bacterial population, suggesting that it may be possible to observe cooperation between strains that inactivate different antibiotics. Here, we experimentally track the population dynamics of two E. coli strains in the presence of two different antibiotics. We find that together the strains are able to grow in antibiotic concentrations that inhibit growth of either of the strains individually. We observe that even when there is stable coexistence between the two strains, the population size of each strain can undergo large oscillations. We expect that our results will provide insight into the evolution of antibiotic resistance and the evolutionary origin of phenotypic diversity and cooperative behaviors.

  9. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges.

    PubMed

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-06-29

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of "pathogen-specific antibiotics," in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  10. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges.

    PubMed

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of "pathogen-specific antibiotics," in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification. PMID:27367739

  11. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach-Nevo, Tamar; Baram, David; Bashan, Anat; Belousoff, Matthew; Breiner, Elinor; Davidovich, Chen; Cimicata, Giuseppe; Eyal, Zohar; Halfon, Yehuda; Krupkin, Miri; Matzov, Donna; Metz, Markus; Rufayda, Mruwat; Peretz, Moshe; Pick, Ophir; Pyetan, Erez; Rozenberg, Haim; Shalev-Benami, Moran; Wekselman, Itai; Zarivach, Raz; Zimmerman, Ella; Assis, Nofar; Bloch, Joel; Israeli, Hadar; Kalaora, Rinat; Lim, Lisha; Sade-Falk, Ofir; Shapira, Tal; Taha-Salaime, Leena; Tang, Hua; Yonath, Ada

    2016-01-01

    Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification. PMID:27367739

  12. Hydrophilic GO/Fe3O4/Au/PEG nanocomposites for highly selective enrichment of glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bo; Wu, Qi; Deng, Nan; Chen, Yuanbo; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-02-01

    GO/Fe3O4/Au/PEG nanocomposites were synthesized via bonding gold nanoparticles on magnetic graphene oxide using polyethylenimine as the reducing and immobilizing reagent, followed by thiol-terminal polyethylene glycol immobilization. With the use of this nanocomposite, 255 glycopeptides, mapped to 127 different glycoproteins, were identified from human serum, demonstrating its great potential for glycosylation analysis.GO/Fe3O4/Au/PEG nanocomposites were synthesized via bonding gold nanoparticles on magnetic graphene oxide using polyethylenimine as the reducing and immobilizing reagent, followed by thiol-terminal polyethylene glycol immobilization. With the use of this nanocomposite, 255 glycopeptides, mapped to 127 different glycoproteins, were identified from human serum, demonstrating its great potential for glycosylation analysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08126b

  13. Metabolic products of microorganisms. 225. Elloramycin, a new anthracycline-like antibiotic from Streptomyces olivaceus. Isolation, characterization, structure and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Drautz, H; Reuschenbach, P; Zähner, H; Rohr, J; Zeeck, A

    1985-10-01

    Elloramycin (1), a new antibiotic produced by Streptomyces olivaceus strain Tü 2353, was detected by chemical screening. The dark yellow compound, molecular formula C32H36O15, is weakly active against a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, especially streptomycetes and against stem cells of L-1210 leukemia. Acidic hydrolysis of the antibiotic liberated elloramycinone (3) as aglycone and 2,3,4-tri-O-methyl-L-rhamnose, which was identified as methyl glycoside 5b. The structure of elloramycin was established by comparison of the spectra (UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR) with those of the known tetracenomycin C (2), 3 and the fact that 2 and 3 gave the same tetramethyl ether after permethylation. Elloramycin is an anthracycline-like antibiotic, the aglycone resembles tetracenomycin C, the sugar is connected in a phenolic alpha-glycosidic linkage. PMID:3840789

  14. Metabolic products of microorganisms. 225. Elloramycin, a new anthracycline-like antibiotic from Streptomyces olivaceus. Isolation, characterization, structure and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Drautz, H; Reuschenbach, P; Zähner, H; Rohr, J; Zeeck, A

    1985-10-01

    Elloramycin (1), a new antibiotic produced by Streptomyces olivaceus strain Tü 2353, was detected by chemical screening. The dark yellow compound, molecular formula C32H36O15, is weakly active against a variety of Gram-positive bacteria, especially streptomycetes and against stem cells of L-1210 leukemia. Acidic hydrolysis of the antibiotic liberated elloramycinone (3) as aglycone and 2,3,4-tri-O-methyl-L-rhamnose, which was identified as methyl glycoside 5b. The structure of elloramycin was established by comparison of the spectra (UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR) with those of the known tetracenomycin C (2), 3 and the fact that 2 and 3 gave the same tetramethyl ether after permethylation. Elloramycin is an anthracycline-like antibiotic, the aglycone resembles tetracenomycin C, the sugar is connected in a phenolic alpha-glycosidic linkage.

  15. Biotic acts of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2013-01-01

    Biological functions of antibiotics are not limited to killing. The most likely function of antibiotics in natural microbial ecosystems is signaling. Does this signaling function of antibiotics also extend to the eukaryotic – in particular mammalian – cells? In this review, the host modulating properties of three classes of antibiotics (macrolides, tetracyclines, and β-lactams) will be briefly discussed. Antibiotics can be effective in treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases and pathological conditions other than those of infectious etiology and, in this capacity, may find widespread applications beyond the intended antimicrobial use. This use, however, should not compromise the primary function antibiotics are used for. The biological background for this inter-kingdom signaling is also discussed. PMID:23966991

  16. Immunology of O-glycosylated proteins: approaches to the design of a MUC1 glycopeptide-based tumor vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Franz-Georg; Ninkovic, Tanja

    2006-08-01

    Until about 1990 there was general consent about the assumption that only protein and peptide antigens have the capacity of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T-cell stimulation. Since about ten years evidence is now accumulating that carbohydrate-peptide epitopes do play a role in classical MHC-mediated immune responses. This holds true for glycopeptides, where the glycan chain is short and not located at an "anchor residue" needed for MHC interaction. T-cell recognition of O-glycosylated peptides is potentially of high biomedical significance, because it can mediate the immune protection against microorganisms, the vaccination in anti-tumor therapies, but also some aspects of autoimmunity. The epithelial type 1 transmembrane mucin MUC1 is established as a marker for monitoring recurrence of breast cancer and is a promising target for immunotherapeutic strategies to treat cancer by active specific immunization. Natural human immune responses to the tumor-associated glycoforms of the mucin indicate that antibody reactivities are more directed to glycopeptide than to non-glycosylated peptide epitopes. To overcome the weak immunogenicity of the natural target, heavily O-glycosylated MUC1, the question was addressed whether O-linked glycans remain intact during processing in the MHC class II pathway and interfere with endosomal processing and peptide presentation. Attempts were made to define on a biochemical level the structural requirements for an efficient endosomal proteolysis catalyzed by cathepsin L in antigen-presenting cells. Evidence based on work with CD4(+) T-hybridomas confirms that O-glycopeptides can be effectively presented to T-cells and that glycans can form integral parts of the TCR defined epitopes. Similar approaches are currently followed in the MHC class I pathway which aim at the identification of immunogenic glycopeptides generated by immunoproteasomes. PMID:16918445

  17. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    PubMed

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work.

  18. Antibiotics and the burn patient.

    PubMed

    Ravat, François; Le-Floch, Ronan; Vinsonneau, Christophe; Ainaud, Pierre; Bertin-Maghit, Marc; Carsin, Hervé; Perro, Gérard

    2011-02-01

    Infection is a major problem in burn care and especially when it is due to bacteria with hospital-acquired multi-resistance to antibiotics. Moreover, when these bacteria are Gram-negative organisms, the most effective molecules are 20 years old and there is little hope of any new product available even in the distant future. Therefore, it is obvious that currently available antibiotics should not be misused. With this aim in mind, the following review was conducted by a group of experts from the French Society for Burn Injuries (SFETB). It examined key points addressing the management of antibiotics for burn patients: when to use or not, time of onset, bactericidia, combination, adaptation, de-escalation, treatment duration and regimen based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of these compounds. The authors also considered antibioprophylaxis and some other key points such as: infection diagnosis criteria, bacterial inoculae and local treatment. French guidelines for the use of antibiotics in burn patients have been designed up from this work. PMID:20510518

  19. Identification and molecular phylogeny of coagulase-negative staphylococci isolates from Minas Frescal cheese in southeastern Brazil: Superantigenic toxin production and antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Casaes Nunes, Raquel Soares; Pires de Souza, Camilla; Pereira, Karen Signori; Del Aguila, Eduardo Mere; Flosi Paschoalin, Vânia Margaret

    2016-04-01

    Minas Frescal is a typical Brazilian fresh cheese and one of the most popular dairy products in the country. This white soft, semiskimmed, nonripened cheese with high moisture content is obtained by enzymatic coagulation of cow milk using calf rennet or coagulants, usually in industrial dairy plants, but is also manufactured in small farms. Contamination of Minas Frescal by several staphylococci has been frequently reported. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) strains are maybe the most harmful, as they are able to produce heat-stable enterotoxins with super antigenic activities in food matrices, especially in dairy products such as soft cheeses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of CNS strains in Minas Frescal marketed in southeastern Brazil concerning the risk of staphylococci food poisoning by the consumption of improperly manufactured cheese and the possibility of these food matrices being a reservoir of staphylococcal resistance to antimicrobials. Ten distinct CNS strains were found in 6 cheeses from distinct brands. The most frequent species were Staphylococcus saprophyticus (40%), Staphylococcus xylosus (30%), Staphylococcus sciuri (20%), and Staphylococcus piscifermentans (10%). Three strains were identified to the Staphylococcus genera. Three major species groups composed of 3 refined clusters were grouped by phylogenetic analyses with similarities over to 90%. All CNS strains carried multiple enterotoxin genes, with high incidence of sea and seb (90 and 70%, respectively), followed by sec/see, seh/sei, and sed with intermediate incidence (60, 50, and 40%, respectively), and, finally, seg/selk/selq/selr and selu with the lowest incidence (20 and 10%, respectively). Real-time reverse transcription PCR and ELISA assays confirmed the enteroxigenic character of the CNS strains, which expressed and produced the enterotoxins in vitro. The CNS strains showed multiresistance to antimicrobial agents such as β-lactams, vancomycin, and

  20. Anthracyclic products from Streptomyces erythromogenes nov. sp. Biotransformation of daunomycin (Dn) by an acellular preparation and synergism between Dn and some known antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, N M; Devys, M; Barbier, M

    1982-01-01

    The filtrate broth as well as mycelium of the new strain Streptomyces erythrochromogenes nov. sp. isolated from Saudi Arabian soil, produce the antitumor antibiotic daunomycin 1 and two anthracyclic derivatives: 7-deoxy 13-dihydrodaunomycinone 2 and 7-deoxy daunomycinone 4. The biotransformation of 1 to 2 and 4 by an acellular enzyme preparation from the strain was found to be NADPH and/or NADH dependent. Mixtures of daunomycin 1 with chloramphenicol or penicillin showed superior antimicrobial activities against Bacillus subtilis ICC strain, than the individual antibiotics. PMID:7113265

  1. Classification of congenital disorders of glycosylation based on analysis of transferrin glycopeptides by capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Albert; Giménez, Estela; Benavente, Fernando; Barbosa, José; Sanz-Nebot, Victoria

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we describe a multivariate data analysis approach for data exploration and classification of the complex and large data sets generated to study the alteration of human transferrin (Tf) N-glycopeptides in patients with congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). Tf from healthy individuals and two types of CDG patients (CDG-I and CDG-II) is purified by immunoextraction from serum samples before trypsin digestion and separation by capillary liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (CapLC-MS). Following a targeted data analysis approach, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) is applied to the relative abundance of Tf glycopeptide glycoforms obtained after integration of the extracted ion chromatograms of the different samples. The performance of PLS-DA for classification of the different samples and for providing a novel insight into Tf glycopeptide glycoforms alteration in CDGs is demonstrated. Only six out of fourteen of the detected glycoforms are enough for an accurate classification. This small glycoform set may be considered a sensitive and specific novel biomarker panel for CDGs. PMID:27591658

  2. Identification of new transformation products during enzymatic treatment of tetracycline and erythromycin antibiotics at laboratory scale by an on-line turbulent flow liquid-chromatography coupled to a high resolution mass spectrometer LTQ-Orbitrap.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Marta; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Couillerot, Olivier; Panigoni, Karine; de Gunzburg, Jean; Bayer, Sally; Czaja, Rico; Barceló, Damià

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the formation of transformation products (TPs) by the enzymatic degradation at laboratory scale of two highly consumed antibiotics: tetracycline (Tc) and erythromycin (ERY). The analysis of the samples was carried out by a fast and simple method based on the novel configuration of the on-line turbulent flow system coupled to a hybrid linear ion trap - high resolution mass spectrometer. The method was optimized and validated for the complete analysis of ERY, Tc and their transformation products within 10 min without any other sample manipulation. Furthermore, the applicability of the on-line procedure was evaluated for 25 additional antibiotics, covering a wide range of chemical classes in different environmental waters with satisfactory quality parameters. Degradation rates obtained for Tc by laccase enzyme and ERY by EreB esterase enzyme without the presence of mediators were ∼78% and ∼50%, respectively. Concerning the identification of TPs, three suspected compounds for Tc and five of ERY have been proposed. In the case of Tc, the tentative molecular formulas with errors mass within 2 ppm have been based on the hypothesis of dehydroxylation, (bi)demethylation and oxidation of the rings A and C as major reactions. In contrast, the major TP detected for ERY has been identified as the "dehydration ERY-A", with the same molecular formula of its parent compound. In addition, the evaluation of the antibiotic activity of the samples along the enzymatic treatments showed a decrease around 100% in both cases.

  3. How Nature Morphs Peptide Scaffolds into Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Elizabeth M.; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional notion that peptides are poor candidates for orally available drugs because of protease-sensitive peptide bonds, intrinsic hydrophilicity, and ionic charges contrasts with the diversity of antibiotic natural products with peptide-based frameworks that are synthesized and utilized by Nature. Several of these antibiotics, including penicillin and vancomycin, are employed to treat bacterial infections in humans and have been best-selling therapeutics for decades. Others might provide new platforms for the design of novel therapeutics to combat emerging antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:19058272

  4. Designing Safer and Greener Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andrew; Gathergood, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Since the production of the first pharmaceutically active molecules at the beginning of the 1900s, drug molecules and their metabolites have been observed in the environment in significant concentrations. In this review, the persistence of antibiotics in the environment and their associated effects on ecosystems, bacterial resistance and health effects will be examined. Solutions to these problems will also be discussed, including the pharmaceutical industries input, green chemistry, computer modeling and representative ionic liquid research. PMID:27029311

  5. Bacteriocins - exploring alternatives to antibiotics in mastitis treatment.

    PubMed

    Pieterse, Reneé; Todorov, Svetoslav D

    2010-07-01

    Mastitis is considered to be the most costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Management strategies involve the extensive use of antibiotics to treat and prevent this disease. Prophylactic dosages of antibiotics used in mastitis control programmes could select for strains with resistance to antibiotics. In addition, a strong drive towards reducing antibiotic residues in animal food products has lead to research in finding alternative antimicrobial agents. In this review we have focus on the pathogenesis of the mastitis in dairy cows, existing antibiotic treatments and possible alternative for application of bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of this disease.

  6. Bacteriocins – Exploring Alternatives to Antibiotics in Mastitis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pieterse, Reneé; Todorov, Svetoslav D.

    2010-01-01

    Mastitis is considered to be the most costly disease affecting the dairy industry. Management strategies involve the extensive use of antibiotics to treat and prevent this disease. Prophylactic dosages of antibiotics used in mastitis control programmes could select for strains with resistance to antibiotics. In addition, a strong drive towards reducing antibiotic residues in animal food products has lead to research in finding alternative antimicrobial agents. In this review we have focus on the pathogenesis of the mastitis in dairy cows, existing antibiotic treatments and possible alternative for application of bacteriocins from lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of this disease. PMID:24031528

  7. Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant E. coli in retail chicken: comparing conventional, organic, kosher, and raised without antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Price, Lance B; Hungate, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    Retail poultry products are known sources of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli, a major human health concern. Consumers have a range of choices for poultry, including conventional, organic, kosher, and raised without antibiotics (RWA) – designations that are perceived to indicate differences in quality and safety. However, whether these categories vary in the frequency of contamination with antibiotic-resistant E. coli is unknown. We examined the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant E. coli on raw chicken marketed as conventional, organic, kosher and RWA. From April – June 2012, we purchased 213 samples of raw chicken from 15 locations in the New York City metropolitan area. We screened E. coli isolates from each sample for resistance to 12 common antibiotics. Although the organic and RWA labels restrict the use of antibiotics, the frequency of antibiotic-resistant E. coli tended to be only slightly lower for RWA, and organic chicken was statistically indistinguishable from conventional products that have no restrictions. Kosher chicken had the highest frequency of antibiotic-resistant E. coli, nearly twice that of conventional products, a result that belies the historical roots of kosher as a means to ensure food safety. These results indicate that production methods influence the frequency of antibiotic-resistant E. coli on poultry products available to consumers. Future research to identify the specific practices that cause the high frequency of antibiotic-resistant E. coli in kosher chicken could promote efforts to reduce consumer exposure to this potential pathogen. PMID:24555073

  8. Sublethal Concentrations of Antibiotics Cause Shift to Anaerobic Metabolism in Listeria monocytogenes and Induce Phenotypes Linked to Antibiotic Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Gitte M; Fromberg, Arvid; Ng, Yin; Gram, Lone

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is exposed to antibiotics both during clinical treatment and in its saprophytic lifestyle. As one of the keys to successful treatment is continued antibiotic sensitivity, the purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations would affect the bacterial physiology and induce antibiotic tolerance. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that each of the four antibiotics tested caused an antibiotic-specific gene expression pattern related to mode-of-action of the particular antibiotic. All four antibiotics caused the same changes in expression of several metabolic genes indicating a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and higher ethanol production. A mutant in the bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase encoded by lmo1634 did not have altered antibiotic tolerance. However, a mutant in lmo1179 (eutE) encoding an aldehyde oxidoreductase where rerouting caused increased ethanol production was tolerant to three of four antibiotics tested. This shift in metabolism could be a survival strategy in response to antibiotics to avoid generation of ROS production from respiration by oxidation of NADH through ethanol production. The monocin locus encoding a cryptic prophage was induced by co-trimoxazole and repressed by ampicillin and gentamicin, and this correlated with an observed antibiotic-dependent biofilm formation. A monocin mutant (ΔlmaDCBA) had increased biofilm formation when exposed to increasing concentration of co-trimoxazole similar to the wild type, but was more tolerant to killing by co-trimoxazole and ampicillin. Thus, sublethal concentrations of antibiotics caused metabolic and physiological changes indicating that the organism is preparing to withstand lethal antibiotic concentrations.

  9. Sublethal Concentrations of Antibiotics Cause Shift to Anaerobic Metabolism in Listeria monocytogenes and Induce Phenotypes Linked to Antibiotic Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Gitte M.; Fromberg, Arvid; Ng, Yin; Gram, Lone

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is exposed to antibiotics both during clinical treatment and in its saprophytic lifestyle. As one of the keys to successful treatment is continued antibiotic sensitivity, the purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations would affect the bacterial physiology and induce antibiotic tolerance. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that each of the four antibiotics tested caused an antibiotic-specific gene expression pattern related to mode-of-action of the particular antibiotic. All four antibiotics caused the same changes in expression of several metabolic genes indicating a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and higher ethanol production. A mutant in the bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase encoded by lmo1634 did not have altered antibiotic tolerance. However, a mutant in lmo1179 (eutE) encoding an aldehyde oxidoreductase where rerouting caused increased ethanol production was tolerant to three of four antibiotics tested. This shift in metabolism could be a survival strategy in response to antibiotics to avoid generation of ROS production from respiration by oxidation of NADH through ethanol production. The monocin locus encoding a cryptic prophage was induced by co-trimoxazole and repressed by ampicillin and gentamicin, and this correlated with an observed antibiotic-dependent biofilm formation. A monocin mutant (ΔlmaDCBA) had increased biofilm formation when exposed to increasing concentration of co-trimoxazole similar to the wild type, but was more tolerant to killing by co-trimoxazole and ampicillin. Thus, sublethal concentrations of antibiotics caused metabolic and physiological changes indicating that the organism is preparing to withstand lethal antibiotic concentrations. PMID:27462313

  10. Sublethal Concentrations of Antibiotics Cause Shift to Anaerobic Metabolism in Listeria monocytogenes and Induce Phenotypes Linked to Antibiotic Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Gitte M; Fromberg, Arvid; Ng, Yin; Gram, Lone

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is exposed to antibiotics both during clinical treatment and in its saprophytic lifestyle. As one of the keys to successful treatment is continued antibiotic sensitivity, the purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations would affect the bacterial physiology and induce antibiotic tolerance. Transcriptomic analyses demonstrated that each of the four antibiotics tested caused an antibiotic-specific gene expression pattern related to mode-of-action of the particular antibiotic. All four antibiotics caused the same changes in expression of several metabolic genes indicating a shift from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism and higher ethanol production. A mutant in the bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase encoded by lmo1634 did not have altered antibiotic tolerance. However, a mutant in lmo1179 (eutE) encoding an aldehyde oxidoreductase where rerouting caused increased ethanol production was tolerant to three of four antibiotics tested. This shift in metabolism could be a survival strategy in response to antibiotics to avoid generation of ROS production from respiration by oxidation of NADH through ethanol production. The monocin locus encoding a cryptic prophage was induced by co-trimoxazole and repressed by ampicillin and gentamicin, and this correlated with an observed antibiotic-dependent biofilm formation. A monocin mutant (ΔlmaDCBA) had increased biofilm formation when exposed to increasing concentration of co-trimoxazole similar to the wild type, but was more tolerant to killing by co-trimoxazole and ampicillin. Thus, sublethal concentrations of antibiotics caused metabolic and physiological changes indicating that the organism is preparing to withstand lethal antibiotic concentrations. PMID:27462313

  11. Quantitative targeted and retrospective data analysis of relevant pesticides, antibiotics and mycotoxins in bakery products by liquid chromatography-single-stage Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Dominicis, Emiliano; Commissati, Italo; Gritti, Elisa; Catellani, Dante; Suman, Michele

    2015-01-01

    In addition to 'traditional' multi-residue and multi-contaminant multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometric techniques devoted to quantifying a list of targeted compounds, the global food industry requires non-targeted methods capable of detecting other possible potentially hazardous compounds. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography combined with a single-stage Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometer (UHPLC-HRMS Exactive™-Orbitrap Technology) was successfully exploited for the complete selective and quantitative determination of 33 target compounds within three major cross categories (pesticides, antibiotics and mycotoxins) in bakery matrices (specifically milk, wheat flour and mini-cakes). Resolution was set at 50 000 full width at half maximum (FWHM) to achieve the right compromise between an adequate scan speed and selectivity, allowing for the limitations related to the necessary generic sample preparation approach. An exact mass with tolerance of 5 ppm and minimum peak threshold of 10 000 units were fixed as the main identification conditions, including retention time and isotopic pattern as additional criteria devoted to greatly reducing the risk of false-positive findings. The full validation for all the target analytes was performed: linearity, intermediate repeatability and recovery (28 analytes within 70-120%) were positively assessed; furthermore, limits of quantification between 5 and 100 µg kg(-1) (with most of the analytes having a limit of detection below 6 µg kg(-1)) indicate good performance, which is compatible with almost all the regulatory needs. Naturally contaminated and fortified mini-cakes, prepared through combined use of industrial and pilot plant production lines, were analysed at two different concentration levels, obtaining good overall quantitative results and providing preliminary indications of the potential of full-scan HRMS cluster analysis. The effectiveness of this analytical approach was also tested in

  12. Quantitative targeted and retrospective data analysis of relevant pesticides, antibiotics and mycotoxins in bakery products by liquid chromatography-single-stage Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Dominicis, Emiliano; Commissati, Italo; Gritti, Elisa; Catellani, Dante; Suman, Michele

    2015-01-01

    In addition to 'traditional' multi-residue and multi-contaminant multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometric techniques devoted to quantifying a list of targeted compounds, the global food industry requires non-targeted methods capable of detecting other possible potentially hazardous compounds. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography combined with a single-stage Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometer (UHPLC-HRMS Exactive™-Orbitrap Technology) was successfully exploited for the complete selective and quantitative determination of 33 target compounds within three major cross categories (pesticides, antibiotics and mycotoxins) in bakery matrices (specifically milk, wheat flour and mini-cakes). Resolution was set at 50 000 full width at half maximum (FWHM) to achieve the right compromise between an adequate scan speed and selectivity, allowing for the limitations related to the necessary generic sample preparation approach. An exact mass with tolerance of 5 ppm and minimum peak threshold of 10 000 units were fixed as the main identification conditions, including retention time and isotopic pattern as additional criteria devoted to greatly reducing the risk of false-positive findings. The full validation for all the target analytes was performed: linearity, intermediate repeatability and recovery (28 analytes within 70-120%) were positively assessed; furthermore, limits of quantification between 5 and 100 µg kg(-1) (with most of the analytes having a limit of detection below 6 µg kg(-1)) indicate good performance, which is compatible with almost all the regulatory needs. Naturally contaminated and fortified mini-cakes, prepared through combined use of industrial and pilot plant production lines, were analysed at two different concentration levels, obtaining good overall quantitative results and providing preliminary indications of the potential of full-scan HRMS cluster analysis. The effectiveness of this analytical approach was also tested in

  13. Setamycin, a new antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Omura, S; Otoguro, K; Nishikiori, T; Oiwa, R; Iwai, Y

    1981-10-01

    A new antibiotic, setamycin, was extracted from the mycelia of a rare actinomycete strain KM-6054. The antibiotic, the molecular formula of which was found to be C42H61NO12 (tentative), is a yellow powder showing activity against some fungi, trichomonads and weakly against Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:7309621

  14. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  15. Metagenomics and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Garmendia, L; Hernandez, A; Sanchez, M B; Martinez, J L

    2012-07-01

    Most of the bacterial species that form part of the biosphere have never been cultivated. In this situation, a comprehensive study of bacterial communities requires the utilization of non-culture-based methods, which have been named metagenomics. In this paper we review the use of different metagenomic techniques for understanding the effect of antibiotics on microbial communities, to synthesize new antimicrobial compounds and to analyse the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in different ecosystems. These techniques include functional metagenomics, which serves to find new antibiotics or new antibiotic resistance genes, and descriptive metagenomics, which serves to analyse changes in the composition of the microbiota and to track the presence and abundance of already known antibiotic resistance genes in different ecosystems.

  16. High Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Serum Proteins using Glycopeptide Capture and Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hui; Yi, Eugene C.; Li, Xiao-jun; Mallick, Parag; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Kemp, Christopher; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2005-02-01

    It is expected that the composition of the serum proteome can provide valuable information about the state of the human body in health and disease, and that this information can be extracted via quantitative proteomic measurements. Suitable proteomic techniques need to be sensitive, reproducible and robust to detect potential biomarkers below the level of highly expressed proteins, to generate data sets that are comparable between experiments and laboratories, and have high throughput to support statistical studies. In this paper, we report a method for high throughput quantitative analysis of serum proteins. It consists of the selective isolation of peptides that are N-linked glycosylated in the intact protein, the analysis of these, no de-glycosylated peptides by LC-ESI-MS, and the comparative analysis of the resulting patterns. By focusing selectively on a few formerly N-linked glycopeptides per serum protein, the complexity of the analyte sample is significantly reduced and the sensitivity and throughput of serum proteome analysis are increased compared with the analysis of total tryptic peptides from unfractionated samples. We provide data that document the performance of the method and show that sera from untreated normal mice and genetically identical mice with carcinogen induced skin cancer can be unambiguously discriminated using unsupervised clustering of the resulting peptide patterns. We further identify, by tandem mass spectrometry, some of the peptides that were consistently elevated in cancer mice compared to their control littermates.

  17. Antiaging Glycopeptide Protects Human Islets Against Tacrolimus-Related Injury and Facilitates Engraftment in Mice.

    PubMed

    Gala-Lopez, Boris L; Pepper, Andrew R; Pawlick, Rena L; O'Gorman, Doug; Kin, Tatsuya; Bruni, Antonio; Abualhassan, Nasser; Bral, Mariusz; Bautista, Austin; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; Young, Lachlan G; MacDonald, Patrick E; Shapiro, A M James

    2016-02-01

    Clinical islet transplantation has become an established treatment modality for selected patients with type 1 diabetes. However, a large proportion of transplanted islets is lost through multiple factors, including immunosuppressant-related toxicity, often requiring more than one donor to achieve insulin independence. On the basis of the cytoprotective capabilities of antifreeze proteins (AFPs), we hypothesized that supplementation of islets with synthetic AFP analog antiaging glycopeptide (AAGP) would enhance posttransplant engraftment and function and protect against tacrolimus (Tac) toxicity. In vitro and in vivo islet Tac exposure elicited significant but reversible reduction in insulin secretion in both mouse and human islets. Supplementation with AAGP resulted in improvement of islet survival (Tac(+) vs. Tac+AAGP, 31.5% vs. 67.6%, P < 0.01) coupled with better insulin secretion (area under the curve: Tac(+) vs. Tac+AAGP, 7.3 vs. 129.2 mmol/L/60 min, P < 0.001). The addition of AAGP reduced oxidative stress, enhanced insulin exocytosis, improved apoptosis, and improved engraftment in mice by decreasing expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, keratinocyte chemokine, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Finally, transplant efficacy was superior in the Tac+AAGP group and was similar to islets not exposed to Tac, despite receiving continuous treatment for a limited time. Thus, supplementation with AAGP during culture improves islet potency and attenuates long-term Tac-induced graft dysfunction. PMID:26581595

  18. High Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Serum Proteins Using Glycopeptide Capture and Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hui; Yi, Eugene C.; Li, Xiao-jun; Mallick, Parag; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Aebersold, Reudi

    2005-02-01

    It is expected that the composition of the serum proteome can provide valuable information about the state of the human body in health and disease and that this information can be extracted via quantitative proteomic measurements. Suitable proteomic techniques need to be sensitive, reproducible, and robust to detect potential biomarkers below the level of highly expressed proteins, generate data sets that are comparable between experiments and laboratories, and have high throughput to support statistical studies. Here we report a method for high throughput quantitative analysis of serum proteins. It consists of the selective isolation of peptides that are N-linked glycosylated in the intact protein, the analysis of these now deglycosylated peptides by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and the comparative analysis of the resulting patterns. By focusing selectively on a few formerly N-linked glycopeptides per serum protein, the complexity of the analyte sample is significantly reduced and the sensitivity and throughput of serum proteome analysis are increased compared with the analysis of total tryptic peptides from unfractionated samples. We provide data that document the performance of the method and show that sera from untreated normal mice and genetically identical mice with carcinogen-induced skin cancer can be unambiguously discriminated using unsupervised clustering of the resulting peptide patterns. We further identify, by tandem mass spectrometry, some of the peptides that were consistently elevated in cancer mice compared with their control littermates.

  19. Can amphipathic helices influence the CNS antinociceptive activity of glycopeptides related to β-endorphin?

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxue; St Louis, Lindsay; Knapp, Brian I; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Anglin, Bobbi; Giuvelis, Denise; Bidlack, Jean M; Bilsky, Edward J; Polt, Robin

    2014-03-27

    Glycosylated β-endorphin analogues of various amphipathicity were studied in vitro and in vivo in mice. Opioid binding affinities of the O-linked glycopeptides (mono- or disaccharides) and unglycosylated peptide controls were measured in human receptors expressed in CHO cells. All were pan-agonists, binding to μ-, δ-, or κ-opioid receptors in the low nanomolar range (2.2-35 nM K(i)'s). The glycoside moiety was required for intravenous (i.v.) but not for intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) activity. Circular dichroism and NMR indicated the degree of helicity in H2O, aqueous trifluoroethanol, or micelles. Glycosylation was essential for activity after i.v. administration. It was possible to manipulate the degree of helicity by the alteration of only two amino acid residues in the helical address region of the β-endorphin analogues without destroying μ-, δ-, or κ-agonism, but the antinociceptive activity after i.v. administration could not be directly correlated to the degree of helicity in micelles. PMID:24576160

  20. Integrated glycoprotein immobilization method for glycopeptide and glycan analysis of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Mishra, Sumita; Chen, Lijun; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Chan, Daniel W; Chatterjee, Subroto; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins can have a major role in disease initiation and progression. Incredible efforts have recently been made to study the regulation of glycoproteins for disease prognosis and diagnosis. It is essential to elucidate glycans and intact glycoproteins to understand the role of glycosylation in diseases. Sialylated N-glycans play crucial roles in physiological and pathological processes; however, it is laborious to study sialylated glycoproteins due to the labile nature of sialic acid residues. In this study, an integrated platform is developed for the analysis of intact glycoproteins and glycans using a chemoenzymatic approach for immobilization and derivatization of sialic acids. N-Glycans, deglycosylated proteins, and intact glycoproteins from heart tissues of wild type (WT) and transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse models were analyzed. We identified 291 unique glycopeptides from 195 glycoproteins; the comparative studies between WT and TAC mice indicate the overexpression of extracellular proteins for heart matrix remodeling and the down-regulation of proteins associated with energy metabolism in cardiac hypertrophy. The integrated platform is a powerful tool for the analysis of glycans and glycoproteins in the discovery of potential cardiac hypertrophy biomarkers.

  1. In vitro activity and spectrum of LY333328, a novel glycopeptide derivative.

    PubMed

    Jones, R N; Barrett, M S; Erwin, M E

    1997-02-01

    Reference methods were used to determine the potency of LY333328, a semisynthetic glycopeptide derivative with a key N-alkylation substitution, against 833 strains (393 gram-positive strains and representative gram-negative bacilli) with various defined resistance mechanisms. The MICs at which 90% of the isolates are inhibited (MIC90S) (in micrograms per milliliter) of LY333328 and the percentages of strains at < or = 8 micrograms/ml were as follows: for oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, 2 and 100%, and for oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 4 and 100%; for oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus epidermis, 4 and 100%, and for oxacillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, 8 and 96%; for Streptococcus serogroups A, B, C, and G, 0.25 to 1 and 100%; for Streptococcus pneumoniae < or = 0.015 to 0.06 and 100%; for Enterococcus faecalis, 2 and 100%; and for vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecium, 0.25 and 100%, and for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, 4 and 100%. LY333328 was not active (MIC50, > or = 16 micrograms/ml) against more than 400 representative strains of Enterobacteriaceae, pseudomonads, Acinetobacter spp., Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, pathogenic Neisseria spp., and anaerobic gram-negative bacilli. Gram-positive anaerobes were LY333328 susceptible (MICs, < or = 2 micrograms/ml). Test methods and conditions may have affected MICs of LY333328, with most (species variation) agar dilution MICs being greater than the broth microdilution MICs. PMID:9021216

  2. Peptide and glycopeptide dendrimer apple trees as enzyme models and for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Darbre, Tamis

    2012-02-28

    Solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) provides peptides with a dendritic topology when diamino acids are introduced in the sequences. Peptide dendrimers with one to three amino acids between branches can be prepared with up to 38 amino acids (MW ~ 5,000 Da). Larger peptide dendrimers (MW ~ 30,000) were obtained by a multivalent chloroacetyl cysteine (ClAc) ligation. Structural studies of peptide dendrimers by CD, FT-IR, NMR and molecular dynamics reveal molten globule states containing up to 50% of α-helix. Esterase and aldolase peptide dendrimers displaying dendritic effects and enzyme kinetics (k(cat)/k(uncat) ~ 10(5)) were designed or discovered by screening large combinatorial libraries. Strong ligands for Pseudomonas aeruginosa lectins LecA and LecB able to inhibit biofilm formation were obtained with glycopeptide dendrimers. Efficient ligands for cobalamin, cytotoxic colchicine conjugates and antimicrobial peptide dendrimers were also developed showing the versatility of dendritic peptides. Complementing the multivalency, the amino acid composition of the dendrimers strongly influenced the catalytic or biological activity obtained demonstrating the importance of the "apple tree" configuration for protein-like function in peptide dendrimers.

  3. The Antitumor Effect of Gekko Sulfated Glycopeptide by Inhibiting bFGF-Induced Lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiu-Li; Man, Ya-Nan; Hao, Jian; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Liu, Chang; Yang, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To study the antilymphangiogenesis effect of Gekko Sulfated Glycopeptide (GSPP) on human lymphatic endothelial cells (hLECs). Methods. MTS was conducted to confirm the antiproliferation effect of GSPP on hLECs; flow cytometry was employed to detect hLECs cycle distribution; the antimigration effect of GSPP on hLECs was investigated by wound healing experiment and transwell experiment; tube formation assay was used to examine its inhibitory effect on the lymphangiogenesis; western blotting was conducted to detect the expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (Erk1/2) and p-Erk1/2 after GSPP and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) treatment. Nude mice models were established to investigate the antitumor effect of GSPP in vivo. Decreased lymphangiogenesis caused by GSPP in vivo was verified by immunohistochemical staining. Results. In vitro, GSPP (10 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL) significantly inhibited bFGF-induced hLECs proliferation, migration, and tube-like structure formation (P < 0.05) and antagonized the phosphorylation activation of Erk1/2 induced by bFGF. In vivo, GSPP treatment (200 mg/kg/d) not only inhibited the growth of colon carcinoma, but also inhibited the tumor lymphangiogenesis. Conclusion. GSPP possesses the antitumor ability by inhibiting bFGF-inducing lymphangiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, which may further inhibit tumor lymphatic metastasis. PMID:27190997

  4. The Antitumor Effect of Gekko Sulfated Glycopeptide by Inhibiting bFGF-Induced Lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiu-Li; Man, Ya-Nan; Hao, Jian; Zhu, Cui-Hong; Liu, Chang; Yang, Xue; Wu, Xiong-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To study the antilymphangiogenesis effect of Gekko Sulfated Glycopeptide (GSPP) on human lymphatic endothelial cells (hLECs). Methods. MTS was conducted to confirm the antiproliferation effect of GSPP on hLECs; flow cytometry was employed to detect hLECs cycle distribution; the antimigration effect of GSPP on hLECs was investigated by wound healing experiment and transwell experiment; tube formation assay was used to examine its inhibitory effect on the lymphangiogenesis; western blotting was conducted to detect the expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (Erk1/2) and p-Erk1/2 after GSPP and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) treatment. Nude mice models were established to investigate the antitumor effect of GSPP in vivo. Decreased lymphangiogenesis caused by GSPP in vivo was verified by immunohistochemical staining. Results. In vitro, GSPP (10 μg/mL, 100 μg/mL) significantly inhibited bFGF-induced hLECs proliferation, migration, and tube-like structure formation (P < 0.05) and antagonized the phosphorylation activation of Erk1/2 induced by bFGF. In vivo, GSPP treatment (200 mg/kg/d) not only inhibited the growth of colon carcinoma, but also inhibited the tumor lymphangiogenesis. Conclusion. GSPP possesses the antitumor ability by inhibiting bFGF-inducing lymphangiogenesis in vitro and in vivo, which may further inhibit tumor lymphatic metastasis. PMID:27190997

  5. Nonmedical Uses of Antibiotics: Time to Restrict Their Use?

    PubMed

    Meek, Richard William; Vyas, Hrushi; Piddock, Laura Jane Violet

    2015-10-01

    The global crisis of antibiotic resistance has reached a point where, if action is not taken, human medicine will enter a postantibiotic world and simple injuries could once again be life threatening. New antibiotics are needed urgently, but better use of existing agents is just as important. More appropriate use of antibiotics in medicine is vital, but the extensive use of antibiotics outside medical settings is often overlooked. Antibiotics are commonly used in animal husbandry, bee-keeping, fish farming and other forms of aquaculture, ethanol production, horticulture, antifouling paints, food preservation, and domestically. This provides multiple opportunities for the selection and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Given the current crisis, it is vital that the nonmedical use of antibiotics is critically examined and that any nonessential use halted. PMID:26444324

  6. Nonmedical Uses of Antibiotics: Time to Restrict Their Use?

    PubMed

    Meek, Richard William; Vyas, Hrushi; Piddock, Laura Jane Violet

    2015-10-01

    The global crisis of antibiotic resistance has reached a point where, if action is not taken, human medicine will enter a postantibiotic world and simple injuries could once again be life threatening. New antibiotics are needed urgently, but better use of existing agents is just as important. More appropriate use of antibiotics in medicine is vital, but the extensive use of antibiotics outside medical settings is often overlooked. Antibiotics are commonly used in animal husbandry, bee-keeping, fish farming and other forms of aquaculture, ethanol production, horticulture, antifouling paints, food preservation, and domestically. This provides multiple opportunities for the selection and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Given the current crisis, it is vital that the nonmedical use of antibiotics is critically examined and that any nonessential use halted.

  7. Nonmedical Uses of Antibiotics: Time to Restrict Their Use?

    PubMed Central

    Meek, Richard William; Vyas, Hrushi; Piddock, Laura Jane Violet

    2015-01-01

    The global crisis of antibiotic resistance has reached a point where, if action is not taken, human medicine will enter a postantibiotic world and simple injuries could once again be life threatening. New antibiotics are needed urgently, but better use of existing agents is just as important. More appropriate use of antibiotics in medicine is vital, but the extensive use of antibiotics outside medical settings is often overlooked. Antibiotics are commonly used in animal husbandry, bee-keeping, fish farming and other forms of aquaculture, ethanol production, horticulture, antifouling paints, food preservation, and domestically. This provides multiple opportunities for the selection and spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Given the current crisis, it is vital that the nonmedical use of antibiotics is critically examined and that any nonessential use halted. PMID:26444324

  8. Longitudinal monitoring of immunoglobulin A glycosylation during pregnancy by simultaneous MALDI-FTICR-MS analysis of N- and O-glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Bondt, Albert; Nicolardi, Simone; Jansen, Bas C.; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Blank, Dennis; Kammeijer, Guinevere S. M.; Kozak, Radoslaw P.; Fernandes, Daryl L.; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.; van der Burgt, Yuri E. M.; Dolhain, Radboud J. E. M.; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a glycoprotein of which altered glycosylation has been associated with several pathologies. Conventional methods for IgA N- and O-glycosylation analysis are tedious, thus limiting such analyses to small sample sizes. Here we present a high-throughput strategy for the simultaneous analysis of serum-derived IgA1 N- and O-glycopeptides using matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (MALDI-FTICR) mass spectrometry (MS). Six non-fucosylated diantennary complex type glycoforms were detected on the Asn144-containing glycopeptide. Thirteen distinct glycoforms were identified for the Asn340-containing tailpiece glycopeptide, mainly of the diantennary complex type, and low amounts of triantennary glycoforms. Simultaneously with these N-glycopeptides, 53 compositional glycoforms of the hinge region O-glycopeptide were profiled in a single high resolution MALDI-FTICR spectrum. Since many pregnancy associated changes have been recognized for immunoglobulin G, we sought to demonstrate the clinical applicability of this method in a cohort of 29 pregnant women, from whom samples were collected at three time points during pregnancy and three time points after delivery. Pregnancy associated changes of N-glycan bisection were different for IgA1 as compared to IgG-Fc described earlier. We foresee further applications of the developed method for larger patient cohorts to study IgA N- and O-glycosylation changes in pathologies. PMID:27302155

  9. Longitudinal monitoring of immunoglobulin A glycosylation during pregnancy by simultaneous MALDI-FTICR-MS analysis of N- and O-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Bondt, Albert; Nicolardi, Simone; Jansen, Bas C; Stavenhagen, Kathrin; Blank, Dennis; Kammeijer, Guinevere S M; Kozak, Radoslaw P; Fernandes, Daryl L; Hensbergen, Paul J; Hazes, Johanna M W; van der Burgt, Yuri E M; Dolhain, Radboud J E M; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a glycoprotein of which altered glycosylation has been associated with several pathologies. Conventional methods for IgA N- and O-glycosylation analysis are tedious, thus limiting such analyses to small sample sizes. Here we present a high-throughput strategy for the simultaneous analysis of serum-derived IgA1 N- and O-glycopeptides using matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionisation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (MALDI-FTICR) mass spectrometry (MS). Six non-fucosylated diantennary complex type glycoforms were detected on the Asn144-containing glycopeptide. Thirteen distinct glycoforms were identified for the Asn340-containing tailpiece glycopeptide, mainly of the diantennary complex type, and low amounts of triantennary glycoforms. Simultaneously with these N-glycopeptides, 53 compositional glycoforms of the hinge region O-glycopeptide were profiled in a single high resolution MALDI-FTICR spectrum. Since many pregnancy associated changes have been recognized for immunoglobulin G, we sought to demonstrate the clinical applicability of this method in a cohort of 29 pregnant women, from whom samples were collected at three time points during pregnancy and three time points after delivery. Pregnancy associated changes of N-glycan bisection were different for IgA1 as compared to IgG-Fc described earlier. We foresee further applications of the developed method for larger patient cohorts to study IgA N- and O-glycosylation changes in pathologies. PMID:27302155

  10. Supercharging Reagent for Enhanced Liquid Chromatographic Separation and Charging of Sialylated and High-Molecular-Weight Glycopeptides for NanoHPLC-ESI-MS/MS Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Haeuptle, Micha A; Aebi, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in proteomic techniques have led to the development of mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods to characterize site-specific glycosylation of proteins. However, appropriate analytical tools to characterize acidic and high-molecular-weight (hMW) glycopeptides are still lacking. In this study, we demonstrate that the addition of supercharging reagent, m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), into mobile phases greatly facilitates the analysis of acidic and hMW glycopeptides. Using commercial glycoproteins, we demonstrated that in the presence of m-NBA the charge state of sialylated glycopeptides increased and the chromatographic separation of neutral and acidic glycopeptides revealed a remarkable improvement. Next, we applied this system to the characterization of a glycoconjugate vaccine candidate consisting of a genetically detoxified exotoxin A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa covalently linked to Shigella flexneri type 2a O-antigen (Sf2E) produced by engineered Escherichia coli. The addition of m-NBA, allowed us to identify peptides with glycan chains of unprecedented size, up to 20 repeat units (98 monosaccharides). Our results indicated that incorporation of m-NBA into reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) solvents improves sensitivity, charging, and chromatographic resolution for acidic and hMW glycopeptides. PMID:27487254

  11. Supercharging Reagent for Enhanced Liquid Chromatographic Separation and Charging of Sialylated and High-Molecular-Weight Glycopeptides for NanoHPLC-ESI-MS/MS Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Haeuptle, Micha A; Aebi, Markus

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in proteomic techniques have led to the development of mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods to characterize site-specific glycosylation of proteins. However, appropriate analytical tools to characterize acidic and high-molecular-weight (hMW) glycopeptides are still lacking. In this study, we demonstrate that the addition of supercharging reagent, m-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), into mobile phases greatly facilitates the analysis of acidic and hMW glycopeptides. Using commercial glycoproteins, we demonstrated that in the presence of m-NBA the charge state of sialylated glycopeptides increased and the chromatographic separation of neutral and acidic glycopeptides revealed a remarkable improvement. Next, we applied this system to the characterization of a glycoconjugate vaccine candidate consisting of a genetically detoxified exotoxin A of Pseudomonas aeruginosa covalently linked to Shigella flexneri type 2a O-antigen (Sf2E) produced by engineered Escherichia coli. The addition of m-NBA, allowed us to identify peptides with glycan chains of unprecedented size, up to 20 repeat units (98 monosaccharides). Our results indicated that incorporation of m-NBA into reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) solvents improves sensitivity, charging, and chromatographic resolution for acidic and hMW glycopeptides.

  12. Semi-Automated Identification of N-Glycopeptides by Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography, nano-Reverse-Phase LC-MS/MS, and Glycan Database Search

    PubMed Central

    Pompach, Petr; Chandler, Kevin B.; Lan, Renny; Edwards, Nathan; Goldman, Radoslav

    2012-01-01

    Glycoproteins fulfill many indispensable biological functions and changes in protein glycosylation have been observed in various diseases. Improved analytical methods are needed to allow a complete characterization of this complex and common posttranslational modification. In this study, we present a workflow for the analysis of the microheterogeneity of N-glycoproteins which couples hydrophilic interaction and nano-reverse-phase C18 chromatography to tandem QTOF mass spectrometric analysis. A glycan database search program, GlycoPeptideSearch, was developed to match N-glycopeptide MS/MS spectra with the glycopeptides comprised of a glycan drawn from the GlycomeDB glycan structure database and a peptide from a user-specified set of potentially glycosylated peptides. Application of the workflow to human haptoglobin and hemopexin, two microheterogeneous N-glycoproteins, identified a total of 57 distinct site-specific glycoforms in the case of haptoglobin and 14 site-specific glycoforms of hemopexin. Using glycan oxonium ions, peptide-characteristic glycopeptide fragment ions, and by collapsing topologically redundant glycans, the search software was able to make unique N-glycopeptide assignments for 51% of assigned spectra, with the remaining assignments primarily representing isobaric topological rearrangements. The optimized workflow, coupled with GlycoPeptideSearch, is expected to make high-throughput semi-automated glycopeptide identification feasible for a wide range of users. PMID:22239659

  13. Presence and in vivo biosynthesis of fragments of CPP (the C-terminal glycopeptide of the rat vasopressin precursor) in the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system

    SciTech Connect

    Seger, M.A.; Burbach, J.P.

    1987-09-01

    The existence and rate of formation of fragments of the 39-residue C-terminal glycopeptide of propressophysin (CPP1-39) was investigated in the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal system. Newly-prepared antisera to CPP were used to confirm the existence of smaller C-terminal fragments derived from CPP1-39. Radiolabelled fucose was injected into rats in vivo into the area of the supraoptic nucleus, and the labelled peptides formed in the neurohypophysis were examined at various time intervals up to five weeks after the injection. The products derived from the neurohypophyseal hormone precursors were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography. The level of the major immunoreactive C-terminal fragment (CPP22-39) was constant and represented about 5% of the intact CPP1-39 in the neurohypophysis. The appearance of newly-synthesized N-terminal fragment of CPP1-39 occurred only after 3 or 4 days. This fucose labelled fragment increased slowly thereafter until it reached the same level as the CPP C-terminal fragment immunoreactivity between 21 and 28 days after injection. The results suggest that CPP1-39 is extremely stable in the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal neurons, and that the cleavage at Arg21-Leu22 is a delayed proteolytic event in the magnocellular neurons of the SON.

  14. Lysozyme as an alternative to antibiotics in swine feed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics have been fed at subtherapeutic levels to swine as growth promoters for more than 60 years, and the majority of swine produced in the U.S. receive antibiotics in their feed at some point in their production cycle. These compounds benefit the producers by minimizing production losses by ...

  15. Infectious prosthetic hip joint loosening: bacterial species involved in its aetiology and their antibiotic resistance profiles against antibiotics recommended for the therapy of implant-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Bogut, Agnieszka; Niedźwiadek, Justyna; Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz; Marczyński, Wojciech; Kozioł-Montewka, Maria

    2014-04-01

    Reliable microbiological diagnosis along with surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy are key elements in the management of prosthetic-joint infections (PJIs). The purpose of this study was to characterize antibiotic resistance profiles of bacteria involved in the aetiology of PJIs. A total of 33 bacterial isolates cultured from 31 patients undergoing exchange of total hip prostheses were analyzed. The diagnostic approach toward isolation of prosthesis- associated microorganisms included sonication of retrieved implants and conventional cultures of periprosthetic tissues and synovial fluid. The in vitro resistance profiles of bacterial isolates were determined in relation to antibiotics recommended for the therapy of PJIs using the disc diffusion method, E-tests(®) and broth microdilution system. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were predominant microorganisms followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae, Streptococcus mitis, and Propionibacterium acnes. Twenty out of 30 and 12 out of 30 staphylococcal isolates were methicillin- and multi-drug resistant, respectively. Only two isolates were rifampicinresistant. All staphylococci were susceptible to glycopeptides and linezolid. This paper stresses the pathogenic role of staphylococci in patients suffering from implant loosening and reports high methicillin- and multidrug-resistance rates in these bacteria. Hence, antimicrobial susceptibility tests of individual bacterial isolates must always be performed to guide selection of the optimal therapeutic option.

  16. Antibiotic resistance shaping multi-level population biology of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Baquero, Fernando; Tedim, Ana P.; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics have natural functions, mostly involving cell-to-cell signaling networks. The anthropogenic production of antibiotics, and its release in the microbiosphere results in a disturbance of these networks, antibiotic resistance tending to preserve its integrity. The cost of such adaptation is the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes, and of all genetic and cellular vehicles in which these genes are located. Selection of the combinations of the different evolutionary units (genes, integrons, transposons, plasmids, cells, communities and microbiomes, hosts) is highly asymmetrical. Each unit of selection is a self-interested entity, exploiting the higher hierarchical unit for its own benefit, but in doing so the higher hierarchical unit might acquire critical traits for its spread because of the exploitation of the lower hierarchical unit. This interactive trade-off shapes the population biology of antibiotic resistance, a composed-complex array of the independent “population biologies.” Antibiotics modify the abundance and the interactive field of each of these units. Antibiotics increase the number and evolvability of “clinical” antibiotic resistance genes, but probably also many other genes with different primary functions but with a resistance phenotype present in the environmental resistome. Antibiotics influence the abundance, modularity, and spread of integrons, transposons, and plasmids, mostly acting on structures present before the antibiotic era. Antibiotics enrich particular bacterial lineages and clones and contribute to local clonalization processes. Antibiotics amplify particular genetic exchange communities sharing antibiotic resistance genes and platforms within microbiomes. In particular human or animal hosts, the microbiomic composition might facilitate the interactions between evolutionary units involved in antibiotic resistance. The understanding of antibiotic resistance implies expanding our knowledge on multi

  17. Solving the Antibiotic Crisis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2015-02-13

    Antibiotics are essential for both treating and preventing infectious diseases. Paradoxically, despite their importance as pillars of modern medicine, we are in danger of losing antibiotics because of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms throughout all pathogenic microbes. This fact, coupled with an inability to bring new drugs to market at a pace that matches resistance, has resulted in a crisis of global proportion. Solving this crisis requires the actions of many stakeholders, but chemists, chemical biologists, and microbiologists must drive the scientific innovation that is required to maintain our antibiotic arsenal. This innovation requires (1) a deep understanding of the evolution and reservoirs of resistance; (2) full knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic action and resistance; (3) the discovery of chemical and genetic probes of antibiotic action and resistance; (4) the integration of systems biology into antibiotic discovery; and (5) the discovery of new antimicrobial chemical matter. Addressing these pressing scientific gaps will ensure that we can meet the antibiotic crisis with creativity and purpose. PMID:27622298

  18. Resistance to Antibiotics and Antifungal Medicinal Products: Can Complementary and Alternative Medicine Help Solve the Problem in Common Infection Diseases? The Introduction of a Dutch Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Kok, Esther T; Jong, Miek C; Gravendeel, Barbara; Van Leeuwen, Willem B; Baars, Erik W

    2015-01-01

    The increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, rising numbers of deaths and costs associated with this, and the fact that hardly any new antimicrobial drugs have been developed during the last decade have increased the interest in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapeutic interventions, if proven safe and effective. Observational studies on clinical CAM practices demonstrate positive effects of treatment of infections with CAM therapies (clinical effects, patient satisfaction) in combination with small percentages of antibiotics prescription. However, Cochrane reviews and other studies demonstrate that in most instances the quality of clinical trials on CAM treatment of infections is currently too low to provide sufficient evidence. Therefore a Dutch consortium on (in vitro and clinical) scientific research on CAM and antibiotic resistance has been formed. The aim and objective of the consortium is to establish an enduring partnership and to develop expertise to further develop and investigate safe and effective CAM treatments for infectious diseases of humans (and animals). A first ongoing project on the development of safe and effective biobased CAM antimycotics in women with (recurrent) vaginal candidiasis infection is introduced. PMID:26539227

  19. Resistance to Antibiotics and Antifungal Medicinal Products: Can Complementary and Alternative Medicine Help Solve the Problem in Common Infection Diseases? The Introduction of a Dutch Research Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Esther T.; Jong, Miek C.; Gravendeel, Barbara; Van Leeuwen, Willem B.; Baars, Erik W.

    2015-01-01

    The increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, rising numbers of deaths and costs associated with this, and the fact that hardly any new antimicrobial drugs have been developed during the last decade have increased the interest in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapeutic interventions, if proven safe and effective. Observational studies on clinical CAM practices demonstrate positive effects of treatment of infections with CAM therapies (clinical effects, patient satisfaction) in combination with small percentages of antibiotics prescription. However, Cochrane reviews and other studies demonstrate that in most instances the quality of clinical trials on CAM treatment of infections is currently too low to provide sufficient evidence. Therefore a Dutch consortium on (in vitro and clinical) scientific research on CAM and antibiotic resistance has been formed. The aim and objective of the consortium is to establish an enduring partnership and to develop expertise to further develop and investigate safe and effective CAM treatments for infectious diseases of humans (and animals). A first ongoing project on the development of safe and effective biobased CAM antimycotics in women with (recurrent) vaginal candidiasis infection is introduced. PMID:26539227

  20. Antibiotic Application and Emergence of Multiple Antibiotic Resistance (MAR) in Global Catfish Aquaculture.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Li-Oon; Effarizah, M E; Goni, Abatcha Mustapha; Rusul, Gulam

    2016-06-01

    Catfish is one of the most cultivated species worldwide. Antibiotics are usually used in catfish farming as therapeutic and prophylactic agents. In the USA, only oxytetracycline, a combination of sulfadimethoxine and ormetoprim, and florfenicol are approved by the Food Drug Administration for specific fish species (e.g., catfish and salmonids) and their specific diseases. Misuse of antibiotics as prophylactic agents in disease prevention, however, is common and contributes in the development of antibiotic resistance. Various studies had reported on antibiotic residues and/or resistance in farmed species, feral fish, water column, sediments, and, in a lesser content, among farm workers. Ninety percent of the world aquaculture production is carried out in developing countries, which lack regulations and enforcement on the use of antibiotics. Hence, efforts are needed to promote the development and enforcement of such a regulatory structure. Alternatives to antibiotics such as antibacterial vaccines, bacteriophages and their lysins, and probiotics have been applied to curtail the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the imprudent application of antibiotics in aquaculture.

  1. Efficacy of telavancin, a lipoglycopeptide antibiotic, in experimental models of Gram-positive infection.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Sharath S; Janc, James W

    2014-12-01

    Telavancin is a parenteral lipoglycopeptide antibiotic with a dual mechanism of action contributing to bactericidal activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. It has been approved for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections due to susceptible Gram-positive bacteria and hospital-acquired/ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus when other alternatives are unsuitable. Telavancin has been demonstrated to be efficacious in multiple animal models of soft tissue, cardiac, systemic, lung, bone, brain and device-associated infections involving clinically relevant Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus, heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus and daptomycin non-susceptible methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The AUC0-24h/MIC ratio is the primary pharmacodynamically-linked pharmacokinetic parameter. The preclinical data for telavancin supports further investigative clinical evaluation of its efficacy in additional serious infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive pathogens.

  2. In-feed antibiotic effects on the swine intestinal microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Looft, Torey; Johnson, Timothy A.; Allen, Heather K.; Bayles, Darrell O.; Alt, David P.; Stedtfeld, Robert D.; Sul, Woo Jun; Stedtfeld, Tiffany M.; Chai, Benli; Cole, James R.; Hashsham, Syed A.; Tiedje, James M.; Stanton, Thad B.

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics have been administered to agricultural animals for disease treatment, disease prevention, and growth promotion for over 50 y. The impact of such antibiotic use on the treatment of human diseases is hotly debated. We raised pigs in a highly controlled environment, with one portion of the littermates receiving a diet containing performance-enhancing antibiotics [chlortetracycline, sulfamethazine, and penicillin (known as ASP250)] and the other portion receiving the same diet but without the antibiotics. We used phylogenetic, metagenomic, and quantitative PCR-based approaches to address the impact of antibiotics on the swine gut microbiota. Bacterial phylotypes shifted after 14 d of antibiotic treatment, with the medicated pigs showing an increase in Proteobacteria (1–11%) compared with nonmedicated pigs at the same time point. This shift was driven by an increase in Escherichia coli populations. Analysis of the metagenomes showed that microbial functional genes relating to energy production and conversion were increased in the antibiotic-fed pigs. The results also indicate that antibiotic resistance genes increased in abundance and diversity in the medicated swine microbiome despite a high background of resistance genes in nonmedicated swine. Some enriched genes, such as aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferases, confer resistance to antibiotics that were not administered in this study, demonstrating the potential for indirect selection of resistance to classes of antibiotics not fed. The collateral effects of feeding subtherapeutic doses of antibiotics to agricultural animals are apparent and must be considered in cost-benefit analyses. PMID:22307632

  3. Historic perspective: prebiotics, probiotics, and other alternatives to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hume, M E

    2011-11-01

    Applications of antimicrobials in food production and human health have found favor throughout human history. Antibiotic applications in agricultural and human medical arenas have resulted in tremendous increases in food animal production and historically unprecedented gains in human health protection. Successes attributed to widespread antibiotic use have been accompanied by the inadvertent emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A major problem associated with this emerging resistance is the crossover use of some antibiotics in agricultural settings as well as in the prevention and treatment of human disease. This outcome led to calls to restrict the use of human health-related antibiotics in food animal production. Calls for restricted antibiotic use have heightened existing searches for alternatives to antibiotics that give similar or enhanced production qualities as highly reliable as the antibiotics currently provided to food animals. Agricultural and scientific advances, mainly within the last 100 yr, have given us insights into sources, structures, and actions of materials that have found widespread application in our modern world. The purpose of this presentation is to provide a historic perspective on the search for what are generally known as antibiotics and alternative antimicrobials, probiotics, prebiotics, bacteriophages, bacteriocins, and phytotherapeutics. PMID:22010256

  4. Historic perspective: prebiotics, probiotics, and other alternatives to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hume, M E

    2011-11-01

    Applications of antimicrobials in food production and human health have found favor throughout human history. Antibiotic applications in agricultural and human medical arenas have resulted in tremendous increases in food animal production and historically unprecedented gains in human health protection. Successes attributed to widespread antibiotic use have been accompanied by the inadvertent emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A major problem associated with this emerging resistance is the crossover use of some antibiotics in agricultural settings as well as in the prevention and treatment of human disease. This outcome led to calls to restrict the use of human health-related antibiotics in food animal production. Calls for restricted antibiotic use have heightened existing searches for alternatives to antibiotics that give similar or enhanced production qualities as highly reliable as the antibiotics currently provided to food animals. Agricultural and scientific advances, mainly within the last 100 yr, have given us insights into sources, structures, and actions of materials that have found widespread application in our modern world. The purpose of this presentation is to provide a historic perspective on the search for what are generally known as antibiotics and alternative antimicrobials, probiotics, prebiotics, bacteriophages, bacteriocins, and phytotherapeutics.

  5. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  6. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  7. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  8. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chellat, Mathieu F.; Raguž, Luka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human‐pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last‐resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled “Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow” triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  9. Direct glycan structure determination of intact N-linked glycopeptides by low-energy collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry and predicted spectral library searching.

    PubMed

    Pai, Pei-Jing; Hu, Yingwei; Lam, Henry

    2016-08-31

    Intact glycopeptide MS analysis to reveal site-specific protein glycosylation is an important frontier of proteomics. However, computational tools for analyzing MS/MS spectra of intact glycopeptides are still limited and not well-integrated into existing workflows. In this work, a new computational tool which combines the spectral library building/searching tool, SpectraST (Lam et al. Nat. Methods2008, 5, 873-875), and the glycopeptide fragmentation prediction tool, MassAnalyzer (Zhang et al. Anal. Chem.2010, 82, 10194-10202) for intact glycopeptide analysis has been developed. Specifically, this tool enables the determination of the glycan structure directly from low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra of intact glycopeptides. Given a list of possible glycopeptide sequences as input, a sample-specific sp