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Sample records for glycopeptide antibiotic production

  1. Glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yim, Grace; Thaker, Maulik N; Koteva, Kalinka; Wright, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides such as vancomycin, teicoplanin and telavancin are essential for treating infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Unfortunately, the dwindled pipeline of new antibiotics into the market and the emergence of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci and other resistant bacteria are increasingly making effective antibiotic treatment difficult. We have now learned a great deal about how bacteria produce antibiotics. This information can be exploited to develop the next generation of antimicrobials. The biosynthesis of glycopeptides via nonribosomal peptide assembly and unusual amino acid synthesis, crosslinking and tailoring enzymes gives rise to intricate chemical structures that target the bacterial cell wall. This review seeks to describe recent advances in our understanding of both biosynthesis and resistance of these important antibiotics.

  2. Multi-objective optimization of glycopeptide antibiotic production in batch and fed batch processes.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Soumen K; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Bhushan, Mani; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2011-07-01

    Fermentation optimization involves potentially conflicting multiple objectives such as product concentration and production media cost. Simultaneous optimization of these objectives would result in a multiobjective optimization problem, which is characterized by a set of multiple solutions, knows as pareto optimal solutions. These solutions gives flexibility in evaluating the trade-offs and selecting the most suitable operating policy. Here, ε-constraint approach was used to generate the pareto solutions for two objectives: product concentration and product per unit cost of media, for batch and fed batch operations using process model for Amycolatopsis balhimycina, a glycopeptide antibiotic producer. This resulted in a set of several pareto optimal solutions with the two objectives ranging from (0.75 g l(-1), 3.97 g $(-1)) to (0.44 g l(-1), 5.19 g $(-1)) for batch and from (1.5 g l(-1), 5.46 g $(-1)) to (1.1 g l(-1), 6.34 g $(-1)) for fed batch operations. One pareto solution each for batch and for fed batch mode was experimentally validated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Glycopeptide antibiotics: back to the future.

    PubMed

    Butler, Mark S; Hansford, Karl A; Blaskovich, Mark A T; Halai, Reena; Cooper, Matthew A

    2014-09-01

    Glycopeptide antibiotics have been a key weapon in the fight against bacterial infections for over half a century, with the progenitors, vancomycin (1) and teicoplanin (2), still used extensively. The increased occurrence of resistance and the effectiveness of these 'last resort' treatments for Gram-positive infections has led to the discovery and clinical development of second generation, semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide derivatives such as telavancin (3), dalbavancin (4) and oritavancin (5), which all possess broader spectra of activity and improved pharmacokinetic properties. Two of these new antibiotics, telavancin (3) and dalbavancin (4), were approved in the past 5 years and the third, oritavancin (5), is awaiting regulatory approval. In this review, the discovery, development and associated resistance of vancomycin (1) and teicoplanin (2), and semi-synthetic glycopeptides, telavancin (3), dalbavancin (4) and oritavancin (5), are detailed. The clinical implications of glycopeptide resistance, especially vancomycin (1), as well as the future prospects for current glycopeptide drugs and the development of new glycopeptides are discussed.

  4. Redesign of Glycopeptide Antibiotics – Back to the Future

    PubMed Central

    James, Robert C.; Pierce, Joshua G.; Okano, Akinori; Xie, Jian; Boger, Dale L.

    2012-01-01

    The glycopeptide antibiotics are the most important class of drugs used in the treatment of resistant bacterial infections including those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). After more than 50 years of clinical use, the emergence of glycopeptide resistant Gram-positive pathogens such as vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) presents a serious global challenge to public health at a time few new antibiotics are being developed. This has led to renewed interest in the search for additional effective treatments including the development of new derivatives of the glycopeptide antibiotics. General approaches have been explored for modifying glycopeptide antibiotics, typically through the derivatization of the natural products themselves or more recently through chemical total synthesis. In this Perspective, we consider recent efforts to redesign glycopeptide antibiotics for the treatment of resistant microbial infections, including VRE and VRSA, and examine their future potential for providing an even more powerful class of antibiotics that are even less prone to bacterial resistance. PMID:22330049

  5. Opportunities for Synthetic Biology in Antibiotics: Expanding Glycopeptide Chemical Diversity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic biology offers a new path for the exploitation and improvement of natural products to address the growing crisis in antibiotic resistance. All antibiotics in clinical use are facing eventual obsolesce as a result of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms, yet there are few new drug leads forthcoming from the pharmaceutical sector. Natural products of microbial origin have proven over the past 70 years to be the wellspring of antimicrobial drugs. Harnessing synthetic biology thinking and strategies can provide new molecules and expand chemical diversity of known antibiotic scaffolds to provide much needed new drug leads. The glycopeptide antibiotics offer paradigmatic scaffolds suitable for such an approach. We review these strategies here using the glycopeptides as an example and demonstrate how synthetic biology can expand antibiotic chemical diversity to help address the growing resistance crisis. PMID:23654249

  6. Opportunities for synthetic biology in antibiotics: expanding glycopeptide chemical diversity.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Maulik N; Wright, Gerard D

    2015-03-20

    Synthetic biology offers a new path for the exploitation and improvement of natural products to address the growing crisis in antibiotic resistance. All antibiotics in clinical use are facing eventual obsolesce as a result of the evolution and dissemination of resistance mechanisms, yet there are few new drug leads forthcoming from the pharmaceutical sector. Natural products of microbial origin have proven over the past 70 years to be the wellspring of antimicrobial drugs. Harnessing synthetic biology thinking and strategies can provide new molecules and expand chemical diversity of known antibiotic scaffolds to provide much needed new drug leads. The glycopeptide antibiotics offer paradigmatic scaffolds suitable for such an approach. We review these strategies here using the glycopeptides as an example and demonstrate how synthetic biology can expand antibiotic chemical diversity to help address the growing resistance crisis.

  7. Glycopeptide antibiotics and their novel semi-synthetic derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jeya, Marimuthu; Moon, Hee-Jung; Lee, Kyoung-Mi; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2011-08-01

    Glycopeptide antibiotics, vancomycin and teicoplanin, inhibit cell wall synthesis in Gram-positive bacteria by interacting with peptidoglycan D-Ala-D-Ala peptide stem termini of the pentapeptide side chains of the peptidoglycan precursors. In glycopeptide-resistant bacteria, multiresistance poses major therapeutic problems. New potent antibacterial agents are needed to combat these resistance problems, resulting in the explosion of novel glycopeptides in recent years. The glycosylation patterns of glycopeptides and the chemical modifications of the glycosyl moieties greatly influence their antibiotic activity, and certain combinations have resulted in highly active new compounds. Considerable efforts have been made to produce semisynthetic glycopeptides with improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties and activity towards resistant strains. This review provides an overview of the chemistry, the antimicrobial activity, the pharmacokinetics and the toxicology of teicoplanin and other glycopeptide antibiotic derivatives.

  8. F-O-G Ring Formation in Glycopeptide Antibiotic Biosynthesis is Catalysed by OxyE

    PubMed Central

    Peschke, Madeleine; Brieke, Clara; Cryle, Max J.

    2016-01-01

    The glycopeptide antibiotics are peptide-based natural products with impressive antibiotic function that derives from their unique three-dimensional structure. Biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotics centres of the combination of peptide synthesis, mediated by a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, and the crosslinking of aromatic side chains of the peptide, mediated by the action of a cascade of Cytochrome P450s. Here, we report the first example of in vitro activity of OxyE, which catalyses the F-O-G ring formation reaction in teicoplanin biosynthesis. OxyE was found to only act after an initial C-O-D crosslink is installed by OxyB and to require an interaction with the unique NRPS domain from glycopeptide antibiotic – the X-domain – in order to display catalytic activity. We could demonstrate that OxyE displays limited stereoselectivity for the peptide, which mirrors the results from OxyB-catalysed turnover and is in sharp contrast to OxyA. Furthermore, we show that activity of a three-enzyme cascade (OxyB/OxyA/OxyE) in generating tricyclic glycopeptide antibiotic peptides depends upon the order of addition of the OxyA and OxyE enzymes to the reaction. This work demonstrates that complex enzymatic cascades from glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis can be reconstituted in vitro and provides new insights into the biosynthesis of these important antibiotics. PMID:27752135

  9. Facile Synthetic Access to Glycopeptide Antibiotic Precursor Peptides for the Investigation of Cytochrome P450 Action in Glycopeptide Antibiotic Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Brieke, Clara; Kratzig, Veronika; Peschke, Madeleine; Cryle, Max J

    2016-01-01

    The glycopeptide antibiotics are an important class of complex, medically relevant peptide natural products. Given that the production of such compounds all stems from in vivo biosynthesis, understanding the mechanisms of the natural assembly system--consisting of a nonribosomal-peptide synthetase machinery (NRPS) and further modifying enzymes--is vital. In order to address the later steps of peptide biosynthesis, which are catalyzed by Cytochrome P450s that interact with the peptide-producing nonribosomal peptide synthetase, peptide substrates are required: these peptides must also be in a form that can be conjugated to carrier protein domains of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase machinery. Here, we describe a practical and effective route for the solid phase synthesis of glycopeptide antibiotic precursor peptides as their Coenzyme A (CoA) conjugates to allow enzymatic conjugation to carrier protein domains. This route utilizes Fmoc-chemistry suppressing epimerization of racemization-prone aryl glycine derivatives and affords high yields and excellent purities, requiring only a single step of simple solid phase extraction for chromatographic purification. With this, comprehensive investigations of interactions between various NRPS-bound substrates and Cytochrome P450s are enabled.

  10. Novel mechanism of resistance to glycopeptide antibiotics in Enterococcus faecium

    PubMed Central

    Cremniter, Julie; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Josseaume, Nathalie; Quincampoix, Jean-Charles; Dubost, Lionel; Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Marie, Arul; Gutmann, Laurent; Rice, Louis B.; Arthur, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Glycopeptides and β-lactams are the major antibiotics available for the treatment of infections due to Gram-positive bacteria. Emergence of cross-resistance to these drugs by a single mechanism has been considered as unlikely since they inhibit peptidoglycan polymerization by different mechanisms. The glycopeptides bind to the peptidyl-D-Ala4-D-Ala5 extremity of peptidoglycan precursors and block by steric hindrance the essential glycosyltransferase and D,D-transpeptidase activities of the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs). The β-lactams are structural analogues of D-Ala4-D-Ala5 and act as suicide substrates of the D,D-transpeptidase module of the PBPs. Here we show that bypass of the PBPs by the recently described β-lactam-insensitive L,D-transpeptidase from Enterococcus faecium (Ldtfm) can lead to high-level resistance to glycopeptides and β-lactams. Cross-resistance was selected by glycopeptides alone or serially by β-lactams and glycopeptides. In the corresponding mutants, UDP-MurNAc-pentapeptide was extensively converted to UDP-MurNAc-tetrapeptide following hydrolysis of D-Ala5, thereby providing the substrate of Ldtfm. Complete elimination of D-Ala5, a residue essential for glycopeptide binding, was possible since Ldtfm uses the energy of the L-Lys3-D-Ala4 peptide bond for cross-link formation in contrast to PBPs which use the energy of the D-Ala4-D-Ala5 bond. This novel mechanism of glycopeptide resistance was unrelated to the previously identified replacement of D-Ala5 by D-Ser or D-lactate. PMID:16943188

  11. Glycopeptide antibiotics: evolving resistance, pharmacology and adverse event profile.

    PubMed

    Henson, Karl Evans R; Levine, Miriam T; Wong, Eunice Ann H; Levine, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The first glycopeptide antibiotic was vancomycin, isolated from the soil in the 1950s; since then, the class has expanded to include teicoplanin and the new semisynthetic glycopeptides dalbavancin, oritavancin and telavancin. They are bactericidal, active against most Gram-positive organisms, and in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibit cell wall synthesis. Resistance to vancomycin has emerged, especially among enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus through a variety of mechanisms. This emerging resistance to vancomycin makes proper dosing and monitoring of the area under the curve/MIC critically important. The chief adverse effect of vancomycin is nephrotoxicity, which is also intricately related to its dose. The efficacy of the semisynthetic glycopeptides has been demonstrated in skin and soft-tissue infections, but remains to be seen in serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  12. Assembling the glycopeptide antibiotic scaffold: The biosynthesis of from Streptomyces toyocaensis NRRL15009

    PubMed Central

    Pootoolal, Jeff; Thomas, Michael G.; Marshall, C. Gary; Neu, John M.; Hubbard, Brian K.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Wright, Gerard D.

    2002-01-01

    The glycopeptide antibiotics vancomycin and teicoplanin are vital components of modern anti-infective chemotherapy exhibiting outstanding activity against Gram-positive pathogens including members of the genera Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and Enterococcus. These antibiotics also provide fascinating examples of the chemical and associated biosynthetic complexity exploitable in the synthesis of natural products by actinomycetes group of bacteria. We report the sequencing and annotation of the biosynthetic gene cluster for the glycopeptide antibiotic A47934 from Streptomyces toyocaensis NRRL15009, the first complete sequence for a teicoplanin class glycopeptide. The cluster includes 34 ORFs encompassing 68 kb and includes all of the genes predicted to be required to synthesize A47934 and regulate its biosynthesis. The gene cluster also contains ORFs encoding enzymes responsible for glycopeptide resistance. This role was confirmed by insertional inactivation of the d-Ala-d-lactate ligase, vanAst, which resulted in the predicted A47934-sensitive phenotype and impaired antibiotic biosynthesis. These results provide increased understanding of the biosynthesis of these complex natural products. PMID:12060705

  13. An economic model for the prevention of MRSA infections after surgery: non-glycopeptide or glycopeptide antibiotic prophylaxis?

    PubMed

    Elliott, Rachel A; Weatherly, Helen L A; Hawkins, Neil S; Cranny, Gillian; Chambers, Duncan; Myers, Lindsey; Eastwood, Alison; Sculpher, Mark J

    2010-02-01

    Surgical site infection is commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The multiresistant strains (MRSA) are resistant to most antibiotic prophylaxis regimens. Our aim was to explore whether there is a threshold of MRSA prevalence at which switching to routine glycopeptide-based antibiotic prophylaxis becomes cost-effective. An indicative model was designed to explore the cost-effectiveness of vancomycin, cephalosporin or a combination, in patients undergoing primary hip arthroplasty. If the MRSA infection rate is equal to or above 0.25% and the rate of other infections with cephalosporin prophylaxis is equal to or above 0.2%, use of the combination antibiotic prophylaxis is optimal. Modelling the cost-effectiveness of interventions for MRSA prevention is complex due to uncertainty around resistance and effectiveness of glycopeptides. The indicative model provides a framework for evaluation. More work is needed to understand the impact of antibiotic resistance over time in these currently effective antibiotics.

  14. Synthesis, Properties, and Mechanism of Action of New Generation of Polycyclic Glycopeptide Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Olsufyeva, Eugenia N; Tevyashova, Anna N

    2017-01-01

    The increased resistance of glycopeptide based antibiotics has become a serious problem for the chemotherapy of infections triggered by resistant Gram-positive bacteria. This has motivated the urgent sincere efforts to develop potent glycopeptide-based antibiotics in both academy and industry research laboratories. Understanding of the mechanism of action of natural and modified glycopeptides is considered as the basis for the rational design of compounds with valuable properties to achieve the fundamental results. Several hydrophobic glycopeptide analogues active against resistant strains were developed during the last two decades. Three drugs, namely, oritavancin, telavancin and dalbavancin were approved by FDA in 2013-2014. It was found that hydrophobic derivatives act through different mechanisms without binding with the modified target of resistant bacteria. Types: Different types of chemical modifications led to several glycopeptide analogues active against Gram-negative bacteria as advocated by in vitro studies or demonstrating potent antiviral activity in the cell models. A new class of glycopeptide antibiotics with potent activity against sensitive and resistant bacterial strains has been recently reported with the aim to overcome the resistance, however, there are a lot of obscure problems in the complete understanding of their mechanisms of actions. In this review, we summarized the achievements of synthetic methods devoted to the construction of new polycyclic glycopeptide antibiotics and described the studies related to their mechanism of actions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Deoxysugars in glycopeptide antibiotics: Enzymatic synthesis of TDP-l-epivancosamine in chloroeremomycin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huawei; Thomas, Michael G.; Hubbard, Brian K.; Losey, Heather C.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Burkart, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    The 2,3,6-trideoxysugar l-epivancosamine is the terminal sugar added to the aglycone scaffold in chloroeremomycin, a member of the vancomycin family of glycopeptide antibiotics. Five proteins from the chloroeremomycin biosynthetic cluster, ORF14 and ORF23 to ORF26, have been expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli and purified to near homogeneity, and each has been characterized for an enzymatic activity. These five enzymes reconstitute the complete biosynthesis of TDP-l-epivancosamine from TDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-glucose. This process involves C-2 deoxygenation, C-3 amination and methylation, C-5 epimerization, and C-4 ketoreduction. Intermediates and the final product of this pathway have been identified by mass spectrometry and NMR. The pathway established here represents the complete in vitro reconstitution of an unusual sugar for an important class of antibiotics and sets the groundwork for future combinatorial biosynthesis for new bioactive compounds. PMID:11035791

  16. Linezolid vs Glycopeptide Antibiotics for the Treatment of Suspected Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Nosocomial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Max R.; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2011-01-01

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Societal guidelines suggest linezolid may be the preferred treatment of MRSA nosocomial pneumonia. We investigated the efficacy of linezolid compared with glycopeptide antibiotics (vancomycin or teicoplanin) for nosocomial pneumonia. Methods: This was a systematic review and meta-analysis of English language, randomized, controlled trials comparing linezolid to glycopeptide antibiotics for suspected MRSA pneumonia in subjects > 12 years of age. A highly sensitive search of PubMed MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases identified relevant studies. Results: Eight trials encompassing 1,641 subjects met entry criteria. Linezolid was not superior to glycopeptide antibiotics for end points of clinical success (relative risk [RR] linezolid vs glycopeptide, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.97-1.11; P = .28), microbiologic success (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.97-1.31; P = .12), or mortality (RR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.69-1.18; P = .47). In addition, clinical success in the subgroup of subjects with MRSA-positive respiratory tract culture (RR, 1.23; 95% CI, 0.97-1.57; P = .09) was not significantly different from those without MRSA (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.83-1.09; P = .48), P for interaction, 0.07. The risk for adverse events was not different between the two antibiotic classes (RR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.86-1.07; P = .48). Conclusion: Randomized controlled trials do not support superiority of linezolid over glycopeptide antibiotics for the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. We recommend that decisions between linezolid or glycopeptide antibiotics for empirical or MRSA-directed therapy of nosocomial pneumonia depend on local availability, antibiotic resistance patterns, preferred routes of delivery, and cost, rather than presumed differences in efficacy. PMID:20864609

  17. Crystal Structure of StaL, A Glycopeptide Antibiotic Sulfotransferase from Streptomyces Toyocaensis

    SciTech Connect

    Shi,R.; Lamb, S.; Bhat, S.; Sulea, T.; Wright, G.; Matte, A.; Cygler, M.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, antimicrobial resistance has emerged as a major public health crisis. Glycopeptide antibiotics such as vanco-mycin and teicoplanin are clinically important for the treatment of Gram-positive bacterial infections. StaL is a 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate-dependent sulfotransferase capable of sulfating the cross-linked heptapeptide substrate both in vivo and in vitro, yielding the product A47934 [GenBank], unique teicoplanin-class glycopeptide antibiotic. The sulfonation reaction catalyzed by StaL constitutes the final step in A47934 [GenBank] biosynthesis. Here we report the crystal structure of StaL and its complex with the cofactor product 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate. This is only the second prokaryotic sulfotransferase to be structurally characterized. StaL belongs to the large sulfotransferase family and shows higher similarity to cytosolic sulfotransferases (ST) than to the bacterial ST (Stf0). StaL has a novel dimerization motif, different from any other STs that have been structurally characterized. We have also applied molecular modeling to investigate the binding mode of the unique substrate, desulfo-A47934. Based on the structural analysis and modeling results, a series of residues was mutated and kinetically characterized. In addition to the conserved residues (Lys{sup 12}, His{sup 67}, and Ser{sup 98}), molecular modeling, fluorescence quenching experiments, and mutagenesis studies identified several other residues essential for substrate binding and/or activity, including Trp{sup 34}, His{sup 43}, Phe{sup 77}, Trp{sup 132}, and Glu{sup 205}.

  18. New insights into glycopeptide antibiotic binding to cell wall precursors using SPR and NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Juan; Bayón, Carlos; Ardá, Ana; Marinelli, Flavia; Gandolfi, Raffaella; Molinari, Francesco; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesús; Hernáiz, María J

    2014-06-10

    Glycopeptide antibiotics, such as vancomycin and teicoplanin, are used to treat life-threatening infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. They inhibit bacterial cell wall biosynthesis by binding to the D-Ala-D-Ala C-terminus of peptidoglycan precursors. Vancomycin-resistant bacteria replace the dipeptide with the D-Ala-D-Lac depsipeptide, thus reducing the binding affinity of the antibiotics with their molecular targets. Herein, studies of the interaction of teicoplanin, teicoplanin-like A40926, and of their semisynthetic derivatives (mideplanin, MDL63,246, dalbavancin) with peptide analogues of cell-wall precursors by NMR spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are reported. NMR spectroscopy revealed the existence of two different complexes in solution, when the different glycopeptides interact with Ac2KdAlaDAlaOH. Despite the NMR experimental conditions, which are different from those employed for the SPR measurements, the NMR spectroscopy results parallel those deduced in the chip with respect to the drastic binding difference existing between the D-Ala and the D-Lac terminating analogues, confirming that all these antibiotics share the same primary molecular mechanism of action and resistance. Kinetic analysis of the interaction between the glycopeptide antibiotics and immobilized AcKdAlaDAlaOH by SPR suggest a dimerization process that was not observed by NMR spectroscopy in DMSO solution. Moreover, in SPR, all glycopeptides with a hydrophobic acyl chain present stronger binding with a hydrophobic surface than vancomycin, indicating that additional interactions through the employed surface are involved. In conclusion, SPR provides a tool to differentiate between vancomycin and other glycopeptides, and the calculated binding affinities at the surface seem to be more relevant to in vitro antimicrobial activity than the estimations from NMR spectroscopy analysis.

  19. Harnessing the synthetic capabilities of glycopeptide antibiotic tailoring enzymes: characterization of the UK-68,597 biosynthetic cluster.

    PubMed

    Yim, Grace; Kalan, Lindsay; Koteva, Kalinka; Thaker, Maulik N; Waglechner, Nicholas; Tang, Irene; Wright, Gerard D

    2014-11-24

    In this study, a draft genome sequence of Actinoplanes sp. ATCC 53533 was assembled, and an 81-kb biosynthetic cluster for the unusual sulfated glycopeptide UK-68,597 was identified. Glycopeptide antibiotics are important in the treatment of infections caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Glycopeptides contain heptapeptide backbones that are modified by many tailoring enzymes, including glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, methyltransferases, and halogenases, generating extensive chemical and functional diversity. Several tailoring enzymes in the cluster were examined in vitro for their ability to modify glycopeptides, resulting in the synthesis of novel molecules. Tailoring enzymes were also expressed in the producer of the glycopeptide aglycone A47934, generating additional chemical diversity. This work characterizes the biosynthetic program of UK-68,597 and demonstrates the capacity to expand glycopeptide chemical diversity by harnessing the unique chemistry of tailoring enzymes.

  20. Genome mining in Amycolatopsis balhimycina for ferredoxins capable of supporting cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in glycopeptide antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Geib, Nina; Weber, Tilmann; Wörtz, Tanja; Zerbe, Katja; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Robinson, John A

    2010-05-01

    Ferredoxins are required to supply electrons to the cytochrome P450 enzymes involved in cross-linking reactions during the biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotics balhimycin and vancomycin. However, the biosynthetic gene clusters for these antibiotics contain no ferredoxin- or ferredoxin reductase-like genes. In a search for potential ferredoxin partners for these P450s, here, we report an in silico analysis of the draft genome sequence of the balhimycin producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina, which revealed 11 putative Fe-S-containing ferredoxin genes. We show that two members (balFd-V and balFd-VII), produced as native-like holo-[3Fe-4S] ferredoxins in Escherichia coli, could supply electrons to the P450 OxyB (CYP165B) from both A. balhimycina and the vancomycin producer Amycolatopsis orientalis, and support in vitro turnover of peptidyl carrier protein-bound peptide substrates into monocyclic cross-linked products. These results show that ferredoxins encoded in the antibiotic-producing strain can act in a degenerate manner in supporting the catalytic functions of glycopeptide biosynthetic P450 enzymes from the same as well as heterologous gene clusters.

  1. Glycopeptide antibiotic analogs efficient against vancomycin-resistant bacteria: a patent evaluation (WO2013022763).

    PubMed

    Olsufyeva, Eugenia N; Preobrazhenskaya, Maria N

    2013-12-01

    The patent claims the preparation of vancomycin analogs equally active against bacterial strains that are primarily sensitive or resistant to this antibiotic. The pseudopeptide core of new compounds carries the amidine group that replaces the carboxamide linking group in the D ring-bearing amino acid residue of the glycopeptide. An elegant method of synthesis of amidine containing glycopeptides via thioamides was developed. The key glycopeptide thioamide analogs were prepared by total multistep synthesis. These analogs can be readily converted to the antibiotic's amidine as well as to alkylamidines, amidrazones, hydroxyamidines and similar analogs. The new analogs are capable of circumventing bacterial resistance derived from the D-Ala-D-Ala to D-Ala-D-Lac alteration - the mechanism operational in the resistant strains VanA and VanB. The interaction of the carboxamide, thioamide and amidine fragments of vancomycin analogs with the targets in resistant and sensitive bacteria was investigated. The novel compounds demonstrated potent activity against VanA-resistant bacteria Enterococcus faecalis (minimal inhibitory concentration = 0.3 - 0.6 μg/ml). However data on susceptible strains and resistant clinical isolates are lacking to further document the interest of the compounds. The results provide evidence for structural modifications that can improve the therapeutic efficacy of vancomycin, in particular, for treatment of vancomycin-resistant infections.

  2. Cold Stress Makes Escherichia coli Susceptible to Glycopeptide Antibiotics by Altering Outer Membrane Integrity.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jonathan M; French, Shawn; Ovchinnikova, Olga G; Bouwman, Catrien; Whitfield, Chris; Brown, Eric D

    2016-02-18

    A poor understanding of the mechanisms by which antibiotics traverse the outer membrane remains a considerable obstacle to the development of novel Gram-negative antibiotics. Herein, we demonstrate that the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli becomes susceptible to the narrow-spectrum antibiotic vancomycin during growth at low temperatures. Heterologous expression of an Enterococcus vanHBX vancomycin resistance cluster in E. coli confirmed that the mechanism of action was through inhibition of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. To understand the nature of vancomycin permeability, we screened for strains of E. coli that displayed resistance to vancomycin at low temperature. Surprisingly, we observed that mutations in outer membrane biosynthesis suppressed vancomycin activity. Subsequent chemical analysis of lipopolysaccharide from vancomycin-sensitive and -resistant strains confirmed that suppression was correlated with truncations in the core oligosaccharide of lipopolysaccharide. These unexpected observations challenge the current understanding of outer membrane permeability, and provide new chemical insights into the susceptibility of E. coli to glycopeptide antibiotics.

  3. Total Syntheses of Vancomycin-Related Glycopeptide Antibiotics and Key Analogues.

    PubMed

    Okano, Akinori; Isley, Nicholas A; Boger, Dale L

    2017-09-27

    A review of efforts that have provided total syntheses of vancomycin and related glycopeptide antibiotics, their agylcons, and key analogues is provided. It is a tribute to developments in organic chemistry and the field of organic synthesis that not only can molecules of this complexity be prepared today by total synthesis but such efforts can be extended to the preparation of previously inaccessible key analogues that contain deep-seated structural changes. With the increasing prevalence of acquired bacterial resistance to existing classes of antibiotics and with the emergence of vancomycin-resistant pathogens (VRSA and VRE), the studies pave the way for the examination of synthetic analogues rationally designed to not only overcome vancomycin resistance but provide the foundation for the development of even more powerful and durable antibiotics.

  4. Structure and Function of the Glycopeptide N-methyltransferase MtfA, a Tool for the Biosynthesis of Modified Glycopeptide Antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Rong; Lamb, Sherry S.; Zakeri, Bijan; Proteau, Ariane; Cui, Qizhi; Sulea, Traian; Matte, Allan; Wright, Gerard D.; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2009-06-01

    There is a considerable interest in the modification of existing antibiotics to generate new antimicrobials. Glycopeptide antibiotics (GPAs) are effective against serious Gram-positive bacterial pathogens including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, resistance to these antibiotics is becoming a serious problem requiring new strategies. We show that the Amycolatopsis orientalis (S)-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferase MtfA, from the vancomycin-class GPA chloroeremomycin biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes in vivo and in vitro methyl transfer to generate methylated GPA derivatives of the teicoplanin class. The crystal structure of MtfA complexed with (S)-adenosyl-L-methionine, (S)-adenosylhomocysteine, or sinefungin inhibitor, coupled with mutagenesis, identified His228 as a likely general base required for methyl transfer to the N terminus of the glycopeptide. Computational docking and molecular dynamics simulations were used to model binding of demethyl-vancomycin aglycone to MtfA. These results demonstrate its utility as a tool for engineering methylated analogs of GPAs.

  5. Characterization of VanYn, a novel D,D-peptidase/D,D-carboxypeptidase involved in glycopeptide antibiotic resistance in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727.

    PubMed

    Binda, Elisa; Marcone, Giorgia L; Pollegioni, Loredano; Marinelli, Flavia

    2012-09-01

    VanY(n) is a novel protein involved in the mechanism of self-resistance in Nonomuraea sp. ATCC 39727, which produces the glycopeptide antibiotic A40926, the precursor of the second-generation dalbavancin, which is in phase III of clinical development. VanY(n) (196 residues) is encoded by the dbv7 gene within the dbv biosynthetic cluster devoted to A40926 production. C-terminal His6-tagged VanY(n) was successfully expressed as a soluble and active protein in Escherichia coli. The analysis of the sequence suggests the presence of a hydrophobic transmembrane portion and two conserved sequences (SxHxxGxAxD and ExxH) in the extracytoplasmic domain that are potentially involved in coordination of Zn(2+) and catalytic activity. The presence of these conserved sequences indicates a similar mechanism of action and substrate binding in VanY(n) as in VanY, VanX and VanXY Zn(2+)-dependent D,D-carboxypeptidases and D-Ala-D-Ala dipeptidases acting on peptidoglycan maturation and involved in glycopeptide resistance in pathogens. On substrates mimicking peptidoglycan precursors, VanY(n) shows D,D-carboxypeptidase and D,D-dipeptidase activity, but lacks D,D-carboxyesterase ability on D-Ala-D-Lac-terminating peptides. VanY(n) belongs to the metallo-D,D-carboxypeptidase family, but it is inhibited by β-lactams. Its characterization provides new insights into the evolution and transfer of resistance determinants from environmental glycopeptide-producing actinomycetes (such as Nonomuraea sp.) to glycopeptide-resistant pathogens (enterococci and staphylococci). It may also contribute to an early warning system for emerging resistance mechanisms following the introduction into clinics of a second-generation glycopeptide such as dalbavancin.

  6. Structure of OxyA tei: completing our picture of the glycopeptide antibiotic producing Cytochrome P450 cascade.

    PubMed

    Haslinger, Kristina; Cryle, Max J

    2016-02-01

    Cyclization of glycopeptide antibiotic precursors occurs in either three or four steps catalyzed by Cytochrome P450 enzymes. Three of these enzymes have been structurally characterized to date with the second enzyme along the pathway, OxyA, escaping structural analysis. We are now able to present the structure of OxyAtei involved in teicoplanin biosynthesis - the same enzyme recently shown to be the first active OxyA homolog. In spite of the hydrophobic character of the teicoplanin precursor, the polar active site of OxyAtei and its affinity for certain azole inhibitors hint at its preference for substrates with polar decorations. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Biosynthesis of Chloro-β-Hydroxytyrosine, a Nonproteinogenic Amino Acid of the Peptidic Backbone of Glycopeptide Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Puk, Oliver; Bischoff, Daniel; Kittel, Claudia; Pelzer, Stefan; Weist, Stefan; Stegmann, Efthimia; Süssmuth, Roderich D.; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    The role of the putative P450 monooxygenase OxyD and the chlorination time point in the biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotic balhimycin produced by Amycolatopsis balhimycina were analyzed. The oxyD gene is located directly downstream of the bhp (perhydrolase) and bpsD (nonribosomal peptide synthetase D) genes, which are involved in the synthesis of the balhimycin building block β-hydroxytyrosine (β-HT). Reverse transcriptase experiments revealed that bhp, bpsD, and oxyD form an operon. oxyD was inactivated by an in-frame deletion, and the resulting mutant was unable to produce an active compound. Balhimycin production could be restored (i) by complementation with an oxyD gene, (ii) in cross-feeding studies using A. balhimycina JR1 (a null mutant with a block in the biosynthesis pathway of the building blocks hydroxy- and dihydroxyphenylglycine) as an excretor of the missing precursor, and (iii) by supplementation of β-HT in the growth medium. These data demonstrated an essential role of OxyD in the formation pathway of this amino acid. Liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analysis indicated the biosynthesis of completely chlorinated balhimycin by the oxyD mutant when culture filtrates were supplemented with nonchlorinated β-HT. In contrast, supplementation with 3-chloro-β-HT did not restore balhimycin production. These results indicated that the chlorination time point was later than the stage of free β-HT, most likely during heptapeptide synthesis. PMID:15342578

  8. [Antibiotics resistance of meticilline-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: detection of the first glycopeptides low sensibility strains in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Mastouri, M; Nour, M; Ben Nejma, M; Bouallegue, O; Hammami, M; Khedher, M

    2006-02-01

    The adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus to the hospital environment led to the acquisition of resistance to all antibiotics available in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to investigate the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated in the F. Bourguiba hospital of Monastir (Tunisia). We determined the antibiotype of all Staphylococcus aureus strains identified. Susceptibility rates to fosfomycin, chloramphenicol, rifampicin and pristinamycin were 7%, 3%, 2% and 0%, respectively. The prevalence of MRSA was 15.5% (96 strains); their susceptible to gentamicin progressively increased. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MICs) of oxacillin, vancomycin and teicoplanin were evaluated for the 96 MRSA strains. We identified two MRSA strains (M4 and M41) showing reduced glycopeptides susceptibility. Further analysis revealed that M4 and M41 harbor the gene encoding the class S and class F proteins specific for the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL). The mecA gene was detected only in strain M41 which harbors the Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome (SCCmec) type III. This is the first reported MRSA showing reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides in Tunisia. Regulatory surveillance of susceptibility to antibiotics is needed to reduce the morbidity and the mortality rates as well as societal costs of S. aureus infections.

  9. Anti-biofilm activity and synergism of novel thiazole compounds with glycopeptide antibiotics against multidrug-resistant staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Haroon; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S.; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are a leading cause of death among all fatalities caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. With the rise of increasing resistance to current antibiotics, new antimicrobials and treatment strategies are urgently needed. Thiazole compounds have been shown to possess potent antimicrobial activity. A lead thiazole 1 and a potent derivative 2 were synthesized and their activity in combination with glycopeptide antibiotics was determined against an array of MRSA and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) clinical isolates. Additionally, the anti-biofilm activity of the novel thiazoles was investigated against Staphylococcus epidermidis. Compound 2 behaved synergistically with vancomycin against MRSA and was able to re-sensitize VRSA to vancomycin, reducing its minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) by 512-fold in two strains. Additionally, both thiazole compounds were superior to vancomycin in significantly reducing S. epidermidis biofilm mass. Collectively the results obtained demonstrate compounds 1 and 2 possess potent antimicrobial activity alone or in combination with vancomycin against multidrug-resistant staphylococci and show potential for use in disrupting staphylococcal biofilm. PMID:25315757

  10. Biochemical and structural characterisation of the second oxidative crosslinking step during the biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotic A47934

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Veronika; Brieke, Clara

    2016-01-01

    The chemical complexity and biological activity of the glycopeptide antibiotics (GPAs) stems from their unique crosslinked structure, which is generated by the actions of cytochrome P450 (Oxy) enzymes that affect the crosslinking of aromatic side chains of amino acid residues contained within the GPA heptapeptide precursor. Given the crucial role peptide cyclisation plays in GPA activity, the characterisation of this process is of great importance in understanding the biosynthesis of these important antibiotics. Here, we report the cyclisation activity and crystal structure of StaF, the D-O-E ring forming Oxy enzyme from A47934 biosynthesis. Our results show that the specificity of StaF is reduced when compared to Oxy enzymes catalysing C-O-D ring formation and that this activity relies on interactions with the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase via the X-domain. Despite the interaction of StaF with the A47934 X-domain being weaker than for the preceding Oxy enzyme StaH, StaF retains higher levels of in vitro activity: we postulate that this is due to the ability of the StaF/X-domain complex to allow substrate reorganisation after initial complex formation has occurred. These results highlight the importance of testing different peptide/protein carrier constructs for in vitro GPA cyclisation assays and show that different Oxy homologues can display significantly different catalytic propensities despite their overall similarities. PMID:28144358

  11. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  12. Molecular modeling of Gram-positive bacteria peptidoglycan layer, selected glycopeptide antibiotics and vancomycin derivatives modified with sugar moieties.

    PubMed

    Ślusarz, Rafał; Szulc, Monika; Madaj, Janusz

    2014-05-07

    Proper understanding of the mechanisms of binding to Gram-positive bacteria cell wall layers-especially to the peptidoglycan (PG) layer, seems to be crucial for proper development of new drug candidates which are effective against these bacteria. In this work we have constructed two different models of the Gram-positive bacteria PG layer: the layered and the scaffold models. PG conformational changes during geometry optimization, models relaxation, and molecular dynamics were described and discussed. We have found that the border surface of both PG layer models differs from the surface located away from the edge of models and the chains formed by disaccharide units prefer helix-like conformation. This curling of PG chains significantly affects the shape of antibiotic-accessible surface and the process is thus crucial for new drug development. Glycopeptide antibiotics effective against Gram-positive bacteria, such as vancomycin and its semisynthetic derivatives-oritavancin and telavancin, bind to d-alanyl-d-alanine stem termini on the peptidoglycan precursors of the cell wall. This binding inhibits cross-linking between the peptides and subsequently prevents cell wall synthesis. In this study some of the aspects of conformational freedom of vancomycin and restrictions from the modifications of vancomycin structure introduced into oritavancin and telavancin and five other vancomycin derivatives (with addition of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-d-galactopyranosylamine, 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-β-d-glucopyranosylamine, 1-amine-1-deoxy-d-glucitol, 2-amino-2-deoxy-d-galactitol, or 2-amino-2-deoxy-d-glucitol to the C-terminal amino acid group in the vancomycin) are presented and discussed. The resulting molecular dynamics trajectories, root mean square deviation changes of aglycon and saccharide moieties as well as a comparative study of possible interactions with cyclic and chain forms of modified groups have been carried out, measured, and analyzed. Energetically advantageous

  13. Mannopeptimycins, New Cyclic Glycopeptide Antibiotics Produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus LL-AC98: Antibacterial and Mechanistic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Singh, M. P.; Petersen, P. J.; Weiss, W. J.; Janso, J. E.; Luckman, S. W.; Lenoy, E. B.; Bradford, P. A.; Testa, R. T.; Greenstein, M.

    2003-01-01

    Mannopeptimycins α, β, γ, δ, and ɛ are new cyclic glycopeptide antibiotics produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus LL-AC98. Mannopeptimycins γ, δ, and ɛ, which have an isovaleryl substitution at various positions on the terminal mannose of the disaccharide moiety, demonstrated moderate to good antibacterial activities. Mannopeptimycin ɛ was the most active component against methicillin-resistant staphylococci and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (MICs, 2 to 4 μg/ml for staphylococci and streptococci and 4 to 32 μg/ml for enterococci), while mannopeptimycins γ and δ were two- to fourfold less active. Mannopeptimycins α and β, which lack the isovaleryl substitution and the disaccharide moiety, respectively, had poor antibacterial activities. The in vivo efficacies of the mannopeptimycins in Staphylococcus aureus mouse protection studies paralleled their in vitro activities. The median effective doses of mannopeptimycins γ, δ, and ɛ were 3.8, 2.6, and 0.59 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. The mannopeptimycins were inactive against cell wall-deficient S. aureus and caused spheroplasting of Escherichia coli imp similar to that observed with penicillin G in an osmotically protective medium. Mannopeptimycin δ rapidly inhibited [3H]N-acetylglucosamine incorporation into peptidoglycan in Bacillus subtilis and had no effect on DNA, RNA, or protein biosynthesis. On the basis of the observations presented above, an effect on cell wall biosynthesis was suggested as the primary mode of action for mannopeptimycin δ. The mannopeptimycins were inactive against Candida albicans, did not initiate hemolysis of human erythrocytes, and did not promote potassium ion leakage from E. coli imp, suggesting a lack of membrane damage to prokaryotic or eukaryotic cells. PMID:12499170

  14. Antibiotic production in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, David; Brown, Robert; Cierpik, Kim

    1998-01-01

    A wide variety of previous experiments have indicated that the space flight environment has a positive influence on the proliferation of microorganisms. Based on this premise, it was hypothesized that the production of secondary metabolites (specifically antibiotics) would also be increased as a consequence of the enhanced growth. Pilot studies performed onboard two shuttle missions to date have indicated that microbial antibiotic production was significantly increased in space grown colonies relative to comparable, matched ground controls. The practical application of these preliminary findings is being investigated. The empirical data are being analyzed in an attempt to establish specific gravity-dependent cause and effect relationships. An analytical model is being developed to further establish how physical principles might give rise to the various physiological responses observed to be altered in space. The envisioned commercial applications stemming from the unique knowledge of how gravity affects natural processes range from developing methods for increasing terrestrial pharmaceutic production efficiency to, ultimately perhaps, the design of economically feasible, space-borne fermentation and bioprocessing platforms.

  15. Staphylococcus epidermidis extracted slime inhibits the antimicrobial action of glycopeptide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Farber, B F; Kaplan, M H; Clogston, A G

    1990-01-01

    Certain strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis produce a mucoid slime that appears to be an important virulence factor. After crude slime was isolated from selected strains of S. epidermidis, phenol and chloroform were used to remove proteins and lipids. The remaining extract contained a polysaccharide that was seen on SDS gels stained with Stains-all. This extract was an inhibitor of the antimicrobial action of vancomycin, raising the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to vancomycin in all 18 isolates of S. epidermidis. A dose-response curve was seen between the amount of extract added and the degree of resistance, as measured by both MIC and growth curves. A similar effect was noted with MICs of organisms to teicoplanin. Addition of the extract did not change the MIC to LY146032, although a modest effect on growth rate was observed. The extract did not raise the MIC to clindamycin, rifampin, and cefazolin. The extract reversed the synergism seen between vancomycin and gentamicin in the 5 strains tested in time-kill studies. The interference by slime of the antimicrobial effect of vancomycin and teicoplanin may explain why these antibiotics are sometimes ineffective in eradicating foreign body infections due to slime-producing coagulase-negative staphylococci.

  16. Characterization of Structural Variations in the Peptidoglycan of Vancomycin-Susceptible Enterococcus faecium: Understanding Glycopeptide-Antibiotic Binding Sites using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Patti, Gary J.; Chen, Jiawei; Schaefer, Jacob; Gross, Michael L.

    2008-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium, an opportunistic pathogen that causes a significant number of hospital-acquired infections each year, presents a serious clinical challenge because an increasing number of infections are resistant to the so-called antibiotic of last resort, vancomycin. Vancomycin and other new glycopeptide derivatives target the bacterial cell wall, thereby perturbing its biosynthesis. To help determine the modes of action of glycopeptide antibiotics, we have developed a bottom-up mass spectrometry approach complemented by solid-state NMR to elucidate important structural characteristics of vancomycin-susceptible E. faecium peptidoglycan. Using accurate-mass measurements and integrating ion-current chromatographic peaks of digested peptidoglycan, we identified individual muropeptide species and approximated the relative amount of each. Even though the organism investigated is susceptible to vancomycin, only 3% of the digested peptidoglycan has the well-known D-Ala-D-Ala vancomycin-binding site. The data are consistent with a previously proposed template model of cell-wall biosynthesis where D-Ala-D-Ala stems that are not cross-linked are cleaved in mature peptidoglycan. Additionally, our mass-spectrometry approach allowed differentiation and quantification of muropeptide species seen as unresolved chromatographic peaks. Our method provides an estimate of the extent of muropeptides containing O-acetylation, amidation and hydroxylation, and the number of species forming cyclic imides. The varieties of muropeptides on which the modifications are detected suggest that significant processing occurs in mature peptidoglycan where several enzymes are active in editing cell-wall structure. PMID:18692403

  17. Antibiotic use in livestock production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotic usage is a useful and commonly implemented practice in livestock and production agriculture that has progressively gained attention in recent years from consumers of animal products due to concerns about human and environmental health. Sub-therapeutic usage of antibiotics has led to a con...

  18. Current perspectives on glycopeptide resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Woodford, N; Johnson, A P; Morrison, D; Speller, D C

    1995-01-01

    In the last 5 years, clinical isolates of gram-positive bacteria with intrinsic or acquired resistance to glycopeptide antibiotics have been encountered increasingly. In many of these isolates, resistance arises from an alteration of the antibiotic target site, with the terminal D-alanyl-D-alanine moiety of peptidoglycan precursors being replaced by groups that do not bind glycopeptides. Although the criteria for defining resistance have been revised frequently, the reliable detection of low-level glycopeptide resistance remains problematic and is influenced by the method chosen. Glycopeptide-resistant enterococci have emerged as a particular problem in hospitals, where in addition to sporadic cases, clusters of infections with evidence of interpatient spread have occurred. Studies using molecular typing methods have implicated colonization of patients, staff carriage, and environmental contamination in the dissemination of these bacteria. Choice of antimicrobial therapy for infections caused by glycopeptide-resistant bacteria may be complicated by resistance to other antibiotics. Severe therapeutic difficulties are being encountered among patients infected with enterococci, with some infections being untreatable with currently available antibiotics. PMID:8665471

  19. Expedient antibiotics production: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Byers, C.H.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-05-01

    The literature on the manufacture, separation and purification, and clinical uses of antibiotics was reviewed, and a bibliography of the pertinent material was completed. Five antimicrobial drugs, penicillin V and G, (and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid), Cephalexin (a cephalosporin), tetracycline and oxytetracycline, Bacitracin (topical), and sulfonamide (chemically produced) were identified for emergency production. Plants that manufacture antibiotics in the continental United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico have been identified along with potential alternate sites such as those where SCP, enzyme, and fermentation ethanol are produced. Detailed process flow sheets and process descriptions have been derived from the literature and documented. This investigation revealed that a typical antibiotic-manufacturing facility is composed of two main sections: (1) a highly specialized, but generic, fermentation unit and (2) a multistep, complex separation and purification unit which is specific to a particular antibiotic product. The fermentation section requires specialized equipment for operation in a sterile environment which is not usually available in other industries. The emergency production of antibiotics under austere conditions will be feasible only if a substantial reduction in the complexity and degree of separation and purity normally required can be realized. Detailed instructions were developed to assist state and federal officials who would be directing the resumption of antibiotic production after a nuclear attack. 182 refs., 54 figs., 26 tabs.

  20. A few atoms make the difference: synthetic, CD, NMR and computational studies on antiviral and antibacterial activities of glycopeptide antibiotic aglycon derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bereczki, Ilona; Mándi, Attila; Rőth, Erzsébet; Borbás, Anikó; Fizil, Ádám; Komáromi, István; Sipos, Attila; Kurtán, Tibor; Batta, Gyula; Ostorházi, Eszter; Rozgonyi, Ferenc; Vanderlinden, Evelien; Naesens, Lieve; Sztaricskai, Ferenc; Herczegh, Pál

    2015-04-13

    Despite the close structural similarity between the heptapeptide cores of the glycopeptide antibiotics teicoplanin and ristocetin, synthetically modified derivatives of their aglycons show significantly different antibacterial and antiviral properties. The teicoplanin aglycon derivatives with one exception proved to be potent antibacterials but they did not exhibit anti-influenza virus activity. In contrast, the aglycoristocetin derivatives generally showed high anti-influenza virus activity and possessed moderate antibacterial activity. A systematic structure-activity relationship study has been carried out on ristocetin and teicoplanin aglycon derivatives, to explore which structural differences are responsible for these markedly different biological activities. According to electronic circular dichroism and in silico conformational studies, it was found that the differences in anti-influenza virus activity are mainly determined by the conformation of the heptapeptide core of the antibiotics controlled by the presence or absence of chloro substituents. Knowledge of the bioactive conformation will help to design new analogs with improved anti-influenza virus activity. For the teicoplanin derivatives, it was shown that derivatization to improve the antiviral efficacy was accompanied by a significant decrease in antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Pharmacodynamics of TD-1792, a novel glycopeptide-cephalosporin heterodimer antibiotic used against Gram-positive bacteria, in a neutropenic murine thigh model.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Sharath S; Okusanya, Olanrewaju O; Skinner, Robert; Shaw, Jeng-Pyng; Obedencio, Glenmar; Ambrose, Paul G; Blais, Johanne; Bhavnani, Sujata M

    2012-03-01

    TD-1792 is a novel glycopeptide-cephalosporin heterodimer investigational antibiotic that displays potent bactericidal effects against clinically relevant Gram-positive organisms in vitro. The present studies evaluated the in vivo pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of TD-1792 in the neutropenic murine thigh infection animal model. TD-1792, dosed subcutaneously (SC), produced dose-dependent reduction in the thigh bacterial burden of several organisms, including methicillin-susceptible and -resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis (MSSA, MRSA, MSSE, MRSE, respectively), penicillin-susceptible strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae (PSSP), Streptococcus pyogenes, and vancomycin-intermediate-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (VISA). In single-dose efficacy studies, the 1-log(10) CFU kill effective dose (ED(1-log kill)) estimates for TD-1792 ranged from 0.049 to 2.55 mg/kg of body weight administered SC, and the bacterial burden was reduced by up to 3 log(10) CFU/g from pretreatment values. Against S. aureus ATCC 33591 (MRSA), the total 24-h log(10) stasis dose (ED(stasis)) and ED(1-logkill) doses for TD-1792 were 0.53 and 1.11 mg/kg/24 h, respectively, compared to 23.4 and 54.6 mg/kg/24 h for vancomycin, indicating that TD-1762 is 44- to 49-fold more potent than vancomycin. PK-PD analysis of data from single-dose and dose-fractionation studies for MRSA (ATCC 33591) demonstrated that the total-drug 24-h area under the concentration-time curve-to-MIC ratio (AUC/MIC ratio) was the best predictor of efficacy (r(2) = 0.826) compared to total-drug maximum plasma concentration of drug-to-MIC ratio (Cmax/MIC ratio; r(2) = 0.715) and percent time that the total-drug plasma drug concentration remains above the MIC (%Time>MIC; r(2) = 0.749). The magnitudes of the total-drug AUC/MIC ratios associated with net bacterial stasis, a 1-log(10) CFU reduction from baseline and near maximal effect, were 21.1, 37.2, and 51.8, respectively. PK

  2. In Vivo Characterization of the Activation and Interaction of the VanR-VanS Two-Component Regulatory System Controlling Glycopeptide Antibiotic Resistance in Two Related Streptomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    Novotna, Gabriela Balikova; Kwun, Min Jung

    2015-01-01

    The VanR-VanS two-component system is responsible for inducing resistance to glycopeptide antibiotics in various bacteria. We have performed a comparative study of the VanR-VanS systems from two streptomyces strains, Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces toyocaensis, to characterize how the two proteins cooperate to signal the presence of antibiotics and to define the functional nature of each protein in each strain background. The results indicate that the glycopeptide antibiotic inducer specificity is determined solely by the differences between the amino acid sequences of the VanR-VanS two-component systems present in each strain rather than by any inherent differences in general cell properties, including cell wall structure and biosynthesis. VanR of S. coelicolor (VanRsc) functioned with either sensor kinase partner, while VanR of S. toyocaensis (VanRst) functioned only with its cognate partner, S. toyocaensis VanS (VanSst). In contrast to VanRsc, which is known to be capable of phosphorylation by acetylphosphate, VanRst could not be activated in vivo independently of a VanS sensor kinase. A series of amino acid sequence modifications changing residues in the N-terminal receiver (REC) domain of VanRst to the corresponding residues present in VanRsc failed to create a protein capable of being activated by VanS of S. coelicolor (VanSsc), which suggests that interaction of the response regulator with its cognate sensor kinase may require a region more extended than the REC domain. A T69S amino acid substitution in the REC domain of VanRst produced a strain exhibiting weak constitutive resistance, indicating that this particular amino acid may play a key role for VanS-independent phosphorylation in the response regulator protein. PMID:26711760

  3. Biologically Relevant Glycopeptides: Synthesis and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Clay S.; Payne, Richard J.; Koeller, Kathryn M.; Wong, Chi-Huey

    Over the past two decades interest in glycopeptides and glycoproteins has intensified, due in part to the development of new and efficient methods for the synthesis of these compounds. This includes a number of chemical and enzymatic techniques for incorporating glycosylation onto the peptide backbone as well as the introduction of powerful peptide ligation methods for the construction of glycoproteins. This review discusses these methods with a special emphasis on biologically relevant glycopeptides and glycoproteins. This includes the development of a number of antigens which hold promise as potential vaccines for HIV, cancer, or a host of other clinically important diseases. In addition the development of new antibiotics aimed at overcoming the problem of resistance will be discussed. Finally, chemical and enzymatic methods for the construction of glycopeptide mimetics will be described.

  4. Glycopeptide Antibiotics Potently Inhibit Cathepsin L in the Late Endosome/Lysosome and Block the Entry of Ebola Virus, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Nan; Pan, Ting; Zhang, Junsong; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Xue; Bai, Chuan; Huang, Feng; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Chao; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infection can cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality in humans. The outbreaks of Ebola viruses in 2014 represented the most serious Ebola epidemics in history and greatly threatened public health worldwide. The development of additional effective anti-Ebola therapeutic agents is therefore quite urgent. In this study, via high throughput screening of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, we identified that teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic, potently prevents the entry of Ebola envelope pseudotyped viruses into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, teicoplanin also has an inhibitory effect on transcription- and replication-competent virus-like particles, with an IC50 as low as 330 nm. Comparative analysis further demonstrated that teicoplanin is able to block the entry of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) envelope pseudotyped viruses as well. Teicoplanin derivatives such as dalbavancin, oritavancin, and telavancin can also inhibit the entry of Ebola, MERS, and SARS viruses. Mechanistic studies showed that teicoplanin blocks Ebola virus entry by specifically inhibiting the activity of cathepsin L, opening a novel avenue for the development of additional glycopeptides as potential inhibitors of cathepsin L-dependent viruses. Notably, given that teicoplanin has routinely been used in the clinic with low toxicity, our work provides a promising prospect for the prophylaxis and treatment of Ebola, MERS, and SARS virus infection. PMID:26953343

  5. Glycopeptide Antibiotics Potently Inhibit Cathepsin L in the Late Endosome/Lysosome and Block the Entry of Ebola Virus, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Pan, Ting; Zhang, Junsong; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Xue; Bai, Chuan; Huang, Feng; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Chao; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-04-22

    Ebola virus infection can cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality in humans. The outbreaks of Ebola viruses in 2014 represented the most serious Ebola epidemics in history and greatly threatened public health worldwide. The development of additional effective anti-Ebola therapeutic agents is therefore quite urgent. In this study, via high throughput screening of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, we identified that teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic, potently prevents the entry of Ebola envelope pseudotyped viruses into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, teicoplanin also has an inhibitory effect on transcription- and replication-competent virus-like particles, with an IC50 as low as 330 nm Comparative analysis further demonstrated that teicoplanin is able to block the entry of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) envelope pseudotyped viruses as well. Teicoplanin derivatives such as dalbavancin, oritavancin, and telavancin can also inhibit the entry of Ebola, MERS, and SARS viruses. Mechanistic studies showed that teicoplanin blocks Ebola virus entry by specifically inhibiting the activity of cathepsin L, opening a novel avenue for the development of additional glycopeptides as potential inhibitors of cathepsin L-dependent viruses. Notably, given that teicoplanin has routinely been used in the clinic with low toxicity, our work provides a promising prospect for the prophylaxis and treatment of Ebola, MERS, and SARS virus infection.

  6. Beta-glucan-depleted, glycopeptide-rich extracts from Brewer's and Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) lower interferon-gamma production by stimulated human blood cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Williams, Roderick; Dias, Daniel A; Jayasinghe, Nirupama; Roessner, Ute; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-04-15

    Regulation of the human immune system requires controlled pro- and anti-inflammatory responses for host defence against infection and disease states. Yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), as used in brewing and baking, are mostly known for ability to stimulate the human immune-system predominantly reflecting the pro-inflammatory cell wall β-glucans. However, in this study, using food-compatible processing methods, glycopeptide-enriched and β-glucan-depleted products were each prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeasts, which suppressed production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in human whole blood cell assay, signifying that anti-inflammatory factors are also present in yeast. Anti-inflammatory bioactivities of products prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeast were compared with the commercial yeast product, Epicor®. While unfractionated Epicor was inactive, the C18 resin-binding fractions of Brewer's and Baker's yeast products and Epicor dose-dependently lowered IFN-γ, demonstrating that Epicor also contained both pro-inflammatory (β-glucans) and anti-inflammatory components. Anti-inflammatory activity was attributed to C18 resin-binding species glyco-peptides in Epicor and experimental yeast products. This study demonstrated that pro- and anti-inflammatory factors could be resolved and enriched in yeasts by suitable processing, with potential to improve specific activities.

  7. Editorial: advances in therapeutic glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wenbin; Chen, Yue-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides, peptides containing sugar β-amino acids, have significant impact on medicinal chemistry research and pharmaceutical industr. In 1956, the discovery of one classic glycopeptide, vancomycin, broke the dawn of a new age for antibacterial research. Employing glycopeptides for the therapeutic purposes used to be regarded as proposals. Owing largely to the recent improvements in separation practices, characterization techniques, synthetic methods, and biological research, these proposals have been transformed into ongoing research projects in many laboratories around the world. Previously known as antibiotics, glycopeptides have been used as chemotherapeutic, antiviral, antitubercular, antifungal, antiproliferative and apoptotic agents. Nowadays they are even considered for the development of HIV and cancer vaccines. While several of them are in clinical trials, it could be expected that in the near future, treatment regimen of such difficult diseases might be reformed accordingly. Many interesting preliminary results are being produced in this emerging area. As witnesses and practitioners in this exciting area, however, we notice that the related communication in public domain is still limited due to the relatively small number of researchers involved. Thus, we feel the necessity to compile a timely issue about the special topic "Advances in Therapeutic Glycopeptides", covering state-of-the-art research papers and expert reviews from this area. We are glad that Protein & Peptide Letters is willing to realize the idea with us. The opening paper of this issue by Dr. Voglmeir and coauthor discusses three types of PNGases in respect of their general properties and applications of the commercially available PNGases in glycopeptide and glycoprotein analysis. Dr. Liu and coauthors describe current techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), and mass spectrometry (MS), for the characterization of

  8. Antibiotic resistance mechanisms inform discovery: identification and characterization of a novel amycolatopsis strain producing ristocetin.

    PubMed

    Truman, Andrew W; Kwun, Min Jung; Cheng, Jinhua; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won; Hong, Hee-Jeon

    2014-10-01

    Discovering new antibiotics is a major scientific challenge, made increasingly urgent by the continued development of resistance in bacterial pathogens. A fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of bacterial antibiotic resistance will be vital for the future discovery or design of new, more effective antibiotics. We have exploited our intimate knowledge of the molecular mechanism of glycopeptide antibiotic resistance in the harmless bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor to develop a new two-step cell wall bioactivity screen, which efficiently identified a new actinomycete strain containing a previously uncharacterized glycopeptide biosynthetic gene cluster. The screen first identifies natural product extracts capable of triggering a generalized cell wall stress response and then specifically selects for glycopeptide antibacterials by assaying for the induction of glycopeptide resistance genes. In this study, we established a diverse natural product extract library from actinomycete strains isolated from locations with widely varying climates and ecologies, and we screened them using the novel two-step bioassay system. The bioassay ultimately identified a single strain harboring the previously unidentified biosynthetic gene cluster for the glycopeptide ristocetin, providing a proof of principle for the effectiveness of the screen. This is the first report of the ristocetin biosynthetic gene cluster, which is predicted to include some interesting and previously uncharacterized enzymes. By focusing on screening libraries of microbial extracts, this strategy provides the certainty that identified producer strains are competent for growth and biosynthesis of the detected glycopeptide under laboratory conditions.

  9. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Jessica A.; Charkoudian, Louise K.; Docherty, Kathryn M.; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W.; Green, Jessica L.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics. PMID:26102275

  10. The Biogeography of Putative Microbial Antibiotic Production.

    PubMed

    Morlon, Hélène; O'Connor, Timothy K; Bryant, Jessica A; Charkoudian, Louise K; Docherty, Kathryn M; Jones, Evan; Kembel, Steven W; Green, Jessica L; Bohannan, Brendan J M

    2015-01-01

    Understanding patterns in the distribution and abundance of functional traits across a landscape is of fundamental importance to ecology. Mapping these distributions is particularly challenging for species-rich groups with sparse trait measurement coverage, such as flowering plants, insects, and microorganisms. Here, we use likelihood-based character reconstruction to infer and analyze the spatial distribution of unmeasured traits. We apply this framework to a microbial dataset comprised of 11,732 ketosynthase alpha gene sequences extracted from 144 soil samples from three continents to document the spatial distribution of putative microbial polyketide antibiotic production. Antibiotic production is a key competitive strategy for soil microbial survival and performance. Additionally, novel antibiotic discovery is highly relevant to human health, making natural antibiotic production by soil microorganisms a major target for bioprospecting. Our comparison of trait-based biogeographical patterns to patterns based on taxonomy and phylogeny is relevant to our basic understanding of microbial biogeography as well as the pressing need for new antibiotics.

  11. Development of antibiotic activity profile screening for the classification and discovery of natural product antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Weng Ruh; Oliver, Allen G; Linington, Roger G

    2012-11-21

    Despite recognition of the looming antibiotic crisis by healthcare professionals, the number of new antibiotics reaching the clinic continues to decline sharply. This study aimed to establish an antibiotic profiling strategy using a panel of clinically relevant bacterial strains to create unique biological fingerprints for all major classes of antibiotics. Antibiotic mode of action profile (BioMAP) screening has been shown to effectively cluster antibiotics by structural class based on these fingerprints. Using this approach, we have accurately predicted the presence of known antibiotics in natural product extracts and have discovered a naphthoquinone-based antibiotic from our marine natural product library that possesses a unique carbon skeleton. We have demonstrated that bioactivity fingerprinting is a successful strategy for profiling antibiotic lead compounds and that BioMAP can be applied to the discovery of new natural product antibiotics leads. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. CNS Active O-Linked Glycopeptides that Penetrate the BBB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Evan; Polt, Robin

    2015-06-01

    Naturally occurring glycopeptides and glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes. Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in vivo. Glycopeptides are involved in cell signaling and sorting, providing cell surface markers for recognition. From the drug design and synthesis perspective, modification of a peptide through glycosylation results in increased bioavailability and bioactivity of glycopeptides in living systems with negligible toxicity of degradation products. Glycopeptide synthesis can be accomplished through incorporation of a glycosylated amino acid in solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) to form the desired peptide, or via incorporation of sugar-amino acid moieties. Additionally, research indicates that glycosylation increases penetration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) by peptides, which may lead to novel therapeutics for neurological disorders. Recent applications of glycopeptides have focused on the in vivo central nervous system effects after peripheral administration of centrally active peptides modified with various carbohydrates.

  13. Complete genome sequence of producer of the glycopeptide antibiotic Aculeximycin Kutzneria albida DSM 43870T, a representative of minor genus of Pseudonocardiaceae.

    PubMed

    Rebets, Yuriy; Tokovenko, Bogdan; Lushchyk, Igor; Rückert, Christian; Zaburannyi, Nestor; Bechthold, Andreas; Kalinowski, Jörn; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2014-10-10

    Kutzneria is a representative of a rarely observed genus of the family Pseudonocardiaceae. Kutzneria species were initially placed in the Streptosporangiaceae genus and later reconsidered to be an independent genus of the Pseudonocardiaceae. Kutzneria albida is one of the eight known members of the genus. This strain is a unique producer of the glycosylated polyole macrolide aculeximycin which is active against both bacteria and fungi. Kutzneria albida genome sequencing and analysis allow a deeper understanding of evolution of this genus of Pseudonocardiaceae, provide new insight in the phylogeny of the genus, as well as decipher the hidden secondary metabolic potential of these rare actinobacteria. To explore the biosynthetic potential of Kutzneria albida to its full extent, the complete genome was sequenced. With a size of 9,874,926 bp, coding for 8,822 genes, it stands alongside other Pseudonocardiaceae with large circular genomes. Genome analysis revealed 46 gene clusters potentially encoding secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways. Two large genomic islands were identified, containing regions most enriched with secondary metabolism gene clusters. Large parts of this secondary metabolism "clustome" are dedicated to siderophores production. Kutzneria albida is the first species of the genus Kutzneria with a completely sequenced genome. Genome sequencing allowed identifying the gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of aculeximycin, one of the largest known oligosaccharide-macrolide antibiotics. Moreover, the genome revealed 45 additional putative secondary metabolite gene clusters, suggesting a huge biosynthetic potential, which makes Kutzneria albida a very rich source of natural products. Comparison of the Kutzneria albida genome to genomes of other actinobacteria clearly shows its close relations with Pseudonocardiaceae in line with the taxonomic position of the genus.

  14. Physics and the production of antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbrother, Robert; Riddle, Wendy; Fairbrother, Neil

    2006-01-01

    This article is the first in a series that describe some of the physics involved in the production of antibiotics. The field is often referred to as biochemical engineering but this does not indicate the considerable part played by physics and physicists. It is a process that undergoes continual research and development. Penicillin has been selected for the focus of this article, although the engineering principles and underlying physics apply to the production of other microbial products such as amino acids (which can be used as food additives), bulk chemicals such as ethanol (used in everything from hair spray and aftershave to solvents for paints and explosives) and the well-known processes of brewing and baking. In this article the application of physics to the design of the fermenter—the giant vessel in which the production of these products occurs—is discussed.

  15. Antibiotics from Pseudomonas reptilivora I. Taxonomic Classification and Optimal Conditions of Fermentation for Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Luis A. Del; Olivares, J.; Blesa, M. C.; Mayor, F.

    1972-01-01

    A bacterium able to produce wide-spectrum antibiotic substances was isolated from a plant extract. The antibiotic-producing bacterium was identified as Pseudomonas reptilivora after suitable morphological and biochemical assays. Optimal yield conditions for antibiotic production in liquid medium have been established. PMID:4790557

  16. Development of a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy coupled to UV-Visible analysis technique for aminosides and glycopeptides quantitation in antibiotic locks.

    PubMed

    Sayet, G; Sinegre, M; Ben Reguiga, M

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic Lock technique maintains catheters' sterility in high-risk patients with long-term parenteral nutrition. In our institution, vancomycin, teicoplanin, amikacin and gentamicin locks are prepared in the pharmaceutical department. In order to insure patient safety and to comply to regulatory requirements, antibiotic locks are submitted to qualitative and quantitative assays prior to their release. The aim of this study was to develop an alternative quantitation technique for each of these 4 antibiotics, using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) coupled to UV-Visible spectroscopy and to compare results to HPLC or Immunochemistry assays. Prevalidation studies permitted to assess spectroscopic conditions used for antibiotic locks quantitation: FTIR/UV combinations were used for amikacin (1091-1115cm(-1) and 208-224nm), vancomycin (1222-1240cm(-1) and 276-280nm), and teicoplanin (1226-1230cm(-1) and 278-282nm). Gentamicin was quantified with FTIR only (1045-1169cm(-1) and 2715-2850cm(-1)) due to interferences in UV domain of parabens, preservatives present in the commercial brand used to prepare locks. For all AL, the method was linear (R(2)=0.996 to 0.999), accurate, repeatable (intraday RSD%: from 2.9 to 7.1% and inter-days RSD%: 2.9 to 5.1%) and precise. Compared to the reference methods, the FTIR/UV method appeared tightly correlated (Pearson factor: 97.4 to 99.9%) and did not show significant difference in recovery determinations. We developed a new simple reliable analysis technique for antibiotics quantitation in locks using an original association of FTIR and UV analysis, allowing a short time analysis to identify and quantify the studied antibiotics.

  17. Identifying producers of antibacterial compounds by screening for antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Maulik N; Wang, Wenliang; Spanogiannopoulos, Peter; Waglechner, Nicholas; King, Andrew M; Medina, Ricardo; Wright, Gerard D

    2013-10-01

    Microbially derived natural products are major sources of antibiotics and other medicines, but discovering new antibiotic scaffolds and increasing the chemical diversity of existing ones are formidable challenges. We have designed a screen to exploit the self-protection mechanism of antibiotic producers to enrich microbial libraries for producers of selected antibiotic scaffolds. Using resistance as a discriminating criterion we increased the discovery rate of producers of both glycopeptide and ansamycin antibacterial compounds by several orders of magnitude in comparison with historical hit rates. Applying a phylogeny-based screening filter for biosynthetic genes enabled the binning of producers of distinct scaffolds and resulted in the discovery of a glycopeptide antibacterial compound, pekiskomycin, with an unusual peptide scaffold. This strategy provides a means to readily sample the chemical diversity available in microbes and offers an efficient strategy for rapid discovery of microbial natural products and their associated biosynthetic enzymes.

  18. Botanical alternatives to antibiotics for use in organic poultry production.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; D'Souza, Doris; Biswas, Debrabrata; Hanning, Irene

    2015-06-01

    The development of antibiotic resistant pathogens has resulted from the use of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics delivered in poultry feed. Furthermore, there are a number of consumer concerns regarding the use of antibiotics in food animals including residue contamination of poultry products and antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. These issues have resulted in recommendations to reduce the use of antibiotics as growth promoters in livestock in the United States. Unlike conventional production, organic systems are not permitted to use antibiotics. Thus, both conventional and organic poultry production need alternative methods to improve growth and performance of poultry. Herbs, spices, and various other plant extracts are being evaluated as alternatives to antibiotics and some do have growth promoting effects, antimicrobial properties, and other health-related benefits. This review aims to provide an overview of herbs, spices, and plant extracts, currently defined as phytobiotics as potential feed additives. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  19. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, Moussa S.; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities. PMID:24987390

  20. Antibiotics in Canadian poultry productions and anticipated alternatives.

    PubMed

    Diarra, Moussa S; Malouin, François

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in food-producing animals has significantly increased animal health by lowering mortality and the incidence of diseases. Antibiotics also have largely contributed to increase productivity of farms. However, antibiotic usage in general and relevance of non-therapeutic antibiotics (growth promoters) in feed need to be reevaluated especially because bacterial pathogens of humans and animals have developed and shared a variety of antibiotic resistance mechanisms that can easily be spread within microbial communities. In Canada, poultry production involves more than 2600 regulated chicken producers who have access to several antibiotics approved as feed additives for poultry. Feed recipes and mixtures vary greatly geographically and from one farm to another, making links between use of a specific antibiotic feed additive and production yields or selection of specific antibiotic-resistant bacteria difficult to establish. Many on-farm studies have revealed the widespread presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in broiler chickens. While some reports linked the presence of antibiotic-resistant organisms to the use of feed supplemented with antibiotics, no recent studies could clearly demonstrate the benefit of antimicrobial growth promoters on performance and production yields. With modern biosecurity and hygienic practices, there is a genuine concern that intensive utilization of antibiotics or use of antimicrobial growth promoters in feed might no longer be useful. Public pressure and concerns about food and environmental safety (antibiotic residues, antibiotic-resistant pathogens) have driven researchers to actively look for alternatives to antibiotics. Some of the alternatives include pre- and probiotics, organic acids and essential oils. We will describe here the properties of some bioactive molecules, like those found in cranberry, which have shown interesting polyvalent antibacterial and immuno-stimulatory activities.

  1. [Historical and Hygienic Aspects on Roles of Quality Requirements for Antibiotic Products in Japan: Part 1--Development of Antibiotic Products].

    PubMed

    Yagisawa, Morimasa; Foster, Patrick J; Kurokawa, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic products have contributed greatly to keep Japanese people healthy by controlling lethal infections. In the early days, antibiotics such as penicillin and streptomycin were produced using microbial fermentation processes. Therefore, the component ratio of the active element and related substances varied lot by lot. For the purpose of efficacy and assuring safety, minimum requirements for penicillin and streptomycin products were enacted. Both variations and the number of clinically available antibiotic products have increased due to the pharmaceutical development of novel natural antibiotics. In addition, semi-synthetic derivatives of various antibiotics have been developed for the purpose of enhancing antimicrobial activity or improving pharmacological properties. As a result, 202 entities of antibiotic products have been approved and used clinically as of 2012. We conducted a detailed investigation of the progress made in the field of antibiotic products, and analyzed the characteristics of those belonging to each class of antibiotics by means of setting up a system of classification that reflects clinical applications. This report is intended to serve as an introduction to our series of investigations into the role and influence of quality requirements on development of antibacterial antibiotic products in Japan. As described here, the general view of antibacterial antibiotic products spanning a time frame of 67 years in Japan might serve as an ideal reference for future reports.

  2. Multiple complexes of long aliphatic N-acyltransferases lead to synthesis of 2,6-diacylated/2-acyl-substituted glycopeptide antibiotics, effectively killing vancomycin-resistant enterococcus.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Syue-Yi; Liu, Yu-Chen; Chang, Chin-Yuan; Huang, Chuen-Jiuan; Chiu, Ya-Huang; Huang, Chun-Man; Hsu, Ning-Shian; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Wu, Chang-Jer; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Li, Tsung-Lin

    2014-08-06

    Teicoplanin A2-2 (Tei)/A40926 is the last-line antibiotic to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections, e.g., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE). This class of antibiotics is powered by the N-acyltransferase (NAT) Orf11*/Dbv8 through N-acylation on glucosamine at the central residue of Tei/A40926 pseudoaglycone. The NAT enzyme possesses enormous value in untapped applications; its advanced development is hampered largely due to a lack of structural information. In this report, we present eight high-resolution X-ray crystallographic unary, binary, and ternary complexes in order to decipher the molecular basis for NAT's functionality. The enzyme undergoes a multistage conformational change upon binding of acyl-CoA, thus allowing the uploading of Tei pseudoaglycone to enable the acyl-transfer reaction to take place in the occlusion between the N- and C-halves of the protein. The acyl moiety of acyl-CoA can be bulky or lengthy, allowing a large extent of diversity in new derivatives that can be formed upon its transfer. Vancomycin/synthetic acyl-N-acetyl cysteamine was not expected to be able to serve as a surrogate for an acyl acceptor/donor, respectively. Most strikingly, NAT can catalyze formation of 2-N,6-O-diacylated or C6→C2 acyl-substituted Tei analogues through an unusual 1,4-migration mechanism under stoichiometric/solvational reaction control, wherein selected representatives showed excellent biological activities, effectively counteracting major types (VanABC) of VRE.

  3. A Synthetic MUC1 Glycopeptide Bearing βGalNAc-Thr as a Tn Antigen Isomer Induces the Production of Antibodies against Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Leiria Campo, Vanessa; Riul, Thalita B; Oliveira Bortot, Leandro; Martins-Teixeira, Maristela B; Fiori Marchiori, Marcelo; Iaccarino, Emanuela; Ruvo, Menotti; Dias-Baruffi, Marcelo; Carvalho, Ivone

    2017-03-16

    This study presents the synthesis of the novel protected O-glycosylated amino acid derivatives 1 and 2, containing βGalNAc-SerOBn and βGalNAc-ThrOBn units, respectively, as mimetics of the natural Tn antigen (αGalNAc-Ser/Thr), along with the solid-phase assembly of the glycopeptides NHAcSer-Ala-Pro-Asp-Thr[αGalNAc]-Arg-Pro-Ala-Pro-Gly-BSA (3-BSA) and NHAcSer-Ala-Pro-Asp-Thr[βGalNAc]-Arg-Pro-Ala-Pro-Gly-BSA (4-BSA), bearing αGalNAc-Thr or βGalNAc-Thr units, respectively, as mimetics of MUC1 tumor mucin glycoproteins. According to ELISA tests, immunizations of mice with βGalNAc-glycopeptide 4-BSA induced higher sera titers (1:320 000) than immunizations with αGalNAc-glycopeptide 3-BSA (1:40 000). Likewise, flow cytometry assays showed higher capacity of the obtained anti-glycopeptide 4-BSA antibodies to recognize MCF-7 tumor cells. Cross-recognition between immunopurified anti-βGalNAc antibodies and αGalNAc-glycopeptide and vice versa was also verified. Lastly, molecular dynamics simulations and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) showed that βGalNAc-glycopeptide 4 can interact with a model antitumor monoclonal antibody (SM3). Taken together, these data highlight the improved immunogenicity of the unnatural glycopeptide 4-BSA, bearing βGalNAc-Thr as Tn antigen isomer. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Natural Products as Platforms To Overcome Antibiotic Resistance.

    PubMed

    Rossiter, Sean E; Fletcher, Madison H; Wuest, William M

    2017-09-27

    Natural products have served as powerful therapeutics against pathogenic bacteria since the golden age of antibiotics of the mid-20th century. However, the increasing frequency of antibiotic-resistant infections clearly demonstrates that new antibiotics are critical for modern medicine. Because combinatorial approaches have not yielded effective drugs, we propose that the development of new antibiotics around proven natural scaffolds is the best short-term solution to the rising crisis of antibiotic resistance. We analyze herein synthetic approaches aiming to reengineer natural products into potent antibiotics. Furthermore, we discuss approaches in modulating quorum sensing and biofilm formation as a nonlethal method, as well as narrow-spectrum pathogen-specific antibiotics, which are of interest given new insights into the implications of disrupting the microbiome.

  5. Antifreeze glycopeptide diastereomers.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Lilly; Budke, Carsten; Dreyer, Axel; Koop, Thomas; Sewald, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGPs) are a special class of biological antifreeze agents, which possess the property to inhibit ice growth in the body fluids of arctic and antarctic fish and, thus, enable life under these harsh conditions. AFGPs are composed of 4-55 tripeptide units -Ala-Ala-Thr- glycosylated at the threonine side chains. Despite the structural homology among all the fish species, divergence regarding the composition of the amino acids occurs in peptides from natural sources. Although AFGPs were discovered in the early 1960s, the adsorption mechanism of these macromolecules to the surface of the ice crystals has not yet been fully elucidated. Two AFGP diastereomers containing different amino acid configurations were synthesized to study the influence of amino acid stereochemistry on conformation and antifreeze activity. For this purpose, peptides containing monosaccharide-substituted allo-L- and D-threonine building blocks were assembled by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The retro-inverso AFGP analogue contained all amino acids in D-configuration, while the allo-L-diastereomer was composed of L-amino acids, like native AFGPs, with replacement of L-threonine by its allo-L-diastereomer. Both glycopeptides were analyzed regarding their conformational properties, by circular dichroism (CD), and their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization in microphysical experiments.

  6. Antifreeze glycopeptide diastereomers

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Lilly; Budke, Carsten; Dreyer, Axel; Koop, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGPs) are a special class of biological antifreeze agents, which possess the property to inhibit ice growth in the body fluids of arctic and antarctic fish and, thus, enable life under these harsh conditions. AFGPs are composed of 4–55 tripeptide units -Ala-Ala-Thr- glycosylated at the threonine side chains. Despite the structural homology among all the fish species, divergence regarding the composition of the amino acids occurs in peptides from natural sources. Although AFGPs were discovered in the early 1960s, the adsorption mechanism of these macromolecules to the surface of the ice crystals has not yet been fully elucidated. Two AFGP diastereomers containing different amino acid configurations were synthesized to study the influence of amino acid stereochemistry on conformation and antifreeze activity. For this purpose, peptides containing monosaccharide-substituted allo-L- and D-threonine building blocks were assembled by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The retro-inverso AFGP analogue contained all amino acids in D-configuration, while the allo-L-diastereomer was composed of L-amino acids, like native AFGPs, with replacement of L-threonine by its allo-L-diastereomer. Both glycopeptides were analyzed regarding their conformational properties, by circular dichroism (CD), and their ability to inhibit ice recrystallization in microphysical experiments. PMID:23209499

  7. Self-Resistance and Cell Wall Composition in the Glycopeptide Producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina▿

    PubMed Central

    Schäberle, Till F.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Frasch, Hans-Jörg; Hüttel, Stephan; Kulik, Andreas; Röttgen, Marlene; von Thaler, Anna-Katharina; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Stegmann, Evi

    2011-01-01

    The prevailing resistance mechanism against glycopeptides in Gram-positive pathogens involves reprogramming the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan precursors, resulting in d-alanyl-d-lactate depsipeptide termini. Amycolatopsis balhimycina produces the vancomycin-like glycopeptide balhimycin and therefore has to protect itself from the action of the glycopeptide. We studied the roles of the accessory resistance gene orthologs vanYb, vnlRb, and vnlSb, which are part of the balhimycin biosynthetic gene cluster (represented by the subscript “b”). The VanYb carboxypeptidase cleaved the terminal d-Ala from peptidoglycan precursors, and its heterologous expression enhanced glycopeptide resistance in Streptomyces coelicolor. The VanRS-like two component system VnlRSb was not involved in glycopeptide resistance or in the expression of the vanHAX glycopeptide resistance genes. Mature A. balhimycina peptidoglycan contained mainly tri- and tetrapeptides, with only traces of the d-Ala-d-Ala-ending pentapeptides that are binding sites for the antibiotic produced. The structure of the peptidoglycan precursor is consistent with the presence of vanHAX genes, which were identified outside the balhimycin synthesis cluster. Both wild-type and non-antibiotic-producing mutant strains synthesized peptidoglycan precursors ending mainly with d-Lac, indicating constitutive synthesis of a resistant cell wall. A. balhimycina could provide a model for an ancestral glycopeptide producer with constitutively expressed resistance genes. PMID:21690280

  8. Opportunities for natural products in 21(st) century antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2017-07-01

    Natural products and their derivatives are mainstays of our antibiotic drugs, but they are increasingly in peril. The combination of widespread multidrug resistance in once susceptible bacterial pathogens, disenchantment with natural products as sources of new drugs, lack of success using synthetic compounds and target-based discovery methods, along with shifting economic and regulatory issues, conspire to move investment in research and development away from the antibiotics arena. The result is a growing crisis in antibiotic drug discovery that threatens modern medicine. 21(st) century natural product research is perfectly positioned to fill the antibiotic discovery gap and bring new drug candidates to the clinic. Innovations in genomics and techniques to explore new sources of antimicrobial chemical matter are revealing new chemistry. Increasing appreciation of the value of narrow-spectrum drugs and re-examination of once discarded chemical scaffolds coupled with synthetic biology methods to generate new compounds and improve yields offer new strategies to revitalize once moribund natural product programs. The increasing awareness that the combination of antibiotics with adjuvants, non-antibiotic compounds that overcome resistance and enhance drug activity, can rescue older chemical scaffolds, and concepts such as blocking pathogen virulence present orthogonal strategies to traditional antibiotics. In all these areas, natural products offer chemical matter, shaped by natural selection, that is privileged in this therapeutic area. Natural product research is poised to regain prominence in delivering new drugs to solve the antibiotic crisis.

  9. Ecological effects of antibiotic production by dermatophyte fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, N.; Wyborn, C. H.; Holt, G.; Noble, W. C.; Clayton, Y. M.

    1979-01-01

    Antibiotic production by dermatophyte fungi has been demonstrated in vivo in the lesions of patients with dermatomycoses. Patients infected with antibiotic-producing strains more frequently carried cocci resistant to penicillin and other antibiotics than did patients infected with non-producer strains. The total bacterial load was less in lesions caused by producer fungi. In vitro studies demonstrated the selection of penicillin-resistant S. aureus from mixed populations of resistant and sensitive cells. PMID:429791

  10. Self-resistance mechanisms of actinomycetes producing lipid II-targeting antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, Evi; Frasch, Hans-Joerg; Kilian, Regina; Pozzi, Roberta

    2015-02-01

    Glycopeptides and several lantibiotics are lipid II-targeting antibiotics produced by actinomycetes. To protect themselves from their own product, antibiotic producers developed self-resistance mechanisms. Inspection of different producer strains revealed that their resistance is not only based on a single determinant but on the synergistic action of different factors. Glycopeptide producers possess different ways to synthesize a modified peptidoglycan to prevent the binding of the glycopeptide antibiotic. One possible modification is the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors terminating with a D-alanyl-D-lactate (D-Ala-D-Lac) rather than with a D-alanyl-D-alanine (D-Ala-D-Ala) resulting in a 1000-fold decreased binding affinity of the glycopeptide to its target. The reprogramming of the peptidoglycan precursor biosynthesis is based on the action of VanHAX or paralogous enzymes as it was shown for Amycolatopsis balhimycina. A second peptidoglycan modification resulting in glycopeptide resistance was investigated in the glycopeptide A40926 producer Nonomuraea ATCC 39727. Nonomuraea eliminates the glycopeptide target by synthesizing a peptidoglycan with 3-3 cross-linked peptide stems. The carboxypeptidase VanYn provides tetrapeptides which serve as substrates for the L,D-transpeptidase catalyzing the formation of 3-3 cross-links. The occurrence of 3-3 cross-linked dimers is also an important feature of the lantibiotic NAI-107 producer Microbispora ATCC PTA-5024. Moreover, the D-Ala in the fourth position in the acceptor peptide of muropeptides is exchanged to glycine or serine in Microbispora, a side reaction of the L,D-transpeptidase. Together with the lipoprotein MlbQ, the ABC transporter MlbYZ and the transmembrane protein MlbJ it might contribute to the self-resistance in Microbispora ATCC PTA-5024.

  11. [Antibiotic resistance and siderophore production in enterococci].

    PubMed

    Lisiecki, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Enterococci belong to the normal bacterial flora of the gastrointensinal tract of humans. Enterococci are regarded as harmless commensal, and are even believed to have probiotic characteristics. However, they can cause variety of infections, including endocarditis, bloodstream infections and urinary tract infections. During the past several decades, enterococci, and particularly Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium, have been identified as an important cause of nosocomial infections. Enterococci are intrinsically resistant to a broad range of antimicrobials. Infection caused by resistant strains are difficult to treat. Iron is an essential element for bacteria, but is not easily available in host organisms. Enterococci are iron dependent bacteria. Competition for iron between the host and bacteria is an important factor determining the course of bacterial infections. A common strategy among bacteria living in iron-limited environments is the secretion of siderophores, which can bind poorly soluble iron and make it available to cells via active transport mechanisms. The aim of the presented study was to evaluate the correlation between antibiotic resistance and siderophore production of bacteria of the genus Enterococcus. The study included 55 bacterial strains from genus Enterococcus belonging to two species--Enterococcus faecalis and E. faecium. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were carried out using disc diffusion methods with guidelines of European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Total siderophore activity in the culture supernatants was measured using chrome azurol S. Hydroxamate siderophores were assayed using a chemical-specific assay. Antibacterial susceptibility pattern reveals that E. faecium is more resistant than E. faecalis. A significant correlation was found between resistance to fluoroquinolnes and siderophores production. Ciprofloxacin- and norfloxacin-resistant enterococal strains produced siderophores in large

  12. Synthetic biology of secondary metabolite biosynthesis in actinomycetes: Engineering precursor supply as a way to optimize antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Mast, Yvonne; Muth, Günther; Röttgen, Marlene; Stegmann, Evi; Weber, Tilmann

    2012-07-16

    Actinomycetes are a rich source for the synthesis of medically and technically useful natural products. The genes encoding the enzymes for their biosynthesis are normally organized in gene clusters, which include also the information for resistance (in the case of antibacterial compounds), regulation, and transport. This facilitates the manipulation of such pathways by molecular genetic techniques. Recent advances in DNA sequencing and analytical chemistry revealed that not only new strains isolated from yet unexplored habitats, but also already known strains possess a large potential for the synthesis of novel compounds. Synthetic Biology now offers a new perspective to exploit this potential further by generating novel pathways, and thereby novel products, by combining different biosynthetic steps originating from different bacteria. The supply of precursors, which are subsequently incorporated into the final product, is often already organized in a modular manner in nature and may directly be exploited for Synthetic Biology. Here we report examples for the synthesis of building blocks and possibilities to modify and optimize antibiotic biosynthesis, exemplary for the synthesis of the manipulation of the synthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotic balhimycin. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Efforts to slacken antibiotic resistance: Labeling meat products from animals raised without antibiotics in the United States.

    PubMed

    Centner, Terence J

    2016-09-01

    As bacteria and diseases spread due to climatic change, greater amounts of antibiotics will be used thereby exacerbating the problem of antibiotic resistance. To help slacken the development of resistant bacteria, the medical community is attempting to reduce unnecessary and excessive usage of antibiotics. One of the targets is the use of antibiotics for enhancing animal growth and promoting feed efficiency in the production of food animals. While governments can adopt regulations prohibiting nontherapeutic uses of antibiotics in food animals and strategies to reduce antibiotic usage, another idea is to publicize when antibiotics are used in food animal production by allowing labeled meat products. This paper builds upon existing labeling and marketing efforts in the United States to show how a government can develop a verified antibiotic-free labeling program that would allow consumers to purchase meat products from animals that had never received antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Short communication: Rapid antibiotic screening tests detect antibiotic residues in powdered milk products.

    PubMed

    Kneebone, J; Tsang, P C W; Townson, D H

    2010-09-01

    Rapid antibiotic screening tests are widely used in the dairy industry to monitor milk for the presence of antibiotic residues above regulated levels. Given the persistent concern over contamination of milk products with antibiotic residues, we investigated the utility of IDEXX Snap test devices (IDEXX Laboratories Inc., Westbrook, ME) as tools for detecting antibiotic residues in powdered milk products. Five powdered milk products were reconstituted according to manufacturer specification with distilled water: Carnation (Nestlé USA Inc., Solon, OH), Nido youth and Nido adult (Nestlé Mexico Inc., Mexico City, Mexico), ELK (Campina, Eindhoven, the Netherlands), and Regilait (Saint-Martin-Belle-Roche, France). Positive samples were generated by spiking reconstituted milk with penicillin G, cephapirin, or tetracycline to either the European Union-regulated maximum residue limit or the FDA-regulated safe/tolerance level, whichever was lower. Control, unspiked negative milk samples and positive samples were tested with appropriate IDEXX Snap test kits (penicillin G and cephapirin with New Beta-Lactam, tetracycline with New Tetracycline). All samples yielded definitive results consistent with expectations, and there were no instances of false-positive or false-negative readings. These results suggest that both the New Beta-Lactam and New Tetracycline IDEXX Snap test kits effectively detect antibiotic residues in commercially available powdered milk samples and are useful tools for monitoring antibiotic residues in reconstituted powdered milk products. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Toyota production system quality improvement initiative improves perioperative antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Burkitt, Kelly H; Mor, Maria K; Jain, Rajiv; Kruszewski, Matthew S; McCray, Ellesha E; Moreland, Michael E; Muder, Robert R; Obrosky, David Scott; Sevick, Mary Ann; Wilson, Mark A; Fine, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    To assess the role of a Toyota production system (TPS) quality improvement (QI) intervention on appropriateness of perioperative antibiotic therapy and in length of hospital stay (LOS) among surgical patients. Pre-post quasi-experimental study using local and national retrospective cohorts. We used TPS methods to implement a multifaceted intervention to reduce nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections on a Veterans Affairs surgical unit, which led to a QI intervention targeting appropriate perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Appropriate perioperative antibiotic therapy was defined as selection of the recommended antibiotic agents for a duration not exceeding 24 hours from the time of the operation. The local computerized medical record system was used to identify patients undergoing the 25 most common surgical procedures and to examine changes in appropriate antibiotic therapy and LOS over time. Overall, 2550 surgical admissions were identified from the local computerized medical records. The proportion of surgical admissions receiving appropriate perioperative antibiotics was significantly higher (P <.01) in 2004 after initiation of the TPS intervention (44.0%) compared with the previous 4 years (range, 23.4%-29.8%) primarily because of improvements in compliance with antibiotic therapy duration rather than appropriate antibiotic selection. There was no statistically significant decrease in LOS over time. The use of TPS methods resulted in a QI intervention that was associated with an increase in appropriate perioperative antibiotic therapy among surgical patients, without affecting LOS.

  16. Antibiotic production by actinomycetes: the Janus faces of regulation.

    PubMed

    Cundliffe, Eric

    2006-07-01

    This manuscript reviews some of the common regulatory mechanisms that control antibiotic production in actinomycetes. These ubiquitous bacteria, collectively responsible for the earthy smell of soil, are prolific producers of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. The content of this review is biased towards the author's current research interests, concerning the action of regulatory gene products that control transcription of antibiotic-biosynthetic genes and the associated involvement of low molecular weight signalling molecules of the gamma-butyrolactone family. As a result, much fertile ground remains unturned particularly in the area of environmental monitoring and responses of actinomycetes to stimuli so perceived. Reviews casting a broader net are cited in the text.

  17. Natural Product-Based Antibiotics: Synthesis and SAR-Studies.

    PubMed

    Prusov, Evgeny V

    2016-01-01

    Efficient control of the infectious diseases in the era of the emerging bacterial resistance demands consistent development of new antibiotic agents with novel modes of action. With some notable exceptions, the majority of the currently used antibiotics are natural product-derived compounds which were elaborated upon lead structures discovered by screening of various isolates. In this review, we summarized some selected examples of recent advances in the area of natural product based antibiotic development with particular emphasis on the synthetic and SAR-elucidation aspects.

  18. Physics and the Production of Antibiotics: 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbrother, Robert; Riddle, Wendy; Fairbrother, Neil

    2006-01-01

    In an article in the preceding issue we discussed the design and construction of fermenters in which antibiotics are cultured. For industrial purposes these fermenters can range in size up to 500 m[cube]. They have to be sterilized, filled with sterile culture medium and the culture itself and supplied with oxygen continuously. In some cases they…

  19. Physics and the Production of Antibiotics: 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairbrother, Robert; Riddle, Wendy; Fairbrother, Neil

    2006-01-01

    In an article in the preceding issue we discussed the design and construction of fermenters in which antibiotics are cultured. For industrial purposes these fermenters can range in size up to 500 m[cube]. They have to be sterilized, filled with sterile culture medium and the culture itself and supplied with oxygen continuously. In some cases they…

  20. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  1. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  2. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  3. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products... First Aid Antibiotic Drug Products § 333.150 Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products. (a... identifies the product as a “first aid antibiotic.” (b) Indications. The labeling of the product...

  4. Different classes of antibiotics differentially influence shiga toxin production.

    PubMed

    McGannon, Colleen Marie; Fuller, Cynthia Ann; Weiss, Alison Ann

    2010-09-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) in Escherichia coli O157:H7 is encoded as a late gene product by temperate bacteriophage integrated into the chromosome. Phage late genes, including stx, are silent in the lysogenic state. However, stress signals, including some induced by antibiotics, trigger the phage to enter the lytic cycle, and phage replication and Stx production occur concurrently. In addition to the Stx produced by O157:H7, phage produced by O157:H7 can infect harmless intestinal E. coli and recruit them to produce Shiga toxin. To understand how antibiotics influence Stx production, Stx lysogens were treated with different classes of antibiotics in the presence or absence of phage-sensitive E. coli, and Stx-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis was monitored using luciferase-expressing Vero cells. Growth-inhibitory levels of antibiotics suppressed Stx production. Subinhibitory levels of antibiotics that target DNA synthesis, including ciprofloxacin (CIP) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, increased Stx production, while antibiotics that target the cell wall, transcription, or translation did not. More Stx was produced when E. coli O157:H7 was incubated in the presence of phage-sensitive E. coli than when grown as a pure culture. Remarkably, very high levels of Stx were detected even when growth of O157:H7 was completely suppressed by CIP. In contrast, azithromycin significantly reduced Stx levels even when O157:H7 viability remained high.

  5. Counteraction of antibiotic production and degradation stabilizes microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Kelsic, Eric D; Zhao, Jeffrey; Vetsigian, Kalin; Kishony, Roy

    2015-05-28

    A major challenge in theoretical ecology is understanding how natural microbial communities support species diversity, and in particular how antibiotic-producing, -sensitive and -resistant species coexist. While cyclic ‘rock–paper–scissors’ interactions can stabilize communities in spatial environments, coexistence in unstructured environments remains unexplained. Here, using simulations and analytical models, we show that the opposing actions of antibiotic production and degradation enable coexistence even in well-mixed environments. Coexistence depends on three-way interactions in which an antibiotic-degrading species attenuates the inhibitory interactions between two other species. These interactions enable coexistence that is robust to substantial differences in inherent species growth rates and to invasion by ‘cheating’ species that cease to produce or degrade antibiotics. At least two antibiotics are required for stability, with greater numbers of antibiotics enabling more complex communities and diverse dynamic behaviours ranging from stable fixed points to limit cycles and chaos. Together, these results show how multi-species antibiotic interactions can generate ecological stability in both spatially structured and mixed microbial communities, suggesting strategies for engineering synthetic ecosystems and highlighting the importance of toxin production and degradation for microbial biodiversity.

  6. Counteraction of antibiotic production and degradation stabilizes microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Kelsic, Eric D.; Zhao, Jeffrey; Vetsigian, Kalin; Kishony, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Summary A major challenge in theoretical ecology is understanding how natural microbial communities support species diversity1-8, and in particular how antibiotic producing, sensitive and resistant species coexist9-15. While cyclic “rock-paper-scissors” interactions can stabilize communities in spatial environments9-11, coexistence in unstructured environments remains an enigma12,16. Here, using simulations and analytical models, we show that the opposing actions of antibiotic production and degradation enable coexistence even in well-mixed environments. Coexistence depends on 3-way interactions where an antibiotic degrading species attenuates the inhibitory interactions between two other species. These 3-way interactions enable coexistence that is robust to substantial differences in inherent species growth rates and to invasion by “cheating” species that cease producing or degrading antibiotics. At least two antibiotics are required for stability, with greater numbers of antibiotics enabling more complex communities and diverse dynamical behaviors ranging from stable fixed-points to limit cycles and chaos. Together, these results show how multi-species antibiotic interactions can generate ecological stability in both spatial and mixed microbial communities, suggesting strategies for engineering synthetic ecosystems and highlighting the importance of toxin production and degradation for microbial biodiversity. PMID:25992546

  7. Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in herbal products.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joseph C; Jiang, Xiuping

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in various herbal products. Twenty-nine herbal supplements (18 traditional and 11 organic products) were purchased from stores and analyzed microbiologically. Total bacterial counts were determined by pour plate and surface spreading on tryptic soy agar (TSA). Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were enumerated on TSA supplemented with ceftriaxone (64 microg/ml) or tetracycline (16 microg/ml). Total bacterial counts ranged from <5 to 2.9 x 10(5) CFU/g. Ceftriaxone- and tetracycline-resistant bacteria were detected in ground garlic samples at 1.1 x 10(2) CFU/g and 3.0 x 102 CFU/g, respectively. Traditional and organic onion powder samples contained tetracycline-resistant bacteria at 17 and 28 CFU/g and ceftriaxone-resistant bacteria at 35 and 2.0 x 10(3) CFU/g, respectively. Other products such as ginger, rosemary, mustard, and goldenseal contained low levels of resistant bacteria. Fifty-two isolates were further evaluated against nine antibiotics, and the prevalence of antibiotic resistance was in the following order: ampicillin, nalidixic acid, trimethoprim, ceftriaxone, and streptomycin. Resistant bacteria were identified as Bacillus spp., Erwinia spp., and Ewingella americana. Staphylococcus spp., Enterobacter cloacae, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia also were isolated. The presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and pathogens in these herbal products suggests that production and use of these products may need further evaluation.

  8. Glycopeptide resistance determinants from the teicoplanin producer Actinoplanes teichomyceticus.

    PubMed

    Serina, Stefania; Radice, Francesca; Maffioli, Sonia; Donadio, Stefano; Sosio, Margherita

    2004-11-01

    In enterococci and other pathogenic bacteria, high-level resistance to vancomycin and other glycopeptide antibiotics requires the action of the van genes, which direct the synthesis of peptidoglycan terminating in the depsipeptide D-alanyl-D-lactate, in place of the usual D-Ala-D-Ala. The Actinoplanes teichomyceticus tcp cluster, devoted to the biosynthesis of the glycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin, contains van genes associated to a murF-like sequence (murF2). We show that A. teichomyceticus contains also a house-keeping murF1 gene, capable of complementing a temperature sensitive Escherichia coli murF mutant. MurF1, expressed in Streptomyces lividans, can catalyze the addition of either D-Ala-D-Ala or D-Ala-D-Lac to the UDP-N-acetyl-muramyl-L-Ala-D-Glu-d-Lys. However, similarly expressed MurF2 shows a small enzymatic activity only with D-Ala-D-lactate. Introduction of a single copy of the entire set of van genes confers resistance to teicoplanin-type glycopeptides to S. coelicolor.

  9. About the equivalence between different batches of a glycopeptide drug.

    PubMed

    Boix-Montañes, Antonio; Garcia-Arieta, Alfredo

    2016-08-01

    Teicoplanin is a glycopeptide antibiotic consisting of a combination of different active components. Clinical equivalence between different batches of this drug is not guaranteed by the present pharmacopeial specification of chemical composition based on an HPLC chromatogram. To test a modification of this specification and to evaluate independent compositions recently published in the literature. The expectable area under the plasma curve of each batch has been estimated based on its chemical composition as described in a former paper. Batch-comparisons are based on ratios between the area of the test batch and the area of a reference. The modification of this specification recently proposed by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has been tested confirming its goodness. A new acceptance range of AUC variation, rounding -10% to +15%, has been obtained. It is narrower than the current interval of the pharmacopeial specification. Concerning the generic batches that have been studied, the majority of differences with the reference is lower than ±10%. Variations in the compositions of the reference product have been observed to influence the results and a control criteria are proposed. The variability of the pharmacokinetic performance of teicoplanin can be better controlled with this new proposal of composition specification given by EMA.

  10. Formation of lactones from sialylated MUC1 glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Pudelko, Maciej; Lindgren, Anna; Tengel, Tobias; Reis, Celso A; Elofsson, Mikael; Kihlberg, Jan

    2006-02-21

    The tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens TN, T, sialyl TN and sialyl T are expressed on mucins in several epithelial cancers. This has stimulated studies directed towards development of glycopeptide-based anticancer vaccines. Formation of intramolecular lactones involving sialic acid residues and suitably positioned hydroxyl groups in neighboring saccharide moieties is known to occur for glycolipids such as gangliosides. It has been suggested that these lactones are more immunogenic and tumor-specific than their native counterparts and that they might find use as cancer vaccines. We have now investigated if lactonization also occurs for the sialyl TN and T antigens of mucins. It was found that the model compound sialyl T benzyl glycoside , and the glycopeptide Ala-Pro-Asp-Thr-Arg-Pro-Ala from the tandem repeat of the mucin MUC1, in which Thr stands for the 2,3-sialyl-T antigen, lactonized during treatment with glacial acetic acid. Compound gave the 1''--> 2' lactone as the major product and the corresponding 1''--> 4' lactone as the minor product. For glycopeptide the 1''--> 4' lactone constitued the major product, whereas the 1''--> 2' lactone was the minor one. When lactonized was dissolved in water the 1''--> 4' lactone underwent slow hydrolysis, whereas the 1''--> 2' remained stable even after a 30 days incubation. In contrast the corresponding 2,6-sialyl-TN glycopeptide did not lactonize in glacial acetic acid.

  11. Antibiotic resistance-mediated isolation of scaffold-specific natural product producers.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Maulik N; Waglechner, Nicholas; Wright, Gerry D

    2014-01-01

    For over half a century, actinomycetes have served as the most promising source of novel antibacterial scaffolds. However, over the years, there has been a decline in the discovery of new antibiotics from actinomycetes. This is partly due to the use of standard screening methods and platforms that result in the re-discovery of the same molecules. Thus, according to current estimates, the discovery of a new antibacterial requires screening of tens to hundreds of thousands of bacterial strains. We have devised a resistance-based antibacterial discovery platform by harnessing the innate self-protection mechanism of antibiotic producers. This protocol provides a detailed method for isolation of scaffold-specific antibacterial producers by isolating strains in the presence of a selective antibiotic. As a specific example, we describe isolation of glycopeptide antibiotic (GPA) producers from soil actinomycetes, using vancomycin as the antibiotic resistance filter. However, the protocol can be adapted to isolate diverse producers from various sources producing different scaffolds, by selecting an appropriate antibiotic as a screening filter. The protocol provides a solution for two major bottlenecks that impede the new drug discovery pipeline: low hit frequency and re-discovery of known molecules. The entire protocol, from soil collection to identification of putative antibacterial producers, takes about 6 weeks to complete.

  12. Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such as Colds Flu Most coughs and bronchitis Sore throats, unless caused by strep If a virus is making you sick, taking antibiotics may do ...

  13. Controlled Antibiotic use during Fuel Ethanol Production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The production of fuel ethanol from corn feedstock is a rapidly growing industry in the US. The ability to make a profit in ethanol production from corn is marginal, and depends heavily on the sale of byproducts of the fermentation process. The fermentation reaction is optimized for yeast growth a...

  14. Crp is a global regulator of antibiotic production in streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chan; Hindra; Mulder, David; Yin, Charles; Elliot, Marie A

    2012-12-11

    Cyclic AMP receptor protein (Crp) is a transcription regulator controlling diverse cellular processes in many bacteria. In Streptomyces coelicolor, it is well established that Crp plays a critical role in spore germination and colony development. Here, we demonstrate that Crp is a key regulator of secondary metabolism and antibiotic production in S. coelicolor and show that it may additionally coordinate precursor flux from primary to secondary metabolism. We found that crp deletion adversely affected the synthesis of three well-characterized antibiotics in S. coelicolor: actinorhodin (Act), undecylprodigiosin (Red), and calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-microarray (ChIP-chip) assays, we determined that eight (out of 22) secondary metabolic clusters encoded by S. coelicolor contained Crp-associated sites. We followed the effect of Crp induction using transcription profiling analyses and found secondary metabolic genes to be significantly affected: included in this Crp-dependent group were genes from six of the clusters identified in the ChIP-chip experiments. Overexpressing Crp in a panel of Streptomyces species led to enhanced antibiotic synthesis and new metabolite production, suggesting that Crp control over secondary metabolism is broadly conserved in the streptomycetes and that Crp overexpression could serve as a powerful tool for unlocking the chemical potential of these organisms. IMPORTANCE Streptomyces produces a remarkably diverse array of secondary metabolites, including many antibiotics. In recent years, genome sequencing has revealed that these products represent only a small proportion of the total secondary metabolite potential of Streptomyces. There is, therefore, considerable interest in discovering ways to stimulate the production of new metabolites. Here, we show that Crp (the classical regulator of carbon catabolite repression in Escherichia coli) is a master regulator of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces

  15. Peptidoglycan cross-linking in glycopeptide-resistant Actinomycetales.

    PubMed

    Hugonnet, Jean-Emmanuel; Haddache, Nabila; Veckerlé, Carole; Dubost, Lionel; Marie, Arul; Shikura, Noriyasu; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Rice, Louis B; Arthur, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors ending in D-lactate (D-Lac) is thought to be responsible for glycopeptide resistance in members of the order Actinomycetales that produce these drugs and in related soil bacteria. More recently, the peptidoglycan of several members of the order Actinomycetales was shown to be cross-linked by L,D-transpeptidases that use tetrapeptide acyl donors devoid of the target of glycopeptides. To evaluate the contribution of these resistance mechanisms, we have determined the peptidoglycan structure of Streptomyces coelicolor A(3)2, which harbors a vanHAX gene cluster for the production of precursors ending in D-Lac, and Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727, which is devoid of vanHAX and produces the glycopeptide A40296. Vancomycin retained residual activity against S. coelicolor A(3)2 despite efficient incorporation of D-Lac into cytoplasmic precursors. This was due to a D,D-transpeptidase-catalyzed reaction that generated a stem pentapeptide recognized by glycopeptides by the exchange of D-Lac for D-Ala and Gly. The contribution of L,D-transpeptidases to resistance was limited by the supply of tetrapeptide acyl donors, which are essential for the formation of peptidoglycan cross-links by these enzymes. In the absence of a cytoplasmic metallo-D,D-carboxypeptidase, the tetrapeptide substrate was generated by hydrolysis of the C-terminal D-Lac residue of the stem pentadepsipeptide in the periplasm in competition with the exchange reaction catalyzed by D,D-transpeptidases. In Nonomuraea sp. strain ATCC 39727, the contribution of L,D-transpeptidases to glycopeptide resistance was limited by the incomplete conversion of pentapeptides into tetrapeptides despite the production of a cytoplasmic metallo-D,D-carboxypeptidase. Since the level of drug production exceeds the level of resistance, we propose that L,D-transpeptidases merely act as a tolerance mechanism in this bacterium.

  16. Antibiotics and immunity: effects of antibiotics on mitogen responsiveness of lymphocytes and interleukin-2 production.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M S; Maged, Z A; Haron, A; Khalil, R Y; Attallah, A M

    1988-12-01

    The immunomodulating properties of antimicrobial drugs may have important implications in prescriptive practice. This is particularly so for patients whose immune system has been compromised. In this study, tetracycline, cephalothin, rifampicin, polymyxin B and nitrofurantoin reduced mitogen responsiveness of both B and T lymphocytes of mouse spleen cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro in a dose-dependent fashion. Ampicillin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, streptomycin and erythromycin had no effect. In the in vivo study none of the antibiotics affected mouse spleen cell transformation in response to mitogen. The addition of interleukin-2 (IL-2) did not prevent the effect of the antibiotics tested on human lymphocytes in vitro. Cephalothin, chloramphenicol and gentamicin decreased IL-2 production by mouse spleen cells in vitro.

  17. Background antibiotic resistance patterns in antibiotic-free pastured poultry production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a significant public health issue, and agroecosystems are often viewed as major environmental sources of antibiotic resistant foodborne pathogens. While the use of antibiotics in agroecosystems can potentially increase AR, appropriate background resistance levels in th...

  18. Microbial antibiotic production aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Benoit, M R; Li, W; Stodieck, L S; Lam, K S; Winther, C L; Roane, T M; Klaus, D M

    2006-04-01

    Previous studies examining metabolic characteristics of bacterial cultures have mostly suggested that reduced gravity is advantageous for microbial growth. As a consequence, the question of whether space flight would similarly enhance secondary metabolite production was raised. Results from three prior space shuttle experiments indicated that antibiotic production was stimulated in space for two different microbial systems, albeit under suboptimal growth conditions. The goal of this latest experiment was to determine whether the enhanced productivity would also occur with better growth conditions and over longer durations of weightlessness. Microbial antibiotic production was examined onboard the International Space Station during the 72-day 8A increment. Findings of increased productivity of actinomycin D by Streptomyces plicatus in space corroborated with previous findings for the early sample points (days 8 and 12); however, the flight production levels were lower than the matched ground control samples for the remainder of the mission. The overall goal of this research program is to elucidate the specific mechanisms responsible for the initial stimulation of productivity in space and translate this knowledge into methods for improving efficiency of commercial production facilities on Earth.

  19. Enabling techniques in the search for new antibiotics: Combinatorial biosynthesis of sugar-containing antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Park, Je Won; Nam, Sang-Jip; Yoon, Yeo Joon

    2017-06-15

    Nature has a talent for inventing a vast number of natural products, including hybrids generated by blending different scaffolds, resulting in a myriad of bioactive chemical entities. Herein, we review the highlights and recent trends (2010-2016) in the combinatorial biosynthesis of sugar-containing antibiotics where nature's structural diversification capabilities are exploited to enable the creation of new anti-infective and anti-proliferative drugs. In this review, we describe the modern combinatorial biosynthetic approaches for polyketide synthase-derived complex and aromatic polyketides, non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-directed lipo-/glycopeptides, aminoglycosides, nucleoside antibiotics, and alkaloids, along with their therapeutic potential. Finally, we present the feasible nexus between combinatorial biosynthesis, systems biology, and synthetic biology as a toolbox to provide new antibiotics that will be indispensable in the post-antibiotic era. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Enhancement of antibiotic productions by engineered nitrate utilization in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Meng, Sitong; Wu, Hang; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Buchang; Bai, Linquan

    2017-07-01

    Nitrate is necessary for primary and secondary metabolism of actinomycetes and stimulates the production of a few antibiotics, such as lincomycin and rifamycin. However, the mechanism of this nitrate-stimulating effect was not fully understood. Two putative ABC-type nitrate transporters were identified in Streptomyces lincolnensis NRRL2936 and verified to be involved in lincomycin biosynthesis. With nitrate supplementation, the transcription of nitrogen assimilation genes, nitrate-specific ABC1 transporter genes, and lincomycin exporter gene lmrA was found to be enhanced and positively regulated by the global regulator GlnR, whose expression was also improved. Moreover, heterologous expression of ABC2 transporter genes in Streptomyces coelicolor M145 resulted in an increased actinorhodin production. Further incorporation of a nitrite-specific transporter gene nirC, as in nirC-ABC2 cassette, led to an even higher actinorhodin production. Similarly, the titers of salinomycin, ansamitocin, lincomycin, and geldanamycin were increased with the integration of this cassette to Streptomyces albus BK3-25, Actinosynnema pretiosum ATCC31280, S. lincolnensis LC-G, and Streptomyces hygroscopicus XM201, respectively. Our work expanded the nitrate-stimulating effect to many antibiotic producers by utilizing the nirC-ABC2 cassette for enhanced nitrate utilization, which could become a general tool for titer increase of antibiotics in actinomycetes.

  1. Triclosan and prescription antibiotic exposures and enterolactone production in adults.

    PubMed

    Adgent, Margaret A; Rogan, Walter J

    2015-10-01

    The gut microbiome plays an important role in the development of disease. The composition of the microbiome is influenced by factors such as mode of delivery at birth, diet and antibiotic use, yet the influence of environmental chemical exposures is largely unknown. The antimicrobial compound triclosan, found in many personal care products and widely detected in human urine, is an environmental exposure for which systemic microbiotic effects may be of particular interest. To investigate the relationship between triclosan and gut microflora, we assessed the association between triclosan and enterolactone, an intestinal metabolite that is produced via bacterial transformation of dietary lignans (seeds, nuts) and has known susceptibility to oral antibiotics. We examined urinary triclosan and enterolactone for 2005-2008 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey subjects, aged ≥20 years (n=3041). We also examined the association between prescription antibiotic use and enterolactone to confirm its susceptibility to changes in bacterial composition of the body. Associations between natural log-transformed enterolactone and (1) detected vs. not detected (<2.3 ng/mL) triclosan, (2) triclosan quintiles (Q1-Q5), and (3) any vs. no antibiotics were estimated with multiple linear regression, adjusting for sex, age, race, body mass index, poverty income ratio, education, fiber intake, bowel movement frequency, cotinine and creatinine (n=2441). Triclosan was detected in 80% of subjects (range: <2.3-3620 ng/mL), while enterolactone was detected in >99% of subjects (range: <0.1-122,000 ng/mL). After adjustment, enterolactone was not associated with triclosan (detect vs. non-detect: β= 0.07 (95% CI: -0.15, 0.30); Q5 (≥104.5 ng/mL) vs. Q1 (none): β= 0.06 (95% CI: -0.21, 0.34)). In sex-stratified analyses, triclosan was associated with higher enterolactone in women (detect vs. non-detect: β= 0.31 (95% CI: -0.07, 0.70), but not men β= -0.18 (95% CI: -0.47, 0

  2. Triclosan and prescription antibiotic exposures and enterolactone production in adults

    PubMed Central

    Adgent, Margaret A.; Rogan, Walter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The gut microbiome plays an important role in the development of disease. The composition of the microbiome is influenced by factors such as mode of delivery at birth, diet and antibiotic use, yet the influence of environmental chemical exposures is largely unknown. The antimicrobial compound triclosan, found in many personal care products and widely detected in human urine, is an environmental exposure for which systemic microbiotic effects may be of particular interest. To investigate the relationship between triclosan and gut microflora, we assessed the association between triclosan and enterolactone, an intestinal metabolite that is produced via bacterial transformation of dietary lignans (seeds, nuts) and has known susceptibility to oral antibiotics. Methods We examined urinary triclosan and enterolactone for 2005–2008 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey subjects, aged ≥ 20 years (n = 3,041). We also examined the association between prescription antibiotic use and enterolactone to confirm its susceptibility to changes in bacterial composition of the body. Associations between natural log-transformed enterolactone and 1) detected vs. not detected (<2.3 ng/mL) triclosan, 2) triclosan quintiles (Q1–Q5), and 3) any vs. no antibiotics were estimated with multiple linear regression, adjusting for sex, age, race, body mass index, poverty income ratio, education, fiber intake, bowel movement frequency, cotinine and creatinine (n=2,441). Results Triclosan was detected in 80% of subjects (range: <2.3 – 3620 ng/mL), while enterolactone was detected in >99% of subjects (range: <0.1 – 122,000 ng/mL). After adjustment, enterolactone was not associated with triclosan (detect vs. nondetect: β= 0.07 (95% CI: −0.15, 0.30); Q5 (≥104.5 ng/mL) vs. Q1 (none): β= 0.06 (95% CI:−0.21, 0.34)). In sex-stratified analyses, triclosan was associated with higher enterolactone in women (detect vs. non-detect: β= 0.31 (95% CI:−0.07, 0.70), but

  3. Fragmentation Characteristics of Deprotonated N-linked Glycopeptides: Influences of Amino Acid Composition and Sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikaze, Takashi; Kawabata, Shin-ichirou; Tanaka, Koichi

    2014-06-01

    Glycopeptide structural analysis using tandem mass spectrometry is becoming a common approach for elucidating site-specific N-glycosylation. The analysis is generally performed in positive-ion mode. Therefore, fragmentation of protonated glycopeptides has been extensively investigated; however, few studies are available on deprotonated glycopeptides, despite the usefulness of negative-ion mode analysis in detecting glycopeptide signals. Here, large sets of glycopeptides derived from well-characterized glycoproteins were investigated to understand the fragmentation behavior of deprotonated N-linked glycopeptides under low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions. The fragment ion species were found to be significantly variable depending on their amino acid sequence and could be classified into three types: (i) glycan fragment ions, (ii) glycan-lost fragment ions and their secondary cleavage products, and (iii) fragment ions with intact glycan moiety. The CID spectra of glycopeptides having a short peptide sequence were dominated by type (i) glycan fragments (e.g., 2,4AR, 2,4AR-1, D, and E ions). These fragments define detailed structural features of the glycan moiety such as branching. For glycopeptides with medium or long peptide sequences, the major fragments were type (ii) ions (e.g., [peptide + 0,2X0-H]- and [peptide-NH3-H]-). The appearance of type (iii) ions strongly depended on the peptide sequence, and especially on the presence of Asp, Asn, and Glu. When a glycosylated Asn is located on the C-terminus, an interesting fragment having an Asn residue with intact glycan moiety, [glycan + Asn-36]-, was abundantly formed. Observed fragments are reasonably explained by a combination of existing fragmentation rules suggested for N-glycans and peptides.

  4. Metabolic engineering of antibiotic factories: new tools for antibiotic production in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tilmann; Charusanti, Pep; Musiol-Kroll, Ewa Maria; Jiang, Xinglin; Tong, Yaojun; Kim, Hyun Uk; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    Actinomycetes are excellent sources for novel bioactive compounds, which serve as potential drug candidates for antibiotics development. While industrial efforts to find and develop novel antimicrobials have been severely reduced during the past two decades, the increasing threat of multidrug-resistant pathogens and the development of new technologies to find and produce such compounds have again attracted interest in this field. Based on improvements in whole-genome sequencing, novel methods have been developed to identify the secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters by genome mining, to clone them, and to express them in heterologous hosts in much higher throughput than before. These technologies now enable metabolic engineering approaches to optimize production yields and to directly manipulate the pathways to generate modified products.

  5. From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Silber, Johanna; Kramer, Annemarie; Labes, Antje; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-07-21

    Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics.

  6. From Discovery to Production: Biotechnology of Marine Fungi for the Production of New Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Silber, Johanna; Kramer, Annemarie; Labes, Antje; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are well known for their capability of producing antibiotic natural products. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential of antimicrobials with vast chemodiversity from marine fungi. Development of such natural products into lead compounds requires sustainable supply. Marine biotechnology can significantly contribute to the production of new antibiotics at various levels of the process chain including discovery, production, downstream processing, and lead development. However, the number of biotechnological processes described for large-scale production from marine fungi is far from the sum of the newly-discovered natural antibiotics. Methods and technologies applied in marine fungal biotechnology largely derive from analogous terrestrial processes and rarely reflect the specific demands of the marine fungi. The current developments in metabolic engineering and marine microbiology are not yet transferred into processes, but offer numerous options for improvement of production processes and establishment of new process chains. This review summarises the current state in biotechnological production of marine fungal antibiotics and points out the enormous potential of biotechnology in all stages of the discovery-to-development pipeline. At the same time, the literature survey reveals that more biotechnology transfer and method developments are needed for a sustainable and innovative production of marine fungal antibiotics. PMID:27455283

  7. Approved Glycopeptide Antibacterial Drugs: Mechanism of Action and Resistance.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Daina; Debabov, Dmitri; Hartsell, Theresa L; Cano, Raul J; Adams, Stacy; Schuyler, Jessica A; McMillan, Ronald; Pace, John L

    2016-12-01

    The glycopeptide antimicrobials are a group of natural product and semisynthetic glycosylated peptides that show antibacterial activity against Gram-positive organisms through inhibition of cell-wall synthesis. This is achieved primarily through binding to the d-alanyl-d-alanine terminus of the lipid II bacterial cell-wall precursor, preventing cross-linking of the peptidoglycan layer. Vancomycin is the foundational member of the class, showing both clinical longevity and a still preferential role in the therapy of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and of susceptible Enterococcus spp. Newer lipoglycopeptide derivatives (telavancin, dalbavancin, and oritavancin) were designed in a targeted fashion to increase antibacterial activity, in some cases through secondary mechanisms of action. Resistance to the glycopeptides emerged in delayed fashion and occurs via a spectrum of chromosome- and plasmid-associated elements that lead to structural alteration of the bacterial cell-wall precursor substrates.

  8. A Practical, Convergent Method for Glycopeptide Synthesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-23

    deprotection, the overall yield from oligosaccharide to glycopeptide is low. This may be acceptable for monosaccharides or for oligosaccharides which...in Figure 3. GIcNAcNH2 (1) is commercially available. Chitobiose constitutes the disaccharide core of N-linked sugars; the peracetylated compound (2...glycopeptides containing this sugar cannot be easily prepared by non- convergent methods. 43 The peracetylated disaccharide (5) was synthesized from L

  9. Presence and biological activity of antibiotics used in fuel ethanol and corn co-product production.

    PubMed

    Compart, D M Paulus; Carlson, A M; Crawford, G I; Fink, R C; Diez-Gonzalez, F; Dicostanzo, A; Shurson, G C

    2013-05-01

    Antibiotics are used in ethanol production to control bacteria from competing with yeast for nutrients during starch fermentation. However, there is no published scientific information on whether antibiotic residues are present in distillers grains (DG), co-products from ethanol production, or whether they retain their biological activity. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to quantify concentrations of various antibiotic residues in DG and determine whether residues were biologically active. Twenty distillers wet grains and 20 distillers dried grains samples were collected quarterly from 9 states and 43 ethanol plants in the United States. Samples were analyzed for DM, CP, NDF, crude fat, S, P, and pH to describe the nutritional characteristics of the samples evaluated. Samples were also analyzed for the presence of erythromycin, penicillin G, tetracycline, tylosin, and virginiamycin M1, using liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Additionally, virginiamycin residues were determined, using a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved bioassay method. Samples were extracted and further analyzed for biological activity by exposing the sample extracts to 10(4) to 10(7) CFU/mL concentrations of sentinel bacterial strains Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19115. Extracts that inhibited bacterial growth were considered to have biological activity. Physiochemical characteristics varied among samples but were consistent with previous findings. Thirteen percent of all samples contained low (≤1.12 mg/kg) antibiotic concentrations. Only 1 sample extract inhibited growth of Escherichia coli at 10(4) CFU/mL, but this sample contained no detectable concentrations of antibiotic residues. No extracts inhibited Listeria monocytogenes growth. These data indicate that the likelihood of detectable concentrations of antibiotic residues in DG is low; and if detected, they are found in very low concentrations. The inhibition in only 1 DG

  10. Interleukin-1 production by antibiotic-treated human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Y; Fay, M; Gougerot-Pocidalo, M A

    1988-05-01

    The effects of penicillin, macrolides (spiramycin and erythromycin), cephalosporins (cefaclor and cefadroxil), tetracycline (doxycycline) and quinolones (pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin) on extracellular and cell-associated interleukin 1 (IL-1) activity from human adherent mononuclear leucocyte cells were investigated in vitro. When cells were treated with an antibiotic concentration of 10 mg/l, no apparent effect could be detected for penicillin, erythromycin, cephalosporins or quinolones, while a slight increase of extracellular IL-1 activity associated with a decrease of intracellular IL-1 activity was observed with spiramycin and doxycycline. When high antibiotic concentration were used, extracellular IL-1 activity was increased by macrolides and tetracycline, while both cell-associated and class II human monocyte antigen expression were decreased. A toxic effect may have been exerted by these antimicrobial agents, since cell viability was altered when they were used at high concentrations. In contrast, extracellular IL-1 activity was found to be decreased by quinolones and cephalosporins. Intracellular IL-1 activity was also decreased by cephalosporins, while quinolones did not modify either cell-associated IL-1 activity or class II human monocyte antigen expression. The effect induced by quinolones and cephalosporins occurred without modification of cell viability. IL-1 activity was shown to be affected by antibiotics over the same range of concentrations which are known to inhibit mononuclear leucocyte proliferation. Our data may help in defining the mechanism by which the mitogen-induced mononuclear proliferative response is suppressed by antimicrobial agents since this appears to involve the inhibition of IL-1 production or of its release.

  11. Dietary risk ranking for residual antibiotics in cultured aquatic products around Tai Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Chao; Li, Le; Zhang, Cong; Qiu, Liping; Fan, Limin; Wu, Wei; Meng, Shunlong; Hu, Gengdong; Chen, Jiazhang; Liu, Ying; Mao, Aimin

    2017-10-01

    Antibiotics are widely used in aquaculture and therefore may be present as a dietary risk in cultured aquatic products. Using the Tai Lake Basin as a study area, we assessed the presence of 15 antibiotics in 5 widely cultured aquatic species using a newly developed dietary risk ranking approach. By assigning scores to each factor involved in the ranking matrices, the scores of dietary risks per antibiotic and per aquatic species were calculated. The results indicated that fluoroquinolone antibiotics posed the highest dietary risk in all aquatic species. Then, the total scores per aquatic species were summed by all 15 antibiotic scores of antibiotics, it was found that Crab (Eriocheir sinensis) had the highest dietary risks. Finally, the most concerned antibiotic category and aquatic species were selected. This study highlighted the importance of dietary risk ranking in the production and consumption of cultured aquatic products around Tai Lake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Alternative Pathway to a Glycopeptide-Resistant Cell Wall in the Balhimycin Producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina.

    PubMed

    Frasch, Hans-Joerg; Kalan, Lindsay; Kilian, Regina; Martin, Tobias; Wright, Gerard D; Stegmann, Evi

    2015-06-12

    Balhimycin, a vancomycin-type glycopeptide, is a lipid II targeting antibiotic produced by Amycolatopsis balhimycina. A. balhimycina has developed a self-resistance mechanism based on the synergistic action of different enzymes resulting in modified peptidoglycan. The canonical resistance mechanism against glycopeptides is the synthesis of peptidoglycan precursors ending with acyl-d-alanyl-d-lactate (d-Ala-d-Lac) rather than acyl-d-alanyl-d-alanine (d-Ala-d-Ala). This reprogramming is the result of the enzymes VanH, VanA, and VanX. VanH and VanA are required to produce d-Ala-d-Lac; VanX cleaves cytosolic pools of d-Ala-d-Ala, thereby ensuring that peptidoglycan is enriched in d-Ala-d-Lac. In A. balhimycina, the ΔvanHAXAb mutant showed a reduced glycopeptide resistance in comparison to the wild type. Nevertheless, ΔvanHAXAb was paradoxically still able to produce d-Ala-d-Lac containing resistant cell wall precursors suggesting the presence of a novel alternative glycopeptide resistance mechanism. In silico analysis, inactivation studies, and biochemical assays led to the characterization of an enzyme, Ddl1Ab, as a paraloguous chromosomal d-Ala-d-Lac ligase able to complement the function of VanAAb in the ΔvanHAXAb mutant. Furthermore, A. balhimycina harbors a vanYAb gene encoding a d,d-carboxypeptidase. Transcriptional analysis revealed an upregulated expression of vanYAb in the ΔvanHAXAb mutant. VanYAb cleaves the endstanding d-Ala from the pentapeptide precursors, reducing the quantity of sensitive cell wall precursors in the absence of VanXAb. These findings represent an unprecedented coordinated layer of resistance mechanisms in a glycopeptide antibiotic producing bacterium.

  13. [Influence of personal attitude of the manager on antibiotic use in pig production].

    PubMed

    Malik, J; Kaufmann, G; Hirsiger, P; Kümmerlen, D; Arnold, C; Spring, P; Sidler, X

    2015-12-01

    The attitude as well as the expertise of a person affect the behavior and actions in daily life. To investigate the influence of attitude and knowledge of pig producers on the use of antibiotics in farms, 220 Swiss pig producers were questioned on health awareness, attitude towards sustainable production, risk behavior, intrinsic motivation and knowledge about antibiotics and resistance development. In addition, the strategy of antibiotic use (therapeutic or prophylactic) and the business practice (single or group therapy) for the amount of antibiotics on one hand and for the risk of antibiotic resistance development on the other hand, were determined in a personal interview. Farmers using antibiotics only therapeutically had a better business practice. A direct link between the personal attitude and the antibiotic use or a higher risk of development of antibiotic resistance was not found in this investigation.

  14. Why and how antibiotics are used in swine production.

    PubMed

    Cromwell, Gary L

    2002-05-01

    In summary, published research data clearly show that the use of antibiotics during all phases of growth benefits the rate and efficiency of body weight gain, reduces mortality and morbidity, reduces subclinical disease, and improves health in pigs. Also, antibiotics at breeding and during lactation benefits reproductive and lactational performance in sows. The economic benefits are several-fold greater than the cost of the antibiotic when a cost-effective antibiotic is used for this purpose. Monitoring and surveillance of microbial resistance in animals and humans has continued, with no animal-to-human infection path being clearly delineated. Although the incidence of antibiotic resistance in the human population remains high, there is no clear evidence that the levels or patterns have changed. The high levels of antimicrobial resistance in humans likely result from antibiotics prescribed directly to humans, because well over half of the antibiotics produced in the United States is used in human medicine. Whether antibiotic usage in swine, poultry, and other food-producing animals contributes to antibiotic resistance in the human population will continue to be debated. Even though antibiotics have been fed for nearly 50 years to literally billions of animals, there is still no convincing evidence of unfavorable health effects in humans that can be directly linked to the feeding of subtherapeutic levels of antibiotics to swine or other animals. Hopefully, policy decisions in the future regarding the use of antimicrobials in animals will be based on science and sound risk assessment, and not on emotionalism.

  15. [Effect of antibiotics on intestinal microflora and production of metabolites].

    PubMed

    Tamm, A O; Siĭgur, U Kh; Mikel'saar, M E

    1989-06-01

    Methodical approaches to detection of relation between intestinal microflora and its metabolites are described. The microbial origin of certain compounds can be asserted by a decrease in their production after exposure to antibacterial drugs or the absence of their production in microbe-free animals. The authors consider that parallel investigation of intestinal microflora and its metabolites after exposure to various agents e.g. narrow spectrum antibiotics or specific substrates is the most accurate methodical approach to detection of their interrelations. Data on the effect of four drugs i.e. kanamycin, metronidazole, cefotaxime and bactrim on production of 10 bacterial metabolites: p-cresol, phenol, indican, acetic, propionic, butyric, isobutyric, valeric, isovaleric and caproic acids in rats are presented. Correlation between the metabolites and the intestinal microflora composition was revealed. It is concluded that detection of microorganisms responsible for production of definite metabolites requires at the maximum: (1) exposure to drugs of different spectra, (2) detection of changes in intestinal microflora by biotope++ and (3) investigation of mucosa microflora which more exactly characterizes metabolism of definite biotops.

  16. Simplification of mass spectral analysis of acidic glycopeptides using GlycoPep ID.

    PubMed

    Irungu, Janet; Go, Eden P; Dalpathado, Dilusha S; Desaire, Heather

    2007-04-15

    Mass spectral analysis is an increasingly common method used to characterize glycoproteins. When more than one glycosylation site is present on a protein, obtaining MS data of glycopeptides is a highly effective way of obtaining glycosylation information because this approach can be used to identify not only what the carbohydrates are but also at which glycosylation site they are attached. Unfortunately, this is not yet a routine analytical approach, in part because data analysis can be quite challenging. We are developing strategies to simplify this analysis. Presented herein is a novel mass spectrometry technique that identifies the peptide moiety of either sulfated, sialylated, or both sialylated and sulfated glycopeptides. This technique correlates product ions in collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments of suspected glycopeptides to a peptide composition using a newly developed web-based tool, GlycoPep ID. After identifying the peptide portion of glycopeptides with GlycoPep ID, the process of assigning the rest of the glycopeptide composition to the MS data is greatly facilitated because the "unknown" portion of the mass assignment that remains can be directly attributed to the carbohydrate component. Several examples of the utility and reliability of this method are presented herein.

  17. N-Glycopeptide Profiling in Arabidopsis Inflorescence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shou-Ling; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Burlingame, Alma L; Chalkley, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This study presents the first large-scale analysis of plant intact glycopeptides. Using wheat germ agglutinin lectin weak affinity chromatography to enrich modified peptides, followed by electron transfer dissociation (ETD)(1) fragmentation tandem mass spectrometry, glycan compositions on over 1100 glycopeptides from 270 proteins found in Arabidopsis inflorescence tissue were characterized. While some sites were only detected with a single glycan attached, others displayed up to 16 different glycoforms. Among the identified glycopeptides were four modified in nonconsensus glycosylation motifs. While most of the modified proteins are secreted, membrane, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), or Golgi-localized proteins, surprisingly, N-linked sugars were detected on a protein predicted to be cytosolic or nuclear. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Glycopeptides from human κ-chains

    PubMed Central

    Milstein, Celia P.; Milstein, C.

    1971-01-01

    Glycopeptides have been isolated from tryptic digests of κ-type light chains separated from human myeloma proteins obtained from the serum of two patients, Car and Rai. The glycopeptides are derived from the variable region of the chain in both cases, but from different sections. On the basis of homology it is deduced that glycopeptide from Car, κI type, is derived from position 25–31 whereas that from Rai, κII type, is from position 62–77, their sequences being respectively Ala-Ser-Gln-Asn-Ile-Ser and Phe-Ser-Gly-Ser-Gly-Ser-Gly(Thr,Asp)Phe-Thr-Leu-Asx-Ile-Ser-Arg. The significance of the results is discussed in connexion with the nature of the attachment site of carbohydrate to protein. PMID:5117028

  19. A Transposon Screen Identifies Genetic Determinants of Vibrio cholerae Resistance to High-Molecular-Weight Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Dörr, Tobias; Delgado, Fernanda; Umans, Benjamin D; Gerding, Matthew A; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2016-08-01

    Gram-negative bacteria are notoriously resistant to a variety of high-molecular-weight antibiotics due to the limited permeability of their outer membrane (OM). The basis of OM barrier function and the genetic factors required for its maintenance remain incompletely understood. Here, we employed transposon insertion sequencing to identify genes required for Vibrio cholerae resistance to vancomycin and bacitracin, antibiotics that are thought to be too large to efficiently penetrate the OM. The screen yielded several genes whose protein products are predicted to participate in processes important for OM barrier functions and for biofilm formation. In addition, we identified a novel factor, designated vigA (for vancomycin inhibits growth), that has not previously been characterized or linked to outer membrane function. The vigA open reading frame (ORF) codes for an inner membrane protein, and in its absence, cells became highly sensitive to glycopeptide antibiotics (vancomycin and ramoplanin) and bacitracin but not to other large antibiotics or detergents. In contrast to wild-type (WT) cells, the vigA mutant was stained with fluorescent vancomycin. These observations suggest that VigA specifically prevents the periplasmic accumulation of certain large antibiotics without exerting a general role in the maintenance of OM integrity. We also observed marked interspecies variability in the susceptibilities of Gram-negative pathogens to glycopeptides and bacitracin. Collectively, our findings suggest that the OM barrier is not absolute but rather depends on specific OM-antibiotic interactions. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Unusual Fragmentation Pathways in Collagen Glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdivara, Irina; Perera, Lalith; Sricholpech, Marnisa; Terajima, Masahiko; Pleshko, Nancy; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Tomer, Kenneth B.

    2013-07-01

    Collagens are the most abundant glycoproteins in the body. One characteristic of this protein family is that the amino acid sequence consists of repeats of three amino acids -(X—Y—Gly)n. Within this motif, the Y residue is often 4-hydroxyproline (HyP) or 5-hydroxylysine (HyK). Glycosylation in collagen occurs at the 5-OH group in HyK in the form of two glycosides, galactosylhydroxylysine (Gal-HyK) and glucosyl galactosylhydroxylysine (GlcGal-HyK). In collision induced dissociation (CID), collagen tryptic glycopeptides exhibit unexpected gas-phase dissociation behavior compared to typical N- and O-linked glycopeptides (i.e., in addition to glycosidic bond cleavages, extensive cleavages of the amide bonds are observed). The Gal- or GlcGal- glycan modifications are largely retained on the fragment ions. These features enable unambiguous determination of the amino acid sequence of collagen glycopeptides and the location of the glycosylation site. This dissociation pattern was consistent for all analyzed collagen glycopeptides, regardless of their length or amino acid composition, collagen type or tissue. The two fragmentation pathways—amide bond and glycosidic bond cleavage—are highly competitive in collagen tryptic glycopeptides. The number of ionizing protons relative to the number of basic sites (i.e., Arg, Lys, HyK, and N-terminus) is a major driving force of the fragmentation. We present here our experimental results and employ quantum mechanics calculations to understand the factors enhancing the labile character of the amide bonds and the stability of hydroxylysine glycosides in gas phase dissociation of collagen glycopeptides.

  1. Unusual fragmentation pathways in collagen glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Perdivara, Irina; Perera, Lalith; Sricholpech, Marnisa; Terajima, Masahiko; Pleshko, Nancy; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Tomer, Kenneth B.

    2013-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant glycoproteins in the body. One characteristic of this protein family is that the amino acid sequence consists of repeats of three amino acids –(X—Y—Gly)n. Within this motif, the Y residue is often 4-hydroxyproline (HyP) or 5-hydroxylysine (HyK). Glycosylation in collagen occurs at the 5-OH group in HyK in the form of two glycosides, galactosylhydroxylysine (Gal-HyK) and glucosyl galactosylhydroxylysine (GlcGal-HyK). In collision induced dissociation (CID), collagen tryptic glycopeptides exhibit unexpected gas-phase dissociation behavior compared to typical N- and O-linked glycopeptides, i.e. in addition to glycosidic bond cleavages, extensive cleavages of the amide bonds are observed. The Gal- or GlcGal- glycan modifications are largely retained on the fragment ions. These features enable unambiguous determination of the amino acid sequence of collagen glycopeptides and the location of the glycosylation site. This dissociation pattern was consistent for all analyzed collagen glycopeptides, regardless of their length or amino acid composition, collagen type or tissue. The two fragmentation pathways – amide bond and glycosidic bond cleavage – are highly competitive in collagen tryptic glycopeptides. The number of ionizing protons relative to the number of basic sites (i.e. Arg, Lys, HyK and N-terminus) is a major driving force of the fragmentation. We present here our experimental results and employ quantum mechanics calculations, to understand the factors enhancing the labile character of the amide bonds and the stability of hydroxylysine glycosides in gas phase dissociation of collagen glycopeptides. PMID:23633013

  2. The future of natural products as a source of new antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Pelzer, Stefan; Bechthold, Andreas

    2007-08-01

    One reason for the current crisis in antibiotic development is the low return on investment, which is intrinsic to anti-infective drug development. Despite this, smaller pharmaceutical companies are attempting to address the medical need for new antibiotics. Natural products have played a major role in antibiotic drug discovery since 1941 when penicillin was introduced to the market, and currently natural products are again the most important source for promising drug candidates. This review discusses novel methods and technologies that will increase the success rate for identifying novel antibiotics from natural sources.

  3. Antiviral antibiotic S15-1. Taxonomy of the producing strain and study of conditions for production of the antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, T; Tago, K; Beppu, T; Arima, K

    1976-03-01

    Strain S15-1 which produces antiviral antibiotic S15-1 belonging to the streptothricin group of antibiotics was isolated from a soil sample. Cell analysis, colony morphology, the absence of sporangia-like vesicles, the formation of spores in chains of the Rectus Flexibilis type, and the ability to produce melanoid pigment, indicate that this strain belongs to the genus Streptomyces Waksman and Henrici. A comparison of the characteristics of strain S15-1 with related Streptomyces show that it should be identified as Streptomyces purpeofuscus Yamaguchi and Saburi. The investigation of cultural conditions show that soluble starch and meat extract are the most suitable carbon and organic nitrogen sources for the production of antibiotic S15-1. Strain S15-1 grew poorly on media with no organic nitrogen sources, and did not produce the antibiotic. Antiviral antibiotic S15-1 is accumulated at the highest level after 3 or 4 days growth of the producing organism.

  4. Complementary or alternative? The use of homeopathic products and antibiotics amongst pre-school children

    PubMed Central

    Wye, Lesley; Hay, Alastair D; Northstone, Kate; Bishop, Jackie; Headley, Judith; Thompson, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Background Any intervention to reduce the inappropriate use of antibiotics for infections in children has the potential to reduce the selective pressure on antimicrobial resistance and minimise the medicalisation of self-limiting illness. Little is known about whether homeopathic products might be used by some families as an alternative to antibiotics or the characteristics of such families. We used the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) observational dataset to explore the hypothesis that the use of homeopathic products is associated with reduced antibiotic use in pre-school children and to identify characteristics of the families of pre-school children given homeopathic products. Methods Questionnaires data were completed by the parents of 9723 children while aged between 3–4.5 years in Bristol UK. Univariable and multivariable analyses were used to explore the relationships between antibiotic and homeopathic product use. Results Six percent of children had received one or more homeopathic products and 62% one or more antibiotics between the ages of 3 and 4.5 years. After adjustment for factors associated with antibiotic use, there was no association between homeopathic product and antibiotic use (adjusted OR = 1.02, 95% CI 0.84, 1.24). Factors independently associated with child homeopathic product use were: higher maternal education, maternal use of homeopathic products, maternal lack of confidence in doctors, mothers reporting that they were less likely to see doctor when the child was ill, children being given vitamins, watching less television and suffering from wheeze and food allergies. Conclusion In this observational study, the use of homeopathic products was not associated with decreased antibiotic consumption, suggesting the use of homeopathic product complements rather than competes with the use of antibiotics in pre-school children. The characteristics of mothers giving homeopathic products to their children are similar to

  5. Mobile antibiotic resistance - the spread of genes determining the resistance of bacteria through food products.

    PubMed

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Guzek, Dominika; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Wierzbicka, Agnieszka

    2016-07-07

    In recent years, more and more antibiotics have become ineffective in the treatment of bacterial nfections. The acquisition of antibiotic resistance by bacteria is associated with circulation of genes in the environment. Determinants of antibiotic resistance may be transferred to pathogenic bacteria. It has been shown that conjugation is one of the key mechanisms responsible for spread of antibiotic resistance genes, which is highly efficient and allows the barrier to restrictions and modifications to be avoided. Some conjugative modules enable the transfer of plasmids even between phylogenetically distant bacterial species. Many scientific reports indicate that food is one of the main reservoirs of these genes. Antibiotic resistance genes have been identified in meat products, milk, fruits and vegetables. The reason for such a wide spread of antibiotic resistance genes is the overuse of antibiotics by breeders of plants and animals, as well as by horizontal gene transfer. It was shown, that resistance determinants located on mobile genetic elements, which are isolated from food products, can easily be transferred to another niche. The antibiotic resistance genes have been in the environment for 30 000 years. Their removal from food products is not possible, but the risks associated with the emergence of multiresistant pathogenic strains are very large. The only option is to control the emergence, selection and spread of these genes. Therefore measures are sought to prevent horizontal transfer of genes. Promising concepts involve the combination of developmental biology, evolution and ecology in the fight against the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  6. Adverse effect of staphylococci slime on in vitro activity of glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Tarun; Singhal, Smita; Khan, Seema; Upadhyay, Dilip; Fatma, Tasneem; Rattan, Ashok

    2005-12-01

    Adhesion to biomaterial is assumed to be a crucial step in the development of staphylococcal foreign body infections. Production of extracellular slime has major implications for the development and implementation of therapeutic strategies. The effect of extracted slime was investigated on the activity of vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, rifampicin and ranbezolid against 10 clinical and 4 ATCC staphylococcal isolates. The slime extract caused a 2- to 16-fold increase in the MICs of vancomycin and teicoplanin, with a shift in the MIC(90) from 2 to 32 (vancomycin) and 2 to 16 (teicoplanin), whereas the MICs of linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin were only moderately affected. In time-kill studies, a significant decrease in bacterial killing (>3 log(10) cfu/ml) was observed with vancomycin and teicoplanin (4 x MIC) after addition of slime (5 and 20 mg/ml), whereas the effect of killing by linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin was very modest. The rifampicin and ranbezolid MICs and kill curves were not influenced by the addition of slime. The present study thus indicated that slime interferes with the antimicrobial effect of glycopeptide drugs (vancomycin, teicoplanin), and that for effective prevention and treatment of prosthetic device-related infections, appropriate and newer antibiotics such as ranbezolid should be considered.

  7. Biosynthetic concepts for the production of β-lactam antibiotics in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefan S; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2012-02-01

    Industrial production of β-lactam antibiotics by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum is based on successive classical strain improvement cycles. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the results of this classical strain improvement process, and discusses avenues to improve β-lactam biosynthesis and to exploit P. chrysogenum as an industrial host for the production of other antibiotics and peptide products. Genomic and transcriptional analysis of strain lineages has led to the identification of several important alterations in high-yielding strains, including the amplification of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster, elevated transcription of genes involved in biosynthesis of penicillin and amino acid precursors, and genes encoding microbody proliferation factors. In recent years, successful metabolic engineering and synthetic biology approaches have resulted in the redirection of the penicillin pathway towards the production of cephalosporins. This sets a new direction in industrial antibiotics productions towards more sustainable methods for the fermentative production of unnatural antibiotics and related compounds.

  8. Evaluation of residual antibacterial potency in antibiotic production wastewater using a real-time quantitative method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min; Liu, Miaomiao

    2015-11-01

    While antibiotic pollution has attracted considerable attention due to its potential in promoting the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment, the antibiotic activity of their related substances has been neglected, which may underestimate the environmental impacts of antibiotic wastewater discharge. In this study, a real-time quantitative approach was established to evaluate the residual antibacterial potency of antibiotics and related substances in antibiotic production wastewater (APW) by comparing the growth of a standard bacterial strain (Staphylococcus aureus) in tested water samples with a standard reference substance (e.g. oxytetracycline). Antibiotic equivalent quantity (EQ) was used to express antibacterial potency, which made it possible to assess the contribution of each compound to the antibiotic activity in APW. The real-time quantitative method showed better repeatability (Relative Standard Deviation, RSD 1.08%) compared with the conventional fixed growth time method (RSD 5.62-11.29%). And its quantification limits ranged from 0.20 to 24.00 μg L(-1), depending on the antibiotic. We applied the developed method to analyze the residual potency of water samples from four APW treatment systems, and confirmed a significant contribution from antibiotic transformation products to potent antibacterial activity. Specifically, neospiramycin, a major transformation product of spiramycin, was found to contribute 13.15-22.89% of residual potency in spiramycin production wastewater. In addition, some unknown related substances with antimicrobial activity were indicated in the effluent. This developed approach will be effective for the management of antibacterial potency discharge from antibiotic wastewater and other waste streams.

  9. Antibiotic resistance--consequences for animal health, welfare, and food production.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Björn; Greko, Christina

    2014-05-01

    Most of the literature on the consequences of emergence and spread of bacteria resistant to antibiotics among animals relate to the potential impact on public health. But antibiotics are used to treat sick animals, and resistance in animal pathogens may lead to therapy failure. This has received little scientific attention, and therefore, in this article, we discuss examples that illustrate the possible impact of resistance on animal health and consequences thereof. For all animals, there may be a negative effect on health and welfare when diseases cannot be treated. Other consequences will vary depending on why and how different animal species are kept. Animals kept as companions or for sports often receive advanced care, and antibiotic resistance can lead to negative social and economic consequences for the owners. Further, spread of hospital-acquired infections can have an economic impact on the affected premises. As to animals kept for food production, antibiotics are not needed to promote growth, but, if infectious diseases cannot be treated when they occur, this can have a negative effect on the productivity and economy of affected businesses. Antibiotic resistance in animal bacteria can also have positive consequences by creating incentives for adoption of alternative regimes for treatment and prevention. It is probable that new antibiotic classes placed on the market in the future will not reach veterinary medicine, which further emphasizes the need to preserve the efficacy of currently available antibiotics through antibiotic stewardship. A cornerstone in this work is prevention, as healthy animals do not need antibiotics.

  10. Antibiotic-free selection in E. coli: new considerations for optimal design and improved production

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The increasing regulatory requirements to which biological agents are subjected will have a great impact in the field of industrial protein expression and production. There is an expectation that in a near future, there may be "zero tolerance" towards antibiotic-based selection and production systems. Besides the antibiotic itself, the antibiotic resistance gene is an important consideration. The complete absence of antibiotic-resistance gene being the only way to ensure that there is no propagation in the environment or transfer of resistance to pathogenic strains. Results In a first step, we have designed a series of vectors, containing a stabilization element allowing a complete elimination of antibiotics during fermentation. Vectors were further improved in order to include alternative selection means such as the well known poison/antidote stabilization system. Eventually we propose an elegant positive pressure of selection ensuring the elimination of the antibiotic-resistance gene through homologous recombination. In addition, we have shown that the presence of an antibiotic resistance gene can indirectly reduce the amount of expressed protein, since even in absence of selection pressure the gene would be transcribed and account for an additional stress for the host during the fermentation process. Conclusions We propose a general strategy combining plasmid stabilization and antibiotic-free selection. The proposed host/vector system, completely devoid of antibiotic resistance gene at the end of construction, has the additional advantage of improving recombinant protein expression and/or plasmid recovery. PMID:20822537

  11. Antibiotic resistance—consequences for animal health, welfare, and food production

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Most of the literature on the consequences of emergence and spread of bacteria resistant to antibiotics among animals relate to the potential impact on public health. But antibiotics are used to treat sick animals, and resistance in animal pathogens may lead to therapy failure. This has received little scientific attention, and therefore, in this article, we discuss examples that illustrate the possible impact of resistance on animal health and consequences thereof. For all animals, there may be a negative effect on health and welfare when diseases cannot be treated. Other consequences will vary depending on why and how different animal species are kept. Animals kept as companions or for sports often receive advanced care, and antibiotic resistance can lead to negative social and economic consequences for the owners. Further, spread of hospital-acquired infections can have an economic impact on the affected premises. As to animals kept for food production, antibiotics are not needed to promote growth, but, if infectious diseases cannot be treated when they occur, this can have a negative effect on the productivity and economy of affected businesses. Antibiotic resistance in animal bacteria can also have positive consequences by creating incentives for adoption of alternative regimes for treatment and prevention. It is probable that new antibiotic classes placed on the market in the future will not reach veterinary medicine, which further emphasizes the need to preserve the efficacy of currently available antibiotics through antibiotic stewardship. A cornerstone in this work is prevention, as healthy animals do not need antibiotics. PMID:24678738

  12. A competitive trade-off limits the selective advantage of increased antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Gerardin, Ylaine; Springer, Michael; Kishony, Roy

    2016-09-26

    In structured environments, antibiotic-producing microorganisms can gain a selective advantage by inhibiting nearby competing species(1). However, despite their genetic potential(2,3), natural isolates often make only small amounts of antibiotics, and laboratory evolution can lead to loss rather than enhancement of antibiotic production(4). Here, we show that, due to competition with antibiotic-resistant cheater cells, increased levels of antibiotic production can actually decrease the selective advantage to producers. Competing fluorescently labelled Escherichia coli colicin producers with non-producing resistant and sensitive strains on solid media, we found that although producer colonies can greatly benefit from the inhibition of nearby sensitive colonies, this benefit is shared with resistant colonies growing in their vicinity. A simple model, which accounts for such local competitive and inhibitory interactions, suggests that the advantage of producers varies non-monotonically with the amount of production. Indeed, experimentally varying the amount of production shows a peak in selection for producers, reflecting a trade-off between benefit gained by inhibiting sensitive competitors and loss due to an increased contribution to resistant cheater colonies. These results help explain the low level of antibiotic production observed for natural species and can help direct laboratory evolution experiments selecting for increased or novel production of antibiotics.

  13. A competitive trade-off limits the selective advantage of increased antibiotic production

    PubMed Central

    Gerardin, Ylaine; Springer, Michael; Kishony, Roy

    2016-01-01

    In structured environments, antibiotic producing microorganisms can gain a selective advantage by inhibiting nearby competing species1. However, despite their genetic potential2,3, natural isolates often make only small amounts of antibiotics, and laboratory evolution can lead to loss rather than enhancement of antibiotic production4. Here we show that, due to competition with antibiotic resistant cheater cells, increased levels of antibiotic production can actually decrease the selective advantage to producers. Competing fluorescently-labeled Escherichia coli colicin producers with non-producing resistant and sensitive strains on solid media, we found that while producer colonies can greatly benefit from the inhibition of nearby sensitive colonies, this benefit is shared with resistant colonies growing in their vicinity. A simple model, which accounts for such local competitive and inhibitory interactions, suggests that the advantage of producers varies non-monotonically with the amount of production. Indeed, experimentally varying the amount of production shows a peak in selection for producers, reflecting a trade-off between benefit gained by inhibiting sensitive competitors and loss due to an increased contribution to resistant cheater colonies. These results help explain the low level of antibiotic production observed for natural species, and can help direct laboratory evolution experiments selecting for increased or novel production of antibiotics. PMID:27668360

  14. Retrospective case-control analysis of patients with staphylococcal infections receiving daptomycin or glycopeptide therapy.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Marco; Russo, Alessandro; Pompeo, Maria Elena; Vena, Antonio; Marruncheddu, Laura; Ciccaglioni, Antonio; Grossi, Paolo; Mancini, Carlo; Novelli, Andrea; Stefani, Stefania; Venditti, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Glycopeptides have been considered the antimicrobials of choice for serious meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and meticillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CoNS) infections for several years. Daptomycin is a new option for the treatment of these infections, including those exhibiting reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides. The aim of this study was to compare glycopeptides and daptomycin for the treatment of infections caused by MRSA or MR-CoNS. Data for 106 patients with bloodstream infections (bacteraemia or infective endocarditis) or skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs) were retrospectively reviewed, of which 43 were treated with daptomycin (DAP group) and 63 were treated with vancomycin or teicoplanin (GLYCO group). Patients included in the two comparison groups were homogeneous in terms of age, risk factors and clinical severity. Aetiology was mainly represented by MRSA in both groups, followed by various species of MR-CoNS. Daptomycin was used more frequently in patients with central venous catheter-associated bacteraemia or pacemaker-associated infection. Patients with SSTIs included in the GLYCO group had a longer mean duration of antibiotic therapy (18.2 days vs. 14.6 days; P=0.009) and a longer mean length of hospital stay (28.2 days vs. 19.6 days; P=0.01) compared with those included in the DAP group. A longer mean duration of antibiotic therapy was also observed in patients with bloodstream infections receiving glycopeptide therapy (25.6 days vs. 18 days; P=0.004). In conclusion, the good clinical efficacy of daptomycin is associated with a more rapid resolution of the clinical syndrome and a reduced length of hospitalisation. This latter aspect may have important pharmacoeconomic implications, promoting the use of daptomycin in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. Slime production and antibiotic resistance of Enterococcus faecalis isolated from arthritis in chickens.

    PubMed

    Ciftci, Alper; Findik, Arzu; Iça, Tuba; Bas, Bülent; Onuk, Ertan Emek; Güngördü, Sibel

    2009-06-01

    Slime factor production and antibiotic resistance of 67 Enterococcus faecalis strains isolated from chicken arthritis were investigated in this study. Slime factor productions of enterococci were found as 59.7%. The antibiotic resistances were investigated by testing gentamycin, penicillin, streptomycin, vancomycin, danofloxacin, and enrofloxacin. The resistance rates were found as 62.68%, 76.11%, 67.16%, 13.43%, 47.76%, 43.28%, respectively. For slime factor positive enterococci, the antibiotic resistance rates were found as follows respectively; 82.50%, 87.50%, 92.50%, 17.50%, 72.50%, and 60.00%. In conclusion; the slime factor might play a role as a colonization factor for chicken arthritis and slime factor positive enterococci were found to be more resistant to these antibiotics. The resistance rates between slime factor positive and negative enterococci against the tested antibiotics except for vancomycin were found statistically significant (p<0.05).

  16. Mechanisms of resistance and clinical relevance of resistance to β-lactams, glycopeptides, and fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Rice, Louis B

    2012-02-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has resulted in a growing problem of antimicrobial resistance in the community and hospital settings. Antimicrobial classes for which resistance has become a major problem include the β-lactams, the glycopeptides, and the fluoroquinolones. In gram-positive bacteria, β-lactam resistance most commonly results from expression of intrinsic low-affinity penicillin-binding proteins. In gram-negative bacteria, expression of acquired β-lactamases presents a particular challenge owing to some natural spectra that include virtually all β-lactam classes. Glycopeptide resistance has been largely restricted to nosocomial Enterococcus faecium strains, the spread of which is promoted by ineffective infection control mechanisms for fecal organisms and the widespread use of colonization-promoting antimicrobials (especially cephalosporins and antianaerobic antibiotics). Fluoroquinolone resistance in community-associated strains of Escherichia coli, many of which also express β-lactamases that confer cephalosporin resistance, is increasingly prevalent. Economic and regulatory forces have served to discourage large pharmaceutical companies from developing new antibiotics, suggesting that the antibiotics currently on the market may be all that will be available for the coming decade. As such, it is critical that we devise, test, and implement antimicrobial stewardship strategies that are effective at constraining and, ideally, reducing resistance in human pathogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2012 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanisms of Resistance and Clinical Relevance of Resistance to β-Lactams, Glycopeptides, and Fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Louis B.

    2012-01-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has resulted in a growing problem of antimicrobial resistance in the community and hospital settings. Antimicrobial classes for which resistance has become a major problem include the β-lactams, the glycopeptides, and the fluoroquinolones. In gram-positive bacteria, β-lactam resistance most commonly results from expression of intrinsic low-affinity penicillin-binding proteins. In gram-negative bacteria, expression of acquired β-lactamases presents a particular challenge owing to some natural spectra that include virtually all β-lactam classes. Glycopeptide resistance has been largely restricted to nosocomial Enterococcus faecium strains, the spread of which is promoted by ineffective infection control mechanisms for fecal organisms and the widespread use of colonization-promoting antimicrobials (especially cephalosporins and antianaerobic antibiotics). Fluoroquinolone resistance in community-associated strains of Escherichia coli, many of which also express β-lactamases that confer cephalosporin resistance, is increasingly prevalent. Economic and regulatory forces have served to discourage large pharmaceutical companies from developing new antibiotics, suggesting that the antibiotics currently on the market may be all that will be available for the coming decade. As such, it is critical that we devise, test, and implement antimicrobial stewardship strategies that are effective at constraining and, ideally, reducing resistance in human pathogenic bacteria. PMID:22305032

  18. Termite usage associated with antibiotic therapy: enhancement of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity by natural products of Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky 1855).

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Henrique D M; Vasconcellos, Alexandre; Lima, Micheline A; Almeida-Filho, Geraldo G; Alves, Rômulo R N

    2009-09-17

    Several species from Insecta are used as remedies. Among these species, the termite Nasutitermes corniger is commonly used in traditional medicine in Northeast Brazil. The present work tests the modifying antibiotic activity of Nasutitermes corniger, a termite used in folk medicine in Northeastern region of Brazil. Chlorpromazine and decocts of N. corniger were collected from two different plant species used in the traditional medicine were tested for their antimicrobial activity against strains of Escherichia coli resistant to aminoglycosides. The growth of two bacterial strains of E. coli was tested using decocts and chlorpromazine alone or associeted with aminogycosides. The MIC and MBC values were > or =1024 microg/ml for both strains of E. coli assayed. A significant synergism was observed between both decocts and chlorpromazine when assyed with neomycin. This synergism with neomycin indicates the involvement of an efflux system in the resistance to this aminoglycoside. Therefore it is suggested that natural products from N. corniger could be used as a source of zoo-derived natural products with modifying antibiotic activity to aminoglycosides, being a new weapon against the bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

  19. Termite usage associated with antibiotic therapy: enhancement of aminoglycoside antibiotic activity by natural products of Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky 1855)

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Henrique DM; Vasconcellos, Alexandre; Lima, Micheline A; Almeida-Filho, Geraldo G; Alves, Rômulo RN

    2009-01-01

    Background Several species from Insecta are used as remedies. Among these species, the termite Nasutitermes corniger is commonly used in traditional medicine in Northeast Brazil. The present work tests the modifying antibiotic activity of Nasutitermes corniger, a termite used in folk medicine in Northeastern region of Brazil. Methods Chlorpromazine and decocts of N. corniger were collected from two different plant species used in the traditional medicine were tested for their antimicrobial activity against strains of Escherichia coli resistant to aminoglycosides. The growth of two bacterial strains of E. coli was tested using decocts and chlorpromazine alone or associeted with aminogycosides. Results The MIC and MBC values were ≥1024 μg/ml for both strains of E. coli assayed. A significant synergism was observed between both decocts and chlorpromazine when assyed with neomycin. This synergism with neomycin indicates the involvement of an efflux system in the resistance to this aminoglycoside. Conclusion Therefore it is suggested that natural products from N. corniger could be used as a source of zoo-derived natural products with modifying antibiotic activity to aminoglycosides, being a new weapon against the bacterial resistance to antibiotics. PMID:19761599

  20. Antibiotics and immunity: effects of antibiotics on natural killer, antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, M S; Maged, Z A; Haron, A; Khalil, R Y; Attallah, A M

    1987-12-01

    We studied the effects of antibiotics on natural killer (NK), antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and immunoglobulin production. When human peripheral blood lymphocytes were incubated overnight with the antibiotic before the assay, nitrofurantoin significantly reduced NK but not ADCC activity. Nitrofurantoin also suppressed both spontaneous and interferon-enhanced NK activities in a dose-dependent fashion. Though it did not affect spontaneous ADCC activity, nitrofurantoin suppressed interferon enhancement of ADCC. Chloramphenicol significantly decreased the number of plaque forming cells in mice. In addition to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, rifampicin, cephalothin, polymyxin B and nitrofurantoin reduced mitogen-induced polycloned immunoglobulin synthesis. Results of this study may have clinical relevance, especially in treating immunocompromised patients.

  1. Antibiotics production by an actinomycete isolated from the termite gut.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru; Tanaka, Junichi; Namihira, Tomoyuki; Shinzato, Naoya

    2012-12-01

    As well as the search for new antibiotics, a new resource or strains for the known antibiotics is also important. Microbial symbionts in the gut of termites could be regarded as one of the feasible resource for such purpose. In this study, antibiotic-producing actinomycetes were screened from symbionts of the termite gut. 16SrRNA sequence analysis for the 10 isolates revealed that they belong to actinomycetes such as Streptomyces sp., Kitasatospora sp., and Mycobacterium sp. A culture broth from one of the isolate, namely strain CA1, belonging to the genera Streptomyces exhibited antagonistic activity against actinomycetes (Micrococcus spp.), gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus spp.), and yeast (Candida spp.). The structures of 2 compounds isolated from the culture broth of the strain CA1 were identified as those of actinomycin X2 and its analog, D. This study is the first to report that some symbionts of the termite gut are antibiotic-producing actinomycetes, and suggest that the termite gut is a feasible resource for bioprospecting.

  2. Detection and Characterization of Low Abundance Glycopeptides Via Higher-Energy C-Trap Dissociation and Orbitrap Mass Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart-Smith, Gene; Raftery, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Broad-scale mass spectrometric analyses of glycopeptides are constrained by the considerable complexity inherent to glycoproteomics, and techniques are still being actively developed to address the associated analytical difficulties. Here we apply Orbitrap mass analysis and higher-energy C-trap dissociation (HCD) to facilitate detailed insights into the compositions and heterogeneity of complex mixtures of low abundance glycopeptides. By generating diagnostic oxonium product ions at mass measurement errors of <5 ppm, highly selective glycopeptide precursor ion detections are made at sub-fmol limits of detection: analyses of proteolytic digests of a hen egg glycoprotein mixture detect 88 previously uncharacterized glycopeptides from 666 precursor ions selected for MS/MS, with only one false positive due to co-fragmentation of a non-glycosylated peptide with a glycopeptide. We also demonstrate that by (1) identifying multiple series of glycoforms using high mass accuracy single stage MS spectra, and (2) performing product ion scans at optimized HCD collision energies, the identification of peptide + N-acetylhexosamine (HexNAc) ions (Y1 ions) can be readily achieved at <5 ppm mass measurement errors. These data allow base peptide sequences and glycan compositional information to be attained with high confidence, even for glycopeptides that produce weak precursor ion signals and/or low quality MS/MS spectra. The glycopeptides characterized from low fmol abundances using these methods allow two previously unreported glycosylation sites on the Gallus gallus protein ovoglycoprotein (amino acids 82 and 90) to be confirmed; considerable glycan heterogeneities at amino acid 90 of ovoglycoprotein, and amino acids 34 and 77 of Gallus gallus ovomucoid are also revealed.

  3. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug, antibiotic...

  4. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug, antibiotic...

  5. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug, antibiotic...

  6. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug, antibiotic...

  7. 37 CFR 1.775 - Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. 1.775 Section 1.775 Patents... Review § 1.775 Calculation of patent term extension for a human drug, antibiotic drug or human biological product. (a) If a determination is made pursuant to § 1.750 that a patent for a human drug, antibiotic...

  8. Sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures for multipotent protein activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungsoo S; Fyrner, Timmy; Chen, Feng; Álvarez, Zaida; Sleep, Eduard; Chun, Danielle S; Weiner, Joseph A; Cook, Ralph W; Freshman, Ryan D; Schallmo, Michael S; Katchko, Karina M; Schneider, Andrew D; Smith, Justin T; Yun, Chawon; Singh, Gurmit; Hashmi, Sohaib Z; McClendon, Mark T; Yu, Zhilin; Stock, Stuart R; Hsu, Wellington K; Hsu, Erin L; Stupp, Samuel I

    2017-08-01

    Biological systems have evolved to utilize numerous proteins with capacity to bind polysaccharides for the purpose of optimizing their function. A well-known subset of these proteins with binding domains for the highly diverse sulfated polysaccharides are important growth factors involved in biological development and tissue repair. We report here on supramolecular sulfated glycopeptide nanostructures, which display a trisulfated monosaccharide on their surfaces and bind five critical proteins with different polysaccharide-binding domains. Binding does not disrupt the filamentous shape of the nanostructures or their internal β-sheet backbone, but must involve accessible adaptive configurations to interact with such different proteins. The glycopeptide nanostructures amplified signalling of bone morphogenetic protein 2 significantly more than the natural sulfated polysaccharide heparin, and promoted regeneration of bone in the spine with a protein dose that is 100-fold lower than that required in the animal model. These highly bioactive nanostructures may enable many therapies in the future involving proteins.

  9. Biomedicine of Enkephalin-Derived Glycopeptide Analgesics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polt, Robin

    The incorporation of glycosides into peptide neurotransmitters imparts drug-like character to the neurotransmitter "message" via "membrane hopping". The importance of the glycopeptide-membrane interaction is emphasized, and the biousian theory is briefly explained. Application of this approach to enkephalins, the endogenous opioid peptides, leads to potent analgesic compounds capable of systemic delivery. The clinical applications of these compounds are advocated by the author.

  10. Activation of Antibiotic Production in Bacillus spp. by Cumulative Drug Resistance Mutations.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Shigeo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Ochi, Kozo

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains produce a wide range of antibiotics, including ribosomal and nonribosomal peptide antibiotics, as well as bacilysocin and neotrehalosadiamine. Mutations in B. subtilis strain 168 that conferred resistance to drugs such as streptomycin and rifampin resulted in overproduction of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin. Cumulative drug resistance mutations, such as mutations in the mthA and rpsL genes, which confer low- and high-level resistance, respectively, to streptomycin, and mutations in rpoB, which confer resistance to rifampin, resulted in cells that overproduced bacilysin. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated that the enhanced transcription of biosynthesis genes was responsible for the overproduction of bacilysin. This approach was effective also in activating the cryptic genes of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, leading to actual production of antibiotic(s).

  11. Activation of Antibiotic Production in Bacillus spp. by Cumulative Drug Resistance Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Tojo, Shigeo; Tanaka, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains produce a wide range of antibiotics, including ribosomal and nonribosomal peptide antibiotics, as well as bacilysocin and neotrehalosadiamine. Mutations in B. subtilis strain 168 that conferred resistance to drugs such as streptomycin and rifampin resulted in overproduction of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin. Cumulative drug resistance mutations, such as mutations in the mthA and rpsL genes, which confer low- and high-level resistance, respectively, to streptomycin, and mutations in rpoB, which confer resistance to rifampin, resulted in cells that overproduced bacilysin. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated that the enhanced transcription of biosynthesis genes was responsible for the overproduction of bacilysin. This approach was effective also in activating the cryptic genes of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, leading to actual production of antibiotic(s). PMID:26369962

  12. Root-derived CLE glycopeptides control nodulation by direct binding to HAR1 receptor kinase.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Satoru; Shinohara, Hidefumi; Mori, Tomoko; Matsubayashi, Yoshikatsu; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Leguminous plants establish a symbiosis with rhizobia to enable nitrogen fixation in root nodules under the control of the presumed root-to-shoot-to-root negative feedback called autoregulation of nodulation. In Lotus japonicus, autoregulation is mediated by CLE-RS genes that are specifically expressed in the root, and the receptor kinase HAR1 that functions in the shoot. However, the mature functional structures of CLE-RS gene products and the molecular nature of CLE-RS/HAR1 signalling governed by these spatially distant components remain elusive. Here we show that CLE-RS2 is a post-translationally arabinosylated glycopeptide derived from the CLE domain. Chemically synthesized CLE-RS glycopeptides cause significant suppression of nodulation and directly bind to HAR1 in an arabinose-chain and sequence-dependent manner. In addition, CLE-RS2 glycopeptide specifically produced in the root is found in xylem sap collected from the shoot. We propose that CLE-RS glycopeptides are the long sought mobile signals responsible for the initial step of autoregulation of nodulation.

  13. Something old, something new: revisiting natural products in antibiotic drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wright, Gerard D

    2014-03-01

    Antibiotic discovery is in crisis. Despite a growing need for new drugs resulting from the increasing number of multi-antibiotic-resistant pathogens, there have been only a handful of new antibiotics approved for clinical use in the past 2 decades. Faced with scientific, economic, and regulatory challenges, the pharmaceutical sector seems unable to respond to what has been called an "apocalyptic" threat. Natural products produced by bacteria and fungi are genetically encoded products of natural selection that have been the mainstay sources of the antibiotics in current clinical use. The pharmaceutical industry has largely abandoned these compounds in favor of large libraries of synthetic molecules because of difficulties in identifying new natural product antibiotics scaffolds. Advances in next-generation genome sequencing, bioinformatics, and analytical chemistry are combining to overcome barriers to natural products. Coupled with new strategies in antibiotic discovery, including inhibition of resistance, novel drug combinations, and new targets, natural products are poised for a renaissance to address what is a pressing health care crisis.

  14. Outbreak of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus with Reduced Susceptibility to Glycopeptides in a Parisian Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, François; Buu-Hoï, Annie; Mainardi, Jean-Luc; Kac, Guillaume; Colardelle, Nathalie; Vaupré, Sabine; Gutmann, Laurent; Podglajen, Isabelle

    2000-01-01

    Epidemiological relationships were investigated between 40 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with decreased glycopeptide susceptibility isolated from November 1998 to March 1999 from 39 patients (17 infected and 22 colonized patients) in nine wards of the Broussais Hospital, Paris, France. Reduced glycopeptide susceptibility was readily detected on brain heart infusion (BHI) agar containing 6 μg of teicoplanin per ml and on gradient plates, but not by the standard disk diffusion method. The MICs of vancomycin and teicoplanin, determined on BHI agar, were 4 and 8 to 32 μg/ml, respectively (standard antibiotic dilution), and 4 to 8 and 8 to 32 μg/ml, respectively (E-test). All strains were resistant to macrolides, aminoglycosides, tetracycline, rifampin, sulfonamides, and pefloxacin, showed reduced susceptibility to fusidic acid and fosfomycin, and were susceptible to trimethoprim and chloramphenicol. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and lysotyping revealed that a multidrug-resistant MRSA clone with decreased susceptibility to glycopeptides has been discretely endemic since at least 1996 in our institution, where it was responsible for an outbreak in November and December 1998. PMID:10921964

  15. The transport of antibiotic resistance genes and residues in groundwater near swine production facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. F.; Yannarell, A. C.; Mackie, R. I.; Krapac, I. G.; Chee-Sanford, J. S.; Koike, S.

    2008-12-01

    The use of antibiotics at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) for disease prevention, disease treatment, and growth promotion can contribute to the spread of antibiotic compounds, their breakdown products, and antibiotic resistant bacteria and/or the genes that confer resistance. In addition, constitutive use of antibiotics at sub-therapeutic levels can select for antibiotic resistance among the bacteria that inhabit animal intestinal tracts, onsite manure treatment facilities, and any environments receiving significant inputs of manure (e.g. through waste lagoon leakage or fertilizer amendments to farm soils). If the antibiotic resistant organisms persist in these new environments, or if they participate in genetic exchanges with the native microflora, then CAFOs may constitute a significant reservoir for the spread of antibiotic resistance to the environment at large. Our results have demonstrated that leakage from waste treatment lagoons can influence the presence and persistence of tetracycline resistance genes in the shallow aquifer adjacent to swine CAFOs, and molecular phylogeny allowed us to distinguish "native" tetracycline resistance genes in control groundwater wells from manure-associated genes introduced from the lagoon. We have also been able to detect the presence of erythromycin resistance genes in CAFO surface and groundwater even though erythromycin is strictly reserved for use in humans and thus is not utilized at any of these sites. Ongoing research, including modeling of particle transport in groundwater, will help to determine the potential spatial and temporal extent of CAFO-derived antibiotic resistance.

  16. Alternatives to antibiotics: a symposium on the challenges and solutions for animal production.

    PubMed

    Seal, Bruce S; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Donovan, David M; Gay, Cyril G

    2013-06-01

    Antibiotics are one of the most important medical discoveries of the 20th century and will remain an essential tool for treating animal and human diseases in the 21st century. However, antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens and concerns over their extensive use in food animals has garnered global interest in limiting antibiotic use in animal agriculture. Yet, limiting the availability of medical interventions to prevent and control animal diseases on the farm will directly impact global food security and safety as well as animal and human health. Insufficient attention has been given to the scientific breakthroughs and novel technologies that provide alternatives to antibiotics. The objectives of the symposium 'Alternatives to Antibiotics' were to highlight promising research results and novel technologies that could potentially lead to alternatives to conventional antibiotics, and assess challenges associated with their commercialization, and provide actionable strategies to support development of alternative antimicrobials. The symposium focused on the latest scientific breakthroughs and technologies that could provide new options and alternative strategies for preventing and treating diseases of animals. Some of these new technologies have direct applications as medical interventions for human health, but the focus of the symposium was animal production, animal health and food safety during food-animal production. Five subject areas were explored in detail through scientific presentations and expert panel discussions, including: (1) alternatives to antibiotics, lessons from nature; (2) immune modulation approaches to enhance disease resistance and to treat animal diseases; (3) gut microbiome and immune development, health and diseases; (4) alternatives to antibiotics for animal production; and (5) regulatory pathways to enable the licensure of alternatives to antibiotics.

  17. Novel Two-Component Systems Implied in Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Yepes, Ana; Rico, Sergio; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Santamaría, Ramón I.; Díaz, Margarita

    2011-01-01

    The abundance of two-component systems (TCSs) in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) genome indicates their importance in the physiology of this soil bacteria. Currently, several TCSs have been related to antibiotic regulation, and the purpose in this study was the characterization of five TCSs, selected by sequence homology with the well-known absA1A2 system, that could also be associated with this important process. Null mutants of the five TCSs were obtained and two mutants (ΔSCO1744/1745 and ΔSCO4596/4597/4598) showed significant differences in both antibiotic production and morphological differentiation, and have been renamed as abr (antibiotic regulator). No detectable changes in antibiotic production were found in the mutants in the systems that include the ORFs SCO3638/3639, SCO3640/3641 and SCO2165/2166 in any of the culture conditions assayed. The system SCO1744/1745 (AbrA1/A2) was involved in negative regulation of antibiotic production, and acted also as a negative regulator of the morphological differentiation. By contrast, the system SCO4596/4597/4598 (AbrC1/C2/C3), composed of two histidine kinases and one response regulator, had positive effects on both morphological development and antibiotic production. Microarray analyses of the ΔabrC1/C2/C3 and wild-type transcriptomes revealed downregulation of actII-ORF4 and cdaR genes, the actinorhodin and calcium-dependent antibiotic pathway-specific regulators respectively. These results demonstrated the involvement of these new two-component systems in antibiotic production and morphological differentiation by different approaches. One is a pleiotropic negative regulator: abrA1/A2. The other one is a positive regulator composed of three elements, two histidine kinases and one response regulator: abrC1/C2/C3. PMID:21625497

  18. Aerobic inhibition assessment for anaerobic treatment effluent of antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Cetecioglu, Zeynep

    2014-02-01

    Biological treatment of antibiotic production effluents is an economical approach; however, there are still difficulties to overcome because of the recalcitrant characteristics of these compounds to biodegradation. This study aims to reveal that anaerobic treatment technology can be an option as pretreatment before the activated sludge system treatment to treat antibiotic production effluents. The ISO 8192 method was chosen to test the inhibitory effect of raw and treated antibiotic production effluents in this work. Inhibition tests, which were applied according to ISO 8192, highlighted that the anaerobic treatment effluent is less inhibitory than antibiotic production effluent for activated sludge system. Early EC50 concentrations (30-min values) of raw and treated wastewaters were lower than 180-min values. Also, triple effects (sulfamethoxazole-erythromycin-tetracycline) of antibiotics are more toxic than dual effects (sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline). In light of the experimental results obtained and their evaluation, it can be concluded that anaerobic digestion can be applied as a biological pretreatment method for pharmaceutical industry wastewater including antibiotic mixtures prior to aerobic treatment.

  19. Engineering of Primary Carbon Metabolism for Improved Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces lividans†

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Michael J.; Bruheim, Per; Jovetic, Srdjan; Marinelli, Flavia; Postma, Pieter W.; Bibb, Mervyn J.

    2002-01-01

    Deletions were made in Streptomyces lividans in either of two genes (zwf1 and zwf2) encoding isozymes of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the first enzyme in the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). Each mutation reduced the level of Zwf activity to approximately one-half that observed in the wild-type strain. When the mutants were transformed with multicopy plasmids carrying the pathway-specific transcriptional activator genes for either the actinorhodin (ACT) or undecylprodigiosin (RED) biosynthetic pathway, they produced higher levels of antibiotic than the corresponding wild-type control strains. The presumed lower flux of carbon through the PPP in each of the Δzwf mutants may allow more efficient glucose utilization via glycolysis, resulting in higher levels of antibiotic production. This appears to occur without lowering the concentration of NADPH (the major biochemical product of the oxidative PPP activity) to a level that would limit antibiotic biosynthesis. Consistent with this hypothesis, deletion of the gene (devB) encoding the enzyme that catalyzes the next step in the oxidative PPP (6-phosphogluconolactonase) also resulted in increased antibiotic production. However, deletion of both zwf genes from the devB mutant resulted in reduced levels of ACT and RED production, suggesting that some of the NADPH made by the PPP is utilized, directly or indirectly, for antibiotic biosynthesis. Although applied here to the model antibiotics ACT and RED, such mutations may prove to be useful for improving the yield of commercially important secondary metabolites. PMID:12324314

  20. Suppression of methanogenesis for hydrogen production in single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells using various antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Catal, Tunc; Lesnik, Keaton Larson; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Methanogens can utilize the hydrogen produced in microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), thereby decreasing the hydrogen generation efficiency. However, various antibiotics have previously been shown to inhibit methanogenesis. In the present study antibiotics, including neomycin sulfate, 2-bromoethane sulfonate, 2-chloroethane sulfonate, 8-aza-hypoxanthine, were examined to determine if hydrogen production could be improved through inhibition of methanogenesis but not hydrogen production in MECs. 1.1mM neomycin sulfate inhibited both methane and hydrogen production while 2-chloroethane sulfonate (20mM), 2-bromoethane sulfonate (20mM), and 8-aza-hypoxanthine (3.6mM) can inhibited methane generation and with concurrent increases in hydrogen production. Our results indicated that adding select antibiotics to the mixed species community in MECs could be a suitable method to enhance hydrogen production efficiency.

  1. Heterologous expression of glycopeptide resistance vanHAX gene clusters from soil bacteria in Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank M; Dalsgaard, Anders; Guardabassi, Luca

    2006-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether glycopeptide resistance gene clusters from soil bacteria could be heterologously expressed in Enterococcus faecalis and adapt to the new host following exposure to vancomycin. The vanHAX clusters from Paenibacillus thiaminolyticus PT-2B1, Paenibacillus apiarius PA-B2B and Amycolatopsis coloradensis DSM 44225 were separately cloned in an appropriately constructed shuttle vector containing the two-component regulatory system (vanRS) of Tn1546. The complete vanA(PT) operon (vanRSHAXY) from P. thiaminolyticus PT-2B1 was cloned in the same shuttle vector lacking enterococcal vanRS. All plasmid constructs were electroporated into E. faecalis JH2-2 and the MICs of vancomycin and teicoplanin were determined for each recombinant strain before and following exposure to sublethal concentrations of vancomycin. The vanHAX clusters from P. thiaminolyticus and P. apiarius conferred high-level vancomycin resistance (MIC > or = 125 mg/L) in E. faecalis JH2-2. In contrast, cloning of the vanHAX cluster from A. coloradensis did not result in a significant increase of vancomycin resistance (MIC = 0.7 mg/L). Resistance to vancomycin was not observed after cloning the complete vanA(PT) operon from P. thiaminolyticus (MIC = 2 mg/L), but this recombinant rapidly adapted to high concentrations of vancomycin (MIC = 500 mg/L) following exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of this antibiotic. The results showed that vanA(PT) in P. thiaminolyticus is a possible ancestor of vanA-mediated glycopeptide resistance in enterococci. Experimental evidence supported the hypothesis that enterococci did not acquire glycopeptide resistance directly from glycopeptide-producing organisms such as A. coloradensis.

  2. Occurrence of antibiotics and their impacts to primary productivity in fishponds around Tai Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Song, Chao; Zhang, Cong; Fan, Limin; Qiu, Liping; Wu, Wei; Meng, Shunlong; Hu, Gengdong; Kamira, Barry; Chen, Jiazhang

    2016-10-01

    Antibiotics are widely used to improve the health and yields of farmed animals, including fish, but their use is accompanied by undesirable ecological effects. Relatively little is known about the water-body burden of antibiotics and their influence on primary productivity in aquaculture ecosystem. In this study, antibiotics usage within 24 fishponds, covering 4 areas, sampled 5 times, and having 5 fish species, was investigated surrounding Tai Lake in China. The study analyzed 15 antibiotics (including 5 sulfonamides, 2 quinolones, 3 β-lactams, 3 tetracyclines, 1 amphenicol, and 1 macrolide), and all of them were detected in water samples, with a detection frequency of 2-60%. Sulfonamides were the most prevalent, and concentrations of sulfamethoxazole, sulfamonomethoxine, and florfenicol being over 2000 ng L(-1) in some samples, while the other antibiotics levels ranged from ND (no detection) to 551.18 ng L(-1). Significant differences were observed in antibiotic burden among different regions for total antibiotics, sulfonamides, quinolones, and amphenicols; among time points for quinolones, β-lactams, and tetracyclines; and among species for quinolones and macrolides. Furthermore, basing on the risk quotient (RQ) method, the assessment revealed that florfenicol was of highest risk to algae with RQ values exceeding 0.1, while macrolide erythromycin posed the second highest risk. The partial correlation coefficient between total antibiotics and chlorophyll (a) was -0.035 that clearly indicated total antibiotics were detrimental to green algae growth, while the nutrient input and other physical - chemical factors were much more beneficial. Overall, holistic far-reaching measures of antibiotics control are recommended to preserve aquaculture ecosystem health.

  3. Effect of amino acids containing sulfur on dithiolopyrrolone antibiotic productions by Saccharothrix algeriensis NRRL B-24137.

    PubMed

    Bouras, N; Mathieu, F; Sabaou, N; Lebrihi, A

    2006-02-01

    To study the effect of sulfur-containing amino acids (L-cysteine, L-cystine, L-methionine and DL-ethionine) on the production of dithiolopyrrolone antibiotics by Saccharothrix algeriensis NRRL B-24137. The production levels of dithiolopyrrolones were investigated by using high performance liquid chromatography in a chemically semi-synthetic medium. The production of the studied antibiotics depends upon the nature, concentration and the time of addition of these sources in the culture medium. Both cysteine and cystine favoured the specific productions of dithiolopyrrolones; iso-butyryl-pyrrothine (ISP) by cysteine, however butanoyl-pyrrothine, senecioyl-pyrrothine and tigloyl-pyrrothine by cystine, when added initially to the culture medium. The maximum specific productions of dithiolopyrrolones were observed in the presence of 5 mmol l(-1) cystine for thiolutin, 5 mmol l(-1) cysteine for ISP, and 10 mmol l(-1) cystine for others studied dithiolopyrrolones as shown in Fig. 3. The production of these antibiotics was decreased when the concentrations of cysteine and cystine were in excess. All dithiolopyrrolone specific productions were strongly inhibited by addition of methionine and ethionine, without inhibition of mycelial growth. Among all studied amino acids, cystine and cysteine can be used as supplements for improvement the production of dithiolopyrrolone antibiotics by S. algeriensis NRRL B-24137. Dithiolopyrrolone antibiotics have many important applications for employing them as medicaments, particularly in the treatment of human and animal cancers. In the present work, the influence of containing-sulfur amino acids on dithiolopyrrolone antibiotic productions was studied. The obtained results can be employed for the optimization of the culture medium for the dithiolopyrrolone productions in higher quantities.

  4. Antibiotics in animal feed and their role in resistance development.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Henrik C

    2003-10-01

    Animals and humans constitute overlapping reservoirs of resistance, and consequently use of antimicrobials in animals can impact on public health. For example, the occurrence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in food-animals is associated with the use of avoparcin, a glycopeptide antibiotic used as a feed additive for the growth promotion of animals. Vancomycin-resistant enterococci and vancomycin resistance determinants can therefore spread from animals to humans. The bans on avoparcin and other antibiotics as growth promoters in the EU have provided scientists with a unique opportunity to investigate the effects of the withdrawal of a major antimicrobial selective pressure on the occurrence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. The data shows that although the levels of resistance in animals and food, and consequently in humans, has been markedly reduced after the termination of use, the effects on animal health and productivity have been very minor.

  5. The historical delivery of antibiotics from microbial natural products--can history repeat?

    PubMed

    Peláez, Fernando

    2006-03-30

    Microbial natural products are the origin of most of the antibiotics on the market today. However, research in antibiotics and natural products has declined significantly during the last decade as a consequence of diverse factors, among which the lack of interest of industry in the field and the strong competition from collections of synthetic compounds as source of drug leads. As a consequence, there is an alarming scarcity of new antibiotic classes in the pipelines of the pharmaceutical industry. Still, microbial natural products remain the most promising source of novel antibiotics, although new approaches are required to improve the efficiency of the discovery process. The impact of microbial biodiversity, the influence of growth conditions on the production of secondary metabolites, the choice of the best approach at the screening step and the challenges faced during the isolation and identification of the active compounds are examined in this review as the critical factors contributing to success in the effort of antibiotic discovery from microbial natural products.

  6. Inflammatory Modulation Effect of Glycopeptide from Ganoderma capense (Lloyd) Teng

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Chen, Song; Yao, Wenbing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptide from Ganoderma capense (Lloyd) Teng (GCGP) injection is widely used in kinds of immune disorders, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of how GCGP could interfere with immune cell function. In the present study, we have found that GCGP had inflammatory modulation effects on macrophage cells to maintain NO production and iNOS expression at the normal level. Furthermore, western blot analysis showed that the underlying mechanism of immunomodulatory effect of GCGP involved NF-κB p65 translation, IκB phosphorylation, and degradation; NF-κB inhibitor assays also confirmed the results. In addition, competition study showed that GCGP could inhibit LPS from binding to macrophage cells. Our data indicates that GCGP, which may share the same receptor(s) expressed by macrophage cells with LPS, exerted immunomodulatory effect in a NF-κB-dependent signaling pathway in macrophages. PMID:24966469

  7. Engineering of an industrial polyoxin producer for the rational production of hybrid peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Lipeng; Lin, Shuangjun; Qu, Dongjing; Hong, Xuechuan; Bai, Linquan; Chen, Wenqing; Deng, Zixin

    2012-07-01

    Polyoxins and nikkomycins are potent antifungal peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics, which inhibit fungal cell wall biosynthesis. They consist of a nucleoside core and one or two independent peptidyl moieties attached to the core at different sites. Making mutations and introducing heterologous genes into an industrial Streptomyces aureochromogenes polyoxin producer, resulted in the production of four polyoxin-nikkomycin hybrid antibiotics designated as polyoxin N and nikkoxin B-D, whose structures were confirmed using high resolution MS and NMR. Two of the hybrid antibiotics, polyoxin N and nikkoxin D, were significantly more potent against some human or plant fungal pathogens than their parents. The data provides an example for rational generation of novel peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics in an industrial producer.

  8. Monitoring of Antibiotic Residues in Aquatic Products in Urban and Rural Areas of Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Kotaro; Konishi, Yoshimasa; Harada, Kazuo; Okihashi, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Do, Mai Hoang Ngoc; Thi Bui, Long; Duc Nguyen, Thinh; Do Nguyen, Phuc; Thi Khong, Diep; Thi Tran, Hoa; Nam Nguyen, Thang; Viet Le, Ha; Van Chau, Vien; Thi Van Dao, Khanh; Thi Ngoc Nguyen, Hue; Kajimura, Keiji; Kumeda, Yuko; Tran Pham, Khanh; Ngoc Pham, Khai; Trong Bui, Chien; Quang Vien, Mai; Hoang Le, Ninh; Van Dang, Chinh; Hirata, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2016-08-10

    Antibiotic residues in aquatic products in Vietnam were investigated. A total of 511 fish and shrimp samples were collected from markets in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Thai Binh (TB), and Nha Trang (NT) from July 2013 to October 2015. The samples were extracted with 2% formic acid in acetonitrile and washed with dispersive C18 sorbent. Thirty-two antibiotics were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. Of the 362 samples from HCMC, antibiotic residues were found in 53 samples. Enrofloxacin was commonly detected, at a rate of 10.8%. In contrast, samples from TB and NT were less contaminated: only 1 of 118 analyzed samples showed residues in TB and only 1 of 31 showed residues in NT. These differences were attributed to the local manufacturing/distribution systems. To understand the current status of antibiotic use and prevent adverse effects that may be caused by their overuse, continual monitoring is required.

  9. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-05-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  10. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Andy M; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M; Cox, Russell J; Willis, Christine L; O'Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W; Foster, Gary D

    2016-05-04

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi.

  11. Identification and manipulation of the pleuromutilin gene cluster from Clitopilus passeckerianus for increased rapid antibiotic production

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Andy M.; Alberti, Fabrizio; Kilaru, Sreedhar; Collins, Catherine M.; de Mattos-Shipley, Kate; Hartley, Amanda J.; Hayes, Patrick; Griffin, Alison; Lazarus, Colin M.; Cox, Russell J.; Willis, Christine L.; O’Dwyer, Karen; Spence, David W.; Foster, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Semi-synthetic derivatives of the tricyclic diterpene antibiotic pleuromutilin from the basidiomycete Clitopilus passeckerianus are important in combatting bacterial infections in human and veterinary medicine. These compounds belong to the only new class of antibiotics for human applications, with novel mode of action and lack of cross-resistance, representing a class with great potential. Basidiomycete fungi, being dikaryotic, are not generally amenable to strain improvement. We report identification of the seven-gene pleuromutilin gene cluster and verify that using various targeted approaches aimed at increasing antibiotic production in C. passeckerianus, no improvement in yield was achieved. The seven-gene pleuromutilin cluster was reconstructed within Aspergillus oryzae giving production of pleuromutilin in an ascomycete, with a significant increase (2106%) in production. This is the first gene cluster from a basidiomycete to be successfully expressed in an ascomycete, and paves the way for the exploitation of a metabolically rich but traditionally overlooked group of fungi. PMID:27143514

  12. Development of an antibiotic marker-free platform for heterologous protein production in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Sevillano, Laura; Díaz, Margarita; Santamaría, Ramón I

    2017-09-26

    The industrial use of enzymes produced by microorganisms is continuously growing due to the need for sustainable solutions. Nevertheless, many of the plasmids used for recombinant production of proteins in bacteria are based on the use of antibiotic resistance genes as selection markers. The safety concerns and legal requirements surrounding the increased use of antibiotic resistance genes have made the development of new antibiotic-free approaches essential. In this work, a system completely free of antibiotic resistance genes and useful for the production of high yields of proteins in Streptomyces is described. This system is based on the separation of the two components of the yefM/yoeBsl (antitoxin/toxin) operon; the toxin (yoeBsl) gene, responsible for host death, is integrated into the genome and the antitoxin gene (yefMsl), which inactivates the toxin, is located in the expression plasmid. To develop this system, the toxin gene was integrated into the genome of a strain lacking the complete operon, and the antibiotic resistance gene integrated along with the toxin was eliminated by Cre recombinase to generate a final host strain free of any antibiotic resistance marker. In the same way, the antibiotic resistance gene from the final expression plasmid was removed by Dre recombinase. The usefulness of this system was analysed by checking the production of two hydrolases from different Streptomyces. Production of both proteins, with potential industrial use, was high and stable over time after strain storage and after serial subcultures. These results support the robustness and stability of the positive selection system developed. The total absence of antibiotic resistance genes makes this system a powerful tool for using Streptomyces as a host to produce proteins at the industrial level. This work is the first Streptomyces antibiotic marker-free system to be described. Graphical abstract Antibiotic marker-free platform for protein expression in Streptomyces

  13. A possible role of poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid in antibiotic production in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shivani; Bhatia, Yukti; Valappil, Sabeel Padinhara; Roy, Ipsita

    2002-12-01

    The occurrence of poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) in 12 different strains of the genus Streptomyces was investigated. Gas chromatographic estimation indicated that all the strains produced PHB and the range of maximum PHB accumulation was between 1.5 and 11.8% dry cell weight. PHB was isolated from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) M145 and characterized using Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The correlation between PHB utilization and antibiotic production in S. coelicolor A3(2) M145, was studied; results indicated a possible role of PHB as a carbon reserve material used for antibiotic production.

  14. Dynamics of symbiont-mediated antibiotic production reveal efficient long-term protection for beewolf offspring

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Insects have evolved a wide range of mechanisms to defend themselves and their offspring against antagonists. One of these strategies involves the utilization of antimicrobial compounds provided by symbiotic bacteria to protect the host or its nutritional resources from pathogens and parasites. In the symbiosis of the solitary digger wasp, Philanthus triangulum (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae), the bacterial symbiont ‘Candidatus Streptomyces philanthi’ defends the developing larvae against pathogens by producing a mixture of at least nine antimicrobial substances on the cocoon surface. This antibiotic cocktail inhibits the growth of a broad range of detrimental fungi and bacteria, thereby significantly enhancing the offspring’s survival probability. Results Here we show that the production of antimicrobial compounds by the beewolf symbionts is confined to the first two weeks after cocoon spinning, leading to a high concentration of piericidins and streptochlorin on the cocoon surface. Expression profiling of housekeeping, sporulation, and antibiotic biosynthesis genes indicates that antibiotic production coincides with morphological differentiation that enables the symbionts to survive the nutrient-limited conditions on the beewolf cocoon. The antibiotic substances remain stable on the cocoon surface for the entire duration of the beewolf’s hibernation period, demonstrating that the compounds are resistant against environmental influences. Conclusions The antibiotic production by the beewolf symbionts serves as a reliable protection for the wasp offspring against pathogenic microorganisms during the long and unpredictable developmental phase in the subterranean brood cells. Thus, the beewolf-Streptomyces symbiosis provides one of the rare examples of antibiotics serving as an efficient defense in the natural environment and may aid in devising new strategies for the utilization of antibiotic combination therapies in human medicine against increasingly

  15. Validation of VITEK 2 version 4.01 software for detection, identification, and classification of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Abele-Horn, Marianne; Hommers, Leif; Trabold, René; Frosch, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of the new VITEK 2 version 4.01 software to identify and detect glycopeptide-resistant enterococci compared to that of the reference broth microdilution method and to classify them into the vanA, vanB, vanC1, and vanC2 genotypes. Moreover, the accuracy of antimicrobial susceptibility testing with agents with improved potencies against glycopeptide-resistant enterococci was determined. A total of 121 enterococci were investigated. The new VITEK 2 software was able to identify 114 (94.2%) enterococcal strains correctly to the species level and to classify 119 (98.3%) enterococci correctly to the glycopeptide resistance genotype level. One Enterococcus casseliflavus strain and six Enterococcus faecium vanA strains with low-level resistance to vancomycin were identified with low discrimination, requiring additional tests. One of the vanA strains was misclassified as the vanB type, and one glycopeptide-susceptible E. facium wild type was misclassified as the vanA type. The overall essential agreements for antimicrobial susceptibility testing results were 94.2% for vancomycin, 95.9% for teicoplanin, 100% for quinupristin-dalfopristin and moxifloxacin, and 97.5% for linezolid. The rates of minor errors were 9% for teicoplanin and 5% for the other antibiotic agents. The identification and susceptibility data were produced within 4 h to 6 h 30 min and 8 h 15 min to 12 h 15 min. In conclusion, use of VITEK 2 version 4.01 software appears to be a reliable method for the identification and detection of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci as well as an improvement over the use of the former VITEK 2 database. However, a significant reduction in the detection time would be desirable.

  16. Validation of VITEK 2 Version 4.01 Software for Detection, Identification, and Classification of Glycopeptide-Resistant Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Abele-Horn, Marianne; Hommers, Leif; Trabold, René; Frosch, Matthias

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of the new VITEK 2 version 4.01 software to identify and detect glycopeptide-resistant enterococci compared to that of the reference broth microdilution method and to classify them into the vanA, vanB, vanC1, and vanC2 genotypes. Moreover, the accuracy of antimicrobial susceptibility testing with agents with improved potencies against glycopeptide-resistant enterococci was determined. A total of 121 enterococci were investigated. The new VITEK 2 software was able to identify 114 (94.2%) enterococcal strains correctly to the species level and to classify 119 (98.3%) enterococci correctly to the glycopeptide resistance genotype level. One Enterococcus casseliflavus strain and six Enterococcus faecium vanA strains with low-level resistance to vancomycin were identified with low discrimination, requiring additional tests. One of the vanA strains was misclassified as the vanB type, and one glycopeptide-susceptible E. facium wild type was misclassified as the vanA type. The overall essential agreements for antimicrobial susceptibility testing results were 94.2% for vancomycin, 95.9% for teicoplanin, 100% for quinupristin-dalfopristin and moxifloxacin, and 97.5% for linezolid. The rates of minor errors were 9% for teicoplanin and 5% for the other antibiotic agents. The identification and susceptibility data were produced within 4 h to 6 h 30 min and 8 h 15 min to 12 h 15 min. In conclusion, use of VITEK 2 version 4.01 software appears to be a reliable method for the identification and detection of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci as well as an improvement over the use of the former VITEK 2 database. However, a significant reduction in the detection time would be desirable. PMID:16390951

  17. Synthetic Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Richard; McDonald, David; Byrne, Scott

    2015-10-01

    Due to changes in glycosyltransferase expression during tumorigenesis, the glycoproteins of cancer cells often carry highly truncated carbohydrate chains compared to those on healthy cells. These glycans are known as tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and are prime targets for use in vaccines for the prevention and treatment of cancer. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art in targeting the immune system towards tumor-associated glycopeptide antigens via synthetic self adjuvanting vaccines, in which the antigenic and adjuvanting moieties of the vaccines are present in the same molecule. The majority of the self-adjuvanting glycopeptide cancer vaccines reported to date employ antigens from mucin 1, a protein which is highly over-expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in many forms of cancer. The adjuvants used in these vaccines predominantly include lipopeptide- or lipoamino acid-based TLR2 agonists, although studies investigating stimulation of TLR9 and TLR4 are also discussed. Most of these adjuvants are highly lipophilic, and, upon conjugation to antigenic peptides, provide amphiphilic vaccine molecules. The amphiphilic nature of these vaccine constructs can lead to the formation of higher-order structures by vaccines in solution, which are likely to be important for their efficacy in vivo.

  18. Glycopeptide capture for cell surface proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, M C Gilbert; Sun, Bingyun

    2014-05-09

    Cell surface proteins, including extracellular matrix proteins, participate in all major cellular processes and functions, such as growth, differentiation, and proliferation. A comprehensive characterization of these proteins provides rich information for biomarker discovery, cell-type identification, and drug-target selection, as well as helping to advance our understanding of cellular biology and physiology. Surface proteins, however, pose significant analytical challenges, because of their inherently low abundance, high hydrophobicity, and heavy post-translational modifications. Taking advantage of the prevalent glycosylation on surface proteins, we introduce here a high-throughput glycopeptide-capture approach that integrates the advantages of several existing N-glycoproteomics means. Our method can enrich the glycopeptides derived from surface proteins and remove their glycans for facile proteomics using LC-MS. The resolved N-glycoproteome comprises the information of protein identity and quantity as well as their sites of glycosylation. This method has been applied to a series of studies in areas including cancer, stem cells, and drug toxicity. The limitation of the method lies in the low abundance of surface membrane proteins, such that a relatively large quantity of samples is required for this analysis compared to studies centered on cytosolic proteins.

  19. Comparative analyses of laccase-catalyzed amination reactions for production of novel β-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Mikolasch, Annett; Manda, Katrin; Schlüter, Rabea; Lalk, Michael; Witt, Sabine; Seefeldt, Simone; Hammer, Elke; Schauer, Frieder; Jülich, Wolf-Dieter; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Seven novel β-lactam antibiotics with activities against Gram-positive bacterial strains, among them methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci, were synthesized by amination of 2,5-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in usable yields (30-60%). These products protected mice against an infection with S. aureus lethal to the control animals. The results show the usefulness of laccase for the synthesis of potential new antibiotics, in addition to the interdependence of the laccase substrates, the amino coupling partners, and the product formation, yield, and activity. The syntheses of β-lactam antibiotics with 2,5-dihydroxyaromatic acid substructures (para-substituted) are then compared with those of 3,4-dihydroxyaromatic acid substructures (ortho-substituted). Para-substituted laccase substrates were better reaction partners in these syntheses than ortho-substituted compounds.

  20. Use of CID/ETD Mass Spectrometry to Analyze Glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Mechref, Yehia

    2013-01-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS) does not allow the characterization of glycopeptides because of the fragmentation of their glycan structures and limited fragmentation of peptide backbones. Electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) tandem MS, on the other hand, offers an alternative approach allowing the fragmentation of only peptide backbones of glycopeptides. Characterization of glycopeptides using both CID and ETD is summarized in this unit. While CID provide information related to the composition of glycan moiety attached to a peptide backbone, ETD permits de novo sequencing of peptides, since it prompts only peptide backbone fragmentation while keeping posttranslational modifications intact. Radical anions transfer of electrons to peptide backbone which induces cleavage of the N-Cα bond is observed in ETD. The glycan moiety is retained on the peptide backbone, largely unaffected by the ETD process. Accordingly, ETD allows not only the identification of the amino acid sequence of a glycopeptide, but also the unambiguous assignment of its glycosylation site. When data acquired from both fragmentation techniques are combined, it is possible to characterize comprehensively the entire glycopeptide. This is achieved using an instrument capable of alternating between CID and ETD experiments during an LC-MS/MS analysis. This unit discusses the different fragmentation of glycopeptides observed in CID and ETD. Tables of residue masses associated with oxonium ions observed in CID are provided to help in the interpretation of CID mass spectra. The utility of both CID and ETD for better characterization of glycopeptides are demonstrated for a model glycoprotein. PMID:22470127

  1. No Apparent Costs for Facultative Antibiotic Production by the Soil Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    PubMed Central

    Garbeva, Paolina; Tyc, Olaf; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja N. P.; van der Wal, Annemieke; Vos, Michiel; Silby, Mark; de Boer, Wietse

    2011-01-01

    Background Many soil-inhabiting bacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites that can suppress microorganisms competing for the same resources. The production of antimicrobial compounds is expected to incur fitness costs for the producing bacteria. Such costs form the basis for models on the co-existence of antibiotic-producing and non-antibiotic producing strains. However, so far studies quantifying the costs of antibiotic production by bacteria are scarce. The current study reports on possible costs, for antibiotic production by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1, a soil bacterium that is induced to produce a broad-spectrum antibiotic when it is confronted with non-related bacterial competitors or supernatants of their cultures. Methodology and Principal Findings We measured the possible cost of antibiotic production for Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 by monitoring changes in growth rate with and without induction of antibiotic production by supernatant of a bacterial competitor, namely Pedobacter sp.. Experiments were performed in liquid as well as on semi-solid media under nutrient-limited conditions that are expected to most clearly reveal fitness costs. Our results did not reveal any significant costs for production of antibiotics by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. Comparison of growth rates of the antibiotic-producing wild-type cells with those of non-antibiotic producing mutants did not reveal costs of antibiotic production either. Significance Based on our findings we propose that the facultative production of antibiotics might not be selected to mitigate metabolic costs, but instead might be advantageous because it limits the risk of competitors evolving resistance, or even the risk of competitors feeding on the compounds produced. PMID:22110622

  2. Prevalence of veterinary antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli in the surface water of a livestock production region in northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L(-1). The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment.

  3. Prevalence of Veterinary Antibiotics and Antibiotic-Resistant Escherichia coli in the Surface Water of a Livestock Production Region in Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuelian; Li, Yanxia; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jing; Feng, Chenghong; Gao, Min; Wang, Lina

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of 12 veterinary antibiotics (VAs) and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) in a rural water system that was affected by livestock production in northern China. Each of the surveyed sites was determined with at least eight antibiotics with maximum concentration of up to 450 ng L−1. The use of VAs in livestock farming probably was a primary source of antibiotics in the rivers. Increasing total antibiotics were measured from up- to mid- and downstream in the two tributaries. Eighty-eight percent of the 218 E. coli isolates that were derived from the study area exhibited, in total, 48 resistance profiles against the eight examined drugs. Significant correlations were found among the resistance rates of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, chloromycetin and ampicillin as well as between tetracycline and chlortetracycline, suggesting a possible cross-selection for resistance among these drugs. The E. coli resistance frequency also increased from up- to midstream in the three rivers. E. coli isolates from different water systems showed varying drug numbers of resistance. No clear relationship was observed in the antibiotic resistance frequency with corresponding antibiotic concentration, indicating that the antibiotic resistance for E. coli in the aquatic environment might be affected by factors besides antibiotics. High numbers of resistant E. coli were also isolated from the conserved reservoir. These results suggest that rural surface water may become a large pool of VAs and resistant bacteria. This study contributes to current information on VAs and resistant bacteria contamination in aquatic environments particularly in areas under intensive agriculture. Moreover, this study indicates an urgent need to monitor the use of VAs in animal production, and to control the release of animal-originated antibiotics into the environment. PMID:25372873

  4. The effects of the antibiotics ampicillin, florfenicol, sulfamethazine, and tylosin on biogas production and their degradation efficiency during anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Shannon M; Ullman, Jeffrey L; Teel, Amy L; Watts, Richard J; Frear, Craig

    2013-12-01

    The impacts of four common animal husbandry antibiotics (ampicillin, florfenicol, sulfamethazine, and tylosin) on anaerobic digestion (AD) treatment efficiency and the potential for antibiotic degradation during digestion were evaluated. Sulfamethazine and ampicillin exhibited no impact on total biogas production up to 280 and 350 mg/L, respectively, although ampicillin inhibited biogas production rates during early stages of AD. Tylosin reduced biogas production by 10-38% between 130 and 913 mg/L. Florfenicol reduced biogas by ≈ 5%, 40% and 75% at 6.4, 36 and 210 mg/L, respectively. These antibiotic concentrations are higher than commonly seen for mixed feedlot manure, so impacts on full scale AD should be minimal. Antibiotic degradation products were found, confirming AD effectively degraded ampicillin, florfenicol, and tylosin, although some products were persistent throughout the process. Contamination of AD solid and liquid effluents with sulfamethazine and antibiotic transformation products from florfenicol and tylosin could present an environmental concern. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. ARS Research Review on "Recent progress in developing alternative strategies to antibiotics in poultry production"

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The global animal industry needs to address the increasing regulatory restrictions on the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in animal production. Many AGPs have already been restricted by animal farms in the European Union and soon other countries are expected to be under increasing scrutin...

  6. Comparative in vitro study of the antimicrobial activities of different commercial antibiotic products for intravenous administration

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The antimicrobial resistance is a global problem, probably due to the indiscriminate and irrational use of antibiotics, prescriptions for incorrect medicines or incorrect determinations of dose, route and/or duration. Another consideration is the uncertainty of patients receiving antibiotics about whether the quality of a generic medicine is equal to, greater than or less than its equivalent brand-name drug. The antibiotics behaviors must be evaluated in vitro and in vivo in order to confirm their suitability for therapeutic use. Methods The antimicrobial activities of Meropenem and Piperacillin/Tazobactam were studied by microbiological assays to determine their potencies (content), minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), critical concentrations and capacity to produce spontaneous drug-resistant mutants. Results With respect to potency (content) all the products fulfill USP requirements, so they should all be considered pharmaceutical equivalents. The MIC values of the samples evaluated (trade marks and generics) were the same for each strain tested, indicating that all products behaved similarly. The critical concentration values were very similar for all samples, and the ratios between the critical concentration of the standard and those of each sample were similar to the ratios of their specific antibiotic contents. Overall, therefore, the results showed no significant differences among samples. Finally, the production of spontaneous mutants did not differ significantly among the samples evaluated. Conclusions All the samples are pharmaceutical equivalents and the products can be used in antimicrobial therapy. PMID:20113478

  7. Impact of raised without antibiotics beef cattle production practices on occurrences of antimicrobial resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the United States (U.S.), it is estimated that food-animal production agriculture accounts for >70% of all antimicrobial (AM) use, which has raised concerns that these uses substantially contribute to the occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant human infections. "Raised without antibiotics" (RWA) m...

  8. Dry powder antibiotic aerosol product development: inhaled therapy for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Anthony J; Misra, Amit; Fourie, P Bernard

    2013-11-01

    Inhaled therapies offer a unique approach to the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) using a relevant target organ system as a route of administration. The number of research reports on this topic has been increasing exponentially in the last decade but studies of clinical efficacy have been rare in recent times. The challenge is to take many research findings and translate them into a strategy for product development. Dry powder inhalers are the dominant drug product under consideration by those interested in the inhaled therapy for TB. A range of factors including candidate drug, formulation, device selection, drug product testing for proof of concept, and preclinical and clinical purposes all demand different considerations. The following review is intended to raise awareness of a growing body of evidence, suggesting that inhaled therapy for TB is possible and desirable. In addition, it is intended to outline key elements of the product-development activity for this particular application that has not been discussed elsewhere in the literature. Hopefully, this will encourage those with development expertise to seriously contemplate the steps required to bring such products forward. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Challenges in the Heterologous Production of Antibiotics in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Bekiesch, Paulina; Basitta, Patrick; Apel, Alexander K

    2016-08-01

    The fast growing genome databases provide us with a large number of so far unknown secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters. A key method to study these gene clusters is their heterologous expression in an engineered host strain. Gene clusters derived from actinomycetes are usually expressed in a Streptomyces host strain to identify and investigate the corresponding compounds. However, heterologous expression is often accompanied with some challenges affecting the production rates of secondary metabolites. The first step is therefore the selection of a suitable expression vector and host strain. Once production has been established, there are several possibilities to improve compound yields either by media screens, by overexpression of regulatory or transport genes or by introduction of constitutive or inducible promoters. A surely important, but hitherto little studied factor is also the regulation of a heterologously expressed gene cluster by its host strain. This review gives a short overview on the chances and challenges provided by heterologous production of secondary metabolites in Streptomyces.

  10. Multigene families for anthracycline antibiotic production in Streptomyces peucetius.

    PubMed Central

    Stutzman-Engwall, K J; Hutchinson, C R

    1989-01-01

    Hybridization of polyketide synthase genes from heterologous Streptomyces sp. led to the identification of four unlinked regions of DNA from Streptomyces peucetius that contain genes that encode the production of the same or closely related metabolites, some of which are intermediates of the daunorubicin pathway. DNA fragments from each region that hybridized with the heterologous polyketide synthase genes were hybridized with each other, but very little sequence similarity was observed even though at least two of the regions have similar (if not identical) functions in metabolite production. Some regions, however, do have sequence similarity with other anthracycline-producing Streptomyces sp. Images PMID:2717612

  11. Antibiotics and bioactive natural products in treatment of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains with Methicillin resistance are associated with increased mortality and morbidity, aggressive course, multiple drug resistance and hospital outbreaks. Several first and second line antibiotics are rapidly becoming ineffective for treatment due to emergence of resistance. Extracts of medicinal plants are rich source of unique phytochemicals. Plants used in traditional medicine have been reported to have significant anti-MRSA activity. The objective of this review is to provide a brief overview of antibiotics as well as anti-MRSA natural products and their future prospect.

  12. Cold drugs. Circulation, production and intelligence of antibiotics in post-WWII years.

    PubMed

    Capocci, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The paper details how the earliest antibiotics were subject to a strict control during the earliest phase of the Cold War. Because of antibiotics strategic and economic value, Anglo-American Governments restricted circulation of scientists, techno-scientific know-how and technology related to penicillin production, as well as closely controlling the circulation of the drugs in the Communist countries. These efforts are documented by archival documents, testifying how drugs were actual instruments of propaganda and political strategies, affecting pharmaceutical development both in the Western and the Eastern bloc.

  13. The impact of Schiff bases on antibiotic production by Streptomyces hygroscopicus

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinović, Sandra S.; Savić, Dragiša S.; Veljković, Vlada B.; Gojgić-Cvijović, G.

    2009-01-01

    A media consisting of isatin-Schiff bases (isatin-3-thiosemicarbazone, isatin-3-semicarbazone, and isatin-3-phenylhydrazone) was developed to maximize the production of antibiotics Hexaene H-85 and Azalomycine B by Streptomyces hygroscopicus. The media isatin-3-thiosemicarbazone resulted in the maximum antibiotics concentration of 372 μg cm−3 for Hexaene H-85 and 118 μg cm−3 for Azalomycine B. The impact of modified media on soil morphology also was investigated. PMID:20700374

  14. The effects of certain antibiotics on biogas production in the anaerobic digestion of pig waste slurry.

    PubMed

    Lallai, A; Mura, G; Onnis, N

    2002-04-01

    Antibiotics commonly used in the treatment of pigs - amoxicillin trihydrate, oxytetracycline hydrochloride and thiamphenicol were added at different concentrations to aliquots of pig waste slurry plus anaerobic sludge in serum bottles. The biogas production and methane concentration in the headspace were monitored to determine the effect of the antibiotics on the anaerobic process. With thiamphenicol significant differences in methane production were found for concentrations of 80 and 160 mg l(-1) slurry. Compared to the control, only minor differences in methane production were noted in the bottles to which amoxicillin (60 and 120 mg l(-1)) had been added. Methane production was about the same for the bottles with different oxytetracycline concentrations (125 and 250 mg l(-1)) and for the control.

  15. Production of peptide antibiotics by Bacillus sp. GU 057 indigenously isolated from saline soil

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Adnan; Khan, Muhammad Ayaz; Ehsanullah, Malik; Haroon, Uzma; Azam, Sheikh Muhammad Farooq; Hameed, Abdul

    2012-01-01

    A total of 112 soil samples were taken from differents areas of district D.I.Khan and Kohat (KPK) Pakistan and screened for production of antibiotics against the Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus. Widest zone of inhibition (18mm) was produced by microorganism isolated from saline soil. The strain was later identified as Bacillus GU057 by standard biochemical assays. Maximum activity (18mm inhibition zone) was observed against Staphylococcus aureus after 48 hours of incubation at pH 8 and 4% concentration of glucose. The antibiotic was identified by autobiography as bacitracin. The Bacillus strain GU057 was confirmed as good peptide antibiotic producer and can effectively be indulged as biocontrol agent. PMID:24031962

  16. Co-production of two new peptide antibiotics by a bacterial isolate Paenibacillus alvei NP75.

    PubMed

    Anandaraj, Balaiah; Vellaichamy, Adaikkalam; Kachman, Maureen; Selvamanikandan, Athinarayanan; Pegu, Shyamanta; Murugan, Vadivel

    2009-02-06

    Two new peptide antibiotics were secreted by a Gram-positive bacterial strain isolated from fermented tomato fruit. Based on its 99% 16S rDNA sequence similarity with Paenibacillus alvei, the isolate was designated as P. alvei NP75. Among these two peptides, one is active against Gram-positive pathogens while the other against Gram-negative pathogens; thus these peptides were named as paenibacillin P and paenibacillin N, respectively. After the purification of those peptide antibiotics from the cell free culture supernatant by RP-HPLC, they were analyzed for their temperature sensitivity and susceptibility to proteases. Higher-temperature tolerant paenibacillin N was easily degraded by proteinase K, while the temperature sensitive paenibacillin P was not affected by any of the proteases used in this study other than a specific protease that was secreted by the same NP75 strain. Mass-spectrometry analysis of the above peptide antibiotics further confirmed their distinction among the known peptide antibiotics. We are reporting first of its kind the co-production of two different new peptide antibiotics from a single bacterial isolate of P. alvei strain.

  17. Immunological Evaluation of Recent MUC1 Glycopeptide Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Wall, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrantly glycosylated mucin 1 (MUC1) is a recognized tumor-specific antigen on epithelial cell tumors. A wide variety of MUC1 glycopeptide anti-cancer vaccines have been formulated by many research groups. Some researchers have used MUC1 alone as an immunogen whereas other groups used different antigenic carrier proteins such as bovine serum albumin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin for conjugation with MUC1 glycopeptide. A variety of adjuvants have been used with MUC1 glycopeptides to improve their immunogenicity. Fully synthetic multicomponent vaccines have been synthesized by incorporating different T helper cell epitopes and Toll-like receptor agonists. Some vaccine formulations utilized liposomes or nanoparticles as vaccine delivery systems. In this review, we discuss the immunological evaluation of different conjugate or synthetic MUC1 glycopeptide vaccines in different tumor or mouse models that have been published since 2012. PMID:27472370

  18. The Effect of Antibiotics on Associated Bacterial Community of Stored Product Mites

    PubMed Central

    Kopecky, Jan; Nesvorna, Marta; Mareckova-Sagova, Marketa; Hubert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteria are associated with the gut, fat bodies and reproductive organs of stored product mites (Acari: Astigmata). The mites are pests due to the production of allergens. Addition of antibiotics to diets can help to characterize the association between mites and bacteria. Methodology and Principal Findings Ampicillin, neomycin and streptomycin were added to the diets of mites and the effects on mite population growth (Acarus siro, Lepidoglyphus destructor and Tyrophagus putrescentiae) and associated bacterial community structure were assessed. Mites were treated by antibiotic supplementation (1 mgg−1 of diet) for 21 days and numbers of mites and bacterial communities were analyzed and compared to the untreated control. Bacterial quantities, determined by real-time PCR, significantly decreased in antibiotic treated specimens from 5 to 30 times in A. siro and T. putrescentiae, while no decline was observed in L. destructor. Streptomycin treatment eliminated Bartonella-like bacteria in the both A. siro and T. putrescentiae and Cardinium in T. putrescentiae. Solitalea-like bacteria proportion increased in the communities of neomycin and streptomycin treated A. siro specimens. Kocuria proportion increased in the bacterial communities of ampicillin and streptomycin treated A. siro and neomycin and streptomycin treated L. destructor. Conclusions/Significance The work demonstrated the changes of mite associated bacterial community under antibiotic pressure in pests of medical importance. Pre-treatment of mites by 1 mgg−1 antibiotic diets improved mite fitness as indicated accelerated population growth of A. siro pretreated streptomycin and neomycin and L. destructor pretreated by neomycin. All tested antibiotics supplemented to diets caused the decrease of mite growth rate in comparison to the control diet. PMID:25387104

  19. Efficient enrichment of glycopeptides with sulfonic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Aisha; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-12-01

    This work presents an efficient and selective enrichment method for glycoprotein/glycopeptides with sulfonic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica (SBA-15-SO3H), which is synthesized via simple oxidation of -SH groups with H2O2. The functionalized SBA-15 shows large surface area and accessible pores, and can selectively adsorb glycopeptides via hydrogen bond and hydrophilic interaction. Upon the selective enrichment prior to the mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, the signals of glycopeptides are significantly enhanced, which leads to the identifiable signals of 21 glycopeptides from the digest of HRP, 16 glycopeptides from the digest of human IgG, and 16 glycopeptides from the digest of chicken avidin. The SBA-15-SO3H gives significant selectivity for glycopeptides even at a low molar ratio of glycopeptides to nonglycopeptides with an enrichment time of 15min. Therefore, this work provides a powerful material for selective enrichment and identification of low abundant glycopeptides in glycoproteomic analysis.

  20. Novel Approach for Improving the Productivity of Antibiotic-Producing Strains by Inducing Combined Resistant Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haifeng; Ochi, Kozo

    2001-01-01

    We developed a novel approach for improving the production of antibiotic from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) by inducing combined drug-resistant mutations. Mutants with enhanced (1.6- to 3-fold-higher) actinorhodin production were detected at a high frequency (5 to 10%) among isolates resistant to streptomycin (Strr), gentamicin (Genr), or rifampin (Rifr), which developed spontaneously on agar plates which contained one of the three drugs. Construction of double mutants (str gen and str rif) by introducing gentamicin or rifampin resistance into an str mutant resulted in further increased (1.7- to 2.5-fold-higher) actinorhodin productivity. Likewise, triple mutants (str gen rif) thus constructed were found to have an even greater ability for producing the antibiotic, eventually generating a mutant able to produce 48 times more actinorhodin than the wild-type strain. Analysis of str mutants revealed that a point mutation occurred within the rpsL gene, which encodes the ribosomal protein S12. rif mutants were found to have a point mutation in the rpoB gene, which encodes the β-subunit of RNA polymerase. Mutation points in gen mutants still remain unknown. These single, double, and triple mutants displayed in hierarchical order a remarkable increase in the production of ActII-ORF4, a pathway-specific regulatory protein, as determined by Western blotting analysis. This reflects the same hierarchical order observed for the increase in actinorhodin production. The superior ability of the triple mutants was demonstrated by physiological analyses under various cultural conditions. We conclude that by inducing combined drug-resistant mutations we can continuously increase the production of antibiotic in a stepwise manner. This new breeding approach could be especially effective for initially improving the production of antibiotics from wild-type strains. PMID:11282646

  1. Random glycopeptide bead libraries for seromic biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Kracun, Stjepan K; Cló, Emiliano; Clausen, Henrik; Levery, Steven B; Jensen, Knud J; Blixt, Ola

    2010-12-03

    Identification of disease-specific biomarkers is important to address early diagnosis and management of disease. Aberrant post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins such as O-glycosylations (O-PTMs) are emerging as triggers of autoantibodies that can serve as sensitive biomarkers. Here we have developed a random glycopeptide bead library screening platform for detection of autoantibodies and other binding proteins. Libraries were build on biocompatible PEGA beads including a safety-catch C-terminal amide linker (SCAL) that allowed mild cleavage conditions (I(2)/NaBH(4) and TFA) for release of glycopeptides and sequence determination by ESI-Orbitrap-MS(n). As proof-of-principle, tumor -specific glycopeptide reporter epitopes were built-in into the libraries and were detected by tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies and autoantibodies from cancer patients. Sequenced and identified glycopeptides were resynthesized at the preparative scale by automated parallel peptide synthesis and printed on microarrays for validation and broader analysis with larger sets of sera. We further showed that chemical synthesis of the monosaccharide O-glycopeptide library (Tn-glycoform) could be diversified to other tumor glycoforms by on-bead enzymatic glycosylation reactions with recombinant glycosyltransferases. Hence, we have developed a high-throughput flexible platform for rapid discovery of O-glycopeptide biomarkers and the method has applicability in other types of assays such as lectin/antibody/enzyme specificity studies as well as investigation of other PTMs.

  2. Electron-Transfer/Higher-Energy Collision Dissociation (EThcD)-Enabled Intact Glycopeptide/Glycoproteome Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qing; Wang, Bowen; Chen, Zhengwei; Urabe, Go; Glover, Matthew S.; Shi, Xudong; Guo, Lian-Wang; Kent, K. Craig; Li, Lingjun

    2017-09-01

    Protein glycosylation, one of the most heterogeneous post-translational modifications, can play a major role in cellular signal transduction and disease progression. Traditional mass spectrometry (MS)-based large-scale glycoprotein sequencing studies heavily rely on identifying enzymatically released glycans and their original peptide backbone separately, as there is no efficient fragmentation method to produce unbiased glycan and peptide product ions simultaneously in a single spectrum, and that can be conveniently applied to high throughput glycoproteome characterization, especially for N-glycopeptides, which can have much more branched glycan side chains than relatively less complex O-linked glycans. In this study, a redefined electron-transfer/higher-energy collision dissociation (EThcD) fragmentation scheme is applied to incorporate both glycan and peptide fragments in one single spectrum, enabling complete information to be gathered and great microheterogeneity details to be revealed. Fetuin was first utilized to prove the applicability with 19 glycopeptides and corresponding five glycosylation sites identified. Subsequent experiments tested its utility for human plasma N-glycoproteins. Large-scale studies explored N-glycoproteomics in rat carotid arteries over the course of restenosis progression to investigate the potential role of glycosylation. The integrated fragmentation scheme provides a powerful tool for the analysis of intact N-glycopeptides and N-glycoproteomics. We also anticipate this approach can be readily applied to large-scale O-glycoproteome characterization. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Electron-Transfer/Higher-Energy Collision Dissociation (EThcD)-Enabled Intact Glycopeptide/Glycoproteome Characterization.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qing; Wang, Bowen; Chen, Zhengwei; Urabe, Go; Glover, Matthew S; Shi, Xudong; Guo, Lian-Wang; Kent, K Craig; Li, Lingjun

    2017-07-10

    Protein glycosylation, one of the most heterogeneous post-translational modifications, can play a major role in cellular signal transduction and disease progression. Traditional mass spectrometry (MS)-based large-scale glycoprotein sequencing studies heavily rely on identifying enzymatically released glycans and their original peptide backbone separately, as there is no efficient fragmentation method to produce unbiased glycan and peptide product ions simultaneously in a single spectrum, and that can be conveniently applied to high throughput glycoproteome characterization, especially for N-glycopeptides, which can have much more branched glycan side chains than relatively less complex O-linked glycans. In this study, a redefined electron-transfer/higher-energy collision dissociation (EThcD) fragmentation scheme is applied to incorporate both glycan and peptide fragments in one single spectrum, enabling complete information to be gathered and great microheterogeneity details to be revealed. Fetuin was first utilized to prove the applicability with 19 glycopeptides and corresponding five glycosylation sites identified. Subsequent experiments tested its utility for human plasma N-glycoproteins. Large-scale studies explored N-glycoproteomics in rat carotid arteries over the course of restenosis progression to investigate the potential role of glycosylation. The integrated fragmentation scheme provides a powerful tool for the analysis of intact N-glycopeptides and N-glycoproteomics. We also anticipate this approach can be readily applied to large-scale O-glycoproteome characterization. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. Electron-Transfer/Higher-Energy Collision Dissociation (EThcD)-Enabled Intact Glycopeptide/Glycoproteome Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Qing; Wang, Bowen; Chen, Zhengwei; Urabe, Go; Glover, Matthew S.; Shi, Xudong; Guo, Lian-Wang; Kent, K. Craig; Li, Lingjun

    2017-07-01

    Protein glycosylation, one of the most heterogeneous post-translational modifications, can play a major role in cellular signal transduction and disease progression. Traditional mass spectrometry (MS)-based large-scale glycoprotein sequencing studies heavily rely on identifying enzymatically released glycans and their original peptide backbone separately, as there is no efficient fragmentation method to produce unbiased glycan and peptide product ions simultaneously in a single spectrum, and that can be conveniently applied to high throughput glycoproteome characterization, especially for N-glycopeptides, which can have much more branched glycan side chains than relatively less complex O-linked glycans. In this study, a redefined electron-transfer/higher-energy collision dissociation (EThcD) fragmentation scheme is applied to incorporate both glycan and peptide fragments in one single spectrum, enabling complete information to be gathered and great microheterogeneity details to be revealed. Fetuin was first utilized to prove the applicability with 19 glycopeptides and corresponding five glycosylation sites identified. Subsequent experiments tested its utility for human plasma N-glycoproteins. Large-scale studies explored N-glycoproteomics in rat carotid arteries over the course of restenosis progression to investigate the potential role of glycosylation. The integrated fragmentation scheme provides a powerful tool for the analysis of intact N-glycopeptides and N-glycoproteomics. We also anticipate this approach can be readily applied to large-scale O-glycoproteome characterization.

  5. Amicoumacin antibiotic production and genetic diversity of Bacillus subtilis strains isolated from different habitats.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Irina V; Bressollier, Philippe; Sorokulova, Irina B; Verneuil, Bernard; Urdaci, Maria C

    2002-06-01

    One of the most interesting groups of phenolic compounds is comprised of the low molecular weight phenylpropanol derivative substances named isocoumarins, which possess important biological activities. In this study, the isocoumarin production and genetic diversity of 51 Bacillus strains isolated from different geographical and ecological niches were studied. Using molecular identification techniques, 47 strains were identified as B. subtilis, three as B. licheniformis and one as B. pumilus. When these strains were screened for isocumarin production, 11 belonging to the species B. subtilis produced amicoumacins, antibiotics of the isocoumarin group. RAPD analysis demonstrated that these strains fell into two groups which contained only these amicoumacin producers. No association was detected between RAPD profiles and the geographic origin or habitat of the strains tested. In conclusion, production of amicoumacin antibiotics by B. subtilis is a common characteristic of individual strains that presented genetic and physiological homogeneity.

  6. Antibiotic and disinfectant resistance of Salmonella isolated from egg production chains.

    PubMed

    Shengzhi, Yang; Guoyan, Wu; Mei, Long; Wenwen, Deng; Hongning, Wang; Likou, Zou

    2016-10-20

    To investigate the contamination of Salmonella and its drug resistance in egg production chains, 111 Salmonella strains of different serotypes isolated from egg production chains were used in the study. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antibiotics and disinfectants against Salmonella isolates were determined, meanwhile, antibiotic and disinfectant resistance genes were amplified. The results showed that the resistance frequency of trimethoprim (TMP, N=100, P=90.09%) was highest among Salmonella isolates and all isolates were sensitive to amoxicillin and clavulanate (AMC), ceftiofur sodium (CFS) and gentamicin (CN), respectively. There were six different antibiotic resistance profiles, and TMP profile was the most prevalent type (N=36, P=32.43%). 52.25% of Salmonella isolates appeared multi-drug resistance. The MICs of benzalkonium chloride (BC) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) against Salmonella strains ranged from 8 to 128 μg/mL and 8 to 256 μg/mL, respectively. Compared to quality control strain Escherichia coli ATCC10536, 101 Salmonella isolates (P=90.99%) had dual resistances to BC and CPC. 109 Salmonella (P=98.20%) were co-resistant to antibiotic and disinfectant. Detection of drug resistance genes showed that blaTEM gene was dominant (N=49, P=44.14%). The qnrA, qnrB and qepA genes were not detected. Only qacEΔ1 gene (N=63, P=56.76%) was detected among the disinfectant resistance genes. There was a significant correlation between sul1 gene and qacEΔ1 gene (P < 0.01). S. Derby showed multi-resistances to TMP, oxytetracycline (OTC), amoxicillin (AML) and ciprofloxacin (CIP). Eleven antibiotic resistance genes were found in S. Derby, in which the prevalence of qacEΔ1 gene was 81.25% (N=52). Besides, the drug resistance frequency and the prevalence of drug resistance genes in internal farm environment were higher than those in external environment. High frequency of drug resistances and high prevalence of drug resistance genes were detected

  7. Enhancement of lovastatin production by supplementing polyketide antibiotics to the submerged culture of Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhihua; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Yaling; Cao, Xuejun

    2010-04-01

    Feedback inhibition existed in lovastatin biosynthesis from Aspergillus terreus. Exogenous lovastatin and other different polyketide antibiotics biosynthesized by polyketide synthase were supplemented to the cultures of A. terreus to investigate their influences on lovastatin production. Supplementing exogenous lovastatin of 100 mg l(-1) at the early stage of fermentation and the fast stage of its biosynthesis resulted in decreases of 76.4% and 20% in final lovastatin production, respectively. However, the fungal cell growth was not affected; the growing cycle was only prolonged in the submerged cultivation. Separate supplementation of the five kinds of polyketide antibiotics such as tylosin, erythromycin, tetracycline, daunorobin, and rifamycin to the cultures resulted in increases of about 20 approximately 25% in the final lovastatin production. Especially, supplementing tylosin of 50 mg l(-1) at the beginning of lovastatin biosynthesis led to the final lovastatin production of 952.7 +/- 24.3 mg l(-1), which was improved by 42% and 22% compared with that produced in the control and the original culture, respectively. These results are helpful to understand the regulations on lovastatin biosynthesis and improve the final desired metabolite contents in many antibiotics production.

  8. Fluoroquinolone-resistant Campylobacter isolates from conventional and antibiotic-free chicken products.

    PubMed

    Price, Lance B; Johnson, Elizabeth; Vailes, Rocio; Silbergeld, Ellen

    2005-05-01

    The use of fluoroquinolones (FQs) in poultry production is an important issue in public health today. In February 2002, two prominent U.S. poultry companies pledged to stop using FQs for flock-wide treatment. One year later, we began a survey of Campylobacter isolates on chicken products from these two companies and from two producers claiming total abstention from antibiotic use. Using both standard isolation methods and new methods modified to enhance detection of FQ-resistant Campylobacter, we compared rates of FQ-resistant Campylobacter among these products. Four major findings were drawn from this study: a) antibiotic-free brands were not more likely to be contaminated with Campylobacter; b) a high percentage of products from the two conventional brands were contaminated with FQ-resistant Campylobacter (43 and 96%); c) these conventional brands had significantly higher odds of carrying resistant strains compared with antibiotic-free products; and d) supplementing media with FQs increased the sensitivity of detecting FQ-resistant strains among mixed populations of Campylobacter, thus reducing a bias toward underestimating the prevalence of FQ-resistant Campylobacter on samples. These results suggest that FQ resistance may persist in the commercial poultry environment in the absence of FQ-selective pressure and that these strains contaminate a larger proportion of foods than reported previously.

  9. Nature's combinatorial biosynthesis and recently engineered production of nucleoside antibiotics in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shawn; Kinney, William A; Van Lanen, Steven

    2017-04-01

    Modified nucleosides produced by Streptomyces and related actinomycetes are widely used in agriculture and medicine as antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer and antiviral agents. These specialized small-molecule metabolites are biosynthesized by complex enzymatic machineries encoded within gene clusters in the genome. The past decade has witnessed a burst of reports defining the key metabolic processes involved in the biosynthesis of several distinct families of nucleoside antibiotics. Furthermore, genome sequencing of various Streptomyces species has dramatically increased over recent years. Potential biosynthetic gene clusters for novel nucleoside antibiotics are now apparent by analysis of these genomes. Here we revisit strategies for production improvement of nucleoside antibiotics that have defined mechanisms of action, and are in clinical or agricultural use. We summarize the progress for genetically manipulating biosynthetic pathways for structural diversification of nucleoside antibiotics. Microorganism-based biosynthetic examples are provided and organized under genetic principles and metabolic engineering guidelines. We show perspectives on the future of combinatorial biosynthesis, and present a working model for discovery of novel nucleoside natural products in Streptomyces.

  10. Suppressive activity of macrolide antibiotics on nitric oxide production by lipopolysaccharide stimulation in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Terao, Hajime; Asano, Kazuhito; Kanai, Ken-ichi; Kyo, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, So; Hisamitsu, Tadashi; Suzaki, Harumi

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-dose and long-term administration of macrolide antibiotics into patients with chronic airway inflammatory diseases could favorably modify their clinical conditions. However, the therapeutic mode of action of macrolides is not well understood. Free oxygen radicals, including nitric oxide (NO), are well recognized as the important final effector molecules in the development and the maintenance of inflammatory diseases. PURPOSE: The influence of macrolide antibiotics on NO generation was examined in vivo. METHODS: Male ICR mice, 5 weeks of age, were orally administered with either roxithromycin, clarithromycin, azithromycin or josamycin once a day for 2-4 weeks. The mice were then injected intraperitoneally with 5.0 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the plasma NO level was examined 6 h later. RESULTS: Although pre-treatment of mice with macrolide antibiotics for 2 weeks scarcely affected NO generation by LPS injection, the administration of macrolide antibiotics, except for josamycin, for 4 weeks significantly inhibited LPS-induced NO generation. The data in the present study also showed that pre-treatment of mice with macrolide antibiotics for 4 weeks significantly suppresses not only production of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, but also inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA expressions, which are enhanced by LPS injection. CONCLUSION: These results strongly suggest that suppressive activity of macrolide antibiotics on NO generation in response to LPS stimulation in vivo may, in part, account for the clinical efficacy of macrolides on chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:14514469

  11. Strategies for the Discovery and Development of New Antibiotics from Natural Products: Three Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Jennifer; Lukežič, Tadeja; Kling, Angela; Baumann, Sascha; Hüttel, Stephan; Petković, Hrvoje; Müller, Rolf

    Natural products continue to be a predominant source for new anti-infective agents. Research at the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) and the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) is dedicated to the development of new lead structures against infectious diseases and, in particular, new antibiotics against hard-to-treat and multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens. In this chapter, we introduce some of the concepts currently being employed in the field of antibiotic discovery. In particular, we will exemplarily illustrate three approaches: (1) Current sources for novel compounds are mainly soil-dwelling bacteria. In the course of our antimicrobial discovery program, a biodiverse collection of myxobacterial strains has been established and screened for antibiotic activities. Based on this effort, one successful example is presented in this chapter: Antibacterial cystobactamids were discovered and their molecular target, the DNA gyrase, was identified soon after the analysis of myxobacterial self-resistance making use of the information found in the respective biosynthesis gene cluster. (2) Besides our focus on novel natural products, we also apply strategies to further develop either neglected drugs or widely used antibiotics for which development of resistance in the clinical setting is an issue: Antimycobacterial griselimycins were first described in the 1960s but their development and use in tuberculosis therapy was not further pursued. We show how a griselimycin derivative with improved pharmacokinetic properties and enhanced potency against Mycobacterium tuberculosis revealed and validated a novel target for antibacterial therapy, the DNA sliding clamp. (3) In a third approach, biosynthetic engineering was used to modify and optimize natural products regarding their pharmaceutical properties and their production scale: The atypical tetracycline chelocardin is a natural product scaffold that was modified to yield a more potent

  12. Increasing antibiotic resistance in preservative-tolerant bacterial strains isolated from cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    Orús, Pilar; Gomez-Perez, Laura; Leranoz, Sonia; Berlanga, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    To ensure the microbiological quality, consumer safety and organoleptic properties of cosmetic products, manufacturers need to comply with defined standards using several preservatives and disinfectants. A drawback regarding the use of these preservatives is the possibility of generating cross-insusceptibility to other disinfectants or preservatives, as well as cross resistance to antibiotics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to understand the adaptive mechanisms of Enterobacter gergoviae, Pseudomonas putida and Burkholderia cepacia that are involved in recurrent contamination in cosmetic products containing preservatives. Diminished susceptibility to formaldehyde-donors was detected in isolates but not to other preservatives commonly used in the cosmetics industry, although increasing resistance to different antibiotics (β-lactams, quinolones, rifampicin, and tetracycline) was demonstrated in these strains when compared with the wild-type strain. The outer membrane protein modifications and efflux mechanism activities responsible for the resistance trait were evaluated. The development of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms due to the selective pressure from preservatives included in cosmetic products could be a risk for the emergence and spread of bacterial resistance in the environment. Nevertheless, the large contribution of disinfection and preservation cannot be denied in cosmetic products. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  13. Genotypic Diversity, Antibiotic Resistance and Bacteriocin Production of Enterococci Isolated from Rhizospheres

    PubMed Central

    Klibi, Naouel; Ben Slimen, Naouel; Fhoula, Imen; López, Maria; Ben Slama, Karim; Daffonchio, Daniele; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen; Ouzari, Hadda

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and to characterize rhizospheric-derived enterococci. The results showed the prevalence of Enterococcus faecium species (97%) vs. Enterococcus durans (3%). Susceptibility testing for antibiotics showed a low percentage of resistance to erythromycin (3.2%) and tetracycline (11.2%), and intermediate resistance to vancomycin (6.5%). Nevertheless, a high proportion of bacteriocin production was recorded. Furthermore, PCR detection of antibiotic resistance and bacteriocin production-encoding genes was investigated. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing (PFGE) showed a great variability of enterococci in the rhizosphere. Moreover, mutilocus-sequence-typing analysis (MLST) revealed the identification of three new sequence types (STs), which were registered as ST613, ST614 and ST615. PMID:23124764

  14. SCO5745, a Bifunctional RNase J Ortholog, Affects Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Bralley, Patricia; Aseem, Madiha

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial RNases J are considered bifunctional RNases possessing both endo- and exonucleolytic activities. We have isolated an RNase J ortholog from Streptomyces coelicolor encoded by the gene sco5745. We overexpressed a decahistidine-tagged version of SCO5745 and purified the overexpressed protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. We demonstrated the presence of both 5′-to-3′ exonucleolytic and endonucleolytic activities on the Bacillus subtilis thrS transcript. Exonucleoytic activity predominated with 5′ monophosphorylated thrS, while endonucleolytic activity predominated with 5′ triphosphorylated thrS. While sco5745 is the only RNase J allele in S. coelicolor, the gene is not essential. Its disruption resulted in delayed production of the antibiotic actinorhodin, overproduction of undecylprodigiosin, and diminished production of the calcium-dependent antibiotic, in comparison with the parental strain. PMID:24415725

  15. Enduracididine, a rare amino acid component of peptide antibiotics: Natural products and synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Darcy J; Naysmith, Briar J; Furkert, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    Rising resistance to current clinical antibacterial agents is an imminent threat to global public health and highlights the demand for new lead compounds for drug discovery. One such potential lead compound, the peptide antibiotic teixobactin, was recently isolated from an uncultured bacterial source, and demonstrates remarkably high potency against a wide range of resistant pathogens without apparent development of resistance. A rare amino acid residue component of teixobactin, enduracididine, is only known to occur in a small number of natural products that also possess promising antibiotic activity. This review highlights the presence of enduracididine in natural products, its biosynthesis together with a review of analogues of enduracididine. Reported synthetic approaches to the cyclic guanidine structure of enduracididine are discussed, illustrating the challenges encountered to date in the development of efficient synthetic routes to facilitate drug discovery efforts inspired by the discovery of teixobactin. PMID:28144300

  16. Antibiotic resistance modulation by natural products obtained from Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky, 1855) and its nest

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Thiago P.; Clementino, Elaine L.C.; Felismino, Delcio C.; Alves, Rômulo R.N.; Vasconcellos, Alexandre; Coutinho, Henrique D.M.; Medeiros, Ana Cláudia D.

    2014-01-01

    Insects and their products are included in the traditional pharmacopoeia of various ethnic groups worldwide. In the Brazilian semiarid region can be highlighted the use of the termite Nasutitermes corniger for the treatment of various diseases. This study evaluated the ethanol extract of N. corniger and its nest as an antimicrobial agent and as a modulator of bacterial resistance against multidrug strains. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the extract on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by microdilution was determined, as well as MIC of antibiotics in the presence and absence of extract. Despite having no significant antimicrobial activity (MIC ⩾ 1000 μg mL−1), the extract showed additive activity to the antibiotic efficacy, significantly reducing its MIC. These results suggest that N. corniger and its nest are promising natural products for use in antimicrobial therapy. PMID:26150745

  17. Antibiotic resistance modulation by natural products obtained from Nasutitermes corniger (Motschulsky, 1855) and its nest.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Thiago P; Clementino, Elaine L C; Felismino, Delcio C; Alves, Rômulo R N; Vasconcellos, Alexandre; Coutinho, Henrique D M; Medeiros, Ana Cláudia D

    2015-07-01

    Insects and their products are included in the traditional pharmacopoeia of various ethnic groups worldwide. In the Brazilian semiarid region can be highlighted the use of the termite Nasutitermes corniger for the treatment of various diseases. This study evaluated the ethanol extract of N. corniger and its nest as an antimicrobial agent and as a modulator of bacterial resistance against multidrug strains. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of the extract on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by microdilution was determined, as well as MIC of antibiotics in the presence and absence of extract. Despite having no significant antimicrobial activity (MIC ⩾ 1000 μg mL(-1)), the extract showed additive activity to the antibiotic efficacy, significantly reducing its MIC. These results suggest that N. corniger and its nest are promising natural products for use in antimicrobial therapy.

  18. Impact of carboxymethylcellulose on morphology and antibiotic production by Streptomyces hygroscopicus.

    PubMed

    Ilić, Slavica B; Konstantinović, Sandra S; Veljković, Vlada B; Savić, Dragisa S; Lazić, Miodrag L; Gojgić-Cvijović, Gordana

    2008-07-01

    A chemically defined media consisting of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was developed to maximize the production of antibiotics, hexaene H-85 and azalomycine, by Streptomyces hygroscopicus CH-7. The production of antibiotics by filamentous organisms is often dependent on the morphology and size distribution of the pellet population within the culture. By adding the polymer to the fermentation medium, the growth was changed from a single large glob to small reproducible pellets, and wall growth was diminished to a minimum. Maximum concentrations of hexaene H-85 (146.7 mg/dm(3)) and azalomycine (188.6 mg/dm(3)) were reached at 3.0% and 1.0% (w/v) CMC, respectively.

  19. A comparison of antibiotic resistance integrons in cattle from separate beef meat production systems at slaughter.

    PubMed

    Barlow, R S; Fegan, N; Gobius, K S

    2008-03-01

    To compare antibiotic resistance integrons in cattle from three separate grass-fed, grain-fed and certified organic cattle production systems at slaughter. In this study 198 samples from three separate cattle production systems were tested by PCR for the presence of class 1 and class 2 integrons. Integron-containing bacteria were readily isolated from pen faeces and hide samples regardless of production system. Lower numbers of integron-containing bacteria were isolated from the remaining sample types. Ninety-one class 1 and 34 class 2 integron-containing bacteria were isolated. Characterization of the integrons demonstrated a high degree of similarity across the three production systems with aadA1 and aadA2 routinely present. Integrons harbouring the cassette array cmlA5-bla(OXA-10)-aadA1 and the putative insertion sequence IS1066 were isolated from organic and grass-fed cattle and have not been described previously. Integrons carrying antibiotic resistance genes were common in cattle from differing production systems at slaughter and the likelihood of presence appears unrelated to the production system. Similar integron arrays are present in different cattle production systems suggesting that their presence may be independent of production practices. This is the first report of two novel integron structures present in Aeromonas.

  20. Occurrence of antibiotics in soils and manures from greenhouse vegetable production bases of Beijing, China and an associated risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Chen, Jiayi; Wang, Jihua; Ma, Zhihong; Han, Ping; Luan, Yunxia; Lu, Anxiang

    2015-07-15

    The occurrence of 15 antibiotics in soil and manure samples from 11 large-scale greenhouse vegetable production (GVP) bases in Beijing, China was investigated. Results showed that the greenhouse soils were ubiquitously contaminated with antibiotics, and that antibiotic concentrations were significantly higher in greenhouses than in open field soils. The mean concentrations of four antibiotic classes decreased in the following order: tetracyclines (102μg/kg)>quinolones (86μg/kg)>sulfonamides (1.1μg/kg)>macrolides (0.62μg/kg). This investigation also indicated that fertilization with manure and especially animal feces might be the primary source of antibiotics. A risk assessment based on the calculated risk quotients (RQs) demonstrated that oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin could pose a high risk to soil organisms. These results suggested that the ecological effects of antibiotic contamination in GVP bases and their potential adverse risks on human health need to be given special attention.

  1. Antibiotic pollution in the Katari subcatchment of the Titicaca Lake: Major transformation products and occurrence of resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Archundia, D; Duwig, C; Lehembre, F; Chiron, S; Morel, M-C; Prado, B; Bourdat-Deschamps, M; Vince, E; Aviles, G Flores; Martins, J M F

    2017-01-15

    An increasing number of studies pointed out the ubiquitous presence of medical residues in surface and ground water as well as in soil compartments. Not only antibiotics can be found in the environment but also their transformation products about which little information is generally available. The development of bacterial resistance to antibiotics is particularly worrying as it can lead to sanitary and health problems. Studies about the dissemination of antibiotics and associated resistances in the Bolivian Altiplano are scarce. We provide baseline information on the occurrence of Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and Trimethoprim (TMP) antibiotics as well as on the most common human SMX transformation products (TP) and on the occurrence of sulfonamide resistance genes. The studied water and soil compartments presented high levels of antibiotic pollution. This situation was shown to be mainly linked with uncontrolled discharges of treated and untreated wastewaters, resulting on the presence of antibiotics in the Titicaca Lake. SMX TPs were detected in surface waters and on soil sampled next to the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). SMX resistance genes sulI and sulII were widely detected in the basin hydrological network, even in areas unpolluted with antibiotics. Mechanisms of co-selection of antibiotic- and metal- resistance may be involved in the prevalence of ARG's in pristine areas with no anthropogenic activity and free of antibiotic pollution.

  2. Comparative activities of daptomycin and several agents against staphylococcal blood isolates. Glycopeptide tolerance.

    PubMed

    Picazo, Juan J; Betriu, Carmen; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Culebras, Esther; López-Fabal, Fátima; Gómez, María

    2011-07-01

    The activity of daptomycin was evaluated against 702 staphylococcal blood isolates (316 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, 187 methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA], and 199 coagulase-negative staphylococci [CoNS]) collected in 41 Spanish hospitals. Glycopeptide tolerance and the incidence of heterogeneous glycopeptide-intermediate (hGISA) isolates were also examined. Vancomycin MICs determined by the Etest were compared with those obtained by the reference broth microdilution method. Daptomycin exhibited good activity, and only 2 isolates were nonsusceptible to this antibiotic. Resistance to linezolid was observed in 2 MRSA isolates and in 16 CoNS. The cfr gene was detected in 7 of these 18 isolates. Vancomycin and teicoplanin tolerance was 9.6% and 21.9%, respectively, in MRSA isolates. We detected the hGISA phenotype in 5.8% of MRSA isolates. Vancomycin MICs by the Etest were slightly higher than those obtained by broth microdilution. Daptomycin retained activity against isolates that were not susceptible to linezolid, teicoplanin, or quinupristin-dalfopristin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Glycopeptides versus β-lactams for the prevention of surgical site infections in cardiovascular and orthopedic surgery: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Anas; Khanna, Ashish; Chagin, Kevin M; Klika, Alison K; Johnston, Douglas; Barsoum, Wael K

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of glycopeptides and β-lactams in preventing surgical site infections (SSIs) in cardiac, vascular, and orthopedic surgery. The cost-effectiveness of switching from β-lactams to glycopeptides for preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis has been controversial. β-Lactams are generally recommended in clean surgical procedures, but they are ineffective against resistant gram-positive bacteria. PubMed, International Pharmaceuticals Abstracts, Scopus, and Cochrane were searched for randomized clinical trials comparing glycopeptides and β-lactams for prophylaxis in adults undergoing cardiac, vascular, or orthopedic surgery. Abstracts and conference proceedings were included. Two independent reviewers performed study selection, data extraction, and assessment of risk of bias. Fourteen studies with a total of 8952 patients were analyzed. No difference was detected in overall SSIs between antibiotic types. However, compared with β-lactams, glycopeptides reduced the risk of resistant staphylococcal SSIs by 48% (relative risk, 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.93; P = 0.03) and enterococcal SSIs by 64% (relative risk, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.80; P = 0.01), but increased respiratory tract infections by 54% (relative risk, 1.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-2.01; P ≤ 0.01). Subgroup analysis of cardiac procedures showed superiority of β-lactams in preventing superficial and deep chest SSIs, susceptible staphylococcal SSIs, and respiratory tract infections. Glycopeptides reduce the risk of resistant staphylococcal SSIs and enterococcal SSIs, but increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Additional high-quality randomized clinical trials are needed as these results are limited by high risk of bias.

  4. [Simultaneous determination of polyether antibiotics and macrolide anthelmintics in livestock products by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Mizuka; Kakimoto, Kensaku; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Obana, Hirotaka

    2011-01-01

    A method using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of polyether antibiotics and macrolide anthelmintics in livestock products. The polyether antibiotics and macrolide anthelmintics were extracted from livestock products with acetonitrile and cleaned up with dispersive solid-phase extractions and a silica gel column. The quantification limits of polyether antibiotics and macrolide anthelmintics were 0.00005-0.0005 µg/g. Except for narasin and lasalocid in bovine liver and milk, the recoveries were 70 to 117%. The relative standard deviations met the required guideline. The developed method was applied to six kinds of livestock products.

  5. The re-emerging role of microbial natural products in antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Genilloud, Olga

    2014-07-01

    New classes of antibacterial compounds are urgently needed to respond to the high frequency of occurrence of resistances to all major classes of known antibiotics. Microbial natural products have been for decades one of the most successful sources of drugs to treat infectious diseases but today, the emerging unmet clinical need poses completely new challenges to the discovery of novel candidates with the desired properties to be developed as antibiotics. While natural products discovery programs have been gradually abandoned by the big pharma, smaller biotechnology companies and research organizations are taking over the lead in the discovery of novel antibacterials. Recent years have seen new approaches and technologies being developed and integrated in a multidisciplinary effort to further exploit microbial resources and their biosynthetic potential as an untapped source of novel molecules. New strategies to isolate novel species thought to be uncultivable, and synthetic biology approaches ranging from genome mining of microbial strains for cryptic biosynthetic pathways to their heterologous expression have been emerging in combination with high throughput sequencing platforms, integrated bioinformatic analysis, and on-site analytical detection and dereplication tools for novel compounds. These different innovative approaches are defining a completely new framework that is setting the bases for the future discovery of novel chemical scaffolds that should foster a renewed interest in the identification of novel classes of natural product antibiotics from the microbial world.

  6. Marine bacteria: potential sources for compounds to overcome antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Eom, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Young-Mog; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2013-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most problematic Gram-positive bacterium in the context of public health due to its resistance against almost all available antibiotics except vancomycin and teicoplanin. Moreover, glycopeptide-resistant S. aureus have been emerging with the increasing use of glycopeptides. Recently, resistant strains against linezolid and daptomycin, which are alternative drugs to treat MRSA infection, have also been reported. Thus, the development of new drugs or alternative therapies is clearly a matter of urgency. In response to the antibiotic resistance, many researchers have studied for alternative antibiotics and therapies. In this review, anti-MRSA substances isolated from marine bacteria, with their potential antibacterial effect against MRSA as potential anti-MRSA agents, are discussed and several strategies for overcoming the antibiotic resistance are also introduced. Our objective was to highlight marine bacteria that have potential to lead in developing novel antibiotics or clinically useful alternative therapeutic treatments.

  7. Crystal Structures of Lipoglycopeptide Antibiotic Deacetylases: Implications for the Biosynthesis of A40926 and Teicoplanin

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yaozhong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Nair, Satish K.

    2008-07-08

    The lipoglycopeptide antibiotics teicoplanin and A40926 have proven efficacy against Gram-positive pathogens. These drugs are distinguished from glycopeptide antibiotics by N-linked long chain acyl-D-glucosamine decorations that contribute to antibacterial efficacy. During the biosynthesis of lipoglycopeptides, tailoring glycosyltransferases attach an N-acetyl-D-glucosamine to the aglycone, and this N-acetyl-glucosaminyl pseudoaglycone is deacetylated prior to long chain hydrocarbon attachment. Here we present several high-resolution crystal structures of the pseudoaglycone deacetylases from the biosynthetic pathways of teicoplanin and A40926. The cocrystal structure of the teicoplanin pseudoaglycone deacetylase with a fatty acid product provides further insights into the roles of active-site residues, and suggests mechanistic similarities with structurally distinct zinc deacetylases, such as peptidoglycan deacetylase and LpxC. A unique, structurally mobile capping lid, located at the apex of these pseudoaglycone deacetylases, likely serves as a determinant of substrate specificity.

  8. Different Dynamic Patterns of β-Lactams, Quinolones, Glycopeptides and Macrolides on Mouse Gut Microbial Diversity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; M, Prabhakar; Wang, Shan; Liao, Shuo-Xi; Peng, Xin; He, Yan; Chen, Yi-Ran; Shen, Hua-Fang; Su, Jin; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Guo-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The adverse impact of antibiotics on the gut microbiota has attracted extensive interest, particularly due to the development of microbiome research techniques in recent years. However, a direct comparison of the dynamic effects of various types of antibiotics using the same animal model has not been available. In the present study, we selected six antibiotics from four categories with the broadest clinical usage, namely, β-lactams (Ceftriaxone Sodium, Cefoperazone/Sulbactam and meropenem), quinolones (ofloxacin), glycopeptides (vancomycin), and macrolides (azithromycin), to treat BALB/c mice. Stool samples were collected during and after the administration of antibiotics, and microbial diversity was analyzed through Illumina sequencing and bioinformatics analyses using QIIME. Both α and β diversity analyses showed that ceftriaxone sodium, cefoperazone/sulbactam, meropenem and vancomycin changed the gut microbiota dramatically by the second day of antibiotic administration whereas the influence of ofloxacin was trivial. Azithromycin clearly changed the gut microbiota but much less than vancomycin and the β-lactams. In general, the community changes induced by the three β-lactam antibiotics showed consistency in inhibiting Papillibacter, Prevotella and Alistipes while inducing massive growth of Clostridium. The low diversity and high Clostridium level might be an important cause of Clostridium difficile infection after usage of β-lactams. Vancomycin was unique in that it inhibited Firmicutes, mainly the genus Clostridium. On the other hand, it induced the growth of Escherichia and effect lasted for months afterward. Azithromycin and meropenem induced the growth of Enterococcus. These findings will be useful for understanding the potential adverse effects of antibiotics on the gut microbiome and ensuring their better usage.

  9. Different Dynamic Patterns of β-Lactams, Quinolones, Glycopeptides and Macrolides on Mouse Gut Microbial Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Liao, Shuo-Xi; Peng, Xin; He, Yan; Chen, Yi-Ran; Shen, Hua-Fang; Su, Jin; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Guo-Xia; Zhou, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The adverse impact of antibiotics on the gut microbiota has attracted extensive interest, particularly due to the development of microbiome research techniques in recent years. However, a direct comparison of the dynamic effects of various types of antibiotics using the same animal model has not been available. In the present study, we selected six antibiotics from four categories with the broadest clinical usage, namely, β-lactams (Ceftriaxone Sodium, Cefoperazone/Sulbactam and meropenem), quinolones (ofloxacin), glycopeptides (vancomycin), and macrolides (azithromycin), to treat BALB/c mice. Stool samples were collected during and after the administration of antibiotics, and microbial diversity was analyzed through Illumina sequencing and bioinformatics analyses using QIIME. Both α and β diversity analyses showed that ceftriaxone sodium, cefoperazone/sulbactam, meropenem and vancomycin changed the gut microbiota dramatically by the second day of antibiotic administration whereas the influence of ofloxacin was trivial. Azithromycin clearly changed the gut microbiota but much less than vancomycin and the β-lactams. In general, the community changes induced by the three β-lactam antibiotics showed consistency in inhibiting Papillibacter, Prevotella and Alistipes while inducing massive growth of Clostridium. The low diversity and high Clostridium level might be an important cause of Clostridium difficile infection after usage of β-lactams. Vancomycin was unique in that it inhibited Firmicutes, mainly the genus Clostridium. On the other hand, it induced the growth of Escherichia and effect lasted for months afterward. Azithromycin and meropenem induced the growth of Enterococcus. These findings will be useful for understanding the potential adverse effects of antibiotics on the gut microbiome and ensuring their better usage. PMID:25970622

  10. Impact of antibiotic use in the swine industry.

    PubMed

    Barton, Mary D

    2014-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance in bacteria associated with pigs not only affects pig production but also has an impact on human health through the transfer of resistant organisms and associated genes via the food chain. This can compromise treatment of human infections. In the past most attention was paid to glycopeptide and streptogramin resistance in enterococci, fluoroquinolone resistance in campylobacter and multi-drug resistance in Escherichia coli and salmonella. While these are still important the focus has shifted to ESBL producing organisms selected by the use of ceftiofur and cefquinome in pigs. In addition Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) suddenly emerged in 2007. We also need to consider multi-resistant strains of Streptococcus suis. Environmental contamination arising from piggery wastewater and spreading of manure slurry on pastures is also a growing problem.

  11. Resolving Isomeric Glycopeptide Glycoforms with Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography (HILIC).

    PubMed

    Huang, Yining; Nie, Yongxin; Boyes, Barry; Orlando, Ron

    2016-09-01

    The ability to resolve glycans while attached to tryptic peptides would greatly facilitate glycoproteomics, as this would enable site-specific glycan characterization. Peptide/glycopeptide separations are typically performed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), where retention is driven by hydrophobic interaction. As the hydrophilic glycans do not interact significantly with the RPLC stationary phase, it is difficult to resolve glycopeptides that differ only in their glycan structure, even when these differences are large. Alternatively, glycans interact extensively with the stationary phases used in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), and consequently, differences in glycan structure have profound chromatographic shifts in this chromatographic mode. Here, we evaluate HILIC for the separation of isomeric glycopeptide mixtures that have the same peptide backbone but isomeric glycans. Hydrophilic functional groups on both the peptide and the glycan interact with the HILIC stationary phase, and thus, changes to either of these moieties can alter the chromatographic behavior of a glycopeptide. The interactive processes permit glycopeptides to be resolved from each other based on differences in their amino acid sequences and/or their attached glycans. The separations of glycans in HILIC are sufficient to permit resolution of isomeric N-glycan structures, such as sialylated N-glycan isomers differing in α2-3 and α2-6 linkages, while these glycans remain attached to peptides.

  12. Resolving Isomeric Glycopeptide Glycoforms with Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography (HILIC)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yining; Nie, Yongxin; Boyes, Barry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to resolve glycans while attached to tryptic peptides would greatly facilitate glycoproteomics, as this would enable site-specific glycan characterization. Peptide/glycopeptide separations are typically performed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC), where retention is driven by hydrophobic interaction. As the hydrophilic glycans do not interact significantly with the RPLC stationary phase, it is difficult to resolve glycopeptides that differ only in their glycan structure, even when these differences are large. Alternatively, glycans interact extensively with the stationary phases used in hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC), and consequently, differences in glycan structure have profound chromatographic shifts in this chromatographic mode. Here, we evaluate HILIC for the separation of isomeric glycopeptide mixtures that have the same peptide backbone but isomeric glycans. Hydrophilic functional groups on both the peptide and the glycan interact with the HILIC stationary phase, and thus, changes to either of these moieties can alter the chromatographic behavior of a glycopeptide. The interactive processes permit glycopeptides to be resolved from each other based on differences in their amino acid sequences and/or their attached glycans. The separations of glycans in HILIC are sufficient to permit resolution of isomeric N-glycan structures, such as sialylated N-glycan isomers differing in α2-3 and α2-6 linkages, while these glycans remain attached to peptides. PMID:27582638

  13. Isolation of glycopeptides with skin test activity from dermatophytes.

    PubMed Central

    Moser, S A; Pollack, J D

    1978-01-01

    By using ethylene glycol extraction of whole submerged cultures followed by Sephadex G-200 and diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex chromatography, we isolated four distinct glycopeptides from Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. rubrum, and Microsporum canis. Chemical analyses revealed that these glycopeptides contained mostly carbohydrate (42.5 to 81.6%) and protein (4.3 to 11.3%), with lesser amounts of phosphorus (0.4 to 6.0%) and hexosamines (0.3 to 0.6%). Based upon total carbohydrate and monosaccharide content, these dermatophyte glycopeptides could be divided into two chemical groups: glucopeptides (DSI1) and mannopeptides (DSI2, DSII1, and DSII2). The mannopeptides and glucopeptides of each species of dermatophyte were not significantly different chemically from those derived from the other two dermatophyte species studied. Skin testing of DSI1-glycopeptides or DSI2-mannopeptides in immunized guinea pigs indicated that only the DSI2-mannopeptides elicited a delayed hypersensitivity reaction. Skin testing T. mentagrophytes 62-infected guinea pigs with the four purified DS-glycopeptides, as well as earlier fractions from the purification scheme, derived from T. mentagrophytes, T. rubrum, and M. canis, again indicated that only the DSI2-mannopeptides of the two Trichophyton species elicited a delayed hypersensitivity reaction. The number of infections or duration of infection had no effect on the size of the skin test response. DSI2-mannopeptides were non-cross-reactive between genera when tested in Trichophyton-immunized or -infected guinea pigs and Microsporum-immunized guinea pigs. Images PMID:640721

  14. Glycopeptides as Analgesics: Non-Toxic Alternatives to Morphine for Combat Casualty Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-05

    in tests of antinociception after peripheral administration, which are more clinically relevant than the tail flick assay, (a) Mouse formalin paw test...glycopeptide 2, s.c. (b) Mouse abdominal constriction test, glycopeptide 2, s.c. (c) Mouse paw inflammation test with carrageenan, glycopeptide 2...i. paw . Injection of glycopeptide 2 into the contralateral injection had no antinociceptive effects, (d) Antinociceptive effects (mouse tail flick

  15. Lysine biosynthesis in microbes: relevance as drug target and prospects for β-lactam antibiotics production.

    PubMed

    Fazius, Felicitas; Zaehle, Christoph; Brock, Matthias

    2013-05-01

    Plants as well as pro- and eukaryotic microorganisms are able to synthesise lysine via de novo synthesis. While plants and bacteria, with some exceptions, rely on variations of the meso-diaminopimelate pathway for lysine biosynthesis, fungi exclusively use the α-aminoadipate pathway. Although bacteria and fungi are, in principle, both suitable as lysine producers, current industrial fermentations rely on the use of bacteria. In contrast, fungi are important producers of β-lactam antibiotics such as penicillins or cephalosporins. The synthesis of these antibiotics strictly depends on α-aminoadipate deriving from lysine biosynthesis. Interestingly, despite the resulting industrial importance of the fungal α-aminoadipate pathway, biochemical reactions leading to α-aminoadipate formation have only been studied on a limited number of fungal species. In this respect, just recently an essential isomerisation reaction required for the formation of α-aminoadipate has been elucidated in detail. This review summarises biochemical pathways leading to lysine production, discusses the suitability of interrupting lysine biosynthesis as target for new antibacterial and antifungal compounds and emphasises on biochemical reactions involved in the formation of α-aminoadipate in fungi as an essential intermediate for both, lysine and β-lactam antibiotics production.

  16. Macroalgal Endophytes from the Atlantic Coast of Canada: A Potential Source of Antibiotic Natural Products?

    PubMed Central

    Flewelling, Andrew J.; Ellsworth, Katelyn T.; Sanford, Joseph; Forward, Erica; Johnson, John A.; Gray, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    As the need for new and more effective antibiotics increases, untapped sources of biodiversity are being explored in an effort to provide lead structures for drug discovery. Endophytic fungi from marine macroalgae have been identified as a potential source of biologically active natural products, although data to support this is limited. To assess the antibiotic potential of temperate macroalgal endophytes we isolated endophytic fungi from algae collected in the Bay of Fundy, Canada and screened fungal extracts for the presence of antimicrobial compounds. A total of 79 endophytes were isolated from 7 species of red, 4 species of brown, and 3 species of green algae. Twenty of the endophytes were identified to the genus or species level, with the remaining isolates designated codes according to their morphology. Bioactivity screening assays performed on extracts of the fermentation broths and mycelia of the isolates revealed that 43 endophytes exhibited antibacterial activity, with 32 displaying antifungal activity. Endophytic fungi from Bay of Fundy macroalgae therefore represent a significant source of antibiotic natural products and warrant further detailed investigation. PMID:27694771

  17. Liofilchem(®) Chromatic VRE and vancomycin MIC Test Strip detected glycopeptide resistance in a vanB neonatal Enterococcus faecium isolate showing alternate vancomycin susceptibility and resistance with bioMérieux Vitek2.

    PubMed

    Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; D'Incecco, Carmine; Fazii, Paolo; Gherardi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A 1-month old neonate urine sample yielded vanB Enterococcus faecium; nevertheless, the isolate alternatively showed susceptibility and resistance to vancomycin with bioMérieux Vitek2 (cards AST592, AST632, AST586), while glycopeptide resistance was detected by Liofilchem(®) vancomycin MIC Test Strip and disc along with the Chromatic VRE chromogenic medium. This communication emphasizes that, as vanB gene may be heterogeneously expressed within a given Enterococcus population, glycopeptide resistance may be missed when using automated systems for antibiotic susceptibility testing. We suggest therefore that vancomycin in vitro activity be studied on all clinical isolates through agar methods, including use of chromogenic media.

  18. Games of life and death: antibiotic resistance and production through the lens of evolutionary game theory.

    PubMed

    Conlin, Peter L; Chandler, Josephine R; Kerr, Benjamin

    2014-10-01

    In this review, we demonstrate how game theory can be a useful first step in modeling and understanding interactions among bacteria that produce and resist antibiotics. We introduce the basic features of evolutionary game theory and explore model microbial systems that correspond to some classical games. Each game discussed defines a different category of social interaction with different resulting population dynamics (exclusion, coexistence, bistability, cycling). We then explore how the framework can be extended to incorporate some of the complexity of natural microbial communities. Overall, the game theoretical perspective helps to guide our expectations about the evolution of some forms of antibiotic resistance and production because it makes clear the precise nature of social interaction in this context.

  19. Effects of antibiotics on Shiga toxin 2 production and bacteriophage induction by epidemic Escherichia coli O104:H4 strain.

    PubMed

    Bielaszewska, Martina; Idelevich, Evgeny A; Zhang, Wenlan; Bauwens, Andreas; Schaumburg, Frieder; Mellmann, Alexander; Peters, Georg; Karch, Helge

    2012-06-01

    The role of antibiotics in treatment of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections is controversial because of concerns about triggering hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) by increasing Shiga toxin (Stx) production. During the recent large EHEC O104:H4 outbreak, antibiotic therapy was indicated for some patients. We tested a diverse panel of antibiotics to which the outbreak strain is susceptible to interrogate the effects of subinhibitory antibiotic concentrations on induction of stx(2)-harboring bacteriophages, stx(2) transcription, and Stx2 production in this emerging pathogen. Ciprofloxacin significantly increased stx(2)-harboring phage induction and Stx2 production in outbreak isolates (P values of <0.001 to <0.05), while fosfomycin, gentamicin, and kanamycin insignificantly influenced them (P > 0.1) and chloramphenicol, meropenem, azithromycin, rifaximin, and tigecycline significantly decreased them (P ≤ 0.05). Ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol significantly upregulated and downregulated stx(2) transcription, respectively (P < 0.01); the other antibiotics had insignificant effects (P > 0.1). Meropenem, azithromycin, and rifaximin, which were used for necessary therapeutic or prophylactic interventions during the EHEC O104:H4 outbreak, as well as tigecycline, neither induced stx(2)-harboring phages nor increased stx(2) transcription or Stx2 production in the outbreak strain. These antibiotics might represent therapeutic options for patients with EHEC O104:H4 infection if antibiotic treatment is inevitable. We await further analysis of the epidemic to determine if usage of these agents was associated with an altered risk of developing HUS.

  20. 60Co irradiation for sterilization of veterinary mastitis products containing antibiotics and steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, K.; Kane, M. P.; Rahn, P. D.; Steindler, K. A.

    Effects of 60Co irradiation for sterilization of veterinary mastitis products were evaluated. The mastitis products which were examined contained various combinations of antibiotics and steroids suspended in peanut oil vehicle. Bioburden data indicated that the unirradiated products were only occasionally contaminated with microorganisms. The D-values of the nonsterile product and environmental isolates were 0.028, 0.15, 0.017, and 0.018 Mrads for Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium oxalicum, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Pseudomonas maltophilia, respectively. The D-value of the biological indicator organism, Bacillus pumilus spores, in the vehicle was 0.27 Mrads. Thus, an irradiation dose of 1.6 Mrads would be sufficient to achieve six log cycles of destruction of the biological indicator organism. The minimum absorbed irradiation dose of 2.5 Mrads preferred by many countries for sterilization would achieve 9.3 log cycle destruction of the indicator organism and guarantee a probability of 1 × 10 -15 assurance for the most radio-resistant product isolate, Penicillium oxalicum. In order to examine short and long term chemical stabilities of active components, stability indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) methods for the determination of the following antibiotics and steroids were developed. They were: dihydrostreptomycin, neomycin, novobiocin, penicillin G, hydrocortisone acetate, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, and prednisolone. The rates of degradation and radiolytic degradation schemes for the majority of these compounds were elucidated. Formation of new compounds was not observed in these antibiotics and steroids upon 60Co irradiation. The compounds that increased by irradiation were inherently present in commercially available non-irradiated lots and/or can easily be formed by either acidic, basic, or thermal treatment.

  1. Comparative in vitro study of the antimicrobial activities of different commercial antibiotic products of vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the most critical problems about antimicrobial therapy is the increasing resistance to antibiotics. Previous studies have shown that there is a direct relation between erroneous prescription, dosage, route, duration of the therapy and the antibiotics resistance. Other important point is the uncertainty about the quality of the prescribed medicines. Some physicians believe that generic drugs are not as effective as innovator ones, so it is very important to have evidence that shows that all commercialized drugs are suitable for therapeutic use. Methods Microbial assays were used to establish the potency, the Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs), the Minimal Bactericidal Concentration (MBCs), the critical concentrations, and the production of spontaneous mutants that are resistant to vancomycin. Results The microbial assay was validated in order to determine the Vancomycin potency of the tasted samples. All the products showed that have potency values between 90 - 115% (USP requirement). The products behave similarly because the MICs, The MBCs, the critical concentrations, the critical concentrations ratios between standard and samples, and the production of spontaneous mutants don't have significant differences. Conclusions All products analyzed by microbiological tests, show that both trademarks and generics do not have statistical variability and the answer of antimicrobial activity Show also that they are pharmaceutical equivalents. PMID:21777438

  2. Significance of oxygen supply in production of a novel antibiotic by Pseudomonas sp. SJT25.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2011-10-01

    A new agricultural antibiotic, 2-heptyl-5-hexylfuran-3-carboxylic acid (HHCA), was recently discovered, but its further application was limited due to its low production titer. In shake flask fermentation, the effect of initial K(L)a within the range of 2.12-18.87 h⁻¹ on HHCA production was investigated. The cell growth and glycerol consumption were faster at a higher initial K(L)a value, but the maximum production (14.43 mg/L) was attained at an initial K(L)a value of 12.46 h⁻¹. The oxygen supply information was further applied to a 2-L bubble column bioreactor (BCB) by varying initial K(L)a from 1.45 to 30.18 h⁻¹, and the hyperproduction of HHCA was achieved at a relatively low initial K(L)a around 5-10 h⁻¹. The control of oxygen supply is considered to be an important strategy to enhance HHCA production, and the information obtained will be useful to production of this powerful new antibiotic on a large scale. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High-yield secretion of recombinant proteins expressed in tobacco cell culture with a designer glycopeptide tag: Process development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ningning; Gonzalez, Maria; Savary, Brett; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-03-01

    Low-yield protein production remains the most significant economic hurdle with plant cell culture technology. Fusions of recombinant proteins with hydroxyproline-O-glycosylated designer glycopeptide tags have consistently boosted secreted protein yields. This prompted us to study the process development of this technology aiming to achieve productivity levels necessary for commercial viability. We used a tobacco BY-2 cell culture expressing EGFP as fusion with a glycopeptide tag comprised of 32 repeat of "Ser-Pro" dipeptide, or (SP)32 , to study cell growth and protein secretion, culture scale-up, and establishment of perfusion cultures for continuous production. The BY-2 cells accumulated low levels of cell biomass (~7.5 g DW/L) in Schenk & Hildebrandt medium, but secreted high yields of (SP)32 -tagged EGFP (125 mg/L). Protein productivity of the cell culture has been stable for 6.0 years. The BY-2 cells cultured in a 5-L bioreactor similarly produced high secreted protein yield at 131 mg/L. Successful operation of a cell perfusion culture for 30 days was achieved under the perfusion rate of 0.25 and 0.5 day(-1) , generating a protein volumetric productivity of 17.6 and 28.9 mg/day/L, respectively. This research demonstrates the great potential of the designer glycopeptide technology for use in commercial production of valuable proteins with plant cell cultures. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Proliferation of antibiotic-producing bacteria and concomitant antibiotic production as the basis for the antibiotic activity of Jordan's red soils.

    PubMed

    Falkinham, Joseph O; Wall, Thomas E; Tanner, Justin R; Tawaha, Khaled; Alali, Feras Q; Li, Chen; Oberlies, Nicholas H

    2009-05-01

    Anecdotes, both historical and recent, recount the curing of skin infections, including diaper rash, by using red soils from the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. Following inoculation of red soils isolated from geographically separate areas of Jordan, Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus were rapidly killed. Over the 3-week incubation period, the number of specific types of antibiotic-producing bacteria increased, and high antimicrobial activity (MIC, approximately 10 microg/ml) was observed in methanol extracts of the inoculated red soils. Antibiotic-producing microorganisms whose numbers increased during incubation included actinomycetes, Lysobacter spp., and Bacillus spp. The actinomycetes produced actinomycin C(2) and actinomycin C(3). No myxobacteria or lytic bacteriophages with activity against either M. luteus or S. aureus were detected in either soil before or after inoculation and incubation. Although protozoa and amoebae were detected in the soils, the numbers were low and did not increase over the incubation period. These results suggest that the antibiotic activity of Jordan's red soils is due to the proliferation of antibiotic-producing bacteria.

  5. Proliferation of Antibiotic-Producing Bacteria and Concomitant Antibiotic Production as the Basis for the Antibiotic Activity of Jordan's Red Soils▿

    PubMed Central

    Falkinham, Joseph O.; Wall, Thomas E.; Tanner, Justin R.; Tawaha, Khaled; Alali, Feras Q.; Li, Chen; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2009-01-01

    Anecdotes, both historical and recent, recount the curing of skin infections, including diaper rash, by using red soils from the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. Following inoculation of red soils isolated from geographically separate areas of Jordan, Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus were rapidly killed. Over the 3-week incubation period, the number of specific types of antibiotic-producing bacteria increased, and high antimicrobial activity (MIC, ∼10 μg/ml) was observed in methanol extracts of the inoculated red soils. Antibiotic-producing microorganisms whose numbers increased during incubation included actinomycetes, Lysobacter spp., and Bacillus spp. The actinomycetes produced actinomycin C2 and actinomycin C3. No myxobacteria or lytic bacteriophages with activity against either M. luteus or S. aureus were detected in either soil before or after inoculation and incubation. Although protozoa and amoebae were detected in the soils, the numbers were low and did not increase over the incubation period. These results suggest that the antibiotic activity of Jordan's red soils is due to the proliferation of antibiotic-producing bacteria. PMID:19286796

  6. Structural analysis and immunostimulatory activity of glycopeptides from Paecilomyces sinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Meng, Meng; Sun, Huiqing; Li, Yang; Yu, Na; Zhang, Yong-Min

    2016-03-01

    The parasitic fungus, Paecilomyces sinensis, is used to produce Cordyceps materials as a succedaneum of natural Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) in China. In this work, a glycopeptide (CPS-II) was isolated and purified from Paecilomyces sinensis. The result of HPLC indicated that CPS-II was a glycopeptide. The estimated average molecular weight of CPS-II was 2 × 10(6) Da. FTIR, methylation, periodate oxidation, Smith degradation, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and CD were used for its structural analysis. The glycopeptide CPS-II was mainly composed of (1 → 3), (1 → 4) connected glucose and galactose as the backbone, there are (1 → 2,3,6) connected glucose, (1 → 3,6) connected mannose, and (1 → 6) connected galactose. Cell proliferation assay and morphological observations indicated that in a certain range of concentrations and time, CPS-II can significantly improve the proliferation activity of RAW264.7 cells.

  7. Glycan Side Reaction May Compromise ETD-Based Glycopeptide Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darula, Zsuzsanna; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.

    2014-06-01

    Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) is one of the most frequently used buffer ingredients. Among other things, it is recommended and is usually used for lectin-based affinity enrichment of glycopeptides. Here we report that sialic acid, a common `capping' unit in both N- and O-linked glycans may react with this chemical, and this side reaction may compromise glycopeptide identification when ETD spectra are the only MS/MS data used in the database search. We show that the modification may alter N- as well as O-linked glycans, the Tris-derivative is still prone to fragmentation both in `beam-type' CID (HCD) and ETD experiments, at the same time—since the acidic carboxyl group was `neutralized'—it will display a different retention time than its unmodified counterpart. We also suggest solutions that—when incorporated into existing search engines—may significantly improve the reliability of glycopeptide assignments.

  8. Prevalence and antibiotic resistance of Salmonella spp. in meat products, meat preparations and minced meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rašeta, M.; Mrdović, B.; Janković, V.; Bečkei, Z.; Lakićević, B.; Vidanović, D.; Polaček, V.

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to determine Salmonella spp. prevalence in meat products, meat preparations and minced meat. Over a period of three years, a total of 300 samples were taken (100 RTE meat products, 100 meat preparations and 100 minced meat) and examined for the presence of Salmonella spp. Sampling was carried out at the warehouses of the food manufacturers. Salmonella spp. were not detected in RTE meat products, while 7% of semi-finished meat products (fresh sausages, grill meat formed and unformed) contained Salmonella, as did 18% of minced meats (minced pork II category, minced beef II category, mixed minced meat). The 25 Salmonella isolates obtained were examined for antibiotic resistance by the disk diffusion test, according to the NCCLS and CLSI guidelines. Isolates showed resistance to ampicillin and nalidixic acid (80%), tetracycline (72%), cefotaxime/clavulanic acid (48%), but not to gentamicin (8%) or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (0%).

  9. Impact of Malic Enzymes on Antibiotic and Triacylglycerol Production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Navone, Laura; Casati, Paula; Gramajo, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we have characterized two malic enzymes (ME), SCO2951 and SCO5261, from Streptomyces coelicolor and analyzed their role in antibiotic and triacylglycerol (TAG) production. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that Sco2951 and Sco5261 genes encode NAD+- and NADP+-dependent malic enzymes, respectively. Single or double mutants in the ME-encoding genes show no effect on growth rate compared to the parental M145 strain. However, the single Sco2951 and the double Sco2951 Sco5261 mutants display a strong reduction in the production of the polyketide antibiotic actinorhodin; additionally, the Sco2951 Sco5261 mutant shows a decrease in stored TAGs during exponential growth. The lower production of actinorhodin in the double mutant occurs as a consequence of a decrease in the expression of actII-ORF4, the transcriptional activator of the actinorhodin gene cluster. On the other hand, the reduced TAG accumulation is not due to reduced transcript levels of fatty acid biosynthetic genes nor to changes in the amount of the precursor acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). This mutant accumulates intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle that could alter the regulation of the actinorhodin biosynthetic pathway, suggesting that MEs are important anaplerotic enzymes that redirect C4 intermediates from the TCA cycle to maintain secondary metabolism and TAG production in Streptomyces. PMID:22544242

  10. Reducing the variability of antibiotic production in Streptomyces by cultivation in 24-square deepwell plates.

    PubMed

    Siebenberg, Stefanie; Bapat, Prashant M; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Gust, Bertolt; Heide, Lutz

    2010-03-01

    Highly reproducible production values of the aminocoumarin antibiotic novobiocin were achieved by cultivation of a heterologous Streptomyces producer strain in commercially available square deepwell plates consisting of 24 wells of 3 ml culture volume each. Between parallel cultivation batches in the deepwell plates, novobiocin accumulation showed standard deviations of 4-9%, compared to 39% in baffled Erlenmeyer flasks. Mycelia used as inoculum could be frozen in the presence of 20% peptone and stored at -70 degrees C, allowing repeated cultivations from the same batch of inoculum over extended periods of time. Originally, novobiocin titers in the deepwell plate (5-12 mg l(-1)) were lower than in Erlenmeyer flasks (24 mg l(-1)). Optimization of the inoculation procedure as well as addition of a siloxylated ethylene oxide/propylene oxide copolymer, acting as oxygen carrier, to the production medium increased novobiocin production to 54 mg l(-1). The additional overexpression of the pathway-specific positive regulator gene novG increased novobiocin production to 163 mg l(-1). Harvesting the precultures in a defined section of growth phase greatly reduced variability between different batches of inoculum. The use of deepwell plates may considerably reduce the workload and cost of investigations of antibiotic biosynthesis in streptomycetes and other microorganisms due to the high reproducibility and the low requirement for shaker space and culture medium. Copyright 2009 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Production of novel antibiotics zeamines through optimizing Dickeya zeae fermentation conditions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lisheng; Cheng, Yingying; Liu, Shiyin; Zhou, Jianuan; An, Shuwen; Lv, Mingfa; Chen, Yufan; Gu, Yanfang; Chen, Shaohua; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Dickeya zeae strain EC1 was recently shown to produce a new type of phytotoxins designated as zeamine and zeamine II, which are potent wide-spectrum antibiotics against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, suggesting their promising potential as clinical medicines. In this study, the optimized medium composition and culture conditions for biosynthesis of novel antibiotics zeamines have been established by using response surface methodology, largely increasing the yield of zeamines from original about 7.35 µg · mL(-1) in minimal medium to about 150 µg · mL(-1) in LS5 medium. The study identified the major factors contributing to zeamines production, which include nitrate, sucrose, asparaginate, mineral elements Mg2+ and K+, and optimized amount of phosphate. In addition, the results showed that overexpression of zmsK in D. zeae strain EC1 could further increase zeamines yield to about 180 µg · mL(-1) in LS5 medium. The findings from this study could facilitate further characterization and utilization of these two novel antibiotics, and also provide useful clues for understanding the regulatory mechanisms that govern D. zeae virulence.

  12. Production of Novel Antibiotics Zeamines through Optimizing Dickeya zeae Fermentation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Lisheng; Cheng, Yingying; Liu, Shiyin; Zhou, Jianuan; An, Shuwen; Lv, Mingfa; Chen, Yufan; Gu, Yanfang; Chen, Shaohua; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Dickeya zeae strain EC1 was recently shown to produce a new type of phytotoxins designated as zeamine and zeamine II, which are potent wide-spectrum antibiotics against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens, suggesting their promising potential as clinical medicines. In this study, the optimized medium composition and culture conditions for biosynthesis of novel antibiotics zeamines have been established by using response surface methodology, largely increasing the yield of zeamines from original about 7.35 µg·mL−1 in minimal medium to about 150 µg·mL−1 in LS5 medium. The study identified the major factors contributing to zeamines production, which include nitrate, sucrose, asparaginate, mineral elements Mg2+ and K+, and optimized amount of phosphate. In addition, the results showed that overexpression of zmsK in D. zeae strain EC1 could further increase zeamines yield to about 180 µg·mL−1 in LS5 medium. The findings from this study could facilitate further characterization and utilization of these two novel antibiotics, and also provide useful clues for understanding the regulatory mechanisms that govern D. zeae virulence. PMID:25541733

  13. Detection of biofilm production and antibiotic resistance pattern in clinical isolates from indwelling medical devices.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Shyam Kumar; Basukala, Prashant; Basukala, Om; Parajuli, Keshab; Pokhrel, Bharat Mani; Rijal, Basista Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilms pose great threat for patients requiring indwelling medical devices (IMDs) as it is difficult to remove them. It is, therefore, crucial to follow an appropriate method for the detection of biofilms. The present study focuses on detection of biofilm formation among the isolates from IMDs. We also aimed to explore the antibiogram of biofilm producers. This prospective analysis included 65 prosthetic samples. After isolation and identification of bacteria following standard methodology, antibiogram of the isolates were produced following Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method. Detection of biofilms was done by tube adherence (TA), Congo red agar and tissue culture plate (TCP) methods. Out of 67 clinical isolates from IMDs, TCP detected 31 (46.3 %) biofilm producers and 36 (53.7 %) biofilm non-producers. Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cepacia complex were found to be the most frequent biofilm producers. The TA method correlated well with the TCP method for biofilm detection. Higher antibiotic resistance was observed in biofilm producers than in biofilm non-producers. The most effective antibiotics for biofilm producing Gram-positive isolates were Vancomycin and Tigecycline, and that for biofilm producing Gram-negative isolates were Polymyxin-B, Colistin Sulphate and Tigecycline. Nearly 46 % of the isolates were found to be biofilm producers. The antibiotic susceptibility pattern in the present study showed Amoxicillin to be an ineffective drug for isolates from the IMDs. For the detection of biofilm production, TA method can be an economical and effective alternative to TCP method.

  14. Chiral Recognition with Macrocyclic Glycopeptides: Mechanisms and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthod, Alain; Qiu, Hai Xiao; Staroverov, Sergey M.; Kuznestov, Mikhail A.; Armstrong, Daniel W.

    The macrocyclic glycopeptide chiral selectors are natural molecules produced by bacterial fermentation. Purified and bonded to silica particles, they make very useful chiral stationary phases (CSP) with a broad spectrum of applicability in enantiomeric separation. The macrocyclic glycopeptide CSPs are multimodal, the same column being able to work in normal phase mode with apolar mobile phase, in reversed-phase mode, or in polar ionic mode with 100% alcoholic mobile phase of adjusted pH. The role of the carbohydrate units is described as well as the critical charge-charge docking interaction responsible for the amino acid enantiomer recognition. The complimentary phenomenon is also exposed.

  15. Degradation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics by ferrate(VI): Effects of water constituents and oxidized products.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingbao; Wang, Xinghao; Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Sui, Yunxia; Cizmas, Leslie; Wang, Zunyao; Sharma, Virender K

    2016-10-15

    The degradation of five fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics (flumequine (FLU), enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL) and marbofloxacin (MAR)) by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)) was examined to demonstrate the potential of this iron-based chemical oxidant to treat antibiotics in water. Experiments were conducted at different molar ratios of Fe(VI) to FQs at pH 7.0. All FQs, except FLU, were degraded within 2 min at [Fe(VI)]:[FQ] ≤ 20.0. Multiple additions of Fe(VI) improved the degradation efficiency, and provided greater degradation than a single addition of Fe(VI). The effects of anions, cations, and humic acid (HA), usually present in source waters and wastewaters, on the removal of FLU were investigated. Anions (Cl(-), SO4(2-), NO3(-), and HCO3(-)) and monovalent cations (Na(+) and K(+)) had no influence on the removal of FLU. However, multivalent cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+)) in water decreased the efficiency of FLU removal by Fe(VI). An increase in the ionic strength of the solution, and the presence of HA in the water, also decreased the percentage of FLU removed by Fe(VI). Experiments on the removal of selected FQs, present as co-existing antibiotics in pure water, river water, synthetic water and wastewater, were also conducted to demonstrate the practical application of Fe(VI) to remove the antibiotics during water treatment. The seventeen oxidized products (OPs) of FLU were identified using solid phase extraction-liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. The reaction pathways are proposed, and are theoretically confirmed by molecular orbital calculations.

  16. Production of fungal antibiotics using polymeric solid supports in solid-state and liquid fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bigelis, Ramunas; He, Haiyin; Yang, Hui Y; Chang, Li-Ping; Greenstein, Michael

    2006-10-01

    The use of inert absorbent polymeric supports for cellular attachment in solid-state fungal fermentation influenced growth, morphology, and production of bioactive secondary metabolites. Two filamentous fungi exemplified the utility of this approach to facilitate the discovery of new antimicrobial compounds. Cylindrocarpon sp. LL-Cyan426 produced pyrrocidines A and B and Acremonium sp. LL-Cyan416 produced acremonidins A-E when grown on agar bearing moist polyester-cellulose paper and generated distinctly different metabolite profiles than the conventional shaken or stationary liquid fermentations. Differences were also apparent when tenfold concentrated methanol extracts from these fermentations were tested against antibiotic-susceptible and antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and zones of inhibition were compared. Shaken broth cultures of Acremonium sp. or Cylindrocarpon sp. showed complex HPLC patterns, lower levels of target compounds, and high levels of unwanted compounds and medium components, while agar/solid support cultures showed significantly increased yields of pyrrocidines A and B and acremonidins A-E, respectively. This method, mixed-phase fermentation (fermentation with an inert solid support bearing liquid medium), exploited the increase in surface area available for fungal growth on the supports and the tendency of some microorganisms to adhere to solid surfaces, possibly mimicking their natural growth habits. The production of dimeric anthraquinones by Penicillium sp. LL-WF159 was investigated in liquid fermentation using various inert polymeric immobilization supports composed of polypropylene, polypropylene cellulose, polyester-cellulose, or polyurethane. This culture produced rugulosin, skyrin, flavomannin, and a new bisanthracene, WF159-A, after fermentation in the presence and absence of polymeric supports for mycelial attachment. The physical nature of the different support systems influenced culture morphology and relative

  17. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria associated with retail aquaculture products from Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Lu, Zhang; Li, Xinhui; Shi, Lei; Huang, Ying; Wang, Hua H

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant (ART) bacteria and representative antibiotic resistance (AR)-encoding genes associated with several aquaculture products from retail markets in Guangzhou, China. ART commensal bacteria were found in 100% of the products examined. Among 505 multidrug-resistant isolates examined, close to one-fourth contained intI and sul1 genes: 15% contained sul2 and 5% contained tet (E). Incidences of β-lactamase-encoding genes bla(TEM), bla(CMY) and erythromycin resistance determinants ermB and ermC were 4.5, 1.7, 1.3, and 0.3%, respectively. Most of the ART isolates identified from the rinse water were Aeromonas spp.; those from intestines belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae. Plasmid-associated intI and AR-encoding genes were identified in several ART isolates by Southern hybridization. Three multidrug resistance-encoding plasmids were transferred into Escherichia coli DH5 a by chemical transformation and led to acquired AR in the transformants. In addition, the AR traits in many isolates were quite stable, even in the absence of selective pressure. Further studies are needed to reveal risk factors associated with the aquaculture production chain for targeted AR mitigation.

  18. [Simultaneous determination of six antibiotics in disinfection products by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Fu, Hui; Hu, Xiaojian; Ding, Changming; Lin, Shaobin

    2012-03-01

    To develop a method for determination of the Metronidazole, Chlortetracycline hydrochloride, Oxytetracycline dihydrate, Minocycline hydrochloride, Erythromycin and Tetracycline hydrochloride in disinfection products by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry(LC-MS/MS). Samples were extracted by methanol and filtered through 0.45 microm PTFE membrane filter, then analyzed by LC-MS/MS using Waters Symmetry C18 (2.1 mm x 150 mm, 3.5 microm) column in positive ion scan mode. The mobile phase was 5 mmol/L ammonium acetate, methanol and acetonitrile. The linear range was 0-2000 ng/ml and the correlation coefficients were more than 0.998, the average recoveries ranged from 74.7% to 114% with the relative standard deviations between 1.6%-20.2%. The method was successfully used to detect the content of antibiotics in 115 disinfection products. The method is simple, sensitive, selective and suitable for the analysis of residual content of antibiotics in cream formulations of disinfection products.

  19. Identification and antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates from probiotic products available in Italy.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Ilaria; Speciale, Annamaria; Musumeci, Rosario; Fazio, Davide; Blandino, Giovanna

    2006-10-01

    This study was carried out to assay the bacterial viability and the probable contamination of a range of probiotic products available in Italy and to test the susceptibility of the isolates. Eleven dried food supplements and five fermented functional foods were examined using different isolation media under standardized cultivation conditions. The identification was made by conventional phenotypic characteristics and biochemical tests. Among isolates from the probiotic products antibiotic susceptibility was detected using the E-test (ABBiodisk). Our results demonstrate that nine food supplements and two fermented foods claimed species which could not be isolated, whereas potential pathogens (i.e. Micromonas micros) were isolated. Lactobacilli displayed species-dependent antibiotic resistance. Atypical resistance occurred for penicillin in Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus and for erythromycin in Lactobacillus lactis and Lactobacillus salivarius. A broad range of MICs was observed for cephalosporins and fluroquinolones. Aminoglycosides had poor activity against Lactobacillus isolates. Two of the four isolates of Bifidobacterium exhibited high resistance to trimethroprim/sulfametoxazole and to fluoroquinolones. Our results suggest that some probiotic products claim species that cannot always be isolated, and are sometimes contaminated by potential pathogens. Moreover, the probable transferable erythromycin or penicillin resistance among the lactobacilli isolated should be taken into account.

  20. Classification of Tandem Mass Spectra for Identification of N- and O-linked Glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Yang, Weiming; Hu, Yingwei; Shah, Punit; Sun, Shisheng; Li, Xingde; Zhang, Hui

    2016-11-01

    Analysis of intact glycopeptides by mass spectrometry is essential to determining the microheterogeneity of protein glycosylation. Higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation of glycopeptides generates mono- or disaccharide ions called oxonium ions that carry information about the structure of the fragmented glycans. Here, we investigated the link between glycan structures and the intensity of oxonium ions in the spectra of glycopeptides and utilized this information to improve the identification of glycopeptides in biological samples. Tandem spectra of glycopeptides from fetuin, glycophorin A, ovalbumin and gp120 tryptic digests were used to build a spectral database of N- and O-linked glycopeptides. Logistic regression was applied to this database to develop model to distinguish between the spectra of N- and O-linked glycopeptides. Remarkably, the developed model was found to reliably distinguish between the N- and O-linked glycopeptides using the spectral features of the oxonium ions using verification spectral set. Finally, the performance of the developed predictive model was evaluated in HILIC enriched glycopeptides extracted from human serum. The results showed that pre-classification of tandem spectra based on their glycosylation type improved the identification of N-linked glycopeptides. The developed model facilitates interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry data for assignment of glycopeptides.

  1. Classification of Tandem Mass Spectra for Identification of N- and O-linked Glycopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Yang, Weiming; Hu, Yingwei; Shah, Punit; Sun, Shisheng; Li, Xingde; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of intact glycopeptides by mass spectrometry is essential to determining the microheterogeneity of protein glycosylation. Higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation of glycopeptides generates mono- or disaccharide ions called oxonium ions that carry information about the structure of the fragmented glycans. Here, we investigated the link between glycan structures and the intensity of oxonium ions in the spectra of glycopeptides and utilized this information to improve the identification of glycopeptides in biological samples. Tandem spectra of glycopeptides from fetuin, glycophorin A, ovalbumin and gp120 tryptic digests were used to build a spectral database of N- and O-linked glycopeptides. Logistic regression was applied to this database to develop model to distinguish between the spectra of N- and O-linked glycopeptides. Remarkably, the developed model was found to reliably distinguish between the N- and O-linked glycopeptides using the spectral features of the oxonium ions using verification spectral set. Finally, the performance of the developed predictive model was evaluated in HILIC enriched glycopeptides extracted from human serum. The results showed that pre-classification of tandem spectra based on their glycosylation type improved the identification of N-linked glycopeptides. The developed model facilitates interpretation of tandem mass spectrometry data for assignment of glycopeptides. PMID:27869200

  2. Biotechnological production and application of the antibiotic pimaricin: biosynthesis and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Jesús F; Barreales, Eva G; Payero, Tamara D; Vicente, Cláudia M; de Pedro, Antonio; Santos-Aberturas, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Pimaricin (natamycin) is a small polyene macrolide antibiotic used worldwide. This efficient antimycotic and antiprotozoal agent, produced by several soil bacterial species of the genus Streptomyces, has found application in human therapy, in the food and beverage industries and as pesticide. It displays a broad spectrum of activity, targeting ergosterol but bearing a particular mode of action different to other polyene macrolides. The biosynthesis of this only antifungal agent with a GRAS status has been thoroughly studied, which has permitted the manipulation of producers to engineer the biosynthetic gene clusters in order to generate several analogues. Regulation of its production has been largely unveiled, constituting a model for other polyenes and setting the leads for optimizing the production of these valuable compounds. This review describes and discusses the molecular genetics, uses, mode of action, analogue generation, regulation and strategies for increasing pimaricin production yields.

  3. Use of Staby(®) technology for development and production of DNA vaccines free of antibiotic resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Reschner, Anca; Scohy, Sophie; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Daukandt, Marc; Jacques, Céline; Michel, Benjamin; Nauwynck, Hans; Xhonneux, Florence; Préat, Véronique; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Szpirer, Cédric

    2013-10-01

    The appearance of new viruses and the cost of developing certain vaccines require that new vaccination strategies now have to be developed. DNA vaccination seems to be a particularly promising method. For this application, plasmid DNA is injected into the subject (man or animal). This plasmid DNA encodes an antigen that will be expressed by the cells of the subject. In addition to the antigen, the plasmid also encodes a resistance to an antibiotic, which is used during the construction and production steps of the plasmid. However, regulatory agencies (FDA, USDA and EMA) recommend to avoid the use of antibiotics resistance genes. Delphi Genetics developed the Staby(®) technology to replace the antibiotic-resistance gene by a selection system that relies on two bacterial genes. These genes are small in size (approximately 200 to 300 bases each) and consequently encode two small proteins. They are naturally present in the genomes of bacteria and on plasmids. The technology is already used successfully for production of recombinant proteins to achieve higher yields and without the need of antibiotics. In the field of DNA vaccines, we have now the first data validating the innocuousness of this Staby(®) technology for eukaryotic cells and the feasibility of an industrial production of an antibiotic-free DNA vaccine. Moreover, as a proof of concept, mice have been successfully vaccinated with our antibiotic-free DNA vaccine against a deadly disease, pseudorabies (induced by Suid herpesvirus-1).

  4. Complex marine natural products as potential epigenetic and production regulators of antibiotics from a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Waters, Amanda L.; Sims, James W.; Fullmer, Alexis; Ellison, Serena; Hamann, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Marine microbes are capable of producing secondary metabolites for defense and competition. Factors exerting an impact on secondary metabolite production of microbial communities included bioactive natural products and co-culturing. These external influences may have practical applications such as increased yields or the generation of new metabolites from otherwise silent genes in addition to reducing or limiting the production of undesirable metabolites. In this paper, we discuss the metabolic profiles of a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of a number of potential chemical epigenetic regulators, adjusting carbon sources and co-culturing with other microbes to induce a competitive response. As a result of these stressors certain groups of antibiotics or antimalarial agents were increased most notably when treating P. aeruginosa with sceptrin and co-culturing with another Pseudomonas sp. An interesting cross-talking event between these two Pseudomonas species when cultured together and exposed to sceptrin was observed. PMID:23563743

  5. Complex marine natural products as potential epigenetic and production regulators of antibiotics from a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Waters, Amanda L; Sims, James W; Fullmer, Alexis; Ellison, Serena; Hamann, Mark T

    2013-05-01

    Marine microbes are capable of producing secondary metabolites for defense and competition. Factors exerting an impact on secondary metabolite production of microbial communities included bioactive natural products and co-culturing. These external influences may have practical applications such as increased yields or the generation of new metabolites from otherwise silent genes in addition to reducing or limiting the production of undesirable metabolites. In this paper, we discuss the metabolic profiles of a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of a number of potential chemical epigenetic regulators, adjusting carbon sources and co-culturing with other microbes to induce a competitive response. As a result of these stressors certain groups of antibiotics or antimalarial agents were increased most notably when treating P. aeruginosa with sceptrin and co-culturing with another Pseudomonas sp. An interesting cross-talking event between these two Pseudomonas species when cultured together and exposed to sceptrin was observed.

  6. Low LC-MS/MS detection of glycopeptides released from pmol levels of recombinant erythropoietin using nanoflow HPLC-chip electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Groleau, Paule Emilie; Desharnais, Philippe; Coté, Linda; Ayotte, Christiane

    2008-07-01

    The test used by anti-doping laboratories to detect the misuse of recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO) is based on its different migration pattern on isoelectric focusing (IEF) gel compared with the endogenous human erythropoietin (hEPO) that can possibly be explained by structural differences. While there is definitely a need to identify those differences by LC-MS/MS, the extensive characterization that was achieved for the rhEPO was never performed on human endogenous EPO because its standard is not available in sufficient amount. The goal of this study was to develop an analytical method to detect pmol amounts of N-linked and O-linked glycopeptides of the recombinant hormone as a model. Using a nanoflow HPLC-Chip electrospray ionization/ion trap mass spectrometer, the diagnostic ion at m/z 366 of oligosaccharides was monitored in the product ion spectra to identify the four theoretical glycosylation sites, Asn24, Asn38, Asn83 and Ser126, respectively, on glycopeptides 22-37, 38-55, 73-96 and 118-136. With 3 pmol of starting material applied on Chip, only the desialylated N-glycopeptides 22-37 and 38-55/38-43 could be observed, and of all the glycan isoforms, those with the smaller structures were predominantly detected. While the preservation of the sialic acid moieties decreased the detection of all the N-glycopeptides, it allowed a more extensive characterization of the O-linked glycopeptide 118-136. The technique described herein provides a mean to detect glycopeptides from commercially available pharmaceutical preparations of rhEPO with the sensitivity required to analyze pmol amounts of hEPO, which could ultimately lead to the identification of structural differences between the recombinant and the human forms of the hormone.

  7. Chemoreactive Natural Products that Afford Resistance Against Disparate Antibiotics and Toxins.

    PubMed

    Du, Lin; You, Jianlan; Nicholas, Kenneth M; Cichewicz, Robert H

    2016-03-18

    Microorganisms use chemical inactivation strategies to circumvent toxicity caused by many types of antibiotics. Yet in all reported cases, this approach is limited to enzymatically facilitated mechanisms that each target narrow ranges of chemically related scaffolds. The fungus-derived shikimate analogues, pericoxide and pericosine A, were identified as chemoreactive natural products that attenuate the antagonistic effects of several synthetic and naturally derived antifungal agents. Experimental and computational studies suggest that pericoxide and pericosine A readily react via SN 2' mechanisms against a variety of nucleophilic substances under both in vitro aqueous and in situ co-culture conditions. Many of the substitution products from this reaction were highly stable and exhibited diminished toxicities against environmental fungal isolates, including the Tolypocladium sp. strain that produced pericoxide and pericosine A. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Enantioselective high-performance liquid chromatographic separation of N-methyloxycarbonyl unsaturated amino acids on macrocyclic glycopeptide stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Boesten, J M M; Berkheij, M; Schoemaker, H E; Hiemstra, H; Duchateau, A L L

    2006-03-03

    This paper describes the enantiomeric resolution of a series of unsaturated N-methyloxycarbonyl-alpha-H-alpha-amino acids (N-MOC-alpha-amino acids) on macrocyclic glycopeptide stationary phases by means of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Three types of glycopeptide phases, i.e. Chirobiotic T, V and R, were evaluated in both reversed-phase (RP) and polar ionic mode (PIM). The best results in terms of enantioselectivity and resolution were obtained on Chirobiotic R phase, with the PIM mobile phase giving the highest resolution per min. Investigation of the pH of the reversed-phase mobile phase in the pH range 4.1-5.9 showed little effect on enantioselectivity. The method was applied for monitoring the conversion and product enantiomeric excess of an enzymatic hydrolysis reaction using N-MOC-alpha-H-alpha-amino acid esters as substrate.

  9. Susceptibility of Glycopeptide-Resistant Enterococci to Linezolid, Quinupristin/dalfopristin, Tigecycline and Daptomycin in a Tertiary Greek Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dimopoulou, Dimitra; Mantadakis, Elpis

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the antibiotic susceptibility of glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE). Seventy consecutive GRE were tested. Sixty-two isolates were identified as Enterococcus faecium (88.6%), and 8 (11.4%) as Enterococcus faecalis. All strains were susceptible to linezolid and daptomycin, while 17.1% (12/70) and 11.4% (8/70) were resistant to quinupristin/dalfopristin (QD) and tigecycline, respectively. All E. faecalis isolates were resistant to QD, while 4 of 62 (6.5%) E. faecium isolates were resistant to QD. All E. faecalis isolates were susceptible to tigecycline, while 14.5% (9/62) E. faecium isolates were resistant. Continued surveillance of GRE antibiotic susceptibilities is important for combating these multi-resistant nosocomial pathogens. PMID:25566405

  10. Effect of antibiotics on group A Streptococcus exoprotein production analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Megumi; Hasegawa, Tadao; Okamoto, Akira; Torii, Keizo; Ohta, Michio

    2005-01-01

    High-dose clindamycin (CLDM) and benzylpenicillin (PCG) are the recommended chemotherapeutic remedies for toxic shock-like syndrome caused by group A streptococci. One reason for this is that it has been shown that CLDM suppresses the expression of some exoproteins, e.g., SpeB, SpeA, and streptolysin O (Slo). We analyzed the effects of antibiotics on the production of whole exoproteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Unexpectedly, we found that the levels of several exoproteins, Slo, NAD(+)-glycohydrolase (Nga), M protein, and Sic, were increased by CLDM treatment, although we also confirmed previous findings that the levels of various exoproteins, including SpeB, were decreased. The increases in exoprotein levels were also detected by using other protein synthesis inhibitor antibiotics: erythromycin, kanamycin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and linezolid. Peptidoglycan synthesis inhibitors (such as PCG, cefazolin, and imipenem), DNA replication inhibitors (such as gatifloxacin), and an RNA polymerase inhibitor (rifampin) did not have significant effects on exoprotein production. The combination of CLDM and PCG had no advantageous effects with regard to exoprotein production compared to the effect achieved with CLDM alone. We also analyzed the transcriptional levels of slo and nga by reverse transcription-PCR and found that this change was also detected at the transcriptional level. Furthermore, the phenomenon was seen not only in strains of the M1 serotype but also in strains of the other M serotypes. Our study suggests that the clinical effectiveness of CLDM might be due to the inhibition of the production of a limited number of exoproteins.

  11. Biofilm formation and lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A production in different peptone media.

    PubMed

    Zohora, Umme Salma; Rahman, Mohammad Shahedur; Ano, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Biofilm fermentation is a newly developed promising technique in fermentation technology. In this study no.3 and no.3S media have been used for the lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A production by Bacillus subtilis RB14. The main component of no.3 and no.3S media is Polypepton and Polypepton S, respectively. B. subtilis RB14 produces thick stable biofilm and high amount of iturin A in no.3S medium. Whereas, impaired biofilm formation and lower iturin A production was observed in no.3 medium. From the analytical information it was observed that the amounts of metal ions, such as K(+), Ca(2+) and Mn(2+), cysteine and cellulose are lower in Polypepton compared to the Polypepton S. To investigate their effect on biofilm formation and iturin A production cysteine, cellulose, K(+), Ca(2+) and Mn(2+) were added respectively into the no.3 medium at similar amount that Polypepton S contains. It was observed that individual addition of K(+), Ca(2+), cysteine and cellulose had no effect on biofilm formation, cellular growth induction or iturin A production. However, when Mn(2+) was supplemented in no.3 medium, biofilm development was restored with an improved production of iturin A. Finally, combined addition of investigated substances into the no.3 medium resulted with highly folded, thick biofilm with high cellular growth and iturin A production compared to the original no.3 medium.

  12. A probabilistic approach to assess antibiotic resistance development risks in environmental compartments and its application to an intensive aquaculture production scenario.

    PubMed

    Rico, Andreu; Jacobs, Rianne; Van den Brink, Paul J; Tello, Alfredo

    2017-09-05

    Estimating antibiotic pollution and antibiotic resistance development risks in environmental compartments is important to design management strategies that advance our stewardship of antibiotics. In this study we propose a modelling approach to estimate the risk of antibiotic resistance development in environmental compartments and demonstrate its application in aquaculture production systems. We modelled exposure concentrations for 12 antibiotics used in Vietnamese Pangasius catfish production using the ERA-AQUA model. Minimum selective concentration (MSC) distributions that characterize the selective pressure of antibiotics on bacterial communities were derived from the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) Minimum Inhibitory Concentration dataset. The antibiotic resistance development risk (RDR) for each antibiotic was calculated as the probability that the antibiotic exposure distribution exceeds the MSC distribution representing the bacterial community. RDRs in pond sediments were nearly 100% for all antibiotics. Median RDR values in pond water were high for the majority of the antibiotics, with rifampicin, levofloxacin and ampicillin having highest values. In the effluent mixing area, RDRs were low for most antibiotics, with the exception of amoxicillin, ampicillin and trimethoprim, which presented moderate risks, and rifampicin and levofloxacin, which presented high risks. The RDR provides an efficient means to benchmark multiple antibiotics and treatment regimes in the initial phase of a risk assessment with regards to their potential to develop resistance in different environmental compartments, and can be used to derive resistance threshold concentrations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Limited Bacterial Diversity within a Treatment Plant Receiving Antibiotic-Containing Waste from Bulk Drug Production.

    PubMed

    Marathe, Nachiket P; Shetty, Sudarshan A; Shouche, Yogesh S; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Biological treatment of waste water from bulk drug production, contaminated with high levels of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, can lead to massive enrichment of antibiotic resistant bacteria, resistance genes and associated mobile elements, as previously shown. Such strong selection may be boosted by the use of activated sludge (AS) technology, where microbes that are able to thrive on the chemicals within the wastewater are reintroduced at an earlier stage of the process to further enhance degradation of incoming chemicals. The microbial community structure within such a treatment plant is, however, largely unclear. In this study, Illumina-based 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was applied to investigate the bacterial communities of different stages from an Indian treatment plant operated by Patancheru Environment Technology Limited (PETL) in Hyderabad, India. The plant receives waste water with high levels of fluoroquinolones and applies AS technology. A total of 1,019,400 sequences from samples of different stages of the treatment process were analyzed. In total 202, 303, 732, 652, 947 and 864 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained at 3% distance cutoff in the equilibrator, aeration tanks 1 and 2, settling tank, secondary sludge and old sludge samples from PETL, respectively. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phyla in all samples with Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria being the dominant classes. Alcaligenaceae and Pseudomonadaceae, bacterial families from PETL previously reported to be highly multidrug resistant, were the dominant families in aeration tank samples. Despite regular addition of human sewage (approximately 20%) to uphold microbial activity, the bacterial diversity within aeration tanks from PETL was considerably lower than corresponding samples from seven, regular municipal waste water treatment plants. The strong selection pressure from antibiotics present may be one important factor in structuring the microbial community in PETL

  14. Antibiotics and sweeteners in the aquatic environment: biodegradability, formation of phototransformation products, and in vitro toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bergheim, Marlies; Gminski, Richard; Spangenberg, Bernd; Debiak, Malgorzata; Bürkle, Alexander; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Kümmerer, Klaus; Gieré, Reto

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, in vitro toxicity as well as biopersistence and photopersistence of four artificial sweeteners (acesulfame, cyclamate, saccharine, and sucralose) and five antibiotics (levofloxacin, lincomycin, linezolid, marbofloxacin, and sarafloxacin) and of their phototransformation products (PTPs) were investigated. Furthermore, antibiotic activity was evaluated after UV irradiation and after exposure to inocula of a sewage treatment plant. The study reveals that most of the tested compounds and their PTPs were neither readily nor inherently biodegradable in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-biodegradability tests. The study further demonstrates that PTPs are formed upon irradiation with an Hg lamp (UV light) and, to a lesser extent, upon irradiation with a Xe lamp (mimics sunlight). Comparing the nonirradiated with the corresponding irradiated solutions, a higher chronic toxicity against bacteria was found for the irradiated solutions of linezolid. Neither cytotoxicity nor genotoxicity was found in human cervical (HeLa) and liver (Hep-G2) cells for any of the investigated compounds or their PTPs. Antimicrobial activity of the tested fluoroquinolones was reduced after UV treatment, but it was not reduced after a 28-day exposure to inocula of a sewage treatment plant. This comparative study shows that PTPs can be formed as a result of UV treatment. The study further demonstrated that UV irradiation can be effective in reducing the antimicrobial activity of antibiotics, and consequently may help to reduce antimicrobial resistance in wastewaters. Nevertheless, the study also highlights that some PTPs may exhibit a higher ecotoxicity than the respective parent compounds. Consequently, UV treatment does not transform all micropollutants into harmless compounds and may not be a large-scale effluent treatment option.

  15. Influences of two antibiotic contaminants on the production, release and toxicity of microcystins.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Guan, Yuntao; Wang, Yan; Huang, Lihui

    2012-03-01

    The influences of spiramycin and amoxicillin on the algal growth, production and release of target microcystins (MCs), MC-LR, MC-RR and MC-YR, in Microcystis aeruginosa were investigated through the seven-day exposure test. Spiramycin were more toxic to M. aeruginosa than amoxicillin according to their 50 percent effective concentrations (EC(50)) in algal growth, which were 1.15 and 8.03 μg/l, respectively. At environmentally relevant concentrations of 100 ng/l-1 μg/l, spiramycin reduced the total MC content per algal cell and inhibited the algal growth, while exposure to amoxicillin led to increases in the total MC content per algal cell and the percentage of extracellular MCs, without affecting the algal growth. Toxicity of MCs in combination with each antibiotic was assessed in the luminescent bacteria test using the toxic unit (TU) approach. The 50 percent effective concentrations for the mixtures (EC(50mix)) were 0.56 TU and 0.48 TU for MCs in combination with spiramycin and amoxicillin, respectively, indicating a synergistic interaction between MCs and each antibiotic (EC(50mix)<1TU). After seven-day exposure to 100 ng/l-1 μg/l of antibiotics, spiramycin-treated algal media and amoxicillin-treated algal media showed significantly lower (p<0.05) and higher (p<0.05) inhibition on the luminescence of Photobacterium phosphoreum, respectively, compared with the untreated algal medium. These results indicated that the toxicity of MCs were alleviated by spiramycin and enhanced by amoxicillin, and the latter effect would increase threats to the aquatic environment.

  16. Genetic Diversity and Antibiotic Resistance of Escherichia coli Isolates from Different Leafy Green Production Systems.

    PubMed

    Jongman, Mosimanegape; Korsten, Lise

    2016-11-01

    Foodborne disease outbreaks linked to contaminated irrigation water and fresh produce are a public health concern. The presence of Escherichia coli isolates from irrigation water and leafy green vegetables in different food production systems (large commercial farms, small-scale farms, and homestead gardens) was investigated. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance and virulence in these isolates was further assessed, and links between water source and irrigated crops were identified using antimicrobial and genotypic analyses. Presumptive E. coli isolates were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, and identities were confirmed by PCR using the uidA gene. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated with the Kirby Bauer disk diffusion test; the presence of virulence genes was determined with enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR assays. Of the 130 E. coli isolates from water (n =60) and leafy green vegetables (n =70), 19 (14.6%) were resistant to one antibiotic (tetracycline) and 92 (70.7%) were resistant to various antibiotics (including ampicillin, cefoxitin, and nalidixic acid). All E. coli isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone and gentamicin. The virulence gene stx2 was detected in E. coli isolates from irrigation water (8 [13.3%] of 60 isolates) and cabbages (3 [7.5%] of 40), but the virulence genes eae and stx1 were not detected in any tested isolates from irrigation water and fresh produce samples. The prevalence of multidrug-resistant E. coli was lower in isolates from GLOBALG.A.P.-certified farms than in isolates from noncertified commercial and small-scale farms and homestead gardens. A link between the E. coli isolates from irrigation water sources and leafy green vegetables was established with phenotypic (antimicrobial) and genotypic (DNA fingerprinting) analyses. However, a link between virulence genes and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance could not be established.

  17. Limited Bacterial Diversity within a Treatment Plant Receiving Antibiotic-Containing Waste from Bulk Drug Production

    PubMed Central

    Shouche, Yogesh S.; Larsson, D. G. Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Biological treatment of waste water from bulk drug production, contaminated with high levels of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, can lead to massive enrichment of antibiotic resistant bacteria, resistance genes and associated mobile elements, as previously shown. Such strong selection may be boosted by the use of activated sludge (AS) technology, where microbes that are able to thrive on the chemicals within the wastewater are reintroduced at an earlier stage of the process to further enhance degradation of incoming chemicals. The microbial community structure within such a treatment plant is, however, largely unclear. In this study, Illumina-based 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was applied to investigate the bacterial communities of different stages from an Indian treatment plant operated by Patancheru Environment Technology Limited (PETL) in Hyderabad, India. The plant receives waste water with high levels of fluoroquinolones and applies AS technology. A total of 1,019,400 sequences from samples of different stages of the treatment process were analyzed. In total 202, 303, 732, 652, 947 and 864 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained at 3% distance cutoff in the equilibrator, aeration tanks 1 and 2, settling tank, secondary sludge and old sludge samples from PETL, respectively. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phyla in all samples with Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria being the dominant classes. Alcaligenaceae and Pseudomonadaceae, bacterial families from PETL previously reported to be highly multidrug resistant, were the dominant families in aeration tank samples. Despite regular addition of human sewage (approximately 20%) to uphold microbial activity, the bacterial diversity within aeration tanks from PETL was considerably lower than corresponding samples from seven, regular municipal waste water treatment plants. The strong selection pressure from antibiotics present may be one important factor in structuring the microbial community in PETL

  18. Does the Recent Growth of Aquaculture Create Antibiotic Resistance Threats Different from those Associated with Land Animal Production in Agriculture?

    PubMed

    Done, Hansa Y; Venkatesan, Arjun K; Halden, Rolf U

    2015-05-01

    Important antibiotics in human medicine have been used for many decades in animal agriculture for growth promotion and disease treatment. Several publications have linked antibiotic resistance development and spread with animal production. Aquaculture, the newest and fastest growing food production sector, may promote similar or new resistance mechanisms. This review of 650+ papers from diverse sources examines parallels and differences between land-based agriculture of swine, beef, and poultry and aquaculture. Among three key findings was, first, that of 51 antibiotics commonly used in aquaculture and agriculture, 39 (or 76%) are also of importance in human medicine; furthermore, six classes of antibiotics commonly used in both agriculture and aquaculture are also included on the World Health Organization's (WHO) list of critically important/highly important/important antimicrobials. Second, various zoonotic pathogens isolated from meat and seafood were observed to feature resistance to multiple antibiotics on the WHO list, irrespective of their origin in either agriculture or aquaculture. Third, the data show that resistant bacteria isolated from both aquaculture and agriculture share the same resistance mechanisms, indicating that aquaculture is contributing to the same resistance issues established by terrestrial agriculture. More transparency in data collection and reporting is needed so the risks and benefits of antibiotic usage can be adequately assessed.

  19. Synthesis, biological evaluation and structural characterization of novel glycopeptide analogues of nociceptin N/OFQ.

    PubMed

    Arsequell, Gemma; Rosa, Mònica; Mayato, Carlos; Dorta, Rosa L; Gonzalez-Nunez, Verónica; Barreto-Valer, Katherine; Marcelo, Filipa; Calle, Luis P; Vázquez, Jesús T; Rodríguez, Raquel E; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Valencia, Gregorio

    2011-09-07

    To examine if the biological activity of the N/OFQ peptide, which is the native ligand of the pain-related and viable drug target NOP receptor, could be modulated by glycosylation and if such effects could be conformationally related, we have synthesized three N/OFQ glycopeptide analogues, namely: [Thr(5)-O-α-D-GalNAc-N/OFQ] (glycopeptide 1), [Ser(10)-O-α-D-GalNAc]-N/OFQ (glycopeptide 2) and [Ser(10)-O-β-D-GlcNAc]-N/OFQ] (glycopeptide 3). They were tested for biological activity in competition binding assays using the zebrafish animal model in which glycopeptide 2 exhibited a slightly improved binding affinity, whereas glycopeptide 1 showed a remarkably reduced binding affinity compared to the parent compound and glycopeptide 3. The structural analysis of these glycopeptides and the parent N/OFQ peptide by NMR and circular dichroism indicated that their aqueous solutions are mainly populated by random coil conformers. However, in membrane mimic environments a certain proportion of the molecules of all these peptides exist as α-helix structures. Interestingly, under these experimental conditions, glycopeptide 1 (glycosylated at Thr-5) exhibited a population of folded hairpin-like geometries. From these facts it is tempting to speculate that nociceptin analogues showing linear helical structures are more complementary and thus interact more efficiently with the native NOP receptor than folded structures, since glycopeptide 1 showed a significantly reduced binding affinity for the NOP receptor.

  20. Development and application of a T7 RNA polymerase-dependent expression system for antibiotic production improvement in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Wei, Junhong; Tian, Jinjin; Pan, Guoqing; Xie, Jie; Bao, Jialing; Zhou, Zeyang

    2017-06-01

    To develop a reliable and easy to use expression system for antibiotic production improvement of Streptomyces. A two-compound T7 RNA polymerase-dependent gene expression system was developed to fulfill this demand. In this system, the T7 RNA polymerase coding sequence was optimized based on the codon usage of Streptomyces coelicolor. To evaluate the functionality of this system, we constructed an activator gene overexpression strain for enhancement of actinorhodin production. By overexpression of the positive regulator actII-ORF4 with this system, the maximum actinorhodin yield of engineered strain was 15-fold higher and the fermentation time was decreased by 48 h. The modified two-compound T7 expression system improves both antibiotic production and accelerates the fermentation process in Streptomyces. This provides a general and useful strategy for strain improvement of important antibiotic producing Streptomyces strains.

  1. Biotechnological approaches to the production of idiotypic vaccines and antiidiotypic antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Magliani, W; Conti, S; Salati, A; Arseni, S; Ravanetti, L; Frazzi, R; Polonelli, L

    2003-04-01

    The potential therapeutic activity of a killer toxin produced by the yeast Pichia anomala (PaKT) characterized by its wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity has been exploited through the simulation of its interaction with the specific cell wall receptor (KTR) of PaKT-sensitive microorganisms by the idiotypic network. Killer antiidiotypes (PaKTantiId) produced by idiotypic vaccination with a PaKT-neutralizing monoclonal antibody have proven to confer active and passive immunoprotection in experimental models of systemic and vaginal candidiasis. PaKTantiId-like human anti-KTR antibodies are naturally produced in infections caused by PaKT-sensitive microorganisms. PaKTantiId in its monoclonal and recombinant formats as well as expressed on human commensal bacteria have shown microbicidal activity in vitro and a therapeutic effect in experimental models of infection caused by PaKT-sensitive microorganisms. New perspectives of idiotypic vaccination and antiidiotypic antibiotic therapy and biotechnological approaches to the production of trandisease idiotypic vaccines and wide-spectrum antiidiotypic antibiotics (killer mimotopes) will be discussed as effective tools to fight epidemiologically important mucosal and systemic microbial infections.

  2. A survey of group-level antibiotic prescriptions in pig production in France.

    PubMed

    Chauvin, Claire; Beloeil, Pierre-Alexandre; Orand, Jean-Pierre; Sanders, Pascal; Madec, François

    2002-09-30

    There is world-wide concern that antimicrobial use in food-producing animals might contribute to antimicrobial resistance both in animals and in humans. The relationship between antimicrobial use and resistance is likely to be related to frequency of prescription of the compound, dose and duration of treatment. Routine collection of that information is not possible today in France. A postal survey of French pig veterinarians therefore was carried out in October 2000. The questionnaire focused on the last antibiotic group-level prescription made; data were collected on the type of animals, presumptive clinical diagnosis and drug prescription. The list frame was defined using a veterinary yearbook. All practitioners with mention of pig in the treated species or with employment in intensive animal production were sent the questionnaire. Out of the 431 selected practitioners, 303 responded to the self-administered questionnaire (overall return proportion 70%). 159 prescriptions were received and analysed (response proportion 37%). Their repartitions according to indications and active compounds were summarised. Mean prescribed daily doses and mean treatment length were calculated for four antibiotics: amoxicillin, colistin, oxytetracycline, tylosin. Prescribed daily dose were in the range of dosages used and recommended in Europe. High variations were encountered in treatment length: from 3 to 21 days.

  3. Production of a New Thiopeptide Antibiotic, TP-1161, by a Marine Nocardiopsis Species▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, Kerstin; Degnes, Kristin F.; Kemmler, Michael; Bredholt, Harald; Fjærvik, Espen; Klinkenberg, Geir; Sletta, Håvard; Ellingsen, Trond E.; Zotchev, Sergey B.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-seven marine sediment- and sponge-derived actinomycetes with a preference for or dependence on seawater for growth were classified at the genus level using molecular taxonomy. Their potential to produce bioactive secondary metabolites was analyzed by PCR screening for genes involved in polyketide and nonribosomal peptide antibiotic synthesis. Using microwell cultures, conditions for the production of antibacterial and antifungal compounds were identified for 15 of the 27 isolates subjected to this screening. Nine of the 15 active extracts were also active against multiresistant Gram-positive bacterial and/or fungal indicator organisms, including vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium and multidrug-resistant Candida albicans. Activity-guided fractionation of fermentation extracts of isolate TFS65-07, showing strong antibacterial activity and classified as a Nocardiopsis species, allowed the identification and purification of the active compound. Structure elucidation revealed this compound to be a new thiopeptide antibiotic with a rare aminoacetone moiety. The in vitro antibacterial activity of this thiopeptide, designated TP-1161, against a panel of bacterial strains was determined. PMID:20562278

  4. New Insights about Antibiotic Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A Gene Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gionco, Bárbara; Tavares, Eliandro R.; de Oliveira, Admilton G.; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F.; do Carmo, Anderson O.; Pereira, Ulisses de Pádua; Chideroli, Roberta T.; Simionato, Ane S.; Navarro, Miguel O. P.; Chryssafidis, Andreas L.; Andrade, Galdino

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial resistance for antibiotics is one of the most important problems in public health and only a small number of new products are in development. Antagonistic microorganisms from soil are a promising source of new candidate molecules. Products of secondary metabolism confer adaptive advantages for their producer, in the competition for nutrients in the microbial community. The biosynthesis process of compounds with antibiotic activity is the key to optimize their production and the transcriptomic study of microorganisms is of great benefit for the discovery of these metabolic pathways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa LV strain growing in the presence of copper chloride produces a bioactive organometallic compound, which has a potent antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms. The objective of this study was to verify overexpressed genes and evaluate their relation to the organometallic biosynthesis in this microorganism. P. aeruginosa LV strain was cultured in presence and absence of copper chloride. Two methods were used for transcriptomic analysis, genome reference-guided assembly and de novo assembly. The genome referenced analysis identified nine upregulated genes when bacteria were exposed to copper chloride, while the De Novo Assembly identified 12 upregulated genes. Nineteen genes can be related to an increased microbial metabolism for the extrusion process of exceeding intracellular copper. Two important genes are related to the biosynthesis of phenazine and tetrapyrroles compounds, which can be involved in the bioremediation of intracellular copper and we suggesting that may involve in the biosynthesis of the organometallic compound. Additional studies are being carried out to further prove the function of the described genes and relate them to the biosynthetic pathway of the organometallic compound. PMID:28966922

  5. [Simultaneous determination of 6 antibiotics and metronidazole in acne removal products bt high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Pang, Yanjun; Li, Yanbo; Wang, Chao

    2012-06-01

    An analytical method for the simultaneous determination of 6 antibiotics (minocycline, oxytetracycline, tetracycline hydrochloride, chlorotetracycline hydrochloride, doxycycline hydrochloride and chloramphenicol) and metronidazole in acne removal products of cosmetic was established using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The drugs in the sample were extracted with methanol. The separation was performed on an Agilent ZORBAX SB-C18 column (250 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm) at 20 degrees C with methanol, acetonitrile and 0.002 mol/L oxalic acid solution as mobile phases with gradient elution at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The detection was performed by a diode array detector (DAD) at 268 nm. The injection volume was 10 microL. The quantification was performed by external standard method. The calibration curves showed good linearity within the range of 1 - 30 mg/L with the correlation coefficients no less than 0.997 0. The detection limits were in the range of 1.1 - 1.2 microg/g. The recoveries were between 91.9% and 107.7% in three spiked levels of 5, 10 and 20 mg/L with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.13% - 1.74%. The method was used in the analysis of acne removal products, and metronidazole was found in 15% of the total test samples. The method is rapid, sensitive, accurate, effective in separation, and can be used in the determination of the six antibiotics and metronidazole in acne removal products.

  6. Prevalence, genetic diversity, and antibiotic resistance of Bacillus cereus isolated from Korean fermented soybean products.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Woo; Cho, Seung-Hak; Kang, Suk-Ho; Park, Yong-Bae; Yoon, Mi-Hye; Lee, Jong-Bok; No, Wan-Seob; Kim, Jung-Beom

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus contamination is a major food safety problem for Korean fermented soybean products, but few studies have assessed its potential to cause foodborne illness. The objectives of this study were to investigate the prevalence and characteristics of B. cereus isolated from Korean fermented soybean products. B. cereus was detected in 110 of 162 (67.9%) samples. The highest B. cereus frequency was observed in deonjang (68 of 93 samples, 73.1%) and cheonggukjang (18 of 25, 72.0%); however, nonhemolytic enterotoxin was detected only in 22 of 162 samples (13.6%). Although the tested B. cereus isolates showed diverse pulsotypes according to repetitive sequence-PCR banding patterns, they displayed similar antibiotic sensitivity spectra. The low frequency of enterotoxin detection suggests that the potential risk of B. cereus foodborne illness associated with Korean fermented soybean products is lower than generally presumed. However, considering the prevalence of B. cereus and the high content of fermented soybean products in the Korean diet, it is necessary to constantly monitor the level of contamination with B. cereus and its toxins in such Korean food products. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. Potential Impact of Increased Use of Biocides in Consumer Products on Prevalence of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Peter; McBain, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    There has recently been much controversy surrounding the increased use of antibacterial substances in a wide range of consumer products and the possibility that, as with antibiotics, indiscriminate use of biocides might contribute to the overall pattern of susceptibility in the general environment and in the clinic. Such speculation, based on the isolation of resistant mutants from in vitro monoculture experiments, is not reflected by an emergence of biocide-resistant strains in vivo. This review provides a broad coverage of the biocide and resistance literature and evaluates the potential risks, perceived from such laboratory monoculture experiments, against evidence gathered over 50 years of field studies. An explanation for the continued effectiveness of broad-spectrum biocidal agents against the decline in efficacy of therapeutic agents is provided based on the fitness costs of resistance and the ubiquity of naturally occurring substances that possess antibacterial effect. While we conclude from this review of the literature that the incorporation of antibacterial agents into a widening sphere of personal products has had little or no impact on the patterns of microbial susceptibility observed in the environment, the associated risks remain finite. The use of such products should therefore be associated with a clear demonstration of added value either to consumer health or to the product life. Hygienic products should therefore be targeted to applications for which the risks have been established. PMID:12692093

  8. Prevalence of antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria in a river impacted by both an antibiotic production plant and urban treated discharges.

    PubMed

    Sidrach-Cardona, Ricardo; Hijosa-Valsero, María; Marti, Elisabet; Balcázar, José Luis; Becares, Eloy

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the abundance and spatial dynamics of antibiotic-resistant fecal bacteria (Escherichia coli, total coliforms and Enterococcus spp.) were determined in water and sediment samples from a river impacted by both antibiotic production plant (APP) and urban wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) discharges. Agar dilution and disk diffusion methods were also used for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Two antimicrobial agents, cephalexin (25 μg/ml) and amoxicillin (50 μg/ml), were evaluated using the agar dilution method for E. coli, total coliforms (TC) and Enterococcus spp., whereas the degree of sensitivity or resistance of E. coli isolates to penicillin (10 U), ampicillin (10 μg), doxycycline (30 μg), tetracycline (30 μg), erythromycin (15 μg), azithromycin (15 μg) and streptomycin (10 μg) was performed using the disk diffusion method. Real-time PCR assays were used to determine the prevalence of three antibiotic-resistance genes (ARGs). The agar dilution method showed that most E. coli isolates and TC were resistant to amoxicillin, especially after receiving the APP discharges. Antibiotic resistances to amoxicillin and cephalexin were higher after the APP discharge point than after the WWTP effluent. The disk diffusion method revealed that 100% of bacterial isolates were resistant to penicillin and erythromycin. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected and showed a higher proportion at the WWTP discharge point than those in the APP. Highly multidrug-resistant bacteria (resistance to more than 4 antibiotics) were also detected, reaching mean values of 41.6% in water samples and 50.1% in sediments. The relative abundance of the blaTEM, blaCTX-M and blaSHV genes was higher in samples from the treatment plants than in those collected upstream from the discharges, especially for water samples collected at the APP discharge point. These results clearly demonstrate that both the APP and the WWTP contribute to the emergence and spread of antibiotic

  9. Screening of antibiotics and chemical analysis of penicillin residue in fresh milk and traditional dairy products in Oyo state, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olatoye, Isaac Olufemi; Daniel, Oluwayemisi Folashade; Ishola, Sunday Ayobami

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: There are global public health and economic concerns on chemical residues in food of animal origin. The use of antibiotics in dairy cattle for the treatment of diseases such as mastitis has contributed to the presence of residues in dairy products. Penicillin residues as low as 1 ppb can lead to allergic reactions and shift of resistance patterns in microbial population as well as interfere with the processing of several dairy products. Antibiotic monitoring is an essential quality control measure in safe milk production. This study was aimed at determining antibiotic residue contamination and the level of penicillin in dairy products from Fulani cattle herds in Oyo State. Materials and Methods: The presence of antibiotic residues in 328 samples of fresh milk, 180 local cheese (wara), and 90 fermented milk (nono) from Southwest, Nigeria were determined using Premi® test kit (R-Biopharm AG, Germany) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of penicillin-G residue. Results: Antibiotic residues were obtained in 40.8%, 24.4% and 62.3% fresh milk, wara and nono, respectively. Penicillin-G residue was also detected in 41.1% fresh milk, 40.2% nono and 24.4% wara at mean concentrations of 15.22±0.61, 8.24±0.50 and 7.6±0.60 μg/L with 39.3%, 36.7% and 21.1%, respectively, containing penicillin residue above recommended Codex maximum residue limit (MRL) of 5 μg/L in dairy. There was no significant difference between the mean penicillin residues in all the dairy products in this study. Conclusion: The results are of food safety concern since the bulk of the samples and substantial quantities of dairy products in Oyo state contained violative levels of antibiotic residues including penicillin residues in concentrations above the MRL. This could be due to indiscriminate and unregulated administration of antibiotics to dairy cattle. Regulatory control of antibiotic use, rapid screening of milk and dairy farmers’ extension education

  10. Screening of antibiotics and chemical analysis of penicillin residue in fresh milk and traditional dairy products in Oyo state, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olatoye, Isaac Olufemi; Daniel, Oluwayemisi Folashade; Ishola, Sunday Ayobami

    2016-09-01

    There are global public health and economic concerns on chemical residues in food of animal origin. The use of antibiotics in dairy cattle for the treatment of diseases such as mastitis has contributed to the presence of residues in dairy products. Penicillin residues as low as 1 ppb can lead to allergic reactions and shift of resistance patterns in microbial population as well as interfere with the processing of several dairy products. Antibiotic monitoring is an essential quality control measure in safe milk production. This study was aimed at determining antibiotic residue contamination and the level of penicillin in dairy products from Fulani cattle herds in Oyo State. The presence of antibiotic residues in 328 samples of fresh milk, 180 local cheese (wara), and 90 fermented milk (nono) from Southwest, Nigeria were determined using Premi(®) test kit (R-Biopharm AG, Germany) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of penicillin-G residue. Antibiotic residues were obtained in 40.8%, 24.4% and 62.3% fresh milk, wara and nono, respectively. Penicillin-G residue was also detected in 41.1% fresh milk, 40.2% nono and 24.4% wara at mean concentrations of 15.22±0.61, 8.24±0.50 and 7.6±0.60 μg/L with 39.3%, 36.7% and 21.1%, respectively, containing penicillin residue above recommended Codex maximum residue limit (MRL) of 5 μg/L in dairy. There was no significant difference between the mean penicillin residues in all the dairy products in this study. The results are of food safety concern since the bulk of the samples and substantial quantities of dairy products in Oyo state contained violative levels of antibiotic residues including penicillin residues in concentrations above the MRL. This could be due to indiscriminate and unregulated administration of antibiotics to dairy cattle. Regulatory control of antibiotic use, rapid screening of milk and dairy farmers' extension education on alternatives to antibiotic prophylaxis, veterinary

  11. Chlorination and chloramination of tetracycline antibiotics: disinfection by-products formation and influential factors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shiqing; Shao, Yisheng; Gao, Naiyun; Zhu, Shumin; Ma, Yan; Deng, Jing

    2014-09-01

    Formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) from chlorination and chloramination of tetracycline antibiotics (TCs) was comprehensively investigated. It was demonstrated that a connection existed between the transformation of TCs and the formation of chloroform (CHCl3), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and dichloroacetone (DCAce). Factors evaluated included chlorine (Cl2) and chloramine(NH2Cl) dosage, reaction time, solution pH and disinfection modes. Increased Cl2/NH2Cl dosage and reaction time improved the formation of CHCl3 and DCAce. Formation of DCAN followed an increasing and then decreasing pattern with increasing Cl2 dosage and prolonged reaction time. pH affected DBPs formation differently, with CHCl3 and DCAN decreasing in chlorination, and having maximum concentrations at pH 7 in chloramination. The total concentrations of DBPs obeyed the following order: chlorination>chloramination>pre-chlorination (0.5h)>pre-chlorination (1h)>pre-chlorination (2h).

  12. Effect of prepartum dry cow antibiotic treatment in dairy heifers on udder health and milk production.

    PubMed

    Sampimon, O C; De Vliegher, S; Barkema, H W; Sol, J; Lam, T J G M

    2009-09-01

    A high percentage of heifers calve with intramammary infections. One of the measures available to control intramammary infections is treatment with antibiotics before calving. In this study, the effects of prepartum treatment of nonlactating heifers with a 600-mg cloxacillin dry cow treatment on the prevalence of culture-positive milk samples at calving and 10 to 14 d in milk (DIM), the incidence of clinical mastitis, somatic cell count (SCC), and milk production during first lactation were quantified. A total of 184 heifers on 13 dairy farms were treated with antibiotics 8 to 10 wk before the expected calving date. Another 185 heifers served as untreated controls. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most frequently isolated group of bacteria in the treatment and control groups at calving (32 and 42%), and at 10 to 14 DIM (15 and 19%), respectively. The prevalence of minor pathogens at calving was lower in the treatment group compared with the control group (34 and 43%, respectively). Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated major pathogen in the treated and control heifers at calving (4 and 5%) and at 10 to 14 DIM (2 and 3%), respectively. The prevalence of major pathogens was lower in the treated heifers at 10 to 14 DIM compared with the control group (4 and 6%, respectively). Cumulative incidence risk of clinical mastitis during the lactation was 9 and 18% in the treatment and control groups, respectively. Treatment with cloxacillin 8 to 10 wk before calving resulted in a lower prevalence of culture-positive milk samples at calving and lower quarter milk SCC in early lactation [30,000 +/- 4,600 (standard deviation) cells/mL in treated heifers versus 40,000 +/- 4,600 cells/mL in control heifers], and was associated with lower average test-day SCC (55,000 +/- 1,400 cells/mL in treated heifers versus 71,000 +/- 1,500 cells/mL in control heifers) and lower incidence of clinical mastitis throughout lactation. The improved udder health resulted in

  13. Gold nanostructure-integrated silica-on-silicon waveguide for the detection of antibiotics in milk and milk products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozhikandathil, Jayan; Badilescu, Simona; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2012-10-01

    Antibiotics are extensively used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases. The use of antibiotics for the treatment of animals used for food production raised the concern of the public and a rapid screening method became necessary. A novel approach of detection of antibiotics in milk is reported in this work by using an immunoassay format and the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance property of gold. An antibiotic from the penicillin family that is, ampicillin is used for testing. Gold nanostructures deposited on a glass substrate by a novel convective assembly method were heat-treated to form a nanoisland morphology. The Au nanostructures were functionalized and the corresponding antibody was absorbed from a solution. Solutions with known concentrations of antigen (antibiotics) were subsequently added and the spectral changes were monitored step by step. The Au LSPR band corresponding to the nano-island structure was found to be suitable for the detection of the antibody antigen interaction. The detection of the ampicillin was successfully demonstrated with the gold nano-islands deposited on glass substrate. This process was subsequently adapted for the integration of gold nanostructures on the silica-on-silicon waveguide for the purpose of detecting antibiotics.

  14. Resistance to colistin: what is the fate for this antibiotic in pig production?

    PubMed

    Rhouma, Mohamed; Beaudry, Francis; Letellier, Ann

    2016-08-01

    Colistin, a cationic polypeptide antibiotic, has reappeared in human medicine as a last-line treatment option for multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB). Colistin is widely used in veterinary medicine for the treatment of gastrointestinal infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae. GNB resistant to colistin owing to chromosomal mutations have already been reported both in human and veterinary medicine, however several recent studies have just identified a plasmid-mediated mcr-1 gene encoding for colistin resistance in Escherichia coli colistin resistance. The discovery of a non-chromosomal mechanism of colistin resistance in E. coli has led to strong reactions in the scientific community and to concern among physicians and veterinarians. Colistin use in food animals and particularly in pig production has been singled out as responsible for the emergence of colistin resistance. The present review will focus mainly on the possible link between colistin use in pigs and the spread of colistin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. First we demonstrate a possible link between Enterobacteriaceae resistance emergence and oral colistin pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and its administration modalities in pigs. We then discuss the potential impact of colistin use in pigs on public health with respect to resistance. We believe that colistin use in pig production should be re-evaluated and its dosing and usage optimised. Moreover, the search for competitive alternatives to using colistin with swine is of paramount importance to preserve the effectiveness of this antibiotic for the treatment of MDR-GNB infections in human medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. The Gene bldA, a regulator of morphological differentiation and antibiotic production in streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Hackl, Stefanie; Bechthold, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Streptomyces species are well known for their particular features of morphological differentiation. On solid agar, a mold-like aerial mycelium is formed and spores are produced, in which the bld genes play a crucial role. In S. coelicolor, mutations in one specific bld gene called bldA led to a "naked" phenotype lacking aerial hyphae and spores. This peculiar behavior became a major interest for scientific research in the past and it was revealed that bldA is coding for a unique tRNA able to translate a UUA codon into the amino acid leucine. UUA codons are a very rare property of G + C-rich Streptomyces genomes. The impact of bldA on morphology can in parts be attributed to the regulatory effect of bldA on the translational level, because TTA-containing genes can only be translated into their corresponding protein in the presence of a fully functioning bldA gene. In addition to the visible effect of bldA expression on the phenotype of S. coelicolor, bldA mutants were also deficient in antibiotic production. This led to the assumption that the role of bldA must exceed translational control. Many TTA-containing genes are coding for transcriptional regulators which are activating or repressing the transcription of many more genes. Proteomics and transcriptomics are two powerful methods for identifying bldA target genes and it was possible to assign also post-translational regulation to bldA. This review wants to give a short overview on the importance of bldA as a regulator of morphological differentiation and antibiotic production by switching on "silent" gene clusters in Streptomyces.

  16. The Posttranslocational Chaperone Lipoprotein PrsA Is Involved in both Glycopeptide and Oxacillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Jousselin, Ambre; Renzoni, Adriana; Andrey, Diego O.; Monod, Antoinette; Lew, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding in detail the factors which permit Staphylococcus aureus to counteract cell wall-active antibiotics is a prerequisite to elaborating effective strategies to prolong the usefulness of these drugs and define new targets for pharmacological intervention. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains are major pathogens of hospital-acquired and community-acquired infections and are most often treated with glycopeptides (vancomycin and teicoplanin) because of their resistance to most penicillins and a limited arsenal of clinically proven alternatives. In this study, we examined PrsA, a lipid-anchored protein of the parvulin PPIase family (peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase) found ubiquitously in all Gram-positive species, in which it assists posttranslocational folding at the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. We show by both genetic and biochemical assays that prsA is directly regulated by the VraRS two-component sentinel system of cell wall stress. Disruption of prsA is tolerated by S. aureus, and its loss results in no detectable overt macroscopic changes in cell wall architecture or growth rate under nonstressed growth conditions. Disruption of prsA leads, however, to notable alterations in the sensitivity to glycopeptides and dramatically decreases the resistance of COL (MRSA) to oxacillin. Quantitative transcriptional analysis reveals that prsA and vraR are coordinately upregulated in a panel of stable laboratory and clinical glycopeptide-intermediate S. aureus (GISA) strains compared to their susceptible parents. Collectively, our results point to a role for prsA as a facultative facilitator of protein secretion or extracellular folding and provide a framework for understanding why prsA is a key element of the VraRS-mediated cell wall stress response. PMID:22526301

  17. Identification of Glycopeptides with Multiple Hydroxylysine O-Glycosylation Sites by Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanlin; Yu, Chuan-Yih; Song, Ehwang; Li, Shuai Cheng; Mechref, Yehia; Tang, Haixu; Liu, Xiaowen

    2015-12-04

    Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in proteins, existing in ~50% of mammalian proteins. Several research groups have demonstrated that mass spectrometry is an efficient technique for glycopeptide identification; however, this problem is still challenging because of the enormous diversity of glycan structures and the microheterogeneity of glycans. In addition, a glycopeptide may contain multiple glycosylation sites, making the problem complex. Current software tools often fail to identify glycopeptides with multiple glycosylation sites, and hence we present GlycoMID, a graph-based spectral alignment algorithm that can identify glycopeptides with multiple hydroxylysine O-glycosylation sites by tandem mass spectra. GlycoMID was tested on mass spectrometry data sets of the bovine collagen α-(II) chain protein, and experimental results showed that it identified more glycopeptide-spectrum matches than other existing tools, including many glycopeptides with two glycosylation sites.

  18. Fouling analysis of membrane bioreactor treating antibiotic production wastewater at different hydraulic retention times.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dawei; Chen, Yutao; Wei, Yuansong; Wang, Jianxing; Wang, Yawei; Li, Kun

    2017-04-01

    Membrane fouling, including foulants and factors, was investigated during hydraulic retention time (HRT) optimization of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) that treated wastewater from the production of antibiotics. The results showed that HRT played an important role in membrane fouling. Trans-membrane pressure (TMP), membrane flux, and resistance were stable at -6 kPa, 76 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), and 4.5 × 10(12) m(-1) when HRT was at 60, 48, and 36 h, respectively. Using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, foulants were identified as carbohydrates and proteins, which correlated with effluent organic matter and effluent chemical oxygen demand (COD) compounds. Therefore, membrane fouling trends would benefit from low supernatant COD (378 mg L(-1)) and a low membrane removal rate (26 %) at a HRT of 36 h. Serious membrane fouling at 72 and 24 h was related to soluble microbial products and extracellular polymeric substances in mixed liquor, respectively. Based on the TMP decrease and flux recovery after physical and chemical cleaning, irremovable fouling aggravation was related to extracellular polymeric substances' increase and soluble microbial products' decrease. According to changes in the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) and mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSSs) during HRT optimization in this study, antibiotic production wastewater largely inhibited MLSS growth, which only increased from 4.5 to 5.0 g L(-1) when HRT was decreased from 72 to 24 h, but did not limit sludge activity. The results of a principal component analysis highlighted both proteins and carbohydrates in extracellular polymeric substances as the primary foulants. Membrane fouling associated with the first principal component was positively related to extracellular polymeric substances and negatively related to soluble microbial products. Principal component 2 was primarily related to proteins in the influent. Additional membrane fouling factors included biomass

  19. A multivalent approach to drug discovery for novel antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Long, Daniel D; Aggen, James B; Christensen, Burton G; Judice, J Kevin; Hegde, Sharath S; Kaniga, Koné; Krause, Kevin M; Linsell, Martin S; Moran, Edmund J; Pace, John L

    2008-10-01

    The design, synthesis and antibacterial activity of novel glycopeptide/beta-lactam heterodimers is reported. Employing a multivalent approach to drug discovery, vancomycin and cephalosporin synthons, A and B respectively, were chemically linked to yield heterodimer antibiotics. These novel compounds were designed to inhibit Gram-positive bacterial cell wall biosynthesis by simultaneously targeting the principal cellular targets of both glycopeptides and beta-lactams. The antibiotics 8a-f displayed remarkable potency against a wide range of Gram-positive organisms including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Compound 8e demonstrated excellent bactericidal activity against MRSA (ATCC 33591) and initial evidence supports a multivalent mechanism of action for this important new class of antibiotic.

  20. Impact of different antibiotics on methane production using waste-activated sludge: mechanisms and microbial community dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Nurul Asyifah; Sakai, Kenji; Shirai, Yoshihito; Maeda, Toshinari

    2016-11-01

    Anaerobic digestion is an effective method for reducing the by-product of waste-activated sludge (WAS) from wastewater treatment plants and for producing bioenergy from WAS. However, only a limited number of studies have attempted to improve anaerobic digestion by targeting the microbial interactions in WAS. In this study, we examined whether different antibiotics positively, negatively, or neutrally influence methane fermentation by evaluating changes in the microbial community and functions in WAS. Addition of azithromycin promoted the microbial communities related to the acidogenic and acetogenic stages, and a high concentration of soluble proteins and a high activity of methanogens were detected. Chloramphenicol inhibited methane production but did not affect the bacteria that contribute to the hydrolysis, acidogenesis, and acetogenesis digestion stages. The addition of kanamycin, which exhibits the same methane productivity as a control (antibiotic-free WAS), did not affect all of the microbial communities during anaerobic digestion. This study demonstrates the simultaneous functions and interactions of diverse bacteria and methanogenic Archaea in different stages of the anaerobic digestion of WAS. The ratio of Caldilinea, Methanosarcina, and Clostridium may correspond closely to the trend of methane production in each antibiotic. The changes in microbial activities and function by antibiotics facilitate a better understanding of bioenergy production.

  1. The VanRS Homologous Two-Component System VnlRSAb of the Glycopeptide Producer Amycolatopsis balhimycina Activates Transcription of the vanHAXSc Genes in Streptomyces coelicolor, but not in A. balhimycina

    PubMed Central

    Kilian, Regina; Frasch, Hans-Joerg; Kulik, Andreas; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In enterococci and in Streptomyces coelicolor, a glycopeptide nonproducer, the glycopeptide resistance genes vanHAX are colocalized with vanRS. The two-component system (TCS) VanRS activates vanHAX transcription upon sensing the presence of glycopeptides. Amycolatopsis balhimycina, the producer of the vancomycin-like glycopeptide balhimycin, also possesses vanHAXAb genes. The genes for the VanRS-like TCS VnlRSAb, together with the carboxypeptidase gene vanYAb, are part of the balhimycin biosynthetic gene cluster, which is located 2 Mb separate from the vanHAXAb. The deletion of vnlRSAb did not affect glycopeptide resistance or balhimycin production. In the A. balhimycina vnlRAb deletion mutant, the vanHAXAb genes were expressed at the same level as in the wild type, and peptidoglycan (PG) analyses proved the synthesis of resistant PG precursors. Whereas vanHAXAb expression in A. balhimycina does not depend on VnlRAb, a VnlRAb-depending regulation of vanYAb was demonstrated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNA-seq analyses. Although VnlRAb does not regulate the vanHAXAb genes in A. balhimycina, its heterologous expression in the glycopeptide-sensitive S. coelicolor ΔvanRSSc deletion mutant restored glycopeptide resistance. VnlRAb activates the vanHAXSc genes even in the absence of VanS. In addition, expression of vnlRAb increases actinorhodin production and influences morphological differentiation in S. coelicolor. PMID:27420548

  2. Glycopeptides as Analgesics: Non-Toxic Alternatives to Morphine for Combat Casualty Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    sedation is required. The third class of opioid agonists includes the much larger endorphin -based glycopeptides that may eventually be useful for their non...73. 5. Muthu, D.et al. (2005) Glycopeptides Related to fP- Endorphin Adopt Helical Amphipathic Conformations in the Presence of Lipid Bilayers. J. Am...behavioral effects of glycopeptides based on enkephalins & endorphins . BIOPOLYMERS 80 (4): 547-547. 5. Egleton RD, Bilsky E, Polt RL (2005

  3. Opioid glycopeptide analgesics derived from endogenous enkephalins and endorphins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxue; Lefever, Mark R; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Bidlack, Jean M; Bilsky, Edward J; Polt, Robin

    2012-02-01

    Over the past two decades, potent and selective analgesics have been developed from endogenous opioid peptides. Glycosylation provides an important means of modulating interaction with biological membranes, which greatly affects the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the resulting glycopeptide analogues. Furthermore, manipulation of the membrane affinity allows penetration of cellular barriers that block efficient drug distribution, including the blood-brain barrier. Extremely potent and selective opiate agonists have been developed from endogenous peptides, some of which show great promise as drug candidates.

  4. Anaerobic treatment of antibiotic production wastewater pretreated with enhanced hydrolysis: Simultaneous reduction of COD and ARGs.

    PubMed

    Yi, Qizhen; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yingxin; Tian, Zhe; Yang, Min

    2017-03-01

    The presence of high concentration antibiotics in wastewater can disturb the stability of biological wastewater treatment systems and promote generation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during the treatment. To solve this problem, a pilot system consisting of enhanced hydrolysis pretreatment and an up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor in succession was constructed for treating oxytetracycline production wastewater, and the performance was evaluated in a pharmaceutical factory in comparison with a full-scale anaerobic system operated in parallel. After enhanced hydrolysis under conditions of pH 7 and 85 °C for 6 h, oxytetracycline production wastewater with an influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 11,086 ± 602 mg L(-1) was directly introduced into the pilot UASB reactor. With the effective removal of oxytetracycline and its antibacterial potency (from 874 mg L(-1) to less than 0.61 mg L(-1) and from 900 mg L(-1) to less than 0.84 mg L(-1), respectively) by the enhanced hydrolysis pretreatment, an average COD removal rate of 83.2%, 78.5% and 68.9% was achieved at an organic loading rate of 3.3, 4.8 and 5.9 kg COD m(-3) d(-1), respectively. At the same time, the relative abundances of the total tetracycline (tet) genes and a mobile element (Class 1 integron (intI1)) in anaerobic sludge on day 96 were one order of magnitude lower than those in inoculated sludge on day 0 (P < 0.01). The reduction of ARGs was further demonstrated by metagenomic sequencing. By comparison, the full-scale anaerobic system treating oxytetracycline production wastewater with an influent COD of 3720 ± 128 mg L(-1) after dilution exhibited a COD removal of 51 ± 4% at an organic loading rate (OLR) 1.2 ± 0.2 kg m(-3) d(-1), and a total tet gene abundance in sludge was five times higher than the pilot-scale system (P < 0.01). The above result demonstrated that enhanced hydrolysis as a pretreatment method could enable efficient anaerobic treatment of

  5. Comparison of Membrane Protein Glycopeptides of Sindbis Virus and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Burge, Boyce W.; Huang, Alice S.

    1970-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the membrane glycoproteins and glycopeptides from two enveloped viruses, Sindbis virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Glycopeptides isolated from Sindbis virus and VSV grown in the same host appear to differ principally in the number of sialic acid residues per glycopeptide; when sialic acid is removed by mild acid treatment, the glycopeptides of the two viral proteins are indistinguishable by exclusion chromatography. Preliminary evidence argues that the carbohydrate moiety covalently bound to different virus-specified membrane proteins may be specified principally by the host. PMID:4322870

  6. Tissue-Specific Glycosylation at the Glycopeptide Level.

    PubMed

    Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Kaasik, Krista; Chalkley, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    This manuscript describes the enrichment and mass spectrometric analysis of intact glycopeptides from mouse liver, which yielded site-specific N- and O-glycosylation data for ∼ 130 proteins. Incorporation of different sialic acid variants in both N- and O-linked glycans was observed, and the importance of using both collisional activation and electron transfer dissociation for glycopeptide analysis was illustrated. The N-glycan structures of predicted lysosomal, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), secreted and transmembrane proteins were compared. The data suggest that protein N-glycosylation differs depending on cellular location. The glycosylation patterns of several mouse liver and mouse brain glycopeptides were compared. Tissue-specific differences in glycosylation were observed between sites within the same protein: Some sites displayed a similar spectrum of glycan structures in both tissues, whereas for others no overlap was observed. We present comparative brain/liver glycosylation data on 50 N-glycosylation sites from 34 proteins and 13 O-glycosylation sites from seven proteins.

  7. Alterations of Membrane Glycopeptides in Human Colonic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young S.; Isaacs, Richard; Perdomo, Jose M.

    1974-01-01

    Membrane glycopeptides were examined in human colonic adenocarcinoma and normal colonic mucosa. The carbohydrates of membrane glycopeptides were found to be markedly reduced in tumor tissue and the relative proportions of the various sugars were altered. Although all of the sugars were lower in tumor tissue when compared to the adjacent normal mucosa, galactosamine, fucose, and sialic acid were more significantly reduced. Examination of the blood group activity and lectin-binding properties of membrane glycopeptides revealed that specific carbohydrate structures had changed in the tumor tissue. Most striking of these changes was the disappearance of glycoprotein-associated blood group A activity. Assay of the enzyme responsible for synthesis of the blood group A determinant showed that this glycosyltransferase activity was greatly diminished in tumor tissue. A galactosyltransferase and a fucosyltransferase were also significantly lower in the tumor tissue whereas the levels of another galactosyltransferase and a sialyltransferase were unaltered. Glycosidase activities in the normal and tumor tissues were similar. The results show that an alteration in glycoprotein biosynthesis occurred during tumorigenesis that resulted in a modified membrane glycoprotein composition and that these changes are probably a reflection of reduced levels of the enzymes responsible for glycoprotein synthesis. PMID:4140512

  8. Finding alternatives to antibiotics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires new treatments. The availability of new antibiotics has severely declined, and so alternatives to antibiotics need to be considered in both animal agriculture and human medicine. Products for disease prevention are different than products for d...

  9. Production of antibiotics by Collybia nivalis, Omphalotus olearis, a Favolaschia and a Pterula species on natural substrates.

    PubMed

    Engler, M; Anke, T; Sterner, O

    1998-01-01

    Collybia nivalis, Favolaschia sp. 87129, Pterula sp. 82168 and Omphalotus olearius were cultivated on natural substrates. The antibiotic metabolites oudemansin A. strobilurins A, D, illudin S and pterulone were isolated and identified. A new antifungal metabolite, pterulone B, was described from cultures of Pterula sp. 82168 on wood. Collybia nivalis was found to be the first species of this genus to produce strobilurins and oudemansin A. As compared to rich media the cultivation on natural substrates resulted in the production of fewer metabolites. The concentrations of the antibiotics, however, were sufficient to inhibit other saprophytic fungi.

  10. Advances in biosensor development for the screening of antibiotic residues in food products of animal origin - A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Valérie

    2017-04-15

    Antibiotic residues may be found in food of animal origin, since veterinary drugs are used for preventive and curative purposes to treat animals. The control of veterinary drug residues in food is necessary to ensure consumer safety. Screening methods are the first step in the control of antibiotic residues in food of animal origin. Conventional screening methods are based on different technologies, microbiological methods, immunological methods or physico-chemical methods (e.g. thin-layer chromatography, HPLC, LC-MS/MS). Screening methods should be simple, quick, inexpensive and specific, with low detection limits and high sample throughput. Biosensors can meet some of these requirements. Therefore, the development of biosensors for the screening of antibiotic residues has been increasing since the 1980s. The present review provides extensive and up-to-date findings on biosensors for the screening of antibiotic residues in food products of animal origin. Biosensors are constituted of a bioreceptor and a transducer. In the detection of antibiotic residues, even though antibodies were the first bioreceptors to be used, new kinds of bioreceptors are being developed more and more (enzymes, aptamers, MIPs); their advantages and drawbacks are discussed in this review. The different categories of transducers (electrochemical, mass-based biosensors, optical and thermal) and their potential applications for the screening of antibiotic residues in food are presented. Moreover, the advantages and drawbacks of the different types of transducers are discussed. Lastly, outlook and the future development of biosensors for the control of antibiotic residues in food are highlighted. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Effect of retS gene on antibiotics production in Pseudomonas fluorescens FD6.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingxia; Xiao, Qi; Xu, Jingyou; Tong, Yunhui; Wen, Jia; Chen, Xijun; Wei, Lihui

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid sensor kinase termed RetS (regulator of exopolysaccharide and Type III secretion) controls expression of numerous genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To investigate the function of RetS in P. fluorescens FD6, the retS gene was disrupted. Genetic inactivation of retS resulted in enhanced production of 2, 4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, and pyoluteorin. The retS mutant also exhibited significant increase in phlA-lacZ, prnA-lacZ, and pltA-lacZ transcription levels, influencing expression levels of the small regulatory RNAs RsmX and RsmZ. In the gacSretS double mutant, all the phenotypic changes caused by the retS deletion were reversed to the level of gacS single mutant. Furthermore, the retS mutation drastically elevated biofilm formation and improved the colonization ability of strain FD6 on wheat rhizospheres. Based on these results, we proposed that RetS negatively controlled the production of antibiotics through the Gac/Rsm pathway in P. fluorescens FD6.

  12. Fouling characteristics and cleaning strategies of NF membranes for the advanced treatment of antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxing; Li, Kun; Yu, Dawei; Zhang, Junya; Wei, Yuansong

    2017-04-01

    The nanofiltration (NF) membrane fouling characteristics and cleaning strategies were investigated through a laboratory-scale NF fouling test treating membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluent and MBR-granular activated carbon (GAC) effluent of an antibiotic production wastewater by DK and NF90 membranes, respectively. Results showed that organic fouling is the main NF membrane fouling for treating both the MBR effluent and MBR-GAC effluent. Soluble microbial by-product (SMP)-like and aromatic protein-like substances were the dominant components in the foulants, whereas humic-like substances had little contribution to the NF fouling. The fouling of DK was more severe than that of NF90. However, foulants respond by UV254 were more easily to foul NF90 membrane. It could get satisfactory effect using combined cleaning of acid (HCl, pH 2.0∼2.5) and alkali (NaOH + 0.3 wt% NaDS, pH 10.0∼10.5). The favorable cleaning strategy is "acid + alkali" for treating MBR-GAC effluent, while it is "alkali + acid" for treating MBR effluent.

  13. Effects of returning NF concentrate on the MBR-NF process treating antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Cheng, Yutao; Wang, Jianxing; Zhang, Junya; Liu, Jibao; Yu, Dawei; Li, Mingyue; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-07-01

    The optimization of the nanofiltration (NF) concentrate backflow ratio (R cb) and the influence of the NF concentrate on the performance of membrane bioreactor-nanofiltration (MBR-NF) process treating antibiotic production wastewater were investigated on a laboratory scale. The R cb was optimized at 60 % based on the removal rates of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and NH4 (+)-N by MBR. Data analyses indicated that salinity brought by NF concentrate is the major driver leading to the decrease of sludge activity, especially at a high R cb. EPS analysis showed that electric conductivity (EC), proteins in soluble microbial products (SMP), and SMP brought by NF concentrate are the dominant factors causing the severe membrane fouling in MBR. Furthermore, undegradable substances including fulvic acid-like and humic acid-like compounds accumulated in NF concentrate showed significant influence on fouling of NF. MBR could well degrade small MW compounds in NF concentrate, which confirmed the enhancement of organic removal efficiency by recycling the NF concentrate to MBR. The MBR-NF process showed a relatively stable performance at the R cb of 60 % (volume reduction factor (VRF) = 5), and the NF permeate could satisfy the water quality standard for fermentation process with a water recovery rate of 90.9 %.

  14. Antibiotic resistance in lactic acid bacteria isolated from some pharmaceutical and dairy products.

    PubMed

    Gad, Gamal Fadl M; Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M; Farag, Zeinab Shawky H

    2014-01-01

    A total of 244 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains were isolated from 180 dairy and pharmaceutical products that were collected from different areas in Minia governorate, Egypt. LAB were identified phenotypically on basis of morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics. Lactobacillus isolates were further confirmed using PCR-based assay. By combination of phenotypic with molecular identification Lactobacillus spp. were found to be the dominant genus (138, 76.7%) followed by Streptococcus spp. (65, 36.1%) and Lactococcus spp. (27, 15%). Some contaminant organisms such as (Staphylococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., mould and yeast) were isolated from the collected dairy samples but pharmaceutical products were free of such contaminants. Susceptibility of LAB isolates to antibiotics representing all major classes was tested by agar dilution method. Generally, LAB were highly susceptible to Beta-lactams except penicillin. Lactobacilli were resistant to vancomycin, however lactococci and streptococci proved to be very susceptible. Most strains were susceptible to tetracycline and showed a wide range of streptomycin MICs. The MICs of erythromycin and clindamycin for most of the LAB were within the normal range of susceptibility. Sixteen Lactobacillus, 8 Lactococcus and 8 Streptococcus isolates including all tetracycline and/or erythromycin resistant strains were tested for the presence of tetracycline and/or erythromycin resistant genes [tet(M) and/or erm(B)]. PCR assays shows that some resistant strains harbor tet(M) and/or erm(B) resistance genes.

  15. [Utilization of mycelial waste of antibiotic production in the technology of kilned construction materials].

    PubMed

    Karpukhin, V F; Krymskiĭ, M V; Ivanov, I A; Makridin, N I; Kalashnikov, V I

    1985-01-01

    At present the main part of the mycelial waste of antibiotic production is collected in sludge lagoones, discarded to the sewage treatment system or burnt. The mycelial waste is one of the causes of the environmental pollution. It contains a significant quantity of valuable substances, such as lipids, carbohydrates, proteins and amino acids. The inorganic portion of the waste includes the compounds of calcium, magnesium, sodium, iron, silicium and phosphorus. The levels of the above substances in the mycelial waste allow using it as organic mineral additives in making expanded clay aggregate gravel with the use of low quality clay and loam. It may be also used as the burn-out of the raw material charge in making burnt bricks and other burnt building materials. By its calorific value the mycelial waste is equal to brown coal or peat. It was shown that the structural and mechanical properties of the mixtures of the mycelium and clay depended on the moisture content of the composition and the proportion of its components. The mycelial waste provided a decrease in the optimal temperature of burning by 40-50 degrees C. The production tests at the expanded clay aggregate plants showed that the bulk weight of expanded clay aggregate might be lowered by 50-100 kg/m3 and the usual additives with the use of petroleum products might be completely excluded from the technological process. The use of the mycelial waste for manufacture of burnt building materials provides saving of the fuel energy sources and improvement of the quality of the finished product. It is also important from the ecological viewpoint.

  16. Enhanced antibiotic production by Streptomyces sindenensis using artificial neural networks coupled with genetic algorithm and Nelder-Mead downhill simplex.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, C K M; Khan, Mahvish; Praveen, Vandana; Khan, Saif; Srivastava, Akanksha

    2012-07-01

    Antibiotic production with Streptomyces sindenensis MTCC 8122 was optimized under submerged fermentation conditions by artificial neural network (ANN) coupled with genetic algorithm (GA) and Nelder-Mead downhill simplex (NMDS). Feed forward back-propagation ANN was trained to establish the mathematical relationship among the medium components and length of incubation period for achieving maximum antibiotic yield. The optimization strategy involved growing the culture with varying concentrations of various medium components for different incubation periods. Under non-optimized condition, antibiotic production was found to be 95 microgram/ml, which nearly doubled (176 microgram/ml) with the ANN-GA optimization. ANN-NMDS optimization was found to be more efficacious, and maximum antibiotic production (197 microgram/ml) was obtained by cultivating the cells with (g/l) fructose 2.7602, MgSO4 1.2369, (NH4)2PO4 0.2742, DL-threonine 3.069%, and soyabean meal 1.952%, for 9.8531 days of incubation, which was roughly 12% higher than the yield obtained by ANN coupled with GA under the same conditions.

  17. Effects of antibiotics and other drugs on toxin production in Clostridium difficile in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Barc, M C; Depitre, C; Corthier, G; Collignon, A; Su, W J; Bourlioux, P

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to understand more completely why patients treated with phenothiazines (chlorpromazine and cyamemazine), methotrexate, and certain antibiotics such as clindamycin have an increased risk of developing pseudomembranous colitis, the production of toxins A and B by Clostridium difficile in the presence of these drugs was measured in vitro as well as in vivo by using axenic mice. None of the drugs tested increased the production of toxins either in vitro or in vivo. PMID:1416834

  18. Antibiotic production by Pseudomonas: Insights into biosynthesis, diversity, and environmental consequences.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our current understanding of the biochemistry and environmental consequences of antibiotic biosynthesis by Pseudomonas is derived largely from studies of root-associated strains inhibitory to plant pathogens. Such strains often produce one or more antibiotics including pyoluteorin, pyrrolnitrin, 2,4...

  19. Quorum-sensing signaling is required for production of the antibiotic pyrrolnitrin in a rhizospheric biocontrol strain of Serratia plymuthica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Bimerew, Mohammed; Ma, Yingxin; Müller, Henry; Ovadis, Marianna; Eberl, Leo; Berg, Gabriele; Chernin, Leonid

    2007-05-01

    One mechanism that bacteria have adopted to regulate the production of antimicrobial compounds is population-density-dependent LuxRI-type quorum sensing (QS), exploiting the production of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) autoinducer signals. In biocontrol bacteria, most known cases involve the AHL control of phenazine antibiotics production by rhizospheric pseudomonads. This work is the first to demonstrate that phenazines are not the only group of biocontrol-related antibiotics whose production is regulated by QS systems. Strain HRO-C48 of Serratia plymuthica isolated from the rhizosphere of oilseed rape and described as a chitinolytic bacterium, which protects crops against Verticillium wilt, was also shown to produce wide-range antibiotic pyrrolnitrin and several AHLs, including N-butanoyl-HSL, N-hexanoyl-HSL and N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-HSL (OHHL). The genes splI and splR, which are analogues of luxI and luxR genes from other Gram-negative bacteria, were cloned and sequenced. The mutant AHL-4 (splI::miniTn5) was simultaneously deficient in the production of AHLs and pyrrolnitrin, as well as in its ability to suppress the growth of several fungal plant pathogens in vitro. However, pyrrolnitrin production could be restored in this mutant by introduction of the splIR genes cloned into a plasmid or by addition of the conditioned medium from strain C48 or OHHL standard to the growth medium.

  20. Farm factors associated with the use of antibiotics in pig production.

    PubMed

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Puister-Jansen, L F; van Asselt, E D; Burgers, S L G E

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate farm-level economic and technical factors that are associated with the use of antibiotics on pig farms. Identification of such factors, like farm size and net farm result, may help to increase epidemiological knowledge and to specify farm advice and policy making to reduce inappropriate use of antibiotics. The study used over 300 farm-year records collected during 2004 to 2007 from pig farms in the Netherlands. Data included economic and technical factors as well as antibiotic administration. Data were statistically analyzed for factors associated with antibiotic use, both for fattening pig and sow farms (piglets only), separately. The response variable was the average number of daily dosages per average pig year. Statistical analysis was performed on 16 and 19 potential explanatory factors for the fattening pig and sow farms, respectively. The results showed that, both on the fattening pig and sow farms, the average use of antibiotics increased from 2004 to 2006, but decreased during 2007, but the effect of year was not significant (P > 0.05). Use of antibiotics varied between individual farms. Large farm repeatability for the use of antibiotics in the different years was found. Factors associated (P < 0.05) with the use of antibiotics included: farm system, number of pigs, and population density in the region of the farm (for sow farms only). As these factors are easy to collect and to register, they can be used to specify farm advice and investigation, as well as for policy making. The majority of the technical and economic factors were not significantly (P > 0.05) related to the on-farm use of antibiotics. Therefore, it is recommended to focus future research on the potential role of socioeconomic factors associated with antibiotic use on pig farms.

  1. Diversity of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Enterococcus Strains Isolated from Ready-to-Eat Meat Products.

    PubMed

    Chajęcka-Wierzchowska, Wioleta; Zadernowska, Anna; Łaniewska-Trokenheim, Łucja

    2016-10-25

    The objective of the study was to answer the question of whether the ready-to-eat meat products can pose indirect hazard for consumer health serving as reservoir of Enterococcus strains harboring tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, and macrolides resistance genes. A total of 390 samples of ready-to-eat meat products were investigated. Enterococcus strains were found in 74.1% of the samples. A total of 302 strains were classified as: Enterococcus faecalis (48.7%), Enterococcus faecium (39.7%), Enterococcus casseliflavus (4.3%), Enterococcus durans (3.0%), Enterococcus hirae (2.6%), and other Enterococcus spp. (1.7%). A high percentage of isolates were resistant to streptomycin high level (45%) followed by erythromycin (42.7%), fosfomycin (27.2%), rifampicin (19.2%), tetracycline (36.4%), tigecycline (19.9%). The ant(6')-Ia gene was the most frequently found gene (79.6%). Among the other genes that encode aminoglycosides-modifying enzymes, the highest portion of the strains had the aac(6')-Ie-aph(2'')-Ia (18.5%) and aph(3'')-IIIa (16.6%), but resistance of isolates from food is also an effect of the presence of aph(2'')-Ib, aph(2'')-Ic, aph(2'')-Id genes. Resistance to tetracyclines was associated with the presence of tetM (43.7%), tetL (32.1%), tetK (14.6%), tetW (0.7%), and tetO (0.3%) genes. The ermB and ermA genes were found in 33.8% and 18.9% of isolates, respectively. Nearly half of the isolates contained a conjugative transposon of the Tn916/Tn1545 family. Enterococci are widely present in retail ready-to-eat meat products. Many isolated strains (including such species as E. casseliflavus, E. durans, E. hirae, and Enterococcus gallinarum) are antibiotic resistant and carry transferable resistance genes. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. Synthesis aided structural determination of amyloid-β(1-15) glycopeptides, new biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Nilsson, Jonas; Brinkmalm, Gunnar; Larson, Göran; Huang, Xuefei

    2014-12-11

    Unique tyrosine glycosylated amyloid-β(1-15) glycopeptides were synthesized with well-defined stereochemistry at the glycosidic linkages. Aided by these glycopeptides and tandem mass spectrometry analysis, the naturally existing amyloid-β glycopeptides, isolated from Alzheimer's disease patients, were determined to contain an α-linked N-acetyl galactosamine at the modified tyrosine 10 residue. Glycosylation can significantly impact the properties of amyloid-β as the glycopeptide has much lower affinity for Cu(+) ions.

  3. Click Synthesis of Hydrophilic Maltose-Functionalized Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanoparticles Based on Dopamine Anchors for Highly Selective Enrichment of Glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Bi, Changfen; Zhao, Yingran; Shen, Lijin; Zhang, Kai; He, Xiwen; Chen, Langxing; Zhang, Yukui

    2015-11-11

    The development of methods to isolate and enrich low-abundance glycopeptides from biological samples is crucial to glycoproteomics. Herein, we present an easy and one-step surface modification strategy to prepare hydrophilic maltose functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs). First, based on the chelation of the catechol ligand with iron atoms, azido-terminated dopamine (DA) derivative was assembled on the surface of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles by sonication. Second, the hydrophilic maltose-functionalized Fe3O4 (Fe3O4-DA-Maltose) NPs were obtained via copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click chemistry). The morphology, structure, and composition of Fe3O4-DA-Maltose NPs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Meanwhile, hydrophilicity of the obtained NPs was evaluated by water contact angle measurement. The hydrophilic Fe3O4-DA-Maltose NPs were applied in isolation and enrichment of glycopeptides from horseradish peroxidase (HRP), immunoglobulin (IgG) digests. The MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis indicated that the novel NPs exhibited high detection sensitivity in enrichment from HRP digests at concentration as low as 0.05 ng μL(-1), a large binding capacity up to 43 mg g(-1), and good recovery for glycopeptides enrichment (85-110%). Moreover, the Fe3O4-DA-Maltose NPs were applied to enrich glycopeptides from human renal mesangial cells (HRMC) for identification of N-glycosylation sites. Finally, we identified 115 different N-linked glycopeptides, representing 93 gene products and 124 glycosylation sites in HRMC.

  4. Molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance profiles of Salmonella isolated from fecal matter of domestic animals and animal products in Nairobi.

    PubMed

    Nyabundi, Diana; Onkoba, Nyamongo; Kimathi, Rinter; Nyachieo, Atunga; Juma, Gerald; Kinyanjui, Peter; Kamau, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella has significant public health implications causing food borne and zoonotic diseases in humans. Treatment of infections due to Salmonella is becoming difficult due to emergence of drug resistant strains. There is therefore need to characterize the circulating non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars in domestic animals and animal products in Kenya as well as determine their antibiotic resistance profiles. A total of 740 fecal samples were collected from cows (n = 150), pigs (n = 182), chicken (n = 191) and chicken eggs (n = 217) from various markets and abattoirs in Nairobi. The prevalence of NTS serovars using culture techniques and biochemical tests, antimicrobial sensitivity testing using disc diffusion method of the commonly prescribed antibiotics and phylogenetic relationships using 16S rRNA were determined. The results showed that the overall prevalence of Salmonella was 3.8, 3.6, 5.9 and 2.6% for pigs, chicken, eggs and cows respectively. Two serovars were isolated S. Typhimurium (85%) and S. Enteritidis (15%) and these two serovars formed distinct clades on the phylogenetic tree. Forty percent of the isolates were resistant to one or more antibiotics. The isolation of Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Enteritidis that are resistant to commonly used antibiotics from seemingly healthy animals and animal products poses a significant public health threat. This points to the need for regular surveillance to be carried out and the chain of transmission should be viewed to ascertain sources of contamination.

  5. Disruption of Macrodomain Protein SCO6735 Increases Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces coelicolor*

    PubMed Central

    Lalić, Jasna; Posavec Marjanović, Melanija; Palazzo, Luca; Perina, Dragutin; Sabljić, Igor; Žaja, Roko; Colby, Thomas; Pleše, Bruna; Halasz, Mirna; Jankevicius, Gytis; Bucca, Giselda; Ahel, Marijan; Matić, Ivan; Ćetković, Helena; Luić, Marija; Mikoč, Andreja; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that can alter the physical and chemical properties of target proteins and that controls many important cellular processes. Macrodomains are evolutionarily conserved structural domains that bind ADP-ribose derivatives and are found in proteins with diverse cellular functions. Some proteins from the macrodomain family can hydrolyze ADP-ribosylated substrates and therefore reverse this post-translational modification. Bacteria and Streptomyces, in particular, are known to utilize protein ADP-ribosylation, yet very little is known about their enzymes that synthesize and remove this modification. We have determined the crystal structure and characterized, both biochemically and functionally, the macrodomain protein SCO6735 from Streptomyces coelicolor. This protein is a member of an uncharacterized subfamily of macrodomain proteins. Its crystal structure revealed a highly conserved macrodomain fold. We showed that SCO6735 possesses the ability to hydrolyze PARP-dependent protein ADP-ribosylation. Furthermore, we showed that expression of this protein is induced upon DNA damage and that deletion of this protein in S. coelicolor increases antibiotic production. Our results provide the first insights into the molecular basis of its action and impact on Streptomyces metabolism. PMID:27634042

  6. Beyond conventional antibiotics - New directions for combination products to combat biofilm.

    PubMed

    Bayramov, Danir Fanisovich; Neff, Jennifer Ann

    2017-03-01

    Medical device related infections are a significant and growing source of morbidity and mortality. Biofilm formation is a common feature of medical device infections that is not effectively prevented or treated by systemic antibiotics. Antimicrobial medical device combination products provide a pathway for local delivery of antimicrobial therapeutics with the ability to achieve high local concentrations while minimizing systemic side effects. In this review, we present considerations for the design of local antimicrobial delivery systems, which can be facilitated by modeling local pharmacokinetics in the context of the target device application. In addition to the need for local delivery, a critical barrier to progress in the field is the need to incorporate agents effective against biofilm. This article aims to review key properties of antimicrobial peptides that make them well suited to meet the demands of the next generation of antimicrobial medical devices, including broad spectrum activity, rapid and biocidal mechanisms of action, and efficacy against biofilm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Oxidation of β-lactam antibiotics by peracetic acid: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kejia; Zhou, Xinyan; Du, Penghui; Zhang, Tuqiao; Cai, Meiquan; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2017-10-15

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a disinfection oxidant used in many industries including wastewater treatment. β-Lactams, a group of widely prescribed antibiotics, are frequently detected in wastewater effluents and surface waters. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven β-lactams (cefalexin (CFX), cefadroxil (CFR), cefapirin (CFP), cephalothin (CFT), ampicillin (AMP), amoxicillin (AMX) and penicillin G (PG)) toward PAA were investigated to elucidate the behavior of β-lactams during PAA oxidation processes. The reaction follows second-order kinetics and is much faster at pH 5 and 7 than at pH 9 due to speciation of PAA. Reactivity to PAA follows the order of CFR ∼ CFX > AMP ∼ AMX > CFT ∼ CFP ∼ PG and is related to β-lactam's nucleophilicity. The thioether sulfur of β-lactams is attacked by PAA to generate sulfoxide products. Presence of the phenylglycinyl amino group on β-lactams can significantly influence electron distribution and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) location and energy in ways that enhance the reactivity to PAA. Reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to accurately model the decay of β-lactams by PAA in surface water matrix and only slightly overestimate the decay in wastewater matrix. Results of this study indicate that the oxidative transformation of β-lactams by PAA can be expected under appropriate wastewater treatment conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Modulation of the gut microbiota with antibiotic treatment suppresses whole body urea production in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Puiman, Patrycja; Stoll, Barbara; Mølbak, Lars; de Bruijn, Adrianus; Schierbeek, Henk; Boye, Mette; Boehm, Günther; Renes, Ingrid; van Goudoever, Johannes; Burrin, Douglas

    2013-02-01

    We examined whether changes in the gut microbiota induced by clinically relevant interventions would impact the bioavailability of dietary amino acids in neonates. We tested the hypothesis that modulation of the gut microbiota in neonatal pigs receiving no treatment (control), intravenously administered antibiotics, or probiotics affects whole body nitrogen and amino acid turnover. We quantified whole body urea kinetics, threonine fluxes, and threonine disposal into protein, oxidation, and tissue protein synthesis with stable isotope techniques. Compared with controls, antibiotics reduced the number and diversity of bacterial species in the distal small intestine (SI) and colon. Antibiotics decreased plasma urea concentrations via decreased urea synthesis. Antibiotics elevated threonine plasma concentrations and turnover, as well as whole body protein synthesis and proteolysis. Antibiotics decreased protein synthesis rate in the proximal SI and liver but did not affect the distal SI, colon, or muscle. Probiotics induced a bifidogenic microbiota and decreased plasma urea concentrations but did not affect whole body threonine or protein metabolism. Probiotics decreased protein synthesis in the proximal SI but not in other tissues. In conclusion, modulation of the gut microbiota by antibiotics and probiotics reduced hepatic ureagenesis and intestinal protein synthesis, but neither altered whole body net threonine balance. These findings suggest that changes in amino acid and nitrogen metabolism resulting from antibiotic- or probiotic-induced shifts in the microbiota are localized to the gut and liver and have limited impact on whole body growth and anabolism in neonatal piglets.

  9. Modulation of the gut microbiota with antibiotic treatment suppresses whole body urea production in neonatal pigs

    PubMed Central

    Puiman, Patrycja; Stoll, Barbara; Mølbak, Lars; de Bruijn, Adrianus; Schierbeek, Henk; Boye, Mette; Boehm, Günther; Renes, Ingrid; Burrin, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether changes in the gut microbiota induced by clinically relevant interventions would impact the bioavailability of dietary amino acids in neonates. We tested the hypothesis that modulation of the gut microbiota in neonatal pigs receiving no treatment (control), intravenously administered antibiotics, or probiotics affects whole body nitrogen and amino acid turnover. We quantified whole body urea kinetics, threonine fluxes, and threonine disposal into protein, oxidation, and tissue protein synthesis with stable isotope techniques. Compared with controls, antibiotics reduced the number and diversity of bacterial species in the distal small intestine (SI) and colon. Antibiotics decreased plasma urea concentrations via decreased urea synthesis. Antibiotics elevated threonine plasma concentrations and turnover, as well as whole body protein synthesis and proteolysis. Antibiotics decreased protein synthesis rate in the proximal SI and liver but did not affect the distal SI, colon, or muscle. Probiotics induced a bifidogenic microbiota and decreased plasma urea concentrations but did not affect whole body threonine or protein metabolism. Probiotics decreased protein synthesis in the proximal SI but not in other tissues. In conclusion, modulation of the gut microbiota by antibiotics and probiotics reduced hepatic ureagenesis and intestinal protein synthesis, but neither altered whole body net threonine balance. These findings suggest that changes in amino acid and nitrogen metabolism resulting from antibiotic- or probiotic-induced shifts in the microbiota are localized to the gut and liver and have limited impact on whole body growth and anabolism in neonatal piglets. PMID:23139222

  10. Highly efficient enrichment of N-linked glycopeptides using a hydrophilic covalent-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yu-Fang; Yuan, Fang; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang

    2017-08-21

    The enrichment of glycopeptides plays an important role in glycoproteomics. In this paper, a covalent-organic framework called TpPa-1, synthesized by the Schiff base reaction of 1,3,5-triformylphloroglucinol and paraphenylenediamine, was first successfully utilized as a hydrophilic porous material for N-linked glycopeptide enrichment. Using this material, interference from non-glycopeptides could be efficiently eliminated, which facilitated the mass spectrometry detection of glycopeptides. By capturing N-linked glycopeptides from tryptic digests of human IgG, our method was proved to have high sensitivity at the femtomole level. And it showed superior selectivity for glycopeptides even when non-glycopeptides were 1000 times more concentrated. Due to the strong covalent bonds, this material possessed good stability and could be repeatedly used for at least 10 times. The ultra-low mass density and abundant binding sites also provided it with high binding capacity (178 mg g(-1), IgG/TpPa-1). Moreover, N-linked glycopeptides were easily enriched by this material from only 10 μL human serum, which demonstrated its potential in pretreatment of complex biological samples.

  11. Isolation, purification, and characterization of avian antimicrobial glycopeptide from the posterior salivary gland of Sepia pharaonis.

    PubMed

    Karthik, R; Saravanan, R; Ebenezar, K Kumar; Sivamalai, T

    2015-02-01

    A proteinaceous glycopeptide was isolated from the posterior salivary gland (PSG) of Sepia pharaonis by gel (Sephadex G-100) filtration chromatography and purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Among the collected fractions, fraction 12 showed a retention time (RT) of 31 min. The total protein and neutral sugar contents of the purified glycopeptide were recorded as 68.14 and 2.95 mg, respectively. The molecular weight of the purified glycopeptide was found to be ~50 kDa. The infrared (IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of peptide and secondary structure in the purified glycopeptide. The antibacterial activity of the purified glycopeptide against avian bacterial strains was also determined. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of the purified glycopeptide revealed the likely compounds for the antibacterial activity such as 22, 23-dibromostigmasterol acetate, 3-methyl 2-(2-oxypropyl) furan, and 2,4,4-trimethyl-3-hydroxymethyl-5A-(3-methyl-but-2-enyl)-cyclohexene. These three compounds found in the purified glycopeptide could be responsible for the antibacterial activity against the avian pathogens. The results of this study suggest that the purified glycopeptide from the PSG of S. pharaonis could be an antibacterial agent against avian bacterial pathogens.

  12. Effects of salinity on antibiotic production in sponge-derived Salinispora actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ng, Y K; Hodson, M P; Hewavitharana, A K; Bose, U; Shaw, P N; Fuerst, J A

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the effects of growth conditions related to marine habitat on antibiotic production in sponge-derived Salinispora actinobacteria. Media with varying salt concentration were used to investigate the effects of salinity in relation to Salinispora growth and rifamycin production. The chemotypic profiles of the model strain Salinispora arenicola M413 was then assessed using metabolomic fingerprints from high-pressure liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and multivariate data analysis, before extending this approach to two other strains of S. arenicola. Fingerprint data were generated from extracts of S. arenicola broth cultures grown in media of varying salt (NaCl) concentrations. These fingerprints were then compared using multivariate analysis methods such as principal components analysis (PCA) and orthogonal projection to latent structures discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). From the analysis, a low-sodium growth condition (1% NaCl) was found to delay the onset of growth of the model S. arenicola M413 strain when compared to growth in media with either 3% artificial sea salt or 3% NaCl. However, low-sodium growth conditions also increased cell mass yield and contributed to at least a significant twofold increase in rifamycin yield when compared to growth in 3% artificial sea salt and 3% NaCl. The integration of HPLC-DAD and multivariate analysis proved to be an effective method of assessing chemotypic variations in Salinispora grown in different salt conditions, with clear differences between strain-related chemotypes apparent due to varying salt concentrations. The observed variation in S. arenicola chemotypic profiles further suggests diversity in secondary metabolites in this actinomycete in response to changes in the salinity of its environment. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. When can glycopeptides be assigned based solely on high-resolution mass spectrometry data?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desaire, Heather; Hua, David

    2009-10-01

    Glycoproteomics is an emerging science that shows promise in applications such as biomarker discovery and biopharmaceutical development. One central technique in glycoproteomic analysis is analyzing glycopeptides by mass spectrometry. This challenging technique is still under development, and methods to simplify the data analysis are greatly needed. One potentially attractive analysis approach would be to assign a significant portion of the glycopeptide compositions using high-resolution MS data. In the work described herein, we ask the question: Under what circumstances is it possible to assign glycopeptides to MS data, using only high-resolution mass spectra? Variables investigated include the number of glycosylation sites on the protein, the potential diversity of the glycans attached to the protein, and the mass accuracy obtained. This work outlines guidelines for when it is (and is not) appropriate to rely heavily on high-resolution mass measurements to assign glycopeptide compositions; such guidelines are potentially useful for anyone conducting glycopeptide analysis by mass spectrometry.

  14. Prediction of collision-induced dissociation spectra of common N-glycopeptides for glycoform identification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongqi; Shah, Bhavana

    2010-12-15

    Confident identification of the glycan moieties in glycopeptides by collision-induced dissociation (CID) requires accurate prediction of the CID spectrum of the glycopeptides. In this Article, the kinetic model for the prediction of peptide CID spectra is extended to predict the CID spectra of N-glycopeptides. The model was trained with 1831 ion-trap CID spectra of N-glycopeptides and is able to predict ion-trap CID spectra with excellent accuracy in ion intensities for N-glycopeptides up to 8000 u in mass. A total of 524 common glycoforms including complex N-glycans with 2-4 antennas, plus high-mannose type and hybrid type, can be predicted.

  15. Detection of glycopeptide resistance genes in enterococci by multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Puneet; Sahni, A.K.; Praharaj, A.K.; Grover, Naveen; Kumar, Mahadevan; Chaudhari, C.N.; Khajuria, Atul

    2014-01-01

    Background Vancomycin Resistant Enterococci (VRE) are a major cause of nosocomial infections. There are various phenotypic and genotypic methods of detection of glycopeptide resistance in enterococci. This study utilizes multiplex PCR for reliable detection of various glycopeptides resistance genes in VRE. Method This study was conducted to detect and to assess the prevalence of vancomycin resistance among enterococci isolates. From October 2011 to June 2013, a total of 96 non-repetitive isolates of enterococci from various clinical samples were analyzed. VRE were identified by Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of all isolates for vancomycin and teicoplanin was determined by E-test. Multiplex PCR was carried out for all enterococci isolates using six sets of primers. Results Out of 96 isolates, 14 (14.6%) were found to be resistant to vancomycin by vancomycin E-test method (MIC ≥32 μg/ml). Out of these 14 isolates, 13 were also resistant to teicoplanin (MIC ≥16 μg/ml). VanA gene was detected in all the 14 isolates by Multiplex PCR. One of the PCR amplicons was sent for sequencing and the sequence received was submitted in the GenBank (GenBank accession no. KF181100). Conclusion Prevalence of VRE in this study was 14.6%. Multiplex PCR is a robust, sensitive and specific technique, which can be used for rapid detection of various glycopeptide resistance genes. Rapid identification of patients infected or colonized with VRE is essential for implementation of appropriate control measures to prevent their spread. PMID:25609863

  16. [Study of simultaneous determination of residual veterinary drugs including tetracycline antibiotics in milk and dairy products].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Emiko; Shibuya, Takahiro; Kurokawa, Chieko; Inoue, Yutaka; Yamamoto, Yoshihiko; Miyazaki, Motonobu

    2009-10-01

    It is considered to be difficult to detect tetracycline antibiotics in all-at-once simultaneous analysis with other drugs by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, because tetracycline antibiotics chelate with bivalent metal ions such as calcium in samples. Therefore, we studied simultaneous determination of tetracycline antibiotics after removal of calcium with disodium ethylenediaminotetraacetate (EDTA-2Na). Tetracycline antibiotics could be assayed in all-at-once analysis by adding EDTA-2Na during the extraction procedure. It was possible to determine 65 veterinary drugs in milk, 70 in yogurt, 59 in whipped cream, 67 in cheese and 60 in ice cream. Recovery ranged from 70 to 120%, with a coefficient of variation of less than 25% and with a quantification limit of 0.01 microg/g (S/N>or=10).

  17. Characterization of Antibiotic Resistance Genes from Lactobacillus Isolated from Traditional Dairy Products.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huiling; Pan, Lin; Li, Lina; Lu, Jie; Kwok, Laiyu; Menghe, Bilige; Zhang, Heping; Zhang, Wenyi

    2017-03-01

    Lactobacilli are widely used as starter cultures or probiotics in yoghurt, cheese, beer, wine, pickles, preserved food, and silage. They are generally recognized as safe (GRAS). However, recent studies have shown that some lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains carry antibiotic resistance genes and are resistant to antibiotics. Some of them may even transfer their intrinsic antibiotic resistance genes to other LAB or pathogens via horizontal gene transfer, thus threatening human health. A total of 33 Lactobacillus strains was isolated from fermented milk collected from different areas of China. We analyzed (1) their levels of antibiotic resistance using a standardized dilution method, (2) their antibiotic resistance gene profiles by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using gene-specific primers, and (3) the transferability of some of the detected resistance markers by a filter mating assay. All Lactobacillus strains were found to be resistant to vancomycin, but susceptible to gentamicin, linezolid, neomycin, erythromycin, and clindamycin. Their susceptibilities to tetracycline, kanamycin, ciprofloxacin, streptomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, trimethoprim, ampicillin, rifampicin, and chloramphenicol was different. Results from our PCR analysis revealed 19 vancomycin, 10 ciprofloxacin, and 1 tetracycline-resistant bacteria that carried the van(X), van(E), gyr(A), and tet(M) genes, respectively. Finally, no transferal of the monitored antibiotic resistance genes was observed in the filter mating assay. Taken together, our study generated the antibiotic resistance profiles of some milk-originated lactobacilli isolates and preliminarily assessed their risk of transferring antibiotic gene to other bacteria. The study may provide important data concerning the safe use of LAB. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  18. Antifreeze glycopeptide adsorption on single crystal ice surfaces using ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, P. W.; Beaglehole, D.; DeVries, A. L.

    1993-01-01

    Antarctic fishes synthesise antifreeze proteins which can effectively inhibit the growth of ice crystals. The mechanism relies on adsorption of these proteins to the ice surface. Ellipsometry has been used to quantify glycopeptide antifreeze adsorption to the basal and prism faces of single ice crystals. The rate of accumulation was determined as a function of time and at concentrations between 0.0005 and 1.2 mg/ml. Estimates of packing density at saturation coverage have been made for the basal and prism faces. PMID:19431902

  19. Opioid glycopeptide analgesics derived from endogenous enkephalins and endorphins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingxue; Lefever, Mark R; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Bidlack, Jean M; Bilsky, Edward J; Polt, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, potent and selective analgesics have been developed from endogenous opioid peptides. Glycosylation provides an important means of modulating interaction with biological membranes, which greatly affects the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of the resulting glycopeptide analogues. Furthermore, manipulation of the membrane affinity allows penetration of cellular barriers that block efficient drug distribution, including the blood–brain barrier. Extremely potent and selective opiate agonists have been developed from endogenous peptides, some of which show great promise as drug candidates. PMID:22300099

  20. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  1. [Contribution of microbiologists of Kirov City to development of penicillin and streptomycin production processes (70 years since development of technology for submerged production of first domestic antibiotics)].

    PubMed

    Bakulin, M K; Tumanov, A S; Bakulin, V M; Kalininskiĭ, V B

    2014-01-01

    The publication is concerned with development of the technological processes for submered production of the first domestic antibiotics 70 years age. The literature data on the contribution of the microbiologists of the Kirov City and mainly the workers of the Red Army Research Institute of Epidemiology and Hygiene (nowadays Central Research Institute No. 48 of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation, Kirov), to development of the manufacture processes for production of penicillin and streptomycin are reviewed.

  2. Acquired Genetic Mechanisms of a Multiresistant Bacterium Isolated from a Treatment Plant Receiving Wastewater from Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Johnning, Anna; Moore, Edward R. B.; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Larsson, D. G. Joakim

    2013-01-01

    The external environment, particularly wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), where environmental bacteria meet human commensals and pathogens in large numbers, has been highlighted as a potential breeding ground for antibiotic resistance. We have isolated the extensively drug-resistant Ochrobactrum intermedium CCUG 57381 from an Indian WWTP receiving industrial wastewater from pharmaceutical production contaminated with high levels of quinolones. Antibiotic susceptibility testing against 47 antibiotics showed that the strain was 4 to >500 times more resistant to sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, macrolides, and the aminoglycoside streptomycin than the type strain O. intermedium LMG 3301T. Whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in the Indian strain causing amino acid substitutions in the target enzymes of quinolones. We also characterized three acquired regions containing resistance genes to sulfonamides (sul1), tetracyclines [tet(G) and tetR], and chloramphenicol/florfenicol (floR). Furthermore, the Indian strain harbored acquired mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer, including a type I mating pair-forming system (MPFI), a MOBP relaxase, and insertion sequence transposons. Our results highlight that WWTPs serving antibiotic manufacturing may provide nearly ideal conditions for the recruitment of resistance genes into human commensal and pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24038701

  3. Acquired genetic mechanisms of a multiresistant bacterium isolated from a treatment plant receiving wastewater from antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Johnning, Anna; Moore, Edward R B; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Shouche, Yogesh S; Larsson, D G Joakim; Kristiansson, Erik

    2013-12-01

    The external environment, particularly wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), where environmental bacteria meet human commensals and pathogens in large numbers, has been highlighted as a potential breeding ground for antibiotic resistance. We have isolated the extensively drug-resistant Ochrobactrum intermedium CCUG 57381 from an Indian WWTP receiving industrial wastewater from pharmaceutical production contaminated with high levels of quinolones. Antibiotic susceptibility testing against 47 antibiotics showed that the strain was 4 to >500 times more resistant to sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, macrolides, and the aminoglycoside streptomycin than the type strain O. intermedium LMG 3301T. Whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in the Indian strain causing amino acid substitutions in the target enzymes of quinolones. We also characterized three acquired regions containing resistance genes to sulfonamides (sul1), tetracyclines [tet(G) and tetR], and chloramphenicol/florfenicol (floR). Furthermore, the Indian strain harbored acquired mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer, including a type I mating pair-forming system (MPFI), a MOBP relaxase, and insertion sequence transposons. Our results highlight that WWTPs serving antibiotic manufacturing may provide nearly ideal conditions for the recruitment of resistance genes into human commensal and pathogenic bacteria.

  4. SdrA, a new DeoR family regulator involved in Streptomyces avermitilis morphological development and antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Ulanova, Dana; Kitani, Shigeru; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Nihira, Takuya

    2013-12-01

    The SAV3339 (SdrA) protein of Streptomyces avermitilis, a member of the DeoR family of regulators, was assessed to determine its in vivo function by gene knockdown through the use of cis-encoded noncoding RNA and knockout of the sdrA gene. These analyses revealed that SdrA represents another class of Streptomyces regulator that controls morphological development and antibiotic production.

  5. SdrA, a New DeoR Family Regulator Involved in Streptomyces avermitilis Morphological Development and Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Ulanova, Dana; Kitani, Shigeru; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2013-01-01

    The SAV3339 (SdrA) protein of Streptomyces avermitilis, a member of the DeoR family of regulators, was assessed to determine its in vivo function by gene knockdown through the use of cis-encoded noncoding RNA and knockout of the sdrA gene. These analyses revealed that SdrA represents another class of Streptomyces regulator that controls morphological development and antibiotic production. PMID:24123736

  6. Total Syntheses and Initial Evaluation of [Ψ[C(=S)NH]Tpg4]vancomycin, [Ψ[C(=NH)NH]Tpg4]vancomycin, [Ψ[CH2NH]Tpg4]vancomycin and their (4-Chlorobiphenyl)methyl Derivatives: Synergistic Binding Pocket and Peripheral Modifications for the Glycopeptide Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Okano, Akinori; Nakayama, Atsushi; Wu, Kejia; Lindsey, Erick A.; Schammel, Alex W.; Feng, Yiqing; Collins, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Full details of studies are disclosed on the total synthesis of binding pocket analogues of vancomycin, bearing the peripheral L-vancosaminyl-1,2-D-glucosyl disaccharide, that contain changes to a key single atom in the residue 4 amide (residue 4 carbonyl O → S, NH, H2) designed to directly address the underlying molecular basis of resistance to vancomycin. Also disclosed are studies piloting the late stage transformations conducted on the synthetically more accessible C-terminus hydroxymethyl aglycon derivatives and full details of the peripheral chlorobiphenyl functionalization of all the binding pocket modified vancomycin analogues designed for dual D-Ala-D-Ala/D-Ala-D-Lac binding are reported. Their collective assessment indicate that combined binding pocket and chlorobiphenyl peripherally modified analogues exhibit a remarkable spectrum of antimicrobial activity (VSSA, MRSA, VanA and VanB VRE) and impressive potencies against both vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant bacteria (MICs = 0.06–0.005 μg/mL and 0.5–0.06 μg/mL for the amidine and methylene analogues, respectively) and likely benefit from two independent and synergistic mechanisms of action, only one of which is dependent on D-Ala-D-Ala/D-Ala-D-Lac binding. Such analogues are likely to display especially durable antibiotic activity not prone to rapidly acquired clinical resistance. PMID:25750995

  7. Total syntheses and initial evaluation of [Ψ[C(═S)NH]Tpg⁴]vancomycin, [Ψ[C(═NH)NH]Tpg⁴]vancomycin, [Ψ[CH₂NH]Tpg⁴]vancomycin, and their (4-chlorobiphenyl)methyl derivatives: synergistic binding pocket and peripheral modifications for the glycopeptide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Okano, Akinori; Nakayama, Atsushi; Wu, Kejia; Lindsey, Erick A; Schammel, Alex W; Feng, Yiqing; Collins, Karen C; Boger, Dale L

    2015-03-18

    Full details of studies are disclosed on the total syntheses of binding pocket analogues of vancomycin bearing the peripheral L-vancosaminyl-1,2-D-glucosyl disaccharide that contain changes to a key single atom in the residue-4 amide (residue-4 carbonyl O → S, NH, H2) designed to directly address the underlying molecular basis of resistance to vancomycin. Also disclosed are studies piloting the late-stage transformations conducted on the synthetically more accessible C-terminus hydroxymethyl aglycon derivatives and full details of the peripheral chlorobiphenyl functionalization of all of the binding-pocket-modified vancomycin analogues designed for dual D-Ala-D-Ala/D-Ala-D-Lac binding. Their collective assessment indicates that combined binding pocket and chlorobiphenyl peripherally modified analogues exhibit a remarkable spectrum of antimicrobial activity (VSSA, MRSA, and VanA and VanB VRE) and impressive potencies against both vancomycin-sensitive and vancomycin-resistant bacteria (MICs = 0.06-0.005 and 0.5-0.06 μg/mL for the amidine and methylene analogues, respectively) and likely benefit from two independent and synergistic mechanisms of action, only one of which is dependent on D-Ala-D-Ala/D-Ala-D-Lac binding. Such analogues are likely to display especially durable antibiotic activity that is not prone to rapidly acquired clinical resistance.

  8. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a halotolerant strain of Penicillium chrysogenum: antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Guedes, Sumaya; Mendes, Benilde; Leitão, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    The extensive use of pesticides in agriculture has prompted intensive research on chemical and biological methods in order to protect contamination of water and soil resources. In this paper the degradation of the pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid by a Penicillium chrysogenum strain previously isolated from a salt mine was studied in batch cultures. Co-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid with additives such as sugar and intermediates of pesticide metabolism was also investigated. Penicillium chrysogenum in solid medium was able to grow at concentrations up to 1000 mg/L of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) with sucrose. Meanwhile, supplementation of the solid medium with glucose and lactose led to fungal growth at concentrations up to 500 mg/L of herbicide. Batch cultures of 2,4-D at 100 mg/L were developed under aerobic conditions with the addition of glucose, lactose and sucrose, showing sucrose as the best additional carbon source. The 2,4-D removal was quantified by liquid chromatography. The fungus was able to use 2,4-D as the sole carbon and energy source under 0%, 2% and 5.9% NaCl. The greatest 2,4-D degradation efficiency was found using alpha-ketoglutarate and ascorbic acid as co-substrates under 2% NaCl at pH 7. Penicillin production was evaluated in submerged cultures by bioassay, and higher amounts of beta-lactam antibiotic were produced when the herbicide was alone. Taking into account the ability of P. chrysogenum CLONA2 to degrade aromatic compounds, this strain could be an interesting tool for 2,4-D herbicide remediation in saline environments.

  9. Improving glycopeptide synthesis: a convenient protocol for the preparation of beta-glycosylamines and the synthesis of glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Hackenberger, Christian P R; O'Reilly, Mary K; Imperiali, Barbara

    2005-04-29

    [reaction: see text] Herein we apply a recently introduced protocol using ammonium carbamate in methanol to the amination of crude chitobiose leading to 1,beta-aminochitobiose. This simple, one-step procedure allows a facile preparation of unstable glycosylamines in contrast to the commonly implemented ammonium bicarbonate based amination of water-soluble carbohydrates. The new amination protocol leads to an improved synthesis of the key chitobiosyl-asparagine building block for the SPPS of glycopeptides. The utility of the method is demonstrated with the synthesis of a 39-amino acid glycoprotein.

  10. Antibiotics Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Everyone Should Know What You Can Do Antibiotic Resistance Q&As Fast Facts Antibiotics Quiz Glossary For ... Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Core Elements of Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship ...

  11. Structure of glycopeptides isolated from bovine milk component PP3.

    PubMed

    Girardet, J M; Coddeville, B; Plancke, Y; Strecker, G; Campagna, S; Spik, G; Linden, G

    1995-12-15

    The heat-stable acid-soluble phosphoglycoprotein component PP3 was isolated from the bovine milk proteose peptone fraction by concanavalin A affinity chromatography. Glycopeptides were released by pronase digestion of the milk component PP3 and were subsequently separated by high-pH anion-exchange chromatography on CarboPac PA-1. The primary structures of the glycan and peptide moieties of eight N-glycopeptides have been established by combining methylation analysis, mass spectrometry, 400-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy, and peptide sequence analysis. All the analyzed fractions contained biantennary N-acetyllactosamine-type carbohydrate chains, some of them with a GalNAc(beta 1-4)GlcNAc or a NeuAc(alpha 2-6)GalNAc(beta 1-4)GlcNAc group. This particular sequence did or did not replace the Gal(beta 1-4)GlcNAc group usually found in most N-linked glycans. Moreover, the sialylated Gal and GalNAc residues were only found on the Man(alpha 1-3) antenna.

  12. Influence of pH on the sonolysis of ciprofloxacin: Biodegradability, ecotoxicity and antibiotic activity of its degradation products.

    PubMed

    De Bel, Evelien; Dewulf, Jo; Witte, Bavo De; Van Langenhove, Herman; Janssen, Colin

    2009-09-01

    The presence of antibiotics in the aquatic environment has raised concerns due to the potential risk for the emergence or persistence of antibiotic resistance. Antibiotics are often poorly degraded in conventional wastewater treatment plants. In this study, sonolysis at 520 kHz and 92 W L(-1) was used for the degradation of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin. In a first experiment at pH 7, 57% of the ciprofloxacin (15 mg L(-1)) was degraded after 120 min of ultrasonic irradiation at 25 degrees C. pH proved to be an important parameter determining the degradation rate, since the pseudo first order degradation constant increased almost fourfold when comparing treatment at pH 7 (0.0058 min(-1)) and pH 10 (0.0069 min(-1)) with that at pH 3 (0.021 min(-1)). This effect can be attributed to the degree of protonation of the ciprofloxacin molecule. The BOD/COD ratio of the solutions, which is a measure for their biodegradability, increased from 0.06 to 0.60, 0.17, and 0.18 after 120 min of irradiation depending on the pH (3, 7, and 10, respectively). The solution treated at pH 3 can even be considered readily biodegradable (BOD/COD>0.4). The antibiotic activity against Escherichia coli (G-) and Bacillus coagulans (G+) of the treated solutions also reduced after sonolysis. The highest decrease was again found when irradiated at pH 3. In contrast, ecotoxicity of the solutions to the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata increased 3- to 10-fold after 20 min of treatment, suggesting the formation of toxic degradation products. The toxicity slowly diminished during further treatment.

  13. Bakery by-products based feeds borne-Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with probiotic and antimycotoxin effects plus antibiotic resistance properties for use in animal production.

    PubMed

    Poloni, Valeria; Salvato, Lauranne; Pereyra, Carina; Oliveira, Aguida; Rosa, Carlos; Cavaglieri, Lilia; Keller, Kelly Moura

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to select S. cerevisiae strains able to exert probiotic and antimycotoxin effects plus antibiotics resistance properties for use in animal production. S. cerevisiae LL74 and S. cerevisiae LL83 were isolated from bakery by-products intended for use in animal feed and examined for phenotypic characteristics and nutritional profile. Resistance to antibiotic, tolerance to gastrointestinal conditions, autoaggregation and coaggregation assay, antagonism to animal pathogens and aflatoxin B1 binding were studied. S. cerevisiae LL74 and S. cerevisiae LL83 showed resistance to all the antibiotics assayed (ampicillin, streptomycin, neomycin, norfloxacin, penicillin G, sulfonamide and trimethoprim). The analysis showed that exposure time to acid pH had a significant impact onto the viable cell counts onto both yeast strains. Presence of bile 0.5% increased significantly the growth of the both yeast strains. Moreover, they were able to tolerate the simulated gastrointestinal conditions assayed. In general, the coaggregation was positive whereas the autoaggregation capacity was not observed. Both strains were able to adsorb AFB1. In conclusion, selected S. cerevisiae LL74 and S. cerevisiae LL83 have potential application to be used as a biological method in animal feed as antibiotic therapy replacement in, reducing the adverse effects of AFB1 and giving probiotic properties.

  14. DasR is a pleiotropic regulator required for antibiotic production, pigment biosynthesis, and morphological development in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed

    Liao, Cheng-Heng; Xu, Ya; Rigali, Sébastien; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2015-12-01

    The GntR-family transcription regulator, DasR, was previously identified as pleiotropic, controlling the primary amino sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and chitin metabolism in Saccharopolyspora erythraea and Streptomyces coelicolor. Due to the remarkable regulatory impact of DasR on antibiotic production and development in the model strain of S. coelicolor, we here identified and characterized the role of DasR to secondary metabolite production and morphological development in industrial erythromycin-producing S. erythraea. The physiological studies have shown that a constructed deletion of dasR in S. erythraea resulted in antibiotic, pigment, and aerial hyphae production deficit in a nutrient-rich condition. DNA microarray assay, combined with quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), confirmed these results by showing the downregulation of the genes relating to secondary metabolite production in the dasR null mutant. Notably, electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) showed DasR as being the first identified regulator that directly regulates the pigment biosynthesis rpp gene cluster. In addition, further studies indicated that GlcNAc, the major nutrient signal of DasR-responsed regulation, blocked secondary metabolite production and morphological development. The effects of GlcNAc were shown to be caused by DasR mediation. These findings demonstrated that DasR is an important pleiotropic regulator for both secondary metabolism and morphological development in S. erythraea, providing new insights for the genetic engineering of S. erythraea with increased erythromycin production.

  15. Separation and Identification of Isomeric Glycopeptides by High Field Asymmetric Waveform Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of intact glycopeptides by mass spectrometry is challenging due to the numerous possibilities for isomerization, both within the attached glycan and the location of the modification on the peptide backbone. Here, we demonstrate that high field asymmetric wave ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS), also known as differential ion mobility, is able to separate isomeric O-linked glycopeptides that have identical sequences but differing sites of glycosylation. Two glycopeptides from the glycoprotein mucin 5AC, GT(GalNAc)TPSPVPTTSTTSAP and GTTPSPVPTTST(GalNAc)TSAP (where GalNAc is O-linked N-acetylgalactosamine), were shown to coelute following reversed-phase liquid chromatography. However, FAIMS analysis of the glycopeptides revealed that the compensation voltage ranges in which the peptides were transmitted differed. Thus, it is possible at certain compensation voltages to completely separate the glycopeptides. Separation of the glycopeptides was confirmed by unique reporter ions produced by supplemental activation electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry. These fragments also enable localization of the site of glycosylation. The results suggest that glycan position plays a key role in determining gas-phase glycopeptide structure and have implications for the application of FAIMS in glycoproteomics. PMID:22280549

  16. Presence of fucosyl residues on the oligosaccharide antennae of membrane glycopeptides of human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Santer, U.V.; Glick, M.C.

    1983-09-01

    Fucosyl residues linked alpha 1 leads to 3 or 4 to N-acetylglucosamine were found in large amounts on glycopeptides from the membranes of human tumor cells of neurectodermal origin but not on membrane glycopeptides from human fibroblasts. The fucosyl residues were detected by release of radioactive fucose from the glycopeptides with an almond alpha-L-fucosidase specific for fucosyl alpha 1 leads to 3(4)-N-acetylglucosamine. In other studies, the linkage was shown to be alpha 1 leads to 3 by nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. Glycopeptides containing these fucosyl residues from four human neuroblastoma cell lines were defined by binding to immobilized lectins. In addition, the glycopeptides from one human neuroblastoma cell line, CHP-134, were further characterized by enzyme degradation and columns calibrated for size and charge. The antennary position of fucosyl alpha 1 leads to 3-N-acetylglucosamine on the glycopeptides was demonstrated by the use of exoglycosidases and endoglycosidase D, since complete degradation to yield fucosyl-N-acetylglucosaminylasparagine was obtained only after treatment with almond alpha-L-fucosidase prior to the sequential degradation. Fucosyl alpha 1 leads to 3-N-acetylglucosamine was present on most size and charge classes of membrane glycopeptides and therefore was not limited to a few glycoproteins. Since the almond alpha-L-fucosidase cleaves fucosyl residues from glycoproteins, the physiological effects of the increased specific fucosylation on human tumors of neurectodermal origin can be examined.

  17. Highly Selective Enrichment of Glycopeptides Based on Zwitterionically Functionalized Soluble Nanopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Weiqian; Huang, Jiangming; Jiang, Biyun; Gao, Xing; Yang, Pengyuan

    2016-07-01

    Efficient glycopeptides enrichment prior to mass spectrometry analysis is essential for glycoproteome study. ZIC-HILIC (zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography) based glycopeptides enrichment approaches have been attracting more attention for several benefits like easy operating, high enrichment specificity and intact glycopeptide retained. In this study, Poly (amidoamine) dendrimer (PAMAM) was adopted for the synthesis of zwitterionically functionalized (ZICF) materials for glycopeptide enrichment. The multiple branched structure and good solubility of ZICF-PAMAM enables a sufficient interaction with glycopeptides. The ZICF-PAMAM combined with the FASP-mode enrichment strategy exhibits more superior performance compared with the existing methods. It has the minimum detectable concentration of femtomolar level and high recovery rate of over 90.01%, and can efficiently enrich glycopeptides from complex biological samples even for merely 0.1 μL human serum. The remarkable glycopeptides enrichment capacity of ZICF-PAMAM highlights the potential application in in-depth glycoproteome research, which may open up new opportunities for the development of glycoproteomics.

  18. Highly Selective Enrichment of Glycopeptides Based on Zwitterionically Functionalized Soluble Nanopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weiqian; Huang, Jiangming; Jiang, Biyun; Gao, Xing; Yang, Pengyuan

    2016-01-01

    Efficient glycopeptides enrichment prior to mass spectrometry analysis is essential for glycoproteome study. ZIC-HILIC (zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography) based glycopeptides enrichment approaches have been attracting more attention for several benefits like easy operating, high enrichment specificity and intact glycopeptide retained. In this study, Poly (amidoamine) dendrimer (PAMAM) was adopted for the synthesis of zwitterionically functionalized (ZICF) materials for glycopeptide enrichment. The multiple branched structure and good solubility of ZICF-PAMAM enables a sufficient interaction with glycopeptides. The ZICF-PAMAM combined with the FASP-mode enrichment strategy exhibits more superior performance compared with the existing methods. It has the minimum detectable concentration of femtomolar level and high recovery rate of over 90.01%, and can efficiently enrich glycopeptides from complex biological samples even for merely 0.1 μL human serum. The remarkable glycopeptides enrichment capacity of ZICF-PAMAM highlights the potential application in in-depth glycoproteome research, which may open up new opportunities for the development of glycoproteomics. PMID:27412817

  19. Access the toxic effect of the antibiotic cefradine and its UV light degradation products on two freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Chen, J Q; Guo, R X

    2012-03-30

    Two common freshwater algae Microcystis aeruginosa and Scenedesmus obliquus were employed as test organism to evaluate the toxic effects of the widely used antibiotic, cefradine. In general, cefradine had significantly toxic effect on population growth and chlorophyll-a accumulation of two algae and the cyanophyceae was more sensitive than the chlorophyceae. In addition, cefradine UV light degraded products had adverse effect on M. aeruginosa's growth and chlorophyll-a accumulation. In comparison, even if S. obliquus had growth ability when exposed to cefradine UV light-degradation products, the algal photosynthesis function was also disrupted.

  20. Variability of antibiotic susceptibility and toxin production of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic commensal bacterium that mostly colonizes the skin and soft tissues. The pathogenicity of S. aureus is due to both its ability to resist antibiotics, and the production of toxins. Here, we characterize a group of genes responsible for toxin production and antibiotic resistance of S. aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections. Results A total of 136 S. aureus strains were collected from five different types of infection: furuncles, pyomyositis, abscesses, Buruli ulcers, and osteomyelitis, from hospital admissions and out-patients in Benin. All strains were resistant to benzyl penicillin, while 25% were resistant to methicillin, and all showed sensitivity to vancomycin. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was the most commonly produced virulence factor (70%), followed by staphylococcal enterotoxin B (44%). Exfoliative toxin B was produced by 1.3% of the strains, and was only found in isolates from Buruli ulcers. The tsst-1, sec, and seh genes were rarely detected (≤1%). Conclusions This study provides new insight into the prevalence of toxin and antibiotic resistance genes in S. aureus strains responsible for skin, soft tissue, and bone infections. Our results showed that PVL was strongly associated with pyomyositis and osteomyelitis, and that there is a high prevalence of PVL-MRSA skin infections in Benin. PMID:23924370

  1. Performance and fate of organics in a pilot MBR-NF for treating antibiotic production wastewater with recycling NF concentrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxing; Li, Kun; Wei, Yuansong; Cheng, Yutao; Wei, Dongbin; Li, Mingyue

    2015-02-01

    A double membrane system comprising a membrane bioreactor (MBR) combined with a nanofiltration (NF) membrane was investigated on a pilot scale for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater over a three-month period at a pharmaceutical company in Wuxi, China. By recycling the NF concentrate, the combined MBR-NF process was shown to be effective for the treatment of antibiotic production wastewater, resulting in excellent water quality and a high water yield of 92±5.6%. The water quality of the pilot-scale MBR-NF process was excellent; e.g., the concentrations of TOC, NH4(+)-N, TP were stable at 5.52, 0.68, 0.34 mg L(-1), respectively, and the values of turbidity and conductivity of the NF permeate were 0.15 NTU and 2.5 mS cm(-1), respectively; these values meet China's water quality standard requirements for industrial use (GB21903-2008). Not only were the antibiotic removal rates of spiramycin (SPM) and new spiramycin (NSPM) over 95%, the acute toxicity was also drastically reduced by the MBR-NF pilot system. The main organics in the MBR effluent were proteins, polysaccharides, and humic-like substances; they were almost completely retained by the NF membrane and further biodegraded in the MBR because the NF concentrate was recycled. The microbial community of the MBR did not significantly change with the recycling of the NF concentrate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Linezolid treatment of glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium in very low birth weight premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Hoehn, Rene; Groll, Andreas H; Schaefer, Volker; Bauer, Karl; Schloesser, Rolf L

    2006-03-01

    Glycopeptide-resistant Enterococcus faecium has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen with limited therapeutic options. Here we report the successful treatment of glycopeptide-resistant E. faecium infection in two very low birth weight premature infants with the new oxazolidinone linezolid. Treatment with linezolid at a dosage of 10 mg/kg every 8 h intravenously for a duration of 16 days and 14 days, respectively, was well tolerated and led to complete clinical recovery and clearance of the organism from all body sites. The two cases support the clinical efficacy and safety of linezolid in very low birth weight premature neonates with glycopeptide-resistant E. faecium infections.

  3. Lysozyme as an alternative to growth promoting antibiotics in swine production

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lysozyme is a naturally occurring enzyme found in bodily secretions such as tears, saliva, and milk. It functions as an antimicrobial agent by cleaving the peptidoglycan component of bacterial cell walls, which leads to cell death. Antibiotics are also antimicrobials and have been fed at subtherape...

  4. Coevolution of antibiotic production and counter-resistance in soil bacteria.

    PubMed

    Laskaris, Paris; Tolba, Sahar; Calvo-Bado, Leo; Wellington, Elizabeth M; Wellington, Liz

    2010-03-01

    We present evidence for the coexistence and coevolution of antibiotic resistance and biosynthesis genes in soil bacteria. The distribution of the streptomycin (strA) and viomycin (vph) resistance genes was examined in Streptomyces isolates. strA and vph were found either within a biosynthetic gene cluster or independently. Streptomyces griseus strains possessing the streptomycin cluster formed part of a clonal complex. All S. griseus strains possessing solely strA belonged to two clades; both were closely related to the streptomycin producers. Other more distantly related S. griseus strains did not contain strA. S. griseus strains with only vph also formed two clades, but they were more distantly related to the producers and to one another. The expression of the strA gene was constitutive in a resistance-only strain whereas streptomycin producers showed peak strA expression in late log phase that correlates with the switch on of streptomycin biosynthesis. While there is evidence that antibiotics have diverse roles in nature, our data clearly support the coevolution of resistance in the presence of antibiotic biosynthetic capability within closely related soil dwelling bacteria. This reinforces the view that, for some antibiotics at least, the primary role is one of antibiosis during competition in soil for resources.

  5. Alternatives to antibiotics as growth promoters for use in swine production: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In the past two decades, an intensive amount of research has been focused on the development of alternatives to antibiotics to maintain swine health and performance. The most widely researched alternatives include probiotics, prebiotics, acidifiers, plant extracts and neutraceuticals such as copper and zinc. Since these additives have been more than adequately covered in previous reviews, the focus of this review will be on less traditional alternatives. The potential of antimicrobial peptides, clay minerals, egg yolk antibodies, essential oils, eucalyptus oil-medium chain fatty acids, rare earth elements and recombinant enzymes are discussed. Based on a thorough review of the literature, it is evident that a long and growing list of compounds exist which have been tested for their ability to replace antibiotics as feed additives in diets fed to swine. Unfortunately, the vast majority of these compounds produce inconsistent results and rarely equal antibiotics in their effectiveness. Therefore, it would appear that research is still needed in this area and that the perfect alternative to antibiotics does not yet exist. PMID:24034214

  6. Cryptic carbapenem antibiotic production genes are widespread in Erwinia carotovora: facile trans activation by the carR transcriptional regulator.

    PubMed

    Holden, M T; McGowan, S J; Bycroft, B W; Stewart, G S; Williams, P; Salmond, G P

    1998-06-01

    Few strains of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) make carbapenem antibiotics. Strain GS101 makes the basic carbapenem molecule, 1-carbapen-2-em-3-carboxylic acid (Car). The production of this antibiotic has been shown to be cell density dependent, requiring the accumulation of the small diffusible molecule N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OHHL) in the growth medium. When the concentration of this inducer rises above a threshold level, OHHL is proposed to interact with the transcriptional activator of the carbapenem cluster (CarR) and induce carbapenem biosynthesis. The introduction of the GS101 carR gene into an Ecc strain (SCRI 193) which is naturally carbapenem-negative resulted in the production of Car. This suggested that strain SCRI 193 contained functional cryptic carbapenem biosynthetic genes, but lacked a functional carR homologue. The distribution of trans-activatable antibiotic genes was assayed in Erwinia strains from a culture collection and was found to be common in a large proportion of Ecc strains. Significantly, amongst the Ecc strains identified, a larger proportion contained trans-activatable cryptic genes than produced antibiotics constitutively. Southern hybridization of the chromosomal DNA of cryptic Ecc strains confirmed the presence of both the car biosynthetic cluster and the regulatory genes. Identification of homologues of the transcriptional activator carR suggests that the cause of the silencing of the carbapenem biosynthetic cluster in these strains is not the deletion of carR. In an attempt to identify the cause of the silencing in the Ecc strain SCRI 193 the carR homologue from this strain was cloned and sequenced. The SCRI 193 CarR homologue was 94% identical to the GS101 CarR and contained 14 amino acid substitutions. Both homologues could be expressed from their native promoters and ribosome-binding sites using an in vitro prokaryotic transcription and translation assay, and when the SCRI 193 carR homologue was

  7. Suppressive effects of peptide antibiotics against proliferation and cytokine production in mitogen-activated human peripheral-blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Masaki; Tanaka, Sachiko; Ishizawa, Hitomi; Nakamura, Yurie; Onda, Kenji; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Certain kinds of peptide antibiotics are suggested to have immunomodulatory effects; however, few studies have been carried out systemically to evaluate the antiproliferative effects of peptide antibiotics in human lymphoid cells. The suppressive efficacies of nine peptide antibiotics and seven non-antibiotic peptides against proliferation of human peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with T cell mitogen were examined in vitro. Nigericin (CAS 28643-80-3), valinomycin (CAS 2001-95-8), gramicidin D (CAS 1405-97-6), and tyrothricin (CAS 1404-88-2) strongly inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A-stimulated PBMCs with IC50 values of 0.15-11.2 ng/ml, while these antibiotics did not show cytotoxicity at 10 000 ng/ml. The IC50 value of the immunosuppressant cyclosporine (CAS 59865-13-3) was 5.2 ng/ml. Virginiamycin (CAS 11006-76-1) and gramicidin S (CAS 113-73-5) moderately inhibited PBMC-proliferation with IC50 values of 1000 and 1900 ng/ml, respectively. On the other hand, bacitracin (CAS 1405-87-4), capreomycin (CAS 11003-38-6), polymyxin B (1404-26-8), angiotensin II antipeptide (CAS 121379-63-3), angiotensin III antipeptide (CAS 133605-55-7), fibrinogen binding inhibitor peptide (CAS 89105-94-2), LH-RH (CAS 71447-49-9), pepstatin A (CAS 26305-03-3), oxytocin (CAS 50-56-6), and vasopressin (CAS 16679-58-6) showed little or no suppressive effect on PBMC-proliferation. Nigericin and valinomycin decreased the concentrations of interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-10, and IL-17 in the culture medium with IC50 values less than 0.01 ng/ml. Nigericin also decreased the concentrations of IL-4 and IL-6 with IC50 values of less than 1 ng/ml. The results show that peptide antibiotics such as nigericin and valinomycin efficiently suppress the production of several cytokines and proliferation in mitogen-stimulated human PBMCs.

  8. Phosphoprotein affinity purification identifies proteins involved in S-adenosyl-L-methionine-induced enhancement of antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingzhu; Yang, Seung Hwan; Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Lee, Sung-Kwon; Lee, In-Ae; Kim, Tae-Jong; Suh, Joo-Won

    2011-01-01

    Streptomycetes are the major natural source of clinical antibiotics. The enhanced secondary metabolite production of many streptomycetes by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) in previous studies suggested the existence of a common SAM regulatory effect. We screened nine proteins using the phosphoprotein purification column from Streptomyces coelicolor. Among them, genes (SCO5477, SCO5113, SCO4647, SCO4885 and SCO1793) for five proteins were disrupted by insertion mutation. The undecylprodigiosin and actinorhodin productions were changed in all mutations. The SAM-induced enhancement of actinorhodin production was abolished by all mutations except SCO4885 mutation, which reduced the production of actinorhodin and undecylprodigiosin with SAM treatment. This study demonstrates that phosphoprotein affinity purification can be used as a screening method to identify the proteins involved SAM signaling.

  9. Effect of antibiotic down-regulatory gene wblA ortholog on antifungal polyene production in rare actinomycetes Pseudonocardia autotrophica.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Kim, Min-Kyung; Jin, Ying-Yu; Kim, Young-Woo; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2014-09-01

    The rare actinomycete Pseudonocardia autotrophica was previously shown to produce a solubilityimproved toxicity-reduced novel polyene compound named Nystatin-like Pseudonocardia Polyene (NPP). The low productivity of NPP in P. autotrophica implies that its biosynthetic pathway is tightly regulated. In this study, wblApau was isolated and identified as a novel negative regulatory gene for NPP production in P. autotrophica, which showed approximately 49% amino acid identity with a global antibiotic down-regulatory gene, wblA, identified from various Streptomycetes species. Although no significant difference in NPP production was observed between P. autotrophica harboring empty vector and the S. coelicolor wblA under its native promoter, approximately 12% less NPP was produced in P. autotrophica expressing the wblA gene under the strong constitutive ermE(*) promoter. Furthermore, disruption of the wblApau gene from P. autotrophica resulted in an approximately 80% increase in NPP productivity. These results strongly suggest that identification and inactivation of the global antibiotic down-regulatory gene wblA ortholog are a critical strategy for improving secondary metabolite overproduction in not only Streptomyces but also non-Streptomyces rare actinomycete species.

  10. Antibiotic Resistance and Biofilm Production in Staphylococcus epidermidis Strains, Isolated from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera-Contreras, Roberto; Morelos-Ramírez, Rubén; Galicia-Camacho, Ada Nelly; Meléndez-Herrada, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis strains isolated from nosocomial infections represent a serious problem worldwide. In various Mexican states several reports have shown isolates from hospitals with antibiotic resistance to methicillin. In Mexico City, there is scarce information on staphylococcal infections in hospitals. Here, our research findings are shown in a four-year period study (2006–2010) for Staphylococcus epidermidis strains. Susceptibility and/or resistance to antibiotics in SE strains were assessed by phenotypic and molecular methods as mecA gene by PCR, as well as the correlation with biofilm production for these isolates and the relationship to the infection site. Out of a total of 161 (66%) negative biofilm SE strains, just 103 (64%) SE strains were confirmed as MRSE by PCR to mecA gene. From 84 (34%) positive biofilm SE strains, 76 (91%) were confirmed as MRSE by PCR to mecA gene. Higher percentages of resistance to antibiotics and higher number of resistance markers were found in biofilm-forming clinical strains (9 to 14) than non-biofilm-forming SE strains (3 to 8). These research findings represent a guide to establish infection control programs for this hospital. PMID:23724338

  11. Antibiotic resistance and molecular analysis of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from cow's milk and dairy products in northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silveira-Filho, Vladimir M; Luz, Isabelle S; Campos, Ana Paula F; Silva, Wellington M; Barros, Maria Paloma S; Medeiros, Elizabeth S; Freitas, Manuela F L; Mota, Rinaldo A; Sena, Maria J; Leal-Balbino, Tereza C

    2014-04-01

    This work aimed to assess the clonal distribution among 94 strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from cow's milk, raw cheese, and a milking machine in 12 dairy farms in northeast Brazil, by analyzing different typing methods and detecting resistance and toxigenic profiles. For the first time, isolates of this region were assessed simultaneously by the polymorphism of the 3'-end coa gene and 16S-23S rDNA, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, antibiotic resistance phenotyping, and toxigenic arsenal. Although pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns showed a wider variation (discriminatory index 0.83) than the PCR-based methods, the internal transcribed spacer-PCR proved to be a useful and inexpensive procedure for conducting epidemiological surveys of S. aureus on a regional scale. Each dairy farm had its own resistance profile, and in two herds, 63% of the strains were multiresistant, probably due to the indiscriminate use of antibiotics in bovine mastitis treatment. No methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains were detected in this study; however, 93.6% of S. aureus strains harbored variable profiles of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes seg, seh, sei, and sej. Transcriptional analysis revealed that 53.3% of staphylococcal enterotoxin genes actually transcribed, pointing out the food poisoning risk of these dairy products to consumers in the region. Based on the detection of the most prevalent clones in a herd or region, appropriate antibiotic therapy and specific immunization can be used for the treatment and control of staphylococcal mastitis.

  12. Relationship of amino acid composition and molecular weight of antifreeze glycopeptides to non-colligative freezing point depression.

    PubMed

    Schrag, J D; O'Grady, S M; DeVries, A L

    1982-08-06

    Many polar fishes synthesize a group of eight glycopeptides that exhibit a non-colligative lowering of the freezing point of water. These glycopeptides range in molecular weight between 2600 and 33 700. The largest glycopeptides [1-5] lower the freezing point more than the small ones on a weight basis and contain only two amino acids, alanine and threonine, with the disaccharide galactose-N-acetyl-galactosamine attached to threonine. The small glycopeptides, 6, 7, and 8, also lower the freezing point and contain proline, which periodically substitutes for alanine. Glycopeptides with similar antifreeze properties isolated from the saffron cod and the Atlantic tomcod contain an additional amino acid, arginine, which substitutes for threonine in glycopeptide 6. In this study we address the question of whether differences in amino acid composition or molecular weight between large and small glycopeptides are responsible for the reduced freezing point depressing capability of the low molecular weight glycopeptides. The results indicate that the degree of amino acid substitutions that occur in glycopeptides 6-8 do not have a significant effect on the unusual freezing point lowering and that the observed decrease in freezing point depression with smaller glycopeptides can be accounted for on the basis of molecular weight.

  13. Algorithm for pre-emptive glycopeptide treatment in patients with haematologic malignancies and an Enterococcus faecium bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Nowadays Enterococcus faecium has become one of the most emerging and challenging nosocomial pathogens. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors in haematology patients who are at risk of an Enterococcus faecium bloodstream infection (BSI) and should be considered for pre-emptive glycopeptide treatment. With these identified risk factors a prediction model can be developed for clinical use. Methods Retrospectively clinical and microbiological data in 33 patients with an E. faecium BSI were compared to 66 control patients during a 5-year period at the haematology ward. Multivariate logistic regression was used to explore the independent risk factors and a prediction model was developed to determine the risk of an E. faecium BSI. Results E. faecium BSIs were found to be associated with high mortality rates. Independent risk factors for E. faecium BSI were colonization with E. faecium 30 days prior to blood culture (OR 5.71; CI 1.7-18.7), combination of neutropenia and abdominal focus (4.37; 1.4-13.4), age > 58 years (4.01; 1.3-12.5), hospital stay prior to blood culture > 14 days (3.55; 0.98-12.9) and CRP (C-reactive protein) level >125 mg/L (4.37; 1.1-10.2). Conclusion Using data from this study, risk stratification for the development of an E. faecium BSI in patients with haematological malignancies is possible. Pre-emptive treatment should be considered in those patients who are at high risk. Using a prediction model as designed in this study, antibiotic stewardship in terms of prudent use of glycopeptides can be improved and might be helpful in controlling further spread of VRE (vancomycin resistant enterococci). PMID:24025668

  14. Synthesis of homogeneous glycopeptides and their utility as DNA condensing agents.

    PubMed

    Collard, W T; Evers, D L; McKenzie, D L; Rice, K G

    2000-01-12

    Two glycopeptides were synthesized by attaching purified glycosylamines (N-glycans) to a 20 amino acid peptide. Triantennary and Man9 Boc-tyrosinamide N-glycans were treated with trifluoroacetic acid to remove the Boc group and expose a tyrosinamide amine. The amine group was coupled with iodoacetic acid to produce N-iodoacetyl-oligosaccharides. These were reacted with the sulfhydryl group of a cysteine-containing peptide (CWK18), resulting in the formation of glycopeptides in good yield that were characterized by 1H NMR and ESIMS. Both glycopeptides were able to bind to plasmid DNA and form DNA condensates of approximately 110 nm mean diameter with zeta potential of +31 mV. The resulting homogeneous glycopeptide DNA condensates will be valuable as receptor-mediated gene-delivery agents.

  15. Facile synthesis of boronic acid-functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rongna; Hu, Junjie; Cai, Zongwei; Ju, Huangxian

    2014-02-01

    A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) via an amide reaction. The introduction of PASE could bridge the MCNT and APBA, suppress the nonspecific adsorption and reduce the steric hindrance among the bound molecules. Due to the excellent structure of the MCNTs, the functionalization of PASE and then APBA on MCNTs was quite simple, specific and effective. The glycopeptides enrichment and separation with a magnetic field could be achieved by their reversible covalent binding with the boronic group of APBA-MCNTs. The exceptionally large specific surface area and the high density of boronic acid groups of APBA-MCNTs resulted in rapid and highly efficient enrichment of glycopeptides, even in the presence of large amounts of interfering nonglycopeptides. The functional MCNTs possessed high selectivity for enrichment of 21 glycopeptides from the digest of horseradish peroxidase demonstrated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis showing more glycopeptides detected than the usual 9 glycopeptides with commercially available APBA-agarose. The proposed system showed better specificity for glycopeptides even in the presence of non-glycopeptides with 50 times higher concentration. The boronic acid functionalized MCNTs provide a promising selective enrichment platform for precise glycoproteomic analysis.A stepwise strategy was developed to synthesize boronic acid functionalized magnetic carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides. The MCNTs were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction of Fe3+ loaded on the acid-treated CNTs and modified with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester (PASE) to bind aminophenylboronic acid

  16. Rapid Glycopeptide Enrichment Using Cellulose Hydrophilic Interaction/Reversed-Phase StageTips

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Yuki; Kameda, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Mei; Kawasaki, Nana

    2017-01-01

    Because the ionization efficiency for glycopeptides is lower than that of peptides in electrospray ionization, it is frequently necessary to enrich them prior to their analysis using liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Although some methods for selectively enriching glycopeptides (e.g., lectin, agarose, and cellulose methods) have been reported, they are time-consuming (procedures that require several hours) and may not be applicable to submicrogram-sized samples. Here, we report on a rapid, simple method for enriching glycopeptides in small sample amounts using cellulose hydrophilic interaction (cellulose HILIC)/reversed-phase (RP) stop-and-go extraction tips (StageTips). Using the cellulose HILIC/RP StageTips, glycopeptide-selective enrichment can be achieved at the nanogram level within a few minutes. PMID:28852604

  17. Spontaneous white sectored-mutants in Streptomyces hygroscopicus 111-81: characterization and antibiotic productivity.

    PubMed

    Gesheva, Victoria

    2008-08-01

    Spontaneous white mutants from sectors of Streptomyces hygroscopicus 111-81 were isolated. The comparison of morphological, cultural, and biochemical properties of the mutants and ancestor showed the differences in colors of aerial, substrate mycelia, and sporulation. Changes in resistance to antibiotics and sensitivity to lysozyme indicated alterations in cell walls and cell membranes of the mutants. They showed antifungal activity close to that of the parent strain on fermentation medium FM2, with unchanged component composition of the AK-111-81 antibiotic complex. The cells of spontaneous white mutants are characterized with electron-transparent structures, vacuoles, aggregation of ribosomes, intrahyphal growth, and lack of multiple cell septa, which was established by transmission electron microscopy. The appearance of white sectored-mutants in S. hygroscopicus 111-81 is connected with exhausting of nutrients causing the substrate limitation and is a stress response to starvation.

  18. Scalable Synthesis of a Key Intermediate for the Production of Pleuromutilin-Based Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Stephen K; Zeng, Mingshuo; Herzon, Seth B

    2017-09-15

    An improved synthesis of an eneimide, which is a useful precursor to pleuromutilin-based antibiotics, is reported. This synthesis proceeds in six steps and 17% overall yield (27% based on recovery of a key hydrindenone intermediate) and requires two fewer chromatography steps and five fewer days of reaction time than the previously reported route. The use of expensive, acutely toxic, and precious metal reagents or catalysts has been minimized.

  19. Abierixin, a new polyether antibiotic. Production, structural determination and biological activities.

    PubMed

    David, L; Leal Ayala, H; Tabet, J C

    1985-12-01

    A new polyether antibiotic, abierixin, was found in the mycelium of a culture broth of nigericin-producing Streptomyces albus NRRL B-1865. Abierixin was extracted with organic solvents and purified by column chromatography and HPLC. The structure of abierixin was determined by FAB/MS/MS and CI/MS/MS and 1H and 13C NMR spectrometries. Abierixin exhibited weak antimicrobial and ionophorous activities, low toxicity but good anticoccidial activity. Nigericin biosynthesis from abierixin is discussed.

  20. Muraymycin nucleoside-peptide antibiotics: uridine-derived natural products as lead structures for the development of novel antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Wiegmann, Daniel; Koppermann, Stefan; Wirth, Marius; Niro, Giuliana; Leyerer, Kristin; Ducho, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Muraymycins are a promising class of antimicrobial natural products. These uridine-derived nucleoside-peptide antibiotics inhibit the bacterial membrane protein translocase I (MraY), a key enzyme in the intracellular part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This review describes the structures of naturally occurring muraymycins, their mode of action, synthetic access to muraymycins and their analogues, some structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies and first insights into muraymycin biosynthesis. It therefore provides an overview on the current state of research, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in this field.

  1. Muraymycin nucleoside-peptide antibiotics: uridine-derived natural products as lead structures for the development of novel antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Marius; Niro, Giuliana; Leyerer, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Muraymycins are a promising class of antimicrobial natural products. These uridine-derived nucleoside-peptide antibiotics inhibit the bacterial membrane protein translocase I (MraY), a key enzyme in the intracellular part of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This review describes the structures of naturally occurring muraymycins, their mode of action, synthetic access to muraymycins and their analogues, some structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies and first insights into muraymycin biosynthesis. It therefore provides an overview on the current state of research, as well as an outlook on possible future developments in this field. PMID:27340469

  2. Large-scale preparation of glycopeptides harboring the TF-antigen unit from royal jelly.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Megumi; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Kimura, Mariko; Kimura, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that new N-glycans carrying the TF-antigen occurred on a major royal jelly glycoprotein, and we have identified the glycosylation site to which the antigenic N-glycan is linked, but an appropriate procedure has not been established to prepare non-labeled immunoreactive glycopeptides in large amounts for functional analysis. In this study, we developed an effective method of preparing Asn-glycopeptide bearing TF-antigen.

  3. Comparison of NF membrane fouling and cleaning by two pretreatment strategies for the advanced treatment of antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxing; Li, Kun; Yu, Dawei; Zhang, Junya; Wei, Yuansong; Chen, Meixue; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-01-01

    The nanofiltration (NF) membrane fouling characteristics and cleaning strategies were investigated and compared for treating membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluent and MBR-granular activated carbon (GAC) effluent of an antibiotic production wastewater by DK membrane. Results showed that the fouling of treating MBR effluent was more severe than that of treating MBR-GAC effluent. After filtering for 216 h, the difference of membrane flux decline was obvious between MBR effluent and MBR-GAC effluent, with 14.9% and 10.3% flux decline, respectively. Further study showed that organic fouling is the main NF membrane fouling in the advanced treatment of antibiotic production wastewater for both of the two different effluents. Soluble microbial by-product like and tyrosine-like substances were the dominant components in the foulants, whereas humic-like substances existing in the effluents had little contribution to the NF membrane fouling. A satisfactory efficiency of NF chemical cleaning could be obtained using combination of acid (HCl, pH 2.0-2.5) and alkali (NaOH + 0.3 wt% NaDS, pH 10.0-10.5). The favorable cleaning strategy is acid-alkali for treating the MBR-GAC effluent, while it is alkali-acid for treating the MBR effluent.

  4. Replacement for antibiotics: Lysozyme

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Antibiotics have been fed at subtherapeutic levels to swine as growth promoters for more than 60 years, and the majority of swine produced in the U.S. receive antibiotics in their feed at some point in their production cycle. These compounds benefit the producers by minimizing production losses by ...

  5. Fractionation and analysis of veterinary antibiotics and their related degradation products in agricultural soils and drainage waters following swine manure amendment.

    PubMed

    Solliec, Morgan; Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Gasser, Marc-Olivier; Coté, Caroline; Généreux, Mylène; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2016-02-01

    The fate of antimicrobial active compound residues in the environment, and especially antibiotics used in swine husbandry are of particular interest for their potential toxicity and contribution to antibiotic resistance. The presence of relatively high concentrations of bioactive compounds has been reported in agricultural areas but few information is available on their degradation products. Veterinary antibiotics reach terrestrial environments through many routes, including application of swine manure to soils. The objectives of this project were first, to develop an analytical method able to quantify and identify veterinary antibiotics and their degradation products in manure, soil and water samples; and second, to study the distribution of these target compounds in soils and drainage waters. A brief evaluation of their potential toxicity in the environment was also made. In order to achieve these objectives, liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry was used for its ability to quantify contaminants with sensitivity and selectivity, and its capacity to identify degradation products. Samples of manure, soil and water came from a long-term experimental site where swine manure containing veterinary antibiotics has been applied for many years. In this study, tetracycline antibiotics were found at several hundred μg L(-1) in the swine manure slurry used for fertilization, several hundred of ng L(-1) in drainage waters and several ng g(-1) in soils, while degradation products were sometimes found at concentrations higher than the parent compounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. LC-MS-Based Metabolomics Study of Marine Bacterial Secondary Metabolite and Antibiotic Production in Salinispora arenicola

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Utpal; Hewavitharana, Amitha K.; Ng, Yi Kai; Shaw, Paul Nicholas; Fuerst, John A.; Hodson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    An LC-MS-based metabolomics approach was used to characterise the variation in secondary metabolite production due to changes in the salt content of the growth media as well as across different growth periods (incubation times). We used metabolomics as a tool to investigate the production of rifamycins (antibiotics) and other secondary metabolites in the obligate marine actinobacterial species Salinispora arenicola, isolated from Great Barrier Reef (GBR) sponges, at two defined salt concentrations and over three different incubation periods. The results indicated that a 14 day incubation period is optimal for the maximum production of rifamycin B, whereas rifamycin S and W achieve their maximum concentration at 29 days. A “chemical profile” link between the days of incubation and the salt concentration of the growth medium was shown to exist and reliably represents a critical point for selection of growth medium and harvest time. PMID:25574739

  7. LC-MS-based metabolomics study of marine bacterial secondary metabolite and antibiotic production in Salinispora arenicola.

    PubMed

    Bose, Utpal; Hewavitharana, Amitha K; Ng, Yi Kai; Shaw, Paul Nicholas; Fuerst, John A; Hodson, Mark P

    2015-01-07

    An LC-MS-based metabolomics approach was used to characterise the variation in secondary metabolite production due to changes in the salt content of the growth media as well as across different growth periods (incubation times). We used metabolomics as a tool to investigate the production of rifamycins (antibiotics) and other secondary metabolites in the obligate marine actinobacterial species Salinispora arenicola, isolated from Great Barrier Reef (GBR) sponges, at two defined salt concentrations and over three different incubation periods. The results indicated that a 14 day incubation period is optimal for the maximum production of rifamycin B, whereas rifamycin S and W achieve their maximum concentration at 29 days. A "chemical profile" link between the days of incubation and the salt concentration of the growth medium was shown to exist and reliably represents a critical point for selection of growth medium and harvest time.

  8. The role of proton mobility in determining the energy-resolved vibrational activation/dissociation channels of N-glycopeptide ions.

    PubMed

    Kolli, Venkata; Roth, Heidi A; De La Cruz, Gabriela; Fernando, Ganga S; Dodds, Eric D

    2015-10-08

    Site-specific glycoproteomic analysis largely hinges on the use of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to identify glycopeptides. Experiments of this type are usually aimed at drawing connections between individual oligosaccharide structures and their specific sites of attachment to the polypeptide chain. These determinations inherently require ion dissociation methods capable of interrogating both the monosaccharide and amino acid connectivity of the glycopeptide. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) shows potential to satisfy this requirement, as the vibrational activation/dissociation of protonated N-glycopeptides has been observed to access cleavage of either glycosidic bonds of the glycan or amide bonds of the peptide in an energy-resolved manner. Nevertheless, the relative energy requirement for these fragmentation pathways varies considerably among analytes. This research addresses the influence of proton mobility on the vibrational energy necessary to achieve either glycan or peptide cleavage in a collection of protonated N-glycopeptide ions. While greater proton mobility of the precursor ion was found to correlate with lower energy requirements for precursor ion depletion and appearance of glycosidic fragments, the vibrational energy deposition necessary for appearance of peptide backbone fragments showed no relation to the precursor ion proton mobility. These results are consistent with observations suggesting that peptide fragments arise from an intermediate fragment which is generally of lower proton mobility than the precursor ion. Such findings have potential to facilitate the rational selection of CID conditions which are best suited to provide either glycan or peptide cleavage products in MS/MS based N-glycoproteomic analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of structure-dependent chromatographic behavior of glycopeptides using reversed phase nanoLC.

    PubMed

    Kozlik, Petr; Goldman, Radoslav; Sanda, Miloslav

    2017-09-01

    Analysis of glycosylation is challenging due to micro- and macro-heterogeneity of the protein attachment. A combination of LC with MS/MS is one of the most powerful tools for glycopeptide analysis. In this work, we show the effect of various monosaccharide units on the retention time of glycopeptides. Retention behavior of several glycoforms of six peptides obtained from tryptic digest of haptoglobin, hemopexin, and sex hormone-binding globulin was studied on a reversed phase chromatographic column. We observed reduction of the retention time with increasing number of monosaccharide units of glycans attached to the same peptide backbone. Fucosylation of larger glycans provides less significant retention time shift than for smaller ones. Retention times of glycopeptides were expressed as relative retention times. These relative retention times were used for calculation of upper and lower limits of glycopeptide retention time windows under the reversed phase conditions. We then demonstrated on the case of a glycopeptide of haptoglobin that the predicted retention time window boosts confidence of identification and minimizes false-positive identification. Relative retention time, as a qualitative parameter, is expected to improve LC-MS/MS characterization of glycopeptides. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles coated with maltose-functionalized polyethyleneimine for highly efficient enrichment of N-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinan; Wang, Fangjun; Wan, Hao; Liu, Jing; Liu, Zheyi; Cheng, Kai; Zou, Hanfa

    2015-12-18

    Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) adsorbents have drawn increasing attention in recent years due to their high efficiency in N-glycopeptides enrichment. The hydrophilicity and binding capacity of HILIC adsorbents are crucial to the enrichment efficiency and mass spectrometry (MS) detection sensitivity of N-glycopeptides. Herein, magnetic nanoparticles coated with maltose-functionalized polyethyleneimine (Fe3O4-PEI-Maltose MNPs) were prepared by one-pot solvothermal reaction coupled with "click chemistry" and utilized for N-glycopeptides enrichment. Owing to the presence of hydrophilic and branched polyethyleneimine, the amount of immobilized disaccharide units was improved about four times. The N-glycopeptides capturing capacity was about 150mg/g (IgG/MNPs) and the MS detection limitation as low as 0.5fmol for IgG and 85% average enrichment recovery were feasibly achieved by using this hybrid magnetic adsorbent. Finally, 1237 unique N-glycosylation sites and 1567 unique N-glycopeptides from 684 N-glycoproteins were reliably characterized from 60μg protein sample extracted from mouse liver. Therefore, this maltose-functionalized polyethyleneimine coated adsorbent can play a promising role in highly efficient N-glycopeptides enrichment for glycoproteomic analyses of complex protein samples.

  11. Biosynthetic study on the polyether carboxylic antibiotic, nigericin production and biohydroxylation of grisorixin by nigericin-producing Streptomyces hygroscopicus NRRL B-1865.

    PubMed

    Mouslim, J; Cuer, A; David, L; Tabet, J C

    1995-09-01

    With addition of methyl oleate, the increased yield of antibiotic production by nigericin-producing Streptomyces hygroscopicus NRRL B-1865 also resulted in the isolation of three additional polyether antibiotics. Two of these are abierixin and epinigericin, as new antibiotics. The third antibiotic is grisorixin. The production of both abierixin (opened ring A and 30-CH2OH) and grisorixin (ring A and 30-CH3) poses the problem of the identity of the last pathway precursor of the major metabolite, nigericin (ring A and 30-CH2OH). Transformation experiments of abierixin by S. hygroscopicus gave negative results. Hydroxylation of grisorixin to nigericin by S. hygroscopicus represents the final step in nigericin biosynthesis.

  12. Degradation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and identification of metabolites/transformation products by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maia, Alexandra S; Ribeiro, Ana R; Amorim, Catarina L; Barreiro, Juliana C; Cass, Quezia B; Castro, Paula M L; Tiritan, Maria Elizabeth

    2014-03-14

    Antibiotics are a therapeutic class widely found in environmental matrices and extensively studied due to its persistence and implications for multi-resistant bacteria development. This work presents an integrated approach of analytical multi-techniques on assessing biodegradation of fluorinated antibiotics at a laboratory-scale microcosmos to follow removal and formation of intermediate compounds. Degradation of four fluoroquinolone antibiotics, namely Ofloxacin (OFL), Norfloxacin (NOR), Ciprofloxacin (CPF) and Moxifloxacin (MOX), at 10 mg L(-1) using a mixed bacterial culture, was assessed for 60 days. The assays were followed by a developed and validated analytical method of LC with fluorescence detection (LC-FD) using a Luna Pentafluorophenyl (2) 3 μm column. The validated method demonstrated good selectivity, linearity (r(2)>0.999), intra-day and inter-day precisions (RSD<2.74%) and accuracy. The quantification limits were 5 μg L(-1) for OFL, NOR and CPF and 20 μg L(-1) for MOX. The optimized conditions allowed picturing metabolites/transformation products formation and accumulation during the process, stating an incomplete mineralization, also shown by fluoride release. OFL and MOX presented the highest (98.3%) and the lowest (80.5%) extent of degradation after 19 days of assay, respectively. A representative number of samples was selected and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with triple quadrupole and the molecular formulas were confirmed by a quadruple time of flight analyzer (QqTOF). Most of the intermediates were already described as biodegradation and/or photodegradation products in different conditions; however unknown metabolites were also identified. The microbial consortium, even when exposed to high levels of FQ, presented high percentages of degradation, never reported before for these compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibiotic Production by a Roseobacter Clade-Affiliated Species from the German Wadden Sea and Its Antagonistic Effects on Indigenous Isolates†

    PubMed Central

    Brinkhoff, Thorsten; Bach, Gabriela; Heidorn, Thorsten; Liang, Lanfang; Schlingloff, Andrea; Simon, Meinhard

    2004-01-01

    A strain affiliated with the Roseobacter clade and producing a new antibiotic named tropodithietic acid (L. Liang, Ph.D. thesis, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany, 2003) was isolated from the German Wadden Sea. The compound showed strong inhibiting properties with respect to marine bacteria of various taxa and marine algae. Antibiotic production was found to occur during the complete growth phase. Strain mutants without antagonistic properties appeared several times spontaneously. PMID:15066861

  14. Phenazines and Other Redox-Active Antibiotics Promote Microbial Mineral Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria E.; Kappler, Andreas; Newman, Dianne K.

    2004-01-01

    Natural products with important therapeutic properties are known to be produced by a variety of soil bacteria, yet the ecological function of these compounds is not well understood. Here we show that phenazines and other redox-active antibiotics can promote microbial mineral reduction. Pseudomonas chlororaphis PCL1391, a root isolate that produces phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN), is able to reductively dissolve poorly crystalline iron and manganese oxides, whereas a strain carrying a mutation in one of the phenazine-biosynthetic genes (phzB) is not; the addition of purified PCN restores this ability to the mutant strain. The small amount of PCN produced relative to the large amount of ferric iron reduced in cultures of P. chlororaphis implies that PCN is recycled multiple times; moreover, poorly crystalline iron (hydr)oxide can be reduced abiotically by reduced PCN. This ability suggests that PCN functions as an electron shuttle rather than an iron chelator, a finding that is consistent with the observation that dissolved ferric iron is undetectable in culture fluids. Multiple phenazines and the glycopeptidic antibiotic bleomycin can also stimulate mineral reduction by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR1. Because diverse bacterial strains that cannot grow on iron can reduce phenazines, and because thermodynamic calculations suggest that phenazines have lower redox potentials than those of poorly crystalline iron (hydr)oxides in a range of relevant environmental pH (5 to 9), we suggest that natural products like phenazines may promote microbial mineral reduction in the environment. PMID:14766572

  15. Disruption of rimP-SC, encoding a ribosome assembly cofactor, markedly enhances the production of several antibiotics in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuanyuan; Lu, Cheng; Dong, Hailing; Yu, Lingjun; Liu, Gang; Tan, Huarong

    2013-07-02

    Ribosome assembly cofactor RimP is one of the auxiliary proteins required for maturation of the 30S subunit in Escherichia coli. Although RimP in protein synthesis is important, its role in secondary metabolites biosynthesis has not been reported so far. Considering the close relationship between protein synthesis and the production of secondary metabolites, the function of ribosome assembly cofactor RimP on antibiotics production was studied in Streptomyces coelicolor and Streptomyces venezuelae. In this study, the rimP homologue rimP-SC was identified and cloned from Streptomyces coelicolor. Disruption of rimP-SC led to enhanced production of actinorhodin and calcium-dependent antibiotics by promoting the transcription of actII-ORF4 and cdaR. Further experiments demonstrated that MetK was one of the reasons for the increment of antibiotics production. In addition, rimP-SC disruption mutant could be used as a host to produce more peptidyl nucleoside antibiotics (polyoxin or nikkomycin) than the wild-type strain. Likewise, disruption of rimP-SV of Streptomyces venezuelae also significantly stimulated jadomycin production, suggesting that enhanced antibiotics production might be widespread in many other Streptomyces species. These results established an important relationship between ribosome assembly cofactor and secondary metabolites biosynthesis and provided an approach for yield improvement of secondary metabolites in Streptomyces.

  16. Metabolomics in the natural products field--a gateway to novel antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Changsheng; Kim, Hye Kyong; van Wezel, Gilles P; Choi, Young Hae

    2015-06-01

    Metabolomics is a high throughput analytical technique used to globally measure low molecular weight metabolites, allowing simultaneous metabolic comparison of different biological samples and thus highlighting differentially produced compounds as potential biomarkers. Although microbes are renowned as prolific sources of antibiotics, the traditional approach for new anti-infectives discovery is time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this review, the use of NMR- or MS-based metabolomics is proposed as an efficient approach to find antimicrobials in microbial single- or co-cultures.

  17. Aurantimycins, new depsipeptide antibiotics from Streptomyces aurantiacus IMET 43917. Production, isolation, structure elucidation, and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Gräfe, U; Schlegel, R; Ritzau, M; Ihn, W; Dornberger, K; Stengel, C; Fleck, W F; Gutsche, W; Härtl, A; Paulus, E F

    1995-02-01

    Aurantimycins A (1), B (2) and C (3) were isolated from the mycelium of Streptomyces aurantiacus JA 4570 as new representatives of the azinothricin group of hexadepsipeptide antibiotics. Their structures were settled by X-ray diffraction analysis of crystalline aurantimycin A (1), high field homo- and heteronuclear 2D NMR experiments, high-resolution mass spectrometry and amino acid analysis. Aurantimycins are characterized by a new side chain containing fourteen carbon atoms. They display strong activity against Gram-positive bacteria and cytotoxic effects against L-929 mouse fibroblast cells.

  18. Incidence, Antibiotic Susceptibility, and Toxin Profiles of Bacillus cereus sensu lato Isolated from Korean Fermented Soybean Products.

    PubMed

    Yim, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Kwang-Yeop; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Kim, Hong-Seok; Choi, Da-Som; Choi, In-Soo; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2015-06-01

    Korean fermented soybean products, such as doenjang, kochujang, ssamjang, and cho-kochujang, can harbor foodborne pathogens such as Bacillus cereus sensu lato (B. cereus sensu lato). The aim of this study was to characterize the toxin gene profiles, biochemical characteristics, and antibiotic resistance patterns of B. cereus sensu lato strains isolated from Korean fermented soybean products. Eighty-eight samples of Korean fermented soybean products purchased from retails in Seoul were tested. Thirteen of 26 doenjang samples, 13 of 23 kochujang samples, 16 of 30 ssamjang samples, and 5 of 9 cho-kochujang samples were positive for B. cereus sensu lato strains. The contamination level of all positive samples did not exceed 4 log CFU/g of food (maximum levels of Korea Food Code). Eighty-seven B. cereus sensu lato strains were isolated from 47 positive samples, and all isolates carried at least one enterotoxin gene. The detection rates of hblCDA, nheABC, cytK, and entFM enterotoxin genes among all isolates were 34.5%, 98.9%, 57.5%, and 100%, respectively. Fifteen strains (17.2%) harbored the emetic toxin gene. Most strains tested positive for salicin fermentation (62.1%), starch hydrolysis (66.7%), hemolysis (98.9%), motility test (100%), and lecithinase production (96.6%). The B. cereus sensu lato strains were highly resistant to β-lactam antibiotics such as ampicillin, penicillin, cefepime, imipenem, and oxacillin. Although B. cereus sensu lato levels in Korean fermented soybean products did not exceed the maximum levels permitted in South Korea (<10(4) CFU/g), these results indicate that the bacterial isolates have the potential to cause diarrheal or emetic gastrointestinal diseases. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Degradation of the antibiotics norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin by a white-rot fungus and identification of degradation products.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Ailette; Möder, Monika; Rodil, Rosario; Adrian, Lorenz; Marco-Urrea, Ernest

    2011-12-01

    More than 90% of the antibiotics ciprofloxacin (CIPRO) and norfloxacin (NOR) at 2 mg L(-1) were degraded by Trametes versicolor after 7 days of incubation in malt extract liquid medium. In in vitro assays with purified laccase (16.7 nkat mL(-1)), an extracellular enzyme excreted constitutively by this fungus, 16% of CIPRO was removed after 20 h. The addition of the laccase mediator 2,2-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt led to 97.7% and 33.7% degradation of CIPRO and NOR, respectively. Inhibition of CIPRO and NOR degradation by the cytochrome P450 inhibitor 1-aminobenzotriazole suggests that the P450 system also plays a role in the degradation of the two antibiotics. Transformation products of CIPRO and NOR were monitored at different incubation times by triple-quadrupole and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and can be assigned to three different reaction pathways: (i) oxidation of the piperazinyl substituent, (ii) monohydroxylation, and (iii) formation of dimeric products. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The bldB Gene Encodes a Small Protein Required for Morphogenesis, Antibiotic Production, and Catabolite Control in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Margaret K.; Green, Brian; Westpheling, Janet

    1998-01-01

    Mutants blocked at the earliest stage of morphological development in Streptomyces species are called bld mutants. These mutants are pleiotropically defective in the initiation of development, the ability to produce antibiotics, the ability to regulate carbon utilization, and the ability to send and/or respond to extracellular signals. Here we report the identification and partial characterization of a 99-amino-acid open reading frame (ORF99) that is capable of restoring morphogenesis, antibiotic production, and catabolite control to all of the bldB mutants. Of the existing bld mutants, bldB is of special interest because the phenotype of this mutant is the most pleiotropic. DNA sequence analysis of ORF99 from each of the existing bldB mutants identified base changes either within the coding region of the predicted protein or in the regulatory region of the gene. Primer extension analysis identified an apparent transcription start site. A promoter fusion to the xylE reporter gene showed that expression of bldB is apparently temporally regulated and that the bldB gene product is involved in the regulation of its own expression. PMID:9515926

  1. Organization of the gene cluster for biosynthesis of penicillin in Penicillium nalgiovense and antibiotic production in cured dry sausages.

    PubMed

    Laich, F; Fierro, F; Cardoza, R E; Martin, J F

    1999-03-01

    Several fungal isolates obtained from two cured meat products from Spain were identified as Penicillium nalgiovense by their morphological features and by DNA fingerprinting. All P. nalgiovense isolates showed antibiotic activity in agar diffusion assays, and their penicillin production in liquid complex medium ranged from 6 to 38 microgram. ml-1. We constructed a restriction map of the penicillin gene cluster of P. nalgiovense and found that the organization of the penicillin biosynthetic genes (pcbAB, pcbC, and penDE) is the same as in Penicillium chrysogenum and Aspergillus nidulans. The pcbAB gene is located in an orientation opposite that of the pcbC and penDE genes in all three species. Significant amounts of penicillin were found in situ in the casing and the outer layer of salami meat during early stages of the curing process, coinciding with fungal colonization, but no penicillin was detected in the cured salami. The antibiotic produced in situ was sensitive to penicillinase.

  2. Organization of the Gene Cluster for Biosynthesis of Penicillin in Penicillium nalgiovense and Antibiotic Production in Cured Dry Sausages

    PubMed Central

    Laich, Federico; Fierro, Francisco; Cardoza, Rosa Elena; Martin, Juan F.

    1999-01-01

    Several fungal isolates obtained from two cured meat products from Spain were identified as Penicillium nalgiovense by their morphological features and by DNA fingerprinting. All P. nalgiovense isolates showed antibiotic activity in agar diffusion assays, and their penicillin production in liquid complex medium ranged from 6 to 38 μg · ml−1. We constructed a restriction map of the penicillin gene cluster of P. nalgiovense and found that the organization of the penicillin biosynthetic genes (pcbAB, pcbC, and penDE) is the same as in Penicillium chrysogenum and Aspergillus nidulans. The pcbAB gene is located in an orientation opposite that of the pcbC and penDE genes in all three species. Significant amounts of penicillin were found in situ in the casing and the outer layer of salami meat during early stages of the curing process, coinciding with fungal colonization, but no penicillin was detected in the cured salami. The antibiotic produced in situ was sensitive to penicillinase. PMID:10049889

  3. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We propose a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal link is briefly su...

  4. Toward Homogeneous Erythropoietin: Chemical Synthesis of the Ala1-Gly28 Glycopeptide Domain by “Alanine” Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Cindy; Trzupek, John D.; Wu, Bin; Wan, Qian; Chen, Gong; Tan, Zhongping; Yuan, Yu; Danishefsky, Samuel J.

    2009-01-01

    The Ala1—Gly28 glycopeptide fragment (28) of EPO was prepared by chemical synthesis as a single glycoform. Key steps in the synthesis include attachment of a complex dodecasaccharide (7) to a seven amino acid peptide via Lansbury aspartylation, native chemical ligation to join peptide 19 with the glycopeptide domain 18, and a selective desulfurization at the ligation site to reveal the natural Ala19. This glycopeptide fragment (28) contains both the requisite N-linked dodecasaccharide and a C-terminal αthioester handle, the latter feature permitting direct coupling with a glycopeptide fragment bearing N-terminal Cys29 without further functionalization. PMID:19334679

  5. Beta-Lactamase Production and Resistance to Beta-Lactam Antibiotics in Nocardia

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Richard J.; Vance, Paula; Weissfeld, Alice; Martin, R. Russell

    1978-01-01

    Although ampicillin has been suggested as a useful agent for the treatment of nocardiosis in man, little is known regarding the presence of beta-lactamase in Nocardia or its possible role in determining resistance to ampicillin and the other beta-lactam antibiotics. We have evaluated 55 isolates of Nocardia for susceptibility to five beta-lactam antibiotics and for the presence of beta-lactamase. Nocardia were resistant to penicillin G, cloxacillin, and cefazolin, but 27 and 62% were susceptible to 3.1 and 25 μg of ampicillin per ml, respectively. Almost 90% of these ampicillin-susceptible or intermediate strains were also susceptible to carbenicillin. The combination of ampicillin and cloxacillin was synergistic against many ampicillin-resistant strains. Beta-lactamase was detected in 89% of Nocardia isolates when intact cells were used and in six of six strains after cell fractionation. This beta-lactamase was most active against penicillin G and ampicillin, with lesser activity against carbenicillin and cephaloridine. These studies suggest that beta-lactamase may be present in all clinical isolates of Nocardia and that mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance other than or in addition to beta-lactamase are responsible for resistance of Nocardia to ampicillin and carbenicillin. PMID:310280

  6. Evaluation and validation of a multi-residue method based on biochip technology for the simultaneous screening of six families of antibiotics in muscle and aquaculture products.

    PubMed

    Gaudin, Valérie; Hedou, Celine; Soumet, Christophe; Verdon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Evidence Investigator™ system (Randox, UK) is a biochip and semi-automated system. The microarray kit II (AM II) is capable of detecting several compounds belonging to different families of antibiotics: quinolones, ceftiofur, thiamphenicol, streptomycin, tylosin and tetracyclines. The performance of this innovative system was evaluated for the detection of antibiotic residues in new matrices, in muscle of different animal species and in aquaculture products. The method was validated according to the European Decision No. EC/2002/657 and the European guideline for the validation of screening methods, which represents a complete initial validation. The false-positive rate was equal to 0% in muscle and in aquaculture products. The detection capabilities CCβ for 12 validated antibiotics (enrofloxacin, difloxacin, ceftiofur, desfuroyl ceftiofur cysteine disulfide, thiamphenicol, florfenicol, tylosin, tilmicosin, streptomycin, dihydrostreptomycin, tetracycline, doxycycline) were all lower than the respective maximum residue limits (MRLs) in muscle from different animal origins (bovine, ovine, porcine, poultry). No cross-reactions were observed with other antibiotics, neither with the six detected families nor with other families of antibiotics. The AM II kit could be applied to aquaculture products but with higher detection capabilities from those in muscle. The detection capabilities CCβ in aquaculture products were respectively at 0.25, 0.10 and 0.5 of the respective MRL in aquaculture products for enrofloxacin, tylosin and oxytetracycline. The performance of the AM II kit has been compared with other screening methods and with the performance characteristics previously determined in honey.

  7. Increased resveratrol production in wines using engineered wine strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 and relaxed antibiotic or auxotrophic selection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Liang, Jing-Long; Kang, Lin-Zhi; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Jia-Jun; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Guo, Li-Qiong; Lin, Jun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound with diverse beneficial effects on human health. Red wine is the major dietary source of resveratrol but the amount that people can obtain from wines is limited. To increase the resveratrol production in wines, two expression vectors carrying 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase gene (4CL) from Arabidopsis thaliana and resveratrol synthase gene (RS) from Vitis vinifera were transformed into industrial wine strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118. When cultured with 1 mM p-coumaric acid, the engineered strains grown with and without the addition of antibiotics produced 8.249 and 3.317 mg/L of trans-resveratrol in the culture broth, respectively. Resveratrol content of the wine fermented with engineered strains was twice higher than that of the control, indicating that our engineered strains could increase the production of resveratrol during wine fermentation. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. Functional characterization of a three-component regulatory system involved in quorum sensing-based regulation of peptide antibiotic production in Carnobacterium maltaromaticum.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Bettina H; Quadri, Luis E N

    2006-10-20

    Quorum sensing is a form of cell-to-cell communication that allows bacteria to control a wide range of physiological processes in a population density-dependent manner. Production of peptide antibiotics is one of the processes regulated by quorum sensing in several species of Gram-positive bacteria, including strains of Carnobacterium maltaromaticum. This bacterium and its peptide antibiotics are of interest due to their potential applications in food preservation. The molecular bases of the quorum sensing phenomenon controlling peptide antibiotic production in C. maltaromaticum remain poorly understood. The present study was aimed at gaining a deeper insight into the molecular mechanism involved in quorum sensing-mediated regulation of peptide antibiotic (bacteriocin) production by C. maltaromaticum. We report the functional analyses of the CS (autoinducer)-CbnK (histidine protein kinase)-CbnR (response regulator) three-component regulatory system and the three regulated promoters involved in peptide antibiotic production in C. maltaromaticum LV17B. CS-CbnK-CbnR system-dependent activation of carnobacterial promoters was demonstrated in both homologous and heterologous hosts using a two-plasmid system with a beta-glucuronidase (GusA) reporter read-out. The results of our analyses support a model in which the CbnK-CbnR two-component signal transduction system is necessary and sufficient to transduce the signal of the peptide autoinducer CS into the activation of the promoters that drive the expression of the genes required for production of the carnobacterial peptide antibiotics and the immunity proteins that protect the producer bacterium. The CS-CbnK-CbnR triad forms a three-component regulatory system by which production of peptide antibiotics by C. maltaromaticum LV17B is controlled in a population density-dependent (or cell proximity-dependent) manner. This regulatory mechanism would permit the bacterial population to synchronize the production of peptide

  9. Virulence factors and antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori isolated from raw milk and unpasteurized dairy products in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Soolmaz; Dehkordi, Farhad Safarpoor; Rahimi, Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high importance of Helicobacter pylori, the origin and transmission of this bacterium has not been clearly determined. According to controversial theories and results of previous studies, animal source foods - especially milk - play an important role in the transmission of H. pylori to humans. The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution of vacA, cagA, iceA and oipA virulence factors in H. pylori strains isolated from milk and dairy products and study their antimicrobial resistance properties. A total of 520 raw milk and 400 traditional dairy product samples were cultured and tested. Those that were H. pylori-positive were analyzed for the presence of vacA, cagA, iceA and oipA virulence factors. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method. One hundred and three out of 520 milk samples (19.8%) and 77 out of 400 dairy products samples (19.2%) were contaminated with H. pylori. The most frequently contaminated samples were ovine milk (35%) and traditional cheese (30%). Total prevalence of vacA, cagA, iceA and oipA factors were 75%, 76.6%, 41.6% and 25%, respectively. H. pylori strains of milk and dairy products harbored high levels of resistance to ampicillin (84.4%), tetracycline (76.6%), erythromycin (70.5%) and metronidazole (70%). High presence of antibiotic-resistant strains of H. pylori suggest that milk and dairy samples may be the sources of bacteria that can cause severe infection. Our findings should raise awareness about antibiotic resistance in H. pylori strains in Iran.

  10. Self-Adjuvanting Glycopeptide Conjugate Vaccine against Disseminated Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Hong; Cartmell, Jonathan; Bailey, Justin J.; Dziadek, Sebastian; Bundle, David R.; Cutler, Jim E.

    2012-01-01

    Our research on pathogenesis of disseminated candidiasis led to the discovery that antibodies specific for Candida albicans cell surface β-1, 2–mannotriose [β-(Man)3] protect mice. A 14 mer peptide Fba, which derived from the N-terminal portion of the C. albicans cytosolic/cell surface protein fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, was used as the glycan carrier and resulted in a novel synthetic glycopeptide vaccine β-(Man)3-Fba. By a dendritic cell-based immunization approach, this conjugate induced protective antibody responses against both the glycan and peptide parts of the vaccine. In this report, we modified the β-(Man)3-Fba conjugate by coupling it to tetanus toxoid (TT) in order to improve immunogenicity and allow for use of an adjuvant suitable for human use. By new immunization procedures entirely compatible with human use, the modified β-(Man)3-Fba-TT was administered either alone or as a mixture made with alum or monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) adjuvants and given to mice by a subcutaneous (s.c.) route. Mice vaccinated with or, surprisingly, without adjuvant responded well by making robust antibody responses. The immunized groups showed a high degree of protection against a lethal challenge with C. albicans as evidenced by increased survival times and reduced kidney fungal burden as compared to control groups that received only adjuvant or DPBS buffer prior to challenge. To confirm that induced antibodies were protective, sera from mice immunized against the β-(Man)3-Fba-TT conjugate transferred protection against disseminated candidiasis to naïve mice, whereas C. albicans-absorbed immune sera did not. Similar antibody responses and protection induced by the β-(Man)3-Fba-TT vaccine was observed in inbred BALB/c and outbred Swiss Webster mice. We conclude that addition of TT to the glycopeptide conjugate results in a self-adjuvanting vaccine that promotes robust antibody responses without the need for additional adjuvant, which is novel and represents a

  11. Insights into solar TiO2-assisted photocatalytic oxidation of two antibiotics employed in aquatic animal production, oxolinic acid and oxytetracycline.

    PubMed

    Pereira, João H O S; Reis, Ana C; Queirós, Daniel; Nunes, Olga C; Borges, Maria T; Vilar, Vítor J P; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2013-10-01

    In this study, solar driven TiO2-assisted heterogeneous photocatalytic experiments in a pilot-plant with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs) were carried out to study the degradation of two authorized veterinary antibiotics with particular relevance in finfish aquaculture, oxolinic acid (OXA) and oxytetracycline (OTC), using pure solutions of individual or mixed antibiotics. Firstly, the influence of natural solar photolysis was assessed for each antibiotic. Secondly, photocatalytic degradation kinetic rate constants for individual and mixed antibiotics were compared, using a catalyst load of 0.5 g L(-1) and an initial pH around 7.5. Thirdly, for individually photocatalytic-treated OXA and OTC in the same conditions, the growth inhibition of Escherichia coli DSM 1103 was followed, and the mineralization extent was assessed by the residual dissolved organic carbon (DOC), low-molecular-weight carboxylate anions and inorganic ions concentration. Finally, the effect of inorganic ions, such as chlorides, sulfates, nitrates, phosphates, ammonium and bicarbonates, on the photocatalytic degradation of individual solutions of OXA and OTC was also evaluated and the formation of different reactive oxygen species were probed using selective scavengers. The removal profiles of each antibiotic, both as single component or in mixture were similar, being necessary 2.5 kJ L(-1) of solar UV energy to fully remove them, and 18 kJ(UV) L(-1) to achieve 73% and 81% mineralization, for OXA and OTC, respectively. The remaining organic carbon content was mainly due to low-molecular-weight carboxylate anions. After complete removal of the antibiotics, the remaining degradation by-products no longer showed antibacterial activity. Also, 10% and 55% of the nitrogen content of each antibiotic was converted to ammonium, while no conversion to nitrite or nitrate was detected. The presence of phosphates hindered considerably the removal of both antibiotics, whereas the presence of other inorganic

  12. Microarray analysis of the human antibody response to synthetic Cryptosporidium glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Priest, Jeffrey W; Live, David; Boons, Geert-Jan; Song, Xuezheng; Cummings, Richard D; Mead, Jan R

    2013-10-01

    Glycoproteins expressed by Cryptosporidium parvum are immunogenic in infected individuals but the nature of the epitopes recognised in C. parvum glycoproteins is poorly understood. Since a known immunodominant antigen of Cryptosporidium, the 17kDa glycoprotein, has previously been shown to bind to lectins that recognise the Tn antigen (GalNAcα1-Ser/Thr-R), a large number of glycopeptides with different Tn valency and presentation were prepared. In addition, glycopeptides were synthesised based on a 40kDa cryptosporidial antigen, a polymorphic surface glycoprotein with varying numbers of serine residues, to determine the reactivity with sera from C. parvum-infected humans. These glycopeptides and non-glycosylated peptides were used to generate a glycopeptide microarray to allow screening of sera from C. parvum-infected individuals for the presence of IgM and IgG antibodies. IgG but not IgM in sera from C. parvum-infected individuals bound to multivalent Tn antigen epitopes presented on glycopeptides, suggesting that glycoproteins from C. parvum that contain the Tn antigen induce immune responses upon infection. In addition, molecular differences in glycosylated peptides (e.g. substituting Ser for Thr) as well as the site of glycosylation had a pronounced effect on reactivity. Lastly, pooled sera from individuals infected with either Toxoplasma or Plasmodium were also tested against the modified Cryptosporidium peptides and some sera showed specific binding to glycopeptide epitopes. These studies reveal that specific anti-glycopeptide antibodies that recognise the Tn antigen may be useful diagnostically and in defining the roles of parasite glycoconjugates in infections.

  13. Hydrazide functionalized core-shell magnetic nanocomposites for highly specific enrichment of N-glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liting; Yu, Meng; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Changchun; Lu, Haojie

    2014-05-28

    In view of the biological significance of glycosylation for human health, profiling of glycoproteome from complex biological samples is highly inclined toward the discovery of disease biomarkers and clinical diagnosis. Nevertheless, because of the existence of glycopeptides at relatively low abundances compared with nonglycosylated peptides and glycan microheterogeneity, glycopeptides need to be highly selectively enriched from complex biological samples for mass spectrometry analysis. Herein, a new type of hydrazide functionalized core-shell magnetic nanocomposite has been synthesized for highly specific enrichment of N-glycopeptides. The nanocomposites with both the magnetic core and the polymer shell hanging high density of hydrazide groups were prepared by first functionalization of the magnetic core with polymethacrylic acid by reflux precipitation polymerization to obtain the Fe3O4@poly(methacrylic acid) (Fe3O4@PMAA) and then modification of the surface of Fe3O4@PMAA with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) to obtain Fe3O4@poly(methacrylic hydrazide) (Fe3O4@PMAH). The abundant hydrazide groups toward highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides and the magnetic core make it suitable for large-scale, high-throughput, and automated sample processing. In addition, the hydrophilic polymer surface can provide low nonspecific adsorption of other peptides. Compared to commercially available hydrazide resin, Fe3O4@PMAH improved more than 5 times the signal-to-noise ratio of standard glycopeptides. Finally, this nanocomposite was applied in the profiling of N-glycoproteome from the colorectal cancer patient serum. In total, 175 unique glycopeptides and 181 glycosylation sites corresponding to 63 unique glycoproteins were identified in three repeated experiments, with the specificities of the enriched glycopeptides and corresponding glycoproteins of 69.6% and 80.9%, respectively. Because of all these attractive features, we believe that this novel hydrazide functionalized

  14. Auxotrophic markers pyrF and proC can replace antibiotic markers on protein production plasmids in high-cell-density Pseudomonas fluorescens fermentation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jane C; Jenings, Annika F; Mun, Deborah M; McGovern, Patricia M; Chew, Lawrence C

    2005-01-01

    The use of antibiotic-resistance genes as selectable markers in transgenic organisms is coming under increased scrutiny, for fear that they may spread to human pathogens, thereby reducing the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. A current Pseudomonas fluorescens protein expression system uses a tetracycline resistance gene (tetR/tetA) to maintain an expression plasmid under control of a repressible promoter and a kanamycin resistance gene (kanR) to maintain a plasmid carrying a repressor gene. We investigated using auxotrophic markers to replace these two antibiotic resistance genes: pyrF (encoding orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase) in place of tetR/tetA and proC (encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase) in place of kanR, complementing their respective precise chromosomal deletions created by allele exchange using a suicide vector carrying pyrF as a counterselectable marker. The resulting strains, devoid of antibiotic-resistance genes, were shown to achieve high productivity of nitrilase and thermostable alpha-amylase equal to that of the former antibiotic-resistant production host. The production plasmids were stable. The pyrF (uracil-dependent) background of the production host strain also allows us to sequentially alter the genome to incorporate other desired genomic changes, deletions, or insertions using 5'-fluoroorotic acid counterselection, restoring the selectable marker after each step.

  15. Vancomycin Molecular Interactions: Antibiotic and Enantioselective Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Timothy J.; Gilmore, Aprile; Ward, Karen; Vowell, Courtney

    Medical studies established that vancomycin and other related macrocyclic antibiotics have an enhanced antimicrobial activity when they are associated as dimers. The carbohydrate units attached to the vancomycin basket have an essential role in the dimerization reaction. Covalently synthesized dimers were found active against vancomycin-resistant bacterial strains. A great similarity between antibiotic potential and enantioselectivity was established. A covalent vancomycin dimer was studied in capillary electrophoresis producing excellent chiral separation of dansyl amino acids. Balhimycin is a macrocyclic glycopeptide structurally similar to vancomycin. The small differences are, however, responsible for drastic differences in enantioselectivity in the same experimental conditions. Contributions from studies examining vancomycin's mechanism for antimicrobial activity have substantially aided our understanding of its mechanism in chiral recognition.

  16. Reciprocal immune benefit based on complementary production of antibiotics by the leech Hirudo verbana and its gut symbiont Aeromonas veronii.

    PubMed

    Tasiemski, Aurélie; Massol, François; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Roger, Emmanuel; Rodet, Franck; Fournier, Isabelle; Thomas, Frédéric; Salzet, Michel

    2015-12-04

    The medicinal leech has established a long-term mutualistic association with Aeromonas veronii, a versatile bacterium which can also display free-living waterborne and fish- or human-pathogenic lifestyles. Here, we investigated the role of antibiotics in the dynamics of interaction between the leech and its gut symbiont Aeromonas. By combining biochemical and molecular approaches, we isolated and identified for the first time the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the leech digestive tract and by its symbiont Aeromonas. Immunohistochemistry data and PCR analyses evidenced that leech AMP genes are induced in the gut epithelial cells when Aeromonas load is low (starved animals), while repressed when Aeromonas abundance is the highest (post blood feeding). The asynchronous production of AMPs by both partners suggests that these antibiotic substances (i) provide them with reciprocal protection against invasive bacteria and (ii) contribute to the unusual simplicity of the gut microflora of the leech. This immune benefit substantially reinforces the evidence of an evolutionarily stable association between H. verbana and A. veronii. Altogether these data may provide insights into the processes making the association with an Aeromonas species in the digestive tract either deleterious or beneficial.

  17. Development, antibiotic production, and ribosome assembly in Streptomyces venezuelae are impacted by RNase J and RNase III deletion.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephanie E; Leong, Vivian; Ortega, Joaquin; Elliot, Marie A

    2014-12-01

    RNA metabolism is a critical but frequently overlooked control element affecting virtually every cellular process in bacteria. RNA processing and degradation is mediated by a suite of ribonucleases having distinct cleavage and substrate specificity. Here, we probe the role of two ribonucleases (RNase III and RNase J) in the emerging model system Streptomyces venezuelae. We show that each enzyme makes a unique contribution to the growth and development of S. venezuelae and further affects the secondary metabolism and antibiotic production of this bacterium. We demonstrate a connection between the action of these ribonucleases and translation, with both enzymes being required for the formation of functional ribosomes. RNase III mutants in particular fail to properly process 23S rRNA, form fewer 70S ribosomes, and show reduced translational processivity. The loss of either RNase III or RNase J additionally led to the appearance of a new ribosomal species (the 100S ribosome dimer) during exponential growth and dramatically sensitized these mutants to a range of antibiotics. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Reciprocal immune benefit based on complementary production of antibiotics by the leech Hirudo verbana and its gut symbiont Aeromonas veronii

    PubMed Central

    Tasiemski, Aurélie; Massol, François; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Roger, Emmanuel; Rodet, Franck; Fournier, Isabelle; Thomas, Frédéric; Salzet, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The medicinal leech has established a long-term mutualistic association with Aeromonas veronii, a versatile bacterium which can also display free-living waterborne and fish- or human-pathogenic lifestyles. Here, we investigated the role of antibiotics in the dynamics of interaction between the leech and its gut symbiont Aeromonas. By combining biochemical and molecular approaches, we isolated and identified for the first time the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the leech digestive tract and by its symbiont Aeromonas. Immunohistochemistry data and PCR analyses evidenced that leech AMP genes are induced in the gut epithelial cells when Aeromonas load is low (starved animals), while repressed when Aeromonas abundance is the highest (post blood feeding). The asynchronous production of AMPs by both partners suggests that these antibiotic substances (i) provide them with reciprocal protection against invasive bacteria and (ii) contribute to the unusual simplicity of the gut microflora of the leech. This immune benefit substantially reinforces the evidence of an evolutionarily stable association between H. verbana and A. veronii. Altogether these data may provide insights into the processes making the association with an Aeromonas species in the digestive tract either deleterious or beneficial. PMID:26635240

  19. Development, Antibiotic Production, and Ribosome Assembly in Streptomyces venezuelae Are Impacted by RNase J and RNase III Deletion

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephanie E.; Leong, Vivian; Ortega, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    RNA metabolism is a critical but frequently overlooked control element affecting virtually every cellular process in bacteria. RNA processing and degradation is mediated by a suite of ribonucleases having distinct cleavage and substrate specificity. Here, we probe the role of two ribonucleases (RNase III and RNase J) in the emerging model system Streptomyces venezuelae. We show that each enzyme makes a unique contribution to the growth and development of S. venezuelae and further affects the secondary metabolism and antibiotic production of this bacterium. We demonstrate a connection between the action of these ribonucleases and translation, with both enzymes being required for the formation of functional ribosomes. RNase III mutants in particular fail to properly process 23S rRNA, form fewer 70S ribosomes, and show reduced translational processivity. The loss of either RNase III or RNase J additionally led to the appearance of a new ribosomal species (the 100S ribosome dimer) during exponential growth and dramatically sensitized these mutants to a range of antibiotics. PMID:25266378

  20. Expeditious chemoenzymatic synthesis of CD52 glycopeptide antigens

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xingyu; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D.; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2013-01-01

    CD52 is a GPI-anchored glycopeptide antigen found on sperm cells and human lymphocytes. Recent structural studies indicate that sperm-associated CD52 antigen carries both a complex type N-glycan and an O-glycan on the polypeptide backbone. To facilitate functional and immunological studies of distinct CD52 glycoforms, we report in this paper the first chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous CD52 glycoforms carrying both N- and O-glycans. The synthetic strategy consists of two key steps: monosaccharide primers GlcNAc and GalNAc were first installed at the pre-determined N- and O-glycosylation sites by a facile solid-phase peptide synthesis, and then the N- and O-glycans were extended by respective enzymatic glycosylations. It was found that the endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation allowed efficient attachment of an intact N-glycan in a single step at the N-glycosylation site, while the recombinant human T-synthase could independently extend the O-linked GalNAc to form the core 1 O-glycan. This chemoenzymatic approach is highly convergent and permits easy construction of various homogeneous CD52 glycoforms from a common polypeptide precursor. In addition, the introduction of a latent thiol group in the form of protected cysteamine at the C-terminus of the CD52 glycoforms will enable site-specific conjugation to a carrier protein to provide immunogens for generating CD52 glycoform-specific antibodies for functional studies. PMID:20848033

  1. Expeditious chemoenzymatic synthesis of CD52 glycopeptide antigens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Xinyu; Ju, Tongzhong; Cummings, Richard D; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2010-11-21

    CD52 is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored glycopeptide antigen found on sperm cells and human lymphocytes. Recent structural studies indicate that sperm-associated CD52 antigen carries both a complex type N-glycan and an O-glycan on the polypeptide backbone. To facilitate functional and immunological studies of distinct CD52 glycoforms, we report in this paper the first chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous CD52 glycoforms carrying both N- and O-glycans. The synthetic strategy consists of two key steps: monosaccharide primers GlcNAc and GalNAc were first installed at the pre-determined N- and O-glycosylation sites by a facile solid-phase peptide synthesis, and then the N- and O-glycans were extended by respective enzymatic glycosylations. It was found that the endoglycosidase-catalyzed transglycosylation allowed efficient attachment of an intact N-glycan in a single step at the N-glycosylation site, while the recombinant human T-synthase could independently extend the O-linked GalNAc to form the core 1 O-glycan. This chemoenzymatic approach is highly convergent and permits easy construction of various homogeneous CD52 glycoforms from a common polypeptide precursor. In addition, the introduction of a latent thiol group in the form of protected cysteamine at the C-terminus of the CD52 glycoforms will enable site-specific conjugation to a carrier protein to provide immunogens for generating CD52 glycoform-specific antibodies for functional studies.

  2. Structural characterization of NETNES glycopeptide from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Chiodi, Carla G; Verli, Hugo

    2013-05-24

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan, responsible for Chagas disease, that parasites triatomines and some vertebrates, mainly Homo sapiens. In 2010, nearly 10 million people in whole world, most from Latin America, had Chagas disease, which is an illness of high morbidity, low mortality, and serious problems of quality of life. The available treatment has high toxicity and low efficacy at chronic phase. Some of the protozoan antigenic or virulence factors include complex carbohydrate structures that, due to their uniqueness, may constitute potential selective targets for the development of new treatments. One example of such structures is NETNES, a low abundance T. cruzi glycopeptide, comprising 13 amino acid residues, one or two N-glycosylation chains, a GPI anchor and two P-glycosylations. In this context, the current work aims to obtain an atomic model for NETNES, including its glycan chains and membrane attachment, in order to contribute in the characterization of its structure and dynamics. Based on POPC and GPI models built in agreement with experimental data, our results indicate that, in the first third of the simulation, NETNES peptide is very flexible in solution, bending itself between asparagine residues and lying down on some carbohydrates and membrane, exposing amino acid residues and some other glycans, mainly terminal mannoses, to the extracellular medium, remaining in this position until the end of simulations.

  3. Endocytosis of Nanomedicines: The Case of Glycopeptide Engineered PLGA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vilella, Antonietta; Ruozi, Barbara; Belletti, Daniela; Pederzoli, Francesca; Galliani, Marianna; Semeghini, Valentina; Forni, Flavio; Zoli, Michele; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Tosi, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The success of nanomedicine as a new strategy for drug delivery and targeting prompted the interest in developing approaches toward basic and clinical neuroscience. Despite enormous advances on brain research, central nervous system (CNS) disorders remain the world’s leading cause of disability, in part due to the inability of the majority of drugs to reach the brain parenchyma. Many attempts to use nanomedicines as CNS drug delivery systems (DDS) were made; among the various non-invasive approaches, nanoparticulate carriers and, particularly, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) seem to be the most interesting strategies. In particular, the ability of poly-lactide-co-glycolide NPs (PLGA-NPs) specifically engineered with a glycopeptide (g7), conferring to NPs’ ability to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in rodents at a concentration of up to 10% of the injected dose, was demonstrated in previous studies using different routes of administrations. Most of the evidence on NP uptake mechanisms reported in the literature about intracellular pathways and processes of cell entry is based on in vitro studies. Therefore, beside the particular attention devoted to increasing the knowledge of the rate of in vivo BBB crossing of nanocarriers, the subsequent exocytosis in the brain compartments, their fate and trafficking in the brain surely represent major topics in this field. PMID:26102358

  4. Evidence for a gamma-turn motif in antifreeze glycopeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, J A; Rowlen, K L

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the secondary structure of antifreeze peptides (AFPs) and glycopeptides (AFGPs) is crucial to understanding the mechanism by which these molecules inhibit ice crystal growth. A polyproline type II helix is perhaps the most widely accepted conformation for active AFGPs; however, random coil and alpha-helix conformations have also been proposed. In this report we present vibrational spectroscopic evidence that the conformation of AFGPs in solution is not random, not alpha-helical, and not polyproline type II. Comparison of AFGP amide vibrational frequencies with those observed and calculated for beta and gamma-turns in other peptides strongly suggests that AFGPs contain substantial turn structure. Computer-generated molecular models were utilized to compare gamma-turn, beta-turn, and polyproline II structures. The gamma-turn motif is consistent with observed amide frequencies and results in a molecule with planar symmetry with respect to the disaccharides. This intriguing conformation may provide new insight into the unusual properties of AFGPs. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:8241413

  5. Liposomal preparations of muramyl glycopeptides as immunomodulators and adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Turánek, Jaroslav; Ledvina, Miroslav; Kasná, Andrea; Vacek, Antonín; Hríbalova, Vera; Krejcí, Josef; Miller, Andrew D

    2006-04-12

    The need for safe and structurally defined immunomodulators and adjuvants is increasing in connection with the recently observed marked increase in the prevalence of pathological conditions characterized by immunodeficiency. Important groups of such compounds are muramyl glycopeptides, analogs of muramyl dipeptide (MDP), glucosaminyl-muramyl dipeptide (GMDP), and desmuramylpeptides. We have designed and synthesized new types of analogs with changes in both the sugar and the peptide parts of the molecule that show a high immunostimulating and adjuvant activity and suppressed adverse side effects. The introduction of lipophilic residues has also improved their incorporation into liposomes, which represent a suitable drug carrier. The proliposome-liposome method is based on the conversion of the initial proliposome preparation into liposome dispersion by dilution with the aqueous phase. The description of a home-made stirred thermostated cell and its link-up with a liquid delivery system for a rapid and automated preparation of multilamellar liposomes at strictly controlled conditions (sterility, temperature, dilution rate and schedule) is presented. The cell has been designed for laboratory-scale preparation of liposomes (300-1000 mg of phospholipid per run) in a procedure taking less than 90 min. The method can be readily scaled up. Examples of adjuvant and immunostimulatory effect of liposomal preparation in mice model will be presented.

  6. Platforms for antibiotic discovery.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kim

    2013-05-01

    The spread of resistant bacteria, leading to untreatable infections, is a major public health threat but the pace of antibiotic discovery to combat these pathogens has slowed down. Most antibiotics were originally isolated by screening soil-derived actinomycetes during the golden era of antibiotic discovery in the 1940s to 1960s. However, diminishing returns from this discovery platform led to its collapse, and efforts to create a new platform based on target-focused screening of large libraries of synthetic compounds failed, in part owing to the lack of penetration of such compounds through the bacterial envelope. This article considers strategies to re-establish viable platforms for antibiotic discovery. These include investigating untapped natural product sources such as uncultured bacteria, establishing rules of compound penetration to enable the development of synthetic antibiotics, developing species-specific antibiotics and identifying prodrugs that have the potential to eradicate dormant persisters, which are often responsible for hard-to-treat infections.

  7. Discrimination of epimeric glycans and glycopeptides using IM-MS and its potential for carbohydrate sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Both, P.; Green, A. P.; Gray, C. J.; Šardzík, R.; Voglmeir, J.; Fontana, C.; Austeri, M.; Rejzek, M.; Richardson, D.; Field, R. A.; Widmalm, G.; Flitsch, S. L.; Eyers, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is the primary analytical technique used to characterize the complex oligosaccharides that decorate cell surfaces. Monosaccharide building blocks are often simple epimers, which when combined produce diastereomeric glycoconjugates indistinguishable by mass spectrometry. Structure elucidation frequently relies on assumptions that biosynthetic pathways are highly conserved. Here, we show that biosynthetic enzymes can display unexpected promiscuity, with human glycosyltransferase pp-α-GanT2 able to utilize both uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine and uridine diphosphate N-acetylgalactosamine, leading to the synthesis of epimeric glycopeptides in vitro. Ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) was used to separate these structures and, significantly, enabled characterization of the attached glycan based on the drift times of the monosaccharide product ions generated following collision-induced dissociation. Finally, ion-mobility mass spectrometry following fragmentation was used to determine the nature of both the reducing and non-reducing glycans of a series of epimeric disaccharides and the branched pentasaccharide Man3 glycan, demonstrating that this technique may prove useful for the sequencing of complex oligosaccharides.

  8. Abundance and distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in a full-scale anaerobic-aerobic system alternately treating ribostamycin, spiramycin and paromomycin production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mei; Dou, Xiaomin; Wang, Chunyan; Tian, Zhe; Yang, Min; Zhang, Yu

    2017-05-27

    The occurrence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) has been intensively investigated for wastewater treatment systems treating single class of antibiotic in recent years. However, the impacts of alternately occurring antibiotics in antibiotic production wastewater on the behavior of ARGs in biological treatment systems were not well understood yet. Herein, techniques including high-capacity quantitative PCR and quantitative PCR (qPCR) were used to investigate the behavior of ARGs in an anaerobic-aerobic full-scale system. The system alternately treated three kinds of antibiotic production wastewater including ribostamycin, spiramycin and paromomycin, which referred to stages 1, 2 and 3. The aminoglycoside ARGs (52.1-79.3%) determined using high-capacity quantitative PCR were the most abundant species in all sludge samples of the three stages. The total relative abundances of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes and aminoglycoside resistance genes measured using qPCR were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in aerobic sludge than in sewage sludge. However, the comparison of ARGs acquired from three alternate stages revealed that MLS genes and the aminoglycoside ARGs did not vary significantly (P > 0.05) in both aerobic and anaerobic sludge samples. In aerobic sludge, one acetyltransferase gene (aacA4) and the other three nucleotidyltransferase genes (aadB, aadA and aadE) exhibited positive correlations with intI1 (r (2) = 0.83-0.94; P < 0.05), implying the significance of horizontal transfer in their proliferation. These results and facts will be helpful to understand the abundance and distribution of ARGs from antibiotic production wastewater treatment systems.

  9. Investigation of ovarian cancer associated sialylation changes in N-linked glycopeptides by quantitative proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In approximately 80% of patients, ovarian cancer is diagnosed when the patient is already in the advanced stages of the disease. CA125 is currently used as the marker for ovarian cancer; however, it lacks specificity and sensitivity for detecting early stage disease. There is a critical unmet need for sensitive and specific routine screening tests for early diagnosis that can reduce ovarian cancer lethality by reliably detecting the disease at its earliest and treatable stages. Results In this study, we investigated the N-linked sialylated glycopeptides in serum samples from healthy and ovarian cancer patients using Lectin-directed Tandem Labeling (LTL) and iTRAQ quantitative proteomics methods. We identified 45 N-linked sialylated glycopeptides containing 46 glycosylation sites. Among those, ten sialylated glycopeptides were significantly up-regulated in ovarian cancer patients’ serum samples. LC-MS/MS analysis of the non-glycosylated peptides from the same samples, western blot data using lectin enriched glycoproteins of various ovarian cancer type samples, and PNGase F (+/−) treatment confirmed the sialylation changes in the ovarian cancer samples. Conclusion Herein, we demonstrated that several proteins are aberrantly sialylated in N-linked glycopeptides in ovarian cancer and detection of glycopeptides with abnormal sialylation changes may have the potential to serve as biomarkers for ovarian cancer. PMID:22856521

  10. Structure of the O-glycopeptides isolated from bovine milk component PP3.

    PubMed

    Coddeville, B; Girardet, J M; Plancke, Y; Campagna, S; Linden, G; Spik, G

    1998-04-01

    The heat-stable acid-soluble phosphoglycoprotein component PP3 was isolated from the bovine milk proteose peptone fraction by concanavalin A affinity chromatography. Glycopeptides from the ConA-bound fraction corresponding to the component PP3 were obtained by Pronase digestion and were separated by gel filtration into high and low-molecular-mass glycopeptides. In a previous work, we have investigated the structure of the N-glycans from the high-molecular-mass glycopeptides [Girardet et al. (1995) Eur J Biochem 234: 939-46]. Here, we describe the structure of the O-glycans from the low-molecular-mass glycopeptides. By combining methylation analysis, mass spectrometry, 400 MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy and peptide sequence analysis, we show that the low-molecular-mass fraction contains several neutral glycopeptides. A mixture of the following three glycan structures linked to the Thr86 has been identified: GalNac alpha1-O-Thr, Gal(beta1-3)GalNAc alpha1-O-Thr and Gal(beta1-4)GlcNAc(beta1-6)[Gal(beta1-3)]GalNAc alpha1-O-Thr.

  11. Click maltose as an alternative to reverse phase material for desalting glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Li, Xiuling; Guo, Zhimou; Yu, Long; Zou, Lijuan; Liang, Xinmiao

    2011-10-07

    Desalting peptides before mass spectrometry analysis is important because salts lead to adduct formation, increased chemical noise and ion suppression effect. A high concentration of salt can clog nanoelectrospray ionization (ESI) emitters. The reverse phase C18 material is commonly used to desalt peptides because of its high binding capacity. However, peptides with high hydrophilicity, such as glycopeptides, are not retained well on this material, resulting in the loss of peptide information. To improve the efficiency of glycopeptide desalting, we introduced a hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC)-based material named click maltose. Four glycoproteins, horseradish peroxidase (HRP), human serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), bovine ribonuclease B (RNase B), and α-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) were chosen as models and their glycopeptides were desalted with click maltose, AQ C18, Empore C18 and ZipTip C18. Click maltose as a HILIC material exhibited better performance than the other three C18 materials for both number of targeted glycopeptides and their corresponding intensities. In addition, accurate glycopeptide profiling was achieved with click maltose desalting regardless of peptide lengths and glycan types.

  12. Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to Subinhibitory Concentrations of β-Lactam Antibiotics Induces Heterogeneous Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Roch, Mélanie; Clair, Perrine; Renzoni, Adriana; Reverdy, Marie-Elisabeth; Dauwalder, Olivier; Bes, Michèle; Martra, Annie; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Laurent, Frédéric; Reix, Philippe; Dumitrescu, Oana

    2014-01-01

    Glycopeptides are known to select for heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (h-VISA) from susceptible strains. In certain clinical situations, h-VISA strains have been isolated from patients without previous exposure to glycopeptides, such as cystic fibrosis patients, who frequently receive repeated treatments with beta-lactam antibiotics. Our objective was to determine whether prolonged exposure to beta-lactam antibiotics can induce h-VISA. We exposed 3 clinical vancomycin-susceptible methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains to ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, imipenem, and vancomycin (as a control) at subinhibitory concentrations for 18 days in vitro. Population analyses showed progressive increases in vancomycin resistance; seven of the 12 derived strains obtained after induction were classified as h-VISA according to the following criteria: area under the curve (AUC) on day 18/AUC of Mu3 of ≥90% and/or growth on brain heart infusion (BHI) agar with 4 mg/liter vancomycin. The derived isolates had thickened cell walls proportional to the level of glycopeptide resistance. Genes known to be associated with glycopeptide resistance (vraSR, yvqF, SA1703, graRS, walKR, and rpoB) were PCR sequenced; no de novo mutations were observed upon beta-lactam exposure. To determine whether trfA, a gene encoding a glycopeptide resistance factor, was essential in the selection of h-VISA upon beta-lactam pressure, a trfA-knockout strain was generated by allelic replacement. Indeed, beta-lactam exposure of this mutated strain showed no capacity to induce vancomycin resistance. In conclusion, these results showed that beta-lactam antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations can induce intermediate vancomycin resistance in vitro. This induction required an intact trfA locus. Our results suggest that prior use of beta-lactam antibiotics can compromise vancomycin efficacy in the treatment of MRSA infections. PMID:24957836

  13. Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to subinhibitory concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics induces heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Roch, Mélanie; Clair, Perrine; Renzoni, Adriana; Reverdy, Marie-Elisabeth; Dauwalder, Olivier; Bes, Michèle; Martra, Annie; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Laurent, Frédéric; Reix, Philippe; Dumitrescu, Oana; Vandenesch, François

    2014-09-01

    Glycopeptides are known to select for heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (h-VISA) from susceptible strains. In certain clinical situations, h-VISA strains have been isolated from patients without previous exposure to glycopeptides, such as cystic fibrosis patients, who frequently receive repeated treatments with beta-lactam antibiotics. Our objective was to determine whether prolonged exposure to beta-lactam antibiotics can induce h-VISA. We exposed 3 clinical vancomycin-susceptible methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains to ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, imipenem, and vancomycin (as a control) at subinhibitory concentrations for 18 days in vitro. Population analyses showed progressive increases in vancomycin resistance; seven of the 12 derived strains obtained after induction were classified as h-VISA according to the following criteria: area under the curve (AUC) on day 18/AUC of Mu3 of ≥90% and/or growth on brain heart infusion (BHI) agar with 4 mg/liter vancomycin. The derived isolates had thickened cell walls proportional to the level of glycopeptide resistance. Genes known to be associated with glycopeptide resistance (vraSR, yvqF, SA1703, graRS, walKR, and rpoB) were PCR sequenced; no de novo mutations were observed upon beta-lactam exposure. To determine whether trfA, a gene encoding a glycopeptide resistance factor, was essential in the selection of h-VISA upon beta-lactam pressure, a trfA-knockout strain was generated by allelic replacement. Indeed, beta-lactam exposure of this mutated strain showed no capacity to induce vancomycin resistance. In conclusion, these results showed that beta-lactam antibiotics at subinhibitory concentrations can induce intermediate vancomycin resistance in vitro. This induction required an intact trfA locus. Our results suggest that prior use of beta-lactam antibiotics can compromise vancomycin efficacy in the treatment of MRSA infections.

  14. Antibiotic Resistance of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Meat-Processing Environments, Beef Products, and Clinical Cases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Anderson Carlos; de Castilho, Natalia Parma Augusto; da Silva, Danilo Augusto Lopes; Vallim, Deyse Christina; Hofer, Ernesto; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to assess the antimicrobial resistance and the presence of virulence markers in 137 Listeria monocytogenes isolates obtained from meat-processing environments, beef products, and clinical cases. All isolates were subject to molecular serogrouping and their antibiotic resistance profiles were assessed against 12 antimicrobials. In addition, isolates were subjected to detection of virulence marker genes (inlA, inlC, inlJ). The isolates were classified into serogroups 4b, 4d, 4a, or 4c (46%), 1/2c or 3c (27%), 1/2a or 3a (13.9%), and 1/2b or 3b (13.1%). All tested isolates presented sensitivity to the majority of the tested antimicrobials, but most of them presented resistance or intermediate resistance to clindamycin (88.3%) and oxacillin (73.7%). Virulence markers were detected in all isolates, demanding further analysis to better characterize their pathogenic potential.

  15. Medium engineering for enhanced production of undecylprodigiosin antibiotic in Streptomyces coelicolor using oil palm biomass hydrolysate as a carbon source.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Shashi Kant; Lee, Bo-Rahm; Sathiyanarayanan, Ganesan; Song, Hun-Seok; Kim, Junyoung; Jeon, Jong-Min; Kim, Jung-Ho; Park, Sung-Hee; Yu, Ju-Hyun; Park, Kyungmoon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a biosugar obtained from empty fruit bunch (EFB) of oil palm by hot water treatment and subsequent enzymatic saccharification was used for undecylprodigiosin production, using Streptomyces coelicolor. Furfural is a major inhibitor present in EFB hydrolysate (EFBH), having a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 1.9mM, and it reduces utilization of glucose (27%), xylose (59%), inhibits mycelium formation, and affects antibiotic production. Interestingly, furfural was found to be a good activator of undecylprodigiosin production in S. coelicolor, which enhanced undecylprodigiosin production by up to 52%. Optimization by mixture analysis resulted in a synthetic medium containing glucose:furfural:ACN:DMSO (1%, 2mM, 0.2% and 0.3%, respectively). Finally, S. coelicolor was cultured in a fermenter in minimal medium with EFBH as a carbon source and addition of the components described above. This yielded 4.2μg/mgdcw undecylprodigiosin, which was 3.2-fold higher compared to that in un-optimized medium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Production of lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A using soybean curd residue cultivated with Bacillus subtilis in solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mizumoto, S; Hirai, M; Shoda, M

    2006-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis RB14-CS, which suppresses the growth of various plant pathogens in vitro by producing the lipopeptide antibiotic iturin A, was cultured using soybean curd residue, okara, a by-product of tofu manufacture in solid-state fermentation. After 4 days incubation, iturin A production reached 3,300 mg/kg wet solid material (14 g/kg dry solid material), which is approximately tenfold higher than that in submerged fermentation. When the okara product cultured with RB14-CS was introduced into soil infested with Rhizoctonia solani, which is a causal agent of damping-off of tomato, the disease occurrence was significantly suppressed. After 14 days, the number of RB14-CS cells remained in soil at the initial level, whereas almost no iturin A was detected in soil. As the okara cultured with RB14-CS exhibited functions of both plant disease suppression and nutritional effect on tomato seedlings, this product is expected to contribute to the recycling of the soybean curd residue.

  17. Prevalence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics and/or biocides on meat processing plant surfaces throughout meat chain production.

    PubMed

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2013-02-01

    In order to investigate the prevalence of resistant bacteria to biocides and/or antibiotics throughout meat chain production from sacrifice till end of production line, samples from various surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse representative of the region were analyzed by the culture dependent approach. Resistant Psychrotrophs (n=255 strains), Pseudomonas sp. (n=166 strains), E. coli (n=23 strains), Staphylococcus sp. (n=17 strains) and LAB (n=82 represented mainly by Lactobacillus sp.) were isolated. Resistant psychrotrophs and pseudomonads (47 and 29%, respectively) to different antimicrobials were frequently detected in almost all areas of meat processing plant regardless the antimicrobial used, although there was a clear shift in the spectrum of other bacterial groups and for this aim such resistance was determined according to several parameters: antimicrobial tested, sampling zone and the bacterial group. Correlation of different parameters was done using a statistical tool "Principal component analysis" (PCA) which determined that quaternary ammonium compounds and hexadecylpyridinium were the most relevant biocides for resistance in Pseudomonas sp., while ciprofloxacin and hexachlorophene were more relevant for psychrotrophs, LAB, and in lesser extent Staphylococcus sp. and Escherichia coli. On the other hand, PCA of sampling zones determined that sacrifice room (SR) and cutting room (CR) considered as main source of antibiotic and/or biocide resistant bacteria showed an opposite behaviour concerning relevance of antimicrobials to determine resistance being hexadecylpyridinium, cetrimide and chlorhexidine the most relevant in CR, while hexachlorophene, oxonia 6P and PHMG the most relevant in SR. In conclusion, rotational use of the relevant biocides as disinfectants in CR and SR is recommended in an environment which is frequently disinfected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genes essential for morphological development and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor are targets of BldD during vegetative growth.

    PubMed

    den Hengst, Chris D; Tran, Ngat T; Bibb, Maureen J; Chandra, Govind; Leskiw, Brenda K; Buttner, Mark J

    2010-10-01

    BldD is a transcriptional regulator essential for morphological development and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. Here we identify the BldD regulon by means of chromatin immunoprecipitation-microarray analysis (ChIP-chip). The BldD regulon encompasses ~167 transcriptional units, of which more than 20 are known to play important roles in development (e.g. bldA, bldC, bldH/adpA, bldM, bldN, ssgA, ssgB, ftsZ, whiB, whiG, smeA-ssfA) and/or secondary metabolism (e.g. nsdA, cvn9, bldA, bldC, leuA). Strikingly, 42 BldD target genes (~25% of the regulon) encode regulatory proteins, stressing the central, pleiotropic role of BldD. Almost all BldD binding sites identified by ChIP-chip are present in the promoters of the target genes. An exception is the tRNA gene bldA, where BldD binds within the region encoding the primary transcript, immediately downstream of the position corresponding to the processed, mature 3 end of the tRNA. Through gene overexpression, we identified a novel BldD target gene (cdgA) that influences differentiation and antibiotic production. cdgA encodes a GGDEF domain protein, implicating c-di-GMP in the regulation of Streptomyces development. Sequence analysis of the upstream regions of the complete regulon identified a 15 bp inverted repeat that functions as a high-affinity binding site for BldD, as was shown by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting analysis. High-scoring copies of the BldD binding site were found at relevant positions in the genomes of other bacteria containing a BldD homologue, suggesting the role of BldD is conserved in sporulating actinomycetes.

  19. In Search of the E. coli Compounds that Change the Antibiotic Production Pattern of Streptomyces coelicolor During Inter-species Interaction.

    PubMed

    Mavituna, Ferda; Luti, Khalid Jaber Kadhum; Gu, Lixing

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the interaction between E.coli and Streptomyces coelicolor A3 (2) for the increased production of undecylprodigiosin and identify the E. coli actives mediating this inter-species interaction. The antibiotics of interest were the red-pigmented undecylprodigiosin and blue-pigmented actinorhodin. Pure cultures of S. coelicolor in a defined medium produced higher concentrations of actinorhodin compared to those of undecylprodigiosin. The latter however, is more important due to its immunosuppressive and antitumor properties. As a strategy to increase undecylprodigiosin production, we added separately, live cells and heat-killed cells of E. coli C600, and the cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture to S. coelicolor cultures in shake flasks. The interaction with live cells of E. coli altered the antibiotic production pattern and undecylprodigiosin production was enhanced by 3.5-fold compared to the pure cultures of S. coelicolor and actinorhodin decreased by 15-fold. The heat-killed cells of E. coli however, had no effect on antibiotic production. In all cases, growth and glucose consumption of S. coelicolor remained almost the same as those observed in the pure culture indicating that the changes in antibiotic production were not due to nutritional stress. Results with cell-free supernatant of E. coli culture indicated that the interaction between S. coelicolor and E. coli was mediated via diffusible molecule(s). Using a set of extraction procedures and agar-well diffusion bioassays, we isolated and preliminarily identified a class of compounds. For the preliminary verification, we added the compound which was the common chemical structural moiety in this class of compounds to the pure S. coelicolor cultures. We observed similar effects on antibiotic production as with the live E. coli cells and their supernatant indicating that this class of compounds secreted by E. coli indeed could act as actives during interspecies

  20. Enhanced ε-poly-L-lysine production by inducing double antibiotic-resistant mutations in Streptomyces albulus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Chen, Xusheng; Wu, Guangyao; Li, Shu; Zeng, Xin; Ren, Xidong; Tang, Lei; Mao, Zhonggui

    2017-02-01

    ε-Poly-L-lysine (ε-PL), as a food additive, has been widely used in many countries. However, its production still needs to be improved. We successfully enhanced ε-PL production of Streptomyces albulus FEEL-1 by introducing mutations related to antibiotics, such as streptomycin, gentamicin, and rifampin. Single- and double-resistant mutants (S-88 and SG-31) were finally screened with the improved ε-PL productions of 2.81 and 3.83 g/L, 1.75- to 2.39-fold compared with that of initial strain FEEL-1. Then, the performances of mutants S-88 and SG-31 were compared with the parent strain FEEL-1 in a 5-L bioreactor under the optimal condition for ε-PL production. After 174-h fed-batch fermentation, the ε-PL production and productivity of hyper-strain SG-31 reached the maximum of 59.50 g/L and 8.21 g/L/day, respectively, which was 138 and 105% higher than that of FEEL-1. Analysis of streptomycin-resistant mutants demonstrated that a point mutation occurred in rpsL gene (encoding the ribosomal protein S12). These single and double mutants displayed remarkable increases of the activities and transcriptional levels of key enzymes in ε-PL biosynthesis pathway, which may be responsible for the enhanced mycelia viability, respiratory activity, and ε-PL productions of SG-31. These results showed that the new breeding method, called ribosome engineering, could be a novel and effective breeding strategy for the evolution of ε-PL-producing strains.

  1. Complex marine natural products as potential epigenetic and production regulators of antibiotics from a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marine microbes are capable of producing secondary metabolites for defense and competition. Factors exerting an impact on secondary metabolite production of microbial communities included bioactive natural products and co-culturing. These external influences may have practical applications such as ...

  2. Isolation of heterotrophic bacteria from Palk Bay sediments showing heavy metal tolerance and antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Nithya, Chari; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha

    2010-09-20

    Analysis of culturable and unculturable bacteria and their potential bioactive compounds from Palk Bay is yet to be explored. The present study for the first time characterizes the culturable bacteria from Palk Bay sediment using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The characterized bacteria were also screened for antibacterial activity against human and aquaculture pathogens. In the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis characterized that most of the bacteria were affiliated to members of Firmicutes and less with Gammaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria. A high portion of (39%) of the bacteria showed antibacterial activity against both Gram positive and Gram negative test strains. The antibiotics from the strain S6-05 were partially purified using solvent extraction followed by TLC and silica column and further characterized by IR analysis. Two active principles A and B showed difference in the activity against Gram positive and Gram negative pathogens. But in the synergistic application they showed excellent activity against all the test pathogens. This study provides the first evidence on the existence of certain Bacillus species in the marine environment, namely Bacillus arsenicus, Bacillus indicus, Bacillus boroniphilus, Bacillus cibi and Bacillus niabensis which also had antibacterial activity. Several of the isolates exhibited tolerance to arsenic and boron to a new level of 25 and 100 mM, respectively. The current study reveals the fact that a great deal remains in the bacterial diversity of Palk Bay region. 2009 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Hunter screening design to understand the product variability of solid dispersion formulation of a peptide antibiotic.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ziyaur; Khan, Mansoor A

    2013-11-18

    The focus of present research was to understand and control the variability of solid dispersion (SD) formulation of non-ribosomal peptide antibiotic, vancomycin (VCM). Hunter screening design was constructed using seven independent variables namely melting temperature (X1), congealing temperature (X2), mixing time (X3), type of capsule shell (X4), filling method (X5), molecular weight of polyethylene glycol (PEG, X6) and surfactant type (X7), and responses measured were cumulative percentage of VCM released in 45 min (Y1) and potency (Y2). The SD formulations were prepared by melt-fusion method, and tested for dissolution, potency, and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and near infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI). Statistically significant (p<0.05) effect of congealing temperature (X2), type of capsule shell (X4), filling method (X5), molecular weight of PEG (X6) was revealed on Y1, and R(2) of 0.992 was obtained between experimental and predicted value. None of the factors have statistically significant (p>0.05) influence on Y2. SEM, DSC and PXRD indicated crystalline nature of SD formulations. Homogeneity of SD formulations was shown by NIR-CI images. In summary, the quality of VCM SD formulations could be assured by controlling the critical factors during manufacturing.

  4. N-Linked Glycosyl Auxiliary-Mediated Native Chemical Ligation on Aspartic Acid: Application towards N-Glycopeptide Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Chai, Hua; Le Mai Hoang, Kim; Vu, Minh Duy; Pasunooti, Kalyan; Liu, Chuan-Fa; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2016-08-22

    A practical approach towards N-glycopeptide synthesis using an auxiliary-mediated dual native chemical ligation (NCL) has been developed. The first NCL connects an N-linked glycosyl auxiliary to the thioester side chain of an N-terminal aspartate oligopeptide. This intermediate undergoes a second NCL with a C-terminal thioester oligopeptide. Mild cleavage provides the desired N-glycopeptide.

  5. High-performance liquid chromatographic separation of paclitaxel intermediate phenylisoserine derivatives on macrocyclic glycopeptide and cyclofructan-based chiral stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Ilisz, István; Grecsó, Nóra; Forró, Enikő; Fülöp, Ferenc; Armstrong, Daniel W; Péter, Antal

    2015-10-10

    High-performance liquid chromatographic methods were developed for the separation of enantiomers of four unnatural paclitaxel precursor phenylisoserine analogs on chiral stationary phases containing macrocyclic glycopeptides and cyclofructans as chiral selectors. The effects of the mobile phase composition, the nature and concentration of different mobile phase additives (alcohols, amines and acids) in different chromatographic modes, temperature and the structures of the analytes on the separations were investigated. Separations were carried out at constant mobile phase compositions in the temperature range 10-50°C on macrocyclic antibiotic-based and 5-35°C on cyclofructan-based columns and the changes in enthalpy, Δ(ΔH°), entropy, Δ(ΔS°), and free energy, Δ(ΔG°), were calculated. The elution sequence was determined in most cases; no general rule could be observed.

  6. Structure of the carbohydrate portion of the sialo-glycopeptide isolated from the skin of the fish Mastacembalus armatus.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, R; Sikder, S K; Das, A

    1987-05-01

    The sialglycopeptide (PSGP-A), isolated from the degelled skin of the fish Mastacembalus armatus, contained sialic acids (NANA and NGNA, 13.5%), GlcNAc (19.3%), Gal (14.7%), Man (12.6%), Fuc (2.5%), and amino acids of which Asp, Ser, Thr, and Pro preponderated. Affinity chromatography showed that the two sialic acids were integral parts of the same glycopeptide molecule. The carbohydrate portion was linked through GlcNAc to Asn of the peptide core. Methylation analysis of PSGP-A and its degradation products and periodate-oxidation studies indicated a structure for the carbohydrate portion of PSGP-A which resembled those of other sialoglycopeptides having similar carbohydrate compositions.

  7. Determination of the antibiotic fungicide validamycin A in formulated products by micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Y M; Lo, C C

    1999-09-01

    A micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatographic method (MEKC) was used to determine validamycin A content in commercial products. The results indicated that this method was capable of analyzing the validamycin A content in formulated products with an instrument detection limit of 0.94 microg/mL and a method detection limit of 1. 70 microg/mL. Relative standard deviation (RSD) values of MEKC determination of validamycin A in formulated products ranged from 0. 61 to 2.09%. Recoveries of validamycin A in formulated products were in the region of 99.5-105.1%. All commercial products collected from markets contained validamycin A. The high percentage of recovery, the low detection limit, and the low RSD values confirmed that the MEKC technique is a senstivie and selective method.

  8. Diversity, Distribution and Quantification of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Goat and Lamb Slaughterhouse Surfaces and Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Knapp, Charles W.; Correa Galeote, David; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and quantification of tetracycline, sulfonamide and beta-lactam resistance genes were assessed in slaughterhouse zones throughout meat chain production and the meat products; this study represents the first to report quantitatively monitor antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in goat and lamb slaughterhouse using a culture independent approach, since most studies focused on individual bacterial species and their specific resistance types. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed a high prevalence of tetracycline resistance genes tetA and tetB in almost all slaughterhouse zones. Sulfonamide resistance genes were largely distributed, while beta-lactam resistance genes were less predominant. Statistical analysis revealed that resistant bacteria, in most cases, were spread by the same route in almost all slaughterhouse zones, except for tetB, blaCTX and blaTEM genes, which occurred in few zones as isolated ‘hot spots.’ The sum of all analyzed ARG indicated that slaughterhouse surfaces and end products act as reservoirs of ARG, mainly tet genes, which were more prevalent in slaughtering room (SR), cutting room (CR) and commercial meat products (MP). Resistance gene patterns suggest they were disseminated throughout slaughterhouse zones being also detected in commercial meat products, with significant correlations between different sampling zones/end products and total resistance in SR, CR and white room (WR) zones, and also refrigerator 4 (F4) and MP were observed. Strategically controlling key zones in slaughterhouse (SR, CR and WR) by adequate disinfection methods could strategically reduce the risks of ARG transmission and minimize the issues of food safety and environment contamination. PMID:25479100

  9. Correlation between biofilm production, antibiotic susceptibility and exopolysaccharide composition in Burkholderia pseudomallei bpsI, ppk, and rpoS mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Mongkolrob, Rungrawee; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2015-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a fatal tropical infectious disease, which has been reported to have a high rate of recurrence, even when an intensive dose of antibiotics is used. Biofilm formation is believed to be one of the possible causes of relapse because of its ability to increase drug resistance. EPS in biofilms have been reported to be related to the limitation of antibiotic penetration in B. pseudomallei. However, the mechanisms by which biofilms restrict the diffusion of antibiotics remain unclear. The present study presents a correlation between exopolysaccharide production in biofilm matrix and antibiotic resistance in B. pseudomallei using bpsI, ppk, and rpoS mutant strains. CLSM revealed a reduction in exopolysaccharide production and disabled micro-colony formation in B. pseudomallei mutants, which paralleled the antibiotic resistance. Different ratios of carbohydrate contents in the exopolysaccharides of the mutants were detected, although they have the same components, including glucose, galactose, mannose, and rhamnose, with the exception being that no detectable rhamnose peak was observed in the bpsI mutant. These results indicate that the correlation between these phenomena in the B. pseudomallei biofilm at least results from the exopolysaccharide, which may be under the regulation of bpsI, ppk, or rpoS genes.

  10. Validation approach for a fast and simple targeted screening method for 75 antibiotics in meat and aquaculture products using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Dubreil, Estelle; Gautier, Sophie; Fourmond, Marie-Pierre; Bessiral, Mélaine; Gaugain, Murielle; Verdon, Eric; Pessel, Dominique

    2017-04-01

    An approach is described to validate a fast and simple targeted screening method for antibiotic analysis in meat and aquaculture products by LC-MS/MS. The strategy of validation was applied for a panel of 75 antibiotics belonging to different families, i.e., penicillins, cephalosporins, sulfonamides, macrolides, quinolones and phenicols. The samples were extracted once with acetonitrile, concentrated by evaporation and injected into the LC-MS/MS system. The approach chosen for the validation was based on the Community Reference Laboratory (CRL) guidelines for the validation of screening qualitative methods. The aim of the validation was to prove sufficient sensitivity of the method to detect all the targeted antibiotics at the level of interest, generally the maximum residue limit (MRL). A robustness study was also performed to test the influence of different factors. The validation showed that the method is valid to detect and identify 73 antibiotics of the 75 antibiotics studied in meat and aquaculture products at the validation levels.

  11. Phenotypic characteristics of coagulase-negative staphylococci: typing and antibiotic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Jarløv, J O

    1999-01-01

    expensive and sophisticated equipment. Various typing schemes for S. epidermidis, i.e. typing which involves several typing methods, have been tested: lectin typing, DNA-plasmid profile analysis, antibiotic susceptibility testing, phage typing, and slime production lectin typing, antibiotic susceptibility testing, biotyping (Minibact-S), phage typing antibiotic susceptibility testing and biotyping (Minibact-S) For use as a "first line" typing scheme in the local clinical microbiology laboratory, the typing of S. epidermidis by combined antibiotic susceptibility testing and biotyping is easy to handle. Antibiotic susceptibility testing should include antibiotics from several groups of antibiotics having different resistance mechanisms. Antibiotic susceptibility among Danish CoNS-strains from blood cultures was studied. A major diversity in species distribution and antibiotic susceptibility was found between different Danish regions, for example methicillin resistant CoNS accounted for 40% in Copenhagen County and only for 21% in Northern Jutland County. Diversity in species distribution was also marked; an example of this is that 73% of the strains from Copenhagen Municipality were identified as S. epidermidis compared to only 46% in Northern Jutland County. In a study from Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, great diversity in antibiotic susceptibility was detected between the different wards. In four wards investigated, high consumption of carbapenems, Third-generation cephalosporins, and quinolones was associated with high prevalence of methicillin resistance. Furthermore, for ciprofloxacin, ciprofloxacin-resistant CoNS-strains were practically not detected in the Neonatal Ward where ciprofloxacin is not used. In contrast to the nationwide study, glycopeptide resistance was found at Rigshospitalet: 5% of the CoNS strains were teicoplanin-resistant but all strains were vancomycin-susceptible. In both the above mentioned studies, antibiotic resistance was strongly associated with

  12. Automated glycopeptide analysis—review of current state and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Martin, William F.; Hua, Serenus

    2013-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins is involved in immune defense, cell–cell adhesion, cellular recognition and pathogen binding and is one of the most common and complex post-translational modifications. Science is still struggling to assign detailed mechanisms and functions to this form of conjugation. Even the structural analysis of glycoproteins—glycoproteomics—remains in its infancy due to the scarcity of high-throughput analytical platforms capable of determining glycopeptide composition and structure, especially platforms for complex biological mixtures. Glycopeptide composition and structure can be determined with high mass-accuracy mass spectrometry, particularly when combined with chromatographic separation, but the sheer volume of generated data necessitates computational software for interpretation. This review discusses the current state of glycopeptide assignment software—advances made to date and issues that remain to be addressed. The various software and algorithms developed so far provide important insights into glycoproteomics. However, there is currently no freely available software that can analyze spectral data in batch and unambiguously determine glycopeptide compositions for N- and O-linked glycopeptides from relevant biological sources such as human milk and serum. Few programs are capable of aiding in structural determination of the glycan component. To significantly advance the field of glycoproteomics, analytical software and algorithms are required that: (i) solve for both N- and O-linked glycopeptide compositions, structures and glycosites in biological mixtures; (ii) are high-throughput and process data in batches; (iii) can interpret mass spectral data from a variety of sources and (iv) are open source and freely available. PMID:22843980

  13. The cryoprotective effect of antifreeze glycopeptides from antarctic fishes.

    PubMed

    Rubinsky, B; Arav, A; Devries, A L

    1992-02-01

    Apparently vitrified cells and tissues often fail to survive, probably from damage from growth of microscopically invisible ice crystals. Special biological antifreezes from some polar fishes have been shown to adsorb to specific faces of ice crystals and inhibit crystal growth. Vitrification in the presence of antifreezes therefore may help enhance postvitrification viability of cells and tissues. We report here that the addition of fish antifreeze glycopeptides (AFGPs) to vitrifying solutions increases post-thaw viability in cultured immature pig oocytes and two-cell stage embryos of mice and pigs after rapid cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The criterion for viability is maturation to metaphase for the oocytes and the ability to develop into the four-cell stage for the pig embryo and the blastocyst stage for the mouse embryo. Without AFGPs, or with addition of antifreeze peptides (AFPs), the particular vitrifying solution and cooling/warming/culturing regime used in this study produced zero viability. In the presence of the AFGPs (40 mg/ml), survival of pig oocytes and embryos was increased to about 25%, and that of mouse embryos to 82%. Dose-response studies for the mouse embryos showed that the protective effect of AFGPs shows saturation kinetics and levels off at 20 mg/ml. The AFGPs appeared to preserve cell membrane structural integrity; however, an intact cell membrane did not always lead to viability. The absence of protective effect by AFPs suggests that protection by the AFGPs is unrelated to their common antifreeze property, i.e., inhibition of ice crystal growth, but probably results from interaction with and stabilization of the cell membranes unique to the AFGPs.

  14. Effect of potential multimicrobe probiotic product processed by high drying temperature and antibiotic on performance of weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Choi, J Y; Kim, J S; Ingale, S L; Kim, K H; Shinde, P L; Kwon, I K; Chae, B J

    2011-06-01

    ADG, ADFI, and ATTD of DM at d 14 and reduced fecal Clostridium population at d 28. Increased (P < 0.05) villus height at jejunum and ileum, and villus height:crypt depth at the ileum was noticed in pigs fed 0.60% probiotic HT and antibiotic diets. In conclusion, high drying temperature had no effect on the efficacy of potential multimicrobe probiotic product. However, the probiotic product dried at high temperature was more effective at 0.60% inclusion, whereas inclusion of an antibiotic improved pig performance but did not show any interaction with probiotics.

  15. Process design and evaluation of production of bioethanol and β-lactam antibiotic from lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bong; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2014-11-01

    To design biorefinery processes producing bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass with dilute acid pretreatment, biorefinery processes were simulated using the SuperPro Designer program. To improve the efficiency of biomass use and the economics of biorefinery, additional pretreatment processes were designed and evaluated, in which a combined process of dilute acid and aqueous ammonia pretreatments, and a process of waste media containing xylose were used, for the production of 7-aminocephalosporanic acid. Finally, the productivity and economics of the designed processes were compared.

  16. Antibiotic Agents

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work Contact Us ABOUT THE ISSUE What is Antibiotic Resistance? General Background Science of Resistance Glossary References POLICY ... for Adaptation Genetics and Drug Resistance Reservoirs of Antibiotic Resistance Project (ROAR) INTERNATIONAL CHAPTERS APUA Chapter Network Africa ...

  17. The double life of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Yap, Mee-Ngan F

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a persistent health care problem worldwide. Evidence for the negative consequences of subtherapeutic feeding in livestock production has been mounting while the antibiotic pipeline is drying up. In recent years, there has been a paradigm shift in our perception of antibiotics. Apart from its roles in self-defense, antibiotics also serve as inter-microbial signaling molecules, regulators of gene expression, microbial food sources, and as mediators of host immune response.

  18. Identification of a Gene Negatively Affecting Antibiotic Production and Morphological Differentiation in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)▿

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wencheng; Ying, Xin; Guo, Yuzheng; Yu, Zhen; Zhou, Xiufen; Deng, Zixin; Kieser, Helen; Chater, Keith F.; Tao, Meifeng

    2006-01-01

    SC7A1 is a cosmid with an insert of chromosomal DNA from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Its insertion into the chromosome of S. coelicolor strains caused a duplication of a segment of ca. 40 kb and delayed actinorhodin antibiotic production and sporulation, implying that SC7A1 carried a gene negatively affecting these processes. The subcloning of SC7A1 insert DNA resulted in the identification of the open reading frame SCO5582 as nsdA, a gene negatively affecting Streptomyces differentiation. The disruption of chromosomal nsdA caused the overproduction of spores and of three of four known S. coelicolor antibiotics of quite different chemical types. In at least one case (that of actinorhodin), this was correlated with premature expression of a pathway-specific regulatory gene (actII-orf4), implying that nsdA in the wild-type strain indirectly repressed the expression of the actinorhodin biosynthesis cluster. nsdA expression was up-regulated upon aerial mycelium initiation and was strongest in the aerial mycelium. NsdA has DUF921, a Streptomyces protein domain of unknown function and a conserved SXR site. A site-directed mutation (S458A) in this site in NsdA abolished its function. Blast searching showed that NsdA homologues are present in some Streptomyces genomes. Outside of streptomycetes, NsdA-like proteins have been found in several actinomycetes. The disruption of the nsdA-like gene SCO4114 had no obvious phenotypic effects on S. coelicolor. The nsdA orthologue SAV2652 in S. avermitilis could complement the S. coelicolor nsdA-null mutant phenotype. PMID:17041057

  19. Variations in the fecal occurrences of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria are greater between seasons than between "raised without antibiotics" and "conventional" cattle production systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to compare, over a year, fecal occurrences of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria (ARB) in fed-cattle between two production systems: "raised without antibiotics" (RWA) and “conventional” (CONV). Feces were recovered from colons at a commercial beef processing plant obta...

  20. Engineering of N-acetylglucosamine metabolism for improved antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and an unsuspected role of NagA in glucosamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Świątek, Magdalena A.; Urem, Mia; Tenconi, Elodie; Rigali, Sebastien; van Wezel, Gilles P.

    2012-01-01

    N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), the monomer of chitin and constituent of bacterial peptidoglycan, is a preferred carbon and nitrogen source for streptomycetes. Recent studies have revealed new functions of GlcNAc in nutrient signaling of bacteria. Exposure to GlcNAc activates development and antibiotic production of Streptomyces coelicolor under poor growth conditions (famine) and blocks these processes under rich conditions (feast). Glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6P) is a key molecule in this signaling pathway and acts as an allosteric effector of a pleiotropic transcriptional repressor DasR, the regulon of which includes the GlcNAc metabolic enzymes N-actetylglucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcNAc-6P) deacetylase (NagA) and GlcN-6P deaminase (NagB). Intracellular accumulation of GlcNAc-6P and GlcN-6P enhanced production of the pigmented antibiotic actinorhodin. When the nagB mutant was challenged with GlcNAc or GlcN, spontaneous second-site mutations that relieved the toxicity of the accumulated sugar phosphates were obtained. Surprisingly, deletion of nagA also relieved toxicity of GlcN, indicating novel linkage between the GlcN and GlcNAc utilization pathways. The strongly enhanced antibiotic production observed for many suppressor mutants shows the potential of the modulation of GlcNAc and GlcN metabolism as a metabolic engineering tool toward the improvement of antibiotic productivity or even the discovery of novel compounds. PMID:22892576

  1. Investigation of Staphylococcus strains with heterogeneous resistance to glycopeptides in a Turkish university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Nakipoglu, Yasar; Derbentli, Sengul; Cagatay, Atahan A; Katranci, Handan

    2005-01-01

    Background The hetero-glycopeptide intermediate staphylococci is considered to be the precursor of glycopeptide intermediate staphylococci especially vancomycin intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA). For this purpose, we aimed to investigate the heterogeneous resistance to glycopeptide and their frequencies in 135 Staphylococcus strains. Methods Heterogeneous resistance of Staphylococcus strains was detected by inoculating the strains onto Brain Heart Infusion agar supplemented with 4 mg/L of vancomycin (BHA-V4). Agar dilution method was used for determining MICs of glycopeptides and population analysis profile was performed for detecting frequency of heterogeneous resistance for the parents of selected strains on BHA-4. Results Eight (6%) out of 135 Staphylococcus strains were exhibited heterogeneous resistance to at least one glycopeptide. One (1.2%) out of 81 S. aureus was found intermediate resistance to teicoplanin (MIC 16 mg/L). Other seven strains were Staphylococcus haemolyticus (13%) out of 54 coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS). Six of the seven strains were detected heterogeneously reducing susceptibility to vancomycin (MICs ranged between 5–8 mg/L) and teicoplanin (MICs ranged between 32–64 mg/L), and one S. haemolyticus was found heterogeneous resistance to teicoplanin (MIC 32 mg/L). Frequencies of heterogeneous resistance were measured being one in 106 – 107 cfu/ml. MICs of vancomycin and teicoplanin for hetero-staphylococci were determined as 2–6 folds and 3–16 folds higher than their parents, respectively. These strains were isolated from six patients (7%) and two (4%) of health care wokers hands. Hetero-VISA strain was not detected. Conclusion Heterogeneous resistance to glycopeptide in CoNS strains was observed to be significantly more emergent than those of S. aureus strains (vancomycin P 0.001, teicoplanin, P 0.007). The increase MICs of glycopeptide resistance for subpopulations of staphylococci comparing with their parents

  2. Multiple-Antibiotic Resistance of Enterococcus spp. Isolated from Commercial Poultry Production Environments

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Joshua R.; English, Linda L.; Carr, Lewis E.; Wagner, David D.; Joseph, Sam W.

    2004-01-01

    The potential impact of food animals in the production environment on the bacterial population as a result of antimicrobial drug use for growth enhancement continues to be a cause for concern. Enterococci from 82 farms within a poultry production region on the eastern seaboard were isolated to establish a baseline of susceptibility profiles for a number of antimicrobials used in production as well as clinical environments. Of the 541 isolates recovered, Enterococcus faecalis (53%) and E. faecium (31%) were the predominant species, while multiresistant antimicrobial phenotypes were observed among all species. The prevalence of resistance among isolates of E. faecalis was comparatively higher among lincosamide, macrolide, and tetracycline antimicrobials, while isolates of E. faecium were observed to be more frequently resistant to fluoroquinolones and penicillins. Notably, 63% of the E. faecium isolates were resistant to the streptogramin quinupristin-dalfopristin, while high-level gentamicin resistance was observed only among the E. faecalis population, of which 7% of the isolates were resistant. The primary observations are that enterococci can be frequently isolated from the poultry production environment and can be multiresistant to antimicrobials used in human medicine. The high frequency with which resistant enterococci are isolated from this environment suggests that these organisms might be useful as sentinels to monitor the development of resistance resulting from the usage of antimicrobial agents in animal production. PMID:15466544

  3. Production of the Antibiotic Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid by Fluorescent Pseudomonas Species in the Rhizosphere of Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Thomashow, Linda S.; Weller, David M.; Bonsall, Robert F.; Pierson, Leland S.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens 2-79 and P. aureofaciens 30-84 produce the antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and suppress take-all, an important root disease of wheat caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. To determine whether the antibiotic is produced in situ, wheat seeds were treated with strain 2-79 or 30-84 or with phenazine-nonproducing mutants or were left untreated and then were sown in natural or steamed soil in the field or growth chamber. The antibiotic was isolated only from roots of wheat colonized by strain 2-79 or 30-84 in both growth chamber and field studies. No antibiotic was recovered from the roots of seedlings grown from seeds treated with phenazine-nonproducing mutants or left untreated. In natural soils, comparable amounts of antibiotic (27 to 43 ng/g of root with adhering soil) were recovered from roots colonized by strain 2-79 whether or not the pathogen was present. Roots of plants grown in steamed soil yielded larger bacterial populations and more antibiotic than roots from natural soils. In steamed and natural soils, roots from which the antibiotic was recovered had significantly less disease than roots with no antibiotic, indicating that suppression of take-all is related directly to the presence of the antibiotic in the rhizosphere. PMID:16348176

  4. Production of indole antibiotics induced by exogenous gene derived from sponge metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Takeshige, Yuya; Egami, Yoko; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro

    2015-05-01

    Sponge metagenomes are accessible genetic sources containing genes and gene clusters responsible for the biosynthesis of sponge-derived bioactive natural products. In this study, we obtained the clone pDC112, producing turbomycin A and 2,2-di(3-indolyl)-3-indolone, based on the functional screening of the metagenome library derived from the marine sponge Discodermia calyx. The subcloning experiment identified ORF 25, which is homologous to inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase and required for the production of 2,2-di(3-indolyl)-3-indolone in Escherichia coli.

  5. Biofilm formation and antibiotic production in Ruegeria mobilis are influenced by intracellular concentrations of cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate.

    PubMed

    D'Alvise, Paul W; Magdenoska, Olivera; Melchiorsen, Jette; Nielsen, Kristian F; Gram, Lone

    2014-05-01

    In many species of the marine Roseobacter clade, periods of attached life, in association with phytoplankton or particles, are interspersed with planktonic phases. The purpose of this study was to determine whether shifts between motile and sessile life in the globally abundant Roseobacter clade species Ruegeria mobilis are associated with intracellular concentrations of the signal compound cyclic dimeric guanosinmonophosphate (c-di-GMP), which in bacteria regulates transitions between motile and sessile life stages. Genes for diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases, which are involved in c-di-GMP signalling, were found in the genome of R. mobilis strain F1926. Ion pair chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry revealed 20-fold higher c-di-GMP concentrations per cell in biofilm-containing cultures than in planktonic cells. An introduced diguanylate cyclase gene increased c-di-GMP and enhanced biofilm formation and production of the potent antibiotic tropodithietic acid (TDA). An introduced phosphodiesterase gene decreased c-di-GMP and reduced biofilm formation and TDA production. tdaC, a key gene for TDA biosynthesis, was expressed only in attached or biofilm-forming cells, and expression was induced immediately after initial attachment. In conclusion, c-di-GMP signalling controls biofilm formation and biofilm-associated traits in R. mobilis and, as suggested by presence of GGDEF and EAL domain protein genes, also in other Roseobacter clade species. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. 21 CFR 333.150 - Labeling of first aid antibiotic drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... if a rash or other allergic reaction develops. Do not use if you are allergic to any of the...) For powder products. “Clean the affected area. Apply a light dusting of the powder on the area 1 to 3...

  7. Work plan for determining the occurrence of glyphosate, its transformation product AMPA, other herbicide compounds, and antibiotics in midwestern United States streams, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Kolpin, D.W.; Scribner, E.A.; Sandstrom, M.W.; Kuivila, K.M.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of glyphosate and its primary transformation product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) in midwestern streams during post-application and harvest-season runoff events. Water samples will be collected in 2002 during two post-herbicide-application runoff events and one harvest-season runoff event from 53 sites on streams in the Midwestern United States. All samples will be analyzed at the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, for glyphosate and 20 other herbicides. Samples will also be analyzed for a glyphosate transformation product (AMPA) and 26 other herbicide transformation products, using GC/MS or HPLC/MS. Selected samples will be analyzed for 36 antibiotics or antibiotic transformational products. Results from this study will represent the first broad-scale investigation of glyphosate and AMPA in U.S. water resources.

  8. Growth and survival of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella typhimurium DT104 in liquid egg products.

    PubMed

    Musgrove, Michael T; Mcquestin, Olivia J; Tamplin, Mark; Kelley, Lynda C

    2009-09-01

    Since 11 September 2001, quality and food safety are no longer the concerns of only consumers, industry, regulatory agencies, or other government officials. Liquid foods that are prepared or stored in bulk, including liquid egg products, are considered to be at potential risk for sabotage. Because of their versatility, low price, and functional properties, many of these products are being marketed. Four of the most common products of this type are whole egg, egg albumen, 10% sugared yolk, and 10% salted yolk. Although all of the serotypes of Salmonella enterica may cause illness, multidrug-resistant Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 has become widespread and can cause severe illness that is difficult to treat. Studies were conducted to determine growth patterns of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 in four commercial liquid egg products held at 4, 10, 20, 30, 37, and 42 degrees C for 0 to 384 h. All experiments were performed in duplicate and repeated twice. Standard methods were used to estimate cell numbers, and log CFU per gram of egg product was plotted against time. The number of cells of Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 increased to 8 to 9 log CFU/g in whole egg and 10% sugared yolk, increased by 1 log CFU/g in liquid albumen, but decreased by 3 log CFU/g in 10% salted yolk. Data from this study have been archived in the ComBase database to further assist policy makers or other scientists interested in Salmonella growth characteristics in liquid eggs. However, based on data generated in this study, Salmonella Typhimurium DT104 probably does not constitute a food threat agent in liquid eggs.

  9. Enhanced production of a novel cyclic hexapeptide antibiotic (NW-G01) by Streptomyces alboflavus 313 using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhengyan; Shen, Ling; Ji, Zhiqin; Wu, Wenjun

    2012-01-01

    NW-G01, produced by Streptomyces alboflavus 313, is a novel cyclic hexapeptide antibiotic with many potential applications, including antimicrobial activity and antitumor agents. This study developed a system for optimizing medium components in order to enhance NW-G01 production. In this study, Plackett-Burman design (PBD) was used to find the key ingredients of medium components, and then response surface methodology (RSM) was implemented to determine their optimal concentrations. The results of PBD revealed that the crucial ingredients related to the production of NW-G01 were (NH(4))(2)SO(4), peptone and CaCO(3). A prediction model has been built in the experiments of central composite design and response surface methodology, and its validation has been further verified. The optimal medium composition was determined (g/L): corn starch 15, glucose 15, peptone 3.80, (NH(4))(2)SO(4) 0.06, NaCl 1.5, CaCO(3) 1.30, MgSO(4)·7H(2)O 0.015, K(2)HPO(4)·3H(2)O 0.015, MnCl(2)·4H(2)O 0.015, FeSO(4)·7H(2)O 0.015, and ZnSO(4)·7H(2)O 0.015. Compared with NW-G01 production (5.707 mg/L) in non-optimized fermentation medium, the production of NW-G01 (15.564 mg/L) in optimized fermentation medium had a 2.73-fold increase.

  10. [Antibiotic Stewardship].

    PubMed

    Lanckohr, Christian; Ellger, Björn

    2016-02-01

    The adequate management of infections is an important task in critical care medicine which has an effect on patient outcome. As a result, the prev