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Sample records for glycoprotein gp41 contributes

  1. The membranotropic regions of the endo and ecto domains of HIV gp41 envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Miguel R; Giudici, Marcela; Villalaín, José

    2006-01-01

    We have identified the membranotropic regions of the full sequence of the HIV gp41 envelope glycoprotein by performing an exhaustive study of membrane rupture, phospholipid-mixing and fusion induced by two 15-mer gp41-derived peptide libraries from HIV strains HIV_MN and HIV_consensus_B on model membranes having different phospholipid compositions. The data obtained for the two strains and its comparison have led us to identify different gp41 membranotropic segments in both ecto- and endodomains which might be implicated in viral membrane fusion and/or membrane interaction. The membranotropic segments corresponding to the gp41 ectodomain were the fusion domain, a stretch located on the N-heptad repeat region adjacent to the fusion domain, part of the immunodominant loop, the pre-transmembrane domain and the transmembrane domain. The membranotropic segments corresponding to the gp41 endodomain were mainly located at some specific parts of the previously described lentivirus lytic sequences. Significantly, the C-heptad repeat region and the Kennedy sequence located in the ectodomain and in the endodomain, respectively, presented no membranotropic activity in any model membrane assayed. The identification of these gp41 segments as well as their membranotropic propensity sustain the notion that different segments of gp41 provide the driving force for the merging of the viral and target cell membranes as well as they help us to define those segments as attractive targets for further development of new anti-viral compounds. PMID:16483537

  2. The cholesterol-binding motif of the HIV-1 glycoprotein gp41 regulates lateral sorting and oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Schwarzer, Roland; Levental, Ilya; Gramatica, Andrea; Scolari, Silvia; Buschmann, Volker; Veit, Michael; Herrmann, Andreas

    2014-10-01

    Enveloped viruses often use membrane lipid rafts to assemble and bud, augment infection and spread efficiently. However, the molecular bases and functional consequences of the partitioning of viral glycoproteins into microdomains remain intriguing questions in virus biology. Here, we measured Foerster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM-FRET) to study the role of distinct membrane proximal regions of the human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein gp41 for lipid raft partitioning in living Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1). Gp41 was labelled with a fluorescent protein at the exoplasmic face of the membrane, preventing any interference of the fluorophore with the proposed role of the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains in lateral organization of gp41. Raft localization was deduced from interaction with an established raft marker, a fluorescently tagged glycophosphatidylinositol anchor and the cholesterol recognition amino acid consensus (CRAC) was identified as the crucial lateral sorting determinant in CHO-K1 cells. Interestingly, the raft association of gp41 indicates a substantial cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the plasma membrane microdomains. In complementary fluorescence polarization microscopy, a distinct CRAC requirement was found for the oligomerization of the gp41 variants. Our data provide further insight into the molecular basis and biological implications of the cholesterol dependent lateral sorting of viral glycoproteins for virus assembly at cellular membranes.

  3. Systematic analysis of intracellular trafficking motifs located within the cytoplasmic domain of simian immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein gp41.

    PubMed

    Postler, Thomas S; Bixby, Jacqueline G; Desrosiers, Ronald C; Yuste, Eloísa

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that truncation of the cytoplasmic-domain sequences of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) just prior to a potential intracellular-trafficking signal of the sequence YIHF can strongly increase Env protein expression on the cell surface, Env incorporation into virions and, at least in some contexts, virion infectivity. Here, all 12 potential intracellular-trafficking motifs (YXXΦ or LL/LI/IL) in the gp41 cytoplasmic domain (gp41CD) of SIVmac239 were analyzed by systematic mutagenesis. One single and 7 sequential combination mutants in this cytoplasmic domain were characterized. Cell-surface levels of Env were not significantly affected by any of the mutations. Most combination mutations resulted in moderate 3- to 8-fold increases in Env incorporation into virions. However, mutation of all 12 potential sites actually decreased Env incorporation into virions. Variant forms with 11 or 12 mutated sites exhibited 3-fold lower levels of inherent infectivity, while none of the other single or combination mutations that were studied significantly affected the inherent infectivity of SIVmac239. These minor effects of mutations in trafficking motifs form a stark contrast to the strong increases in cell-surface expression and Env incorporation which have previously been reported for large truncations of gp41CD. Surprisingly, mutation of potential trafficking motifs in gp41CD of SIVmac316, which differs by only one residue from gp41CD of SIVmac239, effectively recapitulated the increases in Env incorporation into virions observed with gp41CD truncations. Our results indicate that increases in Env surface expression and virion incorporation associated with truncation of SIVmac239 gp41CD are not fully explained by loss of consensus trafficking motifs. PMID:25479017

  4. Systematic Analysis of Intracellular Trafficking Motifs Located within the Cytoplasmic Domain of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Glycoprotein gp41

    PubMed Central

    Postler, Thomas S.; Bixby, Jacqueline G.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.; Yuste, Eloísa

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that truncation of the cytoplasmic-domain sequences of the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) just prior to a potential intracellular-trafficking signal of the sequence YIHF can strongly increase Env protein expression on the cell surface, Env incorporation into virions and, at least in some contexts, virion infectivity. Here, all 12 potential intracellular-trafficking motifs (YXXΦ or LL/LI/IL) in the gp41 cytoplasmic domain (gp41CD) of SIVmac239 were analyzed by systematic mutagenesis. One single and 7 sequential combination mutants in this cytoplasmic domain were characterized. Cell-surface levels of Env were not significantly affected by any of the mutations. Most combination mutations resulted in moderate 3- to 8-fold increases in Env incorporation into virions. However, mutation of all 12 potential sites actually decreased Env incorporation into virions. Variant forms with 11 or 12 mutated sites exhibited 3-fold lower levels of inherent infectivity, while none of the other single or combination mutations that were studied significantly affected the inherent infectivity of SIVmac239. These minor effects of mutations in trafficking motifs form a stark contrast to the strong increases in cell-surface expression and Env incorporation which have previously been reported for large truncations of gp41CD. Surprisingly, mutation of potential trafficking motifs in gp41CD of SIVmac316, which differs by only one residue from gp41CD of SIVmac239, effectively recapitulated the increases in Env incorporation into virions observed with gp41CD truncations. Our results indicate that increases in Env surface expression and virion incorporation associated with truncation of SIVmac239 gp41CD are not fully explained by loss of consensus trafficking motifs. PMID:25479017

  5. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein mediates apoptosis in activated PBMC by a mechanism dependent on gp41 function

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali; Tompkins, Wayne A. . E-mail: Wayne_Tompkins@ncsu.edu

    2004-12-20

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes immunodeficiency in cats, which parallels HIV-1-induced immunodeficiency in humans. It has been established that HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates T cell loss via a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding. The Env glycoprotein of FIV, similar to HIV, requires CXCR4 binding for viral entry, as well as inducing membrane fusion leading to syncytia formation. However, the role of FIV Env in T cell loss and the molecular mechanisms governing this process have not been elucidated. We studied the role of Env glycoprotein in FIV-mediated T cell apoptosis in an in vitro model. Our studies demonstrate that membrane-expressed FIV Env induces apoptosis in activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding, as the process was inhibited by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, studies regarding the role of CD134, the recently identified primary receptor of FIV, suggest that binding to CD134 may not be important for induction of apoptosis in PBMC. However, inhibiting Env-mediated fusion post CXCR4 binding by FIV gp41-specific fusion inhibitor also inhibited apoptosis. Under similar conditions, a fusion-defective gp41 mutant was unable to induce apoptosis in activated PBMC. Our findings are the first report suggesting the potential of FIV Env to mediate apoptosis in bystander cells by a process that is dependent on gp41 function.

  6. N-terminal substitutions in HIV-1 gp41 reduce the expression of non-trimeric envelope glycoproteins on the virus

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Antu K.; David, Kathryn B.; Ray, Neelanjana; Ketas, Thomas J.; Klasse, Per J.; Doms, Robert W.; Moore, John P.

    2008-03-01

    The native, functional HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) complex is a trimer of two non-covalently associated subunits: the gp120 surface glycoprotein and the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein. However, various non-functional forms of Env are present on virus particles and HIV-1-infected cells, some of which probably arise as the native complex decays. The aberrant forms include gp120-gp41 monomers and oligomers, as well as gp41 subunits from which gp120 has dissociated. The presence of non-functional Env creates binding sites for antibodies that do not recognize native Env complexes and that are, therefore, non-neutralizing. Non-native Env forms (monomers, dimers, tetramers and aggregates) can also arise when soluble gp140 proteins, lacking the cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of gp41, are expressed for vaccine studies. We recently identified five amino acids in the gp41 N-terminal region (I535, Q543, S553, K567 and R588) that promote gp140 trimerization. We have now studied their influence on the function and antigenic properties of JR-FL Env expressed on the surfaces of pseudoviruses and Env-transfected cells. The 5 substitutions in gp41 reduce the expression of non-trimeric gp160s, without affecting trimer levels. Pseudovirions bearing the mutant Env are fully infectious with similar kinetics of Env-mediated fusion. Various non-neutralizing antibodies bind less strongly to the Env mutant, but neutralizing antibody binding is unaffected. Hence the gp41 substitutions do not adversely affect Env structure, supporting their use for making new Env-based vaccines. The mutant Env might also help in studies intended to correlate antibody binding to virus neutralization. Of note is that the 5 residues are much more frequent, individually or collectively, in viruses from subtypes other than B.

  7. Structural and Functional Analysis of Interhelical Interactions in the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41 Envelope Glycoprotein by Alanine-Scanning Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Min; Stoller, Marisa O.; Wang, Shilong; Liu, Jie; Fagan, Melinda B.; Nunberg, Jack H.

    2001-01-01

    Membrane fusion by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is promoted by the refolding of the viral envelope glycoprotein into a fusion-active conformation. The structure of the gp41 ectodomain core in its fusion-active state is a trimer of hairpins in which three antiparallel carboxyl-terminal helices pack into hydrophobic grooves on the surface of an amino-terminal trimeric coiled coil. In an effort to identify amino acid residues in these grooves that are critical for gp41 activation, we have used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to investigate the importance of individual side chains in determining the biophysical properties of the gp41 core and the membrane fusion activity of the gp120-gp41 complex. Alanine substitutions at Leu-556, Leu-565, Val-570, Gly-572, and Arg-579 positions severely impaired membrane fusion activity in envelope glycoproteins that were for the most part normally expressed. Whereas alanine mutations at Leu-565 and Val-570 destabilized the trimer-of-hairpins structure, mutations at Gly-572 and Arg-579 led to the formation of a stable gp41 core. Our results suggest that the Leu-565 and Val-570 residues are important determinants of conserved packing interactions between the amino- and carboxyl-terminal helices of gp41. We propose that the high degree of sequence conservation at Gly-572 and Arg-579 may result from selective pressures imposed by prefusogenic conformations of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. Further analysis of the gp41 activation process may elucidate targets for antiviral intervention. PMID:11602754

  8. Immunogens Modeling a Fusion-Intermediate Conformation of gp41 Elicit Antibodies to the Membrane Proximal External Region of the HIV Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Vassell, Russell; He, Yong; Vennakalanti, Prasad; Dey, Antu K.; Zhuang, Min; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yide; Biron-Sorek, Zohar; Srivastava, Indresh K.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Barnett, Susan W.; Weiss, Carol D.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal external region (MPER) of the gp41 subunit of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) contains determinants for broadly neutralizing antibodies and has remained an important focus of vaccine design. However, creating an immunogen that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies to this region has proven difficult in part due to the relative inaccessibility of the MPER in the native conformation of Env. Here, we describe the antigenicity and immunogenicity of a panel of oligomeric gp41 immunogens designed to model a fusion-intermediate conformation of Env in order to enhance MPER exposure in a relevant conformation. The immunogens contain segments of the gp41 N- and C-heptad repeats to mimic a trapped intermediate, followed by the MPER, with variations that include different N-heptad lengths, insertion of extra epitopes, and varying C-termini. These well-characterized immunogens were evaluated in two different immunization protocols involving gp41 and gp140 proteins, gp41 and gp160 DNA primes, and different immunization schedules and adjuvants. We found that the immunogens designed to reduce extension of helical structure into the MPER elicited the highest MPER antibody binding titers, but these antibodies lacked neutralizing activity. The gp41 protein immunogens also elicited higher MPER titers than the gp140 protein immunogen. In prime-boost studies, the best MPER responses were seen in the groups that received DNA priming with gp41 vectors followed by gp41 protein boosts. Finally, although titers to the entire protein immunogen were similar in the two immunization protocols, MPER-specific titers differed, suggesting that the immunization route, schedule, dose, or adjuvant may differentially influence MPER immunogenicity. These findings inform the design of future MPER immunogens and immunization protocols. PMID:26087072

  9. An alternative conformation of the gp41 heptad repeat 1 region coiled coil exists in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Mische, Claudia C.; Yuan Wen; Strack, Bettina; Craig, Stewart; Farzan, Michael; Sodroski, Joseph . E-mail: joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu

    2005-07-20

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmembrane envelope glycoprotein, gp41, which mediates virus-cell fusion, exists in at least three different conformations within the trimeric envelope glycoprotein complex. The structures of the prefusogenic and intermediate states are unknown; structures representing the postfusion state have been solved. In the postfusion conformation, three helical heptad repeat 2 (HR2) regions pack in an antiparallel fashion into the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of a triple-helical coiled coil formed by the heptad repeat 1 (HR1) regions. We studied the prefusogenic conformation of gp41 by mutagenic alteration of membrane-anchored and soluble forms of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Our results indicate that, in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein precursor, the gp41 HR1 region is in a conformation distinct from that of a trimeric coiled coil. Thus, the central gp41 coiled coil is formed during the transition of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins from the precursor state to the receptor-bound intermediate.

  10. Tryptophan dendrimers that inhibit HIV replication, prevent virus entry and bind to the HIV envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp41.

    PubMed

    Rivero-Buceta, Eva; Doyagüez, Elisa G; Colomer, Ignacio; Quesada, Ernesto; Mathys, Leen; Noppen, Sam; Liekens, Sandra; Camarasa, María-José; Pérez-Pérez, María-Jesús; Balzarini, Jan; San-Félix, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Dendrimers containing from 9 to 18 tryptophan residues at the peryphery have been efficiently synthesized and tested against HIV replication. These compounds inhibit an early step of the replicative cycle of HIV, presumably virus entry into its target cell. Our data suggest that HIV inhibition can be achieved by the preferred interaction of the compounds herein described with glycoproteins gp120 and gp41 of the HIV envelope preventing interaction between HIV and the (co)receptors present on the host cells. The results obtained so far indicate that 9 tryptophan residues on the periphery are sufficient for efficient gp120/gp41 binding and anti-HIV activity.

  11. Fine definition of the epitope on the gp41 glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 for the neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2F5.

    PubMed

    Parker, C E; Deterding, L J; Hager-Braun, C; Binley, J M; Schülke, N; Katinger, H; Moore, J P; Tomer, K B

    2001-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), in combination with proteolytic protection assays, has been used to identify the functional epitope on human immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein gp41 for the broadly neutralizing anti-gp41 human monoclonal antibody 2F5. In this protection assay-based procedure, a soluble gp140 protein with a stabilizing intermolecular disulfide bond between the gp120 and gp41 subunits (SOS gp140) was affinity bound to immobilized 2F5 under physiological conditions. A combination of proteolytic enzymatic cleavages was then performed to remove unprotected residues. Residues of SOS gp140 protected by their binding to 2F5 were then identified based on their molecular weights as determined by direct MALDI-MS of the immobilized antibody beads. The epitope, NEQELLELDKWASLWN, determined by this MALDI-MS protection assay approach consists of 16 amino acid residues near the C terminus of gp41. It is significantly longer than the ELDKWA core epitope previously determined for 2F5 by peptide enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. This new knowledge of the structure of the 2F5 epitope may facilitate the design of vaccine antigens intended to induce antibodies with the breadth and potency of action of the 2F5 monoclonal antibody. PMID:11602730

  12. Multimerization potential of the cytoplasmic domain of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp41.

    PubMed

    Lee, S F; Wang, C T; Liang, J Y; Hong, S L; Huang, C C; Chen, S S

    2000-05-26

    We previously demonstrated that an envelope mutant of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 lacking the entire cytoplasmic domain interferes in trans with the production of infectious virus by inclusion of the mutant envelope into the wild-type envelope complex. We also showed that the envelope incorporation into virions is not affected when the wild-type envelope is coexpressed with the mutant envelope. These results suggest that an oligomeric structure of the cytoplasmic domain is functionally required for viral infectivity. To understand whether the cytoplasmic domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmembrane protein gp41 has the potential to self-assemble as an oligomer, in the present study we fused the coding sequence of the entire cytoplasmic domain at 3' to the Escherichia coli malE gene, which encodes a monomeric maltose-binding protein. The expressed fusion protein was examined by chemical cross-linking, sucrose gradient centrifugation, and gel filtration. The results showed that the cytoplasmic domain of gp41 assembles into a high-ordered structural complex. The intersubunit interaction of the cytoplasmic domain was also confirmed by a mammalian two-hybrid system that detects protein-protein interactions in eucaryotic cells. A cytoplasmic domain fragment expressed in eucaryotic cells was pulled down by glutathione-Sepharose 4B beads via its association with another cytoplasmic domain fragment fused to the C terminus of the glutathione S-transferase moiety. We also found that sequences encompassing the lentiviral lytic peptide-1 and lentiviral lytic peptide-2, which are located within residues 828-856 and 770-795, respectively, play a critical role in cytoplasmic domain self-assembly. Taken together, the results from the present study indicate that the cytoplasmic domain of gp41 by itself is sufficient to assemble into a multimeric structure. This finding supports the hypothesis that a multimeric form of the gp41 cytoplasmic domain plays a

  13. Effects of the I559P gp41 Change on the Conformation and Function of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) Membrane Envelope Glycoprotein Trimer

    PubMed Central

    Sodroski, Joseph; Finzi, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    The mature human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer is produced by proteolytic cleavage of a precursor and consists of three gp120 exterior and three gp41 transmembrane subunits. The metastable Env complex is induced to undergo conformational changes required for virus entry by the binding of gp120 to the receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. An isoleucine-to-proline change (I559P) in the gp41 ectodomain has been used to stabilize soluble forms of HIV-1 Env trimers for structural characterization and for use as immunogens. In the native membrane-anchored HIV-1BG505 Env, the I559P change modestly decreased proteolytic maturation, increased the non-covalent association of gp120 with the Env trimer, and resulted in an Env conformation distinctly different from that of the wild-type HIV-1BG505 Env. Compared with the wild-type Env, the I559P Env was recognized inefficiently by polyclonal sera from HIV-1-infected individuals, by several gp41-directed antibodies, by some antibodies against the CD4-binding site of gp120, and by antibodies that preferentially recognize the CD4-bound Env. Some of the gp120-associated antigenic differences between the wild-type HIV-1BG505 Env and the I559P mutant were compensated by the SOS disulfide bond between gp120 and gp41, which has been used to stabilize cleaved soluble Env trimers. Nonetheless, regardless of the presence of the SOS changes, Envs with proline 559 were recognized less efficiently than Envs with isoleucine 559 by the VRC01 neutralizing antibody, which binds the CD4-binding site of gp120, and the PGT151 neutralizing antibody, which binds a hybrid gp120-gp41 epitope. The I559P change completely eliminated the ability of the HIV-1BG505 Env to mediate cell-cell fusion and virus entry, and abolished the capacity of the SOS Env to support virus infection in the presence of a reducing agent. These results suggest that differences exist between the quaternary structures of functional Env spikes and I559P

  14. The C-terminal tail of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D may exist in two conformations: an analysis of sequence, structure, and function

    SciTech Connect

    Hollier, Mark J.; Dimmock, Nigel J. . E-mail: n.j.dimmock@warwick.ac.uk

    2005-07-05

    In addition to the major ectodomain, the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein of HIV-1 is now known to have a minor ectodomain that is part of the long C-terminal tail. Both ectodomains are highly antigenic, carry neutralizing and non-neutralizing epitopes, and are involved in virus-mediated fusion activity. However, data have so far been biologically based, and derived solely from T cell line-adapted (TCLA), B clade viruses. Here we have carried out sequence and theoretically based structural analyses of 357 gp41 C-terminal sequences of mainly primary isolates of HIV-1 clades A, B, C, and D. Data show that all these viruses have the potential to form a tail loop structure (the minor ectodomain) supported by three, {beta}-sheet, membrane-spanning domains (MSDs). This means that the first (N-terminal) tyrosine-based sorting signal of the gp41 tail is situated outside the cell membrane and is non-functional, and that gp41 that reaches the cell surface may be recycled back into the cytoplasm through the activity of the second tyrosine-sorting signal. However, we suggest that only a minority of cell-associated gp41 molecules - those destined for incorporation into virions - has 3 MSDs and the minor ectodomain. Most intracellular gp41 has the conventional single MSD, no minor ectodomain, a functional first tyrosine-based sorting signal, and in line with current thinking is degraded intracellularly. The gp41 structural diversity suggested here can be viewed as an evolutionary strategy to minimize HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein expression on the cell surface, and hence possible cytotoxicity and immune attack on the infected cell.

  15. On the microscopic and mesoscopic perturbations of lipid bilayers upon interaction with the MPER domain of the HIV glycoprotein gp41.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Rosario; Emendato, Alessandro; Vitiello, Giuseppe; De Santis, Augusta; Grimaldi, Manuela; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Busi, Elena; Del Vecchio, Pompea; Petraccone, Luigi; D'Errico, Gerardino

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the 665-683 fragment of the HIV fusion glycoprotein 41, corresponding to the MPER domain of the protein and named gp41MPER, on the microscopic structure and mesoscopic arrangement of palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and POPC/sphingomyelin (SM)/cholesterol (CHOL) lipid bilayers is analyzed. The microscopic structuring of the bilayers has been studied by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, using glycerophosphocholines spin-labelled in different positions along the acyl chain. Transitions of the bilayer liquid crystalline state have been also monitored by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Changes of the bilayers morphology have been studied by determining the dimension of the liposomes through Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) measurements. The results converge in showing that the sample preparation procedure, the bilayer composition and the peptide/lipid ratio critically tune the lipid response to the peptide/membrane interaction. When gp41MPER is added to preformed liposomes, it positions at the bilayer interface and the lipid perturbation is limited to the more external segments. In contrast, if the peptide is mixed with the lipids during the liposome preparation, it assumes a trans-membrane topology. This happens at all peptide/lipid ratios for fluid POPC bilayers, while in the case of rigid POPC/SM/CHOL membranes a minimum ratio has to be reached, thus suggesting peptide self-aggregation to occur. Peptide insertion results in a dramatic increase of the lipid ordering and bilayer stiffening, which reflect in significant changes in liposome average dimension and distribution. The biological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:27179640

  16. Design and evaluation of antiretroviral peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat region (C-HR) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Soonthornsata, Bongkot; Tian, Yu-Shi; Utachee, Piraporn; Sapsutthipas, Sompong; Isarangkura-na-ayuthaya, Panasda; Auwanit, Wattana; Takagi, Tatsuya; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Kawashita, Norihito; Kameoka, Masanori

    2010-09-15

    Two {alpha}-helical heptad repeats, N-HR and C-HR, located in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp41, play an important role in membrane fusion by forming a 6-helix bundle. C34, a peptide mimicking C-HR, inhibits the formation of the 6-helix bundle; thus, it has potential as a novel antiretroviral compound. In order to improve the inhibitory effect of C34 on HIV-1 replication, we designed new C34-derived peptides based on computational analysis of the stable conformation of the 6-helix bundle. Newly designed peptides showed a stronger inhibitory effect on the replication of recombinant viruses containing CRF01{sub A}E, subtype B or subtype C Env than C34 or a fusion inhibitor, T-20. In addition, these peptides inhibited the replication of a T-20-resistant virus. We propose that these peptides could be applied to develop novel antiretroviral compounds to inhibit the replication of various subtypes of HIV-1 as well as of T-20-resistant variants.

  17. Thermodynamics of peptide inhibitor binding to HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Cole, J L; Garsky, V M

    2001-05-15

    The gp41 subunit of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein mediates fusion of the cellular and viral membranes. The gp41 ectodomain is a trimer of alpha-helical hairpins, where N-terminal helices form a parallel three-stranded coiled-coil core and C-terminal helices pack around the core. A deep hydrophobic pocket on the N-terminal core represents an attractive target for antiviral therapeutics. We have employed a soluble derivative of the gp41 core ectodomain and small cyclic disulfide D-peptide inhibitors to define the stoichiometry, affinity, and thermodynamics of ligand binding to this pocket using isothermal titration calorimetry. These inhibitors bind with micromolar affinity to the pocket with the expected stoichiometry of three peptides per gp41 core trimer. There are no cooperative interactions among the three binding sites. Linear eight- or nine-residue D-peptides derived from the pocket-binding domain of the cyclic molecules also bind specifically. A negative heat capacity change is observed and is consistent with burial of hydrophobic surface upon binding. Contrary to expectations for a reaction dominated by the classical hydrophobic effect, peptide binding is enthalpically driven and is opposed by an unfavorable negative entropy change. The calorimetry data support models whereby dominant negative inhibitors bind to a transiently exposed surface on the prefusion intermediate state of gp41 and disrupt subsequent resolution to the fusion-active six-stranded hairpin conformation.

  18. Oligomerization of the hydrophobic heptad repeat of gp41.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, H B; Tucker, S P; Kar, S R; McPherson, S A; McPherson, D T; Dubay, J W; Lebowitz, J; Compans, R W; Hunter, E

    1995-01-01

    The transmembrane protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contains a leucine zipper-like (hydrophobic heptad) repeat which has been predicted to form an amphipathic alpha helix. To evaluate the potential of the hydrophobic heptad repeat to induce protein oligomerization, this region of gp41 has been cloned into the bacterial expression vector pRIT2T. The resulting plasmid, pRIT3, expresses a fusion protein consisting of the Fc binding domain of monomeric protein A, a bacterial protein, and amino acids 538 to 593 of HIV-1 gp41. Gel filtration chromatography demonstrated the presence of oligomeric forms of the fusion protein, and analytical centrifugation studies confirmed that the chimeric protein formed a higher-order multimer that was greater than a dimer. Thus, we have identified a region of HIV-1 gp41 which is capable of directing the oligomerization of a fusion protein containing monomeric protein A. Point mutations, previously shown to inhibit the biological activity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, have been engineered into the segment of gp41 contained in the fusion protein, and expressed mutant proteins were purified and analyzed via fast protein liquid chromatography. A point mutation in the heptad repeat, which changed the central isoleucine to an alanine, caused a significant (> 60%) decrease in oligomerization, whereas changing the central isoleucine to aspartate or proline resulted in almost a complete loss of oligomerization. Deletions of one, two, or three amino acids following the first isoleucine also resulted in a profound decrease in oligomerization. The inhibitory effects of the mutations on oligomer formation correlated with the effects of the same mutations on envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion. A possible role of the leucine zipper-like region in the fusion process and in an oligomerization event distinct from assembly of the envelope glycoprotein complex is discussed. PMID:7707497

  19. Topological Layers in the HIV-1 gp120 Inner Domain Regulate gp41 Interaction and CD4-Triggered Conformational Transitions

    PubMed Central

    Finzi, Andrés; Xiang, Shi-Hua; Pacheco, Beatriz; Wang, Liping; Haight, Jessica; Kassa, Aemro; Danek, Brenda; Pancera, Marie; Kwong, Peter D.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) into cells is initiated by binding of the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein to the receptor, CD4. How does CD4 binding trigger conformational changes in gp120 that allow the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein to mediate viral-cell membrane fusion? The transition from the unliganded to the CD4-bound state is regulated by two potentially flexible topological layers (“Layers 1 and 2”) in the gp120 inner domain. Both layers apparently contribute to the non-covalent association of unliganded gp120 with gp41. After CD4 makes initial contact with the gp120 outer domain, Layer 1-Layer 2 interactions strengthen gp120-CD4 binding by reducing the off-rate. Layer 1-Layer 2 interactions also destabilize the activated state induced on HIV-1 by treatment with soluble CD4. Thus, despite lack of contact with CD4, the gp120 inner domain layers govern CD4 triggering by participating in conformational transitions within gp120 and regulating the interaction with gp41. PMID:20227370

  20. Interactions of HIV-1 inhibitory peptide T20 with the gp41 N-HR coiled coil.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Kelly; Shishido, Akira; Root, Michael J

    2009-02-01

    Cellular entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) involves fusion of viral and cellular membranes and is mediated by structural transitions in viral glycoprotein gp41. The antiviral C-peptide T20 targets the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat region (N-HR), blocking gp41 conformational changes essential for the entry process. To probe the T20 structure-activity relationship, we engineered a molecular mimic of the entire gp41 N-HR coiled coil using the 5-Helix design strategy. T20 bound this artificial protein (denoted 5H-ex) with nanomolar affinity (K(D) = 30 nm), close to its IC50 concentration (approximately 3 nm) but much weaker than the affinity of a related inhibitory C-peptide C37 (K(D) = 0.0007 nm). T20/C37 competitive binding assays confirmed that T20 interacts with the hydrophobic groove on the surface of the N-HR coiled coil outside of a deep pocket region crucial for C37 binding. We used 5H-ex to investigate how the T20 N and C termini contributed to the inhibitor binding activity. Mutating three aromatic residues at the T20 C terminus (WNWF --> ANAA) had no effect on affinity, suggesting that these amino acids do not participate in T20 binding to the gp41 N-HR. The results support recent evidence pointing to a different role for these residues in T20 inhibition (Peisajovich, S. G., Gallo, S. A., Blumenthal, R., and Shai, Y. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 21012-21017; Liu, S., Jing, W., Cheung, B., Lu, H., Sun, J., Yan, X., Niu, J., Farmar, J., Wu, S., and Jiang, S. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 9612-9620). By contrast, mutations near the T20 N terminus substantially influenced inhibitor binding strength. When Ile was substituted for Thr in the second T20 position, a 40-fold increase in binding affinity was measured (K(D) = 0.75 nm). The effect of this affinity enhancement on T20 inhibitory potency varied among different viral strains. The original T20 and the higher affinity T20 variant had similar potency against wild type HIV-1. However, the higher

  1. Role for the disulfide-bonded region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 in receptor-triggered activation of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy-McIntyre, Anna K.; Baer, Severine; Ludlow, Louise; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2010-04-16

    The conserved disulfide-bonded region (DSR) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fusion glycoprotein, gp41, mediates association with the receptor-binding glycoprotein, gp120. Interactions between gp120, CD4 and chemokine receptors activate the fusion activity of gp41. The introduction of W596L and W610F mutations to the DSR of HIV-1{sub QH1549.13} blocked viral entry and hemifusion without affecting gp120-gp41 association. The fusion defect correlated with inhibition of CD4-triggered gp41 pre-hairpin formation, consistent with the DSR mutations having decoupled receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 from gp41 activation. Our data implicate the DSR in sensing conformational changes in the gp120-gp41 complex that lead to fusion activation.

  2. Assessment of antibody responses against gp41 in HIV-1-infected patients using soluble gp41 fusion proteins and peptides derived from M group consensus envelope

    SciTech Connect

    Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Han, Dong P.; Kim, Soon J.; Park, Hanna; Ansari, Rais; Montefiori, David C.; Cho, Michael W.

    2008-03-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 is targeted by broadly-reactive neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E10, making it an attractive target for vaccine development. To better assess immunogenic properties of gp41, we generated five soluble glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins encompassing C-terminal 30, 64, 100, 142, or 172 (full-length) amino acids of gp41 ectodomain from M group consensus envelope sequence. Antibody responses in HIV-1-infected patients were evaluated using these proteins and overlapping peptides. We found (i) antibody responses against different regions of gp41 varied tremendously among individual patients, (ii) patients with stronger antibody responses against membrane-proximal external region exhibit broader and more potent neutralizing activity, and (iii) several patients mounted antibodies against epitopes that are near, or overlap with, those targeted by 2F5 or 4E10. These soluble gp41 fusion proteins could be an important source of antigens for future vaccine development efforts.

  3. Kinetically coupled folding of a single HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 complex in viral membrane fusion and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Junyi; Rebane, Aleksander A.; Ma, Lu; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 (gp41) mediates viral entry into host cells by coupling its folding energy to membrane fusion. Gp41 folding is blocked by fusion inhibitors, including the commercial drug T20, to treat HIV/AIDS. However, gp41 folding intermediates, energy, and kinetics are poorly understood. Here, we identified the folding intermediates of a single gp41 trimer-of-hairpins and measured their associated energy and kinetics using high-resolution optical tweezers. We found that folding of gp41 hairpins was energetically independent but kinetically coupled: Each hairpin contributed a folding energy of ∼−23 kBT, but folding of one hairpin successively accelerated the folding rate of the next one by ∼20-fold. Membrane-mimicking micelles slowed down gp41 folding and reduced the stability of the six-helix bundle. However, the stability was restored by cooperative folding of the membrane-proximal external region. Surprisingly, T20 strongly inhibited gp41 folding by actively displacing the C-terminal hairpin strand in a force-dependent manner. The inhibition was abolished by a T20-resistant gp41 mutation. The energetics and kinetics of gp41 folding established by us provides a basis to understand viral membrane fusion, infection, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26038562

  4. Reorientation of the helix of the tryptophan-rich gp41W peptide from HIV-1 at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matar, Gladys; Benichou, Emmanuel; Nasir, Mehmet Nail; Harfouch, Yara El; Brevet, Pierre-François; Besson, Françoise

    2013-12-01

    The glycoprotein gp41 from the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) has an amino acid sequence enriched in tryptophan residues, the so-called gp41W peptide (i.e., KWASLWNWFNITNWLWYIK) and plays a crucial role in HIV-1 host cell infection. Using the coupling of Second Harmonic Generation targeting the tryptophan residues with lateral surface tension measurements, we investigate the interaction of gp41W with a neat air/water and a lipid/water interfaces. At the air/water interface, gp41W presents a well-defined orientation and this orientation is strongly modified at the lipid/water interface, depending on the surface pressure. These results show that this strategy is well suited to monitor tryptophan containing α-helices orientation at lipid/water interfaces.

  5. HIV type 1 Env precursor cleavage state affects recognition by both neutralizing and nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Bimal K; Pancera, Marie; Phogat, Sanjay; O'Dell, Sijy; McKee, Krisha; Guenaga, Javier; Robinson, James; Mascola, John; Wyatt, Richard T

    2011-08-01

    HIV-1 is relatively resistant to antibody-mediated neutralization; however, rare antibodies to the exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and the transmembrane glycoprotein, gp41, can neutralize a broad array of isolates. Two antibodies, 2F5 and 4E10, are directed against the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER); however, the kinetic neutralization signature of these antibodies remains unresolved. Previously, we reported that the fully cleaved, cell surface envelope glycoproteins (Env) derived from the primary isolate, JR-FL, are well recognized exclusively by gp120-directed neutralizing ligands and not by nonneutralizing gp120 antibodies. However, the gp120 nonneutralizing antibodies can recognize HIV spikes that are rendered fully cleavage defective by site-directed mutagenesis. Here, we extended such analysis to gp41 neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies and, relative to the rules of gp120-specific antibody recognition, we observed marked contrasts. Similar to gp120 recognition, the nonneutralizing gp41 cluster 1 or cluster 2 antibodies bound much more efficiently to cleavage-defective spikes when compared to their recognition of cleaved spikes. In contrast to gp120 neutralizing antibody recognition, the broadly neutralizing gp41 antibodies 2F5 and 4E10, like the nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies, did not efficiently recognize the predominantly cleaved, primary isolate JR-FL spikes. However, if the spikes were rendered cleavage defective, recognition by both the neutralizing and nonneutralizing ligand markedly increased. CD4 interaction with the cleaved spikes markedly increased recognition by most nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies, whereas such treatment had a minimal increase of 2F5 and 4E10 recognition. These data indicate again the profound influence that cleavage imposes on the quaternary packing of primary isolate spikes and have important implications for soluble trimer candidate immunogens. PMID:21158699

  6. HIV type 1 Env precursor cleavage state affects recognition by both neutralizing and nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Bimal K; Pancera, Marie; Phogat, Sanjay; O'Dell, Sijy; McKee, Krisha; Guenaga, Javier; Robinson, James; Mascola, John; Wyatt, Richard T

    2011-08-01

    HIV-1 is relatively resistant to antibody-mediated neutralization; however, rare antibodies to the exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and the transmembrane glycoprotein, gp41, can neutralize a broad array of isolates. Two antibodies, 2F5 and 4E10, are directed against the gp41 membrane proximal external region (MPER); however, the kinetic neutralization signature of these antibodies remains unresolved. Previously, we reported that the fully cleaved, cell surface envelope glycoproteins (Env) derived from the primary isolate, JR-FL, are well recognized exclusively by gp120-directed neutralizing ligands and not by nonneutralizing gp120 antibodies. However, the gp120 nonneutralizing antibodies can recognize HIV spikes that are rendered fully cleavage defective by site-directed mutagenesis. Here, we extended such analysis to gp41 neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibodies and, relative to the rules of gp120-specific antibody recognition, we observed marked contrasts. Similar to gp120 recognition, the nonneutralizing gp41 cluster 1 or cluster 2 antibodies bound much more efficiently to cleavage-defective spikes when compared to their recognition of cleaved spikes. In contrast to gp120 neutralizing antibody recognition, the broadly neutralizing gp41 antibodies 2F5 and 4E10, like the nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies, did not efficiently recognize the predominantly cleaved, primary isolate JR-FL spikes. However, if the spikes were rendered cleavage defective, recognition by both the neutralizing and nonneutralizing ligand markedly increased. CD4 interaction with the cleaved spikes markedly increased recognition by most nonneutralizing gp41 antibodies, whereas such treatment had a minimal increase of 2F5 and 4E10 recognition. These data indicate again the profound influence that cleavage imposes on the quaternary packing of primary isolate spikes and have important implications for soluble trimer candidate immunogens.

  7. Development of Small-molecule HIV Entry Inhibitors Specifically Targeting gp120 or gp41

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Yu, Fei; Cai, Lifeng; Debnath, Asim K.; Jiang, Shibo

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein surface subunit gp120 and transmembrane subunit gp41 play important roles in HIV-1 entry, thus serving as key targets for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors. T20 peptide (enfuvirtide) is the first U.S. FDA-approved HIV entry inhibitor; however, its clinical application is limited by the lack of oral availability. Here, we have described the structure and function of the HIV-1 gp120 and gp41 subunits and reviewed advancements in the development of small-molecule HIV entry inhibitors specifically targeting these two Env glycoproteins. We then compared the advantages and disadvantages of different categories of HIV entry inhibitor candidates and further predicted the future trend of HIV entry inhibitor development. PMID:26324044

  8. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P.; Kim, Arthur S.; Torrents de La Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-09-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120-gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120-gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes.

  9. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P.; Kim, Arthur S.; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120–gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120–gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes. PMID:26404402

  10. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV-1 by destabilizing the Env spike.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Leaman, Daniel P; Kim, Arthur S; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Derking, Ronald; Ramos, Alejandra; de Taeye, Steven W; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Klein, Florian; Burton, Dennis R; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Poignard, Pascal; Moore, John P; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W; Zwick, Michael B; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    The recent identification of three broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against gp120-gp41 interface epitopes has expanded the targetable surface on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer. By using biochemical, biophysical and computational methods, we map the previously unknown trimer epitopes of two related antibodies, 3BC315 and 3BC176. A cryo-EM reconstruction of a soluble Env trimer bound to 3BC315 Fab at 9.3 Å resolution reveals that the antibody binds between two gp41 protomers, and neutralizes the virus by accelerating trimer decay. In contrast, bnAb 35O22 binding to a partially overlapping quaternary epitope at the gp120-gp41 interface does not induce decay. A conserved gp41-proximal glycan at N88 was also shown to play a role in the binding kinetics of 3BC176 and 3BC315. Finally, our data suggest that the dynamic structure of the Env trimer influences exposure of bnAb epitopes. PMID:26404402

  11. Structure of HIV-1 gp120 with gp41-interactive region reveals layered envelope architecture and basis of conformational mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Pancera, Marie; Majeed, Shahzad; Ban, Yih-En Andrew; Chen, Lei; Huang, Chih-chin; Kong, Leopold; Kwon, Young Do; Stuckey, Jonathan; Zhou, Tongqing; Robinson, James E.; Schief, William R.; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard; Kwong, Peter D.

    2010-04-15

    The viral spike of HIV-1 is composed of three gp120 envelope glycoproteins attached noncovalently to three gp41 transmembrane molecules. Viral entry is initiated by binding to the CD4 receptor on the cell surface, which induces large conformational changes in gp120. These changes not only provide a model for receptor-triggered entry, but affect spike sensitivity to drug- and antibody-mediated neutralization. Although some of the details of the CD4-induced conformational change have been visualized by crystal structures and cryoelectron tomograms, the critical gp41-interactive region of gp120 was missing from previous atomic-level characterizations. Here we determine the crystal structure of an HIV-1 gp120 core with intact gp41-interactive region in its CD4-bound state, compare this structure to unliganded and antibody-bound forms to identify structurally invariant and plastic components, and use ligand-oriented cryoelectron tomograms to define component mobility in the viral spike context. Newly defined gp120 elements proximal to the gp41 interface complete a 7-stranded {beta}-sandwich, which appeared invariant in conformation. Loop excursions emanating from the sandwich form three topologically separate - and structurally plastic - layers, topped off by the highly glycosylated gp120 outer domain. Crystal structures, cryoelectron tomograms, and interlayer chemistry were consistent with a mechanism in which the layers act as a shape-changing spacer, facilitating movement between outer domain and gp41-associated {beta}-sandwich and providing for conformational diversity used in immune evasion. A 'layered' gp120 architecture thus allows movement among alternative glycoprotein conformations required for virus entry and immune evasion, whereas a {beta}-sandwich clamp maintains gp120-gp41 interaction and regulates gp41 transitions.

  12. Identifying possible sites for antibody neutralization escape: Implications for unique functional properties of the C-terminal tail of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhifeng; Huang, Yushen; Tan, Yue; Yu, Yang; Wang, Junyi; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2016-07-01

    A previous amino acid sequence analyses from our laboratory reported nine potential sites in gp41 glycoprotein of HIV-1 that may contribute to virus escape from antibody neutralization. Besides four sites found outside the membrane of HIV-1 virus, five located in the C-terminal tail of gp41 specifically in the lentivirus lytic peptides motifs (LLPs). To further study the bioinformatical results, the virus infectivity assay and the standard neutralization assay were conducted on conservatively mutated virus. Two sites in the LLP3 domain stood out with the ability to alter the resistance of HIV-1 virus to certain broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). While the glycoprotein incorporation on the viral membrane and the interaction of the LLP3 domain with the lipid membrane remained unaltered, the increase in neutralization resistance of the mutant virus was associated with the changes on Env conformation. Our findings demonstrate different sensibility of bNAbs to mutations in the C-terminal tail and indicate an unrecognized potential role for even minor sequence variation in the C-terminal tail in modulating the antigenicity of the ectodomain of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex.

  13. Structural Characterization of HIV gp41 with the Membrane-proximal External Region

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, W.; Bohon, J; Han, D; Habte, H; Qin, Y; Cho, M; Chance, M

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (gp120/gp41) plays a critical role in virus infection and pathogenesis. Three of the six monoclonal antibodies considered to have broadly neutralizing activities (2F5, 4E10, and Z13e1) bind to the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41. This makes the MPER a desirable template for developing immunogens that can elicit antibodies with properties similar to these monoclonal antibodies, with a long term goal of developing antigens that could serve as novel HIV vaccines. In order to provide a structural basis for rational antigen design, an MPER construct, HR1-54Q, was generated for x-ray crystallographic and x-ray footprinting studies to provide both high resolution atomic coordinates and verification of the solution state of the antigen, respectively. The crystal structure of HR1-54Q reveals a trimeric, coiled-coil six-helical bundle, which probably represents a postfusion form of gp41. The MPER portion extends from HR2 in continuation of a slightly bent long helix and is relatively flexible. The structures observed for the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes agree well with existing structural data, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicate that the antigen binds well to antibodies that recognize the above epitopes. Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting of the antigen in solution reveals specifically protected and accessible regions consistent with the predictions based on the trimeric structure from the crystallographic data. Overall, the HR1-54Q antigen, as characterized by crystallography and footprinting, represents a postfusion, trimeric form of HIV gp41, and its structure provides a rational basis for gp41 antigen design suitable for HIV vaccine development.

  14. Structural characterization of HIV gp41 with the membrane-proximal external region.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wuxian; Bohon, Jen; Han, Dong P; Habte, Habtom; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W; Chance, Mark R

    2010-07-30

    Human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (gp120/gp41) plays a critical role in virus infection and pathogenesis. Three of the six monoclonal antibodies considered to have broadly neutralizing activities (2F5, 4E10, and Z13e1) bind to the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41. This makes the MPER a desirable template for developing immunogens that can elicit antibodies with properties similar to these monoclonal antibodies, with a long term goal of developing antigens that could serve as novel HIV vaccines. In order to provide a structural basis for rational antigen design, an MPER construct, HR1-54Q, was generated for x-ray crystallographic and x-ray footprinting studies to provide both high resolution atomic coordinates and verification of the solution state of the antigen, respectively. The crystal structure of HR1-54Q reveals a trimeric, coiled-coil six-helical bundle, which probably represents a postfusion form of gp41. The MPER portion extends from HR2 in continuation of a slightly bent long helix and is relatively flexible. The structures observed for the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes agree well with existing structural data, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicate that the antigen binds well to antibodies that recognize the above epitopes. Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting of the antigen in solution reveals specifically protected and accessible regions consistent with the predictions based on the trimeric structure from the crystallographic data. Overall, the HR1-54Q antigen, as characterized by crystallography and footprinting, represents a postfusion, trimeric form of HIV gp41, and its structure provides a rational basis for gp41 antigen design suitable for HIV vaccine development. PMID:20525690

  15. Structural Characterization of HIV gp41 with the Membrane-proximal External Region*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wuxian; Bohon, Jen; Han, Dong P.; Habte, Habtom; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W.; Chance, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (gp120/gp41) plays a critical role in virus infection and pathogenesis. Three of the six monoclonal antibodies considered to have broadly neutralizing activities (2F5, 4E10, and Z13e1) bind to the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41. This makes the MPER a desirable template for developing immunogens that can elicit antibodies with properties similar to these monoclonal antibodies, with a long term goal of developing antigens that could serve as novel HIV vaccines. In order to provide a structural basis for rational antigen design, an MPER construct, HR1-54Q, was generated for x-ray crystallographic and x-ray footprinting studies to provide both high resolution atomic coordinates and verification of the solution state of the antigen, respectively. The crystal structure of HR1-54Q reveals a trimeric, coiled-coil six-helical bundle, which probably represents a postfusion form of gp41. The MPER portion extends from HR2 in continuation of a slightly bent long helix and is relatively flexible. The structures observed for the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes agree well with existing structural data, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicate that the antigen binds well to antibodies that recognize the above epitopes. Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting of the antigen in solution reveals specifically protected and accessible regions consistent with the predictions based on the trimeric structure from the crystallographic data. Overall, the HR1-54Q antigen, as characterized by crystallography and footprinting, represents a postfusion, trimeric form of HIV gp41, and its structure provides a rational basis for gp41 antigen design suitable for HIV vaccine development. PMID:20525690

  16. Recombinant expression, purification, and biophysical characterization of the transmembrane and membrane proximal domains of HIV-1 gp41

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhen; Kessans, Sarah A; Song, Lusheng; Dörner, Katerina; Lee, Ho-Hsien; Meador, Lydia R; LaBaer, Joshua; Hogue, Brenda G; Mor, Tsafrir S; Fromme, Petra

    2014-01-01

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1 associates noncovalently with the surface subunit (gp120) and together they play essential roles in viral mucosal transmission and infection of target cells. The membrane proximal region (MPR) of gp41 is highly conserved and contains epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies. The transmembrane (TM) domain of gp41 not only anchors the envelope glycoprotein complex in the viral membrane but also dynamically affects the interactions of the MPR with the membrane. While high-resolution X-ray structures of some segments of the MPR were solved in the past, they represent the post-fusion forms. Structural information on the TM domain of gp41 is scant and at low resolution. Here we describe the design, expression and purification of a protein construct that includes MPR and the transmembrane domain of gp41 (MPR-TMTEV-6His), which reacts with the broadly neutralizing antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 and thereby may represent an immunologically relevant conformation mimicking a prehairpin intermediate of gp41. The expression level of MPR-TMTEV-6His was improved by fusion to the C-terminus of Mistic protein, yielding ∼1 mg of pure protein per liter. The isolated MPR-TMTEV-6His protein was biophysically characterized and is a monodisperse candidate for crystallization. This work will enable further investigation into the structure of MPR-TMTEV-6His, which will be important for the structure-based design of a mucosal vaccine against HIV-1. PMID:25155369

  17. Functional Analysis of the Disulfide-Bonded Loop/Chain Reversal Region of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp41 Reveals a Critical Role in gp120-gp41 Association

    PubMed Central

    Maerz, Anne L.; Drummer, Heidi E.; Wilson, Kirilee A.; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2001-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry into cells is mediated by the surface-exposed envelope protein (SU) gp120, which binds to cellular CD4 and chemokine receptors, triggering the membrane fusion activity of the transmembrane (TM) protein gp41. The core of gp41 comprises an N-terminal triple-stranded coiled coil and an antiparallel C-terminal helical segment which is packed against the exterior of the coiled coil and is thought to correspond to a fusion-activated conformation. The available gp41 crystal structures lack the conserved disulfide-bonded loop region which, in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and murine leukemia virus TM proteins, mediates a chain reversal, connecting the antiparallel N- and C-terminal regions. Mutations in the HTLV-1 TM protein gp21 disulfide-bonded loop/chain reversal region adversely affected fusion activity without abolishing SU-TM association (A. L. Maerz, R. J. Center, B. E. Kemp, B. Kobe, and P. Poumbourios, J. Virol. 74:6614–6621, 2000). We now report that in contrast to our findings with HTLV-1, conservative substitutions in the HIV-1 gp41 disulfide-bonded loop/chain reversal region abolished association with gp120. While the mutations affecting gp120-gp41 association also affected cell-cell fusion activity, HIV-1 glycoprotein maturation appeared normal. The mutant glycoproteins were processed, expressed at the cell surface, and efficiently immunoprecipitated by conformation-dependent monoclonal antibodies. The gp120 association site includes aromatic and hydrophobic residues on either side of the gp41 disulfide-bonded loop and a basic residue within the loop. The HIV-1 gp41 disulfide-bonded loop/chain reversal region is a critical gp120 contact site; therefore, it is also likely to play a central role in fusion activation by linking CD4 plus chemokine receptor-induced conformational changes in gp120 to gp41 fusogenicity. These gp120 contact residues are present in diverse primate lentiviruses

  18. HIV-1 viral envelope protein gp41: An NMR investigation of dodecyl phosphocholine embedded gp41 reveals a dynamic pre-fusion intermediate conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lakomek, Nils-Alexander; Kaufman, Joshua D.; Stahl, Stephen J.; Wingfield, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Human immunodeficiency viral (HIV-1) fusion is mediated by the viral envelope gp120/gp41 complex (ENVelope glycoprotein). After gp120 shedding, gp41 is exposed and elicits membrane fusion via a cascade of conformational changes. In contrast to pre-fusion and post-fusion conformation, little is known about any intermediate conformation. We report on a solution NMR investigation of homotrimeric HIV-1 gp4127–194, comprising the transmembrane region and reconstituted in dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelles. The protein is mainly α-helical but experiences internal dynamics on the nanosecond and micro-to millisecond time scale and transient α-helical behavior for certain residues in the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR). Strong lipid interactions are observed, in particular for C-terminal residues of the NHR and imunodominant loop region connecting NHR and C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR). Our data indicate an extended conformation with features anticipated for a pre-fusion intermediate, presumably in exchange with a lowly populated post-fusion six-helical bundle conformation. PMID:25132083

  19. Fertilization competence of the egg-coating envelope is regulated by direct interaction of dicalcin and gp41, the Xenopus laevis ZP3.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Naofumi; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Hanaue, Mayu; Takamatsu, Ken

    2015-08-05

    Fertilization begins with species-restricted interaction of sperm and the egg-coating envelope, which includes a three-dimensional meshwork of filaments composed of glycoproteins (called ZP proteins). Growing evidence has unveiled the molecular nature of ZP proteins; however, the structural property conferring fertilization competence to the egg-coating envelope remains unknown. Here, we show the molecular mechanism that mediates direct interaction between dicalcin, a novel fertilization-suppressive ZP protein-associated protein, and gp41, a Xenopus laevis ortholog of mammalian ZP3, and subsequently demonstrate the structural basis of the envelope for fertilization competence. The interactive regions between dicalcin and gp41 comprised five and nine amino acid residues within dicalcin and twenty-three within gp41 [corrected]. Synthetic peptides corresponding to these regions dramatically affected fertilization: treatment with dicalcin- or gp41-derived peptides decreased or increased fertilization rates, respectively. Prior application of these peptides caused distinct alterations in the in vivo lectin-staining pattern of the envelope as well. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the dicalcin-derived peptide induced the formation of a well-organized meshwork, whereas the gp41-derived peptide caused the formation of a significantly disorganized meshwork. These findings indicated that the fertilization competence of the egg-coating envelope is crucially regulated by the direct interaction between dicalcin and gp41.

  20. Antibody to gp41 MPER alters functional properties of HIV-1 Env without complete neutralization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Arthur S; Leaman, Daniel P; Zwick, Michael B

    2014-07-01

    Human antibody 10E8 targets the conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) subunit gp41 and neutralizes HIV-1 with exceptional potency. Remarkably, HIV-1 containing mutations that reportedly knockout 10E8 binding to linear MPER peptides are partially neutralized by 10E8, producing a local plateau in the dose response curve. Here, we found that virus partially neutralized by 10E8 becomes significantly less neutralization sensitive to various MPER antibodies and to soluble CD4 while becoming significantly more sensitive to antibodies and fusion inhibitors against the heptad repeats of gp41. Thus, 10E8 modulates sensitivity of Env to ligands both pre- and post-receptor engagement without complete neutralization. Partial neutralization by 10E8 was influenced at least in part by perturbing Env glycosylation. With unliganded Env, 10E8 bound with lower apparent affinity and lower subunit occupancy to MPER mutant compared to wild type trimers. However, 10E8 decreased functional stability of wild type Env while it had an opposite, stabilizing effect on MPER mutant Envs. Clade C isolates with natural MPER polymorphisms also showed partial neutralization by 10E8 with altered sensitivity to various gp41-targeted ligands. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of virus neutralization by demonstrating how antibody binding to the base of a trimeric spike cross talks with adjacent subunits to modulate Env structure and function. The ability of an antibody to stabilize, destabilize, partially neutralize as well as alter neutralization sensitivity of a virion spike pre- and post-receptor engagement may have implications for immunotherapy and vaccine design.

  1. Antibody to gp41 MPER Alters Functional Properties of HIV-1 Env without Complete Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Arthur S.; Leaman, Daniel P.; Zwick, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Human antibody 10E8 targets the conserved membrane proximal external region (MPER) of envelope glycoprotein (Env) subunit gp41 and neutralizes HIV-1 with exceptional potency. Remarkably, HIV-1 containing mutations that reportedly knockout 10E8 binding to linear MPER peptides are partially neutralized by 10E8, producing a local plateau in the dose response curve. Here, we found that virus partially neutralized by 10E8 becomes significantly less neutralization sensitive to various MPER antibodies and to soluble CD4 while becoming significantly more sensitive to antibodies and fusion inhibitors against the heptad repeats of gp41. Thus, 10E8 modulates sensitivity of Env to ligands both pre- and post-receptor engagement without complete neutralization. Partial neutralization by 10E8 was influenced at least in part by perturbing Env glycosylation. With unliganded Env, 10E8 bound with lower apparent affinity and lower subunit occupancy to MPER mutant compared to wild type trimers. However, 10E8 decreased functional stability of wild type Env while it had an opposite, stabilizing effect on MPER mutant Envs. Clade C isolates with natural MPER polymorphisms also showed partial neutralization by 10E8 with altered sensitivity to various gp41-targeted ligands. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of virus neutralization by demonstrating how antibody binding to the base of a trimeric spike cross talks with adjacent subunits to modulate Env structure and function. The ability of an antibody to stabilize, destabilize, partially neutralize as well as alter neutralization sensitivity of a virion spike pre- and post-receptor engagement may have implications for immunotherapy and vaccine design. PMID:25058619

  2. Increased infectivity in human cells and resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization by truncation of the SIV gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Takeo; Kaori, Takaki; Enomoto, Ikumi; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Matsushita, Shuzo

    2013-01-01

    The role of antibodies in protecting the host from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is of considerable interest, particularly because the RV144 trial results suggest that antibodies contribute to protection. Although infection of non-human primates with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is commonly used as an animal model of HIV-1 infection, the viral epitopes that elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibodies to SIV have not been identified. We isolated a monoclonal antibody (MAb) B404 that potently and broadly neutralizes various SIV strains. B404 targets a conformational epitope comprising the V3 and V4 loops of Env that intensely exposed when Env binds CD4. B404-resistant variants were obtained by passaging viruses in the presence of increasing concentration of B404 in PM1/CCR5 cells. Genetic analysis revealed that the Q733stop mutation, which truncates the cytoplasmic tail of gp41, was the first major substitution in Env during passage. The maximal inhibition by B404 and other MAbs were significantly decreased against a recombinant virus with a gp41 truncation compared with the parental SIVmac316. This indicates that the gp41 truncation was associated with resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. The infectivities of the recombinant virus with the gp41 truncation were 7,900-, 1,000-, and 140-fold higher than those of SIVmac316 in PM1, PM1/CCR5, and TZM-bl cells, respectively. Immunoblotting analysis revealed that the gp41 truncation enhanced the incorporation of Env into virions. The effect of the gp41 truncation on infectivity was not obvious in the HSC-F macaque cell line, although the resistance of viruses harboring the gp41 truncation to neutralization was maintained. These results suggest that viruses with a truncated gp41 cytoplasmic tail were selected by increased infectivity in human cells and by acquiring resistance to neutralizing antibody. PMID:23717307

  3. Characterization of a trimeric MPER containing HIV-1 gp41 antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hinz, Andreas; Schoehn, Guy; Quendler, Heribert; Hulsik, David Lutje; Stiegler, Gabi; Katinger, Hermann; Seaman, Michael S.; Montefiori, David; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2009-08-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 is considered as a prime target for the induction of neutralizing antibodies, since it contains the epitopes for three broadly neutralizing antibodies (2F5, 4E10 and Z13). Here we present a novel gp41 construct (HA-gp41) comprising gp41 HR2 and MPER fused to two triple-stranded coiled-coil domains at both ends. HA-gp41 is trimeric, has a high helical content in solution and forms rod-like structures as revealed by negative staining electron microscopy. Immunization of rabbits with HA-gp41 induced antibodies directed against MPER, which failed to exert significant neutralization capacity against envelopes from primary isolates. Thus trimerisation of MPER regions does not suffice to induce a potent neutralizing antibody response specific for conserved regions within gp41.

  4. Identification of a conserved domain of the HIV-1 transmembrane protein gp41 which interacts with cholesteryl groups.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Nadine; Genin, Christian; Malvoisin, Etienne

    2002-12-23

    A soluble form of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp160 devoid of the transmembrane anchor domain was found to bind to cholesteryl-hemisuccinate agarose. The external subunit gp120 failed to bind to the resin, suggesting that the site responsible for the binding to cholesterol was located in the transmembrane protein gp41. We constructed a series of maltose binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins representing overlapping fragments of the gp41 molecule and we studied their capacity to bind to cholesteryl beads. The domain responsible for binding to cholesterol was localised within the residues 668 to 684 immediately adjacent to the membrane spanning domain. We identified a short sequence (LWYIK, aa 678-683) comparable to the cholesterol interaction amino acid consensus pattern published by Li and Papadopoulos [Endocrinology 139 (1998) 4991]. We demonstrated that the sequence LWYIK synthesized fused to the MBP was able to bind to cholesteryl groups. A synthetic peptide containing the sequence LWYIK was found to inhibit the interaction between cholesteryl beads and MBP44, an MBP fusion HIV-1 envelope protein that contains the putative cholesterol binding domain. Human sera obtained from HIV-1 seropositive patients did not react in ELISA to the LWYIK sequence, suggesting that this region is not exposed to the immune system. The biological significance of the interaction between gp41 and cholesterol is discussed.

  5. Structure-Based Design of a Protein Immunogen that Displays an HIV-1 gp41 Neutralizing Epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Pejchal, Robert; Gach, Johannes S.; Zwick, Michael B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2012-06-27

    Antibody Z13e1 is a relatively broadly neutralizing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antibody that recognizes the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein gp41. Based on the crystal structure of an MPER epitope peptide in complex with Z13e1 Fab, we identified an unrelated protein, interleukin (IL)-22, with a surface-exposed region that is structurally homologous in its backbone to the gp41 Z13e1 epitope. By grafting the gp41 Z13e1 epitope sequence onto the structurally homologous region in IL-22, we engineered a novel protein (Z13-IL22-2) that contains the MPER epitope sequence for use as a potential immunogen and as a reagent for the detection of Z13e1-like antibodies. The Z13-IL22-2 protein binds Fab Z13e1 with a K{sub d} of 73 nM. The crystal structure of Z13-IL22-2 in complex with Fab Z13e1 shows that the epitope region is faithfully replicated in the Fab-bound scaffold protein; however, isothermal calorimetry studies indicate that Fab binding to Z13-IL22-2 is not a lock-and-key event, leaving open the question of whether conformational changes upon binding occur in the Fab, in Z13-IL-22, or in both.

  6. Molecular and Physicochemical Factors Governing Solubility of the HIV gp41 Ectodomain.

    PubMed

    Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Crespillo, Sara; Morel, Bertrand; Casares, Salvador; Mateo, Pedro L; Notka, Frank; Roger, Marie G; Mouz, Nicolas; El-Habib, Raphaelle; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2016-08-23

    The HIV gp41 ectodomain (e-gp41) is an attractive target for the development of vaccines and drugs against HIV because of its crucial role in viral fusion to the host cell. However, because of the high insolubility of e-gp41, most biophysical and structural analyses have relied on the production of truncated versions removing the loop region of gp41 or the utilization of nonphysiological solubilizing conditions. The loop region of gp41 is also known as principal immunodominant domain (PID) because of its high immunogenicity, and it is essential for gp41-mediated HIV fusion. In this study we identify the aggregation-prone regions of the amino acid sequence of the PID and engineer a highly soluble mutant that preserves the trimeric structure of the wild-type e-gp41 under physiological pH. Furthermore, using a reverse mutagenesis approach, we analyze the role of mutated amino acids upon the physicochemical factors that govern solubility of e-gp41. On this basis, we propose a molecular model for e-gp41 self-association, which can guide the production of soluble e-gp41 mutants for future biophysical analyses and biotechnological applications. PMID:27558714

  7. Viremic HIV Infected Individuals with High CD4 T Cells and Functional Envelope Proteins Show Anti-gp41 Antibodies with Unique Specificity and Function

    PubMed Central

    Curriu, Marta; Fausther-Bovendo, Hughes; Pernas, María; Massanella, Marta; Carrillo, Jorge; Cabrera, Cecilia; López-Galíndez, Cecilio; Clotet, Bonaventura; Debré, Patrice; Vieillard, Vincent; Blanco, Julià

    2012-01-01

    Background CD4 T-cell decay is variable among HIV-infected individuals. In exceptional cases, CD4 T-cell counts remain stable despite high plasma viremia. HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) properties, namely tropism, fusion or the ability to induce the NK ligand NKp44L, or host factors that modulate Env cytopathic mechanisms may be modified in such situation. Methods We identified untreated HIV-infected individuals showing non-cytopathic replication (VL>10,000 copies/mL and CD4 T-cell decay<50 cells/µL/year, Viremic Non Progressors, VNP) or rapid progression (CD4 T-cells<350 cells/µL within three years post-infection, RP). We isolated full-length Env clones and analyzed their functions (tropism, fusion activity and capacity to induce NKp44L expression on CD4 cells). Anti-Env humoral responses were also analyzed. Results Env clones isolated from VNP or RP individuals showed no major phenotypic differences. The percentage of functional clones was similar in both groups. All clones tested were CCR5-tropic and showed comparable expression and fusogenic activity. Moreover, no differences were observed in their capacity to induce NKp44L expression on CD4 T cells from healthy donors through the 3S epitope of gp41. In contrast, anti- Env antibodies showed clear functional differences: plasma from VNPs had significantly higher capacity than RPs to block NKp44L induction by autologous viruses. Consistently, CD4 T-cells isolated from VNPs showed undetectable NKp44L expression and specific antibodies against a variable region flanking the highly conserved 3S epitope were identified in plasma samples from these patients. Conversely, despite continuous antigen stimulation, VNPs were unable to mount a broad neutralizing response against HIV. Conclusions Env functions (fusion and induction of NKp44L) were similar in viremic patients with slow or rapid progression to AIDS. However, differences in humoral responses against gp41 epitopes nearby 3S sequence may contribute to the lack

  8. Prolonged exposure of the HIV-1 gp41 membrane proximal region with L669S substitution

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoying; Dennison, S. Moses; Liu, Pinghuang; Gao, Feng; Jaeger, Frederick; Montefiori, David C.; Verkoczy, Laurent; Haynes, Barton F.; Alam, S. Munir; Tomaras, Georgia D.

    2010-01-01

    The conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 envelope is a target for the rare broadly neutralizing 2F5, Z13, and 4E10 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). One strategy to elicit such antibodies is to design an immunogen with increased exposure of the 2F5 and 4E10 mAb epitopes. In this study we characterize a single leucine to serine substitution at position 669 (L669S) in the gp41 Env MPER that confers >250-fold more neutralization sensitivity to 2F5 and 4E10 mAbs than does the wild-type gp41 sequence. On synthetic liposomes, increased solvent exposure of MPER tryptophan residues and stable docking of 2F5 and 4E10 mAbs to mutant MPER peptide liposomes indicate more favorable membrane orientation of MPER neutralizing epitopes with L669S substitution. The time during which virus is sensitive to 2F5 mAb-mediated neutralization is approximately 3-fold longer when the mutation is present. These data suggest that a major contribution to the L669S mutant virus phenotype of enhanced susceptibility to MPER mAbs is prolonged exposure of the MPER neutralizing epitope during viral entry. PMID:20231447

  9. The Atomic Structure of the HIV-1 gp41 Transmembrane Domain and Its Connection to the Immunogenic Membrane-proximal External Region.

    PubMed

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Rujas, Edurne; Serrano, Soraya; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M M; Jiménez, M Ángeles; Nieva, José L

    2015-05-22

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) C-terminal segment and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 are involved in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion and modulation of immune responses during viral infection. However, the atomic structure of this functional region remains unsolved. Here, based on the high resolution NMR data obtained for peptides spanning the C-terminal segment of MPER and the TMD, we report two main findings: (i) the conformational variability of the TMD helix at a membrane-buried position; and (ii) the existence of an uninterrupted α-helix spanning MPER and the N-terminal region of the TMD. Thus, our structural data provide evidence for the bipartite organization of TMD predicted by previous molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, but they do not support the breaking of the helix at Lys-683, as was suggested by some models to mark the initiation of the TMD anchor. Antibody binding energetics examined with isothermal titration calorimetry and humoral responses elicited in rabbits by peptide-based vaccines further support the relevance of a continuous MPER-TMD helix for immune recognition. We conclude that the transmembrane anchor of HIV-1 envelope is composed of two distinct subdomains: 1) an immunogenic helix at the N terminus also involved in promoting membrane fusion; and 2) an immunosuppressive helix at the C terminus, which might also contribute to the late stages of the fusion process. The unprecedented high resolution structural data reported here may guide future vaccine and inhibitor developments.

  10. Neutralization of diverse HIV-1 strains by monoclonal antibodies raised against a gp41 synthetic peptide.

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, A G; Chanh, T C; Kennedy, R C; Kanda, P; Clapham, P R; Weiss, R A

    1988-07-01

    Three IgM monoclonal antibodies raised against synthetic peptide analogs of a hydrophilic region of the gp41 transmembrane env protein of HIV-1 neutralize different HIV-1 isolates but not HIV-2 isolates, as determined by HIV titration and by syncytial inhibition assays. VSV (HIV-1) pseudotypes, however, were not neutralized, indicating that gp41 was not accessible to these antibodies on the pseudotype particles. The antibodies affect early steps in adsorption and penetration of HIV-1.

  11. HIV-1 vaccine development: constrained peptide immunogens show improved binding to the anti-HIV-1 gp41 MAb.

    PubMed

    McGaughey, G B; Citron, M; Danzeisen, R C; Freidinger, R M; Garsky, V M; Hurni, W M; Joyce, J G; Liang, X; Miller, M; Shiver, J; Bogusky, M J

    2003-03-25

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) transmembrane glycoprotein gp41 mediates viral entry through fusion of the target cellular and viral membranes. A segment of gp41 containing the sequence Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala has previously been identified as the epitope of the HIV-1 neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2F5 (MAb 2F5). The 2F5 epitope is highly conserved among HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins. Antibodies directed at the 2F5 epitope have neutralizing effects on a broad range of laboratory-adapted HIV-1 variants and primary isolates. Recently, a crystal structure of the epitope bound to the Fab fragment of MAb 2F5 has shown that the 2F5 peptide adopts a beta-turn conformation [Pai, E. F., Klein, M. H., Chong, P., and Pedyczak, A. (2000) World Intellectual Property Organization Patent WO-00/61618]. We have designed cyclic peptides to adopt beta-turn conformations by the incorporation of a side-chain to side-chain lactam bridge between the i and i + 4 residues containing the Asp-Lys-Trp segment. Synthesis of extended, nonconstrained peptides encompassing the 2F5 epitope revealed that the 13 amino acid sequence, Glu-Leu-Leu-Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala-Ser-Leu-Trp-Asn, maximized MAb 2F5 binding. Constrained analogues of this sequence were explored to optimize 2F5 binding affinity. The solution conformations of the constrained peptides have been characterized by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling techniques. The results presented here demonstrate that both inclusion of the lactam constraint and extension of the 2F5 segment are necessary to elicit optimal antibody binding activity. The ability of these peptide immunogens to stimulate a high titer, peptide-specific immune response incapable of viral neutralization is discussed in regard to developing an HIV-1 vaccine designed to elicit a 2F5-like immune response. PMID:12641452

  12. Biochemistry and Biophysics of HIV-1 gp41 – membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lifeng; Gochin, Miriam; Liu, Keliang

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the pathogen of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), causes ~2 millions death every year and still defies an effective vaccine. HIV-1 infects host cells through envelope protein – mediated virus-cell fusion. The transmembrane subunit of envelope protein, gp41, is the molecular machinery which facilitates fusion. Its ectodomain contains several distinguishing functional domains, fusion peptide (FP), N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR), C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) and membrane proximal extracellular region (MPER). During the fusion process, FP inserts into the host cell membrane, and an extended gp41 prehairpin conformation bridges the viral and cell membranes through MPER and FP respectively. Subsequent conformational change of the unstable prehairpin results in a coiled-coil 6-helix bundle (6HB) structure formed between NHR and CHR. The energetics of 6HB formation drives membrane apposition and fusion. Drugs targeting gp41 functional domains to prevent 6HB formation inhibit HIV-1 infection. T20 (enfuvirtide, Fuzeon) was approved by the US FDA in 2003 as the first fusion inhibitor. It is a 36-residue peptide from the gp41 CHR, and it inhibits 6HB formation by targeting NHR and lipids. Development of new fusion inhibitors, especially small molecule drugs, is encouraged to overcome the shortcomings of T20 as a peptide drug. Hydrophobic characteristics and membrane association are critical for gp41 function and mechanism of action. Research in gp41-membrane interactions, using peptides corresponding to specific functional domains, or constructs including several interactive domains, are reviewed here to get a better understanding of gp41 mediated virus-cell fusion that can inform or guide the design of new HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. PMID:22044229

  13. Cross-Reactive Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody That Recognizes a Novel Conformational Epitope on gp41 and Lacks Reactivity against Self-Antigens ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Vu, Bang K.; Choudhary, Anil; Lu, Hong; Humbert, Michael; Ong, Helena; Alam, Munir; Ruprecht, Ruth M.; Quinnan, Gerald; Jiang, Shibo; Montefiori, David C.; Mascola, John R.; Broder, Christopher C.; Haynes, Barton F.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2008-01-01

    Broadly cross-reactive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-neutralizing antibodies are infrequently elicited in infected humans. The two best-characterized gp41-specific cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies, 4E10 and 2F5, target linear epitopes in the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and bind to cardiolipin and several other autoantigens. It has been hypothesized that, because of such reactivity to self-antigens, elicitation of 2F5 and 4E10 and similar antibodies by vaccine immunogens based on the MPER could be affected by tolerance mechanisms. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a novel anti-gp41 monoclonal antibody, designated m44, which neutralized most of the 22 HIV type 1 (HIV-1) primary isolates from different clades tested in assays based on infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells by replication-competent virus but did not bind to cardiolipin and phosphatidylserine in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a Biacore assay nor to any protein or DNA autoantigens tested in Luminex assays. m44 bound to membrane-associated HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs), to recombinant Envs lacking the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail (gp140s), and to gp41 structures containing five-helix bundles and six-helix bundles, but not to N-heptad repeat trimers, suggesting that the C-heptad repeat is involved in m44 binding. In contrast to 2F5, 4E10, and Z13, m44 did not bind to any significant degree to denatured gp140 and linear peptides derived from gp41, suggesting a conformational nature of the epitope. This is the first report of a gp41-specific cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing human antibody that does not have detectable reactivity to autoantigens. Its novel conserved conformational epitope on gp41 could be helpful in the design of vaccine immunogens and as a target for therapeutics. PMID:18480433

  14. Initiation of immune tolerance–controlled HIV gp41 neutralizing B cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruijun; Verkoczy, Laurent; Wiehe, Kevin; Alam, S. Munir; Nicely, Nathan I.; Santra, Sampa; Bradley, Todd; Pemble, Charles W.; Zhang, Jinsong; Gao, Feng; Montefiori, David C.; Bouton-Verville, Hilary; Kelsoe, Garnett; Larimore, Kevin; Greenberg, Phillip D.; Parks, Robert; Foulger, Andrew; Peel, Jessica N.; Luo, Kan; Lu, Xiaozhi; Trama, Ashley M.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2016-01-01

    Development of an HIV vaccine is a global priority. A major roadblock to a vaccine is an inability to induce protective broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). HIV gp41 bnAbs have characteristics that predispose them to be controlled by tolerance. We used gp41 2F5 bnAb germline knock-in mice and macaques vaccinated with immunogens reactive with germline precursors to activate neutralizing antibodies. In germline knock-in mice, bnAb precursors were deleted, with remaining anergic B cells capable of being activated by germline-binding immunogens to make gp41-reactive immunoglobulin M (IgM). Immunized macaques made B cell clonal lineages targeted to the 2F5 bnAb epitope, but 2F5-like antibodies were either deleted or did not attain sufficient affinity for gp41-lipid complexes to achieve the neutralization potency of 2F5. Structural analysis of members of a vaccine-induced antibody lineage revealed that heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (HCDR3) hydrophobicity was important for neutralization. Thus, gp41 bnAbs are controlled by immune tolerance, requiring vaccination strategies to transiently circumvent tolerance controls. PMID:27122615

  15. Neutralization resistance of virological synapse-mediated HIV-1 Infection is regulated by the gp41 cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Durham, Natasha D; Yewdall, Alice W; Chen, Ping; Lee, Rebecca; Zony, Chati; Robinson, James E; Chen, Benjamin K

    2012-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection can spread efficiently from infected to uninfected T cells through adhesive contacts called virological synapses (VSs). In this process, cell-surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) initiates adhesion and viral transfer into an uninfected recipient cell. Previous studies have found some HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera to be less effective at blocking VS-mediated infection than infection with cell-free virus. Here we employ sensitive flow cytometry-based infection assays to measure the inhibitory potency of HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAb) and HIV-1-neutralizing patient sera against cell-free and VS-mediated infection. To various degrees, anti-Env MAbs exhibited significantly higher 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)s) against VS-mediated infection than cell-free infection. Notably, the MAb 17b, which binds a CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope on gp120, displayed a 72-fold reduced efficacy against VS-mediated inocula compared to cell-free inocula. A mutant with truncation mutation in the gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT) which is unable to modulate Env fusogenicity in response to virus particle maturation but which can still engage in cell-to-cell infection was tested for the ability to resist neutralizing antibodies. The ΔCT mutation increased cell surface staining by neutralizing antibodies, significantly enhanced neutralization of VS-mediated infection, and had reduced or no effect on cell-free infection, depending upon the antibody. Our results suggest that the gp41 CT regulates the exposure of key neutralizing epitopes during cell-to-cell infection and plays an important role in immune evasion. Vaccine strategies should consider immunogens that reflect Env conformations exposed on the infected cell surface to enhance protection against VS-mediated HIV-1 spread. PMID:22553332

  16. The Atomic Structure of the HIV-1 gp41 Transmembrane Domain and Its Connection to the Immunogenic Membrane-proximal External Region*♦

    PubMed Central

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Rujas, Edurne; Serrano, Soraya; Morante, Koldo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Caaveiro, Jose M. M.; Jiménez, M. Ángeles; Nieva, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) C-terminal segment and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 are involved in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion and modulation of immune responses during viral infection. However, the atomic structure of this functional region remains unsolved. Here, based on the high resolution NMR data obtained for peptides spanning the C-terminal segment of MPER and the TMD, we report two main findings: (i) the conformational variability of the TMD helix at a membrane-buried position; and (ii) the existence of an uninterrupted α-helix spanning MPER and the N-terminal region of the TMD. Thus, our structural data provide evidence for the bipartite organization of TMD predicted by previous molecular dynamics simulations and functional studies, but they do not support the breaking of the helix at Lys-683, as was suggested by some models to mark the initiation of the TMD anchor. Antibody binding energetics examined with isothermal titration calorimetry and humoral responses elicited in rabbits by peptide-based vaccines further support the relevance of a continuous MPER-TMD helix for immune recognition. We conclude that the transmembrane anchor of HIV-1 envelope is composed of two distinct subdomains: 1) an immunogenic helix at the N terminus also involved in promoting membrane fusion; and 2) an immunosuppressive helix at the C terminus, which might also contribute to the late stages of the fusion process. The unprecedented high resolution structural data reported here may guide future vaccine and inhibitor developments. PMID:25787074

  17. Striking HIV-1 Entry by Targeting HIV-1 gp41. But, Where Should We Target?

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Cátia; Barbault, Florent; Couesnon, Thierry; Gomes, José R. B.; Gomes, Paula; Maurel, François

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 gp41 facilitates the viral fusion through a conformational switch involving the association of three C-terminal helices along the conserved hydrophobic grooves of three N-terminal helices coiled-coil. The control of these structural rearrangements is thought to be central to HIV-1 entry and, therefore, different strategies of intervention are being developed. Herewith, we describe a procedure to simulate the folding of an HIV-1 gp41 simplified model. This procedure is based on the construction of plausible conformational pathways, which describe protein transition between non-fusogenic and fusogenic conformations. The calculation of the paths started with 100 molecular dynamics simulations of the non-fusogenic conformation, which were found to converge to different intermediate states. Those presenting defined criteria were selected for separate targeted molecular dynamics simulations, subjected to a force constant imposing a movement towards the gp41 fusogenic conformation. Despite significant diversity, a preferred sequence of events emerged when the simulations were analyzed in terms of the formation, breakage and evolution of the contacts. We pointed out 29 residues as the most relevant for the movement of gp41; also, 2696 possible interactions were reduced to only 48 major interactions, which reveals the efficiency of the method. The analysis of the evolution of the main interactions lead to the detection of four main behaviors for those contacts: stable, increasing, decreasing and repulsive interactions. Altogether, these results suggest a specific small cavity of the HIV-1 gp41 hydrophobic groove as the preferred target to small molecules. PMID:26785380

  18. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-120 interface

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is providing important insights regarding the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific mAb, termed 35O22, which binds novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with an IC50<50 μg/ml. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg/ml, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed it to bind a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current mAb-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis, and vaccine design. PMID:25186731

  19. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Imamichi, Hiromi; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark

    2015-10-15

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies is providing important insights into the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in ref. 1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific monoclonal antibody, termed 35O22, which binds a novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) <50 μg ml-1. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg ml-1, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed that it bound to a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current monoclonal-antibody-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis and vaccine design.

  20. Structural delineation of a quaternary, cleavage-dependent epitope at the gp41-gp120 interface on intact HIV-1 Env trimers

    PubMed Central

    Blattner, Claudia; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Sliepen, Kwinten; Derking, Ronald; Falkowska, Emilia; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; van Gils, Marit; Lee, Peter S.; Peng, Wenjie; Paulson, James C.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary All previously characterized broadly neutralizing antibodies to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) target one of four major sites of vulnerability. Here, we define and structurally characterize a unique epitope on Env that is recognized by a recently discovered family of human monoclonal antibodies (PGT151-158). The PGT151 epitope is comprised of residues and glycans at the interface of gp41 and gp120 within a single protomer and glycans from both subunits of a second protomer and represents a neutralizing epitope that is dependent on both gp120 and gp41. As PGT151 binds only to properly formed, cleaved trimers, this distinctive property, and its ability to stabilize Env trimers, has enabled the successful purification of mature, cleaved Env trimers from the cell surface as a complex with PGT151. Here we compare the structural and functional properties of membrane-extracted Env trimers from several clades with those of the soluble, cleaved SOSIP gp140 trimer. PMID:24768348

  1. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kap; Ho, Joseph X.; Keeling, Kim; Gilliland, Gary L.; Ji, Xinhua; Rueker, Florian; Carter, Daniel C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(sub 3)2(sub 1)2 with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  2. Engineering Recombinant Reoviruses To Display gp41 Membrane-Proximal External-Region Epitopes from HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Karl W; Ikizler, Mine'; Iskarpatyoti, Jason A; Wetzel, J Denise; Willis, Jordan; Crowe, James E; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Wilson, Gregory J; Dermody, Terence S

    2016-01-01

    neutralize genetically diverse strains of HIV-1 bind to discrete regions of the envelope glycoproteins, including the gp41 MPER. We engineered recombinant reoviruses that displayed MPER epitopes in attachment protein σ1 (REO-MPER vectors). The REO-MPER vectors replicated with wild-type efficiency, were genetically stable, and retained native antigenicity. However, we did not detect HIV-1-specific immune responses following inoculation of the REO-MPER vectors into small animals. This work provides proof of principle for engineering reovirus to express antigenic epitopes and illustrates the difficulty in eliciting MPER-specific immune responses.

  3. Engineering Recombinant Reoviruses To Display gp41 Membrane-Proximal External-Region Epitopes from HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Karl W; Ikizler, Mine'; Iskarpatyoti, Jason A; Wetzel, J Denise; Willis, Jordan; Crowe, James E; LaBranche, Celia C; Montefiori, David C; Wilson, Gregory J; Dermody, Terence S

    2016-01-01

    neutralize genetically diverse strains of HIV-1 bind to discrete regions of the envelope glycoproteins, including the gp41 MPER. We engineered recombinant reoviruses that displayed MPER epitopes in attachment protein σ1 (REO-MPER vectors). The REO-MPER vectors replicated with wild-type efficiency, were genetically stable, and retained native antigenicity. However, we did not detect HIV-1-specific immune responses following inoculation of the REO-MPER vectors into small animals. This work provides proof of principle for engineering reovirus to express antigenic epitopes and illustrates the difficulty in eliciting MPER-specific immune responses. PMID:27303748

  4. Engineering Recombinant Reoviruses To Display gp41 Membrane-Proximal External-Region Epitopes from HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, Karl W.; Ikizler, Mine'; Iskarpatyoti, Jason A.; Wetzel, J. Denise; Willis, Jordan; Crowe, James E.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.

    2016-01-01

    . Antibodies that neutralize genetically diverse strains of HIV-1 bind to discrete regions of the envelope glycoproteins, including the gp41 MPER. We engineered recombinant reoviruses that displayed MPER epitopes in attachment protein σ1 (REO-MPER vectors). The REO-MPER vectors replicated with wild-type efficiency, were genetically stable, and retained native antigenicity. However, we did not detect HIV-1-specific immune responses following inoculation of the REO-MPER vectors into small animals. This work provides proof of principle for engineering reovirus to express antigenic epitopes and illustrates the difficulty in eliciting MPER-specific immune responses. PMID:27303748

  5. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens. PMID:23668610

  6. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens.

  7. Identification of the gC1qR sites for the HIV-1 viral envelope protein gp41 and the HCV core protein: Implications in viral-specific pathogenesis and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pednekar, Lina; Valentino, Alisa; Ji, Yan; Tumma, Nithin; Valentino, Christopher; Kadoor, Adarsh; Hosszu, Kinga K.; Ramadass, Mahalakshmi; Kew, Richard R.; Kishore, Uday; Peerschke, Ellinor I.B.; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2016-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence accumulated over the past 20 years supports the concept that gC1qR is a major pathogen-associated pattern recognition receptor (PRR). This conclusion is based on the fact that, a wide range of bacterial and viral ligands are able to exploit gC1qR to either suppress the host’s immune response and thus enhance their survival, or to gain access into cells to initiate disease. Of the extensive array of viral ligands that have affinity for gC1qR, the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp41, and the core protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) are of major interest as they are known to contribute to the high morbidity and mortality caused by these pathogens. While the HCV core protein binds gC1qR and suppresses T cell proliferation resulting in a significantly diminished immune response, the gp41 employs gC1qR to induce the surface expression of the NK cell ligand, NKp44L, on uninfected CD4+ T cells, thereby rendering them susceptible to autologous destruction by NKp44 receptor expressing NK cells. Because of the potential for the design of peptide-based or antibody-based therapeutic options, the present studies were undertaken to define the gC1qR interaction sites for these pathogen-associated molecular ligands. Employing a solid phase microplate-binding assay, we examined the binding of each viral ligand to wild type gC1qR and 11 gC1qR deletion mutants. The results obtained from these studies have identified two major HCV core protein sites on a domain of gC1qR comprising of residues 144–148 and 196–202. Domain 196–202 in turn, is located in the last half of the larger gC1qR segment encoded by exons IV–VI (residues 159–282), which was proposed previously to contain the site for HCV core protein. The major gC1qR site for gp41 on the other hand, was found to be in a highly conserved region encoded by exon IV and comprises of residues 174–180. Interestingly, gC1qR residues 174–180 also constitute the cell surface-binding site for soluble

  8. Membrane-Active Sequences within gp41 Membrane Proximal External Region (MPER) Modulate MPER-Containing Peptidyl Fusion Inhibitor Activity and the Biosynthesis of HIV-1 Structural Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si Min; Jejcic, Alenka; Tam, James P.; Vahlne, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal external region (MPER) is a highly conserved membrane-active region located at the juxtamembrane positions within class I viral fusion glycoproteins and essential for membrane fusion events during viral entry. The MPER in the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) interacts with the lipid bilayers through a cluster of tryptophan (Trp) residues and a C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif. The inclusion of the MPER N-terminal sequence contributes to the membrane reactivity and anti-viral efficacy of the first two anti-HIV peptidyl fusion inhibitors T20 and T1249. As a type I transmembrane protein, Env also interacts with the cellular membranes during its biosynthesis and trafficking. Here we investigated the roles of MPER membrane-active sequences during both viral entry and assembly, specifically, their roles in the design of peptidyl fusion inhibitors and the biosynthesis of viral structural proteins. We found that elimination of the membrane-active elements in MPER peptides, namely, penta Trp→alanine (Ala) substitutions and the disruption of the C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif through deletion inhibited the anti-viral effect against the pseudotyped HIV-1. Furthermore, as compared to C-terminal dimerization, N-terminal dimerization of MPER peptides and N-terminal extension with five helix-forming residues enhanced their anti-viral efficacy substantially. The secondary structure study revealed that the penta-Trp→Ala substitutions also increased the helical content in the MPER sequence, which prompted us to study the biological relevance of such mutations in pre-fusion Env. We observed that Ala mutations of Trp664, Trp668 and Trp670 in MPER moderately lowered the intracellular and intraviral contents of Env while significantly elevating the content of another viral structural protein, p55/Gag and its derivative p24/capsid. The data suggest a role of the gp41 MPER in the membrane-reactive events during

  9. Investigating hexameric helicases: Single-molecule studies of DnaB and T4 gp41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Omar; Ribeck, Noah; Berezney, John

    2011-03-01

    Hexameric, ring-shaped motor proteins serve as replicative helicases in many systems. They function by encircling and translocating along ssDNA, denaturing dsDNA in advance of its motion by sterically occluding the complementary strand to the outside of the ring. We investigate the helicase activity of two such motors using single-molecule measurements with magnetic tweezers. First, we measure the activity of the E. coli helicase DnaB complexed with the tau subunit of the Pol III holoenzyme. Tau is known from bulk measurements to stimulate DnaB activity (Kim et al., Cell, 1996); we investigate the means of this stimulation. Second, we measure helicase activity of the T4 phage helicase gp41 in multiple tethered DNA geometries. Previous work on DnaB showed a dependence of helicase activity on DNA geometry (Ribeck et al., Biophys. J., 2010); here, we test gp41 for similar behavior to see whether it is a common characteristic of hexameric helicases.

  10. HIV-1 VACCINES. Diversion of HIV-1 vaccine-induced immunity by gp41-microbiota cross-reactive antibodies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Wilton B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Moody, M Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B; Alam, S Munir; Gao, Feng; Wiehe, Kevin; Trama, Ashley M; Jones, Kathryn; Zhang, Ruijun; Song, Hongshuo; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Sawatzki, Kaitlin; Hua, Axin; Liu, Pinghuang; Tay, Matthew Z; Seaton, Kelly E; Shen, Xiaoying; Foulger, Andrew; Lloyd, Krissey E; Parks, Robert; Pollara, Justin; Ferrari, Guido; Yu, Jae-Sung; Vandergrift, Nathan; Montefiori, David C; Sobieszczyk, Magdalena E; Hammer, Scott; Karuna, Shelly; Gilbert, Peter; Grove, Doug; Grunenberg, Nicole; McElrath, M Juliana; Mascola, John R; Koup, Richard A; Corey, Lawrence; Nabel, Gary J; Morgan, Cecilia; Churchyard, Gavin; Maenza, Janine; Keefer, Michael; Graham, Barney S; Baden, Lindsey R; Tomaras, Georgia D; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-08-14

    An HIV-1 DNA prime vaccine, with a recombinant adenovirus type 5 (rAd5) boost, failed to protect from HIV-1 acquisition. We studied the nature of the vaccine-induced antibody (Ab) response to HIV-1 envelope (Env). HIV-1-reactive plasma Ab titers were higher to Env gp41 than to gp120, and repertoire analysis demonstrated that 93% of HIV-1-reactive Abs from memory B cells responded to Env gp41. Vaccine-induced gp41-reactive monoclonal antibodies were non-neutralizing and frequently polyreactive with host and environmental antigens, including intestinal microbiota (IM). Next-generation sequencing of an immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region repertoire before vaccination revealed an Env-IM cross-reactive Ab that was clonally related to a subsequent vaccine-induced gp41-reactive Ab. Thus, HIV-1 Env DNA-rAd5 vaccine induced a dominant IM-polyreactive, non-neutralizing gp41-reactive Ab repertoire response that was associated with no vaccine efficacy.

  11. The phage T4-coded DNA replication helicase (gp41) forms a hexamer upon activation by nucleoside triphosphate.

    PubMed

    Dong, F; Gogol, E P; von Hippel, P H

    1995-03-31

    Sedimentation and high performance liquid chromatography studies show that the functional DNA replication helicase of bacteriophage T4 (gp41) exists primarily as a dimer at physiological protein concentrations, assembling from gp41 monomers with an association constant of approximately 10(6) M-1. Cryoelectron microscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and protein-protein cross-linking studies demonstrate that the binding of ATP or GTP drives the assembly of these dimers into monodisperse hexameric complexes, which redissociate following depletion of the purine nucleotide triphosphatase (PuTP) substrates by the DNA-stimulated PuTPase activity of the helicase. The hexameric state of gp41 can be stabilized for detailed study by the addition of the nonhydrolyzable PuTP analogs ATP gamma S and GTP gamma S and is not significantly affected by the presence of ADP, GDP, or single-stranded or forked DNA template constructs, although some structural details of the hexameric complex may be altered by DNA binding. Our results also indicate that the active gp41 helicase exists as a hexagonal trimer of asymmetric dimers, and that the hexamer is probably characterized by D3 symmetry. The assembly pathway of the gp41 helicase has been analyzed, and its structure and properties compared with those of other helicases involved in a variety of cellular processes. Functional implications of such structural organization are also considered. PMID:7706292

  12. Three-dimensional structure of Schistosoma japonicum glutathione S-transferase fused with a six-amino acid conserved neutralizing epitope of gp41 from HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Gilliland, G. L.; Ji, X.; Ruker, F.; Carter, D. C.

    1994-01-01

    The 3-dimensional crystal structure of glutathione S-transferase (GST) of Schistosoma japonicum (Sj) fused with a conserved neutralizing epitope on gp41 (glycoprotein, 41 kDa) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Muster T et al., 1993, J Virol 67:6642-6647) was determined at 2.5 A resolution. The structure of the 3-3 isozyme rat GST of the mu gene class (Ji X, Zhang P, Armstrong RN, Gilliland GL, 1992, Biochemistry 31:10169-10184) was used as a molecular replacement model. The structure consists of a 4-stranded beta-sheet and 3 alpha-helices in domain 1 and 5 alpha-helices in domain 2. The space group of the Sj GST crystal is P4(3)2(1)2, with unit cell dimensions of a = b = 94.7 A, and c = 58.1 A. The crystal has 1 GST monomer per asymmetric unit, and 2 monomers that form an active dimer are related by crystallographic 2-fold symmetry. In the binding site, the ordered structure of reduced glutathione is observed. The gp41 peptide (Glu-Leu-Asp-Lys-Trp-Ala) fused to the C-terminus of Sj GST forms a loop stabilized by symmetry-related GSTs. The Sj GST structure is compared with previously determined GST structures of mammalian gene classes mu, alpha, and pi. Conserved amino acid residues among the 4 GSTs that are important for hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions for dimer association and glutathione binding are discussed.

  13. Multimerized HIV-gp41-derived peptides as fusion inhibitors and vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Mizuguchi, Takaaki; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2016-11-01

    To date, several antigens based on the amino-terminal leucine/isoleucine heptad repeat (NHR) region of an HIV-1 envelope protein gp41 and fusion inhibitors based on the carboxy-terminal leucine/isoleucine heptad repeat (CHR) region of gp41 have been reported. We have developed a synthetic antigen targeting the membrane-fusion mechanism of HIV-1. This uses a template designed with C3-symmetric linkers and mimics the trimeric form of the NHR-derived peptide N36. The antiserum obtained by immunization of the N36 trimeric antigen binds preferentially to the N36 trimer and blocks HIV-1 infection effectively, compared with the antiserum obtained by immunization of the N36 monomer. Using another template designed with different C3-symmetric linkers, we have also developed a synthetic peptide mimicking the trimeric form of the CHR-derived peptide C34, with ∼100 times the inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 fusion mechanism than that of the monomer C34 peptide. A dimeric derivative of C34 has potent inhibitory activity at almost the same levels as this C34 trimer mimic, suggesting that presence of a dimeric form of C34 is structurally critical for fusion inhibitors. As examples of rising mid-size drugs, this review describes an effective strategy for the design of HIV vaccines and fusion inhibitors based on a relationship with the native structure of proteins involved in HIV fusion mechanisms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 622-628, 2016.

  14. Rate and severity of HIV-associated dementia (HAD): correlations with Gp41 and iNOS.

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, D. C.; McArthur, J. C.; Dawson, T. M.; Dawson, V. L.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fifteen to thirty percent of AIDS patients develop some type of neurologic disorder during the course of their illness and the vast majority of these neurologic disorders will be HIV-associated dementia (HAD). These patients can exhibit varying degrees of severity and rates of progression of HAD. Neuropathologic variables that are associated with the rate of progression of HAD are not known. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Tissue was collected at autopsy from the Johns Hopkins University HIV Neurology Program. Seventy-one AIDS patients of this prospectively characterized population were followed until death to obtain information on dementia severity and the rate of neurological progression. Immunoblot analysis of immunological nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), HAM56, gp41, p24, gp120, and beta-tubulin was performed and the levels of iNOS, HAM56, gp41, and p24 were normalized to beta-tubulin and analyzed for significance by means of the Kruskal-Wallis test for multiple groups. RESULTS: We have identified unique groups within this spectrum and designated them slow, moderate, and rapid progressors. Slow and moderate progressors' neurological progression occurs over a course of months to years, whereas the rapid progressors' disease shows rapid increases in severity over weeks to months. In the present study we demonstrate that the severity and rate of progression of HAD correlates significantly with levels of the HIV-1 coat protein, gp41, iNOS, and HAM56, a marker of microglial/macrophage activation. CONCLUSION: The severity and rate of progression of HAD correlates with indices of immune activation as well as levels of iNOS and gp41. There appears to be a threshold effect in which high levels of gp41, iNOS, and immune activation are particularly associated with severe (Memorial Sloan-Kettering score 3 to 4) and rapidly progressive HAD. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:10203575

  15. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, X. M.; Ruker, F.; Casale, E.; Carter, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 degrees. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  16. A recombinant mimetics of the HIV-1 gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate fused with human IgG Fc fragment elicits neutralizing antibody response in the vaccinated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Zhi; Pan, Chungen; Lu, Hong; Shui, Yuan; Li, Lin; Li, Xiaojuan; Xu, Xueqing; Liu, Shuwen; Jiang, Shibo

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} One recombinant mimetics of gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate (PFI) consisting of gp41 N46 sequence, foldon and IgG Fc, designated N46FdFc, was expressed. {yields} N46FdFc-induced antibodies in mice that neutralized HIV-1 infection, inhibited PIE7 binding to PFI, blocked gp41 six-helix bundle formation, and suppressed HIV-1 mediated cell-cell fusion. {yields} These findings provide an important clue for developing recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics-based HIV vaccines. -- Abstract: HIV-1 gp41 prehairpin fusion intermediate (PFI) composed of three N-terminal heptad repeats (NHR) plays a crucial role in viral fusion and entry and represents an attractive target for anti-HIV therapeutics (e.g., enfuvirtide) and vaccines. In present study, we constructed and expressed two recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics, designated N46Fd and N46FdFc. N46Fd consists of N46 (residues 536-581) in gp41 NHR and foldon (Fd), a trimerization motif. N46FdFc is composed of N46Fd fused with human IgG Fc fragment as an immunoenhancer. We immunized mice with N46 peptide, N46Fd and N46FdFc, respectively, and found that only N46FdFc elicited neutralizing antibody response in mice against infection by HIV-1 strains IIIB (clade B, X4), 92US657 (clade B, R5), and 94UG103 (clade A, X4R5). Anti-N46FdFc antibodies inhibited PIE7 binding to PFI, blocked gp41 six-helix bundle formation, and suppressed HIV-1 mediated cell-cell fusion. These findings provide an important clue for developing recombinant gp41 PFI mimetics-based HIV vaccines.

  17. HIV-1 gp41 Core with Exposed Membrane-Proximal External Region Inducing Broad HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Leilei; Xu, Liling; Jiang, Shibo; Chen, Ying-hua

    2011-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 gp41 consists of epitopes for the broadly cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. However, antigens containing the linear sequence of these epitopes are unable to elicit potent and broad neutralizing antibody responses in vaccinated hosts, possibly because of inappropriate conformation of these epitopes. Here we designed a recombinant antigen, designated NCM, which comprises the N- and C-terminal heptad repeats that can form a six-helix bundle (6HB) core and the MPER domain of gp41. Two mutations (T569A and I675V) previously reported to expose the neutralization epitopes were introduced into NCM to generate mutants named NCM(TA), NCM(IV), and NCM(TAIV). Our results showed that NCM and its mutants could react with antibodies specific for 6HB and MPER of gp41, suggesting that these antigens are in the form of a trimer of heterodimer (i.e., 6HB) with three exposed MPER tails. Antigen with double mutations, NCM(TAIV), elicited much stronger antibody response in rabbits than immunogens with single mutation, NCM(TA) and NCM(IV), or no mutation, NCM. The purified MPER-specific antibodies induced by NCM(TAIV) exhibited broad neutralizing activity, while the purified 6HB-specific antibodies showed no detectable neutralizing activity. Our recombinant antigen design supported by an investigation of its underlying molecular mechanisms provides a strong scientific platform for the discovery of a gp41 MPER-based AIDS vaccine. PMID:21483871

  18. Downregulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag expression by a gp41 cytoplasmic domain fusion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, W.-E.; Chen, Steve S.-L. . E-mail: schen@ibms.sinica.edu.tw

    2006-05-10

    The cytoplasmic domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) transmembrane protein gp41 interacts with the viral matrix MA protein, which facilitates incorporation of the trimeric Env complex into the virus. It is thus feasible to design an anti-HIV strategy targeting this interaction. We herein describe that Gag expression can be downregulated by a cytoplasmic domain fusion protein of the Env transmembrane protein, {beta}-galactosidase ({beta}-gal)/706-856, which contains the cytoplasmic tail of gp41 fused at the C terminus of Escherichia coli {beta}-gal. This mediator depleted intracellular Gag molecules in a dose-dependent manner. Sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation and confocal microscopy revealed that Gag and {beta}-gal/706-856 had stable interactions and formed aggregated complexes in perinuclear, intracellular sites. Pulse-chase and cycloheximide chase analyses demonstrated that this mediator enhanced unmyristylated Gag degradation. The results demonstrate a novel mode of HIV-1 Gag downregulation by directing Gag to an intracellular site via the interaction of Gag with a gp41 cytoplasmic domain fusion protein.

  19. HIV-1 envelope gp41 antibodies can originate from terminal ileum B cells that share cross-reactivity with commensal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Trama, Ashley M; Moody, M Anthony; Alam, S Munir; Jaeger, Frederick H; Lockwood, Bradley; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Stolarchuk, Christina; Scearce, Richard; Foulger, Andrew; Marshall, Dawn J; Whitesides, John F; Jeffries, Thomas L; Wiehe, Kevin; Morris, Lynn; Lambson, Bronwen; Soderberg, Kelly; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Tomaras, Georgia D; Vandergrift, Nathan; Jackson, Katherine J L; Roskin, Krishna M; Boyd, Scott D; Kepler, Thomas B; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F

    2014-08-13

    Monoclonal antibodies derived from blood plasma cells of acute HIV-1-infected individuals are predominantly targeted to the HIV Env gp41 and cross-reactive with commensal bacteria. To understand this phenomenon, we examined anti-HIV responses in ileum B cells using recombinant antibody technology and probed their relationship to commensal bacteria. The dominant ileum B cell response was to Env gp41. Remarkably, a majority (82%) of the ileum anti-gp41 antibodies cross-reacted with commensal bacteria, and of those, 43% showed non-HIV-1 antigen polyreactivity. Pyrosequencing revealed shared HIV-1 antibody clonal lineages between ileum and blood. Mutated immunoglobulin G antibodies cross-reactive with both Env gp41 and microbiota could also be isolated from the ileum of HIV-1 uninfected individuals. Thus, the gp41 commensal bacterial antigen cross-reactive antibodies originate in the intestine, and the gp41 Env response in HIV-1 infection can be derived from a preinfection memory B cell pool triggered by commensal bacteria that cross-react with Env.

  20. An amphiphilic conjugate approach toward the design and synthesis of betulinic acid-polyphenol conjugates as inhibitors of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion core formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Ke, Zhuofeng; Wu, Kwok Yiu; Liu, Shuwen; Chen, Wen-Hua; Jiang, Shibo; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2011-09-01

    Exploration of potent inhibitors of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion core formation is a promising strategy to discover small-molecule HIV-1 entry inhibitors for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. In this paper, a series of novel betulinic acid-polyphenol conjugates was designed, guided by molecular modeling of the binding of betulinic acid (BA) and phenolic galloyl/caffeoyl groups in the groove on the gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) trimeric coiled coil. These conjugates were synthesized via conjugation of galloyl and caffeoyl groups with BA at the C-28 position. Their inhibitory activities of HIV gp41 six-helix bundle (6-HB) formation between the NHR peptide N36 and the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) peptide C34 were evaluated with size-exclusion HPLC. Conjugates bearing a galloyl group were found to exhibit four to sixfold higher inhibitory activities than that of parent compound BA, suggesting that they may be exploitable as HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors targeting gp41. The docking study on BA and its derivatives suggests that hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonding pockets exist in the groove of the gp41 NHR trimeric coiled coil and that a potent inhibitor should have amphiphilic structures to cooperatively interact with both pockets. This possibility was explored by incorporating both lipophilic and hydrophilic groups into the conjugates in a well-defined orientation to bind with both pockets in the gp41 NHR-trimer.

  1. The crystal structure of HIV CRF07 B′/C gp41 reveals a hyper-mutant site in the middle of HR2 heptad repeat

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Jiansen; Xue, Hailing; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fang; Zhou, Jianhua; Shao, Yiming; Liu, Xinqi

    2013-11-15

    HIV CRF07 B′/C is a strain circulating mainly in northwest region of China. The gp41 region of CRF07 is derived from a clade C virus. In order to compare the difference of CRF07 gp41 with that of typical clade B virus, we solved the crystal structure of the core region of CRF07 gp41. Compared with clade B gp41, CRF07 gp41 evolved more basic and hydrophilic residues on its helix bundle surface. Based on sequence alignment, a hyper-mutant cluster located in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. The mutational study of these residues revealed that this site is important in HIV mediated cell–cell fusion and plays critical roles in conformational changes during viral invasion. - Highlights: • We solved the crystal structure of HIV CRF07 gp41 core region. • A hyper-mutant cluster in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. • The hyper-mutant site is important in HIV-cell fusion. • The model will help to understand the HIV fusion process.

  2. A Monoclonal Fab Derived from a Human Nonimmune Phage Library Reveals a New Epitope on gp41 and Neutralizes Diverse Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Gustchina, Elena; Louis, John M.; Lam, Son N.; Bewley, Carole A.; Clore, G. Marius

    2007-01-01

    A monoclonal Fab (Fab 3674) selected from a human nonimmune phage library by panning against the chimeric construct NCCG-gp41 (which comprises an exposed coiled-coil trimer of gp41 N helices fused in the helical phase onto the minimal thermostable ectodomain of gp41) is described. Fab 3674 is shown to neutralize diverse laboratory-adapted B strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and primary isolates of subtypes A, B, and C in an Env-pseudotyped-virus neutralization assay, albeit with reduced potency (approximately 25-fold) compared to that of 2F5 and 4E10. Alanine scanning mutagenesis maps a novel epitope to a shallow groove on the N helices of gp41 that is exposed between two C helices in the fusogenic six-helix bundle conformation of gp41. Bivalent Fab 3674 and the C34 peptide (a potent fusion inhibitor derived from the C helix of gp41) are shown to act at similar stages of the fusion reaction and to neutralize HIV-1 synergistically, providing additional evidence that the epitope of Fab 3674 is new and distinct from the binding site of C34. PMID:17898046

  3. Monitoring human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients by ratio of antibodies to gp41 and p24.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, G; Amiraian, K; Frey, H; Wethers, J; Stevens, R W; Berns, D S

    1989-01-01

    Antibody responses of 85 patients to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 antigens were quantitated by densitometric analysis of Western blot (immunoblot) assays. All patients had been classified into the following three clinical categories: asymptomatic (ASY), acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related complex (ARC), or AIDS. Fifty of the patients were monitored for 6 to 29 months. The gp41/p24 antibody ratio was examined in three studies. In the first study, initial specimens from each patient were analyzed. The mean gp41/p24 antibody ratios were 1.5 (ASY), 3.2 (ARC), and 5.4 (AIDS). Of ASY patients, 79% had antibody ratios of less than 2.0. In contrast, 72% of patients with AIDS had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. In the second study, serially obtained specimens from ASY, ARC, and AIDS patients were analyzed. These patients were further grouped according to progression of their clinical condition. Of ASY patients whose clinical condition progressed to ARC, 80% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. Of ARC patients whose clinical condition progressed to AIDS, 71% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. Of AIDS patients who died during the study, 100% consistently had ratios of greater than or equal to 2.0. No patients were treated with azidothymidine during the first two studies. In the third study, AIDS patients were monitored before and during treatment with azidothymidine. During treatment, ratios stabilized or improved transiently in five of seven patients. In these three studies, a gp41/p24 antibody ratio of less than 2.0 correlated with a benign clinical state and a ratio of greater than or equal to 2.0 correlated with AIDS or progression to AIDS. Images PMID:2501350

  4. Membrane structure correlates to function of LLP2 on the cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 gp41 protein.

    PubMed

    Boscia, Alexander L; Akabori, Kiyotaka; Benamram, Zachary; Michel, Jonathan A; Jablin, Michael S; Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Montelaro, Ronald C; Nagle, John F; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2013-08-01

    Mutation studies previously showed that the lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP2) sequence of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope protein inhibited viral-initiated T-cell death and T-cell syncytium formation, at which time in the HIV life cycle the gp41 protein is embedded in the T-cell membrane. In striking contrast, the mutants did not affect virion infectivity, during which time the gp41 protein is embedded in the HIV envelope membrane. To examine the role of LLP2/membrane interactions, we applied synchrotron x-radiation to determine structure of hydrated membranes. We focused on WT LLP2 peptide (+3 charge) and MX2 mutant (-1 charge) with membrane mimics for the T-cell and the HIV-1 membranes. To investigate the influence of electrostatics, cholesterol content, and peptide palmitoylation, we also studied three other LLP2 variants and HIV-1 mimics without negatively charged lipids or cholesterol as well as extracted HIV-1 lipids. All LLP2 peptides bound strongly to T-cell membrane mimics, as indicated by changes in membrane structure and bending. In contrast, none of the weakly bound LLP2 variants changed the HIV-1 membrane mimic structure or properties. This correlates well with, and provides a biophysical basis for, previously published results that reported lack of a mutant effect in HIV virion infectivity in contrast to an inhibitory effect in T-cell syncytium formation. It shows that interaction of LLP2 with the T-cell membrane modulates biological function. PMID:23931314

  5. Structure of the HIV-1 gp41 Membrane-Proximal Ectodomain Region in a Putative Prefusion Conformation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Deng, Y; Dey, A; Moore, J; Lu, M

    2009-01-01

    The conserved membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope protein is the established target for very rare but broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (NAbs) elicited during natural human infection. Nevertheless, attempts to generate an HIV-1 neutralizing antibody response with immunogens bearing MPER epitopes have met with limited success. Here we show that the MPER peptide (residues 662-683) forms a labile ?-helical trimer in aqueous solution and report the crystal structure of this autonomous folding subdomain stabilized by addition of a C-terminal isoleucine zipper motif. The structure reveals a parallel triple-stranded coiled coil in which the neutralization epitope residues are buried within the interface between the associating MPER helices. Accordingly, both the 2F5 and 4E10 NAbs recognize the isolated MPER peptide but fail to bind the trimeric MPER subdomain. We propose that the trimeric MPER structure represents the prefusion conformation of gp41, preceding the putative prehairpin intermediate and the postfusion trimer-of-hairpins structure. As such, the MPER trimer should inform the design of new HIV-1 immunogens to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies.

  6. Serologic reactivity of a synthetic peptide from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41 with sera from a Mexican population.

    PubMed Central

    Gevorkian, G; Soler, C; Viveros, M; Padilla, A; Govezensky, T; Larralde, C

    1996-01-01

    The reactivities of 1,172 serum samples obtained from asymptomatic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-positive and HIV-1-negative individuals residing in Mexico to a synthetic disulfide-looped peptide from the HIV-1 gp41 (amino acids 602 to 616 [IWGCSGKLICTTAVP] were examined by an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA) procedure. Antibodies to the synthetic peptide were detected in 261 of 268 serum samples from HIV-positive individuals (sensitivity, 97.4%). The peptide also reacted with 12 of 904 serum samples from control HIV-negative individuals (specificity, 98.7%). Western blots (immunoblots) of four of the seven serum samples that produced false-negative results in the ELISA showed that three of them reacted weakly with gp41 and strongly with gp120, p55, and/or p24. Potential diagnostic difficulties raised by the reported C1q binding capacity of this peptide were also evaluated: few and weak false-positive results were found among sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (1 of 31) and neurocysticercosis (2 of 111). In fact, strong reactivity with the peptide spotted an undetected HIV infection underlying clinical neurocysticercosis. PMID:8914754

  7. Modulating immunogenic properties of HIV-1 gp41 membrane-proximal external region by destabilizing six-helix bundle structure.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saikat; Shi, Heliang; Habte, Habtom H; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W

    2016-03-01

    The C-terminal alpha-helix of gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER; (671)NWFDITNWLWYIK(683)) encompassing 4E10/10E8 epitopes is an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. We previously reported that gp41-HR1-54Q, a trimeric protein comprised of the MPER in the context of a stable six-helix bundle (6HB), induced strong immune responses against the helix, but antibodies were directed primarily against the non-neutralizing face of the helix. To better target 4E10/10E8 epitopes, we generated four putative fusion intermediates by introducing double point mutations or deletions in the heptad repeat region 1 (HR1) that destabilize 6HB in varying degrees. One variant, HR1-∆10-54K, elicited antibodies in rabbits that targeted W672, I675 and L679, which are critical for 4E10/10E8 recognition. Overall, the results demonstrated that altering structural parameters of 6HB can influence immunogenic properties of the MPER and antibody targeting. Further exploration of this strategy could allow development of immunogens that could lead to induction of 4E10/10E8-like antibodies. PMID:26803471

  8. Immunogenic properties of a trimeric gp41-based immunogen containing an exposed membrane-proximal external region.

    PubMed

    Habte, Habtom H; Banerjee, Saikat; Shi, Heliang; Qin, Yali; Cho, Michael W

    2015-12-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 is an attractive target for vaccine development. Thus, better understanding of its immunogenic properties in various structural contexts is important. We previously described the crystal structure of a trimeric protein complex named gp41-HR1-54Q, which consists of the heptad repeat regions 1 and 2 and the MPER. The protein was efficiently recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Here, we describe its immunogenic properties in rabbits. The protein was highly immunogenic, especially the C-terminal end of the MPER containing 4E10 and 10E8 epitopes ((671)NWFDITNWLWYIK(683)). Although antibodies exhibited strong competition activity against 4E10 and 10E8, neutralizing activity was not detected. Detailed mapping analyses indicated that amino acid residues critical for recognition resided on faces of the alpha helix that are either opposite of or perpendicular to the epitopes recognized by 4E10 and 10E8. These results provide critical information for designing the next generation of MPER-based immunogens. PMID:26454663

  9. Cholesterol-Dependent Membrane Fusion Induced by the gp41 Membrane-Proximal External Region–Transmembrane Domain Connection Suggests a Mechanism for Broad HIV-1 Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Rujas, Edurne; Carravilla, Pablo; Requejo-Isidro, José; Huarte, Nerea

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 promotes fusion of the viral membrane with that of the target cell. Structural, biochemical, and biophysical studies suggest that its membrane-proximal external region (MPER) may interact with the HIV-1 membrane and induce its disruption and/or deformation during the process. However, the high cholesterol content of the envelope (ca. 40 to 50 mol%) imparts high rigidity, thereby acting against lipid bilayer restructuring. Here, based on the outcome of vesicle stability assays, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, and atomic force microscopy observations, we propose that the conserved sequence connecting the MPER with the N-terminal residues of the transmembrane domain (TMD) is involved in HIV-1 fusion. This junction would function by inducing phospholipid protrusion and acyl-chain splay in the cholesterol-enriched rigid envelope. Supporting the functional relevance of such a mechanism, membrane fusion was inhibited by the broadly neutralizing 4E10 antibody but not by a nonneutralizing variant with the CDR-H3 loop deleted. We conclude that the MPER-TMD junction embodies an envelope-disrupting C-terminal fusion peptide that can be targeted by broadly neutralizing antibodies. IMPORTANCE Fusion of the cholesterol-enriched viral envelope with the cell membrane marks the beginning of the infectious HIV-1 replicative cycle. Consequently, the Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion function constitutes an important clinical target for inhibitors and preventive vaccines. Antibodies 4E10 and 10E8 bind to one Env vulnerability site located at the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER)–transmembrane domain (TMD) junction and block infection. These antibodies display broad viral neutralization, which underscores the conservation and functionality of the MPER-TMD region. In this work, we combined biochemical assays with molecular dynamics simulations and microscopy observations to characterize the unprecedented fusogenic activity of the

  10. Passively transmitted gp41 antibodies in babies born from HIV-1 subtype C-seropositive women: correlation between fine specificity and protection.

    PubMed

    Diomede, L; Nyoka, S; Pastori, C; Scotti, L; Zambon, A; Sherman, G; Gray, C M; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, M; Lopalco, L

    2012-04-01

    HIV-exposed, uninfected (EUN) babies born to HIV-infected mothers are examples of natural resistance to HIV infection. In this study, we evaluated the titer and neutralizing potential of gp41-specific maternal antibodies and their correlation with HIV transmission in HIV-infected mother-child pairs. Specific gp41-binding and -neutralizing antibodies were determined in a cohort of 74 first-time mother-child pairs, of whom 40 mothers were infected with HIV subtype C. Within the infected mother cohort, 16 babies were born infected and 24 were PCR negative and uninfected at birth (i.e., exposed but uninfected). Thirty-four HIV-uninfected and HIV-unexposed mother-child pairs were included as controls. All HIV-positive mothers and their newborns showed high IgG titers to linear epitopes within the HR1 region and to the membrane-proximal (MPER) domain of gp41; most sera also recognized the disulfide loop immunodominant epitope (IDE). Antibody titers to the gp41 epitopes were significantly lower in nontransmitting mothers (P < 0.01) and in the EUN babies (P < 0.005) than in HIV-positive mother-child pairs. Three domains of gp41, HR1, IDE, and MPER, elicited antibodies that were effectively transmitted to EUN babies. Moreover, in EUN babies, epitopes overlapping the 2F5 epitope (ELDKWAS), but not the 4E10 epitope, were neutralization targets in two out of four viruses tested. Our findings highlight important epitopes in gp41 that appear to be associated with exposure without infection and would be important to consider for vaccine design.

  11. Crystallization of the Fab from a human monoclonal antibody against gp 41 of human immunodeficiency virus type I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casale, Elena; He, Xiao-Min; Snyder, Robert S.; Carter, Daniel C.; Wenisch, Elisabeth; Jungbauer, Alois; Tauer, Christa; Ruker, Florian; Righetti, Pier Giorgio

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal IgG antibody directed against gp 41 from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) has been crystallized in both intact and Fab forms. Crystals of the intact antibody grow as tetragonal-like prisms too small for conventional X-ray analysis. However, the Fab portion of the antibody produces suitable platelike crystals which belong to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with unit cell constants of a = 66.5 A, b = 74.3 A, and c = 105.3 A. There is one molecule of Fab in the asymmetric unit. The Fab crystals show diffraction to d-spacings less than 3.0 A.

  12. Deletion of fusion peptide or destabilization of fusion core of HIV gp41 enhances antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Chen Xi; Jiang Shibo Chen Yinghua

    2008-11-07

    The human monoclonal antibody 4E10 against the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 demonstrates broad neutralizing activity across various strains, and makes its epitope an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. Although the contiguous epitope of 4E10 has been identified, attempts to re-elicit 4E10-like antibodies have failed, possibly due to the lack of proper conformation of the 4E10 epitope. Here we used pIg-tail expression system to construct a panel of eukaryotic cell-surface expression plasmids encoding the extracellular domain of gp41 with deletion of fusion peptide and/or introduction of L568P mutation that may disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle core conformation as DNA vaccines for immunization of mice. We found that these changes resulted in significant increase of the antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope. This information is thus useful for rational design of vaccines targeting the HIV-1 gp41 MPER.

  13. Structure of a human monoclonal antibody Fab fragment against gp41 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Xiao M.; Rueker, Florian; Casale, Elena; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of a human monoclonal antibody (Fab), which binds specifically to a major epitope of the transmembrane protein gp41 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1, has been determined by crystallographic methods to a resolution of 2.7 A. It has been previously determined that this antibody recognizes the epitope SGKLICTTAVPWNAS, belongs to the subclass IgG1 (kappa), and exhibits antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. The quaternary structure of the Fab is in an extended conformation with an elbow bend angle between the constant and variable domains of 175 deg. Structurally, four of the hypervariable loops can be classified according to previously recognized canonical structures. The third hypervariable loops of the heavy (H3) and light chain (L3) are structurally distinct. Hypervariable loop H3, residues 102H-109H, is unusually extended from the surface. The complementarity-determining region forms a hydrophobic binding pocket that is created primarily from hypervariable loops L3, H3, and H2.

  14. Structure and Immunogenicity of a Peptide Vaccine, Including the Complete HIV-1 gp41 2F5 Epitope

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Soraya; Araujo, Aitziber; Apellániz, Beatriz; Bryson, Steve; Carravilla, Pablo; de la Arada, Igor; Huarte, Nerea; Rujas, Edurne; Pai, Emil F.; Arrondo, José L. R.; Domene, Carmen; Jiménez, María Angeles; Nieva, José L.

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 harbors the epitope recognized by the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV 2F5 antibody, a research focus in HIV-1 vaccine development. In this work, we analyze the structure and immunogenic properties of MPERp, a peptide vaccine that includes the following: (i) the complete sequence protected from proteolysis by the 2F5 paratope; (ii) downstream residues postulated to establish weak contacts with the CDR-H3 loop of the antibody, which are believed to be crucial for neutralization; and (iii) an aromatic rich anchor to the membrane interface. MPERp structures solved in dodecylphosphocholine micelles and 25% 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (v/v) confirmed folding of the complete 2F5 epitope within continuous kinked helices. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) measurements demonstrated the retention of main helical conformations in immunogenic formulations based on alum, Freund's adjuvant, or two different types of liposomes. Binding to membrane-inserted MPERp, IR, molecular dynamics simulations, and characterization of the immune responses further suggested that packed helical bundles partially inserted into the lipid bilayer, rather than monomeric helices adsorbed to the membrane interface, could encompass effective MPER peptide vaccines. Together, our data constitute a proof-of-concept to support MPER-based peptides in combination with liposomes as stand-alone immunogens and suggest new approaches for structure-aided MPER vaccine development. PMID:24429284

  15. Effects of sequence changes in the HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide on CCR5 inhibitor resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Johan Klasse, Per; Moore, John P.

    2012-07-05

    A rare pathway of HIV-1 resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as Vicriviroc (VCV) involves changes solely in the gp41 fusion peptide (FP). Here, we show that the G516V change is critical to VCV resistance in PBMC and TZM-bl cells, although it must be accompanied by either M518V or F519I to have a substantial impact. Modeling VCV inhibition data from the two cell types indicated that G516V allows both double mutants to use VCV-CCR5 complexes for entry. The model further identified F519I as an independent determinant of preference for the unoccupied, high-VCV affinity form of CCR5. From inhibitor-free reversion cultures, we also identified a substitution in the inner domain of gp120, T244A, which appears to counter the resistance phenotype created by the FP substitutions. Examining the interplay of these changes will enhance our understanding of Env complex interactions that influence both HIV-1 entry and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors.

  16. CRAC motif peptide of the HIV-1 gp41 protein thins SOPC membranes and interacts with cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Alexander I.; Pan, Jianjun; Mills, Thalia T.; Nagle, John F.; Epand, Richard M.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    This study uses low-angle (LAXS) and wide-angle (WAXS) x-ray synchrotron scattering, volume measurements and thin layer chromatography to determine structure and interactions of SOPC, SOPC/cholesterol mixtures, SOPC/peptide and SOPC/cholesterol/peptide mixtures. N-acetyl-LWYIK-amide (LWYIK) represents the naturally-occurring CRAC motif segment in the pretransmembrane region of the gp41 protein of HIV-1, and N-acetyl-IWYIK-amide (IWYIK), an unnatural isomer, is used as a control. Both peptides thin the SOPC bilayer by ~3 Å, and cause the area/unit cell (peptide+SOPC) to increase by ~9 Å2 from the area/lipid of SOPC at 30 °C (67.0 ± 0.9 Å2). Model fitting suggests that LWYIK’s average position is slightly closer to the bilayer center than IWYIK’s, and both peptides are just inside of the phosphate headgroup. Both peptides increase the wide-angle spacing d of SOPC without cholesterol, whereas with 50% cholesterol LWYIK increases d but IWYIK decreases d. TLC shows that LWYIK is more hydrophobic than IWYIK; this difference persists in peptide/SOPC 1:9 mole ratio mixtures. Both peptides counteract the chain ordering effect of cholesterol to roughly the same degree, and both decrease KC, the bending modulus, thus increasing the SOPC membrane fluidity. Both peptides nucleate crystals of cholesterol, but the LWYIK-induced crystals are weaker and dissolve more easily. PMID:18262490

  17. Paramagnetic relaxation assisted docking of a small indole compound in the HIV-1 gp41 hydrophobic pocket

    PubMed Central

    Gochin, Miriam; Zhou, Guangyan; Phillips, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    The hydrophobic pocket contained within the gp41 coiled coil is an important target for small molecules designed to inhibit HIV-1 fusion. While various screening experiments have identified molecules purported to bind in this pocket, few have confirmed details of the interaction, instead relying on computational docking to predict the binding mode. This is made more challenging by the fact that residues lining the hydrophobic pocket are highly flexible, as is typical for a protein - protein interaction site, limiting the predictive power of computational tools. In this study, we report on an NMR method to define the binding mode of 1-5i, a compound in a series of newly developed indole inhibitors. We show that paramagnetic relaxation enhancement of ligand protons due to an MTSL group positioned close to the binding pocket could be applied quantitatively to distinguish between more than 30 different computational poses, selecting a single pose that agreed with the NMR data. In this pose, important hydrophobic and polar contacts occur with pocket lysine, tryptophan and glutamine residues, including putative hydrogen bonds between the ligand carboxylate and the lysine ε-amino group. A study of the ligand orientation suggests directions for optimization. PMID:21155611

  18. The crystal structure of the streptococcal collagen-like protein 2 globular domain from invasive M3-type group A Streptococcus shows significant similarity to immunomodulatory HIV protein gp41.

    PubMed

    Squeglia, Flavia; Bachert, Beth; De Simone, Alfonso; Lukomski, Slawomir; Berisio, Rita

    2014-02-21

    The arsenal of virulence factors deployed by streptococci includes streptococcal collagen-like (Scl) proteins. These proteins, which are characterized by a globular domain and a collagen-like domain, play key roles in host adhesion, host immune defense evasion, and biofilm formation. In this work, we demonstrate that the Scl2.3 protein is expressed on the surface of invasive M3-type strain MGAS315 of Streptococcus pyogenes. We report the crystal structure of Scl2.3 globular domain, the first of any Scl. This structure shows a novel fold among collagen trimerization domains of either bacterial or human origin. Despite there being low sequence identity, we observed that Scl2.3 globular domain structurally resembles the gp41 subunit of the envelope glycoprotein from human immunodeficiency virus type 1, an essential subunit for viral fusion to human T cells. We combined crystallographic data with modeling and molecular dynamics techniques to gather information on the entire lollipop-like Scl2.3 structure. Molecular dynamics data evidence a high flexibility of Scl2.3 with remarkable interdomain motions that are likely instrumental to the protein biological function in mediating adhesive or immune-modulatory functions in host-pathogen interactions. Altogether, our results provide molecular tools for the understanding of Scl-mediated streptococcal pathogenesis and important structural insights for the future design of small molecular inhibitors of streptococcal invasion.

  19. Insights into the Conformation of the Membrane Proximal Regions Critical to the Trimerization of the HIV-1 gp41 Ectodomain Bound to Dodecyl Phosphocholine Micelles.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Baber, James L; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Aniana, Annie; Bax, Ad; Roche, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The transitioning of the ectodomain of gp41 from a pre-hairpin to a six-helix bundle conformation is a crucial aspect of virus-cell fusion. To gain insight into the intermediary steps of the fusion process we have studied the pH and dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelle dependent trimer association of gp41 by systematic deletion analysis of an optimized construct termed 17-172 (residues 528 to 683 of Env) that spans the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) to the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41, by sedimentation velocity and double electron-electron resonance (DEER) EPR spectroscopy. Trimerization at pH 7 requires the presence of both the FPPR and MPER regions. However, at pH 4, the protein completely dissociates to monomers. DEER measurements reveal a partial fraying of the C-terminal MPER residues in the 17-172 trimer while the other regions, including the FPPR, remain compact. In accordance, truncating nine C-terminal MPER residues (675-683) in the 17-172 construct does not shift the trimer-monomer equilibrium significantly. Thus, in the context of the gp41 ectodomain spanning residues 17-172, trimerization is clearly dependent on FPPR and MPER regions even when the terminal residues of MPER unravel. The antibody Z13e1, which spans both the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes in MPER, binds to 17-172 with a Kd of 1 ± 0.12 μM. Accordingly, individual antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 also recognize the 17-172 trimer/DPC complex. We propose that binding of the C-terminal residues of MPER to the surface of the DPC micelles models a correct positioning of the trimeric transmembrane domain anchored in the viral membrane. PMID:27513582

  20. Insights into the Conformation of the Membrane Proximal Regions Critical to the Trimerization of the HIV-1 gp41 Ectodomain Bound to Dodecyl Phosphocholine Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Louis, John M.; Baber, James L.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Aniana, Annie; Bax, Ad; Roche, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The transitioning of the ectodomain of gp41 from a pre-hairpin to a six-helix bundle conformation is a crucial aspect of virus-cell fusion. To gain insight into the intermediary steps of the fusion process we have studied the pH and dodecyl phosphocholine (DPC) micelle dependent trimer association of gp41 by systematic deletion analysis of an optimized construct termed 17–172 (residues 528 to 683 of Env) that spans the fusion peptide proximal region (FPPR) to the membrane proximal external region (MPER) of gp41, by sedimentation velocity and double electron-electron resonance (DEER) EPR spectroscopy. Trimerization at pH 7 requires the presence of both the FPPR and MPER regions. However, at pH 4, the protein completely dissociates to monomers. DEER measurements reveal a partial fraying of the C-terminal MPER residues in the 17–172 trimer while the other regions, including the FPPR, remain compact. In accordance, truncating nine C-terminal MPER residues (675–683) in the 17–172 construct does not shift the trimer-monomer equilibrium significantly. Thus, in the context of the gp41 ectodomain spanning residues 17–172, trimerization is clearly dependent on FPPR and MPER regions even when the terminal residues of MPER unravel. The antibody Z13e1, which spans both the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes in MPER, binds to 17–172 with a Kd of 1 ± 0.12 μM. Accordingly, individual antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 also recognize the 17–172 trimer/DPC complex. We propose that binding of the C-terminal residues of MPER to the surface of the DPC micelles models a correct positioning of the trimeric transmembrane domain anchored in the viral membrane. PMID:27513582

  1. Mutation of critical serine residues in HIV-1 matrix result in an envelope incorporation defect which can be rescued by truncation of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Ajay K.; Kaushik, Rajnish; Campbell, Nancy A.; Pontow, Suzanne E.; Ratner, Lee

    2009-02-05

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix (MA) domain is involved in both early and late events of the viral life cycle. Simultaneous mutation of critical serine residues in MA has been shown previously to dramatically reduce phosphorylation of MA. However, the role of phosphorylation in viral replication remains unclear. Viruses harboring serine to alanine substitutions at positions 9, 67, 72, and 77 are severely impaired in their ability to infect target cells. In addition, the serine mutant viruses are defective in their ability to fuse with target cell membranes. Interestingly, both the fusion defect and the infectivity defect can be rescued by truncation of the long cytoplasmic tail of gp41 envelope protein (gp41CT). Sucrose density gradient analysis also reveals that these mutant viruses have reduced levels of gp120 envelope protein incorporated into the virions as compared to wild type virus. Truncation of the gp41CT rescues the envelope incorporation defect. Here we propose a model in which mutation of specific serine residues prevents MA interaction with lipid rafts during HIV-1 assembly and thereby impairs recruitment of envelope to the sites of viral budding.

  2. HIV Type 1 Molecular Epidemiology in pol and gp41 Genes Among Naive Patients from Mato Grosso do Sul State, Central Western Brazil

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira, Alexsander Augusto; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; Francisco, Roberta Barbosa Lopes

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Antiretroviral naive patients (n=49) were recruited in central western Brazil (Campo Grande City/Mato Grosso do Sul State, located across the Bolivia and Paraguay borders). HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and env gp41 HR1 fragments were sequenced. Genetic diversity was analyzed by REGA/phylogenetic analyses. Intersubtype recombinants were identified by SimPlot/phylogenetic trees. PR/RT resistance was analyzed by Calibrated Population Resistance/Stanford databases. T-20 resistance in gp41 was assessed by Stanford, Los Alamos, and other sources. Of HIV-1 subtypes 65.3% were BPRBRT, 10.2% were CPRCRT, and 8.2% were F1PRF1RT. Intersubtype recombinants were 16.3%: four B/F1 and four B/C (two were “CRF31_BC-like”). The Pol-RT V75M mutation was detected in two homosexual partners; one patient had the T215S revertant mutation. T-20/gp41 resistance mutations were L44M (n=2) and V38A (n=1). The high percentage of non-B isolates (∼35%) highlights the importance of molecular surveillance studies in settings distant from the origin of the epidemic. Our data help elaborate the molecular epidemiological map of HIV-1 in Brazil. PMID:21790471

  3. HIV type 1 molecular epidemiology in pol and gp41 genes among naive patients from Mato Grosso do Sul State, central western Brazil.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Alexsander Augusto; Cardoso, Ludimila Paula Vaz; Francisco, Roberta Barbosa Lopes; de Araújo Stefani, Mariane Martins

    2012-03-01

    Antiretroviral naive patients (n=49) were recruited in central western Brazil (Campo Grande City/Mato Grosso do Sul State, located across the Bolivia and Paraguay borders). HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and env gp41 HR1 fragments were sequenced. Genetic diversity was analyzed by REGA/phylogenetic analyses. Intersubtype recombinants were identified by SimPlot/phylogenetic trees. PR/RT resistance was analyzed by Calibrated Population Resistance/Stanford databases. T-20 resistance in gp41 was assessed by Stanford, Los Alamos, and other sources. Of HIV-1 subtypes 65.3% were B(PR)B(RT), 10.2% were C(PR)C(RT), and 8.2% were F1(PR)F1(RT). Intersubtype recombinants were 16.3%: four B/F1 and four B/C (two were "CRF31_BC-like"). The Pol-RT V75M mutation was detected in two homosexual partners; one patient had the T215S revertant mutation. T-20/gp41 resistance mutations were L44M (n=2) and V38A (n=1). The high percentage of non-B isolates (∼35%) highlights the importance of molecular surveillance studies in settings distant from the origin of the epidemic. Our data help elaborate the molecular epidemiological map of HIV-1 in Brazil.

  4. Conversion of an immunogenic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope synthetic peptide to a tolerogen in chimpanzees by the fusogenic domain of HIV gp41 envelope protein

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The fusogenic (F) domain of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp41 envelope (env) protein has sequence similarities to many virus and mediates the fusion of HIV-infected cells. During a survey of the immunogenicity of HIV env peptides in chimpanzees, we have observed that HIV peptide immunogenicity was dramatically altered by the NH2- terminal synthesis of the gp41 F domain to an otherwise immunogenic peptide. We compared two hybrid peptide types comprised of T helper (Th) and B cell epitopes of HIV gp120 env protein for their immunogenicity in chimpanzees. The Th-B epitope hybrid peptides contained the HIV gp120 Th cell determinant, T1 (amino acids [aa] 428- 440)-synthesized NH2 terminal to gp120 V3 loop peptides, which contain B cell epitopes that induce anti-HIV-neutralizing antibodies (SP10IIIB [aa 303-321] and SP10IIIB [A] [aa 303-327]). The F-Th-B peptide contained the HIV gp41 F domain of HIVIIIB gp41 (aa 519-530)- synthesized NH2 terminal to the Th-B peptide. Whereas Th-B peptides were potent immunogens for chimpanzee antibody and T cell-proliferative responses, the F-Th-B peptide induced lower anti-HIV gp120 T and B cell responses. Moreover, immunization of chimpanzees with F-Th-B peptide but not Th-B peptides induced a significant decrease in peripheral blood T lymphocytes (mean decrease during immunization, 52%; p < 0.02). Chimpanzees previously immunized with F-Th-B peptide did not respond well to immunization with Th-B peptide with T or B cell responses to HIV peptides, demonstrating that the F-Th-B peptide induced immune hyporesponsiveness to Th and B HIV gp120 env determinants. These observations raise the hypothesis that the HIV gp41 env F domain may be a biologically active immunoregulatory peptide in vivo, and by an as yet uncharacterized mechanism, promotes primate immune system hyporesponsiveness to otherwise immunogenic peptides. PMID:7679708

  5. The transmembrane protein of HIV-1 primary isolates modulates cell surface expression of their envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lebigot, S; Roingeard, P; Thibault, G; Lemiale, F; Verrier, B; Barin, F; Brand, D

    2001-11-10

    We have recently shown that the level of cell surface expression of envelope glycoproteins derived from various human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) primary isolates (PI) was lower than those of envelope glycoproteins derived from T-cell laboratory-adapted (TCLA) HIV-1 (D. Brand et al., 2000, Virology 271, 350-362). We investigated this phenomenon by comparing the cell surface expression of chimeric envelope glycoproteins constructed by swapping the gp120 surface and gp41 transmembrane glycoproteins of the TCLA HIV-1MN and the PI HIV-1(133), HIV-1G365, or HIV-1EFRA. We found that each chimeric envelope construct had a cell surface-specific pattern of expression similar to that of the parental envelope glycoproteins corresponding to the gp41. Thus, the difference in cell surface expression observed between TCLA viruses and various PI is probably due to a signal located in gp41. Identification of this signal may be important for the design of PI envelope-derived immunogens and may increase our understanding of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 escapes from the immune system.

  6. Topology of the C-terminal tail of HIV-1 gp41: differential exposure of the Kennedy epitope on cell and viral membranes.

    PubMed

    Steckbeck, Jonathan D; Sun, Chengqun; Sturgeon, Timothy J; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2010-01-01

    The C-terminal tail (CTT) of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope (Env) protein is increasingly recognized as an important determinant of Env structure and functional properties, including fusogenicity and antigenicity. While the CTT has been commonly referred to as the "intracytoplasmic domain" based on the assumption of an exclusive localization inside the membrane lipid bilayer, early antigenicity studies and recent biochemical analyses have produced a credible case for surface exposure of specific CTT sequences, including the classical "Kennedy epitope" (KE) of gp41, leading to an alternative model of gp41 topology with multiple membrane-spanning domains. The current study was designed to test these conflicting models of CTT topology by characterizing the exposure of native CTT sequences and substituted VSV-G epitope tags in cell- and virion-associated Env to reference monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Surface staining and FACS analysis of intact, Env-expressing cells demonstrated that the KE is accessible to binding by MAbs directed to both an inserted VSV-G epitope tag and the native KE sequence. Importantly, the VSV-G tag was only reactive when inserted into the KE; no reactivity was observed in cells expressing Env with the VSV-G tag inserted into the LLP2 domain. In contrast to cell-surface expressed Env, no binding of KE-directed MAbs was observed to Env on the surface of intact virions using either immune precipitation or surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. These data indicate apparently distinct CTT topologies for virion- and cell-associated Env species and add to the case for a reconsideration of CTT topology that is more complex than currently envisioned.

  7. Single-chain protein mimetics of the N-terminal heptad-repeat region of gp41 with potential as anti–HIV-1 drugs

    PubMed Central

    Crespillo, Sara; Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Casares, Salvador; Morel, Bertrand; Cobos, Eva S.; Mateo, Pedro L.; Mouz, Nicolas; Martin, Christophe E.; Roger, Marie G.; El Habib, Raphaelle; Su, Bin; Moog, Christiane; Conejero-Lara, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    During HIV-1 fusion to the host cell membrane, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) and the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of the envelope subunit gp41 become transiently exposed and accessible to fusion inhibitors or Abs. In this process, the NHR region adopts a trimeric coiled-coil conformation that can be a target for therapeutic intervention. Here, we present an approach to rationally design single-chain protein constructs that mimic the NHR coiled-coil surface. The proteins were built by connecting with short loops two parallel NHR helices and an antiparallel one with the inverse sequence followed by engineering of stabilizing interactions. The constructs were expressed in Escherichia coli, purified with high yield, and folded as highly stable helical coiled coils. The crystal structure of one of the constructs confirmed the predicted fold and its ability to accurately mimic an exposed gp41 NHR surface. These single-chain proteins bound to synthetic CHR peptides with very high affinity, and furthermore, they showed broad inhibitory activity of HIV-1 fusion on various pseudoviruses and primary isolates. PMID:25489108

  8. Resistance of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor can involve sequence changes in both gp120 and gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G. Ketas, Thomas J.; Depetris, Rafael S.; Thomas, Antonia M.; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P.

    2011-04-25

    Here, we describe the genetic pathways taken by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolate, D101.12, to become resistant to the small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, vicriviroc (VCV), in vitro. Resistant D101.12 variants contained at least one substitution in the gp120 V3 region (H308P), plus one of two patterns of gp41 sequence changes involving the fusion peptide (FP) and a downstream residue: G514V+V535M or M518V+F519L+V535M. Studies of Env-chimeric and point-substituted viruses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TZM-bl cells showed that resistance can arise from the cooperative action of gp120 and gp41 changes, while retaining CCR5 usage. Modeling the VCV inhibition data from the two cell types suggests that D101.12 discriminates between high- and low-VCV affinity forms of CCR5 less than D1/85.16, a resistant virus with three FP substitutions.

  9. Identification of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein variant resistant to cold inactivation.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Aemro; Finzi, Andrés; Pancera, Marie; Courter, Joel R; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph

    2009-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein trimer consists of gp120 and gp41 subunits and undergoes a series of conformational changes upon binding to the receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4, that promote virus entry. Surprisingly, we found that the envelope glycoproteins of some HIV-1 strains are functionally inactivated by prolonged incubation on ice. Serial exposure of HIV-1 to extremes of temperature, followed by expansion of replication-competent viruses, allowed selection of a temperature-resistant virus. The envelope glycoproteins of this virus resisted cold inactivation due to a single passage-associated change, H66N, in the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein. Histidine 66 is located within the gp41-interactive inner domain of gp120 and, in other studies, has been shown to decrease the sampling of the CD4-bound conformation by unliganded gp120. Substituting asparagine or other amino acid residues for histidine 66 in cold-sensitive HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins resulted in cold-stable phenotypes. Cold inactivation of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins occurred even at high pH, indicating that protonation of histidine 66 is not necessary for this process. Increased exposure of epitopes in the ectodomain of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein accompanied cold inactivation, but shedding of gp120 did not. An amino acid change in gp120 (S375W) that promotes the CD4-bound state or treatment with soluble CD4 or a small-molecule CD4 mimic resulted in increased cold sensitivity. These results indicate that the CD4-bound intermediate of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins is cold labile; avoiding the CD4-bound state increases temperature stability.

  10. Biophysical Characterization of a Vaccine Candidate against HIV-1: The Transmembrane and Membrane Proximal Domains of HIV-1 gp41 as a Maltose Binding Protein Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zhen; Martin-Garcia, Jose M.; Daskalova, Sasha M.; Craciunescu, Felicia M.; Song, Lusheng; Dörner, Katerina; Hansen, Debra T.; Yang, Jay-How; LaBaer, Joshua; Hogue, Brenda G.; Mor, Tsafrir S.; Fromme, Petra

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal region (MPR, residues 649–683) and transmembrane domain (TMD, residues 684–705) of the gp41 subunit of HIV-1’s envelope protein are highly conserved and are important in viral mucosal transmission, virus attachment and membrane fusion with target cells. Several structures of the trimeric membrane proximal external region (residues 662–683) of MPR have been reported at the atomic level; however, the atomic structure of the TMD still remains unknown. To elucidate the structure of both MPR and TMD, we expressed the region spanning both domains, MPR-TM (residues 649–705), in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with maltose binding protein (MBP). MPR-TM was initially fused to the C-terminus of MBP via a 42 aa-long linker containing a TEV protease recognition site (MBP-linker-MPR-TM). Biophysical characterization indicated that the purified MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein was a monodisperse and stable candidate for crystallization. However, crystals of the MBP-linker-MPR-TM protein could not be obtained in extensive crystallization screens. It is possible that the 42 residue-long linker between MBP and MPR-TM was interfering with crystal formation. To test this hypothesis, the 42 residue-long linker was replaced with three alanine residues. The fusion protein, MBP-AAA-MPR-TM, was similarly purified and characterized. Significantly, both the MBP-linker-MPR-TM and MBP-AAA-MPR-TM proteins strongly interacted with broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. With epitopes accessible to the broadly neutralizing antibodies, these MBP/MPR-TM recombinant proteins may be in immunologically relevant conformations that mimic a pre-hairpin intermediate of gp41. PMID:26295457

  11. The ATP-activated hexameric helicase of bacteriophage T4 (gp41) forms a stable primosome with a single subunit of T4-coded primase (gp61).

    PubMed

    Dong, F; von Hippel, P H

    1996-08-01

    We have examined the formation of the primosome subassembly of the bacteriophage T4-coded DNA replication (elongation) complex from its helicase, primase, and DNA components. Previously, we had shown that the T4 helicase (gp41) exists in solution in a stable monomer left and right arrow dimer equilibrium at physiological protein (and salt) concentrations and forms a hexamer upon activation by ATP (or GTP) binding (Dong, F., Gogol, E. P., and von Hippel, P. H.(1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 7462-7473). Here we report that the T4 primase (gp61) is a monomer in solution under the same conditions, and that the ATP-activated helicase binds to a single gp61 primase molecule on appropriate DNA templates to reconstitute a stable primosome. We show that: (i) the gp41 helicase alone does not form a stable complex with DNA templates, although this helicase by itself can carry out moderately processive ATP-driven translocation along single-stranded DNA (Young, M. C., Schultz, D. E., Ring, D., and von Hippel, P. H.(1994) J. Mol. Biol. 235, 1447-1458); (ii) the primase alone does form a stable complex with DNA; (iii) the helicase can bind to the primase-DNA complex in the presence of ATP or GTP to form a stable ternary complex; (iv) this complex consists of six helicase subunits and one primase subunit; and (v) the reconstituted primosome is stable for at least 10 to 20 min after NTP cleavage and dissociation of the hydrolysis products. These results strongly suggest that the functional T4 DNA replication primosome consists of an integrated 6:1 helicase-primase complex bound to DNA, and that the ATP-activated helicase hexamer remains intact throughout the processive DNA replication process. PMID:8702659

  12. HIV Entry and Envelope Glycoprotein-mediated Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Robert; Durell, Stewart; Viard, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    HIV entry involves binding of the trimeric viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120/gp41 to cell surface receptors, which triggers conformational changes in Env that drive the membrane fusion reaction. The conformational landscape that the lipids and Env navigate en route to fusion has been examined by biophysical measurements on the microscale, whereas electron tomography, x-rays, and NMR have provided insights into the process on the nanoscale and atomic scale. However, the coupling between the lipid and protein pathways that give rise to fusion has not been resolved. Here, we discuss the known and unknown about the overall HIV Env-mediated fusion process. PMID:23043104

  13. Apolipoprotein E Likely Contributes to a Maturation Step of Infectious Hepatitis C Virus Particles and Interacts with Viral Envelope Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Young; Acosta, Eliana G.; Stoeck, Ina Karen; Long, Gang; Hiet, Marie-Sophie; Mueller, Birthe; Fackler, Oliver T.; Kallis, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The assembly of infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles is tightly linked to components of the very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) pathway. We and others have shown that apolipoprotein E (ApoE) plays a major role in production of infectious HCV particles. However, the mechanism by which ApoE contributes to virion assembly/release and how it gets associated with the HCV particle is poorly understood. We found that knockdown of ApoE reduces titers of infectious intra- and extracellular HCV but not of the related dengue virus. ApoE depletion also reduced amounts of extracellular HCV core protein without affecting intracellular core amounts. Moreover, we found that ApoE depletion affected neither formation of nucleocapsids nor their envelopment, suggesting that ApoE acts at a late step of assembly, such as particle maturation and infectivity. Importantly, we demonstrate that ApoE interacts with the HCV envelope glycoproteins, most notably E2. This interaction did not require any other viral proteins and depended on the transmembrane domain of E2 that also was required for recruitment of HCV envelope glycoproteins to detergent-resistant membrane fractions. These results suggest that ApoE plays an important role in HCV particle maturation, presumably by direct interaction with viral envelope glycoproteins. IMPORTANCE The HCV replication cycle is tightly linked to host cell lipid pathways and components. This is best illustrated by the dependency of HCV assembly on lipid droplets and the VLDL component ApoE. Although the role of ApoE for production of infectious HCV particles is well established, it is still poorly understood how ApoE contributes to virion formation and how it gets associated with HCV particles. Here, we provide experimental evidence that ApoE likely is required for an intracellular maturation step of HCV particles. Moreover, we demonstrate that ApoE associates with the viral envelope glycoproteins. This interaction appears to be dispensable

  14. A viral regulator of glycoprotein complexes contributes to human cytomegalovirus cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Nguyen, Christopher C; Ryckman, Brent J; Britt, William J; Kamil, Jeremy P

    2015-04-01

    Viral glycoproteins mediate entry of enveloped viruses into cells and thus play crucial roles in infection. In herpesviruses, a complex of two viral glycoproteins, gH and gL (gH/gL), regulates membrane fusion events and influences virion cell tropism. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gH/gL can be incorporated into two different protein complexes: a glycoprotein O (gO)-containing complex known as gH/gL/gO, and a complex containing UL128, UL130, and UL131 known as gH/gL/UL128-131. Variability in the relative abundance of the complexes in the virion envelope correlates with differences in cell tropism exhibited between strains of HCMV. Nonetheless, the mechanisms underlying such variability have remained unclear. We have identified a viral protein encoded by the UL148 ORF (UL148) that influences the ratio of gH/gL/gO to gH/gL/UL128-131 and the cell tropism of HCMV virions. A mutant disrupted for UL148 showed defects in gH/gL/gO maturation and enhanced infectivity for epithelial cells. Accordingly, reintroduction of UL148 into an HCMV strain that lacked the gene resulted in decreased levels of gH/gL/UL128-131 on virions and, correspondingly, decreased infectivity for epithelial cells. UL148 localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, but not to the cytoplasmic sites of virion envelopment. Coimmunoprecipitation results indicated that gH, gL, UL130, and UL131 associate with UL148, but that gO and UL128 do not. Taken together, the findings suggest that UL148 modulates HCMV tropism by regulating the composition of alternative gH/gL complexes.

  15. A viral regulator of glycoprotein complexes contributes to human cytomegalovirus cell tropism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Nguyen, Christopher C.; Ryckman, Brent J.; Britt, William J.; Kamil, Jeremy P.

    2015-01-01

    Viral glycoproteins mediate entry of enveloped viruses into cells and thus play crucial roles in infection. In herpesviruses, a complex of two viral glycoproteins, gH and gL (gH/gL), regulates membrane fusion events and influences virion cell tropism. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) gH/gL can be incorporated into two different protein complexes: a glycoprotein O (gO)-containing complex known as gH/gL/gO, and a complex containing UL128, UL130, and UL131 known as gH/gL/UL128-131. Variability in the relative abundance of the complexes in the virion envelope correlates with differences in cell tropism exhibited between strains of HCMV. Nonetheless, the mechanisms underlying such variability have remained unclear. We have identified a viral protein encoded by the UL148 ORF (UL148) that influences the ratio of gH/gL/gO to gH/gL/UL128-131 and the cell tropism of HCMV virions. A mutant disrupted for UL148 showed defects in gH/gL/gO maturation and enhanced infectivity for epithelial cells. Accordingly, reintroduction of UL148 into an HCMV strain that lacked the gene resulted in decreased levels of gH/gL/UL128-131 on virions and, correspondingly, decreased infectivity for epithelial cells. UL148 localized to the endoplasmic reticulum, but not to the cytoplasmic sites of virion envelopment. Coimmunoprecipitation results indicated that gH, gL, UL130, and UL131 associate with UL148, but that gO and UL128 do not. Taken together, the findings suggest that UL148 modulates HCMV tropism by regulating the composition of alternative gH/gL complexes. PMID:25831500

  16. Site-specific Isopeptide Bridge Tethering of Chimeric gp41 N-terminal Heptad Repeat Helical Trimers for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xue; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Huixin; Lai, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Ye, Ling; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2016-01-01

    Peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of HIV-1 gp41 can be potent inhibitors against viral entry when presented in a nonaggregating trimeric coiled-coil conformation via the introduction of exogenous trimerization motifs and intermolecular disulfide bonds. We recently discovered that crosslinking isopeptide bridges within the de novo helical trimers added exceptional resistance to unfolding. Herein, we attempted to optimize (CCIZN17)3, a representative disulfide bond-stabilized chimeric NHR-trimer, by incorporating site-specific interhelical isopeptide bonds as the redox-sensitive disulfide surrogate. In this process, we systematically examined the effect of isopeptide bond position and molecular sizes of auxiliary trimeric coiled-coil motif and NHR fragments on the antiviral potency of these NHR-trimers. Pleasingly, (IZ14N24N)3 possessed promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 infection and markedly increased proteolytic stability relative to its disulfide-tethered counterpart, suggesting good potential for further development as an effective antiviral agent for treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27562370

  17. Site-specific Isopeptide Bridge Tethering of Chimeric gp41 N-terminal Heptad Repeat Helical Trimers for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xue; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Huixin; Lai, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Ye, Ling; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2016-01-01

    Peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of HIV-1 gp41 can be potent inhibitors against viral entry when presented in a nonaggregating trimeric coiled-coil conformation via the introduction of exogenous trimerization motifs and intermolecular disulfide bonds. We recently discovered that crosslinking isopeptide bridges within the de novo helical trimers added exceptional resistance to unfolding. Herein, we attempted to optimize (CCIZN17)3, a representative disulfide bond-stabilized chimeric NHR-trimer, by incorporating site-specific interhelical isopeptide bonds as the redox-sensitive disulfide surrogate. In this process, we systematically examined the effect of isopeptide bond position and molecular sizes of auxiliary trimeric coiled-coil motif and NHR fragments on the antiviral potency of these NHR-trimers. Pleasingly, (IZ14N24N)3 possessed promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 infection and markedly increased proteolytic stability relative to its disulfide-tethered counterpart, suggesting good potential for further development as an effective antiviral agent for treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27562370

  18. Rational improvement of gp41-targeting HIV-1 fusion inhibitors: an innovatively designed Ile-Asp-Leu tail with alternative conformations

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yun; Su, Shan; Qin, Lili; Wang, Qian; Shi, Lei; Ma, Zhenxuan; Tang, Jianchao; Jiang, Shibo; Lu, Lu; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2016-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) of HIV gp41 have been developed as effective fusion inhibitors against HIV-1, but facing the challenges of enhancing potency and stability. Here, we report a rationally designed novel HIV-1 fusion inhibitor derived from CHR-derived peptide (Trp628~Gln653, named CP), but with an innovative Ile-Asp-Leu tail (IDL) that dramatically increased the inhibitory activity by up to 100 folds. We also determined the crystal structures of artificial fusion peptides N36- and N43-L6-CP-IDL. Although the overall structures of both fusion peptides share the canonical six-helix bundle (6-HB) configuration, their IDL tails adopt two different conformations: a one-turn helix with the N36, and a hook-like structure with the longer N43. Structural comparison showed that the hook-like IDL tail possesses a larger interaction interface with NHR than the helical one. Further molecular dynamics simulations of the two 6-HBs and isolated CP-IDL peptides suggested that hook-like form of IDL tail can be stabilized by its binding to NHR trimer. Therefore, CP-IDL has potential for further development as a new HIV fusion inhibitor, and this strategy could be widely used in developing artificial fusion inhibitors against HIV and other enveloped viruses. PMID:27666394

  19. Effect of cholesterol on the interaction of the HIV GP41 fusion peptide with model membranes. Importance of the membrane dipole potential.

    PubMed

    Buzón, Víctor; Cladera, Josep

    2006-12-26

    Fusion of viral and cell membranes is a key event in the process by which the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enters the target cell. Membrane fusion is facilitated by the interaction of the viral gp41 fusion peptide with the cell membrane. Using synthetic peptides and model membrane systems, it has been established that the sequence of events implies the binding of the peptide to the membrane, followed by a conformational change (transformation of unordered and helical structures into beta-aggregates) which precedes lipid mixing. It is known that this process can be influenced by the membrane lipid composition. In the present work we have undertaken a systematic study in order to determine the influence of cholesterol (abundant in the viral membrane) in the sequence of events leading to lipid mixing. Besides its effect on membrane fluidity, cholesterol can affect a less known physical parameter, the membrane dipole potential. Using the dipole potential fluorescent sensor di-8-ANEPPS together with other biophysical techniques, we show that cholesterol increases the affinity of the fusion peptide for the model membranes, and although it lowers the extent of lipid mixing, it increases the mixing rate. The influence of cholesterol on the peptide affinity and the lipid mixing rate are shown to be mainly due to its influence of the membrane dipole potential, whereas the lipid mixing extent and peptide conformational changes seem to be more dependent on other membrane parameters such as membrane fluidity and hydration.

  20. Antibody elicited against the gp41 N-heptad repeat (NHR) coiled-coil can neutralize HIV-1 with modest potency but non-neutralizing antibodies also bind to NHR mimetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Josh D.; Kinkead, Heather; Brunel, Florence M.; Leaman, Dan; Jensen, Richard; Louis, John M.; Maruyama, Toshiaki; Bewley, Carole A.; Bowdish, Katherine; Clore, G. Marius; Dawson, Philip E.; Frederickson, Shana; Mage, Rose G.; Richman, Douglas D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Zwick, Michael B.

    2008-07-20

    Following CD4 receptor binding to the HIV-1 envelope spike (Env), the conserved N-heptad repeat (NHR) region of gp41 forms a coiled-coil that is a precursor to the fusion reaction. Although it has been a target of drug and vaccine design, there are few monoclonal antibody (mAb) tools with which to probe the antigenicity and immunogenicity specifically of the NHR coiled-coil. Here, we have rescued HIV-1-neutralizing anti-NHR mAbs from immune phage display libraries that were prepared (i) from b9 rabbits immunized with a previously described mimetic of the NHR coiled-coil, N35{sub CCG}-N13, and (ii) from an HIV-1 infected individual. We describe a rabbit single-chain Fv fragment (scFv), 8K8, and a human Fab, DN9, which specifically recognize NHR coiled-coils that are unoccupied by peptide corresponding to the C-heptad repeat or CHR region of gp41 (e.g. C34). The epitopes of 8K8 and DN9 were found to partially overlap with that of a previously described anti-NHR mAb, IgG D5; however, 8K8 and DN9 were much more specific than D5 for unoccupied NHR trimers. The mAbs, including a whole IgG 8K8 molecule, neutralized primary HIV-1 of clades B and C in a pseudotyped virus assay with comparable, albeit relatively modest potency. Finally, a human Fab T3 and a rabbit serum (both non-neutralizing) were able to block binding of D5 and 8K8 to a gp41 NHR mimetic, respectively, but not the neutralizing activity of these mAbs. We conclude from these results that NHR coiled-coil analogs of HIV-1 gp41 elicit many Abs during natural infection and through immunization, but that due to limited accessibility to the corresponding region on fusogenic gp41 few can neutralize. Caution is therefore required in targeting the NHR for vaccine design. Nevertheless, the mAb panel may be useful as tools for elucidating access restrictions to the NHR of gp41 and in designing potential improvements to mimetics of receptor-activated Env.

  1. Influences on Trimerization and Aggregation of Soluble, Cleaved HIV-1 SOSIP Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Klasse, Per Johan; Depetris, Rafael S.; Pejchal, Robert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Khayat, Reza; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Marozsan, Andre J.; Cupo, Albert; Cocco, Nicolette; Korzun, Jacob; Yasmeen, Anila; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe methods to improve the properties of soluble, cleaved gp140 trimers of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) for use in structural studies and as immunogens. In the absence of nonionic detergents, gp140 of the KNH1144 genotype, terminating at residue 681 in gp41 (SOSIP.681), has a tendency to form higher-order complexes or aggregates, which is particularly undesirable for structure-based research. We found that this aggregation in the absence of detergent does not involve the V1, V2, or V3 variable regions of gp120. Moreover, we observed that detergent forms micelles around the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the SOSIP.681 gp140 trimers, whereas deletion of most of the MPER residues by terminating the gp140 at residue 664 (SOSIP.664) prevented the aggregation that otherwise occurs in SOSIP.681 in the absence of detergent. Although the MPER can contribute to trimer formation, truncation of most of it only modestly reduced trimerization and lacked global adverse effects on antigenicity. Thus, the MPER deletion minimally influenced the kinetics of the binding of soluble CD4 and a CD4-binding site antibody to immobilized trimers, as detected by surface plasmon resonance. Furthermore, the MPER deletion did not alter the overall three-dimensional structure of the trimers, as viewed by negative-stain electron microscopy. Homogeneous and aggregate-free MPER-truncated SOSIP Env trimers are therefore useful for immunogenicity and structural studies. PMID:23824824

  2. Temozolomide competes for P-glycoprotein and contributes to chemoresistance in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Jessian L; Walker, Nykia D; Scotto, Kathleen W; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2015-10-10

    Chemotherapeutic resistance can occur by P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a 12-transmembrane ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. Glioblastoma (GBM) has poor survival rate and uniformly acquired chemoresistance to its frontline agent, Temozolomide (TMZ). Despite much effort, overcoming TMZ resistance remains a challenge. We reported on autonomous induction of TMZ resistance by increased transcription MDR1, the gene for P-gp. This study investigated how P-gp and TMZ interact to gain resistance. Using an experimental model of Adriamycin-resistant DC3F cells (DC3F/Adx), we showed that increased P-gp caused TMZ resistance. Increasing concentrations of TMZ competed with Calcein for P-gp, resulting in reduced efflux in the DC3F/Adx cells. Three different inhibitors of P-gp reversed the resistance to TMZ in two different GBM cell lines, by increasing active Caspase 3. Molecular modeling predicted the binding sites to be the intracellular region of P-gp and also identified specific amino acids and kinetics of energy for the efflux of TMZ. Taken together, we confirmed P-gp targeting of TMZ, a crucial regulator of TMZ resistance in GBM. This study provides insights on the effectiveness by which TMZ competes with other P-gp substrates, thereby opening the door for combined targeted therapies.

  3. Immunohistochemical retrieval of the principal HIV antigens p24, gp41, and gp120 in formalin fixed tissue: an investigation using HIV infected lymphoblasts and postmortem brain tissue from AIDS cases.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, H L; Neal, J W; Parkes, A B; Jasani, B

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an autoclaving procedure followed by immunocytochemistry to enhance the detection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigens p24, gp41, and gp120. This procedure greatly improved the detection rate of the p24 and gp41 HIV surface antigens in formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded, HIV positive central nervous system (CNS) tissue while restricting staining to areas of the CNS showing evidence of neuropathology. However, the technique did not improve retrieval of the gp120 antigen in either HIV positive, formalin fixed CNS tissue or HIV infected T lymphoblasts. The inclusion of the high temperature autoclave step was validated using both HIV infected lymphoblasts and pre-adsorption of the specific antibodies with the appropriate recombinant HIV proteins. Using the methodology described here, formalin fixed CNS tissue from potential or known HIV positive cases can be processed reliably and safely. To ensure the reliability of this technique, it is recommended that an assessment of both the p24 and gp41 antigens is undertaken. PMID:9893752

  4. The Transmission Interfaces Contribute Asymmetrically to the Assembly and Activity of Human P-glycoprotein*

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Tip W.; Clarke, David M.

    2015-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) is an ABC drug pump that protects us from toxic compounds. It is clinically important because it confers multidrug resistance. The homologous halves of P-gp each contain a transmembrane (TM) domain (TMD) with 6 TM segments followed by a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). The drug- and ATP-binding sites reside at the interface between the TMDs and NBDs, respectively. Each NBD is connected to the TMDs by a transmission interface involving a pair of intracellular loops (ICLs) that form ball-and-socket joints. P-gp is different from CFTR (ABCC7) in that deleting NBD2 causes misprocessing of only P-gp. Therefore, NBD2 might be critical for stabilizing ICLs 2 and 3 that form a tetrahelix bundle at the NBD2 interface. Here we report that the NBD1 and NBD2 transmission interfaces in P-gp are asymmetric. Point mutations to 25 of 60 ICL2/ICL3 residues at the NBD2 transmission interface severely reduced P-gp assembly while changes to the equivalent residues in ICL1/ICL4 at the NBD1 interface had little effect. The hydrophobic nature at the transmission interfaces was also different. Mutation of Phe-1086 or Tyr-1087 to arginine at the NBD2 socket blocked activity or assembly while the equivalent mutations at the NBD1 socket had only modest effects. The results suggest that the NBD transmission interfaces are asymmetric. In contrast to the ICL2/3-NBD2 interface, the ICL1/4-NBD1 transmission interface is more hydrophilic and insensitive to mutations. Therefore the ICL2/3-NBD2 transmission interface forms a precise hydrophobic connection that acts as a linchpin for assembly and trafficking of P-gp. PMID:25987565

  5. The Transmission Interfaces Contribute Asymmetrically to the Assembly and Activity of Human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2015-07-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) is an ABC drug pump that protects us from toxic compounds. It is clinically important because it confers multidrug resistance. The homologous halves of P-gp each contain a transmembrane (TM) domain (TMD) with 6 TM segments followed by a nucleotide-binding domain (NBD). The drug- and ATP-binding sites reside at the interface between the TMDs and NBDs, respectively. Each NBD is connected to the TMDs by a transmission interface involving a pair of intracellular loops (ICLs) that form ball-and-socket joints. P-gp is different from CFTR (ABCC7) in that deleting NBD2 causes misprocessing of only P-gp. Therefore, NBD2 might be critical for stabilizing ICLs 2 and 3 that form a tetrahelix bundle at the NBD2 interface. Here we report that the NBD1 and NBD2 transmission interfaces in P-gp are asymmetric. Point mutations to 25 of 60 ICL2/ICL3 residues at the NBD2 transmission interface severely reduced P-gp assembly while changes to the equivalent residues in ICL1/ICL4 at the NBD1 interface had little effect. The hydrophobic nature at the transmission interfaces was also different. Mutation of Phe-1086 or Tyr-1087 to arginine at the NBD2 socket blocked activity or assembly while the equivalent mutations at the NBD1 socket had only modest effects. The results suggest that the NBD transmission interfaces are asymmetric. In contrast to the ICL2/3-NBD2 interface, the ICL1/4-NBD1 transmission interface is more hydrophilic and insensitive to mutations. Therefore the ICL2/3-NBD2 transmission interface forms a precise hydrophobic connection that acts as a linchpin for assembly and trafficking of P-gp.

  6. Structural Basis of HIV-1 Neutralization by Affinity Matured Fabs Directed against the Internal Trimeric Coiled-Coil of gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Gustchina, Elena; Li, Mi; Louis, John M.; Anderson, D.Eric; Lloyd, John; Frisch, Christian; Bewley, Carole A.; Gustchina, Alla; Wlodawer, Alexander; Clore, G.Marius

    2010-12-03

    The conserved internal trimeric coiled-coil of the N-heptad repeat (N-HR) of HIV-1 gp41 is transiently exposed during the fusion process by forming a pre-hairpin intermediate, thus representing an attractive target for the design of fusion inhibitors and neutralizing antibodies. In previous studies we reported a series of broadly neutralizing mini-antibodies derived from a synthetic naive human combinatorial antibody library by panning against a mimetic of the trimeric N-HR coiled coil, followed by affinity maturation using targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop. Here we report crystal structures of the N-HR mimetic 5-Helix with two Fabs that represent the extremes of this series: Fab 8066 is broadly neutralizing across a wide panel of B and C type HIV-1 viruses, whereas Fab 8062 is non-neutralizing. The crystal structures reveal important differences in the conformations of the CDR-H2 loops in the complexes that propagate into other regions of the antigen-antibody interface, and suggest that both neutralization properties and affinity for the target can be attributed, at least in part, to the differences in the interactions of the CDR-H2 loops with the antigen. Furthermore, modeling of the complex of an N-HR trimer with three Fabs suggests that the CDR-H2 loop may be involved in close intermolecular contacts between neighboring antibody molecules, and that such contacts may hinder the formation of complexes between the N-HR trimer and more than one antibody molecule depending on the conformation of the bound CDR-H2 loop which is defined by its interactions with antigen. Comparison with the crystal structure of the complex of 5-Helix with another neutralizing monoclonal antibody known as D5, derived using an entirely different antibody library and panning procedure, reveals remarkable convergence in the optimal sequence and conformation of the CDR-H2 loop.

  7. Swapped domain constructs of the glycoprotein-41 ectodomain are potent inhibitors of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shidong; Kaur, Hardeep; Nemati, Ariana; Walsh, Joseph D.; Partida, Vivian; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Gochin, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The conformational rearrangement of N-and C-heptad repeats (NHR, CHR) of the HIV-1 glycoprotein-41 (gp41) ectodomain into a trimer of hairpins triggers virus – cell fusion by bringing together membrane-spanning N- and C-terminal domains. Peptides derived from the NHR and CHR inhibit fusion by targeting a prehairpin intermediate state of gp41. Typically, peptides derived from the CHR are low nM inhibitors, while peptides derived from the NHR are low μM inhibitors. Here we describe the inhibitory activity of swapped domain gp41 mimics of the form CHR-loop-NHR, which were designed to form reverse hairpin trimers exposing NHR grooves. We observed low nM inhibition of HIV fusion in constructs that possessed the following properties: an extended NHR C-terminus, an exposed conserved hydrophobic pocket on the NHR, high helical content and trimer stability. Low nM activity was independent of CHR length. CD studies in membrane mimetic dodecylphosphocholine micelles suggested that bioactivity could be related to the ability of the inhibitors to interact with a membrane-associated prehairpin intermediate. The swapped domain design resolves the problem of unstable and weakly active NHR peptides, and suggests a different mechanism of action from that of CHR peptides in inhibition of HIV-1 fusion. PMID:25646644

  8. Generation of Long-Lived Bone Marrow Plasma Cells Secreting Antibodies Specific for the HIV-1 gp41 Membrane-Proximal External Region in the Absence of Polyreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Donius, Luke R.; Cheng, Yuxing; Choi, Jaewon; Sun, Zhen-Yu J.; Hanson, Melissa; Zhang, Michael; Gierahn, Todd M.; Marquez, Susanna; Uduman, Mohammed; Kleinstein, Steven H.; Irvine, Darrell; Love, J. Christopher; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT An effective preventive vaccine is highly sought after in order to stem the current HIV-1 pandemic. Both conservation of contiguous gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) amino acid sequences across HIV-1 clades and the ability of anti-MPER broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs) to block viral hemifusion/fusion establish the MPER as a prime vaccination target. In earlier studies, we described the development of an MPER vaccine formulation that takes advantage of liposomes to array the MPER on a lipid bilayer surface, paralleling its native configuration on the virus membrane while also incorporating molecular adjuvant and CD4 T cell epitope cargo. Here we demonstrate that several immunizations with MPER/liposomes induce high levels of bone marrow long-lived plasma cell (LLPC) antibody production. Single-cell immunoglobulin gene retrieval analysis shows that these plasma cells are derived from a germ line repertoire of B cells with a diverse representation of immunoglobulin genes, exhibiting antigen-driven positive selection. Characterization of LLPC recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rMAbs) indicates that antigen recognition is achieved through convergence on a common epitopic focus by utilizing various complementarity-determining region H3 (CDRH3) lengths. Importantly, the vast majority of rMAbs produced from these cells lack polyreactivity yet manifest antigen specificity in the context of lipids, shaping MPER-specific paratopes through selective pressure. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the MPER is a vaccine target with minimal risk of generating off-target autoimmunity. IMPORTANCE A useful vaccine must generate desired long-term, antigen-specific antibody responses devoid of polyreactivity or autoreactivity. The common polyreactive features of some HIV-1 BNAbs have raised concern about elicitation of anti-MPER antibodies. Utilizing single-LLPC repertoire analysis and biophysical characterization of anti-MPER rMAbs, we show that

  9. Mitochondrial P-glycoprotein ATPase contributes to insecticide resistance in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera (Noctuidae: Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Akbar, S Md; Aurade, Ravindra M; Sharma, H C; Sreeramulu, K

    2014-09-01

    Cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, is one of the most damaging polyphagous pests worldwide, which has developed high levels of resistance to commonly applied insecticides. Mitochondrial P-glycoprotein (Pgp) was detected in the insecticide-resistant strain of H. armigera using C219 antibodies, and its possible role was demonstrated in the efflux of xenobiotic compounds using spectrofluorometer. The TMR accumulated in mitochondria in the absence of ATP, and effluxed out in presence of ATP; the process of efflux was inhibited in the presence of ortho-vandate, an inhibitor of Pgp, in insecticide-resistant larvae of H. armigera. The mitochondria isolated from insecticide-resistant larvae were resistant to insecticide-induced inhibition of oxygen consumption and cytochrome c release. Membrane potential decreased in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of higher concentration of insecticides (>50 µM) in mitochondria of insecticide-resistant larvae. In conclusion, mitochondrial Pgp ATPase detected in the insecticide-resistant larvae influenced the efflux of xenobiotic compounds. Pgp might be involved in protecting the mitochondrial DNA and the components of the electron transport chain from damage due to insecticides, and contributing to the resistance to the deleterious effects of insecticides on the growth of insecticide-resistant H. armigera larvae.

  10. The C34 Peptide Fusion Inhibitor Binds to the Six-Helix Bundle Core Domain of HIV-1 gp41 by Displacement of the C-Terminal Helical Repeat Region.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Baber, James L; Clore, G Marius

    2015-11-17

    The conformational transition of the core domain of HIV-1 gp41 from a prehairpin intermediate to a six-helix bundle is responsible for virus-cell fusion. Several inhibitors which target the N-heptad repeat helical coiled-coil trimer that is fully accessible in the prehairpin intermediate have been designed. One such inhibitor is the peptide C34 derived from the C-heptad repeat of gp41 that forms the exterior of the six-helix bundle. Here, using a variety of biophysical techniques, including dye tagging, size-exclusion chromatography combined with multiangle light scattering, double electron-electron resonance EPR spectroscopy, and circular dichroism, we investigate the binding of C34 to two six-helix bundle mimetics comprising N- and C-heptad repeats either without (core(SP)) or with (core(S)) a short spacer connecting the two. In the case of core(SP), C34 directly exchanges with the C-heptad repeat. For core(S), up to two molecules of C34 bind the six-helix bundle via displacement of the C-heptad repeat. These results suggest that fusion inhibitors such as C34 can target a continuum of transitioning conformational states from the prehairpin intermediate to the six-helix bundle prior to the occurrence of irreversible fusion of viral and target cell membranes.

  11. Contribution of mdr1b-type P-glycoprotein to okadaic acid resistance in rat pituitary GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ritz, V; Marwitz, J; Sieder, S; Ziemann, C; Hirsch-Ernst, K I; Quentin, I; Steinfelder, H J

    1999-08-01

    Okadaic acid as well as other, structurally different, inhibitors of serine/threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A induce apoptosis in pituitary GH3 cells. Incubation with stepwise raised concentrations of okadaic acid resulted in the isolation of cells that were increasingly less sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of this agent. After about 18 months cells were selected that survived at 300 nM okadaic acid, which is about 30 times the initially lethal concentration. This study revealed that a major pharmacokinetic mechanism underlying cell survival was the development of a P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The increase in mRNA levels of the mdr1b P-glycoprotein isoform correlated with the extent of drug resistance. Functional assays revealed that increasing drug resistance was paralleled by a decreased accumulation of rhodamine 123, a fluorescent dye which is a substrate of mdr1-mediated efflux activity. Resistance could be abolished by structurally different chemosensitizers of P-glycoprotein function like verapamil and reserpine but not by the leukotriene receptor antagonist MK571 which is a modulator of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP). Okadaic acid resistance included cross-resistance to other cytotoxic agents that are substrates of mdr1-type P-glycoproteins, like doxorubicin and actinomycin D, but not to non-substrates of mdr1, e.g. cytosine arabinoside. Thus, functional as well as biochemical features support the conclusion that okadaic acid is a substrate of the mdr1-mediated efflux activity in rat pituitary GH3 cells. Maintenance of resistance after withdrawal of okadaic acid as well as metaphase spreads of 100 nM okadaic acid-resistant cells suggested a stable MDR genotype without indications for the occurrence of extrachromosomal amplifications, e.g. double minute chromosomes.

  12. Basic Residues in Hypervariable Region 1 of Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E2 Contribute to Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Callens, Nathalie; Ciczora, Yann; Bartosch, Birke; Vu-Dac, Ngoc; Cosset, François-Loïc; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Penin, François; Dubuisson, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The N terminus of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2 contains a hypervariable region (HVR1) which has been proposed to play a role in viral entry. Despite strong amino acid variability, HVR1 is globally basic, with basic residues located at specific sequence positions. Here we show by analyzing a large number of HVR1 sequences that the frequency of basic residues at each position is genotype dependent. We also used retroviral pseudotyped particles (HCVpp) harboring genotype 1a envelope glycoproteins to study the role of HVR1 basic residues in entry. Interestingly, HCVpp infectivity globally increased with the number of basic residues in HVR1. However, a shift in position of some charged residues also modulated HCVpp infectivity. In the absence of basic residues, infectivity was reduced to the same level as that of a mutant deleted of HVR1. We also analyzed the effect of these mutations on interactions with some potential HCV receptors. Recognition of CD81 was not affected by changes in the number of charged residues, and we did not find a role for heparan sulfates in HCVpp entry. The involvement of the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) was indirectly analyzed by measuring the enhancement of infectivity of the mutants in the presence of the natural ligand of SR-BI, high-density lipoproteins (HDL). However, no correlation between the number of basic residues within HVR1 and HDL enhancement effect was observed. Despite the lack of evidence of the involvement of known potential receptors, our results demonstrate that the presence of basic residues in HVR1 facilitates virus entry. PMID:16306604

  13. Basic residues in hypervariable region 1 of hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein e2 contribute to virus entry.

    PubMed

    Callens, Nathalie; Ciczora, Yann; Bartosch, Birke; Vu-Dac, Ngoc; Cosset, François-Loïc; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Penin, François; Dubuisson, Jean

    2005-12-01

    The N terminus of hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoprotein E2 contains a hypervariable region (HVR1) which has been proposed to play a role in viral entry. Despite strong amino acid variability, HVR1 is globally basic, with basic residues located at specific sequence positions. Here we show by analyzing a large number of HVR1 sequences that the frequency of basic residues at each position is genotype dependent. We also used retroviral pseudotyped particles (HCVpp) harboring genotype 1a envelope glycoproteins to study the role of HVR1 basic residues in entry. Interestingly, HCVpp infectivity globally increased with the number of basic residues in HVR1. However, a shift in position of some charged residues also modulated HCVpp infectivity. In the absence of basic residues, infectivity was reduced to the same level as that of a mutant deleted of HVR1. We also analyzed the effect of these mutations on interactions with some potential HCV receptors. Recognition of CD81 was not affected by changes in the number of charged residues, and we did not find a role for heparan sulfates in HCVpp entry. The involvement of the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) was indirectly analyzed by measuring the enhancement of infectivity of the mutants in the presence of the natural ligand of SR-BI, high-density lipoproteins (HDL). However, no correlation between the number of basic residues within HVR1 and HDL enhancement effect was observed. Despite the lack of evidence of the involvement of known potential receptors, our results demonstrate that the presence of basic residues in HVR1 facilitates virus entry.

  14. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of human immunodeficiency virus gp41 protein that includes the fusion peptide: NMR detection of recombinant Fgp41 in inclusion bodies in whole bacterial cells and structural characterization of purified and membrane-associated Fgp41.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Erica P; Curtis-Fisk, Jaime; Young, Kaitlin M; Weliky, David P

    2011-11-22

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of a host cell begins with fusion of the HIV and host cell membranes and is mediated by the gp41 protein, a single-pass integral membrane protein of HIV. The 175 N-terminal residues make up the ectodomain that lies outside the virus. This work describes the production and characterization of an ectodomain construct containing the 154 N-terminal gp41 residues, including the fusion peptide (FP) that binds to target cell membranes. The Fgp41 sequence was derived from one of the African clade A strains of HIV-1 that have been less studied than European/North American clade B strains. Fgp41 expression at a level of ~100 mg/L of culture was evidenced by an approach that included amino acid type (13)CO and (15)N labeling of recombinant protein and solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy of lyophilized whole cells. The approach did not require any protein solubilization or purification and may be a general approach for detection of recombinant protein. The purified Fgp41 yield was ~5 mg/L of culture. SSNMR spectra of membrane-associated Fgp41 showed high helicity for the residues C-terminal of the FP. This was consistent with a "six-helix bundle" (SHB) structure that is the final gp41 state during membrane fusion. This observation and negligible Fgp41-induced vesicle fusion supported a function for SHB gp41 of membrane stabilization and fusion arrest. SSNMR spectra of residues in the membrane-associated FP provided evidence of a mixture of molecular populations with either helical or β-sheet FP conformation. These and earlier SSNMR data strongly support the existence of these populations in the SHB state of membrane-associated gp41.

  15. Affinity maturation by targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop of a monoclonal Fab derived from a synthetic naïve human antibody library and directed against the internal trimeric coiled-coil of gp41 yields a set of Fabs with improved HIV-1 neutralization potency and breadth

    PubMed Central

    Gustchina, Elena; Louis, John M.; Frisch, Christian; Ylera, Francisco; Lechner, Annette; Bewley, Carole A.; Clore, G. Marius

    2009-01-01

    Previously we reported a broadly HIV-1 neutralizing mini-antibody (Fab 3674) of modest potency that was derived from a human non-immune phage library by panning against the chimeric gp41-derived construct NCCG-gp41. This construct presents the N-heptad repeat of the gp41 ectodomain as a stable, helical, disulfide-linked trimer that extends in helical phase from the six-helix bundle of gp41. In this paper, Fab 3674 was subjected to affinity maturation against the NCCG-gp41 antigen by targeted diversification of the CDR-H2 loop to generate a panel of Fabs with diverse neutralization activity. Three affinity-matured Fabs selected for further study, Fabs 8060, 8066 and 8068, showed significant increases in both potency and breadth of neutralization against HIV-1 pseudotyped with envelopes of primary isolates from the standard subtypes B and C HIV-1 reference panels. The parental Fab 3674 is 10-20 fold less potent in monovalent than bivalent format over the entire B and C panels of HIV-1 pseudotypes. Of note is that the improved neutralization activity of the affinity-matured Fabs relative to the parental Fab 3674 was, on average, significantly greater for the Fabs in monovalent than bivalent format. This suggests that the increased avidity of the Fabs for the target antigen in bivalent format can be partially offset by kinetic and/or steric advantages afforded by the smaller monovalent Fabs. Indeed, the best affinity-matured Fab (8066) in monovalent format (∼50 kDa) was comparable in HIV-1 neutralization potency to the parental Fab 3674 in bivalent format (∼120 kDa) across the subtypes B and C reference panels. PMID:19695655

  16. Contribution of radixin to P-glycoprotein expression and transport activity in mouse small intestine in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kentaro; Tomono, Takumi; Sakai, Riyo; Kano, Takashi; Morimoto, Kaori; Kato, Yukio; Ogihara, Takuo

    2013-08-01

    The ERM proteins, ezrin, radixin, and moesin, are membrane-cytoskeleton cross-linkers with multiple physiological functions. We previously showed that radixin is involved in posttranslational regulation of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. Here, we investigated the physiological role of radixin in regulating P-gp expression and activity in the small intestine by comparing wild-type- and radixin knockout (Rdx) mice. In intestinal tissue homogenates, P-gp protein levels increased markedly from the upper part to the lower part of the small intestine in both wild-type- and Rdx(-/-) mice. In the membrane fractions, a similar pattern was seen in wild-type mice. However, the membrane expression of P-gp protein remained at the same level from the upper to the lower part of the small intestine in Rdx(-/-) mice. When rhodamine123 (Rho123), a substrate of P-gp, was orally administered to Rdx(-/-) and wild-type mice, the absorption phase of Rho123 was greater in Rdx(-/-) than in wild-type mice, whereas the elimination phase in Rdx(-/-) mice was not different from that of wild-type mice. Our results indicate that radixin plays an important role in regulating P-gp localization and P-gp functional activity at the intestinal membrane.

  17. Individual contributions of the human metapneumovirus F, G, and SH surface glycoproteins to the induction of neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Skiadopoulos, Mario H. . E-mail: mskiadopoulos@niaid.nih.gov; Biacchesi, Stephane; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Amaro-Carambot, Emerito; Surman, Sonja R.; Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.

    2006-02-20

    We evaluated the individual contributions of the three surface glycoproteins of human metapneumovirus (HMPV), namely the fusion F, attachment G, and small hydrophobic SH proteins, to the induction of serum HMPV-binding antibodies, serum HMPV-neutralizing antibodies, and protective immunity. Using reverse genetics, each HMPV protein was expressed individually from an added gene in recombinant human parainfluenza virus type 1 (rHPIV1) and used to infect hamsters once or twice by the intranasal route. The F protein was highly immunogenic and protective, whereas G and SH were only weakly or negligibly immunogenic and protective, respectively. Thus, in contrast to other paramyxoviruses, the HMPV attachment G protein is not a major neutralization or protective antigen. Also, although the SH protein of HMPV is a virion protein that is much larger than its counterparts in previously studied paramyxoviruses, it does not appear to be a significant neutralization or protective antigen.

  18. A broad HIV-1 inhibitor blocks envelope glycoprotein transitions critical for entry

    PubMed Central

    Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Espy, Nicole; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Sodroski, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Binding to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers conformational changes in the metastable envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer (gp1203/gp413) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) that are important for virus entry into host cells. These changes include an “opening” of the trimer, creation of a binding site for the CCR5 coreceptor, and formation/exposure of a gp41 coiled coil. Here we identify a new compound, 18A (1), that specifically inhibits the entry of a wide range of HIV-1 isolates. 18A does not interfere with CD4 or CCR5 binding, but inhibits the CD4-induced disruption of quaternary structures at the trimer apex and the formation/exposure of the gp41 HR1 coiled coil. Analysis of HIV-1 variants exhibiting increased or reduced sensitivity to 18A suggests that the inhibitor can distinguish distinct conformational states of gp120 in the unliganded Env trimer. The broad-range activity and observed hypersensitivity of resistant mutants to antibody neutralization support further investigation of 18A. PMID:25174000

  19. Expression of the F and HN glycoproteins of human parainfluenza virus type 3 by recombinant vaccinia viruses: contributions of the individual proteins to host immunity.

    PubMed

    Spriggs, M K; Murphy, B R; Prince, G A; Olmsted, R A; Collins, P L

    1987-11-01

    cDNA clones containing the complete coding sequences for the human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoprotein genes were inserted into the thymidine kinase gene of vaccinia virus (WR strain) under the control of the P7.5 early-late vaccinia virus promotor. The recombinant vaccinia viruses, designated vaccinia-F and vaccinia-HN, expressed glycoproteins in cell culture that appeared to be authentic with respect to glycosylation, disulfide linkage, electrophoretic mobility, cell surface expression, and, in the case of the HN protein, biological activity. Cotton rats inoculated intradermally with vaccinia-HN developed serum neutralizing antibody titers equal to that induced by respiratory tract infection with PIV3, whereas animals receiving vaccinia-F had threefold lower neutralizing antibody titers. A single immunization with either recombinant vaccinia virus induced nearly complete resistance in the lower respiratory tract of these animals. With regard to protection in the upper respiratory tract, animals immunized with vaccinia-HN or vaccinia-F exhibited reductions in PIV3 replication of greater than 3,000-fold and 6-fold, respectively. This large difference (greater than 500-fold) in reduction of PIV3 replication in the upper respiratory tract was in contrast to the relatively modest difference (3-fold) in serum neutralizing antibody titers induced by vaccinia-HN versus vaccinia-F. This dissociation between the level of neutralizing antibodies and protection suggested that immunity to PIV3 is complex, and that immune mechanisms other than serum neutralizing antibodies make important contributions to resistance to infection. Overall, under these experimental conditions, vaccinia-HN induced a substantially more protective immune response than did vaccinia-F.

  20. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-05-15

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  1. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-10-31

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  2. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-08-28

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  3. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-07-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  4. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2005-08-09

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  5. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-16

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  6. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-02

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  7. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-02-27

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  8. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

    2009-07-14

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  9. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Shultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-04-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  10. Small molecule fusion inhibitors: design, synthesis and biological evaluation of (Z)-3-(5-(3-benzyl-4-oxo-2-thioxothiazolidinylidene)methyl)-N-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxy)phenyl-2,5-dimethylpyrroles and related derivatives targeting HIV-1 gp41.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Yang; Lu, Lu; Qiu, Jiayin; Zou, Peng; Yu, Fei; Jiang, Xing-Kai; Li, Lin; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Shuwen; Xie, Lan

    2013-12-01

    By a scaffold elongation strategy, a series of (Z)-3-(5-(3-benzyl-4-oxo-2-thioxothiazolidinylidene)methyl)-N-(3-carboxy-4-hydroxy)phenyl-2,5-dimethylpyrroles and related derivatives with a linear multi-aromatic-ring skeleton were designed, synthesized, and evaluated in HIV-1 gp41 and cellular assays. Among them, the most active compounds, 12e, 12g, and 12k with a one-carbon linker (n=1) between the rhodanine (C) and phenyl (D) rings, exhibited very promising inhibitory potency with IC50 values of 1.8-2.6 μM and EC50 values of 0.3-1.5 μM against gp41 6-HB formation and HIV-1 replication in MT-2 cells, respectively. Additionally, they were almost equally effective against both T20-sensitive and resistant strains. The related SAR studies and molecular modeling results provided potential for further developing a new class of non-peptide small molecular fusion inhibitors targeting the HIV-1 gp41.

  11. Pre-fusion structure of trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein determined by cryo-electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Merk, Alan; Borgnia, Mario J.; Milne, Jacqueline L. S.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    The activation of trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) by its binding to the cell surface receptor CD4 and co-receptors (CCR5 or CXCR4) represents the first of a series of events that lead to fusion between viral and target cell membranes. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopic structure, at ~ 6 Å resolution, of the closed, pre-fusion state of trimeric HIV-1 Env in complex with the broadly neutralizing antibody VRC03. We show that three gp41 helices at the core of the trimer serve as an anchor around which the rest of Env is reorganized upon activation to the open quaternary conformation. The architecture of trimeric HIV-1 Env in pre-fusion and activated intermediate states resembles the corresponding states of influenza hemagglutinin trimers, providing direct evidence for the similarity in entry mechanisms employed by HIV-1, influenza and related enveloped viruses. PMID:24154805

  12. An update on post-translational modifications of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins: toward a model highlighting their contribution to plant cell wall architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, May; Velasquez, Silvia M.; Jamet, Elisabeth; Estevez, José M.; Albenne, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composite structures mainly composed of polysaccharides, also containing a large set of proteins involved in diverse functions such as growth, environmental sensing, signaling, and defense. Research on cell wall proteins (CWPs) is a challenging field since present knowledge of their role into the structure and function of cell walls is very incomplete. Among CWPs, hydroxyproline (Hyp)-rich O-glycoproteins (HRGPs) were classified into three categories: (i) moderately glycosylated extensins (EXTs) able to form covalent scaffolds; (ii) hyperglycosylated arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs); and (iii) Hyp/proline (Pro)-Rich proteins (H/PRPs) that may be non-, weakly- or highly-glycosylated. In this review, we provide a description of the main features of their post-translational modifications (PTMs), biosynthesis, structure, and function. We propose a new model integrating HRGPs and their partners in cell walls. Altogether, they could form a continuous glyco-network with non-cellulosic polysaccharides via covalent bonds or non-covalent interactions, thus strongly contributing to cell wall architecture. PMID:25177325

  13. Oviduct-specific glycoprotein and heparin modulate sperm–zona pellucida interaction during fertilization and contribute to the control of polyspermy

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Pilar; Cánovas, Sebastián; Mondéjar, Irene; Saavedra, Maria Dolores; Romar, Raquel; Grullón, Luis; Matás, Carmen; Avilés, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Polyspermy is an important anomaly of fertilization in placental mammals, causing premature death of the embryo. It is especially frequent under in vitro conditions, complicating the successful generation of viable embryos. A block to polyspermy develops as a result of changes after sperm entry (i.e., cortical granule exocytosis). However, additional factors may play an important role in regulating polyspermy by acting on gametes before sperm–oocyte interaction. Most studies have used rodents as models, but ungulates may differ in mechanisms preventing polyspermy. We hypothesize that zona pellucida (ZP) changes during transit of the oocyte along the oviductal ampulla modulate the interaction with spermatozoa, contributing to the regulation of polyspermy. We report here that periovulatory oviductal fluid (OF) from sows and heifers increases (both, con- and heterospecifically) ZP resistance to digestion with pronase (a parameter commonly used to measure the block to polyspermy), changing from digestion times of ≈1 min (pig) or 2 min (cattle) to 45 min (pig) or several hours (cattle). Exposure of oocytes to OF increases monospermy after in vitro fertilization in both species, and in pigs, sperm–ZP binding decreases. The resistance of OF-exposed oocytes to pronase was abolished by exposure to heparin-depleted medium; in a medium with heparin it was not altered. Proteomic analysis of the content released in the heparin-depleted medium after removal of OF-exposed oocytes allowed the isolation and identification of oviduct-specific glycoprotein. Thus, an oviduct-specific glycoprotein–heparin protein complex seems to be responsible for ZP changes in the oviduct before fertilization, affecting sperm binding and contributing to the regulation of polyspermy. PMID:18838686

  14. Early intermediates in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion triggered by CD4 and co-receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, A S; Xiao, X; Dimitrov, D S; Blumenthal, R

    2001-08-10

    An early step in the process of HIV-1 entry into target cells is the activation of its envelope glycoprotein (GP120-GP41) to a fusogenic state upon binding to target cell CD4 and cognate co-receptor. Incubation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 Env-expressing cells with an excess of CD4 and co-recepeptor-bearing target cells resulted in an influx of an impermeant nucleic acid-staining fluorescent dye into the Env-expressing cells. The dye influx occurred concomitant with cell fusion. No influx of dye into target cells was observed if they were incubated with an excess of Env-expressing cells. The permeabilization of Env-expressing cells was also triggered by CD4.co-receptor complexes attached to Protein G-Sepharose beads in the absence of target cells. The CD4 and co-receptor-induced permeabilization of Env-expressing cells occurred with the same specificity with respect to co-receptor usage as cell fusion. Natural ligands for the co-receptors and C-terminal GP41 peptide inhibitors of HIV-1 fusion blocked this effect. Our results indicate that the process of HIV-1 Env-mediated fusion is initiated by the destabilization of HIV-1 Env-expressing membranes. Further elucidation of these early intermediates may help identify and develop potential inhibitors of HIV-1 entry into cells.

  15. Effect of trimerization motifs on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of a noncleavable HIV-1 gp140 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Sean X.; Idiart, Rebecca J.; Mariano, Ellaine B.; Chen, Helen; Jiang Peifeng; Xu Li; Ostrow, Kristin M.; Wrin, Terri; Phung, Pham; Binley, James M.; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Ballantyne, John A.; Whalen, Robert G.

    2009-12-05

    The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120 and the gp41 ectodomain, collectively known as gp140) contain all known viral neutralization epitopes. Various strategies have been used to create soluble trimers of the envelope to mimic the structure of the native viral protein, including mutation of the gp120-gp41 cleavage site, introduction of disulfide bonds, and fusion to heterologous trimerization motifs. We compared the effects on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of three such motifs: T4 fibritin, a GCN4 variant, and the Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase catalytic subunit. Fusion of each motif to the C-terminus of a noncleavable JRCSF gp140(-) envelope protein led to enhanced trimerization but had limited effects on the antigenic profile and CD4-binding ability of the trimers. Immunization of rabbits provided no evidence that the trimerized gp140(-) constructs induced significantly improved neutralizing antibodies to several HIV-1 pseudoviruses, compared to gp140 lacking a trimerization motif. However, modest differences in both binding specificity and neutralizing antibody responses were observed among the various immunogens.

  16. The Envelope Cytoplasmic Tail of HIV-1 Subtype C Contributes to Poor Replication Capacity through Low Viral Infectivity and Cell-to-Cell Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Morgane; Masquelier, Cécile; Beraud, Cyprien; Rybicki, Arkadiusz; Servais, Jean-Yves; Iserentant, Gilles; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Perez Bercoff, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail (gp41CT) of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) mediates Env incorporation into virions and regulates Env intracellular trafficking. Little is known about the functional impact of variability in this domain. To address this issue, we compared the replication of recombinant virus pairs carrying the full Env (Env viruses) or the Env ectodomain fused to the gp41CT of NL4.3 (EnvEC viruses) (12 subtype C and 10 subtype B pairs) in primary CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived-macrophages (MDMs). In CD4+ T-cells, replication was as follows: B-EnvEC = B-Env>C-EnvEC>C-Env, indicating that the gp41CT of subtype C contributes to the low replicative capacity of this subtype. In MDMs, in contrast, replication capacity was comparable for all viruses regardless of subtype and of gp41CT. In CD4+ T-cells, viral entry, viral release and viral gene expression were similar. However, infectivity of free virions and cell-to-cell transmission of C-Env viruses released by CD4+ T-cells was lower, suggestive of lower Env incorporation into virions. Subtype C matrix only minimally rescued viral replication and failed to restore infectivity of free viruses and cell-to-cell transmission. Taken together, these results show that polymorphisms in the gp41CT contribute to viral replication capacity and suggest that the number of Env spikes per virion may vary across subtypes. These findings should be taken into consideration in the design of vaccines. PMID:27598717

  17. The Envelope Cytoplasmic Tail of HIV-1 Subtype C Contributes to Poor Replication Capacity through Low Viral Infectivity and Cell-to-Cell Transmission.

    PubMed

    Santos da Silva, Eveline; Mulinge, Martin; Lemaire, Morgane; Masquelier, Cécile; Beraud, Cyprien; Rybicki, Arkadiusz; Servais, Jean-Yves; Iserentant, Gilles; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Seguin-Devaux, Carole; Perez Bercoff, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail (gp41CT) of the HIV-1 envelope (Env) mediates Env incorporation into virions and regulates Env intracellular trafficking. Little is known about the functional impact of variability in this domain. To address this issue, we compared the replication of recombinant virus pairs carrying the full Env (Env viruses) or the Env ectodomain fused to the gp41CT of NL4.3 (EnvEC viruses) (12 subtype C and 10 subtype B pairs) in primary CD4+ T-cells and monocyte-derived-macrophages (MDMs). In CD4+ T-cells, replication was as follows: B-EnvEC = B-Env>C-EnvEC>C-Env, indicating that the gp41CT of subtype C contributes to the low replicative capacity of this subtype. In MDMs, in contrast, replication capacity was comparable for all viruses regardless of subtype and of gp41CT. In CD4+ T-cells, viral entry, viral release and viral gene expression were similar. However, infectivity of free virions and cell-to-cell transmission of C-Env viruses released by CD4+ T-cells was lower, suggestive of lower Env incorporation into virions. Subtype C matrix only minimally rescued viral replication and failed to restore infectivity of free viruses and cell-to-cell transmission. Taken together, these results show that polymorphisms in the gp41CT contribute to viral replication capacity and suggest that the number of Env spikes per virion may vary across subtypes. These findings should be taken into consideration in the design of vaccines. PMID:27598717

  18. Effect of Trimerization Motifs on Quaternary Structure, Antigenicity, and Immunogenicity of a Non-cleavable HIV-1 gp140 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Du, Sean X.; Idiart, Rebecca J.; Mariano, Ellaine B.; Chen, Helen; Jiang, Peifeng; Xu, Li; Ostrow, Kristin M.; Wrin, Terri; Phung, Pham; Binley, James M.; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Ballantyne, John A.; Whalen, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120 and the gp41 ectodomain, collectively known as gp140) contain all known viral neutralization epitopes. Various strategies have been used to create soluble trimers of the envelope to mimic the structure of the native viral protein, including mutation of the gp120-gp41 cleavage site, introduction of disulfide bonds, and fusion to heterologous trimerization motifs. We compared the effects on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of three such motifs: T4 fibritin, a GCN4 variant, and the E. coli aspartate transcarbamoylase catalytic subunit. Fusion of each motif to the C-terminus of a non-cleavable JRCSF gp140(-) envelope protein led to enhanced trimerization but had limited effects on the antigenic profile and CD4 binding ability of the trimers. Immunization of rabbits provided no evidence that the trimerized gp140(-) constructs induced significantly improved neutralizing antibodies to several HIV-1 pseudoviruses, compared to gp140 lacking a trimerization motif. However, modest differences in both binding specificity and neutralizing antibody responses were observed among the various immunogens. PMID:19815247

  19. Interactions of HIV-1 and HIV-2 envelope glycoproteins with sulphated polysaccharides and mannose-6-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Mbemba, E; Gluckman, J C; Gattegno, L

    1994-02-01

    Envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2) can interact with high-mannose glycans and with the mannosyl or N-acetylglucosaminyl core of complex-type oligosaccharidic structures. HIV-1 glycoproteins also specifically bind sulphated polysaccharides such as dextran sulphate (DS) and heparin. Here, we show that the latter property is shared by HIV-2 recombinant gp140 (rgp140) precursor glycoprotein. Binding of rgp140 and of corresponding rgp160 of HIV-1 to heparin- and DS-substituted (sulphated dextran beads; SDB) affinity matrices was inhibited by the soluble specific ligand and also by fetuin, asialofetuin or the anionic simple carbohydrate derivative mannose-6-phosphate (M6P). Interaction of HIV-1 rgp120 subunit with the two affinity matrices was also inhibited by M6P, but only rgp120 binding to heparin-agarose, and not that to SDB, was affected by fetuin and asialofetuin. These results suggest that HIV-1 and HIV-2 envelope glycoproteins presumably display different sulphated polysaccharide and carbohydrate recognition sites. Some of these may be common or in close proximity: with respect to rgp160, for example, the sites may be common on the gp41 moiety and/or in a region of gp120 which would be more accessible when expressed on rgp160 than on processed gp120, while they may be distinct on the cleaved gp120 subunit. Finally, because M6P is a marker of lysosomal enzymes, we verified that HIV-1 and HIV-2 envelope glycoproteins could specifically bind in a M6P-inhibitable manner to a representative lysosomal enzyme, bovine liver beta-glucuronidase coupled to agarose, suggesting that they may possibly interfere with lysosomal enzyme sorting in HIV-infected cells.

  20. Determining the Structure of an Unliganded and Fully Glycosylated SIV gp120 Envelope Glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bing; Vogan, Erik M.; Gong, Haiyun; Skehel, John J.; Wiley, Don C.; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2010-07-13

    HIV/SIV envelope glycoproteins mediate the first steps in viral infection. They are trimers of a membrane-anchored polypeptide chain, cleaved into two fragments known as gp120 and gp41. The structure of HIV gp120 bound with receptor (CD4) has been known for some time. We have now determined the structure of a fully glycosylated SIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein in an unliganded conformation by X-ray crystallography at 4.0 {angstrom} resolution. We describe here our experimental and computational approaches, which may be relevant to other resolution-limited crystallographic problems. Key issues were attention to details of beam geometry mandated by small, weakly diffracting crystals, and choice of strategies for phase improvement, starting with two isomorphous derivatives and including multicrystal averaging. We validated the structure by analyzing composite omit maps, averaged among three distinct crystal lattices, and by calculating model-based, SeMet anomalous difference maps. There are at least four ordered sugars on many of the thirteen oligosaccharides.

  1. Contribution of Endocytic Motifs in the Cytoplasmic Tail of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein B to Virus Replication and Cell-Cell Fusion▿

    PubMed Central

    Beitia Ortiz de Zarate, Igor; Cantero-Aguilar, Lilia; Longo, Magalie; Berlioz-Torrent, Clarisse; Rozenberg, Flore

    2007-01-01

    The use of endocytic pathways by viral glycoproteins is thought to play various functions during viral infection. We previously showed in transfection assays that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB) is transported from the cell surface back to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and that two motifs of gB cytoplasmic tail, YTQV and LL, function distinctly in this process. To investigate the role of each of these gB trafficking signals in HSV-1 infection, we constructed recombinant viruses in which each motif was rendered nonfunctional by alanine mutagenesis. In infected cells, wild-type gB was internalized from the cell surface and concentrated in the TGN. Disruption of YTQV abolished internalization of gB during infection, whereas disruption of LL induced accumulation of internalized gB in early recycling endosomes and impaired its return to the TGN. The growth of both recombinants was moderately diminished. Moreover, the fusion phenotype of cells infected with the gB recombinants differed from that of cells infected with the wild-type virus. Cells infected with the YTQV-mutated virus displayed reduced cell-cell fusion, whereas giant syncytia were observed in cells infected with the LL-mutated virus. Furthermore, blocking gB internalization or impairing gB recycling to the cell surface, using drugs or a transdominant negative form of Rab11, significantly reduced cell-cell fusion. These results favor a role for endocytosis in virus replication and suggest that gB intracellular trafficking is involved in the regulation of cell-cell fusion. PMID:17913800

  2. Antigenic analysis of classical swine fever virus E2 glycoprotein using pig antibodies identifies residues contributing to antigenic variation of the vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains circulating in China

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glycoprotein E2, the immunodominant protein of classical swine fever virus (CSFV), can induce neutralizing antibodies and confer protective immunity in pigs. Our previous phylogenetic analysis showed that subgroup 2.1 viruses branched away from subgroup 1.1, the vaccine C-strain lineage, and became dominant in China. The E2 glycoproteins of CSFV C-strain and recent subgroup 2.1 field isolates are genetically different. However, it has not been clearly demonstrated how this diversity affects antigenicity of the protein. Results Antigenic variation of glycoprotein E2 was observed not only between CSFV vaccine C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains, but also among strains of the same subgroup 2.1 as determined by ELISA-based binding assay using pig antisera to the C-strain and a representative subgroup 2.1 strain QZ-07 currently circulating in China. Antigenic incompatibility of E2 proteins markedly reduced neutralization efficiency against heterologous strains. Single amino acid substitutions of D705N, L709P, G713E, N723S, and S779A on C-strain recombinant E2 (rE2) proteins significantly increased heterologous binding to anti-QZ-07 serum, suggesting that these residues may be responsible for the antigenic variation between the C-strain and subgroup 2.1 strains. Notably, a G713E substitution caused the most dramatic enhancement of binding of the variant C-strain rE2 protein to anti-QZ-07 serum. Multiple sequence alignment revealed that the glutamic acid residue at this position is conserved within group 2 strains, while the glycine residue is invariant among the vaccine strains, highlighting the role of the residue at this position as a major determinant of antigenic variation of E2. A variant Simpson's index analysis showed that both codons and amino acids of the residues contributing to antigenic variation have undergone similar diversification. Conclusions These results demonstrate that CSFV vaccine C-strain and group 2 strains circulating in China differ in

  3. Influences on the Design and Purification of Soluble, Recombinant Native-Like HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Rajesh P.; Yasmeen, Anila; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Go, Eden P.; Pritchard, Laura K.; Guttman, Miklos; Ketas, Thomas A.; Cottrell, Christopher A.; Wilson, Ian A.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Cupo, Albert; Crispin, Max; Lee, Kelly K.; Desaire, Heather; Ward, Andrew B.; Klasse, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have investigated factors that influence the production of native-like soluble, recombinant trimers based on the env genes of two isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), specifically 92UG037.8 (clade A) and CZA97.012 (clade C). When the recombinant trimers based on the env genes of isolates 92UG037.8 and CZA97.012 were made according to the SOSIP.664 design and purified by affinity chromatography using broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against quaternary epitopes (PGT145 and PGT151, respectively), the resulting trimers are highly stable and they are fully native-like when visualized by negative-stain electron microscopy. They also have a native-like (i.e., abundant) oligomannose glycan composition and display multiple bNAb epitopes while occluding those for nonneutralizing antibodies. In contrast, uncleaved, histidine-tagged Foldon (Fd) domain-containing gp140 proteins (gp140UNC-Fd-His), based on the same env genes, very rarely form native-like trimers, a finding that is consistent with their antigenic and biophysical properties and glycan composition. The addition of a 20-residue flexible linker (FL20) between the gp120 and gp41 ectodomain (gp41ECTO) subunits to make the uncleaved 92UG037.8 gp140-FL20 construct is not sufficient to create a native-like trimer, but a small percentage of native-like trimers were produced when an I559P substitution in gp41ECTO was also present. The further addition of a disulfide bond (SOS) to link the gp120 and gp41 subunits in the uncleaved gp140-FL20-SOSIP protein increases native-like trimer formation to ∼20 to 30%. Analysis of the disulfide bond content shows that misfolded gp120 subunits are abundant in uncleaved CZA97.012 gp140UNC-Fd-His proteins but very rare in native-like trimer populations. The design and stabilization method and the purification strategy are, therefore, all important influences on the quality of trimeric Env proteins and hence their suitability as vaccine components

  4. Elite Control, Gut CD4 T Cell Sparing, and Enhanced Mucosal T Cell Responses in Macaca nemestrina Infected by a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Lacking a gp41 Trafficking Motif

    PubMed Central

    Breed, Matthew W.; Elser, Samra E.; Torben, Workineh; Jordan, Andrea P. O.; Aye, Pyone P.; Midkiff, Cecily; Schiro, Faith; Sugimoto, Chie; Alvarez-Hernandez, Xavier; Blair, Robert V.; Somasunderam, Anoma; Utay, Netanya S.; Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Pahar, Bapi; Wiseman, Roger W.; O'Connor, David H.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Marsh, Mark; Li, Yuan; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Keele, Brandon F.; Fultz, Patricia N.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deletion of Gly-720 and Tyr-721 from a highly conserved GYxxØ trafficking signal in the SIVmac239 envelope glycoprotein cytoplasmic domain, producing a virus termed ΔGY, leads to a striking perturbation in pathogenesis in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Infected macaques develop immune activation and progress to AIDS, but with only limited and transient infection of intestinal CD4+ T cells and an absence of microbial translocation. Here we evaluated ΔGY in pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina), a species in which SIVmac239 infection typically leads to increased immune activation and more rapid progression to AIDS than in rhesus macaques. In pig-tailed macaques, ΔGY also replicated acutely to high peak plasma RNA levels identical to those for SIVmac239 and caused only transient infection of CD4+ T cells in the gut lamina propria and no microbial translocation. However, in marked contrast to rhesus macaques, 19 of 21 pig-tailed macaques controlled ΔGY replication with plasma viral loads of <15 to 50 RNA copies/ml. CD4+ T cells were preserved in blood and gut for up to 100 weeks with no immune activation or disease progression. Robust antiviral CD4+ T cell responses were seen, particularly in the gut. Anti-CD8 antibody depletion demonstrated CD8+ cellular control of viral replication. Two pig-tailed macaques progressed to disease with persisting viremia and possible compensatory mutations in the cytoplasmic tail. These studies demonstrate a marked perturbation in pathogenesis caused by ΔGY's ablation of the GYxxØ trafficking motif and reveal, paradoxically, that viral control is enhanced in a macaque species typically predisposed to more pathogenic manifestations of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) reflects a balance between viral replication, host innate and adaptive antiviral immune responses, and sustained immune activation

  5. Bloch spin waves and emergent structure in protein folding with HIV envelope glycoprotein as an example.

    PubMed

    Dai, Jin; Niemi, Antti J; He, Jianfeng; Sieradzan, Adam; Ilieva, Nevena

    2016-03-01

    We inquire how structure emerges during the process of protein folding. For this we scrutinize collective many-atom motions during all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce, develop, and employ various topological techniques, in combination with analytic tools that we deduce from the concept of integrable models and structure of discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The example we consider is an α-helical subunit of the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41. The helical structure is stable when the subunit is part of the biological oligomer. But in isolation, the helix becomes unstable, and the monomer starts deforming. We follow the process computationally. We interpret the evolving structure both in terms of a backbone based Heisenberg spin chain and in terms of a side chain based XY spin chain. We find that in both cases the formation of protein supersecondary structure is akin the formation of a topological Bloch domain wall along a spin chain. During the process we identify three individual Bloch walls and we show that each of them can be modelled with a precision of tenths to several angstroms in terms of a soliton solution to a discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. PMID:27078392

  6. Bloch spin waves and emergent structure in protein folding with HIV envelope glycoprotein as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jin; Niemi, Antti J.; He, Jianfeng; Sieradzan, Adam; Ilieva, Nevena

    2016-03-01

    We inquire how structure emerges during the process of protein folding. For this we scrutinize collective many-atom motions during all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We introduce, develop, and employ various topological techniques, in combination with analytic tools that we deduce from the concept of integrable models and structure of discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The example we consider is an α -helical subunit of the HIV envelope glycoprotein gp41. The helical structure is stable when the subunit is part of the biological oligomer. But in isolation, the helix becomes unstable, and the monomer starts deforming. We follow the process computationally. We interpret the evolving structure both in terms of a backbone based Heisenberg spin chain and in terms of a side chain based XY spin chain. We find that in both cases the formation of protein supersecondary structure is akin the formation of a topological Bloch domain wall along a spin chain. During the process we identify three individual Bloch walls and we show that each of them can be modelled with a precision of tenths to several angstroms in terms of a soliton solution to a discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  7. Glycoproteins: Occurrence and Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Valentin

    Protein glycosylation is regarded as the most complex form of post-translational modification leading to a heterogeneous expression of glycoproteins as mixtures of glycoforms. This chapter describes the structure and occurrence of glycoproteins with respect to their glycan chains. Discussed are different carbohydrate-peptide linkages including GPI anchors, common structures of N- and O-glycans, and the structure of glycosaminoglycans contained in proteoglycans. Also covered are the bacterial cell wall polymer peptidoglycan and the glycopeptide antibiotics of the vancomycin group. Properties and functions of the glycans contained in glycoproteins are dealt with in the next chapter of this book.

  8. The V4 and V5 Variable Loops of HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Are Tolerant to Insertion of Green Fluorescent Protein and Are Useful Targets for Labeling.

    PubMed

    Nakane, Shuhei; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Matsuda, Zene

    2015-06-12

    The mature human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) comprises the non-covalently associated gp120 and gp41 subunits generated from the gp160 precursor. Recent structural analyses have provided quaternary structural models for gp120/gp41 trimers, including the variable loops (V1-V5) of gp120. In these models, the V3 loop is located under V1/V2 at the apical center of the Env trimer, and the V4 and V5 loops project outward from the trimeric protomers. In addition, the V4 and V5 loops are predicted to have less movement upon receptor binding during membrane fusion events. We performed insertional mutagenesis using a GFP variant, GFPOPT, placed into the variable loops of HXB2 gp120. This allowed us to evaluate the current structural models and to simultaneously generate a GFP-tagged HIV-1 Env, which was useful for image analyses. All GFP-inserted mutants showed similar levels of whole-cell expression, although certain mutants, particularly V3 mutants, showed lower levels of cell surface expression. Functional evaluation of their fusogenicities in cell-cell and virus-like particle-cell fusion assays revealed that V3 was the most sensitive to the insertion and that the V1/V2 loops were less sensitive than V3. The V4 and V5 loops were the most tolerant to insertion, and certain tag proteins other than GFPOPT could also be inserted without functional consequences. Our results support the current structural models and provide a GFPOPT-tagged Env construct for imaging studies.

  9. Specific lysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected cells by a HLA-A3.1-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clone that recognizes a conserved peptide sequence within the gp41 subunit of the envelope protein.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, K; Dai, L C; Fuerst, T R; Biddison, W E; Earl, P L; Moss, B; Ennis, F A

    1991-01-01

    A HLA-A3.1-restricted CD8+ cytotoxic T-cell clone, E7.20, that lyses cells infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 was isolated from an infected individual. The epitope was localized to amino acids 768-778 (RLRDLLLIVTR, NL43 env sequence) of the cytoplasmic domain of gp41 by successive use of a panel of recombinant vaccinia viruses that express truncated env genes and synthetic peptides. The epitope is conserved on 7 (NL43, BRU, HXB2, BRVA, SC, JH3, and JFL) of 13 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates from North America. Synthetic peptides of this region of strains RF and CDC4 are also recognized by E7.20 despite a nonconservative Thr----Val or Thr----Ala change at amino acid 777; however, an MN peptide, which has four amino acid substitutions, was not reactive. The epitope recognized by E7.20 has a predicted hydrophobic alpha-helical structure, with three contiguous Leu residues followed by Ile and Val at amino acids 772-776. Cytotoxicity was restricted by HLA-A3.1 using allogeneic target cells that shared HLA class I antigens with the donor and an HLA-A and -B negative human plasma cell line transfected with the HLA-A3.1 gene. The transfected cells were infectable by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains IIIB and MN but only the former virus sensitized them to killing by E7.20. The ability of E7.20 to specifically lyse a human lymphocyte line infected with a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strain carrying the conserved epitope is consistent with an important role for cytotoxic T cells in controlling infection. PMID:1719555

  10. Residues in the membrane-spanning domain core modulate conformation and fusogenicity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Shang Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2010-09-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for its biological activity. Initial studies have defined an almost invariant 'core' structure in the MSD and demonstrated that it is crucial for anchoring Env in the membrane and virus entry. We show here that amino acid substitutions in the MSD 'core' do not influence specific virus-cell attachment, nor CD4 receptor and CXCR4 coreceptor recognition by Env. However, substitutions within the MSD 'core' delayed the kinetics and reduced the efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by Env. Although we observed no evidence that membrane fusion mediated by the MSD core mutants was arrested at a hemifusion stage, impaired Env fusogenicity was correlated with minor conformational changes in the V2, C1, and C5 regions in gp120 and the immunodominant loop in gp41. These changes could delay initiation of the conformational changes required in the fusion process.

  11. Release of gp120 Restraints Leads to an Entry-Competent Intermediate State of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaochu; Gu, Christopher; Ventura, John D.; Castillo-Menendez, Luis; Melillo, Bruno; Terry, Daniel S.; Smith, Amos B.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Munro, James B.; Mothes, Walther; Finzi, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers [(gp120/gp41)3] typically exist in a metastable closed conformation (state 1). Binding the CD4 receptor triggers Env to undergo extensive conformational changes to mediate virus entry. We identified specific gp120 residues that restrain Env in state 1. Alteration of these restraining residues destabilized state 1, allowing Env to populate a functional conformation (state 2) intermediate between state 1 and the full CD4-bound state (state 3). Increased state 2 occupancy was associated with lower energy barriers between the states. State 2 was an obligate intermediate for all transitions between state 1 and state 3. State 2-enriched Envs required lower CD4 concentrations to trigger virus entry and more efficiently infected cells expressing low levels of CD4. These Envs were resistant to several broadly neutralizing antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors. Thus, state 2 is an Env conformation on the virus entry pathway; sampling state 2 increases the adaptability of HIV-1 to different host cell receptor levels and immune environments. Our results provide new insights into the conformational regulation of HIV-1 entry. PMID:27795397

  12. Genetic signatures in the envelope glycoproteins of HIV-1 that associate with broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gnanakaran, S; Daniels, Marcus G; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Lapedes, Alan S; Sethi, Anurag; Li, Ming; Tang, Haili; Greene, Kelli; Gao, Hongmei; Haynes, Barton F; Cohen, Myron S; Shaw, George M; Seaman, Michael S; Kumar, Amit; Gao, Feng; Montefiori, David C; Korber, Bette

    2010-01-01

    A steady increase in knowledge of the molecular and antigenic structure of the gp120 and gp41 HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env) is yielding important new insights for vaccine design, but it has been difficult to translate this information to an immunogen that elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies. To help bridge this gap, we used phylogenetically corrected statistical methods to identify amino acid signature patterns in Envs derived from people who have made potently neutralizing antibodies, with the hypothesis that these Envs may share common features that would be useful for incorporation in a vaccine immunogen. Before attempting this, essentially as a control, we explored the utility of our computational methods for defining signatures of complex neutralization phenotypes by analyzing Env sequences from 251 clonal viruses that were differentially sensitive to neutralization by the well-characterized gp120-specific monoclonal antibody, b12. We identified ten b12-neutralization signatures, including seven either in the b12-binding surface of gp120 or in the V2 region of gp120 that have been previously shown to impact b12 sensitivity. A simple algorithm based on the b12 signature pattern was predictive of b12 sensitivity/resistance in an additional blinded panel of 57 viruses. Upon obtaining these reassuring outcomes, we went on to apply these same computational methods to define signature patterns in Env from HIV-1 infected individuals who had potent, broadly neutralizing responses. We analyzed a checkerboard-style neutralization dataset with sera from 69 HIV-1-infected individuals tested against a panel of 25 different Envs. Distinct clusters of sera with high and low neutralization potencies were identified. Six signature positions in Env sequences obtained from the 69 samples were found to be strongly associated with either the high or low potency responses. Five sites were in the CD4-induced coreceptor binding site of gp120, suggesting an important role for

  13. Dicalcin Inhibits Fertilization through Its Binding to a Glycoprotein in the Egg Envelope in Xenopus laevis*

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Naofumi; Ogawa, Motoyuki; Shinmyo, Yukiko; Hiraoka, Yoshiki; Takamatsu, Ken; Kawamura, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    Fertilization comprises oligosaccharide-mediated sperm-egg interactions, including sperm binding to an extracellular egg envelope, sperm penetration through the envelope, and fusion with an egg plasma membrane. We show that Xenopus dicalcin, an S100-like Ca2+-binding protein, present in the extracellular egg envelope (vitelline envelope (VE)), is a suppressive mediator of sperm-egg interaction. Preincubation with specific antibody greatly increased the efficiency of in vitro fertilization, whereas prior application of exogenous dicalcin substantially inhibited fertilization as well as sperm binding to an egg and in vitro sperm penetration through the VE protein layer. Dicalcin showed binding to protein cores of gp41 and gp37, constituents of VE, in a Ca2+-dependent manner and increased in vivo reactivity of VE with a lectin, Ricinus communis agglutinin I, which was accounted for by increased binding ability of gp41 to the lectin and greater exposure of gp41 to an external environment. Our findings strongly suggest that dicalcin regulates the distribution of oligosaccharides within the VE through its binding to the protein core of gp41, probably by modulating configuration of oligosaccharides on gp41 and the three-dimensional structure of VE framework, and thereby plays a pivotal role in sperm-egg interactions during fertilization. PMID:20299459

  14. Analysis of Glycoproteins for Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    He, Jintang; Liu, Yashu; Wu, Jing; Lubman, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Glycoproteins play an important role in cell signaling and cell-cell interaction. The alterations of glycoproteins are often relevant to progression of diseases and these changed glycoproteins can be important biomarkers. The lectin-based glycoproteomic technology has extensively been used for high-throughput screening of potential glycoprotein biomarkers. Here we describe a multi-lectin affinity chromatography and label-free quantitative glycoproteomic approach for discovery of glycoprotein biomarkers relevant to differentiation of glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:23625399

  15. Lubrication by glycoprotein brushes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappone, Bruno; Ruths, Marina; Greene, George W.; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2006-03-01

    Grafted polyelectrolyte brushes show excellent lubricating properties under water and have been proposed as a model to study boundary lubrication in biological system. Lubricin, a glycoprotein of the synovial fluid, is considered the major boundary lubricant of articular joints. Using the Surface Force Apparatus, we have measured normal and friction forces between model surfaces (negatively charged mica, positively charged poly-lysine and aminothiol, hydrophobic alkanethiol) bearing adsorbed layers of lubricin. Lubricin layers acts like a versatile anti-adhesive, adsorbing on all the surfaces considered and creating a repulsion similar to the force between end-grafted polymer brushes. Analogies with polymer brushes also appear from bridging experiment, where proteins molecules are end-adsorbed on two opposing surfaces at the same time. Lubricin `brushes' show good lubricating ability at low applied pressures (P<0.5MPa), especially on negatively charged surfaces like mica. At higher load, the adsorbed layers wears and fails lubricating the surfaces, while still protecting the underlying substrate from wearing. Lubricin might thus be a first example of biological polyelectrolytes providing `brush-like' lubrication and wear-protection.

  16. Folding of synthetic homogeneous glycoproteins in the presence of a glycoprotein folding sensor enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dedola, Simone; Izumi, Masayuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Seko, Akira; Kanamori, Akiko; Sakono, Masafumi; Ito, Yukishige; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-10

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) plays a key role in recognizing folded and misfolded glycoproteins in the glycoprotein quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum. UGGT detects misfolded glycoproteins and re-glucosylates them as a tag for misfolded glycoproteins. A flexible model to reproduce in vitro folding of a glycoprotein in the presence of UGGT in a mixture containing correctly folded, folding intermediates, and misfolded glycoproteins is described. The data demonstrates that UGGT can re-glucosylate all intermediates in the in vitro folding experiments, thus indicating that UGGT inspects not only final folded products, but also the glycoprotein folding intermediates.

  17. Diverse specificity and effector function among human antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein epitopes exposed by CD4 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Yongjun; Pazgier, Marzena; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Kamin-Lewis, Roberta; Al-Darmarki, Salma; Flinko, Robin; Lovo, Elena; Wu, Xueji; Robinson, James E.; Seaman, Michael S.; Fouts, Timothy R.; Gallo, Robert C.; DeVico, Anthony L.; Lewis, George K.

    2012-12-13

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) undergoes conformational transitions consequent to CD4 binding and coreceptor engagement during viral entry. The physical steps in this process are becoming defined, but less is known about their significance as targets of antibodies potentially protective against HIV-1 infection. Here we probe the functional significance of transitional epitope exposure by characterizing 41 human mAbs specific for epitopes exposed on trimeric Env after CD4 engagement. These mAbs recognize three epitope clusters: cluster A, the gp120 face occluded by gp41 in trimeric Env; cluster B, a region proximal to the coreceptor-binding site (CoRBS) and involving the V1/V2 domain; and cluster C, the coreceptor-binding site. The mAbs were evaluated functionally by antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and for neutralization of Tiers 1 and 2 pseudoviruses. All three clusters included mAbs mediating ADCC. However, there was a strong potency bias for cluster A, which harbors at least three potent ADCC epitopes whose cognate mAbs have electropositive paratopes. Cluster A epitopes are functional ADCC targets during viral entry in an assay format using virion-sensitized target cells. In contrast, only cluster C contained epitopes that were recognized by neutralizing mAbs. There was significant diversity in breadth and potency that correlated with epitope fine specificity. In contrast, ADCC potency had no relationship with neutralization potency or breadth for any epitope cluster. In conclusion, Fc-mediated effector function and neutralization coselect with specificity in anti-Env antibody responses, but the nature of selection is distinct for these two antiviral activities.

  18. Diverse specificity and effector function among human antibodies to HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein epitopes exposed by CD4 binding

    DOE PAGES

    Guan, Yongjun; Pazgier, Marzena; Sajadi, Mohammad M.; Kamin-Lewis, Roberta; Al-Darmarki, Salma; Flinko, Robin; Lovo, Elena; Wu, Xueji; Robinson, James E.; Seaman, Michael S.; et al

    2012-12-13

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) undergoes conformational transitions consequent to CD4 binding and coreceptor engagement during viral entry. The physical steps in this process are becoming defined, but less is known about their significance as targets of antibodies potentially protective against HIV-1 infection. Here we probe the functional significance of transitional epitope exposure by characterizing 41 human mAbs specific for epitopes exposed on trimeric Env after CD4 engagement. These mAbs recognize three epitope clusters: cluster A, the gp120 face occluded by gp41 in trimeric Env; cluster B, a region proximal to the coreceptor-binding site (CoRBS) and involving the V1/V2 domain;more » and cluster C, the coreceptor-binding site. The mAbs were evaluated functionally by antibody-dependent, cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and for neutralization of Tiers 1 and 2 pseudoviruses. All three clusters included mAbs mediating ADCC. However, there was a strong potency bias for cluster A, which harbors at least three potent ADCC epitopes whose cognate mAbs have electropositive paratopes. Cluster A epitopes are functional ADCC targets during viral entry in an assay format using virion-sensitized target cells. In contrast, only cluster C contained epitopes that were recognized by neutralizing mAbs. There was significant diversity in breadth and potency that correlated with epitope fine specificity. In contrast, ADCC potency had no relationship with neutralization potency or breadth for any epitope cluster. In conclusion, Fc-mediated effector function and neutralization coselect with specificity in anti-Env antibody responses, but the nature of selection is distinct for these two antiviral activities.« less

  19. Stabilizing Exposure of Conserved Epitopes by Structure Guided Insertion of Disulfide Bond in HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Pampi; Labranche, Celia; Go, Eden P.; Clark, Daniel F.; Sun, Yide; Nandi, Avishek; Hartog, Karin; Desaire, Heather; Montefiori, David; Carfi, Andrea; Srivastava, Indresh K.; Barnett, Susan W.

    2013-01-01

    Entry of HIV-1 into target cells requires binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to cellular receptors and subsequent conformational changes that culminates in fusion of viral and target cell membranes. Recent structural information has revealed that these conformational transitions are regulated by three conserved but potentially flexible layers stacked between the receptor-binding domain (gp120) and the fusion arm (gp41) of Env. We hypothesized that artificial insertion of a covalent bond will ‘snap’ Env into a conformation that is less mobile and stably expose conserved sites. Therefore, we analyzed the interface between these gp120 layers (layers 1, 2 and 3) and identified residues that may form disulfide bonds when substituted with cysteines. We subsequently probed the structures of the resultant mutant gp120 proteins by assaying their binding to a variety of ligands using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) assay. We found that a single disulfide bond strategically inserted between the highly conserved layers 1 and 2 (C65-C115) is able to ‘lock’ gp120 in a CD4 receptor bound conformation (in the absence of CD4), as indicated by the lower dissociation constant (Kd) for the CD4-induced (CD4i) epitope binding 17b antibody. When disulfide-stabilized monomeric (gp120) and trimeric (gp140) Envs were used to immunize rabbits, they were found to elicit a higher proportion of antibodies directed against both CD4i and CD4 binding site epitopes than the wild-type proteins. These results demonstrate that structure-guided stabilization of inter-layer interactions within HIV-1 Env can be used to expose conserved epitopes and potentially overcome the sequence diversity of these molecules. PMID:24146829

  20. Salivary Mucin 19 Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Culp, David J.; Robinson, Bently; Cash, Melanie N.; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Stewart, Carol; Cuadra-Saenz, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Saliva functions in innate immunity of the oral cavity, protecting against demineralization of teeth (i.e. dental caries), a highly prevalent infectious disease associated with Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen also linked to endocarditis and atheromatous plaques. Gel-forming mucins are a major constituent of saliva. Because Muc19 is the dominant salivary gel-forming mucin in mice, we studied Muc19−/− mice for changes in innate immune functions of saliva in interactions with S. mutans. When challenged with S. mutans and a cariogenic diet, total smooth and sulcal surface lesions are more than 2- and 1.6-fold higher in Muc19−/− mice compared with wild type, whereas the severity of lesions are up to 6- and 10-fold higher, respectively. Furthermore, the oral microbiota of Muc19−/− mice display higher levels of indigenous streptococci. Results emphasize the importance of a single salivary constituent in the innate immune functions of saliva. In vitro studies of S. mutans and Muc19 interactions (i.e. adherence, aggregation, and biofilm formation) demonstrate Muc19 poorly aggregates S. mutans. Nonetheless, aggregation is enhanced upon adding Muc19 to saliva from Muc19−/− mice, indicating Muc19 assists in bacterial clearance through formation of heterotypic complexes with salivary constituents that bind S. mutans, thus representing a novel innate immune function for salivary gel-forming mucins. In humans, expression of salivary MUC19 is unclear. We find MUC19 transcripts in salivary glands of seven subjects and demonstrate MUC19 glycoproteins in glandular mucous cells and saliva. Similarities and differences between mice and humans in the expression and functions of salivary gel-forming mucins are discussed. PMID:25512380

  1. Downregulation of CYP3A and P-glycoprotein in the secondary inflammatory response of mice with dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis and its contribution to cyclosporine A blood concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Shoji; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Miki, Ikuya; Inoue, Jun; Hamaguchi, Tsuneo; Tanahashi, Toshihito; Mizuno, Shigeto

    2014-01-01

    CYP3A and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) play important roles in drug metabolism and excretion; however, their functions in pathological conditions remain unclear. Hepatobiliary abnormalities have been described in patients with ulcerative colitis, which may affect drug metabolism and excretion in the liver and small intestine. We examined the functions of CYP3A and P-gp in the liver and small intestine of mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis. Up to day 7, inflammatory markers were significantly increased in the livers of DSS-treated mice, accompanied by decreased CYP3A. Additionally hepatobiliary transporters and Pregnane X receptor, which regulates the transcriptional activation of CYP3A, were reduced. Both CYP3A and P-gp were significantly decreased in the upper small intestine of DSS-treated mice on day 7. This was associated with the increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, but not changes in nuclear receptor expression. On day 7 of DSS treatment, the concentrations of cyclosporine A (CsA), a substrate of both CYP3A and P-gp, were significantly higher than controls. These results indicated the existence of a second inflammatory response in the liver and upper small intestine of mice with DSS-induced colitis, and bioavailability of CsA was increased by the dysfunction of CYP3A and P-gp in these organs.

  2. Anti-Glycoprotein G Antibodies of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Contribute to Complete Protection after Vaccination in Mice and Induce Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Mediated Cytolysis

    PubMed Central

    Görander, Staffan; Ekblad, Maria; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2) of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC) activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials. PMID:25398047

  3. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Mellado, W.; Horwitz, S.B.

    1987-11-03

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistant phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl/sub 2/ was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 ..mu..M cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance.

  4. Structure and Function of RSV Surface Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Jason S.; Ray, William C.; Peeples, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The two major glycoproteins on the surface of the RSV virion, the attachment glycoprotein (G) and the fusion (F) glycoprotein, control the initial phases of infection. G targets the ciliated cells of the airways, and F causes the virion membrane to fuse with a target cell membrane. The F protein is the major target for antiviral drug development, and both G and F glycoproteins are the antigens targeted by neutralizing antibodies induced by infection. In this chapter we review the structure and function of the RSV surface glycoproteins, including recent X-ray crystallographic data of the F glycoprotein in its pre- and postfusion conformations, and discuss how this information informs antigen selection and vaccine development. PMID:24362685

  5. Production and characterization of high-affinity human monoclonal antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins in a mouse model expressing human immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Neil C; Davies, Sarah L; Jeffs, Simon A; Vieira, Sueli M; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2007-02-01

    Human (Hu) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) are useful tools in the structural and functional analysis of Env, are under development both as potential prophylaxis and as therapy for established HIV-1 infection, and have crucial roles in guiding the design of preventative vaccines. Despite representing more than 50% of infections globally, no MAbs have been generated in any species against C clade HIV-1 Env. To generate HuMAbs to a novel Chinese C clade Env vaccine candidate (primary isolate strain HIV-1(97CN54)), we used BAB5 mice that express a human immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibody repertoire in place of endogenous murine immunoglobulins. When immunized with HIV-1(97CN54) Env, these mice developed antigen-specific IgM antibodies. Hybridoma fusions using splenocytes from these mice enabled the isolation of two Env-specific IgM HuMAbs: N3C5 and N03B11. N3C5 bound to HIV-1 Env from clades A and C, whereas N03B11 bound two geographically distant clade C isolates but not Env from other clades. These HuMAbs bind conformational epitopes within the immunodominant region of the gp41 ectodomain. N3C5 weakly neutralized the autologous isolate in the absence of complement and weakly enhanced infection in the presence of complement. N03B11 has no effect on infectivity in either the presence or the absence of complement. These novel HuMAbs are useful reagents for the study of HIV-1 Env relevant to the global pandemic, and mice producing human immunoglobulin present a tool for the production of such antibodies.

  6. Dominant-negative effect of hetero-oligomerization on the function of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Carolina; Klasse, Per Johan; Kibler, Christopher W.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P. . E-mail: jpm2003@med.cornell.edu; Beddows, Simon

    2006-07-20

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein forms trimers that mediate interactions with the CD4 receptor and a co-receptor on the target cell surface, thereby triggering viral fusion with the cell membrane. Cleavage of Env into its surface, gp120, and transmembrane, gp41, moieties is necessary for activation of its fusogenicity. Here, we produced pseudoviruses with phenotypically mixed wild-type (Wt) and mutant, cleavage-incompetent Env in order to quantify the effects of incorporating uncleaved Env on virion infectivity, antigenicity and neutralization sensitivity. We modeled the relative infectivity of three such phenotypically mixed viral strains, JR-FL, HXBc2 and a derivative of the latter, 3.2P, as a function of the relative amount of Wt Env. The data were fit very closely (R {sup 2} > 0.99) by models which assumed that only Wt homotrimers were functional, with different approximate thresholds of critical numbers of functional trimers per virion for the three strains. We also produced 3.2P pseudoviruses containing both a cleavage-competent Env that is defective for binding the neutralizing monoclonal antibody (NAb) 2G12, and a cleavage-incompetent Env that binds 2G12. The 2G12 NAb was not able to reduce the infectivity of these pseudoviruses detectably. Their neutralization by the CD4-binding site-directed agents CD4-IgG2 and NAb b12 was also unaffected by 2G12 binding to uncleaved Env. These results further strengthen the conclusion that only homotrimers consisting of cleaved Env are functional. They also imply that the function of a trimer is unaffected sterically by the binding of an antibody to an adjacent trimer.

  7. Topological analysis of HIV-1 glycoproteins expressed in situ on virus surfaces reveals tighter packing but greater conformational flexibility than for soluble gp120.

    PubMed

    Tong, Tommy; Osawa, Keiko; Robinson, James E; Crooks, Ema T; Binley, James M

    2013-08-01

    In natural infection, antibodies interact with HIV-1 primarily through nonfunctional forms of envelope glycoproteins (Env), including uncleaved (UNC) gp160 and gp41 stumps. These antigens are important to fully characterize, as they may be decoys that promote nonneutralizing responses and may also be targets for nonneutralizing effector responses. In this study, we compared the antigenic properties of Env expressed in situ on pseudovirion virus-like particle (VLP) surfaces and soluble gp120 using harmonized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and a panel of 51 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Only 32 of 46 soluble gp120-reactive MAbs recognized the primary UNC gp160 antigen of VLPs. Indeed, many epitopes were poorly exposed (C1, V2, C1-C4, C4, C4-V3, CD4 induced [CD4i], and PGT group 3) or obscured (C2, C5, and C1-C5) on VLPs. In further studies, VLP Env exhibited an increased degree of inter-MAb competition, the epicenter of which was the base of the V3 loop, where PGT, 2G12, V3, and CD4 binding site specificities competed. UNC gp160 also underwent more drastic soluble CD4 (sCD4)-induced conformational changes than soluble gp120, exposing CD4i, C1-C4, and V2 epitopes. A greater propensity of UNC gp160 to undergo conformational changes was also suggested by the induction of CD4i MAb binding to VLPs by a V3 MAb as well as by soluble CD4. The same effect was not observed for soluble gp120. Taken together, our data suggest that membrane-expressed UNC gp160 exists in a less "triggered" conformational state than soluble gp120 and that MAb binding to UNC gp160 tends to have greater conformational consequences.

  8. Effect of glycoprotein-processing inhibitors on fucosylation of glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, P.M.; Elbein, A.D.

    1985-11-25

    Influenza viral hemagglutinin contains L-fucose linked alpha 1,6 to some of the innermost GlcNAc residues of the complex oligosaccharides. To determine what structural features of the oligosaccharide were required for fucosylation influenza virus-infected MDCK cells were incubated in the presence of various inhibitors of glycoprotein processing to stop trimming at different points. After several hours of incubation with the inhibitors, (5,6-TH)fucose and (1- UC)mannose were added to label the glycoproteins, and cells were incubated in inhibitor and isotope for about 40 h to produce mature virus. Glycopeptides were prepared from the viral and the cellular glycoproteins, and these glycopeptides were isolated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-4. The glycopeptides were then digested with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H and rechromatographed on the Bio-Gel column. In the presence of castanospermine or 2,5-dihydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine, both inhibitors of glucosidase I, most of the radioactive mannose was found in Glc3Man7-9GlcNAc structures, and these did not contain radioactive fucose. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, most of the ( UC)mannose was in a Man9GlcNAc structure which was also not fucosylated. However, in the presence of swainsonine, an inhibitor of mannosidase II, the ( UC)mannose was mostly in hybrid types of oligosaccharides, and these structures also contained radioactive fucose. Treatment of the hybrid structures with endoglucosaminidase H released the (TH)fucose as a small peptide (Fuc-GlcNAc-peptide), whereas the ( UC)mannose remained with the oligosaccharide. The data support the conclusion that the addition of fucose linked alpha 1,6 to the asparagine-linked GlcNAc is dependent upon the presence of a beta 1,2-GlcNAc residue on the alpha 1,3-mannose branch of the core structure.

  9. A sweet code for glycoprotein folding.

    PubMed

    Caramelo, Julio J; Parodi, Armando J

    2015-11-14

    Glycoprotein synthesis is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen upon transfer of a glycan (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) from a lipid derivative to Asn residues (N-glycosylation). N-Glycan-dependent quality control of glycoprotein folding in the ER prevents exit to Golgi of folding intermediates, irreparably misfolded glycoproteins and incompletely assembled multimeric complexes. It also enhances folding efficiency by preventing aggregation and facilitating formation of proper disulfide bonds. The control mechanism essentially involves four components, resident lectin-chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin) that recognize monoglucosylated polymannose protein-linked glycans, lectin-associated oxidoreductase acting on monoglucosylated glycoproteins (ERp57), a glucosyltransferase that creates monoglucosylated epitopes in protein-linked glycans (UGGT) and a glucosidase (GII) that removes the glucose units added by UGGT. This last enzyme is the only mechanism component sensing glycoprotein conformations as it creates monoglucosylated glycans exclusively in not properly folded glycoproteins or in not completely assembled multimeric glycoprotein complexes. Glycoproteins that fail to properly fold are eventually driven to proteasomal degradation in the cytosol following the ER-associated degradation pathway, in which the extent of N-glycan demannosylation by ER mannosidases play a relevant role in the identification of irreparably misfolded glycoproteins.

  10. Functional roles of membrane glycoprotein CD36.

    PubMed

    Daviet, L; McGregor, J L

    1996-01-01

    Cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are mediated by a number of membrane glycoproteins. On the basis of structural homologies, several families of cell adhesion molecules (integrins, selectins, immunoglobulins, cadherins, leucine-rich glycoproteins) have been established. Since 1991, a new family of CD36-like proteins has been identified. CD36 is a cell surface glycoprotein that interacts with a large variety of ligands. CD36 has been implicated in thrombosis, vascular biology, lipid metabolism and atherogenesis. In this review, we aim to summarize our present knowledge on this important, multifunctional glycoprotein. PMID:21043590

  11. The B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2)-inhibitors, ABT-737 and ABT-263, are substrates for P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Meike; Dickens, David; Dyer, Martin J.S.; Owen, Andrew; Pirmohamed, Munir; Cohen, Gerald M.

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The BCL2-inhibitor ABT-263 is a substrate for P-glycoprotein. {yields} Apoptosis is inhibited by P-glycoprotein expression. {yields} Overexpression of P-glycoprotein may contribute to resistance to ABT-263 or ABT-737. -- Abstract: Inhibition of BCL2 proteins is one of the most promising new approaches to targeted cancer therapy resulting in the induction of apoptosis. Amongst the most specific BCL2-inhibitors identified are ABT-737 and ABT-263. However, targeted therapy is often only effective for a limited amount of time because of the occurrence of drug resistance. In this study, the interaction of BCL2-inhibitors with the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein was investigated. Using {sup 3}H labelled ABT-263, we found that cells with high P-glycoprotein activity accumulated less drug. In addition, cells with increased P-glycoprotein expression were more resistant to apoptosis induced by either ABT-737 or ABT-263. Addition of tariquidar or verapamil sensitized the cells to BCL2-inhibitor treatment, resulting in higher apoptosis. Our data suggest that the BCL2-inhibitors ABT-737 and ABT-263 are substrates for P-glycoprotein. Over-expression of P-glycoprotein may be, at least partly, responsible for resistance to these BCL2-inhibitors.

  12. Clinical applications of bacterial glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Kelly M; Smith, Jeffrey C; Twine, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    There is an ongoing race between bacterial evolution and medical advances. Pathogens have the advantages of short generation times and horizontal gene transfer that enable rapid adaptation to new host environments and therapeutics that currently outpaces clinical research. Antibiotic resistance, the growing impact of nosocomial infections, cancer-causing bacteria, the risk of zoonosis, and the possibility of biowarfare all emphasize the increasingly urgent need for medical research focussed on bacterial pathogens. Bacterial glycoproteins are promising targets for alternative therapeutic intervention since they are often surface exposed, involved in host-pathogen interactions, required for virulence, and contain distinctive glycan structures. The potential exists to exploit these unique structures to improve clinical prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies. Translation of the potential in this field to actual clinical impact is an exciting prospect for fighting infectious diseases. PMID:26971465

  13. Sweating the small stuff: Glycoproteins in human sweat and their unexplored potential for microbial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Robyn A; Gueniche, Audrey; Adam de Beaumais, Ségolène; Breton, Lionel; Dalko-Csiba, Maria; Packer, Nicolle H

    2016-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that secretory fluids such as tears, saliva and milk play an important role in protecting the human body from infection via a washing mechanism involving glycan-mediated adhesion of potential pathogens to secretory glycoproteins. Interaction of sweat with bacteria is well established as the cause of sweat-associated malodor. However, the role of sweat glycoproteins in microbial attachment has received little, if any, research interest in the past. In this review, we demonstrate how recent published studies involving high-throughput proteomic analysis have inadvertently, and fortuitously, exposed an abundance of glycoproteins in sweat, many of which have also been identified in other secretory fluids. We bring together research demonstrating microbial adhesion to these secretory glycoproteins in tears, saliva and milk and suggest a similar role of the sweat glycoproteins in mediating microbial attachment to sweat and/or skin. The contribution of glycan-mediated microbial adhesion to sweat glycoproteins, and the associated impact on sweat derived malodor and pathogenic skin infections are unchartered new research areas that we are beginning to explore. PMID:26582610

  14. UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT1) promotes substrate solubility in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Sean P.; Jaber, Nikita S.; Molinari, Maurizio; Arvan, Peter; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2013-01-01

    Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is error prone, and ER quality control (ERQC) processes ensure that only correctly folded proteins are exported from the ER. Glycoproteins can be retained in the ER by ERQC, and this retention contributes to multiple human diseases, termed ER storage diseases. UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT1) acts as a central component of glycoprotein ERQC, monoglucosylating deglucosylated N-glycans of incompletely folded glycoproteins and promoting subsequent reassociation with the lectin-like chaperones calreticulin and calnexin. The extent to which UGGT1 influences glycoprotein folding, however, has only been investigated for a few selected substrates. Using mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking UGGT1 or those with UGGT1 complementation, we investigated the effect of monoglucosylation on the soluble/insoluble distribution of two misfolded α1-antitrypsin (AAT) variants responsible for AAT deficiency disease: null Hong Kong (NHK) and Z allele. Whereas substrate solubility increases directly with the number of N-linked glycosylation sites, our results indicate that additional solubility is conferred by UGGT1 enzymatic activity. Monoglucosylation-dependent solubility decreases both BiP association with NHK and unfolded protein response activation, and the solubility increase is blocked in cells deficient for calreticulin. These results suggest that UGGT1-dependent monoglucosylation of N-linked glycoproteins promotes substrate solubility in the ER. PMID:23864712

  15. Structural details of HIV-1 recognition by the broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody 2F5: epitope conformation, antigen-recognition loop mobility, and anion-binding site.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Bryson, Steve; Nieva, Jose L; Pai, Emil F

    2008-12-12

    2F5 is a monoclonal antibody with potent and broadly neutralizing activity against HIV-1. It targets the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the gp41 subunit of the envelope glycoprotein and interferes with the process of fusion between viral and host cell membranes. This study presents eight 2F5 F(ab)' crystal structures in complex with various gp41 peptide epitopes. These structures reveal several key features of this antibody-antigen interaction. (1) Whenever free of contacts caused by crystal artifacts, the extended complementarity-determining region H3 loop is mobile; this is true for ligand-free and epitope-bound forms. (2) The interaction between the antibody and the gp41 ELDKWA epitope core is absolutely critical, and there are also close and specific contacts with residues located N-terminal to the epitope core. (3) Residues located at the C-terminus of the gp41 ELDKWA core do not interact as tightly with the antibody. However, in the presence of a larger peptide containing the gp41 fusion peptide segment, these residues adopt a conformation consistent with the start of an alpha-helix. (4) At high sulfate concentrations, the electron density maps of 2F5 F(ab)'-peptide complexes contain a peak that may mark a binding site for phosphate groups of negatively charged lipid headgroups. The refined atomic-level details of 2F5 paratope-epitope interactions revealed here should contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism of 2F5-based virus neutralization, in general, and prove important for the design of potential vaccine candidates intended to elicit 2F5-like antibody production.

  16. [Biological role of heterogeneous glycoprotein structures].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2016-07-01

    Carbohydrate molecules connected mostly with covalent junctions to protein chains are called glycoproteins. These carbohydrate molecules are attached to the protein core in different qualities and order. When the protein core is connected with acidic components such as uronic acid or SO4 radicals, they are called proteoglycans. The currently used name "glycosaminoglycan" in this case is not entirely correct. In the living world polymannane structures occur, too. Glycoproteins do not only exceptionally hold acidic groups but they have neuraminic acid derivatives. Tissue, cellular and matrix structures, and mostly all serum "proteins" are mainly glycoproteins. In the everyday clinical practice glycoproteins are mentioned as proteins. Nevertheless, the inadequate use of the concept may cause errors in the attitudes, too. This paper aims to correct this notion, because the term of "glycobiology" has already been expanded to be an independent scientific field. The practical clinical consequences of recent knowledge in this field are also summarized including novel findings on glycoprotein structures and functions. The importance of the quantity of carbohydrates, and their structural arrangements are also presented. In short, significance of glycoprotein-carbohydrate structures, as well as their physiological and pathological roles are reviewed in order to introduce the field of "glycobiology". Orosomucoid and immunoglobulins are discussed separately. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(30), 1185-1192.

  17. Chemical synthesis of intentionally misfolded homogeneous glycoprotein: a unique approach for the study of glycoprotein quality control.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masayuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Dedola, Simone; Seko, Akira; Kanamori, Akiko; Sakono, Masafumi; Ito, Yukishige; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2012-05-01

    Biosynthesis of glycoproteins in the endoplasmic reticulum employs a quality control system, which discriminates and excludes misfolded malfunctional glycoproteins from a correctly folded one. As chemical tools to study the glycoprotein quality control system, we systematically synthesized misfolded homogeneous glycoproteins bearing a high-mannose type oligosaccharide via oxidative misfolding of a chemically synthesized homogeneous glycopeptide. The endoplasmic reticulum folding sensor enzyme, UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT), recognizes a specific folding intermediate, which exhibits a molten globule-like hydrophobic nature.

  18. Forcible destruction of severely misfolded mammalian glycoproteins by the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway.

    PubMed

    Ninagawa, Satoshi; Okada, Tetsuya; Sumitomo, Yoshiki; Horimoto, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Takehiro; Ishikawa, Tokiro; Takeda, Shunichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kamiya, Yukiko; Kato, Koichi; Mori, Kazutoshi

    2015-11-23

    Glycoproteins and non-glycoproteins possessing unfolded/misfolded parts in their luminal regions are cleared from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by ER-associated degradation (ERAD)-L with distinct mechanisms. Two-step mannose trimming from Man9GlcNAc2 is crucial in the ERAD-L of glycoproteins. We recently showed that this process is initiated by EDEM2 and completed by EDEM3/EDEM1. Here, we constructed chicken and human cells simultaneously deficient in EDEM1/2/3 and analyzed the fates of four ERAD-L substrates containing three potential N-glycosylation sites. We found that native but unstable or somewhat unfolded glycoproteins, such as ATF6α, ATF6α(C), CD3-δ-ΔTM, and EMC1, were stabilized in EDEM1/2/3 triple knockout cells. In marked contrast, degradation of severely misfolded glycoproteins, such as null Hong Kong (NHK) and deletion or insertion mutants of ATF6α(C), CD3-δ-ΔTM, and EMC1, was delayed only at early chase periods, but they were eventually degraded as in wild-type cells. Thus, higher eukaryotes are able to extract severely misfolded glycoproteins from glycoprotein ERAD and target them to the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway to maintain the homeostasis of the ER.

  19. Forcible destruction of severely misfolded mammalian glycoproteins by the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ninagawa, Satoshi; Okada, Tetsuya; Sumitomo, Yoshiki; Horimoto, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Takehiro; Ishikawa, Tokiro; Takeda, Shunichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kamiya, Yukiko

    2015-01-01

    Glycoproteins and non-glycoproteins possessing unfolded/misfolded parts in their luminal regions are cleared from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by ER-associated degradation (ERAD)-L with distinct mechanisms. Two-step mannose trimming from Man9GlcNAc2 is crucial in the ERAD-L of glycoproteins. We recently showed that this process is initiated by EDEM2 and completed by EDEM3/EDEM1. Here, we constructed chicken and human cells simultaneously deficient in EDEM1/2/3 and analyzed the fates of four ERAD-L substrates containing three potential N-glycosylation sites. We found that native but unstable or somewhat unfolded glycoproteins, such as ATF6α, ATF6α(C), CD3-δ–ΔTM, and EMC1, were stabilized in EDEM1/2/3 triple knockout cells. In marked contrast, degradation of severely misfolded glycoproteins, such as null Hong Kong (NHK) and deletion or insertion mutants of ATF6α(C), CD3-δ–ΔTM, and EMC1, was delayed only at early chase periods, but they were eventually degraded as in wild-type cells. Thus, higher eukaryotes are able to extract severely misfolded glycoproteins from glycoprotein ERAD and target them to the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway to maintain the homeostasis of the ER. PMID:26572623

  20. Platelet interaction with von Willebrand factor is enhanced by shear-induced clustering of glycoprotein Ibα

    PubMed Central

    Gitz, Eelo; Koopman, Charlotte D.; Giannas, Alèkos; Koekman, Cornelis A; van den Heuvel, Dave J.; Deckmyn, Hans; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N.; Gerritsen, Hans C.; Urbanus, Rolf T.

    2013-01-01

    Initial platelet arrest at the exposed arterial vessel wall is mediated through glycoprotein Ibα binding to the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor. This interaction occurs at sites of elevated shear force, and strengthens upon increasing hydrodynamic drag. The increased interaction requires shear-dependent exposure of the von Willebrand factor A1 domain, but the contribution of glycoprotein Ibα remains ill defined. We have previously found that glycoprotein Ibα forms clusters upon platelet cooling and hypothesized that such a property enhances the interaction with von Willebrand factor under physiological conditions. We analyzed the distribution of glycoprotein Ibα with Förster resonance energy transfer using time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Perfusion at a shear rate of 1,600 s−1 induced glycoprotein Ibα clusters on platelets adhered to von Willebrand factor, while clustering did not require von Willebrand factor contact at 10,000 s−1. Shear-induced clustering was reversible, not accompanied by granule release or αIIbβ3 activation and improved glycoprotein Ibα-dependent platelet interaction with von Willebrand factor. Clustering required glycoprotein Ibα translocation to lipid rafts and critically depended on arachidonic acid-mediated binding of 14-3-3ζ to its cytoplasmic tail. This newly identified mechanism emphasizes the ability of platelets to respond to mechanical force and provides new insights into how changes in hemodynamics influence arterial thrombus formation. PMID:23753027

  1. Uncleaved prefusion-optimized gp140 trimers derived from analysis of HIV-1 envelope metastability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Leopold; He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Vora, Nemil; Morris, Charles D.; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    The trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for host immune recognition and neutralization. Despite advances in trimer design, the roots of Env trimer metastability remain elusive. Here we investigate the contribution of two Env regions to metastability. First, we computationally redesign a largely disordered bend in heptad region 1 (HR1) of SOSIP trimers that connects the long, central HR1 helix to the fusion peptide, substantially improving the yield of soluble, well-folded trimers. Structural and antigenic analyses of two distinct HR1 redesigns confirm that redesigned Env closely mimics the native, prefusion trimer with a more stable gp41. Next, we replace the cleavage site between gp120 and gp41 with various linkers in the context of an HR1 redesign. Electron microscopy reveals a potential fusion intermediate state for uncleaved trimers containing short but not long linkers. Together, these results outline a general approach for stabilization of Env trimers from diverse HIV-1 strains.

  2. Uncleaved prefusion-optimized gp140 trimers derived from analysis of HIV-1 envelope metastability

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Leopold; He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Vora, Nemil; Morris, Charles D.; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for host immune recognition and neutralization. Despite advances in trimer design, the roots of Env trimer metastability remain elusive. Here we investigate the contribution of two Env regions to metastability. First, we computationally redesign a largely disordered bend in heptad region 1 (HR1) of SOSIP trimers that connects the long, central HR1 helix to the fusion peptide, substantially improving the yield of soluble, well-folded trimers. Structural and antigenic analyses of two distinct HR1 redesigns confirm that redesigned Env closely mimics the native, prefusion trimer with a more stable gp41. Next, we replace the cleavage site between gp120 and gp41 with various linkers in the context of an HR1 redesign. Electron microscopy reveals a potential fusion intermediate state for uncleaved trimers containing short but not long linkers. Together, these results outline a general approach for stabilization of Env trimers from diverse HIV-1 strains. PMID:27349805

  3. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers.

  4. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2016-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer’s and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers. PMID:26330015

  5. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers. PMID:26330015

  6. Haemonchus contortus P-glycoprotein-2: in situ localisation and characterisation of macrocyclic lactone transport.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Pablo; Lian, Jing; Beech, Robin N; Prichard, Roger K

    2015-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is a veterinary nematode that infects small ruminants, causing serious decreases in animal production worldwide. Effective control through anthelmintic treatment has been compromised by the development of resistance to these drugs, including the macrocyclic lactones. The mechanisms of resistance in H. contortus have yet to be established but may involve efflux of the macrocyclic lactones by nematode ATP-binding-cassette transporters such as P-glycoproteins. Here we report the expression and functional activity of H. contortus P-glycoprotein 2 expressed in mammalian cells and characterise its interaction with the macrocyclic lactones, ivermectin, abamectin and moxidectin. The ability of H. contortus P-glycoprotein 2 to transport different fluorophore substrates was markedly inhibited by ivermectin and abamectin in a dose-dependent and saturable way. The profile of transport inhibition by moxidectin was markedly different. H. contortus P-glycoprotein 2 was expressed in the pharynx, the first portion of the worm's intestine and perhaps in adjacent nervous tissue, suggesting a role for this gene in regulating the uptake of avermectins and in protecting nematode tissues from the effects of macrocyclic lactone anthelmintic drugs. H. contortus P-glycoprotein 2 may thus contribute to resistance to these drugs in H. contortus.

  7. Traceless labeling of glycoproteins and its application to the study of glycoprotein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yung-Lin; Lee, Yen-Pin; Yang, Yen-Ling; Lin, Po-Chiao

    2014-02-21

    A new chemical method for the traceless labeling of glycoproteins with synthetic boronic acid (BA)-tosyl probes was successfully developed. The BA moiety acts as an affinity head to direct the formation of a cyclic boronate diester with the diol groups of glycans. Following this step, the electrophilic tosyl group is displaced by an SN2 reaction with a nucleophilic residue of the boronated glycoprotein, and finally, a reporter group is tagged onto the glycoprotein via an ether linkage. In the presence of polyols, a competition reaction recovers the native glycan of the tagged glycoprotein, conserving its biological significance. The BA-tosyl probes were used successfully for the specific labeling of glycosylated fetuins in a mixed protein pool and from crude Escherichia coli (E. coli) lysate. Further, a BA-tosyl-functionalized glass slide was used to fabricate glycoprotein microarrays with highly conserved glycans. By interacting with various lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins), such as Concanavalin A (Con A) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), the types of carbohydrates and specific linkages of glycoproteins (α or β) could be systematically monitored. It is believed that the newly developed method will greatly accelerate the understanding of glycoproteins.

  8. Characterization of disease-associated N-linked glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hui

    2013-02-01

    N-linked glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes, including cell-to-cell recognition, growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death. Specific N-linked glycoprotein changes are associated with disease progression and identification of these N-linked glycoproteins has potential for use in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatments. In this review, we summarize common strategies for N-linked glycoprotein characterization and applications of these strategies to identification of glycoprotein changes associated with disease states. We also review the N-linked glycoproteins altered in diseases such as breast cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Although assays for these glycoproteins have potential clinical utility, research is needed to translate these glycoproteins to clinical biomarkers.

  9. Characterization of disease-associated N-linked glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hui

    2013-01-01

    N-linked glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes, including cell-to-cell recognition, growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death. Specific N-linked glycoprotein changes are associated with disease progression and identification of these N-linked glycoproteins has potential for use in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatments. In this review, we summarize common strategies for N-linked glycoprotein characterization and applications of these strategies to identification of glycoprotein changes associated with disease states. We also review the N-linked glycoproteins altered in diseases such as breast cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Although assays for these glycoproteins have potential clinical utility, research is needed to translate these glycoproteins to clinical biomarkers. PMID:23255236

  10. Using proximity biotinylation to detect herpesvirus entry glycoprotein interactions: Limitations for integral membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lajko, Michelle; Haddad, Alexander F; Robinson, Carolyn A; Connolly, Sarah A

    2015-09-01

    Herpesvirus entry into cells requires coordinated interactions among several viral transmembrane glycoproteins. Viral glycoproteins bind to receptors and interact with other glycoproteins to trigger virus-cell membrane fusion. Details of these glycoprotein interactions are not well understood because they are likely transient and/or low affinity. Proximity biotinylation is a promising protein-protein interaction assay that can capture transient interactions in live cells. One protein is linked to a biotin ligase and a second protein is linked to a short specific acceptor peptide (AP). If the two proteins interact, the ligase will biotinylate the AP, without requiring a sustained interaction. To examine herpesvirus glycoprotein interactions, the ligase and AP were linked to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) gD and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) gB. Interactions between monomers of these oligomeric proteins (homotypic interactions) served as positive controls to demonstrate assay sensitivity. Heterotypic combinations served as negative controls to determine assay specificity, since HSV1 gD and EBV gB do not interact functionally. Positive controls showed strong biotinylation, indicating that viral glycoprotein proximity can be detected. Unexpectedly, the negative controls also showed biotinylation. These results demonstrate the special circumstances that must be considered when examining interactions among glycosylated proteins that are constrained within a membrane.

  11. Impact of a human CMP-sialic acid transporter on recombinant glycoprotein sialylation in glycoengineered insect cells.

    PubMed

    Mabashi-Asazuma, Hideaki; Shi, Xianzong; Geisler, Christoph; Kuo, Chu-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Jarvis, Donald L

    2013-02-01

    Insect cells are widely used for recombinant glycoprotein production, but they cannot provide the glycosylation patterns required for some biotechnological applications. This problem has been addressed by genetically engineering insect cells to express mammalian genes encoding various glycoprotein glycan processing functions. However, for various reasons, the impact of a mammalian cytosine-5'-monophospho (CMP)-sialic acid transporter has not yet been examined. Thus, we transformed Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells with six mammalian genes to generate a new cell line, SfSWT-4, that can produce sialylated glycoproteins when cultured with the sialic acid precursor, N-acetylmannosamine. We then super-transformed SfSWT-4 with a human CMP-sialic acid transporter (hCSAT) gene to isolate a daughter cell line, SfSWT-6, which expressed the hCSAT gene in addition to the other mammalian glycogenes. SfSWT-6 cells had higher levels of cell surface sialylation and also supported higher levels of recombinant glycoprotein sialylation, particularly when cultured with low concentrations of N-acetylmannosamine. Thus, hCSAT expression has an impact on glycoprotein sialylation, can reduce the cost of recombinant glycoprotein production and therefore should be included in ongoing efforts to glycoengineer the baculovirus-insect cell system. The results of this study also contributed new insights into the endogenous mechanism and potential mechanisms of CMP-sialic acid accumulation in the Golgi apparatus of lepidopteran insect cells.

  12. Human Milk Glycoproteins Protect Infants Against Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Breastfeeding protects the neonate against pathogen infection. Major mechanisms of protection include human milk glycoconjugates functioning as soluble receptor mimetics that inhibit pathogen binding to the mucosal cell surface, prebiotic stimulation of gut colonization by favorable microbiota, immunomodulation, and as a substrate for bacterial fermentation products in the gut. Human milk proteins are predominantly glycosylated, and some biological functions of these human milk glycoproteins (HMGPs) have been reported. HMGPs range in size from 14 kDa to 2,000 kDa and include mucins, secretory immunoglobulin A, bile salt-stimulated lipase, lactoferrin, butyrophilin, lactadherin, leptin, and adiponectin. This review summarizes known biological roles of HMGPs that may contribute to the ability of human milk to protect neonates from disease. PMID:23697737

  13. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. E.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  14. Sweet new world: glycoproteins in bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M Alexander; Riley, Lee W; Benz, Inga

    2003-12-01

    In eukaryotes, the combinatorial potential of carbohydrates is used for the modulation of protein function. However, despite the wealth of cell wall and surface-associated carbohydrates and glycoconjugates, the accepted dogma has been that prokaryotes are not able to glycosylate proteins. This has now changed and protein glycosylation in prokaryotes is an accepted fact. Intriguingly, in Gram-negative bacteria most glycoproteins are associated with virulence factors of medically significant pathogens. Also, important steps in pathogenesis have been linked to the glycan substitution of surface proteins, indicating that the glycosylation of bacterial proteins might serve specific functions in infection and pathogenesis and interfere with inflammatory immune responses. Therefore, the carbohydrate modifications and glycosylation pathways of bacterial proteins will become new targets for therapeutic and prophylactic measures. Here we discuss recent findings on the structure, genetics and function of glycoproteins of medically important bacteria and potential applications of bacterial glycosylation systems for the generation of novel glycoconjugates.

  15. Glycoprotein enrichment method using a selective magnetic nano-probe platform (MNP) functionalized with lectins.

    PubMed

    Cova, Marta; Oliveira-Silva, Rui; Ferreira, José Alexandre; Ferreira, Rita; Amado, Francisco; Daniel-da-Silva, Ana Luísa; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) have increasingly become a research field of incredible importance to fully understand the regulation of biological processes in health and disease. Among PTMs, glycosylation is one of the most studied for which contributed the development and improvement of enrichment techniques. Nowadays, glycoprotein enrichment methods are based on lectin affinity, covalent interactions, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Nonetheless, the nanotechnology era has fetched new methods to enrich glycoproteins from complex samples as human biological fluids. For instance, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are being used as an interesting enrichment approach allowing a better characterization of glycoproteins and glycopeptides.In this chapter, we describe an enrichment method based on MNPs functionalized with lectins (Concavalin A, wheat germ agglutinin, and Maackia amurensis lectin) to enrich specific sets of glycoproteins from biological fluids. Moreover, it is proposed a bioinformatic strategy to deal with data retrieved from mass spectrometry analysis of enriched samples aiming the identification of relevant biological processes modulated by a given stimuli and, ultimately, of new biomarkers for disease screening/management.

  16. Paramyxovirus Glycoprotein Incorporation, Assembly and Budding: A Three Way Dance for Infectious Particle Production

    PubMed Central

    El Najjar, Farah; Schmitt, Anthony P.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2014-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses are a family of negative sense RNA viruses whose members cause serious diseases in humans, such as measles virus, mumps virus and respiratory syncytial virus; and in animals, such as Newcastle disease virus and rinderpest virus. Paramyxovirus particles form by assembly of the viral matrix protein, the ribonucleoprotein complex and the surface glycoproteins at the plasma membrane of infected cells and subsequent viral budding. Two major glycoproteins expressed on the viral envelope, the attachment protein and the fusion protein, promote attachment of the virus to host cells and subsequent virus-cell membrane fusion. Incorporation of the surface glycoproteins into infectious progeny particles requires coordinated interplay between the three viral structural components, driven primarily by the matrix protein. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the contributions of the matrix protein and glycoproteins in driving paramyxovirus assembly and budding while focusing on the viral protein interactions underlying this process and the intracellular trafficking pathways for targeting viral components to assembly sites. Differences in the mechanisms of particle production among the different family members will be highlighted throughout. PMID:25105277

  17. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewis(a) substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review. PMID:25324850

  18. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewisa substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review. PMID:25324850

  19. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewis(a) substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review.

  20. Unusual molecular architecture of the machupo virus attachment glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Thomas A; Crispin, Max; Graham, Stephen C; Harvey, David J; Grimes, Jonathan M; Jones, E Yvonne; Stuart, David I

    2009-08-01

    New World arenaviruses, which cause severe hemorrhagic fever, rely upon their envelope glycoproteins for attachment and fusion into their host cell. Here we present the crystal structure of the Machupo virus GP1 attachment glycoprotein, which is responsible for high-affinity binding at the cell surface to the transferrin receptor. This first structure of an arenavirus glycoprotein shows that GP1 consists of a novel alpha/beta fold. This provides a blueprint of the New World arenavirus attachment glycoproteins and reveals a new architecture of viral attachment, using a protein fold of unknown origins.

  1. Native functionality and therapeutic targeting of arenaviral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Crispin, Max; Zeltina, Antra; Zitzmann, Nicole; Bowden, Thomas A

    2016-06-01

    Surface glycoproteins direct cellular targeting, attachment, and membrane fusion of arenaviruses and are the primary target for neutralizing antibodies. Despite significant conservation of the glycoprotein architecture across the arenavirus family, there is considerable variation in the molecular recognition mechanisms used during host cell entry. We review recent progress in dissecting these infection events and describe how arenaviral glycoproteins can be targeted by small-molecule antivirals, the natural immune response, and immunoglobulin-based therapeutics. Arenaviral glycoprotein-mediated assembly and infection pathways present numerous opportunities and challenges for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27104809

  2. Progesterone regulates the expression and activity of two mouse isoforms of the glycoprotein folding sensor UDP-Glc: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT).

    PubMed

    Prados, María B; Caramelo, Julio J; Miranda, Silvia E

    2013-12-01

    UDP-Glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) is a central component of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glycoprotein-folding quality control system, which prevents the exit of partially folded species. UGGT activity can be regulated by the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER, a stimulus that triggers a complex signaling pathway known as unfolded protein response (UPR) which is closely associated with inflammation and disease. In this work, we investigated the effect of progesterone (P4) on the expression and activity of UGGT in a mouse hybridoma. We detected the expression of two UGGT isoforms, UGGT1 and UGGT2, and demonstrated that both isoforms are active in these cells. Interestingly, the expression of each isoform is regulated by high physiological P4 concentrations. This work provides the first evidence of a hormonal regulation of UGGT isoform expression and activity, which might influence the glycoprotein quality control mechanism. These findings could contribute to the study of pathologies triggered by the accumulation of misfolded proteins.

  3. Antigenic properties of a transport-competent influenza HA/HIV Env chimeric protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ye Ling; Sun Yuliang; Lin Jianguo; Bu Zhigao; Wu Qingyang; Jiang, Shibo; Steinhauer, David A.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang Chinglai . E-mail: chyang@emory.edu

    2006-08-15

    The transmembrane subunit (gp41) of the HIV Env glycoprotein contains conserved neutralizing epitopes which are not well-exposed in wild-type HIV Env proteins. To enhance the exposure of these epitopes, a chimeric protein, HA/gp41, in which the gp41 of HIV-1 89.6 envelope protein was fused to the C-terminus of the HA1 subunit of the influenza HA protein, was constructed. Characterization of protein expression showed that the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins were expressed on cell surfaces and formed trimeric oligomers, as found in the HIV Env as well as influenza HA proteins. In addition, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein expressed on the cell surface can also be cleaved into 2 subunits by trypsin treatment, similar to the influenza HA. Moreover, the HA/gp41 chimeric protein was found to maintain a pre-fusion conformation. Interestingly, the HA/gp41 chimeric proteins on cell surfaces exhibited increased reactivity to monoclonal antibodies against the HIV Env gp41 subunit compared with the HIV-1 envelope protein, including the two broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies 2F5 and 4E10. Immunization of mice with a DNA vaccine expressing the HA/gp41 chimeric protein induced antibodies against the HIV gp41 protein and these antibodies exhibit neutralizing activity against infection by an HIV SF162 pseudovirus. These results demonstrate that the construction of such chimeric proteins can provide enhanced exposure of conserved epitopes in the HIV Env gp41 and may represent a novel vaccine design strategy for inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV.

  4. The hypobranchial mucin of the whelk Buccinum undatum L. Properties of the mucin and of the glycoprotein component

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, S.; Jevons, F. R.

    1965-01-01

    1. The composition of the hypobranchial mucin from Buccinum undatum is reported. 2. The amino acid composition was determined; aspartic acid and glutamic acid contribute almost 24% of the total amino acids in the mucin. 3. Serine, threonine and alanine, in the proportions 2:1:1 respectively, were detected as N-terminal residues, implying the presence of at least four protein chains. 4. A glycoprotein component was isolated by phenol precipitation. 5. The glycoprotein contained 8% of neutral sugars comprising glucose, galactose, mannose and fucose, and 4·5% of hexosamine, comprising glucosamine and galactosamine in equal proportions. 6. A method is described for the preparation of glycopeptides from the glycoprotein. 7. The comparative biochemistry of the mucin is discussed. PMID:5881659

  5. The hypobranchial mucin of the whelk Buccinum undatum L. Properties of the mucin and of the glycoprotein component.

    PubMed

    Hunt, S; Jevons, F R

    1965-12-01

    1. The composition of the hypobranchial mucin from Buccinum undatum is reported. 2. The amino acid composition was determined; aspartic acid and glutamic acid contribute almost 24% of the total amino acids in the mucin. 3. Serine, threonine and alanine, in the proportions 2:1:1 respectively, were detected as N-terminal residues, implying the presence of at least four protein chains. 4. A glycoprotein component was isolated by phenol precipitation. 5. The glycoprotein contained 8% of neutral sugars comprising glucose, galactose, mannose and fucose, and 4.5% of hexosamine, comprising glucosamine and galactosamine in equal proportions. 6. A method is described for the preparation of glycopeptides from the glycoprotein. 7. The comparative biochemistry of the mucin is discussed.

  6. Swainsonine: an inhibitor of glycoprotein processing.

    PubMed Central

    Elbein, A D; Solf, R; Dorling, P R; Vosbeck, K

    1981-01-01

    Swainsonine, an indolizidine alkaloid, inhibits the processing of asparagine-linked glycoproteins in both cell-free extracts and animal cells in culture. Thus, in a liver particulate enzyme preparation, swainsonine at 0.1-1.0 microM inhibited the mannosidase that releases [3H]mannose from a high mannose glycopeptide but only slightly inhibited the release of glucose from a glucose-labeled glycopeptide. MDCK and Chinese hamster ovary cells in culture incorporate [2-3H]mannose and [6-3H]glucosamine into both high mannose and complex types of oligosaccharides. When these cells were incubated with swainsonine and then labeled with mannose or glucosamine, there was a dramatic decrease in the amount of label in the complex type of glycopeptide and a substantial increase in the radioactivity in the high mannose type. This change was monitored by the increase in radioactivity that became susceptible to digestion by endoglucosaminidase H with increasing concentrations of swainosine. The endoglucosaminidase H-released oligosaccharide(s) from swainsonine-treated cells was larger and more homogeneous than that from controls and eluted from Bio-Gel P-4 at the position of Man9GlcNAc. Several tissue culture cell lines were grown in the presence of swainsonine to determine its effect on cell surface glycoproteins. Cells grown in the alkaloid showed an increased capacity to bind Escherichia coli B886, a bacterium that binds to high mannose glycoproteins. These cells also showed an increasing binding of [3H]concanavalin A. PMID:6801650

  7. Swainsonine: an inhibitor of glycoprotein processing.

    PubMed

    Elbein, A D; Solf, R; Dorling, P R; Vosbeck, K

    1981-12-01

    Swainsonine, an indolizidine alkaloid, inhibits the processing of asparagine-linked glycoproteins in both cell-free extracts and animal cells in culture. Thus, in a liver particulate enzyme preparation, swainsonine at 0.1-1.0 microM inhibited the mannosidase that releases [3H]mannose from a high mannose glycopeptide but only slightly inhibited the release of glucose from a glucose-labeled glycopeptide. MDCK and Chinese hamster ovary cells in culture incorporate [2-3H]mannose and [6-3H]glucosamine into both high mannose and complex types of oligosaccharides. When these cells were incubated with swainsonine and then labeled with mannose or glucosamine, there was a dramatic decrease in the amount of label in the complex type of glycopeptide and a substantial increase in the radioactivity in the high mannose type. This change was monitored by the increase in radioactivity that became susceptible to digestion by endoglucosaminidase H with increasing concentrations of swainosine. The endoglucosaminidase H-released oligosaccharide(s) from swainsonine-treated cells was larger and more homogeneous than that from controls and eluted from Bio-Gel P-4 at the position of Man9GlcNAc. Several tissue culture cell lines were grown in the presence of swainsonine to determine its effect on cell surface glycoproteins. Cells grown in the alkaloid showed an increased capacity to bind Escherichia coli B886, a bacterium that binds to high mannose glycoproteins. These cells also showed an increasing binding of [3H]concanavalin A. PMID:6801650

  8. Secondary cell-wall-specific glycoprotein(s) from French bean hypocotyls.

    PubMed Central

    Wojtaszek, P; Bolwell, G P

    1995-01-01

    Specific labeling of secondary cell walls of tracheary elements and of xylary and phloem fibers has been observed when wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and anti-WGA antibodies were used during ultrastructural studies of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) hypocotyls. In this report we demonstrate that at least part of this labeling is due to the presence of secondary cell-wall-specific glycoproteins. Three major novel glycoproteins with relative molecular weights of 55,000, 86,000, and 90,000, purified by means of WGA-Sepharose affinity chromatography, have been characterized. Their amino acid composition indicates that they are not the members of known classes of structural cell-wall proteins, since they contain no hydroxyproline, a lower level of glycine than seen in glycine-rich proteins, and very little proline. N-terminal sequences of all three proteins show no significant homology with other proteins. Antibodies were raised against electrophoretically pure 90-kD glycoprotein. These were used to localize this protein in secondary cell walls of xylem tracheary elements and in xylary and phloem fibers, i.e. in the same compartments where labeling with WGA has been observed. To our knowledge this is one of the first biochemical and ultrastructural demonstrations of secondary cell-wall-specific glycoproteins. PMID:7630932

  9. [Lactoferrin - a glycoprotein of great therapeutic potentials].

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Ryszard; Kamińska, Ewa; Michalski, Piotr; Lauterbach, Jan Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein, which is present in most biological fluids with particularly high levels in colostrum and in mammalian milk. Bovine lactoferrin is more than 70% homologous with human lactoferrin. Most of the clinical trials have used bovine lactoferrin for supplementation. This review summarizes the recent advances in explaining the mechanisms, which are responsible for the multifunctional roles of lactoferrin, and presents its potential prophylactic and therapeutic applications. On the ground of the results of preliminary clinical observations, authors suggest beneficial effect of lactoferrin supplementation on the prevalence of necrotizing enterocolitis in infants with birth weight below 1250 grams. PMID:27442696

  10. The Purification of a Blood Group A Glycoprotein: An Affinity Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estelrich, J.; Pouplana, R.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a purification process through affinity chromatography necessary to obtain specific blood group glycoproteins from erythrocytic membranes. Discusses the preparation of erythrocytic membranes, extraction of glycoprotein from membranes, affinity chromatography purification, determination of glycoproteins, and results. (CW)

  11. THE EFFECTS OF HIV INFECTION ON THE EXPRESSION OF THE DRUG EFFLUX PROTEINS P-GLYCOPROTEIN AND BREAST CANCER RESISTANCE PROTEIN IN A HUMAN INTESTINE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Kelstan; Marlin, Jerry; Taylor, Tracey AH; Fitting, Sylvia; Hauser, Kurt F.; Rice, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In HIV infection, decreased penetration of antiretroviral drugs is postulated to contribute to HIV persistence within lymphoid rich regions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, mechanistic explanations for this phenomenon remain unclear. Specifically, investigations of HIV effects on drug efflux proteins within intestinal models are minimal. Methods Using an in vitro co-culture model of the GI tract, effects of HIV infection on drug efflux proteins, P-glycoprotein and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) were evaluated. The influence of the HIV-1 protein, Tat, and oxidative stress on P-glycoprotein and BCRP also was evaluated. Key Findings P-glycoprotein expression demonstrated an HIV-induced upregulation in Caco-2 cells over time for cells grown in co-culture with resting lymphocytes. BCRP overall expression increased with HIV exposure in activated primary human lymphocytes co-cultured with Caco-2 cells. Tat treatment resulted in no significant alterations in P-glycoprotein (43% increase), BCRP expression, or oxidative stress. Conclusions HIV exposure within an in vitro intestinal model resulted in increases in, P-glycoprotein and BCRP in a cell specific manner. Additionally, observed changes were not mediated by Tat. Collectively, these results suggest that alterations in BCRP and P-glycoprotein may contribute, in part, to decreased antiretroviral concentrations within the gastrointestinal tract in HIV infection. PMID:25557407

  12. Enhanced detection of glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Marshall, S; Cabrera, M; Horvat, A

    1988-05-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method to enhance detection of glycoproteins resolved by either one- or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is described. The method is a modification of the procedure described by D. Fargeaud et al. (D. Fargeaud, J. C. Benoit, F. Kato, and G. Chappuis (1984) Arch. Virol. 80, 69-82) that uses concanavalin A conjugated with fluorescein isothyocyanate to detect the carbohydrate moiety of glycoproteins. Briefly, the electrophoresed gel is exposed to the fluorescent lectin, thoroughly washed, and sequentially transferred to 50% methanol in deionized water and to absolute methanol. The result is an abrupt dehydration of the gel which turns evenly white and stiff. At least a twofold enhancement of fluorescence is obtained as detected by exposing the treated gel to an appropriate uv source. The sensitivity of the procedure allows us to detect purified immunoglobulin molecules by their carbohydrate content in the range of 0.2 microgram of total protein. The specificity of the detection is demonstrated by a comparison with the corresponding polypeptide profile obtained by silver nitrate staining of the gel. PMID:3394948

  13. Enhanced detection of glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Marshall, S; Cabrera, M; Horvat, A

    1988-05-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method to enhance detection of glycoproteins resolved by either one- or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is described. The method is a modification of the procedure described by D. Fargeaud et al. (D. Fargeaud, J. C. Benoit, F. Kato, and G. Chappuis (1984) Arch. Virol. 80, 69-82) that uses concanavalin A conjugated with fluorescein isothyocyanate to detect the carbohydrate moiety of glycoproteins. Briefly, the electrophoresed gel is exposed to the fluorescent lectin, thoroughly washed, and sequentially transferred to 50% methanol in deionized water and to absolute methanol. The result is an abrupt dehydration of the gel which turns evenly white and stiff. At least a twofold enhancement of fluorescence is obtained as detected by exposing the treated gel to an appropriate uv source. The sensitivity of the procedure allows us to detect purified immunoglobulin molecules by their carbohydrate content in the range of 0.2 microgram of total protein. The specificity of the detection is demonstrated by a comparison with the corresponding polypeptide profile obtained by silver nitrate staining of the gel.

  14. Glycosylation modulates arenavirus glycoprotein expression and function

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, Cyrille J. Capul, Althea A. Lauron, Elvin J. Bederka, Lydia H. Knopp, Kristeene A. Buchmeier, Michael J.

    2011-01-20

    The glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) contains nine potential N-linked glycosylation sites. We investigated the function of these N-glycosylations by using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. All the available sites were occupied on GP1 and two of three on GP2. N-linked glycan mutations at positions 87 and 97 on GP1 resulted in reduction of expression and absence of cleavage and were necessary for downstream functions, as confirmed by the loss of GP-mediated fusion activity with T87A and S97A mutants. In contrast, T234A and E379N/A381T mutants impaired GP-mediated cell fusion without altered expression or processing. Infectivity via virus-like particles required glycans and a cleaved glycoprotein. Glycosylation at the first site within GP2, not normally utilized by LCMV, exhibited increased VLP infectivity. We also confirmed the role of the N-linked glycan at position 173 in the masking of the neutralizing epitope GP-1D. Taken together, our results indicated a strong relationship between fusion and infectivity.

  15. Podoplanin - a small glycoprotein with many faces

    PubMed Central

    Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr; Suchanski, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin is a small membrane glycoprotein with a large number of O-glycoside chains and therefore it belongs to mucin-type proteins. It can be found on the surface of many types of normal cells originating from various germ layers. It is present primarily on the endothelium of lymphatic vessels, type I pneumocytes and glomerular podocytes. Increased levels of podoplanin or its neo-expression have been found in numerous types of human carcinomas, but it is especially common in squamous cell carcinomas, such as cervical, larynx, oral cavity, skin and lung cancer. This small sialomucin is also seen on the surface of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in lung adenocarcinomas, as well as in breast and pancreatic tumors. In most cancers, a high level of podoplanin expression, both in cancer cells, as well as in CAFs, is correlated with an increased incidence of metastasis to lymph nodes and shorter survival time of patients. Little is known about the biological role of podoplanin, however research carried out on mice with a knock-out gene of this glycoprotein shows that the presence of podoplanin determines normal development of lungs, the lymphatic system and heart. Podoplanin on cancer cells and CAFs seems to play an important role in the development and progression of various cancers. However, its role in these processes is both unclear and controversial. In this review, the role of podoplanin in both physiological processes and carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:27186410

  16. Podoplanin - a small glycoprotein with many faces.

    PubMed

    Ugorski, Maciej; Dziegiel, Piotr; Suchanski, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin is a small membrane glycoprotein with a large number of O-glycoside chains and therefore it belongs to mucin-type proteins. It can be found on the surface of many types of normal cells originating from various germ layers. It is present primarily on the endothelium of lymphatic vessels, type I pneumocytes and glomerular podocytes. Increased levels of podoplanin or its neo-expression have been found in numerous types of human carcinomas, but it is especially common in squamous cell carcinomas, such as cervical, larynx, oral cavity, skin and lung cancer. This small sialomucin is also seen on the surface of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in lung adenocarcinomas, as well as in breast and pancreatic tumors. In most cancers, a high level of podoplanin expression, both in cancer cells, as well as in CAFs, is correlated with an increased incidence of metastasis to lymph nodes and shorter survival time of patients. Little is known about the biological role of podoplanin, however research carried out on mice with a knock-out gene of this glycoprotein shows that the presence of podoplanin determines normal development of lungs, the lymphatic system and heart. Podoplanin on cancer cells and CAFs seems to play an important role in the development and progression of various cancers. However, its role in these processes is both unclear and controversial. In this review, the role of podoplanin in both physiological processes and carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:27186410

  17. Evidence for glycoprotein transport into complex plastids.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Madeleine; Moog, Daniel; Klingl, Andreas; Maier, Uwe G; Hempel, Franziska

    2013-06-25

    Diatoms are microalgae that possess so-called "complex plastids," which evolved by secondary endosymbiosis and are surrounded by four membranes. Thus, in contrast to primary plastids, which are surrounded by only two membranes, nucleus-encoded proteins of complex plastids face additional barriers, i.e., during evolution, mechanisms had to evolve to transport preproteins across all four membranes. This study reveals that there exist glycoproteins not only in primary but also in complex plastids, making transport issues even more complicated, as most translocation machineries are not believed to be able to transport bulky proteins. We show that plastidal reporter proteins with artificial N-glycosylation sites are indeed glycosylated during transport into the complex plastid of the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Additionally, we identified five endogenous glycoproteins, which are transported into different compartments of the complex plastid. These proteins get N-glycosylated during transport across the outermost plastid membrane and thereafter are transported across the second, third, and fourth plastid membranes in the case of stromal proteins. The results of this study provide insights into the evolutionary pressure on translocation mechanisms and pose unique questions on the operating mode of well-known transport machineries like the translocons of the outer/inner chloroplast membranes (Toc/Tic).

  18. Ammonia transport in the kidney by Rhesus glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Verlander, Jill W.

    2014-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism is a fundamental element of acid-base homeostasis, comprising a major component of both basal and physiologically altered renal net acid excretion. Over the past several years, a fundamental change in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal epithelial cell ammonia transport has occurred, replacing the previous model which was based upon diffusion equilibrium for NH3 and trapping of NH4+ with a new model in which specific and regulated transport of both NH3 and NH4+ across renal epithelial cell membranes via specific membrane proteins is required for normal ammonia metabolism. A major advance has been the recognition that members of a recently recognized transporter family, the Rhesus glycoprotein family, mediate critical roles in renal and extrarenal ammonia transport. The erythroid-specific Rhesus glycoprotein, Rh A Glycoprotein (Rhag), was the first Rhesus glycoprotein recognized as an ammonia-specific transporter. Subsequently, the nonerythroid Rh glycoproteins, Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), were cloned and identified as ammonia transporters. They are expressed in specific cell populations and membrane domains in distal renal epithelial cells, where they facilitate ammonia secretion. In this review, we discuss the distribution of Rhbg and Rhcg in the kidney, the regulation of their expression and activity in physiological disturbances, the effects of genetic deletion on renal ammonia metabolism, and the molecular mechanisms of Rh glycoprotein-mediated ammonia transport. PMID:24647713

  19. Ammonia transport in the kidney by Rhesus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2014-05-15

    Renal ammonia metabolism is a fundamental element of acid-base homeostasis, comprising a major component of both basal and physiologically altered renal net acid excretion. Over the past several years, a fundamental change in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal epithelial cell ammonia transport has occurred, replacing the previous model which was based upon diffusion equilibrium for NH3 and trapping of NH4(+) with a new model in which specific and regulated transport of both NH3 and NH4(+) across renal epithelial cell membranes via specific membrane proteins is required for normal ammonia metabolism. A major advance has been the recognition that members of a recently recognized transporter family, the Rhesus glycoprotein family, mediate critical roles in renal and extrarenal ammonia transport. The erythroid-specific Rhesus glycoprotein, Rh A Glycoprotein (Rhag), was the first Rhesus glycoprotein recognized as an ammonia-specific transporter. Subsequently, the nonerythroid Rh glycoproteins, Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), were cloned and identified as ammonia transporters. They are expressed in specific cell populations and membrane domains in distal renal epithelial cells, where they facilitate ammonia secretion. In this review, we discuss the distribution of Rhbg and Rhcg in the kidney, the regulation of their expression and activity in physiological disturbances, the effects of genetic deletion on renal ammonia metabolism, and the molecular mechanisms of Rh glycoprotein-mediated ammonia transport.

  20. Role of envelope glycoproteins in intracellular virus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The possible role viral glycoproteins in intracellular maturation was studied by using two different viruses, avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), a coronavirus, and Punta Toro virus (PTV), a bunyavirus. Using the antibiotic tunicamycin, which inhibits glycosylation of N-linked glycoproteins, it was shown that coronavirus particles are formed in the absence of glycosylation. Analysis of the protein composition of these particles indicated that they contain an unglycosylated form of the membrane-associated E1 glycoprotein but lack the E2 spike glycoprotein. A cDNA clone derived from the PTV M RNA genome segment, which encodes the G1 and G2 glycoproteins, was cloned into vaccinia virus. Studies by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the glycoproteins synthesized from this recombinant were found to accumulate intracellularly at the Golgi complex, where virus budding usually takes place. Surface immunoprecipitation and {sup 125}I-protein A binding assays also demonstrated that a majority of the glycoproteins are retained intracellularly and are not transported to the cellular surface. The sequences which encode the G1 and G2 glycoproteins were independently cloned into vaccinia virus as well.

  1. Decoration of proteins with sugar chains: recent advances in glycoprotein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryo; Izumi, Masayuki; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Chemical or chemoenzymatic synthesis is an emerging approach to produce homogeneous glycoproteins, which are hard to obtain by conventional biotechnology methods. Recent advances in the synthetic methodologies for the decoration of protein molecules with oligosaccharides provide several remarkable syntheses of homogeneous glycoproteins. This short review highlights several of the latest syntheses of glycoproteins including therapeutically important glycoproteins, a highly glycosylated protein, and unnatural glycoproteins in order to illustrate the power of the modern glycoprotein synthesis. Structurally defined glycoproteins are a novel material for understanding the molecular basis of glycoprotein functions and for the development of the next generation of biopharmaceuticals.

  2. Glycoprotein synthesis in the Golgi apparatus of spermatids during spermiogenesis of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Clermont, Y.; Tang, X.M.

    1985-09-01

    During steps 1-7 of spermiogenesis the Golgi apparatus contributes to the formation of the acrosomic system which develops at the surface of the nucleus. Later, in step 8, the Golgi apparatus detaches from the acrosome and remains suspended in the elongated cytoplasm until it degenerates during step 16. Using /sup 3/H-fucose as a tracer and the radioautographic technique, we observed that the Golgi apparatus incorporates the tracer and delivers the labeled glycoproteins to the developing acrosomic system during steps 1-7 of spermiogenesis, to multivesicular bodies during steps 1-9, and to the remaining cytoplasm and plasma membrane during steps 1-15. Throughout these steps of spermiogenesis the Golgi apparatus does not show major changes in structure; it is composed of a cortex made up of connected stacks of saccules and a medulla showing a loose aggregate of vesicular profiles. Glycoprotein synthesis in this Golgi apparatus, before and after it contributes lysosomal glycoproteins to the growing acrosomic system, was quantitatively assessed in electron microscope EM radioautographs of tissue sections from animals sacrificed at 1, 4, 8, and 24 h of 3H-fucose injection. The incorporation of the labeled sugar was found to remain quantitatively similar during steps 1-15 of spermiogenesis, and therefore, no shift in glycoprotein synthesis took place following separation of the Golgi apparatus from the acrosomic system. Throughout these steps, fucose molecules are first incorporated in the cortex of the organelle and subsequently transported to the medulla, where they temporarily accumulate before being delivered, depending on the step of spermiogenesis, to the acrosomic system, to the multivesicular bodies, and also, presumably, to the plasma membrane.

  3. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics of fungal wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qing Yuan; de Groot, Piet W J; de Koster, Chris G; Klis, Frans M

    2008-01-01

    The manifold functions of fungal wall glycoproteins include maintenance of cell wall integrity, homotypic and heterotypic adhesion, biofilm formation, acquisition of iron and sterols, protein degradation and coping with oxidative stress. Transcriptome studies indicate that the expression levels of most cell wall glycoproteins can vary widely and are tightly controlled. However, owing to their complex and variable glycosylation, fungal wall glycoproteins are difficult to analyze using traditional proteomics approaches. Recent advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have enabled rapid and sensitive identification and quantitation of fungal wall glycoproteins; this will be particularly useful for studying the dynamics of the subproteome of fungal wall glycoproteins, and for the development of novel vaccines and diagnostic tools.

  4. Aberrant expression of a chemokinetic glycoprotein in psoriatic skin.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, S; Schmalsteig, F C; Brysk, M M; Hendrick, S J; Solomon, A R

    1987-05-01

    Clinically involved and uninvolved skin samples of 6 psoriatic patients, 4 samples each of normal skin specimens, basal cell carcinoma and keratoacanthoma were studied by an indirect immunofluorescence technique. The monospecific antibody used in this study was directed against a 30 kD glycoprotein, normally expressed by the terminally differentiated corneocytes. Functional characterization of this glycoprotein was evaluated by neutrophil cell movement assays. The involved and uninvolved skin of psoriatic patients expressed the 30 kD glycoprotein not only in the stratum corneum but in all the viable epidermal layers as well. Functional studies revealed this glycoprotein to be a potent chemokinetic molecule. These results suggest that the 30 kD glycoprotein is an intrinsic chemokinetic molecule of the terminally differentiated corneocytes, and its precocious and aberrant expression in psoriatic epidermis is potentially responsible for some of the pathophysiologic aspects of psoriasis. PMID:3302266

  5. Solubilization of glycoproteins of envelope viruses by detergents

    SciTech Connect

    Berezin, V.E.; Zaides, V.M.; Artamsnov, A.F.; Isaeva, E.S.; Zhdanov, V.M.

    1986-11-20

    The action of a number of known ionic and nonionic detergents, as well as the new nonionic detergent MESK, on envelope viruses was investigated. It was shown that the nonionic detergents MESK, Triton X-100, and octyl-..beta..-D-glucopyranoside selectively solubilize the outer glycoproteins of the virus particles. The nonionic detergent MESK has the mildest action. Using MESK, purified glycoproteins of influenza, parainfluenza, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, rabies, and herpes viruses were obtained. The procedure for obtaining glycoproteins includes incubation of the virus suspension with the detergent MESK, removal of subvirus structures by centrifuging, and purification of glycoproteins from detergents by dialysis. Isolated glycoproteins retain a native structure and biological activity and possess high immunogenicity. The detergent MESK is promising for laboratory tests and with respect to the production of subunit vaccines.

  6. The turnover rate of rabbit urinary Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Anne M. S.; Neuberger, Albert

    1973-01-01

    1. The turnover rate of urinary Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein in rabbits was determined by two different methods. The first involved measurement of the pool size of the glycoprotein in rabbit kidney and the daily urinary excretion rate by a radioimmunoassay from which the turnover rate was calculated. 2. The second method made use of the incorporation in vivo of Na214CO3 and sodium [14C]acetate. After a single intramuscular injection of one of these compounds, urine collections were made every 24h and the glycoprotein was isolated and its specific radioactivity was determined. 3. Incorporation of the label into urinary HCO3−, urea and plasma fibrinogen was also examined. The specific radio-activities of the O-acetyl, sialic acid, aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues isolated from the Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein were compared and their half-lives were compared with that of the intact glycoprotein. The two methods gave results in quite close agreement and indicated a half-life for the glycoprotein of approx. 9h. 4. An attempt was made to localize the glycoprotein within the kidney and within the cell. It is present throughout the kidney, but was not detected in the brush-border fraction isolated from the proximal tubules. From differential cell-centrifugation studies, the glycoprotein seemed to be predominantly present in the soluble fraction (100000g supernatant). This suggests that it is either largely a soluble cytoplasmic component or is very loosely bound to a membrane, being readily released under the gentlest homogenization procedure. 5. The half-life of Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein in human kidney was found by the radioimmunoassay method to be approx. 16h. The similarity between the composition of Tamm–Horsfall glycoprotein and human erythropoietin is discussed. PMID:4780692

  7. Array-based analysis of secreted glycoproteins for rapid selection of a single cell producing a glycoprotein with desired glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Wanjung; Kim, Yongtae; Son, Young Dok; Lee, Sang-Chul; Kim, Eunkyung; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Jung Hoe; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2010-07-01

    The therapeutic efficacy and in vivo biological function of a glycoprotein is significantly affected by its glycosylation profile. For the development of glycoproteins with therapeutic applications, selection of cell lines producing a glycoprotein with adequate glycoform is crucial. Here, we demonstrate an array-based analysis of secreted glycoproteins for rapid and efficient selection of a single cell producing a glycoprotein with desirable glycosylation. Our approach relies on microengraving and interrogation of glycoproteins produced by individual cells in a microwell array in terms of glycosylation profile as well as the produced amount. On the basis of statistical analysis of the interrogation, single cells which are predicted to produce a desired glycoprotein are selected, retrieved, and expanded. We applied the approach to human recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO)-producing CHO cells and verified the selection of a single CHO cell that produces rhEPO with a high sialylation degree. Human erythropoietin (hEPO) bearing highly sialylated oligosaccharide was shown to display a much longer plasma half-life, resulting in high therapeutic efficacy. This method may find widespread use in the clonal selection for the production of other glycoproteins with specific glycosylation as well as analysis of the heterogeneity in cell populations in a high-throughput manner.

  8. EBV glycoproteins: where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M

    2015-01-01

    Glycoproteins are critical to virus entry, to spread within and between hosts and can modify the behavior of cells. Many viruses carry only a few, most found in the virion envelope. EBV makes more than 12, providing flexibility in how it colonizes its human host. Some are dedicated to getting the virus through the cell membrane and on toward the nucleus of the cell, some help guide the virus back out and on to the next cell in the same or a new host. Yet others undermine host defenses helping the virus persist for a lifetime, maintaining a presence that is mostly tolerated and serves to perpetuate EBV as one of the most common infections of man. PMID:26843889

  9. The effect of ginger extract on glycoproteins of Raji cells.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Zahra; Nassir-Ud-Din; Kohan, Haleemeh Kabini; Kadivar, Mehdi; Kalyee, Zahra; Rad, Behzad Laame; Iravani, Ayda; Rahimi, Nourooz Ali; Wahabi, Farideh; Sadeghi, Sedigheh; Pourfallah, Fatemeh; Arjmand, Mohammad

    2014-01-15

    Protein glycosylation is associated with the development and progression of specific diseases, including cancers. The ginger rhizome is known to have anti-cancer and anti-fungal properties. This investigation was carried out to study the effect of ginger on glycoproteins of Raji cells. A 10% yield of ginger extract was mixed with 0.01% DMSO and added to 6 x 10(4) Raji cells at different concentrations for 24, 48 and 72 h at 37 degrees C. Their half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined and analyzed statistically using Graphpad prism software. Cell extracts were prepared and their glycoproteins purified using lectin-affinity chromatography (Q proteome total glycoprotein and O glycoprotein kits) and SDS PAGE was carried out. IC50 of ginger extract on Raji cells was 20 microg mL(-1) at 72 h with < 0.01 significance. Silver staining of purified glycoprotiens in Raji cells indicated the presence of O-glycans and N-glycans. N-linked mannose and N-linked sialic acids were detected with the total glycoprotein kit. O-linked galactose and O-linked sialic acids were identified with the O-glycoprotein. Ginger reduced the expression of O-linked sialic acid and also N-linked mannose on Raji cells but had no effect on other glycoproteins. Sialic acid is now well known as a cancer marker and investigations are on to use it as a drug-target in cancerous tissues.

  10. The N-glycan Glycoprotein Deglycosylation Complex (Gpd) from Capnocytophaga canimorsus Deglycosylates Human IgG

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Francesco; Manfredi, Pablo; Mally, Manuela; Moes, Suzette; Jenö, Paul; Cornelis, Guy R.

    2011-01-01

    C. canimorsus 5 has the capacity to grow at the expenses of glycan moieties from host cells N-glycoproteins. Here, we show that C. canimorsus 5 also has the capacity to deglycosylate human IgG and we analyze the deglycosylation mechanism. We show that deglycosylation is achieved by a large complex spanning the outer membrane and consisting of the Gpd proteins and sialidase SiaC. GpdD, -G, -E and -F are surface-exposed outer membrane lipoproteins. GpdDEF could contribute to the binding of glycoproteins at the bacterial surface while GpdG is a endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase cleaving the N-linked oligosaccharide after the first N-linked GlcNAc residue. GpdC, resembling a TonB-dependent OM transporter is presumed to import the oligosaccharide into the periplasm after its cleavage from the glycoprotein. The terminal sialic acid residue of the oligosaccharide is then removed by SiaC, a periplasm-exposed lipoprotein in direct contact with GpdC. Finally, most likely degradation of the oligosaccharide proceeds sequentially from the desialylated non reducing end by the action of periplasmic exoglycosidases, including β-galactosidases, β-N-Acetylhexosaminidases and α-mannosidases. PMID:21738475

  11. Expression of the rhesus glycoproteins, ammonia transporter family members, RHCG and RHBG in male reproductive organs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Verlander, Jill W; Handlogten, Mary E; Han, Ki-Hwan; Cooke, Paul S; Weiner, I David

    2013-09-01

    The rhesus glycoproteins, Rh B glycoprotein (RHBG) and Rh C glycoprotein (RHCG), are recently identified ammonia transporters. Rhcg expression is necessary for normal male fertility, but its specific cellular expression is unknown, and Rhbg has not been reported to be expressed in the male reproductive tract. This study sought to determine the specific cellular expression of Rhcg, to determine whether Rhbg is expressed in the male reproductive tract, and, if so, to determine which cells express Rhbg using real-time RT-PCR, immunoblot analysis, and immunohistochemistry. Both Rhbg and Rhcg were expressed throughout the male reproductive tract. In the testis, high levels of Rhbg were expressed in Leydig cells, and Rhcg was expressed in spermatids during the later stages of their maturation (steps 13-16) in stages I-VIII of the seminiferous epithelium cycle. In the epididymis, basolateral Rhbg was present in narrow cells in the initial segment, in principal cells in the upper corpus, and in clear cells throughout the epididymis. Apical Rhcg immunolabel was present in principal cells in the caput and upper corpus epididymidis and in clear cells in the middle and lower corpus and cauda epididymidis. In the vas deferens, apical Rhcg immunolabel and basolateral Rhbg immunolabel were present in some principal cells and colocalized with H(+)-ATPase immunolabel. We conclude that both Rhbg and Rhcg are highly expressed in specific cells in the male reproductive tract where they can contribute to multiple components of male fertility.

  12. Lectin binding and surface glycoprotein pattern of human macrophage populations.

    PubMed

    Kreipe, H; Radzun, H J; Schumacher, U; Parwaresch, M R

    1986-01-01

    In the present study unstimulated and stimulated human blood monocytes, untreated and phorbol ester treated U-937 cells, as well as human peritoneal and alveolar macrophages were studied with respect to their surface membrane properties. Binding of different lectins and electrophoretic patterns of tritium labeled surface glycoproteins were compared. The analysis of surface glycoproteins could be interpreted as evidence for a common origin of the analysed cell populations. Furthermore, banding patterns of glycoproteins might be useful to define certain activation states within monocyte/macrophage differentiation. In contrast, lectin binding pattern did not clearly discriminate macrophage subpopulations. PMID:3102412

  13. Synonymous codon usage pattern in glycoprotein gene of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Morla, Sudhir; Makhija, Aditi; Kumar, Sachin

    2016-06-10

    Rabies virus (RABV) is the causative agent of a fatal nervous system ailment. The disease is zoonotic and prevalent in many developing countries. The glycoprotein (G) of RABV is the major antigenic determinant of the virus and plays a pivotal role in its neurovirulence. Various aspects of 'G' protein biology have been explored, but the factors affecting the nucleotide choice and synonymous codon usage have never been reported. In the present study, we have analyzed the relative synonymous codon usage and effective number of codons (Nc) using 132 'G' protein genes of RABV. Corresponding analysis was used to calculate major trends in codon usage. The correlation between base composition and codon usage as well as the plot between Nc and GC3 suggest that mutational pressure is the major factor that influences the codon usage in the G gene of RABV. In addition, factors like aromaticity, aliphatic index and hydropathy have shown slight correlation suggesting that natural selection also contributes to the codon usage variations of the 'G' gene. In conclusion, codon usage bias in 'G' gene of RABV is mainly by mutational pressure and natural selection. PMID:26945626

  14. An extensive endoplasmic reticulum-localised glycoprotein family in trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Harriet; O’Reilly, Amanda J.; Sternberg, Jeremy; Field, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomes are evolutionarily highly divergent parasitic protozoa, and as a consequence the vast majority of trypanosome membrane proteins remain uncharacterised in terms of location, trafficking or function. Here we describe a novel family of type I membrane proteins which we designate ‘invariant glycoproteins’ (IGPs). IGPs are trypanosome-restricted, with extensive, lineage-specific paralogous expansions in related taxa. In T. brucei three IGP subfamilies, IGP34, IGP40 and IGP48 are recognised; all possess a putative C-type lectin ectodomain and are ER-localised, despite lacking a classical ER-retention motif. IGPs exhibit highest expression in stumpy stage cells, suggesting roles in developmental progression, but gene silencing in mammalian infective forms suggests that each IGP subfamily is also required for normal proliferation. Detailed analysis of the IGP48 subfamily indicates a role in maintaining ER morphology, while the ER lumenal domain is necessary and sufficient for formation of both oligomeric complexes and ER retention. IGP48 is detected by antibodies from T. b. rhodesiense infected humans. We propose that the IGPs represent a trypanosomatid-specific family of ER-localised glycoproteins, with potential contributions to life cycle progression and immunity, and utilise oligomerisation as an ER retention mechanism. PMID:26167471

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus envelope glycoprotein (G) has a novel structure.

    PubMed Central

    Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Elango, N; Norrby, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    Amino acid sequence of human respiratory syncytial virus envelope glycoprotein (G) was deduced from the DNA sequence of a recombinant plasmid and confirmed by limited amino acid microsequencing of purified 90K G protein. The calculated molecular mass of the protein encoded by the only long open reading frame of 298 amino acids was 32,588 daltons and was somewhat smaller than the 36K polypeptide translated in vitro from mRNA selected by this plasmid. Inspection of the sequence revealed a single hydrophobic domain of 23 amino acids capable of membrane insertion at 41 residues from the N-terminus. There was no N-terminal signal sequence and the hydrophilic N-terminal 20 residues probably represent the cytoplasmic tail of the protein. The N-terminally oriented membrane insertion was somewhat analogous to paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and influenza neuraminidase (NA). The protein was moderately hydrophilic and rich in hydroxy-amino acids. It was both N- and O-glycosylated with the latter contributing significantly to the net molecular mass 90K. Images PMID:4069997

  16. 21 CFR 866.5430 - Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system....5430 Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein I... the beta-2-glycoprotein I (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5440 - Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system....5440 Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein III... the beta-2-glycoprotein III (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5430 - Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system....5430 Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein I... the beta-2-glycoprotein I (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5440 - Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system....5440 Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein III... the beta-2-glycoprotein III (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5430 - Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system....5430 Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein I... the beta-2-glycoprotein I (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  1. Detection of glycoproteins in the Acanthamoeba plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Paatero, G.I.L. ); Gahmberg, C.G. )

    1988-11-01

    In the present study the authors have shown that glycoproteins are present in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii by utilizing different radioactive labeling techniques. Plasma membrane proteins in the amoeba were iodinated by {sup 125}I-lactoperoxidase labeling and the solubilized radiolabeled glycoproteins were separated by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The periodate/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} and galactose oxidase/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} labeling techniques were used for labeling of surface carbohydrates in the amoeba. Several surface-labeled glycoproteins were observed in addition to a diffusely labeled region with M{sub r} of 55,000-75,000 seen on electrophoresis, which could represent glycolipids. The presence of glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii was confirmed by metabolic labeling with ({sup 35}S)methionine followed by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  2. Regenerated bacterial cellulose microfluidic column for glycoproteins separation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuntao; Zhu, Chunlin; Huang, Yang; Nie, Ying; Yang, Jiazhi; Shen, Ruiqi; Sun, Dongping

    2016-02-10

    To analysis and separate glycoproteins, a simple strategy to prepare regenerated bacterial cellulose (RBC) column with concanavalin A (Con A) lectin immobilized in microfluidic system was applied. RBC was filled into microchannel to fabricate RBC microcolumn after bacterial cellulose dissolved in NaOH-sulfourea water solution. Lectin Con A was covalently connected onto RBC matrix surface via Schiff-base formation. Lysozyme (non-glycoprotein) and transferrin (glycoprotein) were successfully separated based on their different affinities toward the immobilized Con A. Overall, the RBC microfluidic system presents great potential application in affinity chromatography of glycoproteins analysis, and this research represents a significant step to prepare bacterial cellulose (BC) as column packing material in microfluidic system. What is more, troublesome operations for lectin affinity chromatography were simplified by integrating the microfluidic chip onto a HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) system.

  3. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  4. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. PMID:24889823

  5. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies.

  6. Oxygen radicals stimulate guinea pig gallbladder glycoprotein secretion in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, W.B.; Turner, B.; LaMont, J.T. )

    1987-11-01

    In several animal models of cholelithiasis, and in humans with gallstones, hypersecretion of gallbladder mucin is observed. This study was undertaken to determine the effect of oxygen radicals on guinea pig gallbladder glycoprotein secretion in organ culture. Mucosal explants were incubated with ({sup 3}H)glucosamine hydrochloride to label glycoproteins, then exposed to oxygen radicals generated by chelated ferric iron and ascorbic acid. Marked stimulation of glycoprotein release was observed after a 30-min exposure to the oxygen radical-generating system, and the effect was inhibited by mannitol. The stimulatory effect of hydroxyl radical was not accompanied by leakage of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase. Parallel experiments with human granulocytes activated with f-Met-Leu-Phe and coincubated with gallbladder explants revealed similar results. These results indicate that oxygen radicals, especially the hydroxyl radical (OH), are capable of stimulating rapid release of mucous-type glycoproteins from gallbladder epithelium.

  7. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc. PMID:14533798

  8. Concanavalin A binding glycoprotein in human stratum corneum

    SciTech Connect

    Brysk, M.M.; Miller, J.

    1984-03-01

    A mannose-containing 40K glycoprotein has been identified in the stratum corneum of normal human epidermis. It is apparently membrane-bound and in the intact epidermis it is inaccessible to either concanavalin A or to trypsin. After it is detergent-solubilized, it can be labeled with concanavalin A or destroyed with trypsin. There is little or none of this glycoprotein in the viable cells of the epidermis.

  9. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc.

  10. Reduction of cerebral glucose utilization by the HIV envelope glycoprotein Gp-120

    SciTech Connect

    Kimes, A.S.; London, E.D.; Szabo, G.; Raymon, L.; Tabakoff, B. )

    1991-05-01

    Gp-120 is a glycoprotein constituent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope. The effects of gp-120 on cerebral glucose utilization in rats were studied by the quantitative 2-deoxy-D-(1-14C) glucose method. Intracerebroventricular injection of gp-120 significantly reduced glucose utilization in the lateral habenula and the suprachiasmatic nucleus and decreased the global cerebral metabolic rate for glucose. The findings suggest that gp-120 and closely related peptides can alter neuronal function, thereby contributing to the sequelae of HIV infection.

  11. Localization of the papain cleavage site of H-2 glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ewenstein, B M; Freed, J H; Mole, L E; Nathenson, S G

    1976-01-01

    The antigenic products of the murine H-2K and H-2D genes are glycoproteins of about 45,000 molecular weight which are tightly integrated within the cell surface membrane. A glycoprotein fragment (FAg, antigenic fragment) of 37,000 daltons carrying the carbohydrate, antigenic sites, and the associated putative beta2-microglobulin of 12,000 daltons can be generated by papain cleavage either of the native molecules in the cell membrane or of immune precipitates made from the antigen solubilized by nonionic detergent. Partial NH2-terminal sequence analyses of the native H-2 glycoprotein and of the papain-cleaved glycoprotein fragment establish that the fragment is, in fact, the NH2-terminal portion of the native molecule. Thus, the cleavage by papain proteolysis is near the COOH-terminus, and removal of the COOH-terminal portion (Fm, membrane fragment) converts the glycoprotein to a water-soluble form. This observation suggests that the NH2-terminus of the native glycoprotein extends out of the hydrophobic bilayer of the cell membrane, and that the COOH-terminus contains the membrane binding region and is buried within the bilayer. PMID:1062805

  12. Homology modelling of human P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Domicevica, Laura; Biggin, Philip C

    2015-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an ATP-binding cassette transporter that exports a huge range of compounds out of cells and is thus one of the key proteins in conferring multi-drug resistance in cancer. Understanding how it achieves such a broad specificity and the series of conformational changes that allow export to occur form major, on-going, research objectives around the world. Much of our knowledge to date has been derived from mutagenesis and assay data. However, in recent years, there has also been great progress in structural biology and although the structure of human P-gp has not yet been solved, there are now a handful of related structures on which homology models can be built to aid in the interpretation of the vast amount of experimental data that currently exists. Many models for P-gp have been built with this aim, but the situation is complicated by the apparent flexibility of the system and by the fact that although many potential templates exist, there is large variation in the conformational state in which they have been crystallized. In this review, we summarize how homology modelling has been used in the past, how models are typically selected and finally illustrate how MD simulations can be used as a means to give more confidence about models that have been generated via this approach.

  13. Antifreeze glycoprotein agents: structural requirements for activity.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Rondanelli, Patricio A; Marshall, Sergio H; Guzman, Fanny

    2011-11-01

    Antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) are considered to be the most efficient means to reduce ice damage to cell tissues since they are able to inhibit growth and crystallization of ice. The key element of antifreeze proteins is to act in a non-colligative manner which allows them to function at concentrations 300-500 times lowers than other dissolved solutes. During the past decade, AFGPs have demonstrated tremendous potential for many pharmaceutical and food applications. Presently, the only route to obtain AFGPs involves the time consuming and expensive process of isolation and purification from deep-sea polar fishes. Unfortunately, it is not amenable to mass production and commercial applications. The lack of understanding of the mechanism through which the AFGPs inhibit ice growth has also hampered the realization of industrial and biotechnological applications. Here we report the structural motifs that are essential for antifreeze activity of AFGPs, and propose a unified mechanism based on both recent studies of short alanine peptides and structure activity relationship of synthesized AFGPs.

  14. Dissection of the Antibody Response against Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins in Naturally Infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhen-Yu; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Ponce de Leon, Manuel; Lou, Huan; Wald, Anna; Krummenacher, Claude; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Relatively little is known about the extent of the polyclonal antibody (PAb) repertoire elicited by herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoproteins during natural infection and how these antibodies affect virus neutralization. Here, we examined IgGs from 10 HSV-seropositive individuals originally classified as high or low virus shedders. All PAbs neutralized virus to various extents. We determined which HSV entry glycoproteins these PAbs were directed against: glycoproteins gB, gD, and gC were recognized by all sera, but fewer sera reacted against gH/gL. We previously characterized multiple mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and mapped those with high neutralizing activity to the crystal structures of gD, gB, and gH/gL. We used a biosensor competition assay to determine whether there were corresponding human antibodies to those epitopes. All 10 samples had neutralizing IgGs to gD epitopes, but there were variations in which epitopes were seen in individual samples. Surprisingly, only three samples contained neutralizing IgGs to gB epitopes. To further dissect the nature of these IgGs, we developed a method to select out gD- and gB-specific IgGs from four representative sera via affinity chromatography, allowing us to determine the contribution of antibodies against each glycoprotein to the overall neutralization capacity of the serum. In two cases, gD and gB accounted for all of the neutralizing activity against HSV-2, with a modest amount of HSV-1 neutralization directed against gC. In the other two samples, the dominant response was to gD. IMPORTANCE Antibodies targeting functional epitopes on HSV entry glycoproteins mediate HSV neutralization. Virus-neutralizing epitopes have been defined and characterized using murine monoclonal antibodies. However, it is largely unknown whether these same epitopes are targeted by the humoral response to HSV infection in humans. We have shown that during natural infection, virus-neutralizing antibodies are principally

  15. N-glycoprotein analysis discovers new up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Nicastri, Annalisa; Gaspari, Marco; Sacco, Rosario; Elia, Laura; Gabriele, Caterina; Romano, Roberto; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cuda, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death due to cancer worldwide. Therefore, the identification of high-specificity and -sensitivity biomarkers for the early detection of colorectal cancer is urgently needed. Post-translational modifications, such as glycosylation, are known to play an important role in cancer progression. In the present work, we used a quantitative proteomic technique based on (18)O stable isotope labeling to identify differentially expressed N-linked glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue samples compared with healthy colorectal tissue from 19 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. We identified 54 up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer samples, therefore potentially involved in the biological processes of tumorigenesis. In particular, nine of these (PLOD2, DPEP1, SE1L1, CD82, PAR1, PLOD3, S12A2, LAMP3, OLFM4) were found to be up-regulated in the great majority of the cohort, and, interestingly, the association with colorectal cancer of four (PLOD2, S12A2, PLOD3, CD82) has not been hitherto described.

  16. Reglucosylation by UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 delays glycoprotein secretion but not degradation

    PubMed Central

    Tannous, Abla; Patel, Nishant; Tamura, Taku; Hebert, Daniel N.

    2015-01-01

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) is a central quality control gatekeeper in the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The reglucosylation of glycoproteins supports their rebinding to the carbohydrate-binding ER molecular chaperones calnexin and calreticulin. A cell-based reglucosylation assay was used to investigate the role of UGT1 in ER protein surveillance or the quality control process. UGT1 was found to modify wild-type proteins or proteins that are expected to eventually traffic out of the ER through the secretory pathway. Trapping of reglucosylated wild-type substrates in their monoglucosylated state delayed their secretion. Whereas terminally misfolded substrates or off-pathway proteins were most efficiently reglucosylated by UGT1, the trapping of these mutant substrates in their reglucosylated or monoglucosylated state did not delay their degradation by the ER-associated degradation pathway. This indicated that monoglucosylated mutant proteins were actively extracted from the calnexin/calreticulin binding-reglucosylation cycle for degradation. Therefore trapping proteins in their monoglucosylated state was sufficient to delay their exit to the Golgi but had no effect on their rate of degradation, suggesting that the degradation selection process progressed in a dominant manner that was independent of reglucosylation and the glucose-containing A-branch on the substrate glycans. PMID:25428988

  17. Isolation and characterization of lung connective-tissue glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lafuma, C; Moczar, M; Robert, L

    1982-01-01

    1. Glycoproteins of hamster, rat and baboon lung parenchyma were investigated by using [14C]glucosamine incorporation in vitro followed by sequential extraction of the macromolecular components and characterization of the glycoproteins in the extracts. 2. Slices of lung parenchyma maintained in vitro incorporated [U-14C]glucosamine linearly with time into non-diffusible macromolecules for up to 5h. All the macromolecule-associated 14C label was present as [14C]glucosamine. 3. These 14C-labelled macromolecules were extracted from previously delipidated and salt-extracted lung by 5M-guanidinium chloride in the presence of dithiothreitol and proteinase inhibitors before (extract A1) and after (extract A2) hydrolysis of the collagen by collagenase. The [14C]glucosamine-labelled glycoproteins in extracts A1 and A2 contained 55 and 5% respectively of the total [14C]glucosamine incorporated in the lung of all three species studied. 4. The [14C]glucosamine-labelled glycoproteins were analysed by gel-filtration chromatography, sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing. The major [14C]glucosamine-labelled glycoproteins of baboon lung parenchyma had apparent mol.wts. of about 400 000, 140 000 and 65 000 with isoelectric points respectively of 4.8, 5.4 and 5.4. The hamster lung glycoproteins with isoelectric points of 4.1 and 5.8 were devoid of hydroxyproline and contained galactose, mannose and N-acetylglucosamine. These experiments indicate that several distinct glycoproteins are synthesized in situ by the cells of pulmonary parenchyma and may well play a role in its structure and function. PMID:7115303

  18. Role of zona pellucida glycoproteins during fertilization in humans.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Satish Kumar

    2015-04-01

    In the last decade, scientific investigations pertaining to the role of zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins during fertilization in humans have led to new insights. This has been achieved using purified native/recombinant human zona proteins and transgenic mice expressing human ZP glycoproteins. The proposed model in mice of ZP glycoprotein-3 (ZP3) acting as primary sperm receptor and ZP glycoprotein-2 (ZP2) as secondary sperm receptor has been modified for sperm-egg binding in humans. ZP glycoprotein-1 (ZP1), ZP3, and ZP glycoprotein-4 (ZP4) have been shown to bind to the capacitated human sperm. ZP2 binds to the acrosome-reacted human spermatozoa. Further, the eggs obtained from transgenic mice expressing human ZP2 alone or in conjunction with other human instead of mouse zona proteins showed binding of human sperm, suggesting that ZP2 might also play a role in sperm-egg binding. This function has been mapped to a domain corresponding to amino acid residues 51-144 of ZP2. In contrast to mice, where ZP3 is the primary agonist for inducing the acrosome reaction, in humans, the acrosome reaction can be mediated by ZP1, ZP3, and ZP4. The effect of mutations in the genes encoding zona proteins on the ZP morphology and infertility has not been established. Further, the role of autoantibodies against ZP in women with 'unexplained infertility' leading to poor outcome of in vitro fertilization is currently controversial and needs further investigations. Understanding the role of ZP glycoproteins during human fertilization facilitates the development of new contraceptives and strategies to overcome the problem of infertility.

  19. Glycoproteins from the cell wall of Phaseolus coccineus.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, M A; Selvendran, R R

    1980-04-01

    1. The use of a modified sodium chlorite/acetic acid delignification procedure for the solubilization of a hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein fraction from the depectinated cell walls of Phaseolus coccineus is described. 2. The crude glycoprotein was associated with some pectic material; hydroxyproline and serine were the most abundant amino acids, and arabinose, galactose and galacturonic acid the predominant monosaccharides. 3. The bulk of the hydroxyproline is O-glycosidically substituted with tetra- and tri-arabinofuranosides. From methylation analysis the linkages in these arabinosides could be inferred. 4. Ion-exchange chromatography of the crude glycoprotein gave one major and two minor hydroxyproline-rich fractions, with similar amino acid but different monosaccharide composition. 5. In the major fraction, serine appears to be O-glycosidically substituted with a single galactopyranoside residue that can be removed by the action of alpha-galactosidase but not beta-galactosidase. Removal of arabinofuranoside residues by partial acid hydrolysis greatly enhanced the action of alpha-galactosidase. 6. Methylation followed by carboxy reduction with LiAl2H4 has shown the presence of (1 leads to 4)-linked galacturonic acid in the crude glycoprotein fraction but not in the major fraction from the ion-exchange column. Hence the bulk of the pectic material is not associated with the major glycoprotein component. It is suggested that the glycoprotein is held in the wall by phenolic cross-links. 7. Similarities with the glycopeptide moiety of potato lectin provides further evidence for a class of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins with common features.

  20. P-glycoprotein activity and biological response

    SciTech Connect

    Vaalburg, W. . E-mail: w.vaalburg@pet.umcg.nl; Hendrikse, N.H.; Elsinga, P.H.; Bart, J.; Waarde, A. van

    2005-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a transmembrane drug efflux pump encoded by the MDR-1 gene in humans. Most likely P-gp protects organs against endogenous and exogenous toxins by extruding toxic compounds such as chemotherapeutics and other drugs. Many drugs are substrates for P-gp. Since P-gp is also expressed in the blood-brain barrier, P-gp substrates reach lower concentrations in the brain than in P-gp-negative tissues. Failure of response to chemotherapy of malignancies can be due to intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Many tumors are multidrug resistant (MDR); resistant to several structurally unrelated chemotherapeutic agents. Several mechanisms are involved in MDR of which P-gp is studied most extensively. P-gp extrudes drugs out of tumor cells resulting in decreased intracellular drug concentrations, leading to the MDR phenotype. Furthermore, the MDR-1 gene exhibits several single nucleotide polymorphisms, some of which result in different transport capabilities. P-gp functionality and the effect of P-gp modulation on the pharmacokinetics of novel and established drugs can be studied in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) using carbon-11 and fluorine-18-labeled P-gp substrates and modulators. PET may demonstrate the consequences of genetic differences on tissue pharmacokinetics. Inhibitors such as calcium-channel blockers (verapamil), cyclosporin A, ONT-093, and XR9576 can modulate the P-gp functionality. With PET the effect of P-gp modulation on the bioavailability of drugs can be investigated in humans in vivo. PET also allows the measurement of the efficacy of newly developed P-gp modulators.

  1. Physical Properties of the Glycoprotein Mucin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Garrett; Davis, William; Superfine, Richard; Boucher, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Epithelial cell surfaces are covered by a protective gel known as mucus. The physiological function of this gel depends on its rheological properties, and these properties are largely derived from the secreted glycoprotein mucin. The genetic disease Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is characterized by the adhesion of thick, viscous mucus on these tissues. In the lungs, this results in the interruption of mucus transport thus compromising the first line of defense against pathogens in these tissues. In order to restore the flow of tracheobronchial mucus out of the body, knowledge of the molecular and physical properties of mucin and mucin solutions would be greatly beneficial. The present model for these molecules is that of a long linear strand consisting of highly glycosylated regions linked by cystein-rich globular regions. It is thought that the globular regions may interact either through intermolecular disulfide bonds or through hydrophobic interactions. It has also been speculated that the glycosylated regions may have lectin-like interactions. In the present work, single mucin molecules were imaged at high resolution using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Phase mode imaging was used to map the interactions between functionalized AFM tips and the molecular topography. Additionally, using force-distance curves with the AFM, the adhesion between mucin bound tips and cell surface glycocalyx and glycocalyx-like model surfaces, was measured. And, finally, the viscoelastic properties of mucin solutions were measured using the recently developed technique, single particle tracking microrheology. A model is being developed that will incorporate the properties of mucins beginning at the single molecule and ending with the bulk viscoelastic properties.

  2. Molecular insight into conformational transmission of human P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shan-Yan; Liu, Fu-Feng E-mail: ysun@tju.edu.cn; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan E-mail: ysun@tju.edu.cn

    2013-12-14

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a kind of ATP-binding cassette transporter, can export candidates through a channel at the two transmembrane domains (TMDs) across the cell membranes using the energy released from ATP hydrolysis at the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Considerable evidence has indicated that human P-gp undergoes large-scale conformational changes to export a wide variety of anti-cancer drugs out of the cancer cells. However, molecular mechanism of the conformational transmission of human P-gp from the NBDs to the TMDs is still unclear. Herein, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the atomic detail of the conformational transmission of human P-gp. It is confirmed that the conformational transition from the inward- to outward-facing is initiated by the movement of the NBDs. It is found that the two NBDs move both on the two directions (x and y). The movement on the x direction leads to the closure of the NBDs, while the movement on the y direction adjusts the conformations of the NBDs to form the correct ATP binding pockets. Six key segments (KSs) protruding from the TMDs to interact with the NBDs are identified. The relative movement of the KSs along the y axis driven by the NBDs can be transmitted through α-helices to the rest of the TMDs, rendering the TMDs to open towards periplasm in the outward-facing conformation. Twenty eight key residue pairs are identified to participate in the interaction network that contributes to the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs of human P-gp. In addition, 9 key residues in each NBD are also identified. The studies have thus provided clear insight into the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs in human P-gp.

  3. Molecular insight into conformational transmission of human P-glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shan-Yan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a kind of ATP-binding cassette transporter, can export candidates through a channel at the two transmembrane domains (TMDs) across the cell membranes using the energy released from ATP hydrolysis at the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). Considerable evidence has indicated that human P-gp undergoes large-scale conformational changes to export a wide variety of anti-cancer drugs out of the cancer cells. However, molecular mechanism of the conformational transmission of human P-gp from the NBDs to the TMDs is still unclear. Herein, targeted molecular dynamics simulations were performed to explore the atomic detail of the conformational transmission of human P-gp. It is confirmed that the conformational transition from the inward- to outward-facing is initiated by the movement of the NBDs. It is found that the two NBDs move both on the two directions (x and y). The movement on the x direction leads to the closure of the NBDs, while the movement on the y direction adjusts the conformations of the NBDs to form the correct ATP binding pockets. Six key segments (KSs) protruding from the TMDs to interact with the NBDs are identified. The relative movement of the KSs along the y axis driven by the NBDs can be transmitted through α-helices to the rest of the TMDs, rendering the TMDs to open towards periplasm in the outward-facing conformation. Twenty eight key residue pairs are identified to participate in the interaction network that contributes to the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs of human P-gp. In addition, 9 key residues in each NBD are also identified. The studies have thus provided clear insight into the conformational transmission from the NBDs to the TMDs in human P-gp.

  4. Linkage of a membrane skeleton to integral membrane glycoproteins in human platelets. Identification of one of the glycoproteins as glycoprotein Ib.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, J E

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether platelets contain a membrane skeleton. Platelets were labeled by a sodium periodate/sodium [3H]borohydride method and lysed with Triton X-100. Much of the filamentous actin could be sedimented at low g forces (15,600 g, 4 min), but some of the actin filaments required high-speed centrifugation for their sedimentation (100,000 g, 3 h). The latter filaments differed from those in the low-speed pellet in that they could not be depolymerized by Ca2+ and could not be sedimented at low g forces even from Triton X-100 lysates of platelets that had been activated with thrombin. Actin-binding protein sedimented with both types of filaments, but 3H-labeled membrane glycoproteins were recovered mainly with the high-speed filaments. The primary 3H-labeled glycoprotein recovered with this "membrane skeleton" was glycoprotein (GP) Ib. Approximately 70% of the platelet GP Ib was present in this skeleton. Several other minor glycoproteins, including greater than 50% of the GP Ia and small amounts of three unidentified glycoproteins of Mr greater than 200,000, were also recovered with the membrane skeleton. The Triton X-100 insolubility of GP Ib, GP Ia, a minor membrane glycoprotein of 250,000 Mr, and actin-binding protein resulted from their association with actin filaments as they were rendered Triton X-100-soluble when actin filaments were depolymerized with deoxyribonuclease I and co-isolated with actin filaments on sucrose gradients. When isolated platelet plasma membranes were extracted with Triton X-100, actin, actin-binding protein, and GP Ib were recovered as the Triton X-100 residue. These studies show that unstimulated platelets contain a membrane skeleton composed of actin filaments and actin-binding protein that is distinct from the rest of the cytoskeleton and is attached to GP Ib, GP Ia, and a minor glycoprotein of 250,000 Mr on the plasma membrane. Images PMID:2932470

  5. Glycoprotein composition along the pistil of Malus x domestica and the modulation of pollen tube growth

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The characteristics of pollen tube growth are not constant, but display distinct patterns of growth within the different tissues of the pistil. In the stigma, the growth rate is slow and autotrophic, whereas in the style, it is rapid and heterotrophic. Very little is known about the interactions between these distinct maternal tissues and the traversing pollen tube and the role of this interaction on the observed metabolism. In this work we characterise pollen tube growth in the apple flower and look for differences in glycoprotein epitope localization between two different maternal tissues, the stigma and the style. Results While immunocytochemically-detected arabinogalactan proteins were present at high levels in the stigma, they were not detected in the transmitting tissue of the style, where extensins were abundant. Whereas extensins remained at high levels in unpollinated pistils, they were no longer present in the style following pollen tube passage. Similarily, while abundant in unpollinated styles, insoluble polysaccharides such as β-glucans, were depleted in pollinated pistils. Conclusions The switch from autotropic to heterotrophic pollen tube growth correlates spatially with a change of glycoprotein epitopes between the stigma and the style. The depletion of extensins and polysaccharides following pollen tube passage in the style suggest a possible contribution to the acceleration of heterotrophic pollen tube growth, which would imply an active contribution of female tissues on prezygotic male–female crosstalk. PMID:24387633

  6. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains.

    PubMed

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the YxxPhi domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1(NL4.3) compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and increase of virus-cell fusion confirming the correlation between post-translational modification of tubulin and virus-cell fusion. These results thus identify tubulin and its post-translational modification as a new cellular target for interference with HIV-cell fusion.

  7. Inactivation of Burkholderia cepacia Complex Phage KS9 gp41 Identifies the Phage Repressor and Generates Lytic Virions▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Karlene H.; Seed, Kimberley D.; Stothard, Paul; Dennis, Jonathan J.

    2010-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) is made up of at least 17 species of Gram-negative opportunistic bacterial pathogens that cause fatal infections in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease. KS9 (vB_BcenS_KS9), one of a number of temperate phages isolated from BCC species, is a prophage of Burkholderia pyrrocinia LMG 21824. Transmission electron micrographs indicate that KS9 belongs to the family Siphoviridae and exhibits the B1 morphotype. The 39,896-bp KS9 genome, comprised of 50 predicted genes, integrates into the 3′ end of the LMG 21824 GTP cyclohydrolase II open reading frame. The KS9 genome is most similar to uncharacterized prophage elements in the genome of B. cenocepacia PC184 (vB_BcenZ_ PC184), as well as Burkholderia thailandensis phage φE125 and Burkholderia pseudomallei phage φ1026b. Using molecular techniques, we have disrupted KS9 gene 41, which exhibits similarity to genes encoding phage repressors, producing a lytic mutant named KS9c. This phage is incapable of stable lysogeny in either LMG 21824 or B. cenocepacia strain K56-2 and rescues a Galleria mellonella infection model from experimental B. cenocepacia K56-2 infections at relatively low multiplicities of infection. These results readily demonstrate that temperate phages can be genetically engineered to lytic form and that these modified phages can be used to treat bacterial infections in vivo. PMID:19939932

  8. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T.

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the Yxx{phi} domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1{sub NL4.3} compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and increase of virus-cell fusion confirming the correlation between post-translational modification of tubulin and virus-cell fusion. These results thus identify tubulin and its post-translational modification as a new cellular target for interference with HIV-cell fusion.

  9. Glycoprotein labeling with click chemistry (GLCC) and carbohydrate detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Huang, Xinyi; Burton, Andrew J; Swift, Karl A D

    2015-08-14

    Molecular labeling and detection techniques are essential to research in life science. Here, a method for glycoprotein labeling/carbohydrate detection through glycan replacement, termed glycoprotein labeling with click chemistry (GLCC), is described. In this method, a glycoprotein is first treated with specific glycosidases to remove certain sugar residues, a procedure that creates acceptor sites for a specific glycosyltransferase. A 'clickable' monosaccharide is then installed onto these sites by the glycosyltransferase. This modified glycoprotein is then conjugated to a reporter molecule using a click chemistry reaction. For glycoproteins that already contain vacant glycosylation sites, deglycosylation is not needed before the labeling step. As a demonstration, labeling on fetal bovine fetuin, mouse immunoglobulin IgG and bacterial expressed human TNFα and TNFβ are shown. Compared to traditional ways of protein labeling, labeling at glycosylation sites with GLCC is considerably more specific and less likely to have adverse effects, and, when utilized as a method for carbohydrate detection, this method is also highly specific and sensitive.

  10. Intracellular processing of the Newcastle disease virus fusion glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, T.; Ward, L.J.; Semerjian, A.

    1985-03-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (Fo) of Newcastle disease virus is cleaved at an intracellular site into F1 and F2. This result was confirmed by comparing the transit time of the fusion protein to the cell surface with the time course of cleavage of Fo. The time required for cleavage of half of the pulse-labeled Fo protein is ca. 40 min faster than the half time of the transit of the fusion protein to the cell surface. To determine the cell compartment in which cleavage occurs, use was made of inhibitors which block glycoprotein migration at specific points and posttranslational modifications known to occur in specific cell membranes. Cleavage of Fo is inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; thus, cleavage does not occur in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Monensin blocks the incorporation of Newcastle disease virus glycoproteins into virions and blocks the cleavage of the fusion glycoprotein. However, Fo cannot be radioactively labeled with (/sup 3/H) fucose, whereas F1 is readily labeled. These results argue that cleavage occurs in the trans Golgi membranes or in a cell compartment occupied by glycoproteins quite soon after their transit through the trans Golgi membranes. The implications of the results presented for the transit times of the fusion protein between subcellular organelles are discussed.

  11. The effect of glycoprotein-processing inhibitors on fucosylation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, P M; Elbein, A D

    1985-11-25

    The influenza viral hemagglutinin contains L-fucose linked alpha 1,6 to some of the innermost GlcNAc residues of the complex oligosaccharides. In order to determine what structural features of the oligosaccharide were required for fucosylation or where in the processing pathway fucosylation occurred, influenza virus-infected MDCK cells were incubated in the presence of various inhibitors of glycoprotein processing to stop trimming at different points. After several hours of incubation with the inhibitors, [5,6-3H]fucose and [1-14C]mannose were added to label the glycoproteins, and cells were incubated in inhibitor and isotope for about 40 h to produce mature virus. Glycopeptides were prepared from the viral and the cellular glycoproteins, and these glycopeptides were isolated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-4. The glycopeptides were then digested with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H and rechromatographed on the Bio-Gel column. In the presence of castanospermine or 2,5-dihydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine, both inhibitors of glucosidase I, most of the radioactive mannose was found in Glc3Man7-9GlcNAc structures, and these did not contain radioactive fucose. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, most of the [14C]mannose was in a Man9GlcNAc structure which was also not fucosylated. However, in the presence of swainsonine, an inhibitor of mannosidase II, the [14C]mannose was mostly in hybrid types of oligosaccharides, and these structures also contained radioactive fucose. Treatment of the hybrid structures with endoglucosaminidase H released the [3H]fucose as a small peptide (Fuc-GlcNAc-peptide), whereas the [14C]mannose remained with the oligosaccharide. The data support the conclusion that the addition of fucose linked alpha 1,6 to the asparagine-linked GlcNAc is dependent upon the presence of a beta 1,2-GlcNAc residue on the alpha 1,3-mannose branch of the core structure. PMID:3932356

  12. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqian; Cabrera, Robert M; Li, Yue; Miller, David S; Finnell, Richard H

    2013-03-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with many adverse clinical manifestations. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by brain capillary endothelial cells, protects the brain from exposure to neurotoxicants. The function of BBB is modulated by multiple ABC transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein. A proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT)-deficient mouse has been previously described as a model for systemic folate deficiency. Herein, we demonstrate that exposing mouse brain capillaries to the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid (VPA; 5 μM), significantly increased P-glycoprotein transport function in the wild-type animals. A ligand to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), produced a similar induction of P-glycoprotein, which tightened the BBB, thereby increasing the neuroprotection. However, VPA- or TCDD-induced P-glycoprotein transport was blocked in the PCFT-nullizygous mice, indicating that multiple neuroprotective mechanisms are compromised under folate-deficient conditions. Brain capillaries from S-folinic acid (SFA; 40 mg/kg)-treated PCFT-nullizygous mice exhibited increased P-glycoprotein transport following VPA exposure. This suggests that SFA supplementation restored the normal BBB function. In addition, we show that tight-junction proteins are disintegrated in the PCFT mutant mice. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that folate deficiency disrupts the BBB function by targeting the transporter and tight junctions, which may contribute to the development of neurological disorders.

  13. P-Glycoprotein Transport of Neurotoxic Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Lacher, Sarah E; Skagen, Kasse; Veit, Joachim; Dalton, Rachel; Woodahl, Erica L

    2015-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Altered transport of neurotoxic pesticides has been proposed in Parkinson's disease, but it is unknown whether these pesticides are P-gp substrates. We used three in vitro transport models, stimulation of ATPase activity, xenobiotic-induced cytotoxicity, and inhibition of rhodamine-123 efflux, to evaluate P-gp transport of diazinon, dieldrin, endosulfan, ivermectin, maneb, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+)), and rotenone. Diazinon and rotenone stimulated ATPase activity in P-gp-expressing membranes, with Vmax values of 22.4 ± 2.1 and 16.8 ± 1.0 nmol inorganic phosphate/min per mg protein, respectively, and Km values of 9.72 ± 3.91 and 1.62 ± 0.51 µM, respectively, compared with the P-gp substrate verapamil, with a Vmax of 20.8 ± 0.7 nmol inorganic phosphate/min per mg protein and Km of 0.871 ± 0.172 μM. None of the other pesticides stimulated ATPase activity. We observed an increased resistance to MPP(+) and rotenone in LLC-MDR1-WT cells compared with LLC-vector cells, with 15.4- and 2.2-fold increases in EC50 values, respectively. The resistance was reversed in the presence of the P-gp inhibitor verapamil. None of the other pesticides displayed differential cytotoxicity. Ivermectin was the only pesticide to inhibit P-gp transport of rhodamine-123, with an IC50 of 0.249 ± 0.048 μM. Our data demonstrate that dieldrin, endosulfan, and maneb are not P-gp substrates or inhibitors. We identified diazinon, MPP(+), and rotenone as P-gp substrates, although further investigation is needed to understand the role of P-gp transport in their disposition in vivo and associations with Parkinson's disease.

  14. Retroviral env glycoprotein trafficking and incorporation into virions.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Together with the Gag protein, the Env glycoprotein is a major retroviral structural protein and is essential for forming infectious virus particles. Env is synthesized, processed, and transported to certain microdomains at the plasma membrane and takes advantage of the same host machinery for its trafficking as that used by cellular glycoproteins. Incorporation of Env into progeny virions is probably mediated by the interaction between Env and Gag, in some cases with the additional involvement of certain host factors. Although several general models have been proposed to explain the incorporation of retroviral Env glycoproteins into virions, the actual mechanism for this process is still unclear, partly because structural data on the Env protein cytoplasmic tail is lacking. This paper presents the current understanding of the synthesis, trafficking, and virion incorporation of retroviral Env proteins.

  15. Processing of virus-specific glycoproteins of varicella zoster virus

    SciTech Connect

    Namazue, J.; Campo-Vera, H.; Kitamura, K.; Okuno, T.; Yamanishi, K.

    1985-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoproteins were used to study the processing of three glycoproteins with molecular weights of 83K-94K (gp 2), 64K (gp 3), and 55K (gp 5). Immunoprecipitation experiments performed with VZV-infected cells, pulse labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine in the presence of tunicamycin, suggest that O-linked oligosaccharide is present on the glycoprotein of gp 2. Use of the enzyme endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H revealed that the fully processed form of gp 3 had high-mannose type and that of gp 5 had only complex type of N-linked oligosaccharides. Experiments with monensin suggest that the precursor form (116K) of gp 3 is cleaved during the processing from Golgi apparatus to cell surface membrane. The extension of O-linked oligosaccharide chain and the complex type of N-linked oligosaccharide chains also occurs during this processing.

  16. Square-wave voltammetry assays for glycoproteins on nanoporous gold

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Binod; Bhattarai, Jay K.; Pornsuriyasak, Papapida; Fujikawa, Kohki; Catania, Rosa; Demchenko, Alexei V.; Stine, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical enzyme-linked lectinsorbent assays (ELLA) were developed using nanoporous gold (NPG) as a solid support for protein immobilization and as an electrode for the electrochemical determination of the product of the reaction between alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and p-aminophenyl phosphate (p-APP), which is p-aminophenol (p-AP). Glycoproteins or concanavalin A (Con A) and ALP conjugates were covalently immobilized onto lipoic acid self-assembled monolayers on NPG. The binding of Con A – ALP (or soybean agglutinin – ALP) conjugate to glycoproteins covalently immobilized on NPG and subsequent incubation with p-APP substrate was found to result in square-wave voltammograms whose peak difference current varied with the identity of the glycoprotein. NPG presenting covalently bound glycoproteins was used as the basis for a competitive electrochemical assay for glycoproteins in solution (transferrin and IgG). A kinetic ELLA based on steric hindrance of the enzyme-substrate reaction and hence reduced enzymatic reaction rate after glycoprotein binding is demonstrated using immobilized Con A–ALP conjugates. Using the immobilized Con A-ALP conjugate, the binding affinity of immunoglobulin G (IgG) was found to be 105 nM, and that for transferrin was found to be 650 nM. Minimal interference was observed in the presence of 5 mg mL−1 BSA as a model serum protein in both the kinetic and competitive ELLA. Inhibition studies were performed with methyl D-mannoside for the binding of TSF and IgG to Con A-ALP; IC50 values were found to be 90 μM and 286 μM, respectively. Surface coverages of proteins were estimated using solution depletion and the BCA protein concentration assay. PMID:24611035

  17. 21 CFR 866.5440 - Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the beta-2-glycoprotein III (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of beta-2-glycoprotein III aids in the diagnosis of an inherited deficiency of this serum protein and a variety of...

  18. Magnetic enzyme reactors for isolation and study of heterogeneous glycoproteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korecká, Lucie; Ježová, Jana; Bílková, Zuzana; Beneš, Milan; Horák, Daniel; Hradcová, Olga; Slováková, Marcela; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2005-05-01

    The newly developed magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with defined hydrophobicity and porosity were used for the preparation of magnetic enzyme reactors. Magnetic particles with immobilized proteolytic enzymes trypsin, chymotrypsin and papain and with enzyme neuraminidase were used to study the structure of heterogeneous glycoproteins. Factors such as the type of carrier, immobilization procedure, operational and storage stability, and experimental conditions were optimized.

  19. Cancer Biomarker Discovery: Lectin-Based Strategies Targeting Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Clark, David; Mao, Li

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker discovery can identify molecular markers in various cancers that can be used for detection, screening, diagnosis, and monitoring of disease progression. Lectin-affinity is a technique that can be used for the enrichment of glycoproteins from a complex sample, facilitating the discovery of novel cancer biomarkers associated with a disease state. PMID:22710864

  20. Glycoproteins identified from heart failure and treatment models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Chen, Lijun; Sun, Shisheng; Shah, Punit; Yang, Weiming; Zhang, Bai; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W; Kass, David A; van Eyk, Jennifer E; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Conduction abnormalities can lead to dyssynchronous contraction, which significantly worsens morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can reverse ventricular remodeling and improve cardiac function. Although the underlying molecular changes are unknown, the use of a canine model of dyssynchronous heart failure (DHF) and CRT has shown that there are global changes across the cardiac proteome. This study determines changes in serum glycoprotein concentration from DHF and CRT compared to normal. We hypothesize that CRT invokes protective or advantageous pathways that can be reflected in the circulating proteome. Two prong discovery approaches were carried out on pooled normal, DHF, and CRT samples composed of individual canine serum to determine the overall protein concentration and the N-linked glycosites of circulating glycoproteins. The level of the glycoproteins was altered in DHF and CRT compared to control sera, with 63 glycopeptides substantially increased in DHF and/or CRT. Among the 32 elevated glycosite-containing peptides in DHF, 13 glycopeptides were reverted to normal level after CRT therapy. We further verify the changes of glycopeptides using label-free LC-MS from individual canine serum. Circulating glycoproteins such as alpha-fetoprotein, alpha-2-macroglobulin, galectin-3-binding protein, and collectin-10 show association to failing heart and CRT treatment model.

  1. QUANTITATIVE MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF GLYCOPROTEINS COMBINED WITH ENRICHMENT METHODS

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec Rev 34:148–165, 2015. PMID:24889823

  2. Characterization and mapping of a nonessential pseudorabies virus glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Wathen, M.W.; Wathen, L.M.K.

    1986-04-01

    Antigenic variants of pseudorabies virus (PRV) containing mutations in a viral glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 82,000 (gIII) were isolated by selecting for resistance to a complement-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MCA82-2) directed against gIII. These mutants were completely resistant to neutralization with MCA82-2 in the presence of complement. Two mutants selected for further studies either did not express gIII or expressed an improperly processed form of the glycoproteins. The mutations were also associated with an altered plaque morphology (syncytium formation). The gIII gene was mapped by the marker rescue of a gIII/sup -/ mutant with cloned restriction enzyme fragments to the long unique region of the PRV genome between 0.376 and 0.383 map units. This corresponds to the map location of a glycoprotein described by Robbins et al. Since gIII is nonessential for viral replication in cell culture and has several other characteristics in common with the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC, gIII may represent the PRV equivalent to herpes simplex virus gC.

  3. Glycoprotein secretion in a tracheal organ culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Warunek, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Glycoprotein secretion in the rat trachea was studied in vitro, utilizing a modified, matrix embed/perfusion chamber. Baseline parameters of the culture environment were determined by enzymatic and biochemical procedures. The effect of pilocarpine on the release of labelled glycoproteins from the tracheal epithelium was assessed. After a single stimulation with the drug, there was a significant increase in the release of /sup 14/C-glucosamine and /sup 3/H-fucose-labelled glycoprotein. The response was dose-dependent. Similar results were obtained after a second exposure to pilocarpine. However, no dose response was observed. Morphological analyses of the tracheal epithelial secretory cells by Alcian Blue/Periodic Acid Schiff staining showed a significant decrease in the total number of Alcian Blue staining cells and an increase in the mixed cell population after a single exposure to pilocarpine. Second stimulation with the drug showed that the trachea was able to respond again, this time with a further decrease in the number of Alcian Blue staining cells and a decrease in the PAS staining cells as well. Carbohydrate analyses after the first simulation with pilocarpine showed increased levels of N-acetyl neuraminic acid and the neutral carbohydrates, fucose and galactose, in the precipitated glycoproteins.

  4. Glycoprotein expression by adenomatous polyps of the colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roney, Celeste A.; Xie, Jianwu; Xu, Biying; Jabour, Paul; Griffiths, Gary; Summers, Ronald M.

    2008-03-01

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. Specificity in diagnostic imaging for detecting colorectal adenomas, which have a propensity towards malignancy, is desired. Adenomatous polyp specimens of the colon were obtained from the mouse model of colorectal cancer called adenomatous polyposis coli-multiple intestinal neoplasia (APC Min). Histological evaluation, by the legume protein Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-1), determined expression of the glycoprotein α-L-fucose. FITC-labelled UEA-1 confirmed overexpression of the glycoprotein by the polyps on fluorescence microscopy in 17/17 cases, of which 13/17 included paraffin-fixed mouse polyp specimens. In addition, FITC-UEA-1 ex vivo multispectral optical imaging of 4/17 colonic specimens displayed over-expression of the glycoprotein by the polyps, as compared to non-neoplastic mucosa. Here, we report the surface expression of α-L-fucosyl terminal residues by neoplastic mucosal cells of APC specimens of the mouse. Glycoprotein expression was validated by the carbohydrate binding protein UEA-1. Future applications of this method are the development of agents used to diagnose cancers by biomedical imaging modalities, including computed tomographic colonography (CTC). UEA-1 targeting to colonic adenomas may provide a new avenue for the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma by CT imaging.

  5. Changes of glycoprotein patterns in sera of humans under stress.

    PubMed

    Barisic, K; Lauc, G; Dumic, J; Pavlovic, M; Flogel, M

    1996-02-01

    Stress exhibits adverse effects on many vital processes in which glycoproteins play a significant role(e.g. cell-cell/matrix interactions, immune response, neoplastic growth, implantation, prenatal development), yet only scarce attention has been directed towards studying stress induced changes in glycoprotein patterns. Using SDS-electrophoresis, blotting and digoxigenin-labelled lectins (Sambucus nigra agglutinin, Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, Datura stramonium agglutinin, Maackia amurensis agglutinin and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) agglutinin),sera were analysed from 30 individuals chosen randomly from a severely stressed population of 309 male volunteers with no specific medical symptoms. Significant changes were found in glycoprotein pattern and content, compared with healthy controls of matching age and sex. Occasionally minor non-specific deviations from the reference values for several analytes (haemoglobin, glucose, bilirubin and alanine aminotransferase) were detected in the tested group, but glycoprotein GP4S (Mr = 45 000), detected by Datura stramonium agglutinin and Sambucus nigra agglutinin, appeared in 96.7% of samples of the stressed population. The same population also revealed an approximately 500-fold increase of GP37 in comparison with the control sera. These results suggest that stress, as a non-specific syndrome, induces specific biochemical changes, which could be of diagnostic relevance as risk makers before any more serious symptoms of stress-related consequences have developed.

  6. Blepharmone: a conjugation-inducing glycoprotein in the ciliate blepharisma.

    PubMed

    Miyake, A; Beyer, J

    1974-08-16

    Gamone 1 of Blepharisma intermedium was isolated, identified as a slightly basic glycoprotein (mizoleclular weight, 2 x 10(5)), and designated as blepharmnone. At the concentration of 6 x 10(-8) milligram per milliliter, it specifically transforms matinig type 2 cells, so that they can conjugate in about 2 hours.

  7. The peanut lectin-binding glycoproteins of human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, A.I. ); Keeble, S.; Watt, F.M. )

    1988-08-01

    The peanut lectin (PNA) is known to bind more strongly to keratinocytes that are undergoing terminal differentiation than to proliferating keratinocytes. In order to investigate the significance of this change in cell-surface carbohydrate authors have identified the PNA-binding glycoproteins of cultured human keratinocytes and antibodies against them. Two heavily glycosylated bands of 110 and 250 kDa were resolved by PAGE of ({sup 14}C)galactose- or ({sup 14}C)mannose- and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine-labeled cell extracts eluted with galactose from PNA affinity columns. The higher molecular weight band was also detected on PNA blots of unlabeled cell extracts transferred to nitrocellulose. Both bands were sensitive to pronase digestion, but only the 250-kDa band was digested with trypsin. A rabbit antiserum that we prepared (anti-PNA-gp) immunoprecipitated both bands from cell extracts. In contrast to PNA, anti-PNA-gp bound equally to proliferating and terminally differentiating cells, indicating that some epitope(s) of the PNA-binding glycoproteins is present on the cell surface prior to terminal differentiation. When keratinocytes grown as a monolayer in low-calcium medium were switched to medium containing 2 mM calcium ions in order to induce desmosome formation and stratification, there was a dramatic redistribution of the PNA-binding glycoproteins, which became concentrated at the boundaries between cells. This may suggest a role for the glycoproteins in cell-cell interactions during stratification.

  8. Isolation and characterization of glycoproteins from canine tracheal pouch secretions.

    PubMed

    Liao, T H; Blumenfeld, O O; Park, S S

    1979-04-25

    Canine tracheal pouch secretions were solubilized with 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate and visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-agarose-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Intact mucus, and water-soluble and insoluble fractions of mucus were shown to be composed of high molecular weight glycoproteins (Mr greater than or equal to 3 . 10(6)) and three major classes of proteins of lower molecular weight (Mr approximately 4 . 10(5), 2 . 10(5), and 6 . 10(4)). When the mucus secretions were further treated with a reducing agent, the glycoproteins were dissociated into subunits which appeared on the gel as three discrete bands. Separation of the high molecular weight glycoproteins from the other proteins was achieved by gel filtration on Biogel A-15m in the presence of 1% dodecyl sulfate following reduction and alkylation of mucus. These glycoproteins were further resolved, using DEAE cellulose chromatography in the presence of 6 M urea, into two protein fractions. Both fractions contained approximately 87% carbohydrate, high amounts of serine and threonine but differed significantly in contents of N-acetyl glucosamine and sialic acid; their mobility on gel electrophoresis was also different. Significant contents of cysteine were noted in both fractions. Results of this study indicate that the canine tracheal pouch preparations provide normal tracheal secretions which bear similarity in structure to the tracheobronchial secretions obtained from human patients. PMID:454656

  9. EXPRESSION OF THE MAIZE MOSAIC VIRUS GLYCOPROTEIN IN INSECT CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize mosaic virus (genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent-propagative manner by Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper. Like other rhabdoviruses, the MMV genome encodes a surface glycoprotein that is likely involved in virus attachment and entry into host ce...

  10. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueqian; Cabrera, Robert M.; Li, Yue; Miller, David S.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with many adverse clinical manifestations. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by brain capillary endothelial cells, protects the brain from exposure to neurotoxicants. The function of BBB is modulated by multiple ABC transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein. A proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT)-deficient mouse has been previously described as a model for systemic folate deficiency. Herein, we demonstrate that exposing mouse brain capillaries to the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid (VPA; 5 μM), significantly increased P-glycoprotein transport function in the wild-type animals. A ligand to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), produced a similar induction of P-glycoprotein, which tightened the BBB, thereby increasing the neuroprotection. However, VPA- or TCDD-induced P-glycoprotein transport was blocked in the PCFT-nullizygous mice, indicating that multiple neuroprotective mechanisms are compromised under folate-deficient conditions. Brain capillaries from S-folinic acid (SFA; 40 mg/kg)-treated PCFT-nullizygous mice exhibited increased P-glycoprotein transport following VPA exposure. This suggests that SFA supplementation restored the normal BBB function. In addition, we show that tight-junction proteins are disintegrated in the PCFT mutant mice. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that folate deficiency disrupts the BBB function by targeting the transporter and tight junctions, which may contribute to the development of neurological disorders.—Wang, X., Cabrera, R. M., Li, Y., Miller, D. S., Finnell, R. H. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice. PMID:23212123

  11. A new Ebola virus nonstructural glycoprotein expressed through RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Mehedi, Masfique; Falzarano, Darryl; Seebach, Jochen; Hu, Xiaojie; Carpenter, Michael S; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-06-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), an enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. The EBOV glycoprotein (GP) gene encodes the nonstructural soluble glycoprotein (sGP) but also produces the transmembrane glycoprotein (GP₁,₂) through transcriptional editing. A third GP gene product, a small soluble glycoprotein (ssGP), has long been postulated to be produced also as a result of transcriptional editing. To identify and characterize the expression of this new EBOV protein, we first analyzed the relative ratio of GP gene-derived transcripts produced during infection in vitro (in Vero E6 cells or Huh7 cells) and in vivo (in mice). The average percentages of transcripts encoding sGP, GP₁,₂, and ssGP were approximately 70, 25, and 5%, respectively, indicating that ssGP transcripts are indeed produced via transcriptional editing. N-terminal sequence similarity with sGP, the absence of distinguishing antibodies, and the abundance of sGP made it difficult to identify ssGP through conventional methodology. Optimized 2-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis analyses finally verified the expression and secretion of ssGP in tissue culture during EBOV infection. Biochemical analysis of recombinant ssGP characterized this protein as a disulfide-linked homodimer that was exclusively N glycosylated. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized a new EBOV nonstructural glycoprotein, which is expressed as a result of transcriptional editing of the GP gene. While ssGP appears to share similar structural properties with sGP, it does not appear to have the same anti-inflammatory function on endothelial cells as sGP.

  12. Development of glycoprotein capture-based label-free method for the high-throughput screening of differential glycoproteins in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Tan, Yexiong; Wang, Min; Wang, Fangjun; Yao, Zhenzhen; Dong, Liwei; Ye, Mingliang; Wang, Hongyang; Zou, Hanfa

    2011-07-01

    A robust, reproducible, and high throughput method was developed for the relative quantitative analysis of glycoprotein abundances in human serum. Instead of quantifying glycoproteins by glycopeptides in conventional quantitative glycoproteomics, glycoproteins were quantified by nonglycosylated peptides derived from the glycoprotein digest, which consists of the capture of glycoproteins in serum samples and the release of nonglycopeptides by trypsin digestion of captured glycoproteins followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem MS analysis of released peptides. Protein quantification was achieved by comparing the spectrum counts of identified nonglycosylated peptides of glycoproteins between different samples. This method was demonstrated to have almost the same specificity and sensitivity in glycoproteins quantification as capture at glycopeptides level. The differential abundance of proteins present at as low as nanogram per milliliter levels was quantified with high confidence. The established method was applied to the analysis of human serum samples from healthy people and patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to screen differential glycoproteins in HCC. Thirty eight glycoproteins were found with substantial concentration changes between normal and HCC serum samples, including α-fetoprotein, the only clinically used marker for HCC diagnosis. The abundance changes of three glycoproteins, i.e. galectin-3 binding protein, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3, and thrombospondin 1, which were associated with the development of HCC, were further confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In conclusion, the developed method was an effective approach to quantitatively analyze glycoproteins in human serum and could be further applied in the biomarker discovery for HCC and other cancers.

  13. Glycoprotein L Disruption Reveals Two Functional Forms of the Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Glycoprotein H▿

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Laurent; May, Janet S.; Colaco, Susanna; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2007-01-01

    The herpesvirus glycoprotein H (gH) and gL associate to form a heterodimer that plays a central role in virus-driven membrane fusion. When archetypal alpha- or betaherpesviruses lack gL, gH misfolds and progeny virions are noninfectious. In order to define the role that gL plays in gamma-2 herpesvirus infections, we disrupted its coding sequence in murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68). MHV-68 lacking gL folded gH into a conformation antigenically distinct from the form that normally predominates on infected cells. gL-deficient virions bound less well than the wild type to epithelial cells and fibroblasts. However, they still incorporated gH and remained infectious. The cell-to-cell spread of gL-deficient viruses was remarkably normal, as was infection, dissemination, and latency establishment in vivo. Viral membrane fusion was therefore gL independent. The major function of gL appeared to be allowing gH to participate in cell binding prior to membrane fusion. This function was most important for the entry of MHV-68 virions into fibroblasts and epithelial cells. PMID:17050601

  14. [Acid and basic glycoproteins of human saliva. 2. Investigation of glycoprotein of parotid saliva].

    PubMed

    Mirković, S

    1991-01-01

    We applied the standard diagnostic electrophoretic method on lyophilized human parotid saliva under the appropriate conditions (pH = 8.6 voltage 90 V and time of 30 seconds). The variation of the essential electrophoretic parameters (volume, time, voltage and pH) gave the best protein separation results in the natural range (pH = 7). Also in all cases, except pH = 11, the catodic side was richer in fractions than the anodic one; this was the qualitative characteristic of the protein component of the parotid saliva. Consequently, the protein content of the parotid saliva was rich in basic elements with the typical electrophoregram and densitogram for human serum and mixed saliva. The Pol-E agarose film method is appropriate for investigation and detection of the protein content in human, especially parotid saliva. It also enables differentiation of samples of mixed and parotid saliva on the basis of appropriate densitograms which are the consequence of different protein and especially glycoprotein components of the content.

  15. Platelet receptor expression and shedding: glycoprotein Ib-IX-V and glycoprotein VI.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2014-04-01

    Quantity, quality, and lifespan are 3 important factors in the physiology, pathology, and transfusion of human blood platelets. The aim of this review is to discuss the proteolytic regulation of key platelet-specific receptors, glycoprotein(GP)Ib and GPVI, involved in the function of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis, and nonimmune or immune thrombocytopenia. The scope of the review encompasses the basic science of platelet receptor shedding, practical aspects related to laboratory analysis of platelet receptor expression/shedding, and clinical implications of using the proteolytic fragments as platelet-specific biomarkers in vivo in terms of platelet function and clearance. These topics can be relevant to platelet transfusion regarding both changes in platelet receptor expression occurring ex vivo during platelet storage and/or clinical use of platelets for transfusion. In this regard, quantitative analysis of platelet receptor profiles on blood samples from individuals could ultimately enable stratification of bleeding risk, discrimination between causes of thrombocytopenia due to impaired production vs enhanced clearance, and monitoring of response to treatment prior to change in platelet count.

  16. Prestaining of glycoproteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels by dansylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhou, Xuan; Yu, Qing; Duan, Yuanmeng; Huang, Binbin; Hong, Guoying; Zhou, Ayi; Jin, Litai

    2014-06-01

    A new fluorescent prestaining method for gel-separated glycoproteins in 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE was developed by using dansylhydrazine in this study. The prestained gels could be easily imaged after electrophoresis without any time-consuming steps needed for poststains. As low as 4-8 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein) could be selectively detected, which is comparable to that of Pro-Q Emerald 488, one of the most commonly used glycoprotein stain. In addition, a subsequent study of deglycosylation, glycoprotein affinity isolation, and LC-MS/MS analysis was performed to confirm the specificity of the newly developed method. PMID:24668852

  17. Prestaining of glycoproteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels by dansylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhou, Xuan; Yu, Qing; Duan, Yuanmeng; Huang, Binbin; Hong, Guoying; Zhou, Ayi; Jin, Litai

    2014-06-01

    A new fluorescent prestaining method for gel-separated glycoproteins in 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE was developed by using dansylhydrazine in this study. The prestained gels could be easily imaged after electrophoresis without any time-consuming steps needed for poststains. As low as 4-8 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein) could be selectively detected, which is comparable to that of Pro-Q Emerald 488, one of the most commonly used glycoprotein stain. In addition, a subsequent study of deglycosylation, glycoprotein affinity isolation, and LC-MS/MS analysis was performed to confirm the specificity of the newly developed method.

  18. Allergenic Characterization of 27-kDa Glycoprotein, a Novel Heat Stable Allergen, from the Pupa of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Son, Mina; Lee, June Yong

    2016-01-01

    Boiled silkworm pupa is a traditional food in Asia, and patients with silkworm pupa food allergy are common in these regions. Still now only one allergen from silkworm, arginine kinase, has been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify novel food allergens in silkworm pupa by analyzing a protein extract after heat treatment. Heat treated extracts were examined by proteomic analysis. A 27-kDa glycoprotein was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. IgE reactivity of the recombinant protein was investigated by ELISA. High molecular weight proteins (above 100 kDa) elicited increased IgE binding after heat treatment compared to that before heat treatment. The molecular identities of these proteins, however, could not be determined. IgE reactivity toward a 27-kDa glycoprotein was also increased after heating the protein extract. The recombinant protein was recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic subjects (33.3%). Glycation or aggregation of protein by heating may create new IgE binding epitopes. Heat stable allergens are shown to be important in silkworm allergy. Sensitization to the 27-kDa glycoprotein from silkworm may contribute to elevation of IgE to silkworm. PMID:26770033

  19. Allergenic Characterization of 27-kDa Glycoprotein, a Novel Heat Stable Allergen, from the Pupa of Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Son, Mina; Lee, June Yong; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Park, Jung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Boiled silkworm pupa is a traditional food in Asia, and patients with silkworm pupa food allergy are common in these regions. Still now only one allergen from silkworm, arginine kinase, has been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify novel food allergens in silkworm pupa by analyzing a protein extract after heat treatment. Heat treated extracts were examined by proteomic analysis. A 27-kDa glycoprotein was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. IgE reactivity of the recombinant protein was investigated by ELISA. High molecular weight proteins (above 100 kDa) elicited increased IgE binding after heat treatment compared to that before heat treatment. The molecular identities of these proteins, however, could not be determined. IgE reactivity toward a 27-kDa glycoprotein was also increased after heating the protein extract. The recombinant protein was recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic subjects (33.3%). Glycation or aggregation of protein by heating may create new IgE binding epitopes. Heat stable allergens are shown to be important in silkworm allergy. Sensitization to the 27-kDa glycoprotein from silkworm may contribute to elevation of IgE to silkworm.

  20. A role for UDP-glucose glycoprotein glucosyltransferase in expression and quality control of MHC class I molecules

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Wearsch, Pamela A.; Zhu, Yajuan; Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Cresswell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1) serves as a folding sensor in the calnexin/calreticulin glycoprotein quality control cycle. UGT1 recognizes disordered or hydrophobic patches near asparagine-linked nonglucosylated glycans in partially misfolded glycoproteins and reglucosylates them, returning folding intermediates to the cycle. In this study, we examine the contribution of the UGT1-regulated quality control mechanism to MHC I antigen presentation. Using UGT1-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts reconstituted or not with UGT1, we show that, although formation of the peptide loading complex is unaffected by the absence of UGT1, the surface level of MHC class I molecules is reduced, MHC class I maturation and assembly are delayed, and peptide selection is impaired. Most strikingly, we show using purified soluble components that UGT1 preferentially recognizes and reglucosylates MHC class I molecules associated with a suboptimal peptide. Our data suggest that, in addition to the extensively studied tapasin-mediated quality control mechanism, UGT1 adds a new level of control in the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. PMID:21383159

  1. Allergenic Characterization of 27-kDa Glycoprotein, a Novel Heat Stable Allergen, from the Pupa of Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyoung Yong; Son, Mina; Lee, June Yong; Park, Kyung Hee; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Park, Jung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Boiled silkworm pupa is a traditional food in Asia, and patients with silkworm pupa food allergy are common in these regions. Still now only one allergen from silkworm, arginine kinase, has been identified. The purpose of this study was to identify novel food allergens in silkworm pupa by analyzing a protein extract after heat treatment. Heat treated extracts were examined by proteomic analysis. A 27-kDa glycoprotein was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. IgE reactivity of the recombinant protein was investigated by ELISA. High molecular weight proteins (above 100 kDa) elicited increased IgE binding after heat treatment compared to that before heat treatment. The molecular identities of these proteins, however, could not be determined. IgE reactivity toward a 27-kDa glycoprotein was also increased after heating the protein extract. The recombinant protein was recognized by IgE antibodies from allergic subjects (33.3%). Glycation or aggregation of protein by heating may create new IgE binding epitopes. Heat stable allergens are shown to be important in silkworm allergy. Sensitization to the 27-kDa glycoprotein from silkworm may contribute to elevation of IgE to silkworm. PMID:26770033

  2. [Prokaryotic expression and immunogenicity analysis of glycoprotein from infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-ming; Liu, Hong-bai; Yin, Jia-sheng; Lu, Tong-yan

    2013-09-01

    In order to detect Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus with immunological methods, the surface glycoprotein of a recent IHNV-Sn isolated from farmed rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) in China was amplified and cloned into pET27b(+) vector (designated as pET27b-G ). The expression of recombinant plasmid pET27b-G in E. coli BL21(DE3) was induced and determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The predicted molecular weight of glycoprotein protein was approximately 55 kD and was confirmed in this study. The inclusion body of glycoprotein was treated with urea at different urea concentrations, and dialyzed into PBS buffer. Purified glycoprotein with high concentration was obtained after dialyzed in the PBS buffer. Antisera against glycoprotein were produced from immunized rabbits. The prepared antisera could react specifically with both the recombinant glycoprotein and natural glycoprotein of the IHNV-Sn isolated in the test of indirect ELISA, and the titer against the recombinant glycoprotein was 1:20,000. IFA showed that the antisera can recognize the glycoprotein located on the surface of IHNV-Sn and IHNV reference strain. These results indicated that the expressed glycoprotein was immunogenical and antigenical and could be functional as the natural IHNV glycoprotein. These results established a foundation for further study on vaccine and rapid diagnosis of IHNV.

  3. Deletions in one domain of the Friend virus-encoded membrane glycoprotein overcome host range restrictions for erythroleukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hoatlin, M E; Ferro, F E; Geib, R W; Fox, M T; Kozak, S L; Kabat, D

    1995-01-01

    Although the Friend virus-encoded membrane glycoprotein (gp55) activates erythropoietin receptors (EpoR) to cause erythroblastosis only in certain inbred strains of mice but not in other species, mutant viruses can overcome aspects of mouse resistance. Thus, mice homozygous for the resistance allele of the Fv-2 gene are unaffected by gp55 but are susceptible to mutant glycoproteins that have partial deletions in their ecotropic domains. These and other results have suggested that proteins coded for by polymorphic Fv-2 alleles might directly or indirectly interact with EpoR and that changes in gp55 can overcome this defense. A new viral mutant with an exceptionally large deletion in its ecotropic domain is now also shown to overcome Fv-2rr resistance. In all cases, the glycoproteins that activate EpoR are processed to cell surfaces as disulfide-bonded dimers. To initiate analysis of nonmurine resistances, we expressed human EpoR and mouse EpoR in the interleukin 3-dependent mouse cell line BaF3 and compared the abilities of Friend virus-encoded glycoproteins to convert these cells to growth factor independence. Human EpoR was activated in these cells by erythropoietin but was resistant to gp55. However, human EpoR was efficiently activated in these cells by the same viral mutants that overcome Fv-2rr resistance in mice. By construction and analysis of human-mouse EpoR chimeras, we obtained evidence that the cytosolic domain of human EpoR contributes to its resistance to gp55 and that this resistance is mediated by accessory cellular factors. Aspects of host resistance in both murine and nonmurine species are targeted specifically against the ecotropic domain of gp55. PMID:7815553

  4. Lysosomal membrane glycoproteins bind cholesterol and contribute to lysosomal cholesterol export

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2016-01-01

    LAMP1 and LAMP2 proteins are highly abundant, ubiquitous, mammalian proteins that line the lysosome limiting membrane, and protect it from lysosomal hydrolase action. LAMP2 deficiency causes Danon’s disease, an X-linked hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. LAMP2 is needed for chaperone-mediated autophagy, and its expression improves tissue function in models of aging. We show here that human LAMP1 and LAMP2 bind cholesterol in a manner that buries the cholesterol 3β-hydroxyl group; they also bind tightly to NPC1 and NPC2 proteins that export cholesterol from lysosomes. Quantitation of cellular LAMP2 and NPC1 protein levels suggest that LAMP proteins represent a significant cholesterol binding site at the lysosome limiting membrane, and may signal cholesterol availability. Functional rescue experiments show that the ability of human LAMP2 to facilitate cholesterol export from lysosomes relies on its ability to bind cholesterol directly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21635.001 PMID:27664420

  5. Frostbite Protection in Mice Expressing an Antifreeze Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Heisig, Martin; Mattessich, Sarah; Rembisz, Alison; Acar, Ali; Shapiro, Martin; Booth, Carmen J.; Neelakanta, Girish; Fikrig, Erol

    2015-01-01

    Ectotherms in northern latitudes are seasonally exposed to cold temperatures. To improve survival under cold stress, they use diverse mechanisms to increase temperature resistance and prevent tissue damage. The accumulation of anti-freeze proteins that improve cold hardiness occurs in diverse species including plants, arthropods, fish, and amphibians. We previously identified an Ixodes scapularis anti-freeze glycoprotein, named IAFGP, and demonstrated its cold protective function in the natural tick host and in a transgenic Drosophila model. Here we show, in a transgenic mouse model expressing an anti-freeze glycoprotein, that IAFGP protects mammalian cells and mice from cold shock and frostbite respectively. Transgenic skin samples showed reduced cell death upon cold storage ex vivo and transgenic mice demonstrated increased resistance to frostbite injury in vivo. IAFGP actively protects mammalian tissue from freezing, suggesting its application for the prevention of frostbite, and other diseases associated with cold exposure. PMID:25714402

  6. Marine Natural Products with P-Glycoprotein Inhibitor Properties

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Dioxelis; Martinez-Luis, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a protein belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters superfamily that has clinical relevance due to its role in drug metabolism and multi-drug resistance (MDR) in several human pathogens and diseases. P-gp is a major cause of drug resistance in cancer, parasitic diseases, epilepsy and other disorders. This review article aims to summarize the research findings on the marine natural products with P-glycoprotein inhibitor properties. Natural compounds that modulate P-gp offer great possibilities for semi-synthetic modification to create new drugs and are valuable research tools to understand the function of complex ABC transporters. PMID:24451193

  7. Incorporation of Spike and Membrane Glycoproteins into Coronavirus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Ujike, Makoto; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    The envelopes of coronaviruses (CoVs) contain primarily three proteins; the two major glycoproteins spike (S) and membrane (M), and envelope (E), a non-glycosylated protein. Unlike other enveloped viruses, CoVs bud and assemble at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). For efficient virion assembly, these proteins must be targeted to the budding site and to interact with each other or the ribonucleoprotein. Thus, the efficient incorporation of viral envelope proteins into CoV virions depends on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions near the ERGIC. The goal of this review is to summarize recent findings on the mechanism of incorporation of the M and S glycoproteins into the CoV virion, focusing on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions. PMID:25855243

  8. [Purification and analysis of Cimicifuga foetida glycoprotein ( CF- I )].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-jun; Chen, Yan; Song, Zhi-yin; Zhou, Dong-wen

    2007-02-01

    A kind of glycoprotein ( CF- I ) was extracted from Cimicifuga foetida and purified by DEAE-Cellulose ( DEAE-52) and Sepharose CL-4B. It was identified to be homogeneous glycoprotein complex by electrophoresis and fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). alpha-glucosidic bond was detrermined by IR. Typical absorption of polysaccharide was shown in its IR spectrum. It had no typical absorption of nucleic acid or pigment by UV scanning. Glucose, galactose, mannose and arabinose were identified in CF- I with the molar ratio of 11. 94: 2. 18: 1. 38: 1 by GC. Its average MW was estimated to be 5. 8 x 10' by gel filtration. The content of total saccharide, protein and acid polysaccharide was 78% , 14. 4% and 23% respectively. It might be composed of 1-->4 and 1-->6 linked glucopyranose by periodate oxidation and Smith degration.

  9. Rheologic studies on middle ear effusions and their mucus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, J E; Green, G G; Birchall, J P; Pearson, J P

    1989-04-01

    The properties of pooled thick and thin middle ear effusions, from children with otitis media with effusion, were studied by viscometry. Mucus glycoproteins were responsible for effusion viscosity. Their percentage by weight in thick and thin effusions was 25% and 8.2%, respectively. N-acetylcysteine and 0.2 mol/L of mercaptoethanol caused a 39% viscosity drop in a 5-mg/mL glycoprotein solution, whereas S-carboxymethylcysteine had no effect. Treatment of thick effusions with 0.2 mol/L of mercaptoethanol initially caused a viscosity decrease followed by a gradual increase. Higher reducing agent concentrations (0.5 mol/L) caused a more rapid decrease followed by a rapid increase, presumably by causing nonspecific aggregation of reduced protein molecules. These results suggest that the concentration of and the time that a mucolytic is in the middle ear would be of prime importance in achieving the desired decrease in viscosity.

  10. Truncation of the cytoplasmic domain of the simian immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein increases env incorporation into particles and fusogenicity and infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Zingler, K; Littman, D R

    1993-01-01

    Growth of macaque simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac) in certain cloned human T-cell lines, such as HUT.78, selects for isolates containing a premature stop codon within the cytoplasmic domain of the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein. In contrast, propagation of virus in macaques or in their cultured T cells favors replication of virus containing the full-length envelope glycoprotein. To elucidate the causes of this phenomenon, we used a human immunodeficiency virus pseudotyping system to assess the effects on infectivity of the cytoplasmic domains of envelope glycoproteins obtained from SIVmac1A11 and SIVmac239. These envelopes contain truncated and full-length cytoplasmic domains, respectively. By analyzing human immunodeficiency virus particles containing selectable genes pseudotyped with each glycoprotein or with chimeric derivatives, we found that truncation of the cytoplasmic domain resulted in a significant advantage in viral entry into HUT.78 T cells and CD4+ U87.MG glial cells. Truncation of the cytoplasmic domain significantly enhanced both envelope density on particles and envelope-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. It is likely that one or both of these effects contribute to the observed differences in infectivity and to the selection of virions with short cytoplasmic tails in human T cells. Images PMID:8474176

  11. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, K.; Hallett, J.; Burcham, T. S.; Feeney, R. E.; Kerr, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of different degrees of supercooling on the habit and rates of growth of ice crystals from solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins are reported. To isolate the influence of different solutions and supercooling alone, a system was devised that nucleated crystals in the middle of a uniformly supercooled sample. Alternatively, single crystals of selected orientation were inserted into free liquid surface. A crystallization rate up to five times greater than that in pure water was found. A mechanism explaining these results is suggested.

  12. Structural Insights into the Human Metapneumovirus Glycoprotein Ectodomain

    PubMed Central

    Leyrat, Cedric; Paesen, Guido C.; Charleston, James; Renner, Max

    2014-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus is a major cause of respiratory tract infections worldwide. Previous reports have shown that the viral attachment glycoprotein (G) modulates innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to incomplete immunity and promoting reinfection. Using bioinformatics analyses, static light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering, we show that the extracellular region of G behaves as a heavily glycosylated, intrinsically disordered polymer. We discuss potential implications of these findings for the modulation of immune responses by G. PMID:25031352

  13. Alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein phenotype frequencies in Cook Islanders.

    PubMed

    Abe, S; Kurisaki, E; Mizusawa, I; Hiraiwa, K

    1991-01-01

    The polymorphism of the alpha 2-HS-glycoprotein (A2HS) was analysed in Rarotonga and Mangaia, the Cook Islands. The A2HS*2 frequency was found to be the highest value among all populations studied up to now. There was a significant difference in A2HS*2 gene frequencies between the two populations, Rarotonga (0.62) and Mangaia (0.76). PMID:2050386

  14. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-04-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with (3H) glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques.

  15. Requirements within the Ebola Viral Glycoprotein for Tetherin Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Vande Burgt, Nathan H.; Kaletsky, Rachel L.; Bates, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Tetherin is an interferon-induced, intrinsic cellular response factor that blocks release of numerous viruses, including Ebola virus, from infected cells. As with many viruses targeted by host factors, Ebola virus employs a tetherin antagonist, the viral glycoprotein (EboGP), to counteract restriction and promote virus release. Unlike other tetherin antagonists such as HIV-1 Vpu or KSHV K5, the features within EboGP needed to overcome tetherin are not well characterized. Here, we describe sequences within the EboGP ectodomain and membrane spanning domain (msd) as necessary to relieve tetherin restriction of viral particle budding. Fusing the EboGP msd to a normally secreted form of the glycoprotein effectively promotes Ebola virus particle release. Cellular protein or lipid anchors could not substitute for the EboGP msd. The requirement for the EboGP msd was not specific for filovirus budding, as similar results were seen with HIV particles. Furthermore trafficking of chimeric proteins to budding sites did not correlate with an ability to counter tetherin. Additionally, we find that a glycoprotein construct, which mimics the cathepsin-activated species by proteolytic removal of the EboGP glycan cap and mucin domains, is unable to counteract tetherin. Combining these results suggests an important role for the EboGP glycan cap and msd in tetherin antagonism. PMID:26516900

  16. Boron dependent membrane glycoproteins in symbiosome development and nodule organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Reguera, María; Bonilla, Ildefonso

    2008-01-01

    During the last two decades, we have analyzed the roles of boron (B) in the development of the legume-rhizobia symbiosis and nodule organogenesis. As in other plant tissues, B is needed for the maintenance of nodule cell wall structure. Moreover, several symbiotic events including rhizobial infection, nodule cell invasion and symbiosome development that involve membrane related functions (i.e., vesicle targeting, secretion, or cell surface interactions) are affected by B deficiency. Using anti-rhamnogalacturonan II (anti-RGII) antiserum and immunological techniques, we recently described membrane glycoproteins (RGII-glycoproteins) developmentally regulated in Pisum sativum nodules, which are not detected by the antibody in B-deficient nodules. RGII-glycoproteins appeared related with development processes involving extensive membrane synthesis, like symbiosome maturation or cell growth, both of them negatively affected by B deficiency. Here, we suggest that, besides maintaining cell wall structure, B is both stabilizing components of the membrane glycocalyx and promoting interactions between cell surfaces glycoconjugates that are important during the establishment of the symbiosis and during nodule development. Moreover, we hypothesize that B is playing a similar role during plant or animal embryogenesis and development. PMID:19841651

  17. Identification of glycoproteins from mouse skin tumors and plasma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yuan; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Zhang, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Plasma has been the focus of testing different proteomic technologies for the identification of biomarkers due to its ready accessibility. However, it is not clear if direct proteomic analysis of plasma can be used to discover new marker proteins from tumor that are associated with tumor progression. Here, we reported that such proteins can be detected in plasma in a chemical induced skin cancer mouse model. We analyzed glycoproteins from both benign papillomas and malignant carcinomas from mice using our recently developed platform, solid-phase extraction of glycopeptides (SPEG) and mass spectrometry, and identified 463 unique N-linked glycosites from 318 unique glycoproteins. These include most known extracellular proteins that have been reported to play roles in skin cancer development such as thrombospondin, cathepsins, epidermal growth factor receptor, cell adhesion molecules, cadherins, integrins, tuberin, fibulin, TGFβ receptor, etc. We further investigated whether these tumor proteins could be detected in plasma from tumor bearing mice using isotope labeling and 2D-LC-MALDI-MS/MS. Two tumor glycoproteins, Tenascin-C and Arylsulfatase B, were identified and quantified successfully in plasma from tumor bearing mice. This result indicates that analysis of tumor associated proteins in tumors and plasma by method using glycopeptide capture, isotopic labeling, and mass spectrometry can be used as a discovery tool to identify candidate tumor proteins that may be detected in plasma. PMID:21072318

  18. Conformational requirements for glycoprotein reglucosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Trombetta, E S; Helenius, A

    2000-03-20

    Newly synthesized glycoproteins interact during folding and quality control in the ER with calnexin and calreticulin, two lectins specific for monoglucosylated oligosaccharides. Binding and release are regulated by two enzymes, glucosidase II and UDP-Glc:glycoprotein:glycosyltransferase (GT), which cyclically remove and reattach the essential glucose residues on the N-linked oligosaccharides. GT acts as a folding sensor in the cycle, selectively reglucosylating incompletely folded glycoproteins and promoting binding of its substrates to the lectins. To investigate how nonnative protein conformations are recognized and directed to this unique chaperone system, we analyzed the interaction of GT with a series of model substrates with well defined conformations derived from RNaseB. We found that conformations with slight perturbations were not reglucosylated by GT. In contrast, a partially structured nonnative form was efficiently recognized by the enzyme. When this form was converted back to a nativelike state, concomitant loss of recognition by GT occurred, reproducing the reglucosylation conditions observed in vivo with isolated components. Moreover, fully unfolded conformers were poorly recognized. The results indicated that GT is able to distinguish between different nonnative conformations with a distinct preference for partially structured conformers. The findings suggest that discrete populations of nonnative conformations are selectively reglucosylated to participate in the calnexin/calreticulin chaperone pathway. PMID:10725325

  19. Polyethyleneimine is a potent systemic adjuvant for glycoprotein antigens.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Neil C; Brinckmann, Sarah A; Gartlan, Kate H; Puthia, Manoj; Svanborg, Catharina; Krashias, George; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Flavell, Richard A; Sattentau, Quentin J; Wegmann, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Polyethyleneimine (PEI) is an organic polycation used extensively as a gene and DNA vaccine delivery reagent. Although the DNA targeting activity of PEI is well documented, its immune activating activity is not. We recently reported that PEI has robust mucosal adjuvanticity when administered intranasally with glycoprotein antigens. Here, we show that PEI has strong immune activating activity after systemic delivery. PEI administered subcutaneously with viral glycoprotein (HIV-1 gp140) enhanced antigen-specific serum IgG production in the context of mixed Th1/Th2-type immunity. PEI elicited higher titers of both antigen binding and neutralizing antibodies than alum in mice and rabbits and induced an increased proportion of antibodies reactive with native antigen. In an intraperitoneal model, PEI recruited neutrophils followed by monocytes to the site of administration and enhanced antigen uptake by antigen-presenting cells. The Th bias was modulated by PEI activation of the Nlrp3 inflammasome; however its global adjuvanticity was unchanged in Nlrp3-deficient mice. When coformulated with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides, PEI adjuvant potency was synergistically increased and biased toward a Th1-type immune profile. Taken together, these data support the use of PEI as a versatile systemic adjuvant platform with particular utility for induction of secondary structure-reactive antibodies against glycoprotein antigens. PMID:24844701

  20. Hantavirus Gc glycoprotein: evidence for a class II fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Nicole D; Gonzalez, Angel; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Rosemblatt, Mario; Valenzuela, Pablo D T

    2005-11-01

    Hantavirus cell entry is promoted by its envelope glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, through cell attachment and by fusion between viral and endosomal membranes at low pH. However, the role of Gn and Gc in receptor binding and cell fusion has not yet been defined. In this work, a sequence presenting characteristics similar to those of class II fusion peptides (FPs) of alphavirus E1 and flavivirus E proteins is identified within the hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. A three-dimensional comparative molecular model based on crystallographic data of tick-borne encephalitis virus E protein is proposed for the Andes virus (ANDV) Gc ectodomain, which supports a feasible class II fusion-protein fold. In vitro experimental evidence is provided for the binding activity of the ANDV FP candidate to artificial membranes, as demonstrated by fluorescence anisotropy assays. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that the Gc glycoprotein of hantaviruses and of other members of the family Bunyaviridae directs the viral fusion activity and that it may be classified as a class II viral fusion protein.

  1. A double responsive smart upconversion fluorescence sensing material for glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting; Deng, Qiliang; Fang, Guozhen; Yun, Yaguang; Hu, Yongjin; Wang, Shuo

    2016-11-15

    A novel strategy was developed to prepare double responsive smart upconversion fluorescence material for highly specific enrichment and sensing of glycoprotein. The novel double responsive smart sensing material was synthesized by choosing Horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as modal protein, the grapheme oxide (GO) as support material, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as fluorescence signal reporter, N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAAM) and 4-vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) as functional monomers. The structure and component of smart sensing material was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), respectively. These results illustrated the smart sensing material was prepared successfully. The recognition characterizations of smart sensing material were evaluated, and results showed that the fluorescence intensity of smart sensing material was reduced gradually, as the concentration of protein increased, and the smart sensing material showed selective recognition for HRP among other proteins. Furthermore, the recognition ability of the smart sensing material for glycoprotein was regulated by controlling the pH value and temperature. Therefore, this strategy opens up new way to construct smart material for detection of glycoprotein. PMID:27236725

  2. Identification and expression of a human cytomegalovirus early glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C P; Vesole, D H; Nelson, J; Oldstone, M B; Stinski, M F

    1989-01-01

    A human cytomegalovirus early gene which possesses three temporally regulated promoters is located in the large unique component of the viral genome between 0.054 and 0.064 map units (C.-P. Chang, C.L. Malone, and M.F. Stinski, J. Virol. 63:281-290, 1989). This gene contains a major open reading frame (ORF) located 233 bases downstream of the cap site of an early unspliced RNA. The major ORF predicts a polypeptide of 17 kilodaltons (kDa) which contains a glycoproteinlike signal and anchor domains as well as potential N-glycosylation sites. Antisera were prepared against synthetic peptides derived from amino acid sequences within the major ORF. The antisera detected a viral glycoprotein of 48 kDa in infected cells and recognized the in vitro-translated 17-kDa protein early-gene product. The viral glycoprotein, designated gp48, was modified by N-linked glycans and possibly O-linked glycans. The synthesis of gp48 occurred in the absence of viral DNA replication but accumulated to the highest levels at late times after infection. Since gp48 was found in the virion, it is considered an early structural glycoprotein. Images PMID:2545908

  3. Glycoproteins That Exhibit Extensive Size Polymorphisms in Dictyostelium Discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Smith, E.; Gooley, A. A.; Hudson, G. C.; Williams, K. L.

    1989-01-01

    Electrophoretic variants which arise from amino acid substitutions, leading to charge differences between proteins are ubiquitous and have been used extensively for genetic analysis. Less well documented are polymorphisms in the size of proteins. Here we report that a group of glycoproteins, which share a common carbohydrate epitope, vary in size in different isolates of the cellular slime mould, Dictyostelium discoideum. One of these proteins, PsA, a developmentally regulated prespore-specific surface glycoprotein, has previously been shown to exist in three size forms due to allelic variation at the pspA locus on linkage group I. In this report, a second glycoprotein, PsB, which is also prespore specific but found inside prespore cells, is studied. PsB maps to linkage group II and exhibits at least four different sizes in the isolates examined. We propose that the size polymorphisms are the product of allelic variation at the pspB locus, due to differences in the number of repeat units. PMID:2731733

  4. A double responsive smart upconversion fluorescence sensing material for glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting; Deng, Qiliang; Fang, Guozhen; Yun, Yaguang; Hu, Yongjin; Wang, Shuo

    2016-11-15

    A novel strategy was developed to prepare double responsive smart upconversion fluorescence material for highly specific enrichment and sensing of glycoprotein. The novel double responsive smart sensing material was synthesized by choosing Horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as modal protein, the grapheme oxide (GO) as support material, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as fluorescence signal reporter, N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAAM) and 4-vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) as functional monomers. The structure and component of smart sensing material was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), respectively. These results illustrated the smart sensing material was prepared successfully. The recognition characterizations of smart sensing material were evaluated, and results showed that the fluorescence intensity of smart sensing material was reduced gradually, as the concentration of protein increased, and the smart sensing material showed selective recognition for HRP among other proteins. Furthermore, the recognition ability of the smart sensing material for glycoprotein was regulated by controlling the pH value and temperature. Therefore, this strategy opens up new way to construct smart material for detection of glycoprotein.

  5. Requirements within the Ebola Viral Glycoprotein for Tetherin Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Vande Burgt, Nathan H; Kaletsky, Rachel L; Bates, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Tetherin is an interferon-induced, intrinsic cellular response factor that blocks release of numerous viruses, including Ebola virus, from infected cells. As with many viruses targeted by host factors, Ebola virus employs a tetherin antagonist, the viral glycoprotein (EboGP), to counteract restriction and promote virus release. Unlike other tetherin antagonists such as HIV-1 Vpu or KSHV K5, the features within EboGP needed to overcome tetherin are not well characterized. Here, we describe sequences within the EboGP ectodomain and membrane spanning domain (msd) as necessary to relieve tetherin restriction of viral particle budding. Fusing the EboGP msd to a normally secreted form of the glycoprotein effectively promotes Ebola virus particle release. Cellular protein or lipid anchors could not substitute for the EboGP msd. The requirement for the EboGP msd was not specific for filovirus budding, as similar results were seen with HIV particles. Furthermore trafficking of chimeric proteins to budding sites did not correlate with an ability to counter tetherin. Additionally, we find that a glycoprotein construct, which mimics the cathepsin-activated species by proteolytic removal of the EboGP glycan cap and mucin domains, is unable to counteract tetherin. Combining these results suggests an important role for the EboGP glycan cap and msd in tetherin antagonism. PMID:26516900

  6. The mouse F3/contactin glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Bizzoca, Antonella; Corsi, Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    F3/Contactin is an immunoglobulin superfamily component expressed in the nervous tissue of several species. Here we focus on the structural and functional properties of its mouse relative, on the mechanisms driving its regulated expression and on its developmental role. F3/Contactin is differentially expressed in distinct populations of central and peripheral neurons and in some non-neuronal cells. Accordingly, the regulatory region of the underlying gene includes promoter elements undergoing differential activation, associated with an intricate splicing profile, indicating that transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms contribute to its expression. Transgenic models allowed to follow F3/Contactin promoter activation in vivo and to modify F3/Contactin gene expression under a heterologous promoter, which resulted in morphological and functional phenotypes. Besides axonal growth and pathfinding, these concerned earlier events, including precursor proliferation and commitment. This wide role in neural ontogenesis is consistent with the recognized interaction of F3/Contactin with developmental control genes belonging to the Notch pathway. PMID:19372728

  7. Identification of a glycoprotein produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lindenthal, C; Elsinghorst, E A

    1999-08-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain H10407 is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileocecum and colon in vitro. Two separate chromosomally encoded invasion loci (tia and tib) have been cloned from this strain. These loci direct nonadherent and noninvasive laboratory strains of E. coli to adhere to and invade cultured human intestinal epithelial cells. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane protein that is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes. TibA is synthesized as a 100-kDa precursor (preTibA) that must be modified for biological activity. Outer membranes of recombinant E. coli expressing TibA or preTibA were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted to nitrocellulose. The presence of glycoproteins was detected by oxidization of carbohydrates with periodate and labeling with hydrazide-conjugated digoxigenin. Only TibA could be detected as a glycoprotein. Complementation experiments with tib deletion mutants of ETEC strain H10407 demonstrate that the TibA glycoprotein is expressed in H10407, that the entire tib locus is required for TibA synthesis, and that TibA is the only glycoprotein produced by H10407. Protease treatment of intact H10407 cells removes the carbohydrates on TibA, suggesting that they are surface exposed. TibA shows homology with AIDA-I from diffuse-adhering E. coli and with pertactin precursor from Bordetella pertussis. Both pertactin and AIDA-I are members of the autotransporter family of outer membrane proteins and are afimbrial adhesins that play an important role in the virulence of these organisms. Analysis of the predicted TibA amino acid sequence indicates that TibA is also an autotransporter. Analysis of the tib locus DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame with similarity to RfaQ, a glycosyltransferase. The product of this tib locus open reading frame is proposed to be responsible for Tib

  8. Identification of a Glycoprotein Produced by Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lindenthal, Christoph; Elsinghorst, Eric A.

    1999-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain H10407 is capable of invading epithelial cell lines derived from the human ileocecum and colon in vitro. Two separate chromosomally encoded invasion loci (tia and tib) have been cloned from this strain. These loci direct nonadherent and noninvasive laboratory strains of E. coli to adhere to and invade cultured human intestinal epithelial cells. The tib locus directs the synthesis of TibA, a 104-kDa outer membrane protein that is directly correlated with the adherence and invasion phenotypes. TibA is synthesized as a 100-kDa precursor (preTibA) that must be modified for biological activity. Outer membranes of recombinant E. coli expressing TibA or preTibA were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and blotted to nitrocellulose. The presence of glycoproteins was detected by oxidization of carbohydrates with periodate and labeling with hydrazide-conjugated digoxigenin. Only TibA could be detected as a glycoprotein. Complementation experiments with tib deletion mutants of ETEC strain H10407 demonstrate that the TibA glycoprotein is expressed in H10407, that the entire tib locus is required for TibA synthesis, and that TibA is the only glycoprotein produced by H10407. Protease treatment of intact H10407 cells removes the carbohydrates on TibA, suggesting that they are surface exposed. TibA shows homology with AIDA-I from diffuse-adhering E. coli and with pertactin precursor from Bordetella pertussis. Both pertactin and AIDA-I are members of the autotransporter family of outer membrane proteins and are afimbrial adhesins that play an important role in the virulence of these organisms. Analysis of the predicted TibA amino acid sequence indicates that TibA is also an autotransporter. Analysis of the tib locus DNA sequence revealed an open reading frame with similarity to RfaQ, a glycosyltransferase. The product of this tib locus open reading frame is proposed to be responsible for Tib

  9. Characterization of a pseudorabies virus glycoprotein gene with homology to herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 glycoprotein C.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, A K; Watson, R J; Whealy, M E; Hays, W W; Enquist, L W

    1986-01-01

    A pseudorabies virus (Becker strain) glycoprotein gene was located in the UL region at map position 0.40. The gene was identified by using open reading frame Escherichia coli plasmid expression vectors and specific antibody reagents. A 1.55-kilobase unspliced transcript from the gene was detected in pseudorabies virus-infected tissue culture cells. The DNA sequence revealed a single open reading frame of 1,437 base pairs encoding 479 amino acids. The predicted primary translation product has a molecular weight of 50,860 and contains features of a typical herpesvirus glycoprotein. An E. coli expression plasmid was constructed that contained essentially all of the open reading frame for this gene. Antibodies raised in rabbits against the protein expressed in bacteria by this plasmid immunoprecipitated pseudorabies virus-specific glycoproteins of 92,000 and 74,000 daltons from infected cell extracts. It is likely that these two forms represent different glycosylation states of the protein. Images PMID:3009851

  10. A suite of modular fluorescence assays interrogate the human immunodeficiency virus glycoprotein-41 coiled coil and assist in determining binding mechanism of low molecular weight fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gochin, Miriam

    2012-10-01

    Several different segments of the gp41 N-heptad repeat coiled coil have been constructed using N-terminal bipyridyl modification of composite peptides and inducing trimerization by adding ferrous ions. These metallopeptides act as receptors in fluorescence-binding assays with corresponding fluorescently labeled C-peptide probes. The Fe(II) coordination complex quenches C-peptide fluorescence upon binding, and reversal of quenching by a small molecule inhibitor can be used to obtain the inhibitor-binding constant. A total of 10 peptide pairs targeting 25-46 residue segments of the coiled coil were constructed, with C-peptide probes of different lengths and binding affinities. The result is a suite of assays for exploring binding in the mM to nM range to any desired region of the coiled coil, including the hydrophobic pocket (HP), extended regions on either side of the pocket, or a region associated with T20 resistance mutations. These assays are high-throughput ready, and could be used to discover novel compounds binding along various regions of the gp41 coiled coil groove. They were used to evaluate a sub-μM low molecular weight fusion inhibitor, resulting in the finding that the molecule bound specifically to the HP and attained its potency from a low off-rate.

  11. Expression of the glycoprotein gene from a fish rhabdovirus by using baculovirus vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koener, J.F.; Leong, J.A.C. )

    1990-01-01

    A cDNA fragment containing the gene encoding the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was inserted into Autographa californica baculovirus vectors under the control of the polyhedrin promoter. A 66-kilodalton protein, identical in size to the glycosylated glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus, was expressed at high levels in Spodoptera frugiperda cells infected with the recombinant viruses. The expressed protein reacted with antiserum to the glycoprotein on Western blots.

  12. Isolation and characterization of calcium binding glycoproteins of cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, M.; Fliegel, L.; Wlasichuk, K. )

    1990-04-05

    Two major Ca2(+)-binding glycoproteins Mr 120,000 and 100,000 were isolated from 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonic acid -solubilized bovine heart sarcolemma membrane. Peroxidase-conjugated concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin lectins bind strongly to the isolated 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins. Treatment with endoglycosidase F resulted in conversion of the 120-kDa glycoprotein to a form migrating at about 97 kDa. Treatment of the 100-kDa band with endoglycosidase F produced form of about 80 kDa. Endoglycosidase H digestion removes only 5% of the mass of both glycoproteins. the carbohydrate structure of both glycoproteins, is therefore, predicted to be at least 75% complex structure and 25% high mannose or hybrid structure. The 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins are the major Ca2(+)-binding proteins in the sarcolemma membranes. Intact and endoglycosidase-treated glycoproteins bind 45Ca2+ as analyzed by a 45Ca2+ overlay technique. Using polyclonal antibodies, the 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins were identified in muscle plasma membranes (ventricles, atria, and uterus smooth muscle). They were, however, not present in non-muscle tissues such as pancreas, liver, and kidney. The 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins appear to be homologous molecules as judged by their similar V8 protease peptide maps, cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibody, and other physicochemical properties.

  13. Recent advances in glycoprotein production for structural biology: toward tailored design of glycoforms.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Yukiko; Satoh, Tadashi; Kato, Koichi

    2014-06-01

    Because of the complexity, heterogeneity, and flexibility of the glycans, the structural analysis of glycoproteins has been eschewed until recently, with a few prominent exceptions. This aversion may have branded structural biologists as glycophobics. However, recent technological advancements in glycoprotein expression systems, employing genetically engineered production vehicles derived from mammalian, insect, yeast, and even bacterial cells, have yielded encouraging breakthroughs. The major advance is the active control of glycoform expression of target glycoproteins based on the genetic manipulation of glycan biogenetic pathways, which was previously overlooked, abolished, or considered unmanageable. Moreover, synthetic and/or chemoenzymatic approaches now enable the preparation of glycoproteins with uniform glycoforms designed in a tailored fashion.

  14. The glycoprotein-hormones activin A and inhibin A interfere with dendritic cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Segerer, Sabine E; Müller, Nora; Brandt, Jens van den; Kapp, Michaela; Dietl, Johannes; Reichardt, Holger M; Rieger, Lorenz; Kämmerer, Ulrike

    2008-01-01

    Background Pregnancy represents an exclusive situation in which the immune and the endocrine system cooperate to prevent rejection of the embryo by the maternal immune system. While immature dendritic cells (iDC) in the early pregnancy decidua presumably contribute to the establishment of peripheral tolerance, glycoprotein-hormones of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) family including activin A (ActA) and inhibin A (InA) are candidates that could direct the differentiation of DCs into a tolerance-inducing phenotype. Methods To test this hypothesis we generated iDCs from peripheral-blood-monocytes and exposed them to TGF-beta1, ActA, as well as InA and Dexamethasone (Dex) as controls. Results Both glycoprotein-hormones prevented up-regulation of HLA-DR during cytokine-induced DC maturation similar to Dex but did not influence the expression of CD 40, CD 83 and CD 86. Visualization of the F-actin cytoskeleton confirmed that the DCs retained a partially immature phenotype under these conditions. The T-cell stimulatory capacity of DCs was reduced after ActA and InA exposure while the secretion of cytokines and chemokines was unaffected. Conclusion These findings suggest that ActA and InA interfere with selected aspects of DC maturation and may thereby help preventing activation of allogenic T-cells by the embryo. Thus, we have identified two novel members of the TGF-beta superfamily that could promote the generation of tolerance-inducing DCs. PMID:18460206

  15. Mannostatin A, a new glycoprotein-processing inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Tropea, J.E.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pastuszak, I.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D. ); Aoyagi, Takaaki ); Molyneux, R.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Mannostatin A is a metabolite produced by the microorganism Streptoverticillium verticillus and reported to be a potent competitive inhibitor of rat epididymal {alpha}-mannosidase. When tested against a number of other arylglycosidases, mannostatin A was inactive toward {alpha}- and {beta}-glucosidase and galactosidase as well as {beta}-mannosidase, but it was a potent inhibitor of jack bean, mung bean, and rat liver lysosomal {alpha}-mannosidases, with estimated IC{sub 50}'s of 70 nM, 450 nM, and 160 nM, respectively. The type of inhibition was competitive in nature. This compound also proved to be an effective competitive inhibitor of the glycoprotein-processing enzyme mannosidase II (IC{sub 50} of about 10-15 nM with p-nitrophenyl {alpha}-D-mannopyranoside as substrate, and about 90 nM with ({sup 3}H)mannose-labeled GlcNAc-Man{sub 5}GlcNAc as substrate). However, it was virtually inactive toward mannosidase I. The N-acetylated derivative of mannostatin A had no inhibitory activity. In cell culture studies, mannostatin A also proved to be a potent inhibitor of glycoprotein processing. Thus, in influenza virus infected Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, mannostatin A blocked the normal formation of complex types of oligosaccharides on the viral glycoproteins and caused the accumulation of hybrid types of oligosaccharides. This observation is in keeping with other data which indicate that the site of action of mannostatin A is mannosidase II. Thus, mannostatin A represents the first nonalkaloidal processing inhibitor and adds to the growing list of chemical structures that can have important biological activity.

  16. (Hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the plant cell wall)

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    We are studying the chemistry and architecture of plant cells walls, the extracellular matrices that taken together shape the plant and provide mechanical support for the plant. Cell walls are dynamic structures that regulate, or are the site of, many physiological processes, in addition to being the cells' first line of defense against invading pathogens. In the past year we have examined the role of the cell wall enzyme ascorbic acid oxidase as related to the structure of the wall and its possible interactions with hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the wall.

  17. Ebolavirus Glycoprotein Directs Fusion through NPC1+ Endolysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, James A.; D'Souza, Ryan S.; Ruas, Margarida; Galione, Antony; Casanova, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Ebolavirus, a deadly hemorrhagic fever virus, was thought to enter cells through endolysosomes harboring its glycoprotein receptor, Niemann-Pick C1. However, an alternate model was recently proposed in which ebolavirus enters through a later NPC1-negative endosome that contains two-pore Ca2+ channel 2 (TPC2), a newly identified ebolavirus entry factor. Here, using live cell imaging, we obtained evidence that in contrast to the new model, ebolavirus enters cells through endolysosomes that contain both NPC1 and TPC2. PMID:26468524

  18. Glycoprotein import: a common feature of complex plastids?

    PubMed

    Peschke, Madeleine; Hempel, Franziska

    2013-10-01

    Complex plastids evolved by secondary endosymbiosis and are, in contrast to primary plastids, surrounded by 3 or 4 envelope membranes. Recently, we provided evidence that in diatoms proteins exist that get N-glycosylated during transport across the outermost membrane of the complex plastid. This gives rise to unique questions on the transport mechanisms of these bulky proteins, which get transported across up to 3 further membranes into the plastid stroma. Here we discuss our results in an evolutionary context and speculate about the existence of plastidal glycoproteins in other organisms with complex plastids.

  19. Glycoprotein screening in colorectal cancer based on differentially expressed Tn antigen.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hongyun; Cheng, Zongyong; Ouyang, Chunhui; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Yanyan; Chen, Shuijiao; Wang, Chunlian; Lu, Fanggen; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xiaowei

    2016-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and the identification of new biomarkers for CRC is valuable for its diagnosis and treatment. We aimed to screen differentially expressed glycoproteins (especially O-glycoproteins) and to identify diagnostic or therapeutic candidates for colorectal cancer (CRC) based on different Tn antigen expression levels. Fresh cancer tissues and adjacent healthy tissues were obtained from CRC patients and classified into three groups based on their Tn antigen expression: CRC with negative Tn expression (CRC Tn‑), CRC with positive Tn expression (CRC Tn+) and normal control without Tn expression (NC). Protein extractions were separated and identified by iTRAQ technology. Glycoproteins and O-glycoproteins were selected using UniProt and DAVID. Deep bioinformatic analysis, including Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KO), was used to annotate this O-glycoprotein interaction network. Subsequently, two O‑glycoproteins were verified by western blotting and immunohistochemistry in either LS174T cells or CRC tissues. We found that 330 differentially expressed proteins were identified by iTRAQ between CRC Tn‑ and NC tissues, 317 between CRC Tn+ and NC tissues, and 316 between CRC Tn‑ and Tn+ tissues. Of the 316 proteins, 55 glycoproteins and 19 O‑glycoproteins were identified and analyzed via deep informatics. Namely, different Tn antigen expression levels in CRC led to differential protein expression patterns, especially for glycoproteins and O‑glycoproteins. Decorin and SORBS1, two representative functional O-glycoproteins, were significantly downregulated in the CRC Tn+ tissues compared with the level in the CRC Tn‑ or NC tissues. Based on this deep bioinformatic analysis, Decorin and SORBS1 are hypothesized to be involved in the TGF‑β and PPAR‑γ signaling pathways, respectively. PMID:27432485

  20. Arenavirus Stable Signal Peptide Is the Keystone Subunit for Glycoprotein Complex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bederka, Lydia H.; Bonhomme, Cyrille J.; Ling, Emily L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rodent arenavirus glycoprotein complex encodes a stable signal peptide (SSP) that is an essential structural component of mature virions. The SSP, GP1, and GP2 subunits of the trimeric glycoprotein complex noncovalently interact to stud the surface of virions and initiate arenavirus infectivity. Nascent glycoprotein production undergoes two proteolytic cleavage events: first within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cleave SSP from the remaining precursor GP1/2 (glycoprotein complex [GPC]) glycoprotein and second within the Golgi stacks by the cellular SKI-1/S1P for GP1/2 processing to yield GP1 and GP2 subunits. Cleaved SSP is not degraded but retained as an essential glycoprotein subunit. Here, we defined functions of the 58-amino-acid lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) SSP in regard to glycoprotein complex processing and maturation. Using molecular biology techniques, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry, we detected SSP at the plasma membrane of transfected cells. Further, we identified a sorting signal (FLLL) near the carboxyl terminus of SSP that is required for glycoprotein maturation and trafficking. In the absence of SSP, the glycoprotein accumulated within the ER and was unable to undergo processing by SKI-1/S1P. Mutation of this highly conserved FLLL motif showed impaired glycoprotein processing and secretory pathway trafficking, as well as defective surface expression and pH-dependent membrane fusion. Immunoprecipitation of SSP confirmed an interaction between the signal peptide and the GP2 subunit; however, mutations within this FLLL motif disrupted the association of the GP1 subunit with the remaining glycoprotein complex. PMID:25352624

  1. Disulfide Bonds in Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein E1 Control the Assembly and Entry Functions of E2 Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Wahid, Ahmed; Helle, François; Descamps, Véronique; Duverlie, Gilles; Penin, François

    2013-01-01

    Class II membrane fusion proteins have been described in viruses in which the envelope proteins are derived from a precursor polyprotein containing two transmembrane glycoproteins arranged in tandem. Although the second protein, which carries the membrane fusion function, is in general well characterized, the companion protein, which is a protein chaperone for the folding of the fusion protein, is less well characterized for some viruses, like hepatitis C virus (HCV). To investigate the role of the class II companion glycoprotein E1 of HCV, we chose to target conserved cysteine residues in the protein, and we systematically mutated them in a full-length infectious HCV clone by reverse genetics. All the mutants were infectious, albeit with lower titers than the wild-type virus. The reduced infectivity was in part due to a decrease in viral assembly, as revealed by measurement of intracellular infectivity and by quantification of core protein released from cells transfected with mutant genomes. Analyses of mutated proteins did not show any major defect in folding. However, the mutations reduced virus stability, and they could also affect the density of infectious viral particles. Mutant viruses also showed a defect in cell-to-cell transmission. Finally, our data indicate that HCV glycoprotein E1 can also affect the fusion protein E2 by modulating its recognition by the cellular coreceptor CD81. Therefore, in the context of HCV, our data identify an additional function of a class II companion protein as a molecule that can control the binding capacity of the fusion protein. PMID:23175356

  2. The relationship between glycan structures and expression levels of an endoplasmic reticulum-resident glycoprotein, UDP-glucose: Glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Daikoku, Shusaku; Seko, Akira; Son, Sang-Hyun; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Ito, Yukishige; Kanie, Osamu

    2015-06-19

    In this article, we report a relationship between glycan structures and expression levels of a recombinant ER-resident glycoprotein, uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT1). The function of glycan structures attached to a glycoprotein is actively studied; however, the glycan structures of recombinant, and not endogenous, glycoproteins have not been examined. In this study, we indicate a relationship between the glycan structure and the level of protein expression. Expression levels were controlled utilizing a series of vectors (pFN21K, pFN22K, pFN23K, and pFN24K HaloTag CMV Flexi Vectors). Qualitative and semi-quantitative confirmation of glycan structures was achieved with tandem mass spectrometry. The results of this study indicate that glycan structures are similar to endogenous glycans at low expression levels.

  3. Gram Negative Bacterial Inflammation Ameliorated by the Plasma Protein Beta 2-Glycoprotein I

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Saijun; Chen, Gang; Qi, Miao; El-Assaad, Fatima; Wang, Ying; Dong, Shangwen; Chen, Liming; Yu, Demin; Weaver, James C.; Beretov, Julia; Krilis, Steven A.; Giannakopoulos, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a major component of the outer wall of gram negative bacteria. In high doses LPS contributes to the inflammation in gram negative sepsis, and in low doses contributes to the low grade inflammation characteristic of the metabolic syndrome. We wanted to assess the role of beta2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) a highly conserved plasma protein and its different biochemical forms in a mouse model of LPS systemic inflammation. Normal and β2GPI deficient mice were administered LPS through their veins and assessed for a range of inflammation markers in their blood and liver. Different biochemical forms of β2GPI were measured in normal mice given either saline or LPS. We show that β2GPI has a significant role in inhibiting LPS induced inflammation. In this study we provide some evidence that β2GPI serves a protective role in a mouse model of LPS inflammation. This resolves the controversy of previous studies which used LPS and β2GPI in test tube based models of LPS induced activation of white cells. We also highlight the potential relevance of a newly discovered biochemical form of β2GPI in LPS mediated inflammation and we speculate that this form has a protective role against LPS induced pathology. PMID:27670000

  4. Chemosensitization potential of P-glycoprotein inhibitors in malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Alcantara, Laura M; Kim, Junwon; Moraes, Carolina B; Franco, Caio H; Franzoi, Kathrin D; Lee, Sukjun; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H; Ayong, Lawrence S

    2013-06-01

    Members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC)-type transporter superfamily have been implicated in multidrug resistance in malaria, and various mechanistic models have been postulated to explain their interaction with diverse antimalarial drugs. To gain insight into the pharmacological benefits of inhibiting ABC-type transporters in malaria chemotherapy, we investigated the in vitro chemosensitization potential of various P-glycoprotein inhibitors. A fluorescent chloroquine derivative was synthesized and used to assess the efflux dynamics of chloroquine in MDR and wild type Plasmodium falciparum parasites. This novel BODIPY-based probe accumulated in the digestive vacuole (DV) of CQ-sensitive parasites but less so in MDR cells. Pre-exposure of the MDR parasites to non-cytocidal concentrations of unlabeled chloroquine resulted in a diffused cytoplasmic retention of the probe whereas a similar treatment with the CQR-reversing agent, chlorpheniramine, resulted in DV accumulation. A diffused cytoplasmic distribution of the probe was also obtained following treatment with the P-gp specific inhibitors zosuquidar and tariquidar, whereas treatments with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib or imatinib produced a partial accumulation within the DV. Isobologram analyses of the interactions between these inhibitors and the antimalarial drugs chloroquine, mefloquine, and artemisinin revealed distinct patterns of drug synergism, additivity and antagonism. Taken together, the data indicate that competitive tyrosine kinase and noncompetitive P-glycoprotein ATPase-specific inhibitors represent two new classes of chemosensitizing agents in malaria parasites, but caution against the indiscriminate use of these agents in antimalarial drug combinations.

  5. Isolation of oligomannose-type glycans from bean glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Ye, J; Wold, F

    1993-02-15

    We have isolated individual oligosaccharyl-asparagine derivatives from the total soluble glycoproteins from kidney beens (Phaseolus vulgaris) and from lima beans (Phaseolus limensis). The protein/glycoprotein mixture was digested exhaustively by pronase, and the glycan-containing fractions were separated from free amino acids and peptides by gel filtration. The oligosaccharyl-asparagine derivatives were finally fractionated on Dowex 50 (C. C. Huang, H.E. Meyer, and R. Montgomery, Carbohydr. Res. 13, 127-137, 1970), and the individual fractions were characterized by mass spectrometry, NMR, and ion exchange chromatography. With the procedures described, only oligomannose derivatives were obtained from the beans. In the case of kidney beans, six different derivatives were observed and characterized, Man9GlcNAc2Asn, two positional isomers of Man8GlcNAc2Asn, two positional isomers of Man7GlcNAc2Asn, and Man6GlcNAc2Asn. Under identical conditions the lima beans yielded primarily the Man9GlcNAc2Asn derivative along with a small amount of the two Man8GlcNAc2Asn derivatives. The oligomannose structures can be isolated in reasonable quantities (2-20 mg) from about 200 g of dry beans. PMID:8465965

  6. Characterization of immunomodulatory activities of honey glycoproteins and glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Mesaik, M Ahmed; Dastagir, Nida; Uddin, Nazim; Rehman, Khalid; Azim, M Kamran

    2015-01-14

    Recent evidence suggests an important role for natural honey in modulating immune response. To identify active components responsible, this study investigated the immunomodulatory properties of glycoproteins and glycopeptides fractionated from Ziziphus honey. Honey proteins/peptides were fractionated by size exclusion chromatography into five peaks with molecular masses in the range of 2-450 kDa. The fractionated proteins exhibited potent, concentration-dependent inhibition of reactive oxygen species production in zymosan-activated human neutrophils (IC50 = 6-14 ng/mL) and murine macrophages (IC50 = 2-9 ng/mL). Honey proteins significantly suppressed the nitric oxide production by LPS-activated murine macrophages (IC50 = 96-450 ng/mL). Moreover, honey proteins inhibited the phagocytosis latex bead macrophages. The production of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α by human monocytic cell line in the presence of honey proteins was analyzed. Honey proteins did not affect the production of IL-1β; however, TNF-α production was significantly suppressed. These findings indicated that honey glycoproteins and glycopeptides significantly interfere with molecules of the innate immune system.

  7. Stationary phases for the enrichment of glycoproteins and glycopeptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bao-Yu; Yang, Chun-Kai; Liu, Ching-Piao; Liu, Chuen-Ying

    2014-08-01

    The analysis of protein glycosylation is important for biomedical and biopharmaceutical research. Recent advances in LC-MS analysis have enabled the identification of glycosylation sites, the characterisation of glycan structures and the identification and quantification of glycoproteins and glycopeptides. However, this type of analysis remains challenging due to the low abundance of glycopeptides in complex protein digests, the microheterogeneity at glycosylation sites, ion suppression effects and the competition for ionisation by co-eluting peptides. Specific sample preparation is necessary for comprehensive and site-specific glycosylation analyses using MS. Therefore, researchers continue to pursue new columns to broaden their applications. The current manuscript covers recent literature published from 2008 to 2013. The stationary phases containing various chemical bonding methods or ligands immobilisation strategies on solid supports that selectively enrich N-linked or sialylated N-glycopeptides are categorised with either physical or chemical modes of binding. These categories include lectin affinity, hydrophilic interactions, boronate affinity, titanium dioxide affinity, hydrazide chemistry and other separation techniques. This review should aid in better understanding the syntheses and physicochemical properties of each type of stationary phases for enriching glycoproteins and glycopeptides. PMID:24729282

  8. Interaction of native and asialo rat sublingual glycoproteins with lectins.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Herp, A; Song, S C; Wu, J H; Chang, K S

    1995-01-01

    The binding properties of the rat sublingual glycoprotein (RSL) and its asialo product with lectins were characterized by quantitative precipitin(QPA) and precipitin inhibition(QPIA) assays. Among twenty lectins tested for QPA, native RSL reacted well only with Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin), but weakly or not at all with the other lectins. However, its asialo product (asialo-RSL) reacted strongly with many Gal and GalNAc specific lectins-it bound best to three of the GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) and/or Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc (II) active lectins [jacalin, Wistaria floribunda and Ricinus communis agglutinins] and completely precipitated each of these three lectins. Asialo-RSL also reacted well with Abrus precatorius, Glycine max, Bauhinia purpurea alba, and Maclura pomifera agglutinins, and abrin-a, but not with Arachis hypogeae and Dolichos biflorus agglutinins. The interaction between asialo-RSL and lectins were inhibited by either Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc, p-NO2-phenyl alpha-GalNAc or both. The mapping of the precipitation and inhibition profiles leads to the conclusion that the asialo rat sublingual glycoprotein provides important ligands for II (Gal beta 1-->4GlcNAc beta 1-->) and Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser/Thr) active lectins.

  9. The Lyssavirus glycoprotein: A key to cross-immunity.

    PubMed

    Buthelezi, Sindisiwe G; Dirr, Heini W; Chakauya, Ereck; Chikwamba, Rachel; Martens, Lennart; Tsekoa, Tsepo L; Stoychev, Stoyan H; Vandermarliere, Elien

    2016-11-01

    Rabies is an acute viral encephalomyelitis in warm-blooded vertebrates, caused by viruses belonging to Rhabdovirus family and genus Lyssavirus. Although rabies is categorised as a neglected disease, the rabies virus (RABV) is the most studied amongst Lyssaviruses which show nearly identical infection patterns. In efforts to improving post-exposure prophylaxis, several anti-rabies monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting the glycoprotein (G protein) sites I, II, III and G5 have been characterized. To explore cross-neutralization capacity of available mAbs and discover new possible B-cell epitopes, we have analyzed all available glycoprotein sequences from Lyssaviruses with a focus on sequence variation and conservation. This information was mapped on the structure of a representative G protein. We proposed several possible cross-neutralizing B-cell epitopes (GUVTTTF, WLRTV, REECLD and EHLVVEEL) in complement to the already well-characterized antigenic sites. The research could facilitate development of novel cross-reactive mAbs against RABV and even more broad, against possibly all Lyssavirus members. PMID:27614701

  10. An altered platelet granule glycoprotein in patients with essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, W J; Berndt, M C; Castaldi, P A

    1984-01-01

    The protein profiles of washed platelets from nine patients with essential thrombocythemia were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In four patients, an additional protein band (reduced Mr of 170,000) was clearly identified in both unstimulated platelet preparations and thrombin-released supernatant fractions. This band was also evident, though to a lesser extent, in three more patients, but it could not be located in the two remaining patients nor in any of ten controls. Subsequent characterization of the 170,000 reduced protein in one patient indicated that (a) it was glycosylated, as judged by periodic acid-Schiff staining, and (b) that native protein was a disulfide-linked multimer (possibly trimeric), which (c) partially bound to the activated platelet plasma membrane in the presence of calcium, and (d) was immune precipitated by anti-glycoprotein G antisera. The combined evidence is consistent with the 170,000 reduced protein being a modified form of the normal subunit of the platelet alpha-granule constituent, glycoprotein G (also termed thrombospondin and thrombin-sensitive protein). Images PMID:6365970

  11. The variable surface glycoproteins of Trypanosoma equiperdum are phosphorylated.

    PubMed Central

    Baltz, T; Giroud, C; Baltz, D; Duvillier, G; Degand, P; Demaille, J; Pautrizel, R

    1982-01-01

    The phosphoproteins from three Trypanosoma equiperdum variants were studied by labelling the parasites in vivo with 32P. Phosphoprotein analysis reveals the presence of a 58 000 mol. wt. phosphoprotein ( pp58 ) which is absent when live trypanosomes are pre-treated with proteinase K under conditions where only the surface coat containing the variable surface glycoprotein (VSG) is removed. Immunological and fingerprint analysis on labelled pp58 , purified from these variants by affinity chromatography on Concanavalin A-Sepharose, clearly identify this component as the VSG. Furthermore, the VSGs seem to be phosphorylated to the extent of 1 mol phosphate per mol glycoprotein. The phosphorylated region is located in the extreme C-terminal region representing approximately 10% of the total molecule. The phosphorylated residue is not an aliphatic or aromatic ester of serine, threonine, or tyrosine, nor an acyl phosphate involving an aspartyl or glutamyl residue, nor phosphohistidine. The evidence that VSGs are phosphorylated could have considerable implications for the transfer and function of these structures. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6821334

  12. Polyethyleneimine is a potent mucosal adjuvant for viral glycoprotein antigens.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Frank; Gartlan, Kate H; Harandi, Ali M; Brinckmann, Sarah A; Coccia, Margherita; Hillson, William R; Kok, Wai Ling; Cole, Suzanne; Ho, Ling-Pei; Lambe, Teresa; Puthia, Manoj; Svanborg, Catharina; Scherer, Erin M; Krashias, George; Williams, Adam; Blattman, Joseph N; Greenberg, Philip D; Flavell, Richard A; Moghaddam, Amin E; Sheppard, Neil C; Sattentau, Quentin J

    2012-09-01

    Protection against mucosally transmitted infections probably requires immunity at the site of pathogen entry, yet there are no mucosal adjuvant formulations licensed for human use. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) represents a family of organic polycations used as nucleic acid transfection reagents in vitro and DNA vaccine delivery vehicles in vivo. Here we show that diverse PEI forms have potent mucosal adjuvant activity for viral subunit glycoprotein antigens. A single intranasal administration of influenza hemagglutinin or herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D with PEI elicited robust antibody-mediated protection from an otherwise lethal infection, and was superior to existing experimental mucosal adjuvants. PEI formed nanoscale complexes with antigen, which were taken up by antigen-presenting cells in vitro and in vivo, promoted dendritic cell trafficking to draining lymph nodes and induced non-proinflammatory cytokine responses. PEI adjuvanticity required release of host double-stranded DNA that triggered Irf3-dependent signaling. PEI therefore merits further investigation as a mucosal adjuvant for human use. PMID:22922673

  13. [Immune efficacy of rabies virus glycoprotein expressed by baculovirus vector].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Shou-Feng; Liu, Ye; Fu, Yun-Hong; Sun, Cheng-Long; Yang, Yang; Gong, Ting; Song, Fei-Fei; Hu, Rong-Liang

    2012-09-01

    To construct a recombinant baculovirus expressing glycoprotein (GP) of RV SRV9 strain and test the immunological efficacy in mice, open reading frame of rabies virus GP gene of SRV9 strain was cloned into the shuttle vector Bacmid to construct the recombinant shuttle plasmid Bacmid-G and transfection was performed into S f9 cells with the recombinant shuttle plasmid. CPE appeared in cell cultures was identified by electronmicroscopy. Western-blot, IFA and immunity tests in mice were performed to identify the immunoreactivity and immunogenicity of the expression products. Our results showed a recombinant baculovirus expressing GP protein of rabies virus SRV9 was obtained. The expression products possessed a favorable immunogenicity and fall immunized mice could develop 100% protective level of anti-rabies neutralizing antibody. In conclusion, The SRV9 glycoprotein expressed by the recombinant baculovirus in this study had good immunogenicity and could induce anti-rabies neutralizing antibody, which laid the foundation of further development of rabies subunit vaccine.

  14. Glycoprotein Gene Sequence Variation in Rhesus Monkey Rhadinovirus

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Young C.; Jones, Leandro R.; Manrique, Julieta; Lauer, William; Carville, Angela; Mansfield, Keith G.; Desrosiers, Ronald C.

    2010-01-01

    Gene sequences for seven glycoproteins from 20 independent isolates of rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV) and of the corresponding seven glycoprotein genes from nine strains of the Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) were obtained and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis revealed two discrete groupings of RRV gH sequences, two discrete groupings of RRV gL sequences and two discrete groupings of RRV gB sequences. We called these phylogenetic groupings gHa, gHb, gLa, gLb, gBa and gBb. gHa was always paired with gLa and gHb was always paired with gLb for any individual RRV isolate. Since gH and gL are known to be interacting partners, these results suggest the need of matching sequence types for function of these cooperating proteins. gB phylogenetic grouping was not associated with gH/gL phylogenetic grouping. Our results demonstrate two distinct, distantly-related phylogenetic groupings of gH and gL of RRV despite a remarkable degree of sequence conservation within each individual phylogenetic group. PMID:20172576

  15. Weak anion exchange chromatographic profiling of glycoprotein isoforms on a polymer monolithic capillary.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Ren, Lianbing; Liu, Yunchun; Li, Hengye; Liu, Zhen

    2012-03-01

    High resolution separation of intact glycoproteins, which is essential for many aspects such as finger-print profiling, represents a great challenge because one glycoprotein can exhibit many isoforms with close physicochemical properties. Monolithic columns are important separation media for the separation of intact proteins due to its significant advantages such as easy preparation, high column efficiency and high permeability. However, there are few reports on high resolution profiling of intact glycoproteins. Herein, we presented a polymeric weak anion exchange (WAX) monolithic capillary for high resolution separation of glycoprotein isoforms. A base monolith was first prepared through ring-opening polymerization between tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate and tri(2-aminoethyl), and then modified through reacting with ammonia aqueous solution to convert the unreacted epoxide moieties into primary amino groups. The prepared monolithic capillary was characterized in terms of morphology, pore size, hydrophilicity and reproducibility. The obtained WAX monolithic capillary exhibited desired through-pores and mesopore size, stable skeleton and hydrophilic nature. The performance of the capillary was evaluated using several typical glycoproteins such as α(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) as mode analytes. Effects of the experimental parameters on the glycoform resolution were investigated. Under the optimized separation conditions, the tested glycoproteins were all resolved into distinct glycoforms. A comparative investigation with capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) revealed that this WAX column provided better selectivity as more isoforms were observed, although the resolution of some glycoprotein isoforms decreased.

  16. Systemic alteration of cell-surface and secreted glycoprotein expression in malignant breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Timpe, Leslie C; Yen, Roger; Haste, Nicole V; Litsakos-Cheung, Christina; Yen, Ten-Yang; Macher, Bruce A

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer cell lines express fewer transmembrane and secreted glycoproteins than nonmalignant ones. The objective of these experiments was to characterize the changes in the expression of several hundred glycoproteins quantitatively. Secreted and cell-surface glycoproteins were isolated using a glycoprotein capture protocol and then identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Glycoproteins expressed by a group of cell lines originating from malignant tumors of the breast were compared with those expressed by a nonmalignant set. The average number of spectral counts (proportional to relative protein abundance) and the total number of glycopeptides in the malignant samples were reduced to about two-thirds of the level in the nonmalignant samples. Most glycoproteins were expressed at a different level in the malignant samples, with nearly as many increasing as decreasing. The glycoproteins with reduced expression accounted for a larger change in spectral counts, and hence for the net loss of spectral counts in the malignant lines. Similar results were found when the glycoproteins were studied via identified glycosylation sites only, or through identified sites together with non-glycopeptides. The overall reduction is largely due to the loss of integrins, laminins and other proteins that form or interact with the basement membrane.

  17. Glycoprotein Biochemistry--Some Clinical Aspects of Interest to Biochemistry Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Authors describe some clinical features of glycoprotein biochemistry, including recognition, selected blood glycoproteins, glycated proteins, histochemistry, and cancer. The material presented has largely been taught to medical laboratory students; however, it can be used to teach premedical students and pure biochemistry students. Includes two…

  18. Histochemical and structural analysis of mucous glycoprotein secreted by the gill of Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Hae-Young.

    1988-01-01

    Studies were carried out to characterized various mucous cells in the gill filament, to ascertain structural characteristics of the secreted mucous glycoproteins, and to determine the ability of the gill epithelium to incorporate ({sup 14}C)glucosamine as a precursor in the biosynthesis and secretion of mucous glycoproteins. Using histochemical staining techniques, mucous cells containing neutral and acidic mucins were found in the lateral region, whereas mucous cells containing primarily neutral or sulfated mucins were found in the postlateral region. Serotonin, but not dopamine, stimulated the mucous secretion. In tissues pretreated with ({sup 14}C)glucosamine, the secreted glycoproteins contain incorporated radiolabel. Analysis by column chromatography using Bio-Gel P-2 and P-6 shows that the secretion contains two glycoprotein populations. Glycoprotein II has a molecular weight of 2.3 {times} 10{sup 4} daltons. Upon alkaline reductive borohydride cleavage of the O-glycosidic linkages of glycoprotein I, about 70% of the radiolabel was removed from the protein. Gas chromatographic analysis of the carbohydrate composition shows that the glycoproteins contains N-acetylglucosamine (GluNAc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), and galactose, fucose and mannose. Amino acid analysis shows that the glycoproteins are rich in serine, threonine and proline.

  19. Targeted entry via somatostatin receptors using a novel modified retrovirus glycoprotein that delivers genes at levels comparable to those of wild-type viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Ryu, Byoung Y; Krueger, Robin L; Heldt, Scott A; Albritton, Lorraine M

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a novel viral glycoprotein created by replacing a natural receptor-binding sequence of the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope glycoprotein with the peptide ligand somatostatin. This new chimeric glycoprotein, which has been named the Sst receptor binding site (Sst-RBS), gives targeted transduction based on three criteria: (i) a gain of the use of a new entry receptor not used by any known virus; (ii) targeted entry at levels comparable to gene delivery by wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoproteins; and (iii) a loss of the use of the natural ecotropic virus receptor. Retroviral vectors coated with Sst-RBS gained the ability to bind and transduce human 293 cells expressing somatostatin receptors. Their infection was specific to target somatostatin receptors, since a synthetic somatostatin peptide inhibited infection in a dose-dependent manner and the ability to transduce mouse cells bearing the natural ecotropic receptor was effectively lost. Importantly, vectors coated with the Sst-RBS glycoprotein gave targeted entry of up to 1 × 10(6) transducing U/ml, a level comparable to that seen with infection of vectors coated with the parental wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus glycoprotein through the ecotropic receptor and approaching that of infection of VSV G-coated vectors through the VSV receptor. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a glycoprotein that gives targeted entry of retroviral vectors at levels comparable to the natural capacity of viral envelope glycoproteins.

  20. Loop-acting diuretics do not bind to Tamm-Horsfall urinary glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Brunisholz, M C; Lynn, K L; Hunt, J S

    1987-09-01

    1. Binding between the radiolabelled loop-acting diuretics ([14C]frusemide, [14C]ethacrynic acid and [3H]bumetanide) and human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein or human serum albumin in vitro was evaluated by equilibrium dialysis. 2. The diuretic action and binding to urinary Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein of the radiolabelled diuretics in vivo, after intravenous administration, were examined in rabbits. 3. In vitro, all three radiolabelled diuretics bound strongly to human serum albumin, but not to Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein. 4. Radiolabelled frusemide and bumetanide, but not ethacrynic acid, caused a diuresis in rabbits, but no binding between the drugs and Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein was seen in vivo. 5. Binding to Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein does not appear to be an important mechanism in the action of loop diuretics.

  1. Expression of membrane glycoproteins in normal keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Rayter, Z. ); McIlhinney, R. ); Gusterson, B. )

    1989-08-01

    Con A acceptor glycoproteins were analyzed by 2D-PAGE and {sup 125}I-Con A overlay in three squamous carcinoma cell lines and compared with those in the simian virus (SV40)-transformed keratinocyte cell line SVK-14 and in normal keratinocytes. The majority of the glycoproteins identified by this technique were expressed at similar levels in all of the cells examined, independent of the culture conditions used. A cell surface glycoprotein gp34 was increased in the tumor cells compared with normal keratinocytes and expression varied with the culture density. Another glycoprotein, gp21, was found to be increased in expression in normal keratinocytes and stratified hyperconfluent cultures of squamous carcinoma cell lines. This paper describes the potential of this technique to identify membrane glycoproteins which may be expressed as a function of proliferation or differentiation.

  2. Separation of the bovine colostrum M-1 glycoprotein into two components

    PubMed Central

    Bezkorovainy, Anatoly; Grohlich, Dietmar

    1969-01-01

    1. Two glycoproteins were isolated from the M-1 acid glycoprotein fraction of bovine colostrum. 2. The lighter glycoprotein had a molecular weight of 7200, contained about 28·4% of carbohydrate, and had an absorption maximum at 275nm. The heavier glycoprotein had a molecular weight of 12000, contained 39·0% of carbohydrate, and had no absorption maxima in the 240–300nm. range of the spectrum. 3. The carbohydrate moiety of both glycoproteins was removable from the polypeptide moiety under the conditions of the β-elimination reaction. 4. Periodate oxidation experiments showed that sialic acid was linked to galactose in both proteins. ImagesFig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:4311442

  3. Production of Highly Sialylated Recombinant Glycoproteins Using Ricinus communis Agglutinin-I-Resistant CHO Glycosylation Mutants.

    PubMed

    Goh, John S Y; Chan, Kah Fai; Song, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    The degree of sialylation of therapeutic glycoproteins affects its circulatory half-life and efficacy because incompletely sialylated glycoproteins are cleared from circulation by asialoglycoprotein receptors present in the liver cells. Mammalian expression systems, often employed in the production of these glycoprotein drugs, produce heterogeneously sialylated products. Here, we describe how to produce highly sialylated glycoproteins using a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell glycosylation mutant called CHO-gmt4 with human erythropoietin (EPO) as a model glycoprotein. The protocol describes how to isolate and characterize the CHO glycosylation mutants and how to assess the sialylation of the recombinant protein using isoelectric focusing (IEF). It further describes how to inactivate the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in these cells using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology to enable gene amplification and the generation of stable cell lines producing highly sialylated EPO.

  4. Demethoxycurcumin modulates human P-glycoprotein function via uncompetitive inhibition of ATPase hydrolysis activity.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yu-Ning; Hsieh, Yow-Wen; Hung, Chin-Chuan; Lin, Hui-Yi

    2015-01-28

    Curcuminoids are major components of Curcuma longa L., which is widely used as spice in food. This study aimed at identifying whether curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin could modulate efflux function of human P-glycoprotein and be used as chemosensitizers in cancer treatments. Without altering P-glycoprotein expression levels and conformation, the purified curcuminoids significantly inhibited P-glycoprotein efflux function. In rhodamine 123 efflux and calcein-AM accumulation assays, demethoxycurcumin demonstrated the highest inhibition potency (inhibitory IC50 = 1.56 ± 0.13 μM) among the purified curcuminoids, as well as in the fold of reversal assays. Demethoxycurcumin inhibited P-glycoprotein-mediated ATP hydrolysis under concentrations of <1 μM and efficiently inhibited 200 μM verapamil-stimulated ATPase activity, indicating a high affinity of demethoxycurcumin for P-glycoprotein. These results suggested that demethoxycurcumin may be a potential additive natural product in combination with chemotherapeutic agents in drug-resistant cancers.

  5. Identification of glycoproteins containing specific glycans using a lectin-chemical method.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Shah, Punit; De Marzo, Angelo M; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Li, Qianqian; Chan, Daniel W; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most common protein modifications. Each glycoprotein can be glycosylated at multiple glycosites, and each glycosites can be modified by different glycans. Due to this heterogeneity of glycosylation, it has proven difficult to study the structure-function relationship of specific glycans and their affected glycoproteins. Here, we report a novel method for rapid and quantitative identification of glycoproteins containing specific glycans. Lectin affinity isolations are followed by chemical immobilization of the captured glycopeptides, allowing the identification of glycoproteins containing specific glycans by subsequent mass spectrometry. The application of the method should be useful to facilitate our understanding of how changes in glycan associate with diseases, and to discover novel glycoproteins with certain glycans that could serve as biomarkers or therapeutic targets.

  6. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection.

  7. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection. PMID:25271333

  8. Effect of reduced temperature on glycoprotein (Ig, HLA) processing and transport in lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Brand, M; Jansen, E; Ploegh, H L

    1985-07-01

    Secretion of Igs and surface expression of HLA antigens was examined in lymphoid cells as a function of temp. Upon reducing the temp from 37 to 20 degrees C a progressive decrease in the secretion of Ig and surface expression of HLA antigens was noted. When the status of the oligosaccharides present on these glycoproteins was examined, conversion of high-mannose [endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase-(Endo H) sensitive] to complex-type (Endo H resistant) oligosaccharides diminished with decreasing temp. At no time was an accumulation of Endo H resistant glycoproteins seen intracellularly. These results show that the phenomenon observed for synthesis and intracellular transport of viral glycoproteins in epithelial cells at reduced temp, namely intracellular accumulation of viral glycoproteins carrying complex sugar moieties, does not necessarily apply to glycoprotein transport in lymphoid cells. A difference in subcellular organization of epithelial and lymphoid cells may be responsible for this discrepancy.

  9. Lectin-based analysis of fucosylated glycoproteins of human skim milk during 47 days of lactation.

    PubMed

    Lis-Kuberka, Jolanta; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona; Berghausen-Mazur, Marta; Orczyk-Pawiłowicz, Magdalena

    2015-12-01

    Glycoproteins of human milk are multifunctional molecules, and their fucosylated variants are potentially active molecules in immunological events ensuring breastfed infants optimal development and protection against infection diseases. The expression of fucosylated glycotopes may correspond to milk maturation stages. The relative amounts of fucosylated glycotopes of human skim milk glycoproteins over the course of lactation from the 2(nd) day to the 47(th) day were analyzed in colostrums, transitional and mature milk samples of 43 healthy mothers by lectin-blotting using α1-2-, α1-6-, and α1-3-fucose specific biotinylated Ulex europaeus (UEA), Lens culinaris (LCA), and Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA) lectins, respectively. The reactivities of UEA and LCA with the milk glycoproteins showed the highest expression of α1-2- and α1-6-fucosylated glycotopes on colostrum glycoproteins. The level of UEA-reactive glycoproteins from the beginning of lactation to the 14(th) day was high and relatively stable in contrast to LCA-reactive glycoproteins, the level of which significantly decreased from 2-3 to 7-8 days then remained almost unchanged until the 12(th)-14(th) days. Next, during the progression of lactation the reactivities with both lectins declined significantly. Eighty percent of α1-2- and/or α1-6-fucosylated glycoproteins showed a high negative correlation with milk maturation. In contrast, most of the analyzed milk glycoproteins were not recognized or weakly recognized by LTA and remained at a low unchanged level over lactation. Only a 30-kDa milk glycoprotein was evidently LTA-reactive, showing a negative correlation with milk maturation. The gradual decline of high expression of α1-2- and α1-6-, but not α1-3-, fucoses on human milk glycoproteins of healthy mothers over lactation was associated with milk maturation.

  10. Lectin-based analysis of fucosylated glycoproteins of human skim milk during 47 days of lactation.

    PubMed

    Lis-Kuberka, Jolanta; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona; Berghausen-Mazur, Marta; Orczyk-Pawiłowicz, Magdalena

    2015-12-01

    Glycoproteins of human milk are multifunctional molecules, and their fucosylated variants are potentially active molecules in immunological events ensuring breastfed infants optimal development and protection against infection diseases. The expression of fucosylated glycotopes may correspond to milk maturation stages. The relative amounts of fucosylated glycotopes of human skim milk glycoproteins over the course of lactation from the 2(nd) day to the 47(th) day were analyzed in colostrums, transitional and mature milk samples of 43 healthy mothers by lectin-blotting using α1-2-, α1-6-, and α1-3-fucose specific biotinylated Ulex europaeus (UEA), Lens culinaris (LCA), and Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA) lectins, respectively. The reactivities of UEA and LCA with the milk glycoproteins showed the highest expression of α1-2- and α1-6-fucosylated glycotopes on colostrum glycoproteins. The level of UEA-reactive glycoproteins from the beginning of lactation to the 14(th) day was high and relatively stable in contrast to LCA-reactive glycoproteins, the level of which significantly decreased from 2-3 to 7-8 days then remained almost unchanged until the 12(th)-14(th) days. Next, during the progression of lactation the reactivities with both lectins declined significantly. Eighty percent of α1-2- and/or α1-6-fucosylated glycoproteins showed a high negative correlation with milk maturation. In contrast, most of the analyzed milk glycoproteins were not recognized or weakly recognized by LTA and remained at a low unchanged level over lactation. Only a 30-kDa milk glycoprotein was evidently LTA-reactive, showing a negative correlation with milk maturation. The gradual decline of high expression of α1-2- and α1-6-, but not α1-3-, fucoses on human milk glycoproteins of healthy mothers over lactation was associated with milk maturation. PMID:26318738

  11. Pathogenic role of anti-ß2-glycoprotein I antibodies in antiphospholipid associated fetal loss: characterisation of ß2-glycoprotein I binding to trophoblast cells and functional effects of anti-ß2-glycoprotein I antibodies in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Di, S; Raschi, E; Testoni, C; Castellani, R; D'Asta, M; Shi, T; Krilis, S; Caruso, A; Meroni, P

    2005-01-01

    Background: Antiphospholipid antibodies reacting with ß2-glycoprotein I (ß2GPI) have been associated with recurrent fetal loss and pregnancy complications. Objective: To investigate whether specific mutations in the phospholipid binding site of ß2GPI might affect its binding to trophoblast and in turn the anti-ß2GPI antibody induced functional effects. Methods: ß2GPI adhesion to trophoblast was evaluated as human monoclonal IgM or polyclonal IgG anti-ß2GPI antibody binding to trophoblast monolayers cultured (1) in complete medium; (2) in serum-free medium; (3) after serum starvation in the presence of purified human ß2GPI; or (4) in the presence of ß2GPI with single or multiple mutations in the amino acid loop Cys281-Lys-Asn-Lys-Glu-Lys-Lys-Cys288. The effect of anti-ß2GPI binding to trophoblast was evaluated as chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) mRNA expression, and protein release by RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay, respectively. Results: ß2GPI adhesion to trophoblast and its consequent recognition by the specific antibodies were inversely proportional to the mutation number in the phospholipid binding site. Anti-ß2GPI antibodies reduced gonadotropin release, hormone dependent hCG mRNA expression, and protein synthesis in the presence of ß2GPI, while the addition of the mutants or the absence of ß2GPI had no effect. Conclusions: ß2GPI binds to trophoblast in vitro through its fifth domain, as reported for endothelial cells, and can be recognised by anti-ß2GPI antibodies; the antibody binding downregulates trophoblast hCG synthesis and secretion. Such a mechanism might contribute to defective placentation in women with fetal loss associated with the antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:15256379

  12. Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Novel Conserved Epitopes within Filovirus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Enterlein, Sven G.; Howell, Katie A.; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L.; Froude, Jeffrey W.; Araghi, Nazli; Douglas, Robin; Biggins, Julia; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Glass, Pamela J.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses cause highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Current immunotherapeutic options for filoviruses are mostly specific to Ebola virus (EBOV), although other members of Filoviridae such as Sudan virus (SUDV), Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), and Marburg virus (MARV) have also caused sizeable human outbreaks. Here we report a set of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from cynomolgus macaques immunized repeatedly with a mixture of engineered glycoproteins (GPs) and virus-like particles (VLPs) for three different filovirus species. The antibodies recognize novel neutralizing and nonneutralizing epitopes on the filovirus glycoprotein, including conserved conformational epitopes within the core regions of the GP1 subunit and a novel linear epitope within the glycan cap. We further report the first filovirus antibody binding to a highly conserved epitope within the fusion loop of ebolavirus and marburgvirus species. One of the antibodies binding to the core GP1 region of all ebolavirus species and with lower affinity to MARV GP cross neutralized both SUDV and EBOV, the most divergent ebolavirus species. In a mouse model of EBOV infection, this antibody provided 100% protection when administered in two doses and partial, but significant, protection when given once at the peak of viremia 3 days postinfection. Furthermore, we describe novel cocktails of antibodies with enhanced protective efficacy compared to individual MAbs. In summary, the present work describes multiple novel, cross-reactive filovirus epitopes and innovative combination concepts that challenge the current therapeutic models. IMPORTANCE Filoviruses are among the most deadly human pathogens. The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) led to more than 27,000 cases and 11,000 fatalities. While there are five species of Ebolavirus and several strains of marburgvirus, the current immunotherapeutics primarily target Ebola virus

  13. Rapid intramolecular turnover of N-linked glycans in plasma membrane glycoproteins. Extension of intramolecular turnover to the core sugars in plasma membrane glycoproteins of hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Tauber, R; Park, C S; Becker, A; Geyer, R; Reutter, W

    1989-12-01

    Plasma membrane glycoproteins of rat hepatocytes undergo a rapid terminal deglycosylation in that the terminal sugars of the oligosaccharide side chains are rapidly removed from the otherwise intact glycoproteins [Tauber, R., Park, C.S. & Reutter, W. (1983) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 80, 4026-4029]. The present paper demonstrates that this rapid intramolecular turnover of plasma membrane glycoproteins is not restricted to peripheral sugars but, in contrast to liver, in hepatoma the core sugars of the oligosaccharide chains are also involved. Intramolecular turnover was measured in Morris hepatoma 7777 in five plasma membrane glycoproteins with Mr of 85,000 (hgp85), 105,000 (hgp105), 115,000 (hgp115), 125,000 (hgp125), 175,000 (hgp175) (hgp = hepatoma glycoprotein) that were isolated and purified to homogeneity by concanavalin-A--Sepharose affinity chromatography and semipreparative SDS gel electrophoresis. Analysis of the carbohydrates of hgp85, hgp105, hgp115 and hgp125 revealed the presence of N-linked oligosaccharides containing L-fucose, D-galactose, D-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, but only of trace amounts of N-acetyl-D-galactosamine; hgp175 additionally contained significant amounts of N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, indicating the presence of both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. As shown by digestion with endoglucosaminidase H, the N-linked oligosaccharides of hgp105, hgp115, hgp125 and hgp175 were of the complex type, whereas hgp85 also contained oligosaccharides of the high-mannose type. Half-lives of the turnover of the oligosacharide chains and of the protein backbone of the five glycoproteins were measured in the plasma membrane in pulse-chase experiments in vivo, using L-[3H]fucose as a marker of terminal sugars, D-[3H]mannose as marker of a core sugar and L-[3H]leucine for labelling the protein backbone. Protein backbones of the five glycoproteins were degraded with individual half-lives ranging over 41-90 h with a mean of 66 h. Compared to the

  14. Differential requirement for individual sarcoglycans and dystrophin in the assembly and function of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex.

    PubMed

    Hack, A A; Lam, M Y; Cordier, L; Shoturma, D I; Ly, C T; Hadhazy, M A; Hadhazy, M R; Sweeney, H L; McNally, E M

    2000-07-01

    Sarcoglycan is a multimeric, integral membrane glycoprotein complex that associates with dystrophin. Mutations in individual sarcoglycan subunits have been identified in inherited forms of muscular dystrophy. To evaluate the contributions of sarcoglycan and dystrophin to muscle membrane stability and muscular dystrophy, we compared muscle lacking specific sarcoglycans or dystrophin. Here we report that mice lacking (delta)-sarcoglycan developed muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy similar to mice lacking (gamma)-sarcoglycan. However, unlike muscle lacking (gamma)-sarcoglycan, (delta)-sarcoglycan-deficient muscle was sensitive to eccentric contraction-induced disruption of the plasma membrane. In the absence of (delta)-sarcoglycan, (alpha)-, (beta)- and (gamma)-sarcoglycan were undetectable, while dystrophin was expressed at normal levels. In contrast, without (gamma)-sarcoglycan, reduced levels of (alpha)-, (beta)- and (delta)-sarcoglycan were expressed, glycosylated and formed a complex with each other. Thus, the elimination of (gamma)- and (delta)-sarcoglycan had different molecular consequences for the assembly and function of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Furthermore, these molecular differences were associated with different mechanical consequences for the muscle plasma membrane. Through this in vivo analysis, a model for sarcoglycan assembly is proposed.

  15. Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Sindbis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Allows Single Particle Analysis of Virus Budding from Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Jose, Joyce; Tang, Jinghua; Taylor, Aaron B; Baker, Timothy S; Kuhn, Richard J

    2015-12-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne alphavirus. Here we generated and characterized a fluorescent protein-tagged (FP-tagged) SINV and found that the presence of the FP-tag (mCherry) affected glycoprotein transport to the plasma membrane whereas the specific infectivity of the virus was not affected. We examined the virions by transmission electron cryo-microscopy and determined the arrangement of the FP-tag on the surface of the virion. The fluorescent proteins are arranged icosahedrally on the virus surface in a stable manner that did not adversely affect receptor binding or fusion functions of E2 and E1, respectively. The delay in surface expression of the viral glycoproteins, as demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis, contributed to a 10-fold reduction in mCherry-E2 virus titer. There is a 1:1 ratio of mCherry to E2 incorporated into the virion, which leads to a strong fluorescence signal and thus facilitates single-particle tracking experiments. We used the FP-tagged virus for high-resolution live-cell imaging to study the spatial and temporal aspects of alphavirus assembly and budding from mammalian cells. These processes were further analyzed by thin section microscopy. The results demonstrate that SINV buds from the plasma membrane of infected cells and is dispersed into the surrounding media or spread to neighboring cells facilitated by its close association with filopodial extensions.

  16. An Essential Role for the Proximal but Not the Distal Cytoplasmic Tail of Glycoprotein M in Murid Herpesvirus 4 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Philip G.

    2008-01-01

    Murid herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) provides a tractable model with which to define common, conserved features of gamma-herpesvirus biology. The multi-membrane spanning glycoprotein M (gM) is one of only 4 glycoproteins that are essential for MuHV-4 lytic replication. gM binds to gN and is thought to function mainly secondary envelopment and virion egress, for which several predicted trafficking motifs in its C-terminal cytoplasmic tail could be important. We tested the contribution of the gM cytoplasmic tail to MuHV-4 lytic replication by making recombinant viruses with varying C-terminal deletions. Removing an acidic cluster and a distal YXXΦ motif altered the capsid distribution somewhat in infected cells but had little effect on virus replication, either in vitro or in vivo. In contrast, removing a proximal YXXΦ motif as well completely prevented productive replication. gM was still expressed, but unlike its longer forms showed only limited colocalization with co-transfected gN, and in the context of whole virus appeared to support gN expression less well. We conclude that some elements of the gM cytoplasmic tail are dispensible for MuHV-4 replication, but the tail as a whole is not. PMID:18461133

  17. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly. PMID:26301520

  18. Boron bridging of rhamnogalacturonan-II is promoted in vitro by cationic chaperones, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chormova, Dimitra; Fry, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Dimerization of rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) via boron cross-links contributes to the assembly and biophysical properties of the cell wall. Pure RG-II is efficiently dimerized by boric acid (B(OH)3 ) in vitro only if nonbiological agents for example Pb(2+) are added. By contrast, newly synthesized RG-II domains dimerize very rapidly in vivo. We investigated biological agents that might enable this. We tested for three such agents: novel enzymes, borate-transferring ligands and cationic 'chaperones' that facilitate the close approach of two polyanionic RG-II molecules. Dimerization was monitored electrophoretically. Parsley shoot cell-wall enzymes did not affect RG-II dimerization in vitro. Borate-binding ligands (apiose, dehydroascorbic acid, alditols) and small organic cations (including polyamines) also lacked consistent effects. Polylysine bound permanently to RG-II, precluding electrophoretic analysis. However, another polycation, polyhistidine, strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 without irreversible polyhistidine-RG-II complexation. Likewise, partially purified spinach extensins (histidine/lysine-rich cationic glycoproteins), strongly promoted RG-II dimerization by B(OH)3 in vitro. Thus certain polycations, including polyhistidine and wall glycoproteins, can chaperone RG-II, manoeuvring this polyanionic polysaccharide domain such that boron-bridging is favoured. These chaperones dissociate from RG-II after facilitating its dimerization, indicating that they act catalytically rather than stoichiometrically. We propose a natural role for extensin-RG-II interaction in steering cell-wall assembly.

  19. Taenia crassiceps cysticerci: Characterization of the 14-kDa glycoprotein with homologies to antigens from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Regina H; Espíndola, Noeli M; Pardini, Alessandra X; Iha, Alberto H; Moura, Hercules; Barr, John R; Vaz, Adelaide J; Peralta, José M

    2010-03-01

    Glycoproteins from the total vesicular fluid of Taenia crassiceps (VF-Tc) were prepared using three different purification methods, consisting of ConA-lectin affinity chromatography (ConA-Tc), preparative electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) (14 gp-Tc), and monoclonal antibody immunoaffinity chromatography (18/14-Tc). The complex composition represented by the VF-Tc and ConA-Tc antigens revealed peptides ranging from 101- to 14-kDa and from 92- to 12-kDa, respectively. Immunoblotting using lectins confirmed glucose/mannose (glc/man) residues in the 18- and 14-kDa peptides, which are considered specific and immunodominant for the diagnosis of cysticercosis, and indicated that these fractions are glycoproteins. Serum antibodies from a patient with neurocysticercosis that reacted to the 14 gp band from T. crassiceps (Tc) were eluted from immunoblotting membranes and showed reactivity to 14 gp from Taenia solium. In order to determine the similar peptide sequence, the N-terminal amino acid was determined and analyzed with sequences available in public databases. This sequence revealed partial homology between T. crassiceps and T. solium peptides. In addition, mass spectrometry along with theoretical M(r) and pI of the 14 gp-Tc point suggested a close relationship to some peptides of a 150-kDa protein complex of the T. solium previously described. The identification of these common immunogenic sites will contribute to future efforts to develop recombinant antigens and synthetic peptides for immunological assays.

  20. Engineering yeast for producing human glycoproteins: where are we now?

    PubMed

    Laukens, Bram; De Visscher, Charlotte; Callewaert, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Yeast has advanced as an alternative for mammalian cell culture for the production of recombinant therapeutic glycoproteins. Engineered yeast strains not only allow to mimic the human N-glycosylation pathway but also specific types of human O-glycosylation. This is of great value for therapeutic protein production and indispensable to determine the structure-function relationships of glycans on recombinant proteins. However, as the technology matures, some limitations have come up that may hamper biomedical applications and must be considered to exploit the full potential of the unprecedented glycan homogeneity obtained on relevant biopharmaceuticals. In this special report, we focus on the recent developments in N- and O-glycosylation engineering in yeasts of industrial importance, to produce recombinant therapeutics with customized glycans.

  1. Stereoselective Modulation of P-Glycoprotein by Chiral Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Carocci, Alessia; Catalano, Alessia; Turi, Francesco; Lovece, Angelo; Cavalluzzi, Maria M; Bruno, Claudio; Colabufo, Nicola A; Contino, Marialessandra; Perrone, Maria G; Franchini, Carlo; Lentini, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of drug efflux pumps such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an approach toward combating multidrug resistance, which is a significant hurdle in current cancer treatments. To address this, N-substituted aryloxymethyl pyrrolidines were designed and synthesized in their homochiral forms in order to investigate the stereochemical requirements for the binding site of P-gp. Our study provides evidence that the chiral property of molecules could be a strategy for improving the capacity for interacting with P-gp, as the most active compounds of the series stereoselectively modulated this efflux pump. The naphthalene-1-yl analogue (R)-2-[(2,3-dichlorophenoxy)methyl]-1-(naphthalen-1-ylmethyl)pyrrolidine) [(R)-7 a] emerged foremost for its potency and stereoselectivity toward P-gp, with the S enantiomer being nearly inactive. The modulation of P-gp by (R)-7 a involved consumption of ATP, thus demonstrating that the compound behaves as a P-gp substrate.

  2. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Envelope Glycoprotein Core Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Nieusma, Travis; Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Cogburn, Kristin E.; Hua, Yuanzi; Dai, Xiaoping; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun

    2014-08-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a Hepacivirus, is a major cause of viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 mediate fusion and entry into host cells and are the primary targets of the humoral immune response. The crystal structure of the E2 core bound to broadly neutralizing antibody AR3C at 2.65 angstroms reveals a compact architecture composed of a central immunoglobulin-fold β sandwich flanked by two additional protein layers. The CD81 receptor binding site was identified by electron microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis and overlaps with the AR3C epitope. The x-ray and electron microscopy E2 structures differ markedly from predictions of an extended, three-domain, class II fusion protein fold and therefore provide valuable information for HCV drug and vaccine design.

  3. 78 FR 77467 - Findings of Research Misconduct

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Institutes of Health (NIH), grants P01 AI074286, R33 AI076083, and U19... human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) by intentionally spiking samples of rabbit sera with antibodies...-54 moiety of the HIV gp41 glycoprotein induced antibodies capable of neutralizing a broad range...

  4. Crystal Structure of the Human Cytomegalovirus Glycoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Heidi G.; Heldwein, Ekaterina E.

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a dsDNA, enveloped virus, is a ubiquitous pathogen that establishes lifelong latent infections and caused disease in persons with compromised immune systems, e.g., organ transplant recipients or AIDS patients. HCMV is also a leading cause of congenital viral infections in newborns. Entry of HCMV into cells requires the conserved glycoprotein B (gB), thought to function as a fusogen and reported to bind signaling receptors. gB also elicits a strong immune response in humans and induces the production of neutralizing antibodies although most anti-gB Abs are non-neutralizing. Here, we report the crystal structure of the HCMV gB ectodomain determined to 3.6-Å resolution, which is the first atomic-level structure of any betaherpesvirus glycoprotein. The structure of HCMV gB resembles the postfusion structures of HSV-1 and EBV homologs, establishing it as a new member of the class III viral fusogens. Despite structural similarities, each gB has a unique domain arrangement, demonstrating structural plasticity of gB that may accommodate virus-specific functional requirements. The structure illustrates how extensive glycosylation of the gB ectodomain influences antibody recognition. Antigenic sites that elicit neutralizing antibodies are more heavily glycosylated than those that elicit non-neutralizing antibodies, which suggest that HCMV gB uses glycans to shield neutralizing epitopes while exposing non-neutralizing epitopes. This glycosylation pattern may have evolved to direct the immune response towards generation of non-neutralizing antibodies thus helping HCMV to avoid clearance. HCMV gB structure provides a starting point for elucidation of its antigenic and immunogenic properties and aid in the design of recombinant vaccines and monoclonal antibody therapies. PMID:26484870

  5. MALDI linear TOF mass spectrometry of PEGylated (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Birgit K; Siekmann, Jürgen; Belgacem, Omar; Wenzel, Ryan J; Turecek, Peter L; Allmaier, Günter

    2010-06-01

    PEGylation of proteins is a fast growing field in biotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences owing to its ability to prolong the serum half-life time of recombinant proteins. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) has been shown to be a powerful tool in the analysis of several PEGylated small proteins. Here we present data obtained with a standard secondary electron multiplier (SEM) and a high mass (HM) detector combined with a MALDI linear TOF MS system for the detection of PEGylated (glyco)proteins in the range of 60-600 kDa. Examples of MALDI TOF MS of small (interferon alpha2a), middle (human serum albumin (HSA)) and high molecular mass proteins (coagulation factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (vWF), both heavily glycosylated proteins) are presented. The particular challenge for the analysis was the heterogeneity of the (glyco)proteins in the high molecular weight range in combination with additional PEGylation, which even introduced more heterogeneity and was more challenging for interpretation. Nevertheless, the performance of MALDI linear TOF MS with both detector systems in terms molecular weight and heterogeneity determination depending on the m/z range was superior to the other methods. Although the SEM was able to obtain information about protein PEGylation in the mass range up to 100 kDa (e.g. PEGylated HSA), the HM system was crucial for detection of HM ions (e.g. PEGylated recombinant vWF), which was impossible with the standard SEM.

  6. Enrichment and identification of glycoproteins in human saliva using lectin magnetic bead arrays.

    PubMed

    Caragata, Michael; Shah, Alok K; Schulz, Benjamin L; Hill, Michelle M; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2016-03-15

    Aberrant glycosylation of proteins is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and could provide diagnostic value in cancer detection. Human saliva is an ideal source of glycoproteins due to the relatively high proportion of glycosylated proteins in the salivary proteome. Moreover, saliva collection is noninvasive and technically straightforward, and the sample collection and storage is relatively easy. Although differential glycosylation of proteins can be indicative of disease states, identification of differential glycosylation from clinical samples is not trivial. To facilitate salivary glycoprotein biomarker discovery, we optimized a method for differential glycoprotein enrichment from human saliva based on lectin magnetic bead arrays (saLeMBA). Selected lectins from distinct reactivity groups were used in the saLeMBA platform to enrich salivary glycoproteins from healthy volunteer saliva. The technical reproducibility of saLeMBA was analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to identify the glycosylated proteins enriched by each lectin. Our saLeMBA platform enabled robust glycoprotein enrichment in a glycoprotein- and lectin-specific manner consistent with known protein-specific glycan profiles. We demonstrated that saLeMBA is a reliable method to enrich and detect glycoproteins present in human saliva.

  7. Factors affecting recombinant Western equine encephalitis virus glycoprotein production in the baculovirus system.

    PubMed

    Toth, Ann M; Geisler, Christoph; Aumiller, Jared J; Jarvis, Donald L

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to produce processed, soluble Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) glycoproteins for subunit therapeutic vaccine studies, we isolated twelve recombinant baculoviruses designed to express four different WEEV glycoprotein constructs under the transcriptional control of three temporally distinct baculovirus promoters. The WEEV glycoprotein constructs encoded full-length E1, the E1 ectodomain, an E26KE1 polyprotein precursor, and an artificial, secretable E2E1 chimera. The three different promoters induced gene expression during the immediate early (ie1), late (p6.9), and very late (polh) phases of baculovirus infection. Protein expression studies showed that the nature of the WEEV construct and the timing of expression both influenced the quantity and quality of recombinant glycoprotein produced. The full-length E1 product was insoluble, irrespective of the timing of expression. Each of the other three constructs yielded soluble products and, in these cases, the timing of expression was important, as higher protein processing efficiencies were generally obtained at earlier times of infection. However, immediate early expression did not yield detectable levels of every WEEV product, and expression during the late (p6.9) or very late (polh) phases of infection provided equal or higher amounts of processed, soluble product. Thus, while earlier foreign gene expression can provide higher recombinant glycoprotein processing efficiencies in the baculovirus system, in the case of the WEEV glycoproteins, earlier expression did not provide larger amounts of high quality, soluble recombinant glycoprotein product.

  8. Preparation of Concanavalin A-Chelating Magnetic Nanoparticles for Selective Enrichment of Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liping; Feng, Shun; Li, Shanshan; Song, Peipei; Wang, Jide

    2015-07-01

    In this work, a soft and nondestructive approach was developed to prepare concanavalin A-chelating magnetic nanoparticles (Con A-MNPs) for selective enrichment of glycoproteins. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid-modified-MNPs (EDTA-MNPs) were prepared by a one-pot chemical coprecipitation method first, and then, Cu(II) cations were used as bridge groups to immobilize Con A on EDTA-MNPs. The as-prepared absorbents with a mean diameter of 15 nm showed a strong magnetic response to an externally applied magnetic field. The results of thermogravimetric analysis showed the content of immobilized Con A was up to 28 wt %. For glycoprotein ovalbumin, the maximum capacity and equilibrium constant were 72.41 mg/g and 0.6035 L/mg, respectively. The as-prepared nanocomposites exhibited a remarkable selectivity for glycoproteins and can enrich glycoproteins specifically from a mixture of glycoprotein and nonglycoprotein even at a molar ratio of 1:600. It was also successfully applied for the enrichment of glycoproteins from real egg white samples. We expect that our finding will serve as a helpful template for others to design new adsorbents for enriching glycoproteins.

  9. Integrated glycoprotein immobilization method for glycopeptide and glycan analysis of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Mishra, Sumita; Chen, Lijun; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Chan, Daniel W; Chatterjee, Subroto; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins can have a major role in disease initiation and progression. Incredible efforts have recently been made to study the regulation of glycoproteins for disease prognosis and diagnosis. It is essential to elucidate glycans and intact glycoproteins to understand the role of glycosylation in diseases. Sialylated N-glycans play crucial roles in physiological and pathological processes; however, it is laborious to study sialylated glycoproteins due to the labile nature of sialic acid residues. In this study, an integrated platform is developed for the analysis of intact glycoproteins and glycans using a chemoenzymatic approach for immobilization and derivatization of sialic acids. N-Glycans, deglycosylated proteins, and intact glycoproteins from heart tissues of wild type (WT) and transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse models were analyzed. We identified 291 unique glycopeptides from 195 glycoproteins; the comparative studies between WT and TAC mice indicate the overexpression of extracellular proteins for heart matrix remodeling and the down-regulation of proteins associated with energy metabolism in cardiac hypertrophy. The integrated platform is a powerful tool for the analysis of glycans and glycoproteins in the discovery of potential cardiac hypertrophy biomarkers.

  10. Preparation of biointeractive glycoprotein-conjugated hydrogels through metabolic oligosacchalide engineering.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Matsunaga, Aki; Fujii, Shuetsu

    2014-09-17

    In the current study, synthetic hydrogels containing metabolically engineered glycoproteins of mammalian cells were prepared for the first time and selectin-mediated cell adhesion on the hydrogel was demonstrated. A culture of HL-60 cells was supplemented with an appropriate volume of aqueous solution of N-methacryloyl mannosamine (ManMA) to give a final concentration of 5 mM. The cells were then incubated for 3 days to deliver methacryloyl groups to the glycoproteins of the cells. A transparent hydrogel was formed via redox radical polymerization of methacryloyl functionalized glycoproteins with 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine and a cross-linker. Conjugation of the glycoproteins into the hydrogel was determined using Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. The surface density of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) on the hydrogels was also detected using gold-colloid-labeled immunoassay. Finally, selectin-mediated cell adhesion on hydrogels containing glycoproteins was demonstrated. Selectin-mediated cell adhesion is considered an essential step in the progression of various diseases; therefore, hydrogels having glycoproteins could be useful in therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  11. Sialic acid glycoproteins inhibit in vitro and in vivo replication of rotaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Yolken, R H; Willoughby, R; Wee, S B; Miskuff, R; Vonderfecht, S

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the interactions of rotaviruses with glycoproteins and cells that support rotaviral replication. We found that a wide range of naturally occurring glycoproteins, including ovalbumins and ovomucoids from chicken and turkey eggs, and mucin derived from bovine submaxillary glands, inhibit the replication of rotaviruses in MA-104 cells. Our studies further indicated that the glycoproteins bind directly to rotaviruses and that virus-glycoprotein binding is dependent largely upon interactions with sialic acid oligosaccharides. We found that accessible sialic acid oligosaccharides are required for efficient rotavirus infection of MA-104 cells, thus demonstrating that sialic acid oligosaccharides play an important role in the interactions of rotaviruses with both glycoproteins and cells that support rotaviral replication. Bovine submaxillary mucin and chicken ovoinhibitor can also prevent the shedding of rotavirus antigen and the development of rotavirus gastroenteritis in a mouse model of rotavirus infection. Our findings document that a range of glycoproteins inhibit the in vivo and in vitro replication of rotaviruses and suggest that the alteration in the quantity or chemical composition of intestinal glycoproteins is a potential means for the modulation of enteric infections. Images PMID:3025257

  12. Immunogenicity in mice of human metapneumovirus with a truncated SH glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, A B; Fenwick, F; Robinson, M J; Toms, G L

    2014-04-01

    The SH glycoprotein of human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is twice the size of that of human respiratory syncytial virus and possesses a large, hydrophilic luminal domain. The glycoprotein is located on the surface of the virion and of virus infected cells and, if immunogenic, might be expected to play a role in anti-viral immunity. Initial attempts to study anti-SH antibody immunogenicity were thwarted by the instability of the SH gene on passage both in human bronchial epithelial cells and in mice. Repeated passage of virus isolates in human bronchial epithelial cells in culture resulted in the appearance and eventual predominance of HMPV mutants lacking all or most of the luminal domain of SH coincidental with the loss of productive infection in mouse lungs. Where infection was established in mice with an early cell culture passage, the virus recovered from mouse lung differed markedly from the inoculum, carrying 19 coding mutations in the SH luminal domain. Immunization of mice with a mutant virus variant expressing only 14 amino acids of the luminal domain of SH induced a cross-reactive antibody response to both the F glycoprotein and the SH glycoprotein but a largely sub-group specific response to the G glycoprotein. Similar patterns of response were achieved by immunization with individual HMPV glycoproteins expressed from recombinant vaccinia viruses. Recombinant truncated SH glycoprotein induced sub-group cross-reactive antibodies capable of neutralizing wild-type virus. Recombinant F glycoprotein also induced cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies whilst recombinant G glycoprotein induced largely strain-specific, non-neutralizing antibodies.

  13. Bioactivity of proteins isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum L67 treated with Zanthoxylum piperitum DC glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Oh, S; Lim, K-T

    2015-06-01

    Lactobacilli in the human gastrointestinal tract have beneficial effects on the health of their host. To enhance these effects, the bioactivity of lactobacilli can be fortified through exogenous dietary or pharmacological agents, such as glycoproteins. To elucidate the inductive effect of Zanthoxylum piperitum DC (ZPDC) glycoprotein on Lactobacillus plantarum L67, we evaluated the radical-scavenging activity, anti-oxidative enzymes (SOD, GPx and CAT), growth rate, ATPase activity and β-galactosidase activity of this strain. When Lact. plantarum L67 was treated with ZPDC glycoprotein at different concentrations, the intensities of a few SDS-PAGE bands were slightly changed. The amount of a 23 kDa protein was increased upon treatment with increasing concentrations of ZPDC glycoprotein. The results of this study indicate that the radical-scavenging activity for O2(-) and OH¯, but not for the DPPH radical, increased in a concentration-dependent manner after treatment with ZPDC glycoprotein. The activation of anti-oxidative enzymes (SOD, GPx and CAT), growth rate and β-galactosidase activity also increased in a concentration-dependent manner in response to ZPDC glycoprotein treatment, whereas ATPase activity was decreased. In summary, ZPDC glycoprotein stimulated an increase in the bioactivity of Lact. plantarum L67. Significance and impact of the study: This study demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum L67 possesses anti-oxidative activity. This strain of lactic bacteria has been known to have various probiotic uses, such as yogurt starters and dietary additional supplements. We found, through this experiment, that the protein has a strong anti-oxidative character, and the activity can be enhanced by treatment with Zanthoxylum piperitum DC (ZPDC) glycoprotein. This study may be application of Lact. plantarum L67 treated by ZPDC glycoprotein in yogurt fermentation. It could be one of the avenues of minimizing yogurt postacidification during storage. In addition

  14. Identification of OmpA-Like Protein of Tannerella forsythia as an O-Linked Glycoprotein and Its Binding Capability to Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Horie, Toshi; Inomata, Megumi; Into, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Yoshiaki; Kitai, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Murakami, Yukitaka

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial glycoproteins are associated with physiological and pathogenic functions of bacteria. It remains unclear whether bacterial glycoproteins can bind to specific classes of lectins expressed on host cells. Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative oral anaerobe that contributes to the development of periodontitis. In this study, we aimed to find lectin-binding glycoproteins in T. forsythia. We performed affinity chromatography of wheat germ agglutinin, which binds to N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and sialic acid (Sia), and identified OmpA-like protein as the glycoprotein that has the highest affinity. Mass spectrometry revealed that OmpA-like protein contains O-type N-acetylhexosamine and hexose. Fluorometry quantitatively showed that OmpA-like protein contains Sia. OmpA-like protein was found to bind to lectins including E-selectin, P-selectin, L-selectin, Siglec-5, Siglec-9, Siglec-10, and DC-SIGN. The binding of OmpA-like protein to these lectins, except for the Siglecs, depends on the presence of calcium. N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc), which is the most abundant Sia, inhibited the binding of OmpA-like protein to all of these lectins, whereas GlcNAc and mannose only inhibited the binding to DC-SIGN. We further found that T. forsythia adhered to human oral epithelial cells, which express E-selectin and P-selectin, and that this adhesion was inhibited by addition of NeuAc. Moreover, adhesion of an OmpA-like protein-deficient T. forsythia strain to the cells was reduced compared to that of the wild-type strain. Our findings indicate that OmpA-like protein of T. forsythia contains O-linked sugar chains that can mediate interactions with specific lectins. This interaction is suggested to facilitate adhesion of T. forsythia to the surface of host cells. PMID:27711121

  15. Characterization of I/F1 glycoprotein as a receptor for Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Hengge, U R; Kirschfink, M; König, A L; Nicklas, W; Roelcke, D

    1992-01-01

    Serologic evidence of anti-I and anti-Fl cold agglutinins occurring in mycoplasma infections led to the isolation of I/Fl glycoprotein from human erythrocyte membranes. Mycoplasma pneumoniae bound to purified I/Fl glycoprotein in a dose-dependent fashion depending on sialylated carbohydrate determinants. This was shown by the decreased binding of mycoplasmas to either sialidase-treated I/Fl glycoprotein (dot blot analysis) or sialidase-treated erythrocytes (hemagglutination test). Structural properties of the receptor for optimal binding could be explored by hemagglutination inhibition assays. Glycophorins were excluded as receptors. These results indicate that Fl (and I) antigens are receptors for M. pneumoniae. Images PMID:1370278

  16. Proposed pathway for biosynthesis of the S-layer glycoprotein of Bacillus alvei.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, E; Messner, P; Allmeier, G; König, H

    1993-01-01

    The outer surface of the murein sacculus of the eubacterium Bacillus alvei is covered by a surface layer (S-layer) glycoprotein. The glycan chain of this S-layer glycoprotein consists of trisaccharide repeating units with ManNAc, Gal, and Glc as constituents. From cell extracts of B. alvei, nucleotide-activated derivatives of ManNAc, Gal, Glc, and GlcNAc were isolated. Furthermore, GDP- and dolichyl-activated oligosaccharides were obtained. On the basis of the isolated putative glycoprotein precursors, a pathway for the biosynthesis of the oligosaccharide chain is proposed. PMID:8331079

  17. Selective binding of human cumulus cell-secreted glycoproteins to human spermatozoa during capacitation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, J.; Kopecny, V.; Dvorak, M.

    1984-06-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that glycoproteins manufactured by human cumulus cells can be detected bound to human spermatozoa incubated in capacitational medium containing the labeled cumulus-cell secretions. Cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins were labeled with a mixture of /sup 3/H-methionine and /sup 3/H-tryptophan or with 3H-fucose, and the binding of the labeled compounds to spermatozoa was evaluated by autoradiography. The binding was highly selective, involving only approximately 1% of the samples of spermatozoa used. The results suggest that the binding of cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins to spermatozoa may represent a final and highly selective step in human sperm capacitation.

  18. A comprehensive study of interactions between lectins and glycoproteins for the development of effective theranostic nanoagents.

    PubMed

    Shipunova, V O; Nikitin, M P; Zelepukin, I V; Nikitin, P I; Deyev, S M; Petrov, R V

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the interactions between lectins and glycoproteins possessing different glycosylation profiles in the composition of nanoparticles was carried out in order to find specifically interacting protein pairs for the creation of novel classes of multifunctional nanoagets that based on protein-assisted selfassembly. We obtained information about specific interactions of certain lectins with selected glycoproteins as well as about the ability of certain monosaccharides to competitively inhibit binding of glycoproteins with lectins. These protein-mediated interactions may be involved in the formulation of self-assembled nanoparticles for therapy and diagnostics of various diseases. PMID:26518557

  19. Chemistry-enabled methods for the visualization of cell-surface glycoproteins in Metazoans.

    PubMed

    Chuh, Kelly N; Pratt, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    The majority of cell-surface and secreted proteins are glycosylated, which can directly affect their macromolecular interactions, stability, and localization. Investigating these effects is critical to developing a complete understanding of the role of glycoproteins in fundamental biology and human disease. The development of selective and unique chemical reactions have revolutionized the visualization, identification, and characterization of glycoproteins. Here, we review the chemical methods that have been created to enable the visualization of the major types of cell-surface glycoproteins in living systems, from mammalian cells to whole animals.

  20. Multidrug resistance p-glycoprotein 2 is essential for the biliary excretion of indocyanine green.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Vore, M

    2001-05-01

    Multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein 2 (Mdr2) is a phospholipid translocator in the canalicular membrane that is essential for the formation of biliary phospholipid vesicles and mixed lipid/bile salt micelles. Incorporation into biliary vesicles and micelles is thought to contribute to the hepatobiliary excretion of certain hydrophobic organic anions, such as indocyanine green (ICG). The present studies characterized the biliary excretion of two hydrophobic organic anions, ICG and estradiol-17beta(beta-D-glucuronide) (E(2)17G), in the single-pass isolated perfused liver and the biliary excretion of glutathione (GSH) in vivo in wild-type and Mdr2-/- female mice. The biliary excretion of ICG (0.4 micromol) was reduced by 90%, while the biliary excretion of total GSH was decreased by 65% in Mdr2-/- mice relative to wild-type mice. In contrast, the biliary excretion of E(2)17G (0.1 micromol) was increased by 30% in Mdr2-/- mice. These data indicate that the absence of Mdr2 differentially influences the biliary excretion of these organic anions and suggest that phospholipid vesicles and mixed micelles in bile are essential for the biliary excretion of ICG.

  1. Characteristics of Mammalian Rh Glycoproteins (SLC42 transporters) and Their Role in Acid-Base Transport

    PubMed Central

    Nakhoul, Nazih L.; Hamm, L. Lee

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian Rh glycoproteins belong to the solute transporter family SLC42 and include RhAG, present in red blood cells, and two non-erythroid members RhBG and RhCG that are expressed in various tissues, including kidney, liver, skin and the GI tract. The Rh proteins in the red blood cell form an “Rh complex” made up of one D-subunit, one CE-subunit and two RhAG subunits. The Rh complex has a well-known antigenic effect but also contributes to the stability of the red cell membrane. RhBG and RhCG are related to the NH4+ transporters of the yeast and bacteria but their exact function is yet to be determined. This review describes the expression and molecular properties of these membrane proteins and their potential role as NH3/NH4+ and CO2 transporters. The likelihood that these proteins transport gases such as CO2 or NH3 is novel and significant. The review also describes the physiological importance of these proteins and their relevance to human disease. PMID:23506896

  2. The role of intestinal P-glycoprotein in the interaction of digoxin and rifampin

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Bernd; Eichelbaum, Michel; Fritz, Peter; Kreichgauer, Hans-Peter; von Richter, Oliver; Zundler, Johannes; Kroemer, Heyo K.

    1999-01-01

    Recent data point to the contribution of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to digoxin elimination. On the basis of clinical observations of patients in whom digoxin levels decreased considerably when treated with rifampin, we hypothesized that concomitant rifampin therapy may affect digoxin disposition in humans by induction of P-gp. We compared single-dose (1 mg oral and 1 mg intravenous) pharmacokinetics of digoxin before and after coadministration of rifampin (600 mg/d for 10 days) in 8 healthy volunteers. Duodenal biopsies were obtained from each volunteer before and after administration of rifampin. The area under the plasma concentration time curve (AUC) of oral digoxin was significantly lower during rifampin treatment; the effect was less pronounced after intravenous administration of digoxin. Renal clearance and half-life of digoxin were not altered by rifampin. Rifampin treatment increased intestinal P-gp content 3.5 ± 2.1–fold, which correlated with the AUC after oral digoxin but not after intravenous digoxin. P-gp is a determinant of the disposition of digoxin. Concomitant administration of rifampin reduced digoxin plasma concentrations substantially after oral administration but to a lesser extent after intravenous administration. The rifampin-digoxin interaction appears to occur largely at the level of the intestine. Therefore, induction of intestinal P-gp could explain this new type of drug-drug interaction. PMID:10411543

  3. Glycan specificity of myelin-associated glycoprotein and sialoadhesin deduced from interactions with synthetic oligosaccharides.

    PubMed

    Strenge, K; Schauer, R; Bovin, N; Hasegawa, A; Ishida, H; Kiso, M; Kelm, S

    1998-12-01

    Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and sialoadhesin (Sn) bind to sialylated glycans on cell surfaces and are thought to be involved in cell-cell interactions. In order to investigate how the interactions of these proteins are influenced by the glycan structure, we compared the inhibitory potencies of different synthetic monovalent oligosaccharides and polyvalent polyacrylamide derivatives. Using oligosaccharides with modifications in the sialic acid, galactose or N-acetylglucosamine moieties, we could demonstrate that both MAG and Sn bind with high preference to alpha2,3-linked sialic acid and interact at least with the three terminal monosaccharide units. For MAG, contacts with even more distant monosaccharides are likely, since pentasaccharides are bound better than trisaccharides. Also, an additional sialic acid at position six of the third-terminal monosaccharide unit enhances binding to MAG, whereas it does not influence binding to Sn significantly. Modifications of the sialic acid glycerol side chain demonstrated that the hydroxy groups at positions 8 and 9 are required for binding to both proteins. Surprisingly, MAG binds 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-glycero-D-galacto-nononic acid significantly better than N-acetylneuraminic acid, whereas Sn prefers the latter structure. These results indicate that the interactions of MAG and Sn are mainly with sialic acid and that additional contacts with the subterminal galactose and N-acetylglucosamine residues also contribute to the binding strength, although to a lesser degree. PMID:9874234

  4. Enhanced Dynamics of HIV gp120 Glycoprotein by Small Molecule Binding

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Indira; LaLonde, Judith M.

    2011-01-01

    HIV cell entry and infection are driven by binding events to the CD4 and Chemokine receptors with associated conformational change of the viral glycoprotein, gp120. Scyllatoxin mini-protein CD4 mimetics and a small molecule inhibitor of CD4 binding, NBD-556, also effectively induce gp120 conformational change. In this study we examine the fluctuation profile of gp120 in context of CD4, a mini-protein mimetic and NBD-556 with the aim of understanding the effect of ligand binding on gp120 conformational dynamics. Analysis of Molecular Dynamics trajectories indicate that NBD-556 binding in the Phe 43 cavity enhances the overall mobility of gp120 especially in the outer-domain in comparison to CD4 or mini-protein bound complex. Interactions with the more flexible bridging sheet strengthen upon NBD-556 binding and may contribute to gp120 restructuring. The enhanced mobility of D368, E370 and I371 with NBD-556 bound in the Phe 43 cavity suggests that interactions with α3-helix in the outer-domain are not optimal, providing further insights into gp120-small molecule interactions that may impact small molecule designs. PMID:21488663

  5. The secreted glycoprotein lubricin protects cartilage surfaces and inhibits synovial cell overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, David K.; Marcelino, Jose; Baker, MacArthur; Gong, Yaoqin; Smits, Patrick; Lefebvre, Véronique; Jay, Gregory D.; Stewart, Matthew; Wang, Hongwei; Warman, Matthew L.; Carpten, John D.

    2005-01-01

    The long-term integrity of an articulating joint is dependent upon the nourishment of its cartilage component and the protection of the cartilage surface from friction-induced wear. Loss-of-function mutations in lubricin (a secreted glycoprotein encoded by the gene PRG4) cause the human autosomal recessive disorder camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP). A major feature of CACP is precocious joint failure. In order to delineate the mechanism by which lubricin protects joints, we studied the expression of Prg4 mRNA during mouse joint development, and we created lubricin-mutant mice. Prg4 began to be expressed in surface chondrocytes and synoviocytes after joint cavitation had occurred and remained strongly expressed by these cells postnatally. Mice lacking lubricin were viable and fertile. In the newborn period, their joints appeared normal. As the mice aged, we observed abnormal protein deposits on the cartilage surface and disappearance of underlying superficial zone chondrocytes. In addition to cartilage surface changes and subsequent cartilage deterioration, intimal cells in the synovium surrounding the joint space became hyperplastic, which further contributed to joint failure. Purified or recombinant lubricin inhibited the growth of these synoviocytes in vitro. Tendon and tendon sheath involvement was present in the ankle joints, where morphologic changes and abnormal calcification of these structures were observed. We conclude that lubricin has multiple functions in articulating joints and tendons that include the protection of surfaces and the control of synovial cell growth. PMID:15719068

  6. Transmembrane aromatic amino acid distribution in P-glycoprotein. A functional role in broad substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Pawagi, A B; Wang, J; Silverman, M; Reithmeier, R A; Deber, C M

    1994-01-14

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells is associated with overexpression of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a membrane protein which interacts with structurally diverse hydrophobic molecules of high membrane affinity. In an analysis of the molecular basis for this broad range of substrate specificity, we found that the transmembrane (TM) regions of Pgp are rich in highly conserved aromatic amino acid residues. Computer-generated three-dimensional model structures showed that a typical substrate, rhodamine 123, can intercalate between three to four phenylalanine side-chains in any of several Pgp TM helices with minimal protrusion of the drug into bulk lipid, and that five to six (of the 12 Pgp putative TM segments) helices can facilitate transport through creation of a sterically compatible pore. In contrast to the case for proteins involved in the transport of membrane-impermeable, relatively polar substrates, the "transport path" for Pgp substrates need not be polar, and may involve either an internal channel occupied largely by aromatic side-chains, or external gaps along TM helix-lipid interfaces. Weakly polar interactions between drug cationic sites and Pgp aromatic residues contribute additionally to overall protein/drug binding. The ability of Pgp to recognize and efflux structurally diverse molecules suggests that rather than a unique structure, the Pgp channel may maintain the intrinsic capacity to undergo wide-ranging drug-dependent dynamic reorganization. PMID:7904655

  7. Antibody evasion by the N terminus of murid herpesvirus-4 glycoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Laurent; Stevenson, Philip G

    2007-01-01

    Herpesviruses characteristically transmit infection from immune hosts. Although their success in escaping neutralization by pre-formed antibody is indisputable, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Glycoprotein B (gB) is the most conserved component of the herpesvirus entry machinery and its N terminus (gB-NT) is a common neutralization target. We used murid herpesvirus-4 to determine how gB-NT contributes to the virus–antibody interaction. Deleting gB-NT had no obvious impact on virus replication, but paradoxically increased virion neutralization by immune sera. This reflected greater antibody access to neutralization epitopes on gH/gL, with which gB was associated. gB-NT itself was variably protected against antibody by O-linked glycans; on virions from epithelial cells it was protected almost completely. gB-NT therefore provides a protective and largely protected cover for a vulnerable part of gH/gL. The conservation of predicted glycosylation sites in other mammalian herpesvirus gB-NTs suggests that this evasion mechanism is widespread. Interestingly, the gB-NT glycans that blocked antibody binding could be targeted for neutralization instead by a lectin, suggesting a means of therapeutic counterattack. PMID:18034158

  8. Oral and inhaled corticosteroids: Differences in P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) mediated efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, Andrew Tan, Ai May

    2012-05-01

    There is concern that P-glycoprotein mediated efflux contributes to steroid resistance. Therefore, this study examined bidirectional corticosteroid transport and induction capabilities for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to understand which of the systemic and inhaled corticosteroids interacted with P-gp to the greatest extent. Hydrocortisone, prednisolone, prednisone, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone represented systemically active drugs, while fluticasone propionate, beclomethasone dipropionate, ciclesonide and budesonide represented inhaled corticosteroids. Aldosterone and fludrocortisone represented mineralocorticoids. All drugs were detected using individually optimised HPLC protocols. Transport studies were conducted through Caco-2 monolayers. Hydrocortisone and aldosterone had efflux ratios below 1.5, while prednisone showed a P-gp mediated efflux ratio of only 1.8 compared to its active drug, prednisolone, with an efflux ratio of 4.5. Dexamethasone and beclomethasone had efflux ratios of 2.1 and 3.3 respectively, while this increased to 5.1 for methylprednisolone. Fluticasone showed an efflux ratio of 2.3. Protein expression studies suggested that all of the inhaled corticosteroids were able to induce P-gp expression, from 1.6 to 2 times control levels. Most of the systemic corticosteroids had higher passive permeability (> 20 × 10{sup −6} cm/s) compared to the inhaled corticosteroids (> 5 × 10{sup −6} cm/s), except for budesonide, with permeability similar to the systemic corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids are not transported by P-gp to the same extent as systemic corticosteroids. However, they are able to induce P-gp production. Thus, inhaled corticosteroids may have greater interactions with other P-gp substrates, but P-gp itself is less likely to influence resistance to the drugs. -- Highlights: ► Inhaled corticosteroids are only weak substrates for P-gp, including budesonide. ► Inhaled corticosteroid potent P-gp inducers especially

  9. Identification of a Neutralizing Epitope within Antigenic Domain 5 of Glycoprotein B of Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Wiegers, Anna-Katharina; Sticht, Heinrich; Winkler, Thomas H.; Britt, William J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is an important, ubiquitous pathogen that causes severe clinical disease in immunocompromised individuals, such as organ transplant recipients and infants infected in utero. The envelope glycoprotein B (gB) of HCMV is a major antigen for the induction of virus-neutralizing antibodies. We have begun to define target structures within gB that are recognized by virus-neutralizing antibodies. Antigenic domain 5 (AD-5) of gB has been identified as an important target for neutralizing antibodies in studies using human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Anti-AD-5 MAbs share a target site on gB, despite originating from different, healthy, HCMV-infected donors. Mutational analysis of AD-5 identified tyrosine 280 in combination with other surface-exposed residues (the YNND epitope) as critical for antibody binding. The YNND epitope is strictly conserved among different HCMV strains. Recombinant viruses carrying YNND mutations in AD-5 were resistant to virus-neutralizing MAbs. Competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) with human HCMV-convalescent-phase sera from unselected donors confirmed the conserved antibody response for the YNND epitope in HCMV-infected individuals and, because a significant fraction of the gB AD-5 response was directed against the YNND epitope, further argued that this epitope is a major target of anti-AD-5 antibody responses. In addition, affinity-purified polyclonal anti-AD-5 antibodies prepared from individual sera showed reactivity to AD-5 and neutralization activity toward gB mutant viruses that were similar to those of AD-5-specific MAbs. Taken together, our data indicate that the YNND epitope represents an important target for anti-gB antibody responses as well as for anti-AD-5 virus-neutralizing antibodies. IMPORTANCE HCMV is a major global health concern, and a vaccine to prevent HCMV disease is a widely recognized medical need. Glycoprotein B of HCMV is an important target for neutralizing

  10. Novel dihydro-beta-agarofuran sesquiterpenes as potent modulators of human P-glycoprotein dependent multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Torres-Romero, David; Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2009-12-21

    P-Glycoprotein (Pgp) overexpression is one factor contributing to multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells and represents one drawback in the treatment of cancer. In an attempt to find more specific and less toxic anticancer MDR-reversal agents, we report herein the isolation, structure elucidation and biological activity of nine new (, and ) and seven known (, and ) dihydro-beta-agarofuran sesquiterpenes from the leaves of Celastrus vulcanicola. Their stereostructures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques, CD studies and biogenetic means. All the compounds were assayed on human MDR1-transfected NIH-3T3 cells, in order to determine their ability to reverse the MDR phenotype due to Pgp overexpression. Six compounds from these series (, , , , and ) showed an effectiveness that was similar to (or higher than) the classical Pgp reversal agent verapamil for the reversal of resistance to daunomycin and vinblastine. The structure-activity relationships are discussed. PMID:20024113

  11. Glycoprotein C plays a role in the adsorption of duck enteritis virus to chicken embryo fibroblasts cells and in infectivity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Liu, Xiaokun; Zou, Zhong; Jin, Meilin

    2013-06-01

    Unlike glycoprotein C (gC) of many mammalian herpes viruses, gC of some avian herpes viruses does not play a principle role in the binding of virus to heparin sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface. The roles of duck enteritis virus (DEV) gC on viral attachment remained unclear. In this study, we showed that gC expressed in vitro could bind to chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF) cells and inhibit the adsorption of duck enteritis virus (DEV) onto CEF cells effectively and antiserum directed against gC inhibited the infection of DEV. Furthermore, it was confirmed that gC protein expressed in baculovirus system did not bind to heparin-Sepharose beads and virus binding to cells were independent of heparin sulfate proteoglycans on the surface of cells. Therefore, gC contributes to adsorption and infection of DEV.

  12. Novel dihydro-beta-agarofuran sesquiterpenes as potent modulators of human P-glycoprotein dependent multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Torres-Romero, David; Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2009-12-21

    P-Glycoprotein (Pgp) overexpression is one factor contributing to multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancer cells and represents one drawback in the treatment of cancer. In an attempt to find more specific and less toxic anticancer MDR-reversal agents, we report herein the isolation, structure elucidation and biological activity of nine new (, and ) and seven known (, and ) dihydro-beta-agarofuran sesquiterpenes from the leaves of Celastrus vulcanicola. Their stereostructures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques, CD studies and biogenetic means. All the compounds were assayed on human MDR1-transfected NIH-3T3 cells, in order to determine their ability to reverse the MDR phenotype due to Pgp overexpression. Six compounds from these series (, , , , and ) showed an effectiveness that was similar to (or higher than) the classical Pgp reversal agent verapamil for the reversal of resistance to daunomycin and vinblastine. The structure-activity relationships are discussed.

  13. Pathogenic significance of alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity found in the envelope glycoprotein gp160 of human immunodeficiency virus Type 1.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Nobuto

    2006-03-01

    Serum vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein) is the precursor for the principal macrophage-activating factor (MAF). The precursor activity of serum Gc protein was lost or reduced in HIV-infected patients. These patient sera contained alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (Nagalase), which deglycosylates serum Gc protein. Deglycosylated Gc protein cannot be converted to MAF and thus loses MAF precursor activity, leading to immunosuppression. Nagalase in the blood stream of HIV-infected patients was complexed with patient immunoglobulin G, suggesting that this enzyme is immunogenic, seemingly a viral gene product. In fact, Nagalase was inducible by treatment of cultures of HIV-infected patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells with a provirus-inducing agent. This enzyme was immunoprecipitable with polyclonal anti-HIV but not with anticellular constitutive enzyme or with antitumor Nagalase. The kinetic parameters (km value of 1.27 mM and pH optimum of 6.1), of the patient serum Nagalase were distinct from those of constitutive enzyme (km value of 4.83 mM and pH optimum of 4.3). This glycosidase should reside on an envelope protein capable of interacting with cellular membranous O-glycans. Although cloned gp160 exhibited no Nagalase activity, treatment of gp160 with trypsin expressed Nagalase activity, suggesting that proteolytic cleavage of gp160 to generate gp120 and gp41 is required for Nagalase activity. Cloned gp120 exhibited Nagalase activity while cloned gp41 showed no Nagalase activity. Since proteolytic cleavage of protein gp160 is required for expression of both fusion capacity and Nagalase activity, Nagalase seems to be an enzymatic basis for fusion in the infectious process. Therefore, Nagalase appears to play dual roles in viral infectivity and immunosuppression. PMID:16545013

  14. Unique N-glycan moieties of the 66-kDa cell wall glycoprotein from the red microalga Porphyridium sp.

    PubMed

    Levy-Ontman, Oshrat; Arad, Shoshana Malis; Harvey, David J; Parsons, Thomas B; Fairbanks, Antony; Tekoah, Yoram

    2011-06-17

    We report here the structural determination of the N-linked glycans in the 66-kDa glycoprotein, part of the unique sulfated complex cell wall polysaccharide of the red microalga Porphyridium sp. Structures were elucidated by a combination of normal phase/reverse phase HPLC, positive ion MALDI-TOF MS, negative ion electrospray ionization, and MS/MS. The sugar moieties of the glycoprotein consisted of at least four fractions of N-linked glycans, each composed of the same four monosaccharides, GlcNAc, Man, 6-O-MeMan, and Xyl, with compositions Man(8-9)Xyl(1-2)Me(3)GlcNAc(2). The present study is the first report of N-glycans with the terminal Xyl attached to the 6-mannose branch of the 6-antenna and to the 3-oxygen of the penultimate (core) GlcNAc. Another novel finding was that all four glycans contain three O-methylmannose residues in positions that have never been reported before. Although it is known that some lower organisms are able to methylate terminal monosaccharides in glycans, the present study on Porphyridium sp. is the first describing an organism that is able to methylate non-terminal mannose residues. This study will thus contribute to understanding of N-glycosylation in algae and might shed light on the evolutionary development from prokaryotes to multicellular organisms. It also may contribute to our understanding of the red algae polysaccharide formation. The additional importance of this research lies in its potential for biotechnological applications, especially in evaluating the use of microalgae as cell factories for the production of therapeutic proteins.

  15. Enhancement of non-Candida antibody responses by Candida albicans cell wall glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Domer, J E; Elkins, K L; Ennist, D L; Stashak, P W; Garner, R E; Baker, P J

    1987-11-01

    Two cell wall glycoprotein extracts from Candida albicans (glycoprotein [GP] and peptidoglucomannan [PGM]) were tested for their influence on antibody responses to type III pneumococcal polysaccharide and sheep erythrocytes. GP was isolated from lipid-extracted cell walls with ethylenediamine, whereas PGM was extracted with dilute sodium hydroxide. Both glycoproteins increased the number of antibody-producing plaque-forming cells in the spleens of mice immunized with type III polysaccharide or sheep erythrocytes, although PGM appeared to be about 10 times more effective. PGM could be administered up to 3 days prior to immunization with sheep erythrocytes to elicit enhancement; it did not have to be administered by the same route as the immunogen to cause significant enhancement. Enhancement did not appear to be the result of a direct mitogenic effect of GP and PGM on lymphocytes, nor did these glycoproteins appear to stimulate the production of B-cell growth factors or interleukin 2.

  16. 21 CFR 866.5425 - Alpha-2-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the alpha-2-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-2 group when subjected to... some cancers and genetically inherited deficiencies of these plasma proteins. (b) Classification....

  17. 21 CFR 866.5425 - Alpha-2-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the alpha-2-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-2 group when subjected to... some cancers and genetically inherited deficiencies of these plasma proteins. (b) Classification....

  18. 21 CFR 866.5425 - Alpha-2-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the alpha-2-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-2 group when subjected to... some cancers and genetically inherited deficiencies of these plasma proteins. (b) Classification....

  19. 21 CFR 866.5425 - Alpha-2-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the alpha-2-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-2 group when subjected to... some cancers and genetically inherited deficiencies of these plasma proteins. (b) Classification....

  20. 21 CFR 866.5425 - Alpha-2-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the alpha-2-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-2 group when subjected to... some cancers and genetically inherited deficiencies of these plasma proteins. (b) Classification....

  1. [Molecular Mechanism of Glycoprotein-induced Cell-Cell Fusion of Herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Feng, Daishen; Jia, Renyong

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviridae is a large family comprising linear, double-stranded DNA viruses. Herpesviridae contains three subfamilies: α-, β- and γ-herpesviruses. The glycoproteins gB, gH and gL of each subfamily form the "core fusion function" in cell-cell fusion. Other herpesviruses also need additional glycoproteins to promote fusion, such as gD of the Herpes simplex virus, gp42 of the Epstein-Barr virus, and gO or UL128-131 of the Human cytomegalovirus. In contrast, glycoproteins gM or gM/gN of herpesvirus inhibit fusion. We describe the molecular mechanisms of glycoprotein-induced fusion and entry of herpesviruses. It will be helpful to further study the pathogenic mechanism of herpesvirus.

  2. Localization of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babakhanian, Karlo; Bendayan, Moise; Bendayan, Reina . E-mail: r.bendayan@utoronto.ca

    2007-09-21

    P-Glycoprotein is a plasma membrane drug efflux protein implicated in extrusion of cytotoxic compounds out of a cell. There is now evidence that suggests expression of this transporter at several subcellular sites, including the nucleus, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus. This study investigated the localization and expression of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear membrane of rat brain microvessel endothelial (RBE4) and microglial (MLS-9) cell lines. Immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscope levels using P-glycoprotein monoclonals antibodies demonstrated the localization of the protein at the nuclear envelope of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. Western blot analysis revealed a single band of 170-kDa in purified nuclear membranes prepared from isolated nuclei of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein is expressed at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells and suggest a role in multidrug resistance at this subcellular site.

  3. Epitope mapping of the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus glycoprotein by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ming; Liu, Miao; Zhao, Jing-Zhuang; Cao, Yong-Sheng; Yin, Jia-Sheng; Liu, Hong-Bai; Lu, Tongyan

    2014-10-01

    The glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was truncated to ten overlapping fragments. All fragments were displayed on the inner membrane of the Escherichia coli periplasm. After disruption of the outer membrane, spheroplasts that had anchored with the glycoprotein fragment were incubated with an anti-glycoprotein polyclonal antibody. Prey pairs were detected and quantitated by flow cytometry with all fragments but one, G2, reacting with the polyclonal antibody. The antigenicity of all ten fragments was analyzed using conventional methods, and epitopes were localized in all fragments, except for G2 and were consistent with FCM analysis. Antigenicity of purified glycoprotein fusion proteins was confirmed by western blotting and ELISA. This method provides a rapid, quantitative and simple strategy for identifying linear B cell epitopes of a given protein.

  4. Purification and characterization of a novel glycoprotein from Streptomyces sp. ZX01.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Han, Lirong; Zhang, Guifeng; Zhang, Xing; Feng, Juntao

    2015-01-01

    A novel glycoprotein GP-1 with antiviral activity against plant virus was isolated from the fermentation broth of the actinomycete Streptomyces sp. ZX01. MALDI-TOF-MS proved that molecular weight of GP-1 approximately was 8.5 kDa. GP-1 was a heat-sensitive glycoprotein with decreasing antiviral activity after treated from 80 °C to 100 °C for 30 min. GP-1 contained 40.23% carbohydrate with N-linked and O-linked glycan. FT-IR and NMR spectra proved that GP-1 contained protein and carbohydrate portions with α-D-(1,6)-glucose residues. Circular dichroism revealed that GP-1 was a glycoprotein with a large unordered content. Moreover, protein sequencing was predicted by using MALDI-TOF-MS and Mascot search. These results suggested that glycoprotein GP-1 could be used as a novel natural antiviral agent in agricultural industry.

  5. Boronic Acid-Based Approach for Separation and Immobilization of Glycoproteins and Its Application in Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojin; Xia, Ning; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    Glycoproteins influence a broad spectrum of biological processes including cell-cell interaction, host-pathogen interaction, or protection of proteins against proteolytic degradation. The analysis of their glyco-structures and concentration levels are increasingly important in diagnosis and proteomics. Boronic acids can covalently react with cis-diols in the oligosaccharide chains of glycoproteins to form five- or six-membered cyclic esters. Based on this interaction, boronic acid-based ligands and materials have attracted much attention in both chemistry and biology as the recognition motif for enrichment and chemo/biosensing of glycoproteins in recent years. In this work, we reviewed the progress in the separation, immobilization and detection of glycoproteins with boronic acid-functionalized materials and addressed its application in sensing. PMID:24141187

  6. P-glycoprotein inhibitory activity of two phenolic compounds, (-)-syringaresinol and tricin from Sasa borealis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yeon Hee; Chung, Soo Yeon; Han, Ah-Reum; Sung, Min Kyung; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Jun; Kwon, Youngjoo; Lee, Hwa Jeong; Seo, Eun-Kyoung

    2007-01-01

    (-)-Syringaresinol and tricin, isolated from the AcOEt-soluble extract of the whole plants of Sasa borealis (Gramineae), showed inhibitory effects on the P-glycoprotein in adriamycin-resistant human breast cancer cells, MCF-7/ADR. PMID:17256728

  7. Contrasting functions of calreticulin and calnexin in glycoprotein folding and ER quality control.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Maurizio; Eriksson, Klara Kristin; Calanca, Verena; Galli, Carmela; Cresswell, Peter; Michalak, Marek; Helenius, Ari

    2004-01-16

    Calreticulin and calnexin are homologous lectins that serve as molecular chaperones for glycoproteins in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells. Here we show that calreticulin depletion specifically accelerates the maturation of cellular and viral glycoproteins with a modest decrease in folding efficiency. Calnexin depletion prevents proper maturation of some proteins such as influenza hemagglutinin but does not interfere appreciably with the maturation of several others. A dramatic loss of stringency in the ER quality control with transport at the cell surface of misfolded glycoprotein conformers is only observed when substrate access to both calreticulin and calnexin is prevented. Although not fully interchangeable during assistance of glycoprotein folding, calreticulin and calnexin may work, independently, as efficient and crucial factors for retention in the ER of nonnative polypeptides. PMID:14731400

  8. A Luminal Glycoprotein Drives Dose-Dependent Diameter Expansion of the Drosophila melanogaster Hindgut Tube

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Zulfeqhar A.; Tång, Erika; Bouhin, Hervé; van Dijk-Härd, Iris F.; Uv, Anne

    2012-01-01

    An important step in epithelial organ development is size maturation of the organ lumen to attain correct dimensions. Here we show that the regulated expression of Tenectin (Tnc) is critical to shape the Drosophila melanogaster hindgut tube. Tnc is a secreted protein that fills the embryonic hindgut lumen during tube diameter expansion. Inside the lumen, Tnc contributes to detectable O-Glycans and forms a dense striated matrix. Loss of tnc causes a narrow hindgut tube, while Tnc over-expression drives tube dilation in a dose-dependent manner. Cellular analyses show that luminal accumulation of Tnc causes an increase in inner and outer tube diameter, and cell flattening within the tube wall, similar to the effects of a hydrostatic pressure in other systems. When Tnc expression is induced only in cells at one side of the tube wall, Tnc fills the lumen and equally affects all cells at the lumen perimeter, arguing that Tnc acts non-cell-autonomously. Moreover, when Tnc expression is directed to a segment of a tube, its luminal accumulation is restricted to this segment and affects the surrounding cells to promote a corresponding local diameter expansion. These findings suggest that deposition of Tnc into the lumen might contribute to expansion of the lumen volume, and thereby to stretching of the tube wall. Consistent with such an idea, ectopic expression of Tnc in different developing epithelial tubes is sufficient to cause dilation, while epidermal Tnc expression has no effect on morphology. Together, the results show that epithelial tube diameter can be modelled by regulating the levels and pattern of expression of a single luminal glycoprotein. PMID:22876194

  9. Importance of the short cytoplasmic domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein for fusion activity and envelope glycoprotein incorporation into virions

    SciTech Connect

    Celma, Cristina C.P.; Paladino, Monica G.; Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2007-09-30

    The mature form of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein of lentiviruses is a heterodimer composed of the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) possesses a TM glycoprotein with a cytoplasmic tail of approximately 53 amino acids which is unusually short compared with that of the other lentiviral glycoproteins (more than 100 residues). To investigate the relevance of the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain to Env-mediated viral functions, we characterized the biological properties of a series of Env glycoproteins progressively shortened from the carboxyl terminus. All the mutant Env proteins were efficiently expressed in feline cells and processed into the SU and TM subunits. Deletion of 5 or 11 amino acids from the TM C-terminus did not significantly affect Env surface expression, fusogenic activity or Env incorporation into virions, whereas removal of 17 or 23 residues impaired Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Further truncation of the FIV TM by 29 residues resulted in an Env glycoprotein that was poorly expressed at the cell surface, exhibited only 20% of the wild-type Env fusogenic capacity and was inefficiently incorporated into virions. Remarkably, deletion of the TM C-terminal 35 or 41 amino acids restored or even enhanced Env biological functions. Indeed, these mutant Env glycoproteins bearing cytoplasmic domains of 18 or 12 amino acids were found to be significantly more fusogenic than the wild-type Env and were efficiently incorporated into virions. Interestingly, truncation of the TM cytoplasmic domain to only 6 amino acids did not affect Env incorporation into virions but abrogated Env fusogenicity. Finally, removal of the entire TM cytoplasmic tail or deletion of as many as 6 amino acids into the membrane-spanning domain led to a complete loss of Env functions. Our results demonstrate that despite its relatively short length, the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain plays an important role in modulating Env-mediated viral functions.

  10. Glycoprotein isolated from Solanum nigrum L. kills HT-29 cells through apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kye-Taek

    2005-01-01

    Solanum nigrum L. (SNL) has been used in folk medicine for its anti-inflammatory activity. We previously isolated glycoprotein from SNL and observed that it decreased viable HT-29 cell numbers at a low concentration (60 microg/mL). This study investigated the apoptotic signal pathway triggered by glycoprotein isolated from SNL in HT-29 cells. Treatment of HT-29 cells with SNL glycoprotein (60 microg/mL) for 4 hours resulted in a cytotoxic effect of more than 60%, compared with the control. To explain the apoptotic effects of SNL glycoprotein, we investigated its effects on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA)-stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) alpha activity and DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor (NF) kappaB in HT-29 cells, using western blot analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Results from these experiments showed that SNL glycoprotein has remarkable inhibitory effects on the activities of TPA (100 nM)-stimulated PKCalpha and NF-kappaB in HT-29 cells. They also substantiated that PKCalpha is a part of the TPA-activated upstream signal pathway of NF-kappaB, since NF-kappaB activity was inhibited by staurosporine (a PKC inhibitor) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (an NF-kappaB inhibitor) in a western blot analysis. Furthermore, to verify the triggering of apoptosis by the SNL glycoprotein, we performed DNA fragmentation, nuclear staining, and protein expression assays of apoptotic-related proteins. The amount of DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cell numbers increased in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with SNL glycoprotein. Apoptosis-related protein assays demonstrated that SNL glycoprotein-induced apoptosis is associated with the regulation of bcl-2 and Bax expression. Taken together, the results of this study showed that the activation of PKCalpha, NF-kappaB, and Bax expression by SNL glycoprotein is possibly involved in the apoptotic process. Consequently, these results indicate that SNL glycoprotein causes HT-29 cell death through

  11. Postnatal changes in sialylation of glycoproteins in rat liver.

    PubMed Central

    Oda-Tamai, S; Kato, S; Akamatsu, N

    1991-01-01

    Glycoproteins containing N-linked oligosaccharides were prepared from plasma and liver microsomes of rats aged 0-5 weeks, and galactose and sialic acid content were determined. The sialic acid/galactose ratios in plasma membrane N-glycans remained at about 1 throughout the postnatal period, suggesting that most of the galactose residues are sialylated. In the same way, it was suggested that most of the galactose residues of microsomal N-glycans were sialylated at 0, 4 and 5 weeks of age, but that the degree of sialylation was lower at the other ages, with a minimum at 2 weeks. When the activities of sialyltransferase and galactosyltransferase in liver Golgi membranes were determined, age-dependent changes were found, not only in the specific activities of the enzymes, but also in the Golgi membrane content per g of liver. The activity of galactosyltransferase per g of liver increased immediately after birth, whereas that of sialyltransferase remained at a low level for 2 weeks and then increased to a constant level at 4 weeks. It is probable that this delayed increase in the activity of sialyltransferase results in the decreased sialylation of microsomal N-glycans at 1, 2 and 3 weeks. Sialyltransferase was solubilized from the liver microsomes of rats aged 2, 3 and 4 weeks and characterized. Phosphocellulose column chromatography separated the activity into two subfractions, designated transferase I and transferase II in the order of elution. The increase in total sialyltransferase activity during this period was caused mainly by an increase in transferase I. Rechromatography of each transferase from 3-week-old rats after neuraminidase treatment showed that transferase I but not transferase II contained sialic acid residue(s) and that desialylated transferase I was eluted in a similar way as transferase II. Although the apparent Km value for CMP-N-acetylneuraminic acid and the heat stability of transferase I were different from those of transferase II, the

  12. Optimization of irinotecan chronotherapy with P-glycoprotein inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Filipski, Elisabeth; Berland, Elodie; Ozturk, Narin; Guettier, Catherine; Horst, Gijsbertus T.J. van der; Lévi, Francis; and others

    2014-02-01

    The relevance of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) for irinotecan chronopharmacology was investigated in female B6D2F{sub 1} mice. A three-fold 24 h change in the mRNA expression of Abcb1b was demonstrated in ileum mucosa, with a maximum at Zeitgeber Time (ZT) 15 (p < 0.001). No rhythm was found for abcb1a in ileum mucosa, or for Abcb1a/b in Glasgow osteosarcoma (GOS), a mouse tumor cell line moderately sensitive to irinotecan. Non-tumor-bearing mice received irinotecan (50 mg/kg/day i.v. × 4 days) as a single agent or combined with P-gp inhibitor PSC833 (6.25 mg/kg/day i.p. × 4 days) at ZT3 or ZT15, respectively corresponding to the worst or the best irinotecan tolerability. Endpoints involved survival, body weight change and hematologic toxicity. Antitumor efficacy was studied in GOS-bearing mice receiving irinotecan (25, 30 or 40 mg/kg/day × 4 days) and +/− PSC833 at ZT3 or ZT15, with survival, body weight change, and tumor growth inhibition as endpoints. Non-tumor bearing mice lost an average of 17% or 9% of their body weight according to irinotecan administration at ZT3 or ZT15 respectively (p < 0.001). Dosing at ZT15 rather than ZT3 reduced mean leucopenia (9% vs 53%; p < 0.001). PSC833 aggravated irinotecan lethal toxicity from 4 to ∼ 60%. In tumor-bearing mice, body weight loss was ∼ halved in the mice on irinotecan or irinotecan–PSC833 combination at ZT15 as compared to ZT3 (p < 0.001). PSC833–irinotecan at ZT15 increased tumor inhibition by ∼ 40% as compared to irinotecan only at ZT15. In conclusion, P-gp was an important determinant of the circadian balance between toxicity and efficacy of irinotecan. - Highlights: • Irinotecan chronotolerance and chronoefficacy change as drug was applied with PSC833. • P-glycoprotein is an important player of the toxicity and efficacy of irinotecan. • Timing should be considered if chemotherapy is performed with a MDR1 inhibitor.

  13. Co-treatment by docetaxel and vinblastine breaks down P-glycoprotein mediated chemo-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Mahsa; Samadi, Nasser; Ghanbari, Parisa; Yousefi, Bahman; Tabasinezhad, Maryam; Sharifi, Simin; Nazemiyeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Chemoresistance remains the main causes of treatment failure and mortality in cancer patients. There is an urgent need to investigate novel approaches to improve current therapeutic modalities and increase cancer patients’ survival. Induction of drug efflux due to overexpression of P-glycoproteins is considered as an important leading cause of multidrug resistance. In this study, we investigated the role of combination treatments of docetaxel and vinblastine in overcoming P-glycoprotein mediated inhibition of apoptosis and induction of cell proliferation in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. Materials and Methods: Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed using MTT assay and DAPI staining, respectively. P-glycoprotein expression was evaluated in gene and protein levels by Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. Results: Combination treatment of the cells with docetaxel and vinblastine decreased the IC50 values for docetaxel from (30±3.1) to (15±2.6) nM and for vinblastine from (30±5.9) to (5±5.6) nM (P≤0.05). P-glycoprotein mRNA expression level showed a significant up-regulation in the cells incubated with each drug alone (P≤0.001). Incubation of the cells with combined concentrations of both agents neutralized P-glycoprotein overexpression (P≤0.05). Adding verapamil, a P-glycoprotein inhibitor caused a further increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells when the cells were treated with both agents. Conclusion: Our results suggest that combination therapy along with P-glycoprotein inhibition can be considered as a novel approach to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutics in cancer patients with high P-glycoprotein expression. PMID:27114800

  14. P-glycoprotein is a major determinant of norbuprenorphine brain exposure and antinociception.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sarah M; Campbell, Scott D; Crafford, Amanda; Regina, Karen J; Holtzman, Michael J; Kharasch, Evan D

    2012-10-01

    Norbuprenorphine is a major metabolite of buprenorphine and potent agonist of μ, δ, and κ opioid receptors. Compared with buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine causes minimal antinociception but greater respiratory depression. It is unknown whether the limited antinociception is caused by low efficacy or limited brain exposure. Norbuprenorphine is an in vitro substrate of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Mdr1), but the role of P-glycoprotein in norbuprenorphine transport in vivo is unknown. This investigation tested the hypothesis that limited norbuprenorphine antinociception results from P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux and limited brain access. Human P-glycoprotein-mediated transport in vitro of buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and their respective glucuronide conjugates was assessed by using transfected cells. P-glycoprotein-mediated norbuprenorphine transport and consequences in vivo were assessed by using mdr1a(+/+) and mdr1a(-/-) mice. Antinociception was determined by hot-water tail-flick assay, and respiratory effects were determined by unrestrained whole-body plethysmography. Brain and plasma norbuprenorphine and norbuprenorphine-3-glucuronide were quantified by mass spectrometry. In vitro, the net P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux ratio for norbuprenorphine was nine, indicating significant efflux. In contrast, the efflux ratio for buprenorphine and the two glucuronide conjugates was unity, indicating absent transport. The norbuprenorphine brain/plasma concentration ratio was significantly greater in mdr1a(-/-) than mdr1a(+/+) mice. The magnitude and duration of norbuprenorphine antinociception were significantly increased in mdr1a(-/-) compared with mdr1a(+/+) mice, whereas the reduction in respiratory rate was similar. Results show that norbuprenorphine is an in vitro and in vivo substrate of P-glycoprotein. P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux influences brain access and antinociceptive, but not the respiratory, effects of norbuprenorphine. PMID:22739506

  15. P-Glycoprotein Is a Major Determinant of Norbuprenorphine Brain Exposure and Antinociception

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sarah M.; Campbell, Scott D.; Crafford, Amanda; Regina, Karen J.; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Norbuprenorphine is a major metabolite of buprenorphine and potent agonist of μ, δ, and κ opioid receptors. Compared with buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine causes minimal antinociception but greater respiratory depression. It is unknown whether the limited antinociception is caused by low efficacy or limited brain exposure. Norbuprenorphine is an in vitro substrate of the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (Mdr1), but the role of P-glycoprotein in norbuprenorphine transport in vivo is unknown. This investigation tested the hypothesis that limited norbuprenorphine antinociception results from P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux and limited brain access. Human P-glycoprotein-mediated transport in vitro of buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, and their respective glucuronide conjugates was assessed by using transfected cells. P-glycoprotein-mediated norbuprenorphine transport and consequences in vivo were assessed by using mdr1a(+/+) and mdr1a(−/−) mice. Antinociception was determined by hot-water tail-flick assay, and respiratory effects were determined by unrestrained whole-body plethysmography. Brain and plasma norbuprenorphine and norbuprenorphine-3-glucuronide were quantified by mass spectrometry. In vitro, the net P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux ratio for norbuprenorphine was nine, indicating significant efflux. In contrast, the efflux ratio for buprenorphine and the two glucuronide conjugates was unity, indicating absent transport. The norbuprenorphine brain/plasma concentration ratio was significantly greater in mdr1a(−/−) than mdr1a(+/+) mice. The magnitude and duration of norbuprenorphine antinociception were significantly increased in mdr1a(−/−) compared with mdr1a(+/+) mice, whereas the reduction in respiratory rate was similar. Results show that norbuprenorphine is an in vitro and in vivo substrate of P-glycoprotein. P-glycoprotein-mediated efflux influences brain access and antinociceptive, but not the respiratory, effects of norbuprenorphine. PMID

  16. Bypassing P-Glycoprotein Drug Efflux Mechanisms: Possible Applications in Pharmacoresistant Schizophrenia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hoosain, Famida G.; Choonara, Yahya E.; Tomar, Lomas K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Tyagi, Charu; du Toit, Lisa C.; Pillay, Viness

    2015-01-01

    The efficient noninvasive treatment of neurodegenerative disorders is often constrained by reduced permeation of therapeutic agents into the central nervous system (CNS). A vast majority of bioactive agents do not readily permeate into the brain tissue due to the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the associated P-glycoprotein efflux transporter. The overexpression of the MDR1 P-glycoprotein has been related to the occurrence of multidrug resistance in CNS diseases. Various research outputs have focused on overcoming the P-glycoprotein drug efflux transporter, which mainly involve its inhibition or bypassing mechanisms. Studies into neurodegenerative disorders have shown that the P-glycoprotein efflux transporter plays a vital role in the progression of schizophrenia, with a noted increase in P-glycoprotein function among schizophrenic patients, thereby reducing therapeutic outcomes. In this review, we address the hypothesis that methods employed in overcoming P-glycoprotein in cancer and other disease states at the level of the BBB and intestine may be applied to schizophrenia drug delivery system design to improve clinical efficiency of drug therapies. In addition, the current review explores polymers and drug delivery systems capable of P-gp inhibition and modulation. PMID:26491671

  17. Development and validation of glycoprotein-based native-subunit vaccine for fish against Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Çiftci, A; Onuk, E E; Çiftci, G; Fındık, A; Söğüt, M Ü; Didinen, B I; Aksoy, A; Üstünakın, K; Gülhan, T; Balta, F; Altun, S

    2016-08-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is known to be causative agent of an infection named as Bacterial haemorrhagic septicaemia or red pest in freshwater fish. The aim of this study was to develop and validate the glycoprotein-based fish vaccine against Aeromonas hydrophila. For this aim, after identification and characterization of A. hydrophila isolates from fish farms, one A. hydrophila isolate was selected as vaccine strain. Antigenic glycoproteins of this vaccine strain were determined by Western blotting and glycan detection kit. The connection types of these glycoproteins were examined by glycoprotein differentiation kit. Two glycoproteins, molecular weights of 19 and 38 kDa, with SNA connection type were selected for use in vaccination trials. After their purification by SNA-specific lectin and size-exclusion chromatography, protection studies with purified proteins were performed. For challenge trials, four experimental fish groups were designated: Group I (with montanide), Group II (with montanide and ginseng), Group III [with Al(OH)3 ] and Group IV [with Al(OH)3 and ginseng]. The survival ratings of fish were determined, and protection was calculated as 21.56%, 29.41%, 69.83% and 78.88% in groups I, II, III and IV, respectively. In conclusion, A. hydrophila glycoproteins with Al(OH)3 and ginseng could be used as a safe and effective vaccine for fish. PMID:27144782

  18. Characterization of human platelet glycoprotein antigens giving rise to individual immunoprecipitates in crossed-immunoelectrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Kunicki, T.J.; Nurden, A.T.; Pidard, D.; Russell, N.R.; Caen, J.P.

    1981-12-01

    Washed human platelets were labeled with 125I by the lactoperoxidase-catalyzed method and solubilized in 1% Triton X-100. The soluble proteins were analyzed by crossed-immunoelectrophoresis in 1% agarose, employing a rabbit antibody raised against whole human platelets. Analysis of autoradiograms developed from dried agarose gels led to the establishment of a normal reference pattern that was consistent for platelets obtained from more than 50 normal individuals. Six platelet membrane glycoprotein antigens contained in four distinguishable precipitates were identified. Each identification was based on direct sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of 125I-antigens contained in individually excised precipitates. These platelet antigens include major membrane glycoproteins previously designated la, lb, lla, llb, llla, and lllb. Glycoproteins llb and llla were shown to be contained in a single immunoprecipitate, while glycoproteins la and lla were routinely detected in a single different immunoprecipitate. Analysis of soluble proteins from platelets of five patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia demonstrated either a complete absence or a marked reduction of only one radiolabeled precipitate, that containing membrane glycoproteins llb and llla. Platelet samples from two patients with Bernard-Soulier syndrome were devoid of a different precipitate, that containing membrane glycoprotein lb.

  19. Bile canalicular cationic dye secretion as a model for P-glycoprotein mediated transport.

    PubMed

    Thalhammer, T; Stapf, V; Gajdzik, L; Graf, J

    1994-04-01

    This study explores properties of P-glycoprotein dependent membrane transport in rat liver with the use of acridine orange as the substrate. We studied the biliary secretion of the dye, its binding to canalicular membrane P-glycoprotein, and effects of the inhibitor cyclosporin A: acridine orange is excreted into bile together with less hydrophobic and glucuronidated metabolites. Cyclosporin A inhibited both the secretion of acridine orange and of its metabolites. In TR- animals, a rat strain that is deficient of the canalicular multi-specific organic anion transport system, non-metabolized acridine orange is the predominant species in bile and its secretion is also inhibited by cyclosporin A. Binding of acridine orange to liver P-glycoprotein was analyzed by photoaffinity labeling with azidopine, a substrate of P-glycoprotein dependent transport in multi-drug resistant tumor cells. Labeling of the immunoprecipitated P-glycoprotein was inhibited by acridine orange, verapamil, and by cyclosporin A. The results show that biliary secretion of acridine orange is highly analogous to P-glycoprotein mediated membrane drug transport in tumor cells that exhibit multi-drug resistance.

  20. Expression of P-glycoprotein in high grade osteosarcomas with special emphasis on chondroblastic subtype.

    PubMed

    Radig, K; Häckel, C; Herting, J; Oda, Y; Mittler, U; Neumann, W; Roessner, A

    1997-02-01

    The development of chemoresistance is one of the major clinical problems in the therapy of malignant bone tumors in childhood. The expression of membrane-bound P-glycoprotein turned out to be an essential factor in the evidence of resistant tumor cells. To investigate the significance of multidrug resistance in the prognosis of highly malignant osteosarcomas, the immunohistologic expression of P-glycoprotein was investigated in the tumor tissue of 52 patients under special consideration of the histologic subtype. The data were compared with the histologic regression grade in the resection specimen and correlated with clinical data. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue and, additionally, fresh frozen material taken from the primary biopsy were stained using monoclonal antibody JSB1. 29 (55%) of the tumors investigated were P-glycoprotein positive. Considering the response to chemotherapy, no conclusion could be drawn regarding P-glycoprotein expression, regression grade in the resection specimens, and the clinical follow-up. P-glycoprotein was detected in only 52% of the non-responders. A positive reaction was also evidenced in 59% of the patients with high chemosensitivity. A comparison of the histologic subtypes yielded a significant result in the chondroblastic osteosarcomas. 11 of 12 cases showed a strong expression of P-glycoprotein. Most of the cases were non-responders, and using Kaplan-Meier live tables, an unfavorable clinical outcome could be demonstrated. Possibly, chondroblastic tumors have a special position among osteosarcomas because of their differentiation. PMID:9065577

  1. Identification of sialylated glycoproteins in Doxorubicin-treated hepatoma cells with glycoproteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kanako; Serada, Satoshi; Takamatsu, Shinji; Terao, Naoko; Takeishi, Shunsaku; Kamada, Yoshihiro; Naka, Tetsuji; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2014-11-01

    Sialylation is one of the most important types of glycosylation involved in carcinogenesis and establishment of cancer stemness. We previously showed that increased sialylation is a characteristic glycan change in cancer stem cells (CSCs) from hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the identities of glycoproteins targeted for sialylation remain unknown. In the present study, we identified glycoproteins targeted for sialylation in doxorubicin (DXR)-treated hepatocarcinoma cell line, Huh7, using glycoproteomic analyses. Since CSCs constitute a small subset of cells within carcinoma cell lines, it is difficult to identify sialylated proteins using general glycoproteomic strategies. It is known that treatment with anticancer drug can condense CSCs, we used DXR to concentrate CSCs. In DXR-treated Huh7 cells, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) analysis identified 17 sialylated glycoproteins. Most of the identified glycoproteins were cancer-associated proteins. Furthermore, two proteins of approximately 70 kDa were detected using Sambucus sieboldoana agglutinin (SSA) blot analysis and identified as beta-galactosidase and alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein (fetuin-A) by SSA precipitation followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analyses. Sialylation levels of fetuin-A were increased in DXR-treated Huh7 cell lysates. These changes in sialylation of glycoproteins might be involved in the establishment of cancer stemness.

  2. Lipid modification gives rise to two distinct Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein populations.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Guan, Ziqiang; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    The S-layer glycoprotein is the sole component of the protein shell surrounding Haloferax volcanii cells. The deduced amino acid sequence of the S-layer glycoprotein predicts the presence of a C-terminal membrane-spanning domain. However, several earlier observations, including the ability of EDTA to selectively solubilize the protein, are inconsistent with the presence of a trans-membrane sequence. In the present report, sequential solubilization of the S-layer glycoprotein by EDTA and then with detergent revealed the existence of two distinct populations of the S-layer glycoprotein. Whereas both S-layer glycoprotein populations underwent signal peptide cleavage and N-glycosylation, base hydrolysis followed by mass spectrometry revealed that a lipid, likely archaetidic acid, modified only the EDTA-solubilized version of the protein. These observations are consistent with the S-layer glycoprotein being initially synthesized as an integral membrane protein and subsequently undergoing a processing event in which the extracellular portion of the protein is separated from the membrane-spanning domain and transferred to a waiting lipid moiety.

  3. Reconstructed glycan profile for evaluation of operating status of the endoplasmic reticulum glycoprotein quality control.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Shogo; Isoyama, Miho; Hirano, Makoto; Yamaya, Kenta; Ito, Yukishige; Matsuo, Ichiro; Totani, Kiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Glycoprotein oligosaccharides function as tags for protein quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Since most of proteins are glycosylated and function only after they are properly folded, glycoprotein glycan profiles in the ER might be useful to analyze various cellular status including diseases. Here, we examined whether ER glycan-processing profiles in diabetic rats and osteoporotic mice as models might have different cellular status from those of normal controls. Direct analysis of glycoprotein-processing profiles in the ER is often hampered by glycoforms that are retro-translocated to the ER from other cellular compartments. Moreover, when we focus on the mixture of glycoproteins as the processing substrates, the glycan-processing efficiencies are influenced by the aglycon states including their polypeptide folding. To overcome this problem, we reconstructed glycan profiles using ER extracts as an enzymatic source and synthetic glycoprotein mimetic having homogeneous aglycon as a substrate, resulted in disease-specific glycan profiles. To understand such differences, we also analyzed the activity, and expression level, of each glycan-related enzyme. These glycan profiles are expected to be useful indexes for operational status of the ER glycoprotein quality control, and may also give information to classify some diseases.

  4. Structure of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Fusion Glycoprotein in the Postfusion Conformation Reveals Preservation of Neutralizing Epitopes

    SciTech Connect

    McLellan, Jason S.; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2011-09-16

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) invades host cells via a type I fusion (F) glycoprotein that undergoes dramatic structural rearrangements during the fusion process. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, such as 101F, palivizumab, and motavizumab, target two major antigenic sites on the RSV F glycoprotein. The structures of these sites as peptide complexes with motavizumab and 101F have been previously determined, but a structure for the trimeric RSV F glycoprotein ectodomain has remained elusive. To address this issue, we undertook structural and biophysical studies on stable ectodomain constructs. Here, we present the 2.8-{angstrom} crystal structure of the trimeric RSV F ectodomain in its postfusion conformation. The structure revealed that the 101F and motavizumab epitopes are present in the postfusion state and that their conformations are similar to those observed in the antibody-bound peptide structures. Both antibodies bound the postfusion F glycoprotein with high affinity in surface plasmon resonance experiments. Modeling of the antibodies bound to the F glycoprotein predicts that the 101F epitope is larger than the linear peptide and restricted to a single protomer in the trimer, whereas motavizumab likely contacts residues on two protomers, indicating a quaternary epitope. Mechanistically, these results suggest that 101F and motavizumab can bind to multiple conformations of the fusion glycoprotein and can neutralize late in the entry process. The structural preservation of neutralizing epitopes in the postfusion state suggests that this conformation can elicit neutralizing antibodies and serve as a useful vaccine antigen.

  5. Studies on a novel macrophage-specific calmodulin binding glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The murine macrophage-like cell line J774 and peritoneal exudate cells elicited with thioglycollate or starch contain a major calmodulin-binding protein which is absent in trifluoperazine-resistant variants of J774, resident peritoneal macrophages and these elicited with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, proteose peptone or Bacillus Clamette Guerin. Resident murine peritoneal cells maintained in tissue culture for 3 days begin to accumulate this protein as do human peripheral blood monocytes after 7 days of culture. A specific competitive displacement radioimmunoassay was developed using a rabbit antiserum raised to the partially purified calmodulin binding protein and (/sup 125/I) calmodulin covalently crosslinked to the principal calmodulin binding protein in the preparation. The radioimmunoassay confirmed the unique cellular distribution of this protein suggesting that it may be a marker for certain stages of macrophage differentiation. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared and one of these was used to further purify the protein by immunoaffinity chromatography. A protein of molecular weight 50,000 to 60,000 was isolated. It could be selectively adsorbed to wheat germ agglutinin agarose and subsequently eluted with N-acetyl glucosamine. This property plus its sensitivity to endoglycosidase F led to the conclusion that it is a glycoprotein. The cellular distribution, subcellular localization and evidence of glycosylation suggest that this protein may be a macrophage-specific receptor with a high affinity for calcium-calmodulin.

  6. Effects of hydrocortisone on pulsatile pituitary glycoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Samuels, M H; Luther, M; Henry, P; Ridgway, E C

    1994-01-01

    During states of stress, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal function can be suppressed. One putative mediator of this stress response may be glucocorticoids, which have widespread effects on thyroid and gonadal function. To characterize dynamic pituitary glycoprotein secretion during glucocorticoid administration, 24-h TSH, LH, FSH, and alpha-subunit pulses were measured in 10 healthy young subjects on 3 occasions: 1) at baseline, 2) during infusions of 100 mg hydrocortisone (HC) over 24 h, and 3) during infusions of 300 mg HC over 24 h. These HC infusions led to serum cortisol levels similar to the endogenous cortisol levels seen in moderate and severe stress. Both HC infusions had profound rapid effects on TSH levels, decreasing TSH pulse amplitude by 60% and abolishing the nocturnal TSH surge. However, TSH pulse frequency was unaltered. In contrast, HC infusions did not change mean or pulsatile LH, FSH, or alpha-subunit secretion. These results suggest that stress levels of cortisol acutely suppress TSH secretion at the pituitary level, with little effect on the TSH pulse generator. On the other hand, the effects of stress and/or hypercortisolism on the gonadal axis may require higher cortisol levels, more prolonged exposure, or other mediators of the stress response.

  7. [Classification models of structure - P-glycoprotein activity of drugs].

    PubMed

    Grigorev, V Yu; Solodova, S L; Polianczyk, D E; Raevsky, O A

    2016-01-01

    Thirty three classification models of substrate specificity of 177 drugs to P-glycoprotein have been created using of the linear discriminant analysis, random forest and support vector machine methods. QSAR modeling was carried out using 2 strategies. The first strategy consisted in search of all possible combinations from 1÷5 descriptors on the basis of 7 most significant molecular descriptors with clear physico-chemical interpretation. In the second case forward selection procedure up to 5 descriptors, starting from the best single descriptor was used. This strategy was applied to a set of 387 DRAGON descriptors. It was found that only one of 33 models has necessary statistical parameters. This model was designed by means of the linear discriminant analysis on the basis of a single descriptor of H-bond (ΣC(ad)). The model has good statistical characteristics as evidenced by results to both internal cross-validation, and external validation with application of 44 new chemicals. This confirms an important role of hydrogen bond in the processes connected with penetration of chemical compounds through a blood-brain barrier.

  8. [Classification models of structure - P-glycoprotein activity of drugs].

    PubMed

    Grigorev, V Yu; Solodova, S L; Polianczyk, D E; Raevsky, O A

    2016-01-01

    Thirty three classification models of substrate specificity of 177 drugs to P-glycoprotein have been created using of the linear discriminant analysis, random forest and support vector machine methods. QSAR modeling was carried out using 2 strategies. The first strategy consisted in search of all possible combinations from 1÷5 descriptors on the basis of 7 most significant molecular descriptors with clear physico-chemical interpretation. In the second case forward selection procedure up to 5 descriptors, starting from the best single descriptor was used. This strategy was applied to a set of 387 DRAGON descriptors. It was found that only one of 33 models has necessary statistical parameters. This model was designed by means of the linear discriminant analysis on the basis of a single descriptor of H-bond (ΣC(ad)). The model has good statistical characteristics as evidenced by results to both internal cross-validation, and external validation with application of 44 new chemicals. This confirms an important role of hydrogen bond in the processes connected with penetration of chemical compounds through a blood-brain barrier. PMID:27143376

  9. A monocistronic transcript for a trypanosome variant surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon, C M; Son, H J; Hall, T; Donelson, J E

    1994-01-01

    Many protein-encoding genes of African trypanosomes are transcribed as large polycistronic pre-mRNAs that are processed into individual mRNAs containing a 5' spliced leader and 3' poly(A). The 45- to 60-kb pre-mRNAs encoding some variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs) contain as many as eight unrelated coding regions. Here we identify the promoter for a metacyclic VSG gene that is expressed without duplication in a bloodstream trypanosome clone. This 70-bp promoter is located 2 kb upstream of the telomere-linked VSG gene and directs the synthesis of a monocistronic VSG pre-mRNA lacking the 5' spliced leader. Its sequence only slightly resembles those of other known trypanosome promoters, but it does cross-hybridize with several related sequences elsewhere in the genome. These results suggest that a new class of trypanosome promoters has been found, whose function is to initiate monocistronic transcription of those VSG genes normally expressed during the metacyclic stage. Images PMID:8035832

  10. Immunogenicity of varicella zoster virus glycoprotein E DNA vaccine

    PubMed Central

    BAO, LIDAO; WEI, GUOMIN; GAN, HONGMEI; REN, XIANHUA; MA, RUILIAN; WANG, YI; LV, HAIJUN

    2016-01-01

    In the present study a eukaryotic expression vector of varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoprotein E (gE) was constructed and enabled to express in COS7 cells. Furthermore, a specific immune response against the VZV gE eukaryotic expression plasmid was induced in BALB/c mice. The VZV gE gene was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector, pcDNA3.1. The recombinant vector was subsequently transfected into COS7 cells using a liposome transfection reagent. The recombinant protein was instantaneously expressed by the transfected cells, as detected by immunohistochemistry, and the recombinant pcDNA-VZV gE plasmid was subsequently used to immunize mice. Tissue expression levels were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. In addition, the levels of serum antibodies and spleen lymphocyte proliferation activity were investigated. The amplified target gene included the full-length gE gene (~2.7 kb), and the recombinant expression vector induced gE expression in COS7 cells. In addition, the expression plasmid induced sustained expression in vivo following immunization of mice. Furthermore, the plasmid was capable of inducing specific antibody production and effectively stimulating T cell proliferation. Effective humoral and cellular immunity was triggered in the mice immunized with the VZV gE eukaryotic expression vector. The results of the present study laid the foundation for future research into a VZV DNA vaccine. PMID:27168804

  11. Advances in plant-based inhibitors of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Zhou, Peng; Asenso, James; Yang, Xiao-Dan; Wang, Chun; Wei, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) has emerged as the main problem in anti-cancer therapy. Although MDR involves complex factors and processes, the main pivot is the expression of multidrug efflux pumps. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) belongs to the family of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. It functions in cellular detoxification, pumping a wide range of xenobiotic compounds out of the cell. An attractive therapeutic strategy for overcoming MDR is to inhibit the transport function of P-gp and thus, increase intracellular concentration of drugs. Recently, various types of P-gp inhibitors have been found and used in experiments. However, none of them has passed clinical trials due to their high side-effects. Hence, the search for alternatives, such as plant-based P-gp inhibitors have gained attention recently. Therefore, we give an overview of the source, function, structure and mechanism of plant-based P-gp inhibitors and give more attention to cancer-related studies. These products could be the future potential drug candidates for further research as P-gp inhibitors.

  12. Antibody Derived Peptides for Detection of Ebola Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    López-Pacheco, Felipe; Pérez-Chavarría, Roberto; González-Vázquez, Juan Carlos; González-González, Everardo; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Ponce-Ponce de León, César Alejandro; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Background Current Ebola virus (EBOV) detection methods are costly and impractical for epidemic scenarios. Different immune-based assays have been reported for the detection and quantification of Ebola virus (EBOV) proteins. In particular, several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been described that bind the capsid glycoprotein (GP) of EBOV GP. However, the currently available platforms for the design and production of full-length mAbs are cumbersome and costly. The use of antibody fragments, rather than full-length antibodies, might represent a cost-effective alternative for the development of diagnostic and possibly even therapeutic alternatives for EBOV. Methods/Principal Findings We report the design and expression of three recombinant anti-GP mAb fragments in Escherichia coli cultures. These fragments contained the heavy and light variable portions of the three well-studied anti-GP full-length mAbs 13C6, 13F6, and KZ52, and are consequently named scFv-13C6, scFv-13F6, and Fab-KZ52, respectively. All three fragments exhibited specific anti-GP binding activity in ELISA experiments comparable to that of full-length anti-GP antibodies (i.e., the same order of magnitude) and they are easily and economically produced in bacterial cultures. Conclusion/Significance Antibody fragments might represent a useful, effective, and low cost alternative to full-length antibodies in Ebola related capture and diagnostics applications. PMID:26489048

  13. Four glycoproteins are expressed in the cat zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Stetson, I; Avilés, M; Moros, C; García-Vázquez, F A; Gimeno, L; Torrecillas, A; Aliaga, C; Bernardo-Pisa, M V; Ballesta, J; Izquierdo-Rico, M J

    2015-04-15

    The mammalian oocyte is surrounded by a matrix called the zona pellucida (ZP). This envelope participates in processes such as acrosome reaction induction, sperm binding and may be involved in speciation. In cat (Felis catus), this matrix is composed of at least three glycoproteins called ZP2, ZP3, and ZP4. However, recent studies have pointed to the presence of a fourth protein in several mammals (rat, human, hamster or rabbit), meaning that a reevaluation of cat ZP is needed. For this reason, the objective of this research was to analyze the protein composition of cat ZP by means of proteomic analysis. Using ZP from ovaries and oocytes, several peptides corresponding to four proteins were detected, yielding a coverage of 33.17%, 71.50%, 50.23%, and 49.64% for ZP1, ZP2, ZP3, and ZP4, respectively. Moreover, the expression of four genes was confirmed by molecular analysis. Using total RNA isolated from cat ovaries, the complementary deoxyribonucleic acids encoding cat ZP were partially amplified by reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, ZP1 was totally amplified for the first time in this species. As far as we are aware, this is the first study that confirms the presence of four proteins in cat ZP.

  14. Dynamics of antifreeze glycoproteins in the presence of ice.

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkova, Nelly M; Phillips, Brian L; Krishnan, Viswanathan V; Feeney, Robert E; Fink, William H; Crowe, John H; Risbud, Subhash H; Tablin, Fern; Yeh, Yin

    2002-01-01

    Antifreeze glycoproteins from the Greenland cod Boreogadus saida were dimethylated at the N-terminus (m*AFGP) and their dynamics and conformational properties were studied in the presence of ice using (13)C-NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. (13)C-NMR experiments of m*AFGP in D(2)O, in H(2)O, and of freeze-dried m*AFGP were performed as a function of temperature. Dynamic parameters ((1)H T(1 rho) and T(CH)) obtained by varying the contact time revealed notable differences in the motional properties of AFGP between the different states. AFGP/ice dynamics was dominated by fast-scale motions (nanosecond to picosecond time scale), suggesting that the relaxation is markedly affected by the protein hydration. The data suggest that AFGP adopts a similar type of three-dimensional fold both in the presence of ice and in the freeze-dried state. FTIR studies of the amide I band did not show a single prevailing secondary structure in the frozen state. The high number of conformers suggests a high flexibility, and possibly reflects the necessity to expose more ice-binding groups. The data suggest that the effect of hydration on the local mobility of AFGP and the lack of significant change in the backbone conformation in the frozen state may play a role in inhibiting the ice crystal growth. PMID:11751333

  15. The microfibril-associated glycoproteins (MAGPs) and the microfibrillar niche.

    PubMed

    Mecham, Robert P; Gibson, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    The microfibril-associated glycoproteins MAGP-1 and MAGP-2 are extracellular matrix proteins that interact with fibrillin to influence microfibril function. The two proteins are related through a 60 amino acid matrix-binding domain but their sequences differ outside of this region. A distinguishing feature of both proteins is their ability to interact with TGFβ family growth factors, Notch and Notch ligands, and multiple elastic fiber proteins. MAGP-2 can also interact with αvβ3 integrins via a RGD sequence that is not found in MAGP-1. Morpholino knockdown of MAGP-1 expression in zebrafish resulted in abnormal vessel wall architecture and altered vascular network formation. In the mouse, MAGP-1 deficiency had little effect on elastic fibers in blood vessels and lung but resulted in numerous unexpected phenotypes including bone abnormalities, hematopoietic changes, increased fat deposition, diabetes, impaired wound repair, and a bleeding diathesis. Inactivation of the gene for MAGP-2 in mice produced a neutropenia yet had minimal effects on bone or adipose homeostasis. Double knockouts had phenotypes characteristic of each individual knockout as well as several additional traits only seen when both genes are inactivated. A common mechanism underlying all of the traits associated with the knockout phenotypes is altered TGFβ signaling. This review summarizes our current understanding of the function of the MAGPs and discusses ideas related to their role in growth factor regulation. PMID:25963142

  16. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mary Ellen; Koser, Martin; Xiao Sa; Siler, Catherine; McGettigan, James P.; Calkins, Catherine; Pomerantz, Roger J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J. . E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu

    2006-09-30

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems.

  17. Interaction modes and approaches to glycopeptide and glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen-Chun; Su, Wan-Chih; Huang, Bao-Yu; Chen, Yu-Ju; Tai, Hwan-Ching; Obena, Rofeamor P

    2014-02-21

    Protein glycosylation has received increased attention for its critical role in cell biology and diseases. Developing new methodologies to discern phenotype-dependent glycosylation will not only elucidate the mechanistic aspects of cell signaling cascades but also accelerate biomarker discovery for disease diagnosis or prognosis. In the analytical pipeline, enrichment at either the protein or peptide level is the most critical prerequisite for analyzing heterogeneous glycan composition, linkage, site occupancy and carrier proteins. Because the critical factor for choosing a suitable enrichment method is primarily a particular technique's selectivity and affinity towards target glycoproteins/glycopeptides, it is important to fully understand the working principles for the different approaches. For mechanistic insight into the enrichment protocol, we focused on the fundamental chemical and physical processes for the commonly used approaches based on: (a) glycan/peptide physicochemical properties (hydrophilic interactions, chelation/coordination chemistry) and (b) glycan-specific recognition (lectin-based affinity, covalent bond formation by hydrazide/boronic acid). Various interaction modes, such as hydrogen bonding, van der Waals interaction, multivalency, and metal- or water-mediated stabilization, are discussed in detail. In addition, we will review the design of and modifications to such methods, hyphenated approaches, and glycoproteomic applications. Finally, we will outline challenges to existing strategies and offer novel proposals for glycoproteome enrichment. PMID:24336240

  18. Extracellular matrix glycoproteins and diffusion barriers in human astrocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Zámecník, J; Vargová, L; Homola, A; Kodet, R; Syková, E

    2004-08-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) and changes in the size and geometry of the extracellular space (ECS) in tumour tissue are thought to be of critical importance in influencing the migratory abilities of tumour cells as well as the delivery of therapeutic agents into the tumour. In 21 astrocytic neoplasms, the ECM composition was investigated in situ by the immunohistochemical detection of ECM glycoproteins (tenascin, laminin, vitronectin, fibronectin, collagen types I-VI). To explain the changes in ECS size and to detect barriers to diffusion in the tumour tissue, the ECM composition, the cellularity, the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive tumour cell processes and the proliferative activity of the tumours were compared with the size and geometry of the ECS. The ECS volume fraction and the complex of hindrances to diffusion in the ECS (i.e. the tortuosity) were revealed by the real-time iontophoretic tetramethylammonium method. Increased proliferative activity of the tumours correlated with increased ECS volume fraction and tortuosity. The tortuosity of the tumour tissue was not significantly influenced by tumour cell density. Higher tortuosity was found in low-grade astrocytomas associated with the presence of a dense net of GFAP-positive fibrillary processes of the tumour cells. The increase in tortuosity in high-grade tumours correlated with an increased accumulation of ECM molecules, particularly of tenascin. We conclude that the increased malignancy of astrocytic tumours correlates with increases in both ECS volume and ECM deposition.

  19. Platelets deficient in glycoprotein I have normal Fc receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pfueller, S L; de Rosbo, N K; Bilston, R A

    1984-04-01

    Platelet glycoprotein I (GPI) is known to be required for the interaction of platelets with ristocetin and factor VIII:von Willebrand factor (VIII:vWf). However, its role as Fc receptor is not clear. Some studies have shown that enzymatic removal of GPI destroys the ability of platelets to react with VIII:vWf but not their ability to bind Ig G (IgG). Others have shown that IgG immune complexes which block the Fc receptor also inhibit VIII:vWf interaction with platelets. This subject has been re-examined by testing the ability of platelets with reduced amounts of GPI to aggregate and undergo the release reaction in response to stimuli which act at the platelet Fc receptor. Platelets from two patients with Bernard-Soulier syndrome, congenitally deficient in GPI, both aggregated and released 14C-serotonin normally when exposed to latex particles coated with IgG. Levels of GPI were decreased experimentally in normal platelets by treating them with chymotrypsin. Platelets treated in this manner did not aggregate or release [14C]serotonin in response to ristocetin-VIII:vWf. They did, however, both aggregate and release when incubated with heat-aggregated IgG, antigen-antibody complexes or latex particles coated with IgG. Thus the presence of GPI is not a prerequisite for platelet stimulation via the Fc receptor. PMID:6231945

  20. Antifreeze Glycoproteins Alter the Molecular Scale Surface Morphology of Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zepeda, Salvador; Orme, Christine A.; Qiu, Roger; Yeh, Yin

    2003-03-01

    Trematomas borchgrevinki live in the harsh super-cooled waters of the Antarctic. Critical to their survival are antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs) that further suppress the freezing temperature of their blood serum in addition to the colligative action of salts found in the ocean. These proteins also modify ice crystal growth habits as well as inhibit recrystallization in polycrystalline ice. To date many other types of antifreeze proteins have been identified in cold weather insects, plants, and other fish, but the exact mechanism is not entirely understood. The mechanism is non-colligative since only a few mg/ml are required for ice crystal growth inhibition and a non-equilibrium melting/freezing point hysteresis is observed. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can yield a wealth of surface information that can reveal molecular scale information of biomineralization processes. We use AFM to directly probe the surface of ice crystals grown from the vapor in the pure phase and in the presence of growth inhibitors/modifiers, AFGPs. Results show that the AFGPs heavily pin the surface of ice.

  1. A functional glycoprotein competitive recognition and signal amplification strategy for carbohydrate-protein interaction profiling and cell surface carbohydrate expression evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yangzhong; Chen, Zhuhai; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong

    2013-07-01

    A simple and sensitive carbohydrate biosensor has been suggested as a potential tool for accurate analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression as well as carbohydrate-based therapeutics for a variety of diseases and infections. In this work, a sensitive biosensor for carbohydrate-lectin profiling and in situ cell surface carbohydrate expression was designed by taking advantage of a functional glycoprotein of glucose oxidase acting as both a multivalent recognition unit and a signal amplification probe. Combining the gold nanoparticle catalyzed luminol electrogenerated chemiluminescence and nanocarrier for active biomolecules, the number of cell surface carbohydrate groups could be conveniently read out. The apparent dissociation constant between GOx@Au probes and Con A was detected to be 1.64 nM and was approximately 5 orders of magnitude smaller than that of mannose and Con A, which would arise from the multivalent effect between the probe and Con A. Both glycoproteins and gold nanoparticles contribute to the high affinity between carbohydrates and lectin. The as-proposed biosensor exhibits excellent analytical performance towards the cytosensing of K562 cells with a detection limit of 18 cells, and the mannose moieties on a single K562 cell were determined to be 1.8 × 1010. The biosensor can also act as a useful tool for antibacterial drug screening and mechanism investigation. This strategy integrates the excellent biocompatibility and multivalent recognition of glycoproteins as well as the significant enzymatic catalysis and gold nanoparticle signal amplification, and avoids the cell pretreatment and labelling process. This would contribute to the glycomic analysis and the understanding of complex native glycan-related biological processes.A simple and sensitive carbohydrate biosensor has been suggested as a potential tool for accurate analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression as well as carbohydrate-based therapeutics for a variety of diseases and

  2. Pathogenesis of mucosal injury in the blind loop syndrome. Brush border enzyme activity and glycoprotein degradation.

    PubMed

    Jonas, A; Flanagan, P R; Forstner, G G

    1977-12-01

    The effect of intestinal bacterial over-growth on brush border hydrolases and brush border glycoproteins was studied in nonoperated control rats, control rats with surgically introduced jejunal self-emptying blind loops, and rats with surgically introduced jejunal self-filling blind loops. Data were analyzed from blind loop segments, segments above and below the blind loops, and three corresponding segments in the nonoperated controls. Rats with self-filling blind loops had significantly greater fat excretion than controls and exhibited significantly lower conjugated:free bile salt ratios in all three segments. Maltase, sucrase, and lactase activities were significantly reduced in homogenates and isolated brush borders from the self-filling blind loop, but alkaline phosphatase was not affected. The relative degradation rate of homogenate and brush border glycoproteins was assessed by a double-isotope technique involving the injection of d-[6-(3)H]glucosamine 3 h and d-[U-(14)C]glucosamine 19 h before sacrifice, and recorded as a (3)H:(14)C ratio. The relative degradation rate in both homogenate and brush border fractions was significantly greater in most segments from rats with self-filling blind loops. In the upper and blind loop segments from rats with self-filling blind loops, the (3)H:(14)C ratios were higher in the brush border membrane than in the corresponding homogenates, indicating that the increased rates of degradation primarily involve membrane glycoproteins. Incorporation of d-[6-(3)H]glucosamine by brush border glycoproteins was not reduced in rats with self-filling blind loops, suggesting that glycoprotein synthesis was not affected. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of brush border glycoproteins from the contaminated segments indicated that the large molecular weight glycoproteins, which include many of the surface hydrolases, were degraded most rapidly. Brush border maltase, isolated by immunoprecipitation, had (3)H:(14)C ratios characteristic of

  3. Cross-linking of glycoprotein oligomers during herpes simplex virus type 1 entry.

    PubMed

    Handler, C G; Cohen, G H; Eisenberg, R J

    1996-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has 10 glycoproteins in its envelope. Glycoprotein B (gB), gC, gD, gH, and gL have been implicated in virus entry. We previously used chemical cross-linking to show that these five glycoproteins were close enough to each other to be cross-linked into homodimeric and hetero-oligomeric forms; hetero-oligomers of gB-gC, gC-gD, gD-gB, gH-gL, gC-gL and gD-gL were found in purified virions. To better understand the roles of these glycoproteins in viral entry, we have modified a standard HSV penetration assay to include cross-linkers. This allowed us to examine changes in associations of viral glycoproteins during the entry process. HSV-1(KOS) was adsorbed at 4 degrees C to human neuroblastoma cells (SY5Y). The temperature was raised to 37 degrees C and cells were treated with cross-linker at various times after the temperature shift. Cytoplasmic extracts were examined by Western blotting (immunoblotting) for viral glycoproteins. We found that (i) as in virus alone, the length and concentration of the cross-linking agent affected the number of specific complexes isolated; (ii) the same glycoprotein patterns found in purified virions were also present after attachment of virions to cells; and (iii) the ability to cross-link HSV glycoproteins changed as virus penetration proceeded, e.g., gB and gD complexes which were present during attachment disappeared with increasing time, and their disappearance paralleled the kinetics of penetration. However, this phenomenon appeared to be selective since it was not observed with gC oligomers. In addition, we examined the cross-linking patterns of gB and gD in null viruses K082 and KOSgD beta. Neither of these mutants, which attach but cannot penetrate, showed changes in glycoprotein cross-linking over time. We speculate that these changes are due to conformational changes which preclude cross-linking or spatial alterations which dissociate the glycoprotein interactions during the penetration events. PMID

  4. Pre-staining of glycoprotein in SDS-PAGE by the synthesis of a new hydrazide derivative.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ayi; Zhou, Tieli; Yu, Dongdong; Shen, Yingjie; Shen, Jiayi; Zhu, Zhongxin; Jin, Litai; Zhang, Huajie; Wang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a new hydrazide derivative (UGF202) was synthesized and introduced as a highly sensitive and selective fluorescent probe to pre-stain glycoproteins in 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE. As low as 0.5-1 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein, avidin) could be selectively detected, which is comparable to that of Pro-Q Emerald 300 stain, one of the most sensitive and commonly used glycoprotein staining kit. In addition, the specificity of the newly developed method was confirmed by the study of de-glycosylation, glycoproteins affinity enrichment and LC-MS/MS, respectively. According to the results, it is concluded that UGF202 pre-stain can provide an alternative for the visualization of gel-separated glycoproteins. PMID:26256282

  5. Inhibition of rhodamine 123 secretion by cyclosporin A as a model of P-glycoprotein mediated transport in liver.

    PubMed

    Stapf, V; Thalhammer, T; Huber-Huber, R; Felberbauer, F; Gajdzik, L; Graf, J

    1994-01-01

    The interaction between P-glycoprotein modulators and P-glycoprotein mediated transport was investigated using rhodamine 123 in the isolated perfused rat liver of a mutant (TR-) rat strain. TR- rats, deficient in the canalicular multispecific anion transport system, are unable to extrude organic anions (glucuronides) and therefore excrete solely unconjugated rhodamine 123 via P-glycoprotein. Cyclosporin A, a modulator of multidrug resistance in tumor cells, inhibited the biliary secretion of rhodamine 123 dose dependently in a non-competitive manner. Both cyclosporin A and rhodamine inhibited photoaffinity labeling of immunoprecipitated P-glycoprotein with azidopine, indicating binding to hepatic P-glycoprotei