Science.gov

Sample records for glycoproteins induce syncytia

  1. Tromantadine inhibits HSV-1 induced syncytia formation and viral glycoprotein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ickes, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    Tromantadine inhibits a late event in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) replication, visualized by the inhibition of both the size and number of syncytia. Tromantadine can be added at any time between 1 and 9 h post infection with complete inhibition of syncytia formation. Glycan synthesis of the viral glycoproteins, important for syncytia formation, is incomplete due to tromantadine treatment. Tromantadine does not inhibit the initiation of glycosylation, since viral glycoproteins, gX{sub t}, synthesized in the presence of tromantadine still incorporate {sup 3}H-glucosamine. Tromantadine does not inhibit the transport of t e viral glycoproteins to the cell surface, since glycoproteins B, C, and D are expressed, as demonstrated by immunofluorescence. Tromantadine inhibition of HSV-1 glycoprotein processing is demonstrated by an increase in mobility of the radioimmunoprecipitated gX{sub t}, on SDS-PAGE. The gX{sub t} of KOS, a non-syncytial strain of HSV-1, had a similar increase in mobility, suggesting that the block in glycoprotein processing is a general effect of tromantadine treatment. Fucose, which is incorporated into oligosaccharides in the medial Golgi, is incorporated into gX{sub t}, indicating that the tromantadine block in glycoprotein processing occurs after this step. Lectin binding studies and SDS-PAGE analysis of gC processed in the presence of tromantadine, gC{sub t}, indicates that it has terminal galactose residues in both N- and O-linked glycans (binds Peanut and Ricin Agglutinins, respectively). The inhibition of sialylation of N-linked glycans by tromantadine was indicated by the extent of the increase in SDS-PAGE mobility of the G protein from Vesicular Stomatitis Virus. O-glycanase digestion and SDS-PAGE analysis of gC{sub t} indicate that the O-linked disaccharide NAcGal-Galactose is present.

  2. The transcriptome of syncytia induced by the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Szakasits, Dagmar; Heinen, Petra; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Hofmann, Julia; Wagner, Florian; Kreil, David P; Sykacek, Peter; Grundler, Florian M W; Bohlmann, Holger

    2009-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana is a host for the sugar beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii. Juvenile nematodes invade the roots and induce the development of a syncytium, which functions as a feeding site for the nematode. Here, we report on the transcriptome of syncytia induced in the roots of Arabidopsis. Microaspiration was employed to harvest pure syncytium material, which was then used to prepare RNA for hybridization to Affymetrix GeneChips. Initial data analysis showed that the gene expression in syncytia at 5 and 15 days post-infection did not differ greatly, and so both time points were compared together with control roots. Out of a total of 21 138 genes, 18.4% (3893) had a higher expression level and 15.8% (3338) had a lower expression level in syncytia, as compared with control roots, using a multiple-testing corrected false discovery rate of below 5%. A gene ontology (GO) analysis of up- and downregulated genes showed that categories related to high metabolic activity were preferentially upregulated. A principal component analysis was applied to compare the transcriptome of syncytia with the transcriptome of different Arabidopsis organs (obtained by the AtGenExpress project), and with specific root tissues. This analysis revealed that syncytia are transcriptionally clearly different from roots (and all other organs), as well as from other root tissues. PMID:18980640

  3. HIV-1-Induced Small T Cell Syncytia Can Transfer Virus Particles to Target Cells through Transient Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Symeonides, Menelaos; Murooka, Thomas T.; Bellfy, Lauren N.; Roy, Nathan H.; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Thali, Markus

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 Env mediates fusion of viral and target cell membranes, but it can also mediate fusion of infected (producer) and target cells, thus triggering the formation of multinucleated cells, so-called syncytia. Large, round, immobile syncytia are readily observable in cultures of HIV-1-infected T cells, but these fast growing “fusion sinks” are largely regarded as cell culture artifacts. In contrast, small HIV-1-induced syncytia were seen in the paracortex of peripheral lymph nodes and other secondary lymphoid tissue of HIV-1-positive individuals. Further, recent intravital imaging of lymph nodes in humanized mice early after their infection with HIV-1 demonstrated that a significant fraction of infected cells were highly mobile, small syncytia, suggesting that these entities contribute to virus dissemination. Here, we report that the formation of small, migratory syncytia, for which we provide further quantification in humanized mice, can be recapitulated in vitro if HIV-1-infected T cells are placed into 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels rather than being kept in traditional suspension culture systems. Intriguingly, live-cell imaging in hydrogels revealed that these syncytia, similar to individual infected cells, can transiently interact with uninfected cells, leading to rapid virus transfer without cell-cell fusion. Infected cells were also observed to deposit large amounts of viral particles into the extracellular space. Altogether, these observations suggest the need to further evaluate the biological significance of small, T cell-based syncytia and to consider the possibility that these entities do indeed contribute to virus spread and pathogenesis. PMID:26703714

  4. HIV-1-Induced Small T Cell Syncytia Can Transfer Virus Particles to Target Cells through Transient Contacts.

    PubMed

    Symeonides, Menelaos; Murooka, Thomas T; Bellfy, Lauren N; Roy, Nathan H; Mempel, Thorsten R; Thali, Markus

    2015-12-12

    HIV-1 Env mediates fusion of viral and target cell membranes, but it can also mediate fusion of infected (producer) and target cells, thus triggering the formation of multinucleated cells, so-called syncytia. Large, round, immobile syncytia are readily observable in cultures of HIV-1-infected T cells, but these fast growing "fusion sinks" are largely regarded as cell culture artifacts. In contrast, small HIV-1-induced syncytia were seen in the paracortex of peripheral lymph nodes and other secondary lymphoid tissue of HIV-1-positive individuals. Further, recent intravital imaging of lymph nodes in humanized mice early after their infection with HIV-1 demonstrated that a significant fraction of infected cells were highly mobile, small syncytia, suggesting that these entities contribute to virus dissemination. Here, we report that the formation of small, migratory syncytia, for which we provide further quantification in humanized mice, can be recapitulated in vitro if HIV-1-infected T cells are placed into 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels rather than being kept in traditional suspension culture systems. Intriguingly, live-cell imaging in hydrogels revealed that these syncytia, similar to individual infected cells, can transiently interact with uninfected cells, leading to rapid virus transfer without cell-cell fusion. Infected cells were also observed to deposit large amounts of viral particles into the extracellular space. Altogether, these observations suggest the need to further evaluate the biological significance of small, T cell-based syncytia and to consider the possibility that these entities do indeed contribute to virus spread and pathogenesis.

  5. Diversity and activity of sugar transporters in nematode-induced root syncytia

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Julia; Hess, Paul H.; Szakasits, Dagmar; Blöchl, Andreas; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Daxböck-Horvath, Sabine; Bohlmann, Holger; van Bel, Aart J. E.; Grundler, Florian M. W.

    2009-01-01

    The plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii stimulates plant root cells to form syncytial feeding structures which synthesize all nutrients required for successful nematode development. Cellular re-arrangements and modified metabolism of the syncytia are accompanied by massive intra- and intercellular solute allocations. In this study the expression of all genes annotated as sugar transporters in the Arabidopsis Membrane Protein Library was investigated by Affymetrix gene chip analysis in young and fully developed syncytia compared with non-infected Arabidopsis thaliana roots. The expression of three highly up-regulated (STP12, MEX1, and GTP2) and three highly down-regulated genes (SFP1, STP7, and STP4) was analysed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). The most up-regulated gene (STP12) was chosen for further in-depth studies using in situ RT-PCR and a nematode development assay with a T-DNA insertion line revealing a significant reduction of male nematode development. The specific role of STP12 expression in syncytia of male juveniles compared with those of female juveniles was further shown by qRT-PCR. In order to provide evidence for sugar transporter activity across the plasma membrane of syncytia, fluorescence-labelled glucose was used and membrane potential recordings following the application of several sugars were performed. Analyses of soluble sugar pools revealed a highly specific composition in syncytia. The presented work demonstrates that sugar transporters are specifically expressed and active in syncytia, indicating a profound role in inter- and intracelluar transport processes. PMID:19487386

  6. The companion cell-specific Arabidopsis disaccharide carrier AtSUC2 is expressed in nematode-induced syncytia.

    PubMed

    Juergensen, Katja; Scholz-Starke, Joachim; Sauer, Norbert; Hess, Paul; van Bel, Aart J E; Grundler, Florian M W

    2003-01-01

    Cyst nematodes induce a metabolically highly active syncytial cell complex in host roots. The syncytia are symplastically isolated. Because they form a strong sink, assimilates must be imported via the apoplast, thus suggesting that specific membrane-bound sugar transport proteins are expressed and activated. To identify possible candidate genes, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing different reporter genes under the control of different promoters from Arabidopsis sugar transporter genes were infected with the beet cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii). With polymerase chain reaction, 13 additional sugar transporters were tested for their presence in the syncytia through the use of a syncytium-specific cDNA library. Analysis of the infected roots showed that the promoter of the sucrose (Suc) transporter AtSUC2 gene that codes for a companion cell-specific Suc transporter in noninfected plants was found to be expressed in syncytia. Its expression patterns in beta-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein plants were monitored. Syncytium-specific gene expression was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results support the idea that AtSUC2 mediates the transmembrane transfer of Suc. AtSUC2 is the first disaccharide carrier described to be activated by pathogens.

  7. The promoter of a plant defensin gene directs specific expression in nematode-induced syncytia in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Shahid; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Szakasits, Dagmar; Kreil, David P; Bohlmann, Holger

    2011-10-01

    The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii induces a feeding site, called syncytium, in roots of host plants. In Arabidopsis, one of the genes whose expression is strongly induced in these structures is Pdf2.1 which codes for an antimicrobial plant defensin. Arabidopsis has 13 plant defensin genes. Besides Pdf2.1, the Pdf2.2 and Pdf2.3 genes were strongly expressed in syncytia and therefore the expression of all three Pdf genes was studied in detail. The promoter of the Pdf2.1 gene turned out to be an interesting candidate to drive a syncytium-specific expression of foreign genes as RT-PCR showed that apart from the feeding site it was only expressed in siliques (seeds). The Pdf2.2 and Pdf2.3 genes were in addition expressed in seedlings, roots, leaves, stems, and flowers. These results were supported by the analysis of promoter::GUS lines. After infection with H. schachtii all GUS lines showed a strong staining in syncytia at 5 and 15 dpi. This expression pattern was confirmed by in situ RT-PCR.

  8. Descending vasa recta endothelial cells and pericytes form mural syncytia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong; Lin, Hai; Cao, Chunhua; Payne, Kristie

    2013-01-01

    Using patch clamp, we induced depolarization of descending vasa recta (DVR) pericytes or endothelia and tested whether it was conducted to distant cells. Membrane potential was measured with the fluorescent voltage dye di-8-ANEPPS or with a second patch-clamp electrode. Depolarization of an endothelial cell induced responses in other endothelia within a millisecond and was slowed by gap junction blockade with heptanol. Endothelial response to pericyte depolarization was poor, implying high-resistance myo-endothelial coupling. In contrast, dual patch clamp of neighboring pericytes revealed syncytial coupling. At high sampling rate, the spread of depolarization between pericytes and endothelia occurred in 9 ± 2 or 12 ± 2 μs, respectively. Heptanol (2 mM) increased the overall input resistance of the pericyte layer to current flow and prevented transmission of depolarization between neighboring cells. The fluorescent tracer Lucifer yellow (LY), when introduced through ruptured patches, spread between neighboring endothelia in 1 to 7 s, depending on location of the flanking cell. LY diffused to endothelial cells on the ipsilateral but not contralateral side of the DVR wall and minimally between pericytes. We conclude that both DVR pericytes and endothelia are part of individual syncytia. The rate of conduction of membrane potential exceeds that for diffusion of hydrophilic molecules by orders of magnitude. Gap junction coupling of adjacent endothelial cells may be spatially oriented to favor longitudinal transmission along the DVR axis. PMID:24381184

  9. Syncytial apoptosis signaling network induced by the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Nardacci, R; Perfettini, J-L; Grieco, L; Thieffry, D; Kroemer, G; Piacentini, M

    2015-01-01

    Infection by human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is associated with a progressive decrease in CD4 T-cell numbers and the consequent collapse of host immune defenses. The major pathogenic mechanism of AIDS is the massive apoptotic destruction of the immunocompetent cells, including uninfected cells. The latter process, also known as by-stander killing, operates by various mechanisms one of which involves the formation of syncytia which undergo cell death by following a complex pathway. We present here a detailed and curated map of the syncytial apoptosis signaling network, aimed at simplifying the whole mechanism that we have characterized at the molecular level in the last 15 years. The map was created using Systems Biology Graphical Notation language with the help of CellDesigner software and encompasses 36 components (proteins/genes) and 54 interactions. The simplification of this complex network paves the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to eradicate HIV-1 infection. Agents that induce the selective death of HIV-1-elicited syncytia might lead to the elimination of viral reservoirs and hence constitute an important complement to current antiretroviral therapies. PMID:26247731

  10. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  11. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein immunogens to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sliepen, Kwinten; Sanders, Rogier W

    2016-01-01

    The long pursuit for a vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) has recently been boosted by a number of exciting developments. An HIV-1 subunit vaccine ideally should elicit potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), but raising bNAbs by vaccination has proved extremely difficult because of the characteristics of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). However, the isolation of bNAbs from HIV-1-infected patients demonstrates that the human humoral immune system is capable of making such antibodies. Therefore, a focus of HIV-1 vaccinology is the elicitation of bNAbs by engineered immunogens and by using vaccination strategies aimed at mimicking the bNAb maturation pathways in HIV-infected patients. Important clues can also be taken from the successful subunit vaccines against hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus. Here, we review the different types of HIV-1 immunogens and vaccination strategies that are being explored in the search for an HIV-1 vaccine that induces bNAbs.

  12. [Molecular Mechanism of Glycoprotein-induced Cell-Cell Fusion of Herpesviruses].

    PubMed

    Feng, Daishen; Jia, Renyong

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviridae is a large family comprising linear, double-stranded DNA viruses. Herpesviridae contains three subfamilies: α-, β- and γ-herpesviruses. The glycoproteins gB, gH and gL of each subfamily form the "core fusion function" in cell-cell fusion. Other herpesviruses also need additional glycoproteins to promote fusion, such as gD of the Herpes simplex virus, gp42 of the Epstein-Barr virus, and gO or UL128-131 of the Human cytomegalovirus. In contrast, glycoproteins gM or gM/gN of herpesvirus inhibit fusion. We describe the molecular mechanisms of glycoprotein-induced fusion and entry of herpesviruses. It will be helpful to further study the pathogenic mechanism of herpesvirus.

  13. The Beet Cyst Nematode Heterodera schachtii Modulates the Expression of WRKY Transcription Factors in Syncytia to Favour Its Development in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad Amjad; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Kreil, David P.; Bohlmann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Cyst nematodes invade the roots of their host plants as second stage juveniles and induce a syncytium which is the only source of nutrients throughout their life. A recent transcriptome analysis of syncytia induced by the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots has shown that thousands of genes are up-regulated or down-regulated in syncytia as compared to root segments from uninfected plants. Among the down-regulated genes are many which code for WRKY transcription factors. Arabidopsis contains 66 WRKY genes with 59 represented by the ATH1 GeneChip. Of these, 28 were significantly down-regulated and 6 up-regulated in syncytia as compared to control root segments. We have studied here the down-regulated genes WRKY6, WRKY11, WRKY17 and WRKY33 in detail. We confirmed the down-regulation in syncytia with promoter::GUS lines. Using various overexpression lines and mutants it was shown that the down-regulation of these WRKY genes is important for nematode development, probably through interfering with plant defense reactions. In case of WRKY33, this might involve the production of the phytoalexin camalexin. PMID:25033038

  14. Increase in morphine antinociceptive activity by a P-glycoprotein inhibitor in cisplatin-induced neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Balayssac, David; Cayre, Anne; Ling, Bing; Maublant, Jean; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Eschalier, Alain; Coudoré, François; Authier, Nicolas

    2009-11-06

    Pain from anticancer drugs-induced neuropathies is difficult to treat and can significantly alter the patient's quality of life. These neuropathies are considered relatively resistant to conventional analgesic drugs (opioids). Opioids are also P-glycoprotein substrates and it has been demonstrated that the P-glycoprotein is linked to the integrity of blood-brain barrier protecting the nervous system. Previous works presented an increase of P-glycoprotein in vincristine- and cisplatin-induced neuropathy which could potentially decrease opioid efficiency. To test this hypothesis, the efflux inhibition of P-glycoprotein and the antinociceptive effect of morphine were assessed in normal and cisplatin-induced neuropathic rats after the administration of the P-glycoprotein inhibitor (R101933). R101933 (20 mg/kg) inhibited significantly the efflux transporter under the condition of the study and had no analgesic effect. Nociceptive thresholds were measured by the paw pressure test. R101933 (20 mg/kg) enhanced antinociceptive activity of morphine (0.5 mg/kg) to a maximum of +58% and +35%, respectively compared with control animals and animals treated by morphine alone (0.5 mg/kg). R101933 increased morphine (2 mg/kg) antinociceptive activity to a maximum of +105% compared with control animals and to a maximum of +41% compared with morphine alone (2 mg/kg). This study demonstrated that cisplatin-induced neuropathy may present a particular pathophysiology with a multidrug resistance, of the central nervous system, to analgesics. This resistance can be blocked by a P-glycoprotein inhibitor which may enhance analgesia of low doses of morphine.

  15. Characterization of the 92,000-dalton glycoprotein induced by herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Marsden, H S; Buckmaster, A; Palfreyman, J W; Hope, R G; Minson, A C

    1984-05-01

    Evidence is presented showing that the 92,000-dalton glycoprotein (g92K) induced by herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 has properties distinct from those assigned to any other HSV glycoprotein. First, the carbohydrate composition and extent of sulfation differ from those of glycoproteins D and E. Second, two clonally unrelated monoclonal antibodies, AP1 and LP5, shown in this paper to specifically immunoprecipitate g92K, do not react with any of the known processed forms of glycoproteins B, C, D, and E. Third, by using HSV type 1/HSV type 2 intertypic recombinants and a simple radioimmunoassay, the target antigen of the two monoclonal antibodies was shown to map in the same region as g92K (0.846 to 0.924). Fourth, the intertypic recombinant R12-3 was shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of infected cells to induce the HSV type 2 g92K and HSV type 1 gD and GE, whereas R12-1, which did not induce g92K, induced HSV-2 gE and an altered gD, providing genetic evidence that g92K is encoded, at least in part, by a different region of the genome from that encoding gD and gE.

  16. Regulation of HSV glycoprotein induced cascade of events governing cell-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Atanasiu, Doina; Saw, Wan Ting; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H

    2016-09-14

    Receptor dependent HSV-induced fusion requires glycoproteins gD, gH/gL, and gB. Our current model posits that during fusion receptor-activated conformational changes in gD activate gH/gL, which subsequently triggers transformation of the pre-fusion form of gB into a fusogenic state. To examine the role of each glycoprotein in receptor dependent cell-cell fusion we took advantage of our discovery that fusion by wild type HSV-2 glycoproteins occurs twice as fast as that achieved by HSV-1 glycoproteins. By sequentially swapping each glycoprotein between the two serotypes, we established that fusion speed was governed by gH/gL, with gH being the main contributor. While the mutant forms of gB fuse at distinct rates that are dictated by their molecular structure, these restrictions can be overcome by gH2/gL2, thereby enhancing their activity. We also found that deregulated forms of gD1 and gH2/gL2 can alter the fusogenic potential of gB, promoting cell fusion in the absence of a cellular receptor and that deregulated forms of gB can drive the fusion machinery to even higher levels. Low pH enhanced fusion by affecting the structure of both gB and gH/gL mutants. Together, our data highlight the complexity of the fusion machinery, the impact of the activation state of each glycoprotein on the fusion process and the critical role of gH/gL in regulating HSV induced fusion.

  17. Inactivated Recombinant Rabies Viruses Displaying Canine Distemper Virus Glycoproteins Induce Protective Immunity against Both Pathogens.

    PubMed

    da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; Hudacek, Andrew; Sawatsky, Bevan; Krämer, Beate; Yin, Xiangping; Schnell, Matthias J; von Messling, Veronika

    2017-04-15

    The development of multivalent vaccines is an attractive methodology for the simultaneous prevention of several infectious diseases in vulnerable populations. Both canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RABV) cause lethal disease in wild and domestic carnivores. While RABV vaccines are inactivated, the live-attenuated CDV vaccines retain residual virulence for highly susceptible wildlife species. In this study, we developed recombinant bivalent vaccine candidates based on recombinant vaccine strain rabies virus particles, which concurrently display the protective CDV and RABV glycoprotein antigens. The recombinant viruses replicated to near-wild-type titers, and the heterologous glycoproteins were efficiently expressed and incorporated in the viral particles. Immunization of ferrets with beta-propiolactone-inactivated recombinant virus particles elicited protective RABV antibody titers, and animals immunized with a combination of CDV attachment protein- and fusion protein-expressing recombinant viruses were protected from lethal CDV challenge. However, animals that were immunized with only a RABV expressing the attachment protein of CDV vaccine strain Onderstepoort succumbed to infection with a more recent wild-type strain, indicating that immune responses to the more conserved fusion protein contribute to protection against heterologous CDV strains.IMPORTANCE Rabies virus and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause high mortality rates and death in many carnivores. While rabies vaccines are inactivated and thus have an excellent safety profile and high stability, live-attenuated CDV vaccines can retain residual virulence in highly susceptible species. Here we generated recombinant inactivated rabies viruses that carry one of the CDV glycoproteins on their surface. Ferrets immunized twice with a mix of recombinant rabies viruses carrying the CDV fusion and attachment glycoproteins were protected from lethal CDV challenge, whereas all animals that received

  18. Effects of the hydrostatic pressure in in vitro beating cardiac syncytia in terms of kinematics (kinetic energy and beat frequency) and syncytia geometrical-functional classification.

    PubMed

    Fassina, Lorenzo; Di Grazia, Antonio; Naro, Fabio; Aguanno, Salvatore; Cornacchione, Marisa; Cusella De Angelis, Maria Gabriella; Sardi, Francesca; Magenes, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Many important observations and discoveries in heart physiology have been made possible using the isolated heart method of Langendorff, e.g. the discovery of the very famous Frank-Starling law of the heart. Nevertheless, the Langendorff's method has some limitations and disadvantages such as the probability of preconditioning and a high oxidative stress, leading to the deterioration of the contractile function. To avoid the preceding drawbacks associated to the use of a whole heart, we have alternatively used beating mouse cardiac syncytia cultured in vitro in order to assess the ergotropic and chronotropic effects of both increasing and decreasing hydrostatic pressures. To achieve the preceding aim, we have developed a method based on image processing analysis to evaluate the kinematics of that pressure-loaded beating syncytia starting from the video registration of their contraction movement. We have verified the Frank-Starling law of the heart in in vitro beating cardiac syncytia and we have obtained their geometrical-functional classification. The present method could be used in in vitro studies of beating cardiac patches, as alternative to the Langendorff's heart in biochemical, pharmacological, and physiology studies, and, especially, when the Langendorff's technique is inapplicable. Furthermore, the method could help, in heart tissue engineering and bioartificial heart researches, to "engineer the heart piece by piece".

  19. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein mediates apoptosis in activated PBMC by a mechanism dependent on gp41 function

    SciTech Connect

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali; Tompkins, Wayne A. . E-mail: Wayne_Tompkins@ncsu.edu

    2004-12-20

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes immunodeficiency in cats, which parallels HIV-1-induced immunodeficiency in humans. It has been established that HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates T cell loss via a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding. The Env glycoprotein of FIV, similar to HIV, requires CXCR4 binding for viral entry, as well as inducing membrane fusion leading to syncytia formation. However, the role of FIV Env in T cell loss and the molecular mechanisms governing this process have not been elucidated. We studied the role of Env glycoprotein in FIV-mediated T cell apoptosis in an in vitro model. Our studies demonstrate that membrane-expressed FIV Env induces apoptosis in activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding, as the process was inhibited by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, studies regarding the role of CD134, the recently identified primary receptor of FIV, suggest that binding to CD134 may not be important for induction of apoptosis in PBMC. However, inhibiting Env-mediated fusion post CXCR4 binding by FIV gp41-specific fusion inhibitor also inhibited apoptosis. Under similar conditions, a fusion-defective gp41 mutant was unable to induce apoptosis in activated PBMC. Our findings are the first report suggesting the potential of FIV Env to mediate apoptosis in bystander cells by a process that is dependent on gp41 function.

  20. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K.; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C. Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A.; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T.

    2016-01-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits. PMID:26849049

  1. Acidic pH-Induced Conformations and LAMP1 Binding of the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Spike.

    PubMed

    Li, Sai; Sun, Zhaoyang; Pryce, Rhys; Parsy, Marie-Laure; Fehling, Sarah K; Schlie, Katrin; Siebert, C Alistair; Garten, Wolfgang; Bowden, Thomas A; Strecker, Thomas; Huiskonen, Juha T

    2016-02-01

    Lassa virus is an enveloped, bi-segmented RNA virus and the most prevalent and fatal of all Old World arenaviruses. Virus entry into the host cell is mediated by a tripartite surface spike complex, which is composed of two viral glycoprotein subunits, GP1 and GP2, and the stable signal peptide. Of these, GP1 binds to cellular receptors and GP2 catalyzes fusion between the viral envelope and the host cell membrane during endocytosis. The molecular structure of the spike and conformational rearrangements induced by low pH, prior to fusion, remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the three-dimensional ultrastructure of Lassa virus using electron cryotomography. Sub-tomogram averaging yielded a structure of the glycoprotein spike at 14-Å resolution. The spikes are trimeric, cover the virion envelope, and connect to the underlying matrix. Structural changes to the spike, following acidification, support a viral entry mechanism dependent on binding to the lysosome-resident receptor LAMP1 and further dissociation of the membrane-distal GP1 subunits.

  2. A major stress-inducible Mr-42000 wall glycoprotein of French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Millar, D J; Slabas, A R; Sidebottom, C; Smith, C G; Allen, A K; Bolwell, G P

    1992-05-01

    A major wall protein of suspension-cultured cells of French bean has been isolated and characterised. It can be prepared from walls or the culture filtrate and in composition it is particularly rich in proline, valine and glutamic acid/glutamine and contains appreciable amounts of hydroxyproline. The N-terminus shows some glycosylation, while following chemical deglycosylation the first 38 residues were found to be identical to those of proline-rich proteins from soybean. However, the composition of the highly purified Mr-42000 bean protein differs considerably from the soybean proteins and must contain its own specific domains. An antibody was raised and used to demonstrate the inducibility of the Mr-42000 bean protein in response to elicitor action. The protein was found to be mainly localised in the intercellular spaces of the cortical cells of bean hypocotyls and at the wall-plasmalemma interface of xylem vessels, another potentially accessible compartment for pathogens. Following wounding, the protein was found to be generally distributed in the wall of epidermal and cortical cells of the hypocotyls. The Mr-42000 protein is cross reactive with antibodies raised to glycoproteins of the Rhizobium infection thread and the chitin-binding hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein, potato lectin. These common epitopes together with the previously demonstrated chitin-binding properties of the bean protein indicate a role in host-microbial interactions. Furthermore, the Mr-42000 protein itself bound to the growing hyphal tips of the bean pathogen, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

  3. A recombinant canine distemper virus expressing a modified rabies virus glycoprotein induces immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Jigui; Yuan, Daoli; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Jiazeng; Yi, Bao; Hou, Qiang; Mao, Yaping; Liu, Weiquan

    2015-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RV) are two important pathogens of the dog. CDV, a member of the morbillivirus genus, has shown promise as an expression vector. The glycoprotein from RV is a main contributor to protective immunity and capable of eliciting the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we recovered an attenuated strain of canine distemper virus and constructed a recombinant virus, rCDV-RV-G, expressing a modified (R333Q) rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G) of RV Flury strain LEP. RV-G expression by the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Furthermore, G was proved to be incorporated into the surface of CDV particles. While replication of the recombinant virus was slightly reduced compared with the parental CDV, it stably expressed the RV-G over ten serial passages. Inoculation of mice induced specific neutralizing antibodies against both RV-G and CDV. Therefore, the rCDV-RV-G has the potential as a vaccine that may be used to control rabies virus infection in dogs and other animals.

  4. The cell walls of syncytia formed by Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis thaliana are abundant in methyl-esterified pectin.

    PubMed

    Davies, Laura Jane; Urwin, Peter E

    2012-11-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes form a specialized feeding site, termed a syncytium, in the roots of host plants. Monoclonal antibodies to defined glycans, in addition to a cellulose-binding module, were used to characterize the cell walls of a functioning syncytia in situ. Cell walls of syncytia were found to contain cellulose, xyloglucan and mannan. Analysis of the pectin network revealed syncytial cell walls are abundant in homogalacturonan, which was heavily methyl-esterified. Arabinan was also detected and the results suggest the cell walls of syncytia are highly flexible.

  5. Surface glycoproteins of an African henipavirus induce syncytium formation in a cell line derived from an African fruit bat, Hypsignathus monstrosus.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Nadine; Hoffmann, Markus; Weis, Michael; Drexler, Jan Felix; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Winter, Christine; Corman, Victor Max; Gützkow, Tim; Drosten, Christian; Maisner, Andrea; Herrler, Georg

    2013-12-01

    Serological screening and detection of genomic RNA indicates that members of the genus Henipavirus are present not only in Southeast Asia but also in African fruit bats. We demonstrate that the surface glycoproteins F and G of an African henipavirus (M74) induce syncytium formation in a kidney cell line derived from an African fruit bat, Hypsignathus monstrosus. Despite a less broad cell tropism, the M74 glycoproteins show functional similarities to glycoproteins of Nipah virus.

  6. Pherophorins: a family of extracellular matrix glycoproteins from Volvox structurally related to the sex-inducing pheromone.

    PubMed

    Godl, K; Hallmann, A; Rappel, A; Sumper, M

    1995-01-01

    Pherophorins are extracellular matrix (ECM) glycoproteins from Volvox that share homology with the sex-inducing pheromone. A novel pherophorin (pherophorin III) was characterized both with respect to expression pattern and proteolytic processing in vivo. Furthermore, it was shown that the pherophorins represent a protein family of ECM glycoproteins exhibiting a modular composition: their N-terminally located domain is a homolog of a domain found in the ECM glycoprotein SSG 185. Together with SSG 185, pherophorin I is a main component of the cellular zone within the ECM. The Volvox genome contains a tandem arrangement of genes encoding pherophorin II-related polypeptides. Inhibition of proteolytic processing of pherophorin II and III in vivo appears to result in the suppression of sexual induction.

  7. An unusual dependence of human herpesvirus-8 glycoproteins-induced cell-to-cell fusion on heparan sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Vaibhav; Darmani, Nissar A.; Thrush, Gerald R.; Shukla, Deepak

    2009-12-18

    Human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is known to interact with cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) for entry into a target cell. Here we investigated the role of HS during HHV-8 glycoproteins-induced cell fusion. Interestingly, the observed fusion demonstrated an unusual dependence on HS as evident from following lines of evidence: (1) a significant reduction in cell-to-cell fusion occurred when target cells were treated with heparinase; (2) in a competition assay, when the effector cells expressing HHV-8 glycoproteins were challenged with soluble HS, cell-to-cell fusion was reduced; and, (3) co-expression of HHV-8 glycoproteins gH-gL on target cells resulted in inhibition of cell surface HS expression. Taken together, our results indicate that cell surface HS can play an additional role during HHV-8 pathogenesis.

  8. Overexpression of the transcription factor RAP2.6 leads to enhanced callose deposition in syncytia and enhanced resistance against the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyst nematodes invade the roots of their host plants as second stage juveniles and induce a syncytium which is their source of nutrients throughout their life. A transcriptome analysis of syncytia induced by the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots has shown that gene expression in the syncytium is different from that of the root with thousands of genes upregulated or downregulated. Among the downregulated genes are many which code for defense-related proteins. One gene which is strongly downregulated codes for the ethylene response transcription factor RAP2.6. The genome of Arabidopsis contains 122 ERF transcription factor genes which are involved in a variety of developmental and stress responses. Results Expression of RAP2.6 was studied with RT-PCR and a promoter::GUS line. During normal growth conditions the gene was expressed especially in roots and stems. It was inducible by Pseudomonas syringae but downregulated in syncytia from a very early time point on. Overexpression of the gene enhanced the resistance against H. schachtii which was seen by a lower number of nematodes developing on these plants as well as smaller syncytia and smaller female nematodes. A T-DNA mutant had a reduced RAP2.6 transcript level but this did not further increase the susceptibility against H. schachtii. Neither overexpression lines nor mutants had an effect on P. syringae. Overexpression of RAP2.6 led to an elevated expression of JA-responsive genes during early time points after infection by H. schachtii. Syncytia developing on overexpression lines showed enhanced deposition of callose. Conclusions Our results showed that H. schachtii infection is accompanied by a downregulation of RAP2.6. It seems likely that the nematodes use effectors to actively downregulate the expression of this and other defense-related genes to avoid resistance responses of the host plant. Enhanced resistance of RAP2.6 overexpression lines seemed to be due to enhanced

  9. A Glycoprotein in Shells of Conspecifics Induces Larval Settlement of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Hebert Ely; Hashimoto, Kyotaro; Yoshida, Asami; Hara, Kenji; Imai, Chisato Chris; Kitamura, Hitoshi; Satuito, Cyril Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Settlement of larvae of Crassostrea gigas on shell chips (SC) prepared from shells of 11 different species of mollusks was investigated. Furthermore, the settlement inducing compound in the shell of C. gigas was extracted and subjected to various treatments to characterize the chemical cue. C. gigas larvae settled on SC of all species tested except on Patinopecten yessoensis and Atrina pinnata. In SC of species that induced C. gigas larvae to settle, settlement was proportionate to the amount of SC supplied to the larvae. When compared to C. gigas SC, all species except Crassostrea nippona showed lower settlement inducing activities, suggesting that the cue may be more abundant or in a more available form to the larvae in shells of conspecific and C. nippona than in other species. The settlement inducing activity of C. gigas SC remained intact after antibiotic treatment. Extraction of C. gigas SC with diethyl ether (Et2O-ex), ethanol (EtOH-ex), and water (Aq-ex) did not induce larval settlement of C. gigas larvae. However, extraction of C. gigas SC with 2N of hydrochloric acid (HCl-ex) induced larval settlement that was at the same level as the SC. The settlement inducing compound in the HCl-ex was stable at 100°C but was destroyed or degraded after pepsin, trypsin, PNGase F and trifluoromethanesulfonic acid treatments. This chemical cue eluted between the molecular mass range of 45 and 150 kDa after gel filtration and revealed a major band at 55 kDa on the SDS-PAGE gel after staining with Stains-all. Thus, a 55 kDa glycoprotein component in the organic matrix of C. gigas shells is hypothesized to be the chemical basis of larval settlement on conspecifics. PMID:24349261

  10. A glycoprotein in shells of conspecifics induces larval settlement of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Hebert Ely; Hashimoto, Kyotaro; Yoshida, Asami; Hara, Kenji; Imai, Chisato Chris; Kitamura, Hitoshi; Satuito, Cyril Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Settlement of larvae of Crassostrea gigas on shell chips (SC) prepared from shells of 11 different species of mollusks was investigated. Furthermore, the settlement inducing compound in the shell of C. gigas was extracted and subjected to various treatments to characterize the chemical cue. C. gigas larvae settled on SC of all species tested except on Patinopecten yessoensis and Atrina pinnata. In SC of species that induced C. gigas larvae to settle, settlement was proportionate to the amount of SC supplied to the larvae. When compared to C. gigas SC, all species except Crassostrea nippona showed lower settlement inducing activities, suggesting that the cue may be more abundant or in a more available form to the larvae in shells of conspecific and C. nippona than in other species. The settlement inducing activity of C. gigas SC remained intact after antibiotic treatment. Extraction of C. gigas SC with diethyl ether (Et2O-ex), ethanol (EtOH-ex), and water (Aq-ex) did not induce larval settlement of C. gigas larvae. However, extraction of C. gigas SC with 2N of hydrochloric acid (HCl-ex) induced larval settlement that was at the same level as the SC. The settlement inducing compound in the HCl-ex was stable at 100°C but was destroyed or degraded after pepsin, trypsin, PNGase F and trifluoromethanesulfonic acid treatments. This chemical cue eluted between the molecular mass range of 45 and 150 kDa after gel filtration and revealed a major band at 55 kDa on the SDS-PAGE gel after staining with Stains-all. Thus, a 55 kDa glycoprotein component in the organic matrix of C. gigas shells is hypothesized to be the chemical basis of larval settlement on conspecifics.

  11. A recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus expressing the envelope glycoprotein of Hantaan virus induced protective immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hantaviruses cause acute hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS). Currently, several types of inactivated HFRS vaccines are widely used, however the limited ability of these immunogen to elicit neutralizing antibodies restricts vaccine efficacy. Development of an effective vaccine to overcome this weakness is must. Methods In the present study, a recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus bearing the hantaan virus (HTNV) envelope glycoproteins (GP), rLV-M, was constructed. C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the rLV-M and a series of immunological assays were conducted to determine the immunogenicity of the recombinant pseudotyped lentivirus. The humoral and cell-mediated immune responses induced by rLV-M were compared with those of the inactivated HFRS vaccine. Results Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) showed the rLV-M expressed target proteins in HEK-293cells. In mice, the rLV-M efficiently induced GP-specific humoral responses and protection against HTNV infection. Furthermore, the rLV-M induced higher neutralizing antibody titers than the inactivated HFRS vaccine control. Conclusions The results indicated the potential of using a pseudotyped lentivirus as a delivery vector for a hantavirus vaccine immunogen. PMID:24093752

  12. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-01

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection.

  13. Development of decision tree models for substrates, inhibitors, and inducers of p-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hammann, Felix; Gutmann, Heike; Jecklin, Ursula; Maunz, Andreas; Helma, Christoph; Drewe, Juergen

    2009-05-01

    In silico classification of new compounds for certain properties is a useful tool to guide further experiments or compound selection. Interaction of new compounds with the efflux pump P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an important drug property determining tissue distribution and the potential for drug-drug interactions. We present three datasets on substrate, inhibitor, and inducer activities for P-gp (n = 471) obtained from a literature search which we compared to an existing evaluation of the Prestwick Chemical Library with the calcein-AM assay (retrieved from PubMed). Additionally, we present decision tree models of these activities with predictive accuracies of 77.7 % (substrates), 86.9 % (inhibitors), and 90.3 % (inducers) using three algorithms (CHAID, CART, and C4.5). We also present decision tree models of the calcein-AM assay (79.9 %). Apart from a comprehensive dataset of P-gp interacting compounds, our study provides evidence of the efficacy of logD descriptors and of two algorithms not commonly used in pharmacological QSAR studies (CART and CHAID).

  14. Reversibility of thrombin-induced decrease in platelet glycoprotein Ib function.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Menashi, S; Garcia, I; Cramer, E M; Li, H; Tenza, D; De Romeuf, C; Soria, J; Soria, C

    1993-09-01

    Thrombin induces a redistribution of glycoprotein (GP) Ib/GP IX complex from the platelet surface into the surface connected canalicular system (SCCS). This redistribution results in a reduced interaction of platelet GP Ib with von Willebrand factor (vWF) bound to subendothelium leading to impaired platelet adhesion. In this study we show that the platelet aggregation and degranulation require concentrations of thrombin above 0.05 U/ml, while the decrease in GP Ib function (about 50% of control value), as determined by ristocetin induced platelet agglutination, can be induced by lower concentrations (0.01-0.04 U/ml). Moreover, we show that when adding thrombin inhibitors to the platelets preincubated with < 0.04 U/ml thrombin for 5 min, their agglutinability by ristocetin was gradually recovered within 30 min, indicating that in these conditions the decrease in platelet adhesiveness is reversible. Immuno-electromicroscopic study showed that this restoration of platelet GP Ib function was associated with a reversed translocation of GP Ib from the SCCS to the plasma membrane. The data obtained from counting gold particles showed that the ratio of GP Ib immunolabelling on the external membrane versus that on the SCCS was 3.31 +/- 0.90 for resting platelets, down-regulated to 0.84 +/- 0.13 (P < 0.05 versus resting platelets) for the platelets treated with 0.04 U/ml thrombin and returned to 2.63 +/- 2.21 (P > 0.05 versus resting platelets) after incubation for 30 min with hirudin. However, the translocation of GP Ib was poorly reversed by thrombin inhibitors when higher concentrations of thrombin were used which induced platelet aggregation and large extent of degranulation. We conclude that thrombin affects platelets in a dose dependent manner, and that at low concentrations the decrease in platelet GP Ib related function is a reversible phenomenon.

  15. Extracellular Signals induce Glycoprotein M6a Clustering of Lipid-rafts and associated Signaling Molecules.

    PubMed

    Honda, Atsuko; Ito, Yasuyuki; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Matsushita, Natsuki; Nozumi, Motohiro; Tabata, Hidenori; Takeuchi, Kosei; Igarashi, Michihiro

    2017-03-08

    Lipid-raft domains, where sphingolipids and cholesterol are enriched, concentrate signaling molecules. To examine how signaling protein complexes are clustered in rafts, we focused on the functions of glycoprotein M6a (GPM6a), which is expressed at a high concentration in developing mouse neurons. Using imaging of lipid-rafts, we found that GPM6a congregated in rafts in a GPM6a palmitoylation-dependent manner, thereby contributing to lipid-raft clustering. Additionally, we found that signaling proteins downstream of GPM6a, i.e., Rufy3, Rap2, and Tiam2/STEF, accumulated in lipid-rafts in a GPM6a-dependent manner, and that they were essential for laminin-dependent polarity during neurite formation in neuronal development. In utero RNAi targeting of GPM6a resulted in abnormally polarized neurons with multiple neurites. These results demonstrate that GPM6a induces the clustering of lipid-rafts, which supports the raft aggregation of its associated downstream molecules for acceleration of neuronal polarity determination. Thus, GPM6a acts as a signal transducer that responds to extracellular signals.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTLipid-raft domains, where sphingolipids and cholesterol are enriched, concentrate signaling molecules. We focused on glycoprotein M6a (GPM6a), which is expressed at a high concentration in developing neurons. Using imaging of lipid-rafts, we found that GPM6a congregated in rafts in a palmitoylation-dependent manner, thereby contributing to lipid-raft clustering. Additionally, we found that signaling proteins downstream of GPM6a accumulated in lipid-rafts in a GPM6a-dependent manner, and that they were essential for laminin-dependent polarity during neurite formation. In utero RNAi targeting of GPM6a resulted in abnormally polarized neurons with multiple neurites. These results demonstrate that GPM6a induces the clustering of lipid-rafts, which supports the raft aggregation of its associated downstream molecules for acceleration of polarity determination

  16. Inhibition of P-glycoprotein by wogonin is involved with the potentiation of etoposide-induced apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eibai; Enomoto, Riyo; Koshiba, Chika; Hirano, Hiroyuki

    2009-08-01

    Etoposide induces apoptotic cell death in normal and cancer cells. This apoptosis plays a role not only in anticancer effects but also in adverse reactions, such as myelosuppression. Because we had previously found that wogonin, a flavone found in a plant, suppresses thymocyte apoptosis induced by etoposide, we examined the effect of this flavone in cancer cells. Wogonin significantly potentiated etoposide-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells. This flavone impaired the function of P-glycoprotein and then increased cellular content of etoposide in the cells. Thus, this flavone is likely to act as an inhibitor of P-glycoprotein and potentiate the apoptotic action of etoposide. On the other hand, wogonin inhibited etoposide-induced apoptosis in thymocytes, one of the normal cells. The potentiation by wogonin is likely to be a specific action for cancer cells but not normal cells. Therefore, this flavone may be used to reduce the excretion of the anticancer agents via P-glycoprotein and increase the pharmacological action of it in cancer cells. These results suggest that wogonin may play a role in overcoming multidrug resistance.

  17. Rapid and sensitive analyses of glycoprotein-derived oligosaccharides by liquid chromatography and laser-induced fluorometric detection capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Takehiro; Yodohsi, Masahiro; Yamane, Ayako; Kakehi, Kazuaki; Hayakawa, Takao; Suzuki, Shigeo

    2011-10-01

    Asparagine-type oligosaccharides are released from core proteins as N-glycosylamines in the initial step of the action of the peptide N(4)-(N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminyl)asparagine amidase F (PNGase F). The released N-glycosylamine-type oligosaccharides (which are exclusively present at least during the course of the enzyme reaction) could therefore be derivatized with amine-labeling reagents. Here we report a method using 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F) as a labeling reagent for glycosylamine-type oligosaccharides. We applied the method for the sensitive analysis of some oligosaccharide mixtures derived from well-characterized glycoproteins including human transferrin, α(1)-acid glycoprotein, bovine fetuin, and ribonuclease B. NBD-labeled oligosaccharides were successfully separated on an amide-bonded column or a diol-silica column. This labeling method included the release of oligosaccharides from glycoproteins and derivatization of oligosaccharides in a one-pot reaction and was completed within 3h. The method showed approximately fivefold higher sensitivity than that involving labeling with ethyl p-aminobenzoate (ABEE) in HPLC using fluorometric detection and a one order of magnitude higher response in ESI-LC/MS. We also applied this method for the sensitive analysis of glycoprotein-derived oligosaccharides by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorometric detection (LIF-CE). The limit of detection in HPLC and LIF-CE were 100fmol and 4fmol, respectively.

  18. Anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies in complex with β2 glycoprotein I induce platelet activation via two receptors: apolipoprotein E receptor 2' and glycoprotein I bα.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Gao, Fei; Lu, Donghe; Sun, Na; Yin, Xiaoxue; Jin, Meili; Liu, Yanhong

    2016-03-01

    Anti-β2 glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI ) antibodies are important contributors to thrombosis, especially in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). However, the mechanism by which anti-β2GPI antibodies are involved in the pathogenesis of thrombosis is not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the role of anti- β2GPI antibodies in complexes with β2GPI as mediators of platelet activation, which can serve as a potential source contributing to thrombosis. We examined the involvement of the apolipoprotein E receptor 2' (apoER2') and glycoprotein I ba (GP I ba) in platelet activation induced by the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex. The interaction between the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex and platelets was examined using in vitro methods, in which the Fc portion of the antibody was immobilized using protein A coated onto a microtiter plate. Platelet activation was assessed by measuring GPII b/III a activation and P-selectin expression and thromboxane B2 production as well as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Our results revealed that the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex was able to activate platelets, and this activation was inhibited by either the anti-GP I bα antibody or the apoER2' inhibitor. Results showed that the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex induced platelet activation via GPI ba and apoER2', which may then contribute to the prothrombotic tendency in APS patients.

  19. C3d enhanced DNA vaccination induced humoral immune response to glycoprotein C of pseudorabies virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Tiezhu; Fan Huiying; Tan Yadi; Xiao Shaobo; Ling Jieyu; Chen Huanchun; Guo Aizhen . E-mail: aizhen@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2006-09-08

    Murine C3d were utilized to enhance immunogenicity of pseudorabies virus (PrV) gC DNA vaccination. Three copies of C3d and four copies of CR2-binding domain M28{sub 4} were fused, respectively, to truncated gC gene encoding soluble glycoprotein C (sgC) in pcDNA3.1. BALB/c mice were, respectively, immunized with recombinant plasmids, blank vector, and inactivated vaccine. The antibody ELISA titer for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA was 49-fold more than that for sgC DNA, and the neutralizing antibody obtained 8-fold rise. Protection of mice from death after lethal PrV (316 LD{sub 5}) challenge was augmented from 25% to 100%. Furthermore, C3d fusion increased Th2-biased immune response by inducing IL-4 production. The IL-4 level for sgC-C3d{sub 3} DNA immunization approached that for the inactivated vaccine. Compared to C3d, M28 enhanced sgC DNA immunogenicity to a lesser extent. In conclusion, we demonstrated that murine C3d fusion significantly enhanced gC DNA immunity by directing Th1-biased to a balanced and more effective Th1/Th2 response.

  20. Glycoprotein D actively induces rapid internalization of two nectin-1 isoforms during herpes simplex virus entry

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, Katie M.; Krummenacher, Claude

    2010-03-30

    Entry of herpes simplex virus (HSV) occurs either by fusion at the plasma membrane or by endocytosis and fusion with an endosome. Binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to a receptor such as nectin-1 is essential in both cases. We show that virion gD triggered the rapid down-regulation of nectin-1 with kinetics similar to those of virus entry. In contrast, nectin-1 was not constitutively recycled from the surface of uninfected cells. Both the nectin-1alpha and beta isoforms were internalized in response to gD despite having different cytoplasmic tails. However, deletion of the nectin-1 cytoplasmic tail slowed down-regulation of nectin-1 and internalization of virions. These data suggest that nectin-1 interaction with a cytoplasmic protein is not required for its down-regulation. Overall, this study shows that gD binding actively induces the rapid internalization of various forms of nectin-1. We suggest that HSV activates a nectin-1 internalization pathway to use for endocytic entry.

  1. Carbon nanotubes instruct physiological growth and functionally mature syncytia: nongenetic engineering of cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Valentina; Cellot, Giada; Toma, Francesca Maria; Long, Carlin S; Caldwell, John H; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Turco, Antonio; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura; Mestroni, Luisa

    2013-07-23

    Myocardial tissue engineering currently represents one of the most realistic strategies for cardiac repair. We have recently discovered the ability of carbon nanotube scaffolds to promote cell division and maturation in cardiomyocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote cardiomyocyte growth and maturation by altering the gene expression program, implementing the cell electrophysiological properties and improving networking and maturation of functional syncytia. In our study, we combine microscopy, biological and electrophysiological methodologies, and calcium imaging, to verify whether neonatal rat ventricular myocytes cultured on substrates of multiwall carbon nanotubes acquire a physiologically more mature phenotype compared to control (gelatin). We show that the carbon nanotube substrate stimulates the induction of a gene expression profile characteristic of terminal differentiation and physiological growth, with a 2-fold increase of α-myosin heavy chain (P < 0.001) and upregulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase 2a. In contrast, markers of pathological hypertrophy remain unchanged (β-myosin heavy chain, skeletal α-actin, atrial natriuretic peptide). These modifications are paralleled by an increase of connexin-43 gene expression, gap junctions and functional syncytia. Moreover, carbon nanotubes appear to exert a protective effect against the pathologic stimulus of phenylephrine. Finally, cardiomyocytes on carbon nanotubes demonstrate a more mature electrophysiological phenotype of syncytia and intracellular calcium signaling. Thus, carbon nanotubes interacting with cardiomyocytes have the ability to promote physiological growth and functional maturation. These properties are unique in the current vexing field of tissue engineering, and offer unprecedented perspectives in the development of innovative therapies for cardiac repair.

  2. Relationship between excretion clearance of rhodamine 123 and P-glycoprotein (Pgp) expression induced by representative Pgp inducers.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Michiharu; Fukushima, Keizo; Togawa, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Katsukuni; Taki, Mari; Nishimura, Asako; Ito, Yukako; Sugioka, Nobuyuki; Shibata, Nobuhito; Takada, Kanji

    2006-04-01

    P-Glycoprotein (Pgp) locates in several tissues in the living body and acts as an efflux pump for many drugs. In this study, the usefulness of intravenous rhodamine 123 (Rho123) administration as a marker for detecting the inducing effect of Pgp by drugs was identified, and the relationship between excretion clearances of Rho123 via Pgp and its expression during treatment with the representative Pgp inducers rifampicin (RFP), dexamethasone (DEX) and St. John's Wort (SJW) were examined in rat liver, intestine and kidney. After pretreatment with RFP (10 mg/kg/d) for 4 d, DEX (50 mg/kg/d) for 4 d or SJW (15 mg/kg/d) for 7 d orally, the biliary excretion of Rho123 after intravenous administration (0.2 mg/kg) increased significantly by 40%, 55% and 14%, respectively, and the intestinal excretion increased significantly by 24%, 50% and 27%, respectively, as compared with the controls. In contrast, there were no notable changes in the urinary excretion of Rho123 among rats that received these inducers. Western blot analysis with a monoclonal antibody for Pgp (C219) showed that Pgp levels in the small intestine and liver in the inducer-treated rats increased markedly as compared with the controls. In addition, there was a significant correlation between the induction levels of Pgp in the liver or small intestine and their clearance ratios (r2=0.7583, p<0.05), but not in the kidney. These observations suggest that the excretion clearances of Rho123 from blood circulation to the small intestine or to the bile after its intravenous administration are useful indicators to assess the Pgp function in the presence of Pgp inducers.

  3. Abscisic acid- and stress-induced highly proline-rich glycoproteins regulate root growth in rice.

    PubMed

    Tseng, I-Chieh; Hong, Chwan-Yang; Yu, Su-May; Ho, Tuan-Hua David

    2013-09-01

    In the root of rice (Oryza sativa), abscisic acid (ABA) treatment, salinity, or water deficit stress induces the expression of a family of four genes, REPETITIVE PROLINE-RICH PROTEIN (RePRP). These genes encode two subclasses of novel proline-rich glycoproteins with highly repetitive PX₁PX₂ motifs, RePRP1 and RePRP2. RePRP orthologs exist only in monocotyledonous plants, and their functions are virtually unknown. Rice RePRPs are heavily glycosylated with arabinose and glucose on multiple hydroxyproline residues. They are significantly different from arabinogalactan proteins that have glycan chains composed of arabinose and galactose. Transient and stable expressions of RePRP-green fluorescent protein reveal that a fraction of this protein is localized to the plasma membrane. In rice roots, ABA treatment increases RePRP expression preferentially in the elongation zone. Overexpression of RePRP in transgenic rice reduces root cell elongation in the absence of ABA, similar to the effect of ABA on wild-type roots. Conversely, simultaneous knockdown of the expression of RePRP1 and RePRP2 reduces the root sensitivity to ABA, indicating that RePRP proteins play an essential role in ABA/stress regulation of root growth and development. Moreover, rice RePRPs specifically interact with a polysaccharide, arabinogalactan, in a dosage-dependent manner. It is suggested that RePRP1 and RePRP2 are functionally redundant suppressors of root cell expansion and probably act through interactions with cell wall components near the plasma membrane.

  4. P glycoprotein: a new mechanism to control drug-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    del Moral, R G; Olmo, A; Aguilar, M; O'Valle, F

    1998-01-01

    The role of P glycoprotein (P-gp) in kidney is now being explored, and under physiological conditions, this protein is thought to be an excretory pump of cationic xenobiotics and metabolites. Functionally, two different types of P-gp have been described, but only the class I has been related to drug transport, and its overexpression confers the multidrug resistance phenotype in tumoral cells. It has been proposed that P-gp is involved in the energy-dependent transport of substrates through the cell membrane (toxic metabolites, toxins, nutrients, ions, peptides, etc.)--like a 'hydrophobic molecule vacuum cleaner'. Several physiological functions have been attributed to P-gp: defense against xenobiotic aggression and transmembrane transport of prenylcysteine methyl esters, removing these cytotoxic metabolites from cells. A variety of substrates ranging from chemotherapeutics to steroid hormones, antibiotics, and calcium channel blockers can be transported by P-gp, suggesting the possible involvement of this protein in other unknown functions. Results from our group and others have suggested that overexpression of P-gp in renal tubular and mesangial cells prevents pharmacological nephrotoxicity by cyclosporin A (CsA). On the other hand CsA, a substrate of the pump, could act as a blocker in tubular cells by competitive inhibition. One relevant aspect in kidney is the possible relationship between P-gp and protein kinase C. Several reports suggest that protein kinase C may play a role in inducing the P-gp overexpression in cells under xenobiotic pressure, through activation of the ras oncoprotein family. This could be mediated directly by angiotensin II as a ras activator. This way, the detoxicant function of P-gp against products of the ras catabolism could mediate their accumulation when the 'vacuum cleaner' function is blocked by CsA or tacrolimus, contributing to the initial development of fibroblastic activation that leads to interstitial fibrosis associated with

  5. Characterization of African bat henipavirus GH-M74a glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Weis, Michael; Behner, Laura; Hoffmann, Markus; Krüger, Nadine; Herrler, Georg; Drosten, Christian; Drexler, Jan Felix; Dietzel, Erik; Maisner, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, novel henipavirus-related sequences have been identified in bats in Africa. To evaluate the potential of African bat henipaviruses to spread in non-bat mammalian cells, we compared the biological functions of the surface glycoproteins G and F of the prototype African henipavirus GH-M74a with those of the glycoproteins of Nipah virus (NiV), a well-characterized pathogenic member of the henipavirus genus. Glycoproteins are central determinants for virus tropism, as efficient binding of henipavirus G proteins to cellular ephrin receptors and functional expression of fusion-competent F proteins are indispensable prerequisites for virus entry and cell-to-cell spread. In this study, we analysed the ability of the GH-M74a G and F proteins to cause cell-to-cell fusion in mammalian cell types readily permissive to NiV or Hendra virus infections. Except for limited syncytium formation in a bat cell line derived from Hypsignathus monstrosus, HypNi/1.1 cells, we did not observe any fusion. The highly restricted fusion activity was predominantly due to the F protein. Whilst GH-M74a G protein was found to interact with the main henipavirus receptor ephrin-B2 and induced syncytia upon co-expression with heterotypic NiV F protein, GH-M74a F protein did not cause evident fusion in the presence of heterotypic NiV G protein. Pulse-chase and surface biotinylation analyses revealed delayed F cleavage kinetics with a reduced expression of cleaved and fusion-active GH-M74a F protein on the cell surface. Thus, the F protein of GH-M74a showed a functional defect that is most likely caused by impaired trafficking leading to less efficient proteolytic activation and surface expression.

  6. Shoot inversion inhibition of stem elongation in Pharbitis nil: a possible role for ethylene-induced glycoprotein and lignin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, T. K.; Cline, M. G.

    1987-01-01

    Inversion of the upper shoot of Pharbitis nil results in the inhibition of elongation in the inverted stem. The objective of the present study was to determine how shoot inversion-induced gravity stress inhibited elongation and to elucidate the possible role of ethylene-induced glycoprotein and lignin in this process. Determinations of hydroxyproline, peroxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), phenol, and lignin content/activity were carried out by appropriate spectrophotometric methods. It was found that inversion and Ethrel treatments of upright shoots caused significant increases in hydroxyproline content, peroxidase, and PAL activity in 12 hours and in phenol and lignin contents in 24 hours. All of these increases except for that of cytoplasmic peroxidase activity were partially reversed by AgNO3, the ethylene action inhibitor. It is concluded that possible cross-linking associated with the accumulation of the ethylene-induced hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein and lignin may be responsible for the later stages of cessation of elongation in the inverted Pharbitis shoot.

  7. Systemic Delivery of Fusogenic Membrane Glycoprotein-expressing Neural Stem Cells to Selectively Kill Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Detu; Lam, Dang Hoang; Purwanti, Yovita Ida; Goh, Sal Lee; Wu, Chunxiao; Zeng, Jieming; Fan, Weimin; Wang, Shu

    2013-01-01

    Intravenously injected neural stem cells (NSCs) can infiltrate both primary and metastatic tumor sites; thus, they are attractive tumor-targeting vehicles for delivering anticancer agents. However, because the systemic distribution of the injected NSCs involves normal organs and might induce off-target actions leading to unintended side effects, clinical applications of this approach is impeded. Given that the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) can promote the formation of multinucleated syncytia to kill cells in a pH-dependent manner, we engineered a pH sensor of VSV-G and generated a novel VSV-G mutant that efficiently promotes syncytium formation at the tumor extracellular pH (pHe) but not at pH 7.4. Using transduced NSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the VSV-G mutant was delivered into mice with metastatic breast cancers in the lung through tail vein injection. Compared with the conventional stem cell-based gene therapy that uses the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) suicide gene, this treatment did not display toxicity to normal non-targeted organs while retaining therapeutic effects in tumor-bearing organs. Our findings demonstrate the effectiveness of a new approach for achieving tumor-selective killing effects following systemic stem cell administration. Its potential in stem cell-based gene therapy for metastatic cancer is worthy of further exploration. PMID:23752308

  8. Protective Effect of Prosopis cineraria Against N-Nitrosodiethylamine Induced Liver Tumor by Modulating Membrane Bound Enzymes and Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Pakkir Maideen, Naina Mohamed; Velayutham, Ravichandiran; Manavalan, Gobinath

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the protective effect of methanol extract of Prosopis cineraria (MPC) against N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN, 200mg/kg) induced Phenobarbital promoted experimental liver tumors in male Wistar rats. Methods: The rats were divided into four groups, each group consisting of six animals. Group 1 served as control animals. Liver tumor was induced in group 2, 3, and 4 and Group 3 animals received MPC 200mg/kg and Group 4 animals received MPC 400mg/kg. Results: Administration of DEN has brought down the levels of membrane bound enzymes like Na+/ K+ ATPase, Mg2+ ATPase and Ca2+ATPase which were later found to be increased by the administration of Prosopis cineraria (200 and 400mg/kg) in dose dependent manner. The MPC extract also suppressed the levels of glycoproteins like Hexose, Hexosamine and Sialic acid when compared to liver tumor bearing animals. Conclusion: Our study suggests that MPC may extend its protective role by modulating the levels of membrane bound enzymes and suppressing glycoprotein levels. PMID:24312790

  9. Entamoeba histolytica P-glycoprotein (EhPgp) inhibition, induce trophozoite acidification and enhance programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Medel Flores, Olivia; Gómez García, Consuelo; Sánchez Monroy, Virgina; Villalba Magadaleno, José D'Artagnan; Nader García, Elvira; Pérez Ishiwara, D Guillermo

    2013-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is induced in Entamoeba histolytica by a variety of stimuli in vitro and in vivo. In mammals, intracellular acidification serves as a global switch for inactivating cellular processes and initiates molecular mechanisms implicated in the destruction of the genome. In contrast, intracellular alkalinization produced by P-glycoprotein overexpression in multidrug-resistant cells has been related to apoptosis resistance. Our previous studies showed that overexpression of E. histolytica P-glycoprotein (PGP) altered chloride-dependent currents and triggered trophozoite swelling, the reverse process of cell shrinkage produced during PCD. Here we showed that antisense inhibition of PGP expression produced a synchronous death of trophozoites and the enhancement of biochemical and morphological characteristics of PCD induced by G418. The nucleus was contracted, and the nuclear membrane was disrupted. Moreover, chromatin was extensively fragmented. Ca(2+) concentration was increased, while the intracellular pH (ipH) was acidified. In contrast, PGP overexpression prevented intracellular acidification and circumvented the apoptotic effect of G418.

  10. Diesel exhaust particles induce oxidative stress, proinflammatory signaling, and P-glycoprotein up-regulation at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Hartz, Anika M S; Bauer, Björn; Block, Michelle L; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Miller, David S

    2008-08-01

    Here, we report that diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), a major constituent of urban air pollution, affect blood-brain barrier function at the tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. Isolated rat brain capillaries exposed to DEPs showed increased expression and transport activity of the key drug efflux transporter, P-glycoprotein (6 h EC(50) was approximately 5 microg/ml). Up-regulation of P-glycoprotein was abolished by blocking transcription or protein synthesis. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase or pretreatment of capillaries with radical scavengers ameliorated DEP-induced P-glycoprotein up-regulation, indicating a role for reactive oxygen species in signaling. DEP exposure also increased brain capillary tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels. DEP-induced P-glycoprotein up-regulation was abolished when TNF-receptor 1 (TNF-R1) was blocked and was not evident in experiments with capillaries from TNF-R1 knockout mice. Inhibition of JNK, but not NF-kappaB, blocked DEP-induced P-glycoprotein up-regulation, indicating a role for AP-1 in the signaling pathway. Consistent with this, DEPs increased phosphorylation of c-jun. Together, our results show for the first time that a component of air pollution, DEPs, alters blood-brain barrier function through oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine production. These experiments disclose a novel blood-brain barrier signaling pathway, with clear implications for environmental toxicology, CNS pathology, and the pharmacotherapy of CNS disorders.

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 1-induced hemagglutination: glycoprotein C mediates virus binding to erythrocyte surface heparan sulfate.

    PubMed Central

    Trybala, E; Svennerholm, B; Bergström, T; Olofsson, S; Jeansson, S; Goodman, J L

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can cause agglutination of murine erythrocytes (E. Trybala, Z. Larski, and J. Wisniewski, Arch. Virol. 113:89-94, 1990). We now demonstrate that the mechanism of this hemagglutination is glycoprotein C-mediated binding of virus to heparan sulfate moieties at the surface of erythrocytes. Hemagglutination was found to be a common property of all gC-expressing laboratory strains and clinical isolates of HSV-1 tested. Mutants of HSV-1 deficient in glycoprotein C caused no specific hemagglutination, whereas their derivatives transfected with a functional gC-1 gene, thus reconstituting gC expression, regained full hemagglutinating activity. Hemagglutination activity was inhibited by antibodies against gC-1 but not by antibodies with specificity for glycoproteins gB, gD, or gE or by murine antiserum raised against the MP strain of HSV-1, which is gC deficient. Finally, purified gC-1 protein, like whole HSV-1 virions, showed high hemagglutinating activity which was inhibited by heparan sulfate and/or heparin and was completely prevented by pretreatment of erythrocytes with heparitinase, providing evidence that gC-1 mediates hemagglutination by binding to heparan sulfate at the cell surface. Thus, HSV-1-induced hemagglutination is gC-1 dependent and resembles the recently proposed mechanism by which HSV-1 attaches to surface heparans on susceptible cells, providing a simple model for initial events in the virus-cell interaction. Images PMID:8382294

  12. CD4-Induced Antibodies Promote Association of the HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein with CD4-Binding Site Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Fellinger, Christoph H.; Prasad, Neha R.; Zhou, Amber S.; Kondur, Hema R.; Joshi, Vinita R.; Quinlan, Brian D.; Farzan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is a trimer of gp120/gp41 heterodimers that mediates viral entry. Env binds cellular CD4, an association which stabilizes a conformation favorable to its subsequent association with a coreceptor, typically CCR5 or CXCR4. The CD4- and coreceptor-binding sites serve as epitopes for two classes of HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies: CD4-binding site (CD4bs) and CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, respectively. Here we observed that, at a fixed total concentration, mixtures of the CD4i antibodies (E51 or 412d) and the CD4bs antibody VRC01 neutralized the HIV-1 isolates 89.6, ADA, SG3, and SA32 more efficiently than either antibody alone. We found that E51, and to a lesser extent 412d and 17b, promoted association of four CD4bs antibodies to the Env trimer but not to monomeric gp120. We further demonstrated that the binding of the sulfotyrosine-binding pocket by CCR5mim2-Ig was sufficient for promoting CD4bs antibody binding to Env. Interestingly, the relationship is not reciprocal: CD4bs antibodies were not as efficient as CD4-Ig at promoting E51 or 412d binding to Env trimer. Consistent with these observations, CD4-Ig, but none of the CD4bs antibodies tested, substantially increased HIV-1 infection of a CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cell line. We conclude that the ability of CD4i antibodies to promote VRC01 association with Env trimers accounts for the increase potency of VRC01 and CD4i antibody mixtures. Our data further suggest that potent CD4bs antibodies avoid inducing Env conformations that bind CD4i antibodies or CCR5. IMPORTANCE Potent HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies can prevent viral transmission and suppress an ongoing infection. Here we show that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which recognize the conserved coreceptor-binding site of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env), can increase the association of Env with potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that recognize the CD4-binding site (CD4bs antibodies). We further show that

  13. Structural modification of P-glycoprotein induced by OH radicals: Insights from atomistic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosravian, N.; Kamaraj, B.; Neyts, E. C.; Bogaerts, A.

    2016-02-01

    This study reports on the possible effects of OH radical impact on the transmembrane domain 6 of P-glycoprotein, TM6, which plays a crucial role in drug binding in human cells. For the first time, we employ molecular dynamics (MD) simulations based on the self-consistent charge density functional tight binding (SCC-DFTB) method to elucidate the potential sites of fragmentation and mutation in this domain upon impact of OH radicals, and to obtain fundamental information about the underlying reaction mechanisms. Furthermore, we apply non-reactive MD simulations to investigate the long-term effect of this mutation, with possible implications for drug binding. Our simulations indicate that the interaction of OH radicals with TM6 might lead to the breaking of C-C and C-N peptide bonds, which eventually cause fragmentation of TM6. Moreover, according to our simulations, the OH radicals can yield mutation in the aromatic ring of phenylalanine in TM6, which in turn affects its structure. As TM6 plays an important role in the binding of a range of cytotoxic drugs with P-glycoprotein, any changes in its structure are likely to affect the response of the tumor cell in chemotherapy. This is crucial for cancer therapies based on reactive oxygen species, such as plasma treatment.

  14. Residues in the gp41 Ectodomain Regulate HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Conformational Transitions Induced by gp120-Directed Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Beatriz; Alsahafi, Nirmin; Debbeche, Olfa; Prévost, Jérémie; Ding, Shilei; Chapleau, Jean-Philippe; Herschhorn, Alon; Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy; Melillo, Bruno; Gu, Christopher; Zeng, Xin; Mao, Youdong; Smith, Amos B; Sodroski, Joseph; Finzi, Andrés

    2017-03-01

    Interactions between the gp120 and gp41 subunits of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer maintain the metastable unliganded form of the viral spike. Binding of gp120 to the receptor, CD4, changes the Env conformation to promote gp120 interaction with the second receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4. CD4 binding also induces the transformation of Env into the prehairpin intermediate, in which the gp41 heptad repeat 1 (HR1) coiled coil is assembled at the trimer axis. In nature, HIV-1 Envs must balance the requirements to maintain the noncovalent association of gp120 with gp41 and to evade the host antibody response with the need to respond to CD4 binding. Here we show that the gp41 HR1 region contributes to gp120 association with the unliganded Env trimer. Changes in particular amino acid residues in the gp41 HR1 region decreased the efficiency with which Env moved from the unliganded state. Thus, these gp41 changes decreased the sensitivity of HIV-1 to cold inactivation and ligands that require Env conformational changes to bind efficiently. Conversely, these gp41 changes increased HIV-1 sensitivity to small-molecule entry inhibitors that block Env conformational changes induced by CD4. Changes in particular gp41 HR1 amino acid residues can apparently affect the relative stability of the unliganded state and CD4-induced conformations. Thus, the gp41 HR1 region contributes to the association with gp120 and regulates Env transitions from the unliganded state to downstream conformations.IMPORTANCE The development of an efficient vaccine able to prevent HIV infection is a worldwide priority. Knowledge of the envelope glycoprotein structure and the conformational changes that occur after receptor engagement will help researchers to develop an immunogen able to elicit antibodies that block HIV-1 transmission. Here we identify residues in the HIV-1 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein that stabilize the unliganded state by modulating the

  15. Duck enteritis virus glycoprotein D and B DNA vaccines induce immune responses and immunoprotection in Pekin ducks.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Cao, Yongsheng; Cui, Lihong; Ma, Bo; Mu, Xiaoyu; Li, Yanwei; Zhang, Zhihui; Li, Dan; Wei, Wei; Gao, Mingchun; Wang, Junwei

    2014-01-01

    DNA vaccine is a promising strategy for protection against virus infection. However, little is known on the efficacy of vaccination with two plasmids for expressing the glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) of duck enteritis virus (DEV) in inducing immune response and immunoprotection against virulent virus infection in Pekin ducks. In this study, two eukaryotic expressing plasmids of pcDNA3.1-gB and pcDNA3.1-gD were constructed. Following transfection, the gB and gD expressions in DF1 cells were detected. Groups of ducks were vaccinated with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, and boosted with the same vaccine on day 14 post primary vaccination. We found that intramuscular vaccinations with pcDNA3.1-gB and/or pcDNA3.1-gD, but not control plasmid, stimulated a high frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in Pekin ducks, particularly with both plasmids. Similarly, vaccination with these plasmids, particularly with both plasmids, promoted higher levels of neutralization antibodies against DEV in Pekin ducks. More importantly, vaccination with both plasmids significantly reduced the virulent DEV-induced mortality in Pekin ducks. Our data indicated that vaccination with plasmids for expressing both gB and gD induced potent cellular and humoral immunity against DEV in Pekin ducks. Therefore, this vaccination strategy may be used for the prevention of DEV infection in Pekin ducks.

  16. Anaplasma phagocytophilum induces Ixodes scapularis ticks to express an antifreeze glycoprotein gene that enhances their survival in the cold

    PubMed Central

    Neelakanta, Girish; Sultana, Hameeda; Fish, Durland; Anderson, John F.; Fikrig, Erol

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, Ixodes scapularis ticks overwinter in the Northeast and Upper Midwest and transmit the agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, among other pathogens. We now show that the presence of A. phagocytophilum in I. scapularis ticks increases their ability to survive in the cold. We identified an I. scapularis antifreeze glycoprotein, designated IAFGP, and demonstrated via RNAi knockdown studies the importance of IAFGP for the survival of I. scapularis ticks in a cold environment. Transfection studies also show that IAFGP increased the viability of yeast cells subjected to cold temperature. Remarkably, A. phagocytophilum induced the expression of iafgp, thereby increasing the cold tolerance and survival of I. scapularis. These data define a molecular basis for symbiosis between a human pathogenic bacterium and its arthropod vector and delineate what we believe to be a new pathway that may be targeted to alter the life cycle of this microbe and its invertebrate host. PMID:20739755

  17. SJSZ glycoprotein (38 kDa) inhibits cell cycle and oxidative stress in N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2013-05-01

    The initiation stage of liver cancer is closely related to abnormal cell proliferation as observed for other types of carcinogenesis. Recently, we isolated a glycoprotein from Styrax japonica Siebold et al Zuccarini (SJSZ glycoprotein), which consists of a carbohydrate moiety (52.64%) and a protein moiety (47.36%). In this study, the antitumoric mechanism of SJSZ glycoprotein during the initiation stage in N-Methyl-N`-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG; 40 mg/kg, BW)-induced ICR was investigated. First, we evaluated the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), and activities of antioxidative enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT)] in mouse liver tissue and serum. The alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), cell cycle-related factors [cyclin D1/ cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4], cell cycle inhibitors (CKIs; p53, p21, and p27), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were then assessed using Western Blot analysis. The results of this analysis showed that the SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg, BW) decreased the levels of LDH, ALT, TBARS, and the expression of AFP but it increased the activity of hepatic anti-oxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx and CAT). In addition, the SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg, BW)was shown to decrease the expression of cyclin D1/CDK4 and PCNA and increase the expression of CKIs (p53, p21, and p27). The results in this study indicate that the SJSZ glycoprotein displays anti-oxidative stress and anti-cell proliferation activity in MNNG induced ICR.

  18. Effect of multidrug resistance 1/P-glycoprotein on the hypoxia-induced multidrug resistance of human laryngeal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dawei; Zhou, Liang; Huang, Jiameng; Xiao, Xiyan

    2016-08-01

    In a previous study, it was demonstrated that hypoxia upregulated the multidrug resistance (MDR) of laryngeal cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs, with multidrug resistance 1 (MDR1)/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression also being upregulated. The present study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of MDR1/P-gp on hypoxia-induced MDR in human laryngeal carcinoma cells. The sensitivity of laryngeal cancer cells to multiple drugs and cisplatin-induced apoptosis was determined by CCK-8 assay and Annexin-V/propidium iodide staining analysis, respectively. The accumulation of rhodamine 123 (Rh123) in the cells served as an estimate of drug accumulation and was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). MDR1/P-gp expression was inhibited using interference RNA, and the expression of the MDR1 gene was analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. As a result, the sensitivity to multiple chemotherapeutic agents and the apoptosis rate of the hypoxic laryngeal carcinoma cells increased following a decrease in MDR1/P-gp expression (P<0.05). Additionally, FCM analysis of fluorescence intensity indicated that the downregulated expression of MDR1/P-gp markedly increased intracellular Rh123 accumulation (P<0.05). Such results suggest that MDR1/P-gp serves an important role in regulating hypoxia-induced MDR in human laryngeal carcinoma cells through a decrease in intracellular drug accumulation.

  19. The Myeloid LSECtin Is a DAP12-Coupled Receptor That Is Crucial for Inflammatory Response Induced by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dianyuan; Han, Xintao; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Hualei; Yang, Zaopeng; Liu, Di; Han, Ke; Liu, Jing; Wang, Xiaowen; Yang, Wenting; Dong, Qingyang; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu; Tang, Li; He, Fuchu

    2016-01-01

    Fatal Ebola virus infection is characterized by a systemic inflammatory response similar to septic shock. Ebola glycoprotein (GP) is involved in this process through activating dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages. However, the mechanism is unclear. Here, we showed that LSECtin (also known as CLEC4G) plays an important role in GP-mediated inflammatory responses in human DCs. Anti-LSECtin mAb engagement induced TNF-α and IL-6 production in DCs, whereas silencing of LSECtin abrogated this effect. Intriguingly, as a pathogen-derived ligand, Ebola GP could trigger TNF-α and IL-6 release by DCs through LSECtin. Mechanistic investigations revealed that LSECtin initiated signaling via association with a 12-kDa DNAX-activating protein (DAP12) and induced Syk activation. Mutation of key tyrosines in the DAP12 immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif abrogated LSECtin-mediated signaling. Furthermore, Syk inhibitors significantly reduced the GP-triggered cytokine production in DCs. Therefore, our results demonstrate that LSECtin is required for the GP-induced inflammatory response, providing new insights into the EBOV-mediated inflammatory response. PMID:26943817

  20. Force-Induced Unfolding of Leucine-Rich Repeats of Glycoprotein Ibα Strengthens Ligand Interaction.

    PubMed

    Ju, Lining; Lou, Jizhong; Chen, Yunfeng; Li, Zhenhai; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-11-03

    Leucine-rich repeat (LRR) is a versatile motif widely present in adhesive proteins and signal-transducing receptors. The concave structure formed by a group of LRRs is thought to facilitate binding to globular protein domains with increased affinities. However, little is known about the conformational dynamics of LRRs in such a structure, e.g., whether and how force induces conformational changes in LRRs to regulate protein binding and signal transduction. Here we investigated the platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα), a demonstrated mechanoreceptor with known crystal structures for the N-terminal domain (GPIbαN), as a model for LRR-containing proteins using a combined method of steered molecular dynamics simulations and single-molecule force spectroscopy with a biomembrane force probe. We found that force-induced unfolding of GPIbαN starts with LRR2-4 and propagates to other LRRs. Importantly, force-dependent lifetimes of individual VWF-A1 bonds with GPIbα are prolonged after LRR unfolding. Enhancement of protein-protein interactions by force-induced LRR unfolding may be a phenomenon of interest in biology.

  1. Protective effect of Porphyra yezoensis glycoprotein on D-galactosamine‑induced cytotoxicity in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong-Wook; Kim, Young-Min; Park, Su-Jin; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2015-05-01

    The present study aimed to examine the signaling pathways and enzyme activity associated with the protective effect of Porphyra yezoensis glycoprotein (PYGP) on D‑galactosamine (D‑GaIN)‑induced cytotoxicity in Hepa 1c1c7 cells. D‑GaIN is commonly used to induce hepatic injury models in vivo as well as in vitro. PYGP was extracted from Porphyra yezoensis, a red algae distributed along the coasts of Republic of Korea, China and Japan. In the present study, Hepa 1c1c7 cells were pre‑treated with PYGP (20 and 40 µg/ml) for 24 h and then the media was replaced with D‑GaIN (20 mM) and PYGP (20 and 40 µg/ml). The results demonstrated that D‑GaIN induced Hepa 1c1c7 cell death and pretreatment with PYGP was found to attenuate D‑GaIN toxicity. In addition, D‑GaIN decreased the antioxidant activity and increased lipid peroxidation processes; however, pre‑treatment with PYGP reduced the generation of lipid peroxidation products, such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, as well as increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione‑s‑transferase (GST). PYGP was shown to suppress the overexpression of extracellular signal‑regulated kinase, c‑jun N‑terminal kinase and p38 mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation induced by D‑GaIN. Furthermore, PYGP increased the protein expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2‑related factor 2 (Nrf2), quinine oxidoreductase 1, GST and heme oxygenase 1 protein expression. These results suggested that PYGP had cytoprotective effects against D‑GaIN‑induced cell damage, which may be associated with MAPKs and the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  2. Zinc-induced oligomerization of zinc α2 glycoprotein reveals multiple fatty acid-binding sites.

    PubMed

    Zahid, Henna; Miah, Layeque; Lau, Andy M; Brochard, Lea; Hati, Debolina; Bui, Tam T T; Drake, Alex F; Gor, Jayesh; Perkins, Stephen J; McDermott, Lindsay C

    2016-01-01

    Zinc α2 glycoprotein (ZAG) is an adipokine with a class I MHC protein fold and is associated with obesity and diabetes. Although its intrinsic ligand remains unknown, ZAG binds the dansylated C11 fatty acid 11-(dansylamino)undecanoic acid (DAUDA) in the groove between the α1 and α2 domains. The surface of ZAG has approximately 15 weak zinc-binding sites deemed responsible for precipitation from human plasma. In the present study the functional significance of these metal sites was investigated. Analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC) and CD showed that zinc, but not other divalent metals, causes ZAG to oligomerize in solution. Thus ZAG dimers and trimers were observed in the presence of 1 and 2 mM zinc. Molecular modelling of X-ray scattering curves and sedimentation coefficients indicated a progressive stacking of ZAG monomers, suggesting that the ZAG groove may be occluded in these. Using fluorescence-detected sedimentation velocity, these ZAG-zinc oligomers were again observed in the presence of the fluorescent boron dipyrromethene fatty acid C16-BODIPY (4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-hexadecanoic acid). Fluorescence spectroscopy confirmed that ZAG binds C16-BODIPY. ZAG binding to C16-BODIPY, but not to DAUDA, was reduced by increased zinc concentrations. We conclude that the lipid-binding groove in ZAG contains at least two distinct fatty acid-binding sites for DAUDA and C16-BODIPY, similar to the multiple lipid binding seen in the structurally related immune protein CD1c. In addition, because high concentrations of zinc occur in the pancreas, the perturbation of these multiple lipid-binding sites by zinc may be significant in Type 2 diabetes where dysregulation of ZAG and zinc homoeostasis occurs.

  3. Neonatal Immunization with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Glycoprotein Fragment Induces Protective Immunity in the Presence of Maternal Antibodies in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Youran; Shim, Byoung-Shik; Cheon, In Su; Rho, Semi; Kim, Hee Joo; Choi, Youngjoo; Kang, Chang-Yuil; Chang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of severe lower respiratory tract infections in infants and the elderly worldwide. The significant morbidity and mortality associated with this infection underscores the urgent need for development of RSV vaccine. In this study, we first show that intranasal administration of RSV glycoprotein core fragment (Gcf) to neonatal mice can induce systemic humoral immune responses and protective immunity against RSV without causing lung eosinophilia, although antibody response was shifted to a Th2 response. Next, we examined whether the presence of maternal anti-RSV antibodies would affect the responsiveness and protection efficacy of Gcf in newborn mice, since infants can possess RSV-specific maternal antibodies due to frequent RSV re-infections to adults. Intranasal administration of Gcf induced antibody response and increased IFNγ secretion and protected mice against RSV challenge without severe lung eosinophilia, even in the presence of high levels of RSV-specific maternal antibodies. Thus, our findings suggest that Gcf may be an effective and safe RSV vaccine during the neonatal period. PMID:23869549

  4. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2005-08-09

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  5. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-02-27

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  6. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-10-31

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  7. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-16

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  8. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Shultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-04-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  9. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-11-02

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  10. Glycoprotein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

    2009-07-14

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  11. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-08-28

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  12. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-05-15

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  13. Glycoprotein synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2007-07-03

    Methods for making glycoproteins, both in vitro and in vivo, are provided. One method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid into a protein and attaching one or more saccharide moieties to the unnatural amino acid. Another method involves incorporating an unnatural amino acid that includes a saccharide moiety into a protein. Proteins made by both methods can be further modified with additional sugars.

  14. Molecular mimicry between the rabies virus glycoprotein and human immunodeficiency virus-1 GP120: cross-reacting antibodies induced by rabies vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bracci, L; Ballas, S K; Spreafico, A; Neri, P

    1997-11-01

    The 160-170 sequence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 gp120 mimics a nicotinic receptor-binding motif of rabies virus glycoprotein and snake neurotoxins. This sequence has been proposed to be involved in the binding of HIV-1 gp120 to the acetylcholine binding sites of nicotinic receptors. By using biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) technology we have found that HIV-1 gp120 can bind to detergent-extracted nicotinic receptor from fetal calf muscle. The binding is inhibited by nicotine and by a synthetic peptide reproducing the gp120 160-170 sequence. The molecular mimicry between gp120 and rabies virus glycoprotein is confirmed by cross-reacting antibodies. We have found that vaccination against rabies can induce the production of anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibodies in humans. The cross-reacting antibodies are directed to the gp120 sequence involved in the mimicry with the rabies virus glycoprotein. The cross-reactivity between the rabies virus and HIV-1 has important implications in transfusion medicine. Moreover, the presence of cross-reacting antibodies between the nicotinic receptor binding site of rabies virus glycoprotein and a fragment of HIV-1 gp120 strengthens the hypothesis about the possible role of nicotinic receptors as potential receptors for HIV-1 in the central nervous system.

  15. Cardiac and pulmonary anaphylaxis in guinea pigs and rabbits induced by glycoprotein isolated from tobacco leaves and cigarette smoke condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, R.; Zavecz, J.H.; Burke, J.A.; Becker, C.G.

    1982-03-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for heart attack. The pathologic mechanisms responsible for this association are obscure. It has been reported that approximately one-third of human volunteers, smokers and nonsmokers, exhibit immediate cutaneous hypersensitivity to a glycoprotein antigen (TGP) purified from cured tobacco leaves and present in cigarette smoke. It is also known that the heart is a primary target organ for anaphylactic reaction in many animals, including primates. In experiments described herein anaphylaxis was induced in the isolated hearts and lungs of rabbits and guinea pigs previously sensitized by immunization with TGP and challenged with TGP isolated from either tobacco leaf or cigarette smoke condensate. Cardiac anaphylaxis was characterized by sinus tachycardia, decreased contractility, decreased coronary perfusion accompanied by hypoxic electrocardiographic changes, and a variety of rhythm disturbances, including idioventricular tachyarrhythmias. These observations suggest that allergic reactions to tobacco constituents may initiate cardiac arrhythmia and sudden death in some smokers and may, in part, underly the association between cigarette smoking and heart attack.

  16. The nectin-1{alpha} transmembrane domain, but not the cytoplasmic tail, influences cell fusion induced by HSV-1 glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, Ravi P.; Dunn, Jennifer E.; Geraghty, Robert J. . E-mail: rgeragh@uky.edu

    2005-09-01

    Nectin-1 is a receptor for herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, and a cellular adhesion molecule. To study domains of nectin-1{alpha} involved in cell fusion, we measured the ability of nectin-1{alpha}/nectin-2{alpha} chimeras, nectin-1{alpha}/CD4 chimeras, and transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail mutants of nectin-1{alpha} to promote cell fusion induced by HSV-1 glycoproteins. Our results demonstrate that only chimeras and mutants containing the entire V-like domain and a link to the plasma membrane conferred cell-fusion activity. The transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of nectin-1 were not required for any viral receptor or cell adhesion function tested. Cellular cytoplasmic factors that bind to the nectin-1{alpha} cytoplasmic tail, therefore, did not influence virus entry or cell fusion. Interestingly, the efficiency of cell fusion was reduced when membrane-spanning domains of nectin-1{alpha} and gD were replaced by glycosylphosphatidylinositol tethers, indicating that transmembrane domains may play a modulatory role in the gD/nectin-1{alpha} interaction in fusion.

  17. Vaccination with the Secreted Glycoprotein G of Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Induces Protective Immunity after Genital Infection.

    PubMed

    Önnheim, Karin; Ekblad, Maria; Görander, Staffan; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2016-04-22

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) infects the genital mucosa and establishes a life-long infection in sensory ganglia. After primary infection HSV-2 may reactivate causing recurrent genital ulcerations. HSV-2 infection is prevalent, and globally more than 400 million individuals are infected. As clinical trials have failed to show protection against HSV-2 infection, new vaccine candidates are warranted. The secreted glycoprotein G (sgG-2) of HSV-2 was evaluated as a prophylactic vaccine in mice using two different immunization and adjuvant protocols. The protocol with three intramuscular immunizations combining sgG-2 with cytosine-phosphate-guanine dinucleotide (CpG) motifs and alum induced almost complete protection from genital and systemic disease after intra-vaginal challenge with HSV-2. Robust immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody titers were detected with no neutralization activity. Purified splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced interferon-γ (IFN-γ) when re-stimulated with the antigen in vitro. sgG-2 + adjuvant intra-muscularly immunized mice showed a significant reduction of infectious HSV-2 and increased IFN-γ levels in vaginal washes. The HSV-2 DNA copy numbers were significantly reduced in dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord, and in serum at day six or day 21 post challenge. We show that a sgG-2 based vaccine is highly effective and can be considered as a novel candidate in the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HSV-2 infection.

  18. Glycoprotein E2 of classical swine fever virus expressed by baculovirus induces the protective immune responses in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huawei; Li, Xiangmin; Peng, Guiqing; Tang, Chenkai; Zhu, Shixuan; Qian, Suhong; Xu, Jinfang; Qian, Ping

    2014-11-20

    Classical swine fever (CSF) caused by CSF virus (CSFV) is a highly contagious and devastating disease that affects the pig industry worldwide. The glycoprotein E2 of CSFV is the principal immunogenic protein that induces neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity. Several CSFV genotypes, including 1.1, 2.1, 2.2, and 2.3, have been identified in Mainland China. The glycoprotein E2 of genotypes 1.1 and 2.1 was expressed by using a baculovirus system and tested for its protective immunity in rabbits to develop novel CSF vaccines that elicit a broad immune response. Twenty CSFV seronegative rabbits were randomly divided into five groups. Each rabbit was intramuscularly immunized with E2 of genotypes 1.1 (CSFV-1.1E2), 2.1 (CSFV-2.1E2), or their combination (CSFV-1.1 + 2.1E2). A commercial CSF vaccine (C-strain) and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were used as positive or negative controls, respectively. All animals were challenged with CSFV C-strain at 4 weeks and then boosted with the same dose. All rabbits inoculated with CSFV-1.1E2, CSFV-2.1E2, and CSFV-1.1 + 2.1E2 elicited high levels of ELISA antibody, neutralizing antibody, and lymphocyte proliferative responses to CSFV. The rabbits inoculated with CSFV-1.1E2 and CSFV-1.1 + 2.1E2 received complete protection against CSFV C-strain. Two of the four rabbits vaccinated with CSFV-2.1E2 were completely protected. These results demonstrate that CSFV-1.1E2 and CSFV-1.1 + 2.1E2 not only elicit humoral and cell-mediated immune responses but also confer complete protection against CSFV C-strain in rabbits. Therefore, CSFV-1.1E2 and CSFV-1.1 + 2.1E2 are promising candidate subunit vaccines against CSF.

  19. SJSZ glycoprotein (38kDa) prevents thymus atrophy and enhances expression of IL-2 and IL-12 in diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2012-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a typical inflammation-associated cancer, but has also been shown to provoke antitumor immune responses. Polarized T helper type 2 (Th2) responses down-regulate antitumor immunity to link with HCC. The objective of this study was to investigate the protective effect of the Styrax japonica Siebold et al. Zuccarini (SJSZ) glycoprotein on thymus atrophy and differential response of Th1/Th2 cells induced by diethlynitrosamine (DEN). To evaluate the modulatory effect of the SJSZ glycoprotein on thymic atrophy and imbalanced Th1/Th2 cells, we examined the weight of the thymus, [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and activities of protein kinase C (PKC)/intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, p38 MAPK, T-box transcription factor (T-bet), GATA-binding protein-3 (GATA-3), cytokines [interleukin (IL)-4, -10, -2, -12 and interferon (IFN)-γ] using radioactivity, immunoblot analysis, and qRT-PCR. The SJSZ glycoprotein (10mg/kg, BW) was shown to increase the weight of the thymus, [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation and PCNA in thymocytes induced by DEN. Also, it increased expression levels of T-bet and Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-12). However, the activity of PKC/intracellular Ca(2+), phosphorylation of ERK and p38 MAPK, expression levels of GATA-3 and Th2 cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) were decreased. Taken together, these results suggest that the SJSZ glycoprotein can prevent thymic atrophy and Th2 cytokines induced by DEN.

  20. Dysregulated Glycoprotein B-Mediated Cell-Cell Fusion Disrupts Varicella-Zoster Virus and Host Gene Transcription during Infection.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Stefan L; Yang, Edward; Arvin, Ann M

    2017-01-01

    The highly conserved herpesvirus glycoprotein complex gB/gH-gL mediates membrane fusion during virion entry and cell-cell fusion. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) characteristically forms multinucleated cells, or syncytia, during the infection of human tissues, but little is known about this process. The cytoplasmic domain of VZV gB (gBcyt) has been implicated in cell-cell fusion regulation because a gB[Y881F] substitution causes hyperfusion. gBcyt regulation is necessary for VZV pathogenesis, as the hyperfusogenic mutant gB[Y881F] is severely attenuated in human skin xenografts. In this study, gBcyt-regulated fusion was investigated by comparing melanoma cells infected with wild-type-like VZV or hyperfusogenic mutants. The gB[Y881F] mutant exhibited dramatically accelerated syncytium formation in melanoma cells caused by fusion of infected cells with many uninfected cells, increased cytoskeleton reorganization, and rapid displacement of nuclei to dense central structures compared to pOka using live-cell confocal microscopy. VZV and human transcriptomes were concurrently investigated using whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to identify viral and cellular responses induced when gBcyt regulation was disrupted by the gB[Y881F] substitution. The expression of four vital VZV genes, ORF61 and the genes for glycoproteins gC, gE, and gI, was significantly reduced at 36 h postinfection for the hyperfusogenic mutants. Importantly, hierarchical clustering demonstrated an association of differential gene expression with dysregulated gBcyt-mediated fusion. A subset of Ras GTPase genes linked to membrane remodeling were upregulated in cells infected with the hyperfusogenic mutants. These data implicate gBcyt in the regulation of gB fusion function that, if unmodulated, triggers cellular processes leading to hyperfusion that attenuates VZV infection.

  1. Mechanistic Insight into Bunyavirus-Induced Membrane Fusion from Structure-Function Analyses of the Hantavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Gc

    PubMed Central

    Stettner, Eva; Jeffers, Scott Allen; Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Jestin, Jean-Luc; England, Patrick; Tischler, Nicole D.; Rey, Félix A.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses transmitted to humans by persistently infected rodents, giving rise to serious outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), depending on the virus, which are associated with high case fatality rates. There is only limited knowledge about the organization of the viral particles and in particular, about the hantavirus membrane fusion glycoprotein Gc, the function of which is essential for virus entry. We describe here the X-ray structures of Gc from Hantaan virus, the type species hantavirus and responsible for HFRS, both in its neutral pH, monomeric pre-fusion conformation, and in its acidic pH, trimeric post-fusion form. The structures confirm the prediction that Gc is a class II fusion protein, containing the characteristic β-sheet rich domains termed I, II and III as initially identified in the fusion proteins of arboviruses such as alpha- and flaviviruses. The structures also show a number of features of Gc that are distinct from arbovirus class II proteins. In particular, hantavirus Gc inserts residues from three different loops into the target membrane to drive fusion, as confirmed functionally by structure-guided mutagenesis on the HPS-inducing Andes virus, instead of having a single “fusion loop”. We further show that the membrane interacting region of Gc becomes structured only at acidic pH via a set of polar and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, the structure reveals that hantavirus Gc has an additional N-terminal “tail” that is crucial in stabilizing the post-fusion trimer, accompanying the swapping of domain III in the quaternary arrangement of the trimer as compared to the standard class II fusion proteins. The mechanistic understandings derived from these data are likely to provide a unique handle for devising treatments against these human pathogens. PMID:27783711

  2. A novel curcumin derivative which inhibits P-glycoprotein, arrests cell cycle and induces apoptosis in multidrug resistance cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Oliveira, Ana; Correia-da-Silva, Marta; Pinto, Madalena; Lima, Raquel T; Sousa, Emília; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2017-01-15

    Cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major limitation to the success of cancer treatment and is highly associated with the overexpression of drug efflux pumps such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp). In order to achieve more effective chemotherapeutic treatments, it is important to develop P-gp inhibitors to block/decrease its activity. Curcumin (1) is a secondary metabolite isolated from the turmeric of Curcuma longa L.. Diverse biological activities have been identified for this compound, particularly, MDR modulation in various cancer cell models. However, curcumin (1) has low chemical stability, which severely limits its application. In order to improve stability and P-gp inhibitory effect, two potential more stable curcumin derivatives were synthesized as building blocks, followed by several curcumin derivatives. These compounds were then analyzed in terms of antitumor and anti-P-gp activity, in two MDR and sensitive tumor lines (from chronic myeloid leukemia and non-small cell lung cancer). We identified from a series of curcumin derivatives a novel curcumin derivative (1,7-bis(3-methoxy-4-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)phenyl)hepta-1,6-diene-3,5-dione, 10) with more potent antitumor and anti-P-gp activity than curcumin (1). This compound (10) was shown to promote cell cycle arrest (at the G2/M phase) and induce apoptosis in the MDR chronic myeloid leukemia cell line. Therefore it is a really interesting P-gp inhibitor due to its ability to inhibit both P-gp function and expression.

  3. Mechanistic Insight into Bunyavirus-Induced Membrane Fusion from Structure-Function Analyses of the Hantavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Gc.

    PubMed

    Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Bignon, Eduardo A; Stettner, Eva; Jeffers, Scott Allen; Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard; Tortorici, M Alejandra; Jestin, Jean-Luc; England, Patrick; Tischler, Nicole D; Rey, Félix A

    2016-10-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses transmitted to humans by persistently infected rodents, giving rise to serious outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), depending on the virus, which are associated with high case fatality rates. There is only limited knowledge about the organization of the viral particles and in particular, about the hantavirus membrane fusion glycoprotein Gc, the function of which is essential for virus entry. We describe here the X-ray structures of Gc from Hantaan virus, the type species hantavirus and responsible for HFRS, both in its neutral pH, monomeric pre-fusion conformation, and in its acidic pH, trimeric post-fusion form. The structures confirm the prediction that Gc is a class II fusion protein, containing the characteristic β-sheet rich domains termed I, II and III as initially identified in the fusion proteins of arboviruses such as alpha- and flaviviruses. The structures also show a number of features of Gc that are distinct from arbovirus class II proteins. In particular, hantavirus Gc inserts residues from three different loops into the target membrane to drive fusion, as confirmed functionally by structure-guided mutagenesis on the HPS-inducing Andes virus, instead of having a single "fusion loop". We further show that the membrane interacting region of Gc becomes structured only at acidic pH via a set of polar and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, the structure reveals that hantavirus Gc has an additional N-terminal "tail" that is crucial in stabilizing the post-fusion trimer, accompanying the swapping of domain III in the quaternary arrangement of the trimer as compared to the standard class II fusion proteins. The mechanistic understandings derived from these data are likely to provide a unique handle for devising treatments against these human pathogens.

  4. Prenatal stress changes the glycoprotein GPM6A gene expression and induces epigenetic changes in rat offspring brain.

    PubMed

    Monteleone, Melisa C; Adrover, Ezequiela; Pallarés, María Eugenia; Antonelli, Marta C; Frasch, Alberto C; Brocco, Marcela A

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal stress (PS) exerts strong impact on fetal brain development and on adult offspring brain functions. Previous work demonstrated that chronic stress alters the mRNA expression of GPM6A, a neuronal glycoprotein involved in filopodium extension. In this work, we analyzed the effect of PS on gpm6a expression and the epigenetic mechanisms involved. Pregnant Wistar rats received restraint stress during the last week of gestation. Male offspring were sacrificed on postnatal days 28 and 60. Hippocampus and prefrontal cortex samples were analyzed for gene expression (qPCR for mRNAs and microRNAs), methylation status (bisulfite conversion) and protein levels. Hippocampal neurons in culture were used to analyze microRNA overexpression effects. Prenatal stress induced changes in gpm6a levels in both tissues and at both ages analyzed, indicating a persistent effect. Two CpG islands in the gpm6a gene were identified. Variations in the methylation pattern at three specific CpGs were found in hippocampus, but not in PFC samples from PS offspring. microRNAs predicted to target gpm6a were identified in silico. qPCR measurements showed that PS modified the expression of several microRNAs in both tissues, being microRNA-133b the most significantly altered. Further studies overexpressing this microRNA in neuronal cultures showed a reduction in gmp6a mRNA and protein level. Moreover filopodium density was also reduced, suggesting that GPM6A function was affected. Gestational stress affected gpm6a gene expression in offspring likely through changes in methylation status and in posttranscriptional regulation by microRNAs. Thus, our findings propose gpm6a as a novel target for epigenetic regulation during prenatal stress.

  5. Oxycodone induces overexpression of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and affects paclitaxel's tissue distribution in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hazem E; Myers, Alan L; Lee, Insong J; Coop, Andrew; Eddington, Natalie D

    2007-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) modulates the PK/PD of many compounds including opioid agonists and chemotherapeutic agents. The objective of this study was to assess the P-gp affinity status of oxycodone, the P-gp expression, and the paclitaxel's tissue distribution in oxycodone-treated rats. P-gp ATPase assay, Caco-2 transepithelial permeability studies, and mdr1a/b (-/-) mice were used to assess the P-gp affinity status of oxycodone. P-gp expression was determined by Western blot analysis while [(14)C] paclitaxel's distributions in the liver, kidney, brain, and plasma tissues were determined by liquid scintillation counter. Oxycodone stimulated the P-gp ATPase activity in a concentration-dependant manner. The Caco-2 secretory transport of oxycodone was reduced from 3.64 x 10(-5) to 1.96 x 10(-5) cm/s (p < 0.05) upon preincubation with the P-gp inhibitor, verapamil. The brain levels of oxycodone in mdr1a/b (+/+) were not detectable (<15 ng/mL) while in mdr1a/b (-/-) the average levels were 115 +/- 39 ng/mL. The P-gp protein levels were increased by 1.3-4.0 folds while paclitaxel's tissue distributions were decreased by 38-90% (p < 0.05) in oxycodone-treated rats. These findings display that oxycodone is a P-gp substrate, induces overexpression of P-gp, and affects paclitaxel's tissue distribution in a manner that may influence its chemotherapeutic activity.

  6. Novel pathogenic epitopes of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Delarasse, Cecile; Smith, Paul; Baker, David; Amor, Sandra

    2013-12-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), a minor protein of the central nervous system myelin, is recognized as a potential target in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica. The extracellular domain of MOG is commonly used in a wide range of mouse strains and other animals to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an autoimmune animal model of multiple sclerosis, because it is a target for antibody-mediated attack. Previous studies, using selected peptides, have indicated that MOG(35-55) peptide is an encephalitogenic epitope in C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice. A more systematic analysis of both T-cell and B-cell responses following immunization of C57BL/6 mice with either recombinant extracellular mouse MOG protein (1-116) or with overlapping peptides spanning the whole sequence of MOG, before assessment of responses to 15 mer and 23 mer peptides was undertaken. The studies identified T-cell responses within the MOG(35-55) (extracellular domain) but also two new immunogenic and encephalitogenic T-cell epitopes within residues MOG(113-127), MOG(120-134) (localized in the transmembrane region) and MOG(183-197) (in the second hydrophobic MOG domain). In addition, residue MOG(113-127) was found to be a B-cell epitope, suggesting that this may be a useful adjunct for the induction of EAE as well as for immunological studies in C57BL/6 mice, which are increasingly being used to study immune function through the use of transgenic and gene knockout technology.

  7. Autophagy-inducing peptides from mammalian VSV and fish VHSV rhabdoviral G glycoproteins (G) as models for the development of new therapeutic molecules.

    PubMed

    García-Valtanen, Pablo; Ortega-Villaizán, María Del Mar; Martínez-López, Alicia; Medina-Gali, Regla; Pérez, Luis; Mackenzie, Simon; Figueras, Antonio; Coll, Julio M; Estepa, Amparo

    2014-09-01

    It has not been elucidated whether or not autophagy is induced by rhabdoviral G glycoproteins (G) in vertebrate organisms for which rhabdovirus infection is lethal. Our work provides the first evidence that both mammalian (vesicular stomatitis virus, VSV) and fish (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, VHSV, and spring viremia carp virus, SVCV) rhabdoviral Gs induce an autophagic antiviral program in vertebrate cell lines. The transcriptomic profiles obtained from zebrafish genetically immunized with either Gsvcv or Gvhsv suggest that autophagy is induced shortly after immunization and therefore, it may be an important component of the strong antiviral immune responses elicited by these viral proteins. Pepscan mapping of autophagy-inducing linear determinants of Gvhsv and Gvsv showed that peptides located in their fusion domains induce autophagy. Altogether these results suggest that strategies aimed at modulating autophagy could be used for the prevention and treatment of rhabdoviral infections such as rabies, which causes thousands of human deaths every year.

  8. Autophagy-inducing peptides from mammalian VSV and fish VHSV rhabdoviral G glycoproteins (G) as models for the development of new therapeutic molecules

    PubMed Central

    García-Valtanen, Pablo; Ortega-Villaizán, María del Mar; Martínez-López, Alicia; Medina-Gali, Regla; Pérez, Luis; Mackenzie, Simon; Figueras, Antonio; Coll, Julio M; Estepa, Amparo

    2014-01-01

    It has not been elucidated whether or not autophagy is induced by rhabdoviral G glycoproteins (G) in vertebrate organisms for which rhabdovirus infection is lethal. Our work provides the first evidence that both mammalian (vesicular stomatitis virus, VSV) and fish (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, VHSV, and spring viremia carp virus, SVCV) rhabdoviral Gs induce an autophagic antiviral program in vertebrate cell lines. The transcriptomic profiles obtained from zebrafish genetically immunized with either Gsvcv or Gvhsv suggest that autophagy is induced shortly after immunization and therefore, it may be an important component of the strong antiviral immune responses elicited by these viral proteins. Pepscan mapping of autophagy-inducing linear determinants of Gvhsv and Gvsv showed that peptides located in their fusion domains induce autophagy. Altogether these results suggest that strategies aimed at modulating autophagy could be used for the prevention and treatment of rhabdoviral infections such as rabies, which causes thousands of human deaths every year. PMID:25046110

  9. Digoxin and ouabain induce P-glycoprotein by activating calmodulin kinase II and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Riganti, Chiara

    2009-11-01

    Digoxin and ouabain are cardioactive glycosides, which inhibit the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase pump and in this way they increase the intracellular concentration of cytosolic calcium ([Ca{sup ++}]{sub i}). They are also strong inducers of the P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a transmembrane transporter which extrudes several drugs, including anticancer agents like doxorubicin. An increased amount of Pgp limits the absorption of drugs through epithelial cells, thus inducing resistance to chemotherapy. The mechanism by which cardioactive glycosides increase Pgp is not known and in this work we investigated whether digoxin and ouabain elicited the expression of Pgp with a calcium-driven mechanism. In human colon cancer HT29 cells both glycosides increased the [Ca{sup ++}]{sub i} and this event was dependent on the calcium influx via the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup ++} exchanger. The increased [Ca{sup ++}]{sub i} enhanced the activity of the calmodulin kinase II enzyme, which in turn activated the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha. This one was responsible for the increased expression of Pgp, which actively extruded doxorubicin from the cells and significantly reduced the pro-apoptotic effect of the drug. All the effects of glycosides were prevented by inhibiting the Na{sup +}/Ca{sup ++} exchanger or the calmodulin kinase II. This work clarified the molecular mechanisms by which digoxin and oubain induce Pgp and pointed out that the administration of cardioactive glycosides may widely affect the absorption of drugs in colon epithelia. Moreover, our results suggest that the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agent substrates of Pgp may be strongly reduced in patients taking digoxin.

  10. Human pregnancy-specific glycoprotein 1a (PSG1a) induces alternative activation in human and mouse monocytes and suppresses the accessory cell-dependent T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Motrán, Claudia Cristina; Díaz, Fernando López; Gruppi, Adriana; Slavin, Daniela; Chatton, Bruno; Bocco, José Luis

    2002-09-01

    It has been proposed that pregnancy-specific factors induce the suppression of a specific arm of the maternal response accompanied by activation of the nonspecific, innate immune system. The aim of this study was to determine whether pregnancy-specific glycoprotein 1a (PSG1a), the major variant of PSG polypeptides, is able to modulate the monocyte/macrophage (Mo) metabolism to regulate T cell activation and proliferation. Using the recombinant form of this glycoprotein (rec-PSG1a), expressed in mammalian cells with a vaccinia-based expression vector, we have demonstrated that human PSG1a induces arginase activity in peripheral blood human Mo and human and murine Mo cell lines. In addition, rec-PSG1a is able to induce alternative activation because it up-regulates the arginase activity and inhibits the nitric oxide production in Mo activated by lipopolysaccharides. We also observed that rec-PSG1a is an important accessory cells-dependent T cell suppressor factor that causes partial growth arrest at the S/G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Additionally, an impaired T cell proliferative response induced by mitogens and specific antigen was observed in BALB/c mice upon in vivo expression of PSG1a. Our results suggest that PSG1a function contributes to the immunomodulation during pregnancy, having opposite effects on maternal innate and adaptative systems.

  11. Protective effect of S-allyl cysteine sulphoxide (alliin) on glycoproteins and hematology in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarction in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sangeetha, T; Quine, S Darlin

    2008-07-01

    The antihyperlipidemic, antilipoperoxidative and antioxidant effects of S-allyl cysteine sulphoxide (SACS) in myocardial infarcted rats were reported previously. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the preventive role of SACS on some biochemical parameters, glycoproteins and hematology in experimentally induced myocardial infarction in rats. Myocardial infarction was induced in rats by subcutaneous injection of isoproterenol (ISO) (150 mg kg(-1)) at an interval of 24 h for 2 days. ISO-treated rats showed a significant increase in the levels of serum iron, uric acid and blood glucose, Na(+) and Ca(2+) in the heart and a significant decrease in the levels of plasma iron binding capacity, serum total protein, albumin/globulin ratio, heart K(+) and heart glycogen. The levels/concentrations of glycoproteins in serum and the heart were increased in myocardial infarcted rats. Myocardial infarcted rats also showed a significant increase in red blood cells, hemoglobin, packed cell volume, white blood cells, neutrophils, platelet count and fibrinogen level and a significant decrease in erythrocyte sedimentation rate, eosinophils, lymphocytes, bleeding, clotting and prothrombin time. Oral pretreatment with SACS (40 and 80 mg kg(-1)) daily for a period of 35 days showed a positive effect on all the biochemical parameters studied in ISO-induced rats. Thus, the study showed the protective effect of SACS on ISO-induced cardiotoxicity in male Wistar rats.

  12. Glycoprotein (90 kDa) isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO lowers plasma lipid level through scavenging of intracellular radicals in Triton WR-1339-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2006-07-01

    The Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO (OFI) has been traditionally used as health food and herbal agent in folk medicine in Korea. In this study, we investigated whether the OFI glycoprotein has antioxidative activity and hypolipidemic effect on Triton WR-1339-induced A/J mice. The OFI glycoprotein inhibits the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by glucose/glucose oxidase (G/GO) in BNL CL.2 cells. With its antioxidative property, the mice were orally administered in the OFI glycoprotein [50 mg/kg body weight (BW)] for two weeks. Our finding resulted in a significant decrease of plasma lipid levels in Triton WR-1339-treated mice such as total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Indeed, mice which induced by Triton WR-1339 were significantly increased the levels of TC, TG and LDL, whereas the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) level obviously decreased. However, the values were reversed at pretreatment with OFI glycoprotein in Triton WR-1339-treated mice. The data also showed that pretreatment with OFI glycoprotein resulted in decrease of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level and in increase of nitric oxide (NO) amount in presence of Triton WR-1339-treated mice, while the activities of antioxidant enzyme [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)] were augmented. Therefore, we speculate that the OFI glycoprotein would be effective in lowering of plasma lipid levels.

  13. Protective effect of Withania somnifera root powder in relation to lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status, glycoproteins and bone collagen on adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Rasool, M; Varalakshmi, P

    2007-04-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate the protective effect of Withania somnifera Linn. Dunal (family-Solanaceae), commonly known as Ashwagandha, on adjuvant-induced arthritic rats. Results were compared with those for Indomethacin, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Arthritis was induced by intradermal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (0.1 mL) into the right hind paw of Wistar albino rats. Withania somnifera root powder (1000 mg/kg/day) and Indomethacin (3 mg/kg/day) were orally administered for 8 days (from 11th to 18th day) after adjuvant injection. The anti-arthritic effect of W. somnifera root powder was assessed by measuring changes in lipid peroxidation, antioxidant status, and glycoprotein levels in plasma and spleen of arthritic animals. In addition, cartilage degradation was also assessed by estimating bone collagen, and urinary constituents in arthritic animals. Results of the present investigation showed significant increase in the level of lipid peroxides, glycoproteins, and urinary constituents with the depletion of antioxidant status and bone collagen in arthritic animals. These biochemical alterations observed were ameliorated significantly by oral administration of W. somnifera root powder (1000 mg/kg body weight) in arthritic animals. The results of this study clearly indicate that W. somnifera root powder is capable of rectifying the above biochemical changes in adjuvant arthritis.

  14. Characterization of Immune Responses Induced by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein (GP) and Truncated GP Isoform DNA Vaccines and Protection Against Lethal Ebola Virus Challenge in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Carrion, Ricardo; Mohan, Gopi S.; Nunneley, Jerritt; Staples, Hilary; Ticer, Anysha; Patterson, Jean L.; Compans, Richard W.; Yang, Chinglai

    2015-01-01

    In addition to its surface glycoprotein (GP), Ebola virus directs the production of large quantities of a truncated glycoprotein isoform (sGP) that is secreted into the extracellular space. We recently reported that sGP actively diverts host antibody responses against the epitopes that it shares with GP and thereby allows itself to absorb anti-GP antibodies, a phenomenon we termed “antigenic subversion.” To investigate the effect of antigenic subversion by sGP on protection against virus infection, we compared immune responses induced by different prime-boost immunization regimens with GP and sGP DNA vaccines in mice and their efficacy against lethal Ebola virus challenge. Similar levels of anti-GP antibodies were induced by 2 immunizations with sGP and GP DNA vaccines. However, 2 immunizations with GP but not sGP DNA vaccine fully protected mice from lethal challenge. Boosting with sGP or GP DNA vaccine in mice that had been primed by GP or sGP DNA vaccine augmented the levels of anti-GP antibody responses and further improved protective efficacy against Ebola virus infection. These results show that both the quality and the levels of anti-GP antibody responses affect the efficacy of protection against Ebola virus infection. PMID:25877553

  15. Characterization of Immune Responses Induced by Ebola Virus Glycoprotein (GP) and Truncated GP Isoform DNA Vaccines and Protection Against Lethal Ebola Virus Challenge in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenfang; Ye, Ling; Carrion, Ricardo; Mohan, Gopi S; Nunneley, Jerritt; Staples, Hilary; Ticer, Anysha; Patterson, Jean L; Compans, Richard W; Yang, Chinglai

    2015-10-01

    In addition to its surface glycoprotein (GP), Ebola virus directs the production of large quantities of a truncated glycoprotein isoform (sGP) that is secreted into the extracellular space. We recently reported that sGP actively diverts host antibody responses against the epitopes that it shares with GP and thereby allows itself to absorb anti-GP antibodies, a phenomenon we termed "antigenic subversion." To investigate the effect of antigenic subversion by sGP on protection against virus infection, we compared immune responses induced by different prime-boost immunization regimens with GP and sGP DNA vaccines in mice and their efficacy against lethal Ebola virus challenge. Similar levels of anti-GP antibodies were induced by 2 immunizations with sGP and GP DNA vaccines. However, 2 immunizations with GP but not sGP DNA vaccine fully protected mice from lethal challenge. Boosting with sGP or GP DNA vaccine in mice that had been primed by GP or sGP DNA vaccine augmented the levels of anti-GP antibody responses and further improved protective efficacy against Ebola virus infection. These results show that both the quality and the levels of anti-GP antibody responses affect the efficacy of protection against Ebola virus infection.

  16. Cutting edge: IPSE/alpha-1, a glycoprotein from Schistosoma mansoni eggs, induces IgE-dependent, antigen-independent IL-4 production by murine basophils in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schramm, Gabriele; Mohrs, Katja; Wodrich, Maren; Doenhoff, Michael J; Pearce, Edward J; Haas, Helmut; Mohrs, Markus

    2007-05-15

    During infection with the helminth parasite Schistosoma mansoni, the deposition of eggs coincides with the onset of IL-4 production and Th2 development. Although IL-4 is known as a potent inducer of Th2 differentiation, the mechanism by which schistosome eggs induce IL-4 production is not clear. In this study, we demonstrate that the S. mansoni egg Ag (SmEA) induces IgE-dependent IL-4 production by basophils derived from Heligmosomoides polygyrus-infected or OVA/alum-immunized mice in the absence of pathogen-specific IgE. The effect is mediated by the secretory glycoprotein IPSE/alpha-1, because IPSE/alpha-1-depleted SmEA no longer induces cytokine production. Conversely, recombinant IPSE/alpha-1 is sufficient to induce IL-4 production. Importantly, the injection of SmEA or recombinant IPSE/alpha-1 into H. polygyrus-infected 4get/KN2 IL-4 reporter mice rapidly induces the dose-dependent IL-4 production by basophils in the liver, a major site of egg deposition. Thus, IPSE/alpha-1 induces basophils to produce IL-4 even in the absence of Ag-specific IgE.

  17. Inflammation-induced expression of sialyl Lewis X-containing glycan structures on alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) in human sera

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The glycosylation of the acute phase glycoprotein alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) in human sera is subject to marked changes during acute inflammation as a result of the cytokine-induced hepatic acute phase reaction. The changes described thus far comprise alterations in the type of branching of the carbohydrate structures as revealed by increased reactivity of AGP with concanavalin A. We now report on acute inflammation-induced increases in alpha 1-->3-fucosylated AGP molecules, as detected by the reactivity of AGP towards the fucose- binding Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL) in crossed affino- immunoelectrophoresis of human sera. Laparotomy of women, for the removal of benign tumors of the uterus, was used as a model for the development of the hepatic acute phase response. Hugh increases were detected in the amounts of strongly AAL-reactive fractions of AGP, presumably containing three or more fucosylated N-acetyllactosamine units. At least part of these Lewis X-type glycans (Gal beta 1-->[Fuc alpha 1-->3]GlcNAc-R) appeared to be substituted also with an alpha 2-- >3-linked sialic acid residue. This was revealed by the laparotomy- induced abundant staining of AGP with an antisialyl Lewis X monoclonal antibody (CSLEX-1) on blots of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels containing AGP isolated from the sera of a patient at various days after operation. It is concluded that acute inflammation induces a strong increase in sialyl Lewis X-substituted AGP molecules that persists at a high level throughout the inflammatory period. We postulate that these changes represent a physiological feedback response on the interaction between leukocytes and inflamed endothelium, which is mediated via sialylated Lewis X structures and the selectin endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1. PMID:7679706

  18. O-linked carbohydrate of recombinant von Willebrand factor influences ristocetin-induced binding to platelet glycoprotein 1b.

    PubMed Central

    Carew, J A; Quinn, S M; Stoddart, J H; Lynch, D C

    1992-01-01

    By transfecting the full-length cDNA for human von Willebrand factor (vWf) into a line of Chinese hamster ovary cells with a defect in carbohydrate metabolism, we have prepared recombinant vWf specifically lacking O-linked carbohydrates. We have compared this under-glycosylated protein to fully glycosylated recombinant vWf with respect to several structural and binding properties. vWf deficient in O-linked glycans was synthesized, assembled into multimers, and secreted in an apparently normal manner and was not prone to degradation in the extracellular milieu. It did not differ from fully glycosylated vWf in ability to bind to heparin or to collagen type I but did interact less well with glycoprotein 1b on formalin-fixed platelets. This decreased interaction was evidenced in both a lessened overall binding to platelets and in diminished capacity to promote platelet agglutination, in the presence of ristocetin. In contrast, no difference was seen in platelet binding in the presence of botrocetin. These data indicate a possible role for O-linked carbohydrates in the vWf-glycoprotein 1b interaction promoted by ristocetin and suggest that abnormalities in carbohydrate modification might contribute to the altered ristocetin-dependent reactivity between vWf and platelets described for some variant forms of von Willebrand disease. Images PMID:1469086

  19. Binding of soluble CD4 proteins to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and infected cells induces release of envelope glycoprotein gp120.

    PubMed Central

    Hart, T K; Kirsh, R; Ellens, H; Sweet, R W; Lambert, D M; Petteway, S R; Leary, J; Bugelski, P J

    1991-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infects cells after binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the cell surface recognition marker CD4. gp120 is noncovalently associated with the HIV transmembrane envelope glycoprotein gp41, and this complex is believed responsible for the initial stages of HIV infection and cytopathic events in infected cells. Soluble constructs of CD4 that contain the gp120 binding site inhibit HIV infection in vitro. This is believed to occur by competitive inhibition of viral binding to cellular CD4. Here we suggest an alternative mechanism of viral inhibition by soluble CD4 proteins. We demonstrate biochemically and morphologically that following binding, the soluble CD4 proteins sT4, V1V2,DT, and V1[106] (amino acids 1-369, 1-183, and -2 to 106 of mature CD4) induced the release of gp120 from HIV-1 and HIV-1-infected cells. gp120 release was concentration-, time-, and temperature-dependent. The reaction was biphasic at 37 degrees C and did not take place at 4 degrees C, indicating that binding of soluble CD4 was not sufficient to release gp120. The appearance of free gp120 in the medium after incubation with sT4 correlated with a decrease in envelope glycoprotein spikes on virions and exposure of a previously cryptic epitope near the amino terminus of gp41 on virions and infected cells. The concentration of soluble CD4 proteins needed to induce the release of gp120 from virally infected cells also correlated with those required to inhibit HIV-mediated syncytium formation. These results suggest that soluble CD4 constructs may inactivate HIV by inducing the release of gp120. We propose that HIV envelope-mediated fusion is initiated following rearrangement and/or dissociation of gp120 from the gp120-gp41 complex upon binding to cellular CD4, thus exposing the fusion domain of gp41. Images PMID:2006155

  20. Dog nectin-4 is an epithelial cell receptor for canine distemper virus that facilitates virus entry and syncytia formation.

    PubMed

    Noyce, Ryan S; Delpeut, Sebastien; Richardson, Christopher D

    2013-02-05

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) was shown to use dog nectin-4 as a receptor to gain entry into epithelial cells. RNA from dog placenta or MDCK kidney cells was isolated and cDNAs were prepared. Two splice variants of dog nectin-4 were identified. A deletion of 25 amino acids was found in the cytoplasmic domain of dog nectin-4 from MDCK cells, corresponding to a splice variant that is also seen in murine nectin-4, and did not affect its role as a receptor. Both dog nectin-4 and human nectin-4 could function as an entry factor for CDV containing an EGFP reporter gene. Inhibition of dog nectin-4 expression by RNAi or nectin-4 antibodies decreased CDV titers and EGFP fluorescence. Finally, dog nectin-4 also promotes syncytia formation, which could be inhibited by siRNA treatment. These data confirm that dog nectin-4 can be used by CDV to gain entry into epithelial cells, and facilitate virus spread.

  1. Circular dichroism of erythrocyte membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Decker, R V; Carraway, K L

    1975-03-28

    The circular dichroism spectra were obtained for purified equine, human and bovine membrane glycoproteins, which have 40, 55 and 70% carbohydrate, respectively. The spectra in aqueous buffer show similar shapes, maxima and minima but somewhat different peak amplitudes. Analysis of the spectra indicated that the glycoproteins can be pictured as existing primarily in an unordered form in dilute aqueous buffer with small amounts of alpha-helix (13-23%) present. In 2-chloroethanol, a helix-promoting solvent, the amount of alpha-helix is increased to 60-70%. The glycoproteins underwent denaturation in guanidine hydrochloride, although evidence of some residual structure did remain. The spectra of the glycoproteins change relatively little on going from aqueous buffer to dodecylsulfate solutions. Removal of 60% of the sialic acid does not induce significant conformational alterations. The anomalous behavior of the glycoproteins during molecular weight determinations does not appear to be related primarily to conformational restrictions on the polypeptide chain.

  2. Synthesis of huaicarbon A/B and their activating effects on platelet glycoprotein VI receptor to mediate collagen-induced platelet aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongli; Chen, Yeqing; Wu, Hao; Wang, Kuilong; Liu, Liping; Zhang, Xingde

    2017-01-01

    Quercetin and rhamnose were efficiently converted into huaicarbon A/B by heating at 250°C for 10-15 min or at 200°C for 25-30 min. With the optimum molar ratio of quercetin/rhamnose (1:3), huaicarbon A and B yields reached 25% and 16% respectively after heating at 250°C, with 55% quercetin conversion. Huaicarbon A/B both promoted washed platelet aggregation dose-dependently, which was antagonized by an inhibitor of glycoprotein VI (GPVI) receptor. Similarly, they both promoted collagen-induced platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma in dose-dependent manners. According to the S type dose-response model, EC50 values of huaicarbon A and huaicarbon B were calculated as 33.48 μM and 48.73 μM respectively. They induced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation that was specifically blocked by GPVI antagonist. Huaicarbon A/B enhanced intracellular Ca2+ accumulation and facilitated collagen-induced platelet aggregation, which were blocked by GPVI antagonist. They were conducive to collagen-induced platelet aggregation by activating platelet GPVI receptor. PMID:28337278

  3. A Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimer with an Embedded Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Domain Induces Enhanced Antibody and T Cell Responses*

    PubMed Central

    van Montfort, Thijs; Melchers, Mark; Isik, Gözde; Menis, Sergey; Huang, Po-Ssu; Matthews, Katie; Michael, Elizabeth; Berkhout, Ben; Schief, William R.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2011-01-01

    An effective HIV-1 vaccine should ideally induce strong humoral and cellular immune responses that provide sterilizing immunity over a prolonged period. Current HIV-1 vaccines have failed in inducing such immunity. The viral envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) can be targeted by neutralizing antibodies to block infection, but several Env properties limit the ability to induce an antibody response of sufficient quantity and quality. We hypothesized that Env immunogenicity could be improved by embedding an immunostimulatory protein domain within its sequence. A stabilized Env trimer was therefore engineered with the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) inserted into the V1V2 domain of gp120. Probing with neutralizing antibodies showed that both the Env and GM-CSF components of the chimeric protein were folded correctly. Furthermore, the embedded GM-CSF domain was functional as a cytokine in vitro. Mouse immunization studies demonstrated that chimeric EnvGM-CSF enhanced Env-specific antibody and T cell responses compared with wild-type Env. Collectively, these results show that targeting and activation of immune cells using engineered cytokine domains within the protein can improve the immunogenicity of Env subunit vaccines. PMID:21515681

  4. Identification of an 80-kilodalton membrane glycoprotein important for human T-cell leukemia virus type I and type II syncytium formation and infection.

    PubMed Central

    Agadjanyan, M G; Ugen, K E; Wang, B; Williams, W V; Weiner, D B

    1994-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type I and type II (HTLV-I and HTLV-II, respectively) infect certain sublines of the BJAB human B-cell line. We observed that the WH subline, but not the CC/84 subline, of BJAB cells were infectible by cell-free HTLV-I or HTLV-II and formed syncytia with cells infected by these retroviruses. This suggests that the BJAB-CC/84 cells possibly lack a membrane molecule(s) important for syncytium formation and infectibility. In order to identify this antigen, we generated polyclonal anti-BJAB-WH antisera which were adsorbed on BJAB-CC/84 cells. The adsorbed antisera bound only BJAB-WH and BJAB-CC/79 cells as demonstrated by complement-dependent cytotoxicity and flow cytometric assays. Furthermore, this adsorbed antisera bound several human T-cell clones, including SupT-1, as determined by flow cytometric assays. The adsorbed antiserum was monospecific as it immunoprecipitated only one 78- to 80-kDa protein from lysates of metabolically labeled BJAB-WH, BJAB-CC/79, and SupT-1, but not BJAB-CC/84, cells. The monospecific antisera detected a glycoprotein composed of a 64- to 66-kDa core protein containing tunicamycin-sensitive N-linked oligosaccharides. This membrane glycoprotein appears to be involved in HTLV-I- and HTLV-II-induced fusion and infection, as the monospecific antisera were capable of inhibiting both of these processes. The monospecific antisera diluted 1:50 and 1:90 inhibited 85 to 90% of syncytium formation induced in BJAB-WH, BJAB-CC/79, and SupT-1 cells cultured with HTLV-I- or HTLV-II-infected MT2, MoT, or FLW human T- or B-cell lines. At the same dilution, antisera inhibited 70 to 80% of infection of BJAB-WH cells by cell-free HTLV-I or HTLV-II. Thus, these studies indicate a role for a 78- to 80-kDa glycoprotein in HTLV-I or HTLV-II infection and syncytium formation. Images PMID:8254759

  5. Early regenerative responses induced by monoclonal antibodies directed against a surface glycoprotein of goldfish retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, M; Eshhar, N

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed primarily against antigenic determinants associated with the goldfish optic nerve were prepared and characterized. One selected clone 23-4-C(IgG2a), detected antigenic determinants of glycoprotein nature with an apparent mol. wt. of 140 000. Following injury the level of these molecules increased with a peak at 5-7 days after the lesion (2- to 3-fold higher than the basal level). The results strongly suggest that the increase derives, at least partially, from a real increment in the level of these molecules in the retinal ganglion cells rather than from changes in accessibility. Immunofluorescence studies indicate that the retinal ganglion cells carry the antigenicity. Intraocular injection of the monoclonal antibodies, concomitantly with crush injury, resulted in an earlier and higher regenerative response, reflected by sprouting capacity, protein synthesis and accumulation of radiolabeled material in the tectum contralateral to the side of injury. This may indicate that the antibodies directly activate retinal cells via interaction with surface molecules. Alternatively, the antibodies may be directed against surface molecules which are associated with axonal growth inhibitors, and may therefore mask these surface antigens from further interaction with their native substrate. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 7. PMID:6204857

  6. BRAFV600E induces ABCB1/P-glycoprotein expression and drug resistance in B-cells via AP-1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yo-Ting; Lozanski, Gerard; Lehman, Amy; Sass, Ellen J.; Hertlein, Erin; Salunke, Santosh B.; Chen, Ching-Shih; Grever, Michael R.; Byrd, John C.; Lucas, David M.

    2015-01-01

    A subset of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and nearly all patients with classic hairy cell leukemia (HCL) harbor somatic BRAF activating mutations. However, the pathological role of activated BRAF in B-cell leukemia development and progression remains unclear. In addition, although HCL patients respond well to the BRAFV600E inhibitor vemurafenib, relapses are being observed, suggesting the development of drug resistance in patients with this mutation. To investigate the biological role of BRAFV600E in B-cell leukemia, we generated a CLL-like B-cell line, OSUCLL, with doxycycline-inducible BRAFV600E expression. Microarray and real-time PCR analysis showed that ABCB1 mRNA is upregulated in these cells, and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression as well as function were confirmed by immunoblot and rhodamine exclusion assays. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of BRAFV600E and MEK alleviated the BRAFV600E-induced ABCB1/P-gp expression. ABCB1 reporter assays and gel shift assays demonstrated that AP-1 activity is crucial in this mechanism. This study therefore uncovers a pathological role for BRAFV600E in B-cell leukemia, and provides further evidence that combination strategies with inhibitors of BRAFV600E and MEK can be used to delay disease progression and occurrence of resistance. PMID:26350141

  7. BRAF(V600E) induces ABCB1/P-glycoprotein expression and drug resistance in B-cells via AP-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yo-Ting; Lozanski, Gerard; Lehman, Amy; Sass, Ellen J; Hertlein, Erin; Salunke, Santosh B; Chen, Ching-Shih; Grever, Michael R; Byrd, John C; Lucas, David M

    2015-09-05

    A subset of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and nearly all patients with classic hairy cell leukemia (HCL) harbor somatic BRAF activating mutations. However, the pathological role of activated BRAF in B-cell leukemia development and progression remains unclear. In addition, although HCL patients respond well to the BRAF(V600E) inhibitor vemurafenib, relapses are being observed, suggesting the development of drug resistance in patients with this mutation. To investigate the biological role of BRAF(V600E) in B-cell leukemia, we generated a CLL-like B-cell line, OSUCLL, with doxycycline-inducible BRAF(V600E) expression. Microarray and real-time PCR analysis showed that ABCB1 mRNA is upregulated in these cells, and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression as well as function were confirmed by immunoblot and rhodamine exclusion assays. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of BRAF(V600E) and MEK alleviated the BRAF(V600E)-induced ABCB1/P-gp expression. ABCB1 reporter assays and gel shift assays demonstrated that AP-1 activity is crucial in this mechanism. This study, uncovers a pathological role for BRAF(V600E) in B-cell leukemia, and provides further evidence that combination strategies with inhibitors of BRAF(V600E) and MEK can be used to delay disease progression and occurrence of resistance.

  8. Binding of Alphaherpesvirus Glycoprotein H to Surface α4β1-Integrins Activates Calcium-Signaling Pathways and Induces Phosphatidylserine Exposure on the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Gramatica, Andrea; Herrmann, Andreas; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracellular signaling connected to integrin activation is known to induce cytoplasmic Ca2+ release, which in turn mediates a number of downstream signals. The cellular entry pathways of two closely related alphaherpesviruses, equine herpesviruses 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4), are differentially regulated with respect to the requirement of interaction of glycoprotein H (gH) with α4β1-integrins. We show here that binding of EHV-1, but not EHV-4, to target cells resulted in a rapid and significant increase in cytosolic Ca2+ levels. EHV-1 expressing EHV-4 gH (gH4) in lieu of authentic gH1 failed to induce Ca2+ release, while EHV-4 with gH1 triggered significant Ca2+ release. Blocking the interaction between gH1 and α4β1-integrins, inhibiting phospholipase C (PLC) activation, or blocking binding of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) to its receptor on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) abrogated Ca2+ release. Interestingly, phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the plasma membrane in response to cytosolic calcium increase after EHV-1 binding through a scramblase-dependent mechanism. Inhibition of both Ca2+ release from the ER and scramblase activation blocked PS scrambling and redirected virus entry to the endocytic pathway, indicating that PS may play a role in facilitating virus entry directly at the plasma membrane. PMID:26489864

  9. P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) inhibited network of mitochondrion transport along microtubule and BMP signal-induced cell shape in chimpanzee left cerebrum by systems-theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Wang, Lin; Jiang, Minghu; Huang, Juxiang; Qi, Lianxiu

    2012-10-01

    We constructed the significant low-expression P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) inhibited transport and signal network in chimpanzee compared with high-expression (fold change ≥2) the human left cerebrum in GEO data set, by using integration of gene regulatory activated and inhibited network inference method with gene ontology (GO) analysis. Our result showed that ABCB1 transport and signal upstream network RAB2A inhibited ABCB1, and downstream ABCB1-inhibited SMAD1_2, NCK2, SLC25A46, GDF10, RASGRP1, EGFR, LRPPRC, RASSF2, RASA4, CA2, CBLB, UBR5, SLC25A16, ITGB3BP, DDIT4, PDPN, RAB2A in chimpanzee left cerebrum. We obtained that the different biological processes of ABCB1 inhibited transport and signal network repressed carbon dioxide transport, ER to Golgi vesicle-mediated transport, folic acid transport, mitochondrion transport along microtubule, water transport, BMP signaling pathway, Ras protein signal transduction, transforming growth factor beta receptor signaling pathway in chimpanzee compared with the inhibited network of the human left cerebrum, as a result of inducing inhibition of mitochondrion transport along microtubule and BMP signal-induced cell shape in chimpanzee left cerebrum. Our hypothesis was verified by the same and different biological processes of ABCB1 inhibited transport and signal network of chimpanzee compared with the corresponding activated network of chimpanzee and the human left cerebrum, respectively.

  10. Localized Down-regulation of P-glycoprotein by Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, HongSeok; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Han, Mun; Choi, Jong-ryul; Ahn, Sanghyun; Lee, Taekwan; Chang, Yongmin; Park, Juyoung

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant efflux transporters found in Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) acts as a functional barrier, by pumping out most of the drugs into the blood. Previous studies showed focused ultrasound (FUS) induced microbubble oscillation can disrupt the BBB by loosening the tight junctions in the brain endothelial cells; however, no study was performed to investigate its impact on the functional barrier of the BBB. In this study, the BBB in rat brains were disrupted using the MRI guided FUS and microbubbles. The immunofluorescence study evaluated the expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the most dominant multi-drug resistant protein found in the BBB. Intensity of the P-gp expression at the BBB disruption (BBBD) regions was significantly reduced (63.2 ± 18.4%) compared to the control area. The magnitude of the BBBD and the level of the P-gp down-regulation were significantly correlated. Both the immunofluorescence and histologic analysis at the BBBD regions revealed no apparent damage in the brain endothelial cells. The results demonstrate that the FUS and microbubbles can induce a localized down-regulation of P-gp expression in rat brain. The study suggests a clinically translation of this method to treat neural diseases through targeted delivery of the wide ranges of brain disorder related drugs. PMID:27510760

  11. Localized Down-regulation of P-glycoprotein by Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption in Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hongseok; Lee, Hwa-Youn; Han, Mun; Choi, Jong-Ryul; Ahn, Sanghyun; Lee, Taekwan; Chang, Yongmin; Park, Juyoung

    2016-08-01

    Multi-drug resistant efflux transporters found in Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) acts as a functional barrier, by pumping out most of the drugs into the blood. Previous studies showed focused ultrasound (FUS) induced microbubble oscillation can disrupt the BBB by loosening the tight junctions in the brain endothelial cells; however, no study was performed to investigate its impact on the functional barrier of the BBB. In this study, the BBB in rat brains were disrupted using the MRI guided FUS and microbubbles. The immunofluorescence study evaluated the expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the most dominant multi-drug resistant protein found in the BBB. Intensity of the P-gp expression at the BBB disruption (BBBD) regions was significantly reduced (63.2 ± 18.4%) compared to the control area. The magnitude of the BBBD and the level of the P-gp down-regulation were significantly correlated. Both the immunofluorescence and histologic analysis at the BBBD regions revealed no apparent damage in the brain endothelial cells. The results demonstrate that the FUS and microbubbles can induce a localized down-regulation of P-gp expression in rat brain. The study suggests a clinically translation of this method to treat neural diseases through targeted delivery of the wide ranges of brain disorder related drugs.

  12. Involvement of integrins alpha(3)beta(1) and alpha(5)beta(1) and glycoprotein IIb in megakaryocyte-induced osteoblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lemieux, Justin M; Horowitz, Mark C; Kacena, Melissa A

    2010-04-01

    As the prevalence of osteoporosis is expected to increase over the next few decades, the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat this disorder becomes clinically imperative. These efforts draw extensively from an expanding body of knowledge pertaining to the physiologic mechanisms of skeletal homeostasis. To this body of knowledge, we contribute that cells of hematopoietic lineage may play a crucial role in balancing osteoblastic bone formation against osteoclastic resorption. Specifically, our laboratory has previously demonstrated that megakaryocytes (MKs) can induce osteoblast (OB) proliferation in vitro, but do so only when direct cell-to-cell contact is permitted. To further investigate the nature of this interaction, we have effectively neutralized several adhesion molecules known to function in the analogous interaction of MKs with another cell type of mesenchymal origin-the fibroblast (FB). Our findings implicate the involvement of fibronectin/RGD-binding integrins including alpha3beta1 (VLA-3) and alpha5beta1 (VLA-5) as well as glycoprotein (gp) IIb (CD41), all of which are known to be expressed on MK membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that interleukin (IL)-3 can enhance MK-induced OB activation in vitro, as demonstrated in the MK-FB model system. Taken together, these results suggest that although their physiologic and clinical implications are very different, these two models of hematopoietic-mesenchymal cell activation are mechanistically analogous in several ways.

  13. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs.

    PubMed

    Schnee, Margit; Vogel, Annette B; Voss, Daniel; Petsch, Benjamin; Baumhof, Patrick; Kramps, Thomas; Stitz, Lothar

    2016-06-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) encoding messenger RNA (mRNA) to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers) in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases.

  14. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Weizao; Feng, Yang; Wang, Yanping; Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  15. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Daniel; Petsch, Benjamin; Baumhof, Patrick; Kramps, Thomas; Stitz, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) encoding messenger RNA (mRNA) to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers) in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases. PMID:27336830

  16. The Glycoprotein B Cytoplasmic Domain Lysine Cluster Is Critical for Varicella-Zoster Virus Cell-Cell Fusion Regulation and Infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Edward; Arvin, Ann M; Oliver, Stefan L

    2017-01-01

    The conserved glycoproteins gB and gH-gL are essential for herpesvirus entry and cell-cell fusion induced syncytium formation, a characteristic of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) pathology in skin and sensory ganglia. VZV syncytium formation, which has been implicated in the painful condition of postherpetic neuralgia, is regulated by the cytoplasmic domains of gB (gBcyt) via an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) and gH (gHcyt). A lysine cluster (K894, K897, K898, and K900) in the VZV gBcyt was identified by sequence alignment to be conserved among alphaherpesviruses, suggesting a functional role. Alanine and arginine substitutions were used to determine if the positive charge and susceptibility to posttranslational modifications of these lysines contributed to gB/gH-gL cell-cell fusion. Critically, the positive charge of the lysine residues was necessary for fusion regulation, as alanine substitutions induced a 440% increase in fusion compared to that of the wild-type gBcyt while arginine substitutions had wild-type-like fusion levels in an in vitro gB/gH-gL cell fusion assay. Consistent with these results, the alanine substitutions in the viral genome caused exaggerated syncytium formation, reduced VZV titers (-1.5 log10), and smaller plaques than with the parental Oka (pOka) strain. In contrast, arginine substitutions resulted in syncytia with only 2-fold more nuclei, a -0.5-log10 reduction in titers, and pOka-like plaques. VZV mutants with both an ITIM mutation and either alanine or arginine substitutions had reduced titers and small plaques but differed in syncytium morphology. Thus, effective VZV propagation is dependent on cell-cell fusion regulation by the conserved gBcyt lysine cluster, in addition to the gBcyt ITIM and the gHcyt.

  17. Differential vascularization of nematode-induced feeding sites

    PubMed Central

    Hoth, Stefan; Stadler, Ruth; Sauer, Norbert; Hammes, Ulrich Z.

    2008-01-01

    Sedentary nematodes are destructive plant pathogens that cause significant yield losses. In the roots of their host plants, cyst nematodes (CNs) and root-knot nematodes (RKNs) induce different, highly specialized feeding sites—syncytia or giant cells (GCs), respectively—to optimize nutrient uptake. We compared the mechanisms by which nutrients are delivered from the model host plant, Arabidopsis, to GCs induced by the RKN Meloidogyne incognita or to syncytia induced by the CN Heterodera schachtii. From previous work, syncytia were known to be symplastically connected to newly formed host phloem composed of sieve elements (SEs) and companion cells. Here we studied the formation of plasmodesmata (PD) during GC and syncytia development by monitoring a viral movement protein that targets branched PD and the development of host phloem during GC formation by applying confocal laser scanning microscopy and immunocytochemistry. Analyses of plants expressing soluble or membrane-anchored green fluorescent protein in their phloem demonstrated symplastic isolation of GCs. GCs were found to be embedded in a tissue that consists exclusively of SEs. These de novo-formed SEs, contained nuclei and were interconnected by secondary PD. A similar interconnection of SEs was observed around syncytia. However, these secondary PD were also present at the SE–syncytium interface, demonstrating the postulated symplastic connection. Our results show that CNs and RKNs, despite their close phylogenetic relatedness, employ fundamentally different strategies to withdraw nutrients from host plants. PMID:18711135

  18. Pregnancy specific glycoprotein 1 (PSG1) activates TGF-β and prevents dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Blois, Sandra M.; Sulkowski, Gisela; Tirado-González, Irene; Warren, James; Freitag, Nancy; Klapp, Burghard F.; Rifkin, Daniel; Fuss, Ivan; Strober, Warren; Dveksler, Gabriela S.

    2013-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-βs) are secreted from cells as latent complexes and the activity of TGF-βs is controlled predominantly through activation of these complexes. Tolerance to the fetal allograft is essential for pregnancy success; TGF-β1 and -β2 play important roles in regulating these processes. Pregnancy-specific β-glycoproteins (PSGs) are present in the maternal circulation at high concentration throughout pregnancy and have been proposed to have anti-inflammatory functions. We found that recombinant and native PSG1 activate TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 in vitro. Consistent with these findings, administration of PSG1 protected mice from DSS-induced colitis, reduced the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increased the number of T regulatory cells. The PSG1-mediated protection was greatly inhibited by the co-administration of neutralizing anti-TGF-β Ab. Our results indicate that proteins secreted by the placenta directly contribute to the generation of active TGF-β and identify PSG1 as one of the few known biological activators of TGF-β2. PMID:23945545

  19. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2, alpha 1-acid-glycoprotein and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the developing lesions of murine leprosy.

    PubMed

    Silva Miranda, Mayra; Rodríguez, Kendy Wek; Martínez Cordero, Erasmo; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2006-12-01

    Murine leprosy is a chronic disease of the mouse, the most popular animal model used in biomedical investigation, which is caused by Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) whose characteristic lesion is the macrophage-made granuloma. From onset to the end of the disease, the granuloma undergoes changes that gradually transform the environment into a more appropriate milieu for the growth of M. lepraemurium. The mechanisms that participate in the formation and maturation of the murine leprosy granulomas are not completely understood; however, microbial and host-factors are believed to participate in their formation. In this study, we analysed the role of various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory proteins in granulomas of murine leprosy after 21 weeks of infection. We assessed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), alpha acid-glycoprotein (AGP), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at sequential stages of infection. We also looked for the nitric-oxide nitrosylation product, nitrotyrosine (NT) in the granulomatous lesions of murine leprosy. We found that a pro-inflammatory environment predominates in the early granulomas while an anti-inflammatory environment predominates in late granulomas. No obvious signs of bacillary destruction were observed during the entire period of infection, but nitrosylation products and cell alterations were observed in granulomas in the advanced stages of disease. The change from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory environment, which is probably driven by the bacillus itself, results in a more conducive environment for both bacillus replication and the disease progression.

  20. Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is required for amyloid pathology in brain endothelial cells induced by Glycoprotein 120, methamphetamine and nicotine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liqun; Yu, Jingyi; Li, Li; Zhang, Bao; Liu, Lingjuan; Wu, Chun-Hua; Jong, Ambrose; Mao, Ding-An; Huang, Sheng-He

    2017-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) caused by HIV-1 virotoxins and drug abuse is the lack of understanding the underlying mechanisms that are commonly associated with disorders of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which mainly consists of brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Here, we hypothesized that Glycoprotein 120 (gp120), methamphetamine (METH) and nicotine (NT) can enhance amyloid-beta (Aβ) accumulation in BMEC through Alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR). Both in vitro (human BMEC) (HBMEC) and in vivo (mice) models of BBB were used to dissect the role of α7 nAChR in up-regulation of Aβ induced by gp120, METH and NT. Aβ release from and transport across HBMEC were significantly increased by these factors. Methyllycaconitine (MLA), an antagonist of α7 nAChR, could efficiently block these pathogenic effects. Furthermore, our animal data showed that these factors could significantly increase the levels of Aβ, Tau and Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) in mouse cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and Aβ in the mouse brains. These pathogenicities were significantly reduced by MLA, suggesting that α7 nAChR may play an important role in neuropathology caused by gp120, METH and NT, which are the major pathogenic factors contributing to the pathogenesis of HAND. PMID:28074940

  1. Cloning and analysis of the thrombopoietin-induced megakaryocyte-specific glycoprotein VI promoter and its regulation by GATA-1, Fli-1, and Sp1.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Melissa L; Bartle, Natalie; Eisbacher, Michael; Chong, Beng H

    2002-12-13

    The exposure of collagen fibers at sites of vascular injury results in the adherence of platelets and their subsequent activation. The platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein (GP)(1) VI plays a crucial role in platelet activation and thrombus formation and decreased levels or defective GPVI may lead to excessive bleeding. In addition, elevated levels of collagen receptors may predispose individuals to coronary heart disease or strokes. GPVI expression is restricted to platelets and their precursor cell, the megakaryocyte. In this study we investigate the regulation of GPVI expression and show that thrombopoietin induces its expression in the megakaryocytic cell line UT-7/TPO. A 5'-region flanking the transcription start point of the GPVI gene was cloned (-694 to +29) and we report that this putative GPVI promoter bestows megakaryocye-specific expression. Deletion analyses and site-directed mutagenesis identified Sp1(227), GATA(177), and Ets(48) sites as essential for GPVI expression. We show that transcription factors GATA-1, Fli-1, and Sp1 can bind to and activate this promoter. Finally, GPVI mRNA was detected only in megakaryocytic cell lines expressing both Fli-1 and GATA-1, and we show that overexpression of Fli-1 in a stable cell line (which expresses endogenous GATA-1 and Sp1) results in expression of the endogenous GPVI gene.

  2. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2, alpha 1-acid-glycoprotein and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the developing lesions of murine leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Silva Miranda, Mayra; Rodríguez, Kendy Wek; Martínez Cordero, Erasmo; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Murine leprosy is a chronic disease of the mouse, the most popular animal model used in biomedical investigation, which is caused by Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) whose characteristic lesion is the macrophage-made granuloma. From onset to the end of the disease, the granuloma undergoes changes that gradually transform the environment into a more appropriate milieu for the growth of M. lepraemurium. The mechanisms that participate in the formation and maturation of the murine leprosy granulomas are not completely understood; however, microbial and host-factors are believed to participate in their formation. In this study, we analysed the role of various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory proteins in granulomas of murine leprosy after 21 weeks of infection. We assessed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), alpha acid-glycoprotein (AGP), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at sequential stages of infection. We also looked for the nitric-oxide nitrosylation product, nitrotyrosine (NT) in the granulomatous lesions of murine leprosy. We found that a pro-inflammatory environment predominates in the early granulomas while an anti-inflammatory environment predominates in late granulomas. No obvious signs of bacillary destruction were observed during the entire period of infection, but nitrosylation products and cell alterations were observed in granulomas in the advanced stages of disease. The change from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory environment, which is probably driven by the bacillus itself, results in a more conducive environment for both bacillus replication and the disease progression. PMID:17222216

  3. Selective Inhibition of ADAM17 Efficiently Mediates Glycoprotein Ibα Retention During Ex Vivo Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Platelets.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shinji; Murata, Takahiko; Suzuki, Daisuke; Nakamura, Sou; Jono-Ohnishi, Ryoko; Hirose, Hidenori; Sawaguchi, Akira; Nishimura, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Naoshi; Eto, Koji

    2017-03-01

    Donor-independent platelet concentrates for transfusion can be produced in vitro from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, culture at 37°C induces ectodomain shedding on platelets of glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα), the von Willebrand factor receptor critical for adhesive function and platelet lifetime in vivo, through temperature-dependent activation of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17). The shedding can be suppressed by using inhibitors of panmetalloproteinases and possibly of the upstream regulator p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), but residues of these inhibitors in the final platelet products may be accompanied by harmful risks that prevent clinical application. Here, we optimized the culture conditions for generating human iPSC-derived GPIbα(+) platelets, focusing on culture temperature and additives, by comparing a new and safe selective ADAM17 inhibitor, KP-457, with previous inhibitors. Because cultivation at 24°C (at which conventional platelet concentrates are stored) markedly diminished the yield of platelets with high expression of platelet receptors, 37°C was requisite for normal platelet production from iPSCs. KP-457 blocked GPIbα shedding from iPSC platelets at a lower half-maximal inhibitory concentration than panmetalloproteinase inhibitor GM-6001, whereas p38 MAPK inhibitors did not. iPSC platelets generated in the presence of KP-457 exhibited improved GPIbα-dependent aggregation not inferior to human fresh platelets. A thrombus formation model using immunodeficient mice after platelet transfusion revealed that iPSC platelets generated with KP-457 exerted better hemostatic function in vivo. Our findings suggest that KP-457, unlike GM-6001 or p38 MAPK inhibitors, effectively enhances the production of functional human iPSC-derived platelets at 37°C, which is an important step toward their clinical application. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:720-730.

  4. Glycoproteins: Occurrence and Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Valentin

    Protein glycosylation is regarded as the most complex form of post-translational modification leading to a heterogeneous expression of glycoproteins as mixtures of glycoforms. This chapter describes the structure and occurrence of glycoproteins with respect to their glycan chains. Discussed are different carbohydrate-peptide linkages including GPI anchors, common structures of N- and O-glycans, and the structure of glycosaminoglycans contained in proteoglycans. Also covered are the bacterial cell wall polymer peptidoglycan and the glycopeptide antibiotics of the vancomycin group. Properties and functions of the glycans contained in glycoproteins are dealt with in the next chapter of this book.

  5. Drug-induced trafficking of p-glycoprotein in human brain capillary endothelial cells as demonstrated by exposure to mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Hoffmann, Andrea; Maalouf, Katia; Buettner, Manuela; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Alms, Dana; Römermann, Kerstin; Naim, Hassan Y; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1/MDR1) is a major efflux transporter at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), restricting the penetration of various compounds. In other tissues, trafficking of Pgp from subcellular stores to the cell surface has been demonstrated and may constitute a rapid way of the cell to respond to toxic compounds by functional membrane insertion of the transporter. It is not known whether drug-induced Pgp trafficking also occurs in brain capillary endothelial cells that form the BBB. In this study, trafficking of Pgp was investigated in human brain capillary endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) that were stably transfected with a doxycycline-inducible MDR1-EGFP fusion plasmid. In the presence of doxycycline, these cells exhibited a 15-fold increase in Pgp-EGFP fusion protein expression, which was associated with an increased efflux of the Pgp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123). The chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C (MMC) was used to study drug-induced trafficking of Pgp. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of single hCMEC/D3-MDR1-EGFP cells revealed that Pgp redistribution from intracellular pools to the cell surface occurred within 2 h of MMC exposure. Pgp-EGFP exhibited a punctuate pattern at the cell surface compatible with concentrated regions of the fusion protein in membrane microdomains, i.e., lipid rafts, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis of biotinylated cell surface proteins in Lubrol-resistant membranes. MMC exposure also increased the functionality of Pgp as assessed in three functional assays with Pgp substrates (Rho123, eFluxx-ID Gold, calcein-AM). However, this increase occurred with some delay after the increased Pgp expression and coincided with the release of Pgp from the Lubrol-resistant membrane complexes. Disrupting rafts by depleting the membrane of cholesterol increased the functionality of Pgp. Our data present the first direct evidence of drug-induced Pgp trafficking at the human BBB and indicate that Pgp has to be released from lipid

  6. Drug-Induced Trafficking of P-Glycoprotein in Human Brain Capillary Endothelial Cells as Demonstrated by Exposure to Mitomycin C

    PubMed Central

    Noack, Andreas; Noack, Sandra; Hoffmann, Andrea; Maalouf, Katia; Buettner, Manuela; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Romero, Ignacio A.; Weksler, Babette; Alms, Dana; Römermann, Kerstin; Naim, Hassan Y.; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp; ABCB1/MDR1) is a major efflux transporter at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), restricting the penetration of various compounds. In other tissues, trafficking of Pgp from subcellular stores to the cell surface has been demonstrated and may constitute a rapid way of the cell to respond to toxic compounds by functional membrane insertion of the transporter. It is not known whether drug-induced Pgp trafficking also occurs in brain capillary endothelial cells that form the BBB. In this study, trafficking of Pgp was investigated in human brain capillary endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) that were stably transfected with a doxycycline-inducible MDR1-EGFP fusion plasmid. In the presence of doxycycline, these cells exhibited a 15-fold increase in Pgp-EGFP fusion protein expression, which was associated with an increased efflux of the Pgp substrate rhodamine 123 (Rho123). The chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C (MMC) was used to study drug-induced trafficking of Pgp. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of single hCMEC/D3-MDR1-EGFP cells revealed that Pgp redistribution from intracellular pools to the cell surface occurred within 2 h of MMC exposure. Pgp-EGFP exhibited a punctuate pattern at the cell surface compatible with concentrated regions of the fusion protein in membrane microdomains, i.e., lipid rafts, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis of biotinylated cell surface proteins in Lubrol-resistant membranes. MMC exposure also increased the functionality of Pgp as assessed in three functional assays with Pgp substrates (Rho123, eFluxx-ID Gold, calcein-AM). However, this increase occurred with some delay after the increased Pgp expression and coincided with the release of Pgp from the Lubrol-resistant membrane complexes. Disrupting rafts by depleting the membrane of cholesterol increased the functionality of Pgp. Our data present the first direct evidence of drug-induced Pgp trafficking at the human BBB and indicate that Pgp has to be released from lipid

  7. Effects of Lagenaria sicessaria fruit juice on lipid profile and glycoprotein contents in cardiotoxicity induced by isoproterenol in rats.

    PubMed

    Upaganlawar, Aman; Balaraman, R

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated antihyperlipidemic effects of Lagenaria siceraria fruit juice (LSFJ) in isoproterenol (ISO)induced cardiotoxicity in rats. Rats treated with ISO (200 mg/kg, s.c.) showed a significant increase in the levels of triglycerides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids, in both serum and heart tissue. An increase in the levels of phospholipids, low-density lipoprotein, and very low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and decrease in high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol in serum and phospholipid levels in the heart were observed. ISO intoxicated rats also showed a significant decrease in the activities of lecithin: cholesterol acyl transferase, whereas lipoprotein lipase was found to be increased. Administration of LSFJ (400 mg/kg, p.o.) for 30 consecutive days and challenged with ISO on day 29th and 30th significantly attenuated these alterations and restored the levels of serum and heart lipids along with lipid metabolizing enzymes. Histopathological observations were also in correlation with the biochemical parameters. These findings indicate the protective effect of LSFJ during ISO-induced cardiotoxicity in rats.

  8. Influence of ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein) haplotypes on nortriptyline pharmacokinetics and nortriptyline-induced postural hypotension in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Berit Packert; Roberts, Rebecca Lee; Vyas, Ritva; Bonke, Gitte; Jardine, David L; Begg, Evan James

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To investigate the influence of ABCB1 (1236-2677-3435) polymorphisms on nortriptyline pharmacokinetics and nortriptyline-induced postural hypotension in healthy volunteers. METHODS Genetic screening of 67 healthy volunteers identified eight CGC homozygotes and nine TTT homozygotes of ABCB1 (1236-2677-3435), who were administered a single dose of nortriptyline 25 mg. Plasma exposure of nortriptyline and its active metabolites, E- and Z-10-hydroxynortriptyline, was determined over 72 h. Heart rate and blood pressure responses to posture change (active standing and passive head-up tilt) were measured continuously using finger plethysmography. RESULTS There were no differences in plasma exposure between ABCB1 haplotype groups, as the geometric mean (95% CI) AUC(0,72 h) ratios were 0.98 (0.94, 1.03), 1.02 (0.96, 1.09) and 0.95 (0.80, 1.10) for nortriptyline, E- and Z-10-hydroxynortriptyline, respectively. The pre dose heart rate response to standing was greater in the TTT than CGC homozygotes (mean (95% CI) difference 7.4 (1.5, 13.4) beats min–1, P = 0.02). At tmax at 8 h post dose, nortriptyline increased the heart rate response to posture change in all subjects with mean (95% CI) Δ heart rate values of 7.4 (3.6, 11.3) beats min–1 on active standing (P = 0.0009) and 4.8 (2.0, 7.6) beats min–1 on head-up tilt (P = 0.002), but no difference was observed between haplotype groups. There was no difference in blood pressure response to posture change in either group. CONCLUSION The association between ABCB1 polymorphisms and nortriptyline-induced postural hypotension found in the previous study could not be confirmed. The results raise the possibility of a predisposition in heart rate response in the TTT homozygotes rather than an effect of nortriptyline. PMID:21999196

  9. The absorption enhancement of norisoboldine in the duodenum of adjuvant-induced arthritis rats involves the impairment of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Duan, Cong; Guo, Jiao-Mei; Dai, Yue; Xia, Yu-Feng

    2017-01-01

    Lindera aggregata (Sims) Kosterm root has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of rheumatism palsy, dyspepsia and frequent urination for a long time. Norisoboldine, the main active constituent of this herb drug, possesses outstanding anti-arthritis activity. However, the in vivo disposition of norisoboldine is known to a limited extent, especially under the pathological condition of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study is to investigate whether and how the absorption of norisoboldine is altered in adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) rats. Comparative studies of the intestinal absorption of norisoboldine in normal and AIA rats at different pathological stages of the arthritis were performed using in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion, and the effects of an inhibitor of efflux proteins were also investigated. Norisoboldine was shown to be a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), as P-gp inhibitor verapamil markedly increased the permeability coefficient (Peff ) of norisoboldine by 88% in the intestine of normal rats. Compared with normal rats, AIA rats displayed increased Peff values of norisoboldine by 84% and 86% on day 5 and day 10 after the appearance of the secondary response of arthritis, respectively. Verapamil could eliminate the difference of intestinal absorption of norisoboldine between normal and AIA rats. Further studies showed that impaired expression and activity of P-gp in AIA rats play a decisive role in the absorption enhancement of norisoboldine. Notably, the impairment of P-gp function positively correlated with the severity of arthritis. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Multiple linear B-cell epitopes of classical swine fever virus glycoprotein E2 expressed in E.coli as multiple epitope vaccine induces a protective immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Liu, Ke; Jiang, Yan; Wei, Jian-Chao; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2011-07-30

    Classical swine fever is a highly contagious disease of swine caused by classical swine fever virus, an OIE list A pathogen. Epitope-based vaccines is one of the current focuses in the development of new vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Two B-cell linear epitopes rE2-ba from the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV, rE2-a (CFRREKPFPHRMDCVTTTVENED, aa844-865) and rE2-b (CKEDYRYAISSTNEIGLLGAGGLT, aa693-716), were constructed and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as multiple epitope vaccine. Fifteen 6-week-old specified-pathogen-free (SPF) piglets were intramuscularly immunized with epitopes twice at 2-week intervals. All epitope-vaccinated pigs could mount an anamnestic response after booster vaccination with neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 1:16 to 1:256. At this time, the pigs were subjected to challenge infection with a dose of 1 × 106 TCID50 virulent CSFV strain. After challenge infection, all of the rE2-ba-immunized pigs were alive and without symptoms or signs of CSF. In contrast, the control pigs continuously exhibited signs of CSF and had to be euthanized because of severe clinical symptoms at 5 days post challenge infection. The data from in vivo experiments shown that the multiple epitope rE2-ba shown a greater protection (similar to that of HCLV vaccine) than that of mono-epitope peptide(rE2-a or rE2-b). Therefore, The results demonstrated that this multiple epitope peptide expressed in a prokaryotic system can be used as a potential DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals) vaccine. The E.coli-expressed E2 multiple B-cell linear epitopes retains correct immunogenicity and is able to induce a protective immune response against CSFV infection.

  11. Pregnane X Receptor Not Nuclear Factor-kappa B Up-regulates P-glycoprotein Expression in the Brain of Chronic Epileptic Rats Induced by Kainic Acid.

    PubMed

    Yu, Nian; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Zhang, Kang; Cheng, Yong-Fei; Ma, Hai-Yan; Di, Qing

    2017-03-16

    Drug-resistance epilepsy (DRE) is attributed to the brain P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression. We previously reported that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) played a critical role in regulating P-gp expression at the brain of the acute seizure rats. This study was extended further to investigate the interaction effect of NF-κB and pregnane X receptor (PXR) on P-gp expression at the brain of chronic epileptic rats treated with carbamazepine (CBZ). The chronic epileptic models were induced by the micro-injection of kainic acid (KA) into rats' hippocampus. Subsequently, the successful models were treated with different intervention agents of CBZ; PMA(a non-specific PXR activity inhibitor) or PDTC(a specific NF-κB activity inhibitor) respectively. The expression levels of P-gp and its encoded gene mdr1a/b were significantly up-regulated on the brain of KA-induced chronic epilepsy rats or the epilepsy rats treated with CBZ for 1 week, meanwhile with a high expression of PXR. The treatment of PMA dramatically reduced both PXR and P-gp expressions at the protein and mRNA levels in the chronic epilepsy brain. By compared to the epilepsy model group, the P-gp expression was not markedly attenuated by the inhibition of NF-κB activity with PDTC treatment, nevertheless with a decrease of NF-κB expression in this intervention group. Higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines(IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α) were found both in the brain tissue and the serum in the epilepsy rats of each group. There was a declined trend of the pro-inflammatory cytokines expression of the PDTC treatment group but with no statistical significance. This study demonstrates for the first time that P-gp up-regulation is due to increase PXR expression in the chronic phase of epilepsy, differently from that NF-κB signaling may induce the P-gp expression in the acute seizure phase. Our results offer insights into the mechanism underlying the development of DRE using or not using CBZ treatment.

  12. MUC4, a multifunctional transmembrane glycoprotein, induces oncogenic transformation of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Sangeeta; Singh, Ajay P; Moniaux, Nicolas; Eudy, James D; Meza, Jane L; Batra, Surinder K.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have established the association of MUC4 with the progression of cancer and metastasis. An aberrant expression of MUC4 is reported in precancerous lesions indicating its early involvement in the disease process; however, its precise role in cellular transformation has not been explored. MUC4 contains many unique domains and is proposed to impact on cell signaling pathways and behavior of the tumor cells. In the present study, to decipher its oncogenic potential of MUC4, we stably expressed the MUC4 mucin in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. Stable ectopic expression of MUC4 resulted in increased growth, colony formation and motility of NIH3T3 cells in vitro and tumor formation in nude mice, when cells were injected subcutaneously. Microarray analysis demonstrated increased expression of several growth- and mitochondrial energy production-associated genes in MUC4-expressing NIH3T3 cells. In addition, expression of MUC4 in NIH3T3 cells resulted in enhanced levels of oncoprotein ErbB2 and its phosphorylated form (pY1248-ErbB2). In conclusion, our studies provide the first evidence that MUC4 alone induces cellular transformation and indicates a novel role of MUC4 in cancer biology. PMID:19010895

  13. Resistance to Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Infection Induced by Immunization of Cotton Rats with a Recombinant Vaccinia Virus Expressing the RSV G Glycoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elango, Narayanasamy; Prince, Gregory A.; Murphy, Brian R.; Venkatesan, Sundararajan; Chanock, Robert M.; Moss, Bernard

    1986-03-01

    A cDNA copy of the G glycoprotein gene of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was placed under control of a vaccinia virus promoter and inserted into the thymidine kinase locus of the vaccinia virus genome. The recombinant vaccinia virus retained infectivity and expressed a 93-kDa protein that migrated with the authentic RSV G glycoprotein upon polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Glycosylation of the expressed protein and transport to the cell surface were demonstrated in the absence of other RSV proteins. Cotton rats that were inoculated intradermally with the infectious recombinant virus produced serum antibody to the G glycoprotein that neutralized RSV in vitro. Furthermore, the vaccinated animals were resistant to lower respiratory tract infection upon intranasal inoculation with RSV and had reduced titers of RSV in the nose.

  14. Terminal Galactosylation and Sialylation Switching on Membrane Glycoproteins upon TNF-Alpha-Induced Insulin Resistance in Adipocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Benjamin L.; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Holliday, Mira; Packer, Nicolle H.; James, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is a complex pathophysiological state that arises from both environmental and genetic perturbations and leads to a variety of diseases, including type-2 diabetes (T2D). Obesity is associated with enhanced adipose tissue inflammation, which may play a role in disease progression. Inflammation modulates protein glycosylation in a variety of cell types, and this has been associated with biological dysregulation. Here, we have examined the effects of an inflammatory insult on protein glycosylation in adipocytes. We performed quantitative N-glycome profiling of membrane proteins derived from mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes that had been incubated with or without the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha to induce IR. We identified the regulation of specific terminal N-glycan epitopes, including an increase in terminal di-galactose- and a decrease in biantennary alpha-2,3-sialoglycans. The altered N-glycosylation of TNF-alpha-treated adipocytes correlated with the regulation of specific glycosyltransferases, including the up-regulation of B4GalT5 and Ggta1 galactosyltransferases and down-regulation of ST3Gal6 sialyltransferase. Knockdown of B4GalT5 down-regulated the terminal di-galactose N-glycans, confirming the involvement of this enzyme in the TNF-alpha-regulated N-glycome. SILAC-based quantitative glycoproteomics of enriched N-glycopeptides with and without deglycosylation were used to identify the protein and glycosylation sites modified with these regulated N-glycans. The combined proteome and glycoproteome workflow provided a relative quantification of changes in protein abundance versus N-glycosylation occupancy versus site-specific N-glycans on a proteome-wide level. This revealed the modulation of N-glycosylation on specific proteins in IR, including those previously associated with insulin-stimulated GLUT4 trafficking to the plasma membrane. PMID:26537798

  15. Modulatory Effect of Taurine on 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)Anthracene-Induced Alterations in Detoxification Enzyme System, Membrane Bound Enzymes, Glycoprotein Profile and Proliferative Cell Nuclear Antigen in Rat Breast Tissue.

    PubMed

    Vanitha, Manickam Kalappan; Baskaran, Kuppusamy; Periyasamy, Kuppusamy; Selvaraj, Sundaramoorthy; Ilakkia, Aruldoss; Saravanan, Dhiravidamani; Venkateswari, Ramachandran; Revathi Mani, Balasundaram; Anandakumar, Pandi; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2016-08-01

    The modulatory effect of taurine on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancer in rats was studied. DMBA (25 mg/kg body weight) was administered to induce breast cancer in rats. Protein carbonyl levels, activities of membrane bound enzymes (Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase, and Mg(2+) ATPase), phase I drug metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, NADPH cytochrome c reductase), phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase), glycoprotein levels, and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were studied. DMBA-induced breast tumor bearing rats showed abnormal alterations in the levels of protein carbonyls, activities of membrane bound enzymes, drug metabolizing enzymes, glycoprotein levels, and PCNA protein expression levels. Taurine treatment (100 mg/kg body weight) appreciably counteracted all the above changes induced by DMBA. Histological examination of breast tissue further supported our biochemical findings. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated the chemotherapeutic effect of taurine in DMBA-induced breast cancer.

  16. Neurothelin: an inducible cell surface glycoprotein of blood-brain barrier-specific endothelial cells and distinct neurons

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier is characterized by still poorly understood barrier and transport functions performed by specialized endothelial cells. Hybridoma technology has been used to identify a protein termed neurothelin that is specific for these endothelial cells. Neurothelin is defined by the species-specific mouse mAb 1W5 raised against lentil- lectin-binding proteins of neural tissue from embryonic chick. In the posthatch chick, neurothelin expression is found on endothelial cells within the brain but not on those of the systemic vascular system. Injection of the monoclonal antibody in vivo leads to labeling of brain capillaries, indicating that the corresponding antigen is expressed on the luminal surface of brain endothelial cells. Transplantation of embryonic mouse brain onto the chick chorioallantoic membrane results in rodent brain vascularization by the avian vascular system. Subsequently, normally mAb 1W5-negative endothelial cells, originating from blood vessels of the chick chorioallantoic membrane, are induced to express neurothelin when they are in contact with mouse neural tissue. In contrast to differentiated brain neurons that do not express neurothelin, neurons of the nonvascularized chick retina synthesize neurothelin. However, neurothelin is not found on retinal ganglion cell axons terminating on 1W5-negative brain cells. 1W5 immunoreactivity was also found in the pigment epithelium that forms the blood-eye barrier. Putting epithelial cells into culture results in concentration of neurothelin at cell-cell contact sites, leaving other cell surface areas devoid of antigen. Therefore, the distribution of neurothelin appears to be regulated by cell-cell interactions. In Western blot analysis, neurothelin was identified as a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 43 kD. The protein bears at least one intramolecular disulfide bridge and sulfated glucuronic acid as well as alpha-D- substituted mannose/glucose moieties. The exclusive

  17. CX3CL1 (fractalkine) and CX3CR1 expression in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: kinetics and cellular origin

    PubMed Central

    Sunnemark, Dan; Eltayeb, Sana; Nilsson, Maria; Wallström, Erik; Lassmann, Hans; Olsson, Tomas; Berg, Anna-Lena; Ericsson-Dahlstrand, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). It is associated with local activation of microglia and astroglia, infiltration of activated macrophages and T cells, active degradation of myelin and damage to axons and neurons. The proposed role for CX3CL1 (fractalkine) in the control of microglia activation and leukocyte infiltration places this chemokine and its receptor CX3CR1 in a potentially strategic position to control key aspects in the pathological events that are associated with development of brain lesions in MS. In this study, we examine this hypothesis by analyzing the distribution, kinetics, regulation and cellular origin of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 mRNA expression in the CNS of rats with an experimentally induced MS-like disease, myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Methods The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied with in situ hybridization histochemical detection of their mRNA with radio labeled cRNA probes in combination with immunohistochemical staining of phenotypic cell markers. Both healthy rat brains and brains from rats with MOG EAE were analyzed. In defined lesional stages of MOG EAE, the number of CX3CR1 mRNA-expressing cells and the intensity of the in situ hybridization signal were determined by image analysis. Data were statistically evaluated by ANOVA, followed by Tukey\\primes multiple comparison test. Results Expression of CX3CL1 mRNA was present within neuronal-like cells located throughout the neuraxis of the healthy rat. Expression of CX3CL1 remained unaltered in the CNS of rats with MOG-induced EAE, with the exception of an induced expression in astrocytes within inflammatory lesions. Notably, the brain vasculature of healthy and encephalitic animals did not exhibit signs of CX3CL1 mRNA expression. The receptor, CX3CR1, was expressed by microglial cells in all regions of the healthy brain. Induction of MOG-induced

  18. Glycoprotein biosynthesis in calf kidney. Glycoprotein sialyltransferase activities towards serum glycoproteins and calf Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, W; Lasthuis, A M; van den Eijnden, D H

    1979-04-18

    CMP-AcNeu:glycoprotein sialyltransltransltransltransltransferase of calf kidney cortex was characterized using serum glycoproteins and Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, obtained from calf urine, as acceptors. Native calf Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein showed the best acceptor properties, followed by desialylated calf fetuin and desialylated human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein exhibiting V values of, respectively, 114, 63 and 41 nmol/h per g wet wt. of kidney cortex and Km values of 0.12, 0.16 and 0.26 mM glycoprotein acceptor. Desialylated ovine submaxillary mucine appeared to be a very poor acceptor. Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein sialyltransferase could be distinguished from serum glycoprotein sialyltransferase by competition studies. In addition the two glycoprotein sialyltransferase activities showed different distributions over the three regions of the calf kidney: the ratios of the Tamm-Horsfall to serum glycoprotein sialyltransferase activities decreased from 3.3 in the cortex to 0.8 and 0.4 in the medulla and the papilla, respectively. It was concluded that in calf kidney at least two different sialyltransferases exist. The high cortical Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein sialyltransferases activity corresponds markedly to the origin of the urinary Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, namely the distal part of the kidney tubule. Inactivation of glycoprotein sialyltransferase activity by preincubation at various temperatures and during storage at 0 degree C, could be reduced by the addition of CMP-AcNeu. The possible relevance towards the in vivo sialylation of this finding is discussed.

  19. The immune system modulator a1-acid glycoprotein inhibits insulin and IGF1 induced protein synthesis in C2C12 myotubes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AGP) has previously been demonstrated by our laboratory to be negatively correlated with growth rate in newborn piglets. However, a mechanism of action for AGP in growth has not been identified. Previous research has demonstrated that AGP can modify adipose tissue metabo...

  20. Immunomodulatory Effects of Nontoxic Glycoprotein Fraction Isolated from Rice Bran.

    PubMed

    Park, Ho-Young; Yu, A-Reum; Hong, Hee-Do; Kim, Ha Hyung; Lee, Kwang-Won; Choi, Hee-Don

    2016-05-01

    Rice bran, a by-product of brown rice milling, is a rich source of dietary fiber and protein, and its usage as a functional food is expected to increase. In this study, immunomodulatory effects of glycoprotein obtained from rice bran were studied in normal mice and mouse models of cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression. We prepared glycoprotein from rice bran by using ammonium precipitation and anion chromatography techniques. Different doses of glycoprotein from rice bran (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) were administered orally for 28 days. On day 21, cyclophosphamide at a dose of 100 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally. Glycoprotein from rice bran showed a significant dose-dependent restoration of the spleen index and white blood cell count in the immunocompromised mice. Glycoprotein from rice bran affected the immunomodulatory function by inducing the proliferation of splenic lymphocytes, which produce potential T and B cells. Moreover, it prevented cyclophosphamide-induced damage of Th1-type immunomodulatory function through enhanced secretion of Th1-type cytokines (interferon-γ and interleukin-12). These results indicate that glycoprotein from rice bran significantly recovered cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression. Based on these data, it was concluded that glycoprotein from rice bran is a potent immunomodulator and can be developed to recover the immunity of immunocompromised individuals.

  1. Protection induced by a glycoprotein E-deleted bovine herpesvirus type 1 marker strain used either as an inactivated or live attenuated vaccine in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) is the causative agent of respiratory and genital tract infections; causing a high economic loss in all continents. Use of marker vaccines in IBR eradication programs is widely accepted since it allows for protection of the animals against the disease while adding the possibility of differentiating vaccinated from infected animals. The aim of the present study was the development and evaluation of safety and efficacy of a glycoprotein E-deleted (gE-) BoHV-1 marker vaccine strain (BoHV-1ΔgEβgal) generated by homologous recombination, replacing the viral gE gene with the β-galactosidase (βgal) gene. Results In vitro growth kinetics of the BoHV-1ΔgEβgal virus was similar to BoHV-1 LA. The immune response triggered by the new recombinant strain in cattle was characterized both as live attenuated vaccine (LAV) and as an inactivated vaccine. BoHV-1ΔgEβgal was highly immunogenic in both formulations, inducing specific humoral and cellular immune responses. Antibody titers found in animals vaccinated with the inactivated vaccine based on BoHV-1ΔgEβgal was similar to the titers found for the control vaccine (BoHV-1 LA). In the same way, titers of inactivated vaccine groups were significantly higher than any of the LAV immunized groups, independently of the inoculation route (p < 0.001). Levels of IFN-γ were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in those animals that received the LAV compared to those that received the inactivated vaccine. BoHV-1ΔgEβgal exhibited an evident attenuation when administered as a LAV; no virus was detected in nasal secretions of vaccinated or sentinel animals during the post-vaccination period. BoHV-1ΔgEβgal, when used in either formulation, elicited an efficient immune response that protected animals against challenge with virulent wild-type BoHV-1. Also, the deletion of the gE gene served as an immunological marker to differentiate vaccinated animals from infected animals. All

  2. Pregnancy Specific Glycoprotein 23 binds to CD151 and Induces the Secretion of IL-10 and TGF-beta1 in Murine Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-11

    is a nonclassical major histocompatibility complex ( MHC ) class I antigen expressed in the placenta, almost exclusively by the invasive extravillous...glycoprotein genes in hematopoietic cells. Mol Cell Biochem, 1993. 122( 2 ): p. 147. 25. Zheng, Q.X., et al., Characterization of cDNAs of the human...32. McLenachan, P.A., et al., Characterization of the PSG11 gene. Genomics, 1994. 22( 2 ): p. 356-63. 33. Zimmermann, W., CEA homepage. 2006. 34. Tan

  3. Dietary Hizikia fusiformis glycoprotein-induced IGF-I and IGFBP-3 associated to somatic growth, polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism, and immunity in juvenile olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Hee; Kim, Kang-Woong; Han, Hyon-Sob; Nam, Taek Jeong; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the effect of dietary glycoprotein extracted from the sea mustard Hizikia fusiformis (Phaeophyceae: Sargassaceae) as a dietary supplement on growth performance in association with somatotropin level, proximate compositions, and immunity in juvenile olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. Water-ethanol extracted glycoprotein from H. fusiformis was supplemented to three fishmeal-based diets at the concentration of 0, 5, and 10gkg(-1) diet (designated as H0, H5, and H10, respectively). After a 12week-long feeding trial, growth performance and biochemical responses were analyzed including proximate composition, and whole body amino acids and fatty acids. We also measured plasma insulin like growth factor (IGF), IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) and interleukin (IL). The fish fed H5 showed the greatest weight gain among the dietary treatments. In parallel with the growth, the fish fed the diets containing H. fusiformis glycoprotein showed an increased plasma IGF-I activity and increased expression of 43-kDa IGFBP-3 compared to that in the control, whereas an opposite trend was observed for 34-kDa IGFBP-1. Although no differences were found in the level of whole body linoleic acid (C18:2n-6) and linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) among treatments, increases in arachidonic acid (ARA, C20:4n-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) were observed in fish fed H5 compared to control. IL-2 and -6 levels increased significantly in fish fed H10 compared to those in the control indicating increased immunity. These results suggest that supplementation of H. fusiformis glycoprotein in fish diet may be beneficial for fish growth and immunity in juvenile olive flounder.

  4. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) glycoprotein B cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain regulates the energy requirement for EBV-induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Zhang, Xianming; Jardetzky, Theodore S; Longnecker, Richard

    2014-10-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into host cells is preceded by membrane fusion, which in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is thought to be mediated by the refolding of glycoprotein B (gB) from a prefusion to a postfusion state. In our current studies, we characterized a gB C-terminal tail domain (CTD) mutant truncated at amino acid 843 (gB843). This truncation mutant is hyperfusogenic as monitored by syncytium formation and in a quantitative fusion assay and is dependent on gH/gL for fusion activity. gB843 can rescue the fusion function of other glycoprotein mutants that have null or decreased fusion activity in epithelial and B cells. In addition, gB843 requires less gp42 and gH/gL for fusion, and can function in fusion at a lower temperature than wild-type gB, indicating a lower energy requirement for fusion activation. Since a key step in fusion is the conversion of gB from a prefusion to an active postfusion state by gH/gL, gB843 may access this activated gB state more readily. Our studies indicate that the gB CTD may participate in the fusion function by maintaining gB in an inactive prefusion form prior to activation by receptor binding. Importance: Diseases resulting from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in humans range from the fairly benign disease infectious mononucleosis to life-threatening cancer. As an enveloped virus, EBV must fuse with a host cell membrane for entry and infection by using glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42. Among these glycoproteins, gB is thought to be the protein that executes fusion. To further characterize the function of the EBV gB cytoplasmic C-terminal tail domain (CTD) in fusion, we used a previously constructed CTD truncation mutant and studied its fusion activity in the context of other EBV glycoprotein mutants. From these studies, we find that the gB CTD regulates fusion by altering the energy requirements for the triggering of fusion mediated by gH/gL or gp42. Overall, our studies may lead to a better understanding of EBV fusion

  5. Evidence that maturation of the N-linked glycans of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) glycoproteins is required for virus-mediated cell fusion: The effect of {alpha}-mannosidase inhibitors on RSV infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Terence P.; Jeffree, Chris E.; Li, Ping; Rixon, Helen W. McL.; Brown, Gaie; Aitken, James D.; MacLellan, Kirsty; Sugrue, Richard J. . E-mail: rjsugrue@ntu.edu.sg

    2006-07-05

    Glycan heterogeneity of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) protein was demonstrated by proteomics. The effect of maturation of the virus glycoproteins-associated glycans on virus infectivity was therefore examined using the {alpha}-mannosidase inhibitors deoxymannojirimycin (DMJ) and swainsonine (SW). In the presence of SW the N-linked glycans on the F protein appeared in a partially mature form, whereas in the presence of DMJ no maturation of the glycans was observed. Neither inhibitor had a significant effect on G protein processing or on the formation of progeny virus. Although the level of infectious virus and syncytia formation was not significantly affected by SW-treatment, DMJ-treatment correlated with a one hundred-fold reduction in virus infectivity. Our data suggest that glycan maturation of the RSV glycoproteins, in particular those on the F protein, is an important step in virus maturation and is required for virus infectivity.

  6. A human coronavirus OC43 variant harboring persistence-associated mutations in the S glycoprotein differentially induces the unfolded protein response in human neurons as compared to wild-type virus

    SciTech Connect

    Favreau, Dominique J.; Desforges, Marc; St-Jean, Julien R.; Talbot, Pierre J.

    2009-12-20

    We have reported that human respiratory coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) is neurotropic and neuroinvasive in humans and mice, and that neurons are the primary target of infection in mice, leading to neurodegenerative disabilities. We now report that an HCoV-OC43 mutant harboring two persistence-associated S glycoprotein point mutations (H183R and Y241H), induced a stronger unfolded protein response (UPR) and translation attenuation in infected human neurons. There was a major contribution of the IRE1/XBP1 pathway, followed by caspase-3 activation and nuclear fragmentation, with no significant role of the ATF6 and eIF2-alpha/ATF4 pathways. Our results show the importance of discrete molecular viral S determinants in virus-neuronal cell interactions that lead to increased production of viral proteins and infectious particles, enhanced UPR activation, and increased cytotoxicity and cell death. As this mutant virus is more neurovirulent in mice, our results also suggest that two mutations in the S glycoprotein could eventually modulate viral neuropathogenesis.

  7. [Prokaryotic expression and immunogenicity analysis of glycoprotein from infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-ming; Liu, Hong-bai; Yin, Jia-sheng; Lu, Tong-yan

    2013-09-01

    In order to detect Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus with immunological methods, the surface glycoprotein of a recent IHNV-Sn isolated from farmed rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) in China was amplified and cloned into pET27b(+) vector (designated as pET27b-G ). The expression of recombinant plasmid pET27b-G in E. coli BL21(DE3) was induced and determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The predicted molecular weight of glycoprotein protein was approximately 55 kD and was confirmed in this study. The inclusion body of glycoprotein was treated with urea at different urea concentrations, and dialyzed into PBS buffer. Purified glycoprotein with high concentration was obtained after dialyzed in the PBS buffer. Antisera against glycoprotein were produced from immunized rabbits. The prepared antisera could react specifically with both the recombinant glycoprotein and natural glycoprotein of the IHNV-Sn isolated in the test of indirect ELISA, and the titer against the recombinant glycoprotein was 1:20,000. IFA showed that the antisera can recognize the glycoprotein located on the surface of IHNV-Sn and IHNV reference strain. These results indicated that the expressed glycoprotein was immunogenical and antigenical and could be functional as the natural IHNV glycoprotein. These results established a foundation for further study on vaccine and rapid diagnosis of IHNV.

  8. Carboxy-terminally truncated Dengue 4 virus envelope glycoprotein expressed in Pichia pastoris induced neutralizing antibodies and resistance to Dengue 4 virus challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Muné, M; Rodríguez, R; Ramírez, R; Soto, Y; Sierra, B; Rodríguez Roche, R; Marquez, G; Garcia, J; Guillén, G; Guzmán, M G

    2003-11-01

    We have expressed a recombinant Dengue 4 virus envelope glycoprotein (E4rec), truncated at its C-terminus by 53 amino acids, in Pichia pastoris. The presence of E4rec was confirmed by Western-blot using anti-DEN 4 hyper immune mouse ascitic fluid. E4rec migrated during SDS-PAGE as a 64 kDa protein. Treatment with endoglycosidases showed that the E protein was modified by the addition of short mannose chains and the absence of hyperglycosylation. When administered to BALB-C mice, E4rec elicited a DEN 4 neutralizing antibody response haemagglutination inhibition antibodies and specific memory T cell response. Mice immunized were also significantly protected against lethal DEN 4 virus challenge (86.6%, p < 0.001).

  9. Immune Response Induced by an Immunodominant 60 kDa Glycoprotein of the Cell Wall of Sporothrix schenckii in Two Mice Strains with Experimental Sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Pulido-Camarillo, Evelyn; López-Romero, Everardo; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo; Ruiz-Baca, Estela

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall (CW) components of fungus Sporothrix schenckii are the major inductors antigens of immune responses. The immunodominant 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) has been shown to be associated with the virulence of this fungus but its role in experimental sporotrichosis is unknown. In this work, the immunological effects of CW-purified gp60 were investigated in a model of experimental subcutaneous sporotrichosis in normal and gp60-preimmunized C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice strains which were then infected with S. schenckii conidia. Results showed that both mice strains use different cytokine profiles in order to fight S. schenckii infection; C57BL/6 mice seem to use a Th17 response while BALB/c mice tend to depend on a Th1 profile. Preimmunization with gp60 showed a downregulatory effect on the immune response since cytokines levels were diminished in both strains. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of dorsoplantar inflammation between gp60-preimmunized and nonimmunized mice of both strains. However, skin lesions due to the infection in gp60-preimmunized mice were more severe in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that the antigen exerts a higher downregulatory effect on the Th1 response.

  10. Immune Response Induced by an Immunodominant 60 kDa Glycoprotein of the Cell Wall of Sporothrix schenckii in Two Mice Strains with Experimental Sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Fierro, Carlos A.; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Toriello, Conchita; Pulido-Camarillo, Evelyn; Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Cell wall (CW) components of fungus Sporothrix schenckii are the major inductors antigens of immune responses. The immunodominant 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) has been shown to be associated with the virulence of this fungus but its role in experimental sporotrichosis is unknown. In this work, the immunological effects of CW-purified gp60 were investigated in a model of experimental subcutaneous sporotrichosis in normal and gp60-preimmunized C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice strains which were then infected with S. schenckii conidia. Results showed that both mice strains use different cytokine profiles in order to fight S. schenckii infection; C57BL/6 mice seem to use a Th17 response while BALB/c mice tend to depend on a Th1 profile. Preimmunization with gp60 showed a downregulatory effect on the immune response since cytokines levels were diminished in both strains. There were no significant differences in the magnitude of dorsoplantar inflammation between gp60-preimmunized and nonimmunized mice of both strains. However, skin lesions due to the infection in gp60-preimmunized mice were more severe in BALB/c than in C57BL/6 mice, suggesting that the antigen exerts a higher downregulatory effect on the Th1 response. PMID:27051673

  11. Asparagine-linked carbohydrate chains of inducible rat parotid proline-rich glycoprotein contain terminal beta-linked N-acetylgalactosamine.

    PubMed

    Bedi, G S

    1997-12-01

    Rats treated with daily injection of DL-isoproterenol for 10 consecutive days (25 mg kg(-1) body weight) showed marked induction of a proline-rich glycoprotein (GPRP) of 220 kDa. Proteinase K digestion of GPRP produced a homogeneous glycopeptide with an average chemical composition as follows (residues per mol): Pro4, Glx3, Asx2, Gly1, His1, Thr1, Arg1, GlcNAc5, GalNac1, Man3, Gal2-3, and Fuc1. The structural analysis of the asparagine-linked carbohydrate unit was performed by methylation, periodate oxidation and enzymatic degradation. Methylation studies indicated that the three mannosyl residues were substituted at 1,2-, 1,2,4-, and 1,3,6-positions. Fucose, N-acetylgalactosamine, 1.5 residues of galactose and 0.35 residues of N-acetylglucosamine were terminally located and one galactose residue was 1,4-substituted. Approximately four of the 5 N-acetylglucosamine residues were substituted at 1,4-position and approximately 1 residue of N-acetylglucosamine was substituted at 1,4,6-positions. Periodate oxidation studies and exoglycosidase results were consistent with the methylation data. Based on the results of Smith degradation, methylation and sequential exoglycosidase digestions a triantennary oligosaccharide structure having terminal N-acetylgalactosamine in one of the branches is proposed for the major Asn-linked carbohydrate moiety of GPRP.

  12. Interaction of CCN1 with αvβ3 integrin induces P-glycoprotein and confers vinblastine resistance in renal cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Qing-Zhi; Zhou, Ming; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Du, Yue-Feng; Fan, Jin-Hai; Li, Xiang; He, Da-Lin

    2013-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) ranks among the most chemoresistant tumors, and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) predominates multidrug resistance mechanisms by reducing the accumulation of intracellular chemotherapy drugs such as vinblastine (VBL), which is considered the most effective chemotherapeutic agent for this neoplasia. Unfortunately, the mechanism by which the expression of P-gp is regulated and the ways to inhibit the function of P-gp are poorly understood. Our study was carried out to determine the possible role of CCN1 in P-pg-mediated drug resistance on the basis of the validated function of CCN1, an extracellular matrix protein, in promoting chemoresistance. As expected, CCN1 was overexpressed in VBL-resistant cell lines (ACHN/VBL, A498/VBL, Caki-1/VBL, and Caki-2/VBL) as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We then transfected non-VBL-resistant cell lines with Ad-CCN1 and observed that the IC50 of VBL increased by about 3-5 times. Furthermore, both CCN1 antibody neutralization and αvβ3 integrin antibody blockade decreased the IC50 of VBL, which showed that CCN1 and αvβ3 are associated with resistance to VBL in RCC. Simultaneously, the enhanced expression of CCN1 triggered the intracellular PI3K/Akt pathway by binding αvβ3 integrin, as shown by western blot. P-gp expression was augmented in response to activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, which could be modified by PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or multidrug resistance siRNA transfection. Therefore, targeted restraint of CCN1 or αvβ3 integrin in combination with the administration of VBL may be beneficial in the treatment of primary and metastatic RCC.

  13. Neem leaf glycoprotein promotes dual generation of central and effector memory CD8(+) T cells against sarcoma antigen vaccine to induce protective anti-tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sarbari; Sarkar, Madhurima; Ghosh, Tithi; Guha, Ipsita; Bhuniya, Avishek; Saha, Akata; Dasgupta, Shayani; Barik, Subhasis; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2016-03-01

    We have previously shown that Neem Leaf Glycoprotein (NLGP) mediates sustained tumor protection by activating host immune response. Now we report that adjuvant help from NLGP predominantly generates CD44(+)CD62L(high)CCR7(high) central memory (TCM; in lymph node) and CD44(+)CD62L(low)CCR7(low) effector memory (TEM; in spleen) CD8(+) T cells of Swiss mice after vaccination with sarcoma antigen (SarAg). Generated TCM and TEM participated either to replenish memory cell pool for sustained disease free states or in rapid tumor eradication respectively. TCM generated after SarAg+NLGP vaccination underwent significant proliferation and IL-2 secretion following SarAg re-stimulation. Furthermore, SarAg+NLGP vaccination helps in greater survival of the memory precursor effector cells at the peak of the effector response and their maintenance as mature memory cells, in comparison to single modality treatment. Such response is corroborated with the reduced phosphorylation of FOXO in the cytosol and increased KLF2 in the nucleus associated with enhanced CD62L, CCR7 expression of lymph node-resident CD8(+) T cells. However, spleen-resident CD8(+) T memory cells show superior efficacy for immediate memory-to-effector cell conversion. The data support in all aspects that SarAg+NLGP demonstrate superiority than SarAg vaccination alone that benefits the host by rapid effector functions whenever required, whereas, central-memory cells are thought to replenish the memory cell pool for ultimate sustained disease free survival till 60 days following post-vaccination tumor inoculation.

  14. Cell lysis induces redistribution of the GPI-anchored variant surface glycoprotein on both faces of the plasma membrane of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Cardoso De Almeida, M L; Geuskens, M; Pays, E

    1999-12-01

    African trypanosomes are coated by 10 million copies of a single variant specific glycoprotein (VSG) which are anchored in the plasma membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI). A GPI-specific phospholipase C (GPI-PLC) triggers fast VSG release upon cell lysis but in vivo it is safely controlled and topologically concealed from its substrate by being intracellular. One enigmatic aspect of GPI-PLC action therefore consists of how it could gain access to the VSG in the exoplasmic leaflet of the membrane. The data presented herewith disclose an unexpected possible solution for this puzzle: upon cell rupture the VSG invades the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane which thus becomes double coated. This unusual VSG rearrangement was stable in ruptured plasma membrane from GPI-PLC null mutant trypanosomes but transiently preceded VSG release in wild-type parasites. The formation of double coat membrane (DCM) was independent of the presence or activation of GPI-PLC, occurred both at 4 degrees C and 30 degrees C and was unaffected by the classical inhibitor of VSG release, p-choromercuryphenylsulfonic acid (PCM). DCMs conserved the same coat thickness and association with subpellicular microtubules as in intact cells and were prone to form vesicles following gradual detachment of the latter. Our data also demonstrate that: (i) GPI-PLC expressed by one trypanosome only targets its own plasma membrane, being unable to release VSG of another parasite; (ii) DCMs concomitantly formed from trypanosomes expressing different VSGs do not intermix, an indication that DCM might be refractory to membrane fusion.

  15. Envelope glycoprotein of arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Burri, Dominique J; da Palma, Joel Ramos; Kunz, Stefan; Pasquato, Antonella

    2012-10-17

    Arenaviruses include lethal human pathogens which pose serious public health threats. So far, no FDA approved vaccines are available against arenavirus infections, and therapeutic options are limited, making the identification of novel drug targets for the development of efficacious therapeutics an urgent need. Arenaviruses are comprised of two RNA genome segments and four proteins, the polymerase L, the envelope glycoprotein GP, the matrix protein Z, and the nucleoprotein NP. A crucial step in the arenavirus life-cycle is the biosynthesis and maturation of the GP precursor (GPC) by cellular signal peptidases and the cellular enzyme Subtilisin Kexin Isozyme-1 (SKI-1)/Site-1 Protease (S1P) yielding a tripartite mature GP complex formed by GP1/GP2 and a stable signal peptide (SSP). GPC cleavage by SKI-1/S1P is crucial for fusion competence and incorporation of mature GP into nascent budding virion particles. In a first part of our review, we cover basic aspects and newer developments in the biosynthesis of arenavirus GP and its molecular interaction with SKI-1/S1P. A second part will then highlight the potential of SKI-1/S1P-mediated processing of arenavirus GPC as a novel target for therapeutic intervention to combat human pathogenic arenaviruses.

  16. Folding of synthetic homogeneous glycoproteins in the presence of a glycoprotein folding sensor enzyme.

    PubMed

    Dedola, Simone; Izumi, Masayuki; Makimura, Yutaka; Seko, Akira; Kanamori, Akiko; Sakono, Masafumi; Ito, Yukishige; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2014-03-10

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT) plays a key role in recognizing folded and misfolded glycoproteins in the glycoprotein quality control system of the endoplasmic reticulum. UGGT detects misfolded glycoproteins and re-glucosylates them as a tag for misfolded glycoproteins. A flexible model to reproduce in vitro folding of a glycoprotein in the presence of UGGT in a mixture containing correctly folded, folding intermediates, and misfolded glycoproteins is described. The data demonstrates that UGGT can re-glucosylate all intermediates in the in vitro folding experiments, thus indicating that UGGT inspects not only final folded products, but also the glycoprotein folding intermediates.

  17. Salivary Mucin 19 Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Culp, David J.; Robinson, Bently; Cash, Melanie N.; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Stewart, Carol; Cuadra-Saenz, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Saliva functions in innate immunity of the oral cavity, protecting against demineralization of teeth (i.e. dental caries), a highly prevalent infectious disease associated with Streptococcus mutans, a pathogen also linked to endocarditis and atheromatous plaques. Gel-forming mucins are a major constituent of saliva. Because Muc19 is the dominant salivary gel-forming mucin in mice, we studied Muc19−/− mice for changes in innate immune functions of saliva in interactions with S. mutans. When challenged with S. mutans and a cariogenic diet, total smooth and sulcal surface lesions are more than 2- and 1.6-fold higher in Muc19−/− mice compared with wild type, whereas the severity of lesions are up to 6- and 10-fold higher, respectively. Furthermore, the oral microbiota of Muc19−/− mice display higher levels of indigenous streptococci. Results emphasize the importance of a single salivary constituent in the innate immune functions of saliva. In vitro studies of S. mutans and Muc19 interactions (i.e. adherence, aggregation, and biofilm formation) demonstrate Muc19 poorly aggregates S. mutans. Nonetheless, aggregation is enhanced upon adding Muc19 to saliva from Muc19−/− mice, indicating Muc19 assists in bacterial clearance through formation of heterotypic complexes with salivary constituents that bind S. mutans, thus representing a novel innate immune function for salivary gel-forming mucins. In humans, expression of salivary MUC19 is unclear. We find MUC19 transcripts in salivary glands of seven subjects and demonstrate MUC19 glycoproteins in glandular mucous cells and saliva. Similarities and differences between mice and humans in the expression and functions of salivary gel-forming mucins are discussed. PMID:25512380

  18. Murine pregnancy-specific glycoprotein 23 induces the proangiogenic factors transforming-growth factor beta 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor a in cell types involved in vascular remodeling in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Julie A; Johnson, Briana L; Chen, Yongqing; Ha, Cam T; Dveksler, Gabriela S

    2008-12-01

    Haemochorial placentation is a unique physiological process in which the fetal trophoblast cells remodel the maternal decidual spiral arteries to establish the fetoplacental blood supply. Pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSGs) are members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family. PSGs are produced by the placenta of rodents and primates and are secreted into the bloodstream. PSG23 is one of 17 members of the murine PSG family (designated PSG16 to PSG32). Previous studies determined that PSGs have immunoregulatory functions due to their ability to modulate macrophage cytokine secretion. Here we show that recombinant PSG23 induces transforming growth factor (TGF) beta1, TGFB1, and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) in primary murine macrophages and the macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cells. In addition, we identified new cell types that responded to PSG23 treatment. Dendritic cells, endothelial cells, and trophoblasts, which are involved in maternal vasculature remodeling during pregnancy, secreted TGFB1 and VEGFA in response to PSG23. PSG23 showed cross-reactivity with human cells, including human monocytes and the trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo cells. We analyzed the binding of PSG23 to the tetraspanin CD9, the receptor for PSG17, and found that CD9 is not essential for PSG23 binding and activity in macrophages. Overall these studies show that PSGs can modulate the secretion of important proangiogenic factors, TGFB1 and VEGFA, by different cell types involved in the development of the placenta.

  19. Structures and Functions of Pestivirus Glycoproteins: Not Simply Surface Matters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fun-In; Deng, Ming-Chung; Huang, Yu-Liang; Chang, Chia-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Pestiviruses, which include economically important animal pathogens such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and classical swine fever virus, possess three envelope glycoproteins, namely Erns, E1, and E2. This article discusses the structures and functions of these glycoproteins and their effects on viral pathogenicity in cells in culture and in animal hosts. E2 is the most important structural protein as it interacts with cell surface receptors that determine cell tropism and induces neutralizing antibody and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. All three glycoproteins are involved in virus attachment and entry into target cells. E1-E2 heterodimers are essential for viral entry and infectivity. Erns is unique because it possesses intrinsic ribonuclease (RNase) activity that can inhibit the production of type I interferons and assist in the development of persistent infections. These glycoproteins are localized to the virion surface; however, variations in amino acids and antigenic structures, disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, and RNase activity can ultimately affect the virulence of pestiviruses in animals. Along with mutations that are driven by selection pressure, antigenic differences in glycoproteins influence the efficacy of vaccines and determine the appropriateness of the vaccines that are currently being used in the field. PMID:26131960

  20. Inhibition of neutrophil activation by alpha1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Costello, M J; Gewurz, H; Siegel, J N

    1984-01-01

    We report that alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), a naturally occurring human plasma protein and acute phase reactant of uncertain biological function, inhibits human neutrophil aggregation and superoxide anion generation induced by a variety of stimuli including zymosan treated serum, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine and phorbol myristate acetate. Inhibition was transient, directly proportional to the glycoprotein concentration and inversely proportional to the concentration of the stimulus added. Desialyzation, resulting in the removal of a substantial portion of the molecule's negative charge, did not alter the effectiveness of AAG. Removal of the penultimate galactose residues from desialyzed AAG resulted in a slight but significant reversal of inhibition, suggesting that the heteropolysaccharide units of AAG may be important for inhibition of cellular function. We therefore suggest that the acute phase glycoprotein AAG may be a significant modulator of neutrophil as well as platelet and lymphocyte function during inflammation. PMID:6321072

  1. Glycoproteins from sugarcane plants regulate cell polarity of Ustilago scitaminea teliospores.

    PubMed

    Millanes, Ana-María; Fontaniella, Blanca; Legaz, María-Estrella; Vicente, Carlos

    2005-03-01

    Saccharum officinarum, cv. Mayarí, is a variety of sugarcane resistant to smut disease caused by Ustilago scitaminea. Sugarcane naturally produces glycoproteins that accumulate in the parenchymatous cells of stalks. These glycoproteins contain a heterofructan as polysaccharide moiety. The concentration of these glycoproteins clearly increases after inoculation of sugarcane plants with smut teliospores, although major symptoms of disease are not observed. These glycoproteins induce homotypic adhesion and inhibit teliospore germination. When glycoproteins from healthy, non-inoculated plants are fractionated, they inhibit actin capping, which occurs before teliospore germination. However, inoculation of smut teliospores induce glycoprotein fractions that promote teliospore polarity and are different from those obtained from healthy plants. These fractions exhibit arginase activity, which is strongly enhanced in inoculated plants. Arginase from healthy plants binds to cell wall teliospores and it is completely desorpted by sucrose, but only 50% of arginase activity from inoculated plants is desorpted by the disaccharide. The data presented herein are consistent with a model of excess arginase entry into teliospores. Arginase synthesized by sugarcane plants as a response to the experimental infection would increase the synthesis of putrescine, which impedes polarization at concentration values higher than 0.05 mM. However, smut teliospores seem to be able to change the pattern of glycoprotein production by sugarcane, thereby promoting the synthesis of different glycoproteins that activate polarization after binding to their cell wall ligand.

  2. Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Activity Regulates Brain Expression of P-Glycoprotein in the Kainic Acid-Induced Seizure Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Nian; Di, Qing; Liu, Hao; Hu, Yong; Jiang, Ying; Yan, Yu-kui; Zhang, Yan-fang; Zhang, Ying-dong

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of NF-κB activity on the seizure susceptibility, brain damage, and P-gp expression in kainic acid- (KA-) induced seizure rats. Male SD rats were divided into saline control group (NS group), KA induced epilepsy group (EP group), and epilepsy group intervened with NF-κB inhibitor-pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate salt (PDTC group) or with dexamethasone (DEX group). No seizures were observed in the rats of NS group. Compared with NS group, increased P-gp expression and NF-κB activation in the rat brain of the EP group were observed after KA micro-injection. Both PDTC and DEX pre-treatment significantly increased the latency to grade III or V seizure onset compared to EP group but failed to show neuron-protective effect as the number of survival neurons didn't significantly differ from that in EP group. Furthermore, PDTC pre-treatment significantly decreased P-gp expression along with NF-κB activation in the hippocampus CA3 area and amygdala complex of rats compared with the EP group, implying that NF-κB activation involved in the seizure susceptibility and seizure induced brain P-gp over-expression. Additionally, DEX pre-treatment only decreased P-gp expression level without inhibition of NF-κB activation, suggesting NF-κB independent pathway may also participate in regulating seizure induced P-gp over-expression. PMID:21403895

  3. Glycan analysis of therapeutic glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Luo, Shen; Zhang, Baolin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are glycoproteins produced by living cell systems. The glycan moieties attached to the proteins can directly affect protein stability, bioactivity, and immunogenicity. Therefore, glycan variants of a glycoprotein product must be adequately analyzed and controlled to ensure product quality. However, the inherent complexity of protein glycosylation poses a daunting analytical challenge. This review provides an update of recent advances in glycan analysis, including the potential utility of lectin-based microarray for high throughput glycan profiling. Emphasis is placed on comparison of the major types of analytics for use in determining unique glycan features such as glycosylation site, glycan structure, and content. PMID:26599345

  4. Plasma α1-Acid Glycoprotein Can Be Used to Adjust Inflammation-Induced Hyporetinolemia in Vitamin A-Sufficient, but Not Vitamin A-Deficient or -Supplemented Rats12

    PubMed Central

    Gieng, Sin H.; Rosales, Francisco J.

    2006-01-01

    We examined the association between α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), all-trans-retinol (retinol), and albumin concentrations in a longitudinal animal model of IL-6–induced inflammation. Vitamin A–sufficient (VAS) male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered recombinant human IL-6 [n = 4, 65 μg/(kg·d)] or PBS (n = 4) continuously for 7 d via osmotic minipumps. Plasma samples were obtained daily and concentrations of retinol, AGP, albumin, and total protein were measured. Compared with both baseline and controls, retinol and albumin decreased (P < 0.05), AGP increased (P < 0.05), and total protein concentrations were unaffected in IL-6–treated rats. In vitamin A–deficient (VAD) rats, AGP concentrations were significantly lower at all time points and increased only to one-third of that in VAS rats. The AGP cut-off value indicative of inflammation was 0.11 g/L (i.e., 95% upper limit of baseline concentrations). After 20.5 h, there was an inverse linear correlation between AGP concentrations and the relative change in retinol to baseline (y = −0.18x + 0.48, r = −0.84, P < 0.001). However, changes in AGP and albumin were not correlated (P = 0.94). The application of this function to retinol concentrations in rats from separate experiments showed that hyporetinolemia cannot be adjusted using plasma AGP in VAD or vitamin A–supplemented rats. In conclusion, correcting inflammation-induced hyporetinolemia using an acute-phase protein requires longitudinally derived data, knowledge of vitamin A status, and a common underlying mechanism of change. PMID:16772457

  5. CD4 Glycoprotein Degradation Induced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpu Protein Requires the Function of Proteasomes and the Ubiquitin-Conjugating Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Ulrich; Antón, Luis C.; Bačík, Igor; Cox, Josephine H.; Bour, Stéphane; Bennink, Jack R.; Orlowski, Marian; Strebel, Klaus; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    1998-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vpu gene encodes a type I anchored integral membrane phosphoprotein with two independent functions. First, it regulates virus release from a post-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) compartment by an ion channel activity mediated by its transmembrane anchor. Second, it induces the selective down regulation of host cell receptor proteins (CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class I molecules) in a process involving its phosphorylated cytoplasmic tail. In the present work, we show that the Vpu-induced proteolysis of nascent CD4 can be completely blocked by peptide aldehydes that act as competitive inhibitors of proteasome function and also by lactacystin, which blocks proteasome activity by covalently binding to the catalytic β subunits of proteasomes. The sensitivity of Vpu-induced CD4 degradation to proteasome inhibitors paralleled the inhibition of proteasome degradation of a model ubiquitinated substrate. Characterization of CD4-associated oligosaccharides indicated that CD4 rescued from Vpu-induced degradation by proteasome inhibitors is exported from the ER to the Golgi complex. This finding suggests that retranslocation of CD4 from the ER to the cytosol may be coupled to its proteasomal degradation. CD4 degradation mediated by Vpu does not require the ER chaperone calnexin and is dependent on an intact ubiquitin-conjugating system. This was demonstrated by inhibition of CD4 degradation (i) in cells expressing a thermally inactivated form of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 or (ii) following expression of a mutant form of ubiquitin (Lys48 mutated to Arg48) known to compromise ubiquitin targeting by interfering with the formation of polyubiquitin complexes. CD4 degradation was also prevented by altering the four Lys residues in its cytosolic domain to Arg, suggesting a role for ubiquitination of one or more of these residues in the process of degradation. The results clearly demonstrate a role for the cytosolic

  6. Immunogenicity in mice of human metapneumovirus with a truncated SH glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, A B; Fenwick, F; Robinson, M J; Toms, G L

    2014-04-01

    The SH glycoprotein of human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is twice the size of that of human respiratory syncytial virus and possesses a large, hydrophilic luminal domain. The glycoprotein is located on the surface of the virion and of virus infected cells and, if immunogenic, might be expected to play a role in anti-viral immunity. Initial attempts to study anti-SH antibody immunogenicity were thwarted by the instability of the SH gene on passage both in human bronchial epithelial cells and in mice. Repeated passage of virus isolates in human bronchial epithelial cells in culture resulted in the appearance and eventual predominance of HMPV mutants lacking all or most of the luminal domain of SH coincidental with the loss of productive infection in mouse lungs. Where infection was established in mice with an early cell culture passage, the virus recovered from mouse lung differed markedly from the inoculum, carrying 19 coding mutations in the SH luminal domain. Immunization of mice with a mutant virus variant expressing only 14 amino acids of the luminal domain of SH induced a cross-reactive antibody response to both the F glycoprotein and the SH glycoprotein but a largely sub-group specific response to the G glycoprotein. Similar patterns of response were achieved by immunization with individual HMPV glycoproteins expressed from recombinant vaccinia viruses. Recombinant truncated SH glycoprotein induced sub-group cross-reactive antibodies capable of neutralizing wild-type virus. Recombinant F glycoprotein also induced cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies whilst recombinant G glycoprotein induced largely strain-specific, non-neutralizing antibodies.

  7. Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein and calcium nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Hess, B

    1994-01-01

    Available data on the effects of Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein (THP) on calcium oxalate crystallization processes are apparently conflicting. With the main emphasis on calcium oxalate crystal aggregation, this review demonstrates that THP has a dual role as a modifier of crystal aggregation: in solutions with high pH, low ionic strength (IS) and low concentrations of calcium and THP itself, the glycoprotein acts as a powerful inhibitor of calcium oxalate crystal aggregation. Conversely, low pH, high IS and high concentrations of calcium and THP all favor self-aggregation of THP molecules which lowers their inhibitory activity against calcium oxalate crystal aggregation. Some patients with severely recurrent Ca stone disease excrete abnormal THPs which self-aggregate at levels of pH, IS and concentrations of Ca and THP at which normal THPs remain in monomeric form. With high Ca concentrations, such abnormal THPs become strong promoters of crystal aggregation, since conformational changes in crystal-bound THP molecules induce strong viscous binding forces which overcome repulsive electrostatic surface charges. By chelating free Ca ions, citrate reduces self-aggregation of THP molecules and turns promoting THPs into inhibitors of calcium oxalate crystal aggregation.

  8. Surface Glycoproteins of Exosomes Shed by Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Contribute to Function.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sitara; Danielson, Steven; Clements, Virginia; Edwards, Nathan; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Fenselau, Catherine

    2017-01-06

    In this report, we use a proteomic strategy to identify glycoproteins on the surface of exosomes derived from myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and then test if selected glycoproteins contribute to exosome-mediated chemotaxis and migration of MDSCs. We report successful modification of a surface chemistry method for use with exosomes and identify 21 surface N-glycoproteins on exosomes released by mouse mammary carcinoma-induced MDSCs. These glycoprotein identities and functionalities are compared with 93 N-linked glycoproteins identified on the surface of the parental cells. As with the lysate proteomes examined previously, the exosome surface N-glycoproteins are primarily a subset of the glycoproteins on the surface of the suppressor cells that released them, with related functions and related potential as therapeutic targets. The "don't eat me" molecule CD47 and its binding partners thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) and signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) were among the surface N-glycoproteins detected. Functional bioassays using antibodies to these three molecules demonstrated that CD47, TSP1, and to a lesser extent SIRPα facilitate exosome-mediated MDSC chemotaxis and migration.

  9. β-asarone and levodopa co-administration increase striatal dopamine level in 6-hydroxydopamine induced rats by modulating P-glycoprotein and tight junction proteins at the blood-brain barrier and promoting levodopa into the brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Ma, Ruanxin; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-06-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) is widely considered as one of the most effective drug constituents in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of L-dopa is <5%, which causes low efficacy. Neuroprotective effects of β-asarone on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced PD rats were demonstrated by our previous studies. Co-administration of β-asarone and L-dopa has not been explored until being investigated on PD rats in this study. PD rats were divided into four groups: untreated, L-dopa-treated, β-asarone-treated and co-administered-treated groups. All of the treatments were administered to the rats twice per day for 30 days. The L-dopa, dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), S100β and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels were subsequently determined. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp), zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), claudin-5, occludin and actin expression was also assessed in cortex. Changes in BBB ultrastructure were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that the co-administered treatment increased levels of L-dopa, DA, DOPAC and HVA in striatum, and S100β in plasma, but down-regulated NSE, P-gp, ZO-1, occludin, actin and claudin-5 in cortex. Crevices were observed between capillary endothelial cells at intercellular tight junction of the striatum in co-administered-treated group, while the endothelial cells in untreated group were tightly jointing each other. In addition, the correlations of L-dopa or DA and P-gp or tight junction proteins respectively were significantly negative in co-administered- and β-asarone-treated groups. These findings suggest that co-administered treatment may enhance the L-dopa BBB permeability and attenuate brain injury, which may be beneficial to PD treatment.

  10. Selection of resistant acute myeloid leukemia SKM-1 and MOLM-13 cells by vincristine-, mitoxantrone- and lenalidomide-induced upregulation of P-glycoprotein activity and downregulation of CD33 cell surface exposure.

    PubMed

    Imrichova, D; Messingerova, L; Seres, M; Kavcova, H; Pavlikova, L; Coculova, M; Breier, A; Sulova, Z

    2015-09-18

    Bone marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients contain upregulated levels of cell surface antigen CD33 compared with healthy controls. This difference enables the use of humanized anti-CD33 antibody conjugated to cytotoxic agents for CD33 targeted immunotherapy. However, the expression of the membrane-bound drug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been shown to be critical for resistance against the cytotoxicity of a humanized anti-CD33 antibody conjugated to maytansine-derivative DM4. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the expression of P-gp in AML cell lines is associated with changes in CD33 expression. For this purpose, we established drug resistant variants of SKM-1 and MOLM-13 AML cell lines via the selection of parental cells for resistance to vincristine, mitoxantrone and lenalidomide. All three substances induced a multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype in SKM-1 cells associated with strong upregulation of P-gp and downregulation of CD33. However, in MOLM-13 cells, the upregulation of P-gp and downregulation of CD33 were present only in cells selected for resistance to vincristine and mitoxantrone but not lenalidomide. Inverse expression of P-gp and CD33 were observed in all resistant variants of SKM-1 and MOLM-13 cells. The MDR phenotype of resistant variants of SKM-1 and MOLM-13 cells was associated with alterations in apoptotic regulatory proteins and downregulation of the multidrug resistance associated protein 1 and breast cancer resistance protein.

  11. The Calcium-induced Conformation and Glycosylation of Scavenger-rich Cysteine Repeat (SRCR) Domains of Glycoprotein 340 Influence the High Affinity Interaction with Antigen I/II Homologs*

    PubMed Central

    Purushotham, Sangeetha; Deivanayagam, Champion

    2014-01-01

    Oral streptococci adhere to tooth-immobilized glycoprotein 340 (GP340) via the surface protein antigen I/II (AgI/II) and its homologs as the first step in pathogenesis. Studying this interaction using recombinant proteins, we observed that calcium increases the conformational stability of the scavenger-rich cysteine repeat (SRCRs) domains of GP340. Our results also show that AgI/II adheres specifically with nanomolar affinity to the calcium-induced SRCR conformation in an immobilized state and not in solution. This interaction is significantly dependent on the O-linked carbohydrates present on the SRCRs. This study also establishes that a single SRCR domain of GP340 contains the two surfaces to which the apical and C-terminal regions of AgI/II noncompetitively adhere. Compared with the single SRCR domain, the three tandem SRCR domains displayed a collective/cooperative increase in their bacterial adherence and aggregation. The previously described SRCRP2 peptide that was shown to aggregate several oral streptococci displayed limited aggregation and also nonspecific adherence compared to SRCR domains. Finally, we show distinct species-specific adherence/aggregation between Streptococcus mutans AgI/II and Streptococcus gordonii SspB in their interaction with the SRCRs. This study concludes that identification of the metal ion and carbohydrate adherence motifs on both SRCRs and AgI/II homologs could lead to the development of anti-adhesive inhibitors that could deter the adherence of pathogenic oral streptococci and thereby prevent the onset of infections. PMID:24923446

  12. Quantification of 1-(propan-2-ylamino)-4-propoxy-9H-thioxanthen-9-one (TX5), a newly synthetized P-glycoprotein inducer/activator, in biological samples: method development and validation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Filipa; Ponte, Filipa; Silva, Renata; Rocha-Pereira, Carolina; Sousa, Emília; Pinto, Madalena; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Remião, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    A simple, rapid and economical method was developed and validated for the analysis and quantification of 1-(propan-2-ylamino)-4-propoxy-9H-thioxanthen-9-one (TX5), a P-glycoprotein inducer/activator, in biological samples, using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A C18 column and a mobile phase composed of methanol-water (90/10, v/v) with 1% (v/v) triethylamine, at a flow rate of 1 mL/min, were used for chromatographic separation. TX5 standards (0.5-150 μm) were prepared in human serum. Methanol was used for TX5 extraction and serum protein precipitation. After filtration, samples were injected into the HPLC apparatus and TX5 was quantified by a conventional UV detector at 255 nm. The TX5 retention time was 13 min in this isocratic system. The method was validated according to ICH guidelines for specificity/selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, limits of detection and quantification (LOD and LOQ) and recovery. The method was proved to be selective, as there were no interferences of endogenous compounds with the same retention time of TX5. Also, the developed method was linear (r(2)  ≥ 0.99) for TX5 concentrations between 0.5 and 150 μm and the LOD and LOQ were 0.08 and 0.23 μm, respectively. The results indicated that the reported method could meet the requirements for TX5 analysis in the trace amounts expected to be present in biological samples.

  13. A new method of separation and quantitation of mucus glycoprotein in rat gastric mucus gel layer and its application to mucus secretion induced by 16,16-dimethyl PGE2.

    PubMed

    Komuro, Y; Ishihara, K; Ohara, S; Saigenji, K; Hotta, K

    1991-10-01

    A method was established for recovering the mucus gel layer of rat gastric mucosa without damage to underlying surface epithelium. The mucus gel was solubilized by stirring the gastric mucosa in a solution of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a mucolytic agent. Optimal mucus gel solubilization was possible by treatment with 2% NAC for 5 minutes at room temperature. Mucus glycoprotein was quantitatively extracted and measured from the mucus gel sample obtained by the NAC treatment. This treatment caused no damage to surface epithelial cells, as observed by a light microscope. Besides NAC, pronase solution was also adequate for solubilizing the mucus gel layer without any damage to the surface epithelium. However, extraction and measurement of mucus glycoprotein from the pronase-treated mucus gel sample was not possible due to contamination by high molecular hexose-containing substances which were eluted along with the mucus glycoprotein from the column of Bio-Gel A-1.5m. This NAC method was used to examine changes in mucus glycoprotein content in the mucus gel at one hour following the oral administration of 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2. A significant increase in mucus glycoprotein of the gel was brought about by the prostaglandin treatment. Thus, the present method was suitable for estimating the amount of mucus secreted in to the mucus gel layer.

  14. Recent Progress in Electrochemical Biosensors for Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Akiba, Uichi; Anzai, Jun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    This review provides an overview of recent progress in the development of electrochemical biosensors for glycoproteins. Electrochemical glycoprotein sensors are constructed by combining metal and carbon electrodes with glycoprotein-selective binding elements including antibodies, lectin, phenylboronic acid and molecularly imprinted polymers. A recent trend in the preparation of glycoprotein sensors is the successful use of nanomaterials such as graphene, carbon nanotube, and metal nanoparticles. These nanomaterials are extremely useful for improving the sensitivity of glycoprotein sensors. This review focuses mainly on the protocols for the preparation of glycoprotein sensors and the materials used. Recent improvements in glycoprotein sensors are discussed by grouping the sensors into several categories based on the materials used as recognition elements. PMID:27916961

  15. Calcium binding domains and calcium-induced conformational transition of SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin, an extracellular glycoprotein expressed in mineralized and nonmineralized tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Taylor, W.; Paulsson, M.; Sage, H.; Hogan, B.

    1987-11-03

    PSARC, BM-40, and osteonectin are identical or very closely related extracellular proteins of apparent M/sub r/ 43,000 (M/sub r/ 33,000 predicted from sequence). They were originally isolated from parietal endoderm cells, basement membrane producing tumors, and bone, respectively, but are rather widely distributed in various tissues. In view of the calcium binding activity reported for osteonectin, the authors analyzed the SPARC sequence and found two putative calcium binding domains. One is an N-terminal acid region with clusters of glutamic acid residues. This region, although neither ..gamma..-carboxylated nor homologous, resembles the ..gamma..-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain of vitamin K dependent proteins of the blood clotting system in charge density, size of negatively charged clusters, and linkage to the rest of the molecule by a cysteine-rich domain. The other region is an EF-hand calcium binding domain located near the C-terminus. A disulfide bond between the E and F helix is predicted from modeling the EF-hand structure with the known coordinates of intestinal calcium binding protein. The disulfide bridge apparently serves to stabilize the isolated calcium loop in the extracellular protein. As observed for cytoplasmic EF-hand-containing proteins and for Gla domain containing proteins, a major conformational transition is induced in BM-40 upon binding of several Ca/sup 2 +/ ions. This is accompanied by a 35% increase in ..cap alpha..-helicity. A pronounced sigmoidicity of the dependence of the circular dichroism signal at 220 nm on calcium concentration indicates that the process is cooperative. In view of its properties, abundance, and wide distribution, it is proposed that SPARC/BM-40/osteonectin has a rather general regulatory function in calcium-dependent processes of the extra-cellular matrix.

  16. The peanut lectin-binding glycoproteins of human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, A.I. ); Keeble, S.; Watt, F.M. )

    1988-08-01

    The peanut lectin (PNA) is known to bind more strongly to keratinocytes that are undergoing terminal differentiation than to proliferating keratinocytes. In order to investigate the significance of this change in cell-surface carbohydrate authors have identified the PNA-binding glycoproteins of cultured human keratinocytes and antibodies against them. Two heavily glycosylated bands of 110 and 250 kDa were resolved by PAGE of ({sup 14}C)galactose- or ({sup 14}C)mannose- and ({sup 14}C)glucosamine-labeled cell extracts eluted with galactose from PNA affinity columns. The higher molecular weight band was also detected on PNA blots of unlabeled cell extracts transferred to nitrocellulose. Both bands were sensitive to pronase digestion, but only the 250-kDa band was digested with trypsin. A rabbit antiserum that we prepared (anti-PNA-gp) immunoprecipitated both bands from cell extracts. In contrast to PNA, anti-PNA-gp bound equally to proliferating and terminally differentiating cells, indicating that some epitope(s) of the PNA-binding glycoproteins is present on the cell surface prior to terminal differentiation. When keratinocytes grown as a monolayer in low-calcium medium were switched to medium containing 2 mM calcium ions in order to induce desmosome formation and stratification, there was a dramatic redistribution of the PNA-binding glycoproteins, which became concentrated at the boundaries between cells. This may suggest a role for the glycoproteins in cell-cell interactions during stratification.

  17. Reversible conformational changes and fusion activity of rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Y; Tuffereau, C; Segretain, D; Knossow, M; Flamand, A

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the implication of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G) in the first steps of the viral cycle, we studied the pH dependence of virus-induced fusion and hemagglutination, as well as modifications of the structure and properties of the viral glycoprotein following pH acidification. Our results suggest that the G protein adopts at least three distinct configurations, each associated with different properties. At neutral pH, G did not fuse membranes or hemagglutinate erythrocytes. It was insensitive to digestion with bromelain and trypsin. At pH 6.4, the glycoprotein became sensitive to proteases. Hemagglutination was at its maximum and then sharply decreased with the pH. No fusion was detected. Aggregation of virus was also observed. The third configuration, at below pH 6.1, was associated with the appearance of fusion. Some neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were able to differentiate these three configurations. Preincubation of the virus at below pH 6 inhibited fusion, but this inhibition, like the structural modifications of the glycoprotein, was reversible when G was reincubated at neutral pH. Images PMID:1870204

  18. Effect of glycoprotein-processing inhibitors on fucosylation of glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, P.M.; Elbein, A.D.

    1985-11-25

    Influenza viral hemagglutinin contains L-fucose linked alpha 1,6 to some of the innermost GlcNAc residues of the complex oligosaccharides. To determine what structural features of the oligosaccharide were required for fucosylation influenza virus-infected MDCK cells were incubated in the presence of various inhibitors of glycoprotein processing to stop trimming at different points. After several hours of incubation with the inhibitors, (5,6-TH)fucose and (1- UC)mannose were added to label the glycoproteins, and cells were incubated in inhibitor and isotope for about 40 h to produce mature virus. Glycopeptides were prepared from the viral and the cellular glycoproteins, and these glycopeptides were isolated by gel filtration on Bio-Gel P-4. The glycopeptides were then digested with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H and rechromatographed on the Bio-Gel column. In the presence of castanospermine or 2,5-dihydroxymethyl-3,4-dihydroxypyrrolidine, both inhibitors of glucosidase I, most of the radioactive mannose was found in Glc3Man7-9GlcNAc structures, and these did not contain radioactive fucose. In the presence of deoxymannojirimycin, an inhibitor of mannosidase I, most of the ( UC)mannose was in a Man9GlcNAc structure which was also not fucosylated. However, in the presence of swainsonine, an inhibitor of mannosidase II, the ( UC)mannose was mostly in hybrid types of oligosaccharides, and these structures also contained radioactive fucose. Treatment of the hybrid structures with endoglucosaminidase H released the (TH)fucose as a small peptide (Fuc-GlcNAc-peptide), whereas the ( UC)mannose remained with the oligosaccharide. The data support the conclusion that the addition of fucose linked alpha 1,6 to the asparagine-linked GlcNAc is dependent upon the presence of a beta 1,2-GlcNAc residue on the alpha 1,3-mannose branch of the core structure.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-mediated syncytium formation is compatible with adenovirus replication and facilitates efficient dispersion of viral gene products and de novo-synthesized virus particles.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Haviv, Y S; Derdeyn, C A; Lam, J; Coolidge, C; Hunter, E; Curiel, D T; Blackwell, J L

    2001-12-10

    Conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vectors are designed for specific oncolytic replication in tumor tissues with concomitant sparing of normal cells. As such, CRAds offer an unprecedented level of anticancer potential for malignancies that have been refractory to previous cancer gene therapy interventions. CRAd efficacy may, however, be compromised by inefficient dispersion of the replicating vector within the tumor tissue. To address this issue, we evaluated the utility of a fusogenic membrane glycoprotein (FMG), which induces the fusion of neighboring cellular membranes to form multinucleated syncytia. We hypothesized that the FMG-mediated syncytia would facilitate dispersion of the adenovirus (Ad) gene products and viral progeny. To test this, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins, which induce syncytia in the presence of CD4+ target cells, were expressed by an Ad (Ad5HIVenv) in permissive (CD4-positive) and nonpermissive (CD4-negative) cell lines. After validating this Ad-FMG model, the efficiency of Ad replication in the presence or absence of syncytia was evaluated. The results demonstrated that syncytium formation was compatible with Ad replication and dramatically increased the dispersion of virus gene products within the cytoplasm of the syncytia as well as viral particles in the nuclei of the syncytial mass. Moreover, progeny virions were released more efficiently from syncytia compared with nonsyncytial cells. These data demonstrate the utility of FMGs as a dispersion agent and suggest that FMGs can improve the efficacy of CRAd gene therapy.

  20. Factors affecting recombinant Western equine encephalitis virus glycoprotein production in the baculovirus system.

    PubMed

    Toth, Ann M; Geisler, Christoph; Aumiller, Jared J; Jarvis, Donald L

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to produce processed, soluble Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) glycoproteins for subunit therapeutic vaccine studies, we isolated twelve recombinant baculoviruses designed to express four different WEEV glycoprotein constructs under the transcriptional control of three temporally distinct baculovirus promoters. The WEEV glycoprotein constructs encoded full-length E1, the E1 ectodomain, an E26KE1 polyprotein precursor, and an artificial, secretable E2E1 chimera. The three different promoters induced gene expression during the immediate early (ie1), late (p6.9), and very late (polh) phases of baculovirus infection. Protein expression studies showed that the nature of the WEEV construct and the timing of expression both influenced the quantity and quality of recombinant glycoprotein produced. The full-length E1 product was insoluble, irrespective of the timing of expression. Each of the other three constructs yielded soluble products and, in these cases, the timing of expression was important, as higher protein processing efficiencies were generally obtained at earlier times of infection. However, immediate early expression did not yield detectable levels of every WEEV product, and expression during the late (p6.9) or very late (polh) phases of infection provided equal or higher amounts of processed, soluble product. Thus, while earlier foreign gene expression can provide higher recombinant glycoprotein processing efficiencies in the baculovirus system, in the case of the WEEV glycoproteins, earlier expression did not provide larger amounts of high quality, soluble recombinant glycoprotein product.

  1. A sweet code for glycoprotein folding.

    PubMed

    Caramelo, Julio J; Parodi, Armando J

    2015-11-14

    Glycoprotein synthesis is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen upon transfer of a glycan (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) from a lipid derivative to Asn residues (N-glycosylation). N-Glycan-dependent quality control of glycoprotein folding in the ER prevents exit to Golgi of folding intermediates, irreparably misfolded glycoproteins and incompletely assembled multimeric complexes. It also enhances folding efficiency by preventing aggregation and facilitating formation of proper disulfide bonds. The control mechanism essentially involves four components, resident lectin-chaperones (calnexin and calreticulin) that recognize monoglucosylated polymannose protein-linked glycans, lectin-associated oxidoreductase acting on monoglucosylated glycoproteins (ERp57), a glucosyltransferase that creates monoglucosylated epitopes in protein-linked glycans (UGGT) and a glucosidase (GII) that removes the glucose units added by UGGT. This last enzyme is the only mechanism component sensing glycoprotein conformations as it creates monoglucosylated glycans exclusively in not properly folded glycoproteins or in not completely assembled multimeric glycoprotein complexes. Glycoproteins that fail to properly fold are eventually driven to proteasomal degradation in the cytosol following the ER-associated degradation pathway, in which the extent of N-glycan demannosylation by ER mannosidases play a relevant role in the identification of irreparably misfolded glycoproteins.

  2. Extracts of Immature Orange (Aurantii fructus immaturus) and Citrus Unshiu Peel (Citri unshiu pericarpium) Induce P-Glycoprotein and Cytochrome P450 3A4 Expression via Upregulation of Pregnane X Receptor.

    PubMed

    Okada, Naoto; Murakami, Aki; Urushizaki, Shiori; Matsuda, Misa; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Ishizawa, Keisuke

    2017-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) are expressed in the intestine and are associated with drug absorption and metabolism. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is the key molecule that regulates the expression of P-gp and CYP3A4. Given that PXR activity is regulated by a variety of compounds, it is possible that unknown PXR activators exist among known medicines. Kampo is a Japanese traditional medicine composed of various natural compounds. In particular, immature orange [Aurantii fructus immaturus (IO)] and citrus unshiu peel [Citri unshiu pericarpium (CP)] are common ingredients of kampo. A previous study reported that kampo containing IO or CP decreased the blood concentration of concomitant drugs via upregulation of CYP3A4 although the mechanism was unclear. Some flavonoids are indicated to alter P-gp and CYP3A4 activity via changes in PXR activity. Because IO and CP include various flavonoids, we speculated that the activity of P-gp and CYP3A4 in the intestine may be altered via changes in PXR activity when IO or CP is administered. We tested this hypothesis by using LS180 intestinal epithelial cells. The ethanol extract of IO contained narirutin and naringin, and that of CP contained narirutin and hesperidin. Ethanol extracts of IO and CP induced P-gp, CYP3A4, and PXR expression. The increase of P-gp and CYP3A4 expression by the IO and CP ethanol extracts was inhibited by ketoconazole, an inhibitor of PXR activation. The ethanol extract of IO and CP decreased the intracellular concentration of digoxin, a P-gp substrate, and this decrease was inhibited by cyclosporine A, a P-gp inhibitor. In contrast, CP, but not IO, stimulated the metabolism of testosterone, a CYP3A4 substrate, and this was inhibited by a CYP3A4 inhibitor. These findings indicate that the ethanol extract of IO and CP increased P-gp and CYP3A4 expression via induction of PXR protein. Moreover, this induction decreased the intracellular substrate concentration.

  3. Anti-glycoprotein D monoclonal antibody protects against herpes simplex virus type 1-induced diseases in mice functionally depleted of selected T-cell subsets or asialo GM1+ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Staats, H F; Oakes, J E; Lausch, R N

    1991-01-01

    Passive transfer of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) specific for glycoprotein D (gD) is highly effective in preventing the development of herpes simplex virus type 1-induced stromal keratitis. In the present study, we investigated whether animals which had been functionally depleted of T-cell subsets or asialo GM1+ cells would continue to be responsive to MAb therapy. BALB/c mice were depleted of CD4+, CD8+, or asialo GM1+ cells by treatment with anti-L3T4, anti-Lyt 2.2, or anti-asialo GM1 antibodies, respectively. Functional depletion of CD4+ cells was documented by the loss of delayed-type hypersensitivity responsiveness, while CD8+ cell depletion was accompanied by abrogation of cytotoxic lymphocyte activity. Anti-asialo GM1 treatment led to the loss of natural killer cell lytic activity. Mice depleted of the desired cell population and infected on the scarified cornea with herpes simplex virus type 1 uniformly developed necrotizing stromal keratitis by 3 weeks postinfection. A single inoculation of anti-gD MAb (55 micrograms) given intraperitoneally 24 h postinfection strongly protected hosts depleted of CD4+ cells against stromal keratitis. Likewise, antibody treatment in CD8+ or asialo GM1+ cell-depleted hosts was as therapeutically effective as that seen in non-cell-depleted mice. We also observed that in cell-depleted mice, the virus spread into the central nervous system and caused encephalitis. The CD4+ cell-depleted mice were the most severely affected, as 100% developed fatal disease. Anti-gD MAb treatment successfully protected all (32 of 32) CD4+-, CD8+-, or asialo GM1(+)-depleted hosts against encephalitis. We therefore conclude that antibody-mediated prevention of stromal keratitis and encephalitis does not require the obligatory participation of CD4+, CD8+, or asialo GM1+ cells. However, when mice were simultaneously depleted of both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets, antibody treatment could not prevent fatal encephalitis. Thus, antibody can compensate for

  4. Extracts of Immature Orange (Aurantii fructus immaturus) and Citrus Unshiu Peel (Citri unshiu pericarpium) Induce P-Glycoprotein and Cytochrome P450 3A4 Expression via Upregulation of Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Naoto; Murakami, Aki; Urushizaki, Shiori; Matsuda, Misa; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Ishizawa, Keisuke

    2017-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) are expressed in the intestine and are associated with drug absorption and metabolism. Pregnane X receptor (PXR) is the key molecule that regulates the expression of P-gp and CYP3A4. Given that PXR activity is regulated by a variety of compounds, it is possible that unknown PXR activators exist among known medicines. Kampo is a Japanese traditional medicine composed of various natural compounds. In particular, immature orange [Aurantii fructus immaturus (IO)] and citrus unshiu peel [Citri unshiu pericarpium (CP)] are common ingredients of kampo. A previous study reported that kampo containing IO or CP decreased the blood concentration of concomitant drugs via upregulation of CYP3A4 although the mechanism was unclear. Some flavonoids are indicated to alter P-gp and CYP3A4 activity via changes in PXR activity. Because IO and CP include various flavonoids, we speculated that the activity of P-gp and CYP3A4 in the intestine may be altered via changes in PXR activity when IO or CP is administered. We tested this hypothesis by using LS180 intestinal epithelial cells. The ethanol extract of IO contained narirutin and naringin, and that of CP contained narirutin and hesperidin. Ethanol extracts of IO and CP induced P-gp, CYP3A4, and PXR expression. The increase of P-gp and CYP3A4 expression by the IO and CP ethanol extracts was inhibited by ketoconazole, an inhibitor of PXR activation. The ethanol extract of IO and CP decreased the intracellular concentration of digoxin, a P-gp substrate, and this decrease was inhibited by cyclosporine A, a P-gp inhibitor. In contrast, CP, but not IO, stimulated the metabolism of testosterone, a CYP3A4 substrate, and this was inhibited by a CYP3A4 inhibitor. These findings indicate that the ethanol extract of IO and CP increased P-gp and CYP3A4 expression via induction of PXR protein. Moreover, this induction decreased the intracellular substrate concentration. PMID:28270768

  5. Human serum histidine-rich glycoprotein. I. Interactions with heme, metal ions and organic ligands.

    PubMed

    Morgan, W T

    1978-08-21

    The 3.8 S alpha2-histidine-rich glycoprotein of human serum is composed of two non-identical subunits, each of which contains carbohydrate. The far ultraviolet circular dichroism spectrum of alpha2-histidine glycoprotein indicates that the protein has little alpha-helix but apparently appreciable amounts of beta-sheet and non-regular structures. alpha2-Histidine-rich glycoprotein binds heme with concomitant changes in the electrophoretic mobility of the protein, in the fluorescence of tryptophan residues, and in the absorption and optical activity of the heme chromophore. By fluorescence quenching, the stoichiometry of binding is 1 heme per alpha2-histidine-rich glycoprotein molecule with an apparent Kd near 1.5 muM; however, by changes in absorbance, the interaction of 9 to 10 additional heme molecules with the alpha protein can be detected. The absorption spectra of heme . alpha2-histidine-rich glycoprotein complexes resemble those of low-spin hemoproteins. The ellipticity induced in the heme chromophore on binding by alpha2-histidine-rich glycoprotein increases linearly up to about 10 hemes bound per mol protein. No change in the conformation of alpha2-histidine-rich glycoprotein was indicated by circular dichroism when one or two heme molecules are bound by the protein. alpha2-Histidine-rich glycoprotein does not effectively compete with human serum albumin for heme, suggesting that alpha2-histidine-rich glycoprotein has no major function in serum heme transport. Nonetheless, the binding of heme by alpha2-histidine-rich glycoprotein provides a means of studying the structure of this protein using the heme chromophore as a probe. alpha2-Histidine-rich glycoprotein also binds other organic molecules including bilirubin, diaquocobinamide, Cibacron blue F3GA and rose bengal, and certain divalent metals. It is of interest that copper, zinc, nickel, cadmium and cobalt effectively inhibit the binding of heme by alpha2-histidine-rich glycoprotein, whereas other

  6. P-glycoprotein in autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    García-Carrasco, M; Mendoza-Pinto, C; Macias Díaz, S; Vera-Recabarren, M; Vázquez de Lara, L; Méndez Martínez, S; Soto-Santillán, P; González-Ramírez, R; Ruiz-Arguelles, A

    2015-07-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is a transmembrane protein of 170 kD encoded by the multidrug resistance 1 (MDR-1) gene, localized on chromosome 7. More than 50 polymorphisms of the MDR-1 gene have been described; a subset of these has been shown to play a pathophysiological role in the development of inflammatory bowel disease, femoral head osteonecrosis induced by steroids, lung cancer and renal epithelial tumors. Polymorphisms that have a protective effect on the development of conditions such as Parkinson disease have also been identified. P-glycoprotein belongs to the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter superfamily and its structure comprises a chain of approximately 1280 aminoacid residues with an N-C terminal structure, arranged as 2 homologous halves, each of which has 6 transmembrane segments, with a total of 12 segments with 2 cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains. Many cytokines like interleukin 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha increase Pgp expression and activity. Pgp functions as an efflux pump for a variety of toxins in order to protect particular organs and tissues as the central nervous system. Pgp transports a variety of substrates including glucocorticoids while other drugs such as tacrolimus and cyclosporine A act as modulators of this protein. The most widely used method to measure Pgp activity is flow cytometry using naturally fluorescent substrates such as anthracyclines or rhodamine 123. The study of drug resistance and its association to Pgp began with the study of resistance to chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer and antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus; however, the role of Pgp in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis has been a focus of study lately and has emerged as an important mechanism by which treatment failure occurs. The present review analyzes the role of Pgp in these autoimmune diseases.

  7. Thyroid hormone upregulates zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in the liver but not in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Simó, Rafael; Hernández, Cristina; Sáez-López, Cristina; Soldevila, Berta; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Selva, David M

    2014-01-01

    Overproduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein by adipose tissue is crucial in accounting for the lipolysis occurring in cancer cachexia of certain malignant tumors. The main aim of this study was to explore whether thyroid hormone could enhance zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in adipose tissue. In addition, the regulation of zinc-α2-glycoprotein by thyroid hormone in the liver was investigated. We performed in vitro (HepG2 cells and primary human adipocytes) and in vivo (C57BL6/mice) experiments addressed to examine the effect of thyroid hormone on zinc-α2-glycoprotein production (mRNA and protein levels) in liver and visceral adipose tissue. We also measured the zinc-α2-glycoprotein serum levels in a cohort of patients before and after controlling their hyperthyroidism. Our results showed that thyroid hormone up-regulates zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the zinc-α2-glycoprotein proximal promoter contains functional thyroid hormone receptor binding sites that respond to thyroid hormone treatment in luciferase reporter gene assays in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, zinc-α2-glycoprotein induced lipolysis in HepG2 in a dose-dependent manner. Our in vivo experiments in mice confirmed the up-regulation of zinc-α2-glycoprotein induced by thyroid hormone in the liver, thus leading to a significant increase in zinc-α2-glycoprotein circulating levels. However, thyroid hormone did not regulate zinc-α2-glycoprotein production in either human or mouse adipocytes. Finally, in patients with hyperthyroidism a significant reduction of zinc-α2-glycoprotein serum levels was detected after treatment but was unrelated to body weight changes. We conclude that thyroid hormone up-regulates the production of zinc-α2-glycoprotein in the liver but not in the adipose tissue. The neutral effect of thyroid hormones on zinc-α2-glycoprotein expression in adipose tissue could be the reason why zinc-α2-glycoprotein is not related to weight

  8. Ovine Herpesvirus 2 Glycoproteins B, H, and L Are Sufficient for, and Viral Glycoprotein Ov8 Can Enhance, Cell-Cell Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    AlHajri, Salim M; Cunha, Cristina W; Nicola, Anthony V; Aguilar, Hector C; Li, Hong; Taus, Naomi S

    2017-03-15

    Ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) is a gammaherpesvirus in the genus Macavirus that is carried asymptomatically by sheep. Infection of poorly adapted animals with OvHV-2 results in sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever, a fatal disease characterized by lymphoproliferation and vasculitis. There is no treatment or vaccine for the disease and no cell culture system to propagate the virus. The lack of cell culture has hindered studies of OvHV-2 biology, including its entry mechanism. As an alternative method to study OvHV-2 glycoproteins responsible for membrane fusion as a part of the entry mechanism, we developed a virus-free cell-to-cell membrane fusion assay to identify the minimum required OvHV-2 glycoproteins to induce membrane fusion. OvHV-2 glycoproteins B, H, and L (gB, gH, and gL) were able to induce membrane fusion together but not when expressed individually. Additionally, open reading frame Ov8, unique to OvHV-2, was found to encode a transmembrane glycoprotein that can significantly enhance membrane fusion. Thus, OvHV-2 gB, gH, and gL are sufficient to induce membrane fusion, while glycoprotein Ov8 plays an enhancing role by an unknown mechanism.IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses enter cells via attachment of the virion to the cellular surface and fusion of the viral envelope with cellular membranes. Virus-cell membrane fusion is an important step for a successful viral infection. Elucidating the roles of viral glycoproteins responsible for membrane fusion is critical toward understanding viral entry. Entry of ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), the causative agent of sheep associated-malignant catarrhal fever, which is one of the leading causes of death in bison and other ungulates, has not been well studied due to the lack of a cell culture system to propagate the virus. The identification of OvHV-2 glycoproteins that mediate membrane fusion may help identify viral and/or cellular factors involved in OvHV-2 cell tropism and will advance investigation of cellular

  9. The B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2)-inhibitors, ABT-737 and ABT-263, are substrates for P-glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Vogler, Meike; Dickens, David; Dyer, Martin J.S.; Owen, Andrew; Pirmohamed, Munir; Cohen, Gerald M.

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} The BCL2-inhibitor ABT-263 is a substrate for P-glycoprotein. {yields} Apoptosis is inhibited by P-glycoprotein expression. {yields} Overexpression of P-glycoprotein may contribute to resistance to ABT-263 or ABT-737. -- Abstract: Inhibition of BCL2 proteins is one of the most promising new approaches to targeted cancer therapy resulting in the induction of apoptosis. Amongst the most specific BCL2-inhibitors identified are ABT-737 and ABT-263. However, targeted therapy is often only effective for a limited amount of time because of the occurrence of drug resistance. In this study, the interaction of BCL2-inhibitors with the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein was investigated. Using {sup 3}H labelled ABT-263, we found that cells with high P-glycoprotein activity accumulated less drug. In addition, cells with increased P-glycoprotein expression were more resistant to apoptosis induced by either ABT-737 or ABT-263. Addition of tariquidar or verapamil sensitized the cells to BCL2-inhibitor treatment, resulting in higher apoptosis. Our data suggest that the BCL2-inhibitors ABT-737 and ABT-263 are substrates for P-glycoprotein. Over-expression of P-glycoprotein may be, at least partly, responsible for resistance to these BCL2-inhibitors.

  10. Production and glyco-engineering of immunomodulatory helminth glycoproteins in plants

    PubMed Central

    Wilbers, Ruud H. P.; Westerhof, Lotte B.; van Noort, Kim; Obieglo, Katja; Driessen, Nicole N.; Everts, Bart; Gringhuis, Sonja I.; Schramm, Gabriele; Goverse, Aska; Smant, Geert; Bakker, Jaap; Smits, Hermelijn H.; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Schots, Arjen; Hokke, Cornelis H.

    2017-01-01

    Helminth parasites control host-immune responses by secreting immunomodulatory glycoproteins. Clinical trials and mouse model studies have demonstrated the potential of helminth-derived glycoproteins for the treatment of immune-related diseases, like allergies and autoimmune diseases. Studies are however hampered by the limited availability of native parasite-derived proteins. Moreover, recombinant protein production systems have thus far been unable to reconstitute helminth-like glycosylation essential for the functionality of some helminth glycoproteins. Here we exploited the flexibility of the N-glycosylation machinery of plants to reconstruct the helminth glycoproteins omega-1 and kappa-5, two major constituents of immunomodulatory Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg antigens. Fine-tuning transient co-expression of specific glycosyltransferases in Nicotiana benthamiana enabled the synthesis of Lewis X (LeX) and LDN/LDN-F glycan motifs as found on natural omega-1 and kappa-5, respectively. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of the introduction of native LeX motifs on plant-produced omega-1 confirmed that LeX on omega-1 contributes to the glycoprotein’s Th2-inducing properties. These data indicate that mimicking the complex carbohydrate structures of helminths in plants is a promising strategy to allow targeted evaluation of therapeutic glycoproteins for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. In addition, our results offer perspectives for the development of effective anti-helminthic vaccines by reconstructing native parasite glycoprotein antigens. PMID:28393916

  11. Requirements within the Ebola Viral Glycoprotein for Tetherin Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Vande Burgt, Nathan H.; Kaletsky, Rachel L.; Bates, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Tetherin is an interferon-induced, intrinsic cellular response factor that blocks release of numerous viruses, including Ebola virus, from infected cells. As with many viruses targeted by host factors, Ebola virus employs a tetherin antagonist, the viral glycoprotein (EboGP), to counteract restriction and promote virus release. Unlike other tetherin antagonists such as HIV-1 Vpu or KSHV K5, the features within EboGP needed to overcome tetherin are not well characterized. Here, we describe sequences within the EboGP ectodomain and membrane spanning domain (msd) as necessary to relieve tetherin restriction of viral particle budding. Fusing the EboGP msd to a normally secreted form of the glycoprotein effectively promotes Ebola virus particle release. Cellular protein or lipid anchors could not substitute for the EboGP msd. The requirement for the EboGP msd was not specific for filovirus budding, as similar results were seen with HIV particles. Furthermore trafficking of chimeric proteins to budding sites did not correlate with an ability to counter tetherin. Additionally, we find that a glycoprotein construct, which mimics the cathepsin-activated species by proteolytic removal of the EboGP glycan cap and mucin domains, is unable to counteract tetherin. Combining these results suggests an important role for the EboGP glycan cap and msd in tetherin antagonism. PMID:26516900

  12. The immunomodulating roles of glycoproteins in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Manish S.; Gubbels, Jennifer A.A.; Felder, Mildred; Connor, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of the immune system demands an intricate defense mechanism by tumors. Ovarian and other tumors employ specific glycoproteins and the associated glycan sequences to modulate immune responses. Glycoproteins enable tumor cells that express or secrete these molecules to evade immune cell attack and induce the immune system to promote tumor growth. This review focuses first on the immune environment in ovarian cancer, and the mechanisms of activation and inhibition that immune cells undergo in order to either attack or ignore a target cell. Next we illustrate the immunomodulatory roles of ovarian cancer-associated glycans and glycoproteins in 1. preventing immune synapse formation, 2. serving as ligands of immune cell receptors, 3. scavenging cytokines and chemokines, and 4. participating in the formation of autoantibodies against the tumor. The importance of these immunomodulating strategies from the view points of understanding the tumor immunology of ovarian tumors, potential origin of such mechanisms, and specific strategies to circumvent the glycoconjugate-mediated suppression of immune responses is discussed in this review. PMID:22201900

  13. Expression and antigenicity of recombinant human respiratory syncytial virus glycoproteins having different affinity tags.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Saem; Kim, A-Reum; Kim, Kisoon; Lee, Wan-Ji; Kim, Sung Soon; Kim, You-Jin

    2016-12-29

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is a main cause of lower respiratory tract infections in infants and the elderly. Glycoprotein (G) is major antigen on the viral surface, and plays a key role for virus entry. Therefore, purification of the glycoprotein of HRSV is critical for the development of HRSV vaccine and serological diagnosis. In this study, we report the design and characterization of glycoprotein engineered rationally to enhance the protein solubility and to facilitate efficient purification. We permuted HRSV glycoproteins with two tags: (i) an immunoglobulin (Ig) M signal peptide and a protein A B domain tag to render HRSV glycoprotein secret into the culture media and (ii) a foldon and 6 × histidine tag with or without transmembrane domain. Three recombinant baculoviruses were constructed: (i) transmembrane-truncated HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 66-298) inserted with the N-terminal IgM signal peptide and protein A B domain (MG-GΔTM), (ii) truncated HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 66-298) fused with a C-terminal foldon and 6 × histidine tag (GΔTM-FH), and (iii) full-length HRSV glycoprotein (amino acid positions 1-298) fused with a C-terminal foldon and 6 × histidine tag (G-FH). Highly soluble recombinant MG-GΔTM protein was clearly purified using one-step affinity chromatography with IgG-sepharose resin, whereas the recombinant G-FH protein and truncated GΔTM-FH were purified partially using nickel-resin. Although, the antigenicity of GΔTM-FH was stronger than highly mannose-rich MG-GΔTM protein, MG-GΔTM induced neutralizing antibodies efficiently in the mice to protect from infectious HRSV.

  14. Interaction between calcofluor white and carbohydrates of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Plancke, Y D

    1999-05-31

    Interactions between the fluorescent probe, calcofluor white, and human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) are compared. The two proteins have comparable isoelectric points, but alpha 1-acid glycoprotein is highly glycosylated (40% of glycans by weight), while the serum albumin is not. Binding of calcofluor to the proteins induces an increase in both the fluorescence anisotropy and the fluorescence intensity of the fluorophore. Also, we found that the calcofluor exhibits a fluorescence emission with a maximum located at 432, 415 or 445 nm, respectively, in the absence of proteins, in the presence of HSA, and in the presence of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein. The stoichiometries of the calcofluor-serum albumin and calcofluor-alpha 1-acid glycoprotein complexes are 2:1 and 1:1, respectively. The association constants are 0.04 and 0.15 microM-1, respectively. The calcofluor does not interact with Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA), although the protein has a hydrophobic site. Nevertheless, one cannot exclude that the binding of the fluorophore to the HSA is nonspecific. Our results, when compared with those obtained with calcofluor dissolved in the hydrophobic solvent isobutanol, and with the fluorescent probe, potassium 6-(p-toluidino)-2-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS), bound to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, indicate that the emission of calcofluor bound to HSA occurs from a hydrophobic state, while that of calcofluor bound to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein occurs from a hydrophilic state. The fluorescence intensity of calcofluor decreases in the presence of carbohydrates isolated from alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, while it increases in the presence of alpha 1-cellulose. Thus, calcofluor interacts mainly with the glycan moiety of alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, and its fluorescence is sensitive to the secondary structure of the glycans.

  15. Due to interleukin-6 type cytokine redundancy only glycoprotein 130 receptor blockade efficiently inhibits myeloma growth

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Renate; Günther, Andreas; Klausz, Katja; Staudinger, Matthias; Peipp, Matthias; Penas, Eva Maria Murga; Rose-John, Stefan; Wijdenes, John; Gramatzki, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-6 has an important role in the pathophysiology of multiple myeloma where it supports the growth and survival of the malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. It belongs to a family of cytokines which use the glycoprotein 130 chain for signal transduction, such as oncostatin M or leukemia inhibitory factor. Targeting interleukin-6 in plasma cell diseases is currently evaluated in clinical trials with monoclonal antibodies. Here, efforts were made to elucidate the contribution of interleukin-6 and glycoprotein 130 signaling in malignant plasma cell growth in vivo. In the xenograft severe combined immune deficiency model employing our interleukin-6-dependent plasma cell line INA-6, the lack of human interleukin-6 induced autocrine interleukin-6 production and a proliferative response to other cytokines of the glycoprotein 130 family. Herein, mice were treated with monoclonal antibodies against human interleukin-6 (elsilimomab/B-E8), the interleukin-6 receptor (B-R6), and with an antibody blocking glycoprotein 130 (B-R3). While treatment of mice with interleukin-6 and interleukin-6 receptor antibodies resulted in a modest delay in tumor growth, the development of plasmacytomas was completely prevented with the anti-glycoprotein 130 antibody. Importantly, complete inhibition was also achieved using F(ab’)2-fragments of monoclonal antibody B-R3. Tumors harbor activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, and in vitro, the antibody inhibited leukemia inhibitory factor stimulated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation and cell growth, while being less effective against interleukin-6. In conclusion, the growth of INA-6 plasmacytomas in vivo under interleukin-6 withdrawal remains strictly dependent on glycoprotein 130, and other glycoprotein 130 cytokines may substitute for interleukin-6. Antibodies against glycoprotein 130 are able to overcome this redundancy and should be explored for a possible therapeutic window

  16. Tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 modulate HIV-1-induced membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Yañez-Mó, María; Barreiro, Olga; Alvarez, Susana; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2006-10-15

    Protein organization on the membrane of target cells may modulate HIV-1 transmission. Since the tetraspanin CD81 is associated to CD4, the receptor of HIV-1 envelope protein (Env; gp120/gp41), we have explored the possibility that this molecule may modulate the initial steps of HIV-1 infection. On the other hand, CD81 belongs to the tetraspanin family, which has been described as organizers of protein microdomains on the plasma membrane. Therefore, the role of CD81 and other related tetraspanin, CD9, on the cell-to-cell fusion process mediated by HIV-1 was studied. We found that anti-tetraspanin Abs enhanced the syncytia formation induced by HIV-1 envelope proteins and viral entry in human T lymphoblasts. In addition, anti-CD81 Abs triggered its clustering in patches, where CD4 and CXCR4 were included. Moreover, the knocking down of CD81 and CD9 expression resulted in an increase in syncytia formation and viral entry. Accordingly, overexpression of CD81 and CD9 rendered cells less susceptible to Env-mediated syncytia formation. These data indicate that CD9 and CD81 have an important role in membrane fusion induced by HIV-1 envelope.

  17. Requirements for cell rounding and surface protein down-regulation by Ebola virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Francica, Joseph R; Matukonis, Meghan K; Bates, Paul

    2009-01-20

    Ebola virus causes an acute hemorrhagic fever that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. The viral glycoprotein is thought to contribute to pathogenesis, though precise mechanisms are unknown. Cellular pathogenesis can be modeled in vitro by expression of the Ebola viral glycoprotein (GP) in cells, which causes dramatic morphological changes, including cell rounding and surface protein down-regulation. These effects are known to be dependent on the presence of a highly glycosylated region of the glycoprotein, the mucin domain. Here we show that the mucin domain from the highly pathogenic Zaire subtype of Ebola virus is sufficient to cause characteristic cytopathology when expressed in the context of a foreign glycoprotein. Similarly to full length Ebola GP, expression of the mucin domain causes rounding, detachment from the extracellular matrix, and the down-regulation of cell surface levels of beta1 integrin and major histocompatibility complex class 1. These effects were not seen when the mucin domain was expressed in the context of a glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored isoform of the foreign glycoprotein. In contrast to earlier analysis of full length Ebola glycoproteins, chimeras carrying the mucin domains from the Zaire and Reston strains appear to cause similar levels of down-modulation and cell detachment. Cytopathology associated with Ebola glycoprotein expression does not occur when GP expression is restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast to a previously published report, our results demonstrate that GP-induced surface protein down-regulation is not mediated through a dynamin-dependent pathway. Overall, these results support a model in which the mucin domain of Ebola GP acts at the cell surface to induce protein down modulation and cytopathic effects.

  18. Calnexin, calreticulin and the folding of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    Calnexin and calreticulin are molecular chaperones in the endoplasmic reticulum (ERJ. They are lectins that interact with newly synthesized glycoproteins that have undergone partial trimming of their core N-linked oligosaccharides. Together with the enzymes responsible for glucose removal and a glucosyltransferase that re-glucosylates already-trimmed glycoproteins, they provide a novel mechanism for promoting folding, oligomeric assembly and quality control in the ER.

  19. [Biological role of heterogeneous glycoprotein structures].

    PubMed

    Jakab, Lajos

    2016-07-01

    Carbohydrate molecules connected mostly with covalent junctions to protein chains are called glycoproteins. These carbohydrate molecules are attached to the protein core in different qualities and order. When the protein core is connected with acidic components such as uronic acid or SO4 radicals, they are called proteoglycans. The currently used name "glycosaminoglycan" in this case is not entirely correct. In the living world polymannane structures occur, too. Glycoproteins do not only exceptionally hold acidic groups but they have neuraminic acid derivatives. Tissue, cellular and matrix structures, and mostly all serum "proteins" are mainly glycoproteins. In the everyday clinical practice glycoproteins are mentioned as proteins. Nevertheless, the inadequate use of the concept may cause errors in the attitudes, too. This paper aims to correct this notion, because the term of "glycobiology" has already been expanded to be an independent scientific field. The practical clinical consequences of recent knowledge in this field are also summarized including novel findings on glycoprotein structures and functions. The importance of the quantity of carbohydrates, and their structural arrangements are also presented. In short, significance of glycoprotein-carbohydrate structures, as well as their physiological and pathological roles are reviewed in order to introduce the field of "glycobiology". Orosomucoid and immunoglobulins are discussed separately. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(30), 1185-1192.

  20. Forcible destruction of severely misfolded mammalian glycoproteins by the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway.

    PubMed

    Ninagawa, Satoshi; Okada, Tetsuya; Sumitomo, Yoshiki; Horimoto, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Takehiro; Ishikawa, Tokiro; Takeda, Shunichi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Suzuki, Tadashi; Kamiya, Yukiko; Kato, Koichi; Mori, Kazutoshi

    2015-11-23

    Glycoproteins and non-glycoproteins possessing unfolded/misfolded parts in their luminal regions are cleared from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by ER-associated degradation (ERAD)-L with distinct mechanisms. Two-step mannose trimming from Man9GlcNAc2 is crucial in the ERAD-L of glycoproteins. We recently showed that this process is initiated by EDEM2 and completed by EDEM3/EDEM1. Here, we constructed chicken and human cells simultaneously deficient in EDEM1/2/3 and analyzed the fates of four ERAD-L substrates containing three potential N-glycosylation sites. We found that native but unstable or somewhat unfolded glycoproteins, such as ATF6α, ATF6α(C), CD3-δ-ΔTM, and EMC1, were stabilized in EDEM1/2/3 triple knockout cells. In marked contrast, degradation of severely misfolded glycoproteins, such as null Hong Kong (NHK) and deletion or insertion mutants of ATF6α(C), CD3-δ-ΔTM, and EMC1, was delayed only at early chase periods, but they were eventually degraded as in wild-type cells. Thus, higher eukaryotes are able to extract severely misfolded glycoproteins from glycoprotein ERAD and target them to the non-glycoprotein ERAD pathway to maintain the homeostasis of the ER.

  1. Defining glycoprotein cancer biomarkers by MS in conjunction with glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Song, Ehwang; Mechref, Yehia

    2015-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is an important and common post-translational modification. More than 50% of human proteins are believed to be glycosylated to modulate the functionality of proteins. Aberrant glycosylation has been correlated to several diseases, such as inflammatory skin diseases, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's and prion diseases, and cancer. Many approved cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins which are not highly abundant proteins. Therefore, effective qualitative and quantitative assessment of glycoproteins entails enrichment methods. This chapter summarizes glycoprotein enrichment methods, including lectin affinity, immunoaffinity, hydrazide chemistry, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, and click chemistry. The use of these enrichment approaches in assessing the qualitative and quantitative changes of glycoproteins in different types of cancers are presented and discussed. This chapter highlights the importance of glycoprotein enrichment techniques for the identification and characterization of new reliable cancer biomarkers.

  2. Immunoglobulin-E reactivity to wine glycoproteins in heavy drinkers.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Quintela, Arturo; Gomez-Rial, Jose; Valcarcel, Catalina; Campos, Joaquin; Sanz, Maria-Luisa; Linneberg, Allan; Gude, Francisco; Vidal, Carmen

    2011-03-01

    N-glycans from plant and invertebrate allergens can induce extensive immunoglobulin-E (IgE) cross-reactivity in vitro. IgE antibodies against these N-glycans, also termed cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants or CCDs, are prevalent in alcohol drinkers. This study investigated the prevalence and biological significance of IgE antibodies to N-glycans from wine glycoproteins in heavy drinkers. A structured questionnaire, skin prick tests, serum IgE levels, IgE-immunoblotting to wine extracts, and basophil activation tests were used to characterize 20 heavy drinkers and 10 control subjects. Eleven heavy drinkers (55%) showed IgE binding to proteins in wine extracts. The proteins were identified by mass spectrometry as grape-derived vacuolar invertase and thaumatin-like protein. Immunoblot reactivity was closely associated with the presence of IgE to CCDs and was inhibited by preincubation with a glycoconjugate containing bromelain-type N-glycans. The same conjugate, CCD-bearing allergens, and wine extracts activated basophils in patients with high-titer CCD-specific IgE but not in healthy controls. There was no relationship between immunoblot reactivity and consumption of any specific type of wine. No patient reported symptoms of hypersensitivity to Hymenoptera venom, food, or wine. In conclusion, heavy drinkers frequently show IgE reactivity to the N-glycans of wine glycoproteins. Glycans and wine glycoprotein extracts can induce basophil activation in sensitized alcoholics. The clinical significance of these findings remains to be elucidated.

  3. Early Activation of Primary Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells by Nipah Virus Glycoprotein-Containing Particles

    PubMed Central

    Freitag, Tanja C.

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a highly pathogenic paramyxovirus that causes pronounced infection of brain endothelia and central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Using primary porcine brain microvascular endothelial cells, we showed that upregulation of E-selectin precedes cytokine induction and is induced not only by infectious NiV but also by NiV-glycoprotein-containing virus-like particles. This demonstrates that very early events in NiV brain endothelial infection do not depend on NiV replication but can be triggered by the NiV glycoproteins alone. PMID:26676791

  4. A Dual-Modality Herpes Simplex Virus 2 Vaccine for Preventing Genital Herpes by Using Glycoprotein C and D Subunit Antigens To Induce Potent Antibody Responses and Adenovirus Vectors Containing Capsid and Tegument Proteins as T Cell Immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Mahairas, Gregory G.; Shaw, Carolyn E.; Huang, Meei-Li; Koelle, David M.; Posavad, Christine; Corey, Lawrence; Friedman, Harvey M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We evaluated a genital herpes prophylactic vaccine containing herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoproteins C (gC2) and D (gD2) to stimulate humoral immunity and UL19 (capsid protein VP5) and UL47 (tegument protein VP13/14) as T cell immunogens. The HSV-2 gC2 and gD2 proteins were expressed in baculovirus, while the UL19 and UL47 genes were expressed from replication-defective adenovirus vectors. Adenovirus vectors containing UL19 and UL47 stimulated human and murine CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Guinea pigs were either (i) mock immunized; (ii) immunized with gC2/gD2, with CpG and alum as adjuvants; (iii) immunized with the UL19/UL47 adenovirus vectors; or (iv) immunized with the combination of gC2/gD2-CpG/alum and the UL19/UL47 adenovirus vectors. Immunization with gC2/gD2 produced potent neutralizing antibodies, while UL19 and UL47 also stimulated antibody responses. After intravaginal HSV-2 challenge, the mock and UL19/UL47 adenovirus groups developed severe acute disease, while 2/8 animals in the gC2/gD2-only group and none in the combined group developed acute disease. No animals in the gC2/gD2 or combined group developed recurrent disease; however, 5/8 animals in each group had subclinical shedding of HSV-2 DNA, on 15/168 days for the gC2/gD2 group and 13/168 days for the combined group. Lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia were positive for HSV-2 DNA and latency-associated transcripts for 5/8 animals in the gC2/gD2 group and 2/8 animals in the combined group. None of the differences comparing the gC2/gD2-only group and the combined group were statistically significant. Therefore, adding the T cell immunogens UL19 and UL47 to the gC2/gD2 vaccine did not significantly reduce genital disease and vaginal HSV-2 DNA shedding compared with the excellent protection provided by gC2/gD2 in the guinea pig model. IMPORTANCE HSV-2 infection is a common cause of genital ulcer disease and a significant public health concern. Genital herpes increases the risk of

  5. Traceless labeling of glycoproteins and its application to the study of glycoprotein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yung-Lin; Lee, Yen-Pin; Yang, Yen-Ling; Lin, Po-Chiao

    2014-02-21

    A new chemical method for the traceless labeling of glycoproteins with synthetic boronic acid (BA)-tosyl probes was successfully developed. The BA moiety acts as an affinity head to direct the formation of a cyclic boronate diester with the diol groups of glycans. Following this step, the electrophilic tosyl group is displaced by an SN2 reaction with a nucleophilic residue of the boronated glycoprotein, and finally, a reporter group is tagged onto the glycoprotein via an ether linkage. In the presence of polyols, a competition reaction recovers the native glycan of the tagged glycoprotein, conserving its biological significance. The BA-tosyl probes were used successfully for the specific labeling of glycosylated fetuins in a mixed protein pool and from crude Escherichia coli (E. coli) lysate. Further, a BA-tosyl-functionalized glass slide was used to fabricate glycoprotein microarrays with highly conserved glycans. By interacting with various lectins (carbohydrate-binding proteins), such as Concanavalin A (Con A) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), the types of carbohydrates and specific linkages of glycoproteins (α or β) could be systematically monitored. It is believed that the newly developed method will greatly accelerate the understanding of glycoproteins.

  6. Characterization of disease-associated N-linked glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Hui

    2013-02-01

    N-linked glycoproteins play important roles in biological processes, including cell-to-cell recognition, growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death. Specific N-linked glycoprotein changes are associated with disease progression and identification of these N-linked glycoproteins has potential for use in disease diagnosis, prognosis, and prediction of treatments. In this review, we summarize common strategies for N-linked glycoprotein characterization and applications of these strategies to identification of glycoprotein changes associated with disease states. We also review the N-linked glycoproteins altered in diseases such as breast cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Although assays for these glycoproteins have potential clinical utility, research is needed to translate these glycoproteins to clinical biomarkers.

  7. Using proximity biotinylation to detect herpesvirus entry glycoprotein interactions: Limitations for integral membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lajko, Michelle; Haddad, Alexander F; Robinson, Carolyn A; Connolly, Sarah A

    2015-09-01

    Herpesvirus entry into cells requires coordinated interactions among several viral transmembrane glycoproteins. Viral glycoproteins bind to receptors and interact with other glycoproteins to trigger virus-cell membrane fusion. Details of these glycoprotein interactions are not well understood because they are likely transient and/or low affinity. Proximity biotinylation is a promising protein-protein interaction assay that can capture transient interactions in live cells. One protein is linked to a biotin ligase and a second protein is linked to a short specific acceptor peptide (AP). If the two proteins interact, the ligase will biotinylate the AP, without requiring a sustained interaction. To examine herpesvirus glycoprotein interactions, the ligase and AP were linked to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV1) gD and Epstein Barr virus (EBV) gB. Interactions between monomers of these oligomeric proteins (homotypic interactions) served as positive controls to demonstrate assay sensitivity. Heterotypic combinations served as negative controls to determine assay specificity, since HSV1 gD and EBV gB do not interact functionally. Positive controls showed strong biotinylation, indicating that viral glycoprotein proximity can be detected. Unexpectedly, the negative controls also showed biotinylation. These results demonstrate the special circumstances that must be considered when examining interactions among glycosylated proteins that are constrained within a membrane.

  8. Anti-glycoprotein g antibodies of herpes simplex virus 2 contribute to complete protection after vaccination in mice and induce antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Görander, Staffan; Ekblad, Maria; Bergström, Tomas; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-11-12

    We investigated the role of antibodies against the mature portion of glycoprotein G (mgG-2) of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) in protective immunity after vaccination. Mice were immunized intramuscularly with mgG-2 and oligodeoxynucleotides containing two CpG motifs plus alum as adjuvant. All C57BL/6 mice survived and presented no genital or systemic disease. High levels of immunoglobulin G subclass 1 (IgG1) and IgG2 antibodies were detected and re-stimulated splenic CD4+ T cells proliferated and produced IFN-γ. None of the sera from immunized mice exhibited neutralization, while all sera exerted antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-mediated cytolysis (ACMC) activity. Passive transfer of anti-mgG-2 monoclonal antibodies, or immune serum, to naive C57BL/6 mice did not limit disease progression. Immunized B‑cell KO mice presented lower survival rate and higher vaginal viral titers, as compared with vaccinated B-cell KO mice after passive transfer of immune serum and vaccinated C57BL/6 mice. Sera from mice that were vaccinated subcutaneously and intranasally with mgG-2 presented significantly lower titers of IgG antibodies and lower ADCC and ACMC activity. We conclude that anti-mgG-2 antibodies were of importance to limit genital HSV‑2 infection. ADCC and ACMC activity are potentially important mechanisms in protective immunity, and could tentatively be evaluated in future animal vaccine studies and in clinical trials.

  9. Antiviral and anti-proliferative glycoproteins from the rhizome of Smilax glabra Roxb (Liliaceae).

    PubMed

    Ooi, Linda S M; Wong, Elaine Y L; Chiu, Lawrence C M; Sun, Samuel S M; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2008-01-01

    The glycoproteins possessing antiviral and anti-proliferative activities were isolated from the Chinese medicinal herb Smilax glabra (known as tufuling), by extraction with 0.2 M NaCl, ammonium sulfate precipitation, fetuin-agarose affinity chromatography and gel filtration. The molecular mass of the fetuin-binding glycoprotein (designated SGPF2) was estimated to be about 58 kDa, with a major protein subunit of 26 kDa. The non-fetuin binding glycoproteins (in the unadsorbed fraction) were further separated into 5 different subfractions (SGPF1a-SGPF1e) with anion-exchange chromatography, all of which also contained the major band at 26 kDa. All the isolated proteins of 26 kDa had similar N-terminal amino acid sequences, implying that they were probably the isoforms originated putatively from a multigene family with different binding affinity and ionic strength. The glycoprotein SGPF2 exhibited antiviral activity against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) with a median inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 62.5 microg/ml and Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) had an IC(50) of 31.3 microg/ml. The glycoprotein potencies for antiviral activity appeared to depend on the molecules' binding affinity for fetuin, that is, the fetuin-binding protein was more potent than the non-fetuin binding proteins. Further examination revealed that these glycoproteins also had the ability to suppress the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. The possible mechanism of anti-proliferative action as analyzed by DNA flow cytometry indicated that they could induce apoptosis mediated via sub-G(1) phase of the MCF-7 cell cycle. For example, there was an increase by 75.8% of the control level of apoptosis after incubation with SGPF1a.

  10. P-Glycoprotein Transport of Neurotoxic Pesticides.

    PubMed

    Lacher, Sarah E; Skagen, Kasse; Veit, Joachim; Dalton, Rachel; Woodahl, Erica L

    2015-10-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been associated with a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, although the mechanisms remain unclear. Altered transport of neurotoxic pesticides has been proposed in Parkinson's disease, but it is unknown whether these pesticides are P-gp substrates. We used three in vitro transport models, stimulation of ATPase activity, xenobiotic-induced cytotoxicity, and inhibition of rhodamine-123 efflux, to evaluate P-gp transport of diazinon, dieldrin, endosulfan, ivermectin, maneb, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+)), and rotenone. Diazinon and rotenone stimulated ATPase activity in P-gp-expressing membranes, with Vmax values of 22.4 ± 2.1 and 16.8 ± 1.0 nmol inorganic phosphate/min per mg protein, respectively, and Km values of 9.72 ± 3.91 and 1.62 ± 0.51 µM, respectively, compared with the P-gp substrate verapamil, with a Vmax of 20.8 ± 0.7 nmol inorganic phosphate/min per mg protein and Km of 0.871 ± 0.172 μM. None of the other pesticides stimulated ATPase activity. We observed an increased resistance to MPP(+) and rotenone in LLC-MDR1-WT cells compared with LLC-vector cells, with 15.4- and 2.2-fold increases in EC50 values, respectively. The resistance was reversed in the presence of the P-gp inhibitor verapamil. None of the other pesticides displayed differential cytotoxicity. Ivermectin was the only pesticide to inhibit P-gp transport of rhodamine-123, with an IC50 of 0.249 ± 0.048 μM. Our data demonstrate that dieldrin, endosulfan, and maneb are not P-gp substrates or inhibitors. We identified diazinon, MPP(+), and rotenone as P-gp substrates, although further investigation is needed to understand the role of P-gp transport in their disposition in vivo and associations with Parkinson's disease.

  11. Tertiary structure of human alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid). Straightforward fluorescence experiments revealing the presence of a binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad R

    2004-02-25

    Binding of hemin to alpha1-acid glycoprotein has been investigated. Hemin binds to the hydrophobic pocket of hemoproteins. The fluorescent probe 2-(p-toluidino)-6-naphthalenesulfonate (TNS) binds to a hydrophobic domain in alpha1-acid glycoprotein with a dissociation constant equal to 60 microM. Addition of hemin to an alpha1-acid glycoprotein-TNS complex induces the displacement of TNS from its binding site. At saturation (1 hemin for 1 protein) all the TNS has been displaced from its binding site. The dissociation constant of hemin-alpha1-acid glycoprotein was found equal to 2 microM. Thus, TNS and hemin bind to the same hydrophobic site: the pocket of alpha1-acid glycoprotein. Energy-transfer studies performed between the Trp residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein and hemin indicated that efficiency (E) of Trp fluorescence quenching was equal to 80% and the Förster distance, R0 at which the efficiency of energy transfer is 50% was calculated to be 26 A, revealing a very high energy transfer.

  12. Calpain-controlled detachment of major glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton regulates adhesive properties of activated phosphatidylserine-positive platelets.

    PubMed

    Artemenko, Elena O; Yakimenko, Alena O; Pichugin, Alexey V; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-02-15

    In resting platelets, adhesive membrane glycoproteins are attached to the cytoskeleton. On strong activation, phosphatidylserine(PS)-positive and -negative platelet subpopulations are formed. Platelet activation is accompanied by cytoskeletal rearrangement, although the glycoprotein attachment status in these two subpopulations is not clear. We developed a new, flow cytometry-based, single-cell approach to investigate attachment of membrane glycoproteins to the cytoskeleton in cell subpopulations. In PS-negative platelets, adhesive glycoproteins integrin αIIbβ3, glycoprotein Ib and, as shown for the first time, P-selectin were associated with the cytoskeleton. In contrast, this attachment was disrupted in PS-positive platelets; it was retained to some extent only in the small convex regions or 'caps'. It correlated with the degradation of talin and filamin observed only in PS-positive platelets. Calpain inhibitors essentially prevented the disruption of membrane glycoprotein attachment in PS-positive platelets, as well as talin and filamin degradation. With the suggestion that detachment of glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton may affect platelet adhesive properties, we investigated the ability of PS-positive platelets to resist shear-induced breakaway from the immobilized fibrinogen. Shear rates of 500/s caused PS-positive platelet breakaway, but their adhesion stability increased more than 10-fold after pretreatment of the platelets with calpain inhibitor. In contrast, the ability of PS-positive platelets to adhere to immobilized von Willebrand's factor at 100/s was low, but this was not affected by the preincubation of platelets with a calpain inhibitor. Our data suggest that calpain-controlled detachment of membrane glycoproteins is a new mechanism that is responsible for the loss of ability of the procoagulant platelets to resist detachment from thrombi by high shear stress.

  13. Glycoprotein patterns in normal and malignant cervical tissue.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, M E; Souberbielle, B E; Cowan, M E; Allen, C A; Luesley, D M; Mould, J J; Blackledge, G R; Skinner, G R

    1991-07-04

    Glycoproteins from normal and malignant human cervix were studied using an organ culture system and compared by gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Five glycoproteins of 178 kDa, 95 kDa, 93 kDa, 82 kDa and 38 kDa and 1 glycolipid (46 kDa) were detected more frequently in squamous carcinomas. Certain glycoproteins were shown to be oncofoetal and some had affinity for Concanavalin A (Con A). The 82 kDa glycoprotein was present in 16/17 squamous carcinomas but in only 1/13 normal cervices. This band represented a glycoprotein containing glucosamine, mannose, small quantities of methionine and no fucose. These preliminary results suggest that these glycoproteins and in particular the 82-kDa glycoprotein are worthy of further investigation and characterisation.

  14. Ceramide 1-Phosphate Increases P-Glycoprotein Transport Activity at the Blood-Brain Barrier via Prostaglandin E2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mesev, Emily V; Miller, David S; Cannon, Ronald E

    2017-04-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven efflux pump, regulates permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Sphingolipids, endogenous to brain tissue, influence inflammatory responses and cell survival in vitro. Our laboratory has previously shown that sphingolipid signaling by sphingosine 1-phosphate decreases basal P-glycoprotein transport activity. Here, we investigated the potential for another sphingolipid, ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), to modulate efflux pumps at the BBB. Using confocal microscopy and measuring luminal accumulation of fluorescent substrates, we assessed the transport activity of several efflux pumps in isolated rat brain capillaries. C1P treatment induced P-glycoprotein transport activity in brain capillaries rapidly and reversibly. In contrast, C1P did not affect transport activity of two other major efflux transporters, multidrug resistance protein 2 and breast cancer resistance protein. C1P induced P-glycoprotein transport activity without changing transporter protein expression. Inhibition of the key signaling components in the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 signaling cascade (phospholipase A2, COX-2, multidrug resistance protein 4, and G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E2 receptors 1 and 2), abolished P-glycoprotein induction by C1P. We show that COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 are required for C1P-mediated increases in P-glycoprotein activity independent of transporter protein expression. This work describes how C1P activates a signaling cascade to dynamically regulate P-glycoprotein transport at the BBB and offers potential clinical targets to modulate neuroprotection and drug delivery to the CNS.

  15. Ceramide 1-Phosphate Increases P-Glycoprotein Transport Activity at the Blood-Brain Barrier via Prostaglandin E2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mesev, Emily V.; Miller, David S.

    2017-01-01

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven efflux pump, regulates permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Sphingolipids, endogenous to brain tissue, influence inflammatory responses and cell survival in vitro. Our laboratory has previously shown that sphingolipid signaling by sphingosine 1-phosphate decreases basal P-glycoprotein transport activity. Here, we investigated the potential for another sphingolipid, ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P), to modulate efflux pumps at the BBB. Using confocal microscopy and measuring luminal accumulation of fluorescent substrates, we assessed the transport activity of several efflux pumps in isolated rat brain capillaries. C1P treatment induced P-glycoprotein transport activity in brain capillaries rapidly and reversibly. In contrast, C1P did not affect transport activity of two other major efflux transporters, multidrug resistance protein 2 and breast cancer resistance protein. C1P induced P-glycoprotein transport activity without changing transporter protein expression. Inhibition of the key signaling components in the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 signaling cascade (phospholipase A2, COX-2, multidrug resistance protein 4, and G-protein–coupled prostaglandin E2 receptors 1 and 2), abolished P-glycoprotein induction by C1P. We show that COX-2 and prostaglandin E2 are required for C1P-mediated increases in P-glycoprotein activity independent of transporter protein expression. This work describes how C1P activates a signaling cascade to dynamically regulate P-glycoprotein transport at the BBB and offers potential clinical targets to modulate neuroprotection and drug delivery to the CNS. PMID:28119480

  16. Construction of a Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Expressing Both a Fusogenic Glycoprotein and IL-12: A Novel Vector for Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Shinozaki K, Kournioti C, Park MS, Garcia-Sastre A, Woo SL. Syncytia induction enhances the oncolytic potential of vesicular stomatitis virus in virotherapy for cancer. Cancer Res. 2004 May 1;64(9):3265- 70

  17. Glycoprotein 5 of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain SD16 inhibits viral replication and causes G2/M cell cycle arrest, but does not induce cellular apoptosis in Marc-145 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Yang; Li, Liangliang; Zhang, Beibei; Huang, Baicheng; Gao, Jiming; and others

    2015-10-15

    Cell apoptosis is common after infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). PRRSV GP5 has been reported to induce cell apoptosis. To further understand the role of GP5 in PRRSV induced cell apoptosis, we established Marc-145 cell lines stably expressing full-length GP5, GP5{sup Δ84-96} (aa 84-96 deletion), and GP5{sup Δ97-119} (aa 97-119 deletion). Cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, cell apoptosis and virus replication in these cell lines were evaluated. Neither truncated nor full-length GP5 induced cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells. However, GP5{sup Δ97-119}, but not full-length or GP5{sup Δ84-96}, induced a cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase resulting in a reduction in the growth of Marc-145 cells. Additionally, GP5{sup Δ84-96} inhibited the replication of PRRSV in Marc-145 cells through induction of IFN-β. These findings suggest that PRRSV GP5 is not responsible for inducing cell apoptosis in Marc-145 cells under these experimental conditions; however it has other important roles in virus/host cell biology. - Highlights: • Marc-145 cell lines stable expression PRRSV GP5 or truncated GP5 were constructed. • GP5{sup Δ97-119} expression in Marc-145 cell induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase. • Expression of GP5 and truncated GP5 could not induce Marc-145 cells apoptosis. • PRRSV replication in Marc-145-GP5{sup Δ84-96} was significantly inhibited.

  18. Bile acid transport in sister of P-glycoprotein (ABCB11) knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ping; Wang, Renxue; Ling, Victor

    2005-09-20

    In vertebrates, bile flow is essential for movement of water and solutes across liver canalicular membranes. In recent years, the molecular motor of canalicular bile acid secretion has been identified as a member of the ATP binding cassette transporter (ABC) superfamily, known as sister of P-glycoprotein (Spgp) or bile salt export pump (Bsep, ABCB11). In humans, mutations in the BSEP gene are associated with a very low level of bile acid secretion and severe cholestasis. However, as reported previously, because the spgp(-)(/)(-) knockout mice do not express severe cholestasis and have substantial bile acid secretion, we investigated the "alternative transport system" that allows these mice to be physiologically relatively normal. We examined the expression levels of several ABC transporters in spgp(-)(/)(-) mice and found that the level of multidrug resistance Mdr1 (P-glycoprotein) was strikingly increased while those of Mdr2, Mrp2, and Mrp3 were increased to only a moderate extent. We hypothesize that an elevated level of Mdr1 in the spgp(-)(/)(-) knockout mice functions as an alternative pathway to transport bile acids and protects hepatocytes from bile acid-induced cholestasis. In support of this hypothesis, we showed that plasma membrane vesicles isolated from a drug resistant cell line expressing high levels of P-glycoprotein were capable of transporting bile acids, albeit with a 5-fold lower affinity compared to Spgp. This finding is the first direct evidence that P-glycoprotein (Mdr1) is capable of transporting bile acids.

  19. Ion Mobility-Mass Correlation Trend Line Separation of Glycoprotein Digests without Deglycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongli; Bendiak, Brad; Siems, William F.; Gang, David R.; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    A high-throughput ion mobility mass spectrometer (IMMS) was used to rapidly separate and analyze peptides and glycopeptides derived from glycoproteins. Two glycoproteins, human α-1-acid glycoprotein and antithrombin III were digested with trypsin and subjected to electrospray traveling wave IMMS analysis. No deglycosylation steps were performed; samples were complex mixtures of peptides and glycopeptides. Peptides and glycosylated peptides with different charge states (up to 4 charges) were observed and fell on distinguishable trend lines in 2-D IMMS spectra in both positive and negative modes. The trend line separation patterns matched between both modes. Peptide sequence was identified based on the corresponding extracted mass spectra and collision induced dissociated (CID) experiments were performed for selected compounds to prove class identification. The signal-to-noise ratio of the glycopeptides was increased dramatically with ion mobility trend line separation compared to non-trend line separation, primarily due to selection of precursor ion subsets within specific mobility windows. In addition, isomeric mobility peaks were detected for specific glycopeptides. IMMS demonstrated unique capabilities and advantages for investigating and separating glycoprotein digests in this study and suggests a novel strategy for rapid glycoproteomics studies in the future. PMID:23914139

  20. Inhibition of henipavirus infection by Nipah virus attachment glycoprotein occurs without cell-surface downregulation of ephrin-B2 or ephrin-B3.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Grolla, Allen; Kuzenko, Nina; Weingartl, Hana; Czub, Markus

    2007-02-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) are newly identified members of the family Paramyxoviridae and have been classified in the new genus Henipavirus based on unique genetic characteristics distinct from other paramyxoviruses. Transgenic cell lines were generated that expressed either the attachment protein (G) or the fusion protein (F) of NiV. Functional expression of NiV F and G was verified by complementation with the corresponding glycoprotein, which resulted in the development of syncytia. When exposed to NiV and HeV, expression of NiV G in Crandall feline kidney cells resulted in a qualitative inhibition of both cytopathic effect (CPE) and cell death by both viruses. RT-PCR analysis of surviving exposed cells showed a complete absence of viral positive-sense mRNA and genomic negative-sense viral RNA. Cells expressing NiV G were also unable to fuse with cells co-expressing NiV F and G in a fluorescent fusion inhibition assay. Cell-surface staining for the cellular receptors for NiV and HeV (ephrin-B2 and ephrin-B3) indicated that they were located on the surface of cells, regardless of NiV G expression or infection by NiV. These results indicated that viral interference can be established for henipaviruses and requires only the expression of the attachment protein, G. Furthermore, it was found that this interference probably occurs at the level of virus entry, as fusion was not observed in cells expressing NiV G. Finally, expression of NiV G by either transient transfection or NiV infection did not alter the cell-surface levels of the two known viral receptors.

  1. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function.

    PubMed

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewis(a) substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review.

  2. Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins: aspects of biosynthesis and function

    PubMed Central

    Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Gotté, Maxime; Plancot, Barbara; Lerouge, Patrice; Bardor, Muriel; Driouich, Azeddine

    2014-01-01

    Cell wall O-glycoproteins and N-glycoproteins are two types of glycomolecules whose glycans are structurally complex. They are both assembled and modified within the endomembrane system, i.e., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus, before their transport to their final locations within or outside the cell. In contrast to extensins (EXTs), the O-glycan chains of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) are highly heterogeneous consisting mostly of (i) a short oligo-arabinoside chain of three to four residues, and (ii) a larger β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked side chains containing galactose, arabinose and, often, fucose, rhamnose, or glucuronic acid. The fine structure of arabinogalactan chains varies between, and within plant species, and is important for the functional activities of the glycoproteins. With regards to N-glycans, ER-synthesizing events are highly conserved in all eukaryotes studied so far since they are essential for efficient protein folding. In contrast, evolutionary adaptation of N-glycan processing in the Golgi apparatus has given rise to a variety of organism-specific complex structures. Therefore, plant complex-type N-glycans contain specific glyco-epitopes such as core β,2-xylose, core α1,3-fucose residues, and Lewisa substitutions on the terminal position of the antenna. Like O-glycans, N-glycans of proteins are essential for their stability and function. Mutants affected in the glycan metabolic pathways have provided valuable information on the role of N-/O-glycoproteins in the control of growth, morphogenesis and adaptation to biotic and abiotic stresses. With regards to O-glycoproteins, only EXTs and AGPs are considered herein. The biosynthesis of these glycoproteins and functional aspects are presented and discussed in this review. PMID:25324850

  3. Chemical and Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of Glycoproteins for Deciphering Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lai-Xi; Amin, Mohammed N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glycoproteins are an important class of biomolecules involved in a number of biological recognition processes. However, natural and recombinant glycoproteins are usually produced as mixtures of glycoforms that differ in the structures of the pendent glycans, which are difficult to separate in pure glycoforms. As a result, synthetic homogeneous glycopeptides and glycoproteins have become indispensable probes for detailed structural and functional studies. A number of elegant chemical and biological strategies have been developed for synthetic construction of tailor-made, full-size glycoproteins to address specific biological problems. In this review, we highlight recent advances in chemical and chemoenzymatic synthesis of homogeneous glycoproteins. Selected examples are given to demonstrate the applications of tailor-made, glycan-defined glycoproteins for deciphering glycosylation functions. PMID:24439206

  4. Detection, isolation and partial characterization of an immunostimulating glycoprotein from Rhodococcus fascians.

    PubMed

    Butschak, Günter; Karsten, Uwe; Schelhaas, Ute; Ott, Holger; Emmendörffer, Andreas; Niemeyer, Bernd; Helmholz, Heike; Goletz, Steffen

    2006-09-01

    In a search for novel immunostimulating substances we detected that culture supernatants of the gram-positive phytopathogenic bacterium, Rhodococcus fascians, were able to induce cytokine release (TNF(alpha)) from mouse peritoneal macrophages. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against the active principle, and were employed for its isolation and partial characterization as a high molecular (MW>100 kDa) glycoprotein. In addition, methods practicable for its biotechnological preparation and several ELISA variants for its determination were developed.

  5. Markers of Ovarian Cancer Using a Glycoprotein/Antibody Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    204. 4. Zhao J, Patwa TH, Qiu W, Shedden K, Hinderer R, Misek DE, Anderson MA, Simeone DM, and Lubman DM. Glycoprotein microarrays with multi -lectin...quantitative strategy, clusterin (CLUS), leucine-rich alpha-2-glycoprotein (LRG1), hemopexin (HEMO), vitamin D-binding protein (VDB), and complement...Part of complement system P02750 LRG1 Leucine-rich alpha-2- glycoprotein 0.019 It is expressed during granulocyte differentiation P02774 VDB Vitamin

  6. Expression of bovine viral diarrhea virus glycoprotein E2 as a soluble secreted form in a Mammalian cell line.

    PubMed

    Donofrio, Gaetano; Bottarelli, Ezio; Sandro, Cavirani; Flammini, Cesidio Filippo

    2006-06-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) membrane-anchored type I glycoprotein E2 is an approximately 53-kDa immunodominant glycoprotein inducing the production of neutralizing antibodies in the animal host after natural infection or following immunization with live or killed vaccines. The E2 coding region lacking the transmembrane domain was constructed in a soluble secreted form (secE2) and expressed in the medium of a transiently transfected human cell line. The crude conditioned medium containing secE2 can be potentially employed to develop an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antigen for the diagnosis of BVDV infection or for vaccine purposes.

  7. Glycoprotein Degradation in the Blind Loop Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prizont, Roberto

    1981-01-01

    Contents obtained from jejunum of normal controls, self-emptying and self-filling blind loop rats were analyzed for the presence of glycoprotein-degrading glycosidases. The blind loop syndrome was documented by the increased fat excretion and slower growth rate of self-filling blind loop rats 6 wk after surgery. With p-nitrophenylglycosides as substrate, the specific activity of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, a potential blood group A destroying glycosidase, was 0.90±0.40 mU/mg of protein. This level was 23-fold higher than the specific activity of normal controls. In partially purified self-filling blind loop contents, the activity of α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase was 9- to 70-fold higher than activities of self-emptying and normal controls. Antibiotic treatment with chloromycetin and polymyxin decreased 24-fold the glycosidase levels in self-filling blind loops. In experiments with natural substrate, the blood group A titer of a20,000g supernate from normal jejunal homogenates decreased 128-fold after 24-h incubation with blind loop contents. Normal contents failed to diminish the blood group reactivity of the natural substrate. Furthermore, blind loop contents markedly decreased the blood group A titer of isolated brush borders. Incubation between blind loop bacteria and mucosal homogenates or isolated brush borders labeled with d-[U-14C]glucosamine revealed increased production of labeled ether extractable organic acids. Likewise, intraperitoneal injection of d-[U-14C]glucosamine into self-filling blind loop rats resulted in incorporation of the label into luminal short chain fatty acids. These results suggest that glycosidases may provide a mechanism by which blind loop bacteria obtain sugars from intestinal glycoproteins. The released sugars are used and converted by bacteria into energy and organic acids. This use of the host's glycoproteins would allow blind loop bacteria to grow and survive within the lumen independent of exogenous sources. PMID:6257760

  8. [Lactoferrin - a glycoprotein of great therapeutic potentials].

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Ryszard; Kamińska, Ewa; Michalski, Piotr; Lauterbach, Jan Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Lactoferrin is an iron-binding glycoprotein, which is present in most biological fluids with particularly high levels in colostrum and in mammalian milk. Bovine lactoferrin is more than 70% homologous with human lactoferrin. Most of the clinical trials have used bovine lactoferrin for supplementation. This review summarizes the recent advances in explaining the mechanisms, which are responsible for the multifunctional roles of lactoferrin, and presents its potential prophylactic and therapeutic applications. On the ground of the results of preliminary clinical observations, authors suggest beneficial effect of lactoferrin supplementation on the prevalence of necrotizing enterocolitis in infants with birth weight below 1250 grams.

  9. Characterization of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68 Glycoprotein B

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Filipa B.; Colaco, Susanna; May, Janet S.; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2004-01-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) glycoprotein B (gB) was identified in purified virions by immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunoelectron microscopy. It was synthesized as a 120-kDa precursor in infected cells and cleaved into 65-kDa and 55-kDa disulfide-linked subunits close to the time of virion release. The N-linked glycans on the cleaved, virion gB remained partially endoglycosidase H sensitive. The processing of MHV-68 gB therefore appears similar to that of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gB and human cytomegalovirus gB. PMID:15542690

  10. The Purification of a Blood Group A Glycoprotein: An Affinity Chromatography Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estelrich, J.; Pouplana, R.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a purification process through affinity chromatography necessary to obtain specific blood group glycoproteins from erythrocytic membranes. Discusses the preparation of erythrocytic membranes, extraction of glycoprotein from membranes, affinity chromatography purification, determination of glycoproteins, and results. (CW)

  11. Lactobacillus plantarum L67 glycoprotein protects against cadmium chloride toxicity in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Sooyeon; Oh, Sejong; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-03-01

    The food and water we consume may be contaminated with a range of chemicals and heavy metals, such as lead, cadmium, arsenic, chromium, and mercury by accumulation through the food chain. Cadmium is known to be one of the major components in cigarette smoke and can cause lesions in many organs. Some lactobacilli can bind and remove heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, and copper. However, the mechanisms of cadmium toxicity and inhibition by probiotics are not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that glycoprotein (18 kDa) isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum L67 protected RAW 264.7 cells from expression of inflammation-related factors stimulated by cadmium chloride (100 µM). Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of cadmium using the MTT assay and intracellular Ca(2+) using fluorescence, and assessed activities of activator protein kinase C (PKC-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase, activator protein (AP)-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases using immunoblot. Our results indicated that glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 inhibited intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. It also significantly suppressed inflammatory factors such as AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38), and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Our findings suggest that the 24-kDa glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 might be used as a food component for protection of inflammation caused by cadmium ion.

  12. In vitro enhancement of human natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity by purified influenza virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Arora, D J; Houde, M; Justewicz, D M; Mandeville, R

    1984-01-01

    The role of the glycoproteins of influenza virus, hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) in the in vitro stimulation of natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity (NCMC) or natural killer activity of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was evaluated with radiolabeled K562 cells as target cells in an overnight chromium release assay. Three different approaches were used. (i) Purified viral proteins were obtained by extraction with Nonidet P-40, separation on a sucrose gradient, and further purification by affinity chromatography. Ficoll-Hypaque-purified peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to HA or NA individually or to a mixture of both significantly increased NCMC (32 to 50%). (ii) Treatment of HA and NA with their respective homologous antisera or F(ab')2 antibody abrogated the stimulation of NCMC by these glycoproteins. (iii) Virions treated with proteolytic enzymes resulted in viral cores lacking either HA or NA or both activities. Compared to whole virions, viral cores devoid of HA activity only induced a 50% increase in NCMC, whereas viral cores lacking HA activity and with traces of NA activity stimulated only 10% of the NCMC. These results suggest that influenza virus-induced cell-mediated cytotoxicity is largely due to its glycoproteins. PMID:6387178

  13. Enhanced detection of glycoproteins in polyacrylamide gels.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, G; Marshall, S; Cabrera, M; Horvat, A

    1988-05-01

    A highly sensitive and simple method to enhance detection of glycoproteins resolved by either one- or two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is described. The method is a modification of the procedure described by D. Fargeaud et al. (D. Fargeaud, J. C. Benoit, F. Kato, and G. Chappuis (1984) Arch. Virol. 80, 69-82) that uses concanavalin A conjugated with fluorescein isothyocyanate to detect the carbohydrate moiety of glycoproteins. Briefly, the electrophoresed gel is exposed to the fluorescent lectin, thoroughly washed, and sequentially transferred to 50% methanol in deionized water and to absolute methanol. The result is an abrupt dehydration of the gel which turns evenly white and stiff. At least a twofold enhancement of fluorescence is obtained as detected by exposing the treated gel to an appropriate uv source. The sensitivity of the procedure allows us to detect purified immunoglobulin molecules by their carbohydrate content in the range of 0.2 microgram of total protein. The specificity of the detection is demonstrated by a comparison with the corresponding polypeptide profile obtained by silver nitrate staining of the gel.

  14. Glycosylation modulates arenavirus glycoprotein expression and function

    SciTech Connect

    Bonhomme, Cyrille J. Capul, Althea A. Lauron, Elvin J. Bederka, Lydia H. Knopp, Kristeene A. Buchmeier, Michael J.

    2011-01-20

    The glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) contains nine potential N-linked glycosylation sites. We investigated the function of these N-glycosylations by using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. All the available sites were occupied on GP1 and two of three on GP2. N-linked glycan mutations at positions 87 and 97 on GP1 resulted in reduction of expression and absence of cleavage and were necessary for downstream functions, as confirmed by the loss of GP-mediated fusion activity with T87A and S97A mutants. In contrast, T234A and E379N/A381T mutants impaired GP-mediated cell fusion without altered expression or processing. Infectivity via virus-like particles required glycans and a cleaved glycoprotein. Glycosylation at the first site within GP2, not normally utilized by LCMV, exhibited increased VLP infectivity. We also confirmed the role of the N-linked glycan at position 173 in the masking of the neutralizing epitope GP-1D. Taken together, our results indicated a strong relationship between fusion and infectivity.

  15. Human immune responses to major human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y N; Kari, B; Gehrz, R C

    1988-01-01

    Sera from both human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-seropositive adults and infants with congenital HCMV infection recognized two major HCMV glycoprotein complexes. However, proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to these complexes varied among seropositive adults and were not detected in any of the infants. Thus, these glycoproteins alone may not be sufficient to develop a subviral HCMV vaccine. Images PMID:2828655

  16. Ammonia transport in the kidney by Rhesus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Weiner, I David; Verlander, Jill W

    2014-05-15

    Renal ammonia metabolism is a fundamental element of acid-base homeostasis, comprising a major component of both basal and physiologically altered renal net acid excretion. Over the past several years, a fundamental change in our understanding of the mechanisms of renal epithelial cell ammonia transport has occurred, replacing the previous model which was based upon diffusion equilibrium for NH3 and trapping of NH4(+) with a new model in which specific and regulated transport of both NH3 and NH4(+) across renal epithelial cell membranes via specific membrane proteins is required for normal ammonia metabolism. A major advance has been the recognition that members of a recently recognized transporter family, the Rhesus glycoprotein family, mediate critical roles in renal and extrarenal ammonia transport. The erythroid-specific Rhesus glycoprotein, Rh A Glycoprotein (Rhag), was the first Rhesus glycoprotein recognized as an ammonia-specific transporter. Subsequently, the nonerythroid Rh glycoproteins, Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg), were cloned and identified as ammonia transporters. They are expressed in specific cell populations and membrane domains in distal renal epithelial cells, where they facilitate ammonia secretion. In this review, we discuss the distribution of Rhbg and Rhcg in the kidney, the regulation of their expression and activity in physiological disturbances, the effects of genetic deletion on renal ammonia metabolism, and the molecular mechanisms of Rh glycoprotein-mediated ammonia transport.

  17. Decoration of proteins with sugar chains: recent advances in glycoprotein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryo; Izumi, Masayuki; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Chemical or chemoenzymatic synthesis is an emerging approach to produce homogeneous glycoproteins, which are hard to obtain by conventional biotechnology methods. Recent advances in the synthetic methodologies for the decoration of protein molecules with oligosaccharides provide several remarkable syntheses of homogeneous glycoproteins. This short review highlights several of the latest syntheses of glycoproteins including therapeutically important glycoproteins, a highly glycosylated protein, and unnatural glycoproteins in order to illustrate the power of the modern glycoprotein synthesis. Structurally defined glycoproteins are a novel material for understanding the molecular basis of glycoprotein functions and for the development of the next generation of biopharmaceuticals.

  18. Defining the antibody cross-reactome directed against the influenza virus surface glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Choi, Angela; Hirsh, Ariana; Margine, Irina; Iida, Sayaka; Barrera, Aldo; Ferres, Marcela; Albrecht, Randy A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Bouvier, Nicole M; Ito, Kimihito; Medina, Rafael A; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian

    2017-04-01

    Infection with influenza virus induces antibodies to the viral surface glycoproteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, and these responses can be broadly protective. To assess the breadth and magnitude of antibody responses, we sequentially infected mice, guinea pigs and ferrets with divergent H1N1 or H3N2 subtypes of influenza virus. We measured antibody responses by ELISA of an extensive panel of recombinant glycoproteins representing the viral diversity in nature. Guinea pigs developed high titers of broadly cross-reactive antibodies; mice and ferrets exhibited narrower humoral responses. Then, we compared antibody responses after infection of humans with influenza virus H1N1 or H3N2 and found markedly broad responses and cogent evidence for 'original antigenic sin'. This work will inform the design of universal vaccines against influenza virus and can guide pandemic-preparedness efforts directed against emerging influenza viruses.

  19. Array-based analysis of secreted glycoproteins for rapid selection of a single cell producing a glycoprotein with desired glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunyoung; Kim, Wanjung; Kim, Yongtae; Son, Young Dok; Lee, Sang-Chul; Kim, Eunkyung; Kim, Sung Ho; Kim, Jung Hoe; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2010-07-01

    The therapeutic efficacy and in vivo biological function of a glycoprotein is significantly affected by its glycosylation profile. For the development of glycoproteins with therapeutic applications, selection of cell lines producing a glycoprotein with adequate glycoform is crucial. Here, we demonstrate an array-based analysis of secreted glycoproteins for rapid and efficient selection of a single cell producing a glycoprotein with desirable glycosylation. Our approach relies on microengraving and interrogation of glycoproteins produced by individual cells in a microwell array in terms of glycosylation profile as well as the produced amount. On the basis of statistical analysis of the interrogation, single cells which are predicted to produce a desired glycoprotein are selected, retrieved, and expanded. We applied the approach to human recombinant erythropoietin (rhEPO)-producing CHO cells and verified the selection of a single CHO cell that produces rhEPO with a high sialylation degree. Human erythropoietin (hEPO) bearing highly sialylated oligosaccharide was shown to display a much longer plasma half-life, resulting in high therapeutic efficacy. This method may find widespread use in the clonal selection for the production of other glycoproteins with specific glycosylation as well as analysis of the heterogeneity in cell populations in a high-throughput manner.

  20. The primary structure of a procaryotic glycoprotein. Cloning and sequencing of the cell surface glycoprotein gene of halobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lechner, J; Sumper, M

    1987-07-15

    The hexagonally patterned surface layer of halobacteria consists of a true glycoprotein. This procaryotic glycoprotein has recently been shown to exhibit novel features with respect to saccharide structure and saccharide biosynthesis. The primary structure and the location of glycosylation sites were determined by cloning and sequencing of the glycoprotein gene of Halobacterium halobium. According to the predicted amino acid sequence, the glycoprotein is synthesized with a N-terminal leader sequence of 34 amino acid residues reminiscent of eucaryotic and procaryotic signal peptides. A hydrophobic stretch of 21 amino acid residues at the C terminus probably serves as a transmembrane domain. 14 threonine residues are clustered adjacent to this membrane anchor and linked to these threonines are all the disaccharides of the cell surface glycoprotein. 12 N-glycosylation sites are distributed over the polypeptide chain.

  1. Spatial orientation of glycoproteins in membranes of rat liver rough microsomes. II. Transmembrane disposition and characterization of glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Rat liver microsomal glycoproteins were purified by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A Sepharose columns from membrane and content fractions, separated from rough microsomes (RM) treated with low concentrations of deoxycholate (DOC). All periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive glycoproteins of RM showed affinity for concanavalin A Sepharose; even after sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) acrylamide gel electrophoresis, most of the microsomal glycoproteins bound [125I]concanavalin A added to the gels, as detected by autoradiography. Two distinct sets of glycoproteins are present in the membrane and content fractions derived from RM. SDS acrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that RM membranes contain 15--20 glycoproteins (15--22% of the total microsomal protein) which range in apparent mol wt from 23,000 to 240,000 daltons. A smaller set of glycoproteins (five to seven polypeptides), with apparent mol wt between 60,000 and 200,000 daltons, was present in the microsomal content fraction. The disposition of the membrane glycoproteins with respect to the membrane plane was determined by selective iodination with the lactoperoxidase (LPO) technique. Intact RM were labeled on their outer face with 131I and, after opening of the vesicles with 0.05% DOC, in both faces with 125I. An analysis of iodination ratios for individual proteins separated electrophoretically showed that in most membrane glycoproteins, tyrosine residues are predominantly exposed on the luminal face of the vesicles, which is the same face on which the carbohydrate moieties are exposed. Several membrane glycoproteins are also exposed on the cytoplasmic surface and therefore have a transmembrane disposition. In this study, ribophorins I and II, two integral membrane proteins (mol wt 65,000 and 63,000) characteristic of RM, were found to be transmembrane glycoproteins. It is suggested that the transmembrane disposition of the ribophorins may be related to their possible role in ribosome binding and in the

  2. Interaction between carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) and saturating concentrations of Calcofluor White. A fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R; Sillen, A; Plancke, Y D; Coddeville, B; Engelborghs, Y

    2000-07-24

    Calcofluor White is a fluorescent probe that interacts with polysaccharides and is commonly used in clinical studies. Interaction between Calcofluor White and carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) was previously followed by fluorescence titration of the Trp residues of the protein. A stoichiometry of one Calcofluor for one protein has been found [J.R. Albani and Y.D. Plancke, Carbohydr. Res., 318 (1999) 193-200]. Alpha1-acid glycoprotein contains 40% carbohydrate by weight and has up to 16 sialic acid residues. Since binding of Calcofluor to alpha1-acid glycoprotein occurs mainly on the carbohydrate residues, we studied in the present work the interaction between Calcofluor and the protein by following the fluorescence change of the fluorophore. In order to establish the role of the sialic acid residues in the interaction, the experiments were performed with the sialylated and asialylated protein. Interaction of Calcofluor with sialylated alpha1-acid glycoprotein induces a red shift of the emission maximum of the fluorophore from 438 to 450 nm at saturation (one Calcofluor for one sialic acid) and an increase in the fluorescence intensity. At saturation the fluorescence intensity increase levels off. Binding of Calcofluor to asialylated acid glycoprotein does not change the position of the emission maximum of the fluorophore and induces a decrease in its fluorescence intensity. Saturation occurs when 10 molecules of Calcofluor are bound to 1 mol of alpha1-acid glycoprotein. Since the protein contains five heteropolysaccharide groups, we have 2 mol of Calcofluor for each group. Addition of free sialic acid to Calcofluor induces a continuous decrease in the fluorescence intensity of the fluorophore but does not change the position of the emission maximum. Our results confirm the presence of a defined spatial conformation of the sialic acid residues, a conformation that disappears when they are free in solution. Dynamics studies on Calcofluor

  3. Glycoproteins and glycoproteomics in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A; Chen, Ru

    2016-01-01

    Aberrations in protein glycosylation and polysaccharides play a pivotal role in pancreatic tumorigenesis, influencing cancer progression, metastasis, immuno-response and chemoresistance. Abnormal expression in sugar moieties can impact the function of various glycoproteins, including mucins, surface receptors, adhesive proteins, proteoglycans, as well as their effectors and binding ligands, resulting in an increase in pancreatic cancer invasiveness and a cancer-favored microenvironment. Recent advance in glycoproteomics, glycomics and other chemical biology techniques have been employed to better understand the complex mechanism of glycosylation events and how they orchestrate molecular activities in genomics, proteomics and metabolomics implicated in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A variety of strategies have been demonstrated targeting protein glycosylation and polysaccharides for diagnostic and therapeutic development. PMID:27895417

  4. Conformational Changes of the Flavivirus E Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Ogata, Steven; Clements, David; Strauss, James H.; Baker, Timothy S.; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dengue virus, a member of the Flaviviridae family, has a surface composed of 180 copies each of the envelope (E) glycoprotein and the membrane (M) protein. The crystal structure of an N-terminal fragment of E has been determined and compared with a previously described structure. The primary difference between these structures is a 10° rotation about a hinge relating the fusion domain DII to domains DI and DIII. These two rigid body components were used for independent fitting of E into the cryo-electron microscopy maps of both immature and mature dengue viruses. The fitted E structures in these two particles showed a difference of 27° between the two components. Comparison of the E structure in its postfusion state with that in the immature and mature virions shows a rotation approximately around the same hinge. Flexibility of E is apparently a functional requirement for assembly and infection of flaviviruses. PMID:15341726

  5. Glycoprotein expression in human milk during lactation.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, John W; Dodds, Eric D; Barboza, Mariana; McJimpsey, Erica L; Seipert, Richard R; Francis, Jimi; An, Hyun Joo; Freeman, Samara; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2010-05-26

    While milk proteins have been studied for decades, strikingly little effort has been applied to determining how the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of these proteins may change during the course of lactation. PTMs, particularly glycosylation, can greatly influence protein structure, function, and stability and can particularly influence the gut where their degradation products are potentially bioactive. In this work, previously undiscovered temporal variations in both expression and glycosylation of the glycoproteome of human milk are observed. Lactoferrin, one of the most abundant glycoproteins in human milk, is shown to be dynamically glycosylated during the first 10 days of lactation. Variations in expression or glycosylation levels are also demonstrated for several other abundant whey proteins, including tenascin, bile salt-stimulated lipase, xanthine dehydrogenase, and mannose receptor.

  6. Immunological aspects of pregnancy-associated glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Dosogne, H; Massart-Leën, A M; Burvenich, C

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of severe cases of acute E. coli mastitis in dairy cows is highest during early lactation. This phenomenon has been associated with a decreased function and decreased numbers of circulating polymorphonuclear neutrophil leukocytes (PMN). The cause of this impaired function and decreased number is poorly understood. Stress, hormonal and metabolic alterations around parturition and the onset of lactation may play a role in this phenomenon. Several molecules, such as cortisol and beta-hydroxybutyrate have been found to alter the oxidative burst activity of circulating PMN around parturition. Pregnancy-Associated Glycoprotein (bPAG) could also be involved. The theory of immunosuppression by bPAG was investigated because analogous glycoproteins produced by the placenta of other species exert local immunosuppression in order to maintain the histoincompatible feto-maternal unit. The production and subsequent release into the maternal circulation of bPAG is ensured by the binucleate cells from the trophoblast and starts already at implantation. However, peak levels are only reached 1 week before parturition. Due to the long half-life time of this molecule, high levels are found in plasma until 2 weeks after calving. The co-occurrence of the impairment of PMN oxidative burst activity in the early postpartum period and a peak in plasma bPAG concentrations might support the hypothesis of an immunosuppressive effect of PAG. Moreover, an inhibitory effect of bPAG on the proliferation of bovine bone marrow progenitor cells has been found recently in our laboratory. bPAG occurs in colostrum, but its effect on milk cells has not been clarified. It is concluded that interaction between the physiology of reproduction and lactation on the one side and immune function on the other side in dairy cattle requires further research.

  7. St. John's Wort reduces beta-amyloid accumulation in a double transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model-role of P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Brenn, Anja; Grube, Markus; Jedlitschky, Gabriele; Fischer, Andrea; Strohmeier, Barbara; Eiden, Martin; Keller, Markus; Groschup, Martin H; Vogelgesang, Silke

    2014-01-01

    The adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transport protein P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) is involved in the export of beta-amyloid from the brain into the blood, and there is evidence that age-associated deficits in cerebral P-glycoprotein content may be involved in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. P-glycoprotein function and expression can be pharmacologically induced by a variety of compounds including extracts of Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort). To clarify the effect of St. John's Wort on the accumulation of beta-amyloid and P-glycoprotein expression in the brain, St. John's Wort extract (final hyperforin concentration 5%) was fed to 30-day-old male C57BL/6J-APP/PS1(+/-) mice over a period of 60 or 120 days, respectively. Age-matched male C57BL/6J-APP/PS1(+/-) mice receiving a St. John's Wort-free diet served as controls. Mice receiving St. John's Wort extract showed (i) significant reductions of parenchymal beta-amyloid 1-40 and 1-42 accumulation; and (ii) moderate, but statistically significant increases in cerebrovascular P-glycoprotein expression. Thus, the induction of cerebrovascular P-glycoprotein may be a novel therapeutic strategy to protect the brain from beta-amyloid accumulation, and thereby impede the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. THE EFFECTS OF HIV INFECTION ON THE EXPRESSION OF THE DRUG EFFLUX PROTEINS P-GLYCOPROTEIN AND BREAST CANCER RESISTANCE PROTEIN IN A HUMAN INTESTINE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Kelstan; Marlin, Jerry; Taylor, Tracey AH; Fitting, Sylvia; Hauser, Kurt F.; Rice, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In HIV infection, decreased penetration of antiretroviral drugs is postulated to contribute to HIV persistence within lymphoid rich regions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, mechanistic explanations for this phenomenon remain unclear. Specifically, investigations of HIV effects on drug efflux proteins within intestinal models are minimal. Methods Using an in vitro co-culture model of the GI tract, effects of HIV infection on drug efflux proteins, P-glycoprotein and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) were evaluated. The influence of the HIV-1 protein, Tat, and oxidative stress on P-glycoprotein and BCRP also was evaluated. Key Findings P-glycoprotein expression demonstrated an HIV-induced upregulation in Caco-2 cells over time for cells grown in co-culture with resting lymphocytes. BCRP overall expression increased with HIV exposure in activated primary human lymphocytes co-cultured with Caco-2 cells. Tat treatment resulted in no significant alterations in P-glycoprotein (43% increase), BCRP expression, or oxidative stress. Conclusions HIV exposure within an in vitro intestinal model resulted in increases in, P-glycoprotein and BCRP in a cell specific manner. Additionally, observed changes were not mediated by Tat. Collectively, these results suggest that alterations in BCRP and P-glycoprotein may contribute, in part, to decreased antiretroviral concentrations within the gastrointestinal tract in HIV infection. PMID:25557407

  9. Inhibitory effect of glycoprotein isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO on activities of allergy-mediators in compound 48/80-stimulated mast cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kye-Taek

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the anti-allergy potentials of glycoprotein (90kDa) isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO (OFI glycoprotein) in vivo (ICR mice) and in vitro (RBL-2H3 cells). At first, to know whether the OFI glycoprotein has an inhibitory ability for allergy in vivo, we evaluated the activities of allergy-related factors such as histamine and beta-hexosaminidase release, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in compound 48/80 (8 ml/kg BW)-treated ICR mice. After that, we studied to found the effect for anti-allergy in vitro such as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, arachidonic acid, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in compound 48/80 (5 microg/ml)-treated RBL-2H3 cells. Our results showed that the OFI glycoprotein (5 mg/kg) inhibited histamine and beta-hexosaminidase release, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) in mice serum. Also OFI glycoprotein (25 microg/ml) has suppressive effects on the expression of MAPK (ERK1/2), and on protein expression of anti-allergic proteins (iNOS and COX-2). Thus, we speculate that the OFI glycoprotein is an example of natural compound that blocks anti-allergic signal transduction pathways.

  10. Improvement of N-glycan site occupancy of therapeutic glycoproteins produced in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung-Kwon; Warburton, Shannon; Lin, Heping; Patel, Rohan; Boldogh, Istvan; Meehl, Michael; Meehl, Meehl; d'Anjou, Marc; Pon, Liza; Stadheim, Terrance A; Sethuraman, Natarajan

    2012-08-01

    Yeast is capable of performing posttranslational modifications, such as N- or O-glycosylation. It has been demonstrated that N-glycans play critical biological roles in therapeutic glycoproteins by modulating pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. However, N-glycan sites on recombinant glycoproteins produced in yeast can be underglycosylated, and hence, not completely occupied. Genomic homology analysis indicates that the Pichia pastoris oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) complex consists of multiple subunits, including OST1, OST2, OST3, OST4, OST5, OST6, STT3, SWP1, and WBP1. Monoclonal antibodies produced in P. pastoris show that N-glycan site occupancy ranges from 75-85 % and is affected mainly by the OST function, and in part, by process conditions. In this study, we demonstrate that N-glycan site occupancy of antibodies can be improved to greater than 99 %, comparable to that of antibodies produced in mammalian cells (CHO), by overexpressing Leishmania major STT3D (LmSTT3D) under the control of an inducible alcohol oxidase 1 (AOX1) promoter. N-glycan site occupancy of non-antibody glycoproteins such as recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) was also significantly improved, suggesting that LmSTT3D has broad substrate specificity. These results suggest that the glycosylation status of recombinant proteins can be improved by heterologous STT3 expression, which will allow for the customization of therapeutic protein profiles.

  11. Conservation of hydrophobicity within viral envelope glycoproteins reveals a putative hepatitis C virus fusion peptide.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; O'Leary, J M; Pollock, S; Zitzmann, N

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters and infects cells remains unknown. Identifying the HCV fusion peptide(s) and understanding the early stages of infection may provide new opportunities for improved antiviral therapy. The HCV envelope glycoprotein E2 is thought to be a class II fusion protein. Class II fusion proteins are exemplified by the E protein of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) and the E1 protein of the Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Analysis of the hydrophobicity profiles of four HCV E2 envelope glycoproteins revealed a region with a conserved three-pronged pattern of hydrophobicity, termed the tridentate (TD) region. The primary sequence of the TD region is highly conserved in all 490 HCV strains currently reported. The known fusion peptide loops of TBEV and SFV share the characteristic TD region hydrophobicity profile and significant sequence conservation in the TD region was identified in the E and E1 glycoproteins of members of the Flaviviridae and Togaviridae families, respectively. The HCV TD region peptides have membranotropic activity; in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the HCV TD region peptides insert into in a biomimetic bilayer in a similar manner to the TBEV fusion peptide and the peptides induce effective mixing of lipid membranes in a liposome fusion assay. Together these results indicate that the highly conserved TD region of the HCV E2 protein is a fusion peptide candidate and may be an important factor in the class II fusion mechanism.

  12. The Use of Chimeric Virus-like Particles Harbouring a Segment of Hantavirus Gc Glycoprotein to Generate a Broadly-Reactive Hantavirus-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Razanskiene, Ausra; Petraityte-Burneikiene, Rasa; Klempa, Boris; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against viral glycoproteins have important diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In most cases, the MAbs specific to viral glycoproteins are raised against intact virus particles. The biosynthesis of viral glycoproteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria, yeast, insect or mammalian cells is often problematic due to their low expression level, improper folding and limited stability. To generate MAbs against hantavirus glycoprotein Gc, we have used initially a recombinant yeast-expressed full-length Puumala virus (PUUV) Gc protein. However, this approach was unsuccessful. As an alternative recombinant antigen, chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) harboring a segment of PUUV Gc glycoprotein were generated in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 99 amino acid (aa)-long segment of Gc protein was inserted into the major capsid protein VP1 of hamster polyomavirus at previously defined positions: either site #1 (aa 80–89) or site #4 (aa 280–289). The chimeric proteins were found to self-assemble to VLPs as evidenced by electron microscopy. Chimeric VLPs induced an efficient insert-specific antibody response in immunized mice. Monoclonal antibody (clone #10B8) of IgG isotype specific to hantavirus Gc glycoprotein was generated. It recognized recombinant full-length PUUV Gc glycoprotein both in ELISA and Western blot assay and reacted specifically with hantavirus-infected cells in immunofluorescence assay. Epitope mapping studies revealed the N-terminally located epitope highly conserved among different hantavirus strains. In conclusion, our approach to use chimeric VLPs was proven useful for the generation of virus-reactive MAb against hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. The generated broadly-reactive MAb #10B8 might be useful for various diagnostic applications. PMID:24513568

  13. The use of chimeric virus-like particles harbouring a segment of hantavirus Gc glycoprotein to generate a broadly-reactive hantavirus-specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Zvirbliene, Aurelija; Kucinskaite-Kodze, Indre; Razanskiene, Ausra; Petraityte-Burneikiene, Rasa; Klempa, Boris; Ulrich, Rainer G; Gedvilaite, Alma

    2014-02-07

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against viral glycoproteins have important diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In most cases, the MAbs specific to viral glycoproteins are raised against intact virus particles. The biosynthesis of viral glycoproteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria, yeast, insect or mammalian cells is often problematic due to their low expression level, improper folding and limited stability. To generate MAbs against hantavirus glycoprotein Gc, we have used initially a recombinant yeast-expressed full-length Puumala virus (PUUV) Gc protein. However, this approach was unsuccessful. As an alternative recombinant antigen, chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) harboring a segment of PUUV Gc glycoprotein were generated in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 99 amino acid (aa)-long segment of Gc protein was inserted into the major capsid protein VP1 of hamster polyomavirus at previously defined positions: either site #1 (aa 80-89) or site #4 (aa 280-289). The chimeric proteins were found to self-assemble to VLPs as evidenced by electron microscopy. Chimeric VLPs induced an efficient insert-specific antibody response in immunized mice. Monoclonal antibody (clone #10B8) of IgG isotype specific to hantavirus Gc glycoprotein was generated. It recognized recombinant full-length PUUV Gc glycoprotein both in ELISA and Western blot assay and reacted specifically with hantavirus-infected cells in immunofluorescence assay. Epitope mapping studies revealed the N-terminally located epitope highly conserved among different hantavirus strains. In conclusion, our approach to use chimeric VLPs was proven useful for the generation of virus-reactive MAb against hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. The generated broadly-reactive MAb #10B8 might be useful for various diagnostic applications.

  14. Use of boronic acid nanoparticles in glycoprotein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yawei; Zhang, Lijuan; Lu, Haojie

    2013-01-01

    Glyco-specific enrichment methods for mass spectrometry pretreatment are invaluable for the detection of low abundant glycoproteins or glycopeptides. For example, boronic acid can specifically interact with glycans in nonaqueous or basic aqueous solutions. Here, we describe a glyco-specific enrichment method which uses a boronic acid-functionalized "core-satellite" composite nanoparticle to isolate glycoproteins or glycopeptides from complex biological samples. Furthermore, we also demonstrate detection limit improvements and show how to evaluate the percent recovery from the glycoprotein or glycopeptide enrichment process via SDS-PAGE and (16)O/(18)O labeling strategies.

  15. [Glycoprotein hexoses in feces of infants with lactose intolerance].

    PubMed

    Filippvskiĭ, G K; Klimov, L Ia

    1995-01-01

    A modified method for estimation of total glycoprotein hexoses in feces, based on their measurements in the blood serum, is presented. Sixty-six nursing children with lactose intolerance, breastfed or formula fed, were examined; formula fed babies were kept on mixtures with high and low lactose content. Glycoprotein hexose parameters were as follows (X +/- m): 13.51 +/- 1.93, 12.05 +/- 2.20, and 3.69 +/- 0.47 g/l feces. In control children without lactose intolerance (n = 33) this value was 3.6 +/- 0.79 g/l. Increased glycoprotein excretion is connected with glycocalix and small intestinal enterocyte alteration.

  16. Extracellular glycoprotein from virulent and avirulent Cryptococcus species.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, A; Taylor, I E

    1981-01-01

    Two virulent strains of Cryptococcus neoformans and two nonvirulent forms (C. albidus and C. laurentii) were grown in liquid culture to produce maximal capsule formation. A glycoprotein was isolated from the culture medium and was homogeneous as determined by cellulose acetate electrophoresis and anion-exchange chromatography. The amino acid, neutral sugar, amino sugar, uronic acid, and O-acetyl compositions and the infrared spectra of the glycoprotein were determined. The product of the C. neoformans strains contained more mannose and uronic acid than did that from the nonpathogenic strains. O-acetyl groups were absent from glycoprotein of the two nonpathogens. PMID:7228406

  17. Synthesis and P-glycoprotein induction activity of colupulone analogs.

    PubMed

    Bharate, Jaideep B; Batarseh, Yazan S; Wani, Abubakar; Sharma, Sadhana; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Kaddoumi, Amal; Kumar, Ajay; Bharate, Sandip B

    2015-05-21

    Brain amyloid-beta (Aβ) plaques are one of the primary hallmarks associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Efflux pump proteins located at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) have been reported to play an important role in the clearance of brain Aβ, among which the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux transporter pump has been shown to play a crucial role. Thus, P-gp has been considered as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of AD. Colupulone, a prenylated phloroglucinol isolated from Humulus lupulus, is known to activate pregnane-X-receptor (PXR), which is a nuclear receptor controlling P-gp expression. In the present work, we aimed to synthesize and identify analogs of colupulone that are potent P-gp inducer(s) with an ability to enhance Aβ transport across the BBB. A series of colupulone analogs were synthesized by modifications at both prenyl as well as acyl domains. All compounds were screened for P-gp induction activity using a rhodamine 123 based efflux assay in the P-gp overexpressing human adenocarcinoma LS-180 cells, wherein all compounds showed significant P-gp induction activity at 5 μM. In the western blot studies in LS-180 cells, compounds 3k and 5f were able to induce P-gp as well as LRP1 at 1 μM. The effect of compounds on the Aβ uptake and transport was then evaluated. Among all tested compounds, diprenylated acyl phloroglucinol displayed a significant increase (29%) in Aβ transport across bEnd3 cells grown on inserts as a BBB model. The results presented here suggest the potential of this scaffold to enhance clearance of brain Aβ across the BBB and thus its promise for development as a potential anti-Alzheimer agent.

  18. 21 CFR 866.5440 - Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system....5440 Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein III... the beta-2-glycoprotein III (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  19. 21 CFR 866.5430 - Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system....5430 Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein I... the beta-2-glycoprotein I (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  20. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system....5420 Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-glycoproteins... alpha-1-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-1 group when subjected...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system....5420 Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-glycoproteins... alpha-1-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-1 group when subjected...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5430 - Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system....5430 Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein I... the beta-2-glycoprotein I (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5440 - Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system....5440 Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein III... the beta-2-glycoprotein III (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5430 - Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system....5430 Beta-2-glycoprotein I immunological test system. (a) Identification. A beta-2-glycoprotein I... the beta-2-glycoprotein I (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of...

  5. Glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al. Zuccarini inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in HCT116 colonic epithelial cells and dextran sulfate sodium-treated ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sei-Jung; Lee, Jin; Song, Sooyeon; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the anti-inflammatory potentials of a 38 kDa glycoprotein isolated from Styrax japonica Siebold et al Zuccarini (SJSZ glycoprotein). We found that SJSZ glycoprotein has concentration-dependent scavenging activity against DPPH and hydroxyl radicals in the cell-free systems. In colonic epithelial cells (HCT116 cells), the results showed that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by glucose/glucose oxidase (G/GO) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experimental mouse colitis was induced by adding dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to the drinking water at a concentration of 4% (w/v) for 7 days. We figured out that administration of SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg) lowers the levels of disease activity index, myeloperoxidase activity, and histological inflammation in DSS-treated mice. In addition, SJSZ glycoprotein inhibited plasmic thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation, nitric oxide (NO) production, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, accompanying the inhibition of colonic inflammatory signal proteins (NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2) and inflammation-related cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α). These results indicate that SJSZ glycoprotein inhibits oxidative and pro-inflammatory responses in mouse colitis.

  6. Detection of glycoproteins in the Acanthamoeba plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Paatero, G.I.L. ); Gahmberg, C.G. )

    1988-11-01

    In the present study the authors have shown that glycoproteins are present in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii by utilizing different radioactive labeling techniques. Plasma membrane proteins in the amoeba were iodinated by {sup 125}I-lactoperoxidase labeling and the solubilized radiolabeled glycoproteins were separated by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography followed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The periodate/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} and galactose oxidase/NaB{sup 3}H{sub 4} labeling techniques were used for labeling of surface carbohydrates in the amoeba. Several surface-labeled glycoproteins were observed in addition to a diffusely labeled region with M{sub r} of 55,000-75,000 seen on electrophoresis, which could represent glycolipids. The presence of glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of Acanthamoeba castellanii was confirmed by metabolic labeling with ({sup 35}S)methionine followed by lectin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  7. Herpesvirus Glycoproteins Undergo Multiple Antigenic Changes before Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Daniel L.; Kratz, Anne-Sophie; Stevenson, Philip G.

    2012-01-01

    Herpesvirus entry is a complicated process involving multiple virion glycoproteins and culminating in membrane fusion. Glycoprotein conformation changes are likely to play key roles. Studies of recombinant glycoproteins have revealed some structural features of the virion fusion machinery. However, how the virion glycoproteins change during infection remains unclear. Here using conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies we show in situ that each component of the Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) entry machinery—gB, gH/gL and gp150—changes in antigenicity before tegument protein release begins. Further changes then occurred upon actual membrane fusion. Thus virions revealed their final fusogenic form only in late endosomes. The substantial antigenic differences between this form and that of extracellular virions suggested that antibodies have only a limited opportunity to block virion membrane fusion. PMID:22253913

  8. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies.

  9. Using Single Lectins to Enrich Glycoproteins in Conditioned Media.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Fanayan, Susan

    2015-08-03

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that can recognize and bind to carbohydrates conjugated to proteins and lipids. Coupled with mass spectrometry technologies, lectin affinity chromatography is becoming a popular approach for identification and quantification of glycoproteins in complex samples such as blood, tumor tissues, and cell lines. Given the commercial availability of a large number of lectins that recognize diverse sugar structures, it is now possible to isolate and study glycoproteins for biological and medical research. This unit provides a general guide to single-lectin-based enrichment of glycoproteins from serum-free conditioned media. Due to the unique carbohydrate specificity of most lectins and the complexity of the samples, optimization steps may be required to evaluate different elution buffers and methods as well as binding conditions, for each lectin, for optimal recovery of bound glycoproteins.

  10. Regenerated bacterial cellulose microfluidic column for glycoproteins separation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuntao; Zhu, Chunlin; Huang, Yang; Nie, Ying; Yang, Jiazhi; Shen, Ruiqi; Sun, Dongping

    2016-02-10

    To analysis and separate glycoproteins, a simple strategy to prepare regenerated bacterial cellulose (RBC) column with concanavalin A (Con A) lectin immobilized in microfluidic system was applied. RBC was filled into microchannel to fabricate RBC microcolumn after bacterial cellulose dissolved in NaOH-sulfourea water solution. Lectin Con A was covalently connected onto RBC matrix surface via Schiff-base formation. Lysozyme (non-glycoprotein) and transferrin (glycoprotein) were successfully separated based on their different affinities toward the immobilized Con A. Overall, the RBC microfluidic system presents great potential application in affinity chromatography of glycoproteins analysis, and this research represents a significant step to prepare bacterial cellulose (BC) as column packing material in microfluidic system. What is more, troublesome operations for lectin affinity chromatography were simplified by integrating the microfluidic chip onto a HPLC (High Performance Liquid Chromatography) system.

  11. Antibodies elicited by yeast glycoproteins recognize HIV-1 virions and potently neutralize virions with high mannose N-glycans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong; Fu, Hu; Luallen, Robert J.; Liu, Bingfen; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W.; Geng, Yu

    2015-01-01

    The glycan shield on the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein has drawn attention as a target for HIV-1 vaccine design given that an increasing number of potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) recognize epitopes entirely or partially comprised of high mannose type N-linked glycans. In an attempt to generate immunogens that target the glycan shield of HIV-1, we previously engineered a triple mutant (TM) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that results in exclusive presentation of high mannose type N-glycans, and identified five TM yeast glycoproteins that support strong binding of 2G12, a bNAb that targets a cluster of high mannose glycans on the gp120 subunit of Env. Here, we further analyzed the antigenicity and immunogenicity of these proteins in inducing anti-HIV responses. Our study demonstrated that the 2G12-reactive TM yeast glycoproteins efficiently bound to recently identified bNAbs including PGT125–130 and PGT135 that recognize high mannose glycan-dependent epitopes. Immunization of rabbits with a single TM yeast glycoprotein (Gp38 or Pst1), when conjugated to a promiscuous T-cell epitope peptide and coadministered with a Toll-like receptor 2 agonist, induced glycan-specific HIV-1 Env cross-reactive antibodies. The immune sera bound to both synthetic mannose oligosaccharides and gp120 proteins from a broad range of HIV-1 strains. The purified antibodies recognized and captured virions that contain both complex- and high mannose-type of N-glycans, and potently neutralized virions from different HIV-1 clades but only when the virions were enforced to retain high mannose N-glycans. This study provides insights into the elicitation of anti-carbohydrate, HIV-1 Env-cross reactive antibodies with a heterologous glycoprotein and may have applications in the design and administration of immunogens that target the viral glycan shield for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. PMID:26277072

  12. Glucocorticoid-regulated localization of cell surface glycoproteins in rat hepatoma cells is mediated within the Golgi complex

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones regulate the post-translational maturation and sorting of cell surface and extracellular mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) glycoproteins in M1.54 cells, a stably infected rat hepatoma cell line. Exposure to monensin significantly reduced the proteolytic maturation and externalization of viral glycoproteins resulting in a stable cellular accumulation of a single 70,000-Mr glycosylated polyprotein (designated gp70). Cell surface- and intracellular-specific immunoprecipitations of monensin-treated cells revealed that gp70 can be localized to the cell surface only in the presence of 1 microM dexamethasone, while in uninduced cells gp70 is irreversibly sequestered in an intracellular compartment. Analysis of oligosaccharide processing kinetics demonstrated that gp70 acquired resistance to endoglycosidase H with a half-time of 65 min in the presence or absence of hormone. In contrast, gp70 was inefficiently galactosylated after a 60-min lag in uninduced cells while rapidly acquiring this carbohydrate modification in the presence of dexamethasone. Furthermore, in the absence or presence of monensin, MMTV glycoproteins failed to be galactosylated in hormone-induced CR4 cells, a complement-selected sorting variant defective in the glucocorticoid-regulated compartmentalization of viral glycoproteins to the cell surface. Since dexamethasone had no apparent global effects on organelle morphology or production of total cell surface-galactosylated species, we conclude that glucocorticoids induce the localization of cell surface MMTV glycoproteins by regulating a highly selective step within the Golgi apparatus after the acquisition of endoglycosidase H- resistant oligosaccharide side chains but before or at the site of galactose attachment. PMID:2836430

  13. KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, H; Hama, Y; Sumi, T; Li, S C; Li, Y T

    2001-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that the mucus coat of fish plays a variety of important physical, chemical, and physiological functions. One of the major constituents of the mucus coat is mucus glycoprotein. We found that sialic acids in the skin mucus of the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, consisted predominantly of KDN. Subsequently, we isolated KDN-containing glycoprotein from loach skin mucus and characterized its chemical nature and structure. Loach mucus glycoprotein was purified from the Tris-HCl buffer extract of loach skin mucus by DEAE-cellulose chromatography, Nuclease P1 treatment, and Sepharose CL-6B gel filtration. The purified mucus glycoprotein was found to contain 38.5 KDN, 0.5% NeuAc, 25.0% GalNAc, 3.5% Gal, 0.5% GlcNAc and 28% amino acids. Exhaustive Actinase digestion of the glycoprotein yielded a glycopeptide with a higher sugar content and higher Thr and Ser contents. The molecular size of this glycopeptide was approximately 1/12 of the intact glycoprotein. These results suggest that approximately 11 highly glycosylated polypeptide units are linked in tandem through nonglycosylated peptides to form the glycoporotein molecule. The oligosaccharide alditols liberated from the loach mucus glycoprotein by alkaline borohydride treatment were separated by Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and HPLC. The purified sugar chains were analyzed b --> 6GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 3(GalNAcbeta1 --> 14)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(GalNAcalpha1 --> 3)GalNAc-ol, KDNalpha2 --> 6(Gal3alpha1--> 3)GalNAc-ol, and NeuAcalpha2 --> 6Gal NAc-ol. It is estimated that one loach mucus glycoprotein molecule contains more than 500 KDN-containing sugar chains that are linked to Thr and Ser residues of the protein core through GalNAc.

  14. Association of dystrophin and an integral membrane glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Campbell, K P; Kahl, S D

    1989-03-16

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by a defective gene found on the X-chromosome. Dystrophin is encoded by the DMD gene and represents about 0.002% of total muscle protein. Immunochemical studies have shown that dystrophin is localized to the sarcolemma in normal muscle but is absent in muscle from DMD patients. Many features of the predicted primary structure of dystrophin are shared with membrane cytoskeletal proteins, but the precise function of dystrophin in muscle is unknown. Here we report the first isolation of dystrophin from digitonin-solubilized skeletal muscle membranes using wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-Sepharose. We find that dystrophin is not a glycoprotein but binds to WGA-Sepharose because of its tight association with a WGA-binding glycoprotein. The association of dystrophin with this glycoprotein is disrupted by agents that dissociate cytoskeletal proteins from membranes. We conclude that dystrophin is linked to an integral membrane glycoprotein in the sarcolemma. Our results indicate that the function of dystrophin could be to link this glycoprotein to the underlying cytoskeleton and thus help either to preserve membrane stability or to keep the glycoprotein non-uniformly distributed in the sarcolemma.

  15. Peptide mimotopes of rabies virus glycoprotein with immunogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Houimel, Mehdi; Dellagi, Koussay

    2009-07-23

    A random constrained hexapeptide phage display library (Cys-6aa-Cys) was screened with purified neutralizing human anti-rabies virus IgG antibodies (hRABVIgG) to identify peptides that correspond to or mimic natural epitopes on rabies virus glycoprotein (RABVG) and to investigate their immunogenicities in vivo. After four rounds of biopanning, 20 phage clones randomly selected for their specificity to hRABVIgG, effectively blocked the binding of the inactive rabies virus (RABV) to hRABVIgG. The phage clones were sequenced and the deduced amino acid sequences were derived (C-KRDSTW-C; C-KYLWSK-C; C-KYWLSR-C; C-KYWWSK-C; C-KYAWSR-C; C-KYSMSK-C). Alignments to the amino acid sequence of RABVG showed good match with the antigenic site III (at 330-338 aa), indicating that the hRABVIgG antibodies most likely recognize preferentially this antigenic site. The selected mimotopes were able to inhibit the interactions of the hRABVIgG antibodies with RABV in a dose-dependent manner. Subcutaneous administration of phageKRDSTW expressing the RABVG site III mimotope induced an RABVG-specific IgG response in BALB/c mice. The results indicated that peptide mimotopes when displayed on phages, are accessible to the mice immune system to trigger a humoral response and to induce IgG production. The RABVG site III mimotope (C-KRDSTW-C) would provide a new and promising concept for the development of rabies vaccine.

  16. Interaction of the Most Membranotropic Region of the HCV E2 Envelope Glycoprotein with Membranes. Biophysical Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Berná, Ana J.; Guillén, Jaime; Moreno, Miguel R.; Gómez-Sánchez, Ana I.; Pabst, George; Laggner, Peter; Villalaín, José

    2008-01-01

    The previously identified membrane-active regions of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) E1 and E2 envelope glycoproteins led us to identify different segments that might be implicated in viral membrane fusion, membrane interaction, and/or protein-protein binding. HCV E2 glycoprotein contains one of the most membranotropic segments, segment 603–634, which has been implicated in CD81 binding, E1/E2 and E2/E2 dimerization, and membrane interaction. Through a series of complementary experiments, we have carried out a study of the binding and interaction with the lipid bilayer of a peptide corresponding to segment 603–634, peptide E2FP, as well as the structural changes induced by membrane binding that take place in both the peptide and the phospholipid molecules. Here, we demonstrate that peptide E2FP binds to and interacts with phospholipid model membranes, modulates the polymorphic phase behavior of membrane phospholipids, is localized in a shallow position in the membrane, and is probably oligomerized in the presence of membranes. These data support the role of E2FP in HCV-mediated membrane fusion, and sustain the notion that this segment of the E2 envelope glycoprotein, together with other segments of E2 and E1 glycoproteins, provides the driving force for the merging of the viral and target cell membranes. PMID:18339752

  17. Activation of factor XII by tobacco glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Becker, C G; Dubin, T

    1977-08-01

    A glycoprotein of mol wt ca. 18,000 daltons isolated from cured tobacco leaves (TGP-L) and from cigarette smoke condensate (TGP-CSC) activated factor XII in normal human plasma in vitro as measured by (a) shortening of the partial thromboplastin time, (b) shortening of the lysis time of euglobulin clots, and (c) generation of kinin activity. These effects were not demonstrable in plasma deficient in factor XII. The capacity of TGP-L and TGP-CSC to activate factor XII was shown to depend on the presence of rutin, a substance chemically similar to quercetin and ellagic acid, which are known activators of factor XII. Rutin and rutin coupled to bovine serum albumin, but not bovine serum albumin alone, were also demonstrated to activate factor XII. The presence in cigarette smoke of material that is both allergenic and capable of activating factor XII of the intrinsic pathway of coagulatin may be important to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease associated with cigarette smoking.

  18. Activation of factor XII by tobacco glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    A glycoprotein of mol wt ca. 18,000 daltons isolated from cured tobacco leaves (TGP-L) and from cigarette smoke condensate (TGP-CSC) activated factor XII in normal human plasma in vitro as measured by (a) shortening of the partial thromboplastin time, (b) shortening of the lysis time of euglobulin clots, and (c) generation of kinin activity. These effects were not demonstrable in plasma deficient in factor XII. The capacity of TGP-L and TGP-CSC to activate factor XII was shown to depend on the presence of rutin, a substance chemically similar to quercetin and ellagic acid, which are known activators of factor XII. Rutin and rutin coupled to bovine serum albumin, but not bovine serum albumin alone, were also demonstrated to activate factor XII. The presence in cigarette smoke of material that is both allergenic and capable of activating factor XII of the intrinsic pathway of coagulatin may be important to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and pulmonary disease associated with cigarette smoking. PMID:874423

  19. Glucosylation of glycoproteins in Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed

    Gotz, G; Gañán, S; Parodi, A J

    1991-04-01

    High mannose-type, N-linked oligosaccharides devoid of glucose units may be glucosylated directly from UDP-Glc in mammalian, plant, fungal and protozoan cells. The glucosylated compounds thus formed (protein-linked Glc1Man5-9GlcNAc2, depending on the organisms) are immediately deglucosylated by glucosidase II, an enzyme located, the same as the glucosylating activity, in the endoplasmic reticulum. In order to evaluate the molar proportion of N-linked oligosaccharides that are glucosylated in the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata (a microorganism transferring Man7GlcNAc2 in protein N-glycosylation) cells of the parasite were grown in the presence of [14C]glucose and concentrations of the glucosidase II inhibitors deoxynojirimycin and/or castanospermine that were several hundred-fold higher than those required to inhibit 50% of the activity of the protozoan enzyme. The inhibitors did not affect the cell growth rate and, although glucose analogs, did not interfere with the entry of glucose into the cells. About 40-43% of total N-linked oligosaccharides appeared to be glucosylated. As on the average there are several N-linked oligosaccharides per glycoprotein, more than 40-43% (but probably not all of them) are transiently glucosylated in the endoplasmic reticulum.

  20. Protective Efficacy of Recombinant Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara Delivering Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Spike Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Volz, Asisa; Kupke, Alexandra; Song, Fei; Jany, Sylvia; Fux, Robert; Shams-Eldin, Hosam; Schmidt, Jörg; Becker, Christin; Eickmann, Markus; Becker, Stephan; Sutter, Gerd

    2015-08-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes severe respiratory disease in humans. We tested a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vaccine expressing full-length MERS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein by immunizing BALB/c mice with either intramuscular or subcutaneous regimens. In all cases, MVA-MERS-S induced MERS-CoV-specific CD8(+) T cells and virus-neutralizing antibodies. Vaccinated mice were protected against MERS-CoV challenge infection after transduction with the human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 receptor. This MERS-CoV infection model demonstrates the safety and efficacy of the candidate vaccine.

  1. [Interaction of the glycoprotein from the Bacillus pumilis cell wall with liposomes].

    PubMed

    Karamushka, V I; Gruzina, T G; Podol'skaia, V I; Ul'berg, Z R

    1987-01-01

    The methods of centrifugation and gel-filtration on Sephadexes G-50 and G-150 were used to study the interaction of Bacillus pumilis cell wall glycoprotein component having the molecular weight of 50 kDa (GP-50) with lyposomes from bacterial lipids. GP-50 is shown to sorb on such liposomes and disturb their barrier properties inducing yield of low-molecular label. GP-50 exerts no effect on properties of liposomes from egg lecithin. Electrostatic forces are supposed to play a decisive role in initial acts of GP-50 interactions with lipid phase of microbial envelopes.

  2. Mechanisms of ammonia and ammonium transport by rhesus-associated glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Caner, Tolga; Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange; Brown, Karen; Islam, M Toriqul; Hamm, L Lee; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2015-12-01

    In this study we characterized ammonia and ammonium (NH3/NH4(+)) transport by the rhesus-associated (Rh) glycoproteins RhAG, Rhbg, and Rhcg expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We used ion-selective microelectrodes and two-electrode voltage clamp to measure changes in intracellular pH, surface pH, and whole cell currents induced by NH3/NH4(+) and methyl amine/ammonium (MA/MA(+)). These measurements allowed us to define signal-specific signatures to distinguish NH3 from NH4(+) transport and to determine how transport of NH3 and NH4(+) differs among RhAG, Rhbg, and Rhcg. Our data indicate that expression of Rh glycoproteins in oocytes generally enhanced NH3/NH4(+) transport and that cellular changes induced by transport of MA/MA(+) by Rh proteins were different from those induced by transport of NH3/NH4(+). Our results support the following conclusions: 1) RhAG and Rhbg transport both the ionic NH4(+) and neutral NH3 species; 2) transport of NH4(+) is electrogenic; 3) like Rhbg, RhAG transport of NH4(+) masks NH3 transport; and 4) Rhcg is likely to be a predominantly NH3 transporter, with no evidence of enhanced NH4(+) transport by this transporter. The dual role of Rh proteins as NH3 and NH4(+) transporters is a unique property and may be critical in understanding how transepithelial secretion of NH3/NH4(+) occurs in the renal collecting duct.

  3. N-glycoprotein analysis discovers new up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Nicastri, Annalisa; Gaspari, Marco; Sacco, Rosario; Elia, Laura; Gabriele, Caterina; Romano, Roberto; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cuda, Giovanni

    2014-11-07

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death due to cancer worldwide. Therefore, the identification of high-specificity and -sensitivity biomarkers for the early detection of colorectal cancer is urgently needed. Post-translational modifications, such as glycosylation, are known to play an important role in cancer progression. In the present work, we used a quantitative proteomic technique based on (18)O stable isotope labeling to identify differentially expressed N-linked glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue samples compared with healthy colorectal tissue from 19 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. We identified 54 up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer samples, therefore potentially involved in the biological processes of tumorigenesis. In particular, nine of these (PLOD2, DPEP1, SE1L1, CD82, PAR1, PLOD3, S12A2, LAMP3, OLFM4) were found to be up-regulated in the great majority of the cohort, and, interestingly, the association with colorectal cancer of four (PLOD2, S12A2, PLOD3, CD82) has not been hitherto described.

  4. Biogenesis of plasma membrane glycoproteins. Purification and properties of two rat liver plasma membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Elovson, J

    1980-06-25

    As a preliminary to a study of the biogenesis of individual plasma membrane glycoproteins, the marker enzyme nucleotide pyrophosphatase (NPPase) and a major rat liver plasma membrane sialoprotein, subsequently found to be identical with the enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), were purified 10,000- and 2,000-fold, respectively, from rat liver. Both were amphipathic proteins which formed defined micellar complexes with detergents and aggregated in their absence. Gel filtration, sucrose density gradient centrifugation, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate showed the Triton X-100 complex of NPPase to contain a single 150,000-dalton peptide, while that of DPP IV was composed of two 120,000-dalton subunits; each complex also contained about 150,000-dalton Triton X-100. Trypsin cleaved the detergent complexes with release of major hydrophilic fragments which no longer bound detergent micelles; the accompanying change in peptide size was small for NPPase and undetectable for DPP IV, which also retained the dimer structure of its native form. DPP IV was the only major glycoprotein in rat liver plasma membrane which bound strongly to wheat germ agglutinin. Monospecific rabbit antibodies against NPPase and DPP IV precipitated the antigens without affecting their enzymatic activities.

  5. Genetic variability of platelet glycoprotein Ibalpha gene.

    PubMed

    Ozelo, Margareth C; Costa, Devanira S P; Siqueira, Lucia H; Machado, Tania M F; Castro, Vagner; Gonçalves, Marilda S; Menezes, Raimundo C; Soares, Manoel; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce M; Costa, Fernando F; Arruda, Valder R

    2004-10-01

    Platelet membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ibalpha is a critical component of platelet adhesion complex to subendothelium structures following tissue injury or pathological surfaces, such as atherosclerotic plaques. Polymorphisms of the GPIbalpha gene have been associated with a high risk for occlusive vascular disease, and its distribution varies considerably among distinct populations. These polymorphisms comprise the human platelet antigen (HPA)-2 system, the -5C/T dimorphism of the Kozak sequence, and the variable number of tandem 39-bp repeats (VNTR). Here we report the prevalence of the GPIbalpha gene polymorphisms among Brazilians, a highly ethnically diverse population. We analyzed 492 subjects of European, African, or Indigenous origin. It was possible to determine ten distinct haplotypes. The most common ( reverse similar 40%) haplotype was the Kozak-TT/HPA-2aa/VNTR-CC for both Caucasian and African descent. However, among Indigenous, Kozak-TT/HPA-2aa/VNTR-CC and Kozak-TC/HPA-2aa/VNTR-CC were equally present. Although a strong linkage disequilibrium between VNTR and HPA-2 polymorphism had also been observed, here we determined incomplete linkage disequilibrium in 10% of subjects from all ethnic groups. VNTR-E, a rare variant lacking the 39-bp repeat, was identified in two unrelated subjects, and functional platelet studies revealed no abnormalities. The VNTR-A allele, the largest variant containing four copies of the repeats, was not identified in this population. However, homozygosity for the VNTR-A allele (Kozak-TT/HPA-2aa/VNTR-AA) was determined in two distinct species of nonhuman primates. These results suggest a greater complex evolutionary mechanism in the macroglycoprotein region of the GPIbalpha gene and may be useful in the design of gene-disease association studies for vascular disease.

  6. Refined structures of mouse P-glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingzhi; Jaimes, Kimberly F; Aller, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    The recently determined C. elegans P-glycoprotein (Pgp) structure revealed significant deviations compared to the original mouse Pgp structure, which suggested possible misinterpretations in the latter model. To address this concern, we generated an experimental electron density map from single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing of an original mouse Pgp dataset to 3.8 Å resolution. The map exhibited significantly more detail compared to the original MAD map and revealed several regions of the structure that required de novo model building. The improved drug-free structure was refined to 3.8 Å resolution with a 9.4 and 8.1% decrease in Rwork and Rfree, respectively, (Rwork = 21.2%, Rfree = 26.6%) and a significant improvement in protein geometry. The improved mouse Pgp model contains ∼95% of residues in the favorable Ramachandran region compared to only 57% for the original model. The registry of six transmembrane helices was corrected, revealing amino acid residues involved in drug binding that were previously unrecognized. Registry shifts (rotations and translations) for three transmembrane (TM)4 and TM5 and the addition of three N-terminal residues were necessary, and were validated with new mercury labeling and anomalous Fourier density. The corrected position of TM4, which forms the frame of a portal for drug entry, had backbone atoms shifted >6 Å from their original positions. The drug translocation pathway of mouse Pgp is 96% identical to human Pgp and is enriched in aromatic residues that likely play a collective role in allowing a high degree of polyspecific substrate recognition. PMID:24155053

  7. Physical Properties of the Glycoprotein Mucin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Garrett; Davis, William; Superfine, Richard; Boucher, Richard

    2003-03-01

    Epithelial cell surfaces are covered by a protective gel known as mucus. The physiological function of this gel depends on its rheological properties, and these properties are largely derived from the secreted glycoprotein mucin. The genetic disease Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is characterized by the adhesion of thick, viscous mucus on these tissues. In the lungs, this results in the interruption of mucus transport thus compromising the first line of defense against pathogens in these tissues. In order to restore the flow of tracheobronchial mucus out of the body, knowledge of the molecular and physical properties of mucin and mucin solutions would be greatly beneficial. The present model for these molecules is that of a long linear strand consisting of highly glycosylated regions linked by cystein-rich globular regions. It is thought that the globular regions may interact either through intermolecular disulfide bonds or through hydrophobic interactions. It has also been speculated that the glycosylated regions may have lectin-like interactions. In the present work, single mucin molecules were imaged at high resolution using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Phase mode imaging was used to map the interactions between functionalized AFM tips and the molecular topography. Additionally, using force-distance curves with the AFM, the adhesion between mucin bound tips and cell surface glycocalyx and glycocalyx-like model surfaces, was measured. And, finally, the viscoelastic properties of mucin solutions were measured using the recently developed technique, single particle tracking microrheology. A model is being developed that will incorporate the properties of mucins beginning at the single molecule and ending with the bulk viscoelastic properties.

  8. Behavioral effects and central nervous system levels of the broadly available κ-agonist hallucinogen salvinorin A are affected by P-glycoprotein modulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Butelman, Eduardo R; Caspers, Michael; Lovell, Kimberly M; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2012-06-01

    Active blood-brain barrier mechanisms, such as the major efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (mdr1), modulate the in vivo/central nervous system (CNS) effects of many pharmacological agents, whether they are used for nonmedical reasons or in pharmacotherapy. The powerful, widely available hallucinogen salvinorin A (from the plant Salvia divinorum) is a high-efficacy, selective κ-opioid agonist and displays fast-onset behavioral effects (e.g., within 1 min of administration) and relatively short duration of action. In vitro studies suggest that salvinorin A may be a P-glycoprotein substrate; thus, the functional status of P-glycoprotein may influence the behavioral effects of salvinorin A or its residence in CNS after parenteral administration. We therefore studied whether a competing P-glycoprotein substrate (the clinically available agent loperamide; 0.032-0.32 mg/kg) or a selective P-glycoprotein blocker, tariquidar (0.32-3.2 mg/kg) could enhance unconditioned behavioral effects (ptosis and facial relaxation, known to be caused by κ-agonists in nonhuman primates) of salvinorin A, as well as its entry and residence in the CNS, as measured by cerebrospinal fluid sampling. Pretreatment with either loperamide or tariquidar dose-dependently enhanced salvinorin A-induced ptosis, but not facial relaxation. In a control study, loperamide and tariquidar were inactive when given as a pretreatment to ((+)-(5α,7α,8β)-N-methyl-N-[7-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]-benzeneacetamide (U69,593), a κ-agonist known to be a very poor P-glycoprotein substrate. Furthermore, pretreatment with tariquidar (3.2 mg/kg) also enhanced peak levels of salvinorin A in cerebrospinal fluid after intravenous administration. These are the first studies in vivo showing the sensitivity of salvinorin A effects to modulation by the P-glycoprotein transporter, a major functional component of the blood-brain barrier.

  9. Inhibitory effect of SJSZ glycoprotein (38 kDa) on expression of heat shock protein 27 and 70 in chromium (VI)-treated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2012-01-01

    Chromium (VI) is as an extremely toxic chemical substance, and is also an internationally recognized human carcinogen. The principal objective of this study was to determine whether or not Styrax japonica Siebold et al. Zuccarini (SJSZ) glycoprotein prevents hepatocarcinogenesis in chromium-treated BNL CL.2 cells and ICR mice. Firstly, it was evaluated that SJSZ glycoprotein has strong antioxidant character and scavenges radicals. In an effort to assess the chemopreventive effects of SJSZ glycoprotein on hepatocarcinogenesis, ICR mice were intraperitoneally injected with chromium (10 mg/kg, BW) for 8 weeks. After sacrifice, we evaluated indicators of liver tissue damage [the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS)], antioxidative enzymes [activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and gluthathione peroxidase (GPx)], and initiating hepatocarcinogenic indicator [heat shock protein (HSP) 27 and 70] and protein kinase C (PKC), p38 MAPK and PCNA via biochemical methods and immunoblot analysis. The results obtained from this study demonstrated that the SJSZ glycoprotein (50 μg/ml) inhibited the production of intracellular ROS in BNL CL.2 cells. In addition, the SJSZ glycoprotein (10 mg/kg, BW) attenuated the levels of LDH, ALT, and TBARS, whereas it increased antioxidative enzymes in mouse serum. SJSZ glycoprotein attenuated the activity of HSP27, HSP70, PKC, MAPKs, and PCNA in BNL CL.2 cells and liver tissue. Taken together, our results indicate that SJSZ glycoprotein might be have a potent preventive effect against hepatocarcinogenesis induced by oxidative stress.

  10. Cross-reactivity between herpes simplex virus glycoprotein B and a 63,000-dalton varicella-zoster virus envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Edson, C M; Hosler, B A; Respess, R A; Waters, D J; Thorley-Lawson, D A

    1985-01-01

    Cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies recognizing both herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B and a major 63,000-dalton varicella-zoster virus (VZV) envelope glycoprotein were isolated and found to neutralize VZV infection in vitro. None of the other VZV glycoproteins was recognized by any polyclonal anti-HSV serum tested. These results demonstrate that HSV glycoprotein B and the 63,000-dalton VZV glycoprotein share antigenic epitopes and raise the possibility that these two proteins have a similar function in infection. Images PMID:2993665

  11. Relation between the secondary structure of carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) and the fluorescence of the protein.

    PubMed

    Albani, Jihad R

    2003-05-01

    We studied in this work the relation that exists between the secondary structure of the glycans of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein and the fluorescence of the Trp residues of the protein. We calculated for that the efficiency of quenching and the radiative and non-radiative constants. Our results indicate that the glycans display a spatial structure that is modified upon asialylation. The asialylated conformation is closer to the protein matrix than the sialylated form, inducing by that a decrease in the fluorescence parameters of the Trp residues. In fact, the mean quantum yield of Trp residues in sialylated and asialylated alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein are 0.0645 and 0.0385, respectively. Analysis of the fluorescence emission of alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein as the result of two contributions (surface and hydrophobic domains) indicates that quantum yields of both classes of Trp residues are lower when the protein is in the asialylated form. Also, the mean fluorescence lifetime of Trp residues decreases from 2.285 ns in the sialylated protein to 1.948 ns in the asialylated one. The radiative rate constant k(r) of the Trp residues in the sialylated alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein is higher than that in the asialylated protein. Thus, the carbohydrate residues are closer to the Trp residues in the absence of sialic acid. The modification of the spatial conformation of the glycans upon asialylation is confirmed by the decrease of the fluorescence lifetimes of Calcofluor, a fluorophore that binds to the carbohydrate residues. Finally, thermal intensity quenching of Calcofluor bound to alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein shows that the carbohydrate residues have slower residual motions in the absence of sialic acid residues.

  12. Linkage of a membrane skeleton to integral membrane glycoproteins in human platelets. Identification of one of the glycoproteins as glycoprotein Ib.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, J E

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether platelets contain a membrane skeleton. Platelets were labeled by a sodium periodate/sodium [3H]borohydride method and lysed with Triton X-100. Much of the filamentous actin could be sedimented at low g forces (15,600 g, 4 min), but some of the actin filaments required high-speed centrifugation for their sedimentation (100,000 g, 3 h). The latter filaments differed from those in the low-speed pellet in that they could not be depolymerized by Ca2+ and could not be sedimented at low g forces even from Triton X-100 lysates of platelets that had been activated with thrombin. Actin-binding protein sedimented with both types of filaments, but 3H-labeled membrane glycoproteins were recovered mainly with the high-speed filaments. The primary 3H-labeled glycoprotein recovered with this "membrane skeleton" was glycoprotein (GP) Ib. Approximately 70% of the platelet GP Ib was present in this skeleton. Several other minor glycoproteins, including greater than 50% of the GP Ia and small amounts of three unidentified glycoproteins of Mr greater than 200,000, were also recovered with the membrane skeleton. The Triton X-100 insolubility of GP Ib, GP Ia, a minor membrane glycoprotein of 250,000 Mr, and actin-binding protein resulted from their association with actin filaments as they were rendered Triton X-100-soluble when actin filaments were depolymerized with deoxyribonuclease I and co-isolated with actin filaments on sucrose gradients. When isolated platelet plasma membranes were extracted with Triton X-100, actin, actin-binding protein, and GP Ib were recovered as the Triton X-100 residue. These studies show that unstimulated platelets contain a membrane skeleton composed of actin filaments and actin-binding protein that is distinct from the rest of the cytoskeleton and is attached to GP Ib, GP Ia, and a minor glycoprotein of 250,000 Mr on the plasma membrane. Images PMID:2932470

  13. Glycoprotein labeling with click chemistry (GLCC) and carbohydrate detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhengliang L; Huang, Xinyi; Burton, Andrew J; Swift, Karl A D

    2015-08-14

    Molecular labeling and detection techniques are essential to research in life science. Here, a method for glycoprotein labeling/carbohydrate detection through glycan replacement, termed glycoprotein labeling with click chemistry (GLCC), is described. In this method, a glycoprotein is first treated with specific glycosidases to remove certain sugar residues, a procedure that creates acceptor sites for a specific glycosyltransferase. A 'clickable' monosaccharide is then installed onto these sites by the glycosyltransferase. This modified glycoprotein is then conjugated to a reporter molecule using a click chemistry reaction. For glycoproteins that already contain vacant glycosylation sites, deglycosylation is not needed before the labeling step. As a demonstration, labeling on fetal bovine fetuin, mouse immunoglobulin IgG and bacterial expressed human TNFα and TNFβ are shown. Compared to traditional ways of protein labeling, labeling at glycosylation sites with GLCC is considerably more specific and less likely to have adverse effects, and, when utilized as a method for carbohydrate detection, this method is also highly specific and sensitive.

  14. Intracellular processing of the Newcastle disease virus fusion glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, T.; Ward, L.J.; Semerjian, A.

    1985-03-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (Fo) of Newcastle disease virus is cleaved at an intracellular site into F1 and F2. This result was confirmed by comparing the transit time of the fusion protein to the cell surface with the time course of cleavage of Fo. The time required for cleavage of half of the pulse-labeled Fo protein is ca. 40 min faster than the half time of the transit of the fusion protein to the cell surface. To determine the cell compartment in which cleavage occurs, use was made of inhibitors which block glycoprotein migration at specific points and posttranslational modifications known to occur in specific cell membranes. Cleavage of Fo is inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; thus, cleavage does not occur in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Monensin blocks the incorporation of Newcastle disease virus glycoproteins into virions and blocks the cleavage of the fusion glycoprotein. However, Fo cannot be radioactively labeled with (/sup 3/H) fucose, whereas F1 is readily labeled. These results argue that cleavage occurs in the trans Golgi membranes or in a cell compartment occupied by glycoproteins quite soon after their transit through the trans Golgi membranes. The implications of the results presented for the transit times of the fusion protein between subcellular organelles are discussed.

  15. Glycoprotein isolated from Rhus verniciflua Stokes inhibits inflammation-related protein and nitric oxide production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Lee, Sei-Jung; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2007-01-01

    Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS) has traditionally been used for medical purpose, such as healing of inflammatory diseases in South Korea. Glycoprotein (36 kDa) was isolated from RVS fruit, purified and used to evaluate the inhibitory effect on inflammatory-related proteins and nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 200 ng/ml)-stimulated RAW 264.7 (murine macrophage cell line). Our results were showed that RVS glycoprotein has a strong antioxidative activity against lipid peroxyl radicals in cell-free system, and inhibits NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. To elucidate the inhibitory effect of RVS glycoprotein on activities of inflammatory-related proteins, we firstly evaluated the amount of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and expression of intracellular protein kinase C (PKC), nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB, and activator protein-1 (AP-1). The results in the present study showed that RVS glycoprotein (200 microg/ml) inhibits ROS production and PKCalpha translocation, and down-regulates the expression of NF-kappaB and AP-1. Such upstream signals consequently inhibited the levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression. Therefore, we speculate that RVS glycoprotein inhibits the inflammatory-related protein and can act as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  16. Human platelet glycoprotein Ia. One component is only expressed on the surface of activated platelets and may be a granule constituent

    SciTech Connect

    Bienz, D.; Clemetson, K.J.

    1989-01-05

    Glycoprotein Ia (GP Ia) is a relatively minor component of human blood platelets thought to be a receptor involved in collagen-induced platelet activation. However, some difficulties exist with the definition of this glycoprotein. The expression of GP Ia on resting (prostacyclin analogue-treated) and thrombin-activated platelets was compared by surface labeling with /sup 125/I-lactoperoxidase. Intact platelets or platelets solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate were labeled with periodate/(/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/. Analysis on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels showed that GP Ia is very poorly labeled in resting platelets. After activation a new spot (GP Ia*) appears with the same relative molecular mass as GP Ia under reducing conditions. GP Ia and Ia* can be clearly separated by two-dimensional nonreduced/reduced gel electrophoresis. Therefore, two glycoproteins which have been termed GP Ia exist in platelets with similar molecular weight and pI under reducing conditions. One of these (GP Ia*) is only surface-labeled when platelets are activated, indicating that it is only exposed on the surface of activated platelets. Supernatant from activated platelets contains this glycoprotein as well as other granule components. This glycoprotein is missing in platelets from two patients with collagen-response defects.

  17. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqian; Cabrera, Robert M; Li, Yue; Miller, David S; Finnell, Richard H

    2013-03-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with many adverse clinical manifestations. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by brain capillary endothelial cells, protects the brain from exposure to neurotoxicants. The function of BBB is modulated by multiple ABC transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein. A proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT)-deficient mouse has been previously described as a model for systemic folate deficiency. Herein, we demonstrate that exposing mouse brain capillaries to the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid (VPA; 5 μM), significantly increased P-glycoprotein transport function in the wild-type animals. A ligand to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), produced a similar induction of P-glycoprotein, which tightened the BBB, thereby increasing the neuroprotection. However, VPA- or TCDD-induced P-glycoprotein transport was blocked in the PCFT-nullizygous mice, indicating that multiple neuroprotective mechanisms are compromised under folate-deficient conditions. Brain capillaries from S-folinic acid (SFA; 40 mg/kg)-treated PCFT-nullizygous mice exhibited increased P-glycoprotein transport following VPA exposure. This suggests that SFA supplementation restored the normal BBB function. In addition, we show that tight-junction proteins are disintegrated in the PCFT mutant mice. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that folate deficiency disrupts the BBB function by targeting the transporter and tight junctions, which may contribute to the development of neurological disorders.

  18. Activating PKC-β1 at the blood-brain barrier reverses induction of P-glycoprotein activity by dioxin and restores drug delivery to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqian; Hawkins, Brian T; Miller, David S

    2011-06-01

    Upregulation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) P-glycoprotein expression causes central nervous system (CNS) pharmacoresistance. However, activation of BBB protein kinase C-β1 (PKC-β1) rapidly reduces basal P-glycoprotein transport activity. We tested whether PKC-β1 activation would reverse CNS drug resistance caused by dioxin acting through aryl hydrocarbon receptor. A selective PKC-β1 agonist abolished the increase in P-glycoprotein activity induced by dioxin in isolated rat brain capillaries and reversed the effect of dioxin on brain uptake of verapamil in dioxin-dosed rats. Thus, targeting BBB PKC-β1 may be an effective strategy to improve drug delivery to the brain, even in drug-resistant individuals.

  19. Emerging Technologies for Making Glycan-Defined Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lai-Xi; Lomino, Joseph V.

    2011-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is a common and complex posttranslational modification of proteins, which expands functional diversity while boosting structural heterogeneity. Glycoproteins, the end products of such a modification, are typically produced as mixtures of glycoforms possessing the same polypeptide backbone but differ in the site of glycosylation and/or in the structures of pendant glycans, from which single glycoforms are difficult to isolate. The urgent need for glycan-defined glycoproteins in both detailed structure-function relationship studies and therapeutic applications has stimulated an extensive interest in developing various methods for manipulating protein glycosylation. This review highlights emerging technologies that hold great promise in making a variety of glycan-defined glycoproteins, with a particular emphasis in the following three areas: specific glycoengineering of host biosynthetic pathways, in vitro chemoenzymatic glycosylation remodeling, and chemo-selective and site-specific glycosylation of proteins. PMID:22141574

  20. Retroviral env glycoprotein trafficking and incorporation into virions.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Together with the Gag protein, the Env glycoprotein is a major retroviral structural protein and is essential for forming infectious virus particles. Env is synthesized, processed, and transported to certain microdomains at the plasma membrane and takes advantage of the same host machinery for its trafficking as that used by cellular glycoproteins. Incorporation of Env into progeny virions is probably mediated by the interaction between Env and Gag, in some cases with the additional involvement of certain host factors. Although several general models have been proposed to explain the incorporation of retroviral Env glycoproteins into virions, the actual mechanism for this process is still unclear, partly because structural data on the Env protein cytoplasmic tail is lacking. This paper presents the current understanding of the synthesis, trafficking, and virion incorporation of retroviral Env proteins.

  1. "Clickable" affinity ligands for effective separation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Suksrichavalit, Thummaruk; Yoshimatsu, Keiichi; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Bülow, Leif; Ye, Lei

    2010-06-04

    In this paper, we present a new modular approach to immobilize boronic acid ligands that can offer effective separation of glycoproteins. A new "clickable" boronic acid ligand was synthesized by introducing a terminal acetylene group into commercially available 3-aminophenyl boronic acid. The clickable ligand, 3-(prop-2-ynyloxycarbonylamino)phenylboronic acid (2) could be easily coupled to azide-functionalized hydrophilic Sepharose using Cu(I)-catalyzed 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction under mild condition. Compared to other boronic acid affinity gels, the new affinity gel displayed superior effectiveness in separating model glycoproteins (ovalbumin and RNase B) from closely related bovine serum albumin and RNase A in the presence of crude Escherichia coli proteins. Because of the simplicity of the immobilization through "click chemistry", the new ligand 2 is expected to not only offer improved glycoprotein separation in other formats, but also act as a useful building block to develop new chemical sensors for analysis of other glycan compounds.

  2. A model of the rabies virus glycoprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Neri, P; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Spreafico, A; Niccolai, N

    1993-06-01

    The glycoprotein from the neurotropic rabies virus shows a significant homology with the alpha neurotoxin that binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The crystal structure of the alpha neurotoxins suggests that the Arg 37 guanidinium group and the Asp 31 side-chain carboxylate of the erabutoxin have stereochemical features resembling those of acetylcholine. Conformational studies on the Asn194-Ser195-Arg196-Gly197 tetrapeptide, an essential part of the binding site of the rabies virus glycoprotein, indicate that the side chains of Asn and Arg could also mimic the acetylcholine structure. This observation is consistent with the recently proposed mechanism of the viral infection.

  3. Reversers of the multidrug resistance transporter P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Stein, Wilfred D

    2002-05-01

    Multidrug resistance can arise from the presence of the membrane-bound pump, P-glycoprotein, in a tumor. Major efforts have been made to develop inhibitors of this pump, and a number of promising blockers have reached late stages of clinical trials. The kinetics of the inhibition of P-glycoprotein is complex, with binding sites that can interact synergistically. Reversers of increased affinity and specificity could, in principle, be developed on the basis of these synergies, and offer some promise in cancer therapeutics.

  4. 21 CFR 866.5440 - Beta-2-glycoprotein III immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the beta-2-glycoprotein III (a serum protein) in serum and other body fluids. Measurement of beta-2-glycoprotein III aids in the diagnosis of an inherited deficiency of this serum protein and a variety of...

  5. Localization and synthesis of an antigenic determinant of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein D that stimulates the production of neutralizing antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, G.H.; Dietzschold, B.; Ponce de Leon, M.; Long, D.; Golub, E.; Varrichio, A.; Pereira, L.; Eisenberg, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    An antigenic determinant capable of inducing type-common herpes simplex virus (HSV)-neutralizing antibodies has been located on glycoprotein D (gD) of HSV type 1 (HSV-1). A peptide of 16 amino acids corresponding to residues 8 to 23 of the mature glycoprotein (residues 33 to 48 of the predicted gD-1 sequence) was synthesized. This peptide reacted with an anti-gD monoclonal antibody (group VII) previously shown to neutralize the infectivity of HSV-1 and HSV-2. The peptide was also recognized by polyclonal antibodies prepared against purified gD-1 but was less reactive with anti-gD2 sera. Sera from animals immunized with the synthetic peptide reacted with native gD and neutralized both HSV-1 and HSV-2.

  6. The Ebola virus glycoprotein mediates entry via a non-classical dynamin-dependent macropinocytic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Mulherkar, Nirupama; Raaben, Matthijs; Torre, Juan Carlos de la; Whelan, Sean P.; Chandran, Kartik

    2011-10-25

    Ebola virus (EBOV) has been reported to enter cultured cell lines via a dynamin-2-independent macropinocytic pathway or clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The route(s) of productive EBOV internalization into physiologically relevant cell types remain unexplored, and viral-host requirements for this process are incompletely understood. Here, we use electron microscopy and complementary chemical and genetic approaches to demonstrate that the viral glycoprotein, GP, induces macropinocytic uptake of viral particles into cells. GP's highly-glycosylated mucin domain is dispensable for virus-induced macropinocytosis, arguing that interactions between other sequences in GP and the host cell surface are responsible. Unexpectedly, we also found a requirement for the large GTPase dynamin-2, which is proposed to be dispensable for several types of macropinocytosis. Our results provide evidence that EBOV uses an atypical dynamin-dependent macropinocytosis-like entry pathway to enter Vero cells, adherent human peripheral blood-derived monocytes, and a mouse dendritic cell line.

  7. The chaotrope-soluble glycoprotein GP1 is a constituent of the insoluble glycoprotein framework of the Chlamydomonas cell wall.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Jürgen; Frank, Ronald; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2009-02-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii wild-type cells are surrounded by the insoluble cell wall component, a sac-like framework of cross-linked glycoproteins containing 22% hydroxyproline. The chaotrope-soluble cell wall glycoprotein GP1 is the only polypeptide with an even higher proportion of hydroxyproline (35%) occurring in vegetative C. reinhardtii cells. Mass spectrometric analyses of peptides released from the purified insoluble cell wall fraction by trypsin treatment and epitope analyses of polyclonal antibodies raised against different deglycosylation products of this particular wall fraction using 181 chemically synthesized GP1-derived pentadecapeptides revealed evidence that GP1 is indeed a constituent of the insoluble wall component.

  8. Foreign Glycoproteins Can Be Actively Recruited to Virus Assembly Sites during Pseudotyping▿

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Rebecca L.; Vogt, Volker M.; Johnson, Marc C.

    2009-01-01

    Retroviruses like human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), as well as many other enveloped viruses, can efficiently produce infectious virus in the absence of their own surface glycoprotein if a suitable glycoprotein from a foreign virus is expressed in the same cell. This process of complementation, known as pseudotyping, often can occur even when the glycoprotein is from an unrelated virus. Although pseudotyping is widely used for engineering chimeric viruses, it has remained unknown whether a virus can actively recruit foreign glycoproteins to budding sites or, alternatively, if a virus obtains the glycoproteins through a passive mechanism. We have studied the specificity of glycoprotein recruitment by immunogold labeling viral glycoproteins and imaging their distribution on the host plasma membrane using scanning electron microscopy. Expressed alone, all tested viral glycoproteins were relatively randomly distributed on the plasma membrane. However, in the presence of budding HIV-1 or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) particles, some glycoproteins, such as those encoded by murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, were dramatically redistributed to viral budding sites. In contrast, the RSV Env glycoprotein was robustly recruited only to the homologous RSV budding sites. These data demonstrate that viral glycoproteins are not in preformed membrane patches prior to viral assembly but rather that glycoproteins are actively recruited to certain viral assembly sites. PMID:19224995

  9. Interaction of forskolin with the P-glycoprotein multidrug transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Ming s, D.I.; Seamon, K.B. ); Speicher, L.A.; Tew, K.D. ); Ruoho, A.E. )

    1991-08-27

    Forskolin and 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, an analogue that does not activate adenylyl cyclase, were tested for their ability to enhance the cytotoxic effects of adriamycin in human ovarian carcinoma cells, SKOV3, which are sensitive to adriamycin and express low levels of P-glycoprotein, and a variant cell line, SKVLB, which overexpresses the P-glycoprotein and has the multidrug reing ance (MDR) phenotype. Forskolin and 1,9-dideoxyforskolin both increased the cytotoxic effects of adriamycin in SKVLB cells, yet had no effect on SKOV3 cells. Two photoactive derivatives of forskolin have been synthesized, 7-O-((2-(3-(4-azido-3-({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)propionamido)ethyl)carbamyl)forskolin, {sup 125}I-6-AIPP-Fsk, and 6-O-((2-(3-(4-azido-3-({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)propionamido)ethyl)carbamyl)forskolin, {sup 125}I-6-AIPP-Fsk, which exhibit specificity for labeling the glucose transporter and aing lyl cyclase, respectively. Both photolabels identified a 140-kDa protein in membranes from SKVLB cells whose labeling was inhibited by forskolin and 1,9-dideoxyforskolin. The data are consistent with forskolin binding to the P-glycoprotein analogous to that of other chemosensitizing drugs that have been shown to partially reverse MDR. The ability of forskolin photolabels to specifically label the transporter, the adenylyl cyclase, and the P-glycoprotein suggests that these proteins may share a common biing g domain for forskolin analogues.

  10. Glycoprotein expression by adenomatous polyps of the colon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roney, Celeste A.; Xie, Jianwu; Xu, Biying; Jabour, Paul; Griffiths, Gary; Summers, Ronald M.

    2008-03-01

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. Specificity in diagnostic imaging for detecting colorectal adenomas, which have a propensity towards malignancy, is desired. Adenomatous polyp specimens of the colon were obtained from the mouse model of colorectal cancer called adenomatous polyposis coli-multiple intestinal neoplasia (APC Min). Histological evaluation, by the legume protein Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-1), determined expression of the glycoprotein α-L-fucose. FITC-labelled UEA-1 confirmed overexpression of the glycoprotein by the polyps on fluorescence microscopy in 17/17 cases, of which 13/17 included paraffin-fixed mouse polyp specimens. In addition, FITC-UEA-1 ex vivo multispectral optical imaging of 4/17 colonic specimens displayed over-expression of the glycoprotein by the polyps, as compared to non-neoplastic mucosa. Here, we report the surface expression of α-L-fucosyl terminal residues by neoplastic mucosal cells of APC specimens of the mouse. Glycoprotein expression was validated by the carbohydrate binding protein UEA-1. Future applications of this method are the development of agents used to diagnose cancers by biomedical imaging modalities, including computed tomographic colonography (CTC). UEA-1 targeting to colonic adenomas may provide a new avenue for the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma by CT imaging.

  11. Glycoprotein secretion in a tracheal organ culture system

    SciTech Connect

    Warunek, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    Glycoprotein secretion in the rat trachea was studied in vitro, utilizing a modified, matrix embed/perfusion chamber. Baseline parameters of the culture environment were determined by enzymatic and biochemical procedures. The effect of pilocarpine on the release of labelled glycoproteins from the tracheal epithelium was assessed. After a single stimulation with the drug, there was a significant increase in the release of /sup 14/C-glucosamine and /sup 3/H-fucose-labelled glycoprotein. The response was dose-dependent. Similar results were obtained after a second exposure to pilocarpine. However, no dose response was observed. Morphological analyses of the tracheal epithelial secretory cells by Alcian Blue/Periodic Acid Schiff staining showed a significant decrease in the total number of Alcian Blue staining cells and an increase in the mixed cell population after a single exposure to pilocarpine. Second stimulation with the drug showed that the trachea was able to respond again, this time with a further decrease in the number of Alcian Blue staining cells and a decrease in the PAS staining cells as well. Carbohydrate analyses after the first simulation with pilocarpine showed increased levels of N-acetyl neuraminic acid and the neutral carbohydrates, fucose and galactose, in the precipitated glycoproteins.

  12. NEW CLINICALLY SIGNIFICANT METHOD OF DETERMINING GLYCOPROTEINS IN BLOOD SERUM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The reaction with ammonium molybdate is a simple and at the same time a very sensitive method for determining the level of glycoproteins in the blood ... serum , which has a number of advantages over the diphehylamine reaction. The reaction with ammonium molybdate is a valuable supplementary test for

  13. QUANTITATIVE MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF GLYCOPROTEINS COMBINED WITH ENRICHMENT METHODS

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec Rev 34:148–165, 2015. PMID:24889823

  14. Glycoproteins identified from heart failure and treatment models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Chen, Lijun; Sun, Shisheng; Shah, Punit; Yang, Weiming; Zhang, Bai; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W; Kass, David A; van Eyk, Jennifer E; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Conduction abnormalities can lead to dyssynchronous contraction, which significantly worsens morbidity and mortality of heart failure. Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can reverse ventricular remodeling and improve cardiac function. Although the underlying molecular changes are unknown, the use of a canine model of dyssynchronous heart failure (DHF) and CRT has shown that there are global changes across the cardiac proteome. This study determines changes in serum glycoprotein concentration from DHF and CRT compared to normal. We hypothesize that CRT invokes protective or advantageous pathways that can be reflected in the circulating proteome. Two prong discovery approaches were carried out on pooled normal, DHF, and CRT samples composed of individual canine serum to determine the overall protein concentration and the N-linked glycosites of circulating glycoproteins. The level of the glycoproteins was altered in DHF and CRT compared to control sera, with 63 glycopeptides substantially increased in DHF and/or CRT. Among the 32 elevated glycosite-containing peptides in DHF, 13 glycopeptides were reverted to normal level after CRT therapy. We further verify the changes of glycopeptides using label-free LC-MS from individual canine serum. Circulating glycoproteins such as alpha-fetoprotein, alpha-2-macroglobulin, galectin-3-binding protein, and collectin-10 show association to failing heart and CRT treatment model.

  15. Inflammatory glycoproteins in cardiometabolic disorders, autoimmune diseases and cancer.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Margery A; Gruppen, Eke G; Otvos, James D; Dullaart, Robin P F

    2016-08-01

    The physiological function initially attributed to the oligosaccharide moieties or glycans on inflammatory glycoproteins was to improve protein stability. However, it is now clear that glycans play a prominent role in glycoprotein structure and function and in some cases contribute to disease states. In fact, glycan processing contributes to pathogenicity not only in autoimmune disorders but also in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes and malignancy. While most clinical laboratory tests measure circulating levels of inflammatory proteins, newly developed diagnostic and prognostic tests are harvesting the information that can be gleaned by measuring the amount or structure of the attached glycans, which may be unique to individuals as well as various diseases. As such, these newer glycan-based tests may provide future means for more personalized approaches to patient stratification and improved patient care. Here we will discuss recent progress in high-throughput laboratory methods for glycomics (i.e. the study of glycan structures) and glycoprotein quantification by methods such as mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. We will also review the clinical utility of glycoprotein and glycan measurements in the prediction of common low-grade inflammatory disorders including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and cancer, as well as for monitoring autoimmune disease activity.

  16. Synthesis of cell envelope glycoproteins of Cryptococcus laurentii

    PubMed Central

    Schutzbach, John; Ankel, Helmut; Brockhausen, Inka

    2007-01-01

    Fungi of the genus Cryptococcus are encapsulated basidiomycetes that are ubiquitously found in the environment. These organisms infect both lower and higher animals. Human infections that are common in immune-compromised individuals have proven difficult to cure or even control with currently available antimycotics that are quite often toxic to the host. The virulence of Cryptococcus has been linked primarily to its polysaccharide capsule, but also to cell-bound glycoproteins. In this review we show that C. laurentii is an excellent model for studies of polysaccharide and glycoprotein synthesis in the pathogenic relative C. neoformans. In particular we will discuss the structure and biosynthesis of O-linked carbohydrates on cell envelope glycoproteins of C. laurentii. These O-linked structures are synthesized by at least four mannosyltransferases, two galactosyltransferases and at least one xylosyltransferase that have been characterized. These glycosyltransferases have no known homologues in human tissues. Therefore enzymes involved in the synthesis of cryptococcal glycoproteins, as well as related enzymes involved in capsule synthesis, are potential targets for the development of specific inhibitors for treatment of cryptococcal disease. PMID:17316583

  17. Characterization and mapping of a nonessential pseudorabies virus glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Wathen, M.W.; Wathen, L.M.K.

    1986-04-01

    Antigenic variants of pseudorabies virus (PRV) containing mutations in a viral glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 82,000 (gIII) were isolated by selecting for resistance to a complement-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MCA82-2) directed against gIII. These mutants were completely resistant to neutralization with MCA82-2 in the presence of complement. Two mutants selected for further studies either did not express gIII or expressed an improperly processed form of the glycoproteins. The mutations were also associated with an altered plaque morphology (syncytium formation). The gIII gene was mapped by the marker rescue of a gIII/sup -/ mutant with cloned restriction enzyme fragments to the long unique region of the PRV genome between 0.376 and 0.383 map units. This corresponds to the map location of a glycoprotein described by Robbins et al. Since gIII is nonessential for viral replication in cell culture and has several other characteristics in common with the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC, gIII may represent the PRV equivalent to herpes simplex virus gC.

  18. The Role of Phlebovirus Glycoproteins in Viral Entry, Assembly and Release

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Martin; Plegge, Teresa; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are enveloped viruses with a tripartite RNA genome that can pose a serious threat to animal and human health. Members of the Phlebovirus genus of the family Bunyaviridae are transmitted by mosquitos and ticks to humans and include highly pathogenic agents like Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) as well as viruses that do not cause disease in humans, like Uukuniemi virus (UUKV). Phleboviruses and other bunyaviruses use their envelope proteins, Gn and Gc, for entry into target cells and for assembly of progeny particles in infected cells. Thus, binding of Gn and Gc to cell surface factors promotes viral attachment and uptake into cells and exposure to endosomal low pH induces Gc-driven fusion of the viral and the vesicle membranes. Moreover, Gn and Gc facilitate virion incorporation of the viral genome via their intracellular domains and Gn and Gc interactions allow the formation of a highly ordered glycoprotein lattice on the virion surface. Studies conducted in the last decade provided important insights into the configuration of phlebovirus Gn and Gc proteins in the viral membrane, the cellular factors used by phleboviruses for entry and the mechanisms employed by phlebovirus Gc proteins for membrane fusion. Here, we will review our knowledge on the glycoprotein biogenesis and the role of Gn and Gc proteins in the phlebovirus replication cycle. PMID:27455305

  19. Pseudorabies virus glycoproteins gII and gp50 are essential for virus penetration.

    PubMed Central

    Rauh, I; Mettenleiter, T C

    1991-01-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PrV) glycoproteins gII and gp50 are major constituents of the viral envelope and targets of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. Both are homologs of essential glycoproteins found in herpes simplex virus, gB (gII) and gD (gp50). We recently isolated a gII-negative PrV deletion mutant on complementing cell lines and established the essential character of gII for PrV replication (I. Rauh, F. Weiland, F. Fehler, G. Keil, and T.C. Mettenleiter, J. Virol. 65: 621-631, 1991). In this report, we describe the isolation of a gp50-negative PrV mutant after constructing cell lines that constitutively express gp50 and phenotypically complement the gp50 defect. Analysis of the gp50- mutant proved that gp50 is essential for PrV replication. Further studies showed that both gII and gp50 are required for viral penetration into target cells. The penetration defect in the gII and gp50 deletion mutants could be overcome by experimental polyethylene glycol-induced membrane fusion. Surprisingly, whereas gII proved to be essential for both penetration and cell-cell spread of the virus, gp50 was required only for penetration and appeared dispensable for direct cell-cell spread. Images PMID:1654444

  20. Stoichiometry of Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers in the Entry of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinzhen; Kurteva, Svetla; Ren, Xinping; Lee, Sandra; Sodroski, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Envs) function as a trimer, mediating virus entry by promoting the fusion of the viral and target cell membranes. HIV-1 Env trimers induce membrane fusion through a pH-independent pathway driven by the interaction between an Env trimer and its cellular receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4. We studied viruses with mixed heterotrimers of wild-type and dominant-negative Envs to determine the number (T) of Env trimers required for HIV-1 entry. To our surprise, we found that a single Env trimer is capable of supporting HIV-1 entry; i.e., T = 1. A similar approach was applied to investigate the entry stoichiometry of envelope glycoproteins from amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV), avian sarcoma/leukosis virus type A (ASLV-A), and influenza A virus. When pseudotyped on HIV-1 virions, the A-MLV and ASLV-A Envs also exhibit a T = 1 entry stoichiometry. In contrast, eight to nine influenza A virus hemagglutinin trimers function cooperatively to achieve membrane fusion and virus entry, using a pH-dependent pathway. The different entry requirements for cooperativity among Env trimers for retroviruses and influenza A virus may influence viral strategies for replication and evasion of the immune system. PMID:16160141

  1. Prediction and identification of mouse cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in Ebola virus glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ebola viruses (EBOVs) cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate. At present, there are no licensed vaccines or efficient therapies to combat EBOV infection. Previous studies have shown that both humoral and cellular immune responses are crucial for controlling Ebola infection. CD8+ T cells play an important role in mediating vaccine-induced protective immunity. The objective of this study was to identify H-2d-specific T cell epitopes in EBOV glycoproteins (GPs). Results Computer-assisted algorithms were used to predict H-2d-specific T cell epitopes in two species of EBOV (Sudan and Zaire) GP. The predicted peptides were synthesized and identified in BALB/c mice immunized with replication-deficient adenovirus vectors expressing the EBOV GP. Enzyme-linked immunospot assays and intracellular cytokine staining showed that the peptides RPHTPQFLF (Sudan EBOV), GPCAGDFAF and LYDRLASTV (Zaire EBOV) could stimulate splenoctyes in immunized mice to produce large amounts of interferon-gamma. Conclusion Three peptides within the GPs of two EBOV strains were identified as T cell epitopes. The identification of these epitopes should facilitate the evaluation of vaccines based on the Ebola virus glycoprotein in a BALB/c mouse model. PMID:22695180

  2. Immunogenicity and functional characterization of Leishmania-derived hepatitis C virus envelope glycoprotein complex

    PubMed Central

    Grzyb, Katarzyna; Czarnota, Anna; Brzozowska, Agnieszka; Cieślik, Anna; Rąbalski, Łukasz; Tyborowska, Jolanta; Bieńkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 are the main inducers of a cross-neutralizing antibody response which plays an important role in the early phase of viral infection. Correctly folded and immunologically active E1E2 complex can be expressed in mammalian cells, though the production process might still prove restrictive, even if the immunological response of a vaccine candidate is positive. Here, we report a characterization and immunogenicity study of a full-length (fE1E2) and soluble version of the E1E2 complex (tE1E2) from genotype 1a, successfully expressed in the cells of Leishmania tarentolae. In a functional study, we confirmed the binding of both Leishmania-derived E1E2 complexes to the CD-81 receptor and the presence of the major epitopes participating in a neutralizing antibody response. Both complexes were proved to be highly immunogenic in mice and elicited neutralizing antibody response. Moreover, cross-reactivity of the mouse sera was detected for all tested HCV genotypes with the highest signal intensity observed for genotypes 1a, 1b, 5 and 6. Since the development of a prophylactic vaccine against HCV is still needed to control the global infection, our Leishmania-derived E1E2 glycoproteins could be considered a potential cost-effective vaccine candidate. PMID:27481352

  3. A new Ebola virus nonstructural glycoprotein expressed through RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Mehedi, Masfique; Falzarano, Darryl; Seebach, Jochen; Hu, Xiaojie; Carpenter, Michael S; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-06-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), an enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. The EBOV glycoprotein (GP) gene encodes the nonstructural soluble glycoprotein (sGP) but also produces the transmembrane glycoprotein (GP₁,₂) through transcriptional editing. A third GP gene product, a small soluble glycoprotein (ssGP), has long been postulated to be produced also as a result of transcriptional editing. To identify and characterize the expression of this new EBOV protein, we first analyzed the relative ratio of GP gene-derived transcripts produced during infection in vitro (in Vero E6 cells or Huh7 cells) and in vivo (in mice). The average percentages of transcripts encoding sGP, GP₁,₂, and ssGP were approximately 70, 25, and 5%, respectively, indicating that ssGP transcripts are indeed produced via transcriptional editing. N-terminal sequence similarity with sGP, the absence of distinguishing antibodies, and the abundance of sGP made it difficult to identify ssGP through conventional methodology. Optimized 2-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis analyses finally verified the expression and secretion of ssGP in tissue culture during EBOV infection. Biochemical analysis of recombinant ssGP characterized this protein as a disulfide-linked homodimer that was exclusively N glycosylated. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized a new EBOV nonstructural glycoprotein, which is expressed as a result of transcriptional editing of the GP gene. While ssGP appears to share similar structural properties with sGP, it does not appear to have the same anti-inflammatory function on endothelial cells as sGP.

  4. Development of glycoprotein capture-based label-free method for the high-throughput screening of differential glycoproteins in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Tan, Yexiong; Wang, Min; Wang, Fangjun; Yao, Zhenzhen; Dong, Liwei; Ye, Mingliang; Wang, Hongyang; Zou, Hanfa

    2011-07-01

    A robust, reproducible, and high throughput method was developed for the relative quantitative analysis of glycoprotein abundances in human serum. Instead of quantifying glycoproteins by glycopeptides in conventional quantitative glycoproteomics, glycoproteins were quantified by nonglycosylated peptides derived from the glycoprotein digest, which consists of the capture of glycoproteins in serum samples and the release of nonglycopeptides by trypsin digestion of captured glycoproteins followed by two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem MS analysis of released peptides. Protein quantification was achieved by comparing the spectrum counts of identified nonglycosylated peptides of glycoproteins between different samples. This method was demonstrated to have almost the same specificity and sensitivity in glycoproteins quantification as capture at glycopeptides level. The differential abundance of proteins present at as low as nanogram per milliliter levels was quantified with high confidence. The established method was applied to the analysis of human serum samples from healthy people and patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to screen differential glycoproteins in HCC. Thirty eight glycoproteins were found with substantial concentration changes between normal and HCC serum samples, including α-fetoprotein, the only clinically used marker for HCC diagnosis. The abundance changes of three glycoproteins, i.e. galectin-3 binding protein, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3, and thrombospondin 1, which were associated with the development of HCC, were further confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In conclusion, the developed method was an effective approach to quantitatively analyze glycoproteins in human serum and could be further applied in the biomarker discovery for HCC and other cancers.

  5. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueqian; Cabrera, Robert M.; Li, Yue; Miller, David S.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with many adverse clinical manifestations. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by brain capillary endothelial cells, protects the brain from exposure to neurotoxicants. The function of BBB is modulated by multiple ABC transporters, particularly P-glycoprotein. A proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT)-deficient mouse has been previously described as a model for systemic folate deficiency. Herein, we demonstrate that exposing mouse brain capillaries to the antiepileptic drug, valproic acid (VPA; 5 μM), significantly increased P-glycoprotein transport function in the wild-type animals. A ligand to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), produced a similar induction of P-glycoprotein, which tightened the BBB, thereby increasing the neuroprotection. However, VPA- or TCDD-induced P-glycoprotein transport was blocked in the PCFT-nullizygous mice, indicating that multiple neuroprotective mechanisms are compromised under folate-deficient conditions. Brain capillaries from S-folinic acid (SFA; 40 mg/kg)-treated PCFT-nullizygous mice exhibited increased P-glycoprotein transport following VPA exposure. This suggests that SFA supplementation restored the normal BBB function. In addition, we show that tight-junction proteins are disintegrated in the PCFT mutant mice. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that folate deficiency disrupts the BBB function by targeting the transporter and tight junctions, which may contribute to the development of neurological disorders.—Wang, X., Cabrera, R. M., Li, Y., Miller, D. S., Finnell, R. H. Functional regulation of P-glycoprotein at the blood-brain barrier in proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) mutant mice. PMID:23212123

  6. Prestaining of glycoproteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels by dansylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhou, Xuan; Yu, Qing; Duan, Yuanmeng; Huang, Binbin; Hong, Guoying; Zhou, Ayi; Jin, Litai

    2014-06-01

    A new fluorescent prestaining method for gel-separated glycoproteins in 1D and 2D SDS-PAGE was developed by using dansylhydrazine in this study. The prestained gels could be easily imaged after electrophoresis without any time-consuming steps needed for poststains. As low as 4-8 ng glycoproteins (transferrin, α1-acid glycoprotein) could be selectively detected, which is comparable to that of Pro-Q Emerald 488, one of the most commonly used glycoprotein stain. In addition, a subsequent study of deglycosylation, glycoprotein affinity isolation, and LC-MS/MS analysis was performed to confirm the specificity of the newly developed method.

  7. Immunohistochemical detection of P-glycoprotein in endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    Axiotis, C. A.; Monteagudo, C.; Merino, M. J.; LaPorte, N.; Neumann, R. D.

    1991-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (Pgp) has emerged as the central mediator in classic multidrug resistance in model systems in vitro. High levels of Pgp also have been detected in many normal human tissues and tumors; and its role in clinical drug resistance is currently under investigation. Recently significant levels of Pgp were localized to gravid and secretory endometrium; and it was demonstrated that the combination of estrogen and progesterone is sufficient to induce high levels of both Pgp mRNA and Pgp in uterine secretory epithelium. These findings suggest that increased Pgp expression also may be present in hormone-responsive malignancies such as endometrial adenocarcinoma. To determine whether Pgp is expressed in endometrial adenocarcinoma, 36 endometrial adenocarcinomas (grade I [n = 17]; grade II [n = 6]; grade III [n = 13]) were investigated retrospectively by the avidin-biotin-complex immunohistochemical procedure using three murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb) MAb C219, MAb C494, and MAb JSB-1, which recognize spatially distinct cytoplasmic epitopes of Pgp. Seventy-two percent of the tumors showed positive immunostaining with at least one MAb; 67% showed immunostaining with MAb C219, 50% with MAb C494, and 62% with MAb JSB-1. Forty-six percent of tumors were immunoreactive to two and 29% to all three antibodies. Membranous and Golgi/paranuclear type staining patterns were observed. Overall the intensity of immunostaining varied from one sample to another for a given tumor type, and considerable heterogeneity of expression was commonly seen within a given tumor. Strong to moderate immunoreactivity was seen in diffusely infiltrating, adenosquamous, and serous papillary carcinomas. In general, immunoreactivity to MAb C494 was weaker than MAb C219 or MAb JSB-1. Adenomatous and non-neoplastic endometrium adjacent to the tumors displayed strong membranous immunostaining with MAb JSB-1. Endometrial capillaries showed weak-to-moderate immunostaining to all three antibodies. It

  8. Synthetic peptides of neurotoxins and rabies virus glycoprotein behave as antagonists in a functional assay for the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Donnelly-Roberts, D L; Lentz, T L

    1989-01-01

    Peptides of portions of loop 2 (the "toxic" loop) of snake venom curare-mimetic neurotoxins (alpha-bungarotoxin and king cobra toxin b) and of a structurally similar region of the rabies virus glycoprotein were synthesized. The effect of the peptides on carbachol-induced 22Na+ flux into BC3H-1 cells, which contain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on their surfaces, was measured. Both the neurotoxin and glycoprotein peptides inhibited ion transport with IC50 values of 10(-4) M to 7 x 10(-7) M. The most effective peptides correspond to neurotoxin loop 2 and inhibited 22Na+ flux in the micromolar range comparable to the competitive antagonist d-tubocurarine. These findings show that neurotoxin loop 2 and the corresponding rabies virus glycoprotein segment interact with the agonist binding site of teh acetylcholine receptor and that short synthetic peptides representing portions of larger molecules by themselves can exert a biological effect on a large macromolecular complex like the acetylcholine receptor.

  9. Expression of platelet membrane glycoproteins and alpha-granule proteins by a human erythroleukemia cell line (HEL).

    PubMed Central

    Tabilio, A; Rosa, J P; Testa, U; Kieffer, N; Nurden, A T; Del Canizo, M C; Breton-Gorius, J; Vainchenker, W

    1984-01-01

    We demonstrate that HEL, a human erythroleukemic cell line, has numerous megakaryocytic markers which were markedly enhanced following the addition of the inducers dimethyl sulfoxide or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate to the culture medium. Ultrastructural and cytochemical studies showed: (i) the presence of organelles morphologically resembling the platelet alpha-granules; and (ii) a peroxidase activity with the same characteristics as that specifically found in platelets. The platelet alpha-granule proteins (von Willebrand factor, platelet factor-4 and beta-thromboglobulin) were immunologically detected in the HEL cell cytoplasm and their amounts increased after induction. Of particular interest was the presence of platelet membrane proteins. A monoclonal antibody specific for glycoprotein Ib bound to HEL cells. Platelet membrane glycoproteins IIb and IIIa were identified on intact cells using specific antibodies in a binding assay or in cell lysates using either crossed immunoelectrophoresis or an immunoblotting procedure following SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Most HEL cells also expressed the platelet alloantigen PIA1. All of the platelet membrane proteins were present in higher amounts after induction. Glycophorin A, specific for the erythroid lineage, was also detected on HEL cells. Thus, while confirming the presence of erythroid markers, our studies provide evidence that the HEL cell line also expresses platelet antigens. As such, HEL cells represent a unique system with which to study the biosynthesis of platelet-specific proteins and glycoproteins. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:6201359

  10. Effect of collecting duct-specific deletion of both Rh B Glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhcg) on renal response to metabolic acidosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Verlander, Jill W; Handlogten, Mary E; Han, Ki-Hwan; Weiner, I David

    2014-02-15

    The Rhesus (Rh) glycoproteins, Rh B and Rh C Glycoprotein (Rhbg and Rhcg, respectively), are ammonia-specific transporters expressed in renal distal nephron and collecting duct sites that are necessary for normal rates of ammonia excretion. The purpose of the current studies was to determine the effect of their combined deletion from the renal collecting duct (CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO) on basal and acidosis-stimulated acid-base homeostasis. Under basal conditions, urine pH and ammonia excretion and serum HCO3(-) were similar in control (C) and CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice. After acid-loading for 7 days, CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice developed significantly more severe metabolic acidosis than did C mice. Acid loading increased ammonia excretion, but ammonia excretion increased more slowly in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO and it was significantly less than in C mice on days 1-5. Urine pH was significantly more acidic in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO mice on days 1, 3, and 5 of acid loading. Metabolic acidosis increased phosphenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE-3 and decreased glutamine synthetase (GS) expression in both genotypes, and these changes were significantly greater in CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO than in C mice. We conclude that 1) Rhbg and Rhcg are critically important in the renal response to metabolic acidosis; 2) the significantly greater changes in PEPCK, NHE-3, and GS expression in acid-loaded CD-Rhbg/Rhcg-KO compared with acid-loaded C mice cause the role of Rhbg and Rhcg to be underestimated quantitatively; and 3) in mice with intact Rhbg and Rhcg expression, metabolic acidosis does not induce maximal changes in PEPCK, NHE-3, and GS expression despite the presence of persistent metabolic acidosis.

  11. Contribution of mdr1b-type P-glycoprotein to okadaic acid resistance in rat pituitary GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Ritz, V; Marwitz, J; Sieder, S; Ziemann, C; Hirsch-Ernst, K I; Quentin, I; Steinfelder, H J

    1999-08-01

    Okadaic acid as well as other, structurally different, inhibitors of serine/threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A induce apoptosis in pituitary GH3 cells. Incubation with stepwise raised concentrations of okadaic acid resulted in the isolation of cells that were increasingly less sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of this agent. After about 18 months cells were selected that survived at 300 nM okadaic acid, which is about 30 times the initially lethal concentration. This study revealed that a major pharmacokinetic mechanism underlying cell survival was the development of a P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. The increase in mRNA levels of the mdr1b P-glycoprotein isoform correlated with the extent of drug resistance. Functional assays revealed that increasing drug resistance was paralleled by a decreased accumulation of rhodamine 123, a fluorescent dye which is a substrate of mdr1-mediated efflux activity. Resistance could be abolished by structurally different chemosensitizers of P-glycoprotein function like verapamil and reserpine but not by the leukotriene receptor antagonist MK571 which is a modulator of the multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP). Okadaic acid resistance included cross-resistance to other cytotoxic agents that are substrates of mdr1-type P-glycoproteins, like doxorubicin and actinomycin D, but not to non-substrates of mdr1, e.g. cytosine arabinoside. Thus, functional as well as biochemical features support the conclusion that okadaic acid is a substrate of the mdr1-mediated efflux activity in rat pituitary GH3 cells. Maintenance of resistance after withdrawal of okadaic acid as well as metaphase spreads of 100 nM okadaic acid-resistant cells suggested a stable MDR genotype without indications for the occurrence of extrachromosomal amplifications, e.g. double minute chromosomes.

  12. Synthesis of Glc1Man9-Glycoprotein Probes by a Misfolding/Enzymatic Glucosylation/Misfolding Sequence.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Masayuki; Oka, Yukiho; Okamoto, Ryo; Seko, Akira; Takeda, Yoichi; Ito, Yukishige; Kajihara, Yasuhiro

    2016-03-14

    Glycoproteins in non-native conformations are often toxic to cells and may cause diseases, thus the quality control (QC) system eliminates these unwanted species. Lectin chaperone calreticulin and glucosidase II, both of which recognize the Glc1 Man9 oligosaccharide on glycoproteins, are important components of the glycoprotein QC system. Reported herein is the preparation of Glc1 Man9 -glycoproteins in both native and non-native conformations by using the following sequence: misfolding of chemically synthesized Man9 -glycoprotein, enzymatic glucosylation, and another misfolding step. By using synthetic glycoprotein probes, calreticulin was found to bind preferentially to a hydrophobic non-native glycoprotein whereas glucosidase II activity was not affected by glycoprotein conformation. The results demonstrate the ability of chemical synthesis to deliver homogeneous glycoproteins in several non-native conformations for probing the glycoprotein QC system.

  13. Development of live-attenuated arenavirus vaccines based on codon deoptimization of the viral glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Benson Y H; Nogales, Aitor; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2017-01-15

    Several arenaviruses, chiefly Lassa (LASV) in West Africa, cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans and pose important public health problems in their endemic regions. To date, there are no FDA-approved arenavirus vaccines and current anti-arenaviral therapy is limited to the use of ribavirin that has very limited efficacy. In this work we document that a recombinant prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) with a codon deoptimized (CD) surface glycoprotein (GP), rLCMV/CD, exhibited wild type (WT)-like growth properties in cultured cells despite barely detectable GP expression levels in rLCMV/CD-infected cells. Importantly, rLCMV/CD was highly attenuated in vivo but able to induce complete protection against a subsequent lethal challenge with rLCMV/WT. Our findings support the feasibility of implementing an arenavirus GP CD-based approach for the development of safe and effective live-attenuated vaccines (LAVs) to combat diseases caused by human pathogenic arenaviruses.

  14. Membrane skeleton orchestrates the platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX complex clustering and signaling.

    PubMed

    Shang, Dan; Zhang, Zuping; Wang, Qian; Ran, Yali; Shaw, Tanner S; Van, John N; Peng, Yuandong

    2016-10-01

    Platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX complex is affixed to the membrane skeleton through interaction with actin binding protein 280 (ABP-280). We find that removal of the ABP-280 binding sites in GP Ibα cytoplasmic tail has little impact on the complex clustering induced by antibody crosslinking. However, large truncation of the GP Ibα cytoplasmic tail allows the formation of larger patches of the complex, suggesting that an ABP-280 independent force may exist. Besides, we observe that the signaling upon GP Ib-IX clustering is elicited in both membrane lipid domain dependent and independent manner, a choice that relies on how the membrane skeleton interacts with the complex. Our findings suggest a more complex mechanism for how the membrane skeleton regulates the GP Ib-IX function. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(10):823-829, 2016.

  15. Nonlinear Waves on Stochastic Support: Calcium Waves in Astrocyte Syncytia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, P.; Cornell-Bell, A. H.

    Astrocyte-signaling has been observed in cell cultures and brain slices in the form of Calcium waves. Their functional relevance for neuronal communication, brain functions and diseases is, however, not understood. In this paper, the propagation of intercellular calcium waves is modeled in terms of waves in excitable media on a stochastic support. We utilize a novel method to decompose the spatiotemporal patterns into space-time clusters (wave fragments). Based on this cluster decomposition, a statistical description of wave patterns is developed.

  16. Incorporation of Spike and Membrane Glycoproteins into Coronavirus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Ujike, Makoto; Taguchi, Fumihiro

    2015-01-01

    The envelopes of coronaviruses (CoVs) contain primarily three proteins; the two major glycoproteins spike (S) and membrane (M), and envelope (E), a non-glycosylated protein. Unlike other enveloped viruses, CoVs bud and assemble at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). For efficient virion assembly, these proteins must be targeted to the budding site and to interact with each other or the ribonucleoprotein. Thus, the efficient incorporation of viral envelope proteins into CoV virions depends on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions near the ERGIC. The goal of this review is to summarize recent findings on the mechanism of incorporation of the M and S glycoproteins into the CoV virion, focusing on protein trafficking and protein–protein interactions. PMID:25855243

  17. Frostbite Protection in Mice Expressing an Antifreeze Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Heisig, Martin; Mattessich, Sarah; Rembisz, Alison; Acar, Ali; Shapiro, Martin; Booth, Carmen J.; Neelakanta, Girish; Fikrig, Erol

    2015-01-01

    Ectotherms in northern latitudes are seasonally exposed to cold temperatures. To improve survival under cold stress, they use diverse mechanisms to increase temperature resistance and prevent tissue damage. The accumulation of anti-freeze proteins that improve cold hardiness occurs in diverse species including plants, arthropods, fish, and amphibians. We previously identified an Ixodes scapularis anti-freeze glycoprotein, named IAFGP, and demonstrated its cold protective function in the natural tick host and in a transgenic Drosophila model. Here we show, in a transgenic mouse model expressing an anti-freeze glycoprotein, that IAFGP protects mammalian cells and mice from cold shock and frostbite respectively. Transgenic skin samples showed reduced cell death upon cold storage ex vivo and transgenic mice demonstrated increased resistance to frostbite injury in vivo. IAFGP actively protects mammalian tissue from freezing, suggesting its application for the prevention of frostbite, and other diseases associated with cold exposure. PMID:25714402

  18. Facing extremes: archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Eichler, Jerry

    2003-12-01

    Archaea are best known in their capacities as extremophiles, i.e. micro-organisms able to thrive in some of the most drastic environments on Earth. The protein-based surface layer that envelopes many archaeal strains must thus correctly assemble and maintain its structural integrity in the face of the physical challenges associated with, for instance, life in high salinity, at elevated temperatures or in acidic surroundings. Study of archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins has thus offered insight into the strategies employed by these proteins to survive direct contact with extreme environments, yet has also served to elucidate other aspects of archaeal protein biosynthesis, including glycosylation, lipid modification and protein export. In this mini-review, recent advances in the study of archaeal surface-layer (glyco)proteins are discussed.

  19. Ice growth in supercooled solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, K.; Hallett, J.; Burcham, T. S.; Feeney, R. E.; Kerr, W. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of different degrees of supercooling on the habit and rates of growth of ice crystals from solutions of antifreeze glycoproteins are reported. To isolate the influence of different solutions and supercooling alone, a system was devised that nucleated crystals in the middle of a uniformly supercooled sample. Alternatively, single crystals of selected orientation were inserted into free liquid surface. A crystallization rate up to five times greater than that in pure water was found. A mechanism explaining these results is suggested.

  20. Structural insights into the human metapneumovirus glycoprotein ectodomain.

    PubMed

    Leyrat, Cedric; Paesen, Guido C; Charleston, James; Renner, Max; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2014-10-01

    Human metapneumovirus is a major cause of respiratory tract infections worldwide. Previous reports have shown that the viral attachment glycoprotein (G) modulates innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to incomplete immunity and promoting reinfection. Using bioinformatics analyses, static light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering, we show that the extracellular region of G behaves as a heavily glycosylated, intrinsically disordered polymer. We discuss potential implications of these findings for the modulation of immune responses by G.

  1. Insulin receptor: Interaction with nonreceptor glycoprotein from liver cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Maturo, Joseph M.; Hollenberg, Morley D.

    1978-01-01

    In crude receptor preparations (either particulate or soluble) of rat liver membranes, the insulin receptor exhibits complicated binding kinetics (two binding plateaus, half-saturated at approximately 60 pM and 700 pM insulin) and an apparent chromatographic heterogeneity, suggested by the presence of two detectable, soluble insulin-binding components with apparent Stokes radii of 72 Å and 38 Å. In contrast, the insulin receptor isolated by affinity chromatography exhibits a simple binding isotherm (half-maximal saturation of binding at 700 pM insulin) without evidence for negative cooperativity and behaves as a single component (apparent Stokes radius of 38 Å) upon chromatography on Sepharose 6B. The apparent discrepancies between the properties of the unpurified insulin receptor and the affinity-purified receptor can be attributed to the presence in crude preparations of a nonreceptor constituent(s) having properties consistent with those of a membrane glycoprotein. A glycoprotein fraction from such crude soluble membrane preparations, freed from insulin receptor and subsequently partially purified using concanavalin-A-agarose, when combined with affinity-purified insulin receptor, causes both a reappearance of the complicated binding kinetics and an increase in the receptor's apparent Stokes radius from 38 Å to 72 Å. Similar results are observed for a glycoprotein fraction obtained from rat adipocyte membranes but are not observed for an identical fraction isolated from human erythrocyte membranes. We conclude that the insulin receptor in rat liver membranes can interact with another nonreceptor membrane glycoprotein that may represent either a nonrecognition moiety of the receptor oligomer or an effector molecule to the biological action of insulin. PMID:277909

  2. Structural Insights into the Human Metapneumovirus Glycoprotein Ectodomain

    PubMed Central

    Leyrat, Cedric; Paesen, Guido C.; Charleston, James; Renner, Max

    2014-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus is a major cause of respiratory tract infections worldwide. Previous reports have shown that the viral attachment glycoprotein (G) modulates innate and adaptive immune responses, leading to incomplete immunity and promoting reinfection. Using bioinformatics analyses, static light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering, we show that the extracellular region of G behaves as a heavily glycosylated, intrinsically disordered polymer. We discuss potential implications of these findings for the modulation of immune responses by G. PMID:25031352

  3. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-04-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with (3H) glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques.

  4. Differential effects of the organochlorine pesticide DDT and its metabolite p,p'-DDE on p-glycoprotein activity and expression

    SciTech Connect

    Shabbir, Arsalan; DiStasio, Susan; Zhao, Jingbo; Cardozo, Christopher P.; Wolff, Mary S.; Caplan, Avrom J. . E-mail: avrom.caplan@mssm.edu

    2005-03-01

    1,1-Bis(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2,2-trichloroethane (DDT) is an organochlorine pesticide. Its metabolite, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-ethene (p,p'-DDE) is a persistent environmental contaminant and both compounds accumulate in animals. Because multidrug resistance transporters, such as p-glycoprotein, function as a defense against xenobiotic exposure, we analyzed the ability of DDT and p,p'-DDE to act as efflux modulators. Using a competitive intact cell assay based on the efflux of the fluorescent dye rhodamine 123, we found that DDT, but not p,p'-DDE, stimulated dye retention. Subsequent studies using verapamil as competitor suggested that DDT is a weak p-glycoprotein inhibitor. Further studies addressed the ability of DDT and p,p'-DDE to induce MDR1, the gene encoding p-glycoprotein. In HepG2 cells, we found that both compounds induced MDR1 by twofold to threefold. Similar results were observed in mouse liver after a single dose of p,p'-DDE, although some gender-specific induction differences were noted. By contrast, p,p'-DDE failed to induce MDR1 in HeLa cells, indicating some cell-specific effects for induction. Further expression studies demonstrated increased levels of the endoplasmic reticulum molecular chaperone, Bip, in response to DDT, but not p,p'-DDE. These results suggest that DDT, but not p,p'-DDE, induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

  5. Role of sialidase in glycoprotein utilization by Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sumita; Honma, Kiyonobu; Douglas, C W Ian; Sharma, Ashu; Stafford, Graham P

    2011-11-01

    The major bacterial pathogens associated with periodontitis include Tannerella forsythia. We previously discovered that sialic acid stimulates biofilm growth of T. forsythia, and that sialidase activity is key to utilization of sialoconjugate sugars and is involved in host-pathogen interactions in vitro. The aim of this work was to assess the influence of the NanH sialidase on initial biofilm adhesion and growth in experiments where the only source of sialic acid was sialoglycoproteins or human oral secretions. After showing that T. forsythia can utilize sialoglycoproteins for biofilm growth, we showed that growth and initial adhesion with sialylated mucin and fetuin were inhibited two- to threefold by the sialidase inhibitor oseltamivir. A similar reduction (three- to fourfold) was observed with a nanH mutant compared with the wild-type. Importantly, these data were replicated using clinically relevant serum and saliva samples as substrates. In addition, the ability of the nanH mutant to form biofilms on glycoprotein-coated surfaces could be restored by the addition of purified NanH, which we show is able to cleave sialic acid from the model glycoprotein fetuin and, much less efficiently, 9-O-acetylated bovine submaxillary mucin. These data show for the first time that glycoprotein-associated sialic acid is likely to be a key in vivo nutrient source for T. forsythia when growing in a biofilm, and suggest that sialidase inhibitors might be useful adjuncts in periodontal therapy.

  6. A double responsive smart upconversion fluorescence sensing material for glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ting; Deng, Qiliang; Fang, Guozhen; Yun, Yaguang; Hu, Yongjin; Wang, Shuo

    2016-11-15

    A novel strategy was developed to prepare double responsive smart upconversion fluorescence material for highly specific enrichment and sensing of glycoprotein. The novel double responsive smart sensing material was synthesized by choosing Horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as modal protein, the grapheme oxide (GO) as support material, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as fluorescence signal reporter, N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAAM) and 4-vinylphenylboronic acid (VPBA) as functional monomers. The structure and component of smart sensing material was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), respectively. These results illustrated the smart sensing material was prepared successfully. The recognition characterizations of smart sensing material were evaluated, and results showed that the fluorescence intensity of smart sensing material was reduced gradually, as the concentration of protein increased, and the smart sensing material showed selective recognition for HRP among other proteins. Furthermore, the recognition ability of the smart sensing material for glycoprotein was regulated by controlling the pH value and temperature. Therefore, this strategy opens up new way to construct smart material for detection of glycoprotein.

  7. Australine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid that inhibits amyloglucosidase and glycoprotein processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tropea, J.E.; Molyneux, R.J.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pan, Y.T.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D. )

    1989-03-07

    Australine is a polyhydroxylated pyrrolizidine alkaloid that was isolated from the seeds of the Australian tree Castanospermum australe and characterized by NMR and X-ray diffraction analysis. Since swainsonine and catanospermine are polyhydroxylated indolizidine alkaloids that inhibit specific glycosidases, the authors tested australine against a variety of exoglycosidases to determine whether it would inhibit any of these enzymes. This alkaloid proved to be a good inhibitor of the {alpha}-glucosidase amyloglucosidase (50% inhibition at 5.8 {mu}M), but it did not inhibit {beta}-glucosidase, {alpha}- or {beta}-mannosidase, or {alpha}- or {beta}-galactosidase. The inhibition of amyloglucosidase was of a competitive nature. Australine also inhibited the glycoprotein processing enzyme glucosidase I, but had only slight activity toward glucosidase II. When incubated with cultured cells, this alkaloid inhibited glycoprotein processing at the glucosidase I step and caused the accumulation of glycoproteins with Glc{sub 3}Man{sub 7-9}(GlcNAc){sub 2}-oligosaccharides.

  8. Platelet membrane glycoproteins and their function: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kunicki, T J

    1989-07-01

    The membrane glycoproteins (GP) of human platelets act as receptors that mediate two important functions, adhesion to the subendothelial matrix and platelet-platelet cohesion, or aggregation. Many of these glycoprotein receptors exist as noncovalently linked heterodimers, including those that belong to the supergene family of adhesion receptors called the integrins. Human platelets contain at least five members of this integrin family, including a collagen receptor (GP Ia-IIa; alpha 2, beta 1), a fibronectin receptor (GP Ic-IIa; alpha 5, beta 1), a laminin receptor (GP Ic'-IIa; alpha 6, beta 1), a vitronectin receptor (VnR; alpha v, beta 3), and a promiscuous, activation-dependent receptor that is thought to be the receptor most responsible for fibrinogen-dependent, platelet-platelet cohesion (GP IIb-IIIa; alpha IIb, beta 3). Some, but not all, of the integrins bind to a tripeptide sequence, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD), on the adhesive proteins. In addition to the integrins, platelets contain other membrane glyco-proteins: GP Ib-IX, a receptor for von Willebrand factor, which is thought to be the receptor most responsible for platelet adhesion to the subendothelial matrix in a flowing system; GP V, which may be associated with GP Ib-IX and whose function remains unknown; and GP IV (GP IIIb), which functions as a receptor for thrombospondin and collagen.

  9. Influence of Respiratory Syncytial Virus F Glycoprotein Conformation on Induction of Protective Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Thom, Michelle; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Terrón, María C.; Luque, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) vaccine development has received new impetus from structure-based studies of its main protective antigen, the fusion (F) glycoprotein. Three soluble forms of F have been described: monomeric, trimeric prefusion, and trimeric postfusion. Most human neutralizing antibodies recognize epitopes found exclusively in prefusion F. Although prefusion F induces higher levels of neutralizing antibodies than does postfusion F, postfusion F can also induce protection against virus challenge in animals. However, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the three forms of F have not hitherto been directly compared. Hence, BALB/c mice were immunized with a single dose of the three proteins adjuvanted with CpG and challenged 4 weeks later with virus. Serum antibodies, lung virus titers, weight loss, and pulmonary pathology were evaluated after challenge. Whereas small amounts of postfusion F were sufficient to protect mice, larger amounts of monomeric and prefusion F proteins were required for protection. However, postfusion and monomeric F proteins were associated with more pathology after challenge than was prefusion F. Antibodies induced by all doses of prefusion F, in contrast to other F protein forms, reacted predominantly with the prefusion F conformation. At high doses, prefusion F also induced the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies, and all mice were protected, yet at low doses of the immunogen, these antibodies neutralized virus poorly, and mice were not protected. These findings should be considered when developing new hRSV vaccine candidates. IMPORTANCE Protection against hRSV infection is afforded mainly by neutralizing antibodies, which recognize mostly epitopes found exclusively in the viral fusion (F) glycoprotein trimer, folded in its prefusion conformation, i.e., before activation for membrane fusion. Although prefusion F is able to induce high levels of neutralizing antibodies, highly stable postfusion

  10. Characterization of Site-Specific N-Glycopeptide Isoforms of α-1-Acid Glycoprotein from an Interlaboratory Study Using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Park, Gun Wook; Hwang, Heeyoun; Jeong, Hoi Keun; Yun, Ki Na; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Kim, Jun Seok; Kim, Jong Won; Yun, Sung Ho; Choi, Chi-Won; Kim, Seung Il; Lim, Jong-Sun; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Paik, Young-Ki; Lee, Soo-Youn; Park, Jisook; Kim, Su Yeon; Choi, Young-Jin; Kim, Yong-In; Seo, Jawon; Cho, Je-Yoel; Oh, Myoung Jin; Seo, Nari; An, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2016-12-02

    Glycoprotein conformations are complex and heterogeneous. Currently, site-specific characterization of glycopeptides is a challenge. We sought to establish an efficient method of N-glycoprotein characterization using mass spectrometry (MS). Using alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) as a model N-glycoprotein, we identified its tryptic N-glycopeptides and examined the data reproducibility in seven laboratories running different LC-MS/MS platforms. We used three test samples and one blind sample to evaluate instrument performance with entire sample preparation workflow. 165 site-specific N-glycopeptides representative of all N-glycosylation sites were identified from AGP 1 and AGP 2 isoforms. The glycopeptide fragmentations by collision-induced dissociation or higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) varied based on the MS analyzer. Orbitrap Elite identified the greatest number of AGP N-glycopeptides, followed by Triple TOF and Q-Exactive Plus. Reproducible generation of oxonium ions, glycan-cleaved glycopeptide fragment ions, and peptide backbone fragment ions was essential for successful identification. Laboratory proficiency affected the number of identified N-glycopeptides. The relative quantities of the 10 major N-glycopeptide isoforms of AGP detected in four laboratories were compared to assess reproducibility. Quantitative analysis showed that the coefficient of variation was <25% for all test samples. Our analytical protocol yielded identification and quantification of site-specific N-glycopeptide isoforms of AGP from control and disease plasma sample.

  11. 4.1R-deficient human red blood cells have altered phosphatidylserine exposure pathways and are deficient in CD44 and CD47 glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Jeremy, Kris P.; Plummer, Zoe E.; Head, David J.; Madgett, Tracey E.; Sanders, Kelly L.; Wallington, Amanda; Storry, Jill R.; Gilsanz, Florinda; Delaunay, Jean; Avent, Neil D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Protein 4.1R is an important component of the red cell membrane skeleton. It imparts structural integrity and has transmembrane signaling roles by direct interactions with transmembrane proteins and other membrane skeletal components, notably p55 and calmodulin. Design and Methods Spontaneous and ligation-induced phosphatidylserine exposure on erythrocytes from two patients with 4.1R deficiency were studied, using CD47 glycoprotein and glycophorin C as ligands. We also looked for protein abnormalities in the 4.1R - based multiprotein complex. Results Phosphatidylserine exposure was significantly increased in 4.1R-deficient erythrocytes obtained from the two different individuals when ligands to CD47 glycoprotein were bound. Spontaneous phosphatidylserine exposure was normal. 4.1R, glycophorin C and p55 were missing or sharply reduced. Furthermore there was an alteration or deficiency of CD47 glycoprotein and a lack of CD44 glycoprotein. Based on a recent study in 4.1R-deficient mice, we found that there are clear functional differences between interactions of human red cell 4.1R and its murine counterpart. Conclusions Glycophorin C is known to bind 4.1R, and we have defined previously that it also binds CD47. From our evidence, we suggest that 4.1R plays a role in the phosphatidylserine exposure signaling pathway that is of fundamental importance in red cell turnover. The linkage of CD44 to 4.1R may be relevant to this process. PMID:19794081

  12. Expression, purification and crystallization of the ectodomain of the envelope glycoprotein E2 from Bovine viral diarrhoea virus

    PubMed Central

    Iourin, Oleg; Harlos, Karl; El Omari, Kamel; Lu, Weixian; Kadlec, Jan; Iqbal, Munir; Meier, Christoph; Palmer, Andrew; Jones, Ian; Thomas, Carole; Brownlie, Joe; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Stuart, David I.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important animal pathogen which is closely related to Hepatitis C virus. Of the structural proteins, the envelope glycoprotein E2 of BVDV is the major antigen which induces neutralizing antibodies; thus, BVDV E2 is considered as an ideal target for use in subunit vaccines. Here, the expression, purification of wild-type and mutant forms of the ectodomain of BVDV E2 and subsequent crystallization and data collection of two crystal forms grown at low and neutral pH are reported. Native and multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) data sets have been collected and structure determination is in progress. PMID:23295482

  13. Encephalitogenic and immunogenic potential of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), oligodendrocyte-specific glycoprotein (OSP) and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) in ABH and SJL mice.

    PubMed

    Morris-Downes, Margaret M; McCormack, Kirsty; Baker, David; Sivaprasad, Dinesh; Natkunarajah, Janahan; Amor, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Synthetic peptides of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), oligodendrocyte-specific glycoprotein (OSP) and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) were screened for their ability to induce experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) in ABH (H-2A(g7)) and SJL (H-2(s)) mice. The use of overlapping 16mer MAG peptides identified residues 97-112 as a T-cell and encephalitogenic epitope in ABH mice which induced clinical and histological signs of acute EAE. Immunization of SJL mice with MAG peptides failed to induce disease whereas immunization of SJL mice with synthetic peptides of OSP induced major T-cell responses to OSP 73-88 and 81-96. Another epitope, OSP 57-72, that induced EAE, failed to induce T-cell responses in mice immunised with peptides based on the whole sequence supporting a role for cryptic epitopes. In comparison, whilst immunization of ABH mice with OSP revealed two immunodominant T-cell epitopes (49-64 and 137-152), an encephalitogenic epitope was not identified. Similarly, immunization of both SJL and ABH mice with CNPase peptides induced T-cell responses to several epitopes. However, these were not encephalitogenic. This study is the first to identify an encephalitogenic epitope of MAG and immunodominant epitopes of MAG, OSP and CNPase in SJL and ABH mice. The ability of both cryptic and noncryptic peptide epitopes of these myelin antigens to initiate EAE suggests that mice at least are not tolerant to some regions of MAG and OSP and that such specific autoimmune responses may play an important role in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

  14. Inhibition of in Vitro Pollen Tube Growth by Isolated S-Glycoproteins of Nicotiana alata.

    PubMed Central

    Jahnen, W.; Lush, W. M.; Clarke, A. E.

    1989-01-01

    Pollen from three S-genotypes of Nicotiana alata was grown in vitro in the presence of S-glycoproteins isolated from styles of the same three genotypes. Pollen germination was not affected by the presence of the S-glycoproteins, but pollen tube growth of all genotypes was inhibited. S2 pollen was preferentially inhibited by the S2-glycoprotein and S3 pollen by the S3-glycoprotein. The S6-glycoprotein preferentially inhibited growth of both S2 and S6 pollen over S3 pollen. Heat treatment dramatically increased the inhibitory activity of the S-glycoproteins as inhibitors both of pollen germination and tube growth; after heat treatment, S-allele specificity of pollen tube inhibition was not detected. PMID:12359898

  15. Characterization of the O- and N-linked oligosaccharides in glycoproteins synthesized by Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Nyame, A.K.

    1987-01-01

    The structures of the O- and N-linked oligosaccharides in glycoproteins synthesized by larval and adult schistosomes of Schistosoma mansoni have been investigated. Mechanically transformed schistosomula or adult schistosomes were incubated in media containing either (/sup 3/H)mannose, (/sup 3/H)glucosamine or (/sup 3/H)galactose for 48 and 24 hr, respectively, to radiolabel metabolically the oligosaccharide moieties of newly synthesized glycoproteins. Analyses of the radiolabeled glycoproteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS/PAGE) and fluorography demonstrated that numerous glycoproteins from 48-hr old schistosomula and adult schistosomes were labeled by both the (/sup 3/H)mannose and (/sup 3/H)glucosamine precursors. The (/sup 3/H)galactose precursor was incorporated into numerous glycoproteins in adult schistosomes; however, few, if any, glycoproteins in schistosomula were labeled by this radioactive sugar precursor.

  16. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Glycoproteins Antagonize Tetherin through a Distinctive Mechanism That Requires Virion Incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Rebekah B.; Marcano, Adriana C.; Saenz, Dyana T.; Fadel, Hind J.; Rogstad, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT BST2/tetherin inhibits the release of enveloped viruses from cells. Primate lentiviruses have evolved specific antagonists (Vpu, Nef, and Env). Here we characterized tetherin proteins of species representing both branches of the order Carnivora. Comparison of tiger and cat (Feliformia) to dog and ferret (Caniformia) genes demonstrated that the tiger and cat share a start codon mutation that truncated most of the tetherin cytoplasmic tail early in the Feliformia lineage (19 of 27 amino acids, including the dual tyrosine motif). Alpha interferon (IFN-α) induced tetherin and blocked feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication in lymphoid and nonlymphoid feline cells. Budding of bald FIV and HIV particles was blocked by carnivore tetherins. However, infectious FIV particles were resistant, and spreading FIV replication was uninhibited. Antagonism mapped to the envelope glycoprotein (Env), which rescued FIV from carnivore tetherin restriction when expressed in trans but, in contrast to known antagonists, did not rescue noncognate particles. Also unlike the primate lentiviral antagonists, but similar to the Ebola virus glycoprotein, FIV Env did not reduce intracellular or cell surface tetherin levels. Furthermore, FIV-enveloped FIV particles actually required tetherin for optimal release from cells. The results show that FIV Envs mediate a distinctive tetherin evasion. Well adapted to a phylogenetically ancient tetherin tail truncation in the Felidae, it requires functional virion incorporation of Env, and it shields the budding particle without downregulating plasma membrane tetherin. Moreover, FIV has evolved dependence on this protein: particles containing FIV Env need tetherin for optimal release from the cell, while Env− particles do not. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 antagonizes the restriction factor tetherin with the accessory protein Vpu, while HIV-2 and the filovirus Ebola use their envelope (Env) glycoproteins for this purpose. It turns out that the FIV

  17. A glycoprotein from Porphyra yezoensis produces anti-inflammatory effects in liposaccharide-stimulated macrophages via the TLR4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Soon; Hwang, Hye-Jung; Kim, In-Hye; Nam, Taek-Jeong

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of a glycoprotein isolated from the alga Porphyra yezoensis in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages. First, we extracted a novel material with antioxidant activity from P. yezoensis, confirmed by SDS-PAGE to be a glycoprotein, which we named P. yezoensis glycoprotein (PGP). PGP inhibited the production of NO and ROS and expression of iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α and IL-1β, which are involved in the pathogenesis of many inflammation-associated human diseases, including septic shock, hemorrhagic shock and rheumatoid arthritis. Next, we determined the mechanisms behind the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of PGP. We focused on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway because it is well-known to induce the pro-inflammatory proteins that trigger MAPK and NF-κB activation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative events. PGP treatment reduced the formation of the TLR4-IRAK4 and TLR4-TRIF binding complexes in response to LPS. Moreover, it inhibited LPS-induced activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB by abrogating IκB phosphorylation. PGP also suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that PGP exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by modulating TLR4 signaling and thus inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and MAP kinases.

  18. Protective efficacy of ellagic acid on glycoproteins, hematological parameters, biochemical changes, and electrolytes in myocardial infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Kannan, M Mari; Quine, S Darlin; Sangeetha, T

    2012-07-01

    The cardioprotective property of ellagic acid in rats has been reported previously. The present study reveals the protective role of ellagic acid in biochemical parameters including serum iron, plasma iron binding capacity, uric acid, glycoprotein, and electrolytes along with hematological parameters. Rats were subcutaneously injected with isoproterenol (ISO) (100 mg/kg) for 2 days to induce myocardial infarction. ISO-induced rats showed a significant increase in their levels of serum iron, serum uric acid, and blood glucose, and a significant decrease in their levels of plasma iron binding capacity, serum total protein, albumin/globulin ratio, and heart glycogen, when compared with normal control rats. The altered hematological parameters were also observed in ISO-induced rats when compared with normal control rats. Pretreatment with ellagic acid at doses of 7.5 and 15 mg/kg produced significant beneficial effect by returning all the above-mentioned biochemical and hematological parameters to near normal levels.

  19. The trail of my studies on glycoproteins from enterokinase to tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the results of the author's studies on glycoproteins which have been carried out for more than 50 years. Starting from the elucidation of basic structures of glycoproteins, i.e. the structure of the linkage between an amino acid and a sugar and the occurrence of the beta-mannosidic linkage as the common structure of glycoproteins, the author became interested in the cell membrane glycoproteins focused on the comparison of cancer cells versus normal cells. These studies were then extended to the establishment of sugar-directed and cancer-associated monoclonal antibodies. Some of the monoclonal antibodies are useful for cancer diagnosis.

  20. Isolation and characterization of calcium binding glycoproteins of cardiac sarcolemmal vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, M.; Fliegel, L.; Wlasichuk, K. )

    1990-04-05

    Two major Ca2(+)-binding glycoproteins Mr 120,000 and 100,000 were isolated from 3-((3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonic acid -solubilized bovine heart sarcolemma membrane. Peroxidase-conjugated concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin lectins bind strongly to the isolated 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins. Treatment with endoglycosidase F resulted in conversion of the 120-kDa glycoprotein to a form migrating at about 97 kDa. Treatment of the 100-kDa band with endoglycosidase F produced form of about 80 kDa. Endoglycosidase H digestion removes only 5% of the mass of both glycoproteins. the carbohydrate structure of both glycoproteins, is therefore, predicted to be at least 75% complex structure and 25% high mannose or hybrid structure. The 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins are the major Ca2(+)-binding proteins in the sarcolemma membranes. Intact and endoglycosidase-treated glycoproteins bind 45Ca2+ as analyzed by a 45Ca2+ overlay technique. Using polyclonal antibodies, the 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins were identified in muscle plasma membranes (ventricles, atria, and uterus smooth muscle). They were, however, not present in non-muscle tissues such as pancreas, liver, and kidney. The 120- and 100-kDa glycoproteins appear to be homologous molecules as judged by their similar V8 protease peptide maps, cross-reactivity with polyclonal antibody, and other physicochemical properties.

  1. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... alpha-1-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-1 group when subjected to... diagnosis of collagen (connective tissue) disorders, tuberculosis, infections, extensive malignancy,...

  2. The trail of my studies on glycoproteins from enterokinase to tumor markers

    PubMed Central

    YAMASHINA, Ikuo

    2010-01-01

    This review describes the results of the author’s studies on glycoproteins which have been carried out for more than 50 years. Starting from the elucidation of basic structures of glycoproteins, i.e. the structure of the linkage between an amino acid and a sugar and the occurrence of the β-mannosidic linkage as the common structure of glycoproteins, the author became interested in the cell membrane glycoproteins focused on the comparison of cancer cells versus normal cells. These studies were then extended to the establishment of sugar-directed and cancer-associated monoclonal antibodies. Some of the monoclonal antibodies are useful for cancer diagnosis. PMID:20551595

  3. Palmitoylation of the cysteine-rich endodomain of the SARS-coronavirus spike glycoprotein is important for spike-mediated cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Petit, Chad M.; Chouljenko, Vladimir N.; Iyer, Arun; Colgrove, Robin; Farzan, Michael; Knipe, David M.; Kousoulas, K.G. . E-mail: vtgusk@lsu.edu

    2007-04-10

    The SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is the etiological agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein mediates membrane fusion events during virus entry and virus-induced cell-to-cell fusion. The cytoplasmic portion of the S glycoprotein contains four cysteine-rich amino acid clusters. Individual cysteine clusters were altered via cysteine-to-alanine amino acid replacement and the modified S glycoproteins were tested for their transport to cell-surfaces and ability to cause cell fusion in transient transfection assays. Mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster I, located immediately proximal to the predicted transmembrane, domain did not appreciably reduce cell-surface expression, although S-mediated cell fusion was reduced by more than 50% in comparison to the wild-type S. Similarly, mutagenesis of the cysteine cluster II located adjacent to cluster I reduced S-mediated cell fusion by more than 60% compared to the wild-type S, while cell-surface expression was reduced by less than 20%. Mutagenesis of cysteine clusters III and IV did not appreciably affect S cell-surface expression or S-mediated cell fusion. The wild-type S was palmitoylated as evidenced by the efficient incorporation of {sup 3}H-palmitic acid in wild-type S molecules. S glycoprotein palmitoylation was significantly reduced for mutant glycoproteins having cluster I and II cysteine changes, but was largely unaffected for cysteine cluster III and IV mutants. These results show that the S cytoplasmic domain is palmitoylated and that palmitoylation of the membrane proximal cysteine clusters I and II may be important for S-mediated cell fusion.

  4. Behavioral Effects and Central Nervous System Levels of the Broadly Available κ-Agonist Hallucinogen Salvinorin A Are Affected by P-Glycoprotein Modulation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Caspers, Michael; Lovell, Kimberly M.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Prisinzano, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Active blood-brain barrier mechanisms, such as the major efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (mdr1), modulate the in vivo/central nervous system (CNS) effects of many pharmacological agents, whether they are used for nonmedical reasons or in pharmacotherapy. The powerful, widely available hallucinogen salvinorin A (from the plant Salvia divinorum) is a high-efficacy, selective κ-opioid agonist and displays fast-onset behavioral effects (e.g., within 1 min of administration) and relatively short duration of action. In vitro studies suggest that salvinorin A may be a P-glycoprotein substrate; thus, the functional status of P-glycoprotein may influence the behavioral effects of salvinorin A or its residence in CNS after parenteral administration. We therefore studied whether a competing P-glycoprotein substrate (the clinically available agent loperamide; 0.032–0.32 mg/kg) or a selective P-glycoprotein blocker, tariquidar (0.32–3.2 mg/kg) could enhance unconditioned behavioral effects (ptosis and facial relaxation, known to be caused by κ-agonists in nonhuman primates) of salvinorin A, as well as its entry and residence in the CNS, as measured by cerebrospinal fluid sampling. Pretreatment with either loperamide or tariquidar dose-dependently enhanced salvinorin A-induced ptosis, but not facial relaxation. In a control study, loperamide and tariquidar were inactive when given as a pretreatment to ((+)-(5α,7α,8β)-N-methyl-N-[7-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]-benzeneacetamide (U69,593), a κ-agonist known to be a very poor P-glycoprotein substrate. Furthermore, pretreatment with tariquidar (3.2 mg/kg) also enhanced peak levels of salvinorin A in cerebrospinal fluid after intravenous administration. These are the first studies in vivo showing the sensitivity of salvinorin A effects to modulation by the P-glycoprotein transporter, a major functional component of the blood-brain barrier. PMID:22434677

  5. A Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Elicits a Strong Rift Valley Fever Virus Neutralizing Antibody Response in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Maxim; McVey, D. Scott; Wilson, William; Morozov, Igor; Young, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Bunyaviridae family, is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen that causes serious morbidity and mortality in livestock and humans. The recent spread of the virus beyond its traditional endemic boundaries in Africa to the Arabian Peninsula coupled with the presence of susceptible vectors in nonendemic countries has created increased interest in RVF vaccines. Subunit vaccines composed of specific virus proteins expressed in eukaryotic or prokaryotic expression systems are shown to elicit neutralizing antibodies in susceptible hosts. RVFV structural proteins, amino-terminus glycoprotein (Gn), and carboxyl-terminus glycoprotein (Gc), were expressed using a recombinant baculovirus expression system. The recombinant proteins were reconstituted as a GnGc subunit vaccine formulation and evaluated for immunogenicity in a target species, sheep. Six sheep were each immunized with a primary dose of 50 μg of each vaccine immunogen with the adjuvant montanide ISA25; at day 21, postvaccination, each animal received a second dose of the same vaccine. The vaccine induced a strong antibody response in all animals as determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT80) showed the primary dose of the vaccine was sufficient to elicit potentially protective virus neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 40 to 160, and the second vaccine dose boosted the titer to more than 1280. Furthermore, all animals tested positive for neutralizing antibodies at day 328 postvaccination. ELISA analysis using the recombinant nucleocapsid protein as a negative marker antigen indicated that the vaccine candidate is DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals) compatible and represents a promising vaccine platform for RVFV infection in susceptible species. PMID:25325319

  6. A glycoprotein subunit vaccine elicits a strong Rift Valley fever virus neutralizing antibody response in sheep.

    PubMed

    Faburay, Bonto; Lebedev, Maxim; McVey, D Scott; Wilson, William; Morozov, Igor; Young, Alan; Richt, Juergen A

    2014-10-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Bunyaviridae family, is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen that causes serious morbidity and mortality in livestock and humans. The recent spread of the virus beyond its traditional endemic boundaries in Africa to the Arabian Peninsula coupled with the presence of susceptible vectors in nonendemic countries has created increased interest in RVF vaccines. Subunit vaccines composed of specific virus proteins expressed in eukaryotic or prokaryotic expression systems are shown to elicit neutralizing antibodies in susceptible hosts. RVFV structural proteins, amino-terminus glycoprotein (Gn), and carboxyl-terminus glycoprotein (Gc), were expressed using a recombinant baculovirus expression system. The recombinant proteins were reconstituted as a GnGc subunit vaccine formulation and evaluated for immunogenicity in a target species, sheep. Six sheep were each immunized with a primary dose of 50 μg of each vaccine immunogen with the adjuvant montanide ISA25; at day 21, postvaccination, each animal received a second dose of the same vaccine. The vaccine induced a strong antibody response in all animals as determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). A plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT80) showed the primary dose of the vaccine was sufficient to elicit potentially protective virus neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 40 to 160, and the second vaccine dose boosted the titer to more than 1280. Furthermore, all animals tested positive for neutralizing antibodies at day 328 postvaccination. ELISA analysis using the recombinant nucleocapsid protein as a negative marker antigen indicated that the vaccine candidate is DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals) compatible and represents a promising vaccine platform for RVFV infection in susceptible species.

  7. Characterization of a Surface Glycoprotein from Echinococcus multilocularis and Its Mucosal Vaccine Potential in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kouguchi, Hirokazu; Matsumoto, Jun; Nakao, Ryo; Yamano, Kimiaki; Oku, Yuzaburo; Yagi, Kinpei

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar echinococcosis is a refractory disease caused by the metacestode stage of Echinococcus multilocularis. The life cycle of this parasite is maintained primarily between foxes and many species of rodents; thus, dogs are thought to be a minor definitive host except in some endemic areas. However, dogs are highly susceptible to E. multilocularis infection. Because of the close contact between dogs and humans, infection of dogs with this parasite can be an important risk to human health. Therefore, new measures and tools to control and prevent parasite transmission required. Using 2-dimensional electrophoresis followed by western blot (2D-WB) analysis, a large glycoprotein component of protoscoleces was identified based on reactivity to intestinal IgA in dogs experimentally infected with E. multilocularis. This component, designated SRf1, was purified by gel filtration using a Superose 6 column. Glycosylation analysis and immunostaining revealed that SRf1 could be distinguished from Em2, a major mucin-type antigen of E. multilocularis. Dogs (n = 6) were immunized intranasally with 500 µg of SRf1 with cholera toxin subunit B by using a spray syringe, and a booster was given orally using an enteric capsule containing 15 mg of the same antigen. As a result, dogs immunized with this antigen showed an 87.6% reduction in worm numbers compared to control dogs (n = 5) who received only PBS administration. A weak serum antibody response was observed in SRf1-immunized dogs, but there was no correlation between antibody response and worm number. We demonstrated for the first time that mucosal immunization using SRf1, a glycoprotein component newly isolated from E. multilocularis protoscoleces, induced a protection response to E. multilocularis infection in dogs. Thus, our data indicated that mucosal immunization using surface antigens will be an important tool to facilitate the development of practical vaccines for definitive hosts. PMID:23894545

  8. Murine viral hepatitis involves NK cell depletion associated with virus-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    LEHOUX, M; JACQUES, A; LUSIGNAN, S; LAMONTAGNE, L

    2004-01-01

    Mouse hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV3), a coronavirus, is an excellent animal model for the study of immunological disorders related to acute and chronic hepatitis. In this study, we have verified if the fulminant hepatitis induced by MHV3 could be related to an impairment of innate immunity. Groups of three C57BL/6 mice were infected with the pathogenic L2-MHV3 or attenuated YAC-MHV3 viruses, and the natural killer (NK) cell populations from liver, spleen and bone marrow were analysed. The percentage of intrahepatic NK1·1+T cell receptor (TCR)− cells did not increase while NK1·1+TCRinter cells decreased in both L2-MHV3- and YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Concurrently, splenic and myeloid NK1·1+ cells decreased in L2-MHV3-infected mice. However, the cytotoxic activity of NK cells increased in liver and decreased in bone marrow from pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice while no modification was detected in YAC-MHV3-infected mice. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that both normal and larger splenic or myeloid NK cells decreased more in pathogenic L2-MHV3-infected mice than in attenuated YAC-MHV3-infected mice. In vitro viral infections of interleukin (IL)-15-stimulated lymphoid cells from liver and bone marrow revealed that L2-MHV3 induced higher decreases in cell viability of NK1·1+ cells than the YAC-MHV3 variant. The NK cell decreases were due to the viral permissivity leading to cytopathic effects characterized by cell rounding, syncytia formation and apoptosis. Larger NK+ syncytia were observed in L2-MHV3-infected cells than in YAC-MHV3-infected cells. These results suggest that NK cell production is impaired by viral infection favouring fulminant hepatitis. PMID:15196242

  9. Oral and inhaled corticosteroids: Differences in P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) mediated efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, Andrew Tan, Ai May

    2012-05-01

    There is concern that P-glycoprotein mediated efflux contributes to steroid resistance. Therefore, this study examined bidirectional corticosteroid transport and induction capabilities for P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to understand which of the systemic and inhaled corticosteroids interacted with P-gp to the greatest extent. Hydrocortisone, prednisolone, prednisone, methylprednisolone, and dexamethasone represented systemically active drugs, while fluticasone propionate, beclomethasone dipropionate, ciclesonide and budesonide represented inhaled corticosteroids. Aldosterone and fludrocortisone represented mineralocorticoids. All drugs were detected using individually optimised HPLC protocols. Transport studies were conducted through Caco-2 monolayers. Hydrocortisone and aldosterone had efflux ratios below 1.5, while prednisone showed a P-gp mediated efflux ratio of only 1.8 compared to its active drug, prednisolone, with an efflux ratio of 4.5. Dexamethasone and beclomethasone had efflux ratios of 2.1 and 3.3 respectively, while this increased to 5.1 for methylprednisolone. Fluticasone showed an efflux ratio of 2.3. Protein expression studies suggested that all of the inhaled corticosteroids were able to induce P-gp expression, from 1.6 to 2 times control levels. Most of the systemic corticosteroids had higher passive permeability (> 20 × 10{sup −6} cm/s) compared to the inhaled corticosteroids (> 5 × 10{sup −6} cm/s), except for budesonide, with permeability similar to the systemic corticosteroids. Inhaled corticosteroids are not transported by P-gp to the same extent as systemic corticosteroids. However, they are able to induce P-gp production. Thus, inhaled corticosteroids may have greater interactions with other P-gp substrates, but P-gp itself is less likely to influence resistance to the drugs. -- Highlights: ► Inhaled corticosteroids are only weak substrates for P-gp, including budesonide. ► Inhaled corticosteroid potent P-gp inducers especially

  10. Mannostatin A, a new glycoprotein-processing inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tropea, J E; Kaushal, G P; Pastuszak, I; Mitchell, M; Aoyagi, T; Molyneux, R J; Elbein, A D

    1990-10-30

    Mannostatin A is a metabolite produced by the microorganism Streptoverticillium verticillus and reported to be a potent competitive inhibitor of rat epididymal alpha-mannosidase. When tested against a number of other arylglycosidases, mannostatin A was inactive toward alpha- and beta-glucosidase and galactosidase as well as beta-mannosidase, but it was a potent inhibitor of jack bean, mung bean, and rat liver lysosomal alpha-mannosidases, with estimated IC50's of 70 nM, 450 nM, and 160 nM, respectively. The type of inhibition was competitive in nature. This compound also proved to be an effective competitive inhibitor of the glycoprotein-processing enzyme mannosidase II (IC50 of about 10-15 nM with p-nitrophenyl alpha-D-mannopyranoside as substrate, and about 90 nM with [3H]mannose-labeled GlcNAc-Man5GlcNAc as substrate). However, it was virtually inactive toward mannosidase I. The N-acetylated derivative of mannostatin A had no inhibitory activity. In cell culture studies, mannostatin A also proved to be a potent inhibitor of glycoprotein processing. Thus, in influenza virus infected Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, mannostatin A blocked the normal formation of complex types of oligosaccharides on the viral glycoproteins and caused the accumulation of hybrid types of oligosaccharides. This observation is in keeping with other data which indicate that the site of action of mannostatin A is mannosidase II. Thus, mannostatin A represents the first nonalkaloidal processing inhibitor and adds to the growing list of chemical structures that can have important biological activity.

  11. Mannostatin A, a new glycoprotein-processing inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Tropea, J.E.; Kaushal, G.P.; Pastuszak, I.; Mitchell, M.; Elbein, A.D. ); Aoyagi, Takaaki ); Molyneux, R.J. )

    1990-10-01

    Mannostatin A is a metabolite produced by the microorganism Streptoverticillium verticillus and reported to be a potent competitive inhibitor of rat epididymal {alpha}-mannosidase. When tested against a number of other arylglycosidases, mannostatin A was inactive toward {alpha}- and {beta}-glucosidase and galactosidase as well as {beta}-mannosidase, but it was a potent inhibitor of jack bean, mung bean, and rat liver lysosomal {alpha}-mannosidases, with estimated IC{sub 50}'s of 70 nM, 450 nM, and 160 nM, respectively. The type of inhibition was competitive in nature. This compound also proved to be an effective competitive inhibitor of the glycoprotein-processing enzyme mannosidase II (IC{sub 50} of about 10-15 nM with p-nitrophenyl {alpha}-D-mannopyranoside as substrate, and about 90 nM with ({sup 3}H)mannose-labeled GlcNAc-Man{sub 5}GlcNAc as substrate). However, it was virtually inactive toward mannosidase I. The N-acetylated derivative of mannostatin A had no inhibitory activity. In cell culture studies, mannostatin A also proved to be a potent inhibitor of glycoprotein processing. Thus, in influenza virus infected Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, mannostatin A blocked the normal formation of complex types of oligosaccharides on the viral glycoproteins and caused the accumulation of hybrid types of oligosaccharides. This observation is in keeping with other data which indicate that the site of action of mannostatin A is mannosidase II. Thus, mannostatin A represents the first nonalkaloidal processing inhibitor and adds to the growing list of chemical structures that can have important biological activity.

  12. Developmental changes in microheterogeneity of foetal plasma glycoproteins of mice

    PubMed Central

    Gustine, David L.; Zimmerman, Ernest F.

    1973-01-01

    Changes in microheterogeneity of foetal plasma glycoproteins during development of mouse embryos were investigated. Analysis of foetal plasma by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis indicated three major zones of proteins: (1) transferrins, (2) α-foetoproteins and (3) albumin. Three transferrins (Tr1, Tr2, Tr3) and five α-foetoproteins (Fp1, Fp2, Fp3, Fp4, Fp5) were resolved. Evidence for the presence of transferrins was the binding of 59Fe to the three electrophoretic variants. By day 15.5 of gestation, there was a marked increase in the more-acidic components (Tr3, Fp4, Fp5) and a decrease in the less-acidic ones (Tr1, Tr2, Fp1, Fp2, Fp3). Treatment of foetal plasma with neuraminidase at this time of development converted the more acidic components into Tr1 and Tr2 and Fp1, Fp2 and Fp3. Furthermore, it was shown that early in development (day 12.5) only the less-acidic components of transferrin and α-foetoprotein were synthesized; at the later time in development (day 14.5) new synthesis of the acidic components of both groups occurred. That these more-acidic components of α-foetoprotein (Fp4, Fp5) were in fact electrophoretic variants of the less-acidic α-foetoproteins was shown by the immunoprecipitation of labelled Fp4 and Fp5 with anti-Fp1, anti-Fp2 and anti-Fp3. From these results it is postulated that the plasma glycoproteins that are synthesized later in development contain increased amounts of sialic acid and that the observed changes in microheterogeneity of these proteins represent regulation of glycoprotein biosynthesis at the level of carbohydrate attachment. PMID:4353382

  13. HIV Entry and Envelope Glycoprotein-mediated Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Robert; Durell, Stewart; Viard, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    HIV entry involves binding of the trimeric viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120/gp41 to cell surface receptors, which triggers conformational changes in Env that drive the membrane fusion reaction. The conformational landscape that the lipids and Env navigate en route to fusion has been examined by biophysical measurements on the microscale, whereas electron tomography, x-rays, and NMR have provided insights into the process on the nanoscale and atomic scale. However, the coupling between the lipid and protein pathways that give rise to fusion has not been resolved. Here, we discuss the known and unknown about the overall HIV Env-mediated fusion process. PMID:23043104

  14. Interaction of a Monoclonal Antibody to Glycoprotein IV (CD36) with Human Platelets and its Effect on Platelet Function.

    PubMed

    Legrand, C; Pidard, D; Beiso, P; Tenza, D; Edelman, L

    1991-01-01

    FA6-152, a monoclonal antibody to platelet membrane glycoprotein IV (CP IV), was used to quantify the expression of this glycoprotein on platelets, as well as to evaluate its role in platelet aggregation. On resting platelets, 19 400 ± 7700 molecules of the (125)I-labelled IgC could bind per platelet (n = 20). Binding was not modified following stimulation of the platelets with ADP (10 µmol/l) or thrombin (0.1 U/ml). Fab fragments prepared from the antibody by papain digestion also bound to the platelet surface in a saturable manner. Both the intact IgC and its Fab fragments were found to inhibit platelet aggregation and secretion induced by ADP or collagen in platelet-rich plasma and by thrombin in platelet suspensions. Under nonstirred conditions, whereby the release reaction was only minimally affected, the antibody markedly inhibited thrombin-induced surface expression of α-granule thrombospondin (TSP), whereas it did not alter the concomitant expression of α-granule fibrinogen. In addition, electron microscopy revealed a predominant distribution of TSP and T;P IV on pseudopodia and between adherent cells on thrombin-stimulated platelets. These findings thus support the hypothesis that the interaction of TSP with GP IV on the platelet surface is required for an optimal platelet aggregation/secretion process to occur.

  15. Monensin and FCCP inhibit the intracellular transport of alphavirus membrane glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Kääriäinen, L; Hashimoto, K; Saraste, J; Virtanen, I; Penttinen, K

    1980-12-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutants of semliki forest virus (SFV) and sindbis virus (SIN) were used to study the intracellular transport of virus membrane glycoproteins in infected chicken embryo fibroblasts. When antisera against purified glycoproteins and (125)I- labeled protein A from staphylococcus aureus were used only small amounts of virus glycoproteins were detected at the surface of SFV ts-1 and SIN Ts-10 infected cells incubated at the restrictive temperature (39 degrees C). When the mutant-infected cells were shifted to the permissive temperature (28 degrees C), in the presence of cycloheximide, increasing amounts of virus glycoproteins appeared at the cell surface from 20 to 80 min after the shift. Both monensin (10muM) and carbonylcyanide-p- trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP; 10-20 muM) inhibited the appearance of virus membrane glycoproteins at the cell surface. Vinblastine sulfate (10 mug/ml) inhibited the transport by approximately 50 percent, whereas cytochalasin B (1 mug/ml) had only a marginal effect. Intracellular distribution of virus glycoproteins in the mutant-infected cells was visualized in double-fluorescence studies using lectins as markers for endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. At 39 degrees C, the virus membrane glycoproteins were located at the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas after shift to 28 degrees C, a bright juxtanuclear reticular fluorescence was seen in the location of the Golgi apparatus. In the presence of monensin, the virus glycoproteins could migrate to the Golgi apparatus, although transport to the cell surface did not take place. When the shift was carried out in the presence of FCCP, negligible fluorescence was seen in the Golgi apparatus and the glycoproteins apparently remained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. A rapid inhibition in the accumulation of virus glycoproteins at the cell surface was obtained when FCCP was added during the active transport period, whereas with monensin there was a delay of

  16. Arenavirus Stable Signal Peptide Is the Keystone Subunit for Glycoprotein Complex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Bederka, Lydia H.; Bonhomme, Cyrille J.; Ling, Emily L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rodent arenavirus glycoprotein complex encodes a stable signal peptide (SSP) that is an essential structural component of mature virions. The SSP, GP1, and GP2 subunits of the trimeric glycoprotein complex noncovalently interact to stud the surface of virions and initiate arenavirus infectivity. Nascent glycoprotein production undergoes two proteolytic cleavage events: first within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cleave SSP from the remaining precursor GP1/2 (glycoprotein complex [GPC]) glycoprotein and second within the Golgi stacks by the cellular SKI-1/S1P for GP1/2 processing to yield GP1 and GP2 subunits. Cleaved SSP is not degraded but retained as an essential glycoprotein subunit. Here, we defined functions of the 58-amino-acid lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) SSP in regard to glycoprotein complex processing and maturation. Using molecular biology techniques, confocal microscopy, and flow cytometry, we detected SSP at the plasma membrane of transfected cells. Further, we identified a sorting signal (FLLL) near the carboxyl terminus of SSP that is required for glycoprotein maturation and trafficking. In the absence of SSP, the glycoprotein accumulated within the ER and was unable to undergo processing by SKI-1/S1P. Mutation of this highly conserved FLLL motif showed impaired glycoprotein processing and secretory pathway trafficking, as well as defective surface expression and pH-dependent membrane fusion. Immunoprecipitation of SSP confirmed an interaction between the signal peptide and the GP2 subunit; however, mutations within this FLLL motif disrupted the association of the GP1 subunit with the remaining glycoprotein complex. PMID:25352624

  17. Recombinant Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein Vaccine Elicits Antibodies Targeting Multiple Epitopes on the Envelope Glycoproteins Associated with Broad Cross-Neutralization

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jason Alexander Ji-Xhin; Bhat, Rakesh; Hockman, Darren; Logan, Michael; Chen, Chao; Levin, Aviad; Frey, Sharon E.; Belshe, Robert B.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although effective hepatitis C virus (HCV) antivirals are on the horizon, a global prophylactic vaccine for HCV remains elusive. The diversity of the virus is a major concern for vaccine development; there are 7 major genotypes of HCV found globally. Therefore, a successful vaccine will need to protect against HCV infection by all genotypes. Despite the diversity, many monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with broadly cross-neutralizing activity have been described, suggesting the presence of conserved epitopes that can be targeted to prevent infection. Similarly, a vaccine comprising recombinant envelope glycoproteins (rE1E2) derived from the genotype 1a HCV-1 strain has been shown to be capable of eliciting cross-neutralizing antibodies in guinea pigs, chimpanzees, and healthy human volunteers. In order to investigate the basis for this cross-neutralization, epitope mapping of anti-E1E2 antibodies present within antisera from goats and humans immunized with HCV-1 rE1E2 was conducted through peptide mapping and competition studies with a panel of cross-neutralizing MAbs targeting various epitopes within E1E2. The immunized-goat antiserum was shown to compete with the binding of all MAbs tested (AP33, HC33.4, HC84.26, 1:7, AR3B, AR4A, AR5A, IGH526, and A4). Antisera showed the best competition against HC84.26 and AR3B and the weakest competition against AR4A. Furthermore, antisera from five immunized human vaccinees were shown to compete with five preselected MAbs (AP33, AR3B, AR4A, AR5A, and IGH526). These data show that immunization with HCV-1 rE1E2 elicits antibodies targeting multiple cross-neutralizing epitopes. Our results further support the use of such a vaccine antigen to induce cross-genotype neutralization. IMPORTANCE An effective prophylactic vaccine for HCV is needed for optimal control of the disease burden. The high diversity of HCV has posed a challenge for developing vaccines that elicit neutralizing antibodies for protection against infection

  18. Pseudorabies virus glycoprotein L is necessary for virus infectivity but dispensable for virion localization of glycoprotein H.

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, B G; Fuchs, W; Weiland, E; Mettenleiter, T C

    1997-01-01

    Herpesviruses contain a number of envelope glycoproteins which play important roles in the interaction between virions and target cells. Although several glycoproteins are not present in all herpesviruses, others, including glycoproteins H and L (gH and gL), are conserved throughout the Herpesviridae. To elucidate common properties and differences in herpesvirus glycoprotein function, corresponding virus mutants must be constructed and analyzed in different herpesvirus backgrounds. Analysis of gH- mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PrV) showed that in both viruses gH is essential for penetration and cell-to-cell spread and that its presence is required for virion localization of gL. Since gH homologs are found complexed with gL, it was of interest to assess the phenotype of gL- mutant viruses. By using this approach, HSV-1 gL has been shown to be required for entry and for virion localization of gH (C. Roop, L. Hutchinson, and D. Johnson, J. Virol. 67:2285-2297, 1993). To examine whether a similar phenotype is associated with lack of gL in another alphaherpesvirus, PrV, we constructed two independent gL- PrV mutants by insertion and deletion-insertion mutagenesis. The salient findings are as follows: (i) PrV gL is required for penetration of virions and cell-to-cell spread; (ii) unlike HSV-1, PrV gH is incorporated into the virion in the absence of gL; (iii) virion localization of gH in the absence of gL is not sufficient for infectivity; (iv) in the absence of gL, N-glycans on PrV gH are processed to a greater extent than in the presence of gL, indicating masking of N-glycans by association with gL; and (v) an anti-gL polyclonal antiserum is able to neutralize virion infectivity but did not inhibit cell-to-cell spread. Thus, whereas PrV gL is essential for virus replication, as is HSV-1 gL, gL- PrV mutants exhibit properties strikingly different from those of HSV-1. In conclusion, our data show an important functional role for

  19. The relationship between glycan structures and expression levels of an endoplasmic reticulum-resident glycoprotein, UDP-glucose: Glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Daikoku, Shusaku; Seko, Akira; Son, Sang-Hyun; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Ito, Yukishige; Kanie, Osamu

    2015-06-19

    In this article, we report a relationship between glycan structures and expression levels of a recombinant ER-resident glycoprotein, uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucose: glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGGT1). The function of glycan structures attached to a glycoprotein is actively studied; however, the glycan structures of recombinant, and not endogenous, glycoproteins have not been examined. In this study, we indicate a relationship between the glycan structure and the level of protein expression. Expression levels were controlled utilizing a series of vectors (pFN21K, pFN22K, pFN23K, and pFN24K HaloTag CMV Flexi Vectors). Qualitative and semi-quantitative confirmation of glycan structures was achieved with tandem mass spectrometry. The results of this study indicate that glycan structures are similar to endogenous glycans at low expression levels.

  20. P-glycoprotein induction in Caco-2 cells by newly synthetized thioxanthones prevents paraquat cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Renata; Palmeira, Andreia; Carmo, Helena; Barbosa, Daniel José; Gameiro, Mariline; Gomes, Ana; Paiva, Ana Mafalda; Sousa, Emília; Pinto, Madalena; Bastos, Maria de Lourdes; Remião, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The induction of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump, has been proposed as a strategy against the toxicity induced by P-gp substrates such as the herbicide paraquat (PQ). The aim of this study was to screen five newly synthetized thioxanthonic derivatives, a group known to interact with P-gp, as potential inducers of the pump's expression and/or activity and to evaluate whether they would afford protection against PQ-induced toxicity in Caco-2 cells. All five thioxanthones (20 µM) caused a significant increase in both P-gp expression and activity as evaluated by flow cytometry using the UIC2 antibody and rhodamine 123, respectively. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the tested compounds, when present only during the efflux of rhodamine 123, rapidly induced an activation of P-gp. The tested compounds also increased P-gp ATPase activity in MDR1-Sf9 membrane vesicles, indicating that all derivatives acted as P-gp substrates. PQ cytotoxicity was significantly reduced in the presence of four thioxanthone derivatives, and this protective effect was reversed upon incubation with a specific P-gp inhibitor. In silico studies showed that all the tested thioxanthones fitted onto a previously described three-feature P-gp induction pharmacophore. Moreover, in silico interactions between thioxanthones and P-gp in the presence of PQ suggested that a co-transport mechanism may be operating. Based on the in vitro activation results, a pharmacophore model for P-gp activation was built, which will be of further use in the screening for new P-gp activators. In conclusion, the study demonstrated the potential of the tested thioxanthonic compounds in protecting against toxic effects induced by P-gp substrates through P-gp induction and activation.

  1. Inhibition of bacterial ice nucleators by fish antifreeze glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Parody-Morreale, A; Murphy, K P; Di Cera, E; Fall, R; DeVries, A L; Gill, S J

    1988-06-23

    Certain bacteria promote the formation of ice in super-cooled water by means of ice nucleators which contain a unique protein associated with the cell membrane. Ice nucleators in general are believed to act by mimicking the structure of an ice crystal surface, thus imposing an ice-like arrangement on the water molecules in contact with the nucleating surface and lowering the energy necessary for the initiation of ice formation. Quantitative investigation of the bacterial ice-nucleating process has recently been made possible by the discovery of certain bacteria that shed stable membrane vesicles with ice nucleating activity. The opposite effect, inhibition of ice formation, has been described for a group of glycoproteins found in different fish and insect species. This group of substances, termed antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), promotes the supercooling of water with no appreciable effect on the equilibrium freezing point or melting temperature. Substantial evidence now indicates that AFGPs act by binding to a growing ice crystal and slowing crystal growth. As the ice-nucleating protein surface is believed to have a structure similar to an embryonic ice crystal, AFGPs might be predicted to interact directly with a bacterial ice-nucleating site. We report here that AFGPs from the antarctic fish Dissostichus mawsoni inhibit the ice-nucleating activity of membrane vesicles from the bacterium Erwinia herbicola. The inhibition effect shows saturation at high concentration of AFGP and conforms to a simple binding reaction between the AFGP and the nucleation centre.

  2. Immunomodulatory roles of the carcinoembryonic antigen family of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ling; Allez, Matthieu; Park, Mee-Sook; Mayer, Lloyd

    2006-08-01

    One of the most remarkable aspects of the immune system is its ability to fashion an immune response most appropriate to the activating stimulus. Although the immune system possesses a number of adaptations to accomplish this, an important theme is local immune regulation by site-specific expression of receptors and ligands. One family of molecules that is gaining attention as modulators of the immune system is the carcinoembryonic antigen cell-adhesion molecule family (CEACAM). Functionally, the carcinoembryonic antigen family can mediate cell-cell contact, host-pathogen interactions, and immune regulation. For example, biliary glycoprotein (CEACAM1) can have direct activity on T cells, leading to the inhibition of helper or cytotoxic T cell function. The expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEACAM5) on intestinal epithelial cells is involved in the activation of populations of regulatory CD8(+) T cells, while a distinct subset of regulatory CD8+ T cells is activated by nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (CEACAM6) on placental trophoblasts. Interestingly, the function and phenotype of these cells depend upon the specific member of the carcinoembryonic antigen family expressed, as well as the antigen-presenting molecule with which it associates. Thus, these glycoproteins comprise a family of molecules whose functions can depend on their nature and context.

  3. Determinants of oligomeric structure in the chicken liver glycoprotein receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Verrey, F; Drickamer, K

    1993-01-01

    The oligomeric state of the chicken liver receptor (chicken hepatic lectin), which mediates endocytosis of glycoproteins terminating with N-acetylglucosamine, has been investigated using physical methods as well as chemical cross-linking. Receptor isolated from liver and from transfected rat fibroblasts expressing the full-length polypeptide is a homotrimer immediately following solubilization in non-ionic detergent, but forms the previously observed hexamer during purification. These results are most consistent with the presence of a trimer of receptor polypeptides in liver membranes and in transfected cells. Analysis of truncated receptors reveals that the C-terminal extracellular portion of this type-II transmembrane protein does not form stable oligomers when isolated from the membrane anchor and cytoplasmic tail. The behaviour of chimeric receptors, in which the cytoplasmic tail of the glycoprotein receptor is replaced with the corresponding segments of rat liver asialoglycoprotein receptor or the beta-subunit of Na+,K(+)-ATPase, or with unrelated sequences from globin, indicates that the cytoplasmic tail influences oligomer stability. Replacement of N-terminal portions of the receptor with corresponding segments of influenza virus neuraminidase results in formation of tetramers, suggesting that the membrane anchor and flanking sequences are important determinants of oligomer formation. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8503842

  4. Myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG): past, present and beyond.

    PubMed

    Quarles, Richard H

    2007-03-01

    The myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein localized in periaxonal Schwann cell and oligodendroglial membranes of myelin sheaths where it functions in glia-axon interactions. It contains five immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains and is in the sialic acid-binding subgroup of the Ig superfamily. It appears to function both as a ligand for an axonal receptor that is needed for the maintenance of myelinated axons and as a receptor for an axonal signal that promotes the differentiation, maintenance and survival of oligodendrocytes. Its function in the maintenance of myelinated axons may be related to its role as one of the white matter inhibitors of neurite outgrowth acting through a receptor complex involving the Nogo receptor and/or gangliosides containing 2,3-linked sialic acid. MAG is expressed as two developmentally regulated isoforms with different cytoplasmic domains that may activate different signal transduction pathways in myelin-forming cells. MAG contains a carbohydrate epitope shared with other glycoconjugates that is a target antigen in autoimmune peripheral neuropathy associated with IgM gammopathy and has been implicated in a dying back oligodendrogliopathy in multiple sclerosis.

  5. A facile and general approach for preparation of glycoprotein-imprinted magnetic nanoparticles with synergistic selectivity.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yi; Gao, Ruixia; Liu, Dechun; He, Gaiyan; Tang, Yuhai; Guo, Zengjun

    2016-06-01

    In light of the significance of glycoprotein biomarkers for early clinical diagnostics and treatments of diseases, it is essential to develop efficient and selective enrichment platforms for glycoproteins. In this study, we present a facile and general strategy to prepare the boronate affinity-based magnetic imprinted nanoparticles. Boronic acid ligands were first grafted on the directly aldehyde-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles through amidation reaction. Then, template glycoproteins were immobilized on the boronic acid-modified magnetic nanoparticles via boronate affinity binding. Subsequently, a thin layer of dopamine was formed to coat the surface of magnetic nanoparticles through self-polymerization. After the template glycoproteins were removed, the cavities that can specific bind the template glycoproteins were fabricated. Adopting horseradish peroxidase as model template, the effects of imprinting conditions as well as the properties and performance of the obtained products were investigated. The resultant imprinted materials exhibit highly favorable features, including uniform surface morphology with thin imprinted shell of about 8nm, super-paramagnetic property, fast kinetics of 40min, high adsorption capacity of 60.3mgg(-1), and satisfactory reusability for at least five cycles of adsorption-desorption without obvious deterioration. Meanwhile, the obtained magnetic imprinted nanoparticles could capture target glycoprotein from nonglycoproteins, but also from other glycoproteins because the synergistic selectivity of boronate affinity and imprinting effect. In addition, the facile preparation method shows feasibility in the imprinting of different glycoproteins.

  6. Rapid and efficient glycoprotein identification through microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion.

    PubMed

    Segu, Zaneer M; Hammad, Loubna A; Mechref, Yehia

    2010-12-15

    Identification of protein glycosylation sites is analytically challenging due to the diverse glycan structures associated with a glycoprotein. Mass spectrometry (MS)-based identification and characterization of glycoproteins has been achieved predominantly with the bottom-up approach, which typically involves the enzymatic cleavage of proteins to peptides prior to LC/MS or LC/MS/MS analysis. However, the process can be challenging due to the structural variations and steric hindrance imposed by the attached glycans. Alternatives to conventional heating protocols, that increase the rate of enzymatic cleavage of glycoproteins, may aid in addressing these challenges. An enzymatic digestion of a glycoprotein can be accelerated and made more efficient through microwave-assisted digestion. In this paper, a systematic study was conducted to explore the efficiency of microwave-assisted enzymatic (trypsin) digestion (MAED) of glycoproteins as compared with the conventional method. In addition, the optimum experimental parameters for the digestion such as temperature, reaction time, and microwave radiation power were investigated. It was determined that efficient tryptic digestion of glycoproteins was attained in 15 min, allowing comparable if not better sequence coverage through LC/MS/MS analysis. Optimum tryptic cleavage was achieved at 45°C irrespective of the size and complexity of the glycoprotein. Moreover, MAED allowed the detection and identification of more peptides and subsequently higher sequence coverage for all model glycoprotein. MAED also did not appear to prompt a loss or partial cleavage of the glycan moieties attached to the peptide backbones.

  7. Characterization of Lassa virus glycoprotein oligomerization and influence of cholesterol on virus replication.

    PubMed

    Schlie, Katrin; Maisa, Anna; Lennartz, Frank; Ströher, Ute; Garten, Wolfgang; Strecker, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Mature glycoprotein spikes are inserted in the Lassa virus envelope and consist of the distal subunit GP-1, the transmembrane-spanning subunit GP-2, and the signal peptide, which originate from the precursor glycoprotein pre-GP-C by proteolytic processing. In this study, we analyzed the oligomeric structure of the viral surface glycoprotein. Chemical cross-linking studies of mature glycoprotein spikes from purified virus revealed the formation of trimers. Interestingly, sucrose density gradient analysis of cellularly expressed glycoprotein showed that in contrast to trimeric mature glycoprotein complexes, the noncleaved glycoprotein forms monomers and oligomers spanning a wide size range, indicating that maturation cleavage of GP by the cellular subtilase SKI-1/S1P is critical for formation of the correct oligomeric state. To shed light on a potential relation between cholesterol and GP trimer stability, we performed cholesterol depletion experiments. Although depletion of cholesterol had no effect on trimerization of the glycoprotein spike complex, our studies revealed that the cholesterol content of the viral envelope is important for the infectivity of Lassa virus. Analyses of the distribution of viral proteins in cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant membrane areas showed that Lassa virus buds from membrane areas other than those responsible for impaired infectivity due to cholesterol depletion of lipid rafts. Thus, derivation of the viral envelope from cholesterol-rich membrane areas is not a prerequisite for the impact of cholesterol on virus infectivity.

  8. Histochemical and structural analysis of mucous glycoprotein secreted by the gill of Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Hae-Young.

    1988-01-01

    Studies were carried out to characterized various mucous cells in the gill filament, to ascertain structural characteristics of the secreted mucous glycoproteins, and to determine the ability of the gill epithelium to incorporate ({sup 14}C)glucosamine as a precursor in the biosynthesis and secretion of mucous glycoproteins. Using histochemical staining techniques, mucous cells containing neutral and acidic mucins were found in the lateral region, whereas mucous cells containing primarily neutral or sulfated mucins were found in the postlateral region. Serotonin, but not dopamine, stimulated the mucous secretion. In tissues pretreated with ({sup 14}C)glucosamine, the secreted glycoproteins contain incorporated radiolabel. Analysis by column chromatography using Bio-Gel P-2 and P-6 shows that the secretion contains two glycoprotein populations. Glycoprotein II has a molecular weight of 2.3 {times} 10{sup 4} daltons. Upon alkaline reductive borohydride cleavage of the O-glycosidic linkages of glycoprotein I, about 70% of the radiolabel was removed from the protein. Gas chromatographic analysis of the carbohydrate composition shows that the glycoproteins contains N-acetylglucosamine (GluNAc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), and galactose, fucose and mannose. Amino acid analysis shows that the glycoproteins are rich in serine, threonine and proline.

  9. Glycoprotein Biochemistry--Some Clinical Aspects of Interest to Biochemistry Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Christopher A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Authors describe some clinical features of glycoprotein biochemistry, including recognition, selected blood glycoproteins, glycated proteins, histochemistry, and cancer. The material presented has largely been taught to medical laboratory students; however, it can be used to teach premedical students and pure biochemistry students. Includes two…

  10. Weak anion exchange chromatographic profiling of glycoprotein isoforms on a polymer monolithic capillary.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Ren, Lianbing; Liu, Yunchun; Li, Hengye; Liu, Zhen

    2012-03-09

    High resolution separation of intact glycoproteins, which is essential for many aspects such as finger-print profiling, represents a great challenge because one glycoprotein can exhibit many isoforms with close physicochemical properties. Monolithic columns are important separation media for the separation of intact proteins due to its significant advantages such as easy preparation, high column efficiency and high permeability. However, there are few reports on high resolution profiling of intact glycoproteins. Herein, we presented a polymeric weak anion exchange (WAX) monolithic capillary for high resolution separation of glycoprotein isoforms. A base monolith was first prepared through ring-opening polymerization between tris(2,3-epoxypropyl)isocyanurate and tri(2-aminoethyl), and then modified through reacting with ammonia aqueous solution to convert the unreacted epoxide moieties into primary amino groups. The prepared monolithic capillary was characterized in terms of morphology, pore size, hydrophilicity and reproducibility. The obtained WAX monolithic capillary exhibited desired through-pores and mesopore size, stable skeleton and hydrophilic nature. The performance of the capillary was evaluated using several typical glycoproteins such as α(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP) as mode analytes. Effects of the experimental parameters on the glycoform resolution were investigated. Under the optimized separation conditions, the tested glycoproteins were all resolved into distinct glycoforms. A comparative investigation with capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) revealed that this WAX column provided better selectivity as more isoforms were observed, although the resolution of some glycoprotein isoforms decreased.

  11. Systemic alteration of cell-surface and secreted glycoprotein expression in malignant breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Timpe, Leslie C; Yen, Roger; Haste, Nicole V; Litsakos-Cheung, Christina; Yen, Ten-Yang; Macher, Bruce A

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer cell lines express fewer transmembrane and secreted glycoproteins than nonmalignant ones. The objective of these experiments was to characterize the changes in the expression of several hundred glycoproteins quantitatively. Secreted and cell-surface glycoproteins were isolated using a glycoprotein capture protocol and then identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Glycoproteins expressed by a group of cell lines originating from malignant tumors of the breast were compared with those expressed by a nonmalignant set. The average number of spectral counts (proportional to relative protein abundance) and the total number of glycopeptides in the malignant samples were reduced to about two-thirds of the level in the nonmalignant samples. Most glycoproteins were expressed at a different level in the malignant samples, with nearly as many increasing as decreasing. The glycoproteins with reduced expression accounted for a larger change in spectral counts, and hence for the net loss of spectral counts in the malignant lines. Similar results were found when the glycoproteins were studied via identified glycosylation sites only, or through identified sites together with non-glycopeptides. The overall reduction is largely due to the loss of integrins, laminins and other proteins that form or interact with the basement membrane.

  12. Targeted entry via somatostatin receptors using a novel modified retrovirus glycoprotein that delivers genes at levels comparable to those of wild-type viral glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Ryu, Byoung Y; Krueger, Robin L; Heldt, Scott A; Albritton, Lorraine M

    2012-01-01

    Here we report a novel viral glycoprotein created by replacing a natural receptor-binding sequence of the ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope glycoprotein with the peptide ligand somatostatin. This new chimeric glycoprotein, which has been named the Sst receptor binding site (Sst-RBS), gives targeted transduction based on three criteria: (i) a gain of the use of a new entry receptor not used by any known virus; (ii) targeted entry at levels comparable to gene delivery by wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G glycoproteins; and (iii) a loss of the use of the natural ecotropic virus receptor. Retroviral vectors coated with Sst-RBS gained the ability to bind and transduce human 293 cells expressing somatostatin receptors. Their infection was specific to target somatostatin receptors, since a synthetic somatostatin peptide inhibited infection in a dose-dependent manner and the ability to transduce mouse cells bearing the natural ecotropic receptor was effectively lost. Importantly, vectors coated with the Sst-RBS glycoprotein gave targeted entry of up to 1 × 10(6) transducing U/ml, a level comparable to that seen with infection of vectors coated with the parental wild-type ecotropic Moloney murine leukemia virus glycoprotein through the ecotropic receptor and approaching that of infection of VSV G-coated vectors through the VSV receptor. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a glycoprotein that gives targeted entry of retroviral vectors at levels comparable to the natural capacity of viral envelope glycoproteins.

  13. Replication and neutralization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 lacking the V1 and V2 variable loops of the gp120 envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, J; Sullivan, N; Desjardin, E; Parolin, C; Robinson, J; Wyatt, R; Sodroski, J

    1997-01-01

    A human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mutant lacking the V1 and V2 variable loops in the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein replicated in Jurkat lymphocytes with only modest delays compared with the wild-type virus. Revertants that replicated with wild-type efficiency rapidly emerged and contained only a few amino acid changes in the envelope glycoproteins compared with the parent virus. Both the parent and revertant viruses exhibited increased sensitivity to neutralization by antibodies directed against the V3 loop or a CD4-induced epitope on gp120 but not by soluble CD4 or an antibody against the CD4 binding site. This result demonstrates the role of the gp120 V1 and V2 loops in protecting HIV-1 from some subsets of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:9371651

  14. Subunit structure of deglycosylated human and swine trachea and Cowper's gland mucin glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, S; Kim, D; Brewer, J M; Mendicino, J

    1991-03-27

    The oligosaccharide chains in human and swine trachea and Cowper's gland mucin glycoproteins were completely removed in order to examine the subunit structure and properties of the polypeptide chains of these glycoproteins. The carbohydrate, which constitutes more than 70% of these glycoproteins, was removed by two treatments with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid for 3 h at 3 degrees and periodate oxidation by a modified Smith degradation. All of the sialic acid, fucose, galactose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine present in these glycoproteins was removed by these procedures. The deglycosylated polypeptide chains were purified and characterized. The size of the monomeric forms of all three polypeptide chains were very similar. Data obtained by gel filtration, release of amino acids during hydrolysis with carboxypeptidase B and gel electrophoresis in the presence of 0.1% dodecyl sulfate showed that a major fraction from each of the three mucin glycoproteins had a molecular size of about 67 kDa. All of the deglycosylated chains had a tendency to aggregate. Digestion with carboxypeptidases showed that human and swine trachea mucin glycoproteins had identical carboxyl terminal sequences, -Val-Ala-Phe-Tyr-Leu-Lys-Arg-COOH. Cowper's gland mucin glycoprotein had a similar carboxyl terminal sequence, -Val-Ala-Tyr-Leu-Phe-Arg-Arg-COOH. The yield of amino acids after long periods of hydrolysis with carboxypeptidases showed that at least 85% of the polypeptide chains in each of the deglycosylated preparations have these sequences. These results suggested that the polypeptide chains in these deglycosylated mucin glycoprotein preparations were relatively homogeneous. The deglycosylated polypeptide chains as well as the intact mucin glycoproteins had blocked amino terminii. The purified polypeptide chains were digested with trypsin-TCPK, and S. aureus V8 protease and the resulting peptides were isolated by gel electrophoresis in the presence of 0.1% dodecyl sulfate

  15. Amino acid sequence similarity between rabies virus glycoprotein and snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Wilson, P T; Hawrot, E; Speicher, D W

    1984-11-16

    Evidence was presented earlier that a host-cell receptor for the highly neurotropic rabies virus might be the acetylcholine receptor. The amino acid sequence of the glycoprotein of rabies virus was compared by computer analysis with that of snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins, potent ligands of the acetylcholine receptor. A statistically significant sequence relation was found between a segment of the rabies glycoprotein and the entire sequence of long neurotoxins. The greatest identity occurs with residues considered most important in neurotoxicity, including those interacting with the acetylcholine binding site of the acetylcholine receptor. Because of the similarity between the glycoprotein and the receptor-binding region of the neurotoxins, this region of the viral glycoprotein may function as a recognition site for the acetylcholine receptor. Direct binding of the rabies virus glycoprotein to the acetylcholine receptor could contribute to the neurotropism of this virus.

  16. Binding of soluble glycoproteins from sugarcane juice to cells of Acetobacter diazotrophicus.

    PubMed

    Legaz, M E; de Armas, R; Barriguete, E; Vicente, C

    2000-09-01

    Sugarcane produces two different pools of glycoproteins containing a heterofructan as glycidic moiety, tentatively defined as high-molecular mass (HMMG) and mid-molecular mass (MMMG) glycoproteins. Both kinds of glycoproteins can be recovered in sugarcane juice. Fluorescein-labelled glycoproteins are able to bind to Acetobacter diazotrophicus cells, a natural endophyte of sugarcane. This property implies the aggregation of bacterial cells in liquid culture after addition of HMMG or MMMG. Anionic glycoproteins seem to be responsible for the binding activity whereas cationic fraction is not retained on the surface ofA. diazotrophicus. Bound HMMG is competitively desorbed by sucrose whereas MMMG is desorbed by glucosamine or fructose. On this basis, a hypothesis about the discriminatory ability of sugarcane to choose the compatible endophyte from several possible ones is proposed.

  17. Developmental and mutational changes of glycoproteins in the mouse neuronal retina: studies with bovine galactosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Wallenfels, B

    1979-07-01

    Bovine galactosyltransferase (lactose synthase; EC 2.4.1.22) which catalyzes the transfer of galactose from UDPgalactose to glycoproteins with N-acetylglucosamine as the terminal residue of their oligosaccharide side chains was used to label glycoproteins of mouse retina with [14C]galactose. The glycoproteins were separated by isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis in the second dimension. Their position on the gel was determined by autofluorography. With this method, quantitative as well as qualitative changes in the glycoprotein composition of the neuronal mouse retina during postnatal development were observed. Furthermore, it was found that the photoreceptor loss in mice with retinal degeneration was paralleled by the disappearance of certain glycoprotein bands.

  18. Developmental and mutational changes of glycoproteins in the mouse neuronal retina: studies with bovine galactosyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Wallenfels, B

    1979-01-01

    Bovine galactosyltransferase (lactose synthase; EC 2.4.1.22) which catalyzes the transfer of galactose from UDPgalactose to glycoproteins with N-acetylglucosamine as the terminal residue of their oligosaccharide side chains was used to label glycoproteins of mouse retina with [14C]galactose. The glycoproteins were separated by isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis in the second dimension. Their position on the gel was determined by autofluorography. With this method, quantitative as well as qualitative changes in the glycoprotein composition of the neuronal mouse retina during postnatal development were observed. Furthermore, it was found that the photoreceptor loss in mice with retinal degeneration was paralleled by the disappearance of certain glycoprotein bands. Images PMID:290997

  19. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection.

  20. Purification and characterization of a soluble glycoprotein from garlic (Allium sativum) and its in vitro bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zou, Tingting; Xiang, Minghui; Jin, Chenzhong; Zhang, Xuejiao; Chen, Yong; Jiang, Qiuqing; Hu, Yihong

    2016-10-02

    A soluble glycoprotein was purified to homogeneity from ripe garlic (Allium sativum) bulbs using ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sephadex G-100 gel filtration, and diethylaminoethyl-52 cellulose anion-exchange chromatography. A native mass of 55.7 kDa estimated on gel permeation chromatography and a molecular weight of 13.2 kDa observed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis supported that the glycoprotein is a homotetramer. β-Elimination reaction result suggested that the glycoprotein is an N-linked type. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy proved that it contains sugar. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis showed that its sugar component was galactose. The glycoprotein has 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazil free radical scavenging activity and the peroxidation inhibition ability to polyunsaturated fatty acid. These results indicated that the glycoprotein has potential for food additives, functional foods, and even biotechnological and medical applications.

  1. Differential targeting of closely related ECM glycoproteins: the pherophorin family from Volvox.

    PubMed

    Godl, K; Hallmann, A; Wenzl, S; Sumper, M

    1997-01-02

    The alga Volvox carteri represents one of the simplest multicellular organisms. Its extracellular matrix (ECM) is modified under developmental control, e.g. under the influence of the sex-inducing pheromone that triggers development of males and females at a concentration below 10(-16) M. A novel ECM glycoprotein (pherophorin-S) synthesized in response to this pheromone was identified and characterized. Although being a typical member of the pherophorins, which are identified by a C-terminal domain with sequence homology to the sex-inducing pheromone, pherophorin-S exhibits a completely novel set of properties. In contrast to the other members of the family, which are found as part of the insoluble ECM structures of the cellular zone, pherophorin-S is targeted to the cell-free interior of the spherical organism and remains in a soluble state. A main structural difference is the presence of a polyhydroxyproline spacer in pherophorin-S that is linked to a saccharide containing a phosphodiester bridge between two arabinose residues. Sequence comparisons indicate that the self-assembling proteins that create the main parts of the complex Volvox ECM have evolved from a common ancestral gene.

  2. Sputum Leucine-Rich Alpha-2 Glycoprotein as a Marker of Airway Inflammation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hiromi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Miyamoto, Shintaro; Ishikawa, Nobuhisa; Serada, Satoshi; Hattori, Noboru; Nomura, Shintaro; Kohno, Nobuoki; Yokoyama, Akihito; Naka, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of airways, but an ideal biomarker that accurately reflects ongoing airway inflammation has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to examine the potential of sputum leucine-rich alpha-2 glycoprotein (LRG) as a new biomarker for airway inflammation in asthma. Methods We obtained induced sputum samples from patients with asthma (N = 64) and healthy volunteers (N = 22) and measured LRG concentration by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma model mice were used to investigate the mechanism of LRG production during airway inflammation. The LRG concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) obtained from mice were determined by ELISA and mouse lung sections were stained with anti-LRG antibody and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reagent. Results Sputum LRG concentrations were significantly higher in patients with asthma than in healthy volunteers (p = 0.00686). Consistent with patients’ data, BALF LRG levels in asthma model mice were significantly higher than in control mice (p = 0.00013). Immunohistochemistry of lung sections from asthma model mice revealed that LRG was intensely expressed in a subpopulation of bronchial epithelial cells, which corresponded with PAS-positive mucus producing cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that sputum LRG is a promising biomarker of local inflammation in asthma. PMID:27611322

  3. A gamma-herpesvirus glycoprotein complex manipulates actin to promote viral spread.

    PubMed

    Gill, Michael B; Edgar, Rachel; May, Janet S; Stevenson, Philip G

    2008-03-19

    Viruses lack self-propulsion. To move in multi-cellular hosts they must therefore manipulate infected cells. Herpesviruses provide an archetype for many aspects of host manipulation, but only for alpha-herpesviruses in is there much information about they move. Other herpesviruses are not necessarily the same. Here we show that Murine gamma-herpesvirus-68 (MHV-68) induces the outgrowth of long, branched plasma membrane fronds to create an intercellular network for virion traffic. The fronds were actin-based and RhoA-dependent. Time-lapse imaging showed that the infected cell surface became highly motile and that virions moved on the fronds. This plasma membrane remodelling was driven by the cytoplasmic tail of gp48, a MHV-68 glycoprotein previously implicated in intercellular viral spread. The MHV-68 ORF58 was also required, but its role was simply transporting gp48 to the plasma membrane, since a gp48 mutant exported without ORF58 did not require ORF58 to form membrane fronds either. Together, gp48/ORF58 were sufficient to induce fronds in transfected cells, as were the homologous BDLF2/BMRF2 of Epstein-Barr virus. Gp48/ORF58 therefore represents a conserved module by which gamma-herpesviruses rearrange cellular actin to increase intercellular contacts and thereby promote their spread.

  4. Inflammatory response of endothelial cells to hepatitis C virus recombinant envelope glycoprotein 2 protein exposure.

    PubMed

    Urbaczek, Ana Carolina; Ribeiro, Lívia Carolina de Abreu; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Afonso, Ana; Nogueira, Camila Tita; Generoso, Wesley Cardoso; Alberice, Juliana Vieira; Rudnicki, Martina; Ferrer, Renila; Fonseca, Luiz Marcos da; Costa, Paulo Inácio da

    2014-09-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) encodes approximately 10 different structural and non-structural proteins, including the envelope glycoprotein 2 (E2). HCV proteins, especially the envelope proteins, bind to cell receptors and can damage tissues. Endothelial inflammation is the most important determinant of fibrosis progression and, consequently, cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the inflammatory response of endothelial cells to two recombinant forms of the HCV E2 protein produced in different expression systems (Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris). We observed the induction of cell death and the production of nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide, interleukin-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor A in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) stimulated by the two recombinant E2 proteins. The E2-induced apoptosis of HUVECs was confirmed using the molecular marker PARP. The apoptosis rescue observed when the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was used suggests that reactive oxygen species are involved in E2-induced apoptosis. We propose that these proteins are involved in the chronic inflammation caused by HCV.

  5. Identification of a juxtamembrane mechanosensitive domain in the platelet mechanosensor glycoprotein Ib-IX complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Deng, Wei; Zhou, Liang; Xu, Yan; Yang, Wenjun; Liang, Xin; Wang, Yizhen; Kulman, John D.; Zhang, X. Frank

    2015-01-01

    How glycoprotein (GP)Ib-IX complex on the platelet surface senses the blood flow through its binding to the plasma protein von Willebrand factor (VWF) and transmits a signal into the platelet remains unclear. Here we show that optical tweezer-controlled pulling of the A1 domain of VWF (VWF-A1) on GPIb-IX captured by its cytoplasmic domain induced unfolding of a hitherto unidentified structural domain before the dissociation of VWF-A1 from GPIb-IX. Additional studies using recombinant proteins and mutant complexes confirmed its existence in GPIb-IX and enabled localization of this quasi-stable mechanosensitive domain of ∼60 residues between the macroglycopeptide region and the transmembrane helix of the GPIbα subunit. These results suggest that VWF-mediated pulling under fluid shear induces unfolding of the mechanosensitive domain in GPIb-IX, which may possibly contribute to platelet mechanosensing and/or shear resistance of VWF-platelet interaction. The identification of the mechanosensitive domain in GPIb-IX has significant implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of related blood diseases. PMID:25359992

  6. Uncoupling GP1 and GP2 Expression in the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Complex: Implications for GP1 Ectodomain Shedding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-23

    BioMed CentralVirology Journal ssOpen AcceResearch Uncoupling GP1 and GP2 expression in the Lassa virus glycoprotein complex: implications for GP1...contributors Abstract Background: Sera from convalescent Lassa fever patients often contains antibodies to Lassa virus (LASV) glycoprotein 1 (GP1...uncoupled Lassa virus (LASV) glycoprotein 1 (GP1) and glycoprotein 2 (GP2) were established. Soluble GP1 was generated using either the native

  7. Uncoupling GP1 and GP2 Expression in the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Complex: Implications for GPI Ectodomain Shedding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-23

    BioMed CentralVirology Journal ssOpen AcceResearch Uncoupling GP1 and GP2 expression in the Lassa virus glycoprotein complex: implications for GP1...contributors Abstract Background: Sera from convalescent Lassa fever patients often contains antibodies to Lassa virus (LASV) glycoprotein 1 (GP1...uncoupled Lassa virus (LASV) glycoprotein 1 (GP1) and glycoprotein 2 (GP2) were established. Soluble GP1 was generated using either the native

  8. Heterologous expression of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus glycoprotein 5 in Bordetella bronchisepticaaroA mutant

    PubMed Central

    PARK, Sang Ik; SEO, Ja Young; KIM, Tae Jung

    2016-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an economically important disease around the globe. Protection against this virus remains problematic. Here, we evaluated antibody (IgG & IgA) inducibility of a heterologous PRRSV glycoprotein 5 (GP5) expressed in a live attenuated Bordetella bronchisepticaaroA mutant strain (BBS-GP5). Mice and pigs were primed with recombinant GP5 (rGP5) subcutaneously followed by boosting with live BBS-GP5. As a result, anti-GP5 IgG was induced in both mice (P<0.001) and pigs (P<0.1). Pigs were challenged with live PRRSV (VR2332). Viral RNA was found to be significantly (P<0.01) removed in the vaccinated pig group. Overall, BBS-GP5 is a good candidate as a live attenuated vaccine against PRRSV infection. PMID:27349762

  9. Enhanced protection against HSV lethal challenges in mice by immunization with a combined HSV-1 glycoprotein B:H:L gene DNAs.

    PubMed

    Cha, Soung Chul; Kim, Young Sik; Cho, Jae Kyung; Cho, Jun; Kim, Su Yung; Kang, Hyun; Cho, Myung Hwan; Lee, Hyung Hoan

    2002-06-01

    The effectiveness of a cocktailed HSV-1 three-glycoprotein B, H, and L gene vaccine in comparison to individual glycoprotein gene vaccines was studied with regard to protecting against the HSV-1 infection. Three glycoprotein gene recombinant DNA vaccines, which produced the corresponding glycoproteins in Vero cells, were constructed using a CMV promoter. The cocktailed DNA vaccines were prepared by combining all three genes. The titers of neurtalizing antibody following the immunization of the five vaccines were KOS(1/1024)>B:H:L=B(1/512)>H:L(1/64)>H(1/16) genes. The mice, which were immunized with L gene alone failed to induce enough neutralizing antibody. The CTL activity was rated as KOS (95%)>B:H:L (80%)>B(60%)>H:L(50%)> H (35%) gene vaccines at an E:T ratio of 50:1. The H gene alone or L gene vaccine alone induced little CTL activity. The protection rates of the DNA-vaccinated mice against the lethal intraperitoneal (i.p.) or i.m challenges were shown as KOS>B:H:L>B>H:L>H gene vaccines, and the protection activity depended on the lethal dosage of the challenging virus, which are inversely proportional to each other. Compared with the mice, which were vaccinated with individual DNA vaccines, the mice, which were vaccinated with the cocktailed three-gene vaccine, were shown to be better protected against the lethal challenging doses. It can be concluded that vaccination with the cocktailed three gene vaccines is more effective in protecting mice from the viral challenge and the protection rate varies inversely with the amount of lethal challenging dose used, although all DNA vaccines failed to block the latent infection in sensory nerves.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 glycoproteins gp120 and gp160 specifically inhibit the CD3/T cell-antigen receptor phosphoinositide transduction pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Cefai, D; Debre, P; Kaczorek, M; Idziorek, T; Autran, B; Bismuth, G

    1990-01-01

    The interference of the recombinant HIV-1 glycoproteins gp160 and gp120 with the CD3/T cell antigen receptor (TcR)-mediated activation process has been investigated in the CD4+ diphtheria toxoid-specific human P28D T cell clone. Both glycoproteins clearly inhibit the T cell proliferation induced in an antigen-presenting cell (APC)-free system by various cross-linked monoclonal antibodies specific for the CD3 molecule or the TcR alpha chain (up to 80% inhibition). Biochemical studies further demonstrate that exposure of the T cell clone to both glycoproteins (gps) specifically inhibits the CD3/TcR phospholipase C (PLC) transduction pathway, without affecting the CD3/TcR cell surface expression. Thus, inositol phosphate production, phosphatidic acid turnover, intracellular free calcium, and intracellular pH increase induced by CD3/TcR-specific MAbs are specifically impaired in gps-treated P28D T cells. Addition of purified soluble CD4 prevents binding of gps to T cells and overcomes all observed inhibitions. Maximal inhibitions are obtained for long-term exposure of the T cell clone to gps (16 h). No early effect of gps is observed. By contrast, gp160 and gp120 fail to suppress the CD2-triggered functional and biochemical P28D T cell responses. These results demonstrate that, in addition to their postulated role in the alteration of the interaction between CD4 on T lymphocytes and MHC class II molecules on APC, soluble HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins may directly and specifically impair the CD3/TcR-mediated activation of PLC in uninfected T cells via the CD4 molecule. PMID:1979339

  11. Moxidectin has a lower neurotoxic potential but comparable brain penetration in P-glycoprotein-deficient CF-1 mice compared to ivermectin.

    PubMed

    Janko, C; Geyer, J

    2013-06-01

    The anti-parasitic drugs ivermectin (IVM) and moxidectin (MOX) normally show limited brain penetration in vertebrates because of effective drug efflux at the blood-brain barrier by P-glycoprotein, encoded by the multi-drug resistance (MDR1) gene. However, dogs with homozygous nt230(del4) mutation in the MDR1 gene do not express a functionally active P-glycoprotein and show increased brain penetration of these drugs, resulting in neurological toxicity to different degrees. Thus, whereas IVM provokes neurological toxicity at 0.1 mg/kg, MOX is tolerated at this dosage. To investigate whether this difference is attributable to lower brain penetration of MOX in the absence of P-glycoprotein or to their neurotoxic potential, we applied IVM and MOX to P-glycoprotein-deficient CF-1 mice and comparatively analysed the absolute drug concentrations in the brain. Furthermore, we quantified drug-induced neurotoxicity by measuring the walking performance of the mice on a rotarod setup. We found that at a dosage of 0.2 mg/kg, representing 0.23 μmol/kg IVM and 0.31 μmol/kg MOX, the absolute drug concentrations in the brain were comparable with 100.8 pmol/g and 140.2 pmol/g, respectively. However, MOX induced the same degree of neurotoxicosis at the higher dosage of 1.09 μmol/kg (0.7 mg/kg) compared with IVM at 0.40 μmol/kg (0.35 mg/kg), demonstrating the 2.7-fold lower neurotoxic potential of MOX compared to IVM. This could be explained by a lower binding affinity or lower intrinsic activity of MOX at the relevant central nervous system receptors compared with IVM.

  12. Component(s) of Sendai virus that can induce interferon in mouse spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Y; Hosaka, Y

    1983-01-01

    To identify the active component of Sendai virus that induces interferon in mouse spleen cells, infectious and noninfectious viruses, envelope particles derived from them, and isolated hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoproteins were examined for interferon induction. The interaction between membranous structures containing Sendai virus HN glycoprotein and the receptors on the cell surface was shown to be sufficient for interferon induction in mouse spleen cells, suggesting that the actual inducer of interferon in mouse spleen cells is the HN glycoprotein of Sendai virus. When mouse spleen cells were stimulated in vitro with Sendai virus grown in eggs or LLC-MK2 cells or with membranous structures containing glycoproteins obtained from these viruses, interferon could be detected in the culture fluid. Furthermore, isolated HN glycoprotein per se could induce interferon in the cells. A linear correlation was found between the titer of interferon induced and the hemagglutinating activity of the membranous structure containing the HN glycoprotein. It was concluded from these findings that HN glycoprotein was the active component of Sendai virus responsible for interferon induction in mouse spleen cells and that viral RNA and F glycoprotein were not required. The results also showed that the interaction between HN glycoprotein and receptors on the cell surface triggered production of type I interferon (IFN-alpha and IFN-beta). Although when Sendai virus was incubated at 56 degrees C for 5 min it lost its hemolytic and hemagglutinating activities, it induced a considerable amount of interferon in the culture fluid of mouse spleen cells. The interferon-inducing ability of heat-inactivated virus could be absorbed with mouse spleen cells but not with sheep erythrocytes or mouse erythrocytes, indicating that the inactivated virus retained ability to bind to mouse lymphoid cells. PMID:6301988

  13. Identification of peanut agglutinin binding glycoproteins restricted to Hodgkin's disease-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Flavell, D J; Jones, D B; Wright, D H

    1989-01-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) binding glycoproteins from four Hodgkin's disease (HD)-derived cell lines and a variety of cell lines/peripheral blood cells representative of the lymphoid and myeloid lineages were identified by probing nitrocellulose membranes of SDS-PAGE separated NP40 solubilized cellular glycoproteins with [125I]-labelled PNA. The two Hodgkin's cell lines Ho and L428 demonstrated the most heterogeneous glycoprotein profiles each expressing 15 PNA binding glycoproteins, respectively. The two remaining Hodgkin's lines Co and L591 expressed only four glycoproteins each and these were all also commonly expressed by Ho and L428. Comparative analysis with all other cell types studied revealed the expression of five glycoproteins restricted to Ho (gp42, gp40, gp38, gp24 and gp22) and six restricted to L428 (gp180, gp75, gp40, gp38, gp24 and gp22). Four of these, gp40, gp38, gp24 and gp22 were commonly expressed by both Ho and L428. Of cell lines of myeloid lineage studied only the erythroleukemia cell line K562 expressed detectable glycoproteins also expressed by some of the Hodgkin's cell lines (gp110, gp96, gp50 and gp45). Only one glycoprotein, gp20 expressed by Ho was also commonly expressed by normal peripheral blood granulocytes. This limited study has thus succeeded in demonstrating for the range of cell types studied, that some glycoproteins with terminal D-galactose beta (1----3) N-acetyl galactosamine oligosaccharide sequences are apparently restricted to two of the HD cell lines. Moreover, the heterogeneous glycoprotein profiles obtained for the HD cell lines Ho and L428 suggests that galactosylation processes in these two cell lines is aberrant.

  14. Lectin-based analysis of fucosylated glycoproteins of human skim milk during 47 days of lactation.

    PubMed

    Lis-Kuberka, Jolanta; Kątnik-Prastowska, Iwona; Berghausen-Mazur, Marta; Orczyk-Pawiłowicz, Magdalena

    2015-12-01

    Glycoproteins of human milk are multifunctional molecules, and their fucosylated variants are potentially active molecules in immunological events ensuring breastfed infants optimal development and protection against infection diseases. The expression of fucosylated glycotopes may correspond to milk maturation stages. The relative amounts of fucosylated glycotopes of human skim milk glycoproteins over the course of lactation from the 2(nd) day to the 47(th) day were analyzed in colostrums, transitional and mature milk samples of 43 healthy mothers by lectin-blotting using α1-2-, α1-6-, and α1-3-fucose specific biotinylated Ulex europaeus (UEA), Lens culinaris (LCA), and Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA) lectins, respectively. The reactivities of UEA and LCA with the milk glycoproteins showed the highest expression of α1-2- and α1-6-fucosylated glycotopes on colostrum glycoproteins. The level of UEA-reactive glycoproteins from the beginning of lactation to the 14(th) day was high and relatively stable in contrast to LCA-reactive glycoproteins, the level of which significantly decreased from 2-3 to 7-8 days then remained almost unchanged until the 12(th)-14(th) days. Next, during the progression of lactation the reactivities with both lectins declined significantly. Eighty percent of α1-2- and/or α1-6-fucosylated glycoproteins showed a high negative correlation with milk maturation. In contrast, most of the analyzed milk glycoproteins were not recognized or weakly recognized by LTA and remained at a low unchanged level over lactation. Only a 30-kDa milk glycoprotein was evidently LTA-reactive, showing a negative correlation with milk maturation. The gradual decline of high expression of α1-2- and α1-6-, but not α1-3-, fucoses on human milk glycoproteins of healthy mothers over lactation was associated with milk maturation.

  15. Effect of reduced renal mass on renal ammonia transporter family, Rh C glycoprotein and Rh B glycoprotein, expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Young; Baylis, Chris; Verlander, Jill W; Han, Ki-Hwan; Reungjui, Sirirat; Handlogten, Mary E; Weiner, I David

    2007-10-01

    Kidneys can maintain acid-base homeostasis, despite reduced renal mass, through adaptive changes in net acid excretion, of which ammonia excretion is the predominant component. The present study examines whether these adaptations are associated with changes in the ammonia transporter family members, Rh B glycoprotein (Rhbg) and Rh C glycoprotein (Rhcg). We used normal Sprague-Dawley rats and a 5/6 ablation-infarction model of reduced renal mass; control rats underwent sham operation. After 1 wk, glomerular filtration rate, assessed as creatinine clearance, was decreased, serum bicarbonate was slightly increased, and Na(+) and K(+) were unchanged. Total urinary ammonia excretion was unchanged, but urinary ammonia adjusted for creatinine clearance, an index of per nephron ammonia metabolism, increased significantly. Although reduced renal mass did not alter total Rhcg protein expression, both light microscopy and immunohistochemistry with quantitative morphometric analysis demonstrated hypertrophy of both intercalated cells and principal cells in the cortical and outer medullary collecting duct that was associated with increased apical and basolateral Rhcg polarization. Rhbg expression, analyzed using immunoblot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and measurement of cell-specific expression, was unchanged. We conclude that altered subcellular localization of Rhcg contributes to adaptive changes in single-nephron ammonia metabolism and maintenance of acid-base homeostasis in response to reduced renal mass.

  16. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of HIV-1 consensus subtype B envelope glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kothe, Denise L.; Decker, Julie M.; Li Yingying; Weng Zhiping; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Zammit, Kenneth P.; Salazar, Maria G.; Chen, Yalu; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Moldoveanu, Zina; Mestecky, Jiri; Gao Feng; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M. ||; Muldoon, Mark; Korber, Bette T.M. |; Hahn, Beatrice H. |. E-mail: bhahn@uab.edu

    2007-03-30

    'Centralized' (ancestral and consensus) HIV-1 envelope immunogens induce broadly cross-reactive T cell responses in laboratory animals; however, their potential to elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies has not been fully explored. Here, we report the construction of a panel of consensus subtype B (ConB) envelopes and compare their biologic, antigenic, and immunogenic properties to those of two wild-type Env controls from individuals with early and acute HIV-1 infection. Glycoprotein expressed from full-length (gp160), uncleaved (gp160-UNC), truncated (gp145), and N-linked glycosylation site deleted (gp160-201N/S) versions of the ConB env gene were packaged into virions and, except for the fusion defective gp160-UNC, mediated infection via the CCR5 co-receptor. Pseudovirions containing ConB Envs were sensitive to neutralization by patient plasma and monoclonal antibodies, indicating the preservation of neutralizing epitopes found in contemporary subtype B viruses. When used as DNA vaccines in guinea pigs, ConB and wild-type env immunogens induced appreciable binding, but overall only low level neutralizing antibodies. However, all four ConB immunogens were significantly more potent than one wild-type vaccine at eliciting neutralizing antibodies against a panel of tier 1 and tier 2 viruses, and ConB gp145 and gp160 were significantly more potent than both wild-type vaccines at inducing neutralizing antibodies against tier 1 viruses. Thus, consensus subtype B env immunogens appear to be at least as good as, and in some instances better than, wild-type B env immunogens at inducing a neutralizing antibody response, and are amenable to further improvement by specific gene modifications.

  17. Reversible translocation of glycoprotein Ib in plasmin-treated platelets: consequences for platelet function.

    PubMed

    Lu, H; Soria, C; Soria, J; De Romeuf, C; Perrot, J Y; Tenza, D; Garcia, I; Caen, J P; Cramer, E M

    1993-12-01

    Understanding the effect of fibrinolysis on platelet function is of clinical importance. Plasmin is recognized to affect platelet adhesive function by reducing the interaction of platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib with von Willebrand factor (vWF) bound to the subendothelium. This platelet function is commonly explored in vitro by the ristocetin-induced agglutination test. Our previous study demonstrated a plasmin-induced redistribution of GP Ib molecules from the platelet surface to the linings of the surface-connected canalicular system (SCCS), a critical mechanism for understanding plasmin-induced GP Ib dysfunction. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of plasmin by its inhibitors, aprotinin or tripeptide Val-Phe-Lys-CH2Cl, permits a time dependent recovery (within 30 min) of ristocetin-induced agglutination in the platelets which were stimulated by plasmin at < 1 CU ml-1. This functional recovery was accompanied with a restoration of a normal amount of GP Ib on the platelet surface, as measured by the binding of both monoclonal anti-GP Ib antibody SZ 2 and 125I-labelled vWF to the platelets. Cytochalasin D did not inhibit this recovery, suggesting that this process may be due to passive actin depolymerization. These findings were further confirmed by immunoelectron microscopic study. Utilizing the platelets pre-labelled with anti-GP Ib antibody prior to plasmin stimulation, it was demonstrated that the observed recovery is due to a reverse translocation from the SCCS to the plasma membrane of the same GP Ib molecules which were present initially at the cell surface.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Differential redistribution of platelet glycoproteins Ib and IIb-IIIa after plasmin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cramer, E M; Lu, H; Caen, J P; Soria, C; Berndt, M C; Tenza, D

    1991-02-15

    The subcellular localization of the platelet membrane receptors glycoproteins (GP) Ib and IIb/IIIa [corrected] has been studied within resting platelets by a combination of biochemical and cytochemical techniques. While both GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa are localized within the plasma membrane and surface-connected canalicular system (SCCS) membranes, only GPIIb/IIIa is present within the internal face of alpha-granular membranes. Previous studies demonstrated that plasmin can induce platelet stimulation and also decrease ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation; it was suggested that this was because of GPIb degradation by plasmin. In this study, the respective localizations of both GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa were visualized during in vitro plasmin stimulation of platelets. Generally, plasmin induced shape change, pseudopod formation, organelle centralization either with or without alpha-granule release depending on the conditions of stimulation. Plasmin treatment of platelets at 37 degrees C resulted in the disappearance of GPIb from the cell surface and its subsequent redistribution into the channels and vesicles of the SCCS with no significant modification of GPIIb/IIIa remaining on the plasma membrane. Within degranulated platelets, GPIIb/IIIa was expressed on the plasma membrane and within membranes of large vacuoles containing the alpha-granule proteins. GPIb was virtually absent from these structures and mainly restricted to the SCCS. Addition of cytochalasin D inhibited the migration of GPIb to the SCCS. Biochemical measurements confirmed that no important hydrolysis of GPIb had occurred because only very little amounts of glycocalicin were generated during the reaction. In conclusion, in plasmin-treated platelets GPIIb/IIIa is externalized to the plasma membrane while GPIb is internalized into the SCCS. Although previous studies have suggested that plasmin degrades GPIb, the reduction in ristocetin-induced aggregation may be explained by its apparent redistribution within

  19. Macaque Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Novel Conserved Epitopes within Filovirus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-Yong; Enterlein, Sven G.; Howell, Katie A.; Vu, Hong; Shulenin, Sergey; Warfield, Kelly L.; Froude, Jeffrey W.; Araghi, Nazli; Douglas, Robin; Biggins, Julia; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Herbert, Andrew S.; Dye, John M.; Glass, Pamela J.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Foung, Steven K. H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses cause highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. Current immunotherapeutic options for filoviruses are mostly specific to Ebola virus (EBOV), although other members of Filoviridae such as Sudan virus (SUDV), Bundibugyo virus (BDBV), and Marburg virus (MARV) have also caused sizeable human outbreaks. Here we report a set of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) derived from cynomolgus macaques immunized repeatedly with a mixture of engineered glycoproteins (GPs) and virus-like particles (VLPs) for three different filovirus species. The antibodies recognize novel neutralizing and nonneutralizing epitopes on the filovirus glycoprotein, including conserved conformational epitopes within the core regions of the GP1 subunit and a novel linear epitope within the glycan cap. We further report the first filovirus antibody binding to a highly conserved epitope within the fusion loop of ebolavirus and marburgvirus species. One of the antibodies binding to the core GP1 region of all ebolavirus species and with lower affinity to MARV GP cross neutralized both SUDV and EBOV, the most divergent ebolavirus species. In a mouse model of EBOV infection, this antibody provided 100% protection when administered in two doses and partial, but significant, protection when given once at the peak of viremia 3 days postinfection. Furthermore, we describe novel cocktails of antibodies with enhanced protective efficacy compared to individual MAbs. In summary, the present work describes multiple novel, cross-reactive filovirus epitopes and innovative combination concepts that challenge the current therapeutic models. IMPORTANCE Filoviruses are among the most deadly human pathogens. The 2014-2015 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) led to more than 27,000 cases and 11,000 fatalities. While there are five species of Ebolavirus and several strains of marburgvirus, the current immunotherapeutics primarily target Ebola virus

  20. Structure-Based Design of Head-Only Fusion Glycoprotein Immunogens for Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Boyington, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Man; Kong, Wing-Pui; Ngwuta, Joan O.; Thomas, Paul V.; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Chen, Lei; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Ko, Kiyoon; Zhou, Tongqing; Mascola, John R.; Graham, Barney S.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a significant cause of severe respiratory illness worldwide, particularly in infants, young children, and the elderly. Although no licensed vaccine is currently available, an engineered version of the metastable RSV fusion (F) surface glycoprotein—stabilized in the pre-fusion (pre-F) conformation by “DS-Cav1” mutations—elicits high titer RSV-neutralizing responses. Moreover, pre-F-specific antibodies, often against the neutralization-sensitive antigenic site Ø in the membrane-distal head region of trimeric F glycoprotein, comprise a substantial portion of the human response to natural RSV infection. To focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø, we designed a series of RSV F immunogens that comprised the membrane-distal head of the F glycoprotein in its pre-F conformation. These “head-only” immunogens formed monomers, dimers, and trimers. Antigenic analysis revealed that a majority of the 70 engineered head-only immunogens displayed reactivity to site Ø-targeting antibodies, which was similar to that of the parent RSV F DS-Cav1 trimers, often with increased thermostability. We evaluated four of these head-only immunogens in detail, probing their recognition by antibodies, their physical stability, structure, and immunogenicity. When tested in naïve mice, a head-only trimer, half the size of the parent RSV F trimer, induced RSV titers, which were statistically comparable to those induced by DS-Cav1. When used to boost DS-Cav1-primed mice, two head-only RSV F immunogens, a dimer and a trimer, boosted RSV-neutralizing titers to levels that were comparable to those boosted by DS-Cav1, although with higher site Ø-directed responses. Our results provide proof-of-concept for the ability of the smaller head-only RSV F immunogens to focus the vaccine-elicited response to antigenic site Ø. Decent primary immunogenicity, enhanced physical stability, potential ease of manufacture, and potent immunogenicity

  1. Reduced cell surface expression of processed human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein in the presence of Nef.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, O; Rivière, Y; Heard, J M; Danos, O

    1993-01-01

    nef genes from two laboratory grown human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains and from two proviruses that had not been propagated in vitro were introduced into CD4+ lymphoblastoid CEM cells. The stable expression of all four Nef proteins was associated with an almost complete abrogation of CD4 cell surface localization. The consequences of the presence of Nef on gp160 cleavage, gp120 surface localization, and envelope-induced cytopathic effect were examined in CEM cells in which the HIV-1 env gene was expressed from a vaccinia virus vector. The presence of Nef did not modify the processing of gp160 into its subunits but resulted in a significant decrease of cell surface levels of gp120, associated with a dramatic reduction of the fusion-mediated cell death. Surface levels of mutant envelope glycoproteins unable to bind CD4 were not altered in Nef-expressing cells, suggesting that the phenomenon was CD4 dependent. The intracellular accumulation of fully processed envelope glycoproteins could significantly delay the cytopathic effect associated with envelope surface expression in HIV-infected cells and may be relevant to the selective advantage associated with Nef during the in vivo infectious process. Images PMID:8497051

  2. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Envelope Glycoprotein Core Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Nieusma, Travis; Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Cogburn, Kristin E.; Hua, Yuanzi; Dai, Xiaoping; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun

    2014-08-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a Hepacivirus, is a major cause of viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 mediate fusion and entry into host cells and are the primary targets of the humoral immune response. The crystal structure of the E2 core bound to broadly neutralizing antibody AR3C at 2.65 angstroms reveals a compact architecture composed of a central immunoglobulin-fold β sandwich flanked by two additional protein layers. The CD81 receptor binding site was identified by electron microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis and overlaps with the AR3C epitope. The x-ray and electron microscopy E2 structures differ markedly from predictions of an extended, three-domain, class II fusion protein fold and therefore provide valuable information for HCV drug and vaccine design.

  3. P-glycoprotein Inhibition for Optimal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Md. Lutful

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux membrane transporter, is widely distributed throughout the body and is responsible for limiting cellular uptake and the distribution of xenobiotics and toxic substances. Hundreds of structurally diverse therapeutic agents are substrates to it and it impedes the absorption, permeability, and retention of the drugs, extruding them out of the cells. It is overexpressed in cancer cells and accountable for obstructing cell internalization of chemotherapeutic agents and for developing transporter mediated resistance by cancer cells during anti-tumor treatments. As it jeopardizes the success of drug delivery and cancer targeting, strategies are being developed to overcome P-gp mediated drug transport. This concise review represents a brief discussion on P-gp mediated drug transport and how it hinders the success of various therapies. Its main focus is on various strategies used to tackle this curb in the field of drug delivery and targeting. PMID:24023511

  4. Glycoproteins histochemistry of the gills of Odontesthes bonariensis (Teleostei, Atherinopsidae).

    PubMed

    Díaz, A O; García, A M; Escalante, A H; Goldemberg, A L

    2010-11-01

    The histochemistry of glycoproteins (GP) in the mucous cells of the gills of the silverside Odontesthes bonariensis was identified with: (1) oxidizable vicinal diols; (2) sialic acid and some of their chain variants, carbon 7 ((7) C), carbon 8 ((8) C) or carbon 9 ((9) C); (3) sialic acid residues without O-acyl substitution and with O-acyl substitution at (7) C, (8) C or (9) C; (4) carboxyl groups and (5) sulphate groups. A battery of seven biotinylated lectins allowed GPs sugar residues to be distinguished. Mucous cells showed the presence of neutral, sulphated and sialylated GPs. Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA) and Glycine max agglutinin (SBA) showed strong positive staining; Arachis hypogaea agglutinin (PNA), Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I) and Triticum vulgaris agglutinin (WGA) showed moderate staining, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) was completely negative.

  5. An analysis of amino acid sequences surrounding archaeal glycoprotein sequons.

    PubMed

    Abu-Qarn, Mehtap; Eichler, Jerry

    2007-05-01

    Despite having provided the first example of a prokaryal glycoprotein, little is known of the rules governing the N-glycosylation process in Archaea. As in Eukarya and Bacteria, archaeal N-glycosylation takes place at the Asn residues of Asn-X-Ser/Thr sequons. Since not all sequons are utilized, it is clear that other factors, including the context in which a sequon exists, affect glycosylation efficiency. As yet, the contribution to N-glycosylation made by sequon-bordering residues and other related factors in Archaea remains unaddressed. In the following, the surroundings of Asn residues confirmed by experiment as modified were analyzed in an attempt to define sequence rules and requirements for archaeal N-glycosylation.

  6. Bioskin as an affinity matrix for the separation of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Vicente, C; Sebastián, B; Fontaniella, B; Márquez, A; Xavier Filho, L; Legaz, M E

    2001-05-11

    Bioskin is a natural product produced by a mixed culture of Acetobacter xylinum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. pombe cultured on media containing sucrose. It is of fibrillar nature able to retain some proteins, such as cytochrome c, by adsorption, and mainly composed of glucosamine and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. This makes it possible that, at an adequate pH value, proteins charged as polyanionic molecules, such as catalase, can be retained by ionic adsorption using the positively charged amino groups of the matrix. In addition, bioskin can also be used as an affinity matrix to retain glycoproteins able to perform specific affinity reactions with the amino sugars of the matrix, such as invertase, fetuin or ovalbumin. Its possible use as a chromatographic support is discussed.

  7. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, A. E.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  8. P-glycoprotein Inhibition for Optimal Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Amin, Md Lutful

    2013-08-19

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an efflux membrane transporter, is widely distributed throughout the body and is responsible for limiting cellular uptake and the distribution of xenobiotics and toxic substances. Hundreds of structurally diverse therapeutic agents are substrates to it and it impedes the absorption, permeability, and retention of the drugs, extruding them out of the cells. It is overexpressed in cancer cells and accountable for obstructing cell internalization of chemotherapeutic agents and for developing transporter mediated resistance by cancer cells during anti-tumor treatments. As it jeopardizes the success of drug delivery and cancer targeting, strategies are being developed to overcome P-gp mediated drug transport. This concise review represents a brief discussion on P-gp mediated drug transport and how it hinders the success of various therapies. Its main focus is on various strategies used to tackle this curb in the field of drug delivery and targeting.

  9. Human milk glycoproteins protect infants against human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Newburg, David S

    2013-08-01

    Breastfeeding protects the neonate against pathogen infection. Major mechanisms of protection include human milk glycoconjugates functioning as soluble receptor mimetics that inhibit pathogen binding to the mucosal cell surface, prebiotic stimulation of gut colonization by favorable microbiota, immunomodulation, and as a substrate for bacterial fermentation products in the gut. Human milk proteins are predominantly glycosylated, and some biological functions of these human milk glycoproteins (HMGPs) have been reported. HMGPs range in size from 14 kDa to 2,000 kDa and include mucins, secretory immunoglobulin A, bile salt-stimulated lipase, lactoferrin, butyrophilin, lactadherin, leptin, and adiponectin. This review summarizes known biological roles of HMGPs that may contribute to the ability of human milk to protect neonates from disease.

  10. Small-angle scattering study of Aspergillus awamori glycoprotein glucoamylase

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, A. E. Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Lebedev, D. V.; Surzhik, M. A.; Sergeev, V. R.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.

    2016-01-15

    Glucoamylase from fungus Aspergillus awamori is glycoside hydrolase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of α-1,4- and α-1,6-glucosidic bonds in glucose polymers and oligomers. This glycoprotein consists of a catalytic domain and a starch-binding domain connected by an O-glycosylated polypeptide chain. The conformation of the linker, the relative arrangement of the domains, and the structure of the full-length enzyme are unknown. The structure of the recombinant glucoamylase GA1 was studied by molecular modelling and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) methods. The experimental SANS data provide evidence that glucoamylase exists as a monomer in solution and contains a glycoside component, which makes a substantial contribution to the scattering. The model of full-length glucoamylase, which was calculated without taking into account the effect of glycosylation, is consistent with the experimental data and has a radius of gyration of 33.4 ± 0.6 Å.

  11. Human Milk Glycoproteins Protect Infants Against Human Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Breastfeeding protects the neonate against pathogen infection. Major mechanisms of protection include human milk glycoconjugates functioning as soluble receptor mimetics that inhibit pathogen binding to the mucosal cell surface, prebiotic stimulation of gut colonization by favorable microbiota, immunomodulation, and as a substrate for bacterial fermentation products in the gut. Human milk proteins are predominantly glycosylated, and some biological functions of these human milk glycoproteins (HMGPs) have been reported. HMGPs range in size from 14 kDa to 2,000 kDa and include mucins, secretory immunoglobulin A, bile salt-stimulated lipase, lactoferrin, butyrophilin, lactadherin, leptin, and adiponectin. This review summarizes known biological roles of HMGPs that may contribute to the ability of human milk to protect neonates from disease. PMID:23697737

  12. Identification of the Fusion Peptide-Containing Region in Betacoronavirus Spike Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiuyuan; Zheng, Wangliang; Shan, Yiwei; Mu, Zhixia; Dominguez, Samuel R.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The fusion peptides (FP) play an essential role in fusion of viral envelope with cellular membranes. The location and properties of the FPs in the spike (S) glycoproteins of different coronaviruses (CoV) have not yet been determined. Through amino acid sequence analysis of S proteins of representative CoVs, we identified a common region as a possible FP (pFP) that shares the characteristics of FPs of class I viral fusion proteins, including high Ala/Gly content, intermediate hydrophobicity, and few charged residues. To test the hypothesis that this region contains the CoV FP, we systemically mutated every residue in the pFP of Middle East respiratory syndrome betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV) and found that 11 of the 22 residues in the pFP (from G953 to L964, except for A956) were essential for S protein-mediated cell-cell fusion and virus entry. The synthetic MERS-CoV pFP core peptide (955IAGVGWTAGL964) induced extensive fusion of liposome membranes, while mutant peptide failed to induce any lipid mixing. We also selectively mutated residues in pFPs of two other β-CoVs, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV). Although the amino acid sequences of these two pFPs differed significantly from that of MERS-CoV and each other, most of the pFP mutants of SARS-CoV and MHV also failed to mediate membrane fusion, suggesting that these pFPs are also the functional FPs. Thus, the FPs of 3 different lineages of β-CoVs are conserved in location within the S glycoproteins and in their functions, although their amino acid sequences have diverged significantly during CoV evolution. IMPORTANCE Within the class I viral fusion proteins of many enveloped viruses, the FP is the critical mediator of fusion of the viral envelope with host cell membranes leading to virus infection. FPs from within a virus family, like influenza viruses or human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV), tend to share high amino acid sequence identity. In this

  13. MALDI linear TOF mass spectrometry of PEGylated (glyco)proteins.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Birgit K; Siekmann, Jürgen; Belgacem, Omar; Wenzel, Ryan J; Turecek, Peter L; Allmaier, Günter

    2010-06-01

    PEGylation of proteins is a fast growing field in biotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences owing to its ability to prolong the serum half-life time of recombinant proteins. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS) has been shown to be a powerful tool in the analysis of several PEGylated small proteins. Here we present data obtained with a standard secondary electron multiplier (SEM) and a high mass (HM) detector combined with a MALDI linear TOF MS system for the detection of PEGylated (glyco)proteins in the range of 60-600 kDa. Examples of MALDI TOF MS of small (interferon alpha2a), middle (human serum albumin (HSA)) and high molecular mass proteins (coagulation factor VIII and von Willebrand factor (vWF), both heavily glycosylated proteins) are presented. The particular challenge for the analysis was the heterogeneity of the (glyco)proteins in the high molecular weight range in combination with additional PEGylation, which even introduced more heterogeneity and was more challenging for interpretation. Nevertheless, the performance of MALDI linear TOF MS with both detector systems in terms molecular weight and heterogeneity determination depending on the m/z range was superior to the other methods. Although the SEM was able to obtain information about protein PEGylation in the mass range up to 100 kDa (e.g. PEGylated HSA), the HM system was crucial for detection of HM ions (e.g. PEGylated recombinant vWF), which was impossible with the standard SEM.

  14. Preparation of Concanavalin A-Chelating Magnetic Nanoparticles for Selective Enrichment of Glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liping; Feng, Shun; Li, Shanshan; Song, Peipei; Wang, Jide

    2015-07-07

    In this work, a soft and nondestructive approach was developed to prepare concanavalin A-chelating magnetic nanoparticles (Con A-MNPs) for selective enrichment of glycoproteins. Ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid-modified-MNPs (EDTA-MNPs) were prepared by a one-pot chemical coprecipitation method first, and then, Cu(II) cations were used as bridge groups to immobilize Con A on EDTA-MNPs. The as-prepared absorbents with a mean diameter of 15 nm showed a strong magnetic response to an externally applied magnetic field. The results of thermogravimetric analysis showed the content of immobilized Con A was up to 28 wt %. For glycoprotein ovalbumin, the maximum capacity and equilibrium constant were 72.41 mg/g and 0.6035 L/mg, respectively. The as-prepared nanocomposites exhibited a remarkable selectivity for glycoproteins and can enrich glycoproteins specifically from a mixture of glycoprotein and nonglycoprotein even at a molar ratio of 1:600. It was also successfully applied for the enrichment of glycoproteins from real egg white samples. We expect that our finding will serve as a helpful template for others to design new adsorbents for enriching glycoproteins.

  15. Enrichment and identification of glycoproteins in human saliva using lectin magnetic bead arrays.

    PubMed

    Caragata, Michael; Shah, Alok K; Schulz, Benjamin L; Hill, Michelle M; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2016-03-15

    Aberrant glycosylation of proteins is a hallmark of tumorigenesis and could provide diagnostic value in cancer detection. Human saliva is an ideal source of glycoproteins due to the relatively high proportion of glycosylated proteins in the salivary proteome. Moreover, saliva collection is noninvasive and technically straightforward, and the sample collection and storage is relatively easy. Although differential glycosylation of proteins can be indicative of disease states, identification of differential glycosylation from clinical samples is not trivial. To facilitate salivary glycoprotein biomarker discovery, we optimized a method for differential glycoprotein enrichment from human saliva based on lectin magnetic bead arrays (saLeMBA). Selected lectins from distinct reactivity groups were used in the saLeMBA platform to enrich salivary glycoproteins from healthy volunteer saliva. The technical reproducibility of saLeMBA was analyzed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to identify the glycosylated proteins enriched by each lectin. Our saLeMBA platform enabled robust glycoprotein enrichment in a glycoprotein- and lectin-specific manner consistent with known protein-specific glycan profiles. We demonstrated that saLeMBA is a reliable method to enrich and detect glycoproteins present in human saliva.

  16. Binding properties of monoclonal antibodies recognizing external epitopes of the human MDR1 P-glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, A H; Arceci, R J; Smit, J J; Wagenaar, E; Baas, F; Dollé, M; Tsuruo, T; Mechetner, E B; Roninson, I B; Borst, P

    1993-09-30

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) recognizing external epitopes of the human MDR1 P-glycoprotein have been used both for the detection of multidrug-resistant cells and as specific inhibitors of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance. Using a panel of recently developed transfected or transgenic cell lines containing variants of the human MDR1 and MDR3 P-glycoproteins, we have compared the specificity and binding properties of the previously isolated MAbs MRK16, HYB-241, UIC2 and 4E3, and of the newly isolated MAb 7G4. The removal of 1, 2 or all 3 of the N-glycosylation sites present in the first extracellular loop of MDR1 P-glycoprotein did not significantly affect the binding of these MAbs. In contrast, 20 amino acid deletion in the first extracellular loop of MDR1 P-glycoprotein completely abolished binding of UIC2, whereas the binding of all other MAbs was hardly affected. None of the MAbs tested bound detectably to cell lines containing a high level of the human MDR3 P-glycoprotein. The differences in the binding specificity between UIC2 and the other tested antibodies parallel the reported functional differences in the ability of these antibodies to inhibit P-glycoprotein-mediated drug efflux.

  17. Integrated glycoprotein immobilization method for glycopeptide and glycan analysis of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuang; Mishra, Sumita; Chen, Lijun; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Chan, Daniel W; Chatterjee, Subroto; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-06

    Post-translational modifications of proteins can have a major role in disease initiation and progression. Incredible efforts have recently been made to study the regulation of glycoproteins for disease prognosis and diagnosis. It is essential to elucidate glycans and intact glycoproteins to understand the role of glycosylation in diseases. Sialylated N-glycans play crucial roles in physiological and pathological processes; however, it is laborious to study sialylated glycoproteins due to the labile nature of sialic acid residues. In this study, an integrated platform is developed for the analysis of intact glycoproteins and glycans using a chemoenzymatic approach for immobilization and derivatization of sialic acids. N-Glycans, deglycosylated proteins, and intact glycoproteins from heart tissues of wild type (WT) and transverse aortic constriction (TAC) mouse models were analyzed. We identified 291 unique glycopeptides from 195 glycoproteins; the comparative studies between WT and TAC mice indicate the overexpression of extracellular proteins for heart matrix remodeling and the down-regulation of proteins associated with energy metabolism in cardiac hypertrophy. The integrated platform is a powerful tool for the analysis of glycans and glycoproteins in the discovery of potential cardiac hypertrophy biomarkers.

  18. Preparation of biointeractive glycoprotein-conjugated hydrogels through metabolic oligosacchalide engineering.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Matsunaga, Aki; Fujii, Shuetsu

    2014-09-17

    In the current study, synthetic hydrogels containing metabolically engineered glycoproteins of mammalian cells were prepared for the first time and selectin-mediated cell adhesion on the hydrogel was demonstrated. A culture of HL-60 cells was supplemented with an appropriate volume of aqueous solution of N-methacryloyl mannosamine (ManMA) to give a final concentration of 5 mM. The cells were then incubated for 3 days to deliver methacryloyl groups to the glycoproteins of the cells. A transparent hydrogel was formed via redox radical polymerization of methacryloyl functionalized glycoproteins with 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine and a cross-linker. Conjugation of the glycoproteins into the hydrogel was determined using Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) and periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. The surface density of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) on the hydrogels was also detected using gold-colloid-labeled immunoassay. Finally, selectin-mediated cell adhesion on hydrogels containing glycoproteins was demonstrated. Selectin-mediated cell adhesion is considered an essential step in the progression of various diseases; therefore, hydrogels having glycoproteins could be useful in therapeutic and diagnostic applications.

  19. Bioactivity of proteins isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum L67 treated with Zanthoxylum piperitum DC glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Oh, S; Lim, K-T

    2015-06-01

    Lactobacilli in the human gastrointestinal tract have beneficial effects on the health of their host. To enhance these effects, the bioactivity of lactobacilli can be fortified through exogenous dietary or pharmacological agents, such as glycoproteins. To elucidate the inductive effect of Zanthoxylum piperitum DC (ZPDC) glycoprotein on Lactobacillus plantarum L67, we evaluated the radical-scavenging activity, anti-oxidative enzymes (SOD, GPx and CAT), growth rate, ATPase activity and β-galactosidase activity of this strain. When Lact. plantarum L67 was treated with ZPDC glycoprotein at different concentrations, the intensities of a few SDS-PAGE bands were slightly changed. The amount of a 23 kDa protein was increased upon treatment with increasing concentrations of ZPDC glycoprotein. The results of this study indicate that the radical-scavenging activity for O2(-) and OH¯, but not for the DPPH radical, increased in a concentration-dependent manner after treatment with ZPDC glycoprotein. The activation of anti-oxidative enzymes (SOD, GPx and CAT), growth rate and β-galactosidase activity also increased in a concentration-dependent manner in response to ZPDC glycoprotein treatment, whereas ATPase activity was decreased. In summary, ZPDC glycoprotein stimulated an increase in the bioactivity of Lact. plantarum L67. Significance and impact of the study: This study demonstrated that Lactobacillus plantarum L67 possesses anti-oxidative activity. This strain of lactic bacteria has been known to have various probiotic uses, such as yogurt starters and dietary additional supplements. We found, through this experiment, that the protein has a strong anti-oxidative character, and the activity can be enhanced by treatment with Zanthoxylum piperitum DC (ZPDC) glycoprotein. This study may be application of Lact. plantarum L67 treated by ZPDC glycoprotein in yogurt fermentation. It could be one of the avenues of minimizing yogurt postacidification during storage. In addition

  20. Yellow fever 17D-vectored vaccines expressing Lassa virus GP1 and GP2 glycoproteins provide protection against fatal disease in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J; Bredenbeek, Peter J; Carrion, Ricardo; Brasky, Kathleen; Patterson, Jean; Goicochea, Marco; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2011-02-01

    Yellow Fever (YF) and Lassa Fever (LF) are two prevalent hemorrhagic fevers co-circulating in West Africa and responsible for thousands of deaths annually. The YF vaccine 17D has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) or their subunits, GP1 (attachment glycoprotein) and GP2 (fusion glycoprotein). Cloning shorter inserts, LASV-GP1 and -GP2, between YF17D E and NS1 genes enhanced genetic stability of recombinant viruses, YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2, in comparison with YF17D/LASV-GPC recombinant. The recombinant viruses were replication competent and properly processed YF proteins and LASV GP antigens in infected cells. YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice and protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal LF. Unlike immunization with live attenuated reassortant vaccine ML29, immunization with YF17D/LASV-GP1 and -GP2 did not provide sterilizing immunity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of YF17D-based vaccine to control LF in West Africa.

  1. Preparation and characterization of glycoprotein-resistant starch complex as a coating material for oral bioadhesive microparticles for colon-targeted polypeptide delivery.

    PubMed

    Situ, Wenbei; Li, Xiaoxi; Liu, Jia; Chen, Ling

    2015-04-29

    For effective oral delivery of polypeptide or protein and enhancement their oral bioavailability, a new resistant starch-glycoprotein complex bioadhesive carrier and an oral colon-targeted bioadhesive delivery microparticle system were developed. A glycoprotein, concanavalin A (Con A), was successfully conjugated to the molecules of resistant starch acetate (RSA), leading to the formation of resistant starch-glycoprotein complex. This Con A-conjugated RSA film as a coating material showed an excellent controlled-release property. In streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type II diabetic rats, the insulin-loaded microparticles coated with this Con A-conjugated RSA film exhibited good hypoglycemic response for keeping the plasma glucose level within the normal range for totally 44-52 h after oral administration with different insulin dosages. Oral glucose tolerance tests indicated that successive oral administration of these colon-targeted bioadhesive microparticles with insulin at a level of 50 IU/kg could achieve a hypoglycemic effect similar to that by injection of insulin at 35 IU/kg. Therefore, the potential of this new Con A-conjugated RSA film-coated microparticle system has been demonstrated to be capable of improving the oral bioavailability of bioactive proteins and peptides.

  2. Effect of binding of Calcofluor White on the carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) on the structure and dynamics of the protein moiety. A fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Albani, J R

    2001-08-23

    Calcofluor White is a fluorescent probe that interacts with polysaccharides and is commonly used in clinical studies. Interaction between Calcofluor White and carbohydrate residues of alpha1-acid glycoprotein (orosomucoid) was previously studied at low and high concentrations of Calcofluor compared to that of the protein. alpha1-Acid glycoprotein contains 40% carbohydrate by weight and has up to 16 sialic acid residues. At equimolar concentrations of Calcofluor and alpha1-acid glycoprotein, the fluorophore displays free motions [Albani, J. R.; Sillen, A.; Coddeville, B.; Plancke, Y. D.; Engelborghs, Y. Carbohydr. Res. 1999, 322, 87-94], while at high concentration of Calcofluor, its surrounding microenvironment is rigid, inducing the rigidity of the fluorophore itself [Albani, J. R.; Sillen, A.; Plancke, Y. D.; Coddeville, B.; Engelborghs, Y. Carbohydr. Res. 2000, 327, 333-340]. In the present work, red-edge excitation spectra and steady-state anisotropy studies performed on Trp residues in the presence of Calcofluor, showed that the apparent dynamics of Trp residues are not modified. However, deconvoluting the emission spectra with two different methods into different components, reveals that the structure of the protein matrix has been disrupted in the presence of high Calcofluor concentrations.

  3. Yellow fever 17D-vectored vaccines expressing Lassa virus GP1 and GP2 glycoproteins provide protection against fatal disease in guinea pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaohong; Dalebout, Tim J.; Bredenbeek, Peter J.; Carrion, Ricardo; Brasky, Kathleen; Patterson, Jean; Goicochea, Marco; Bryant, Joseph; Salvato, Maria S.; Lukashevich, Igor S.

    2010-01-01

    Yellow Fever (YF) and Lassa Fever (LF) are two prevalent hemorrhagic fevers co-circulating in West Africa and responsible for thousands of deaths annually. The YF vaccine 17D has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) or their subunits, GP1 (attachment glycoprotein) and GP2 (fusion glycoprotein). Cloning shorter inserts, LASV GP1 and GP2, between YF17D E and NS1 genes enhanced genetic stability of recombinant viruses, YF17D/LASV-GP1 and –GP2, in comparison with YF17D/LASV-GPC recombinant. The recombinant viruses were replication competent and properly processed YF and LASV GP proteins in infected cells. YF17D/LASV-GP1&GP2 induced specific CD8+ T cell responses in mice and protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal LF. Unlike immunization with live attenuated reassortant vaccine ML29, immunization with YF17D/LASV-GP1&GP2 did not provide sterilizing immunity. This study demonstrates the feasibility of YF17D-based vaccine to control LF in West Africa. PMID:21145373

  4. Insolubilization of hydroxyproline-rich cell wall glycoprotein in aerated carrot root slices.

    PubMed

    Cooper, J B; Varner, J E

    1983-04-15

    The hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein of plant cell walls is secreted from the cytoplasm as a soluble monomer which slowly becomes insolubilized. A tyrosine derivative, isodityrosine, is formed in the cell wall during this insolubilization and could serve as a protein-protein crosslink. Glycoprotein insolubilization is inhibited by peroxidase inhibitors and free radical scavengers, the most effective of which is L-ascorbate. These data support a hypothesis that the hydroxyproline-rich cell wall glycoprotein forms a covalently crosslinked wall network under the control of an extracellular peroxidase/ascorbate oxidase system.

  5. Affinity of bronchial secretion glycoproteins and cells of human bronchial mucosa for Ricinus communis lectins.

    PubMed

    Lhermitte, M; Lamblin, G; Degand, P; Roussel, P; Mazzuca, M

    1977-01-01

    The coupling of Ricinus communis lectins to Sephadex G 25 was used in order to study mucins and other glycoproteins from human bronchial secretion. The major part of human bronchial mucins and other glycoproteins such as immunoglobulins A, bronchotransferrin and alpha1-antichymotrypsin were isolated by this procedure. A parallel study of human bronchial mucosa was achieved with peroxidase labeled Ricinus communis lectins; this study characterized goblet cells and mucous cells which contain mucins, and serous cells which are involved in the synthesis or the secretion of the other glycoproteins.

  6. Selective binding of human cumulus cell-secreted glycoproteins to human spermatozoa during capacitation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarik, J.; Kopecny, V.; Dvorak, M.

    1984-06-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that glycoproteins manufactured by human cumulus cells can be detected bound to human spermatozoa incubated in capacitational medium containing the labeled cumulus-cell secretions. Cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins were labeled with a mixture of /sup 3/H-methionine and /sup 3/H-tryptophan or with 3H-fucose, and the binding of the labeled compounds to spermatozoa was evaluated by autoradiography. The binding was highly selective, involving only approximately 1% of the samples of spermatozoa used. The results suggest that the binding of cumulus-cell-secreted glycoproteins to spermatozoa may represent a final and highly selective step in human sperm capacitation.

  7. Proposed pathway for biosynthesis of the S-layer glycoprotein of Bacillus alvei.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, E; Messner, P; Allmeier, G; König, H

    1993-01-01

    The outer surface of the murein sacculus of the eubacterium Bacillus alvei is covered by a surface layer (S-layer) glycoprotein. The glycan chain of this S-layer glycoprotein consists of trisaccharide repeating units with ManNAc, Gal, and Glc as constituents. From cell extracts of B. alvei, nucleotide-activated derivatives of ManNAc, Gal, Glc, and GlcNAc were isolated. Furthermore, GDP- and dolichyl-activated oligosaccharides were obtained. On the basis of the isolated putative glycoprotein precursors, a pathway for the biosynthesis of the oligosaccharide chain is proposed. PMID:8331079

  8. Hazelnut (Corylus avellana) vicilin Cor a 11: molecular characterization of a glycoprotein and its allergenic activity

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    In Europe, hazelnuts (Corylus avellana) are a frequent cause of food allergies. Several important hazelnut allergens have been previously identified and characterized. Specific N-glycans are known to induce strong IgE responses of uncertain clinical relevance, but so far the allergenic potential of glycoproteins from hazelnut has not been investigated. The aim of the study was the molecular characterization of the glycosylated vicilin Cor a 11 from hazelnut and the analysis of its allergenic activity. Although MALDI–TOF (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization–time-of-flight) MS showed that one of two potential glycosylation sites of Cor a 11 was glycosylated, CD spectroscopy indicated that recombinant and natural Cor a 11 share similar secondary structures. Thus to analyse the impact of the glycan residues of Cor a 11 on IgE binding, the allergenic activity of natural glycosylated Cor a 11 and recombinant Cor a 11 was compared. In addition, the IgE sensitization pattern to recombinant Cor a 11, Cor a 1, Cor a 2 and Cor a 8 of 65 hazelnut allergic patients was determined in vitro. The prevalence of IgE reactivity to hazelnut vicilin Cor a 11 was below 50%. Basophil histamine-release assays were used to determine the allergenic activity of both natural and recombinant Cor a 11 in comparison with Cor a 1, a birch (Betula verrucosa) pollen-related major hazelnut allergen. Both forms of Cor a 11 induced mediator release from basophils to a similar extent, indicating that the hazelnut allergic patients had cross-linking IgE antibodies binding to the protein backbone and not to carbohydrate structures. In comparison to Cor a 1, a 10000-fold higher concentration of Cor a 11 was required to induce similar basophil mediator release. In conclusion, the hazelnut vicilin Cor a 11 is a minor allergen both in regard to prevalence and allergenic potency, whereas its glycan does not contribute to its allergenic activity. PMID:15233621

  9. Human metapneumovirus glycoprotein G disrupts mitochondrial signaling in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaoyong; Kolli, Deepthi; Ren, Junping; Liu, Tianshuang; Garofalo, Roberto P; Casola, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a recently identified RNA virus belonging to the Paramyxoviridae family. It is a common cause of respiratory tract infections in children, adults, and immunocompromised patients, for which no specific treatment or vaccine is available. Recent investigations in our lab identified hMPV glycoprotein G as an important virulence factor, as a recombinant virus lacking the G protein (rhMPV-ΔG) exhibited enhanced production of important immune and antiviral mediators, such as cytokines, chemokines and type I interferon (IFN) in airway epithelial cells, and expression of G protein alone inhibits cellular signaling dependent on retinoic induced gene (RIG)-I, a RNA helicase with a fundamental role in initiating hMPV-induced cellular responses. In this study, we have further investigated the mechanism underlying the inhibitory role of hMPV G protein on RIG-I-dependent signaling. We found that the interaction of hMPV G with RIG-I occurs primarily through the CARD domains of RIG-I N-terminus, preventing RIG-I association with the adaptor protein MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein), recruitment of RIG-I to mitochondria, as well as the interaction between mitochondria and mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) component of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which contains STINGS, an important part of the viral-induced RIG-I/MAVS signaling pathway, leading in the end to the inhibition of cytokine, chemokine and type I IFN expression. Mutagenesis analysis showed that hMPV G protein cytoplasmic domain played a major role in the observed inhibitory activity, and recombinant viruses expressing a G protein with amino acid substitution in position 2 and 3 recapitulated most of the phenotype observed with rhMPV-ΔG mutant upon infection of airway epithelial cells.

  10. Plasma gelsolin facilitates interaction between β2 glycoprotein I and α5β1 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Bohgaki, Miyuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Kondo, Takeshi; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Horita, Tetsuya; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Okumura, Fumihiko; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Koike, Takao

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is characterized by thrombosis and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) that directly recognizes plasma β2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI). Tissue factor (TF), the major initiator of the extrinsic coagulation system, is induced on monocytes by aPL in vitro, explaining in part the pathophysiology in APS. We previously reported that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway plays an important role in aPL-induced TF expression on monocytes. In this study, we identified plasma gelsolin as a protein associated with β2GPI by using immunoaffinity chromatography and mass spectrometric analysis. An in vivo binding assay showed that endogenous β2GPI interacts with plasma gelsolin, which binds to integrin a5β1 through fibronectin. The tethering of β2GPI to monoclonal anti-β2GPI autoantibody on the cell surface was enhanced in the presence of plasma gelsolin. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that p38 MAPK protein was phosphorylated by monoclonal anti-β2GPI antibody treatment, and its phosphorylation was attenuated in the presence of anti-integrin a5β1 antibody. Furthermore, focal adhesion kinase, a downstream molecule of the fibronectin-integrin signalling pathway, was phosphorylated by anti-β2GPI antibody treatment. These results indicate that molecules including gelsolin and integrin are involved in the anti-β2GPI antibody-induced MAPK pathway on monocytes and that integrin is a possible therapeutic target to modify a prothrombotic state in patients with APS. PMID:19840195

  11. Hazelnut (Corylus avellana) vicilin Cor a 11: molecular characterization of a glycoprotein and its allergenic activity.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Iris; Foetisch, Kay; Kolarich, Daniel; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara K; Conti, Amedeo; Altmann, Friedrich; Vieths, Stefan; Scheurer, Stephan

    2004-10-15

    In Europe, hazelnuts (Corylus avellana) are a frequent cause of food allergies. Several important hazelnut allergens have been previously identified and characterized. Specific N-glycans are known to induce strong IgE responses of uncertain clinical relevance, but so far the allergenic potential of glycoproteins from hazelnut has not been investigated. The aim of the study was the molecular characterization of the glycosylated vicilin Cor a 11 from hazelnut and the analysis of its allergenic activity. Although MALDI-TOF (matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight) MS showed that one of two potential glycosylation sites of Cor a 11 was glycosylated, CD spectroscopy indicated that recombinant and natural Cor a 11 share similar secondary structures. Thus to analyse the impact of the glycan residues of Cor a 11 on IgE binding, the allergenic activity of natural glycosylated Cor a 11 and recombinant Cor a 11 was compared. In addition, the IgE sensitization pattern to recombinant Cor a 11, Cor a 1, Cor a 2 and Cor a 8 of 65 hazelnut allergic patients was determined in vitro. The prevalence of IgE reactivity to hazelnut vicilin Cor a 11 was below 50%. Basophil histamine-release assays were used to determine the allergenic activity of both natural and recombinant Cor a 11 in comparison with Cor a 1, a birch (Betula verrucosa) pollen-related major hazelnut allergen. Both forms of Cor a 11 induced mediator release from basophils to a similar extent, indicating that the hazelnut allergic patients had cross-linking IgE antibodies binding to the protein backbone and not to carbohydrate structures. In comparison to Cor a 1, a 10000-fold higher concentration of Cor a 11 was required to induce similar basophil mediator release. In conclusion, the hazelnut vicilin Cor a 11 is a minor allergen both in regard to prevalence and allergenic potency, whereas its glycan does not contribute to its allergenic activity.

  12. Methoxypolyethylene glycol-block-polycaprolactone diblock copolymers reduce P-glycoprotein efflux in the absence of a membrane fluidization effect while stimulating P-glycoprotein ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Zastre, Jason; Jackson, John K; Wong, Wesley; Burt, Helen M

    2007-04-01

    We have previously shown that amphiphilic diblock copolymers composed of methoxypolyethylene glycol-b-polycaprolactone (MePEG-b-PCL) increased the cellular accumulation and reduced the basolateral to apical flux of the P-glycoprotein substrate, rhodamine 123 (R-123) in caco-2 cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate membrane perturbation effects of MePEG-b-PCL diblock copolymers with erythrocyte membranes and caco-2 cells and the effect on P-gp ATPase activity. The diblock copolymer MePEG(17)-b-PCL(5) induced increasing erythrocyte hemolysis at concentrations which correlated with increasing accumulation of R-123 into caco-2 cells. However, no increase in cellular accumulation of R-123 by non-P-gp expressing cells was observed, suggesting that diblock did not enhance the transmembrane passive diffusion of R-123, but that the accumulation enhancement effect of the diblock in caco-2 cells was likely mediated primarily via P-gp inhibition. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements of membrane fluidity and P-gp ATPase activity demonstrated that MePEG(17)-b-PCL(5) decreased caco-2 membrane fluidity while stimulating ATPase activity approximately threefold at concentrations that maximally enhanced R-123 caco-2 accumulation. These results suggest that inhibition of P-gp efflux by MePEG(17)-b-PCL(5) does not appear to be related to increases in membrane fluidity or through inhibition in P-gp ATPase activities, which are two commonly reported cellular effects for P-gp inhibition mediated by surfactants.

  13. MAGIC: an automated N-linked glycoprotein identification tool using a Y1-ion pattern matching algorithm and in silico MS² approach.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Ke-Shiuan; Chen, Chen-Chun; Lih, T Mamie; Cheng, Cheng-Wei; Su, Wan-Chih; Chang, Chun-Hao; Cheng, Chia-Ying; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sung, Ting-Yi

    2015-02-17

    Glycosylation is a highly complex modification influencing the functions and activities of proteins. Interpretation of intact glycopeptide spectra is crucial but challenging. In this paper, we present a mass spectrometry-based automated glycopeptide identification platform (MAGIC) to identify peptide sequences and glycan compositions directly from intact N-linked glycopeptide collision-induced-dissociation spectra. The identification of the Y1 (peptideY0 + GlcNAc) ion is critical for the correct analysis of unknown glycoproteins, especially without prior knowledge of the proteins and glycans present in the sample. To ensure accurate Y1-ion assignment, we propose a novel algorithm called Trident that detects a triplet pattern corresponding to [Y0, Y1, Y2] or [Y0-NH3, Y0, Y1] from the fragmentation of the common trimannosyl core of N-linked glycopeptides. To facilitate the subsequent peptide sequence identification by common database search engines, MAGIC generates in silico spectra by overwriting the original precursor with the naked peptide m/z and removing all of the glycan-related ions. Finally, MAGIC computes the glycan compositions and ranks them. For the model glycoprotein horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and a 5-glycoprotein mixture, a 2- to 31-fold increase in the relative intensities of the peptide fragments was achieved, which led to the identification of 7 tryptic glycopeptides from HRP and 16 glycopeptides from the mixture via Mascot. In the HeLa cell proteome data set, MAGIC processed over a thousand MS(2) spectra in 3 min on a PC and reported 36 glycopeptides from 26 glycoproteins. Finally, a remarkable false discovery rate of 0 was achieved on the N-glycosylation-free Escherichia coli data set. MAGIC is available at http://ms.iis.sinica.edu.tw/COmics/Software_MAGIC.html .

  14. High in situ rat intestinal permeability of artemisinin unaffected by multiple dosing and with no evidence of P-glycoprotein involvement.

    PubMed

    Svensson, U S; Sandström, R; Carlborg, O; Lennernäs, H; Ashton, M

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether the decrease in artemisinin bioavailability after repeated oral dosing in humans can be a result of increased efflux of artemisinin by P-glycoprotein or decreased membrane transport at the intestinal barrier. The effective jejunal permeability (Peff) of artemisinin was investigated using an in situ rat perfusion model. Fifty-four rats were randomized to one of three treatment arms: no pretreatment, pretreatment with artemisinin emulsion for 5 days (60 mg/kg/day, p.o. ), or pretreatment with emulsion vehicle for 5 days. The rats within each treatment arm were randomized further to be jejunally perfused with either low (500 ng/ml) or high (5000 ng/ml) artemisinin concentration or low artemisinin concentration plus the P-glycoprotein inhibitor R,S-verapamil (400 microg/ml). Perfusate samples were assayed for content of artemisinin, R,S-verapamil, and perfusion viability markers. Artemisinin Peff was 1.44 +/- 0.38, 1. 17 +/- 0.32, and 1.71 +/- 0.29 (.10(-4), cm/s) in rats receiving no pretreatment and perfused with low, high, or low artemisinin concentration plus verapamil, respectively. Multiple oral dosing of artemisinin did not affect the jejunal permeability of artemisinin. R,S-verapamil Peff was similar in artemisinin-pretreated rats (1.09 +/- 0.54. 10(-4), cm/s) and rats pretreated with only vehicle (1.07 +/- 0.37. 10(-4), cm/s). The decrease in artemisinin bioavailability after multiple oral dosing in human is probably not a result of changes in P-glycoprotein expression or general intestinal transport. It seems more likely attributed to increased hepatocellular activity. Furthermore, artemisinin exhibits high jejunal permeability and is neither a substrate nor inducer of P-glycoprotein.

  15. Role of the cytosolic tails of Rift Valley fever virus envelope glycoproteins in viral morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carnec, Xavier; Ermonval, Myriam; Kreher, Felix; Flamand, Marie; Bouloy, Michèle

    2014-01-05

    The correct folding, heterodimerization and trafficking of Gn/Gc envelope glycoproteins of Rift Valley fever virus, RVFV (Bunyaviridae and Phlebovirus genus) are essential for Golgi assembly and budding of viral particles. The Gn and Gc carboxy-terminus contain a Golgi targeting and an ER-retrieval signal, respectively. We generated RVFV-like particles with mutations in the cytosolic tails of Gn or Gc and identified regions important for release of infectious particles. The role of specific amino-acids in these regions was further investigated by creating recombinant mutant viruses by reverse-genetics. Residues outside the suspected Golgi targeting motif, i.e. the di-lysine K29-K30 motif and the N43, R44 and I46 residues of the Gn cytosolic domain, appeared important for Golgi localization and RNP packaging. Concerning the Gc tail, replacement of K2 or K3 in the di-lysine motif, had a drastic impact on Gn trafficking and induced an important organelle redistribution and cell remodeling, greatly affecting particle formation and release.

  16. A broad HIV-1 inhibitor blocks envelope glycoprotein transitions critical for entry

    PubMed Central

    Herschhorn, Alon; Gu, Christopher; Espy, Nicole; Richard, Jonathan; Finzi, Andrés; Sodroski, Joseph G.

    2014-01-01

    Binding to the primary receptor, CD4, triggers conformational changes in the metastable envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer (gp1203/gp413) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) that are important for virus entry into host cells. These changes include an “opening” of the trimer, creation of a binding site for the CCR5 coreceptor, and formation/exposure of a gp41 coiled coil. Here we identify a new compound, 18A (1), that specifically inhibits the entry of a wide range of HIV-1 isolates. 18A does not interfere with CD4 or CCR5 binding, but inhibits the CD4-induced disruption of quaternary structures at the trimer apex and the formation/exposure of the gp41 HR1 coiled coil. Analysis of HIV-1 variants exhibiting increased or reduced sensitivity to 18A suggests that the inhibitor can distinguish distinct conformational states of gp120 in the unliganded Env trimer. The broad-range activity and observed hypersensitivity of resistant mutants to antibody neutralization support further investigation of 18A. PMID:25174000

  17. Modified C-reactive protein interacts with platelet glycoprotein Ibα.

    PubMed

    Boncler, Magdalena; Rywaniak, Joanna; Szymański, Jacek; Potempa, Lawrence A; Rychlik, Błażej; Watała, Cezary

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we investigated the possible mechanisms by which recombinant modified CRP(m(r)CRP) modulates blood platelet function. Modified CRP could activate blood platelets and stimulate their adhesion and aggregation in the absence of any other physiological stimuli. Preincubation of isolated blood platelets with m(r)CRP at a concentration as low as 2 μg/ml resulted in significant platelet degranulation (fraction of CD62-positive platelets increased 2-fold, p < 0.0002), and at concentrations of 20 μg/ml and 100 μg/ml, increased exposure of the platelet procoagulant surface was observed (expression of annexin V-positive platelets increased to 5.7 ± 1.0% and 10.4 ± 2.2%, respectively, p < 0.03, vs. 2.9 ± 0.2% in control). Furthermore, m(r)CRP (100 μg/ml) strongly augmented spontaneous and ADP-induced fibrinogen binding to platelets (p < 0.05), platelet adhesion to fibrinogen and platelet aggregation. Using the Biacore™ surface plasmon resonance technique and glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) immobilized on the sensor surface, we demonstrated direct binding between platelet GPIbα and m(r)CRP. Binding of m(r)CRP to GPIbα and C1q was also observed by ELISA, irrespective of the immobilized ligand. These outcomes strongly support a role of the GPIb-IX-V complex in the interactions of m(r)CRP with blood platelets.

  18. Guanylate binding protein 5: Impairing virion infectivity by targeting retroviral envelope glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Hotter, Dominik; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-02

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-inducible cellular factors that belong to the superfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and play important roles in the cell-intrinsic defense against bacteria, protozoa and viruses. In a recent report in Cell Host & Microbe, we identify GBP5 as novel restriction factor of HIV-1 that reduces the infectivity of progeny virions by interfering with processing and incorporation of the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein. The inhibitory activity of GBP5 requires C-terminal isoprenylation, mediating Golgi-association, but not its GTPase function. Notably, GBP5 expression levels vary considerably in human macrophages and inversely correlate with infectious virus yield. We demonstrate that GBP5 can be evaded by an unusual tradeoff mechanism: Naturally occurring mutations in the start codon of the viral accessory gene vpu attenuate GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression at the cost of Vpu function. Whether direct counteraction mechanisms or more subtle changes balancing Vpu and Env expression also affect HIV-1 inhibition by GBP5 remains to be clarified. Other open questions are whether GBP5 restricts HIV-1 in CD4(+) T cells and if other GBP family members also decrease infectivity of HIV and/or additional enveloped viruses.

  19. Neem Leaf Glycoprotein Prophylaxis Transduces Immune Dependent Stop Signal for Tumor Angiogenic Switch within Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Saptak; Ghosh, Tithi; Barik, Subhasis; Das, Arnab; Ghosh, Sarbari; Bhuniya, Avishek

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that prophylactic as well as therapeutic administration of neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP) induces significant restriction of solid tumor growth in mice. Here, we investigate whether the effect of such pretreatment (25µg/mice; weekly, 4 times) benefits regulation of tumor angiogenesis, an obligate factor for tumor progression. We show that NLGP pretreatment results in vascular normalization in melanoma and carcinoma bearing mice along with downregulation of CD31, VEGF and VEGFR2. NLGP pretreatment facilitates profound infiltration of CD8+ T cells within tumor parenchyma, which subsequently regulates VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling in CD31+ vascular endothelial cells to prevent aberrant neovascularization. Pericyte stabilization, VEGF dependent inhibition of VEC proliferation and subsequent vascular normalization are also experienced. Studies in immune compromised mice confirmed that these vascular and intratumoral changes in angiogenic profile are dependent upon active adoptive immunity particularly those mediated by CD8+ T cells. Accumulated evidences suggest that NLGP regulated immunomodulation is active in tumor growth restriction and normalization of tumor angiogenesis as well, thereby, signifying its clinical translation. PMID:25391149

  20. Induction of humoral responses to BHV-1 glycoprotein D expressed by HSV-1 amplicon vectors

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Andrea Maria; Berois, Mabel Beatriz; Tomé, Lorena Magalí; Epstein, Alberto L.

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors are versatile and useful tools for transferring genes into cells that are capable of stimulating a specific immune response to their expressed antigens. In this work, two HSV-1-derived amplicon vectors were generated. One of these expressed the full-length glycoprotein D (gD) of bovine herpesvirus 1 while the second expressed the truncated form of gD (gDtr) which lacked the trans-membrane region. After evaluating gD expression in the infected cells, the ability of both vectors to induce a specific gD immune response was tested in BALB/c mice that were intramuscularly immunized. Specific serum antibody responses were detected in mice inoculated with both vectors, and the response against truncated gD was higher than the response against full-length gD. These results reinforce previous findings that HSV-1 amplicon vectors can potentially deliver antigens to animals and highlight the prospective use of these vectors for treating infectious bovine rhinotracheitis disease. PMID:22437537

  1. Structural intermediates in the fusion-associated transition of vesiculovirus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Baquero, Eduard; Albertini, Aurélie A; Raux, Hélène; Abou-Hamdan, Abbas; Boeri-Erba, Elisabetta; Ouldali, Malika; Buonocore, Linda; Rose, John K; Lepault, Jean; Bressanelli, Stéphane; Gaudin, Yves

    2017-03-01

    Vesiculoviruses enter cells by membrane fusion, driven by a large, low-pH-induced, conformational change in the fusion glycoprotein G that involves transition from a trimeric pre-fusion toward a trimeric post-fusion state via monomeric intermediates. Here, we present the structure of the G fusion protein at intermediate pH for two vesiculoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Chandipura virus (CHAV), which is responsible for deadly encephalopathies. First, a CHAV G crystal structure shows two intermediate conformations forming a flat dimer of heterodimers. On virions, electron microscopy (EM) and tomography reveal monomeric spikes similar to one of the crystal conformations. In solution, mass spectrometry shows dimers of G. Finally, mutations at a dimer interface, involving fusion domains associated in an antiparallel manner to form an intermolecular β-sheet, affect G fusion properties. The location of the compensatory mutations restoring fusion activity strongly suggests that this interface is functionally relevant. This work reveals the range of G structural changes and suggests that G monomers can re-associate, through antiparallel interactions between fusion domains, into dimers that play a role at some early stage of the fusion process.

  2. Guanylate binding protein 5: Impairing virion infectivity by targeting retroviral envelope glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Hotter, Dominik; Sauter, Daniel; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-inducible cellular factors that belong to the superfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and play important roles in the cell-intrinsic defense against bacteria, protozoa and viruses. In a recent report in Cell Host & Microbe, we identify GBP5 as novel restriction factor of HIV-1 that reduces the infectivity of progeny virions by interfering with processing and incorporation of the viral envelope (Env) glycoprotein. The inhibitory activity of GBP5 requires C-terminal isoprenylation, mediating Golgi-association, but not its GTPase function. Notably, GBP5 expression levels vary considerably in human macrophages and inversely correlate with infectious virus yield. We demonstrate that GBP5 can be evaded by an unusual tradeoff mechanism: Naturally occurring mutations in the start codon of the viral accessory gene vpu attenuate GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression at the cost of Vpu function. Whether direct counteraction mechanisms or more subtle changes balancing Vpu and Env expression also affect HIV-1 inhibition by GBP5 remains to be clarified. Other open questions are whether GBP5 restricts HIV-1 in CD4+ T cells and if other GBP family members also decrease infectivity of HIV and/or additional enveloped viruses. PMID:27275775

  3. The bacteria binding glycoprotein salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp340) activates complement via the lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Leito, Jelani T D; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; van Houdt, Michel; van den Berg, Timo K; Wouters, Diana

    2011-10-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG), also known as gp-340 and Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1, is a glycoprotein that is present in tears, lung fluid and mucosal surfaces along the gastrointestinal tract. It is encoded by the Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 gene, a member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine Rich group B protein superfamily. SAG aggregates bacteria thus promoting their clearance from the oral cavity and activates the complement system. Complement proteins may enter the oral cavity in case of serum leakage, which occurs after mucosal damage. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mode of complement activation. We showed a dose-dependent C4 deposition on SAG-coated microplates showing that either the classical or lectin pathway of complement was activated. Antibodies against mannose binding lectin inhibited C4 deposition and SAG induced no C4 deposition in MBL deficient sera showing SAG activated complement through the MBL pathway. Periodate treatment of SAG abolished MBL pathway activation consistent with an involvement of SAG glycans in complement activation. This provides the first evidence for a role of SAG in complement activation through the MBL pathway and suggests a potential role of SAG as a complement activating factor at the mucosal epithelia.

  4. Analysis of B cell epitopes of a glycoprotein porcine zona pellucida (pZP1).

    PubMed

    Shigeta, M; Hasegawa, A; Hamada, Y; Koyama, K

    2000-07-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) of mammalian oocytes forms an extracellular matrix composed of three major glycoproteins and plays an important role in sperm-zona interactions. As ZP had a strong organ-specific but species-cross-reactive antigenicity and passive or active immunization with ZP antigens could impair fertilization, the possibility of developing a immunocontraceptive vaccine has been extensively studied. Studies on active immunization with porcine ZP (pZP) that contain B cell epitopes and T cell epitopes demonstrated that a temporary infertility could be induced along with the elevation of antibody titers, but it was always associated with ovarian failure. This could be due to the oophoritis by activation of pathogenic T cell immunity. It is the general consideration that any adverse effects by vaccination should be avoided for an immunocontraception. From this point of view, the analysis of B cell epitopes of pZP protein would be helpful for construction of a safe immunocontraceptive vaccine with zona antigens. We determined the amino acid sequence of the B epitope in the pZP1 protein by using a monoclonal antibody (MAb-5H4) that possesses a fertilization blocking ability. In addition, antiserum raised to the epitope sequence was revealed to block in vitro fertilization of homologous animal species.

  5. Variant surface glycoprotein RNA interference triggers a precytokinesis cell cycle arrest in African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Sheader, Karen; Vaughan, Sue; Minchin, James; Hughes, Katie; Gull, Keith; Rudenko, Gloria

    2005-06-14

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes African sleeping sickness. T. brucei multiplies extracellularly in the bloodstream, relying on antigenic variation of a dense variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat to escape antibody-mediated lysis. We investigated the role of VSG in proliferation and pathogenicity by using inducible RNA interference to ablate VSG transcript down to 1-2% normal levels. Inhibiting VSG synthesis in vitro triggers a rapid and specific cell cycle checkpoint blocking cell division. Parasites arrest at a discrete precytokinesis stage with two full-length flagella and opposing flagellar pockets, without undergoing additional rounds of S phase and mitosis. A subset (<10%) of the stalled cells have internal flagella, indicating that the progenitors of these cells were already committed to cytokinesis when VSG restriction was sensed. Although there was no obvious VSG depletion in vitro after 24-h induction of VSG RNA interference, there was rapid clearance of these cells in vivo. We propose that a stringent block in VSG synthesis produces stalled trypanosomes with a minimally compromised VSG coat, which can be targeted by the immune system. Our data indicate that VSG protein or transcript is monitored during cell cycle progression in bloodstream-form T. brucei and describes precise precytokinesis cell cycle arrest. This checkpoint before cell division provides a link between the protective VSG coat and cell cycle progression and could function as a novel parasite safety mechanism, preventing extensive dilution of the protective VSG coat in the absence of VSG synthesis.

  6. Structural Basis of Regulation of von Willebrand Factor Binding to Glycoprotein Ib*

    PubMed Central

    Blenner, Mark A.; Dong, Xianchi; Springer, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Activation by elongational flow of von Willebrand factor (VWF) is critical for primary hemostasis. Mutations causing type 2B von Willebrand disease (VWD), platelet-type VWD (PT-VWD), and tensile force each increase affinity of the VWF A1 domain and platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) for one another; however, the structural basis for these observations remains elusive. Directed evolution was used to discover a further gain-of-function mutation in A1 that shifts the long range disulfide bond by one residue. We solved multiple crystal structures of this mutant A1 and A1 containing two VWD mutations complexed with GPIbα containing two PT-VWD mutations. We observed a gained interaction between A1 and the central leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of GPIbα, previously shown to be important at high shear stress, and verified its importance mutationally. These findings suggest that struct